Old Bailey Proceedings, 8th September 1831.
Reference Number: 18310908
Reference Number: f18310908-1

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR JOHN KEY, BART., MAYOR.

SEVENTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 8th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1831, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TTITERTON, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1831.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON. AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR JOHN KEY , BART., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley, Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Edward Alderson , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Patterson, Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; John Ansley, Esq.; Matthew Wood, Esq.; Sir William Heygate , Bart.; John Thomas Thorpe, Esq., and Anthony Brown , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Charles Farebrother , Esq., and John Cowan, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the Country of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

William Newman ,

William Collins ,

William Huggins ,

William Webb ,

Charles Good ,

John Tomkins ,

Thomas Buff ,

Charles Law ,

Thomas Edgington ,

Richard Doudney ,

James Steed ,

James Clark .

Second

George Simmonds ,

John Breckles ,

Robert Chant ,

James Blofield ,

John Martin ,

George Whitford ,

Henry Baughton ,

Charles Hayne ,

Charles Gilbert ,

Edw. Hartley Wall ,

Eyra Gardner ,

Henry Hammond .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Beniah Gibb ,

Richard Fairey ,

Thomas Carpenter ,

William Cochrane ,

Wm. R. Goodfellow,

Ninean Graves ,

Daniel Kellard ,

William Dempsey ,

Wm. Scaggs Francis ,

Joseph Friar ,

Lawson Holmes ,

Thomas Hayward .

Second

John A. Aslet ,

Samuel Heath ,

Henry Johnson ,

John Sumner King ,

John Lissett ,

James Massingham ,

William Martin ,

William Morrison ,

Thomas Mills ,

John Owen ,

Dennis Peel ,

Wm. Tho. Priestley .

Third

William Love ,

Aaron Heal .

Thomas McCall ,

William Anderton ,

William Ashdown ,

William Archer ,

George Arden ,

James Arderson ,

William Brown ,

thomas Barton ,

Thomas Akers ,

John Chatwood ,

Fourth

John Simmonds ,

Thomas Stevens ,

John Turpin ,

James Veitch ,

John Shepherd ,

Robert Savory ,

Jacob Swartz ,

Joseph White ,

Anthony Scott ,

Richard Westcoe ,

Jones Rowley ,

Thomas Priestley .

Fifth

George West ,

Joseph Wilson ,

Thomas Gash ,

John Fred. Hasted ,

John Frazer ,

Jesse Bridgman ,

Francis Brown ,

John Bailey ,

James Barker ,

John Fisher ,

Thomas Gardner ,

George Gibson .

SESSIONS' EOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1831.

KEY, MAYOR - SEVENTH SESSION.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

Reference Number: t18310908-1

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1530. THOMAS STACEY was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Jefferson Holt , about the hour of two in the night of the 31st of July , at St. Gregory by St. Paul, with intent to steal the goods and monies of the said Thomas Jefferson Holt and Jabez Woodhill .

SECOND COUNT, like the first, only calling it the dwelling-house of Thomas Jefferson Holt and Jabez Williams .

THOMAS JEFFERSON HOLT. I live at No. 63, St. Paul's church-yard, in the parish of St. Gregory by St. Paul . Jabez Woodhill lodges in my house - he pays rent to me; the house is mine - I have a lease of it, and pay the rent; I am a cook and confectioner - Woodhill keeps a jeweller's shop at my house, and sleeps in the house, but was absent at the time. On the 30th of July I went to bed about a quarter to eleven o'clock at night - the house was all secure then, and about two in the morning, on the 31st, before daylight, on hearing the alarm bell ring, I went down and in the cellar I found a dark-lantern a-light; the iron grating of the cellar had been secured by an iron chain, which I found had been broken in the course of the night - the prisoner was not in the house when I came down; John Smith was living in the house - he is Mr. Woodhill's servant; the prisoner was a perfect stranger to me - I have no partner.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You keep a pastry-cook's shop, at the corner of Canon-alley, St. Paul's church-yard? A. Yes - Woodhill has a shopman and porter living on the premises; I have one female and two male servants - they are not here; a person could not get from the cellar to the upper part of the house without unfastening the cellar inner door - that door was not broken; the cellar is part of the house - I had seen the grating fast at five o'clock the evening before, when I was in Canon-alley; the chain was attached to the staple in the usual manner, and if it had not been fast the chain must have given way, as it was attached at one end to the grating, and at the other by a staple to the wall - it is never opened; it had been made for a coal-shoot, but the house having been broken open about two months ago I did away with the padlock, and had it fastened by a staple, not intending to open it again - I went to bed a little before eleven o'clock; my servants usually go to bed before me - Mr. Woodhill's people are generally up after me - after the alarm I found the grating of the cellar separated from the chain, but the grating was down, as it lifts on a swivel; the chain was broken, and down in the cellar - a link of it was broken by violence, and the curb of the grating much pressed, apparently by a crow-bar; Mr. Woodhill keeps the first and second floors, and has a shop frontage round St. Paul's Church-yard - he has no occupation of the cellar: I have a lease of the house distinct from him.

JOHN SMITH . I am assistant to Jabez Woodhill , a jeweller, who lives at Holt's. I went to bed at near twelve o'clock on the night in question, and was awoke about two by a noise on the cellar stairs - I rose myself up in bed, listened, and heard the noise repeated; it sounded as if the door at the top of the cellar stairs was being pulled - I pulled the alarm bell, and soon brought five or six persons down stairs; we found nobody in the house - I sleep on the ground floor, not three feet from the door; the door had not been opened - I afterwards went into the cellar, and found a dark-lantern with a candle burning in it, a crow-bar, a chisel, and a centre-bit with the brace, but without a stock; I looked to see which way the thieves got in, and found the strong iron chain, which held the grating down, had been broken - any body could then lift up the grating, and get in; the prisoner was a stranger - I saw him at the watch-house in King's Arm's-passage, in about ten minutes; my master's stock is valuable.

JOB GUY CLARKE . I am shopman to Mr. Woodhill. I heard the alarm bell ring about two o'clock - there was no day-light then; I looked out of my bed-room window on the second floor, which looks into Canon-alley - I observed a man getting out of the cellar: I could not distinguish his features - I called Watch! the watchman came - I am certain I saw him lay hold of the same man; he was nearly twenty yards from the cellar window when laid hold of; I saw his person moving till he was stopped by the watchman - there was only one person going from the cellar: I came down, went into the cellar with Smith, and saw the chain had been broken, which enabled him to get in: I went to the watch-house, and saw the prisoner there with George Nichols , the watchman, who I had seen take him; I found the centre-bit, crowbar, and things in the cellar.

Cross-examined. Q.Canon-alley turns out of St. Paul's church-yard, does it not? A. Yes - a pastrycook's shop is at the corner of the alley; there is a public-house in the alley, before you come to the covered way leading to St. Paul's church-yard - I saw the prisoner taken immediately that he got on his feet, out of the grating - he was as near as possible to the door of the public-house; he was taken before he entered the covered archway, for I did not lose sight of him from the time he left the grating till he was in the hands of the watchman; I will swear that - I got out of bed immediately I heard the bell ring, and saw him - I could see about half along the covered way from my window; the man was leaving our house - the watchman came under the archway towards our house, and took him; I saw him in the watchman's hands before he got half through the covered way, for I did not lose sight of him.

GEORGE NICHOLS . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm bell - I was in Paternoster-row, about one door from the alley; I made my way towards Canon-alley, and seeing the prisoner running, I ran instantly - I first caught sight of him within a yard of the cellar, and secured him about halfway along the alley; I immediately took him to the watch-house - he was searched in my presence, and a phosphorus-box and matches, some was candle, and some skeleton-keys found on him; Clark came to the watch-house in five minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it before or after you got to the covered end of the alley that you took the prisoner? A. Before.

THOMAS BROWN . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house by Nichols - I searched him, and found on him five skeleton-keys, a bag with a stock of a centre-bit, a chisel, a gimblet, a knife, a phosphorus-box, matches, wax candles, and 5s. 7d.; in money.

JOHN LAWS . I am inspector of the watch. I went to Mr. Holt's cellar, and found a crow-bar, a dark-lantern, a centre-bit, and chisel.

MR. HOLT. The things found in the cellar do not belong to me; the whole of my house, including the cellar, is in the parish of St. Gregory; it is the last house in the parish - the next house is in the parish of St. Faith - none of our cellar is under that house.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was taken I was at the corner of Paternoster-row; I had found those things - I came round by the side of Holt's shop, heard the alarm bell ring, and as I turned the corner into Paternoster-row I was taken.

[Sept. 9.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18310908-2

1531. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Midford John Spring , on the 5th of September , at All Hallows on London Wall, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 30s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 15s.; 1 waiscoat, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 pair of braces, value 2d. , the goods of Thomas Henry Orr .

THOMAS HENRY ORR. I am a land-surveyor . I lodged in the back-room on the ground-floor in the house of Mr. Spring. No. 9, Camomile-street, Bishopsgate-street . On the 5th of September I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock, and was awoke between seven and eight in the morning by a noise in the house, and my landlord telling me my things were stolen - I perceived that all the clothes which I had taken off the night before, and put at the foot of the bed, were gone; there was a coat, worth 30s., a pair of trousers, worth 15s., a waistcoat, worth 5s., and a handkerchief, worth 2s.; I got up, and went into the parlour, after putting on another pair of trousers, and found the prisoner in the house - my room door had not been locked; I am positive it was closed -I saw my clothes in the house, but not in the room; the prisoner was a stranger.

JOHN WILLIAM EVANS . I am apprentice to Midford John Spring, who is the only owner of this house. Last Monday morning, about half-past seven o'clock, I opened the shutters, and left the front door ajar; I went down to the back kitchen, and in about ten minutes mistress sent me out for some milk, and as I came up the kitchen stairs I saw the shadow of somebody in the passage - I went to the door, and saw the prisoner running with a coat sleeve hanging down out of a bundle by his side; I called Stop thief! - nobody was in view but the prisoner till Mr. Wood saw me; I followed with him to Cutler-street, Houndsditch, and secured the prisoner - I only lost sight of him in turning the corner, and am quite sure of him; the parlour door had been opened while I was in the kitchen - I am quite sure I had closed it; Orr's room is on the same floor as the parlour - both rooms lead into each other; he had to go through the passage, and open the front and back parlour doors to get to Orr's room - before he was secured he tried to throw the clothes into the Cutlers' Arms public-house; I took him there, and while Wood secured him I got back all the clothes - I never saw the prisoner before.

WILLIAM WOOD. I stood in my yard in Camomile-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! - I ran to the gate and saw the prisoner run by, and Evans in pursuit of him; he never got out of my sight, only in turning the corner - I am certain of his person; when I got within about five yards of him he flung the bundle down into the cutlers' Arms - I followed, tripeed his heels up, and fell on him; he laid a little while, then jumped up, struck me in the face with a brush, and hit me three times on the shoulder - I threw him down, and he said he would go with me, but when we got a few yards he struck me again two or three times, and tried to throttle me; he resisted a good deal, but I secured him, took him back to Spring's house, and gave him in charge of Sapwell.

THOMAS SAPWELL. I know Mr. Spring's house is in the parish of All Hallows on the Wall; I took charge of the prisoner, and the property was in a chimney soot cloth.

MR. ORR. These are my clothes.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

[Sept. 9.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18310908-3

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1532. HENRY ALPHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , at St. Margaret, Westminster, 9 gold rings, value 9l.; 1 gold eye-glass, value 30s., and 11 brooches, value 5l., the goods of Anthony Assereti , in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MARY CHARLOTTE ASSERETI . I am the daughter of Anthony Assereti , who keeps a jewellery and toy shop , No. 45. Bridge-street, Westminster . On the 19th of August, at one o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner in the shop - nobody was with him; he was in the shop when I first saw him - I saw him standing in the shop, and went in; he was standing by a chair, on which a tray stood, containing rings and brooches; his hands were on the tray: I did not observe him take any thing - he said, "Is there another No. 45?" and ran out - I heard something chink as he ran away, and followed him out of the shop, calling Stop thief! I saw some persons run after him - he was brought back in two or three minutes, and I knew him to be the same person - some property was given to the officer; the prisoner did not ask to buy any thing.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take any thing? A. No; You did not ask to look at any thing - I had been in the shop a few minutes before, and every thing was perfectly secure.

EDWARD DOUGHARTY . I am porter to a grocer in Bridge-street. On the 19th of August I was on a ladder, cleaning the window, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running in a direction from the prosecutor's shop; I saw him leave the door, and ran after him - he ran into a stone-yard, and I took him; he said nothing; I afterwards saw Moody.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask what you wanted? A. You never said a word.

HENRY MOODY . I am a porter. On the 19th of August I picked up some jewellery near Bridge-court steps - I saw three or four persons running, but cannot say the prisoner was one of them; I found the property in the course they ran - I gave it to Dungate.

FRANCIS DUNGATE . Moody picked up the property, and gave it to me; I gave it to Hall - I took the prisoner to Queen-square; he knew what he was charged with, but said nothing to me.

WILLIAM HALL . Dungate gave me the property.

ANTHONY ASSERETI . My house is in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster. I know every one of these articles to be mine - I value them at 16l., but we have lost 40l. worth or more altogether.

Prisoner's Defence. I had left my place a week, when I met a porter in Parliament-street; I asked him if he knew of a situation - he said he did, at No. 45 in the next street - I went to No. 45, Bridge-street; I did not see a bill in the window, which he said I should see - I asked if there was another No. 45, and she said not; I immediately went into the stone-yard, as I had occasion to go there - they came and charged me with stealing property; I had not left my place a week, and had no occasion to do it - they say I went in and took a handful out; was it possible I could snatch a handful of things, and run out with them, if they were properly placed in the shop?

[Sept. 9.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Reference Number: t18310908-4

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1533. WALBARGIS ELVIRE ROULETTE, alias CHRISTIANA ECKHARDT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , at Paddington, in the dwelling-house of Ann Carey , spinster , 11 pairs of stockings, value 3l.; 11 pairs of gloves, value 16s.; 8 pairs of drawers, value 16s.; 9 bed-gowns, value 2l.; 8 petticoats, value 40s.; 1 muslin dress, value 4s.; 1 silk slip, value 7s.; 3 shawls value 7l.; 17 handkerchiefs, value 30s.; 4 shifts, value 30s.; 1 book, value 7s.; 2 drawings, value 7s.; 54 yards of silk, value 8l.; 4 gowns, value 2l.; 1 pair of gaiters, value 1s.; 108 yards of lace, value 26l.; 5 combs, value 5s.; 1 veil, value 2l.; 4 frills, value 10s.; 1 pair of steel clasps, value 2s., and 8 ostrich feathers, value 2l., and one 20l., one 10l., and four 5l. Bank notes , her property; against the Statute.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BARRY conducted the prosecution.

ANN CAREY . I live at No. 20, Connaught-terrace , in the parish of Paddington - I keep the house, and am single - Mr. Arundell, my nephew, lives in the house with me, and another nephew; my nephew, William Arundell , brought the prisoner to my house on the 9th or 10th of June, to reside there for a short time - she staid six weeks and three days, and left on the 23rd of July - she lived in the same room, sat at the same table with us, and knew where I kept my keys and property. On Wednesday night, the 22nd of July, there was in my cupboard, a 20l., a 10l., and four 5l. Bank notes - I had received the 20l. from my nephew, and received 40l., in 5l. Bank notes, from Colonel Bentinck; I gave my nephew four of those 5l. notes for the 20l. note, and the 10l. note I had from a lady who lodged in the house; there were two sovereigns and two half-sovereigns in a paper - these were all in a cupboard in the dining-parlour; I saw those notes safe in the closet about eight or nine o'clock at night, when I went to put away the tea, and at bed time the prisoner was sitting in the small back parlour with me; I left the room to go round the house, to see that it was safe; the closet was in the next room - I was not gone more than five minutes; I came up again, sat down, and put away my work; I looked at her, and said, "Good G - d, Miss Eckhardt, what a smell of fire there is;" I ran out with the candle - she followed me; I said, "Good G - d, where is it?" she pointed to a little bit of string like a thread, which hung down from a nail in the closet, and said,"There it is;" it hung down by the side of the cupboard, which was open at the time; I ran to the cupboard, and there was a fire.

Q. What was burnt? A.Paper - I put it out, and said, "Good G - d, my money is burnt;" it was some paper which I had there - I put it out as well as I could, and ran down stairs; I got a shovel, and put the burnt pieces of paper into a plate, and begged her not to touch it till my nephew came in - I went out, and when I returned she was still at the cupboard, and said, "Here is your gold, that is not burnt, but your stupid English money, paper money, is burnt;" I then waited for a short time, to see that every thing was right - there was no danger in the cupboard, and then we went to bed; she at that time slept with me.

Q. Had there been any money transactions between you, in the course of which you could have given her either of these notes? A. No - this was on the 20th, and on the Saturday following, the 23rd, she went away; she told me and my nephew she was going abroad, to travel with a new married gentleman and lady, who had come from Cologne, and were going back there; that she was going to Paris, going to travel, and then going home to her father and mother at Cologne - she said that the

lady and gentleman were to meet her at Southampton; she was to go with them across the water, and then home, but she at first told me she was going to Winchester - she afterwards said she was going to Southampton, as she could not get a place to Winchester - on the Sunday or Monday after she was gone, I went to the wardrobe to get my shawl to go out with my nephew, and could not find it; I have also missed lace, dresses, cambric handkerchiefs, muslin, gloves, pieces of new silk, a crape shawl, veils, a long shawl, a lace shawl, feathers, and various, articles of dress - I have lost also two rings, and a portfolio of drawings was taken from my wardrobe; I have seen some of them since - I never permitted her in any way to take these articles; I did not know she had got them - the very night before she went away I said I had got some things to sell; she looked at them and paid me eighteen sovereigns for them.

Cross-examined by MR. LOVEDAY. Q. I thought you had never had any money transactions with her? A. I conceive that was my money, and her board and lodging was included in the amount - I do not always lock my drawers, but I see that the keys are laid on the table; I locked the closet when I went to bed, but that was after the fire - I had been to the closet before I went down stairs; it was between ten and eleven o'clock at night -I put the candle on the table which stands by the closet, and threw in my work; I did not take a candle into the cupboard - the fire was discovered about that time; we went to bed about half-past ten or eleven o'clock - it was all done within ten minutes; I merely threw the work into the closet, and saw that the notes were there - I did not count them - I saw that they laid on the shelf in two parcels; the 10l. note was with some bills and two sovereigns and two half-sovereigns - the 20l. and the 5l. notes were altogether; I usually drink a little table-ale, and when I have none in the house I send to the public-house for it; I have lived with the Bentinck family more than thirty years - I did not touch the notes when I went to the cupboard, but am certain they were there - I saw the two parcels, but did not examine to see the notes; my nephews have lived with me some time; I am single: the prisoner knew where I kept my keys - the cupboard door was not locked, nor yet put too; a piece of string was hanging down, and there was fire at the end of the string - the end paper was burning; I collected the burnt pieces of paper, thinking when my nephew returned he might find the numbers of some of the notes - he was out of town: I thought it might be the notes, but it turned out to be nothing but paper which I had some tea in - we have since found the notes, therefore they could not be burnt; I am not related to Colonel Bentinck - he pays me an annuity; he paid me 40l. in July, which was half a year's annuity - he paid me these 5l. notes, and the rest in gold and silver; I received 40l. odd from him - the 10l. note I received from Miss Impey, a lodger; I never saw any thing of the notes afterwards - the two sovereigns and two half-sovereigns, which were in a paper, were left behind; the burnt paper was taken to the Bank - I have not seen it since.

Q. What did the prisoner pay you 18l. for? A. She bought a dress for 1l., and six shifts for half a guinea a-piece - that was a week or a fortnight before, but they had not been paid for; I had no money transaction with her till she paid me for them the night before she left; she asked me that night to show her some more things, and she would buy them - it was then she bought the shifts; the shifts were made of Dutch linen, trimmed with cambric, trimmed in Holland; she paid me three guineas for a blue dress, and the shifts came to three guineas, and there were six weeks' board and lodging at a guinea and a half a week; my nephew brought her to my house in a coach from an hotel in the Haymarket - Colonel Bentinck had written to him to fetch her.

Q. Will you swear you did not receive twenty-seven guineas from her? A. I swear I did not receive more than eighteen; I have heard her speak of Mrs. Kently, but I never saw her.

COURT. Q. You called her Miss Eckhardt - is that the name she was known to you by? A. Yes - I did not know her by any other name.

WILLIAM ARUNDELL . I am the prosecutrix's nephew. I first saw the prisoner at an hotel, in the Haymarket; I went there for her, in consequence of a letter from Colonel Bentinck ; she told me her name was Christiana Eckhardt - I took her to my aunt's, and she boarded and lodged there; while she was there a two-penny post letter came, addressed to Madame Roulette - she heard my aunt tell the postman nobody lived there by that name, and I heard the same; I said I thought there must be some mistake, it must be for Miss Eckhardt - she opened it immediately, and said it was for her; before she left my aunt's she told me she wished to get a place by the stage to Winchester, that she had been to the coach-office, and every place was engaged for the following day, but a French lady had booked a place to go to Southampton, and she had arranged with that lady to have her place, by paying for it; this was the second day after the burning in the closet - I went with her to the New White Horse cellar, in Piceadilly; she took two trunks with her, and an umbrella, that was all - when she got to the coach-office she showed me a ticket, which she said she had received from the lady, with the lady's name on it, which was Roulette; I made no remark to her, but she said, "Roulette I thought it was Broulette - that must have been the French lady who was going to take a governess' situation which I had given up - you remember a letter coming to me in that name - that must have been the lady; I wish I had remembered it, I would have talked to her about it;" I saw her off by the Southampton coach- this was on Saturday, and on the Tuesday following my aunt missed some property, upon which I went to Southampton, and at last found the prisoner at a young ladies' boarding-school, kept by Mrs. Wood, at Houndwell, near Southampton; Mrs. Wood, spoke to her by the name of Roulette - I told Mrs. Wood, in her presence, what had brought me there; I said she had made so many false representations at my aunt's house that she must return with me to town, to clear them up; Mrs. Wood took two drawings from the mantel-piece, and said, in her presence, that Miss Roulette had given them to her as her own drawings; I believe them to be my aunt's - I asked her for her keys; she gave them to me - I went up stairs with a constable, and opened her boxes; they were the same boxes as I saw her take to the stage - I saw some feathers on the top of the boxes when I opened them; I did not search the boxes - I put in some things which were found; there were shawls, lace, silk stockings, and

various articles - I put them into the boxes, locked them, and brought the boxes to town, with the whole of the things belonging to her; I put the keys into my own pocket - the boxes came to town untouched and unaltered - I left them at Mary-le-bone watch-house; an officer, who had met me at the coach, was with me at the time - the boxes were produced before the Justice, with the same things in them; my aunt saw them there - they have been in the hands of the officer ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. You went to the hotel to fetch her? A. I went there to see her, in consequence of a note from Colonel Bentinck, and the next time I went I found a note in her possession, directed to me, from General Bentinck , desiring me to take her to my aunt's; I have the letter here - it is addressed to me; my aunt did not wish her to come at first, as she was a stranger; she lets lodgings, but did not exactly take her in as a lodger - she resided in the same apartment as I did, with my aunt and brother; I found she was an unfortunate stranger here - it was in consequence of a story she told me about Mrs. Kently that I brought her to my aunt's, and from General Bentinck having known her; she left our house to go abroad - my aunt was perfectly satisfied with her while she was in our house; I did not suspect her before the notes were gone - she was sober, and perfectly well behaved; she did not appear in want of money - I saw her pays her bill at the hotel: I think it was something under 2l.; I think she said she had been there ten days - the prisoner had not told me she was going to Southampton, she said she was going to Winchester; I found her by inquiring of the coachman who took her down - she had said she was going abroad; I had a constable there with me - I told her, before, Mrs. Wood came into the room, that she must return to town, in consequence of the false representations she had made, and she said if I would not tell Mrs. Wood she would explain; she returned with me alone; a book of coloured prints laid on the table in the room where I saw her; I knew them to be my aunt's - I never knew of my aunt borrowing 30s. to pay taxes; I opened the prisoner's boxes, in the presence of the constable, herself, and Mrs. Wood - I found other things in the drawer of a bedroom where she slept with Mrs. Wood; I merely opened her boxes, saw the feathers, locked them up again, and brought them away.

COURT. Q.Have you brought the boxes away in the state in which you found them? A. Yes, they are here, with their contents.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I am an officer. On the 29th of July the prisoner was delivered into my charge with the boxes; I took her to Marylebone watch-house, and left the trunks locked up at the office - I told her she was taken about some Bank of England notes and some clothes; she said there was a quantity of Mrs. Carey's clothes in the trunks, but she did not know any thing about the notes - the trunks were produced before the Magistrate the next day; they are in the same condition now - part of her clothes have been given up to her; there were five shifts, some collars, and a gown, given up to her, with that exception the boxes are in the same state that I received them; this veil I took off the prisoner's head in the dock, before the Magistrate.

MRS. CAREY. This black lace veil is mine, and is worth 3l. in the state it is now in - it cost more; all these things are mine, made and unmade - they are in the state they were in when in my possession; here are four pieces of new silk, worth 20l. together - they were in my wardrobe altogether; here is another piece of silk, worth 5l. - here are about a hundred yards of point and blond lace, which is worth 50l. at a low rate - it is in several pieces; they were kept in a drawer in the wardrobe in a large box, altogether in one box; here are three shawls of mine worth 6l. - one of them was in a trunk up stairs, and the other two in a drawer; here are eight pairs of drawers, eleven pairs of silk stockings, nine bed-gowns, seven white petticoats, and a variety of property, all mine - these drawings were in this portfolio; I know the drawings, they were given to me by Lady Bentinck - I never gave, lent, or sold them to the prisoner - not did I know she had ever seen them; here is another box of property here.

Cross-examined. Q. You say this piece of silk is worth 5l.? A. Yes - here is another piece that is cut off it; I kept my purse in a drawer - I did not keep my money in a box; I am sure I drink nothing but table-ale - half a pint at dinner, and half a pint at supper.

WILLIAM ARUNDELL . These two drawings are the same as Mrs. Wood handed to me; I think I found the lace in the drawer - all the articles were not in the drawers; I do not remember seeing the silk in the drawers - the feathers were in a tray at the top of the box.

MRS. CAREY. The shift produced is one that I sold her - they cost a guinea a-piece.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I left Amsterdam in the capacity of companion with a lady of the name of Kently; having arrived at the Custom-house, and not finding my box, Mrs. Kently desired me to return to the steam-boat to look for it - however it was not there, and the captain representing that it was probably left at Rotterdam I returned to the Custom-house, where Mrs. Kently had left a note for me, desiring me to follow her to her residence at Pall-mall, but not being able to trace her there I was compelled to repair to an hotel; the keeper of the hotel took the utmost pains to find her, and I put an advertisement in the newspaper for the same purpose, but all in vain - reduced to despair, on finding myself thus forlorn in a strange country, I recollected a General Bentinck , who was well known to a family of the name of Eckhardt, with whom I had been very intimate during my stay at Cologne; I addressed him under the signature of my friend's name, Cristine Eckhardt, begging his assistance in finding Mrs. Kently; he came to see me, and showed me so much kindness that I felt ashamed at having given him an assumed name - he procured me a lodging with Miss Carey, No. 20, Connaught-terrace, till I should be able to find Mrs. Kently, and to recover my box; I received my box from Rotterdam, and at the same time a letter from Mrs. Kently in which she told me that she had deceived me, and many other things which I cannot now repeat - Miss Carey persuaded me to remain with her and try to get another place; I accordingly answered several advertisements (but in my own name), and at length had the good fortune to be engaged by Mrs. Wood, of Southampton, who expressed her entire satisfaction with my testimonials as to character and deportment, confirmed as they were by the representations of Mr. Herstatt, at Cologne; many times I felt inclined to make it known to Miss Carey that I was not Miss Eckhardt, whose name I had been induced by my distress to assume, but I was ashamed to do it - from the first day I discovered that Miss Carey was always drunk, and often in such a state as not to know what she did; on the Wednesday

before I set out for Southampton, I changed with others a 10l. Bank note for her, and these she says are the notes which were burnt - in the evening she was very much intoxicated, and on going to a cupboard with a candle she set fire to it; after it was extinguished, she said that she had put some Bank notes into the cupboard and that they were all burnt; the day before I left she showed me after dinner twelve shifts and two dresses, asking me to buy them of her, which I consented to do, and paid her nine guineas, and nine guineas for my lodging - in the evening, being very drunk, in going up stairs with me to bed, she asked me if I had any money left with which to buy some more things; I said Yes, and she brought me a great quantity of things, telling me that I might have them all for thirty guineas; I told her I could not give so much, but that I would give her eighteen guineas, which she at length agreed to take, (saying that she was in want of money,) and helped me to put the things into my box; now she says that I stole all these things - she had several pictures, which I asked her to lend me to copy them, but she refused, and when I left I took them with me; she took at the office a black lace veil from my bonnet, (which I had worn during my stay in her house,) saying it was hers; she also told the Magistrate that I had given her three gilt shillings for three sovereigns, having seen in my box some gold dust which I used to put on my writing, and some gold leaf, which I had brought from Amsterdam for the purpose of ornamenting some trifles; Madam Van Doesberg, at Amsterdam, knows all this, and also that I was possessed of 80l., 50l. in gold, and 30l. in Bank notes.

MR. LOVEDAY to WILLIAM ARUNDELL . Q. Did not your aunt borrow 30s. of the prisoner in your presence? A. No - she has borrowed money of me if she has wanted any; I recollect her borrowing about 30s. to pay the water-rate.

[Sept.9.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18310908-5

1534. PATRICK MULLEN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edwin Hill and Rowland Hill , on the 4th of July , at Tottenham, and stealing therein 17 plates, value 3s.; 6 dishes, value 2s.; 2 saucepans, value 1s. 6d.; 1 butter-boat, value 6d.; 1 earthen mug, value 3d.; 10 lbs. weight of lead, value 15d., and 1 apron, value 6d. , their property.

SOPHIA COOPER . I am servant to Edwin and Rowland Hill, who live in the parish of Tottenham - they are brothers, and it is their joint dwelling-house. On the 4th of July, at six o'clock in the morning, when I came down we opened the kitchen door, and found the door leading to the yard open; I missed a quantity of crockery and two spoons - the thieves must have got in through a skylight, which was open; I cannot say whether that was fastened the night before.

HANNAH RAY . I am cook to the prosecutors. When I went to bed I saw the house all secure, except the skylight - I cannot be positive whether that was shut; I fastened all the doors myself - the sky-light draws up with two iron weights; I missed this property in the morning, and found the inner doors all open - three doors were open which were shut when I went to bed; one leads out of the yard, and one out of the back kitchen - the scullery door was found open; they could drop from the sky-light into the passage, and go from there to the scullery door, which I am positive was shut at night.

THOMAS HART . I am a Police-constable. On the 4th of July I saw two persons fighting opposite Milfields-place - the prisoner was one of them; that is about two miles and a half from the prosecutors' - I went up, and parted them; the prisoner was rather drunk - a bundle was given to him by a person, who brought it out of a beer-shop, and he put it on his shoulder - I then suspected all was not right, and took him into custody; I asked him what the bundle contained - he asked what was that to me, and said I could see what he had got; I asked what he was going to do with them - he said he dealt in the trade, and that he bought, sold and exchanged - I said my opinion was that he had stolen them, and asked how he came by them; he used very abusive language, not fit to mention, and in our way to the station-house he offered to treat me with a pot of porter to let him go about his business - as I was taking him from the station-house to Worship-street, Foster passed me in a chaise-cart, and informed me a robbery had been committed at Tottenham: the prisoner then changed countenance very much, and said, "Now I am done!" he said he should like to shoot that bl - y fellow's brains out: he said he hoped I should be as favourable to him as I could, and if I did I should find him an honourable chap.

Prisoner. Q. Why not tell those words to the Magistrate on the evening of the 4th of July? A. You was remanded till the party was brought forward, and I was not examined as to the particulars.

MARY POND . I was at the beer-shop in Cock-lane, on the 4th of July; the prisoner was there, and had a bundle in a cloth - he sold me a spoon for 7d., which is here.

Prisoner. The spoon was cracked, and I sold it for half price.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I am a constable of Tottenham. I had seen the prisoner before I heard of this robbery, and in consequence of my information he was detained.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever know me work at Tottenham? A. Yes, you worked at Bruce Castle a fortnight or three weeks before the robbery.

HANNAH RAY . I know this spoon by two burns inside, which I did myself; I believe all this crockery in the bundle to be my masters' - I know this butter-boat; these brushes belong to the stable.

Prisoner's Defence. I was discharged from the 99th regiment on the 13th of June. I dealt in hardware and other things; I finished some haymaking on the 2nd of July, and on the Monday following I got these goods on the road - there were four persons in company with me; two persons met us with a horse and cart coming from the country; I was fourteen yards behind my companions, and when I got up they proposed to them to sell the goods - they had not enough money; I asked how they came by them - they said they were in the habit of attending sales, and bought them of a man going to America; they wanted 8s. for the things - I gave them 3s. 9d. and my shirt for them; I know nothing of the robbery.

[Sept. 10.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18310908-6

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1535. WILLIAM ARNOLD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Pound , widow , on the 4th of September , at St. James, Clerkenwell, and stealing there in 1 cloak, value 20s.; 3 shawls, value 2l.; 1 veil, value 25s.; 1 watch, value 30s.,

2 spoons, value 14s.; 1 umbrella, value 2s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s.; 2 frills, value 2s.; 2 caps, value 20s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 8 ozs. of tobacco, value 2s. , her property.

ELIZABETH POUND . I live in Myddleton-place, Sadler's-wells, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell , and am a widow. On the 4th of September I went out to church, just after the clock struck six, leaving nobody in the house; there is a kitchen, parlour, and shop on the ground floor - the shop and parlour communicate; a door leads from the parlour into the passage, and into a lower kitchen - there is a door from the shop into the street; I locked my parlour door, and put the key in the shop - I locked the shop door, and put the key in my pocket; I left the door leading from the parlour to the passage bolted inside, and found it so, and the kitchen door was fastened with a chain - the windows were all shut up and bolted; I came home between eight and nine o'clock, when service was over - I unlocked the shop door as usual, as I thought; it goes with a double lock - that door was not broken, but when I opened it, the parlour door, which faces the shop door, was wide open; I missed a green cloak, three silk shawls, two silver spoons, a table-cloth, and other things - I have seen part of them since, in the hands of the Police; I had left them safe in a chest of drawers in the parlour when I went out - I had seen them in the drawer that very day, when I took something out; I called Ann clarke, who lives next door - we examined the place together, and then sent for the Police.

ANN CLARKE . I live next door to Mrs. Pound; she came home on Sunday evening, and called to me - I went with a light; her parlour door was open - the drawers were all open, and things strewed on the floor; the place seemed ransacked - I found the lining of a man's hat on the shop counter, also a phosphorus-box, matches, and candle.

FREDERICK MILES . I am a Policeman. Last Sunday evening, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Golden-lane, with two other men; I knew him before - I saw him cross the road, and go into a clothes-shop, kept by a Jew, with a green cloak on his left arm; directly he entered the door it was closed - I forced it open, and found the prisoner standing behind a heap of clothes on the counter; I took the cloak off his arm, and asked where he got it from - he made no reply, but rushed out of the shop; Reid was with me - we pursued after him, calling Stop thief! he was stopped by Morris, and his hat directly fell off - Draper picked it up- I produce the cloak.

ROBERT REID . I am a Policeman. I was with Miles on the night of the 4th of September, and pursued the prisoner; I saw his hat fall off just as Morris stopped him - I had seen him in the shop with the cloak on his arm; Miles asked him where he got it, and no sooner had he said so than he rushed by me and Miles, and ran off.

HUGH MORRIS . I am a Policeman. On the 4th of September I heard a cry of Stop thief! and apprehended the prisoner, who was running - I saw his hat fall off just as I caught him by the neck; Draper took it up.

GEORGE DRAPER . I was present when Morris seized the prisoner; his hat fell off - I picked it up, and found in it two caps, two handkerchiefs, and other things.

ELIZABETH POUND . This is my cloak - these caps are mine; I had one on the day before - the other things are mine: I know the cloak by this mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I left home about four o'clock -I live in Tottenham-court-road, and was going to see my sister, who was ill - on my way I met a man and his wife who I had been in company with before; I was with them two or three hours, and just before I left them they gave me the cleak, and wished me to leave it in the name of Draper, at a place in Golden-lane; I did not know the lane, and had to inquire for it: the officer came and took me out of the house, and by their rough usage I forced myself from them; that caused the cry of Stop thief!

[Sept.10.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18310908-7

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley .

1536. HENRY DIXON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wilks Dixon , on the 19th of July , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing therein 1 shawl, value 7s., and 1 towel, value 4d. , his property.

HANNAH DIXON . I am the wife of John Wilks Dixon - I live at No. 5, York-place, York-street, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; the prisoner is my son - my husband was not living at home: I have only one room; I rent it of Mr. Clay, who does not live in the house - he lets it all out; I used to rent it myself - there are only two rooms, but I gave up one, and he lets it. On Tuesday, the 19th of July, I went out between ten and eleven o'clock - I locked my room door; I returned between twelve and one, and saw a pelisse hanging outside the door - it belonged to me; I went in to see what else was gone, and missed a shawl; I did not miss the towel till I saw that and the shawl together at Mr. Biggs', a pawnbroker, between two and three o'clock the same day -(looking at them) here is a stain on the shawl; I know them both well - I have done this to implore mercy for him, that he may be sent to the Penitentiary; I found my door on the latch when I came back, but unlocked - I am sure I had locked it, and it was also on the catch; I saw the shawl and towel the night before - the prisoner had come home very early in the morning, and went out again; I saw this shawl after he went out.

HENRY PETER PIGE . I am a pawnbroker. On the 19th of July, about ten or eleven o'clock, the prisoner pawned this shawl and towel for 2s.; he said they were his own, to the best of my recollection.

[Sept. 10.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth.

Reference Number: t18310908-8

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1537. JOSEPH CARTER and EDWARD JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , at St. Martin in the Fields, 1 gelding, price 15l. , the property of Daniel Hawkins Reed .

DANIEL HAWKINS REED. On Thursday, the 7th of July, I had a bay pony, and turned it out on Peckhamrye common , about nine or ten o'clock that evening; I had been used to turn it out there - I went there next

morning, and it was gone; I looked after it all day, till between four and five o'clock that afternoon, when I found it in Smithfield, in the possession of George Chapman's man, whose name I do not know; I knew it again directly I saw it, and claimed it; I had had it five years, and have not a doubt of it being mine - I value it at 15l. - I do not know what it would fetch at market.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What is your business? A. I do hired work for gentlemen, whatever they want me to do, respecting horses and carts; I live at Peckham-rye; I have no partner - my father-in-law had the pony before I did; I took his business, and the horse with it; I did not know Chapman before this - I was here yesterday, and this morning, but by mistake went into the other Court; I am a stranger, and did not know but it was the right Court; I have not received any money from Chapman.

Q. Were you present when any money was paid to Chapman? A. No; I saw 14s. 6d. tied up in a woman's shawl - I cannot say she gave it to Chapman.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . On Friday, the 8th of July, I was in Smithfield, and had a pony, there; I asked William Cogan to hold the pony - I had bought it of Johnson about half-past nine o'clock that morning; I was coming down Charles-street, Drury-lane, where I live - Carter came up to me, and told me he had a pony to sell me, which would pay me a few shillings, if I would buy it -I went with him to Johnson, who was standing at the bottom of Newton-street, Holborn, with the pony in between the shafts of a cart; I asked Johnson what he wanted for it - he asked me 6l., to the best of my recollection; I gave him 3l. for it - there was a good deal said about it; I had not the money to pay him, and they both went with me to Parker's, in James-street, Paddington, and waited there till I came out - Parker lent me three sovereigns, which I paid Johnson; Carter was present - we took the pony out of the harness: some people collected, and bought the cart of him; I took the pony away in about ten minutes - I put it into the stable, then brought it to Smithfield, and gave it to Cogan to hold; it was the same pony as I bought of Johnson.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you acquainted with Carter before? A. I had seen him before, and spoken to him; he lived with a horse-dealer - I had never been to his place; I had known him about two years, but was not intimate - I never saw Johnson before; I did not take a receipt for the money - I cannot write myself; Mr. Parker saw me buy it - he keeps a green-grocer's shop, and is a friend of mine.

Q. I believe he received 14s. for you, that you might stay away? A. No, that promise was never made; the woman said she knew it was a great loss to me, and she would make the 3l. up to me, but I got nothing; Parker, who lent me the money, had it, I believe, but I was not present, for I was taken with the horse, and was locked up in the Compter all night.

Q. Do you mean to tell the Jury that you gave 3l. for a horse which you were asked 6l. for, by a person you never saw before? A. I knew Carter before, having lived with a horse-dealer; I deal in horses a little - when the horse was claimed I ran up, and said, "That is my horse, I bought it;" Reed said, "It is mine - it has been stolen from me this morning;" I said it was mine, and the officer came up, and took me to the Compter.

Q. Did you say any thing about who you got it from till you were charged with stealing it? A.When the man said it was his I told him who I bought it of immediately.

Q. Did you say a word about it till you were before the Magistrate? A. Yes, I said so to my friends about me; I believe Parker and Reed knows that - I said I believed I could find the man; I have not received any money to stay away - I believe Parker has received 14s. of the money; Johnson's wife gave my wife 2l. 1s., which my wife gave to Parker, as I had borrowed the money of him to pay for the horse; it was given to her to give to Parker - I was never at Peckham-rye in my life; I have never received any of the money myself - I told the Justice that Parker had received 2l. 15s.

Q. On your oath, did you not say no further proceedings should be taken, and that you would not appear if you could get enough to pay Parker? A. I never said such a word; I was in custody at the time Parker received it - I do not know whether Reed referred the person to Parker to pay the money, for it happened outside Guildhall, and I was in custody at the time; I suppose Reed must have shown the woman to Mr. Parker, because I understand she wanted Reed to take it; I cannot say whether the Magistrate asked what I had done with the money - I told him my wife had 2l. 1s., and Parker 14s.; I told him what had become of it without his asking me - I will not swear it was before he asked me about it; the woman went and complained that I had promised to acquit her husband if she paid the money and I went to explain it; I do not know of any warrant being issued against me - none was served; I mentioned my wife's having had the money before any complaint was made.

ROBERT PARKER. I live in James-street, Lisson-green. On the 8th of July Chapman and the two prisoners came to me with a pony; Chapman came into my house - the prisoners were outside; I lent him 3l. to buy the pony - I went out of the house with him, and saw him give the money to Johnson: Carter said it was a good pony, and he had had it some time - that is all I recollect; they then went into a public-house - the cart stood at the door, and while they were there a man came in, and asked the prisoners if they would sell the cart; they both went outside with the young man, and sold him the cart - the pony was taken away, and I went home to breakfast; Carter was outside the public-house when he said he had had the pony some time, Johnson was close to him, and could hear what he said.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the man who bought the cart here? A. Not that I know of - I know him, he lives near me; I never saw the prisoners before - the cart was sold directly, and then Chapman took away the pony; there did not appear any thing unusual in the transaction to me - I have seen such things done before, when people have been wanting carts and had no further use for them; I never lent money before for that purpose - I took no receipt from Chapman: I have lent him money before - I keep a potato-warehouse and green-grocer's; I have lived there eight months - I have known Chapman

about three years; I have received 2l. 15s. of the money back again - a woman brought me back 14s. of it.

Q. On your oath, did you not receive it on the express condition to forswear your evidence? A. No, the woman asked me if I would keep away if I received the money, and not appear - I said, "I cannot help appearing - I must appear;" I received the 14s. from Carter's wife, or Johnson's wife, I believe she calls herself; Chapman's wife brought me 2l. 1s. - she did not tell me where it came from, nor did Chapman; the women themselves told me outside that they were sorry they had found the money for me now; I had told them I should appear to clear Chapman, as I had seen him pay for the pony - I had a right to receive the money, as I had lent it; I had no business to ask Chapman's wife where she got it; I did not tell the Magistrate that Carter said he had had the pony for some time - I was not asked the question.

Carter's Defence. I did not say the pony belonged to me, and that I had had it a long time - on Friday morning, the 8th of July, I met Johnson at the foot of Westminster-bridge; he asked if I had any thing to do- I said No; he asked if I knew any body wanted to buy a pony - I said I knew a man who might buy it; he asked me to go with him to the man - I went and recommended the man to buy the pony, and after it was sold I went to Johnson's house, and stopped all night with him.

CARTER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

JOHNSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.[September 10.]

Reference Number: t18310908-9

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley.

1538. THOMAS HELMES and THOMAS SIMPSON were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Goodenough Hayter , Esq. , on the 27th of August , at St. Andrew, holborn, and stealing therein, 1 bed, value 40s.; 1 pillow, value 4s.; 1 bolster, value 6s.; 1 counterpane, value 10s.; 1 set of bed-furniture, value 15s., and 1 saddle, value 40s. , the goods of the said William Goodenough Hayter.

WILLIAM KEW . I am in the service of William Goodenough Hayter, Esq., who lives at Winterborn Stoke, wilts, but he has a stable and coach-house in Jockey's-fields, Bedford-row - there is a loft and sleeping-room to it; I do not know what parish it is in - I sleep there, as being his groom. I was there on the 12th of August, and left about five or six o'clock in the morning to go down to Winterborn Stoke - I left nobody there; I left a bed and bedding there - I locked up the premises, and put the key into my pocket; all the doors and windows were fastened - I returned on the 5th of September, and found the bed, pillow, bolster, carpet, set of bed-furniture, and a saddle gone; they were all master's property, and are now in the possession of Baylis, the Policeman - (looking at them,) I know this saddle by stains on the stirrups, which I could not get out; I have no mark on this bed and bedding, but they are similar to what I lost - the prisoner Helmes has been at the stables sometimes; I am not certain whether he knew I was gone out of town - I lost an old pair of boots, which I have not found, and other things, but I do not know what Mrs. Helmes has got.

Simpson. Q.What are the stirrups stained with? A. It is rust eat in - they were stained when I went into the employ, which is rather more than twelve months; I cleaned them most days with oil and sand - I am confident of the saddle; I got a little of it out sometimes - here are the marks on the bottom and on the side; I noticed them every time I cleaned them.

RICHARD BAYLIS . I belong to the Police. On Saturday, the 27th of August, about ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoners in Portpool-lane, Gray's Inn-lane, coming in a direction from Jockey's-fields; Helmes was pulling a truck, and Simpson pushing behind - they had the articles now produced in the truck; I followed them into Cross-street, hatton-garden, about four hundred yards, then stopped them, and asked what they had in the truck - Helmes said, "Ask the other behind;" he did not mention his name - he said he was hired to assist him, and the other was to give him 2s.; I said to Simpson, "Hopeful, what have you got here?" that is the name I knew him by - I knew him before; he said, "It is my property, I am going to set up house-keeping;" I asked where he was going with it - he said into West-street, Smithfield; I asked where he got the property from - he said he bought it of a broker in Old-street; I asked the broker's name, and the number of the house where he lived - he said he did not know; I said as he could not give a satisfactory account where he obtained the property, I should take him into custody; I took hold of Helmes, but Simpson got away before I took hold of him, and I took him on the next morning, between eight and nine o'clock, in bed, at his mother's house, No. 3, New-court, Portpool-lane, which I knew before - Newcourt is about the middle of Portpool-lane; they were opposite that court when I first saw them - they might have been taking the things from that court, for what I know.

Simpson. Q. Did you suspect the things were stolen when you first saw me? A. I did - I followed you down the lane, hoping to get assistance to take you both - Johnson, the Policeman, No. 18, came up; I then seized Helmes - Johnson did not hear the conversation between us; he came up just as I finished questioning him, and also Serjeant Barton; I stopped the truck about ten o'clock - they were not three minutes going from portpool-lane to Cross-street; they went very fast.

COURT. Q. Did you go to Jockey's-fields? A. No.

SARAH HELMES . I am the wife of Bryan Helmes, and live at No. 5, Castle-court, Fulwood's-rents. My husband was employed by Mr. Hayter, and I was directed by my husband to buy these things for Mr. Hayter - I believe the articles produced to be the same that I bought; I had no particular marks on them - they are all similar to those I bought; I know nothing about the saddle - I believe the other articles to be those I bought about four months ago for Mr. Hayter - he lives at No. 9, Old-square, Lincoln's Inn; the things were taken to the stables in Jockey's-fields- I saw them there; the prisoner is my son.

BRYAN HELMES . I am a stone-mason, and live in Castle-court. I gave my wife direction to buy these things for Mr. Hayter, and saw them repeatedly at the place in Jockey's-fields; there is no particular mark on them - I was at Jockey's-fields a fortnight or three weeks before they were taken, but not later; I have been in the habit of going there a great deal, but the groom was out of town - I passed by the place on Saturday, the 27th of August,

at ten o'clock in the morning, and seeing a person pass who I knew to be a bad character, I tried the door, and it was fast - I put my knee against it; I went there the next morning, (Sunday,) and found the door standing open, as if it had been opened with a key.

HENRY FLATMAN. I am a farrier. On Sunday morning. the 28th of August, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw this stable - the door stood two or three inches ajar; I could not judge how it had been opened - there was no appearance of violence; I alarmed the neighbours, and a man went up stairs with me - I found the property gone; I was never there before - Jockey's-fields is all stables, and is much frequented.

SARAH HELMES re-examined. A good many things have been removed to my premises.

Q. Have you got all that was in the room before the robbery, except what was found by the Policeman? A. No, three blankets and a carpet are still missing.

Helmes' Defence. I was at work in the City-road on the Saturday, and as I passed the end of Portpool-lane, on my way home, a man came up and asked if I was busy; I said not - he asked if I would help him move a few things, and he would give me 1s.; he told me to fetch a truck for him - I did so; I came up the lane, and a person put in the bed and things - he told me to go down Holborn-hill; the Policeman came, and asked where I was going with them - I said I did not know; I was going towards Holborn, and told him to ask the man behind - the man said they were his, and he was going to take them to West-street; I never saw the man any more.

Simpson's Defence. The bed and furniture have been in my possession nine months - I bought them with money I worked hard for, and kept them at my lodgings till this time, when I was going to move to a room I had taken -I bought the saddle and bridle in Smithfield on the Friday week before; I have not seen the bridle since I have been take - I met this man in Gray's Inn-lane, and employed him to help me.

BRYAN HELMES . I suppose the door had been fastened by a lock - the only fastenings were a bolt inside and a lock; nobody could fasten it outside except by locking it.

JURY to RICHARD BAYLIS . Q.What is become of the track? A. It was returned to a person in Bell-court, Gray's Inn-lane, from whom it was hired.

WILLIAM KEW . I have not the least doubt of having locked the door.

Six witnesses gave each of the prisoners a good character.

HELMES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

SIMPSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Helmes recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth and good character.[September 12.]

Reference Number: t18310908-10

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1539. ELIZABETH BACON and ELIZABETH LEE were indicted for feloniously assaulting Alexander Kenneth Henry , on the 27th of August , at St. Mary Matsellon, alias Whitechapel, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 pocket-book, value 4s., and 4 sovereigns , his property; and JAMES COTTER and THOMAS MOORE , were indicted for that they, well knowing the prisoners to have done and committed the felony aforesaid, in manner and form aforesaid, the said prisoners feloniously did receive, harbour, conceal, and maintain .

ALEXANDER KENNETH HENRY . I am a seaman . I was returning to my ship on the night of the 27th of August, between one and two o'clock, and saw the two female prisoners in the street - (I afterwards saw the Policeman in the same street;) the females went with me to show me the road to Ratcliffe-cross - they came up to me first, and Bacon asked where I was going to; I told them, and they offered to show me the way - they took me down towards Whitechapel , and when I got there I told them I did not want any more of them, as I knew my way; they asked if I was going to treat them - I said there was no house open; they said they would find one, and we went into a public-house over the way, and I treated them - I took out my pocket-book, and took a sovereign from among five; I changed it, and put the change into my waistcoat pocket, after paying for the liquor - I put the pocket-book, with the four sovereigns in it, into my pocket; I wanted to leave them there, but they said it was nearer for me to go down Whitechapel-road, and turn to the right - they turned down the second turning beyond the church, and in that street they have me right down on my back, took the pocket-book out of my pocket, and ran away with it; I had only drank a pint of beer and a glass of rum, but they have me down unawares - I was not in liquer; I pursued them up the street - I could not get across on account of some waggons and carts coming along the road, and they got out of my sight; I went to the street where it was done, and spoke to two officers - I gave them information of my loss, and they went with me straight to a house; they opened the door after knocking some time - I went in after them, and found the four prisoners in a place like a shop in the house; there was a fire in the room, and my pocket-book was burning on it - they were secured; I am sure the pocket-book on the fire was mine - the officer has a piece of it; the pocketbook contained papers of importance to me - my money was not found.

HENRY COTTON . I am a Policeman. On the night in question I saw the prosecutor in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel, in company with the prisoner Bacon - she had hold of his arm; Lee was walking close behind him- I saw them go away together down Essex-street, and in about forty minutes the two female prisoners came back, went into the house where they live, and in about twenty minutes, or hardly so much, the prosecutor came and appeared looking about for somebody; I asked him if he had lost any thing - he complained of his loss to me; I went with him to the house I had seen the females enter- I knocked at the door twice; Moore asked who was there - I called him by name, and told him to open the door, which he did; I immediately went into the room - he followed me; he had nothing but his shirt on - I went into the room, and told the two female prisoners they must consider themselves in custody; the prisoner Cotter was also in the room - he was dressed; I saw some papers burning on the fire, and the covers of a red leather pocket - book - I produce one piece which I took off the fire; I could not save the papers - the two male prisoners said they knew nothing at all about the circumstance; Moore keeps the house - Bacon and Lee live there; Moore's wife was in bed, under a kind of counter in the room - I know there is a crack by which I could see into the house when the shutters are closed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Are there not oyster barrels by the shutters? A. Yes, but that does not impede the view - Moore appeared to have just got out of bed; I believe Cotter lives with the prisoner Lee- I have taken oysters outside the window, but was never inside the house; it is an oyster-shop, but not an intermediate beer-shop.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many other persons lodge in the house? A. I cannot say - I do not know that any women lodged there except Moore's wife; it is a lodging-house - I do not know how many rooms there are; I only went into two - the prosecutor appeared to me as if he had been drinking, but capable of conducting himself; I saw Bacon with him - I do duty in that street; I first saw them about half-past one o'clock or a little later, in Wentworth-street - a good many men and women are about there late at night; I make it a practice to notice every party I see.

Q. The prosecutor did not complain of being robbed till you asked him about it? A. No, he began his conversation with me by asking if it was not a very fine morning - I suggested to him that he had been robbed; I was in my uniform - he merely passed me, and said it was a fine morning; I followed him, and asked if he had been robbed, as I thought it singular he should be wandering down the street, and he appeared to be looking for somebody - his looking at every house as he passed made me speak to him; he was not looking at one house more than another - he appeared as if he had lost something, and was endeavouring to find it; I could not tell whether he was looking for assistance or not - if I had seen him go into a house with the prisoners I should have stopped him; there were not many people about.

Q. Did not the prosecutor tell you he was so drunk he was utterly incapable of telling you by whom he had been robbed? A.He did not - that I swear; he was not very drunk - he did not appear to have been drinking to excess at all, but to have his perfect senses.

COURT. Q.Was he able to speak? A. Yes, and walk as straight as a man could - he gave me a correct account of what took place.

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am a Policeman. I went into the house after Cotter, and took one piece of the pocketbook off the fire; before I went in I looked through a crack in the shutters, and could see the prisoner Cotter with a piece of paper in his hand, and heard him say, "In what manner have you got rid of him?" I could not see any body but him - the reply was that they laid him flat on his back and left him; that is all I heard.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Had you taken any oysters at the shop that night? A. Yes, I had them outside the window - Cotton was not with me; Moore helped me to them - he was dressed then; when I looked through the crack Cotter stood about two yards from the window; there is glass to the window, but whether the sash was down I cannot say - I was sober; I do not know whether I was looking through glass or not; the window was up when I had the oysters - the shutters were up when I saw this; I looked through an aperture in them - I went into the shop afterwards, but did not notice whether the sash was down; if the glass had been down I should think I could not hear distinctly; I was not above half a minute looking through the shutter - I heard what was said quite distinctly; my eye was to the crack, and my ear close to the shutter - there was a candle standing on the counter; Moore's wife was under the counter, in bed - I do not know how many people lodge in the house; knowing the prisoners before made me notice them; the crack in the shutter was large enough to put a penny-piece through - it is a bow-out window, with a front window to shut upthe shutter is in front of the bow; it is a sash window.

ALEXANDER KENNETH HENRY . These are two pieces of my pocket-book - I know them by the look of them - the particular marks I had on the book are burnt.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you mean to say you had nothing that day but a glass of rum and a pint of porter? A. I had some beer on board the ship before I left, but nothing but my allowance; that was all I had - I had drank no liquor but a glass of rum; I do not know the name of the street I took that in - my ship had come up the day before; I drank nothing in the prisoners' company - they wanted me, but I would not.

Q. Did you state to the prisoners, when you produced the sovereign in the house, that that was the only one you had, for you had been robbed of the rest? A. On my oath I did not say any such thing, nor any thing like it; I left my ship between six and seven o'clock, and went up Holborn, but being a stranger I cannot tell the names of the streets I went to - I have been a seaman ever since I was twelve years old; I was in Holborn about nine or ten o'clock - I was going to see my cousin, who I learned was gone to Gravesend; I came away down homeward again- I called at no house; I strolled about some time - I passed through smithfield; I never sat down - I walked about, and intended to go to my ship - I was paid that afternoon from the ship, and received six sovereigns; I left one on board with a shipmate, named Grant, and changed another after I came on shore, and another after I saw the prisoners.

Q.Then how had you five when you saw the prisoners? A. I had four sovereigns in my pocket-book when I was robbed; I was sober - I do not know what became of the change of the first sovereign exactly; I believe the change was taken out of my pocket before I saw the prisoners - I told them I had been robbed, but did not tell them that was the only sovereign I had left; I was robbed in a house in that same street, I think - I do not recollect that I have sworn I did not go into any house; I was in one undoubtedly - I went with a woman I fell in with in the street; she was showing me the road where I was to go - a person like me might lose their way in London; I did not give the woman any money, nor any thing to drink - I did not go into any public-house with her - I might be there an hour.

Q. Three hours? A. I cannot tell, but I was sober and knew what I was doing - I will not swear that it was in the same street that I was robbed in; I was robbed of my pocket-book and money the second turning below Whitechapel church - I was robbed before that in a house, and lost about 14s.; I cannot say exactly how much.

Q. Did you not say you could not tell what became of your change? A. I say that still, because I lost it - I had no money before I was paid; I changed the first sovereign down by the London-docks - I think I had about 14s. left; I cannot tell how much I spent - I spent it dif

ferent ways; I might go into a shop, and get something to eat - I might have bought a biscuit or so; I got different things to eat - some bacon, bread, and potatoes; I swear that I was sober.

Q. What became of you from half-past ten till half-past one o'clock? A. If I could repeat every street I was in, I could tell you.

COURT. Q. At what time of night was you in the house with the woman, where you suppose you were robbed? A. It might be between ten and eleven o'clock, I cannot say exactly.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you look at your pocket-book from the time you left your ship till you went with the officer? A. I did, as I took the sovereign out, and there were four remaining; I changed the first sovereign at a public-house, but did not drink there - I paid for what I bought to eat with the change of that sovereign; I took that sovereign out of the pocket-book.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.When you went to search the oyster-shop, Moore's wife was in bed under the counter? A.She might be, but I did not search the room - I did not notice whether the window was down.

HENRY COTTON re-examined. I did not notice whether the window was shut or open.

Bacon's Defence. This is a lodging-house; there are eight rooms in it, and a good many more young women live there - I know nothing of the robbery; we got up to get something to eat, and saw the prosecutor standing there - he said he had been robbed; there was a lot of people round him - he was washing his face with a handkerchief; somebody gave him water to wash it with.

Cotter's Defence. The Policeman saw me come home; directly I got in I asked for a light to go up to my bedthe people had not got the light before the Policeman came to the door and knocked; this man let him in - he searched the girl and searched me; he found 11/2d. on me - they laid hold of the two girls, and I walked behind; if I had not been innocent I could have got away - I was eight or ten yards behind them all the time.

ALEXANDER KENNETH HENRY . My nose was bleeding, and I was washing my face when the prisoners came up; I do not know what made my nose bleed - I received no blow; I rather think I was robbed of the 14s. in the same street - it is a very long street, but I might have turned the corner.

Two witnesses gave Bacon a good character, and one deposed the same for Lee.

BACON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

LEE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

COTTER - NOT GUILTY .

MOORE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-11

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1540. GEORGE BAGLEY , GEORGE FORECAST , and FRANCES (THE WIFE OF THE SAID GEORGE) BAGLEY , were indicted for that they, not having the fear of God before their eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the Devil, and contriving and intending our Lord the King, and his people, craftily, deceitfully, feloniously, and traitorously to deceive and defraud, on the 22nd of July , at Christchurch , 3 pieces of false, feigned, and counterfeit money and coin, each and every of them to the likeness and similitude of the good, legal, and current money and silver coin of this realm, called half-crowns, falsely, deceitfully, feloniously, and traitorously did forge, counterfeit, and coin; against the duty of their allegiance, and against the Statute , &c.

MR. SCARLETT conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BRUMMITT . I am a potter, and live at Lambeth. On Friday, the 22nd of July, in consequence of information which I received, I went with Lawrence to Dean's-yard, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel; I do not know the number of the house - I saw the prisoner George Bagley there; Lawrence asked him if he had got any half-crowns - he said No, he had not got any half-crowns, but he said he would soon make him some, and asked how many he would like; Lawrence said twenty half-crowns and twenty shillings - Bagley said he would make him the twenty half-crowns and twenty shillings in an hour and a half or an hour and a quarter, if he would call for them; he showed us a pair of moulds, and he showed me a half-crown and a shilling - he said he must break the shilling up again, because it was not perfect; I looked at the pair of moulds, and asked if he made them himself - he said Yes, he did - I and Lawrence then left, and went to a public-house in the street; we met some officers there - I came back between six and seven o'clock in the evening, accompanied by some officers; I went up stairs, and saw Bagley at the top of the stairs, and in the room were two women and Forecast - Bagley stood at the top of the stairs; he asked me who that was coming up behind me - I said no one in particular that I knew of; he rushed by me, and went down stairs - I then went into the room; it is on the two pair of stairs; Lawrence was not with me the second time - I found forecast in the room with Frances Bagley and another woman - forecast was sitting down by the fire, putting some metal into a pot; it was apparantly from a pewter table-spoon, which was on the table, cut up; one pipe was in the fire, and another was in his hand - he was filling it: on my entering the room Frances Bagley had the moulds in her hand - she began to rub them together in her hand, trying to break them; I went up to her, and said, "Don't break the moulds," and took them out of her hand - they were quite warm: Forecast said, "Oh, don't break the moulds, there is no occasion for that;" I gave the moulds to Mr. Lloyd - Forecast got up from the fire, and said, "What do you want?" I said, "Is them things all right?" he directly jumped off his chair, and he had something between his legs in his lap: it seemed like chalk - he chucked it out of window, and said,"I don't live here, now I have done you:" he put himself in an attitude to fight - he took a mallet off the floor, and said to Lloyd, "If you don't let me go I will knock your brains out;" we had a bit of a skirmish - I took the staff out of my pocket, and we took them into custody - we found in the room some half-crowns, some pewter spoons cut up, and a band to put round the plaster, to form moulds with; I found on the mantel-piece two half-crowns, and a shilling - I believe in all twelve or fourteen half-crowns were found; I gave the two half-crowns and the shillings into Lloyd's hands.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You are a potter, where do you live? A. At No. 1, Lambeth-butts

- the pottery is in High-street, Lambeth; Mr. Walter is the master - I am a journeyman; I did not work for him at the time I took the prisoners; he keeps a pottery, and makes pots; I do not know that I have worked for him above once before, and that was about two years ago - I am working for him now when I am at work, and I have worked for other masters; I did a day's work for Mr. Walter the day before yesterday - I have been taken into his regular employ since this affair; I have worked for Mr. Denew, in Ferry-street - it is four months ago since I was regularly employed there; I cannot say what month it was- I swear I worked for him in April as a regular servant; I think it is about four months ago that I left him, because he was slack of business - I had a guinea a week; I have a wife.

Q.What did you do for the two months before the 22nd of July, up to that day? A. I used to get jobs where I could - I worked for Dalton and Watts, in High-street, Lambeth; I did several days work for them between the time of my leaving Denew and going to the prisoner's - I had a whole week's work there, and I have worked at getting clay out of barges by the water side; I have supported myself by my own work as a potter - I was not in want of money, not to be distressed; I had money at home which I had earned by working as a potter - Lawrence is a fishmonger; I have known him in Lambeth, I suppose, six or seven years.

Q.How came you first to go with Lawrence? A. I was desired by Gollocker to assist in taking him - I expect nothing but my expences; I did not go for the purpose of making money by it - I have not been told any thing about what I am to receive, nor that I am to receive any thing; I do not expect to be paid more than for my loss of time -I was never in trouble myself; I was never at the place till Lawrence took me - I went with Lawrence; he gave the order for the money - I afterwards went and took them; Forecast was not there the first time I went - I saw Forecast put the metal into the pipe; I went to take them, not to entrap them.

ROBERT LAWRENCE . I live at No. 23, Lambeth-butts. I know Gollocker - he is a parish constable; he asked me to go to the prisoners' lodging - I said I would; I accompanied Brummitt on the 22nd of July - I had seen Brummitt twice before; when we got there we went up into Bagley's room, and I asked if he had any half-bulls, meaning half-crowns - he said No, and asked what I should want; I told him I should want a score of half-bulls and a score of garter-bobs, which means shillings, and a score of plain, which means plain shillings that have not got the garter round them - I asked him how long they would be before they were ready; he said he would have them ready in an hour and a half - we then went down, and went to the public-house at the corner of the street, where the officers were waiting; I did not go to the place a second time.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.How long have you been a dealer in counterfeit coin? A.Since the 10th of June; I have been with Gollocker at times - I am not a dealer; I consider myself an honest, upright man - I have not given more than six or seven orders for counterfeit coin; I believe it is not more than five times - Gollocker is the person I principally go with when he calls on me; he never pays me, nor has any body else paid me - I expect to be paid for my loss of time, but as to any thing furthere I cannot tell; I do not get people to make coin, to entrap them, and then inform the Mint - if a person is introduced to me, I go and make a purchase of him; I never go myself, because I have no connexion with dealers in coin, except they are pointed out to me - Gollocker asked me to go to the prisoners'.

Q. He asked you as a friend of his? A. He and I have been together many years on the watch - he was a patrol, I was a private-watchman; I am a fishmonger - I live by that, and not by following Gollocker; I have never received a halfpenny for this, and as soon as I go from here I shall go to my employ - if a person is pointed out to me, I make it my duty to go, if I am sanctioned by an officer; it is my duty to go under the patronage of the officer, and detect them - I was not acquainted with coiners, so as to introduce myself to them - Gollocker was waiting in the street while I went in to the prisoners' - he had been with me previously to the same room.

Q. How came you to be acquainted with the terms? A. It is language I hear them make use of - I ordered a score of half-bulls, &c. in those words; I used those words when speaking to those sort of people.

Q. Did you not go there on purpose to betray them? A. I went to convince the world that they were the people they were represented to me; we knew of it a long time before - I do not entrap any one.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I went to the prisoners' lodging, on the 22nd of July, with Brummitt, Hall, and Myers - I never saw Brummitt before that day; I followed Brummitt up stairs, and entered the room close after him - there were two men and two women in the room when I went in; Forecast was one of them - I cannot identify the other man or the woman, as I only took Forecast - I saw Forecast on entering the room, standing by a table by the fire-side; the instant I entered he threw something out of window in a handkerchief, and said,"Now, I have done you:" I seized him - he was in his shirt sleeves - he struggled very much, and with a mallet, which he had procured, he tried to strike me; he was then secured, after a very great struggle - Bagley was brought into the room by Myers; they were handcuffed together, and taken away - Myers had taken Bagley on the stair case; I searched the room, and found on the table one half-crown and one good shilling - Brummitt took some money up; I have a counterfeit half-crown and a good shilling, which I found on the table, and another counterfeit half-crown, which I found on the bed, and on the table I found two pieces of metal quite hot - I produce them; I believe it is called the get of a mould; it is the part which fills the channel of the mould - one of these half-crowns appears finished, and the other not.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Were you at the public-house on the morning of this day? A. No.

RICHARD MYERS . I am a tobacconist, and live on Newington-causeway. On the 22nd of July I went to the prisoners' lodgings with Brummitt, Lloyd, and Hall - I followed Lloyd up stairs, and after we got on the first floor I heard a man say, "Who have you got there?" and at that moment he rushed down stairs - when he came down I seized him on the

landing, and forced him into a room on the first floor; it was Bagley - when I got there another man was behind the door, and directly upon that the female prisoner and another man came round, and endeavoured to get him from me; I drew my cutlass, and said if he did not go up stairs I would cut him down - I forced him up stairs, and Forecast was sitting in the chair with Lloyd holding him; after he was secured, this tin dish was on the hob in the two pair of stairs room - there was a sharp fire there; two tobacco pipes were in the fire red hot, and full of metal - on the top of the ashes, under the fire, was this half-crown, which I picked up; it was very hot - on the table laid two pieces of metal, called gets; another get laid on the right-hand side of the fire place, and a three-square file and scissors on the table; a blue cloth on the right-hand side of the fire place on a chair, and on the table laid these pieces of new pewter spoons, cut up; on the bed by the side of a shawl lay these four half-crowns, finished - on the floor, by the side of a chair by the window, laid four more unfinished; in a cupboard, in the room, was this tin band, which they make the moulds with, and this knife with plaster of Paris on it - some wet plaster of Paris in a basin, and by the side of it a paper bag, containing a quantity of plaster in a dry state.

Cross-examined. Q. The room seems to have been nearly ready to receive you? A.It appears like it: Gollocker is here - Lawrence goes with us both if we want him; I cannot tell how much money I have received in two years from the Mint - you asked me yesterday that question on a trial, and I told you if you had asked me to bring my book, I would; I have not looked at it.

Q. Will you swear you have not had 100l. in the last two years? A. Not within twelve months; I will swear I have not had 150l. within the last two years - my business as a tobacconist is very good, but I do not depend upon that; I have landed property - I did this out of regard to the laws; I am entitled to my expences - I have been in the habit of going with Lawrence about twelve months; I should think it is nearly as long - he was at Maidstone, at the Spring Assizes, and you saw him there; I believe that was the first Mint case he had, but I have known him about twelve months - when we send him on this business we can trust him, and he never deceives us; he does not get people to make coin that I know of - I do not think I have been paid any thing by the Mint for these twelve months; I have done business for them for the last ten years, but do not think I have been paid above five years.

Q.Is there not one Perkins employed about coin? A. Yes, he came to us; I do not know of his having been convicted - I told you yesterday; I sometimes gave him a shilling or two - I will swear I never gave him 5l. - I mean to charge the Mint with what money I pay.

Bagley. Q. Did you not put out your hands to stop me from going out at the bottom of the stairs into the street? A.When I first saw him he was coming out of the two pair of stairs room - he rushed by the witness; I stood at the corner of the stairs, and as he came by I seized him with my left hand - he never got down the stairs; the staircase is very narrow and dark - I pushed you into the front room; another man and that woman came into the room, and gave me a drive towards the window - I drew my cutlass, and you surrendered; you said you did not live in that room - I seized him at the bottom of the second flight of stairs, coming down from his room, not near the street door - the female prisoner and another man came into the room to us.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 22nd of July I accompanied the officers to the prisoners' lodgings in Wentworth-street; Brummitt and Lloyd went across the yard first - Myers and I were following them; I saw something come out of the two pair of stairs window; it fell on the ground, and fell almost all to pieces; it was like chalk - I took it up, and have it here - it was quite warm at the time, and I picked up one half-crown close by it, that was quite hot, and another at a little distance off; one of the half-crowns had the get to it - I then went up stairs, and saw Forecast at the top of the stairs, endeavouring to get away from Lloyd; I assisted in getting him into the room, and after the two men were secured I took off the table three pieces of metal spoon.

Cross-examined. Q. You were not at the public-house in the morning? A. No.

ANDREW LLOYD . Here is a mould which I saw Brummitt take from the hands of the female prisoner; he gave it into my hands - it was quite hot at the time.

Frances Bagley . It was not taken out of my hands - it was the other woman. Witness. I am not sure it was her hand; there was another female in the room.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint, and have been in the habit of seeing counterfeit coin for many years. I am acquainted with the materials coiners use - this mould is made of plaster of Paris; there are the two sides of a half-crown, of the date of 1817, impressed on it, here are also two pieces of what appears to be a plaster of Paris mould - it has part of the impression of the reverse side of a half-crown of 1817, the date is on it now - one of the half-crowns produced by Hall is finished, and the other has the get to it, as if just out of the mould; they are both counterfeits, and of the date of 1817 - I cannot say they are made from this mould, it being so broken; the two produced by Lloyd are both counterfeit, and dated 1817 - one is finished and the other not; the four produced by Myers are counterfeit, and dated 1817 - they are finished; here are four more produced by him, one finished and three unfinished; they are of the same date, but cast in a different mould to the others - they appear to me to have been cast in the mould which is perfect; in fact I have no hesitation in swearing so - there is an indented mark just under the chin of the whole four, and there is a corresponding mark in the mould; the moulds are made by inserting a good half-crown into the plaster of Paris - the unfinished ones merely require small particles of metal to be removed from them, which is occasioned by the mould not being closed; it is removed by a file or scissors - a spot or defect in the mould would appear in the coin; these are Britannia metal spoons, which is similar metal to the coin - a tin band is usually used to form the mould.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you call this half-crown entirely finished for circulation? A. Yes - aquafortis would entirely destroy it; I cannot say these smaller pieces of plaster of Paris have ever been a mould for a half-crown, because here is only part of the reverse side - whether the

obverse side was to it I cannot tell; I have no hesitation in saying it is the obverse side of a half-crown - part of the impression of this other mould is broken off on the outside- rubbing it together would produce that; the convex part of it is in a perfect state, but there are projecting parts in order that the mould might fit together in one place always, and those are off.

ANN SHEEN . I am the wife of William Sheen. I occupy the house in which the prisoners were apprehended; I live in the front parlour - the house is in a yard; Bagley and his wife occupied the second floor in the back house - they had been there about a fortnight, so that I knew them well; I have had some rent from both of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Forecast never lived in your house? A. No - they occupied the room where they were taken.

Frances Bagley . Q. Who took the room of you? A. You and George together.

Frances Bagley . We lived with you two months ago, and left in your debt - you said you would never let us a room again; you let us be in the house after that, but we never occupied one room together. Witness. They occupied that room only.

Frances Bagley . She keeps four brothels, and her house is open at all hours - she sits at her door till four o'clock in the morning, waiting for stragglers.

George Bagley 's Defence. One of the witnesses, you will remember, said I was an entire stranger to him, and at the same time he says I gave him a mould in his hand; is it likely I should show a stranger a mould, and give my life into his hands?

Forecast's Defence. I do not live there, but live in the same street - I went to the Star, and asked for a newspaper; they said it was out, and if I went to such a place I should get it - I went to this room, and asked two females for the newspaper; they said I should have it, and directly the officers came they took and threw me on the bed; a mallet laid there - I laid hold of it, and he said if I did not go up stairs he would cut me down with his staff - I did not see Bagley in the room when I went up; one of them says I threw the handkerchief out of the window; these men say they picked up the mould, but there was no handkerchief found - I believe Sheen can prove I was taken at the street door.

ANN SHEEN . I did not see him taken, and did not know it till the officers had him in the yard.

Frances Bagley 's Defence. Several girls have robbed men in Sheen's house - she is the mother of William Sheen, who cut his child's head off; she is inveterate against us, and said, in the street, she would hang any one she could for money.

G. BAGLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

FORECAST - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

F. BAGLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.[Sept. 14.]

Reference Number: t18310908-12

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bayley .

1541. EDWARD DOWLING was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Willows , on the 12th of August , at the Precinct of the Savoy, and stealing therein 1 bag, value 6d.; 1 gown, value 3s.; 1 sheet, value 6d.; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 6d. , his property.

SAMUEL WILLOWS. I am a fishmonger . At the time in question I lived at No. 122, Strand, in the Precinct of the Savoy , and rented the house. I was disturbed about six o'clock in the morning, on the 12th of August - I went down stairs, and found the prisoner between two kitchens; he had just been taken out of my cellar by two Policemen, who were with him - I found he had got a quantity of things which were in a green bag, which was mine; there was a gown, a shirt, and a pair of stockings - I had seen them over night, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Do you know whether you had or not? A. I should say I had not - I know them to be mine; he had a pair of trousers in the bag, and they were mine - I had seen them the night before, and left them in the front kitchen; I examined the premises, and found he had got in at a back window, over a shed in the yard - it was the fourth morning I had been robbed, exactly in the same way; it is a sash window, but does not throw up - it was made fast; I found three panes broken - there was a sufficient hole for him to get through; I had seen the window over night - the panes were whole then; the prisoner had been in my service once for four years; I lived in that house all that time - he has left me about six months - (looking at the goods produced by Agate and Young) I know this bag, and all the articles of it to be mine.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a porter. On the 12th of August, at five minutes before six o'clock, I went down the Savoy, by Mr. Willows' and saw a man coming out of his back window, on the first floor - he dragged a green bag out; I called Agate, the Policeman, who was in sight- the man then got out of the window, and got into the back yard; I got over the wall by the shed into the prosecutor's premises, and found the prisoner down in the cellar- he had got into the cellar from the yard, and was secured; he had got the green bag in the cellar - the Policeman took possession of it.

THOMAS AGATE . I am a Policeman. Ward called me as I was in front of the premises; I went down, got over the wall, and found the prisoner in the cellar - he had a sheet, a shirt, a gown, and a pair of stockings; when he saw me coming down with a candle he dropped them from his hand; I took charge of them, and have had them ever since - Young was with me.

Prisoner. He first saw the green bag, and took hold of the things; he said, "Here is something;" that was before he saw me, and now he swears he saw them in my hand. Witness. I saw him drop them; he had not got the green bag in his hand.

CHARLES YOUNG . I am an officer. I got over the wall, and went into Mr. Willows' house; I found the green bag and trousers, and a wine-glass, under the stairs, near where the prisoner was standing; I found him in the cellar, under the house.

MR. WILLOWS. I had seen the trousers in the front kitchen the night before - I had seen the green bag in the first floor back room shortly before, or the day before, and I had left this wine-glass in the back room.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Willows says I got through the window - there were only two squares broken, which I never broke; neither of the squares are half a foot wide -

I could not even get my head through, much more my body: Ward stated at Bow-street that he saw me come through the window - I was not through it.

WILLIAM WARD . I saw him come through the window - his head and shoulders were through; I afterwards saw the window - it was large enough for him to get through.[Sept. 14.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18310908-13

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1542. HANNAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , at St. James, Westminster, 2 bags, value 6d.; 15 sovereigns, 80 half-crowns, 300 shillings, and 20 sixpences, the property of Elizabeth Grace , in her dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH GRACE . I live at No. 2, Eaden-street, Regent-street, in the parish of St. James' - I rent a room there; the house is let out to different people - the landlord does not live in the house. The prisoner lodged with me; I pay the rent of the room - she was to pay me rent, but never did; she had been with me about three weeks, and left me on the night of the robbery, the 16th of August; I did not find this out till the morning of the 17th, when I was dressing myself; I then found my box not in the place I had left it - I found a dent in the lid, and it was open; I looked into it, and missed nearly 40l., which was placed in a small box inside the larger one; the money was taken out, and the little box was left - nothing was taken but the money; it was fifteen sovereigns, and the rest in shillings and half-crowns - 3l. was left; the silver was loose in a little purse - the purse was taken, and a bag which had the money in it was taken; I immediately cried out - my neighbours came and asked what was the matter, and they told me to go to the watch-house; I have since seen the bag the money was in, in clements' possession.

Prisoner. Q. Had you any other lodgers in the house besides me? A. Not the day you took the money; two women lodge with me, but they were both out on the 16th.

COURT. Q.When did you see your money last? A. I was at my box on the Monday, and saw my money, that was the 15th; on the 16th one of the lodgers went to her mother's, and the other to her work - they slept in my house at night; I did not see the money after they left.

Prisoner. I left one lodger in the room, named Ann West, very much intoxicated, on the bed; Mrs. Grace, I, and West's husband, came out together, went to a public-house, and there had some drink; I said to Grace, "Now, remember where I am going - I have paid you all I owe you;" she said, "Mrs. Jones, you have paid me every thing satisfactorily;" I paid her 11s. for rent; she knew I was going out, and should not return till four o'clock in the morning, and I left her 5s. to get breakfast. Did you not know I was in possession of a few pounds? Witness. No.

JOSEPH FREDERICK CLEMENTS . I am a Policeman. I received charge of the prisoner for being drunk, and searched her on the morning of the 17th - I found on her a canvas bag and 9l. 19s.; after searching her, I asked where the remainder of the money was - she said she knew nothing about it; I brought her up from the lock-up place, and she said that nobody but her knew that old Betty had got so much money - I asked where the rest was; she said she knew nothing about it - I sent one of my men to her lodgings; he brought some more money - she was remanded for a week, and at the end of the week she sent for me, and said if I went to her brother he could tell me where the rest of the money was; in consequence of information from him, I went to a public-house, and the landlord produced some money to me.

Prisoner. When you found the money on me, you took me up, and said, "Well, my girl, you are in a fine predicament, are not you? you had better tell me the truth." Witness. I did not tell her to tell the truth.

Prisoner. He shook hands with me, and said he would befriend me - I said, "Mr. Clements, I will never betray a friend;" he afterwards said to me, "We have found a swag of sovereigns in your box;" I said there was no money in my box - I never said a word to any body about sovereigns.

ROBERT CURRIE . I am a Policeman. I searched the prisoner's box on Wednesday, the 17th, and found in it a bag, containing 8l. 8s. 6d.

RICHARD ELLIOTT . I am a publican. The prisoner came into my house about ten o'clock in the evening, on the 16th of August, with a man, whom she called her brother - they had something to drink; she told me she had sold a little property out of the Bank, that it was the last she had, she was fearful her brother would get it from her, and would I let her leave it with me for a few days; I said I had no objection if she would count it before her brother, and she counted eleven sovereigns and four half-crowns, which I produce.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you to supply me with a bed that night? A. Yes, and I said I never supplied females with beds.

Prisoner. I offered to sleep with his servant, or make any shift, as I had been drinking brandy-and-water, and was not capable of taking care of myself.

ELIZABETH GRACE . Both these bags are mine, and my money was in them in my box, I am certain.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 16th of August, I came home about two o'clock, and Mrs. Grace was washing next door - I went to her, and told her, as I could not get what I wanted for dinner, I would let it rest till the evening, and when I came home I would pay her a little money, and perhaps all that I owed, as we had had a few words the evening before; she wanted to turn me out of doors, but the landlord would not let her - she had two more women lodging with her; we all slept in one bed, and there was a dispute about so many being in the bed, and I slept on the boxes at the foot of the bed - when I came home I fetched her from next door, and paid her 11s. which I owed her; we both went out together, and the key was hung up - we went round the corner to a public-house, and had a quartern of gin, which I paid for; I saw no more of her till I came home at nine o'clock at night - I had been to redeem some articles; nobody was at home - I went next door, spoke to Grace, and then came away, finding I should be too late to go where I intended - I went in a coach to my husband's brother, in Covent-garden; I told him I had met a friend who was now going to set me up in life again, and I intended to leave London altogether - I had paid my landlady

all I owed, had sufficient to relieve myself from all difficulties, and should have a few pounds left - the last time I left Grace's room Ann West was on the bed, tipsy; her husband was there, and a strange woman - Grace came in, and we all went out together, except Ann West, and drank - we met my brother at the corner of Leicester-square; Grace, I, Joseph West, the strange woman, and my brother-in-law, all went to Elliott's, and had something to drink; I and my brother went away together - we went to Elliott's again, sat down alone, and had two pints of half-and-half; my brother and I were holding rather an argument - he thought I had not befriended him enough, and I was afraid I should be overpowered by him; we had three glasses of brandy-and-water, and the landlord partook of the last glass - then I gave him the eleven sovereigns and the silver; we came out - my brother asked where I was going - I said I thought I should return home after all; the gentleman who supplied me with the money I had known about twenty-five years, and borne him a son, when I was first seduced; I met him in Red Lion-square - he recognised me; I told him my circumstances, and I went with him into the City; he gave me that money on the 15th of August, to relieve me from difficulties till he could take me into the country.

[Sept. 15.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Reference Number: t18310908-14

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1543. THOMAS SUMPTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Colesell , on the 17th of July , at Heston, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 17s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s., and 1 shirt value 2s., the goods of James Colesell ; 1 waistcoat, value 8s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of William Tillier .

JOHN COLESELL. I live at Heston, in Middlesex . On Sunday, the 17th of July, I went to bed within five minutes of ten o'clock; I had fastened the doors - the outer door was bolted inside and barred; it leads into the passage; the passage door was fastened with a bolt- I did not look at the window before I went to bed; I got up about four o'clock in the morning, and found both the doors wide open - they were not broken open, but a window by the side of the outer door was pushed up at the bottom; my son James slept in the room up stairs, above that window, with some other lads - it is at the back of the house; I went outside, and saw a hurdle put to that window - it was placed end-ways, so as to make a sort of ladder quite up to the casement; the window was open - I cannot say whether it was shut at night; there was a square of glass out of that window - it had been out before; the hurdle went close up to the casement - I went and called the lads; five of them slept in that room - they were all five there; I did not miss any thing of my own.

JAMES COLESELL . I am the prosecutor's son. On the 17th of July I slept in this room, with four other lads- I went to bed about ten o'clock; I believe I was the last that went to bed - I saw that the window was shut when I went to bed; it was fastened with a handle, which turns round; I am quite sure of that - it could not be opened without turning the handle; there was a pane of glass out of the window - a person outside putting their hand through could turn the handle -I put all my clothes under the foot of the bed; I got up about ten minutes after I went to bed, and had occasion to go into the garden - I shut the door when I went out; I did not go out of sight of the door at all, and was not gone five minutes - I fastened the door inside; I did not go through the passage door - I went up stairs; the window was shut when I went to bed again, and I am sure the four other lads were there; I was the last that awoke in the morning - Tillier, who slept there, awoke me, when my father came to call them up; my father was in the room - I lost a blue frock-coat, a pair of black trousers, a black waistcoat, a pair of shoes, and a shirt - I did not miss the shirt till three days afterwards; I missed the other things directly - the window was wide open, and a hurdle against it; all the four lads were in the room when I missed my things; I have since seen my shoes -I have known the prisoner ten or eleven years; he was with me on the evening of Sunday, the 17th of July, on the cricket-ground; he has been in my father's house many times, and has slept in the room which I did.

WILLIAM TILLIER . I slept in this room with Colesell on the 17th of July - I went to bed before him; his little brother Ned slept with me - John Sneller , another lad, awoke me in the morning, and the window was wide open - I missed a red plush waistcoat and a handkerchief, which I had put the night before on a chair by the side of the bed - I had not left the room: I was fast asleep all night.

MARIA COLESELL . I am the prosecutor's daughter - my bed-room is some distance from the boys'. On the night of the 17th of July I heard the watchman cry out past eleven o'clock, and was disturbed by a person coming into my room; my door was shut, but left on the latch, as I was very ill at the time - I do not know who the person was, but I saw it was a person in dark trousers, and without a coat; he stood some minutes by the side of a cradle, and went away without taking any thing.

HENRY BAKER . I am a shoemaker, and live at Heston. I mended a pair of shoes for James Colesell on the Monday week before the robbery; (looking at a pair) I know these to be the same by the nails in the welts, and toes - there are three nails gone since I mended them, and the tongue has been cut off; I am sure these are the shoes; they were lined inside, but not by me.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am high-constable of Isleworth. My son apprehended the prisoner, in consequence of information - I was present at his examination on Wednesday, the 20th, I think; these shoes produced are what I took off his feet - I have had them ever since; nothing else was found on him.

JAMES COLESELL . These are the shoes which were under my bed that night; I know them - there are a pair of socks now in them which I fastened in when I bought them.

EDWIN COOK . I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday, the 19th of July - I searched, but found nothing on him; I cannot say whether he had these shoes on when I took him; I kept him in custody till my father saw him, which was next day - he could not have changed his shoes before that; he was locked up by himself in the cage all night.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) With respect to the robbery I now stand charged with, I have not the slightest knowledge of; on the night of the robbery I was at home, and in bed by ten o'clock, at my father's house, and remained there till six o'clock the following morning, when I left my father's house to go to my aunt, who resides at Camden-town: with respect to the bundle that I was seen with on the morning after the robbery appears to have been committed, it contained a home-baked cake, which I took to my aunt - with respect to the shoes that I wore, that prosecutor's son claims as his property - I purchased them near Howland-street, Tottenham-court-road, for 7s. 6d.; I declare them never to have been his property at any time.

[Sept. 15.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18310908-15

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1544. JAMES BLACKET and JOSEPH EDWARD COHEN were indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Esther Collison , about ten o'clock in the night of the 5th of August , at St. George, with intent to steal the goods and chattels therein .

ESTHER COLLISON . I keep the White Hart public-house, Ratcliff-highway , and rent the house - it is in the parish of St. George. On Friday night, the 5th of August, there were some things in my bed-room, which was locked; I cannot say whether the window was shut - I went to carry some things up stairs that evening, and when I went up Blacket sat in the club-room, which is right opposite the staircase leading to the bed-room; I saw him sitting right facing the staircase - I had not been in the club-room that evening; there were several persons in the room - I had not seen Cohen there; they were all strangers to me; when I got on the landing-place Blacket came out of the club-room on to the landingplace; I went to my bed-room door, and could not put my own key in the lock - I found there was another key in the door; I did not take it out, and cannot say what sort of a key it was - on turning the handle the door came open, and as soon as I opened it two men rushed out: I laid hold of the last one, and held him till Blacket laid hold of me, and kept me away from him - the two men escaped down stairs; I cannot say who they were - I think the second man was dressed in a brown coat, but I had very little opportunity of seeing; I laid hold of Blacket, and gave him in charge - when I laid hold of him he said he had not been in the room; he would have got away if he could - he did not do any thing.

Q.Had you any difficulty in stopping him? A. There were several people at the bottom of the stairs, as I called out, and it was useless for him to attempt to escape; after going to the station-house I went into the room - my sister, Elizabeth Walker, went in first, I believe: when I went in I found one of the top drawers taken out, and the contents thrown on the bed; they were bills, papers, and receipts - there was wearing-apparel and things taken out of the second drawer; some of my late husband's clothes were taken out, and put on the bed, and some of my little boy's clothes - the veneer was of some of the drawers, as if they had been forced open with a knife; a pipe laid across the wash-hand stand; it was warm when I saw it, which was a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after the men had rushed out.

Q.When you opened the door was the window open? A. I am not certain - it is a corner house; the window looks on Artichoke-hill - it is on the first floor, and a person holding by his hands could drop on the ground.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. About what time did the persons rush out of the room? A. As near as I can tell about ten o'clock - I cannot say whether it was a little before or a little after.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many times have you been examined on this case before the Justice? A. I was at Lambeth-street once or twice - I have been examined four times there; I believe a gentleman wrote down what I said each time - it was read over to me the last time, and I made my mark to it; I do not recollect its being read over to me more than once - I told the whole story over each time, as near as I could, I did not take much notice of what was being written - I was asked to come into a room, and what I said was taken down; I made my mark to it - that was the last time; I do not know whether what I said was taken down every time, or only the last; I have always told the same story, as near as possible.

Q. Have you ever said you knew so little of the matter that you would not have come at all if it had not been for the Police? A. No, I will swear that positively; it was not the Policeman who asked me to come - I gave the account I have now before the Magistrate: whether Blacket was committed as a rogue and vagabond I do not know; he rescued the man, and pulled me away from him - he got between us, and pulled me away; it was in the dark, because when the club-room was shut I could not see; the moment I laid hold of the door to open it the light was knocked out of my hand.

Q. That was before the men rushed out? A. No, it happened all at one time - Blacket came on the landingplace where I stood; he was close against me - there was nobody on the landing-place but him and me; I did not know him before - I did not let him go till he was taken by the Policeman at the bottom of the stairs, which was directly after he prevented my holding the man; we came down the stairs together, and he was taken at the bottom of the stairs - he might have got from me by using great violence, but there were several people at the bottom of the stairs; my girl went and hallooed out - the Policeman and several people were at the bottom of the stairs, and took him directly - I never let him go; it was only up one pair of stairs - the Policeman was not in the house; I held Blacket by the collar - the girl passed us at the top of the stairs; she ran out with several more, and the Policeman came in.

Q. Did you not release him altogether, and was he not some time in the house before he was given in charge? A. No.

HENRY MARQUARD. I am a Police-officer. On Friday night I was on duty near this house, about ten o'clock -I went to the White Hart; I found Blacket there - the prosecutrix was there, and gave him in charge; I should think when I got to the station-house, it was near halfpast ten - I did not see the other prisoner; I afterwards went up to the room, found a small drawer on the bed, and some papers - the room was in disorder; Elizabeth Walker gave me a skeleton-key, which I produce - I found a little key on the bed; I received a knife from some

witness - there was a tobacco-pipe with the bowl rather hot, and three phosphorus-matches on the floor.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you at the examinations before the Magistrate? A. Yes - Cohen offered to tender two witnesses to prove where he was.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where was Blacket when you took him? A.Standing just by the bar, at the bottom of the stairs - there were several women round him; the prosecutrix was one, and, I think, she had hold of him - there was great confusion at the time: she was standing close to him - the station-house is about a quarter of a mile from the house; it might take me seven or eight minutes to get there - we walked slowly; the clock had struck ten when I heard the alarm- I was not a minute and a half going there, but we searched the prisoner at the public-house, and found a half-sovereign and some silver on him.

ELIZA FITZGERALD . I was at Mrs. Collison's house on the night in question; I heard her give an alarm up stairs, and at that time I saw the prisoner Cohen come down stairs - he was alone; I saw one man come down before him, but I do not know him - Cohen came down alone; the other man had come down two or three minutes before - I had seen Cohen, I think, the evening before, in the club-room, but not before; I had not seen him in the club-room, that night - I had seen him the night before, but cannot be positive I had seen him that night.

Q. How long had you an opportunity of seeing the person you call Cohen? A. I was standing at the counter at the bar, and he went by; he turned his head, and looked up at the clock - I had an opportunity of seeing his side face as he passed; he did not stop - he was dressed in a kind of snuff-coloured coat, the same colour as he has on now, with a black velvet collar.

Q. How soon after he went away did Mrs. Collison come down? A. I heard her call out directly; I went towards her, hearing her give an alarm, and saw Blacket holding her - this was immediately after I saw Cohen pass.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Can you tell how many minutes before the other man had passed? A. To the best of my recollection two or three minutes - I never said I did not see Cohen's face; I recollect telling the Magistrate that to the best of my recollection, I had seen Cohen the night before - I cannot swear positively that he is the man I saw the night before, because there were more people there; I was not confused at the time I saw Cohen go through - I heard Mrs. Collison call out after that; I saw Cohen at the station-house, I think, the next night - I cannot say whether it was Saturday or Monday night, but it was on the night he was taken; I cannot say whether his cravat was white or black - he passed too quick for me to observe that; he went by quite quick.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever hear Mrs. Collison say she knew so little about it she never would have come if it had not been for the Police? A. I did not.

CHARLES FITZGERALD . I went to this house on Friday night, to help Mrs. Collison; I know the prisoners -I saw them in the club-room that night, in conversation together; to the best of my recollection it was nine or ten o'clock - It was before the alarm; I should think it was about nine - there were several others in the room in conversation with the prisoners also.

Q. Did you afterwards go into the club-room, before you heard the alarm, and after you had seen the prisoners there? A. Yes, Blacket was there then, but Cohen was not - that might be about half-past nine o'clock; I heard Mrs. Collison give the alarm about ten o'clock, and saw Blacket holding her - I did not see any body go out of the room then; I afterwards went into her bed-room, and found the things in disorder.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you related to the last witness? A. She is my mother - I am not a waiter there; I merely went over, being a neighbour: the regular waiter's name is Richard - he was attending on the club-room all the evening, backwards and forwards; I did not serve Cohen - if he was served with any thing it must have been by the regular waiter; he is not here - I do not know that he is ill; Cohen declared at the office that he was not in the house - I did not notice what waistcoat he had on; he had a black cravat, to the best of my recollection, but I cannot swear that - I will not swear it was not white.

ELIZABETH WALKER . I am the prosecutrix's sister. -I was at the bar on Friday night, and remember her giving an alarm; at the time she gave the alarm I saw Cohen come down stairs - I am sure of him; he looked at the clock as he went out, which gave me an opportunity of seeing his face - I found a key outside the bed-room door, and gave it to the Policeman.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you never go by any other name? A. No - I was married at Whitechapel church, to Robert Walker, and never went by any other name - my maiden name was Barlow.

Q.Whoever the man was, he took some time to look at the clock? A. He made a full stop.

Q. And deliberately looked up at the clock? A. Yes- Mrs. Fitzgerald stood by my side at the bar at the time, but my face was towards him.

Q. If she has sworn he went so swift by her she could not see whether he had a white or black cravat, she must have made a mistake? A. Yes - I was never in a Court of Justice before; I went to Collison's to take some caps home; I said at the office that the man made a full stop and looked at the clock - there were different people in the public-house, outside the door and inside; I cannot swear what coloured cravat Cohen had on.

Q. He made a very full stop at the clock? A. No, he passed and put his head up; I had seen him in the same dress the night before, in my sister's club-room.

Cohen's Defence. On Friday evening, the 5th of August, in consequence of an indisposition, I did not leave home till after four o'clock; I then went to Charles Atkins', in Green-street, drank tea with him, and remained till after eight - I walked with him to London-bridge, then went down High-street, to the end of Dover-road, where we met two ladies of his acquaintance, but they are now in the country; we then proceeded down the Borough, to the end of Princes-street - I bade him good night, went home to supper, and was in bed at half-past ten o'clock, or from that to eleven.

CHARLES ATKINS . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in

Green-street, Blackfriars-road. On Friday, the 5th of August, Cohen came to my lodging, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; he did not appear in good health - he took tea with me, and staid till eight o'clock; I then went out with him - we walked through various streets, and met two young women who I knew; I have not heard the defence he has made - I attended at the Police-office, ready to state this; he left me as near ten o'clock as I can guess, at the corner of Princes-street, in the London-road, which is one hundred yards or so from his home; he lived at No. 23. Pitt-street, Prospect-place - I think the clock had struck ten: the females we met are gone to Brighton.

COURT. Q. What sort of a night was it? A. It rained while we were out, about nine o'clock: it was fine when I parted with him; I cannot say whether he had a white or a black cravat - I was with him all the evening.

MARGARET HILL . On Friday, the 5th of August, the prisoner Cohen lodged with me, in Pitt-street, near the Elephant and Castle - he had lodged with me for three years; he was not in good health on the 5th of August - he came home on that night just after the clock struck ten, and was in bed before eleven o'clock; I had been at home all the evening - I attended to state this to the Magistrate.

COURT. Q. How far do you live from the White Hart? A. I understand it is between four and five miles, but I do not know the house; he bore a very good character indeed while he lodged with me - I am quite sure of that.

A JUROR. Pitt-street is in St. George's-fields.

HENRY MARQUARD . That is about two miles and a half from the White Hart.

GEORGE SEAMAN . I am a Policeman. I took Cohen on Saturday, the 6th of August, in the Commercial-road, just by the turnpike.

BLACKET - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

COHEN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.[Sept. 15.]

Reference Number: t18310908-16

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1545. WILLIAM ANDERSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Heath , on the 11th of September , at St. Anne, Westminster, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 2 shirts, value 1s., and 1 petticoat, value 6d. , his property.

GEORGE HEATH. I am a tallow-chandler , and live at No. 14, Great Chapel-street, Soho, in the parish of St. Anne - I occupy the second floor front room; the landlord does not live in the house - it is let out to different persons; I, my wife, and four children live in my apartment. When I went to bed on Saturday night, the 10th of September, the room door was shut, but not locked - there is but one door; it opens on the staircase - about six o'clock on the Sunday morning I was awoke by my wife running into the room; she called out, "Good G-d! you have let somebody rob the room;" I immediately jumped out of bed, ran down stairs partly dressed, and found the prisoner in custody in the yard of the house - Edgcomb was with him; my wife, who was there, gave me a bundle of things, which the Policeman has got.

JAMES EDGCOMB . I occupy the shop and two parlours on the ground floor of this house. On Sunday morning, the 11th of September, about a quarter before six o'clock, I heard somebody open the street door, and go up stairs - in about ten minutes I heard some person coming down again; I went out, and met the prisoner in the passage, with a bundle under his arm - he ran into the yard, and then into the water-closet, with the bundle, and pulled the door after him; I pulled it open, collared him, pulled him out, took the bundle from him, and gave it to Mrs. Heath - I opened it to see the contents; there was a coat, waistcoat, trousers, three shirts, and other things - he begged me to let him go, which I did; he stood a little while, and then slipped out at the street door - he said if I would let him go he never would do the like any more; I had never seen him before - we went to the street door; the Policeman ran, and caught him - I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS ELKINGTON . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner in King's-court, at the corner of Carlile-street, about twenty yards from Heath's - the prosecutor gave me the bundle.

JAMES EDGCOME . This is the bundle I took from the prisoner.

GEORGE HEATH . I can swear to all these things except the petticoat - I know this shirt to be mine, and the coat; I had pulled it off on Saturday night, when I went to bed, and put it across a chair - my wife had been called up, between two and half-past two, to the apartment of another lodger, where a death happened; she is not here- I was awake when she got up; she shut the door when she went out, and I was out of bed just before day-light, as the baby I had in bed with me cried - I went on the stairs, and called my wife to fetch it; I came back, and when she went out of the room with the child I shout the door after her - I went to sleep, and knew nothing more till I awoke; I cannot say that the things were safe when I shut the door the last time - I missed them when the alarm was given, and when I got down stairs they were put into my hands; the prisoner fell on his knees, and begged me to let him go - my wife did not come up stairs, after taking the baby, till she came to alarm me; she had been down in Edgcomb's room.

Prisoner. I asked you to let me go. Witness. Yes, but I did not, the women let you go - the house was all in confusion, and one of the women certainly helped him to get out.

JAMES EDGCOME re-examined. The prosecutor's wife was in my room from half-past two o'clock till she went to call her husband, except when she went to fetch the baby - one of my children died that morning; she fetched her baby, and I do not recollect her leaving the room afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence, (written). I have always lived by industry, and have lived in the parish of St. Martin above twenty years, and part of that time as housekeeper, carrying on business as a working-jeweller, working for some of the first shops in London, supporting a wife and a large family; but by losses and misfortune failed. I have been working since as a journeyman for many respectable masters, and latterly with Mr. Rayner, of Union-street, Blackfriars-road, who is ready, at any time, to take me into his employ, should your mercy be extended to me by your verdict. I have only to assure you, that going towards the prosecutor's house I saw a man come out, and seeing the door nearly open, and wanting to go to the yard, I went in - I was followed by a woman and a man to the privy, when they laid hold of me, and accused me of taking some clothes, which were

shown by the woman. I did not go up stairs - the prosecutor was called down; I told him I did not know that I had done any thing wrong, that I was intoxicated, and hoped he would let me go, which he did; I was then pushed out into the street - I was walking away towards my home, reflecting on the impropriety of my going in, when the Policeman stopped me, and took me to the station-house - he went back, and compelled the prosecutor to come against me. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I throw myself entirely on the mercy and consideration of the Court, having a wife and three children to support.

[Sept. 15.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 48.

Reference Number: t18310908-17

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1546. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Brown , on the 22nd of August , at St. Margaret, Westminster, and stealing therein 1 handkerchief, value 5s.; 24 half-crowns, 40 shillings, 20 sixpences, and 12 pence , his property.

WILLIAM BROWN. I am a costermonger , and keep a horse and cart - I live in the Almonry, Westminster . On the 22nd of August I left my house, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, leaving nobody in it - my wife locked the door in my presence, and put the key into her pocket; every other part of the house was secure - I came back about a quarter-past twelve o'clock, and was the first who came back; upon going to take my harness up stairs, I found my door had been burst open -I shoved the room door open, and the first thing I found was the poker moved from the fire-place; I found two boxes broken open, but nothing was taken from them - I went to a third box, which was broken open, and missed 5l. 11s.; I missed nothing but money then, but in an hour afterwards I missed a silk handkerchief, with my own name marked on it - I kept all quiet, and on Sunday, the 27th, I saw that handkerchief on Charlotte Andrews' neck, in Pye-street; she is not here - I called her husband aside, and told him if it was mine how it was marked; the account she gave of it induced me to make inquiry of Mary Ann Newland - the prisoner and I were brought up children together; I took him into custody on the 30th or 31st - I could not find him before; when I found him I said, " Thomas Smith , I want you, you have been and robbed me - how came you to give my handkerchief away?" he said, "I gave your handkerchief away, but I did not have your money;" he said he gave the handkerchief to Mary Newland, but he had none of the money.

Prisoner. I was in the way till Sunday. Witness. He was in the way till Sunday, the 27th, when I found my handkerchief, and then I could not find him.

MARY ANN NEWLAND . On Wednesday, the 22nd or 23rd of August, I was in Tothill-fields prison; the prisoner came down to me there, and gave me this handkerchief - he brought me a loaf and some butter.

Q. Were you acquainted with him before? A.Only by speaking to him, and civility - I had an old red handkerchief on my neck; he gave me this, and when I came out he asked me for it; I had sold it - he had not lent it to me.

Prisoner. I lent it to her till she came out - I had a red one of hers to wash, and gave it her to put on the while. Witness. Yes, but he gave me this one, and I sold it to Charlotte Andrews for 2s.

WILLIAM CLIFTON . I am a constable. I took this handkerchief from Charlotte Andrews , and have had it ever since.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON . I know the prisoner - he is of no trade; he lived with his mother - I lived at his mother's house; he came in in the morning of the 22nd of August, between eleven and twelve o'clock, with a great many shillings, sixpences, and half-crowns.

Prisoner. When the robbery was talked of, if she saw the money, she ought to have told Brown. Witness. I did not hear of the robbery till Sunday, then I told him; Brown's house is opposite to his mother's - the prisoner went out of the way on Sunday, and did not come home till he was apprehended; he had been at home till Sunday.

WILLIAM BROWN . This is my handkerchief; it is marked with my name, and No. 3 - my house is in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster; I kept the robbery secret till I found the handkerchief; two or three people came, and told me they had seen Andrews with it, both on Saturday and Sunday - they are my next door neighbours; I had told them of it, because I had desired them to look out after my place, but I told nobody else.

Prisoner's Defence. On Wednesday morning I bought the handkerchief for half a crown - I was intoxicated; I have known this young woman a long time - I went, and took her a loaf and some butter; I said, "The handkerchief on your neck is very dirty, take this, and I will get the other washed;" on Saturday I heard she had sold it - I am innocent of the charge.

[Sept. 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18310908-18

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1547. JAMES SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Cox , on the 2nd of September , at St. George , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 loaves of bread, value 8d.; 8 ozs. of butter, value 5d., and 5 shillings , his property.

THOMAS COX . I am a ballast-man , and live in King-street, Wapping. On the 2nd of September, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was coming home with two loaves of bread under my arm, and some butter on the top of them; I had had a little drop of beer, but could not say I was tipsy, nor very sober - I had had a heavy day's work; three of these chaps met me, and knocked me down - I did not know the other two; I had known the prisoner for twelve months, and have known his father and mother these fifteen years - I cannot say which of them knocked me down first, but he is the last man that knocked me down; they then took my money, and the bread and butter from me - I cannot say which of them it was, because they knocked me into the kennel; I had five shillings in my pocket - I am sure it was in my pocket when they knocked me down; I had seen it just as I left the public-house, not above two hundred perches from the spot - I had settled my wages there, and put the money into my waistcoat pocket; all the five shillings were taken - two of them went away; the prisoner stuck to me, and followed me; the Policeman saw him throw a stone at me - I had got up again, and was making my way home in gores of blood; the prisoner

followed me a second time, and knocked me down with a stone, which the officer, who took him, has got.

Q. Where did the stone strike you? A. I cannot say the exact spot, but my skull-bone was laid open; all the wounds now in my face were made that night by those persons - I have been in the London-hospital ever since, and have come from there now; I had nothing to lose when I was knocked down a second time; they must have knocked me down the first time with a stone, because I got two very heavy wounds in my chin; I had a half-crown and a shilling in my fob, they did not get that - I was sober enough to be certain of the prisoner.(The witness had two or three plasters on his face.)

WILLIAM CLAYTON . I am a Policeman. On the 2nd of September I was in King-street, and heard a cry of Police! I went and found the prosecutor laying on the ground - he got up and said he had been robbed and murdered; it was a dark night, and I could not see that he was hurt, but advised him to go home; he went along some distance before me - the prisoner came up to me, and wanted me to go and drink with him, which I refused; he said the prosecutor had given him twenty days just before, and asked me not to take notice of him if he shoved him down - I told him to go about his business, and presently I saw him shove him down in the gutter - he then stooped, as if to take up something; I heard a blow, and the old man fell down - I ran up to him; he was bleeding dreadfully - the prisoner was then gone; he came round the corner presently afterwards, and I took him - I found a large stone there, with blood on it -I took the prisoner, and found 3s. 51/2d. in money upon him, and a pocket-book.

[Sept. 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18310908-19

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1548. WILLIAM HOWE and ELIZABETH HOPKINS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Heather , on the 5th of August , at St. John, the Evangelist, Westminter, and stealing therein 1 pair of bracelets, value 3s.; 1 cross, value 4s.; 1 pencil-case, value 4s.; 1 shawl, value 4s.; 1 veil, value 5s.; 2 shifts, value 3s.; 2 collars, value 2s.; 2 shirts, value 4s.; 2 caps, value 5s., and 5 handkerchiefs, value 5s. , his property.

MARY ANN HEATHER . I am the wife of William Heather - we live at No. 19, Belvoir-terrace, Vauxhallbridge-road ; he rents the house. I went to bed about eleven o'clock on Friday, the 5th of August - every part of the house was fastened up, except the wash-house window, and that was shut up close, to the very top - it has no fastening nor shutter; it is a sash-window, and was put down quite close: there was a basket of linen and other property in the wash-house; I was awoke between two and three o'clock in the morning by a rumbling noise, such as pushing up a window would make - I got out of bed, and smelt a strong smell of grease burning; I went on the landing, and listened - I heard no more; the smell died away, and I went to bed again - I got up, and came down stairs between seven and eight o'clock, and discovered the wash-house window wide open - the top sash was down as low as it would come; there was sufficient room to admit a man - I directly missed from the basket of clothes, the shirts, shifts, collars, and other things; I missed out of the parlour, a veil, a shawl, and a little purse, with not less than fourteen silver pennies, of the reign of George the Third.

SARAH MORRIS. I am shopwoman to Mr. Brooks, hardwareman, Tothill-street, Westminster. On the 6th of August, about five o'clock in the morning, the prisoner Howe came to the shop, and produced fourteen silver pennies, which master bought of him - I have them here.

SARAH NEEDHAM . On the 19th of August Hopkins came to my house for a lodging, and offered me a duplicate - I put it away in my drawer, and on the Wednesday or Thursday she came and asked me to give it her, which I did; she gave it me for her lodging - she said it was the ticket of a shawl, but I did not read it; she gave it me again to take care of, and I gave the same ticket to Butler, the Policeman.

HENRY GIBSON . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have a shawl, which was pawned at our shop on the 20th of August, by a woman, whom I do not know; this is the duplicate I gave her (looking at one.)

THOMAS BUTLER . I am an officer. I got that duplicate from Mrs. Needham.

SARAH ANN SMITH . I live in Union-court, Westminster - I did live with my mother in the Almonry. The prisoners lodged at my mother's for about a fortnight - they lived together, and while they lodged there I found a veil down in the privy, rather among the soil, as if it had been thrown down; I gave it to my mother.

- SMITH. The prisoners lodged at my house together - some nights at my house, and some at other houses; while they were at my house I saw a veil in my own room, and asked Howe what that veil did there - I said I did not like to see such a thing in my house; I told him to take it out, and he did so - my little girl afterwards brought it to me out of the privy; it was the same - I kept it about a week, and gave it to the prosecutrix; I am sure I gave her the same as my daughter gave me; I first saw it a week or nine days before I gave it to her.

MARY ANN HEATHER . Mrs. Smith gave me a veil on the 25th of August, about twenty days after the robbery; I gave it to Butler - (looking at it) this is it; it was taken out of the parlour with this shawl - they were folded up together; I cannot identify the pennies, but it is about the number I had.

THOMAS BUTLER . I am a Policeman. Mrs. Heather gave me that veil; I have had it ever since - the house is in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster.

Howe's Defence. I was going down Strutton-ground, and picked up this property; a veil was with it, but it was a different colour to that one altogether - I went and sold the penny-pieces for 14d. or 1s., I am not certain which.

Hopkins' Defence. I bought the ticket of the shawl, which I left with the witness for a night's lodging.

HOWE. - GUILTY DEATH .

HOPKINS. NOT GUILTY .[Sept. 16.]

Reference Number: t18310908-20

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1549. HANNAH CREED was indicted for feloniously

breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Davis , on the 5th of September , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, and stealing therein 2 half-sovereigns, 1 crown, 2 half-crowns, 9 shillings, and one 5l. Bank note, her property ; against the Statute.

MARY DAVIS. I live at Nottingdale, in the parish of Kensington ; I do not know any other name to the parish. I lost this money on Tuesday morning, the 5th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock; I saw it safe on Saturday night; I was not out of the house from then till Monday morning - the money was in a little box in my bed-room, at the foot of the bed, with many more odd things; there were two half-sovereigns, a 5s. piece, two half-crowns, nine shillings, and a 5l. Bank note - I do not know the number of it; it had two or three names on the back of it, but I do not know the names - I missed it on Tuesday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock; I know the prisoner - she has been in my house several times; she saw me receive the 5l. note, and said at the time, "I wish this was mine" - I said, "I must save it to buy some more pigs;" I had sold my pigs to a butcher- she is fourteen years old, and used to come to fetch errands for me; I went out on the Monday morning, and locked up every thing - there was a pane of glass broken large enough for her to get through - I suppose she got through there, if she stole the money.

CATHERINE GIBBONS . I know the prisoner. On Monday, between ten and eleven o'clock, she came to me, and brought a 5l. Bank note; I looked at the back of it - there were two names on the back which I could not make out; she also brought two half-sovereigns, and 19s. in silver - there were two half-crowns and odd shillings, but I did not notice a crown-piece; she told me she was acquainted with several girls of the town, and they had made a gathering for her, that the 5l. note and halfsovereigns belonged to a girl of the town, named Sarah Cusa , and she was to give her a sovereign for getting the 5l. note changed - I advised her, whoever owned the note, to take it to them; she said she would take it to her in the evening - she gave it to me to take care of for her, and on Monday afternoon she came to me for a 5l. note, a half-sovereign, and 4s. or 5s., saying she was going to buy a new frock for herself; she afterwards brought me the 5l. note again, saying she could not see Cusa, and would I mind it for her - a young woman came and asked if I was minding a 5l. note for her; I said Yes - I told my father, and then as soon as the prisoner came and asked for some of the silver, I gave her all the money; I saw no more of her - the last time I gave her the 5l. note was on a Tuesday evening.

SELINA PONTZ . I know the prisoner - she came to me at Kensington on Tuesday night, and asked me to go with her to buy a frock in town; I went to town with her, in company with Conner, and she changed a 5l. note at a shop, for two shawls and a silk handkerchief; Conner took the change - we were coming back: I saw a Policeman - Conner said, "There are two Policemen coming - I am afraid you did not get this money honestly, and am afraid they will take me - I will chuck these three sovereigns away;" I saw him stoop, but do not know whether he threw them away - the prisoner afterwards said to him,"Why did you not give them to me, and I would have put them into my shoe?" he said, "If I had given them to you it would have been as bad as having them myself;" she cried, and said she should get murdered, for it had been given to her to get changed by Cusa - I went with her and her aunt that day, and bought a frock and some stockings.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I was present when the prisoner was taken up - she objected to walk with the Policeman; I walked with her, and said if she had stolen the money she had better own it.

ROBERT AUSTIN PYALL . I am a Policeman. I have a piece of cotton and one of the shawls which she bought, but I found no note nor money; I know Davis' house - it is in the parish of St. Mary Abbott's, Kensington.

Prisoner. I was driven to it by distress - my father turned me out of doors.

Two witnesses deposed to the prisoner's good character, and represented that she had been cruelly treated by her father, and compelled to remain in the streets all night.

GUILTY of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering - DEATH . Aged 12.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of her tender years and destitute condition.

Reference Number: t18310908-21

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1550. GEORGE McLOCHLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 20 sovereigns, 3 half-sovereigns, 1 crown, 18 half-crowns, 81 shillings, 13 sixpences, two 10l. and one 5l. Bank note, the monies of Samuel Bennett , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL BENNETT . I am a corn-chandler , and live in the Hackney-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . On the 9th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in my shop, and sent my servant away with some goods - he was about thirty yards from the door; I went after him, to give him the bill, which he had left behind; I left my door open - I had seen the till about a minute before - I put some money into the bag, tied up the bag, and put it into the till, at the farthest part of it - when I came back I met two lads coming out of the shop; one of them said, "Have you got any oats?" I said Yes: he said, "How do you sell them?" I said 1s. a peck - I do not know who they were; I had never seen them before - I am quite sure I met them both at the door; they walked out, and I walked in - a lad, who stood in front of the door, said to me, "Have you lost any thing?" I had seen both the lads apparently come out of the shop - the door-way is very narrow, and there was a truss of hay at the door; I was absent more than a minute or a minute and a half; I went into the shop, in consequence of what the lad said, looked into my till, and the bag was gone - I was going down Thomas-street next morning, and met Mr. Flood, who gave me the bag, tied up as I had left it; I do not think it had been opened - the same money was in it - this is the bag (looking at it) - it contains twenty sovereigns, three half-sovereigns, a crown-piece, eighteen half-crowns, eighty-one shillings, thirteen sixpences, two 10l. and a 5l. note; they were all in the bag when Flood gave it to me - the notes are all endorsed.

EDWARD ALLEN . I am the son of Richard Allen, of Weymouth-terrace. On the 9th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing Bennett's shop, and saw the prisoner leaning over the counter; I did not know

him before - there was somebody with him, outside, apparently watching Mr. Bennett; I saw the prisoner go into the shop, lean over the counter, and draw the till out - I saw him take something out, but could not tell what it was- a boy about his own size was watching outside, watching Mr. Bennett, who had gone about thirty yards, to his man; after he came away from the counter the one outside went into the shop to him - Mr. Bennett came back; they came out, and the prisoner asked how he sold his oats - I told Mr. Bennett directly; he went and looked at his till; - I went after the boys; they walked as far as the first turning, then turned down Thomas-street, and began to run - I am quite sure the prisoner is the boy who went into the shop; I lost sight of him at the end of Thomas-street, leading into Kingsland-road, where there is a narrow passage.

Prisoner. Q. If I was the boy, why did you not detain me in the shop? A. I cannot say - I went into the shop after Mr. Bennett came back; I told him as soon as he returned.

JOHN FLOOD . I live in the Hackney-road. On the 9th of September, about ten o'clock at night, an alarm was given about somebody being in my garden - my wife went out, and I followed her; I found the prisoner there- my wife had hold of him; he was taken into custody -I searched the garden next morning, traced some footsteps, and at the end of them I found a bag, which I gave to Bennett with the money in it: he opened it in my presence - it contained two 10l., a 5l. note, some sovereigns, and silver; this was within five minutes after I found it - there was nobody in the garden but the prisoner and two Policemen; I found the bag about eight yards from where my wife was holding the prisoner - there were footsteps from the entrance of the garden, past the bag, down to where he was taken.

GEORGE HARRIS . I am a Policeman. On the 9th of September I was on duty near Hackney-road - there was an alarm of thieves being in Flood's garden; I went to the back of the garden, and saw the prisoner running away - he went back into Flood's garden; he broke through the fence - I followed, and there he was apprehended; I searched him, and found a small key on him - another Policeman was there, but nobody else; I saw him come out of the garden, and rush back again - Flood's wife caught hold of him.

Prisoner. The lady had hold of me before he came up; he was running after two more young men. Witness. I saw nobody but him.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday evening, about ten o'clock, I was going along - I wanted to ease myself; I went down a turning - I did not know it was a garden; I got over the pales, and seeing it was a garden was getting over the pales again, and the lady laid hold of me, saying I had come to steal the flowers.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Reference Number: t18310908-22

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1551. DANIEL PACE and JAMES ROGERS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Powell , on the 10th of September , at St. Anne, Westminster, and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 30s. , his property.

JAMES WARD . I am a Policeman. On Saturday night last I was going along Princes-street, Leicestersquare, about ten o'clock, near Mr. Powell's shop, and saw the two prisoners standing close to his window - I watched them for three or four minutes at the window; I did not see them talking together - I then heard the breaking of a pane of glass, and saw Pace snatch his hand from the window, and put something into his pocket; they both ran different ways - I followed, and canght Pace; I found this watch in his pocket - I never lost sight of him; as I was taking him back Rogers came up, and said he knew him - I immediately recognized him, and Pace said he was a d-d fool to come back; I took them both.

JAMES POWELL . I am a watchmaker , and live in Princes-street, Leicester-square, in the parish of St. Anne, Westminster . I was in my shop last Saturday night - the window was whole; I heard it break, and in two minutes Pace was brought to my shop by the Policeman, and the watch taken out of his pocket - it is mine; I had seen it in the window a moment before - I have not a doubt of it; I saw Rogers taken.

Pace. I know nothing of this lad.

Rogers' Defence. I know nothing of him, only I was standing at the shop at the time - I did not run away, but went into the shop with the people.

PACE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

ROGERS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.[September 16.]

Reference Number: t18310908-23

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1552. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Weatherley , on the 6th of September , at St. Mildred the Virgin and stealing therein 1 snuff-box, value 4l. 4s. , his property.

JAMES MITCHELL . I was in the Poultry on Tuesday, the 6th of September, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening; I could not, at that time, by the light of day, discern the features of a man's face; as I was passing I heard something fall, which appeared to sound like a box- I saw the prisoner throw something away; he was running, and several persons after him: while running he threw something away - I had not heard any thing before- I picked up what he threw down, and it proved to be a silver snuff-box, which I delivered to the officer at the watch-house; I do not know his name: I know the house of Mr. Weatherley; it was about forty yards from his house that the box was thrown down.

WILLIAM STOCKER . I was on duty as private-watchman of the ward of Cheap, opposite Mr. Weatherley's shop, in the Poultry, on the 6th of September - it was near halfpast eight o'clock in the evening; I heard some glass, break, and instantly saw the prisoner run - I followed him, and did not lose sight of him till I had him in custody: I took him at the corner of the Old Jewry, and took him to the watch-house; he was close to the prosecutor's window when I heard the glass break.

JOSEPH WEATHERLEY . On the night of the 6th of September, I was behind my counter in my shop, at my house in the Poultry - I heard a pane of glass violently broken in my shop window, and saw a man's hand thrust through

the opening of the broken glass; the hand drew out a silver snuff-box - the hand and the box were withdrawn; I saw the box in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards, produced by the constable of the night - it is worth 4l. 4s.

JAMES LEATT . I was constable of the night. On the night of the 6th of September I received this snuff-box from Mitchell.

MR. WEATHERLEY. This is my box; I know it by my own private-mark on it - my house is in the parish of St. Mildred the Virgin; I am quite sure that is the name it goes by - my shop door was shut, and I had some customers in my shop, looking at some articles at the time; the window was quite closed - he could not get any thing without breaking the glass.

Prisoner's Defence. It was distress drove me to it; I had no place to lie in - I had nothing to eat; no clothes and could get no ship - I had been fourteen years in His Majesty's service; I did not know what to do for the best - I throw myself on the mercy of the Court; I was at the Battle of Navarino - no one knows me, but the officers who are now with the squadron.

JURY to MR. WEATHERLEY. Q. Did you see the man's face? A. No - I saw nothing but the hand.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, believing the offence to have been committed under the pressure of distress.

Reference Number: t18310908-24

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bailey .

1553. JOSEPH FOSTER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Meads , on the 8th of June , and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 sovereigns , his monies.

JOSEPH MEADS . I am a lighterman - I have known the prisoner about twelve years. About the 8th of July I had come up with a barge, and went into a public-house, in Tothill-street , between ten and twelve o'clock in the day -I do not know the sign, for I cannot read; I had a pint of half-and-half, and took a sovereign out of my pocket instead of a shilling - I had two sovereigns and 13s.; I then pulled out my silver, and parted the sovereigns from it - I had the sovereings in my hand, and paid for the beer with silver, and while I was taking up the change, the prisoner who was in the house, snatched the two sovereigns out of my hand, and immediately ran away - he did not use any violence; I turned round to catch him, another one put his legs out, and threw me down - I received a blow on my head, and when I got up they were gone; I found the prisoner in about three hours, at his lodging - I went up to his room, and ten of them sat there drinking; I asked the prisoner for my money, and was immediately knocked down by a poker and broom - I went up again, and was served the same way; I went up a third time, and dragged the prisoner out of the room - we both fell down the stairs together; the people tried to make me loose him, and dragged me over the dairy-hole, but I held him till Thatcher took him; he got him to the station with a deal of trouble - only 4s. 111/2d. was found on him there, and a bad 5s. piece; he said if they would let him go for a quarter of an hour he would make up the money, but he had not got any about him - I had not been in the house above ten minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you not very intimate? A. No; I have drank in company where he has been, in the brickfields, eight or nine years ago - there was nobody round the table but him and three of his party; a woman was by the fire-place, three or four feet from the table - I did not agree to fight any body, nor give the prisoner the sovereigns as a stake; I was taken up, about three years ago, for an assault and acquitted, but was never accused of attempting to rob.

LOUISA JOHNSON . I am an unfortunate woman. I was at Smith's public-house, in Tothill-street, and saw Meads; there were three people there besides the prisoner; I saw two sovereigns and some silver in Meads' hand - I did not see the prisoner take it, but saw him run out; Meads attempted to follow, and somebody struck him by the side of his eye - I went out, and saw no more; Meads complained of being robbed of two sovereigns before he was knocked down.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you near enough to hear their conversation? A. I did not notice it; I heard nothing about a fight - I was three or four feet from the table; when the prisoner went away the prosecutor had the pot in his hand; I cannot say he was drinking - there were two men in the room besides Meads and the prisoner; they were not drinking with Meads; the landlord was not there- Meads had not been many minutes in the house; the other men were there before him - I went to Chelsea with Meads that day, to take the prisoner, and I heard him say at the watch-house that he took the money.

COURT. Q. What did you go to Chelsea for? A. To look after the prisoner, as we heard where he lived.

GEORGE THATCHER . I am a Policeman. On the 8th of June Meads gave the prisoner into my charge, in Queen'syard, Jews'-row, Chelsea; he said he had taken two sovereigns out of his hand at a public-house in Tothill-street; the prisoner denied it going to the watch-house - he said he never had them, not that they had been given to him to hold as a stake; the prosecutor asked how he could be so ungrateful after knowing him so many years, and he said,"I did not take the money;" he again charged him with it - the prisoner then said, "I did take it, and if you will allow me to go, I will restore it to you again;" I think he said in a quarter of an hour; I found 4s. 11d. on him, and a bad crown-piece - it was about five o'clock in the afternoon; the prosecutor was struggling with him in the yard when I took him - the prisoner was on the top of him, and there were a number of thieves and prostitutes there, assisting the prisoner, to prevent his being taken.

Prisoner's Defence. That woman was never in the room; the prosecutor was there, drinking, three or four hours before I went in - he was falling out with a gentleman I did not know, and he threw the money down to me to hold; he was going to fight the gentleman - he said, "If your friends are agreeable I will fight you directly for the money;" I said I did not wish any thing of the kind, for the prosecutor was too much in liquor; the young man then said, "Well, I will have nothing more to do with it;"

I then gave the gentleman his money - he threw it down, and put it to me again; I went about my business, and left the money on the table - he put his handkerchief up to his eye, and was crying drunk.

GEORGE MABER . I am waiter at the Chequers, where this happened, and have been there eight months. I was there the day this happened; the prosecutor was there nearly the whole day - he came in about nine o'clock, and left about an hour or an hour and a half after this happened: Johnson was never in the house - I have seen her several times: I supplied the prosecutor several times with drink - he was far from sober when he left; I heard him several times challenge a man to fight, and he put the money down on the table; he put above 3l. down at one time- it was two sovereigns and some silver; I was out of the room when he left - he, the prisoner, and the persons at the table were all chatting together; I should think there were ten or twelve persons drinking there while he was there - he came in before the prisoner.

COURT. Q. Was the prosecutor very drunk? A. He was - a man named Easy Chapman had been drinking with him; the prisoner was drinking by himself: the prosecutor went away between two and three o'clock - I have known the prisoner two or three years, by seeing him; he did not frequent the house; I lived seven years with Mr. Muston, of Grosvenor-place - he died, and the establishment was broken up; after leaving there I was thirty-two weeks in the hospital, and sixteen weeks before I went to the Chequers; I have never been in trouble myself.

GEORGE THATCHER . I apprehended the prisoner about five o'clock; he appeared as if he had been drinking a trifle, but was not drunk.

JURY. Q.Was any thing said at the station about the money being deposited as a stake? A. Never; after denying it, he said, "I took the money, and will return it to you;" I then would not allow the prosecutor to say any more to him.

GEORGE MABER re-examined. Q. How did you become acquainted with the prisoner? A. I was not acquainted with him; I have seen him at Chelsea, and considered that he was a bricklayer; I have seen him at buildings, and at public-houses, where he was drinking -I saw the prosecutor put his money down two or three times, but he took it up and put into his pocket again; I never saw it after he said it was lost.

Q. Did he say he had lost it before the prisoner went away? A. No; Chapman and another came into the room, and he gave charge of them too, but the Policeman would not take them.

Q.Did you receive the money for his liquor? A. No, he paid at the bar; I am positive Johnson was not there: he told me he had thrown two sovereigns down on the table, and the prisoner had taken them up and gone away with them; I had not been out of the room above ten minutes: the prisoner had left during that time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-25

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1552. DANIEL FIELD and MARY MEEKING were indicted for feloniously assaulting Duncan Gollan , on the 14th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 hat, value 20s.; 1 snuffbox, value 2s.; 1 watch-guard, value 5s.; 1 pocket-book, value 2s.; 8 sovereigns, 17 shillings, one 20l., and one 5l. Bank note , his property.

DUNGAN GOLLAN. I am a private gentleman , and live in Wormwood-street. On Sunday morning, the 14th of August, about half-past one o'clock, I was coming home through Rose-lane, Spitalfields , and saw about six persons standing on the pavement and in the road - to the best of my recollection there were two men and four women; the prisoner Field was one of them - it was not very dark, and there was a lamp at a short distance; I had never seen him before - as I was about to pass them the men seized me by the arms, forced me against the wall of a house, and kept me there; the others began to rifle my pockets - they took a black leather pocketbook out of my left-hand trousers pocket, containing a 20l., a 10l., and a 5l. Bank note, and a guard-chain from round my neck; my watch was not attached to it - it was made of silk, and had gold beads fixed to it; they took a snuff box, eight sovereigns, and sixteen or seventeen shillings, from my right-hand trousers pocket - I had accidentally torn one corner of the 10l. note off, but cannot say at which end; I folded the torn part in the rest, and had the whole note - my hat was also taken off; this did not last more than three or four minutes, I should think - I had drank a little rum-and-water after supper, but was perfectly sober; I called Murder! and Police! a person immediately put his hand before my mouth, and I could not halloo - they tore my coat with pulling my hands from holding my pocket; they dispersed when they had got my money - it happened near the Bishopsgate-street end of Rose-lane; I am certain Field is the man who held my left arm - I do not know Meeking; I have seen none of the property except the chain - no blows were struck.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you always sworn that Field held your arm? A. I swore he was one of the party that held me; I do not know that I mentioned my arm - I swore to him at the first examination; I gave the name of Donald McTavish at the first examination - I was not asked my name before I was sworn; having shortly come from Scotland, I thought my name being inserted in the reports might distress my friends -Mc Tavish was my mother's name; I gave my real name before my evidence was read over to me, and told the Magistrate my reason for giving the first name; I had been three days in London - I went straight home after the robbery; I went to no public-house, but after the robbery, as I was going home, one of the robbers followed me, and asked if I had any more money, as he wanted something to drink - I was in fear of my life at the moment, and glad to get away on any condition; I had a few halfpence left, and gave them to him - I should know him again, but have never seen him since; I gave nobody any thing else - I do not know the Queen's Head in Fashion-street.

Q. Did you not sit yourself down on the step of a door instead of going home? A. I did not, except at the time they robbed me; it happened about half-past one o'clock - I had dined at my lodging, in Wormwood-street, at five, and had a glass of warm rum-and-water, and perhaps a glass of porter; I left home at half-past nine - I am not well acquainted with town; I went to call on a Mr. Ross, who was ill - he lives near Finsbury-square;

I did not know his house - I was directed to a baker, who showed it to me; I cannot remember whether I drank any thing there - I swear I did not drink a bottle of wine there; I do not think I took any thing - I left about half-past eleven o'clock, and was going to a Mr. McDonald, in the Commercial-road, but could not find his house; I then returned directly home - I went to a tavern in Fenchurch-street before I went to Mr. Ross, and may have had two glasses of rum-and-water there: I could swear it was not three - I only paid 1s. there: I was at no other public-house - I drank nothing at Mr. Ross to the best of my recollection, and am sure I had no wine; I did not state at the office that I was intoxicated - I denied that I was; I swear I was not on the step of a door, except when these people were holding me.

COURT. Q.How many times were you at the office? A. Five - my examination was written down the last time; I gave my right name at the second examination.

MARIA JOHNSON . I live in Rose-lane. On Sunday morning, the 14th of August, I got out of bed to let a lodger in; I do not know what time it was - the prisoners lived three or four doors from me, on the other side of the way, in the same house, but I do not know that they live together; when I got up I saw five or six people standing over the way, and heard a gentleman ask for his hat - I saw the prisoners coming to the mob; they were about half a yard from the person who asked for his hat -I left them, went to bed, and next day, about one or two o'clock, I saw Meeking with a necklace round her neck: it was silk or hair - I saw beads on it; I have seen the guard - it was such a thing as that; I never saw her with such a thing before.

SARAH JOHNSON . I am the last witness' mother. I got up about half-past one or two o'clock, when this took place - I let the lodger in myself; my daughter was up- I saw both the prisoners in the street; there were four or five other people altogether - I saw them doing nothing but hanging over a man: I do not know who it was - I cannot say whether it was the prosecutor; they were stooping towards him - he was sitting on the step. as near as I could judge, while they were hanging over him.

MARY WARD . I saw these people in the street that night - the prisoner were among them; I think it was about half-past one o'clock - I cannot say what the people were doing: I was only looking through the window- there were a great many people there.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not the prisoner at some distance from the gentleman? A.There might be seven or eight people standing, and they were among them.

JOSEPH ALLEN . I live in Wentworth-street - I saw the people in Rose-lane, standing round a gentleman, who was rather intoxicated; I saw one lift up his arm - I do not know who it was, as it was dark; I did not see them take any thing - I saw one man with a brown guard-chain in his hand; it was just like the one produced - the gentleman had no bat on; he was asleep on the step of a door when I saw him - five or six were round him; he appeared to be asleep, because his hands were on his face, and his elbows on his knees; he made no noise, nor resistance - he appeared to be asleep - I was coming home, and met Reynolds; he and I went up, and saw this.

Cross-examined. Q. Did any body come up after you? A. No; I have known Field some years - I saw him come up backwards and forwards two or three times; I did not see him take any thing from the man, but we kept at a distance from them - I did not rouse the man, as there were five or six; they might have struck me, or something.

COURT. Q.Your only reason for saying he was asleep is because he sat with his hands on his face? A. Yes; I saw the female prisoner there.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . I am a butcher, and was with Allen - I know the prisoners well by sight; I saw them both there - there were four more men, but I saw no other woman; I did not see the transaction till I saw the prosecutor sitting on a step - he had no hat on; he was rather in liquor, I think, and asleep - these people were round him; I saw one of them take the guard off his neck while he sat in that state - he did not resist; he appeared fast asleep - I do not know who took it; the prisoners might be a yard or a yard and a half from the man who took it.

Cross-examined. Q. He made no sign that he knew they were taking the guard? No - they lifted his head back, and took the guard off, but he never spoke; he was between asleep and awake - Allen and I were about the same distance as the prisoners, but they were there before us; I cannot say whether Field took the guard off or not- I gave no alarm; I wanted to get home.

HENRY KENNY . On the night in question I was in Fashion-street, near Rose-lane; I heard a person cry Robbery! and Murder! I ran into Rose-lane, and saw the prosecutor standing up, with a parcel of women holding his hands; there were four or five women, I suppose - they were encouraging each other to take something out of his pocket; there was no man there that I particularly noticed at that moment, but there might have been; I do not know whether Meeking was there: when I got there I picked up a hat, and put it on the gentleman's head; it was laying in the kennel - I turned round, and saw a person very much like Field with a black pocket-book in his hand; he opened it, shook it, and said, "My friends, there arn't a bl-y mag in it;" he and another man enticed the prosecutor up to the top of Fashion-street, and asked him for something to drink; they brought him up to the door of a private house, and said, "This is a public-house, let us have something to drink;" the prosecutor put his hands into his pockets, and gave them three or four halfpence; I think it was the prisoner took them - they both said, "Good night, my friend;" I did not see them do any thing to his pockets.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure it was to two men he gave the halfpence? A. There were two men together - I was not at the Queen's Head; I swear I never said Field was not the man - he is as much like the man as I ever saw: I never said the prosecutor offered me 5l. to swear to Field - I said if I could swear to him the inspector would make it as good as 5l. to me; the inspector of the Police told me so.

CHARLES VANDERSTEIN . I know the prisoner Field - he came to me about a fornight ago last Saturday, and asked if I could change a 10l. note; I looked at it - it was very much rumpled: it was a Bank note, and the lefthand corner was torn off; I did not change it, thinking it

was not a good note; I returned it to him - I did not see the other part of it; this was after the 14th of August - I keep a public-house.

CHARLOTTE MOLLER . I live at the Black Swan, Rose-lane, which my father keeps. I saw Meeking in our taproom last Sunday three weeks - she had a chain, and asked if I would have it; I said Yes, and she gave it to me - I took it up stairs, and afterwards gave it to Attfield.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I received this chain from Moller.

DUNCAN GOLLAN. This is the guard I had on my neck- I was not on the steps till they forced me down against the wall - I was leaning backwards, not standing straight- the chain was taken from me after the pocket-book- I was kept at that time with my head back against the door; my hat was taken off before.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you swear that just previous to the chain being taken, you had not your elbows on your knees, and your hands on your face? A. No, I had not.

Meeking's Defence. I got up on Sunday morning between four and five o'clock, and picked up this chain at the corner of Catherine Wheel-alley, all over dirt - I did not think it of any value, and in the afternoon I asked the witness if she would have it, and I tore it of my neck.

FIELD - GUILTY. Aged 31.

MEEKING - GUILTY. Aged 31.

Of stealing from the person only . - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310908-26

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1554. FREDERICK FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 12 pairs of stockings, value 12s. , the goods of William Josiah Allen .

WILLIAM JOSIAH ALLEN . I am a hosier , and live at Holborn-bars . On the 16th of July these stockings hung within the door, secured by a small chain; I saw the prisoner make a snatch at them; the chain broke, and he ran away with them - I followed, and overtook him about fifty yards off, with them under his arm; he made no resistance.

DENNIS LEWIS . I am a watchman. I apprehended the prisoner; I saw Mr. Allen take the stockings from under his arm - he said nothing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned up a street, and a man threw these stockings down; I picked them up, and was accused of taking them.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-27

1555. ELIZABETH GURNETT was indicted for that she, on the 5th of September , maliciously and feloniously did lead and take away a certain female child, named Jane Sarah Mouatt , about the age of two years, with intent to deprive John Mouatt and Jane Mouatt , the parents, of the possession of the said child , against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, stating her intent to be to steal 1 frock, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 1 pair of socks, value 3d., and 1 pair of half-boots, value 1s., the goods of John Mouatt.

JOHN MOUATT . My wife's name is Jane. I live in Sparrow-corner ; our daughter Jane Sarah is just turned two years old - she used to walk about before the door; I saw her about nine o'clock in the morning of the 5th of September, when I went out - I returned about halfpast five; she was then gone, and had been missing some hours - she was dressed as a poor tradesman's child ; I found her in about ten minutes, at the watch-house in Leadenhall leather market - the prisoner, who was a stranger, was in custody there; the child was clothed as she was in the morning - the prisoner said to me, "You are a cork-cutter, are you not?" - I said I should have nothing to say to her; I left her there, and took my child home - it had received no injury; she had once before been found at the top of the Minories - she had on a frock, petticoat, shift, stockings, and half-boots.

THOMAS BROWN . I sweep a crossing by the East India House. On the 5th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner with a child about two years old; it was crying - it struck me, from its appearance, that it did not belong to her; I said,"My good woman, where are you going with that child?"- she said, "What is that to you? mind your own business;" I said I considered it my business, as I was confident it did not belong to her - she said it did; the child could not talk to be understood - I said I was fully confident, from its respectable appearance, that it did not; I took it up in my arms - she said if I offered to take her child away she would be d-d if she would not split my nose; I then applied to Drinkwater, and gave her in charge - she was taken to the watch-house with the child- I afterwards saw the father returning home with it, and told him what had happened; the child was bathed in tears when I saw it.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am one of the City Police. Brown came to me at the corner of Bishopsgate-street, and I went and found the prisoner sitting on the step of a door, with the child sitting by her side; I asked whose child it was - she said it was her own; I told her to get up, and said I should not let her go, as I was not satisfied about it - she then said it was not her's, but a neighbour's; I asked her the name of the parents, at the watch-house -she said the child's name was Billy Atkinson, that the father was in trouble, and the mother had been put to bed eight or nine hours ago - that the parents lived in a court opposite Bishop's gin-shop, Rosemary-lane; I thought from its appearance that it did not belong to her.

THOMAS SINDRY. I am beadle of the parish. I heard the prisoner give the account of the child as Drinkwater has stated; I went to a court opposite a gin-shop, in Rosemary-lane, but could find nobody named Atkinson - the prisoner did not say where she herself lived; I made inquiry, and found out the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to the Virginia coffee-house, and saw the child at the top of the Minories, crying; I took hold of her by the hand, and was taking it, not with intent to steal it, for I could not keep myself; I meant to take it with me as far as the coffee-house, and come back again, but was detected by Drinkwater, who took me to the watch-house, and, being a little intoxicated, I gave him a little abusive language.

THOMAS BROWN. When I saw her she appeared rather in liquor, but not insensible, far from it.

JANE MOUATT . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw my child safe about one o'clock, sitting on the step of a neighbour's door, about three doors off; she was very

well known by the neighbour's - if inquiry had been made, there would be no difficulty in knowing who she was.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . She was certainly a little in liquor, but knew what she was about.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-28

1556. CHARLES POWELL was indicted for stealing on the 11th of August , 60 yards of woollen cloth, value 50l. , the goods of Edward Smith .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating it to be the goods of James Phillimore Hicks and another.

EDWARD SMITH . I am a cloth-factor , and live at Walcot-place, Lambeth. On the 10th of August I gave the prisoner's brother, who was my servant, an order to receive these goods from Hicks, Brothers and Co., of Basinghall-street, and to take them to Mr. Thompson's, Frith-street, Soho - it was not to be received by the prisoner.

Q. You state in your deposition, you gave the order to Richard, for the prisoner to receive the goods? A. No -Richard was to receive them and take them there; he could not go himself, and sent the prisoner.

WILLIAM HARDWICK . I live with John Phillimore Hicks, Brothers, and Co., Basinghall-street. On the 10th of August Mr. Smith purchased these sixty yards of cloth of them - it was worth 50l. - an invoice was delivered to him at that time; he said he should send his porter for them on the following morning - on the 11th the prisoner came, and produced an order written by "Richard Powell, per procuration of Edward Smith," for the delivery of the goods; I have not got the order - I delivered them to him, in consequence of the order he produced - I never saw him before; I am quite certain of him - I was present while he packed them up, which was for about five minutes; I saw him again at the Mansion-house in about a fortnight - I have not seen the cloth since.

RICHARD HARRIS . I am foreman to Mr. Thompson, of Frith-street. This cloth never came there; if it had I must have seen it.

RICHARD POWELL . I am the prisoner's brother, and was in Mr. Smith's employ - I had left him about three weeks previous to this. He gave me a verbal order to receive three ends of cloth from Hicks and Co., and on the morning of the 11th of August, I had to go to Paddington with my uncle, and thought I would leave it till the afternoon; at dinner time I was sent for to Mr. Fox's, in Basinghall-street, as his man was taken ill - I met my brother in the court, and asked him to go for the cloth; he came to Fox, and I wrote him an order in pencil to Hicks and Co., to deliver the cloth; I do not know what became of it - I did not see it in his possession.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-29

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1557. GEORGE THOMAS ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , 4 bird-cages, value 4s. , the goods of John Dove ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-30

1558. RICHARD BENDY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 1 half-crown , the money of George Daw .

LEWIS DATHIER. I am five years and a half old - I sometimes go to church, and can say the Lord's Prayer; my uncle, George Daw, keeps a pastry-cook's shop , in Wimpole-street . About three months ago the prisoner came and bought a bun - he gave 6d. to pay for it; I saw him take a half-crown out of the till, and he ran off with it, without waiting for his change - he was brought back afterwards.

GEORGE DAW . I keep a pastry-cook's shop, in Wimpole-street. On the 10th of June I heard my nephew scream out; I ran into the street, and saw the prisoner running - I called Stop thief! and he was taken; I had a half-crown and 6d. worth of copper in my till before, and I missed the half-crown.

JOHN LOCK . I am a Police-officer. I was on duty in Harley-street, and heard an alarm - I ran, and met the prisoner running; I took him, and in going to the station I passed the prosecutor's door - he charged him with having taken a half-crown, and this half-crown was brought to me by a boy, who said he had picked it up, but I do not think the prisoner heard that - I searched him, and found part of a bun in his hat.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-31

1559. JANE ROBERTSON and ANN MILTON were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , 26 yards of ribbon, value 12s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell , and Thomas Cross ; and that Ann Milton had before been convicted of felony.

JOHANNA DAY . I am an assistant to Messrs. George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross, haberdashers , of Old Compton-street . On the 1st of June the two prisoners came and asked me for some bonnet ribbons - I showed them some, but they did not like them; I then produced a basket of ribbons - they chose one, and told me to cut off two yards, which came to 6d.; they had but 51/2d. between them - they told me to put the money and the ribbon by, and they would call again for it; they then went out, and a young man went after them, but I did not know what for - I have since seen two pieces of ribbons, which are part of what had been in the basket; the shop-mark is on them - I had not sold either of them to the prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.How long was it before you saw them? A. Not an hour; there were some other customers in the shop; there might have been forty- I believe there were persons on the opposite side of the shop.

HENRY TOMLINSON POOLE . I am shopman to the prosecutors. I saw Robertson lay the corner of her shawl on the counter, where I saw a piece of pearl-white ribbon; she then drew her shawl off the counter, and I missed the ribbon at the same time - the prisoners then went out; I followed them out of the door - I there took hold of Robertson, and said she must come back; I did not charge her with any thing at that time - this piece of pearl-white ribbon was picked up in the kennel, about a yard from where she was; I then took hold of Milton, and this piece of green ribbon fell from under her arm - I saw the end of it under her arm, and the roll fell on the pavement; these ribbons have our shop-marks on them - I took the prisoners

to the passage, and Robertson went down on her knees; I think it was about twelve yards from the door that the green ribbon fell down.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not go into the street, and charge them with having taken the ribbon? A.No; Robertson did not throw open her shawl, and say, "I have no property of yours;" I am certain of that - I did not ask her for the length of white ribbon; I am not aware that I swore that before the Magistrate - this is my signature; I believe this deposition was read over to me, but it is not correctly taken - it is a very bad systemed office; Milton was about three yards from the door when the end of the ribbon was under her arm, and the roll in the street - the end of the shawl covered the pearl ribbon; it might fall on the counter, and be over the goods - Miss Day was directly before them.

COURT. Q.When the ribbon was picked up a yard from Robertson, was Milton as near to it as she was? A. No - if it had been swept down by the shawl it would have fallen in the shop, and it was picked up two yards out of the shop; the ribbon was taken up in their presence, and given to me before they were taken to the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS WILSON . I am an officer. I know Milton, the prisoner; I was present when she was tried in this Court in September, 1829 - I have a certificate of her conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office; I know she is the person - (read).

ROBERTSON - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

MILTON - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-32

1560. WILLIAM CONWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Dewhurst , from his person .

THOMAS DEWHURST. I live in Oxford-street, and am a woollen-draper . On the night of the 5th of June I was in Holborn , about nine o'clock, I felt a sudden twitch - I put my hand, and missed my handkerchief, I turned and saw the prisoner about one yard from me; he was the nearest person to me, he passed me, and I observed something under his coat - he turned up Red Lion-street; I gave notice to the first officer I saw; he was taken in my presence, and my handkerchief taken from him.

Prisoner. I was six yards from him. Witness. Not when I first turned round.

JOHN CARNEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the prosecutor's desire, and found this handkerchief on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a petition, pleading poverty. He received a good character, and a witness engaged to take him into his employ.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310908-33

1561. ELIZABETH GUNYON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 shawl, value 25s.; 1 veil, value 2s.; 1 piece of silk, value 6d.; 1 bag, value 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 necklace, value 3s., and 2 bracelets, value 5s. , the goods of Mary Butt .

MARY BUTT. I lodge in Broad-street, Golden-square ; I keep my boxes in the kitchen - I am in the habit of going out to work from eight o'clock in the morning till eight at night; the prisoner was in the habit of coming to work there. On Sunday the 17th of July, I missed these articles from my boxes - they were worth about 4l.; I saw some of them on the 19th of July, when I took the prisoner - she had been at the house the day before I missed my property.

FRANCIS GARVIL . I keep a shop, at No. 9, Moor-street, Soho. On the 8th or 9th of July the prisoner came and offered me this black veil, a shift, and a pair of stockings for sale - she asked 5s. for them; I gave her 4s. 6d.; she said they were her own - she came again in a few days, and I purchased a pink waistband ribbon and a piece of very old lace, for 1s. 3d. - that was before the 17th of July; I have the veil and the hand here.

ANN WEATS . I keep a second-hand clothes shop, at No. 19, Compton-street, Soho. The prisoner came on the 18th of July, about nine o'clock in the morning, and brought this old petticoat, a bag, and a waistband; she asked me 1s. for them, and I gave her 8d.

GEORGE HORMAN . I am in the employ of Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker, of Middlesex-hospital. I took in this gown of the prisoner on the 19th of July, for 5s. - she pawned this shawl, but I did not see it; these are the duplicates of the gown and shawl.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in custody on the 19th of July - I found this duplicate of the gown and this necklace, in her pocket, and 4s. 31/4d., which she said was part of the money for which she had disposed of the articles; in consequence of what she said I went to search for them, and found them exposed for sale.

MARY BUTT. These are my property - the prisoner had lived in service there about nine weeks; she had 2s. a week.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-34

1562. JOSEPH BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , from the person of Robert Samuel Palmer , 1 pocket-book, value 5s.; 1 bill of exchange, for payment of and value 460l., and 1 order, for payment of and value 40l. , his property.

ROBERT SAMUEL PALMER . On Monday, the 25th of July, I was in Compton-street , between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; my attention was called to the prisoner, and to the state of my pocket; I missed my pocket-book, and the prisoner was running down Greek-street - I pursued, calling Stop thief! and saw him throw my pocket-book down - it was picked up, and given to me - I had lost sight of him two or three seconds, after he threw down the pocket-book, while he turned the corner of the street, but I had such a view of him I have not the smallest doubt of him; I had a bill for 460l. in the pocket-book, and an order for 40l.

JOHN JOHNSON . On the 25th of July I was in Greek-street, and saw the prisoner in company with two other persons - before I got to Compton-street I saw the prisoner

with the tail of the prosecutor's coat in his hand, as he was crossing Greek-street, and with his other hand he drew a red pocket-book from the coat pocket; he walked up Greek-street, and then ran - I called the prosecutor's attention to the circumstance; I had lost sight of the prisoner, but I had taken particular notice of him, and I know he is the same person - I saw him taken; he might be out of my sight half a minute.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310908-35

1563. WILLIAM WELCH and FREDERICK PULLING were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 2 coats, value 2l. , the goods of Thomson Hankey , the younger.

THOMSON HANKEY. On the 8th of July I had two coats in my house at Hornsey ; I was absent that day, and on my return I heard of the coats having been stolen - I did not see the prisoners till next morning: these are the coats - they were kept in the hall, near the front door.

RICHARD STANTON. I am servant to the prosecutor. On the 8th of July I saw Welch walking down from the hall-door, with two coats on his arm - Pulling was outside the premises, twenty or thirty yards from the door, and could not see the coats hanging in the hall from where he stood; I went out at the gate, and saw the coats in the possession of Pulling, but I did not see Welch give them to him - there was a third person with them; I followed directly, and inquired what they had done with the coats -I had lost sight of them for about a minute and a half: I then saw Pulling with the coats, and the third man, who is not here; they ran, and I secured the two prisoners, and gave charge of them - I left the coats where they dropped them, outside the premises.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. How far were you from Welch when you first saw him? A.Between twenty and thirty yards; I was gathering some peas in the garden, and saw Welch coming from the hall door - there was a shrub between us, four or five feet high; when I saw Welch again the other man had the coats.

COURT. Q.Had you a view of the person carrying the coats, before the shrubs intercepted your sight? A. Yes, and then he passed nearer to me; it was Welch who was in the garden - I have no doubt about it: the man who got away was different in appearance.

JAMES HOBSON . I am coachman to the prosecutor. I have the coats, which I picked up outside the gates - they are my master's; I saw the prisoners after I took the coats up.

THOMAS FITCH . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WELCH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

PULLING - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-36

1564. MARY NEWMAN and ANN RICHARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , 2 hams, value 30s. , the goods of John Cantis .

JAMES RAPLEY . I am a Policeman. On the 21st of August I was passing the house of Mr. Cantis, in the Strand , and saw Newman, who is his servant , open the door, let out Richards, and close it again; Richards was carrying two hams under her left arm, and she had hold of her apron or gown - she turned up Ship-yard, and went on to Picket-street; I went up to her, and asked whose hams these were - she said she did not know; I asked where she was going to take them - she said to No. 1, Chapel-place, Duke-street, where she lived; I said she must know who they belonged to - she then said Mr. Cantis' servant had given them to her to take out and weigh; I said I believed it was all false, and I took her and the hams back to Mr. Cantis' shop - I knocked at the door; Newman opened it - I asked if Mr. Cantis was at home; she said No - I said I had brought the woman back who took out the two hams a little while ago, to know if it was all right; she said she knew nothing of the woman, except that she had brought the hams there to be weighed - I took Richards to Covent-garden watch-house; Mr. Cantis afterwards claimed the hams, and gave charge of Newman.

JOHN CANTIS . I am a ham-dealer . These hams are mine, I believe - I had a row of eight hams hanging up on the morning of the 21st of August; I went out that morning, and did not return till ten o'clock at night - Newman was my servant, but had no authority to part with any hams; the shop is shut during church time - the shopman was up stairs; the shop is opened on Sunday's, and provision is sold if any one wants it - Newman was servant of allwork.

Richards' Defence. I had Newman's child to nurse, and I went that morning to take it to her; she gave me the hams to take to my room till she called for them in the afternoon, to take them to some person who had bought them of her master.

Richards received a good character.

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-37

1565. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 1 order, for payment of and value 16l. , the property of Henry Fynes Clinton .

CATHERINE CLINTON . I am the wife of Henry Fynes Clinton - we live in Dean's-yard; the prisoner was in my husband's employ for fifteen months. On the 4th of August I delivered him a cheque for 16l., to take to the banker's, and get it changed; this is the cheque - he went away with it; I did not see him again till he was in custody about a week after.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Where was he to take this cheque? A. To Duckett's; he conducted himself well - we thought highly of him.

WILLIAM GEORGE LAMBERT . I am a butcher, and live in Abingdon-street. I have known the prisoner some time; I received this cheque from Bryan, and gave him 16l. for it - I paid it away in the course of business, and it came back to me; I have no doubt this is the cheque - here is my name on the back of it, but not in my writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Then how do you know it? A. I have not the least doubt of it; there is no mark of mine on it.

DANIEL BRYAN . I received this cheque from the prisoner last month, but I cannot tell the day, it was about ten o'clock in the morning; he told me to get it cashed for him at Mr. Lambert's - I went there, and got cash for it; the prisoner told me to go because he was busy, and he

would take it as a favour - I gave him the money I got for it.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A plasterer - the prisoner gave me this at the Crown, in Tufton-street.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner at his lodgings, in Vine-street, Westminster, on the 7th of August - he said he was very glad I had come for him, as he had come back on purpose to be taken; I found 1l. 16s. on him.

DANIEL BRYAN. I gave the prisoner the money at the Crown; I think the Crown is further from the prosecutor's than Mr. Lambert's is.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it in the same direction? A. No; he must have returned near Mr. Clinton's to have got to Mr. Lambert's.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-38

1566. WILLIAM STONEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 48 half-crowns, 100 shillings, and 40 sixpences , the monies of William Rigden , his master.

WILLIAM RIGDEN . I keep the Blue Boar, in King-street, Westminster . The prisoner was in my employ in March, 1830, and had been so for three years; I heard my wife give him some silver, and say, "I think here is 12l., go and get it changed for notes or gold;" he came to me, and said, "How much is there?" I said 12l., as I had just counted it - I saw it in his hand; I told him to go to Mr. Castle's, and get it changed; I never saw him again till he was in custody.

WILLIAM CASTLE. I gave the prisoner change for the silver - I think I gave him a 5l. note, and the rest in sovereigns.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-39

1567. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 1 tub, value 3s. 6d., and 1 bucket, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of our Sovereign Lord the King .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of John Wray , Esq.

3rd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of George Wood .

GEORGE HUTCHINSON . I am a Police-constable, and live at the station-house in White Hart-yard . On the morning of the 30th of August, about seven o'clock I was within a few yards of the station-house door, and saw the prisoner put this tub and bucket on a knot on his head - I knew them to belong to the Commissioners of the Metropolitan Police - George Wood is the serjeant who has charge of the house where they were.

Prisoner. Q.Where did you apprehend me? A.Nearly at the end of White Hart-yard - I had put the bucket into the tub the night before; you said Mrs. Jones gave you them to carry - you said you were going to take them to your lodgings, at No. 7, Clipston-street.

MARTHA COOPER . I live with my husband at the Police-station. These articles were under the care of George Wood , the serjeant - I had seen them safe at ten o'clock at night, standing in the cellar, full of water; I was up stairs that morning, and looked out of window - I saw the prisoner bring them out of the door on his head; he had come up a pair of stairs, gone along the passage, and gone out at the door.

Prisoner. It is very strange she could see me come out, and the man did not - there were eight or ten people repairing the road, and a person was obliged to go sideways. Witness. There were persons repairing the road - I saw him come out, and close the door too.

Prisoner's Defence. I have of late gone out portering; I was in business fourteen years, after leaving his Majesty's service - I never was on the premises at all.

GEORGE HUTCHINSON. I went to his lodgings, and there is a board up that he gets his living as a porter - his landlord said he had been there three weeks.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-40

1568. EDWARD RICE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 14 ozs. weight of rhubarb, value 20s.; 6 nutmegs, value 6d.; 1/2 oz. weight of mace, value 6d.; 1 oz. weight of cloves, value 3d.; 4 ozs. of pepper, value 1s.; 4 ozs. weight of gum, value 4d., and 7 quarts of brandy, value 20s. , the goods of the St. Katharine-dock Company .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of a certain person or persons unknown; - to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 54. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-41

1569. JOHN BARNING was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Robert Worthington , from his person .

ROBERT WORTHINGTON. I live in Gray's Inn-square , and am a conveyancer . On the 12th of July I was at the arch-way, going into South-square ; I heard an alarm, and missed my handkerchief - I saw it in the hands of Hutchinson, the officer who took the prisoner into custody.

JOSEPH HUTCHINSON . I am a porter of Gray's Inn, and live in Fulwood's-rents. On the evening of the 12th of July I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, under the arch-way, between Southsquare and Gray's Inn; I pursued, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and in the square I heard a cry of Stop thief! I stood a minute, a man ran and caught hold of me - I looked on the ground, and this handkerchief was by my side; I took it up and gave it to the gentleman.

JOSEPH HUTCHINSON. I am quite clear he took it - I have made inquiry, and his mother is a distressed widow.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-42

1570. ENOCH BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 9 pieces of mother-o'-pearl, value 4s., and 5 working tools, value 1s. , the goods of Louis Perrottet , his master.

LOUIS PERROTTET. The prisoner worked for me as a journeyman about two years, and left me about a fortnight before he was apprehended - he was then living in Tottenham-court-road; I went there with Andrews, the officer - we saw him; I told him I suspected he had some of my property, and we wanted to look at his premises - we found some of my things, and I selected what I could positively swear to; I found some pieces of mother-o'pearl, and some working tools; they were in my possession while he worked with me - part of them were locked up in a cupboard.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. He had been two years in your employ? A. Yes, and I employed him particularly in mother-o'-pearl turning; I never allowed him to take any turnery home to do - I never allowed him to take home two needle-books as patterns; if he had work of his own to do he would want such tools as these, but these fit my lathe - he had been working on his own account for about a fortnight; I had no quarrel with him about introducing another workman - I only said I should want a few more men; I employed the prisoner at weekly wages, and he was not to take work from any other person; he left as soon as he saw another man - he said, "That man will be likely to take bread from my mouth," and went away; I had employed the prisoner's brother about three weeks or a month, and then turned him away - the prisoner wanted his brother to be instructed at my shop; the prisoner was at work when we took him - I had sold him a watch for silver gilt - I had bought it as such; the gilt was nearly worn off, and he had it gilt again - I do not know that it turned out to be brass; I told him to give me my watch back, as he had not paid for it - we had no quarrel about it.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's lodging - I told him I had a search-warrant to search for property belonging to Mr. Perrottet, his master - he said, "I have no articles belonging to him;" these articles were then found - the prisoner said they were all his own, and part of the tools he had brought from Birmingham with him; there were a great many other things there.

MR. PERROTTET. I was in the habit of using these tools, and seeing them in my shop; these pieces of mother-o'-pearl were in a drawer, which I opened almost every day - one or two of these pieces have been worked upon; I helped to make part of this - this tool fits my lathe exactly; the prisoner had a lathe, but I did not try it to that.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you swear to these rough pieces of mother-o'-pearl? A. Yes, they have been more than two years in my drawer; these are tools commonly used - there is no mark on them; I know them by using them from time to time.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw any thing of this kind in his shop; I had been in business before I came from Birmingham - he allowed me to take those two needle-books home one night to forward them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-43

1571. JOHN HODGSON was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOSHUA DORSET JOSEPH MAYHEW . I am a solicitor , and have a partner. The prisoner was in our service, and was in the habit of receiving money for suits - he received a salary; a Mr. Lightfoot directed me to apply to a Mr. Taylor, living in Essex, for the payment of a sum of money; I told the prisoner to write for it - it was not paid, and a writ was issued; from that time I lost sight of it - the prisoner never accounted to me for a sum of money, which I ought to have received in the case of Mr. Tebby, an insolvent, and which ought to have come from Mr. Dance - it was 26l.; I had repeatedly directed the prisoner to apply for it; he made frivolous excuses about Mr. Dance, saying it was not convenient, and so on; I said if he did not pay I would move the Court against Mr. Dance - I think the prisoner then left my service; I did not go to Mr. Dance myself; Mr. Topp was the prisoner's friend - I gave the prisoner directions to apply to him for 9l. 7s., which was to be paid into Court; he said Mr. Topp would call, and desired me to pay it into Court for him - I then wrote to Mr. Topp, who called on me; the prisoner never accounted to me for the money he received from Mr. Topp.

JOHN BONIFACE . I am clerk to Humphreys and Porter, attornies, King's Arms-yard - they are agents to the Under-Sheriff of Essex. I was present when Mr. Humphreys drew a cheque, and handed it to the prisoner, in discharge of the debt and costs in the case of Lightfoot and Taylor; the prisoner applied for it on account of Messrs. Mayhew and Johnson - he gave a receipt, which I have here.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. That is more than eighteen months ago? A. Yes - I had not known him before, but I am certain of his person.

HENRY DANCE . I am provisional assignee of the Insolvent Debtors' Court. I paid 26l. by a cheque, in the matter of Tebby, an insolvent, in exchange for the receipt of the assignee, which was brought to me by some person, but I cannot say who - I think I have seen the prisoner.

PHILIP SELBY . I am a Sheriff's-officer. In January, 1830, I had an execution against the prisoner's goods; I received a cheque of Mr. Dance's, and gave the prisoner my cheque for the balance; this is what I received from the prisoner - it has my name on it.

JOHN TOPP . I keep the Eel Pie public-house, Surreycanal. I employed Messrs. Mayhew and Johnson as my solicitors; I know the prisoner very well - he called on me for 7l. to pay into Court, on the 20th of January, 1830- I gave him 4l. first, and then I wanted change for a 50l. note; I gave the prisoner 3l. afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Have you known him some time? A. Yes - I was a client of the prisoner's before 1829, and owed him 20l. for business on his own account - I took no receipt of him for this 4l.; I had paid him money two or three times - I have a memorandum of this, which I got from my wife; I did not employ the prisoner in this business of the 7l. - Mr. Mayhew did; the prisoner introduced me to the prosecutors, and they were my attornies in this business; I cannot tell whether the prisoner is an attorney at all.

COURT. Q. You were indebted to the prisoner 20l.? A. Yes - the prisoner did not apply to me generally for money, but for money for Messrs. Mayhew and Johnson, to be paid into Court - I am still in the prisoner's debt more than 7l.

JOSEPH LOCK . I am cashier in the prosecutor's office, and have been so for seventeen years. It is the prisoner's duty always to account to me for money he received - he never accounted to me for 23l. 6s. received in the matter of Taylor. I never received from him a cheque of 26l. received from Mr. Dance, nor the 7l. from Mr. Topp - he never accounted to me for these monies; it was certainly his duty to have accounted to me for them all.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prisoner been engaged there? A. I think from February 1829; he had a salary of 150l. a year, with an allowance of 10l. for errors, by which losses might accrue to himself; that is the usual course in the common law department - I do not know of the prisoner having agreed with the prosecutors to allow him a third of any business he brought to the office; but it was the custom if a clerk introduced any business, to allow him a gratuity, which was generally at the rate of about a third; the prisoner introduced several clients - I know of no engagement but the regular rule of the office - the prisoner left about March, 1830; his salary was paid up to the 27th of February, 1830, and after that his attendance at the office was very irregular - there was no ascertained sum of money due to him, (at the time he left,) for business he had introduced; I believe something was said about some money - I cannot tell whether there was eleven months of the 10l. a year due to him; I have heard of a notice to produce a bond, executed by Mr. Cuer and the prisoner; but I have not brought it - I saw the bond this morning in Mr. Johnson's hand; I know Mr. Cuer - the prisoner left his disbursement-book behind him, when he went away; I have heard that he went into the service of Mr. Martin, in Red Lion-square - I understood he was taken in his office; I had seen him three or four times after he left the prosecutors -Mr. Cuer came to the office several times; Mr. Mayhew might have been there sometimes - but I do not recollect it; I remember going into the prisoner's accounts with Mr. Cuer after the prisoner had left.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. MAYHEW. Q. Is this receipt the prisoner's writing? A. I believe it is - I spoke to him about this money of Topp's, and he admitted having received it; I said Mr. Topp had been and said he had paid him 7l., which was to be paid into Court off the 9l. 7s.; I had spoken to him about Mr. Topp's money before, and he said he had not got it; that caused me to write to Mr. Topp.

COURT. Q. When was it you spoke to the prisoner? A. I had spoken to him repeatedly after the 10th of January, 1829, and then after Mr. Topp had been - I said he had been, and said he had paid the prisoner, and he said he had - I kept speaking to him about Mr. Dance's money up to the very hour he left; and he always declared he had not paid it - the 26l. was on account of Tebby's insolvency; I directed the prisoner to apply for it, on my account, as I had accounted to my client at Coventry for it, as received by me - I never allowed the prisoner to retain 26l. from the 10th of July to the middle of March; I called on Mr. Cuer to make good the prisoner's deficiencies - I suppose it was eight or nine months after that before I took steps to prosecute him, as I discovered he had kept counsel fees and other things; I then said "Let me see every thing you have done, and we will see what can be done;" he discovered every thing except the 26l. and the 23l. 6s. - I discovered that his security was not available to make good his deficiencies after seven or eight months.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find out that before you preferred the indictment against the prisoner? A. No, I think afterwards - I cannot tell whether I had any bills of exchange from Mr. Cuer, but I believe there were; I took an assignment of Mr. Cuer's equity of redemption, and I released him from any demand we might have upon him under that bond, but I afterwards refused to give up the bond - I have it still, in case there should be any further demand; I make no doubt but the 7l. was included in the account with Mr. Cuer, and the 23l. 6s. and the 26l. - I did not take the prisoner before a Magistrate; I did not tell a person who applied to know the charge, that if the law would not tell him I would not; I said the indictment would tell the charge before the Grand Jury, because they were sitting at the time: I recollect a friend of the prisoner's applying to me on the subject of this charge, and I recollect saying that the premiums which had been assigned to me had been put up for sale, and they would not pay the money they were mortgaged for; that was after I had preferred the indictment - I had no conversation with any one before; I discovered the embezzlement of the 23l. 6s. when my client came to me, which was, I think, six or seven months after the prisoner left me - I did not then know where the prisoner lived; I thought he was in no service; I went to Mr. Martin's, in Fitzroy-street, and there I found the prisoner - I never went to Mr. Martin's, in Red Lion-square; I asked Mr. Lock where the prisoner was, and he said he was in Mr. Martin's employ - I thought he had gone there, as he was in the habit of doing, to make up some work; I had not then discovered the whole of these deficiences, only monies that I said I would forgive if he made discoveries; I cannot think Mr. Martin would allow him to stay there after what I told him.

The bond was here put in and read, and the agreement for the 10l.

NOT GUILTY .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner, on which Mr. Phillips declined to offer any evidence.

Reference Number: t18310908-44

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1572. ANN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1 glass sugar-bason, value 10s.; 2 sheets, value 10s.; 3 stew-pans, value 7s.; 1 liquor-frame, value 5s.; 2 decanters, value 4s.; 1 pair of glass-salts, value 2s.; 1 counterpane, value 4s., and 1 pillow, value 1s. , the goods of Henry Dunbar Tolley , his master.

HENRY DUNBAR TOLLEY. The prisoner lived as cook in my house between two and three months - it is a hired furnished house; I was responsible for the furniture: I gave the prisoner notice to quit my service about three weeks or a month before the 1st of August - she left on that day, and when I was about dismissing her I found these articles missing - I accused her of it; she at first denied it, but afterwards confessed she had given them to a pawnbroker, and gave me the duplicate.

HENRY HILLSWORTH . I am shopman to Messrs. Matthews and Philmore, pawnbrokers. I have a stew-pan and liquor-frame, a pair of salts, a sheet, a sugar-bason and cover, and two decanters, pawned by the prisoner, at different times.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a pawnbroker. I have two stew-pans, pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM GORDON . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; the prosecutor gave me all these duplicates, but one for a sheet, which was found in her bed-room.

H. D. TOLLEY, These sugar-tongs and the sheets are mine.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I meant to get them out when I received my wages.

GUILTY . Aged 53. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-45

1573. GEORGE NEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Francis Crew , from his person .

FRANCIS CREW . I am a bookseller . I was in Piccadilly about nine o'clock in the evening on the 4th of August; I felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket - I turned, and saw the prisoner close to me; he dropped my handkerchief immediately, and I took him - I do not think there was any one with him.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. It was rather dark? A. Not at that time; his hand was close to my pocket, and I saw the handkerchief drop from his hand - he could not have not away from me.

JURY to MR. CREW. Q. Was there any person near you? A. No one so near as the prisoner, and I saw the handkerchief drop from his hand; I felt it drawn from me - it was impossible for any other person to do it.

WILLIAM SIBLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have had the handkerchief ever since.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-46

1574. JOHN DAVIS and GEORGE WATSON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , 1 writingdesk, value 9s. , the goods of James Ward .

JOHN THOMAS CATHOLIC. I am a mathematical-case maker. On the 6th of August, a little after two o'clock, I saw the two prisoners in company together - I watched them, and saw Davis go to Mr. Ward's shop, on Back-hill , and come back; he went a second time, and came back again - he went a third time, covered the writing-desk over, which was on the outside of the shop, and took it away - Watson was at that time at the corner of Christopher-street, and Davis gave him the desk; I saw this out of a window; I went down, and took Watson with the desk, which he threw down; Davis walked away - I called Stop thief! and he was taken.

JAMES WARD . I was not at home: I returned just as the prisoners were taken - this is my desk.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS. I am an officer, and took the prisoners.

Watson put in a written Defence, stating that the desk was never in his possession, and that he had no knowledge of Davis.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

WATSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-47

1575. JANE FREEMAN and ANN ARTHUR were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 3l. 13s.; 1 key, value 10s.; 1 chain, value 6d., and 12 shillings, the property of James Cooper , from his person .

JAMES COOPER . I keep an eating-house . On the 21st of July I had been to visit a friend; I came in an omnibus, and met the prisoners between ten and twelve o'clock, in Chiswell-street - I was very drunk; they asked me for something to drink, with which I foolishly complied, and I believe I might take a glass myself; I became so insensible that I recollect no more till the next morning, when the officer brought my watch.

MATTHEW PEAK . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prosecutor very much in liquor, and Arthur was in company with him; that was from half-past twelve o'clock to half-past one - they were drinking a bottle of ginger-beer: I saw something white in Freeman's hand - I took hold of it: she got from me, got to a form, and threw herself on it - she got up, and said, "Now, what do you want with me?" I saw the watch on the form - I found 5s. 6d. on Arthur, and 6s. 5d. on Freeman.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-48

1576. GEORGE GUNNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , 66 lbs. weight of tin, value 40s. , the goods of Charles Mansfield .

GEORGE BAKER . I am in the employ of Mr. Charles Mansfield , a plumber , who lives in Gray's Inn-lane . On the 2nd of August I heard some footsteps in the front part of our shop - I came into the street, and saw the prisoner about twenty yards from our house, in the street; I looked into the shop, and missed a piece of tin: I followed the prisoner, and saw him carrying something before him - I took him with this piece of tin, which is my master's.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-49

1577. MARGARET GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing on the 4th of August , 1 gown, value 4s., and 2 shifts, value 4s. , the goods of Mary Tuck .

JOHN TUCK . I live on Back-hill , and am a cottonglazer. I heard a noise on the 4th of August, between nine and ten o'clock - I got up and saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, going out at the door; she had no right there - I followed her, and asked what she had got in her apron; she said things belonging to herself - I said,"Come back and let me see;" she resisted very much -I got her back, and took from her apron, a gown, and two shifts, belonging to my mother; they had been taken from the passage, where they had hung to dry.

MARY TUCK. These things are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. He is wronging me - I am not the person who took the things; a woman gave them to me as I was coming from Battle-bridge hospital, where I had been seven weeks with a fever.

GUILTY . Aged 64. Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-50

1578. WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 1 coat, value 1l. , the goods of John Fordham Taylor .

JOHN FORDHAM TAYLOR . I am clerk at Messrs. Hoare's brewhouse. I left this coat in my chaise on the 27th of July, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, while I stepped into a house - I told a person to mind it; he turned his back, and the coat was taken: this is it.

GEORGE COLEMAN . I was going up the street, on the opposite side; I saw the prisoner, and another lad in a blue coat; they were together; the prisoner went to the side of the chaise, snatched the coat out, rolled it up, and ran away; the other man pushed the prisoner off as fast as he could - I told the gentleman of it.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a headborough. I was coming up Whitecross-street, at a quarter to twelve o'clock that day, and saw the prisoner, with this coat; there were two

others in his company - I asked him what he had there; he said a coat which he had bought at a shop - I said, "Come and show me where;" as we were going along, he said he bought it of a man in Bethnal-green-road for 9s. - I found the prosecutor out.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-51

1579. DAVID HOLLEY and JOHN REESE were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 1 book, value 1l. , the goods of George Tomlinson .

ANN ACTON . I am niece to George Tomlinson, who lives in London-lane, Hackney . On the 13th of July, about half-past one o'clock in the day, I went into the front parlour; I saw the window open, and both the closet doors - I went to shut down the window, and saw the print of a man's foot on a chair under the window - I went and shut one closet door, and found every thing right - I went to the other closet, and missed the Bible from there - I gave an alarm, and in about ten minutes the officer came with the Bible.

CHARLOTTE CRABTREE . My husband is a Policeman, we live in the same row with the prosecutor. I was looking out at a window, and saw Holley walking backwarks and forwards by the prosecutor's window; my husband was in bed - I told him, and he desired me to watch; I saw the other prisoner get out of the prosecutor's window, and hand a parcel to Holley - I could not see what I was; they came by my window, and went towards London-field - I watched them till my husband got his clothes on; the prisoners were soon brought back.

JOHN CRABTREE . My wife told me what she saw; I pursued the prisoners, and when they found I did that Holley dropped the Bible; I took it up, and while I did, that they jumped over a piece of garden wall or gravel, and I lost sight of them - I sung out Stop thief! and when I came up they were in custody; I swear they are the same persons.

ROBERT DALLENGER . I live at Dalston, near half a mile from where the robbery was committed - I looked out at my window, and saw some men running - they turned to the back of my house; I ran down, and pursued - I cried Stop thief! Grange stopped Reese; I asked him if he could hold him - he said Yes; I then pursued Holley, and called to him to stop, which he did - I took him back - the Policeman came up, and took them; Holley said he would go quietly, which he did.

- GRANGE. I was returning to my work - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a great many men running - Mr. Dallenger told me to stop Reese, which I did; he made use of bad language.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Holley. I never was in trouble before.

The prisoners received good characters.

HOLLEY - GUILTY . Aged 33.

REESE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-52

1580. ANN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , 1 purse, value 2s.; 5 sovereigns, 6 half-crowns, 8 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the property of Robert Dixon , Esq. , from his person .

ROBERT DIXON, ESQ. I live in Chancery-lane , and am a barrister . On the 3rd of August, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was going home, and had got within one hundred yards of my own door - the prisoner ran across the street, and took hold of my left arm, which was towards her; my purse was in my left-hand waistcoat pocket - there were 24s. or 25s. in silver in it and five sovereigns; she held my arm so violently that I could not get rid of her - when we got about twenty or thirty yards further, which was about half-way between where she first accosted me and my own door, she quitted me, and ran up one of the courts; I missed my purse, and ran after her - she went up one or two courts, and came back again to the court she first ran up; I came up to her there - she was stopping, and seemed to be secreting something; two sovereigns fell from her on the pavement, and the purse was in her hand - I took the purse, and part of the silver was in it, but none of the sovereigns; there was some silver in her pocket, which, with what was in the purse about made up the quantity I had in my purse - I went with her to the Police-office, where she was searched; I should think about a minute and a half had elapsed from the time of her first running and my taking her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time was this? A. I should think it wanted a quarter to twelve o'clock - I very frequently take a walk round Lincoln's Inn-fields; I did not speak to her first - I only told her to go about her business; I did go twenty or thirty yards with her, but I must have knocked her down if I had not; she did not accuse me of soliciting her; I dare say she asked me to go with her, or something of that kind - I told her to go about her business twice or thrice; I had taken fast hold of her when the Policeman came up; she did not state, in my presence, that I had given her the silver: my purse was in my pocket, as it is now, and the only way she could have got it was with the hand that was through my arm; I did not go into any court with her - when she was first taken she said she had not so much as would purchase a glass of gin; I can only account for the money being in her pocket by her putting it in as she ran away - she did not say that I had given her the five shillings, and that the seven shillings in her pocket she had got to pay a bill for a woman named Bryan - I think I had seen the prisoner before: I judge that by her person, not her voice.

COURT. Q. What did the purse contain? A. Five sovereigns and about 24s., as near as I can calculate; I recovered two sovereigns and the silver, the purse was in her hand.

MICHAEL KELLY . I am a Police-officer; I heard a cry of Police! - I came up, and Mr. Dixon had hold of the prisoner; he said she had robbed him of five sovereigns - he had the purse in his hand, and said he had taken it from her hand - I found five or seven shillings in her hand, and in her pocket I found some more silver; I took her to the station house, but I found no more, though I made her strip.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search every part of her? A. Yes: I cannot exactly say how much money I found in her pocket - she said the money in her pocket was her own; she said so in the presence of Mr. Dixon, and she said it all through - but she said at first that she had not the

price of a glass of gin; I searched every place about there for the three sovereigns, but I could not find them; the prisoner did not mention the name of Mrs. Bryan - the inspector asked her address; I do not know whether she gave it right or not, I did not go to it, - it was Fetter-lane, but I do not recollect the number - she did not say who she lived with.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Chancery-lane, and this man met me; he put the 5s. into my hand, and said he wanted to speak with me - I would not comply with him; he called the Policeman, and gave charge of me.

JOHN BRYAN . I am a boot and shoemaker, and live at No. 1, Garden-court, Baldwin's-gardens: I have known the prisoner twelve months; she is acquainted with my wife. On the night she was taken up she had been at my house for work; she binds boots and shoes - there was a little bill due, but I do not know of my wife giving her money to pay it.

COURT. Q.What time do you leave off work? A.Sometimes as late as nine or ten o'clock - she lives at No. 28, St. Clement's-lane: I believe at a lodging-house for tradespeople - I cannot account for her being at a quarter before twelve o'clock in Chancery-lane; I suppose she left my place between eight and nine.

RACHAEL BRYAN . I am the wife of this witness. I remember the prisoner being at our house in the day, and she had some tea; I gave her 7s. to pay a bill, because my children were ill - she was to pay it to Mr. Roach, her landlady's son.

RICHARD ROACH . The 7s. was owing to me by Bryan; I knew the prisoner, as a lodger at my mother's, for eight or ten months - I was out that evening, and have not had the money.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am a cloth-dresser, at No. 3, Chair-court, Temple-bar. The prisoner called at my place about ten o'clock that evening; she said she had been to defray a bill of 7s., but the people were not at home.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-53

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1581. JOHN OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Ann Ragan , from her person .

ANN RAGAN . On the 15th of August, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was going along the street with a basket on my head (I sell fruit in the street ) - I felt my silk handkerchief snatched off my neck from behind; I turned round, and saw the prisoner running down an alley, with it in his hand - I pursued, calling Stop thief! and he was secured; I am sure he is the man.

EDWARD FRANCIS . I am a Policeman. I pursued the prisoner, who was running, and secured him in the act of putting the handkerchief between two water-casks.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-54

1582. JAMES HENRY MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 4 stockings, value 10s.; 2 dresses, value 50s.; 1 tippet, value 30s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 18s.; 4 gloves, value 3s., and 6 yards of ribbon, value 4s., the goods of Edward Hill , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD HILL . I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Shadwell . The prisoner lived with me for three months, three months ago, then left, and came back again eight days before this happened; I missed some handkerchiefs the week before, and on the 26th of August, I found in the shop a paper, which I knew had contained stockings, laying down by the side of the counter - I referred to my book, and found no entry of their being sold; I desired to search the prisoner and the other shopman, to which they agreed - I found nothing on the other; I did not search the prisoner till the officer came, and on him we found one pair of stockings inside his boot, and another pair under his stockings, next his legs - he was not wearing either of them; they were as a bundle - I went to his lodgings with the officer, and found the other property stated in the indictment.

JOHN DRUMMOND . I am an officer. I was sent for - the prosecutor's evidence is correct; I searched the prisoner - I afterwards found all this other property at his lodgings.

MR. HILL. This is all mine; my private-mark is on some of it - one pair of the stockings had been in the paper.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you deal in made-up garments? A. No - the dresses have been made up from the raw material, but my mark is on it.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 90s. only . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-55

Before Mr. Baron Bayley.

1583. CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH HOLDEN was indicted for feloniously and maliciously setting fire to the dwelling-house of George Titterton , with intent to injure him .

ELEANOR TITTERTON. I am the wife of George Titterton; we live at 57, Exmouth-street , and rent the house - the prisoner was five weeks in our service. Last Friday week I was at home with my two children, and had three people at work in the workshop at the back of the yard; about five o'clock in the afternoon, or a little after, I called the prisoner to get tea, and heard a dreadful noise in the kitchen - I went down, and she laid there apparently in a fit, whether she was really so or not I cannot tell; the cry must have been heard by any person in the house - I went up to my bed-room on the first floor, to fetch her some brandy, and on opening the door I saw smoke; it was so great I did not see from what part of the room it came - I did not see a blaze; I saw it afterwards - it was put out by the inspector and serjeant of the Police; it had burnt the bed in part, the blankets, sheets, and a wool mattress, a chair, and several articles of apparel, but not the whole of any thing; the blankets,&c. were on the bed - the wearing-apparel, when I left the room, was part on a chair, and part on the bed; a small part of the floor was seorched, which might have been done by the clothes falling from the chair; whether the wood-work of the floor had been on fire I cannot tell - I had not heard any body in the room; I was there for about ten minutes, about three o'clock, and all was safe

then; there had been an alarm about the kitchen chimney being on fire about two o'clock, and the prisoner helped Mr. Titterton to put it out - Jesse Davis, who was at work in the back shop, had given that alarm; there had been a disagreement between the prisoner and me on the Wednesday, and on the previous night I gave her warning to quit on the Wednesday - she did not use any particular expression then; she had gone out without leave.

Q. If she meant to burn the house, can you conceive any motive besides the words on the Thursday night? -A. No; she never threatened me in any way.

JOHN BUSAIN. I am an inspector of the Police - I went to this house with the serjeant and constable; I got there a little after six o'clock, I think - I went up stairs, and found the back bed-room on fire; the blaze was ascending from the top of the bed and about the bed, about three inches high; there were no curtains nor hangings to the bed - the cane bottom of a chair, about a foot and a half from the bed, was burnt out; there were fragments of wearing apparel burning on it - I produce a piece of the floor that was burnt; that was all the damage that was done to the floor - it is deal wood.

Q. Do you suppose the wood itself has been in a blaze? A. No, I will not say that it has; it was immediately under the chair, and might be occasioned by the burning clothes falling on it; the chair was on fire when I entered, and the back nearly burned - the clothes were burning on this part of the floor when I went in; I threw water on the chair and put it out; this is the only damage done to the house, except that the door which was near the bed was scorched - there is hardly a doubt on my mind but if it had not been put out it would have set the house on fire, either by communication with the floor, or the chair communication with the closet, which contained a dozen or twenty pounds of candles; the chair was close to the closet - the bed was on fire; I extinguished the whole of that, and then saw the prisoner - this was about ten or fifteen minutes after I arrived - she was in the back kitchen, and appeared labouring under intoxication, and pretended fits - it was pretence, in my judgment.

MRS. TITTERTON. The chair with the clothes on it was near the closet when I was in the room; I keep my candles in that closet - the prisoner knew they were there- the cupboard is locked occasionally, and I think it was so then.

JOHN FOOTMAN. I am a Policeman. I went with Busain, and found the bed on fire, and the chair - I did not notice whether any part of the floor was burnt - I saw the prisoner in the kitchen as soon as I entered the house; she was stretched on the floor, screaming and hallooing, and when the serjeant left me in the kitchen, to take care of her, she was sitting in a chair, and cried for George - I asked what she wanted him for; she made no answer, and presently afterwards she said, "What shall my mistress say? Oh dear! what shall I do?" she called for George again - I asked what she wanted him for; she said the house was on fire, and to save the children - I said the fire was out, there was no fear of the children; there was a smell of fire, and the house was all in a smoke at the time; she afterwards called for George again - I said, "Here he is, what do you want him for?" she then held up her head, which was down before, looked about, and said, "He is not here;" he was not there.

JEREMIAH SHACKELL . I am an inspector of the Police. I went with Busain - I got there, to the best of my recollection, about five o'clock; the boy went up and opened the back bed-room door; the smoke was so strong he shut it again; Busain opened it - the room was full of smoke; we extinguished it a little with water; the smoke having disappeared, I could see fire on both sides of the bed, and in the middle of the bed; the fire on the left side was nearer the head than the other part; there was fire at the foot of the bed, and on a chair which stood by the fire-place, about two feet from the bed, and another chair at the foot of the bed was also burnt.

Q.Might not the fire have communicated from the bed to that chair? A. I think not: I saw fire in six places; a piece of the floor was burnt - I think that had been done by the clothes falling off the chair; the floor had been on fire, but I did not notice it on fire; it was under the chair, and might have been done by the flames from the clothes which was burning on the ground, and had fallen from the chair; it might be done without setting the wood itself on fire.

NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner was detained, to be indicted for the misdeameanor.

Reference Number: t18310908-56

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1584. SUSAN SOMERVILLE was indicted for stealing on the 24th of July , 1 watch, value 9l., and 4 seals, value 1l., the goods of Ann Carey , in her dwelling-house .

ANN CAREY. I live in Connaught-terrace . The prisoner came into my service in the name of Green, on the 21st of July, and left on the 24th, without notice; after she was gone I missed a gold watch and five seals.

JOHN SELL . I am servant to Mr. Turner, a pawnbroker, Brydges-street. On the 26th of July the prisoner pawned this gold watch with five seals, for 3l.; they would fetch 4l. or 5l. - I am confident of her person; Mrs. Carey saw and identified them a few days after.

MRS. CAREY. These are my watch and seals.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Are you the lady who prosecuted a French woman here yesterday? A. Yes; she could not have taken the watch, because I had it after she left, I am certain. (See page 751.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left on the Sunday night; a young lady left on the Saturday afternoon, while I was cleaning the steps, and took two boxes away.

MRS. CAREY. I wound it up on the Saturday night.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear you was not tipsy on the Saturday? A. Yes.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-57

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1585. SAMUEL GREEN was indicted for that he, in and upon Rebecca his wife , feloniously and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did strike and cut her in and upon her neck and throat, with intent to kill and murder .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable, or to do her some grievous bodily harm.

REBECCA GREEN . I have been married to the prisoner twenty-eight years, but have not lived with him for the last four years; he is a pensioner , and lived at Greenwich college - I live in Underwood-street, Mile-end New-town. On Thursday, the 14th of July, he passed the end of the street, near my house - I went out, and sent my little girl to call him back; he came back part of the way - I went to meet him, and begged him to go home; he seemed quite wet and uncomfortable; he said he would not go home, and told me to go home, and he would not trouble me any more; he went away, and I followed him at a distance into Whitechapel - I was about one hundred yards behind him - I missed him in Whitechapel, and waited there some time, then looked into the Blind Beggar public-house, and saw him sitting there; I called him out - he came out; I asked him to go home - he said he would not - that he would not be yellowed any more - that he would be a pauper on the public - I again begged of him to go home, saying, I would go with him, and beg him off; yellowing is a punishment at the hospital; he said he would never go home any more - I told him I was afraid if he did not return he would go to prison, and he had better submit to any punishment at Greenwich, than go to prison; he then asked if I was going to give him any thing - I said No, I had enough to do to find his children; he then walked on with me, and seemed very much agitated - I felt afraid, and shifted from side to side; this was in Whitechapel-road; and when we came between Colt-street and Greyhound-lane , he cut me with a knife, across my throat - I did not perceive the knife a moment before I was cut; it cut my throat, and I got a blow on my mouth at the same time.

Q.What was the blow given with? A. I could not ascertain I was so frightened - it came from him, for no other person was near; as I stood looking at him, after I received the blow, he said he meant to die himself - but he would kill me first; I ran back in my fright to Colt-street, saying "Will no one stop him" - he was taken, and I was lead over to the London-hospital; he was in liquor; I have seen him on other occasions, when he has been intoxicated, and taken precautions - for when he is in liquor, he seems not quite right in his head; the smallest quantity of liquor seems to take effect on him, and when he had no liquor he used to ramble from his family, and has been two months from the college, without any body knowing where he was, and not always in his right mind when sober - he appeared to have had a little liquor when I first saw him, but he answered more reasonable - he said he had had half a pint of ale at the Blind Beggar, and seemed more angry then than when I first saw him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long had he been in the navy? A. Twenty-one years - I do not know of his being wounded in the head, but he has been to St. Helena, and was very bad on the voyage, and seemed much reduced in his constitution; he always seemed uncomfortable and wrangling when not in liquor; if I had not sent after him that day he would not liave called.

Q.Had you not some high words on the road before he cut you? A. It was my urging him so against his will to return to Greenwich made him quite angry - I was not going to take him to the Police-office - there was a warrant against him, and I said he had better go home than to prison - I did not pull or push him - I never put a hand on him; I should have been glad to get out of his way - the would has not injured my constitution at all; I soon recovered, I was discharged on the Saturday from the hospital - when taken before the Magistrate, he was fined 5l. for the assault, and afterward held to bail; I said it was not in his power to get bail, and then the Magistrate settled that he was to be sent to Greenwich; I said I wished nothing more - he in fifty-nine years old.

COURT. Q. On former occasions have you put sharp instruments out of his way? Yes, I have done so six times; he formerly begged me to put every thing out of his way, in case he should do me mischief - I have put knives and a razor out of his way; he was in his right mind when he desired me to do so - it was while he was living with me; he returned from St. Helena seventeen years ago, and was paid off.

CATHERINE CLIFFORD . I was in Whitechapel-road, and saw the prisoner commit this act - it was about halfpast one o'clock in the day; it is a public street, where plenty of people are walking.

SAUL PEARCE . I was at the London-hospital as housesurgeon when the proseuctrix was brought in; I found a simple incised would in the throat, extending merely through the integuments, such a would as a knife would have inflicted, about an inch and a half long; it bled very little indeed.

Cross-examined. Q. Bleeding might take place if it merely passed through the skin? A. Yes, without passing entirely through the integuments - it was exceedingly slight - it was an incised wound; my impression is that the integuments were cut through - the outher integuments were cut, and it bled.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to Lambeth-street with the knife; it is his bread and cheese knife - here is the shawl the prosecutrix had on; it has three or four outs in it, and a spot of blood - it was in two folds; he told me as we went to the office, he hoped I would take him to the hospital, as he should be confined there as long as he lived, for he was not fit to be at large.

Prisoner. All the years we have been married, I never intended to hurt a hair of her head; I never lifted a hand against her till the present moment - I did not know where I was.

REBECCA GREEN . He has not been in the habit of striking me.

NOT GUILTY, being of unsound mind at the time .

Reference Number: t18310908-58

Before Mr. Baron Buileys .

1586. JOHN LONG and DENNIS MURPHY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Allen , from his person .

JOHN ALLEN . I am a school-master . On the 11th of July, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was at a review in Hyde-park - I lost my handkerchief; I did not feel it taken - the prisoners were secured immediately, and my handkerchief produced by Farrant.

THOMAS FARRANT . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Hyde-park; I watched the prisoner for nearly an hour;

they came in company together - Long tried one or two pockets; Murphy was close by his side, and must have seen what he was about - I saw Long pick Mr. Allen's pocket; Murphy was close by his side - Edbury immediately secured Long, and he threw the handkerchief down: I picked it up, Murphy stepped into the crowd, and got away - he was taken three or four days after; I knew them both before, and frequently saw them together.

Long. I was not in the Park ten minutes. Witness. I followed him up and down round the crowd nearly twenty times.

WILLIAM EDBURY . I am a Policeman. I was with Farrant, and saw the prisoners for nearly an hour - I have seen them in company before; I kept my eyes on them as well as I could for the crowd - I did not see Long do any thing till I saw him take the handkerchief out of Mr. Allen's pocket; Murphy was close by his side at the time- I immediately seized Long; Murphy escaped into the crowd before I got up to Long - he saw me going towards him; Long threw the handkerchief away - I saw Farrant take it up.

Long. Farrant searched me, and asked where the handkerchief was.

THOMAS FARRANT . I did not - it was Edbury searched him.

LONG- GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Life .

MURPHY- NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-59

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1587. JOHN MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 book, value 1s.; 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 shirt, value 6s.; 1 waistcoat, value 8s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 12s., and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Powell , his master.

SARAH POWELL . I am the wife of Joseph Powell - we live in Mansell-street, Goodman's-field; the prisoner was our servant . On Sunday morning, the 24th of July, I gave him these articles, tied in a bundle, to carry to myhusband, who was in the country - he had about nine miles to go; he never returned - I saw him at Worship-street on the Wednesday - the Hymn-book and gloves, which were in the coat pocket, were brought to me by Tubb on the Monday - I have not seen the clothes.

JOSEPH TUBB . I live in Kingsland-road. On Sunday, the 24th of July, about one o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my house with a bundle of clothes, and wished me to lend him 8s. on them - he said he had just received them from his brother, in Bershire; it was a suit of black, and a shirt marked J.P. - they were tied up in a pocket-handkerchief: as I would not lend any thing on them he offered to sell them for 1l. - he was about half drunk; I put my hand into the coat pocket, and took out the Hymn-book, in which Powell's name was written, and there was a pair of gloves - the prisoner lodged with me, but I did not know he was in Powell's service; I went to Mrs. Powell that afternoon, but she was not at home; I saw her on Monday - he came again on Monday evening, told me he had no money, and gave me the gloves to let him sleep there; he said he had left the clothes at a public-house, and would bring them to me in the morning - my shopman had offered him 15s. for the bundle on Sunday, when I refused to buy them, but he did not buy them; he told me on Tuesday they were at a public-house, and I lent him 8d. to redeem them - I sent for an officer, but he did not come back, and on Wednesday I gave him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and went to leave the bundle for a few shillings, thinking to get it back on Monday; why not give me in charge on Monday night? but if I had brought the property back he would have received it.

RICHARD HAWKES . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner in charge at the public-house - I asked where the clothes were; he said he had sold them - he could not tell to whom, and that he got them from his brother, in Berkshire; he was perfectly sober.(Hymn-book and glove produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 52. - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-60

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1588. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Barrowcliff , on the 1st of August putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 purse, value 6d.; 38 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns , his property.

JOHN BARROWCLIFF . I am an upholsterer , and live in Fleet-street. On the 1st of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was on the left-hand side of Blackfriarsbridge , on the London side - it was the day London-bridge was opened; I had three children with me - I had twelve 5l. Bank-notes, thirty-eight sovereigns, and two half-sovereigns in my purse, and one sovereign loose in my pocket; the Bank notes were in my breast pocket - I did not lose them; the gold was in my left-hand breeches pocket -I opened my purse on my way to the bridge, and at that time put the notes into my breast pocket; I buttoned up my pocket tight a few minutes before I got to the bridge, and the moment I got there - I was on the top of the step- I and my childern were surrounded, and the prisoner, who was among a number of others who surrounded me, pressed between me and my little child, got between up, and separated us - their pressing against me, drew my attention from my pocket - I preceived my pocket much lighter than it was; I put my hand to it, and the purse and money were gone - one of my childern saw the loose sovereign on the steps; I am sure at least six persons surrounded me - I am certain of the prisoner; he was under my left arm, directly at the side of my pocket from which the sovereigns were taken - I told my eldest child to take care of the childern while I followed the prisoner, who, I was sure, had robbed me; I followed him at a few yards' distance, as near as the crowd would let me, and was looking out for an officer - the moment I saw one I gave him in charge; he might have gone one hunderd yards from where I was robbed; I have not found my purse or money- he said nothing to the charge; I took my eldest daughter to the Computer to see him a few hours after.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many other persons were on the bridge? A. It was covered - my attention was exclusively directed to the prisoner after I was beset; my attention was directed to six persons - I have sworn to another person before the Alderman; I only swore that, to the best of my belief, that person was

among the six who beset me - I believe that person to be a witness here; he has served me with a copy of a writ, to sue me for damages - I have not a doubt he is the person I took him for now; I only swore to him, to the best of my belief - I did not swear to him positively; I swear positively to the prisoner - the prisoner last night called that person Thomas Bickerton , and got his trial put off to have him here; a copy of a writ was served on me - I did not read it, but took it to my solicitor; I have been told the person has one or two names - he went by the name of Wilson at the lock-up house; I kept my eye on the prisoner from the time I was robbed till he was taken, which was in about four minutes, and he was attempting to pick a pocket at that time - I gave him in charge, and so did the person whose pocket he was attempting; I did not see him do that - he could pick half a dozen pockets without my seeing him; I could see his head in the crowd, but not his hands.

Q. Have you ever gone out to fish for pickpockets? A. Yes - I have been endeavouring to find the other five; I believe I said at Guildhall that I lost upwards of thirtyfive sovereigns, but have since counted my money, and discovered that it was thirty-eight sovereigns and two half-sovereigns - I never swore I lost forty sovereigns; I should recollect three of the others if I saw them twelve months hence - Bickerton was one of the six, to the best of my recollection.

ELIZA BARROWCLIFF . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I was with him on the steps of the bridge, nearest to the shore; three more of my father's family were with us - they are younger than me; I saw five or six men surround him - I then saw one of them get under my father's arm; he was nearest to my father's person - I could not see what was done, for the men pushed us; directly they were gone my father said he was robbed - I looked at the persons who had left him; I observed the features of the man who was under his arm before he left, and am certain it was the prisoner - I saw him again at Guildhall; I was not present when the constable took him - I went with my father to the Compter the same evening; he was in custody there.

Cross-examined. Q. On your oath, did you see that man at the Compter? A. Yes - I saw him at Guildhall the night of the robbery; the Compter is at Guildhall - I was at Guildhall the next day; I saw the prisoner the same night as the robbery, but I forgot that - I was very much frightened when it happened; I know the prisoner is the man- there was a great rush of people; I did not have all my sisters to hold - there were three of the family with us; the youngest was six years old - my father was looking after her; I cannot say what handkerchief the prisoner had on.

JAMES HACKWELL . I was sworn as a special-constable, to act on the bridge. I was on the bridge, and saw the prisoner there - I did not see the prosecutor till after I had the prisoner, who I immediately took, on seeing him draw his hand from a person's pocket; Mr. Barrowcliff immediately came up, and charged him with robbing him of a purse and sovereigns - I cannot recollect how many sovereigns he mentioned; the prisoner made no answer to the charge - he was taken to the Compter, examined next day, and committed; when I first saw him he was in company with others, and went away to a person who gave him in charge, and whose pocket I saw him draw his hand out of; he was searched, but nothing was found on him -I had not seen him near the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to be sworn in? A.Because I applied for it - I was a constable of Bow-street, but not a regular one; I hold two Bow-street warrants now - I was transferred to the new Police, and was charged with being drunk, but it was not true - I was dismissed; I heard Mr. Barrowcliff make a charge against a person who he thought was one of the men, but I did not attend to what he said, as that was not a case of mine; I dare say there were a thousand people on the bridge.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see the sight, like other people; the bridge was much crowded - I was taken by the officers, but knew nothing of the charge.

RICHARD BICKERTON . I hold a situation in Doctors'-commans, as clerk, and have been there nearly twenty years. I went to see His Majesty open the bridge - I did not see the prosecutor there; he charged me at Guildhall as being one of the gang concerned in robbing him of forty sovereigns and somethings more - he positively stated that I was one of the party, that he was positive of it; I have brought on action against him - I was only a few hours in custody, and discharged by the Alderman; I had no knowledge of his being robbed.

COURT. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. I never saw him till he was at Guildhall - I had been out that evening, and was taken up as being disorderly; I swear the prosecutor positively swore I was one of the gang, but the Alderman discharged me - Mr. Armstrong, my principal, came forward, and gave me a twenty years' character.

GUILTY of stealing from the person only . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310908-61

1589. JOSEPH HOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Joseph Yates Cooper , from his person .

JOSEPH YATES COOPER . I live in Clapton-square, Hackney. On the 2nd of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was in Smithfield , a few doors from Long-lane, and had my handkerchief in my outside coat pocket - I was pressed on by a crowd, and respectable dressed woman told me the prisoner had picked my pocket - he was then about three yards from me; I immediately followed, and collard him - he denied the charge, and at that moment an officer came up; I then saw him take my handkerchief from his pocket and drop it on the pavement.(Property produced and sworn to.)

STEPHEN DAVIS . I am a constable. I was in Smithfield - a woman said," This gentleman has been robbed;" I ran up, laid hold of the prisoner, and said I was a constabel; he said," I have got nothing;" I then saw him take the handkerchief from his pocket, and drop it.

Prisoner.Q. Were there not Other lads round at the time? A.There were others about.

Prisoner's Defence. Some lad picked the gentlemen's pocket, and threw the handkerchief against me - it laid about three yards from me.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-62

1590. WILLIAM SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Elphinstone Maclagan , from his person .

WILLIAM ELPHINSTONE MACLAGAN . I live in the

Hampstead-road, and hold an office under the East India Company . On the 4th of August, about one o'clock, I was on Old London-bridge , crossing to the Surrey side; Bowler, the officer, came and asked if I had lost any thing - I felt and missed my handkerchief, which was safe a few minutes before; he had the prisoner in custody at the time - on looking round I saw my handkerchief laying at the prisoner's feet, between his legs.

SAMUEL BOWLER . I am an officer. On the 4th of August I saw the prisoner on the bridge; it was the first day of oysters - the bridge was crowded with carts: on looking round I saw the prisoner lift up the prosecutor's coat tail; I caught hold of the gentleman, and asked if he had been robbed - he said No; I said," You had better feel," which he did, and missed his handkerchief; on turning round I saw it at the prisoner's feet - I do not think any body was near enough to take it but him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He never saw me lift the coat-tail up - I had been into the City to took for work; the officer came up, put his hand on my shoulder, and asked if he had lost any thing - he took the handkerchief off the ground; there were plenty of people passing.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-63

1591. ELIZABETH PATTERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 purse, value 6d., the goods of George Whit Bailey , from the person of Ann Weston Bailey .

ANN WESTON BAILEY . I am the wife of George Whit Bailey, who is in the horse-hair trade ; we live in Kingsgate-street, Holborn. On the 5th of September, between three and four o'clock, I was in Smithfield , and had this purse in my pocket, but no money; I did not feel it taken, but the officer spoke to me, and the prisoner was behind me, nearer than she is now - the officer charged her with taking my purse; she denied it - she was taken to the Compter, searched, and the purse was found on the ground between me and her; she was a stranger to me - I am certain of the purse; I had made it myself.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You do not mean to say it was found at the Compter, but on the ground in Smithfield; I saw the officer take it up - it was very light, and would easily come out of my pocket; I had taken my handkerchief out a minute or two before.

Q. I believe you told the officer at the moment, that in all probability the purse might have fallen out at the same time? A. Yes, and I desired him to give me my purse -I believe I said I did not think she had touched it; it was found close against my heels - it might have fallen; I felt no jerk - my pocket is not very deep: I should think it could not be taken out without my feeling it - she strongly denied it.

FRANCIS BIGNALL . I am a City officer, and was in Smithfield; a lady came to me about a quarter to four o'clock, and told me something - I followed after the prisoner, who she described to me; she placed herself by the side of Mrs. Bailey, and had not stood many minutes before she put her left hand outside Mrs. Bailey's clothes, raised the pocket up, put her right hand into the pocket, and with her right hand the purse came out; I allowed her to go a yard or so, and said, "Now, my good woman, you must give me hold of that purse;" I seized her hand, and the purse fell to the ground - she said," My good man, what do you want with me?" I said, "Never mind, you shall know;" Mrs. Bailey turned round, and saw me take up the purse.

Cross-examined. Q.Did not Mrs. Bailey tell you she had pulled out her handkerchief, and it might have dropped out? A.She did, but I saw it taken; Mrs. Bailey said at Guildhall she supposed it was ten minutes before that she took out her handkerchief, and not on that spot; I had the prisoner and purse before Mrs. Bailey knew she was robbed - she did not say she might have dropped it till she got to the Compter; I then told her I saw it taken - I had been observing the prisoner for about five minutes - there was a crowd; I was obliged to get another officer to help me - I told my brother officer I saw it taken; I am a special officer, sworn in for the fair.

MRS. BAILEY. This is my purse.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was there another officer there? A. Yes; Bignall told me the woman had robbed me, and taken my purse out of my pocket - I told him on the spot that I might have dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-64

1592. SOPHIA PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 1 watch, value 1l. , the goods of Joseph York Hatton .

JOSEPH YORK HATTON . I live at the foot of Londonbridge, on the City side, and am a watchmaker . On the 22nd of August, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop, and from certain circumstances, which I must not mention, I had my suspicion, and went into the shop - I told my wife to show her what she wanted to see; I went to where I could command a view of the shop without being seen; my female-servant followed me to the same place - the servant directed my attention to her; I did not see her take the watch, but I saw her put it into her bosom - I came round into the shop, put my hand into her bosom, and took it from nearly under her arm; it was a watch which I had to repair.

BETSEY COOPER. I am in Mr. Hatton's service. I saw the prisoner reach over, take the watch from the board, and put it into her bosom - I went round, and shut the shop door; Mr. Hatton took it from her bosom.

THOMAS KILBY . I am a constable, and received the prisoner in charge with the watch.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-65

1593. ELLEN POLLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 ribbon, value 1d.; 2 seals, value 10s.; 1 key, value 3d., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the monies of Abraham Regier her master.

MARY REGIER . I am the wife of Abraham Regier . The prisoner came into our service on Friday, the 19th of July, and on the Tuesday following I suspected her; this watch hung on the waistcoat in my bed-room on the first floor: it was safe twenty minutes before it was missed; a man, his wife, and two children lodge on my second floor - they still remain there; on missing the watch I went up to the second floor, to consult the lodger, and while I was up there the prisoner went away, without

any warning, leaving her dinner - I charged her at Guildhall with stealing a handkerchief, which I missed the first day she came; she told the lodger and me we should find the watch on Mutton-hill - I found it on Snow-hill.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. I had her given into my custody - I have a handkerchief.

JOHN BROWNING . I manage the business of Mr. Baxter, a pawnbroker, on Snow-hill, This watch was taken in pledge by a young man who has left; I have the counterpart of the duplicate - it was pawned for 26s., in the name of Jane Clark ; the prosecutrix came to our shop and claimed it; she had told the prisoner if she knew where it was she would forgive her.

MRS. REGIER. I could not find the watch on Muttonhill, but at last found it on Snow-hill; this handkerchief was taken from my house - I have had it several years; I did not say if she told where the watch was I would show her lenity - she said her sister would take it out of pawn for me; she made the confession to my lodger - I overheard it; I waited till last week for her sister to redeem it, but she did not.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-66

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1594. ANN ROWELL was indicted for bigamy .

The prisoner being but 15 years of age at the time of the first marriage, and there being no proof of her parents' consent, she was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310908-67

1595. THOMAS SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 saw, value 3s. , the property of Daniel Moier .

CHARLES PAGE . I am storekeeper to the ship-yard of Messrs. Curling and Young, at Limehouse . In the evening of the 18th of July I stopped the prisoner coming out of the yard gate, and asked what he had under his jacket - he said Nothing; I found this hand-saw, which he was carrying, down his trousers, and the handle was under his jacket; he pointed out a place called the slip, where it had come from - this is the saw.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to swear that this saw could be concealed in this child's trousers? A. The whole of the blade was concealed, and the handle was as high up as he could cleverly walk with it.

DANIEL MOIR . I was at work on these premises, and left my saw by the side of the slip in the tool bag - the place the prisoner took Page to is where I left it.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any private mark on it? A. No - I had had this new handle put three or four days before; the yard gate is left open in the day time - I believe boys go in and bathe.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Ten Days , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310908-68

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1596. JAMES WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 1 leg of mutton, value 4s.; 2lbs. of bacon, value 1s.; 2lbs. of cheese, value 1s.; 6 eggs, value 3d., and 1 plate, value 2d. , the goods of Sir George Leman Tuthill , Knt.

EDWARD JONES . I am a Police-officer. I was on duty at half-past one o'clock in the morning, on the 19th of June, in Cavendish-square , two doors off Sir George Tuthill's house, and I saw the prisoner jump over his area rails, out of the area - he ran across the square; I followed and stopped him; I saw something under his coat, and asked what it was - he made no answer; I found a piece of cheese there - I brought him back, and my serjeant got over the area rails and took up a bundle - I heard a rattling in his hat; I took it off, and found six eggs in it - the bundle contained the leg of mutton, the bacon, and the plate.

MARY WALKER . I am housekeeper at Sir George Leman Tuthill's, Knt. We missed all the articles of provision out of the larder, and this plate from the safe in the area.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not jump over the rails; there is a house next to it goes up two or three steps - I stood there for shelter from the rain.

GUILTY . Aged 41. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-69

1597. JOHN RUTHERFORD was indicted for stealing, ont the 19th of July , 4 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 6 shillings, and one 10l. Bank note , the monies of Sarah Sanders Nunnallee .

SARAH SANDERS NUNNALLEE . I am housekeeper to the Earl of Abergavenny. On the 19th of July I wrote a letter to a fiend, and enclosed in it a 10l. Bank note, No 13,192, dated 17th June, 1831; I put the letter, containing the note, into a parcel, which also containd four sovereigns, one half-severeigo, and six shillings in silver - I tied up the parcel, and sealed the straing; I directed it to

"Mr. James Bowden , Marlborough tavern, Bath, to go by the Bath coach on the 17th July;" I took it myself, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and left it at the booking-office, at the Gloucester coffee-house, Piccadilly; I had it booked in the usual way by one of the clerks - in about a week afterwards I had reason to believe it had not been delivered.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How is it you remember the number of the note? A. I made a memorandum of it before I enclosed it, and I have it here.

JOHN PULLEN . I keep the King's Head, in St. James'-street. The prisoner has been about three years attending the coaches at the Gloucester coffee-house; he came to me with a 10l. note, and asked me to give him change; I am not certain whether it was on the 20th or the 21st of July; he said it was for Mr. Ryder is the Gloucester coffee-house - Mr. Ryder is the proprictor of the booking-office; I think I gave him a 5l. note and five sovereigns, but I am not certain; I put Mr. Ryder's name on the note, and paid it to Mr. Winch, of Crutched-friars - I know the note by my own hand-writing on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you in a considerable way of business? A. No; I put the name of the person I took it of on the note - I might have twenty notes at that time.

COURT. Q. Did you put Mr. Ryder's name on any other note about that time? A.No.

GEORGE RYDER . I am book-keeper at the coach-office at the Gloucester coffee-house. The prisoner was employed by the proprietor of the Bath and Bristol mail; I remember the proprietor of the Bath and Bristol mail; I remember the parcel the prosecutrix has described, from its being on the books of the office, and from its being entered in the way-bill of the mail by myself; it should have gone by the Bath and Exeter mail - the parcels are taken out by the porters of the office, assisted by the porters coming with the mail; the prisoner would have access to this parcel, as he generally came into the office the last thing, to inquire if we had any more parcels belonging to such a mail; I have reason to believe this parcel never arrived at its place of destination.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there many men about whose duty it was to take parcels out? A. Yes, there are necessarily; I have no recollection of whom I gave the parcel to - the coaches were all gone, and there was only the mail for it to go by; the lady said by the first coach - there are about seven mails come there, and about two porters to each.

COURT. Q. Did you, on the 20th or 21st of July, direct the prisoner to go and get change for a 10l. note for you? A. No.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I produce the 10l. note, No. 13,192, dated 17th of June, 1831; it came in on the 25th of July, from Currie and Co's.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know of its coming in except by some mark? A. It has my writing on it, which I put when it came in.

JAMES BOWDEN . The parcel was directed for me at Bath, but I never received it or its contents.

JOHN PULLEN . This note has my writing on it, but I did not put the date; I asked the prisoner who it was for - he said for Mr. Ryder; I might have put his name or Mr. Ryder's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was stationed to attend the Bath and Bristol coaches; I seldom do any thing for the Bath, except unloading the mail - I sometimes put in a parcel, if the man is busy, and if this had been given to me I should have put it in; the note was given me by some one in the office to get changed, but who I could not tell - I am daily in the habit of getting change, and it is not always possible to ask the name; I can declare, upon my oath, that I did not put three parcels in a week into the coach, and the coachman was always present to count them.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-70

1598. WILLIAM MURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , one 50l. Bank note , the property of Richard Parsons , since deceased.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

SARAH CAROLINE STRICKLAND . I am the wife of Moses Strickland . In the month of August I was housekeeper to the late Mr. Richard Parsons , who died on the 18th of August - he was overturned in his gig, and lived but five days afterwards; the prisoner was in his service for five or six days - I was at dinner with the prisoner, Mr. Corfield, and Mr. Parsons at his house, one Wednesday about a fortnight before his death; Mr. Parsons desired me to go up stairs, and get two bills and two letters, one containing a note for 50l., which I gave the prisoner to pay a bill of 50l., at Masterman's, and he was to take up another bill of 18l. 19s. - I gave him 70l. in the whole, and there was amongst it a cheque for 9l. on Child's bank, which he was to get changed - he went at two o'clock from our house, and was to take an omnibus that he might be in time, before the banking-house shut up; he was to return that night, but he did not till ten o'clock the next morning, when he was very much intoxicated - I found him in the counting-house, with his head laying on the desk - I said," How do you account for this strange conduct? what have you done with the bills?" he said it was all right - I said he had occasioned us great alarm; he produced the 18l. bill, torn all to pieces - I asked for the 50l. bill; he said the gentleman was not known at the Bank, and he produced the letter of Mr. Hankin's, in which the note had been enclosed - I asked what he had done with the note; he said it was all right, he had left it at the banking-house - I asked if he had not brought the receipt for the 50l. - he said they did not give him any.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure those were his words, that it was all right, and he had left it at the banking-house? A. Yes; he did not say it was not all right, but he would explain it to Mr. Parsons - the prosecutor was indited to drink a little more than he ought somtimes - he was sober the day he gave this money out, and the day following, I think; I never heard Mr. Parsons tell him he might purchase some clothes, as he looked very ragged and distressed, and I am sure it was never intended - the prisoner staid away two or three days, which excited suspicion, and when he came he was very much intoxicated; the last day he came was Thursday - he breakfasted with Mr. Parsons; he did take up the bill for 18l. - I do not know of his being at any races, where he was knocked down and ill-used, nor did I hear him mention it.

MR. MALLETT. I am chief clerk at Marylebone-office. I was present, and took the deposition of the deceased Richard Parsons - this is it.(Read.)

Richard Parsons , on his oath, says,

"I live at No.5, Carpenter-street, Mount-street, Grosvenor-square - I am a coal- merchant. On Thursday, the 28th of July last, I was at Marylebone Police-office for a beach of the peace, and I saw the prisoner there, employed writing at the desk - on the same evening,I I went to the watch-house again, to inquire of Mr. Lazenby, the superintendant, if he could recommend me a person as a clerk; I saw the prisoner, and I told him I wanted to see Mr. Lezenby, and the purpose I wanted him for - the prisoner said," Why Sir, I have got a good deal of leisure time upon my hands, and I think I could do what you want very well;" I said very well, he might come into my service - the prisoner came to my house; I placed him in my counting-house, and put him to his duty - I proposed that he should dine at my table, thinking him to be a respoectable person, from him being empolyed in Mr. Lazenby's office; while at dinner, on Wednesday last, (I think,) the prisoner was with me, I desired my housekeeper to bring some money down stairs, for the prisoner to go and take up two bills, one for 18l. odd, and the other for 50l., at Messrs. Masterman's banking-house; it was drawn by William Hankin , Esq., accepted by the Basingstke Bank, and paybable at Messrs. Masterman's, Nicholas-lane - Mr. Hankin had written to me to get the 50l. bill taken up for him, and I gave the prisoner a 50l. Bank of Engalnd note to go and take up the bill, and he left the house for that purpose; the next day, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the prionser returned to my house in a dirty state - he breakfasted with me, and delivered me the bill

for the 18l., he said he had paid the 50l. at the banker's, but they did not know any thing of Mr. Hankin - he was very dirty, and I told him to go and clean himself, but I afterwards found him in the same state, sleeping in the counting-house; I did not see him again till he was in custody - on the Saturday I went to Messrs. Masterman's, and was informed that no such money had been paid in there. RICHARD PARSONS ."

JOHN CORFIELD . I am a dressing-case maker, and live in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square. I was dining at Mr. Parsons' on the day in question, and saw the money given to the prisoner.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a clerk in the banking-house of Messrs. Masterman and Co. On the 3rd of August a person came to our house, but I cannot say that it was the prisoner - he did not take up a bill, nor leave any money; I said we knew nothing of the party, and could not take the money.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the man press you to take the money? A. I have no doubt he did, but it is such a common thing that I cannot say he did; if we had had the bill I would have given it him, and taken the money.

JOHN GOSLING . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner at the Horse and Groom, Oxford-street, on the 8th of August - one of my inspectors, who was with me, said,"This is an unpleasant business about Mr. Parsons' money"- he said it was all right, he knew all about it - I took him to the watch-house, and found on him twenty-six sovereigns and a half in gold, 17s. in silver, and 6d. in coppers - I asked him where the remainder of the money was, and he said he had been drinking about and made off with it.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was this from Mr. Parsons? A. I think near half a mile - it was in the parlour of the house; he did not tell me that he was on his road home to Mr. Parsons'.

Prisoner's Defence. I returned to Mr. Parsons' the same evening; Mr. Corfield said, before the Magistrate, that I was paid the other bill in sovereigns, and it turned out afterwards it was a cheque and sovereigns.

JOHN RAND . I am not in any business - I live upon my means, in Stamford-street, Blackfriars; I have known the prisoner four years. On Saturday, the 6th of August, I lent him 40l. - he came to me in extreme distress, and said he had had a misfortune.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Was it a note you lent him? A. No, sovereigns - I had no memorandum of it; I am under obligations to his friends in the country.

COURT. Q. Who was present? A.Nobody but ourselves - he told me he had been in distress, at least in some drunken frolic, and this was to make the money up, to settle with Mr. Parsons.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-71

1599. THOMAS PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of August , 1 jacket, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Smith and Sidney Smith .

GABRIEL BURROWS . I am servant to Thomas and Sidney Smith , pawnbrokers , in Pitfield-street . On the 23rd of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Charles-street, about fifty yards from my masters', in company with two other boys - he had this jacket wrapped up as it is now; I took it from him, and took it back to the shop; it is my masters', and had hung inside the door.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I was going on an errand; two boys ran up to me, and said,

"Hold this a moment," at the same time forcing a bundle into my hands; and before I had time to reflect on the circumstance, I was taken into custody.

GABRIEL BURROWS . When I took him he said that boy was the cause of it, and I thought I saw a boy put it into his hand.

GUILTY Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310908-72

1600. ISAAC STRAFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 12lbs. of block tin, value 9s. , the goods of James Whiskin , his master.

PATRICK WALLACE . I am a Police-officer. I saw the prisoner on the 8th of July, at the end of Aylesbury-street- he walked as if sober; he looked at me, and I thought it was not all right; I walked on one side of the way, and he in the road, till he came to some courts - he then could not get down, as he appeared to be drunk, but he could not walk, because of these things being between his legs- I went and asked what it was; he jumped up, and said it was nothing to me; I took the property, and took him to the station-house - he walked very soberly; I understood from him it was his own property.

JAMES WHISKIN . I live in Asbby-street, St. Johnstreet-road, and am a builder. The prisoner has been my groom and labourer more than five years and a half; this property was kept in a secure place, and the prisoner obtained the key of the drop-latch to get in there.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310908-73

1601. TRYPHENA ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 1 spoon, value 3s., and 1 seal, value 6d., the goods of Harriet Bancroft ; 2 curtains, value 3s., and 2 yards of printed cotton, value 1s. the goods of Hannah Prentice .

HARRIET BANCROFT . I am single . Mrs. Prentice lives in my house, No. 39, North Audley-street , and does childbed linen work; the prisoner was in her service. On the 24th of June a spoon, a seal, and some pieces of silk of mine were found concealed in the prisoner's bed; they had been taken out of my apartment, where she had no business to go.

HANNAH PRENTICE . I lodge at Mrs. Bancroft's. The prisoner was in my service a little more than a fortnight; she slept in the kitchen - I missed some articles: I looked into her bed, and found these articles rolled up on the pillow, and the bed turned up; these curtains and printed cotton are mine, and they had been taken from a trunk in the kitchen; when the prisoner saw the articles found she burst into tears, and said she was very sorry.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. My mistress said if I confessed she would forgive me, and let me go.

MRS. PRENTICE. It was a conditional promise, if this was all, but it was not.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress accused me of taking some of her work - but she found it in a box, which

she said she had searched all over; these curtains belong to the bed.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18310908-74

1602. JOSEPH THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of William Henry Whitehead , from his person .

WILLIAM HENRY WHITEHEAD. I am a solicitor . I was in the narrow passage leading from Lincoln's Inn New-square , to Serle-street , about a quarter before three o'clock in the afternoon of the 4th of July; my nephew, who was with me, told me my handkerchief was taken -I turned and found it on the ground in a corner, where it could not have dropped; it had been in my pocket - the prisoner, who was close behind me, was pointed out, and I called an officer.

JOHN ALEXANDER BEGBEE . I was walking a little behind my uncle, and saw the prisoner put his hand into the pocket and pull the handkerchief out; I told my uncle immediately - the prisoner put the handkerchief into his pocket, but when I told my uncle he took it out, and threw it on the ground.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking in the passage - there were several persons there; a person tapped me on the shoulder and said, I had picked that gentleman's pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-75

1603. JAMES PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 40lbs. weight of cotton, value 1l. , the goods of James Crocker and another.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD HAWKES . I am a Police-constable. On the 1st of July, about half past eight o'clock in the evening: I was opposite Baising-house court, Kingsland-road - I saw the prisoner come from the direction of that court, with a load on his head; I asked what he had there, he said cotton, and that he had it from Mr. Blackmore, Backhill, Billingsgate - I asked where he was going to take it; he and a man who was with him both said to Mr. Walker's, Norfolk-place, Curtain-road - I said they must go with me to the station-house; they turned and went about one hundred yards, and some persons said they were fools to carry the cotton - let the Policeman carry it; they then threw down the cotton, and the other man walked away - the prisoner attempted to go another way, but I seized and kept him till assistance came; he said he was carrying it for London.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. There was another man with him? A. Yes, who turned out to be a servant of the prosecutors' - the prisoner did not say London had employed him till he got to the station; I ascertained the next morning, that the prisoner and London both worked at one cotton factory.

JAMES CROCKER . I am a wadding-manufacturer , and have one partner - we live in Wood-street, Cheapside. The prisoner was in our employ for about five days; he had access to the warehouse - the greater part of this cotton has been through a process of manufacture and we cannot tell it so well as in its raw state, but this part is raw, and I know it to be ours; it is a rare description of cotton, we had bought about one hundred bags of it at Christmas.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a man named London in your employ? A. Yes, we have lost sight of him; I believe this cotton to be ours, but I would not swear to it - we have two manufactories, but only one for the manufacture of wadding; I expect this was taken from Cooper-street, City-road - London had access to the property.

THOMAS METCALFE. I am foreman to the prosecutors. I have examined the cotton, and believe it to be theirs; I suspected that some cotton was missing - this bag, in which it was found, is similar to ours, and I believe is one of ours.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose in bulk, your masters had a great deal of this cotton? A. Yes; I found the bales reduced faster than I expected, from what was manufactured; we employ forty persons or more - I generally give out the cotton, and it is open to all up stairs; London and the prisoner both knew the premises.

WILLIAM HENRY BLACKMORE . I am a cotton-merchant, and live at No. 64, Tower-street - I used to reside near Billingsgate; there is no such place as Back-hill there - I do not know the prisoner; I never employed him to carry cotton to Mr. Walker - there is no other cottonmerchant of my name.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that London had employed him to carry the cotton, which he informed him he had bought of Mr. Blackmore.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-76

1604. ELIZA SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 half-sovereign , the money of Alexander Skinner .

ALEXANDER SKINNER . I live in Shepperton-place, New North-road . I have known the prisoner about two years; her sister occupied my first floor; I missed money at different times, and on the 24th of July I marked a half-sovereign, which I put in a paper into one of the drawers in a chest of drawers in my bed-room; I locked the drawer, and told Dugan to hide himself under the bed; I left a young lad in my parlour, to come to me if he heard any demur - I was out about ten minutes, when I was sent for, and I found the prisoner in my bed-room, where she had no right to be; I found a key in the drawer in which I had left the money - the drawer was unlocked, and the half-sovereign was gone, but the purse was left, and four shillings, which were marked as the half-sovereign was- the prisoner denied having any money about her; she was searched by my wife, in the officer's presence - this half-sovereign was found on her.

ALEXANDER DUGAN . I am a baker. I saw the half-sovereign marked, and put into the purse; the purse was put into the drawer, which was locked by Mr. Skinner - I went under the bed, and in eight or ten minutes the prisoner came into the room, took a key from her pocket, and opened the drawer; she had it open about a minute - she then shut it in again, and I went and took hold of her; I said I had been waiting for her - she said," Have you?" I sent for Mr. Skinner.

MARY SKINNER . I am the prosecutor's wife. I asked the prisoner to give me the money; she owned she had had it - I put my hand into her bosom, and the half-sovereign fell from her; the Policeman took it up.

DANIEL HILEY . I am a Police-constable. I was sent for, and Mrs. Skinner said," I feel it in her bosom, but I cannot get it;" it then dropped from her, and I took it up.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-77

1605. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 watch-key, value 5s., and 1 watchribbon, value 6d., the goods of James James , from his person .

JAMES JAMES. I am an auctioneer . On the evening of the 7th of July, about ten o'clock, I was in Drury-lane -His Majesty was expected at the Theatre; I had two ladies with me - in going along I was surrounded by six or eight young men; I felt my watch drawing - I heard something snap, and it appeared that the swivel of my watch broke, and the ribbon and the key went off; the prisoner was nearest to me, and I took hold of him - I would not swear I saw his hand put towards me; I have not found my key and ribbon.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was it a dark night? A. Yes, but light in that neighbourhood with the lamps; there were a great many persons about; I said at the office that I would not swear the prisoner had robbed me; I do not recollect the Policeman telling me not to be afraid, but to swear positively - I did not tell the prisoner's mother that the Policeman desired me to swear to him; but the prisoner stood before me, and I laid hold of him instantly: when I first took hold of him he had a hat on certainly; whether it was off afterwards or not I cannot tell, but mine was.

JOHN NEWTON . I am a Police-officer. I was on duty, and saw a gang of fifteen young men; the prosecutor was going on, and the ladies following him - the gang separated, and part of them surrounded the prosecutor: I stood next to the prisoner, when I heard the prosecutor exclaim to the crowd around, "You have got my watch?" the prisoner was the nearest person to him - he did not know that I was an officer: the instant the prosecutor called out, I seized the prisoner's two hands, and lifted them up - I saw a ribbon and a key attached to it, in his possession; this was all the work of a moment; there was an attempt at rescue, and I was very ill-used with blows and kicks - I secured the prisoner, with three others.

Cross-examined. Q. Had any one else hold of the prisoner at that time? A. Yes, the prosecutor and two gentlemen, who are not here - I had counted the fifteen persons in the gang; there were thousands of persons in the street- I took fast hold of the prisoner's hands, and held them up, but in the attempt at rescue the key and ribbon might be taken from him without my seeing it - the ribbon appeared a dark colour; I saw no seal, only a key.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-78

1606. RICHARD TAYLOR and CHARLES FAVELL were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Victor Gex , from his person .

VICTOR GEX . I was in Oxford-street on the 22nd of July - I had a pocket-handkerchief in my pocket; I did not notice any thing about it, but as I was walking with a lady some one tapped me on the shoulder, and said if I would go back I should find where my handkerchief was; I turned, and found it in the hands of two Police-officers, and the prisoners were in custody - this is it.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a Police-constable. I was in Oxford-street, and saw the two prisoners following a gentleman; they left him, followed the prosecutor, and just as they got to Swallow-passage Taylor drew the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and gave it to Favell; they ran down Swallow-passage, and Favell threw the handkerchief into a shop - I and my brother officer took them.

Favell. You said you did not lose sight of me. Witness. No, I did not.

THOMAS FARRAND . I was with Hobbs, and saw the two prisoners following a gentleman and lady - they then crossed, and followed the prosecutor; Taylor took the handkerchief from him, and gave it to Favell - he threw it into a poulterer's shop; I seized him, and informed the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Favell's Defence. I know nothing of this lad, and was not in his company.

TAYLOR- GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

FAVELL- GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-79

1607. SARAH VOLKART was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 2 sheets, value 5s.; 2 blankets, value 4s.; 1 pillow, value 1s.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d.; 1 towel, value 6d., and 1 quilt, value 2s. , the goods of William Thompson .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am an upholsterer , and live in Marylebone . I let the prisoner a one pair back room, furnished, on the 7th of July, and on the 18th I followed her into the room, asked for rent, and missed some articles - I asked her about them; she said I should have them by ten o'clock that night - I sent for an officer, who found the duplicates on the table in her room.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found the duplicates on the table.

WILLIAM SPENCER . I am shopman to Mr. Hall, a pawnbroker. I have a number of articles, which were pawned by a woman, in the name of Ann Smith , and these are the duplicates that were given for them - I cannot swear to the prisoner.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that being in distressed circumstances she had pledged the articles to procure the prosecutrix her rent, and intended to redeem them. She received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-80

1608. RICHARD CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 coat, value 4l. , the goods of Frederick Drayson .

FREDERICK DRAYSON . I live at Waltham Abbey. I was returning from town in my chaise, on the 18th of July, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening - I was passing through Shoreditch ; I had a surtout-coat, wrapped up in a paper, and my address on it, under the back seat of the chaise - I was on the front seat; it rained - I

buttoned myself up, and on turning the coat was gone: I saw a Police-officer, and told him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN ECCLESTON . I am an officer. I was on duty in East-road, near the City-road, and saw the prisoner near the Three Crowns; I suspected he had something; I went to stop him - he ran down Brunswick-place, and I followed him; he dropped this parcel from under his smock-frock, and ran on to Charles-square.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-81

1609. EDWARD CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , 1 saw, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Pye .

JAMES OAKES . I am a Policeman. I met the prisoner with this saw, at half-past four o'clock in the morning, in Paradise-row, Chelsea; I asked who it belonged to - he would not tell me; at last he said he had it from a man whom he did not know, and that he himself had no residence.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am a sawyer. I work for Thomas Pye ; I saw this saw in his tool-house, in Manor-street , the night before; I know the prisoner - he never worked for the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310908-82

1610. JOSEPH CLAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 1 coat, value 12s. , the goods of Henry Cohen .

JAMES CLAPSON . I am a Policeman. On the 28th of July, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner with this parcel on his shoulder; I asked what it was - he said a coat, which he had bought that morning, and at the station he said he had bought it at Cohen's.

HENRY COHEN . I keep a clothes-shop in Edgwareroad . This is my coat - I never sold it; it was not missed till the Policeman brought it - I had seen it the night before by the window; my shopmen are not here- I am to and fro all day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-83

1611. HENRY COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , 2 coats, value 2l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 1l., and 1 cloak, value 1l. , the goods of William Bourne and Henry Bax , his masters.

HENRY BAX . I am in partnership with William Bourne ; we are tailors , in Leicester-square - the prisoner was our journeyman . On the 9th of August he came between five and six o'clock, when I was in bed; I only heard him come in, and cannot myself say it was him - when the shopmen came at seven they found the shop stripped.

ANN REVELL . I am the prosecutor's servant. On the 9th of August the prisoner came, between five and six o'clock, and went up into the workshop - I heard him go out in about half an hour, but cannot say he took any thing out.

JAMES McDONALD . I work at the prosecutor's. When I went that morning I found the shop stripped.

GEORGE COLLY . I am a Policeman. I received information, and took the prisoner at Hampstead; he denied the robbery, and said he had not been at the prosecutors' that day - I found this lead pencil on him.

JOHN McDONALD . This pencil I had left safe at seven o'clock the night before in the shop, and left the prisoner there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-84

1612. JOHN SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Charles Rigby , from his person .

JOSEPH BROWN RIGBY . On the 23rd of July, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in St. Giles' , with my brother Charles - we heard a scuffle behind; I turned, and saw the prisoner with my brother's handkerchief in his hand - I took hold of him, and gave him in charge.

Prisoner. Q. Was any body with me? A. There was another person with him, but it was in his hand.

CHARLES RIGBY . My handkerchief was in my pocket - I did not feel it taken, but on hearing a scuffle I saw it in the prisoner's hand.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief was taken out of the pocket, and thrown at my feet - I took it up, and was going to give it to the gentleman; I told him who the lad was.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-85

1613. JOHN SEYMOUR and JOSEPH BROOK were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 21/2lbs. of ham, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Egan .

JOHN EGAN . I keep a chandler's shop , at Brompton , and sell beer. This ham was in pickle in my yard; I saw it safe on the 6th of July - it was one ham and a small piece.

WILLIAM REARDON . I am a plumber. I was at Mr. Egan's, having half a pint of beer - I saw four soldiers in the little room behind the shop; the prisoners were two of them - I saw Brook go out of the room into the yard; he returned through the room, carrying a piece of ham partly covered with a handkerchief; he went up the street with it - I tried to get through the passage after him, but the other soldiers obstructed me; Seymour was one of them - when they left I went out, and came up with Brook, who then had two other soldiers with him; I went up the street, and saw Seymour with the same bundle under his arm.

THOMAS EASTLAND . I am an officer. I took Seymour with this piece of ham; he said they were only going to have bacon and eggs for supper.

Seymour's Defence. Brook came and gave me the bundle to hold.

Brook. I did no such thing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-86

1614. ISAIAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s., and 2 sovereigns , the property of Henry Henderson , his master.

HENRY HENDERSON . I am a surgeon , and live in Gloucester-place - the prisoner had lived with me as errand-boy , and I took him again. On the 22nd of August, before I was up, he brought me a bill from Mr. Bell, a bootmaker, for 5l., and said Bell was waiting; I said it was not convenient to pay it - he said Bell would be satisfied with part payment, and I gave him two sovereigns; I came down in about an hour - the prisoner was then gone, and he had taken a suit of clothes, which were

given him to wear in my house; he was taken next morning.

JOHN BELL. I am a bootmaker. Mr. Henderson owed me a bill; I never went for it, nor did the prisoner ever give me any money.

CHARLES MORGAN . I am a Police-constable. On the 22nd of August I took the prisoner, and got the clothes from his brother; his sister gave me two sovereigns.

GUILTY of stealing two sovereigns . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-87

1615. ANN READ was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 waistcoat, value 5s. , the goods of William Gofton .

CHARLES HENRY WATER . I am a servant to Mr. William Gofton , a pawnbroker , in Gilbert-street . On the 4th of July I received information, went out, and secured the prisoner about half way up the street; I said she had taken something from our shop, which she denied, and dropped this waistcoat, which had been pinned outside the door.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-88

1616. WILLIAM LE COMBER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Pearce .

JOHN GOSTLING . I live with Mr. Pearce, a salesman . These shoes hung on some wax-end in the shop; I saw the prisoner break the wax-end, take the shoes, and go on; I ran and collared him, and found the shoes on the pavement.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310908-89

1617. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , 10 shirts, value 18s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s. 6d.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 jacket, value 3s. 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 3s.; 1 cap, value 2s. 6d., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Rothwell .

THOMAS ROTHWELL . I am a Chelsea pensioner . I took my passage on board the Caroline for New South Wales; I packed up the articles stated in the indictment in my trunk - a man named Ecclesby fetched the prisoner to carry it to St. Katharine's-dock to be put on board; I saw him in possession of it - I went on board next morning, and found it had not been brought; I went to Ecclesby's house, but did not see the prisoner again till he was in custody - the box was locked, and was found still locked, but the screws are taken out.

JOHN RIDLER . I am a Policeman. Ecclesby described the prisoner to me; I found him at the General Elliott, Jews'-row, Chelsea - as I brought him by the Coach and Horses public-house, he wanted to go in there, but I would not let him; I took him to the station-house, then returned to the Coach and Horses, and found this trunk - I went and searched the prisoner, and found this duplicate on him; he then owned that he had taken some shirts out of the box, but that he took the box on board, and said Ecclesby knew nothing about it.

JOHN HILLINGWORTH . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in King's-road, Chelsea. I took in two parcels of shirts, one of which I am certain the prisoner pawned.

GEORGE HULL . I am shopman to Mr. Thompson, a pawnbroker. I have a shirt, pawned by the prisoner.

URIAH AUSTIN . I live at the Coach and Horses public-house. The prisoner left this box there when I went to dinner; he said he would call again for it, but did not - I am positive he left it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-90

1618. FRANCES HORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 necklace, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Goulden , from the person of Eliza Goulden .

ANN GOULDEN . I am the wife of Thomas Goulden ; we live near Vauxhall-bridge. My daughter Eliza went out with her brother about seven o'clock in the evening, and returned without her neclace.

THOMAS KING . I am a Policeman. I received information of this, ran down to Courtney and Page's, Pimlico, and heard the prisoner and another girl had been there two minutes before; I ran and overtook them, and found this necklace on the prisoner - she said it was her sister's, and her mother had sent her to pawn it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-91

1619. JOHN HOOK was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 1 brooch, value 2s. , the goods of Ann Maynard .

ANN MAYNARD . I am the wife of Thomas Maynard . The prisoner was employed by Roberts, who was doing a job at our house. On the 27th of July the gold brooch was safe in my dressing table drawer in my bed-room, at seven o'clock in the morning, and I missed it soon after five, when the prisoner went; he had been at work in the bed-room - I saw the brooch found on him by Roberts.

EDWARD ROBERTS . I was at work at Maynard's. I went to look at the work, and heard the brooch was lost; I asked the prisoner if he had it - he said, No; I told him to turn out his pocket, which he did, and the brooch fell down - he has worked for me some time.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-92

1620. JOHN HENDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 26 yards of linen, value 26s. , the goods of Thomas Lewis .

THOMAS LEWIS . I live in Pleasant-row, Camden-town , On the 17th of August, about one o'clock, I was at the back of my shop, which is about forty feet long; the prisoner and another came in - I saw the other take a piece of print out of a box, and give it to the prisoner; they then went out - there was nobody else in the shop; I followed, and when they had got some distance one went up the street and the other down; I went down the street in search of the other, but he had not got it - I then returned, and brought the prisoner with it under his arm; I knew nothing of him before.

MALACHI ENGLISH . I am a Policeman. I was passing, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-93

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1621. HENRY ELSMORE was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE HAMPTON . I am a clerk to Messrs. Pickford and Co. - Zachary Langton is one of the partners. The prisoner was one of their porters - it was his duty to carry out parcels; here is the book which he takes out - this entry of the 25th of July is mine; it is a parcel directed to Mr. Stubley, and opposite it is written 8d. and 2s. 10d., which is the porterage and carriage - I delivered the book to the prisoner with the parcels; it was his duty at night to account for that 3s. 6d. - he did not account to me that night; here is an entry of mine of 5s. 8d., and another in the name of Cooper of 8d. and 7s. 6d. - that was in the book when it was delivered to him on the 5th of August; the prisoner did not account to me for the 5s. 8d.

EDWARD GARRET STUBLEY . I am foreman to my brother, a hatter, in Castle-street. On the 25th of July, the prisoner brought a package from Pickford's; my brother paid him 3s. 6d., and he gave the ticket.

WILLIAM GEORGE STUBLEY . On the 25th of July I received the ticket as a receipt from the prisoner, and gave it to my brother to file; I took it off, and gave it to the officer.

THOMAS KERSEY BROWN . I am servant to Messrs. Pickford and Co. I made out this ticket, which the prisoner took out on the 25th of July - I put it into the book with other tickets.

FREDERICK NEWCOME . I am warehouseman to Mr. Cooper, a hat-manufacturer, in Castle-street. On the 5th of August the prisoner brought a package from Pickford's - I paid him 8s. 2d.; he gave me this ticket - I signed this book, as having received the parcel.

JAMES SIMPSON FROST . I am a clerk to Messrs. Pickford and Co. It was the prisoner's duty to account to me on his return; here is the account made from his report of the proceedings of the 25th of July - here is Stubley's entry, but the money left unpaid, and I have carried it out as not paid; I carry out in a margin what he says is not paid - he was by when I carried it out; I do not recollect this particular item - I never made up an account in his absence; it is entirely confined to his transactions; I charge him with all the parcels, then what he says is not paid I carry out and deduct - I do not think I could make a mistake; on the 5th of August, 8s. 2d., in the name of Cooper is deducted - I paid another clerk the sum the prisoner paid me.

CHARLES SHERIDAN SATERTHWAITE . I am a clerk to Messrs. Pickford's - I receive the balance from Frost. On the 25th of July I received 7l. 2s. 11d.; I put it down as I received it, in gold, silver, and copper.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Have you any particulars of the transaction? A. No, not of the particular one, but here are my figures.

THOMAS DEWHURST . I am cashier to the prosecutors. On the 5th of August I received 5l. 3s. 8d. from Frost, as the balance of the prisoner's account with the ticket - I cannot speak to the transaction from memory.

J. S. FROST re-examined. I never made an error in my account, and never made an entry but from the dictation of the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prisoner been there? A.I was there two years and a half, and he was there before me.

Prisoner's Defence. The clerks frequently made a mistake from my books, entering them when there was carriage paid; and they have entered more money in my books than was charged on the bill, and I have brought the bills back to show them.

GEORGE HAMPTON . I have not the least recollection of any mistakes being made.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever make a mistake in your accounts with the prisoner? A. I will not swear I did not.

JURY to J.S. FROST. Q. When the prisoner said the people had not paid him, was it not your duty to ask for the tickets? A. In most cases the parties keep the tickets till morning, when he has to call again; I do not know whether he can read a bill.

W. G. STUBLEY. I recollect paying the money on the 25th of July, from a conversation I had with him; I think on two occasions he left goods without being paid, but I never recollect his leaving the tickets.

THOMAS DEWHURST . I know the prisoner can read.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-94

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1622. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 1 coat, value 8s. , the goods of Joseph Goose .

JOSEPH GOOSE . I live in Tooley street, and am a carman . On the 27th of August, about eleven o'clock in the day, my cart stood in St. Paul's-church-yard ; I came out of a shop, and my coat was gone; I saw it in the officer's hands in about three minutes.

THOMAS WEST . I live at Brook-green, and am a coachman. I saw the prisoner take the coat from the cart, and the officer had him.

JAMES WILMOTT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner with the coat under his arm - he said it was his, and he was going to take it home.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked a young man to show me the way to St. James'-Park; as I went on with him he stopped and gave me the coat to hold, while he went up an alley.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-95

1623. WILLIAM FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 4 fitch skins, value 10s. , the goods of Samuel John Grottick .

BARNEY AARON . I live in Carter-street, Houndsditch, and am a furrier. On the 13th of July, the prisoner brought four fitch skins to my house, and asked what I would give for a dozen - I offered 15s.; he asked how much I would give for the four, and said 2s. - he said he would fetch the rest - I gave him 1s., and he went away; upon looking at them I knew they were the prosecutors, and informed him - I saw the prisoner in about an hour at his house.

JAMES GARDNER . I am foreman to Samuel John Grottick, of Wood-street, Cheapside, furrier , &c. These skins are marked with his mark - he does not sell them in this

state, but makes them up - he was out of town when this was committed; they are worth 2s. 6d. or 3s. each - the prisoner's wife was nursing the children, who were ill, and he was in the habit of coming to the house - I went to her lodgings, found him there, and six more skins, which he said he would bring back.

SAMUEL JOHN GROTTICK . I am a furrier. The prisoner was about two months in my employ, and I discharged him on account of ill health; I was out of town at this time - he had an honest character; I had known him three or four years - I would not object to take him again; I have no means of knowing whether these have been sold.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-96

1624. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 cloak, value 3l. , the goods of James Parkins and another.

JAMES PARKINS . I live in Aldgate , and have a partner. On the 9th of July, I saw the prisoner pull a cloak down from our door; there was a person in his company - I ran out, and he dropped it; I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man pull it down, and run off; I am innocent.

JAMES PARKINS . I am certain he took it.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-97

1625. WILLIAM MERES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 4 handkerchiefs, value 16s. , the goods of George Everingham .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, calling it 4 yards of silk.

GEORGE EVERINGHAM . I live in Leadenhall-street . This piece of handkerchiefs was at my shop door for sale; it was four handkerchiefs in one piece - on the 25th of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was looking, and saw them taken; I went to the door, and saw the prisoner running off with them - I pursued, calling Stop thief! he dropped them, and was taken, without my losing sight of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Q. You asked me where they were - if you saw me drop them why not take them up? A. I was anxious to take him; I saw him drop them, and a gentleman gave them to me.

BENJAMIN SAVILL . I am a watchman. I heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running, and stopped him two or three hundred yards from the door; I was opposite the house, and saw him come into the road.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and the patrol stopped me; I was running because I was late.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-98

1626. THOMAS CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

BENJAMIN ALLEN STONE . I live in Hosier-lane, and am a constable. On the 21st of July, at night, I was on Holborn-hill; I followed the prisoner and two others from Field-lane to the corner of Hatton-garden - the prisoner was attempting a gentleman's pocket all the way; I at last saw him take a silk handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket - I had followed them two or three hundred yards; he gave the handkerchief to a lad in a blue jacket, who was one of his companions - I ran across the road, and tried to lay hold of both, but they got from me; the other dropped the handkerchief - I took it up, and seized the prisoner; this is it - I do not know the gentleman: if I had followed him I should have lost the prisoner - I should know the other lad again; I have inquired respecting the prisoner, and find he and all his friends were out of work - I believe the utmost distress drove him to it; I hear a very good character of him - he ran about one hundred and fifty yards.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, denying the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-99

1627. THOMAS BIGWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 chain, value 2s.; 2 seals, value 5s.; 1 key, value 1s., and 4 halfcrowns, the property of James Whitty from his person ; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JAMES WHITTY . I live in Water-lane, Fleet-street. On the 14th of July, I was in West Smithfield , about twelve o'clock at night, in company with the prisoner, and another man and woman, who were his friends; I had before that lost a sovereign, and the prisoner said, at Smithfield, that he did not believe it, and wished me to count my money over - I did so, and, in counting it, dropped a farthing: the prisoner said directly, "There goes half a crown;" I said it was only a farthing, and pulled out my watch to see the time - the woman said, "Look at his watch;" I was sober - the man in a white jacket immediately held up his head, and said, "What is it o'clock?" I said, "Nearly twelve;" he said, "Let us look," and immediately took it from me - the prisoner immediately seized me by my right arm, and said, "Come along, I want to get home, it is wet;" I said, "Where are your friends? they have got my watch;" he said, "They will be here in a minute;" he immediately put his hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took the remaining money which I had - it was four half-crowns, and 1s, or 1s. 6d.

Prisoner. Q.We had been drinking all day - can you swear I took your money out of your pocket? A. You did, nearly opposite Long-lane, on the other side of the way - I lost 15s. in all; I lost the sovereign in Brick-lane, and gave you leave to search my pocket, but that was before I lost the watch - I made my money 16s.; he counted it, and said there were only 11s. - I can swear there were four half-crowns; the other man did not search my pocket- I had been to Shadwell with a young man, who was a patient in the hospital with me, and the prisoner went with us - as we returned about ten o'clock the prisoner asked us to go into a public-house, and we staid there half an hour - a man brought a woman in, and put her opposite the prisoner; he did not recognize her at first, but afterwards said she was his sister, and had come from the country - I left there about eleven o'clock, and they all followed me; I told the prisoner I was a stranger, and would he see me a little way home - he said he would, and at Finsbury-square I said I knew my way then, and would not trouble him.

THOMAS McNEIL . I am a wheelwright, and live at Clerkenwell-green. I was in Smithfield, and heard the

prosecutor accuse the prisoner of robbing him; the prisoner said he had not a farthing in his pocket, and was willing to be searched; I stood there a little bit, and the prisoner took the prosecutor aside, and said, "Come with me, I'll find your watch and money;" we went a little way, and then the prisoner bolted off; we followed, and saw him under an archway, pulling out four half-crowns and 1s. 6d.; I said, "Give this young man the money, it is not yours: he said, "I will keep what I have got," and escaped, but was afterwards taken: I returned, and told the watchman.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner next day, in consequence of information from McNeil and the prosecutor - I took him and his sister in Smithfield.

CHARLES THOROGOOD . I produce a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner for felony, on the 20th of December; (read) - I know he is the man.

GUILTY of stealing the half-crowns only . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-100

1628. HENRY THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of John Gardner , from his person .

THOMAS CUSS . I live in Buckingham-street, Strand, and am a constable. On the morning of the 22nd of August I saw the prisoner and another lad in Smithfield , following John Gardner - I followed a little way, and saw the prisoner putting a handkerchief into his own pocket; he saw me then threw it among some sheep, and ran away- I called Stop thief! and some butchers stopped him - a boy took up the handkerchief, and gave it to me.

Prisoner. Q.Did you see me take it? A. No.

JOHN GARDNER . I live at No. 12, Gloucester-street, St. John-street-road. On the 22nd of August I was in Smithfield, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned, saw the prisoner stopped by a butcher, and saw some person throw my handkerchief among some sheep - it was safe in my pocket shortly before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have been convicted here before - I then went home, but my father could do nothing for me; I was going to get a ship when the officer laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-101

OLD COURT. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1629. FREDERICK MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 2 aprons, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 3s.; and 1 towel, value 6d., the goods of Elizabeth Peney ; 3 aprons, value 1s., and 1 gown, value 6d. , the goods of Ann Allen .

ANN ALLEN . I am a chambermaid , at Mr. Hawkins' hotel, Daver-street - the prisoner was their errand-boy . On the 13th of July I gave him these things in a bundle to take to the mangler's, in Vine-street - he returned, and said the woman would not let him have them, unless he paid 6d. for them, which I gave him, and never saw him again.

ELIZABETH PENEY . I am a servant at this hotel. I put my things in this bundle.

DANIEL McLEAN . I am a Policeman. On the 17th of July I took the prisoner in Great James-street, and found duplicates of the property on him.

JOHN EDWARD NEAVES . I am a shopman to Mr. Tomlinson, of George-street. I have a shift and apron, pawned by a boy, in the name of Catherine Murray - this is the counterpart of the duplicate; I do not know the boy - I did not take them in.

WILLIAM IRELAND . I am an officer. I have a gown, apron, and towel, which the prisoner's sister gave me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had taken the articles to the mangler's, fetched them on the following day, and returned all but those produced, which he pledged to assist his mother.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-102

1630. WILLIAM MELSOM was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 1 time-piece, value 20s., the goods of Thomas Stillman ; and 1 parasol, value 3s. , the goods of Catherine Stillman .

CATHERINE STILLMAN . I am the daughter of Thomas Stillman, a furniture-broker , who lives in Duncan-place . This time-piece was near the window on the 24th of August- as I came down stairs I saw the prisoner going off the step of the door with it in his hand; I pursued about a hundred yards, calling Stop thief! I then lost sight of him as he put it down, and ran away - I took it up, and returned home; the Policeman brought him back soon after - I did not see his face, but have not a doubt of him; he was the same size, and wore the same dress - the parasol laid on a side-board in the passage.

HENRY GODDARD . I am a baker. I saw the prisoner about twenty yards from the prosecutor's door, with a time piece and a parasol in his hand - he ran away, I followed, saw him drop the time-piece, and did not lose sight of him till he was taken.

WILLIAM LAMBERT . I am a Policeman. I saw the prisoner lay down the parasol on the pathway - I pursued, and never lost sight of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was walking with a boy, who on hearing the alarm, threw the articles at his feet, and ran away, but that they were never in his possession.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-103

1631. ROBERT NEWBY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 2 saws, value 35s. , the goods of Matthew Buck .

The saws being obtained by the prisoner under a false pretence, and not feloniously he was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310908-104

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1632. JOHN WINDSOR was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 17 silver spoons, value 4l. 1s.; 1 teapot, value 10s., and 4 forks, value 9s., the goods of Clarissa Mary Ann Freemantle , in her dwelling-house .

ANN MARY COLLINS . I am servant to Mrs. Clarissa Mary Ann Freemantle, who lives in Queen's-row, Pentonville . On the 22nd of July, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I was at the first floor window, and saw the prisoner leaving the garden - suspecting him, I ran down instantly, and missed this property from the kitchen closet - I had put it out of my hands ten minutes before;

the cupboard was open - I followed, and overtook him in Claremont-square; I laid hold of him, and charged him with it - he broke from me; I raised a cry of Stop thief! he was brought back to me at the corner of Middleton-street; I had lost sight of him.

BENJAMIN GOODMAN . I work at Mr. Aker's liverystable, Arlington-street, about a quarter of a mile from Claremont-square, on the 22nd of July. An alarm was given, and the prisoner came by me, as I was washing a chaise - he jumped over a cistern and over a wall into the back of No. 108, St. John's-street; I saw his countenance so as to know him again - I followed him down the garden - he ran through the house, and down the front area steps; he shut the area door - I went to the front kitchen window, and saw him pull the silver spoons out of his pocket, and put them under the mat at the door; I secured him in the area, and gave the spoons to the Policeman.

EDWARD GROGAN . I am a Policeman. I met the prisoner in Rosamond-street, in Goodman's custody - Goodman gave me all the things but the tea-pot, which a baker in Arlington-street gave me - as I took him to Hattongarden he said it would be the breaking of his mother's heart; that want drove him to it, and he was sorry for it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-105

Before Mr. Baron Bayley .

1633. SARAH NICHOLS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 2 blankets, value 8s.; 1 bolster, value 6s., and 1 candlestick, value 1s. , the goods of Mark Falorina .

ESTHER FALORINA. I am the wife of Mark Falorina . The prisoner and her husband came to lodge at our house on the 17th of June - these articles were let with the lodgings; I went up, in consequence of a lodger calling out, "Mrs. Nichols has pawned your blankets;" I went into the room - the prisoner said, "I have only pawned one blanket," but I insisted on going to the bed - she owed me 2l. 10s., which was five weeks' rent; I do not know whether she was distressed - she behaved very well.

JOSEPH WILLIAM CLARK. I am shopman to Mr. Herring, a pawnbroker. These blankets were pawned on the 28th of July, by a woman, whom I do not know.

JOSEPH HUTTSON. I have two blankets, which were pawned separately, on the 22nd of June and the 14th of July, by a woman, whom I do not know; the prisoner pawned the candlestick on the 23rd of August - the person who took in the blankets has left.

WILLIAM KING . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge - she seemed quite confused; she said she was going to redeem the things, and that she was looking for her husband, who was in my custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. During the last nine years my husband has been dreadfully afflicted, and this summer was wholly laid up; we were without victuals.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310908-106

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1634. ELIZABETH BETTESWORTH was indicted for embezzling 2s. 3d., which she had received as a servant employed in the Post-office .

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL and MR. SCARIETT conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH WILLY . I am the son of Ambrose Willy , who lives at Teddington. On the 31st of June last I wrote nine letters, by desire of my father, in answer to advertisements in the Times respecting servants - I directed eight of the letters; they were addressed to initials - I gave them to my father.

AMBROSE WILLY . On the 30th of June my son wrote these letters by my direction - I sealed them, and on the next morning (Friday, the 1st of July,) gave them to my son, Ambrose, with 2s. 6d. to pay the postage; I went to three of the places where I had appointed meetings, and none of the servants came.

AMBROSE WILLY. On the 1st of July I received nine letters from my father, with half a crown; I took them to the post-office, and saw a little girl at the door - she called Aunt! and the prisoner came; I will not be sure she is the woman - it was a stouter woman, I think, but I gave that person the letters, and the half-crown; I do not recollect whether I said any thing - the postage came to 2s. 3d.; I waited a few minutes while she stamped one or two of the letters - I then left, and forgot the change; I went back in about an hour, and got the change from a woman - I do not recollect whether it was the same person; I stopped at the door on my donkey - she brought the change out to me directly; I took the letters to the post-office about seven o'clock in the morning.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you sure it was not near eight o'clock when you got there with them? A. I do not know; I went directly I got them from my father - our house is about a quarter of a mile from the post-office - I do not know whether I was known there; I did not see the postman come in - when I returned for my change; I did not say who I was - I stopped outside, and asked for 3d. which I had forgotten, and she gave it to me.

MR. WILLY. I gave the letters to my son about seven o'clock - I have seen the prisoner at the post-office at Teddington; she had a niece there - I sent my son back about nine o'clock for the threepence.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner knew who you were? A. Perfectly well; I have lived there six years- my family are very likely known there.

ROBERT WEAL . I am a letter-carrier. I carry the letters from Teddington receiving-house to Twickenham - Mr. Edwards kept the receiving-house at Teddington; the prisoner generally acted for him - she used to take the letters out of the box, and stamp them by the time I came, and give them to me, with the postage; on Friday, the 1st of July, I received the unpaid letters, and two paid letters, with 6d.; I remember it well, because Mr. Willy called on me about it on the following Monday; this is the bill which I received on the 1st of July, (looking at it) - I put down on it "Seven unpaid, and two paid, 6d.;" it is dated the 31st of June, but I did not date it - here is the entry of a money letter on it; I have seen the prisoner write, and believe that entry to be her writing - the letters were taken out of the box at the time I went, and laid on a table; the

prisoner gave me the 6d. - I took all the letters which I received to Twickenham, with this bill; Mr. Willy made some inquiries on the Monday of me - I immediately went to the post-office, to the prisoner - nobody else was present; I asked if she remembered receiving nine letters from Mr. Willy on Friday morning; she said she remembered receiving nine letters from Mr. Willy's son, but it was on Saturday morning, not Friday - I said I was sure they did not go on Friday morning, nor on Saturday, for I should have remembered them going through my hands - I do not remember, during the eight years I have fetched them, having so many paid letters in a morning; the afternoon delivery contains general-post letter - she said she was quite sure it was on Saturday morning, and it was as long back as Saturday week; I said I had not the slightest recollection of the letters myself - I had seen Mr. Willy at my house about seven o'clock, and got to the post-office about half-past seven o'clock; I should be there a quarter before eight o'clock.

Q.Were you in the habit of filling up the columns in the bill? A. Yes, my predecessor had done it - the prisoner was always by me when I made out the bill, when at home, and was so on the 1st of July, when I did it; she said, at the post-office, where there was an examination, that her niece was present, and heard her observe to me "What a number of paid letters there are to-day;" that this was the morning the nine letters were brought - I know her niece was not in the room on the Friday morning - she might have been standing at the door; she certainly did not make that observation to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you always very punctual to your time of half-past eight in the morning? A. Yes, in my collection; I sometimes got the prisoner to deliver letters for me - I paid her for it; I have got others to do it- I do not drink till after my duty is over - I have got a man named Kembly to deliver letters for me; I may have been drunk once or twice during the time I have been at Teddington, and he has delivered letters for me when I had a friend whom I wished to be with - the evening collection is at three o'clock - I was never at the office so late as ten o'clock at night; I dare not leave in the morning till a quarter before eight o'clock - I was in the house on the 1st of July at a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning; I was there perhaps about five minutes before I received the letters; I did not state that I was in a hurry - the prisoner was standing by the table when I went in; I did not see these letters brought - I will swear the niece was not in the room; my regular time to be at Twickenham is twenty minutes before nine; it is better than a mile and a half from Teddington - I was there in time that morning.

Q.Did you not take the letters and stamp some of them yourself? A. I did not on that morning - I have done so: I heard the niece say at the post-office, and at Bow-street, that her aunt had observed to me what a number of paid letters there were; I remember one very wet day in the winter getting Stevens, the watchman, to deliver a letter at Dr. Vint's, which is opposite his box - I cannot say whether the two paid letters on the 1st of July were directed to initials.

Q.Did you not take the letters off the counter, professing to be in a hurry, and carry them away? A. I did not; I received the prisoner's salary for her, and she had said, "Let me have 1l., I do not want the rest till my rent is due; if I have not got it I cannot pay it away;" about six months ago she said her rent was due to-morrow, and she should be obliged to me for the money; I unfortunately had not got it in my pocket, but she had it, I believe, next day; I had received it about a fortnight - she did not threaten to complain to the post-office of me.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q.Where do you receive the money? A. We receive an order from the office to pay it out of the money we collect; it sometimes takes a week to collect what we have to pay, which is three offices - she had 8l. a year; I was sober on the morning of the 1st of July, and employed nobody to deliver any letters.

Q. On what morning did the little girl say this conversation had passed? A.She did not say it was not on the Friday morning.

JAMES ARCHER . I am charge-taker at the Twickenham post-office. It is the duty of the letter-carriers to bring all the Teddington letters to me - I take them is my hand, compare them with the bill, then make a fresh bill, which I send with the old one: I receive the letters from three offices, and send three bills with my own - this bill (looking at it) was made out on the 1st of July; the Teddington letters that morning were seven unpaid and two paid, and the postage 6d. - I received no others from Teddington that morning; I never remember so many as nine paid letters coming from Teddington - Weal mentioned this circumstance to me on the Monday, and I certainly should have recollected so many paid letters, if they had been brought within four or five days; Weal has been the Teddington carrier about eight years - I believe he was punctual that morning; I know nothing against his not being in time generally.

MR. BARRY. Q. What time have you to make up your letters? A.Ten minutes after his arrival.

ROBERT SMITH . I am one of the presidents of the Twopenny Post-office. On Saturday, the 9th of July, I went to Teddington; I saw the prisoner - I said I had come from the Post-office, in consequence of an inquiry made by Mr. Willy, and asked if she remembered receiving nine letters from his son on the 1st of July; she said she did remember receiving the letters, but thought it was before that period - I said, "What did you do with them?" she said, "Sent them to the office;" I said, "That is impossible, for on the morning in question there are only two letters entered," and for a week previous there were not any letters to correspond with that number - I produced the bill, which she looked at, and said, "The figures are not my hand-writing," that Weal had put them; I said that was extremely improper, against the positive instructions, and I should say no more till Weal was present - I left, and returned about a quarter before three o'clock, with Weal, and asked him, in the prisoner's presence, whether he had received that number of letters; he said he had not - I asked how he came to put the figures in the bill; he said they were frequently in a hurry, and the letters were not always ready when he called; that he had been in the practice of doing so, and his predecessor also - the prisoner also said that it was in consequence of his being in a hurry that he put them there, but did not admit that

he always did it; she said she was quite sure that all letters she received she gave him, but she could not be quite sure on what morning these came - I told her nine letters were an unusual number, and could she recollect having paid him any particular sum of money; she said she could not, but all the money, and all the letters she had received she gave him - on Thursday, the 14th, she was at the Post-office; the solicitor had her into his room - he first cautioned her not to say any thing to prejudice herself, but that she might answer what questions she thought proper, and that the answers she made might be brought in evidence against her; he wrote down what she stated, and I witnessed and signed it - this is it (looking at it) - (read)

Elizabeth Bettesworth says "I recollect receiving the nine letters from Mr. Willy's son, with half a crown to pay 2s. 3d. - he stood and saw me stamp them with the paid stamp; and, before I counted them, he went away without his change - this was just after seven o'clock; and between eight and nine, after the postman had gone out, he came back and asked for his change, which I gave him - I think the nine letters were all directed to London; after stamping them I put them into the letter-box, which is always locked - I dropped them through the slip; I cannot say whether I put the money into my pocket, or on the ink-stand - I do not recollect whether there were any other unpaid letters that morning; when Weal, the carrier, came for the letters, a little before, I unlocked the box, and gave him out the letters - I cannot say exactly how many there were; I remarked to him There are a great many paid letters this morning -I cannot say what answer he made; I gave him the postage, but cannot say how much - the half-crown I had received was part of it - whether he gave me change or not I cannot say; Weal mostly entered the number of paid and unpaid letters on the bill, which I look over, to see that it is correct; I mostly do so, but cannot say whether I did that morning - the address, Mr. John Fisher , No. 16, Providence-row, on the bill now produced, is my hand-writing; the figures are not mine, they are Weal's - the 31st of June means the 1st of July; it was very unusual to have so many paid letters in a morning, which made me mention it."

Witness. On the 14th I went to her house, and Mr. Edwards said, in the prisoner's presence, that the girl had heard the observation made - the niece had been mentioned before this examination.

Cross-examined. Q. You afterwards took the niece into a room and examined her? A. I did not, but she was taken into a room at Bow-street; I believe the witnesses were present, and her father also - I searched at Mrs. Edwards' premises for the letters, and at the carrier's also, but did not find them.

THOMAS MUSGRAVE . I am comptroller of the Postoffice. I received these papers from the Post-office at Teddington; it is the oath of office of the assistant to the letter-receiver.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) The postman, on the morning in question, filled up the ticket himself, as I believe, for I did not fill it up - he said he was behind time, and could not stop; he snatched up all the letters, and said he would fill up the bill at Twickenham, as he was afraid of being too late - I placed the amount of paid letters on the table, which I believe he took up; I am sure 2s. 3d. was put down, if not more - I do not think he counted the letters in my presence, nor did he fill up the ticket then; he was often careless and inattentive in money matters - he used to receive my salary, and omitted to give it to me; it was only because I threatened to complain to the Post-office that I got it - he was in the habit of getting intoxicated, and getting others to deliver for him; I have held my situation for more than forty years.

ELIZA EDWARDS . I am the daughter of Joseph Edwards of Teddington. The prisoner (my aunt) lived with us; I recollect Mr. Willy's son bringing nine letters - I do not know that it was on the 1st of July; he put down half a crown and was to have 3d. change - I called my aunt down to him; he went away and afterwards came back on a donkey; I recollect Weal coming that morning, I do not know at what time - I was in the room against a chest of drawers: my aunt took the letters out of the box; Weal appeared in a hurry, I did not hear him say he was so - I think I saw him stamp the letters; I did not see the bill - I do not recollect his taking the letters up; it was about an hour after Willy's son had gone - I heard my aunt say to him, "There are a great many paid letters;" he must have heard her say that.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. Were any of the letters stamped before little Willy left? A. Yes, but not all, for he went away without his change - I do not know how many my aunt had stamped; I saw her stamp them all afterwards, and put them into the box - it was the unpaid letters that Weal stamped; my aunt stood at the table when Weal was there - I did not see him writing, because his back was towards me; my aunt and him were standing side by side.

Q. You saw him with a pen and ink before him, I suppose? A. Yes, my aunt could see what he wrote; I remember Mr. Smith coming from the Post-office - I think I told my father and aunt before Mr. Smith came, that I had heard her observe, what a many paid letters there were - I heard my father talking something about it, and mentioned it; I am sure it was before Mr. Smith came; they said Mr. Willy had lost some letters - they did not say Weal had said so; it was about two days after the letters were brought there - it was on the Monday I am sure; it was on Monday morning, after Weal had been -I saw Mr. Weal there on the Saturday afterwards.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. On the morning Willy brought the letters must Weal have seen you, or were you hid? A. No - I stood against the drawers by the middle door, he did not speak to me; his back would have been to me ask he stood at the table - I told Mr. Smith what I have stated now.

MR. ATTORNEY-GEENERAL. Q.What, when he first came? A. No, it was the second time; it was not by my aunt's desire, he asked me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-107

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1634. WILLIAM LEESON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 70 buttons, value 1s., and 2lbs. 11 ozs. of plated copper, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Warren and another.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am in the employ of John and Robert Warren , brass-founders , of Jewin-cresent ; the prisoner was also in their employ. On the 1st of August, about ten minutes after six o'clock in the morning, I saw him put his hand into a copper pan in the metal-shop, and take out metal three different times, which he put

into his pocket; there were buttons in that pan - I told Hibbert, and before breakfast time he gave me further information; when the prisoner went to breakfast I followed him out, and said to him, "Leeson, you have something in your hat that you have no business with;" he said, "No, I have not:" I said, "You have, and you shall not go till I have seen it" - he then said, "Now, Wood I am done;" he returned with me to the counting-house, pulled seventy buttons from his waistcoat pocket, and this metal from his coat pocket and his hat, and said."This is all I have got, it is the first time;" the buttons were master's.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you been in the employment? A. About seven years - the prisoner has been there nine months; I never quarrelled with him.

JOHN HIBBERT . I am in Mr. Warren's employ. Wood gave me information; I went and found the prisoner's hat and coat in their usual place, and found in his hat some large plated metal, covered with a white cloth or handkerchief; he was stopped in the street, at half-past eight o'clock, when going to breakfast - Wood's evidence is correct.

ROBERT HOWARD . I took charge of the prisoner with the property.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310908-108

1635. ROBERT CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 12 handkerchiefs, value 21s. , the goods of Thomas Jones .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 11 yards of silk.

HENRY JUDD . I am in the employ of Thomas Jones , who keeps a silk-wharehouse , in Wood-street, Cheapside . On the 2nd of September, about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and asked to look at some heavy Brussels silk handkerchiefs; he came and looked at some printed bandannas, and knocked one piece off the counter - while I stooped to take that up, I suppose he must have put the piece in question into his apron; there were bundles of handkerchiefs on the counter - he then asked to see some black bandannas, which I showed him; he bought none, and was going out - I charged him with having taken something; and he said I was injuring his character: nobody else was present - he desired me to call the person from the next warehouse; I went to a window which looks into the next warehouse - Mr. Lock came and the prisoner wanted him to allow me to go to Mr. Leaf's, to inquire his character; he was then going down stairs - I followed and told him, I thought he had got another piece - he came up stairs with me, and a piece, containing twelve handkerchiefs, was found in his outside pocket; it was the first piece I had shown him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he not speak like a foreigner? A. No - he asked the price of the goods; I said I did not know the price of any thing - he was not two steps from me when I went to call somebody, and could not have got out without my seeing him.

RICHARD LOCK . I am warehouseman to Mr. Haslock, whose warehouse is on the same floor with Mr. Jones', and is parted by a glass partition - Judd called me in, and said he suspected the prisoner, who seemed very indignant at the charge, and wished me to let the boy go to Mr. Leaf's, in Old' Change, and inquire his character; I refused, and wished to know if he had the goods he was charged with taking: he denied having them, and was going away -Judd still said he had a piece in his pocket; he followed him, laid hold of his coat pocket, and said, "You have a piece here" - the prisoner said, "What do you mean?" I said, "We will see if it is so or not;" he said, "No one shall search me but an officer;" I said we could soon send for one - he said, "I will go back with you into the warehouse," and while I was directing Judd where to find and officer, I saw him pulling the handkerchiefs out of his pocket, and endeavouring to put them on the counter - they came unfolded, part on the counter and the other end in his pocket - while Judd was gone for the officer he took out his purse, and said, "For God's sake, let me go, and take this;" the officer found the purse contained eleven sovereigns, besides silver.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you he intended to pay for it? A. Not a word of the kind.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am an officer. The prisoner and goods were delivered to me; he denied the charge altogether.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 34. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310908-109

1636. WILLIAM MANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 chain, value 10s.; 2 seals, value 10s., and 1 key, value 1d., the goods of Ann Tyrell , in the dwelling-house of John Shaw .

ANN TYRELL . I am a widow , and lodge in the first floor front room of Mr. John Shaw's house. On the 11th of July, about twelve o'clock, I saw my watch hanging in the cupboard by the fire-side; I then went out about the door, with my son's baby, leaving the room door open - I returned in about half an hour, but did not miss the watch till about four o'clock, not having occasion to look for it; it was worth about 5l. altogether - I believe the two seals were gold, and the chain; I am not a judge of the value -I saw the prisoner in charge with it at the Mansion-house on the 19th: the key was then gone.

JOHN BUGG . I am shopman to Mr. Spinks, a pawnbroker, of Gracechurch-street. On the 12th of July, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned this silver watch, with two seals and a chain, for 4l. - I received information three days afterwards that it was stolen; I went to Bow-street, and was told to stop the party if any application was made for it - I met the prisoner in Cornhill as I went home, and gave him in charge; I understood him to say he had had it from a captain, merely out of a frolic, and he knew nothing about stealing it, that the person's name was Germain, and he had gone into the country; he told the Lord Mayor he was gone to Ipswich, and he was remanded to bring the person forward, but he never came.

JURY. Q. Did the prisoner frequent your shop? A. I never saw him before; I know him by his being lame in his right hand and foot - I saw him among a number of persons, at a fire in Cornhill.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM LOVELL . Bugg gave the prisoner into my

charge, in Cornhill; I told him the gentleman charged him with felony - he immediately said, "I suppose it is for a watch?" I said I believed it was - he said, "I have made that all right, it is only a joke; I have sent to Mr. Germain to set it right;" I went to his lodging, and found a letter addressed to Germain, who lodged, at the public-house where the prisoner did; I have been there several times, but he has never appeared.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly pawned the watch, but as to stealing it I did not.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-110

1637. JOHN MARRIOTT was indicted for stealing on the 1st of December , 1 carriage, called a landau-fly value 60l., and 1 set of harness, value 3l. , the goods of William Snow .

WILLIAM SNOW . I am a coach-maker , and live in Wandsworth-road. On the 6th of October I let the prisoner a landau-fly and harness, at 15s. a week, for three months certain; I went at the expiration of the three months, to White Lion-street, Pentonville, which was the address he had given me, and stated himself to be a corn-chandler; this was in January; I found the house all in confusion, and heard nothing of the fly till I received this letter, dated the 7th of January (producing it) - I had seen the prisoner write, and believe the signature to be his, but not the letter.

HENRY AGATE . I know the prisoner, and have seen him write twice; I believe this letter to be his writing -(read.)

7th of January, Norwich.

SIR, - I am extremely sorry it was not in my power to honour my bill for 13l., due on Saturday; I fully expected to have met it, but being disappointed in getting money, and two fellows having run away deeply in my debt, have put it out of my power - my wife being so unwell, I cannot possibly come to town at present, but if you will give me a week or ten days, I shall be able to pay you, together with all charges; I have received a letter from my son, stating that you had called, and seemed surprised I was not there - I have to inform you, you have no occasion to be afraid of your money or property, it is my intention to pay you and every body else; I cannot at present return the fly or gig, for the fly is now on a job, and will not be home for a month, and the gig a traveller has - it will be home in a week, and I will return them to you; I did very little with them at first, and business has been very had of late - I send this letter by my son, who will put it into the post for you, and will thank you to send him an answer back; I have no doubt I shall be in town in ten days - my son's address is, No. 2, Mill-street, Pentonville.

MR. SNOW. I did not see the fly again till last June; I went to Mr. Bruin's, in Camberwell-road, in consequence of information, and found it there; I have not been allowed to take it away - I have never had it, nor been paid a farthing for the hire of it; I never authorised the prisoner to sell it.

HENRY AGATE . I am a clerk at Mr. Robinson's, horse and carriage repository, Little Britain. On the 1st of December the prisoner brought the landau-fly there for sale. and requested an advance; I lent him 15l. on it - he wanted more; the sale took place on the 4th of April - we kept it till then; it was not out on any job - it was sold to James Bruin , of Camberwell-road, for forty guineas; I paid the balance to a person representing herself to be the prisoner's wife - she brought this order, which I believe to be in his hand-writing - (read.)

April 5, 1831.

Please to pay the bearer the balance due for the carriage, and her receipt will be your discharge. J. MARRIOTT.

WILLIAM BATEMAN . I am a labourer at Claremontmews, Claremont-square, Clerkenwell. I was in the prisoner's service in November last, and remember his bringing a landau-fly and harness from Mr. Snow; he said he could buy and sell Mr. Snow for a pint of beer, and he would mace him out of it; this was the day he brought it home - he represented himself as a livery-stable keeper; I left him very shortly after the carriage came, and did not see him again till he was in custody, in August.

Prisoner. This witness knows I am no scholar, and can say it is not my hand-writing - he was not my servant, but a partner with my son, and pretty well the ruin of me; he absconded with two sovereigns - I have got his handwriting for it. Witness. He got a mare of mine, and sold it clandestinely - I was obliged to leave him; I have never been paid for it.

JOHN SNOW . I am the prosecutor's son. This carriage has never been brought back.

SAMUEL JEFFERSON . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge on the 15th of August - he said he was sorry he was wronging Snow out of his property, but hoped he should be able to make it good to him.

Prisoner. I had the carriage for a certain time, and for the hire of the stanhope I sent nine trusses of hay, which came to 1l. 2s. 6d., but Snow has never paid me.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-111

1638. JOHN MARRIOTT was again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 chaise, called a stanhope, value 30l. , the goods of William Snow .

JOHN SNOW . I am the son of William Snow . On the 19th of October the prisoner hired this stanhope for one month, at 3l. a month - it was worth 30l.; it has never been returned.

Prisoner. When I hired it I asked you the price, and you said it would be 30l. if I kept it. Witness. He never said a word about the price.

WILLIAM SNOW . I found the stanhope at Mr. Robinson's, advertised for sale; it had not been returned - I have not received a farthing for the hire.

HENRY AGATE . I am a clerk at Robinson's repository. The prisoner brought this stanhope on the 26th of October, for sale; I advanced him 10l. on it - it has not been sold; it is now in our possession - the prisoner has not applied for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I hired it to let out; the price was to be 30l. if I bought it - I have tickets to prove it was let out on hire - when I was taken I was allowed three days to settle this, but could not find friends.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years, to commence from the expiration of the former sentence .

Reference Number: t18310908-112

1639. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 1 pair of gloves, value 2s., and 38 pairs of unfinished gloves, value 3l. , the goods of George Bullock Watts , his master.

2nd COUNT, calling them silk tranks.

3rd COUNT, stating it to he 470 pieces of leather.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE BULLOCK WATTS . I am a wholesale glovemanufacturer , and carry on business in the Old Jewry , but live at Kensington - I leave my premises early in the evening - the prisoner was in my employ. On the 13th of June, in the evening. I observed his coat hanging up, and having frequently missed property, I examined it, and found in it a quantity of incomplete gloves, which had been stolen from me - the prisoner afterwards returned to the warehouse; I told him he might leave for the evening - I followed him down stairs; on his getting out I called him back, and requested to inspect his pockets, in which I discovered the materials for three pairs of gloves - I asked him whose they were; he said they were mine, but it was the first offence he had been guilty of - I promised him forgiveness if he told me the whole truth, but he said that was his first offence; I requested the keys of his boxes, and gave him in charge - he delivered three keys to me; I asked him again, in the officer's presence, if that was his only offence - I went with Henman, the officer, to his lodgings, in a court leading from Farringdon-street to Snow-hill, and searched his drawers; I saw the officer apply the keys to the drawers, and in them he found upwards of three dozen' pairs of unmade leather gloves - there were four hundred and odd pieces, worth at least 3l.; I returned to my house, where the prisoner had been left in custody - the officer produced to him one of the three keys he had given me, and asked how he got possession of that key; he said he had found it - it was afterwards applied to a chest of drawers in my house, which contained clothes, and opened all the drawers in that chest; after he was in custody I went to Giltspur-street prison - I did not hold out any threat or promise to him; I said I was sorry to find a person in whom I had placed such confidence had committed such a breach, and was sorry I had not an opportunity of finding the receiver - he said he had been induced to steal the property from me, to support himself when out of employ.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you charge him before the Lord Mayor with stealing the leather contained in this indictment? A. I charged him first with stealing three pairs of gloves - this charge was made before the last Session; I gave my evidence before the Grand Jury in a general way, on the indictment for the three pairs of gloves - I stated the whole of the thefts to them, and understood I was dismissed; I did not go before them on the other indictment - he was tried for the gloves last Session, and discharged; I ordered the officer to detain him, and take him before the Lord Mayor on this charge; I found the pair of gloves named in this indictment at his lodgings, and I believe I named that before the Lord Mayor - he was tried last Session for those found in his coat; my servant on that trial swore he believed the marks on the tranks to be his, but he would not positively swear it was his mark; I positively swore it was his mark - he was admitted to bail after being detained; I have been to him once in prison since the last Session, and asked if he had been set at liberty on the Saturday, whether he meant to remain in town or go into the country - my motive was to know if I should rid myself of a person who had committed such extensive depredations on me; I should have persisted in this charge if he had gone into the country; he was a good workman; I produced a bit of ribbon before the Lord Mayor, but did not prefer a charge against him for that - I know the leather found to be mine; they have the marks of two of my men, King and another, on them.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You gave before the Grand Jury last time a general account of what you had lost, did you suppose you had given all the evidence required? A. I did; I did not mean to abstain from evidence on the other charges on any consideration; it was entirely an error on my part that I did not go before the Grand Jury on the other bills; finding they were ignored, I had him taken before a Magistrate, and stated the circumstance - he was bailed.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a constable. I accompanied Mr. Watts to the prisoner's lodgings with three keys, which Mr. Watts gave me; I produced the keys to the prisoner, and asked him what they were; he said two of them belonged to his trunks, and the other to a drawer at his lodgings - I went to a house kept by Hodson in Sea-coal-lane, on Tuesday the 7th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening - Hodson showed me a chest of drawers, to which I applied two of the keys, and found a quantity of leather, which Mr. Watts identified; before I went I cautioned the prisoner, and told him if he had no more property of Mr. Watts', but the three pairs of gloves, Mr. Watts would fulfil the promise he had made, (as Mr. Watts told me he had made him a promise;) he then said there would be no more found, none whatever - there was nothing at his lodging, I might go and see; I did so, and found these thirty-eight pair of tranks, and a pair of made-up gloves; there was but one box and one drawer, at the prisoner's lodgings; I could find no use for the third key - I returned to Mr. Watts' house, and said to the prisoner, "You have stated wrong, you have not got two boxes" - he said,"I never said I had" - I said, "You did, what is the use of this key?" he said he had no use for it, that he had found it - he had told me two keys would open his boxes, and one his drawer; I applied the key he said he had found to a chest of drawers at Mr. Watts' house - it opened the whole of them.

COURT. Q. How do you know the lodging to be the prisoner's? A. He informed me he lodged there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the key fit the place the gloves were kept in? A. No; he told me I should find no property whatever of Mr. Watts' at his lodging.

MR. WATTS. I know this leather to be my property; here is the mark made by the cutter, which I know perfectly well - there are two marks; I lost as many tranks as I found at the prisoner's lodging - there are the cutter's initials on the tranks; there is no mark on this pair of gloves, but I am certain they are mine - the prisoner was never a cutter.

Cross-examined. Q. Are all the tranks in the same state of manufacture? A. Yes, the marks are scraped out of some of them; here is a pair I have no doubt have been defaced - here is another with a K. on it, and something more; here is another mark of another cutter - King is the first cutter; his Christian name is John, I believe.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. On this pair here is a K., has that been attempted to be erased? A. I cannot think how it could

be in this state, unless it had; King had been in my sole employ for about nine months.

Witness for the Defence.

JOHN KING . I was in Mr. Watts' service about six or seven weeks ago, as a cutter - I should not know my marks on the gloves, not to speak positively to them; (looking at a pair) I could not swear this is my mark.

MR. CLARKSON. On your oath, do you believe that it is your mark? A. Why, it is like it; I believe it to be mine, to the best of my belief it is; it is the K. as I used to mark it, when employed by Mr. Watts.

COURT. Q. You have left Mr. Watts six or seven weeks, that must have been after this second charge was made? A. Yes; I was before the Lord Mayor six times about this, but not examined.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you leave Mr. Watts' employ? A.Because I received great insults from him, through not swearing to the mark at the last trial.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you not state to the officer, before the prisoner was charged with any offence, that you would swear to the marks on the gloves? A. I never did.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310908-113

NEW COURT. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1640. JOHN AUSTIN NEAME was indicted for embezzlement ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310908-114

1641. SIMON PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 2 seal-skins, value 7s. , the goods of Hyman Emanuel and others, his masters.

PETER MAMROTH. I know the prisoner - he was a capblocker to Hyman Emanuel, Simon Emanuel and another - he lived in their house. I have some seal-skins here, which are their property; I received them from Mrs. Emanuel.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you quite sure there are two partners besides Hyman Emanuel? A. Yes; these are not fitch-skins, they are seal-skins.

FAGE EMANUEL (examined by an interpreter.) On the 5th of June I went up to the garret, where the prisoner was employed blocking the caps - I found him with his back towards the door, pressing something into his hat; he put his hat on his head; I desired him to show what he had in it - he refused; I took his hat off, and these two skins, which belong to Messrs. Hyman Emanuel and Co., were in it.

Cross-examined. Q.Does Mr. Emanuel sell skins in this state? A. I do not interfere in the business - he makes caps of them; the prisoner was in his service last year, and came back again last May - there was no other person worked in the room; no one had any quarrel with the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. It is impossible for those two skins to go into my hat.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-115

1642. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Clark , his master; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

HENRY CLARK . I live in Jermyn-street, St. James' , and am a bath proprietor - the prisoner was in my service about two months. On the 16th of July I took off a coat, and delivered it to my female servant the last thing at night - it was past ten o'clock, and she put it into the parlour in my presence - I missed the coat, and went in search of the prisoner; we found him at a pawnbroker's door with anther person, and another person was inside pawning the coat at the time, but I did not know that till we brought the prisoner back to my house.

Prisoner. There was no more than one with me? Witness. You said there was another inside the house.

ANN WANSBOURNE . I am in the prosecutor's service. I received his coat - I put it on the parlour table; I missed it the first thing in the morning - I heard the prisoner charged with taking it: he said he had had it, and given it to a young man to pawn; I found the shutters open in the morning, when the coat was gone - there was no one in the house but my master and I.

JAMES DENNIS . I am a constable. I went with the prosecutor: we found the prisoner at the pawnbroker's door; he said a person in company with him had pawned the coat - I went to the shop; they said it had been offered, but it was not there.

HENRY EGERTON . I am a Police-officer. I know the prisoner, and was present at his trial in this Court - I have the certificate of his conviction; I am certain he is the person - (read.)

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-116

1643. THOMAS BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 waistcoat, value 6d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s., and 3 towels, value 6d. , the goods of John Grogan .

CHARLOTTE GROGAN . I am the wife of John Grogan. On the 16th of July I was out with my husband; he got a little too much to drink - when we got back to Charles-street, Drury-lane , where we live, I went up stairs first, and opened the door; the prisoner, who was near the street door, accosted my husband, and offered to help him up stairs - he came up with my husband, sat down in a chair by the side of the bed, and entered into frivolous ignorant conversation, and offered to send for liquor, which was not accepted; my husband insisted he should go out; he went to the door, and then turned back again - my husband fell asleep, and the prisoner turned to me and said, "Deliver me that gown;" I refused, and received a blow from him, which knocked me down; he seized my arm, and got the gown, then put his hand into his pocket, took out a clasp-knife, and said if I said a word he would rip my bl-y g-ts out; he took my gown, shawl, a sheet, two Prayer-books, a plate, my husband's spectacles, three towels, two handkerchiefs, a dishful of beans and bacon, four knives, two forks, a teaspoon, and almost every thing I had; I was so exhausted, so weak, and low, I was incapable of alarming my husband, and was in bodily fear; he went down stairs, came back,

and took the remainder of the articles - as soon as I was able I alarmed my husband.

Prisoner. Q. When I came into the court, was not you laying down in a scaudalous state of intoxication, at the foot of the stairs, quarreling with your neighbours, and I helped you up; you said you should like to go to bed; I helped your husband to take your gown off? A. I was not intoxicated.

JOHN GROGAN. I have heard my wife's evidence - the prisoner was in the room; I put him out, and then fell asleep; when I awoke my wife informed me of the loss - I looked and missed all the property.

WILLIAM FOWLIS. I lodge in Bull's-Head-yard. I was standing at my door, which is next to the prosecutor's; I saw the prisoner come down the prosecutor's stairs with an apron full of something; he took them across to an opposite room, in which room I saw the officer take him next morning; I saw him afterwards on that day going out of that room, with a man and woman who lodge there, with a bag, which appeared bulky.

JOHN JEANS . I lodge in Bull's-Head-yard. On Saturday, the 16th of July, I saw the prisoner take a bundle of things into the opposite room.

AUGUSTUS HORNCASTLE . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner on Sunday, the 17th of July, in the room; I found this knife on him.

CHARLOTTE GROGAN. It was a knife of that description he pulled out.

Prisoner. That knife was never in my possession - I never gave her a blow.

GUILTY . Aged 61. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-117

1644. FREDERICK BLEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 coat, value 16s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 2 waistcoats, value 7s.; 1 brooch, value 4s.; 2 watch-keys, value 5s.; 1 seal, value 2s.; 1 ring, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d., and 9s. , the property of Henry Norris .

HENRY NORRIS. I live in Palace-court , and am a journeyman sadler . The prisoner lodged in the same room. On Sunday night, the 3rd of July, I took off my clothes, and put them into my box; I went to work at six o'clock the next morning, leaving him in bed - I returned at nine o'clock, and the prisoner was then gone; I found my box forced open, and these things gone; the prisoner did not return till the 7th of July, when he surrendered, and brought back all but one waistcoat, one handkerchief, and the money.

Prisoner. I brought back all I took - there was only one waistcoat; it was distress drove me to it. Witness. The waistcoat I miss I had worn on Sunday.

JAMES BACON . I am an officer. I have the articles, which I received in the prisoner's presence, at the prosecutor's room.

Prisoner. I was in the deepest distress; when I found I had done wrong, my guilt accused me of it, and I returned.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-118

1645. EDWARD BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 3 boots, value 7s. , the goods of James Lloyd .

JAMES ISAACS . I am a Policeman. On the 16th of July I was called into a pawnbroker's shop, in High-street, and saw the prisoner; the pawnbroker said he had offered these three boots in pawn - I took him; he had a bag, with boot-legs in it, on which were Mr. Lloyd's name and address - the prisoner said they were his own.

JAMES LLOYD. I am a boot and shoemaker , in Bond-street. These boots are mine - I have brought the fellows, and know the marks on them; the prisoner was in my employ - I gave him the boot-legs to make up, but the boots had been taken from my shop.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-119

1646. GEORGE CASELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 half-sovereign, 1 half-crown, 1 crown, and 6d. in copper monies , the monies of Thomas Jewson , his master.

ESTHER JEWSON. I am the wife of Thomas Jewson, a coal-dealer , in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's - the prisoner was nearly twelve months in our employ. I sent him out on the 16th of July - when he returned he told me he was to take half a bushel of coals to Mrs. Killick, of Church-row, with change for a sovereign; she owed me for a half-bushel, and I gave him a crown, a half-crown, a half-sovereign, and 6d. - he went away, and never returned; after he was taken my husband asked his reason for doing this - he said he did not know, he was sorry for it, and he must do as he liked with him.

MARY ANN KILLICK . I had not ordered any coals on the 16th of July, but I found half a bushel on the stairs.

JOHN STEWART . I am a watchman. On the 20th of July, about half-past ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came to me in Helmet-row, he said he had left his master, and took 18s. away, and he understood he was going to prosecute him - I kept him in conversation till the Policeman came up, and then gave him in charge.

THOMAS MIDDLETON . I took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to keep the money - I lost the half-sovereign, and did not like to return with the rest.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310908-120

1647. JAMES CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , 52 lbs. of flour, value 12s. , the goods of Jediah Squirrel , his master.

HUGH CHAPMAN DRIVER . I am a Policeman. On the 18th of August, at a quarter to three o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in Pollard-street, Bethnal-green - I observed something large before him, and asked what it was; he said, "Only a little flour;" I asked where he got it - he made no answer; I took him to Mr. Squirrel's, Pollard's-row - he had this bag in his apron, with 52 lbs. of flour.

JEDIAH SQUIRREL. I am a baker , and live at No. 16, Pollard's-row. The prisoner had been nearly five years in my service - I had seen him on my premises not more than twenty minutes before he was stopped; this bag is not mine - I cannot speak to the flour; I had let him in that morning, and locked the two gates - when I came down

in the morning I found these false keys in the gates, which led out the back-way, and was the way the prisoner was going; I saw nothing in his apron when he came in - my flour is kept in a loft, about two yards from the house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Had you ever seen those keys before? A. No; a widow and her daughter lodge in my house - the daughter has at times come home late; she would be let in at the street door, not at the back gates; I never found the prisoner in flour - he has bought flour of me.

JOHN FORWARD . I am a Policeman. I was on duty about three o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner come out at the back door of the prosecutor's premises, with something large in front of him; in a minute or two I heard a rattle, and found him in custody.

GUILTY . Aged 52. - Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-121

1648. JOHN DAVIS and WILLIAM DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 2 penholders, value 2s., and 1 pair of compasses, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Hogarth .

GEORGE POWELL . I am a Policeman. On the morning of the 22nd of August, I saw the prisoners in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square - I saw John Davis enter Mr. Hogarth's shop; William stood outside the door -John came out in two or three minutes, and joined William; I went in, and informed Allen - I then followed them, and they ran; I overtook them in Grafton-street -I took them to a public-house, and found on each of them a pen-holder; in going along, William said, "Here are the compasses;" they pleaded poverty.

HENRY ALLEN. I work for Joseph Hogarth , of Mortimer-street. The officer spoke to me - I looked about, missed the compasses, and told him so; the prisoners were brought back soon after.(Property produced and sworn to.)

William Davis received a good character, and a person engaged to provide him a berth on board of ship.

JOHN DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310908-122

1649. WILLIAM DAYMENT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of James Warren , from his person .

JAMES WARREN. I am a butcher , and live in Francis-place, Lambeth. On the night of the 18th of August I was in the Strand - the prisoner and two others passed me several times before I got to Charing-cross, and opposite Northumberland-house I felt something go out of my pocket; I turned, and caught the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - the others escaped.

JOHN COLLIS . I am an officer. I received him in charge, with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-123

1650. JAMES FORRESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 pair of trousers, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 gold ring, value 5s., and 2 sovereigns , the property of John Welsford .

JOHN WELSFORD. I lodge in Rupert-street - the prisoner slept in the same bed with me for one week - another man slept in another bed in the room. On Wednesday night I saw all my property safe in my box, at the foot of the bed; I went out about six o'clock in the morning, returned about nine, and missed this property - the box had been forced open; one sovereign was a dark colour, and had not the George and dragon on it - the other had, and was disfigured on the edge; I had looked at it, thinking it was not good - (looking at two sovereigns) this one I can swear to; I have not found my clothes.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Do many persons lodge in the house? A. Three besides the prisoner - the room door was not kept locked; the other lodgers were not in the habit of coming home till night - I went out first in the morning; I saw the things there at night, but not the sovereigns - I had put them into the trunk on Monday.

MARK MERRITT . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner about twelve o'clock that day, and got these two sovereigns from him, and 15s.

JOHN WELSFORD . I know this to be one of the sovereigns which was in my box, by this mark at the edge; I had looked at it particularly, and being a gilder by trade, I thought it was a gilt one - I can swear the other sovereign was a darker colour, and had not the George and dragon; this is one of that description, but I will not swear to this.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I slept in the same room with the prosecutor; the prisoner and the landlord's son slept in the same room - I got up at a quarter to seven o'clock that morning; the landlord's son got up at the same time - we left the prisoner in bed; there was then a basket on the prosecutor's trunk, and nothing seemed to be out of its place.

REBECCA SNELL. I keep the house. Welsford came down about a quarter past six o'clock that morning; Chapman and my son came down together at a quarter to seven - the prisoner did not come down till a few minutes after eight, but I had heard him about for an hour before; there had been no one else in the house, but myself and my husband - I am quite sure nobody went up stairs nor came down till the prisoner came down; I went up to make the beds about half an hour after he left, and am certain nobody had been in the house - when I went up I saw the basket on the floor, and the lock hanging to the box; my house stands back in a yard, and consists of three rooms, one above the other - there is no passage; the stairs come down into the room which I was in that morning - I was ironing, and never left the room; I sent for the prosecutor, who came home and discovered his loss - I did not leave the house till he came home; I went to several pawnbrokers, and while there the prisoner came into one, and was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you let lodgings by the night? A. No, none are less than weekly lodgers; the prisoner came on the 22nd of June - when he came down he said,"My week's rent is up to-day?" I said, "No, not till tomorrow;" he just spoke as he went through, but did not stop - he must have had the property about him then, but I was busy; he had no bundle.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-124

1651. ELIZABETH GORDON was indicted for steal

ing, on the 31st of August , 1 necklace, value 1l. 5s., the goods of George Henry Wulff , from the person of Sarah Wulff .

JANE FREWER. I live in Charles-square, Hoxton. On the 31st of August I was in the City-road , with Sarah Wulff , who is three years and a half old - she is the daughter of George Henry Wulff, and had a coral necklace on, with a gold snap: a little boy came out of a shop, and said a woman had taken the child's necklace off - I looked, missed it, and followed the prisoner; I ran up to her, and asked for the necklace - she said she had not got it, but a woman had brushed by her, and very likely she had it; she offered to help me overtake her, and led me down Hill-street, but as I was carrying one child and leading another she got a good deal a-head of me, and suspecting her, I got a person to stop her - this necklace was found in her right hand; when I first saw her she was not more than ten yards from me.

JAMES BROWN . I took the prisoner, and have the necklace.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the necklace on the ground, and took it up, but did not know whose it was; this young woman said I had taken it - the boy said he could not say it was me.

THOMAS WEST. I saw Frewer going along with a child, and saw the prisoner take the necklace from its neck.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-125

1652. WILLIAM HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 4 pairs of trousers, value 20s. , the goods of John Wheeldon .

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a Policeman. On the night of the 15th of August, about ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner in some ground called Shadwell ruins, about forty yards from the prosecutor's shop; he had a bundle, and on seeing me he put it into his bosom: he was going along - I called to him to stop and show me what he had got; but he ran away and I followed him five or six minutes, calling Stop thief! and kept him in sight till he was stopped - I took three pairs of trousers from his bosom and this other pair was in his hand.

GEORGE LORIMER . I was an officer. I stopped the prisoner, who was running as fast as he could; I asked what he had got - he said Nothing - I said I insisted on knowing; he made a blow at me, and we both fell - I got two pairs of trousers from him; he said he bought them for 7s. of a man who hawked them about - he made great resistance.

WILLIAM BURTON . I am in John Wheeldon's employ. I had seen these trousers safe in his shop from half-past nine to ten o'clock.

JOHN WHEELDON . I am a clothes-salesman . These articles are mine; three pairs are new, 1 value them at 20s., but they are worth considerably more.

Prisoner's Defence. I had come from on board my ship - we had been drinking freely; these trousers were offered to me for 7s. - I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-126

1653. LOUISA HUMPHRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 1 basket, value 1s., and 1 brush, value 6d. , the goods of Susannah Mitchinton .

SUSANNAH MITCHINTON . I am a widow , and live in Orchard-street, Westminster . On the 3rd of September I missed a wicker basket from my door; I received information and sent my girl, who brought the prisoner back with the officer, and the basket and brush - she had asked the price of the basket, and I told her 14d., but she bought nothing.

Prisoner. I offered her a 1s. for it, which she took and sent for change. Witness. She did not; I took nothing from her, nor did she offer it - she had a woman with her, and when she came back she put the brush in my face, and said, "What did I give you for this brush?"

LEWIS HYAM SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and another woman - the prisoner had the basket; and the other woman the brush - the prisoner, at the watchhouse, begged to be excused for taking the basket, as the prosecutrix knew her as a neighbour; she had before said she gave 1s. for it.

Prisoner. I said I did not want to be taken, and would give up the shilling and basket too. Witness. No, she said she took it - she begged to be excused, and burst into tears.

ANN SOMERS . I work for the prosecutrix. I was sent after the prisoner, and came up to her in Great Chapelstreet, walking with another woman; she had the basket in her hand - I took hold of it, and said she had taken it from mistress' door; she called me a liar, and said she would come back - she then opened the basket, and said to the other woman, "If I stole the basket I did not the brush - take the brush;" the prisoner seemed willing to return, but the other woman raised a mob; the officer came up, and took them back.

Prisoner's Defence. The other woman had the brush in her hand; I said, "Put it into the basket;" I bought the basket, and paid for it.

SUSANNAH MITCHINTON . I never sold either of the articles.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-127

1654. JOHN HARRADINE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 6 tea-spoons, value 4s. , the goods of John Duffey .

MARY DUFFEY . A distress was put into my mother's house, at Dalston - the prisoner was in possession; these six spoons were not in the inventory, but were put into a desk, which was in the inventory - I never saw them in the prisoner's possession; I afterwards got them from the prisoner's wife - he said he knew nothing about them, and that he had delivered the desk to a little girl.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-128

1655. THOMAS IRWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 2 printed books, value 3s. , the goods of John Chidley .

JOHN CHIDLEY. I am a bookseller , and live in Goswell-street . On the 20th of July the prisoner came and bought a book for 3d. - he left hastily, and in consequence of information I went after him; he was running fast - I stopped him, and took him back; he produced these books, which are mine.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I travel with books for sale; I laid my bundle on the counter, and these books were tied in my bundle with others, by mistake.

JOHN CHIDLEY . He said he had stolen them, and begged to be forgiven - he is in the habit of buying books.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-129

1656. ANN KELLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 watch, value 4l., the goods of Thomas Rust , from his person .

THOMAS RUST. I am servant to Mr. Carr, a barrister, of No. 19, Park-crescent. On the 5th of July I was in the New-road, with the coachman, and met the prisoner; I went with her to a public-house at the corner of Fitzroystreet; we had a pint of beer and a glass of gin each - I then went to a house in a court with her, for about ten minutes, and gave her half a crown: as I came out of the court I went to feel for my watch, and missed it - the prisoner was with me; I saw my fellow-servant again in the court; I called the prisoner aside, and said, "While I have been with you I have lost my watch;" she said I must have laid it on the table, but I had not - I returned to the house; the watch was found, but not in my presence.

SARAH BUCKELEY . I am the wife of Joseph Buckeley , and live in Fitzroy-row, New-road . The prisoner and prosecutor came to my house - they went out; the prosecutor returned, and said he had lost his watch - the prisoner was searched, but it was not found about her clothes - his fellow-servant brought a Policeman; I searched the prisoner again, but could not find it - I asked if she had got it; she said No: I said, "If you have you had better give it to me;" she still said she had not - the Policeman insisted on my searching her again, and said if I did not find it he would send for a doctor or surgeon; I then saw her hand go to the chimney-piece, and I took the watch from there.

Q. At the time you asked her again about the watch, did you not know she had it about her person? A. I did see her hand come from her person, and go to the chimneypiece, and then the watch was there - I do not recollect her saying any thing to me.

Q.Mind how you answer - when you told her the Policeman talked about a doctor, did she make any offer to you? A. Yes, she said she would give me 5s. if I would say I had searched her and could not find it; I told her I would not say any thing of the kind, and that she had better give it up - she said she had got it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who was in the room when she offered you 5s.? A.Nobody; after returning with the prosecutor she did not leave the house- my sister did not assist in searching the room for the watch - she opened the door for her; the prosecutor was in the room till the Policeman came - the prisoner and I were alone when the watch was found; the Policeman was at the door while I searched her - I only searched her clothes - she undressed several times. I have been to see her in prison once - I did not make her any offer; not a syllable passed about 2l. - I felt unhappy about her being here; I merely asked at the door to see Ann Kelley ; I was not asked what relation I was, nor did I say - I only saw her once before this transaction; I did not tell the prisoner I got into the gaol as her sister; there was a female with her - my sister lives in Buckinghamshire; she never entered the room while I was there, to my knowledge - I will not swear she did not come into the room; the prosecutor did not say, in my presence, that he did not believe the prisoner robbed him - she was nearly dressed when she produced the watch. I have kept this house about two months - I never kept any other house; I have been servant at other houses - I do not know where my husband is now; I saw him on Saturday.

MR. PHILLIPS to THOMAS RUST. Q.When you missed your watch did not the prisoner request that you should go back with her? A. She did - I saw Buckeley's sister in the room; I do not know that she assisted in looking for the watch - I offered the prisoner three halfcrowns for it; she said she had not got it, and asked to be searched.

JOHN RYLES . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in the New-road; the coachman called me to No. 4, Fitzroyrow - I found the prisoner there, and understood she had been searched; I required her to be searched again - she voluntarily stripped; nothing was found: I was not satisfied, and desired Buckeley to strip her quite - I went out at the door; I heard some words, but cannot say what - Buckeley afterwards produced the watch to me, with a ribbon - the prisoner clasped her hands together, burst into tears, and begged me to forgive her.

Cross-examined. Q. Who else was present? A. I believe Buckeley's husband; it was a man who appeared to belong to the house - Buckeley's sister came into the room.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Buckeley was looking for the watch; she took it from a tea-caddy on the table, and said, "I have found the watch;" she said to me, "Hold your tongue - I will give you 5s.; my husband is in the habit of selling watches in the country;" I said I would do no such thing, and to give it to the gentleman - she came to me in prison, and said she had said she was my sister, or they would not have let her in - she said, "I am sorry you did not sell me the watch, but I am still sorry for you, and if you will make up 2l. I will not come against you" - I refused, and she said, "You shall rue it."

MARGARET BRANDON (a prisoner). I saw a woman like this witness come to see the prisoner - I cannot say she is the woman, as I was talking to a woman myself; I heard the woman say to Kelley, "Don't be alarmed - if you can give me 2l. I will go into the country, and not come against you;" I did not notice much what else passed, but I heard Kelley say, "Mrs. Buckeley (or Buckey) are you not ashamed of what you said of me?" she said she did not say what she did at the time, and she need not be uneasy, she would not hurt a hair of her head - Pollard was present, but no turnkey.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-130

1657. MARY KIRBY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 1 umbrella, value 4s. , the goods of William Arthur .

WILLIAM ARTHUR . I am a shoemaker , and live in Wigmore-street; the prisoner was servant to my lodger. I missed an umbrella from behind the parlour door; the prisoner left that night.

JAMES STOKES . I am shopman to Mr. Henry, a pawnbroker, of John-street. On the 28th of July Mclutire

pawned this umbrella; she had a woman with her, who I believe was the prisoner.

ESTHER McINTIRE . I am the wife of David McIntire, and live in Lownes-court, Carnaby-market. The prisoner called and asked me to go with her and pawn this article, which I did.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the umbrella in the area, and did not know who it belonged to.

WILLIAM ARTHUR. I saw it safe behind the parlour door that evening.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18310908-131

1658. THOMAS KIRBY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 suit of boy's clothes, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 gown, value 5s., and 1 coat, value 19s. , the goods of John Chapman .

JOHN CHAPMAN, JUN. I live with my father, John Chapman , who keeps the Duke of Argyle public-house, Laystall street . On the night of the 17th of August I saw the prisoner coming down stairs from the second floor; on seeing me he dropped a bundle which he had, on the landing - I immediately asked what he had been up stairs for; he said he was waiting till the song was over - I came down, and told my father, who secured him; he said he had some friends up stairs, but nobody there would own him - the bundle contained these articles.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Were any other persons there? A. No; I am certain the bundle fell from his hand.

WILLIAM NORMAN, I am an officer. I took the bundle from Mrs. Chapman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the things, nor saw them.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-132

1659. THOMAS LISINEA was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 sovereign, and 7s. , the monies of Mary Field .

MARY FIELD . I was in Old-street-road on the 6th of July; the prisoner came up, passed me, and picked up a paper parcel, close at my side - he opened it, and took out a bill, which he requested me to read; it said, "Two gold rings, and one pair of handsome gold ear-rings, with drops, 5l. 19s. 6d." - he said he could not read writing; I read it, and gave him the bill back - he said he wished it had been two sovereigns, it would have done him more service, as he was going out of town that afternoon; he then left me, and went to Shoreditch - I went up Kingsland-road, and had not gone far before another man passed me, and he picked up a paper - he said to me,"I have not found a prize;" I had not gone far before the prisoner overtook me again, and said if I liked I should have the jewellery for 30s. - I said I did not know how much I had about me, but would see; I looked and found I had but 7s. and a sovereign, which I gave him for the rings and the ear-rings, and we parted - I had told him I had seen the other man, who told me a lady in her carriage had just dropped some jewellery, that her footman was looking for it, and there would be a reward of three sovereigns for it in the morning; the man had told me so - the prisoner said he should not hear of that, as he was going out of town, and if I gave him 30s. for them, and went to the place I should get 30s. for myself - I took them to a jeweller's on the following Saturday; I am told they are not worth 4s.

THOMAS RESEAM . I know the prisoner; I saw him on the morning of the 6th of July, in Kingsland-road, with the prosecutrix - I was in a shop at the time.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and asked if he had been in Kingsland-road on the Wednesday - he said, No; I asked if he had sold no earrings or rings, he said, No.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutrix till I was at the office; she said she did not know me at the office.

MARY FIELD . I did not.

GUILTY . - Aged 32. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-133

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1660. THOMAS POPE and JOHN MASKELL were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 1 gaspillar, value 10s.; 1 gas-cock, value 5d.; 1 key, value 6d., and 6 feet of pewter pipe, value 5s. , the goods of James Wilson .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-134

1661. ANN DRAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August 1 shawl, value 8s.; 2 blankets, value 8s., and 1 collar, value 1s. , the goods of George Collins .

CATHERINE COLLINS . I am the wife of George Collins - he does not now live with me. I lodged with the prisoner's mother, in Princes-street ; these articles were in my box - I had only lodged there a week; I was out for three days, and when I came home the hinges of my box were broken, and my property gone - the prisoner was out; she returned, and I charged her with it - she said she had not taken the property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know James Gleeson ? A. Not till this affair; he had no business with my things - my husband is in America.

WILLIAM SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Cable-street. I have a shawl, pawned by the prisoner on the 20th of August, in the name of Ann Drane .

Cross-examined. Q. Do you swear to her? A. I could almost swear it; I saw it taken from her - I will not positively swear she is the person.

JAMES GLEESON . The prisoner told me she had been selling off her things, and had a pair of blankets to sell for 6s.; I said I did not want them, but could sell them for her - I sold them for 7s. 6d., and gave her 6s.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear you have told all you know? A. Yes; I was never at Collins' house, I am sure - I sold the blankets to Mr. Carter; I never saw this hammer (looking at one,) nor did my wife, to my knowledge - I never heard of my wife having two gowns; I did not tell Carter they were my own, and that I sold them, being in distress.

EDWIN CORPE . I live with Mr. Carter, in the Minories. I was not present when the blankets were sold to him, but I sold them again from his warehouse; they went into the country - I wrote to get them back.

GEORGE JOHN WEST . I am an officer. The prosecu

trix fetched me; I took the prisoner - she said she gave the blankets to Gleeson, and that he only gave her 4s. 6d. of the money - Gleeson told me at the watch-house that he told Carter they were his own, and he sold them through distress.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-135

1662. ANN DRAIN was again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , 2 gowns, value 23s. , the goods of George Collins .

CATHERINE COLLINS . I am the wife of George Collins. I lost these two gowns out of the same box in the prisoner's mother's room; I put them in on the 15th.

EBENEZER HODGES . I live at a pawnbroker's, in Aldgate. The prisoner pawned these two gowns with me, in the name of Ann Jones .

Prisoner. There was a woman with me. Witness. There might be, but I gave you the money.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Gleeson's wife was with me.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-136

1663. BENJAMIN ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 12th of July , 120 printed books, in quires, value 50l., the goods of Henry Butterworth , well knowing them to be stolen .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH BRETTELL . I am warehousemen to Mr. Henry Butterworth , a law-bookseller , in Fleet-street; he has a warehouse in Apollo-court, Fleet-street , and a very large stock there - a considerable quantity of it has been taken away without our knowledge, and must have been stolen; the key of the warehouse is kept at the shop - we sometimes sell small quantities of misprinted paper, but not in this quantity.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Whether this was taken away in quires, or in small quantities alone, you cannot tell? A. No - I suppose it was not all taken at once.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Could any body take it without stealing it? A. No - they are collated into perfect books; the prisoner never dealt with us.

COURT. Q.Were these taken after they were made into books? A. Yes; they are divided into books, but not stitched.

ESTHER LYONS . I am a dress-maker, of No. 12, Creechurch-lane, Leadenhall-street. The prisoner came to me on Thursday morning, the 14th of July, and brought six bundles of printed paper; I never looked at them - he asked if he might leave them for half an hour; I said Yes he might, being an acquaintance - he said if I could sell them while he was gone I might; he wanted 31/2d. per lb. for them - I said I did not think I could sell them, but after he was gone I went down to Mr. Raphael, who lived in the house, and dealt in stationery - I asked him about it; he said he would not purchase it, but he took them out and sold them to Mr. Abrahams; he took only a sample - he came back, and said he had got a purchaser; he afterwards gave me 5l. 1s. 6d., which I gave to the prisoner -I delivered the paper to Raphael.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is Mr. Raphael? A. He is a commercial man, and has been out of town since the day after he sold it - I do not know where he is; he never writes to me - I lodge at his mother's; I have known Raphael many years - he is not related to me; I do no business with his mother, and have no connexion in trade with her or her son, nor has my mother.

Q.Read this bill? A.This is right, but it only alludes to Passover time - my mother and Mrs. Raphael have a sort of partnership during the Passover.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Is this bill printed for general trade or only at Passover time? A. Only at the Passover, which lasts eight days - persons unite to sell provision among the Jews at that time.

SOESMAN ABRAHAMS . I am a grocer and pastry-cook, and live in Petticoat-lane. I bought 312 lbs. of paper of Raphael, for which I gave 36s. a cwt., which is about 4d. per lb. - I do not know what has become of him since; I sent my boy with a truck for the paper - he went with Raphael, but I bargained for it - Raphael brought me a sample: the officer took the paper away afterwards, and it is here now.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see it taken by the officer? A. Yes; I can neither read nor write, but I can swear to the size of the paper - I put no mark on it: the officer put a mark on it, and took it away about five days after I bought it - I had other paper in the house, but not made up in bundles like this; not such a quantity - it stood in my parlour at the back of the shop.

LEON MAY . I am in Mr. Abrahams' employ. I went with Raphael to fetch some paper, which was in the first floor of Mrs. Raphael's house - I took it home, and put it into the front part of the shop; I was present when the officer took the same paper away.

BENJAMIN ALLEN STONE . I am an extra patrol of the City. In consequence of information I went to Abrahams' house, and found these six bundles of paper in a little room, adjoining the shop - there was other paper in the house, but not in the corner where this was; I saw no large bundles - this is what I brought away; it has my mark on it - I did not take Abrahams into custody; I told him to come to Mr. Butterworth's, and he promised he would, but his wife was taken very ill; I returned, and he went up to Mr. Butterworth's - I asked who he bought the paper of, and he showed me a copy of a receipt which Thomas, who was with me, took a copy of - I afterwards took the prisoner, and told him what it was for: he said he had never sold any printed paper in his life - that he had sold writing paper; I took him to Mr. Butterworth's, and then to the Compter - one day, in the Alderman's room, I asked him again where he got it; he was in a bit of a passion, and said he never bought printed paper, but he bought writing paper of several parties at the West-end of the town, but they were now off, and he knew nothing of them.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner told you all through that he had never sold printed paper? A. Yes; I have been looking for Raphael sometimes till two o'clock in the morning, but cannot find him - I inquired at his house; they say he is travelling, but do not know where.

JOSEPH BRETTELL . These are part of Mr. Butterworth's stock - they are not in a state to be sold for wastepaper; they lay in books, and if stitched and boarded would sell for 24s. a copy - there are one hundred and twentycopies of them.

ESTHER LYONS . The paper I sold Raphael was printed - there was no writing paper.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long is it since Raphael left your house? A. I believe it was the next day, but I was not down stairs - they sometimes hear from him when absent once a week, sometimes it is a month or two; I cannot tell when his mother heard from him last - he travels with pens, quills, and pencils; my father is at Portsmouth, on board ship - he was sent there for seven years, on board the bulks - my mother does not keep any shop; I have lived in the house three years - my sister and I support my mother.

LEAH RAPHAEL . I am Raphael's mother. I saw the paper delivered at my house; it was taken out by Abrahams' servant.

Cross-examined. Q. Is this your house? A. Yes; Lyons lodged in my house two years and a half or three years; I have known them fifteen years - the young lasses get their living by needle-work, and support their mother as well as they can; I keep a shop in the general line - Mrs. Lyons has sometimes been my partner at the Passover, but not always; I do not know where my son is - I never heard from him since he left, and have not the least idea where he is to be found.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Does Mrs. Lyons ever interfere in your shop? A. Never, except when I am busy I may call her down; my son went out of town four days after I heard of this.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about any printed paper - I am an innocent man; on my word and honour I never had any printed paper in my possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-137

1664. MARY ANN REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously receiving, of a certain evil-disposed person, 1 sacramental cup and cover, value 16s., and 1 patten, value 1l., the goods of Benjamin Davis and another, Churchwardens of the parish of Elstow, in Bedford , wellknown them to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, calling it 9ozs. of silver plate.

WILLIAM KIRKETT. I am parish-clerk of Elstow, Bedfordshire - Mr. Benjamin Davis is one of the churchwardens. I went to the church on Sunday, the 31st of July, and the iron chest which contained the registers and the sacramental plate was gone - I acquainted the churchwardens, and a vestry was called; I have since seen part of the plate in possession of Mr. Hatton - I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOSEPH YORK HATTON . I live in Thames-street, opposite the Old London-bridge; I am a watchmaker, and deal in silver. On the 2nd of August, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in a little room behind the shop; Mrs. Hutton was in the shop, she came and brought me this silver, which she said was offered for sale - I immediately said, "This is stolen silver," and directed her to buy it; I went to a place where I can observe every thing without being noticed, and there I saw the prisoner selling this plate; I took particular notice of her person; her name and direction were asked; she gave her direction, No. 20, Long-lane, Borough; I am not positive whether she gave her name - I sent my female servant out at the private door, to watch where she went - she was gone some time, and from what she said, when she returned, I went after dark to No. 7, Castle-street, Kent-street, Borough, with two Policemen; I knocked at the door, and the prisoner opened it; I gave an agreed signed to the Policemen, and they approached - I challenged her with having been at my house, and given a false address; she said she had never seen me in my life, and I do not think she did see me, but she added that she had not been over the bridge, nor at my house, which I described; I took out the silver, and said to the prisoner, in the Policemen's presence,"Will you say you did not bring this silver to my house today;" she utterly denied all knowledge of it; she was taken into custody; the Policemen went into a back room, which her landlady said she rented, and found a man there, whom they took; I have no doubt this silver is part of a cup and cover.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not tell the landlady that you would transport her? A. I do not remember it- I said the case would transport her; I was about four yards from her in the shop, looking through a hole; my wife bought the plate; she might give her name as Mary Ann Reynolds; I do not recollect; I went to Long-lane, and found it was a false address; I think she did say her name was Reynolds - my wife is not here; I had no conversation with the prisoner in the shop; she told the Magistrate her brother gave it her; I did not know at first sight that this was sacramental plate.

BETSEY COOPER . I am servant to Mr. Hatton. He desired me to follow the prisoner; she went to No. 7, Castle-street, Borough; I am quite sure she is the person - she did not knock at the door, it was open.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you was in the shop when she first came in? A. Yes - she asked if the gentleman was at home; I went and sent Mrs. Hatton out to her - I remained in the parlour, which is a very little way from the shop; I was within hearing, but did not hear her say her brother gave her the silver - if she had I must have heard it: I might not hear all she said - she gave the name of Ann Reynolds, for it is down in the book; I did not hear this.

THOMAS WATKINS . I am a Policeman. I went to No. 7, Castle-street, on the 2nd of August - we found the prisoner in the passage; there was a man in the room - the prisoner and the man both said they lived there together; I found a lap-stone there, with marks of silver on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there not shoemaker's tools there? A. Yes - they use a lap-stone; I have heard that the prisoner's brother ran away - he did not live at the house; I have been looking for him.

MR. HATTON. I gave 4s. an oz. for the silver - it came to 37s. 6d.; I thought at first it was foreign silver, but on looking at it, I saw the Hall mark, and advertised it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see your wife weight it? A. Yes, and she entered it in the book - there were 9 ozs.

WILLIAM KIRKETT . This is part of the cup - I know this piece, which is part of the top of the cover; here is a figure of 9 on it - it was made in 1639; I can swear to several of these pieces.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it; my brother gave it me to sell - I asked what it was; he said he did not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-138

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1665. WILLIAM PACKHAM was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS WATNEY . I am a corn-dealer , and live in Weymouth-mews, Marylebone. The prisoner was a year and a half in my service - when he receives money on my account, it is his duty to give it to me the moment he sees me- on the 17th of August the witness fetched this hay; I was not there - the prisoner never gave me this 2s.: on the Saturday I told him of it, and he said he meant to have given it to me - I discharged him, because I suspected this had been going on for some time; he had 1l. a week.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you mention the 2s. to him before you discharged him? A. No - I discovered it on the Saturday morning, when Tyzack came and asked for a better truss than he had on Wednesday; the prisoner did not tell me he had received 2s. from a fishmonger - he never paid me money, saying he had had it two or three days; I had a visit from the Excise on Monday evening - the prisoner was taken on Tuesday; I did not suspect he had sent the officer.

ROBERT TYZACK . I am porter to Mr. Elmore, of Marylebone. I fetched a truss of hay from the prosecutor's on Wednesday, the 17th of August, and paid the prisoner 2s. for it.

Cross-examined. Q. Your brother is a fishmonger? A. Yes.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and on the way to the office he asked what he was taken for - I said his master informed me he had robbed him; he said, "Why I know nothing I have robbed him of, except the 2s. I received for a truss of hay, and did not account for."

Prisoner's Defence. I mentioned the truss of hay on Saturday night, when he settled with me - he said I owed him 1s. 9d.; I said, "Yes, and 2s. I had from the fish-monger."

CHARLES CARTER . I was in the prosecutor's service, minding his place, when this happened; I was present when the prisoner was settled with on Saturday night - Mr. Watney mentioned the truss of hay; the prisoner said he would pay him, and told him to take the money; he said he had sold the truss to the fishmonger's brother - I saw him pay it into Mr. Watney's hand, with 1s. 9d. which he owed besides.

COURT. Q.Then it is all false that the 2s. have not been paid? A. Mr. Watney will take a false oath - I was there about three weeks, merely to mind the place while the man went out with the cart.

Q.Was the prisoner the first to mention this truss of hay to his master? A. He was - he said, "Here are 2s., which I forgot to give you:" it was settled in full of all demands - I was suprised to hear of his being taken up; they kept me back from going to the Magistrate - nobody stopped me from going in, certainly, but I was ordered out of the Court-yard; I cannot say who by - the prisoner's wife asked me to go there; she asked me if I did not remember his paying the 2s.

Q.What time were you discharged on the Saturday night? A.About half-past seven o'clock, when the account was settled.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-139

Before Mr. Baron Bailey.

1666. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 40 yards of merino, value 10l.; 150 yards of fustian, value 10l.; 12 pattern-cards, value 6l.; 40 yards of woollen cloth, value 35l.; 100 yards of kerseymere, value 35l.; 400 yards of cassimere, value 160l.; 20 yards of twilled cloth, value 8l.; 50 yards of patent-cord, value 10l.; 80 yards of jean, value 8l.; 150 yards of valentia, value 50l.; 60 yards of plush, value 20l.; 130 yards of silk, value 60l.; 18 yards of petersham, value 10l.; 140 yards of drill, value 16l., and 20 yards of velveteen, value 5l., the goods of Charles James East and Henry Vigurs East , in their dwelling-house ; and RICHARD MARTIN was indicted for feloniously receiving part of the same goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE ELVIDGE . I lived as porter with Messrs. Easts, in Leicester-square. I left them on the 20th of March - the prisoner Robinson was in their employ with me; I slept in the shop - Robinson generally came between six and seven o'clock in the morning; Mr. East generally came into the shop to business about nine - he occasionally came into the shop before nine, but not to continue; Robinson employed me three or four times to take out parcels before eight o'clock in the morning; I took one or two to a coffee-shop in St. Martin's-lane, by his direction - I am not certain whether they had a direction on them - I think one of them had "James Robinson" written on it; he sometimes told me the parcels were linen, or his dirty shirts - I tore a bit of the brown-paper off one of them, which I was to leave at a baker's-shop, in Bear-street, St. James', and saw it contained what looked to me like brown kerseymere - I told him that was not his linen as he had told me, and he said it was a cut which he had brought with him out of the City; I have observed him go out with parcels himself of a morning, before Mr. East came down - I have asked him about them; he generally said they were his clothes going to be mended, or his linen going to be washed - John King was the porter who succeeded me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You never looked into more than one parcel? A. No; I undid one corner as well as tore the paper; whether there was linen under the kerseymere I cannot tell; nor do I know what was in the parcels he took out - if I had supposed property of large value was being taken away, I should have mentioned it.

JOHN KING . I succeeded Elvidge as porter to Messrs. East. Robinson, on several occasions, sent me out with parcels before Mr. East came down - in consequence of suspicion I informed Mr. East; Robinson was soon after apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you in that employ? A.About five months; I was sent out much oftener than three or four times.

HENRY VIGURS EAST . I am in partnership with Charles James East; we are woollen-drapers , and carry on business in Leicester-square - Robinson was in our em

ploy. On the 17th of August, in consequence of information, I called in Clements, and we had Robinson into the counting-house - I said to him, "Where do you live?" he hesitated considerably, and said, "What do you say?" I said, "Where do you live, sir?" he said, "No. 3, Upper St. Martin's-lane;" I sent one of my shopmen to inquire if it was true - he came into the counting-house, and said, in the prisoner's presence, that no such person lived there; I again asked where he lived - he replied, "I have done nothing wrong, I shall not tell you;" I then said, "Now, James, I have been seriously robbed, and I am determined to find out the thief;" he then said, "I have never robbed you of 6d.;" I said, "You are resolved then not to tell me where you live?" he said, "Come with me to my brother's, and I will tell you;" I said, "Why not tell me here?" and after he was given in charge he gave me his address, No. 12, Blenheim-street - I saw him searched, and among other things a bunch of keys taken from him; in consequence of some inquiries we made I went to No. 48, Han's-place, Sloane-street, with an officer; I saw the prisoner Martin there, and asked him to show us Robinson's room; he said it was locked - he took us up to the back attic; I found the door wide open - we went in, and with the keys found on Robinson, Clements opened some boxes, trunks, and closets - in the boxes I found several articles of my own wearing-apparel, some account-books, and banker's cheques; the account-books are mine, but not the writing that was in them; the cheque-book was mine - I found in the closets silks, kerseymeres, cloths, umbrellas, and a variety of things; immediately I saw the cloths and silks I knew them to be ours - Martin was with us; we went down stairs, and as we were leaving the room I said,"Have you bought any goods of Robinson?" he said Yes, that he had had considerable dealings with him, and believed he owed Robinson between 400l. and 500l.; I said,"Have the goodness to show me the articles you bought of him;" he said, "All that I have bought of Robinson have tickets on them;" he was at that time showing us his stock - I said, "You appear to me to have an immense sized stock, pray what sized trade have you?" (he is a master tailor) - he said, "I keep from two to three men;" I said, "Have you been aware that this young man is in my service?" he replied, "Most certainly I am;" I said,"Pray when did you expect to pay for these goods you have bought so extensively?" he said, "Perhaps in two or three years' time;" that money was no object to Robinson, and that was the only way he had of investing his property - he said that he (Martin) had had dealings with Mr. Bousfield; we know that name in our trade - the property was in a room on the ground floor; I know it to be ours by the marks - the value of the property he stated to have bought of Robinson was about 300l., besides which there was about 200l. worth in Robinson's room; Martin had no shop - it was a private room; the name of "Martin, Tailor," is on the door.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Has your father any share in the business? A. He has not; we succeeded him, and pay him a fixed income - Robinson did not give me the information, which led me to Martin; I only know it to be Robinson's room, by what Martin said; we had not missed any of these goods - my brother sold in the shop, also William Landon and Robinson - these goods have not been sold; I can tell that by my books - it is our invariable custom to take off the marks when they are sold, and several of those found both in Robinson's and Martin's rooms have marks attached to them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q.Then the marks were plainly visible to any body who opened the cloth? A. Yes; they still remain fixed to the goods - I cannot be certain that the marks remain on those sold to Martin, till I look at them - I know they are on those found in Robinson's room; our stock mark is made with red pencil and not easily removed; they could be cut off - Clements was with me at Martin's, and heard all that was said; he said that Robinson himself attached the tickets to the goods, to distinguish them from the property he had purchased of other persons - I was violently agitated, and said, "You all deserve to be hanged;" he pointed out 2l. or 3l. worth of goods, which he said, he purchased of Bousfield: Martin's son was present at the latter part of the conversation - two coaches were sent for, and the property put into them, but I do not know whether Martin's son fetched the coaches - it was some part of his household undoubtedly; he did not say he had a book in which an account of the transactions between him and Robinson were kept - we brought a book away, which we took out of Robinson's box; Martin did not produce a book - this is the book we took from Robinson's box; Martin wished his son to accompany him to the office.

Q.Was it not a voluntary act on the part of the prisoner and his son, that they went to the office? A.The officer told them they must go to the office.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is this the book (producing one)? A. Yes, it is; Clement's was present at the conversation with Martin - he knew he was an officer.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer, of Marlborough-street. On the 17th of August I saw Robinson at Mr. East's shop; the first address he gave was No. 3, Upper St. Martin's-lane; he then said No. 12, Blenheim-street, and afterwards, No. 8, College-street, Fulham-road - I went to Blenheim-street with a search-warrant, and they said they did not know him, and to No. 8, College-street, but he did not live there - I asked where his brother lived, he said in Yorkshire; I asked where there; he again said in Yorkshire - I ultimately found his brother lived at Mr. Dalston's, in Regent-street; I saw his brother there - I took some keys from the prisoner's possession, and went to No. 48, Han's-place, with Mr. East, and applied the keys to the cupboard, boxes, and drawers in the back attic; they fitted and opened them - a considerable quantity of property was found in Martin's room on the ground floor, as well as in Robinson's - in his parlour and a back room, which appeared a cutting room; they were both on the ground floor - Mr. East asked Martin, if he knew where Robinson lived; he said he knew he lived at Messrs. East's.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Do you remember a coach being sent for? A. Yes, two; I think Martin's son went for them - the property produced was brought away in them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Has it been in your possession ever since? A. It has been locked in a room in my house.

MR. EAST. Here is a ticket in Robinson's hand-writing

fixed to five or six yards of velveteen, found in Martin's room; it cost me 5s. a yard - here is another in his writing, attached to twenty-one yards of fustian, at 2s. 9d. a yard; and another on ten yards of patent cord, worth 2l. -I have examined all the property and can conscientiously say it belongs to our firm.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you mean to say the goods which are not marked are yours? A. I do; some have neither marks nor tickets, but I should say they are ours.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Are you sure they are what Martin told you he had from Robinson? A. Yes - he said that as to every one of them.

WILLIAM WILSON SCOTT . I know Robinson, and visited him at No. 48, Han's-place, in a bed-room - I cannot say on what floor.

HENRY MARTIN . I am the prisoner's son, and am nineteen years old.

MR. ALLEY. Q.Did not your father openly and fairly disclose what he knew of the transaction? A. I fetched the coach to take away the goods; I did not expect my father would be taken into custody; my father and I both walked to the office.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Clements go with you? A. He was sometimes before, and sometimes behind - Robinson lodged in my father's back attic.

MR. EAST. I sleep in the house in Leicester-square; the rent is paid out of the business; we do not both live in it - it is leased to my father, and transferred by him to us; I pay a greater portion of the rent than my brother; the porter belonging to the firm lives in the house; the goods could not have been carried away all at once - I cannot say what portion was carried away at one time; the house is in the parish of St. Anne, Soho.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . The house is in the parish of St. Anne, in the liberty of Westminster - it is known by that name.

Martin put in a written Defence, stating that he had known Robinson upwards of seven years, and from the opportunity he had of observing him, he considered him an honest industrious man, and entitled to confidence; that he let him a room in his house last July; a few days after which, he observed, that as he was frequently in the City, he could match patterns for him, and afterwards stated he could purchase goods for him, representing that he had various opportunities of procuring them, and having property himself, he could afford to give long credit; that he had purchased the goods of him at a regular and fair price, which was entered in a book now in the prosecutors' possession; that he understood he had property left him by his father, and he had no suspicion of the goods having been improperly obtained; he frequently discounted bills for him; and that upon the prosecutors and officer coming, he had made a full disclosure, and afforded every facility to the search. Twenty witnesses gave him an excellent character.

ROBINSON - GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 20.

MARTIN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-140

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

1667. JOHN ROBINSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 14 yards of woollen cloth, value 14l.; 2 yards of kerseymere, value 1l.; 1 yard of velvet, value 1l.; 2 pattern cards, value 1l., and 3 yards of quilting, value 1l. , the goods of Charles James East and Henry Vigurs East , his masters; and WILLIAM NEWLAND was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM LANDON. I was in the employ of Messrs. East, and on the 18th of August I went, by desire of Messrs. East, to the house of the prisoner Newland, No. 12, Bury-street - Goddard went in first; I followed, with four or five more, and found, laying on the table, three coats in an unfinished state, one silk waistcoat made up, and one surtout, not made, and six white quilting waistcoats cut out, but not made: Newland said the coats he had cut out to make up for Robinson's wear, and the silk waistcoats also, but the quilting waistcoats were for customers of his own - two lengths of drill were also produced with other articles, by Newland; he said he had them from Robinson - Goddard asked if that was all the property he had got which he had received from Robinson; he said it was all he had got; Clements said, "Then if that is all you have got, we will look round the room;" he did so, and on taking a candle, on a sideboard or shelf on the left-hand side of the room, he found this parcel, tied up in brown paper - here is the paper; there is written on it, in Robinson's hand-writing, "Mr. J. Robinson;" I have seen him write many times; the parcel contained a yard and a quarter of fancy velvet, a yard and a half of figured silk, a yard and three-quarters of superfine brown cloth, and two pairs of trousers made up: I do not think they have been worn - one pair has not been worn certainly: Newland said he was not aware of it having been left there - that it must have been left three or four days before; he was asked if he had an account with Robinson, and said he had been in the habit of making up a good many clothes for him - that he was never paid in money, but in goods, which answered his purpose equally well; he produced no account in my presence - he was asked if he was aware Robinson was in the employ of Messrs. East, and he said he was perfectly aware of that - he was asked what he owed Robinson, and at first said, Nothing; being again asked, he said there was an account between them, and he believed he owed him between 30l. and 40l., which was to be paid at Christmas - several of these articles I can positively swear to; I have the piece this velvet was cut from in Court - it matches exactly, where the figures is cut through, and tallies exactly, and this silk I thoroughly believe to be Messrs. Easts', as we have the exact pattern; here are two pattern-cards which we found in Newland's room - they are Messrs. Easts', and his name ought to be on them; that part of the cover which had" C. and H. East" on it is cut out.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Had this conversation passed before you found the coats? A.They were produced to Goddard, I believe, before I went up -I never heard him say any thing about his believing Robinson to be an agent, selling on commission, or any thing to that effect; he lives at a baker's shop, and is a tailor - it is a small room, about fourteen feet square; I did not see the parcel till Clements took hold of it - Newland's attention had not been directed to it; I do not think it had been opened at all - it was not directed to Newland.

Q.When the officer asked if he had more articles which

he had bought of Robinson, did he call his apprentice to look and see if there was more? A. I did not hear him, and think I can swear he did not; I never knew an instance of a clerk acting as a commission agent in our trade; I have been with Mr. East twelve years - Robinson was two years and a half or three years in Mr. East's employ, and acted as a servant.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was the sideboard, on which the parcel was, in the dining-room? A. Yes; there was nothing to prevent the family seeing it - I never knew a clerk allowed to get goods made up, and pay the tailor in cloth.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer. I went with another officer and Landon to the prisoner's house; I went up stairs first, saw Newland, and asked if her knew a young man named Robinson, in the employ of Mr. East - he said he did: I asked how long it was since he had any cloth from him - he said, "Last week;" I said his employers had been robbed to a very considerable extent, and that I had a search-warrant, and it was for him to produce the property he had of Robinson: I then asked how much he owed Robinson - he said he did not owe him any, for he always took it out in cloth: he then went into a back room, and brought three unfinished coats, and the articles Landon has spoken of - the drill was in the front room; he said he was making the coats up for Robinson; Clements and Landon then came up stairs - the conversation was in the middle room; I asked if he had got any more property which Robinson had brought there - we were then in the front room, in which the sideboard was; he said No: Clements then proceeded to search further, and on the sideboard found a small parcel, directed to J. Robinson - Newland said it must have been left there three or four days ago, for he did not know it was there; he was again asked if he owed Robinson any thing, and said he owed him nothing - we pot him into St. James' watch-house, and on our way to the office next day, he said he supposed he owed Robinson 20l. or 30l., but if he had finished the clothes he supposed he would have owed him 10l.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you go there? A.About a quarter-past seven o'clock in the evening, or it might be half-past; it was certainly getting towards dark - he at once said he knew Robinson, and had bought goods of him; the things were brought to us by himself and his apprentice - he went into the back room, where they make up clothes; the front is a set of dining and a cutting-room, and the middle a bed-room - I asked him to produce the whole of the property which he had from Robinson; we were then in the front room, and he was asked if he had got any thing else; Clements took the candle off the front room table, and brought the parcel - the parcel was tied up, as if it had not been undone; the drill laid openly on the cutting-board - the other things were brought out of the back room, except the quilted waistcoats, which were in the front room; his apprentices assisted to produce the things - I particularly asked if it was all the property he had of Robinson.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the pattern-cards? A. Yes, they were found, to the best of my knowledge, under the paper parcel on the sideboard.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I went with the officers, and found the paper parcel on the sideboard, with these two pattern-cards under it, and another by the side of it; Landon took them up, and said, "Why, these are ours;" I was bringing Newland to the office on the 19th; he said he owed Robinson about 20l., or it might be rather more, that he had been making a suit of clothes for a young man at No. 120, Sloane-street, named Wilson Scott, with cloth brought by Robinson, which he took home last Saturday, and that would reduce it to about 12l.; I went there, and got the clothes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go into the room were you found the parcel with a candle? A. I took a candle off the table in that room.

HENRY VIGURS EAST. I am in partnership with my brother. Robinson was our servant; we paid him wages as a servant - he was called into the counting-house on the 17th of August, and asked where he lived; he gave three false addresses - these pattern-cards contain patterns of the goods we had for sale in August, and our present stock corresponds with 19-20lbs of them; the cards are ours, and all the property produced is ours.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you deal in the wholesale way? A. Yes; we serve tailors as well as others - we give pattern-cards, not sell them; August is not the season for giving them; we gave several dozens away in April or May - the goods found at Newland's are worth 9l. or 10l., besides that in the parcel.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.When you give any cards do you erase your name from them, or is it that the persons may know your stock? A.Certainly it is - our name is outside, and we generally write inside the name of the person we give them to; there is no name inside these.

COURT. Q. If a person sells on commission for you, in what way does he sell? A. It is a very different description of trade altogether; we have a country traveller, but never sell on commission - I do not think it is the practice in our trade to sell on commission at all.

GEORGE ELVIDGE . I was porter to the prosecutors five months ago; Robinson directed me to take two parcels out for him; I left one or two for him at a coffeeshop kept by Arliss, in Upper St. Martin's-lane, tied in brown paper - I think they were directed in the name of James Robinson; I also took a parcel to a baker's-shop, in Bury-street, St. James', and think it is the house Newland lodged at - I think I took two parcels there.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to leave Messrs. East? A. On account of getting up late in the morning; I understood so at the time - I have since heard I was not confident enough; I left on the 20th of March - it was about July last year that I went to Bury-street, and about February to the coffee-shop - I did not know what the parcels contained.

CHARLES ARLISS . I keep a coffee-shop, in Upper St. Martin's-lane, and have known Robinson about eight months. He left a parcel himself with me, about eight o'clock in the morning, directed to Mr. Newland, and one for Mr. Green - I cannot positively say whether Newland himself came for the parcel; I was examined at the office - a person called about eleven o'clock the same morning, and asked for a parcel left for Mr. Newland by Robinson; it was the prisoner Newland for all I know - I had never seen him before.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.How long age

was it that Robinson left the parcel for Newland? A. I cannot say; I think it was after Christmas, five or six months ago - I do not know who fetched it away.

Newland's Defence (written). If I had dealt with the prisoner Robinson as a mere acquaintance of yesterday, more caution might have been required at my hands, but I have known him intimately for several years, and known him employed in various situations of great respectability and trust, in which no misconduct was ever imputed to him - I knew him to be a sober and an attentive industrious man. I was acquainted with some of his relatives and friends, who were highly respectable, and in a condition, as I believed, to afford him the means which he stated they had done; I have long worked for him, as a tailor, before he entered the service of the prosecutors, and was always told by himself, when he solicited orders from me, that he was transacting business occassionally on his own account - a circumstance not at all uncommon with persons in his situation. In confirmation of all this, his prices were as high as those charged by the wholesale traders; and I humbly hope you will be satisfied that, in crediting these assertions and representations, I was doing no more than almost any other man would have done; he came openly to my shop, and transacted business in the presence of my two apprentices, to whom our accounts were always open for inspection - nor was there any thing in the extent of our dealings to awaken suspicion on my part. When his conduct was discovered, and the prosecutors, with the officers, came to my house, I was ready and anxious to give every explanation - I directed every article to be brought forward, and gave up the accounts without hesitation, for I had nothing either to conceal or to deny; and if I have been in any instance too easily induced to believe in the representations of so very old an acquaintance, who, as far as I knew, had deserved the good character he had enjoyed, I trust the character the Court will hear of me to-day, from respectable individuals, will induce your Lordship and the Jury to believe that I have not done so with any culpable intention of defrauding others, but that I have been myself most cruelly deceived.

ISAAC ACKROYD . I live in College-street, Chelsea, and was formerly in business with Mr. Lamot, in Marylebone-street, Golden-square. Robinson is my brother-inlaw, and came into our service about six years ago; his father died in October,1828, and, I believe, he had property left him - I cannot tell the amount; I do not know any thing about it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where did he lodge in August last? A. On my oath, I cannot tell, farther than by hear - say - the last place I knew him at was Mr. East's, and he told me he slept there.

JOHN COWIE . I am a woollen-draper. It is customary for drapers to buy goods of agents, and the agents may serve on their own account if they please; it is frequently the case, but not always.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Has it been customary at your house? A. Yes - I do not give pattern cards like these; I am in the wholesale line - I am in the agency business, and sell on my own account as well; I never give my clerks liberty to have goods made up, and pay the tailors with cloth.

COURT. Q. Is it customary for a clerk to be a commission agent? A. No, it is not when he is employed as a clerk.

EDWARD WEST . I am apprentice to Newland. I have seen Robinson at his house - master has bought articles of him in the usual way of business: they were entered in the books - I have seen them entered at the time they were bought; Robinson used to enter them, and I have seen master enter them - master made up clothes for him; I never knew master pay him except by making clothes for him; I have heard master complain to him of being over - charged for goods - Robinson has answered that he did not get 2d. a yard by them; I have heard Robinson tell master at the time that he had bought the goods in the City - I was present when the officers came; master and I gathered up the things I was making, and took them into the front room - master told me to look for all the things he had had from Robinson: I produced all that came from him to the best of my knowledge.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How many dealings had your master with Robinson? A. I am not aware - I have heard him there a dozen times; we never made him more than one coat at a time, except the last - there was a great coat and three dress coats; they were for Robinson himself, and a black coat was made for a gentleman in Sloane-street - I never saw any money pass between Robinson and master; I never heard him say where in the City the goods came from - it was the first dealing I was present at that he said he bought them in the City; master and mistress used to sit in the front room - I did not go there unless I was wanted; I did not know he was in Mr. East's employ till be was taken - master's books were given to Mr. East on the first examination.

RICHARD FIGGINS . I have been apprentice to Newland these two years - he was in the habit of buying goods of Robinson; I have several times heard him complain of their high price, and Robinson said he did not get 2d. a yard by it - I have heard him say he got the goods in the City, but never heard where; the purchases were regularly entered into the book at the time - I believe that book is in Mr. East's possession.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How long has Robinson dealt with your master? A. Ever since I have been there, I think, but I did not know much of master's affairs when I first went; he would appear very young two years ago - the first dealing I was present at was about a year and a half since; when he has called master has said he wanted goods - I have heard him say, "It is a pity I did not know it an hour ago, as I have just come from the City;" I have heard that several times - I never heard master ask where he got them; I knew he was in Mr. East's employ, and have heard master say so - Robinson frequently brought cloth to master's, he might have brought cloth a dozen or three dozen times.

Q. Will you swear your master has not bought one hundred and fifty yards of cloth of him at different times? A. I cannot; I have seen pattern-cards about, but do not know whether these were them - they had not the name scratched out; I never noticed what the names were - I seldom went into the front room; I believe Robinson went into master's front room whenever he chose - I never saw the parcel on the sideboard; I had not been into the room for three days.

COURT. Q.Look at these trousers? A. This pair was made at our house, and I believe the others; they do not appear to have been worn.

Q.Then in the bundle was a pair of trousers made by your master? A. I think they are his make - I do not remember when they were made.

EDWARD WEST. These trousers are my make; I do not remember when they were made; I do not know whether they fitted - they do not appear to have been tried on.

THOMAS EVANS . I am servant to Mr. Bedward, a man's-mercer, in Vigo-lane - I have managed his business for the last seven years, and receive all his cash. I know Newland perfectly well; I have dealt with him as an agent, at least he has had goods of me on my own account; I bought them of Mr. Bedward, who is my uncle - I am allowed that privilege; they are booked to me, and I dispose of them among my friends - I have sold the prisoner goods, and have been paid by his making clothes for myself, my brother, my cousin, and Dr. Jewell, whom I recommended to him.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Your uncle was acquainted with this, and you did nothing secretly? A.Certainly - he knew where I lived; I told him I had my uncle's permission.

COURT. Q.How were the goods delivered? A.Sometimes he came to our shop for them, and at other times I sent our young man with them.

ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

NEWLAND - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-141

1668. JAMES ROBINSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , 20 yards of drill, value 3l.; 140 yards of silk, value 70l.; 90 yards of cassimere, value 40l.; 40 yards of quilting, value 8l.: 70 yards of valentia. value 20l.; 50 yards of kersey, value 20l.; 20 yards of toilenette, value 5l.; 26 yards of woollen cloth, value 20l.; 25 yards of fustian, value 3l., and 40 yards of merino, value 8l., the goods of Charles James East and Henry Vigurs East , in their dwelling-house ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years, to commence from the expiration of the former Sentence of Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-142

1669. JAMES ROBINSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 11 yards of silk, value 6l; 29 yards of cassimere, value 8l.; 10 yards of dimity, value 1l.; 10 yards of mole-skin, value 1l.; 3 yards of plush, value 1l.; 1 yard of toilenette, value 5s., and 5 yards of nankeen, value 13s., the goods of Charles James East and Henry Vigurs East , in their dwelling-house ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 21.

MR. PHILLIPS declined offering any evidence on the capital part of the charges.

Reference Number: t18310908-143

1670. JOSEPH EVANS was indicted for feloniously receiving the goods stolen by the said James Robinson on the 10th of August , well knowing them to have been stolen .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-144

1671. ALFRED GREEN was indicted for feloniously receiving 35 yards of kersey, value 10l.; 33 yards of cassimere, value 10l., and three-quarters of a yard of silk, value 1l.,the goods of Charles James East and Henry Vigurs East , well knowing them to have been stolen .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18310908-145

1672. THOMAS JAMES DENKIN was indicted for embezzling the sums of 90l. 4s. 2d. - 3l. 3s. 9d. - 9l. 8s. 6d., and 120l. , which he had received on account of Nicholas Denny , Esq. , his master.

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, describing it to have been received on account of the West of England Fire and Life Insurance Company ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-146

1673. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosectuion.

JANE WRIGHT . I live at Hyde, Middlesex. On the 13th of July I went to Messrs. Harvey's shop, on Ludgatehill , and purchased goods of the prisoner, which came to 21s. - I paid him a shilling and a sovereign; he made out a bill, and gave it to me directly, without taking it to the desk - here is the bill; it amounts to 21s. - he took the sovereign up in his left hand, and the shilling in his right - he stood a few minutes, and then put his left hand into his pocket; I then saw him make out another bill, which he took to a desk where the cashier sits - he returned to me - I made another purchase, which came to 2l. 18s.; the bill for that was stamped - I then left the shop: he had never left me to attend to any other customer before he went to the desk; he did not show me the bill which he presented at the desk - this was about six o'clock; I went straight to my son's, named it to him, and he went to Mr. Harvey's.

GEORGE HILL . I was cashier to Messrs. Harvey, and was stationed at the desk in their shop - it is the duty of the shopmen to bring the money and the bills to me; I stamp the bills, and return them. On the 13th of July, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner brought me a bill of 1s.; I did not know whether Mrs. Wright was there - I received the shilling, and stamped the bill; I think he left the bill at the desk; it is usual to give it to the customer, but there was no change, and he did not require the bill back; I have my books here, in which I enter every payment - there are twenty-seven entries of money to him that day, but none of 21s.; each shopman has a column marked for himself - No. 19 on this bill refers to his book; each shopman has a book of his own, and writes on the bill the folio in which he enters the transaction in his book - there is no entry in his book of 21s. being received that day; the bill produced by Mrs. Wright, I believe to be in his hand-writing.

ROBERT COOK . I am one of the firm of John Harvey and others. The prisoner was our shopman - it was his duty, on making a sale, to take the bill with the money to the cashier immediately; this is the book the prisoner kept, and it was his duty to enter in it every sale he made, to number it, and to insert on the bill the number of the transaction in his book. In folio 19 in his book, here is 1s. entered, but no 21s. - if the entry in the book had been correct it should have been 21s. Information was given to me that evening; we took the prisoner into custody next morning, and a sovereign was found in his boot - upon my charging him with it he denied it, but on the following morning, as I was going out of the door to call the officer, he called me back, and said he had got the sovereign, he took off his boot, and produced it - he had been about three months in our employ, and we had a good character with him; he had from 30l. to 35l. per annum, and his board

and lodging; I have nothing to do with the countinghouse, and cannot say whether he had been paid - if he had applied for his wages he could have had them.

JAMES SNOW. I am an officer. I was called in on the 4th of July, and heard the prisoner say that he took the sovereign, made a fresh bill out, and gave a shilling to the cashier.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-147

1674. FRANCIS MACDOWALL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 1 coat, value 5l. , the goods of Henry Ruffy .

RENRY RUFFY . I live in Newgate-street, and was in the service of my father, who is a printer , in Budgerow; the prisoner was in his employ. I was out of town on the 13th of August, and was not aware of my loss until I was informed of it; I then missed a coat worth about 4l. or 5l. - I had left it at my lodging in the cupboard; the prisoner knew I lived there - I left in July, and returned about the end of August - I then found him in custody; I never gave him permission to take it.

REBECCA FENTON . I am servant to Mr. Wilson, of Newgate-street , where Mr. Ruffy lives. The prisoner used to call there; he came on the 13th of August last, and asked for Mr. Henry's brown great coat - I knew him to be in Mr. Ruffy's service, and delivered it to him; the prosecutor was out of town at the time - I thought he wanted it for Mr. Henry.

ISAAC HUGHES PUGH . I am shopman to Mr. Bayles, a pawnbroker, in Aldersgate-street. I have a coat, pawned on the 13th of August, for 1l.; I cannot say by whom - I gave the person a duplicate, in the name of John Macdowell , No. 21, Dove-street.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at his father's house, at Hackney; I told him it was for robbing his master - his father said, "If you have done wrong, you must answer for it;" he told me voluntarily that he had torn up the duplicate.

Prisoner's Defence (written). Having been made the dupe of villainy, by a lad that addressed me about two months ago, in the street, he, having been informed by me my employer's name, and the hours of going and leaving, at different times waylaid me in the street, and by his deceitful artifice I was over persuaded to absent myself from the employment of my master, unknown to my loving and affectionate parents, whose peace of mind I have for ever broken, and I fear no reparation on my part will ever repay - at the same time be persuaded me to rob the best and kindest of masters; let me entreat of your Lordship to take my tender age into your consideration.

GUILTY. Aged 16. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310908-148

1675. HENRY SMITH and WILLIAM BARNES were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 1 hat, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.: 1 shirt, value 3s.; 1 neck handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 4 half-crowns, and 2 shillings, the property of Benjamin Lambeth , from his person .

BENJAMIN LAMBETH . I am servant to Mr. Freeman, of Warwick-lane, a coach-proprietor. On the 28th of August, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Smithfield; this handkerchief was in my pocket, and the money also, and the shirt - I was not sober, and laid down in Smithfield , opposite the Ram Inn, in one of the sheep-pens - I awoke about five o'clock, and my hat was gone from my head, my money from my breeches pocket and my stockings and shirt also - my shoes were taken off my feet - I did not know either of the prisoners, and have not found any of my property - I saw the prisoners in custody next day on this charge.

WILLIAM CLEENSON . I am a scale-maker, and live in Smithfield. On the 28th of August, about five o'clock, I saw the prosecutor asleep in the pens; he then had his hat and shoes on - I saw both the prisoners there about five minutes after; they came up to him, from West-street, and took off his shoes and hat: then one of their companions who is not in custody, took the hat and shoes down West-street - they went away, came back again in about five minutes to try his pockets; I saw them take a white parcel, which appeared a shirt, from his coat pocket - they then went away; I went next door to my brother-in-law to inform him - and soon after they returned a third time; one of the prisoners laid down by the prosecutor's side, and rifled his pockets - I pointed them out to my brother-in-law; he went and they were secured - the third person was only with them the first time.

ROBERT WOOD . I am Cleenson's brother in-law. I was informed of this; I saw the prisoners return to the prosecutor, and rifle his pockets; I went and procured an officer, and had them taken.

FRANCIS GETTINGS . I am an officer. Wood took the prisoners and delivered them to me; I took them to the Compter, and found 2s. on Barnes, and 2s. 41/2d. on Smith - they called me by my name, and knew me very well, and I knew them.

Smith's Defence. I work in Smithfield market; this young man, living in the neighbourhood, went with me to Islington; as we came back there was a man preaching in Smithfield, and just before I got there Gettings came and collard us.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

BARNES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310908-149

1676. WILLIAM HUGHES and JAMES CARNEY were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Robert Norris , from his person .

CARNEY pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

ROBERT NORRIS. I am an East India agent , and live in Hatton-garden. On the 22nd of July, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was on Holborn-hill , going into the City, and was not aware that my handkerchief was taken until the officer told me - he was in the act of securing the prisoners; I saw my handkerchief on the ground, close to me.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am an officer of the City. I saw Mr. Norris walking arm-in-arm with another gentleman down Holborn - the two prisoners and another boy got behind him; the other boy got away as soon as Stone laid hold of one of them - I saw Carney take hold of the handkerchief twice before he got it out; the other two were with him at the time, and could not avoid seeing him - a cart passed, which prevented my crossing to take hold of

them; when I got across Stone had both the prisoners, one in each hand, and the handkerchief laid between them- he crossed before the cart passed; I am quite sure of their persons, and had seen them repeatedly before.

BENJAMIN ALLEN STONE . I belong to the City Police. I was with Davis, who told me to look out - I saw Hughes take the handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket; the other one had his hand ready to receive it - I seized them - in the scuffle the hat dropped out of his hand, and the handkerchief fell at his feet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Hughes' Defence. I was coming down Holborn, by the side of the prosecutor, but did not know him - all in a moment the officer caught hold of me and Carney - at that instant Carney dropped the handkerchief.

HUGHES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Both Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310908-150

1677. ELIZABETH POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 4 hare-skins, value 7s. , the goods of Isaac Lialter .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HANNAH NATHAN . I am in the service of Isaac Lialter , a furrier , who lives in Middlesex-street - the prisoner was in his service. On the evening of the 31st of August, in consequence of directions from Mr. Lialter, I counted some skins - the prisoner had sixty skins to work upon; I counted them about seven o'clock, and there were only fifty-three - the three, which were cut, made fifty-six.

ISAAC LIALTER . The prisoner was in my employ. In consequence of information I had two officers on my premises on the 31st of August, between six and seven o'clock, when the servants leave work - the prisoner had no authority to take away skins; I had given her sixty foreign hare-skins, about a quarter-past five, to work upon, and told Nathan to count them - Roberts was placed a few yards outside the warehouse; he afterwards produced four skins to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was the prisoner in the habit of working for you for any time? A. I believe for five or six years - I had a good opinion of her; I never allowed her to take skins home, unless I gave them to her to work upon - I have, at times, given her English rabbit-skins to work upon at home, but never foreign skins - I never suffer them to be taken home, and do not allow work to be done on the premises in our new year, but August was not a time of that kind.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a constable. On the 31st of August I stopped the prisoner about a hundred yards from the prosecutor's door, about seven o'clock in the evening, with a basket in her hand - I asked her if she did not work for Mr. Lialter; she said she did - I told her he suspected things were not all right, and that he missed his skins - she immediately said she had four in her basket; I asked what she was going to do with them - she said to cut the wool off, and return it in the morning; I asked if Mr. Lialter knew of it - she said he knew nothing of it - I took her to the watch-house; three of the skins were in a paper, and one in a handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to wrong Mr. Lialter of them - I took them home to forward me an hour the next day; he often gave me leave to take work home, as I was obliged to go home early in the evening.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-151

1678. The said ELIZABETH POTTER & ELIZABETH GAPES were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 8 hare skins, value 12s. , the goods of Isaac Lialter .

HANNAH NATHAN . The prisoner Gapes was one of our workwomen. On the 29th of August, a young woman, named McCartney, produced a bundle to me, about halfpast twelve o'clock; I examined it - it contained two foreign hare skins: the prosecutor had about ten persons in his employ then - I put it where I found it, which was at the next board to Gapes'; they work at separate boards - she had left the room to fetch something for her dinner - when she returned she took the parcel from the next board to her, and put it on her own board; she then eat her dinner, and after getting up I saw her put the parcel into her basket - I did not see her leave the premises.

Cross-examined by MR. SMITH. Q.Are you related to the prosecutor? A. I am not; the boards are parted from one another - it was on McCartney's board at first; it was not concealed - I said nothing to her about it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Were the skins wrapped up in a handkerchief? A. In white paper; nobody could see they were skins without undoing the bundle.

MARGARET SCAGO. I am in the service of the prosecutor - I have heard Nathan's evidence, which is correct.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you see the parcel? A. Yes, every body in the room could see it.

COURT. Q.Did you see it on McCartney's board? A. I first saw it in Nathan's hand - she put it on Gapes' board: it was in whitey-brown paper - none of the skin could be seen.

CATHERINE McCARTNEY . I am in the prosecutor's service. When I came up at half-past twelve o'clock, Gapes was out of the room; I found a parcel, wrapped in whitey-brown paper on my board - I turned round and showed it to Nathan - Simpson was by; we opened the paper and looked at it; Nathan opened it - I saw two foreign skins; it was put back on my board, I am sure - I had put it on the board opposite; I saw Gapes come back, and after she had dined, she put it on her own board, and then into her basket - Simpson stood behind me at the time at work; I saw Gapes leave between six and seven o'clock - she took her basket with her.

Cross-examined. Q. Had Scago had an opportunity of seeing whether the parcel was placed on your board or Gapes'? A. I cannot say - she was about two yards from me; after the prisoner put it into her basket, she fastened it, and put it close to where she was at work; every body could see the basket.

HANNAH SIMPSON . I am in the service of the prosecutor. I saw the parcel; it was on McCartney's board - Nathan opened it, showed it to me, and put it again on McCartney's board; it was put on a little place between McCartney's board and Gapes' - they both worked about one spot; it was put on a board opposite theirs - the boards all join; Gapes came in in about ten minutes, took it up, and put it on her own board - she then took and put it into her basket; I saw her go out about half-past six o'clock with it.

Cross-examined. Q. The board is a long table, placed against the side of the room? A. Yes; eight or nine of them worked in the room - we could not see what was in the parcel.

MR. LIALTER. In consequence of information, I had Gapes apprehended on the 31st of August, and at the watch-house I asked if she had any of my foreign hare skins at home - she declared she had not; I then said I was informed she had taken two skins, wrapped up in paper, on the Monday, and likewise that she had taken two on the Tuesday, that we had the keys of her lodging, and were going to search - (Potter and her both lived together;) she said I might, I should find nothing at home but a lot of rubbish, which I had given her to work on on the Saturday - we took her with us to her lodgings, No. 2, Lock-street, Commercial-road; the door was open- she struck a light, and there was nothing; she then took us into a back room adjoining, and said, "Sir, I will tell you the truth, I hope you will forgive me;" she went to one part of the room, took up two paper parcels from the corner, and said, "There are two skins which I brought home on Monday in this paper parcel, and two which I brought on Tuesday, and four which Potter brought home;" she got them all from one place - the four were not in paper, but she said she meant to bring the produce of those skins back again - I said, "How did you mean to bring them back, when the work I gave you on Monday you returned on Tuesday, and when you brought down that work, I said it was very light; you said it was all you could get off the skins, you could not bring more than you had;" I found a quantity of my felt in the room.

Cross-examined. Q. Do these persons work by the piece? A. Yes - it would not take ten minutes to manufacture this - they earn 3s. 9d. by cutting sixty skins - we cannot count them when they bring the produce, as they are obliged to cut the skins up; I am certain I have correctly stated what she said.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I took Gapes in charge - the prosecutor's statement is correct; I went with him, Roberts and Gapes, to the house, where the prosecutor picked out his goods, and said they were his; Gapes said she had brought them home on the Tuesday, and some on the Monday - they were in two parcels; I heard her ask him to forgive her, two or three times - I did not pay much attention to the conversation.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you not asked if what the last witness related respecting the conversation as true? A. Yes, I say so now; but they were talking for nearly an hour.

JAMES ROBERTS. I was present at the examination of the premises - Mr. Lialter's evidence is correct, every word of it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Gapes' Defence. I took the work home to forward me next day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-152

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1679. DANIEL MADDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 2 pillows, value 4s.; 1 counterpane, value 2s., and 2 flat irons, value 1s. , the goods of William Woodland ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Reference Number: t18310908-153

1680. SAMUEL HORATIO LARKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , 1 watch, value 20l. , the goods of William Moore Tracey , his master.

WILLIAM MOORE TRACEY. The prisoner lived servant with me, in Charles-street, St. James'-square. On the 9th of August I gave him my watch to get a glass put into it; in the afternoon, between three and four o'clock, I gave him half a crown to go and get it - I did not see him again till the Sunday, when he was in custody.

RICHARD DEACON . I am a constable of Kentish-town. On the 14th of August the prisoner came to me, and said he had robbed his master, that he could not rest, and he came to give himself up into my hands - he said he had robbed his master of a watch, and gave me the duplicate.

WILLIAM HILL . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this watch of the prisoner, on the 9th of August - I lent him 6l. on it, and gave this duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-154

1681. MARY ANN EVITTS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 watch, value 20l., the goods of Clere Talbot , from his person .

CLERE TALBOT. I am in the Colonial-office . On the 23rd or 24th of March, I was returning home, and met the prisoner between one and two o'clock in the morning - I entered into conversation with her for about ten minutes, did not go to any house with her, but into a mews; when I got home, on taking my things off, I missed my watch - the chain came off without it; I had lost my watch, and part of the chain - it was a gold guard-chain; I returned, and described her to a Policeman - he said she had just passed him, but we could not find her then; I gave twenty guineas for the watch.

Prisoner. I was crossing from Thomas' hotel when you came and caught hold of me. Witness. No, it was in Bond-street, near Berkeley-square , not the side the hotel is; the Policeman told us to pass on - I did not appoint to meet you any where; I rushed from you - I certainly said when I saw you I would give you something, but I did not appoint any place; it is morally impossible the watch could fall from me - it is a thick guard-chain, and obviously cut off; I do not recollect whether it was the same Policeman who had told us to move on, to whom I made known my loss - I told half a dozen Policemen of it.

COURT. Q. Did you leave the prisoner under such circumstances, that upon any little scuffle the watch might have fallen from you? A. Oh no! it was impossible; the chain was so thick it must have been cut.

Prisoner. I stood full ten minutes, and if I had stolen the watch I could have gone off; he rushed from me very swiftly, and I caught hold of his cloak. Witness. She never took any means to restrain my going - I do not recollect her taking hold of my cloak; I certainly did run home.

JOSEPH HALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Battlebridge. I have a watch, pawned by the prisoner, in the

name of Heard, on the 24th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, for 5l.; I am satisfied she is the person - I asked if it was her own property; she said Yes.

Prisoner. You did not ask if it was my own. Witness. Yes, I did, and it is put down on the duplicate,"Gold watch, 5l., Mrs. E. Heard, No. 17, Speldhurst-street, owner and pledger."

THOMAS GOODYEAR . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner coming out of the House of Correction, where she had been one month for being disorderly.

Prisoner. I went to Mr. Hall, and made inquires about the watch.

MR. HALL. Yes, in about three weeks she came and desired it to be stopped, as she had lost the duplicate; she did not leave any message about its not being inquired for, nor did she pay any thing.

Prisoner to MR. TALBOT. Q.Did I have my hands in any position about your person, either when your cloak was open or when you were rushing from me? A.Very likely you had - you asked for money, and I said I had none; I have no recollection of saying I would meet you at the theatre.

Prisoner's Defence. On his leaving me I was running, and struck my foot against something, which proved to be this watch; I followed the prosecutor to the end of Grosvenor-street, and the Policeman said he ran so swiftly that he could not tell which way be went; I examined the watch - it proved to be gold, and had the glass broken; I remembered I had heard it crack, as I was following the prosecutor because he had not given me any money; I went with the watch to the theatre, where he said he would meet me - after going through the saloon several times, I then went to Berkeley-square to see for him: I should have stopped longer, but a Police-officer said, "I am not certain you are the person, but there is a tall person suspected of stealing a gold watch;" I said I had stolen no watch, but I asked where the gentleman lived, and they would not give me the address - I had mislaid the duplicate, and could not find it: I went to the pawnbroker that no one else might get it till I found who it belonged to.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-155

1682. JOHN CURTIS was indicted for feloniously putting off, to James Gollocker, 10 counterfeit half-crowns, at and for a lower rate and denomination than the same were counterfeited for .

MESSRS. SCARLETT and GURNEY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES GOLLOCKER. I am a constable of the parish of Lambeth. On the 4th of June I met Richard Myers - he is a tobacconist, and lives on Newington-causeway; I met him at the Rose and Crown - I received from him six shillings, a sixpence, and four half-pence; I went to Goswell-street, and waited there three quarters of an hour - I saw the prisoner, a person named Johnson, and another named Avis; Avis said to the prisoner and Johnson, "This is the young man that wants the things" - I went into New-court, which is opposite the Rose and Crown, where Myers was waiting - the prisoner and Johnson followed me into the court, and Avis stood just at the mouth of the court; I asked the prisoner what he had got; he said ten, and he took a paper parcel from his trousers pocket, which he gave me - I opened it, and found it contained ten half-crowns: I gave him the 6s. 8d. for them, which Myers gave me - I said he must stand something to drink, which he agreed to; we went to the Rose and Crown, where Myers was waiting - the prisoner paid for some rum, but did not take any himself; Myers had been in such a position that he could see what was done in the court - when we were at the Rose and Crown the prisoner said, "They are very good ones, I suppose you will get rid of them to-day;" I said I would if I could - I marked them at the Rose and Crown, and gave them to Myers.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you been employed by the Mint to buy coin? A. From about the beginning of December - I have been a constable six years; I have known Avis three or four months; he said he knew who made base coin; he gives us information at times - I never paid him any thing, nor have I seen him paid; I never knew him till the 15th of May; I have heard he has been convicted - I did not take the prisoner at the time, as we had information that there were four or five coiners in Wentworth-street, and we could not have taken them if we took him then; I did not induce him to do this - I believe this is the fourth time I have bought coin, but will not swear it is not more; if I was at home I could refer to some accounts and tell; I have been a witness in vmore than ten cases, but not bought coin - I believe I have been a witness in seventeen cases, but am not quite sure; I have not received a farthing since December - I expect to be paid for my loss of time; I had a case about four years ago, and then I was paid for it - I am in the coal trade, but do not attend much to it; my wife is a laundress, and I keep a few pigs - I had five chaldrons of coals of Mr. Scott in the last twelve months, and sold them to my neighbours; I sell from a cellar; I fetch my wife's linen, and do other jobs; I was a patrol of the parish before the establishment of the New Police; I feel a pleasure in detecting people who act against the law - it is not for gain; Myers searched me to satisfy the Jury I had no money about me - if I could find Johnson I would take him- I have not seen him since; Avis knew I was to meet the prisoner - I did not know it was the prisoner I was to buy of - I did not direct Avis to send the prisoner with them.

MR. SCARLETT. Q. You have been a constable several years? A. Yes; I think it is entered into the seventh year - officers are often obliged to speak to persons of suspicious character; I have been in the room with them, and in all kind of company.

RICHARD MYERS . I am a tobacconist, and live on Newington-causeway. I received information that the prisoner was a dealer in counterfeit coin - I made an arrangement to introduce him to Gollocker, and he was to meet him on the 4th of June; Avis was the person who gave me information; I met Gollocker at the Rose and Crown public-house, Goswell-street, a little after nine o'clock in the morning - I searched him, and satisfied myself that he had no coin about him; I have known him some time; he is a constable - I gave him six good shillings, a sixpence, and 2d. in half-pence - I had no reason to doubt his honesty, though I did this; I do not employ him, he goes as a constable with me - when I had given him the money I remained in the Rose and Crown, and he went into the street - I was in such a position as

to see what he did; when he had been some time in the street, the prisoner, another man, and Avis, came up - Gollocker then went into New-court, immediately opposite where I was; they had some conversation, and the prisoner stood with his back against the wall - after they had talked a minute or two the prisoner put his hand, I think, into his left-hand trousers pocket, and pulled out a paper parcel, which Gollocker received, and gave him something in return - Gollocker then opened the parcel, took one out, and tried it upon his thumb; I saw him do it - they then came across to the house where I was, and I withdrew from the door where I had been standing, and went into a parlour adjoining the bar, with a glass partition across it; they called for some rum, but the prisoner would not drink any - her said he had other business to do, or he had not had breakfast I do not know which; I think the prisoner paid for it, and Gollocker and the other two men drank it - the prisoner and the other men then went out - Gollocker came to me and produced these half-crowns; my reason for not taking the prisoner at the time was, because we had other parties in view - we made several attempts to take the prisoner afterwards, but failed in them, till the 22nd of August, when I met with Hall, and took him at the bottom of Wilson-street - he was searched, and in the lining of his jacket Hall found three counterfeit half-crowns.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been a tobacconist? A. Ten years; my servants attend to my business - I was a constable ten years, and left off about a year ago; when I receive information, I go and tell Gollocker, and he tells me - I have heard Avis called Perkins - I have heard of his being in trouble once about coin before I knew him; I have given him 1s. or 2s. for refreshments, and sometimes 3s., but not as payment - I never introduced him to the Mint; the solicitor knew he has been with me finding these people out - I will not swear I have not given him 5l.; I enter in a book what I give him, and expect to be paid again; the Mint paid me last about a year ago - I cannot tell how much I have received for the last two years without my books - I do not think it is 100l. in all.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. I accompained Myers, and took the prisoner at the corner of Wilson-street, Gray's-Inn-road - I searched him, and found in the lining of his coat-tail three counterfeit half-crowns - I had some trouble to get them.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint. These ten half-crowns are all counterfeit - they are alike, and, I believe, are cast in the same mould; these three others are connterfeit also; they are of a different impression - they are made in a plaster of Paris mould, and the metal is poured in hot.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor in my life till I was at Hatton-Garden.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-156

1683. JAMES HITCHCOCK was indicted for feloniously puting off to Robert Lawrence , 20 counterfeit shillings, at and for a lower rate and denomination than the same were counterfeited for .

MESSRS. SCARLETT and GURNEY conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT LAWRENCE . I am a fishmonger, and live in Lambeth-walk. In consequence of an application made to me, I met Gollocker and Myers, at Myers' house, on the 10th of June; Gollocker there searched me, to see if I had any money, and then provided me with four shillings, and Myers gave me six pence; I then went with them to Kingsland-road - I and Gollocker went to the sign of the Bull, and Myers went to the Weavers' Arms - Gollocker and I had a pint of porter, for which Gollocker paid; in about ten minutes the prisoner came in, he took a drink of porter and then beckoned me out - I had seen him on the day before, at the same house; we went into Edward-street, and Gollocker followed us - I went with the prisoner nearly to the bottom of the street, and asked what he had got; he said a score of bobs - I asked him the price - he said they were to be 4s.; he took a parcel out of his waistcoat pocket, and gave it me - I broke it open, and found there was a score; I gave him four shillings in return - I took one of them out of the paper, and threw it up with my thumb and finger, to give Myers a sight of it - we then went into the Weavers' Arms, called for a pot of ale, and the prisoner asked me when I should want any more; I said I would let him know; he then left, and I gave the twenty base shillings which I had from him to Gollocker, and he gave them to Myers, in my presence - we then went to Myers' house, where I marked them; I went to the prisoner's house on the 22nd of July, and he was there taken.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How long have you been employed by the Mint? A. I have gone now and then for about eleven weeks; but I attend to my own trade - I am a fishmonger; I never passed bad coin; Gollocker knew I had taken seven bad shillings, and applied to me to assist in taking these people - I have not received a farthing; I have given evidence for the Mint once before; I expect to be paid for my loss of time, whether the prisoner is convicted or not - there is a dead wall where the sale took place; it is a long street.

JURY. Q.What did you see the prisoner for on the 9th? A. I went with Gollocker, and the prisoner and him had some transactions together; I made an arrangement with the prisoner to meet me on the next day - he asked Avis, in my presence, if I should want any thing, and he said Yes, a score of bobs.

JAMES GOLLOCKER . I am a constable, and live in King-street, Lambeth-walk. I applied to Lawrence to assist in apprehending the prisoner; I met Lawrence at Myers' house, on the 10th of June - I searched him, furnished him with four shillings, and Myers gave him 6d.; we then went to Kingland-road, to a public-house called the Bull; we went in, and had a pint of beer - the prisoner came in, and took part of the beer; he then went out, and Lawrence followed him - I followed them, and as they were going down Edward-street I heard Lawrence ask the prisoner how many he had got; he said a score - he took a paper parcel from his pocket, and Lawrence gave him something in return; we then went to the Weavers' Arms, and had a pot of ale together - I said to the prisoner, "We shall see you again by and by;" I received the money from Lawrence, and gave it to Myers - we went to Myers' house, and there Lawrence

marked the money: we did not take the prisoner at that time, because we had information that he was one of the coiners who resided in Wentworth-street - I had bought twenty of the prisoner myself on the 9th.

Cross-examined. Q.How long had you known Lawrence? A.Eight or ten years - I never employed him before; he has been engaged with others - he had three cases at Maidstone, which is all I know of; they were all three tried the same day - this is the first case here; the prisoner was aware I was near him - nobody was passing at the time.

RICHARD MYERS . On the 10th of June I accompanied Gollocker and Lawrence, and left them at the Bull-Lawrence had been searched, in my presence, at my house, and four good shillings were given him by Gollocker, and I gave him 6d.; I went to the sign of the Weavers' Arms, which is about the middle of Edward-street, where I could see what took place - the prisoner came down first, Lawrence next, and Gollocker next; the prisoner stood and put something into Lawrence's hand, and Lawrence gave him something in return - Lawrence threw up one of the shillings, to let me see what it was; they then came into the Weavers' Arms, and I drew back - this is the parcel.

WILLIAM HALL . I was at the Orchard public-house on the 22nd of July, and apprehended the prisoner; I found there was something in his waistcoat pocket, and asked him what it was - he said a bad shilling which he had taken a fortnight ago.

JOHN FIELD . I have been long employed as inspector of counterfeit coin for the Mint. These shillings are all counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence I have only to say that I know none of these gentlemen who now come to prosecute me -I never saw any of them before but Lawrence.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-157

1684. WILLIAM HEWKE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 25 yards of linen, value 50s.; 4 collars, value 20s.; 6 yards of bobbinet, value 15s.; 1 muslin dress, value 20s., and 6 sheets of printed paper, value 7s. , the goods of Hellen Morley .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Robert Towns .

3rd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Joseph Ingo .

WILLIAM EDMUND RUMSEY . I am shopman to Messrs. Walkers, pawnbrokers, Waterloo-terrace. I have two lace collars, which the prisoner pawned on the 19th of May, in the name of Charles White .

JOHN RALPH LAWSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have two lace collars and a piece of net, which I took in on the 19th of May, in the name of George White - I could not swear to the prisoner; it was such a sized man in appearance.

ROBERT TAYLOR . I am a Thames Police-officer. On the 19th of May I was called on board the ship Brothers, in the West India-docks - I saw the prisoner in the gunroom; the captain made a charge against him for plundering a chest or trunk, but he could not ascertain of what - the captain is not here.

JOSEPH INGO . I packed the whole of the articles up in a box, to send to my friends in Jamaics; these collars are part of them - they were to go by the ship Brothers Captain Towns ; I sent the chest to a broker, to ship them on board about the 14th of May.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that being in want of money he applied to a man named Whitehead, on board the Brothers, who lent him the goods to pledge, stating that they were his wife's.

ROBERT TAYLOR. I did see Whitehead, and took him into custody on board the ship; I found this piece of Irish linen stowed away among the sails.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-158

1685. ANN HUSSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 2 caps, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Wilmer .

MARV WILMER. I am the wife of Robert Wilmer ; we live in Red Lion-street, Kingsland-road . On the 1st of August the prisoner brought a bundle of lint - she asked if I would allow her to mangle it; I asked her to walk in, and said I would do it myself - I placed the lint in the mangle, and at her request I left her to turn the mangle, whilst I went into the next room - I went into the room where the mangle was, about ten minutes after she was gone; I saw a basket of linen had been disturbed, but I did not miss any thing then - no one had been in after she left - I had seen her stooping towards the basket.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.How were you able to see her? A. Quite well; I was standing against the door - she was touching the basket, and I thought she was placing the lint on it as she took it out of the mangle; I do not let my mangle out, but she had a particular wish to do it herself - I never saw any lint mangled before, and did not understand the nature of it.

FREDERICK EDWARDS. I am a pawnbroker. I have two caps, which I took in of the prisoner on the 1st of August, for 2s. - I have known her two years, and am certain of her person; I believe her an honest good girl.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. I took the prisoner to the pawnbroker's - she denied all knowledge of it, and said the pawnbroker must be mistaken.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18310908-159

1686. JOHANNA HARRAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

WILLIAM GWYTHER. I am an assistant to Messrs. George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , of Old Compton-street, Soho , linen-drapers . On the evening of the 14th of July I saw the prisoner standing at the counter, and in consequence of information I followed her out, and told her I suspected she had stolen a handkerchief, which the young man had shown her - she denied it; I took her into a room - she there said she had not a handkerchief of any sort about her; I then took her to the housekeeper's room - she still denied it, but when she found we were going to leave the room for the housekeeper to search her, she pulled out this handkerchief, and said, "Here is one which I bought in Tottenham-court-road;" I said, "This is ours, here is our mark on it;" she then began to beg that we

would forgive her, and said it was the first time she had ever done any thing of the kind.

JOHN CASTINE . I am a shopman to Messrs. Sewell and Cross. On the 14th of July I saw the prisoner in the shop - she said she had bought some handkerchief before, and wanted to see some of the same sort - I showed her a great many, and several like this one.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE BORDMAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - I did not perceive that she was intoxicated.

The prisoner, in a long address, stated that she was in a state of intoxication, and thought she had paid for the handkerchief. She received an excellent character.

WILLIAM GWYTHER . After she produced it she said,"Here is the money, let me go - I will pay for it."

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310908-160

1687. ROBERT HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 6 pieces of wood, value 2s. , the goods of John Thomas Hobbs .

JOHN THOMAS HOBBS . I live in Gurnell-place, Clerkenwell, and am a cabinet-maker - the prisoner was my porter . I lost some wood, and found some of very small value at a house in Peartree-street, where I believe the prisoner lived, but I did not see him in possession of any.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-161

1688. STEPHEN HARMER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 1 coat, value 4s.; 2 collars, value 1s., and 1 pair of cuffs, value, 1s. , the goods of George John Boyce .

WILLIAM ROBINSON. I am shopman to Mr. George John Boyce - he lives in Theobald's-road . On the afternoon of the 30th of July I saw the prisoner in the shop; he took down these articles from a nail, and ran off with them - I pursued. and called Stop thief! I saw him go into Mr. Beecham's, in Lamb's Conduit-street - I went in, and found him in the kitchen; he had dropped these things before he entered the house, and I took them up; he denied having had them, and then offered to pay for them.

Prisoner. Q.When you saw me take them, why did you not ask me what I was going to do? A. You did not give me time; our's is a corner house, and has two doors, and he went right through - I saw him run up a court, and caught sight of him just as he was entering Mr. Beecham's house; I asked him if he had been in Green-street, because I had been into several rooms, and could not see him - he then offered to purchase the articles which I had in my hand.

JOSEPH STANNARD. I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never ran away with them at all; I took them down to buy them for my little boy, and I all at once thought I would go to Mr. Beecham's - which I did.

GUILTY . Aged 47. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-162

1689. NATHAN THOMAS and WILLIAM BROTHERHOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 8 sheaves of oats, in the straw, value 4s. , the goods of George Daws .

WILLIAM TILLIER . I live at Hutton, in the parish of Bedfont, and am a carpenter. I saw the prisoners near Crawford-bridge on the 7th of August, riding in a one-horse cart, and some rails in it - I saw Thomas get out of the cart, go into Mr. Daws' field, and take a handful of sheaves of oats in the straw; the cart had stopped near the bridge while he went into the field, about a dozen yards off - he put the sheaves into the cart, and Brotherhood, who had the reins, drove off as soon as Thomas got up into the cart; they went off at full trot for twenty or thirty yards, then returned, and went into a bye-lane, togo to Hutton.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Where were you? A.About one hundred yards behind the cart - I had been acquainted with Brotherhood before that; there were no hedges between me and them - it is a turnpike road; the cart had no tilt over it - when the cart was stopped I was gone for the constable; Brotherhood was not laying drunk in the bottom of the cart.

GEORGE DAWS . I have a field near the spot described. I lost some oats in the straw from it - I afterwards saw some of the same description, and I believe they are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You received information of their being taken? A. Yes, and went to the cart; Brotherhood was there, laying in the cart asleep - that was a mile and a half from my field; I aroused him; he was asleep, but I do not think he was drunk -I asked what he had in his cart; he made an answer not fit to be repeated; I made them an offer to take the oats back to the field, which they refused - they followed me; I said I should give charge of them; Brotherhood then took the reins out of Thomas' hand, and they turned and drove off - I gave them both into custody of the patrol, but I said that if he felt disposed to let Brotherhood out for the Sunday he might; Thomas remained in custody -Brotherhood went away, and appeared next day; the Magistrate let him out on bail, by my wish - I always considered him a man of credit - I think he had had some liquor; he called on me the same evening, to know what was the matter - I told him I had nothing to do with it; I had given it up to other hands.

JAMES TAYLOR . On Sunday, the 7th of August, I saw the two prisoners driving fast down the road, as I stood in my garden; I saw the name of William Brotherhood on the cart, and saw the oats in it.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you from the cart? A. About fifteen yards; but I could see the oats, they were on the top of the rails - Brotherhood was driving.

JOHN EMERSON . I am an officer. I went in pursuit of the cart - I took the two prisoners; Thomas said his master knew nothing about it, and he was the only person who had stolen the oats, while his master was asleep- he was not asleep when I found him.

Cross-examined. Q.Was Brotherhood sober? A. I thought him in liquor.

Brotherhood's Defence. I was very much in liquor, and know nothing about it; when Mr. Daws came up, I said if there were any oats in my cart they did not be

long to me - I staggered to the cart, saw the oats, and said they did not belong to me.

The prisoners received a good character.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

BROTHERHOOD - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18310908-163

1690. PETER MELVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 10 shirts, value 50s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 table-cloth, value 15s.; 5 silver spoons, value 40s.; 2 silver forks, value 20s., and 1 silver sauce-ladle, value 10s. , the goods of the Rev. John Bentall ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Months, without Labour .

Reference Number: t18310908-164

1691. JANE MURRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 10 yards of cotton, value 5s. , the goods of John Tate .

JOHN TATE . I am a shipwright , and live in Queen-street, Limehouse. On the 1st of August I was looking at a gown piece in a shop window - the prisoner was near me, and I asked her to step in and look at it with me; I had not known her before - we went in and bought a gown-piece and an apron or two; we came out together, and another woman who was with her; I took them to a public-house, had something to drink, and laid the articles down on the table while I stepped out; when I returned they were gone, and the prisoner - I did not intend to make her a present of them; I only took the prisoner in to give her judgement on those things, and I said I would treat them for going; they each had a glass of peppermint, and we called for a pot of cyder - I do not recollect that the prisoner carried the articles out of the shop; I think I did - she dealt for them, but I paid for them.

Prisoner. He gave them to me in the shop, and when we came out I offered them to him - he told me to keep them; we went to the public-house, and were there drinking for two hours. Witness. We might be there about half an hour; I did not intend her to keep these things.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am a Police-officer. I apprehended the prisoner the same day, at the door of her own house; I said I took her for stealing the man's cotton- she said she had it, but the man had given it to her; this is it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-165

1692. JOHN ELLIOTT ROLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 3 pairs of sheets, value 10s.; 5 blankets, value 12s., and 2 rugs, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Grout .

JAMES DYER . I am a Police-officer. On the 12th of August I was called on by Mr. Groat's servant, to take the prisoner; he was then in St. Giles', and had a bundle - I followed him on to Broad-street; he was about taking a coach, which he ordered to drive to Petticoat-lane - I went up, and asked what property he had there; he said it was bedding - I asked how he came by it; he made me no answer - I took him to the station.

JOSEPH GROUT . I live in Lawrence-street, St. Giles', and I have a house in Church-street , which I let out in lodgings - the prisoner had lodged there two or three nights. On this day I saw him on the steps of my door with a bundle, and I sent my servant to watch him, and give him in charge - these are all my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along crying old clothes - a man came and asked me to buy these things; I said I would if they were honestly come by, and I gave 8s. for them.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgement Respited .

Reference Number: t18310908-166

Second London Jury, before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1693. EDWARD JONES HOLLAND was indicted for embezzlement ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 42. Transported for Seven Years .

MR. BODKIN declined offering evidence on other charges.

Reference Number: t18310908-167

1694. WILLIAM KAY was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM DANES . I am a solicitor , and live in Princes-street. The prisoner was my clerk , and was entrusted occasionally to receive money on my account, which it was his duty to pay to me immediately; there was a bill for 100l., due to me on the 12th of August - I sent it with some other bills and cash to my banker's some time before, and last week I sent him to my banker's, Martin, Stone, and Co., for my book, and upon examining it I found no credit given for the amount of the bill - I have not the book or the bill here; I have never received a sum of 90l., or a sum of 10l. - I spoke to the prisoner about it on Wednesday last, and asked him and two other clerks who were there, if they knew any thing about the payment of this 100l. bill; the prisoner said it had been paid, and he had received it - I asked what he had done with it; he said he had either paid it to my banker's, or my partner, Mr. Outhwaite - he said afterwards that he could swear he had paid it to Mr. Outhwaite.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q.Had you not promised you would do nothing against him if he would state all about it? A. No, certainly not, neither to him or any of his friends; I am told Mr. Capson paid the money, but he is not here.

JAMES JOSEPH OUTHWAITE . I am in partnership with Mr. Danes. The prisoner never paid this money to me.

Cross-examined. Q.How do you know there was a 100l. bill due? A. I was told so; the money belonged to Mr. Danes - I did not know it was due, nor that I ought to have received it.

COURT to MR. DANES. Q. To whom was the money due in the first instance? A. To myself - I considered it a partnership account; the prisoner was clerk to the firm, and he was liable to my partner as well as myself - he has received money on my private account; he might have brought it either to me or Mr. Outhwaite.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-168

1695. JOHN JOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 100 lbs. weight of sugar, value 2l., and 1 bag, value 6d. , the goods of Edward Bedwell Kemble and another, his masters; and GEORGE CLARKE was indicted for feloniniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BARRY conducted the prosecution.

PHILIP CORNMAN . I am porter to Edward Bedwell Kemble and another. The prisoner Jolly was porter over me - I always acted under his direction. On the 27th of August I was in the sample room, and Jolly told me to call a man (Milner) out of Mincing-lane, which I did; I then sewed up a bag of sugar, and put a card on it, which Jolly gave me - I did not see him write the card; we put the bag upon the man's back - Jolly told him to take it to the Elephant, in Fenchurch-street; Jolly asked me to lend him 2d., which he gave Milner to pay the booking - the next morning, which was Sunday, Jolly came to my house very early, and said he was very sorry that the bag of sugar had got seized, he hoped I would say nothing about it, and he would never do the like again - the ticket which was on it was similar to this.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. I suppose you frequently employ people to carry out parcels? A. We do not send out many - we have employed people to carry them; I was afraid if I divulged it I should lose my place, and did not tell my employer of it till the 1st of September, which was the day I myself was taken; I did not at first know that it was going in a clandestine way - I never was in trouble before.

MR. BARRY. Q. Is it usual to put samples of sugar together, sew them up in a bag, and send them away? A. I never saw it done before.

EDWARD MILNER . I am a porter. I was in Mincing-lane, and was called in to take the parcel; Jolly and Cornman put it on my knot, and gave me 2d. to pay for it; I took it to the Elephant public-house, Fenchurch-street - it was booked according to the direction, which was the same as when I received it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.There is nothing unusual in your carrying parcels? A. No; I had not been employed by Jolly before - I knew him well, and lived two doors from him.

SARAH SKIVOR. My uncle keeps the Elephant, in Fenchurch-street. Milner brought the bag on the 27th of August, and I booked it - here is the entry; (read) "Poplar - Clarke, one bag, 27th of August, signed George Woolford;" he is the Poplar carrier, and signs the book when he takes the parcels.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.How can you tell that this entry refers to this particular bag? A. Because so much has been said about it - my attention was particularly directed to it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Does your memory enable you to state that Milner brought the parcel in question? A. Yes, and I remember booking it, and Woolford taking it away- Milner had frequently been in our house.

WILLIAM ELLIS . I am in the employ of Mr. Woolford, the carrier. On Saturday, the 27th, of August, I received a parcel from the Elephant, for Mr. Clarke, of Poplar; Mr. Woolford was with me, and I was inside the cart - we went home, and put the cart into master's yard; I took the parcel to Mr. Clarke's - he opened the door to me; I said, "I have a bag for you;" he said it was all right, and paid me 1s. - his is a private house, not a shop.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. So he keeps no shop? A. No - the words "Tea-dealer" are over his door; I only went into the passage - there is another Mr. Clarke almost opposite; I never stated that I did not receive the parcel till I got to the Red Lion - I said I removed them from one cart to another there; Clarke did not open the parcel before he said it was all right; it was night when I took it there - the officer followed me to Mr. Clarke's with the parcel, and directly I had put it in the passage and received the carriage-money, he seized the parcel and Clarke; I then went away.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know the officer was following you? A. Not till I got to the house.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am an officer. In consequence of information I followed the cart; I saw Ellis put the cart into Woolford's yard - I followed him with this bag to Clarke's house, Cotton-street, Poplar; Clarke opened the door, received the parcel, and said' "It is all right;" Ellis said there was 1s. to pay - I did not see Clarke give it; I directly went in and asked Clarke to show me the bill of parcels, or tell me where the bag came from - he said No; I said it was stolen sugar - he said he knew nothing about it; I took him into custody, and this ticket was taken off the bag by a person who was with me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.When were you before the Magistrate? A. On the 29th; Clarke was examined and bailed by - Mr. Alderman Cowan; he appeared again on the Wednesday, and bail was again extended, till Milner was brought forward.

JAMES SHORTLAND . I am a porter. I was at the Elephant when Milner brought the bag; I assisted to take it off his back, and take it to the Elephant - I went with Howard the same night, and saw the same parcel at Clarke's, at Poplar; when Clarke had paid for it Howard went in and took him into custody - he said he was very willing to go; I took this direction off the bag in Howard's presence, and gave it to him on the Monday.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not Howard seize Clarke directly the shilling was paid? A. He went in and told him he must take him - he allowed him to walk into the room and speak to his wife; I saw Ellis deliver the parcel, but I cannot say Clarke touched it.

ROBERT HOWARD . I kept the direction in my possession for two or three days, and then gave it to Mr. Sherman.

PHILLIP CORNMAN . This is a similar bag to that which went from the warehouse, but I cannot swear it is the same- I saw no mark on it, and did not particularly notice it.

MR. EDWARD BEDWELL KEMBLE. I have one partner only. Jolly was in our employ, and I know his handwriting; I have not a doubt this direction is in his writing- Jolly was our porter, and Cornman was under him.

Jolly's Defence. I should not have been charged with this if it had not been for Cornman; I knew nothing of it, but when Cornman was accused of it, he accused me to get off himself.

Clarke's Defence. I know nothing whatever of this parcel; I expected a parcel of coffee that evening - I never touched this parcel; it was half-past nine o'clock - I had no light, and could not ascertain what it was.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . I am a coffee-roaster, and live in King's Arms-yard, Whitecross-street. I have roasted Mr. Clarke's coffee for some time; I never was at his house, but I suppose he is a grocer - I have forwarded coffee to him from the Elephant, and from the White Horse,

Criplegate; I did not send him a parcel on the 27th of August, but he expected one from me, for I had had a remnant of coffee belonging to Mr. Puce, which had laid by me for some time, and he authorised me to sell it if I could - I offered it to Clarke for 1s. 01/2d. per lb.; Clarke offered 1s. - I said I could not take that until I had seen Mr. Puce, and if that would do I would send it, but I did not see him, and so could not send it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time did you see Clarke that day? A. About one o'clock; there were three-quarters of a hundred weight of coffee - it would have made about a similar sized parcel to this, and the bag this is in is a coffee bag.

JOLLY - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

CLARKE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-169

1696. JOHN DENNY and DENNIS DENNIS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Lee Dale , from his person .

JOHN LEE DALE. I am a horse-dealer , and was in Sweeting's-alley , about nine o'clock on the 31st of August - I felt something at my pocket, I turned, and saw Girton holding Denny, who had my handkerchief - I saw him drop it.

JOHN GIRTON . I am an officer. I saw these two lads following the prosecutor; Dennis took the handkerchief from his pocket, and gave it to Denny, who put it towards his breast - I took of it; he dropped it, and I picked it up - Dennis ran up the alley; I gave an alarm, and he was secured.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Denny received a good character.

DENNY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

DENNIS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-170

1697. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Simpson Morton , from his person .

SIMPSON MORTON. I live at Messrs. Smith's, distillers. On the 25th of July I was opposite Little Eastcheap - I did not miss my handkerchief until somebody asked me if I had lost any thing; I found I had - the officer had the prisoner and my handkerchief in his hand.

RICHARD FULLER . I am a Police-officer. I was walking in private clothes, about half-past two o'clock on the 25th of July; I saw the prisoner ten or fifteen yards before me, with his hand towards the prosecutor's coat - I slipped forward, and saw him draw the handkerchief from his pocket; I seized him with the handkerchief, and asked what he was doing - he made no answer; I touched the prosecutor, and asked him if he had lost any thing - he felt and said Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-171

1698. JEREMIAH DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Charles Gravenor , from his person .

CHARLES GRAVENOR. I was at Smithfield-bars , in the forenoon of the 25th of July - I felt a pull at my pocket, and on turning, saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand, in his waistcoat pocket; I seized him, and kept him till the officer came.

THOMAS CUSS . I am the officer. I saw a crowd, and took the prisoner from the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground, and took it up - I did not know who it belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-172

1699. WILLIAM SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 4 bushels of malt, value 35s. , the goods of Benjamin Tomkins and another.

ROBERT GRAHAM . I am employed by Mr. Richard Parker, at his granary - I know Mr. Tomkins' warehouse on Hambro'-wharf . I saw the prisoner, on the 14th of July, carrying a sack of malt; I met him in what we call the side warehouse, at the top of the stairs - he was about fifty yards from Mr. Tomkins' warehouse; the prisoner had been employed by me and the foreman of the lower granary, but he was not on that day - I asked him where he was going with it; he said he did not know, but Tom gave it him, meaning a man in Mr. Parker's employ; Tom was by his side at the time, and I heard him say to the prisoner, "Cut down with it;" meaning for him to make haste - I put my hand on the sack, and the prisoner pitched it down - I was going to untie it, and Tom Collins said,"It is only a bit of sweepings," by which I understood what is generally swept up for fowls - Tom Collins then went down stairs, and I have never seen him since; the prisoner staid there - I found the sack contained four bushels of clean malt; I showed the same to Mr. Tomkins about a fortnight afterwards; it is in the warehouse now- the prisoner had worked there two or three months, when we wanted hands.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Collins might have been employed in Mr. Tomkins' warehouse? A. Yes; the prisoner was taken a fortnight or three weeks after.

MR. BENJAMIN TOMKINS . I am in partnership with Mr. Gostling - we have three floors at that warehouse, and had a great quantity of clean malt there at that time - I saw this malt, and I believe it to be ours; we missed as much as sixteen quarters from one bulk - I had not seen the prisoner, nor had I employed Collins.

JOB COX . I was on the wharf as foreman. I met the prisoner, and asked what was in the sack - he was speechless, and turned as white as ashes; it was Mr. Parker's sack - Collins said it was sweepings; I said I would see what it was - they had no business there either of them; I went to the office, and while I was gone they both started.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-173

1700. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

CHARLES THOROGOOD . I am an officer. On the 13th of July I was on duty in Cornhill, about one o'clock, and saw the prisoner in company with another person - I watched, and saw them follow a gentleman; at the end of Gracechurch-street I saw the prisoner take this handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, and put it under his coat- I took hold of him, and called to the gentleman - he said, "That is my handkerchief, give it me back;" I said

I could not, he must go with me to the Mansion-house - he would not, but walked off.

Prisoner. Q. How far were you from me? A. About fourteen yards, on the other side of the way; there were no people passing at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. I get my living in an honest and industrious way; I was in a respectable solicitor's office for three years and a half, and lost my place through a dissolution of partnership - I was going on an errand when I was taken by the officer; he touched some gentleman on the shoulder, and while they were in conversation a young man brought up a handkerchief to the officer, and they went away - the gentleman found his own handkerchief in his pocket, and strongly denied that this was his.

CHARLES THOROGOOD . It is not true - I called the gentleman, and he said it was his.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-174

1701. JOHN GINNINGHAM and ROBERT SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Joseph Humphreys , from his person .

JOSEPH HUMPHREYS. I am a draper , and live at Islington. On the 3rd of September I was in Smithfield , about half-past twelve o'clock - my handkerchief was in my coat pocket; I did not feel it taken, but the officer told me of it - I went back with him to the prisoners, who were about twenty yards off; another officer had them in custody with my handkerchief.

GEORGE DOWDING . I am an officer of St. Martin's. I saw the two prisoners together; Ginningham took the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and gave it to Smith, who put it into his breeches; I went and told the prosecutor - my brother officer kept the prisoners till I came back.

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer, and was with Dowding, We had been to the Commercial-road, and returned through the fair; I saw the prisoner, and when the prosecutor stopped at the wax-work, Ginningham took out the handkerchief, and gave it to Smith - I took one of the prisoners and Dowding took the other; I held them while he went to the prosecutor - and while Dowding was gone Smith threw the handkerchief down.

Smith's Defence. We had been into a penny show, and on coming out the handkerchief laid on the ground; Ginningham took it up, and I took it of him.

GINNINGHAM - GUILTY . Aged 16.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-175

OLD COURT. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1702. JAMES SLATE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 5 pieces of leather, value 2s. , the goods of Ebenezer Golding , his master.

EBENEZER GOLDING . I am a shoemaker , and live in Whitechapel-road. The prisoner worked for me, as a closer; and lodged at my house - I did not miss this leather till Bennet brought it to another shop of mine in Long-lane.

JAMES CHAMPION . I am a shoemaker, and work in Bishop's-court, Chancery-lane. The prisoner brought me leather frequently, which I thought was stolen; I gave information at Hatton-garden the first time, and on the 14th of July he brought some, which I gave 1s. 3d. for, and gave it to Bennett, the officer - I went with Bennett to a public-house in Whitechapel, and pointed the prisoner out.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.When did you pay for it? A. Two or three days after, when he called for the money - I had previously given information at the office.

JOHN BENNETT . I am an officer. On the 25th of July Champion mentioned this to me, and I apprehended the prisoner that day in Whitechapel, at a public-house; I myself had not received information of this before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I deny taking it, or selling it.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-176

1703. STEPHEN O'NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 1 watch, value 20s., and 1 key, value 2d. , the goods of John Freestene Parris .

MARY PARRIS . I am the wife of John Freestene Parris, we live at Maida-hill - the prisoner visited my first floor lodger. On the 1st of September this watch was in the parlour of the ground floor; about ten o'clock, I saw him come out of my parlour, walk on tip-toe to the door, and go away - I missed my watch in about ten minutesit was safe twenty minutes before; the lodger went after him; he came back about eleven o'clock - I charged him with it and he denied it; I said I would send for a constable: he then went away - the lodger met a Policeman, and gave him in charge; he told me at the station-house where he had pawned it.

HENRY BAYFIELD . I am shopman to Mr. Gideon, a pawnbroker, of Lisson-green. This watch was pawned in the name of O'Neal, on the 1st of September - I cannot identify the prisoner.

ROBERT HAWKSLY . I am an officer. The prisoner told me he had pawned the watch at this shop, and I found it there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-177

1704. CATHERINE WALLER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 14 yards of ribbon, value 14s. , the goods of James Withenberry Hawthorn .

JOHN ACRES . I am shopman to James Withenberry Hawthorn, a linen-draper , of Islington . On the 30th of August the prisoner came into the shop with another person - the prisoner had a basket; she asked to see some bonnet ribbons - I showed them different things; they bought one yard of gauze ribbon at 21/2d., and said they would call again on Saturday - they then bought a pair of stockings at 71/2d.; before they left the counter I saw a piece of ribbon in the basket, which they had not bought- the prisoner went out alone; I followed, tapped her on the shoulder at the next house, and brought her back - when she got back the ribbon was not in the basket, but Davis produced it; it was taken out of a drawer on the counter.

REBECCA DAVIS . My husband is a wheelwright. I was passing, and saw the prisoner drop a piece of ribbon as she was brought back to the shop - I gave it to the prosecutor.

JAMES WITHENBERRY HAWTHORN. The prisoner was brought back; I saw Davis pick up the ribbon.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence I asked to see some ribbon - two women went out; he came and asked me to walk in again, and said I had something in my basket - I said if I had it was unknown to me; while I was in the shop the ribbon was picked up outside, and brought in.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-178

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.

1705. CHARLOTTE CAMP was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of August , 1 watch, value 7l., the goods of Joseph Chaffe , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Ingram .

JOSEPH CHAFFE. On the 23rd of August I lodged in Upper Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square , in the house of Joseph Ingram. My watch hung by the side of the mantel-piece, in my own room, on the second floor - I went out about eight o'clock in the morning, leaving my wife at home; I returned in the evening, and it was gone - I went next morning with my wife in search of the prisoner, and found her, after much inquiry, crossing Foley-street; I did not know her, but my wife said, "That's her;" I crossed over, and charged her with stealing my watch - she denied it several times, and I said if she would tell all about it, I would forgive her.

WILLIAM LANE . I live at No. 12, Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square - I have known the prisoner by sight for about six months. On the 23rd of August I saw her at the corner of Little Ogle-street, talking to a woman - she asked if I was out of work; I said Yes, and asked who that young woman was - she said it was a young woman who was going to pawn a watch for her; she then asked if I wanted to buy one - I said No, but I dare say I could sell it, and asked where she got it; she said a gentleman gave it to her for sleeping with her all night, as he had no money - this was about half-past eight o'clock in the morning; I asked to look at it - she said she would go home and fetch it, and meet me in half an hour; I met her in about three quarters of an hour, at the corner of Riding-house-lane - she gave it to me; I told her I had but 11s. about me, which I gave her, and asked what she wanted for it - she said she did not know how much; I said I would give her 3l. 10s. for it, and pay the rest by instalments - I gave her half a sovereign and a shilling; she asked if I would have any drink - I had half a glass of grog; she gave me 2s. to keep for her, and I left her with the young woman - she said she was going to the play, and I went with her that night; I was never in her company before, but knew her by passing her of a morning as I went to work - I gave the watch to the prosecutor's wife.

ROBERT KNOWLES . I am an officer. I received the watch from the inspector of my division.

JOSEPH CHAFFE . This is my watch, and cost me 7l. 7s. three or four years ago.

WILLIAM LANE . I believe this to be the watch I had from her; it was in my possession two days.

The prisoner handed in a Written paper, stating that lane had taken the watch for her, she having informed him it had been given her by a gentleman, and that he had pretended to her that he had sold it to a Jew for 11s.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Alderson.

Reference Number: t18310908-179

1706. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Patterson.

Reference Number: t18310908-180

1707. GEORGE FITZWATER was indicted for b - gg - y .

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Bayley .

Reference Number: t18310908-181

1708. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Williams , on the 7th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 seal, value 5s., and 1 key, value 1s. , his property.

JOHN WILLIAMS. I am a coachman out of employ . On the 7th of July, at half-past six, o'clock in the evening, I went to the Guinea public-house, in Bruton-mews - I was there a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes; I went into the water-closet, came out, and stood looking at the men playing at skittles - I laid a bet of 1d. with a man, and won it; he said he had not got a 1d. - I said it did not signify; he wanted me to lay again, but I refused he laid bets with others, and paid them; I said if he could pay them he could pay me.

Q. Well, did any thing happen to you? A.They made a swing at me, and shoved one another against me - the landlord came, and told me to go out; I asked him what I had done; the pot-boy came, and asked if I wanted to fight - I said No; he said I must either fight or go out - he caught me round the waist, and shoved me into a passage, where the rest of the people followed - I was shoved down in that passage - as soon as I got up I went out into the mews; I saw Harrington bring the prisoner up - he asked if I had lost my watch; I put my hand to my fob, and said I had - he told the prisoner to give it to me; he did so - Clements has it; I know it to be mine by the maker's name - I delivered it to Stevens, the landlord, when I took it from the prisoner; I cannot tell whether the prisoner had been in the skittle-ground or not - I did not see him till Harrington brought him up; I did not perceive the watch go.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You was thrown down, was your coat and waistcoat unbuttoned? A. My coat was, but not my waistcoat, except the two bottom buttons, which I always leave unbuttoned; my watch was in my fob, and I had a steel chain to it - the prisoner delivered it to me, and said he had picked it up; I made no disturbance at the public-house - we wrangled when the man would not pay me; he did pay me at last - I was no party to any disturbance there.

Q. Why did the landlord order you out? A. He said I had not spent any money there, which I had not; he said I should not kick up a riot in his place - there was no riot about betting; they sneered at me, and began shoving one another against me - I should think there were eighteen or twenty people there.

Q. Do you know where the prisoner's father lives? A.Somewhere in Carnaby-market; Harrington and I

called at his house one night, after we had found the bill- that was the only time; he seemed very uneasy, and wished to know if it was a true bill or not; I promised to go and let him know, to save him the trouble of coming down.

Q.How came you to take Harrington with you? A. We were going the same way home, and he knew where his father lived, which I did not - that was my only object in calling; I never called before.

JOHN HARRINGTON . I am a helper at Mr. Jay's livery stables, and have been so eight or nine months. I was coming by, and heard a noise at the Guinea; I did not go in, but stood outside, and saw the pot-boy catch hold of the prosecutor round the waist - he let go of him, and caught him round the waist again, to turn him out, I suppose - I heard nothing said; a man came and put his foot out before the pot-boy, and threw him down; I do not know the man - Williams was thrown down also, and was under the pot-boy, Williams said, "Let me get up;" they did so, and the man who put out his foot threw him down again, he caught hold of the collar of Williams' coat, and said he should not go out - while that man held his collar, Jones stood on his right-hand side, and I saw him, with his right hand, draw the prosecutor's watch out of his fob - he reached his hand across his body, put the watch into his right-hand trousers pocket, and went out at the door; he said to a young man, who stood outside,"Come along;" the young man said, "Stop a minute;" he said, "Come along" again - the young man made no answer, and the prisoner started off to run - I hallooed out, "Where's the man's watch?" the young man who stood by the prisoner's side said, "He has not got no watch;" I said he had, for I saw him take it out of the man's pocket, and hallooed out, Stop him! Mr. Billing's was coming round the corner of the mews, and seized him by the collar - I caught hold of the other side of his collar, and asked where the man's watch was - he said he had got no watch; I said he had, for I saw him take it - Billings said he had got it in his right-hand breeches pocket - he denied it again, and then we took him up the mews, and met the prosecutor - I asked if he had not lost his watch; he put his hand to his fob, and said he had - we took him as far as the Guinea, which was two or three hundred yards off, and there he (the prisoner) delivered the watch up to the prosecutor, who gave it to the landlord, and took the prisoner to the station-house.

Q. Where does his father live? A. I do not know, any more than I have heard him say it was in Claremarket - I went this night to his father's house, with the prosecutor; it was last week, I think on Friday, but will not be certain - I do not know what the prosecutor went for; I did not hear what passed; he asked if his father was at home, and his mother said not; he said it was very wet, and he should not stand there - he left no message that I know of.

Q. Are you the same Harrington who once lived with Mr. Murle? A. Yes; I happened to get drunk when I went to see a friend, and lost my service - I was not so drunk as not to be able to drive my master's family if they had let me - I lived there three or four months; I have been drunk before, but it is not my habit; Billings is not here - I have not been to look for him; I was perfectly sober on this occasion; the watch was taken while the prosecutor was standing up.

Q. How came you to tell his Lordship you did not know where Jones' father lived, when you had been there within a week? A. I did not recollect it at the moment; I have not been there more than once, I am sure of that; I think it was Monday afternoon that I was before the Grand Jury- I walked home with the prosecutor; we went up Holborn with a young man named Brown - I did not call at Clare-market with him; we never went near Jones' father's house that day - I will swear I never went but once - when we were there the prosecutor was talking to a gentleman by the side of the house, and said he was out of employ - I do not know who the gentleman was - this was on the Friday; I have not heard what the prosecutor swore; Mr. Jones was standing at the door when he was talking to the gentleman; I have not seen that gentleman at Clerkenwell - he was a stranger to me; how he came by the house I do not know; he did not go with us - the prosecutor told him he had been out of place, but could have had one if it had not been for this case - I did not hear him say he was rather in want of money; I did not go with the prosecutor to the father's house after the bill was found, it was before.

Q. Then if it has been sworn it was after the bill was found, it is not true? A. It is not - I heard the prosecutor tell the woman the bill was not found that day - that is all that passed, I am sure.

Q. How came you to know where to go? A. I went with the prosecutor, who took me there, not I him; I did not know where the father lived till he showed me - the father said in the hall that it was in Clare-market; the prosecutor asked him what number - the prosecutor said he should go to Clare-market, and let the father know about the bill, and we both went; I had heard him tell the father he should come down and let him know if the bill was found- if he has sworn he did not know where the father lived, and should not have gone if I had not taken him, it is not true - I did not go there the day the bill was found; I did not ask for money, nor did he, to my knowledge - I swear he did not, in my presence; it rained, and I went away from the door a little while, and was out of hearing - I suppose we were there five or ten minutes, but I took no particular notice of the time; Williams came away with me - I was quite sober; I do not think we could have been there three quarters of an hour - I was not in the public-house on the night of the robbery; this all took place in the passage - it was broad day-light; I did not see the landlord till he came to take the watch.

CHARLES STEVENS . I am the landlord of the Guinea. There was a disturbance in my skittle-ground; I wanted Williams to go away - he would not go, and I helped to turn him out in the first instance; there was a disturbance in the passage afterwards - I did not see the watch taken; it was given to me by Williams at the tap, while they were going to take the prisoner to the station-house- I did not see what passed in the passage; I gave the watch to Clements.

Cross-examined. Q.Was the company in the house perfectly quiet and well-behaved till the prosecutor came? A.They were; he was the cause of all the dis

turbance - I did not leave the house at all, and heard no thing of the robbery; Williams gave me the watch at the bar, and took the prisoner away, but did not tell me the charge - Mr. Billings is not here; he is a respectable man - I should have brought the pot-boy if I had been required; I was attempting to put the prosecutor out - the pot-boy took hold of him and shoved him back; he then said he would fight him - the prosecutor said he would not go out, and a crowd came.

JOSHUA FREDERICK CLEMENTS . I am an inspector of Police. I took the prisoner in charge, and received the watch from Stevens.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18310908-182

1709. RICHARD ROLAND and SAMUEL SIMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 1 handkerchief, value 4s. , the goods of William Milligan ; and that the said Richard Roland had been before convicted of felony.

MR. WILLIAM MILLIGAN . I am a merchant , and live in Old' change. On the 3rd of September, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Newgate-street ; my handkerchief was safe a few minutes before, when I was in Holborn - I did not perceive it taken; I saw the prisoners in the custody of an officer in about two minutes - I did not miss it until a young man gave me information - I then felt in my pocket, and it was gone; the officer produced it.

JOHN NUGENT . I live in Fox-court, Gray's Inn-lane, and am a printer. On the 3rd of September, I saw the prosecutor in Newgate-street, and saw Roland take a handkerchief from his pocket, and give it to Simpson, who was in his company - I laid hold of Simpson; they had not got half a yard from the prosecutor.

Roland. Q. Are you in employ now? A. No; I was never in custody on any charge - I was errand-boy to Mr. Gilbert, in St. John-square; I did not apply to the prisoner's father to give me money not to appear - they offered me money.

GEORGE WEBB . I was on duty as street-keeper in Newgate-street; Nugent gave me information - he held Simpson in his hand, and said he had the handkerchief; I found it under his left arm - he pointed out Roland in about a minute, as being the one who took it, and I secured him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Roland's Defence. I was in Newgate-street, and saw a Tow; I went up, and the gentleman took me.

Simpson's Defence. I saw the handkerchief on the ground, took it up, put it inside my coat, and walked on; the gentleman crossed, took me, and said I picked his pocket.

WILLIAM RAVEN . I am messenger at the Police-office, Hatton-garden. I produce a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner Roland. which I got from Mr. Mr. Clark's office - I know him to have been the person convicted in April last - (read).

ROLAND - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

SIMPSON - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310908-183

1710. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 8ozs. of silver filings, value 2l. , the goods of Mary Ann Holmes , his mistress.

JOHN COOPER . I am a spectacle-maker, and live in Ball-alley, Redcross-street - I am in the employ of Mary Ann Holmes ; the prisoner was her apprentice - I suspected and watched him. On the 8th of July, after he had gone down to dinner, I felt his coat, which he had left in the shop; there appeared to be a small parcel in the pocket -I did not take it out; he slept in the house - I told Mrs. Holmes to send for Hawkins, the marshalman; he came into the workshop, and took him on suspicion of stealing the silver filings - his coat was examined in his presence, and a parcel containing 8ozs. of file-dust, worth about 40s., found; it was kept in a tin can in the shop - he voluntarily acknowledged that he had put it into his pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long had he been in Mrs. Holmes' employ? A.About five years; I have been there twelve years - his coat hung by the side of mine in the workshop; five or six men besides boys work there, but only one other coat hung there - I merely felt the skirt of his coat; a man named Williams and two boys were there - I told Mrs. Holmes in about an hour; she was engaged till then - the coat had not been moved after I found the parcel; Hawkins asked how the parcel came into his pocket - he said he put it in himself, and hoped Mrs. Holmes would excuse him; nothing was said to induce him to confess.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. I was sent for to Mrs. Holmes' - the prisoner was brought to the counting-house; he had not his coat on - I said he was suspected of stealing silver filings; his coat was brought in - I asked if it was his; he said it was - I found about 8 ozs. of silver filings in the pocket; he said he had put it there, and that his mistress kept him short of money - that he hoped she would forgive him.

Cross-examined. Q.Was any thing said to induce him to say this? A. Not a word.

JOHN COOPER . These are the silver filings. The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-184

1711. MARY MIDDLETON was indicted for that she, unlawfully and maliciously, by force and fraud, did lead and carry away a certain female child , named Mary Ann Youhill , about the age of five years, with intent to deprive John Youhill and Anne Youhill , the parents, of the possession of the same child .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, stating her intent to be to steal 1 frock, value 2s.; 2 petticoats, value 2s.; 1 pinafore, value 6d.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 3d., the goods of John Youhill.

ANNE YOUHILL . I am the wife of John Youhill . we live in Phooenix-court, West-street, Smithfields , our daughter Ann was five years old in August. On the 5th of September , about ten o'clock in the morning, I sent her into the court, to play - she was completely dressed; my little boy, who is about six years and a half old, was with her - in about an hour he came home crying, without her I never saw the prisoner in my life till she was at Guild

hall, where I found her with the child, at one o'clock that day; an officer fetched me there - none of its clothes had been taken off.

JOHN HAINSON . I am a ribbon-dresser, and live in Cook's-court, Staining-lane. I was passing the Postoffice between eleven and twelve o'clock; I turned round into St. Ann's-lane, and saw the prisoner and this child together, at St. Ann's school door; I stopped to watch her, and saw her pull off its frock, pinafore, and shirt - I was about six yards from her, in the middle of the road - supposing it might belong to her I went on - I had not been home twenty minutes before she came into the court I live in without the child - she went down to the watercloset there; a quantity of people came up the court, looking after her, saying she either lived there, or had concealed herself there - I went and ordered her out; she got into Staining-lane, and was taken into custody in Noble-street- I am certain she is the woman whom I saw taking the child's clothes off.

JAMES MADDOCK . I live at a Leghorn warehouse in Foster-lane. I was passing through St. Ann's-lane, and saw the prisoner with the child - the clothes were off the child, and laying on the step; I watched, and saw her put them on again - I did not speak to her; she took the child by the hand, and walked up Noble-street; it did not cry, and I thought it was her own - I went away, but in about five minutes I was in Noble-street, and saw a mob round the child, which had been left; it had its clothes on then; the prisoner was taken in five or ten minutes, in Noble-street; I am certain she is the woman.

JAMES ALLEN . I am a print-colourer. I saw the prisoner with the child on the steps of St. Ann's school - she was putting the frock on, and had the pinafore in her hand; I rather suspected her - she led the child to the corner of Noble-street, and my sister, who was with me then, asked her what was the matter with the child - she said it had been in the dirt; it had dirted its clothes very little - I followed her up Noble-street, and a gentleman called after her, but she did not stop; he went up and stopped her, and asked what she was going to do with the child - she said, "What do you think?" several people collected - the gentleman asked the child if that was her mother; the child said No; the prisoner then, in a moment, let go of the child's hand, and was going away - she was stopped, and I went to look for an officer; on returning she was not there - I went into Staining-lane, and saw her come out of the court; she was taken into custody in Noble-street - a gentleman had taken the child away, to find out where it lived; the prisoner said she was going to take it home and wash its clothes - she did not say where she lived, that I ever heard - I afterwards saw Mrs. Youhill at Guildhall, and she claimed the child.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - See 9th Day.

Reference Number: t18310908-185

NEW COURT. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1712. MARY MURCH was indicted for that she, on the 16th of August , maliciously and feloniously, by force and fraud, did take and carry away a certain male child , named Thomas Fall , about the age of three months, with intent to deprive Henry Fall and Sarah his wife , the parents, of the possession of the same child .

WILLIAM ATFIELD. I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 18th of August the prisoner came to the office with a child in her arms - she had a man with her; the child appeared to be three or four months old - in consequence of what the prisoner said, an officer was sent to make inquiries.

MARY ANN FALL . I am ten years of age, and am the daughter of Henry Fall, who lives at No. 4, Somer's-court, Back-hill. On Tuesday, the 16th of August, I had my little brother on my arms in Back-hill - he is three months old, and his name is Thomas; I saw the prisoner about half-past five o'clock; she said, "Little girl, I will give you a penny if you will show me where Saffron-hill is;" when we got there, she said, "I will give you fivepence more, which will make sixpence, if you will go to Smithfield for me, and fetch a gentleman named Jackson from No. 17 or 18, to come to me directly" - she said she would mind the child till I came back; I gave her the child, and went to Smithfield - I could not find Mr. Jackson, but I saw a lad at No. 16, who said his father, Mr. Jackson, lived at No. 19, and he would tell him to come the next morning, at ten o'clock - I went back, on hearing that; the prisoner had told me that her name was Johnson, and that was the name I mentioned to the boy; when I got back I could not find the prisoner, and I did not see her again till she was at Hatton-garden, three days after - she had told me, when I left her, that she would sit down at the step of a door in Peter-street till I returned - I came back in about half an hour; I should not have been so long, if I could have found the gentleman I went for - she gave no reason why she did not go herself to Smithfield; I went all about the street, and could not find her - I then went home; this is the child- when she took it of me, it had on a white frock, a linen shirt, a new flannel petticoat, a white petticoat, a calico binder, and a cross-bar muslin cap - when I found it again, it was dressed much worse.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. The prisoner was quite a stranger? A. Yes; I was some distance from home when I saw her, but I told her, I lived on Back-hill - I went with her to Saffron-hill, and carried the child myself; she did not say she was ill; she did not look ill then - I might have got back in a quarter of an hour, if I had found the gentleman and made haste; she might have said, "Go in the name of Johnson, and tell Mr. Jackson to come here;" she did not tell the particular number, she said No. 17 or 18 - there are a great many people about the place where I left the prisoner, and a great many turnings; a person might be lost sight of in a moment - she had sent me to get change for a shilling before I went to Smithfield; she held the child at that time, and when I came back she was still there with it - Saffron-hill is the nearest way from Back-hill, to Smithfield.

SARAH FALL . I am the wife of Henry Fall; we live in Somer's-court. I gave this child to my daughter, on the 16th of August; it then had on a linen shirt, a muslin frock, a calico petticoat, a cap, and a calico roller - I did not see it again till at the office, on the Friday after

wards, when my husband had it; a man who I understood to be the husband of the prisoner, came and told me about the child, and I sent my husband for it - it was then dressed quite differently to what it was when I sent it out; the child was ill when it returned, and has been so ever since - I do not think it had been ill-used.

HENRY FALL. In consequence of information, on the 19th of August, I got my child from the nurse at Shoreditch workhouse.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you get information from the prisoner's husband? A. Yes; I had bills stuck up about the street - he came to me; when I went home to breakfast, I found him in my room.

CORDELIA WALTERS . I am the wife of Edward Walters, of No. 44, Marylebone-lane, Manchester-square. The prisoner lived with me, with a person who I believe is her husband; they have lived there since January last- I remember the prisoner being brought to my house one day, but I do not recollect when; I believe it was two days before she was taken up - she was treated like a woman in labour; I gave her some brandy and water, and what I thought necessary - she said she had been delivered of a child, and I saw the eyes and nose of a child, which was covered with flannel, and was under her arm; I sent for a midwife the next morning - when I saw the child afterwards, it appeared to be a male, and about two month's old.

Cross-examined. Q.You are not a nurse? A. No; I have had children of my own - the prisoner before that appeared to be in a state of pregnancy, and I had let her have any thing about my shop - I could not see the size of the child when it was first brought in, but I desired it to be wrapped up and put on the hearth, while we attended to her, and got her to bed - I did not take notice of the child that night, I was so flurried; we went to dress it the next night, between seven and eight o'clock, and then I saw what it was - I certainly did not see enough of the child the first night to be able to state that it was the same I saw the next night; I cannot state whether the prisoner appeared to be pregnant after this, as she left my house so soon afterwards - I had signed for a box of linen for her.

CHARLOTTE CONSTABLE . I am a midwife, and live in James-street, Manchester-square. I was called to visit the prisoner on the 17th of August - I asked how she came to go so far from home, being so near her confinement; she did not make any answer, but said she had been delivered in St. Giles' by a medical man; I did not undress the child at that time, but I did in the evening - I saw it was a child of some months old, and demanded the letter of her that she had taken from the Queen's-hospital for me to attend her - she said she had been taken ill in St. Giles', and was senseless for three hours on the ground, then she took a coach, and came home, and that some one must have changed the child.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had she had this letter for you to attend her? A. I should think two months - she had prepared to be confined; it is the custom at the Queen's-hospital, if any medical man attends one of their patients, that they pay him, and I asked who had attended her.

WILLIAM ATFIELD . The prisoner came to Worship-street office on the 18th of August - she brought this child in her arms; her husband was with her; she said she was walking down Old-street-road that afternoon, and at the end of Pitfield-street she met a woman with this child, who asked her to be so kind as to hold it while she went on an errand to a shop up Pitfield-street; that she had taken the child, and waited three hours, but the woman never came back - the overseer of Shoreditch happened to be there, and he sent the child to the workhouse.

CHARLES WICKS . I am a porter, and live on Back-hill. On Tuesday, the 16th of August, I came up Saffronhill, and saw the prisoner there - I saw a little girl with the child; the prisoner sent her to a public-house for change for 1s.: I then heard her ask if she would go on an errand for her - the girl said Yes, and she said she wanted her to go as far as Smithfield; when they got to the corner of Peter-street the prisoner said, "My dear. I will take the child for you while you go, as I am in a great hurry;" the girl said No, she would take the child with her - the prisoner said, "No, you know me, you need not be afraid of me; I live in Peter-street, my name is Johnson;" she took the child out of the girl's arms.

Prisoner's Defence. The reason I changed the child's clothes was that they were so dirty, and I could not take it out as it was - I have friends to produce them; I had not taken off the roller.

GUILTY on the 2nd and 4th Counts. Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-186

1713. FREDERICK THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , 1 shilling , the money of John Clements Pink .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN CLEMENTS PINK. I kept the King's Arms, St. George's in the East . I used to leave my son James to take care of the bar before breakfast; he had the key of the till - I missed money from my cash-box.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Your son had not the key of the cash-box? A. I used to give it him when he wanted change - I have been cautioned about boys drinking at my house, and not paying for it, but my son said they did pay.

JAMES PINK . I am twelve years old. I used to mind the bar in the morning - Stapleton made an application to me - after that the prisoner came to me in the bar, and said he knew all that had passed between me, Stapleton, and other boys; that I had robbed my father, and he would have money as well as the rest - he said he would have 1s. or 1s. 6d., and I gave it him through fear that he should tell my father; I took it from the till - he was near enough to see where I took it from; I saw him several hours after, and he had a good deal more money.

Cross-examined. Q. How long ago is this? A. About Easter twelve months; I had been in the habit of robbing my father for nine months before, and continued to do so for about three months, as near as I can recollect - I have taken above 60l.; a boy named Dean wrote to my father about it, and I then charged Dean with setting me on to steal - my father usually came down between seven and eight o'clock, sometimes later; the boys drank beer, ale, and milk at the house.

MR. BODKIN. Q.What did you do with the money

you took? A. I gave it to the prisoner and the other boys; I think the prisoner might have about 2l. 10s. -Dean received above 15l.; he applied to me to allow him 4l. a week; I refused, and then he wrote to my father - the prisoner asked me for the first shilling about February.

JAMES GONER . I sell milk, and have frequented this public-house for thirty years. I have seen the prisoner there of a morning about seven o'clock - he used the house.

Cross-examined. Q. What is he? A. A bricklayer -I believe he went for refreshment; I told Pink that boys were drinking there in the morning, and he ought not to trust his son.

J. C. PINK. The letter came to me the latter end of May - I showed it to my son, and he immediately acknowledged what he had done; he gave me the account he has to-day - he wrote down the particulars to the amount of above 60l.

Prisoner's Defence. James Pink came to me one morning, and asked if I wanted the loan of a shilling, and lent it to me.

ROBERT STAPLETON . I am now a prisoner in Newgate. I never induced James Pink, by persuasion or other means, to rob his father - I never told the prisoner that he had robbed his father; I had money from Pink to buy him a box of paints, a knife, and two or three seals - I only bought them for him, and had no interest in it; I never had any money to myself - 4s. or 5s. is the utmost I laid out for him.

COURT. Q. Did you see where he got the money from? A. No; it was not in the morning - he gave it me generally in the street; I am seventeen years old.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310908-187

1714. ROBERT STAPLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 shilling , the money of John Clements Pink .

JOHN CLEMENTS PINK . About April, last year, I was in the habit of leaving my son in care of the bar; he was then not eleven years old; when my payments became due I found I had not the money I expected, but did not know how it went; the prisoner was in the habit of coming to my house; his mother has sent him for things - he lived near.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When did you miss your money? A. Chiefly about nine months ago - I received the letter three or four months ago - I did not mention it to my son till then - I showed him the direction of the letter, and asked if he knew the hand-writing; he said he did not - I showed him the signature; he said he knew that; he burst out crying, and said he had been robbing me; he wrote down the boys' names, which were also in the letter, but he had not seen them; he never saw more than the signature of the letter, and he does not now know the contents; here is the letter, it is signed by Dean - I know he had paints - I had given him the money to buy them - I found he had pistols and powder in the garret; he said one of the pistols was the pot-boy's,(Burkins) who denied it; the only person who spoke to me about him was Goner - I do not think I told him not to let boys drink there - I found a few seals in his possession.

JAMES PINK . I have known the prisoner about four years - I first gave him money about Easter twelvemonth, between six and seven o'clock in the morning; I was in the bar at the time; the first time he came, he said he was in great distress, and if I would lend him 1s., he would pay me the first he got - I said I could not, it was not my property, but at last I gave him one - I took it from the till; he saw that; he came again next afternoon, between six and seven o'clock, and said if I did not give him 1s., he would tell my father I had robbed him, and I did it for fear he should tell; he saw me take that from the till - I saw him several times on the same business.

Cross-examined. Q. How long before your father received the letter had the prisoner been to you? A.About three months - I was out when the letter came; my father, when I came in, told me to get a sheet of paper to write down every farthing I had robbed him of - I did so, to the best of my recollection; he showed me the direction - I did not know the writing; he then showed me the signature, and it was Dean's; he showed me the letter, and I read it myself - I read what I was charged with then in the letter (looking at it), and this is the paper on which I wrote what had I taken; the largest sum is 25l., and the smallest 2d.; my father took me to the Thames Police next day - Stapleton gave me a box of paints - I never had any other - I had thirty or forty small seals, a few watch-keys, and a knife - I gave them back to Stapleton; Berkins gave me a horse pistol - I never had any other - I did not ask Berkins to say they were his pistols.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you mean that your father only showed you the signature, and not the other part of the letter? A. Only the signature - I did not know the contents when I wrote this paper; after I put down what was in this paper, I read the letter.

JAMES GONER gave the same evidence as in the formet case, except that he had seen the prisoner in the house.

JOHN BURKINS . I was put-boy to Mr. Pink. I found two pistols in my box, and showed them to the servant, who told mistress; James Pink offered to give me a watch, a box of colours, and some money, if I would say they were mine: Stapleton used to come every morning, about seven o'clock, for half a quartern of gin in a bottle - his friends lived close by; he was a very good boy.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you always in the bar? A. Yes, or about the bar; I had to clean the shoes and the tap-room - I was there eleven months, and he came every morning.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-188

1715. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , 1 half-crown , the money of John Clements Pink .

JAMES PINK . The prisoner used to come in the morning about three months before the letter was sent - he said he knew I had given other boys money, and he would have some, or he would tell my father; I had seen him in Thomas's company - he said he must have a shilling, which I gave him; he had half a crown about the 26th of May, as he said he would tell my father if I did not give it to him; I got it from the cash-box up stairs - he did not see me take it.

COURT. Q.What did you think of your own conduct at the time? A. I thought I was doing very wrong, but it was done through fear.

Prisoner. Q.Where was I when you gave me the first shilling? A. In the bar.

Prisoner. You said, "Will you have a shilling?" I said, "I will thank any body to give me one;" you went into the bar, brought one out, and gave me 1s. 6d. to buy you some ballads. Witness. No, I did not; he gave me a good many songs once - he gave me a seal once; he received from 25s. to 30s. in all - the seal is worth about 6d.; I never gave him money without his demanding it, and never employed him to bring me things in.

JOHN CLEMENTS PINK gave the same evidence as in the former case.

NOT GUILTY .

The Jury stated that if they had been aware of the facts of this case they should not have convicted Thomas.

Reference Number: t18310908-189

1716. JAMES ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , 1 sack, value 3s., and 2 bushels of potatoes, value 4s. , the goods of Fordham Ellis , his master.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD WATKIN . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 7th of September I went with Mead to the William the Fourth beer-house, at Enfield; the prisoner came there about a quarter-past one o'clock in the morning, with a horse and cart - he stopped opposite the house, came up to the door which leads into the yard, jumped up, put his hand over, and unbolted the door; he then went back to the cart, and brought out a sack of potatoes- when he had got to the passage leading to the road, we showed ourselves, and he put the potatoes down; I asked him what he was going to do with them - he said to leave them for the ostler, who was to give him a 1s. for them; I secured him - he begged forgiveness, and said it was the first time he ever robbed his master; after some time I allowed him to go on to London with his cart, and when he returned I took him.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. How many horses were there in the cart? A. Two; he did not say it was so loaded he was forced to leave some - he said he lodged at that house.

JOHN MEAD . I was in company with Watkin - what he has stated is correct; the cart he was driving was Mr. Ellis' - the sack was turned inside out, and upon turning it I found the name of Fordham Ellis, Edmonton, upon it.

BENJAMIN MEERES . I am bailliff to Mr. Fordham Ellis, of Edmonton. The prisoner was in his service, and the sack is his property.

MR. FORDHAM ELLIS. The prisoner has been in my employ about two years; I employed him to carry the potatoes to London, and on his return I met him at the station-house, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence When I put them off my back the officer told me to take them into the stable, which I did; I said I was going to leave them there - he asked what I could get for them if I was going to sell them; I said I might get 1s. for them, but I did not mean to sell them.

RICHARD WATKIN . I am quite positive he told me the ostler was to have them, and give him 1s. for them.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-190

1717. CHARLES PRIEST was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July , 1 copper lid, value 4s. , the goods of John Lockington .

The prosecutor's name being Cockerton, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310908-191

1718. JOHN POTTER was indicted for feloniously receiving, of a certain evil-disposed person, on the 7th of September , 1 sack, value 18d., and 1 bushel of potatoes, value 18d., the goods of Richard Palmer , well knowing the same to have been stolen .

MR. CLARKSON declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-192

1719. JOHN POTTER was again indicted for feloniously receiving, of a certain evil-disposed person, on the 7th of September , 4 sacks, value 3s.; 2 bushels of potatoes, value 1s., and 6 bushels of chaff, value 3s., the goods of Richard Walker , the younger, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-193

1720. ARTHUR TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 8 pennyweights of silver solder, value 2s.; 2 pennyweights of gold solder, value 18d., and 1 pennyweight of gold and silver solder, value 6d. , the goods of John Sandon , his master.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a Police-officer. On the evening of the 30th of August, about half-past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the watch-house in Rosamon-street; I found in his pocket a quantity of gold and silver - he said it was gold and silver dust, and that he worked for himself; I knew that he had worked for Mr. Sandon, and took him there.

JOHN SANDON . I am a goldsmith , and live in Great Sutton-street. The prisoner was in my employ five or six years; I did not miss this property till it was found on him - he worked on the the day he was apprehended; I can swear to a mark on one piece of the solder produced - the prisoner had it to work on my premises; he left me about seven o'clock in the evening - he did no work at home; he could not have carried it away accidentally.

GEORGE SANDON . I am foreman to my brother. I gave the prisoner some solder for his work, and in two or three hours he asked for more, for he had finished what I gave him; when the men leave at night I take the gold and silver - I saw there was very little in the prisoner's can.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-194

1721. GEORGE WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 2 books, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Kimpton .

RICHARD KIMPTON . I am a bookseller , in High Holborn . In the forenoon of the 5th of July I saw the prisoner at my show-board; he took two books, and walked away with them - I secured him; he had the books under his jacket.

THOMAS MAPP. I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It was the greatest distress which drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 63. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-195

1722. MARY GODMAN was indicted for stealing, on

the 29th of August , 28 yards of cotton, value 15s. , the goods of Isaac Welchman .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-196

1723. JOHN CHARLES FREDERICK HUNTER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , 1 compass, value 5s., the goods of John Bartholomew Cowmeadow ; and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s. , the goods of John Edward Cowmeadow .

ANN COWMEADOW . I am the wife of John Edward Cowmeadow, a coal-merchant , at Notting-hill grove, Kensington . The prisoner came to our house one Sunday, about three weeks ago, to see my son, John Bartholomew Cowmeadow; this compass was in a work-box on the back parlour mantel-piece when he came - I saw it there the night before; he stopped about an hour - when he was gone we missed the compass and a pair of gloves from a drawer in the bed-room, which belonged to Ann Esther Cowmeadow; it was under my care.

EDWARD JAMES LEVY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner between five and six o'clock the same evening - he had left the prosecutor's about ten in the morning; this pair of gloves was in his waistcoat pocket, and this bundle was at the Swan, at Kensington Gravel-pits, where he was stopped; I found 2l. 19s. on him - he said he knew nothing of any part of the property; he told me what he had done with the compass.

HUGH MCGANEY . On Sunday, the 21st of August, between three and four o'clock, I was in Praed-street, Edgware-road; I saw the prisoner standing, with some persons round, who said it was a shame he should be treated so - upon inquiry I found he had been into a shop for a pennyworth of curds and whey - that he said it was sour, and that the man of the shop had kicked him in the mud; he said he was going to Bayswater - I asked him to come to my house and have his clothes brushed; while he was there he seemed to take a great fancy to an opera-glass on my mantel-piece, and he offered me this compass in exchange for it - I gave him the opera-glass and a penknife for the compass; I gave the same compass to the officer.

JOHN BARTHOLOMEW COWMEADOW . The prisoner called that Sunday morning at our house - this compass was in the back parlour; it is mine - I did not see him go into that room, but I saw him in the room where the gloves were.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-197

1724. CHARLES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 2 waistcoats, value 9s , the goods of Robert Schofield .

SARAH SCHOFIELD . I am the wife of Robert Schofield - he is a salesman . On the 26th of July I went out, and on my return saw the prisoner at my street door; he asked about a black coat, which had laid in our window - I told him it was sold, and he went away; when I got into the shop I missed a waistcoat off the drawers, and another out of the drawers - he came next morning, between nine and ten o'clock, and asked if I had a white waistcoat to sell; I said No, and told him I had missed two waistcoats - he said if I called where he lived, at William-street, I should have his character - I went there with an officer, and found him; he denied the charge - I found the property at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES WATSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Strutton-ground, Westminster. These two waistcoats were pawned by the prisoner, in the afternoon of the 26th of July.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18310908-198

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1725. THOMAS SMITH and JOHN JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 56 lbs. of lead, value 4s. 10d., the goods of James Rhodes , and fixed to a building .

BENJAMIN COLLINS . I am an officer. On the 27th of August, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoners in the City-road, near the bridge - Smith had this parcel on his shoulder, and Jones was a little behind him; I followed them some distance, and Smith gave Jones the parcel - they went to Mr. Pearces' shop, a plumber, in Plumber's-row, and Jones threw the lead into the scale; Mr. Pearce came into the shop - I told him I suspected it was stolen; Jones said it was not, that he had brought it from his own house in Golden-lane, and it was his own - I said I had seen them come in a very contrary direction, and asked if they had not brought it from the back of Mr. Rhodes'; they denied it- I asked Mr. Pearce to assist me in taking them to the station; in going along Smith struck Mr. Pearce, pushed him down, and attempted to escape, but we secured them- at the station-house Jones said they had picked the lead up, but they thought it was no harm; I found some lead had been taken from a gutter in one of the houses at the back of Mr. Rhodes', and I found the lead which the prisoners had, fitted the gutter exactly - the nail holes all matched, and it exactly corresponded where it was cut.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What did Jones say when he got to the shop? A. He said he had brought some lead, and that he wanted some glass for it; the lead had been taken from the top of a kitchen adjoining a house - Jones said they picked it up in a field; a boy, who came and swore he saw the prisoners pick up the lead in a field, is not here - he gave evidence at the office against the prisoners.

GEORGE PEARCE . I am a lead-merchant and glasscutter - I live in Plumbers'-row, The prisoners brought this lead to my house on the 27th of August; one of them put it into the scale - my son was in the shop; when I came out the officer asked me to assist in taking the prisoners - I was knocked down in going along, and a staff, which I carry in my pocket, as a warrant-officer to the Commissioners of Sewers, was bruised; I was dragged in the mud for a considerable distance.

THOMAS PEARSON . I know Mr. James Rhodes. The officer called, and showed me some lead; I went to one of Mr. Rhodes' houses, and the lead fitted the gutter exactly.

Cross-examined. Q.When had you seen it safe? A. Not since it was put up, which is three years ago.

COURT. Q. Are the houses inhabited? A. No - this lead was on a kitchen which leans against the house; the

lead being off would have let the rain in - I had been in the house three days before, and there was not any appearance of rain coming in.

Smith's Defence. We went down by the side of the New-river, and saw this lead laying among the grass, in a field - I took it up, and we went to a shop; a boy saw us find it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-199

1726. MICHAEL NEESON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July , 1 book, value 2s. , the goods of Benjamin Galpin .

JOHN ARKLEY . I was shopman to Mr. Benjamin Galpin, who keeps a shop in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square . I saw the prisoner at his window on the 2nd of July - he took up the Pilgrim's Progress, and put it at the end of a book, he came a second time, looked at it, and put it down; he came a third time, looked at it again, and pretended to put it down, but did not - he ran across the street; we followed, and took it from his hand.

GUILTY . Aged 36 - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310908-200

1727. JOHN HOLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 silk dress, value 3l.; 1 basket, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 1 pair of gloves, value 6d. , the goods of Samuel Biss .

The prosecutor's name being Samuel Benjamin Biss, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310908-201

1728. GEORGE NEWBY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 7 yards of printed cotton, value 5s. , the goods of Dickenson Sowerby .

WILLIAM CLARK . I am shopman to Mr. Dickenson Sowerby, a pawnbroker , in Booth-street . On the 16th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, Wall said a man had stolen a piece of cotton from the shop - I went to the door; an officer had the prisoner, and asked if this was my master's property - I said it was; it had hung about the middle of the shop, and had been covered over - I had seen it about six or seven o'clock.

GEORGE WALL . I was standing close by the prisoner in the shop; I saw him take this cotton from a partition in the middle of the shop - he went out; I followed him till I saw an officer, and he was taken; I had seen him throw the cotton into an area.

JAMES DENNIS . I am an officer. Wall pointed out the prisoner to me - he was running, and I took him; I had not seen him throw the cotton away, but a female at the house gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-202

1729. THOMAS OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 saw, value 2s. , the goods of James Tester ; and that he had before been convicted of felony.

JAMES TESTER . I am a carpenter . I lost my saw from Sussex-terrace, Kentish-town , on the 17th of August, while I was gone to breakfast; I had left it in a house which I was finishing - on my return I met the prisoner; I had not known him before - a person had given me information; I said, "You have been stealing my tools," and I found the saw down his bosom.

THOMAS VATER . I am a carpenter. I was sitting at breakfast, and a man came in and gave us information -I went out, and saw the prisoner coming round the corner of the building - I took him back; I thought he walked stiff and took this saw from his bosom.

SAMUEL BRACHER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the saw.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES CLARK . I am an officer. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction, by the name of John Mason , for stealing two planes and some other tools - I took him, and know he is the person - he was confined seven days in Newgate.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310908-203

1730. JAMES PIPER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 1 hat, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Merry .

THOMAS GILKES . I am a Police-officer. On the 1st of July, within a few minutes of nine o'clock at night, I was near Hackney church-tower; the prisoner passed me, and had nothing with him - in about two minutes he passed me again, with something concealed under his coat; on going to see what it was, I found this straw hat, which he said. he had bought in a public-house, at Clapton, for 6d.: I looked in it, saw Mr. Merry's name, and went there - he was about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's.

CHRISTIANA BURGESS. I lived with Mr. Merry - he keeps a straw-hat warehouse . This hat is his; it had been taken from the end of the counter, near the door - I had seen it a few minutes before eight o'clock.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310908-204

1731. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 1 silk handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Jonathan Murray .

ROBERT STUPART . I live with Mr. Jonathan Murray, a pawnbroker , of East Smithfield . On the 30th of July, I was informed that a person had taken a handkerchief, which had hung by the door; I looked and missed it; I had seen it about an hour before - I went to the door, and the officer brought the prisoner back with it.

JOHN MADDY . I am an officer. I met the prisoner coming towards Rosemary-lane, about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's; a young man from the shop overtook him, and said he had stolen a handkerchief: he denied it, but I saw him drop this handkerchief from his jacket - I took it up, and took charge of him.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18310908-205

1732. ELIZA SLATER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 1 gold seal, value 4s., and 1 watchkey, value 4s., the goods of William Mosto , from his person .

THOMAS ANDREW CAMROUX . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor laying on the ground in Hoxton, at a quarter-past nine o'clock, on the 7th of August - the prosecutor was very drunk, I heard the prisoner say, "Give me the watch;" I asked if he was her husband - she said Yes; I took them both to the station-house- the prisoner had the seal and key; the prosecutor could not speak - he was quite insensible.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310908-206

1733. WILLIAM FORSCUTT was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN SMITH . I am a baker . The prisoner was in my employ about seven months; he had to book his bread every night, and give an account of the money he had received - I had given him notice to quit previous to the 27th of June, but he seemed sorry for something he had done, and I forgave him - he left me without notice in the middle of the week.

JANE MARTIN . I am a customer of the prosecutor's - I paid the prisoner 3s. 7d. for him on the 27th of June; he receipted this bill for it.

MARY WESTON . I paid the prisoner 4s. on account of his master, on the 7th of July - he wrote a receipt on this bill.

MR. SMITH. He never accounted to me for these sums; the 7th of July was the day he left me - I had mentioned to him about the 3s. 7d. a morning or two before, and he owned he had not accounted for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had between seventy and eighty customers to give an account of every night - when I gave in the account on the 27th of June I was money over in my pocket, and could not recollect where it came from; on the Monday, when I went to Mrs. Martin's I took her two bills - she said, "I paid you one;" she went to my master, and he took the work out of my hand.

The prisoner received a good character, and a master said he would take him into his employ.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310908-207

1734. JOHN DROVER and JOHN HARTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 hat, value 10s.; 1 stock, value 2s., and 1 snuff-box, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Edward Thomas Mills .

CHARLES EDWARD THOMAS MILLS . I am a medical-student , and live in John-street, Blackfriars-road. On the 14th of July I was in Newcastle-street, Strand , about nine o'clock at night; I was not altogether sober, but was not drunk - a man insulted me by shoving against me; the two prisoners came up, and offered to assist me in getting away - shortly afterwards I stripped to fight, and took off my hat and coat; Drover took my hat - I do not know who took my coat; my opponents all ran off - I then looked for my coat and hat; they were gone also - Drover was taken with my hat; they were all strangers to me.

JOHN PERKINS . I am a Police-officer. The prosecutor came, and said he had been robbed - he was sober enough to tell me all this; I went down my beat, met Drover with the hat on his head, and I found in his possession the pocket-book, handkerchief, and gloves - I took him to the prosecutor, who said it was his, and that was the man who took them; I asked Drover where the coat and stock were - he said he had sold them in Russel-court, Drurylane, and I found them there.

CHARLES YOUNG . I am a Police-officer. I saw the two prisoners following the prosecutor up towards Templebar, and back again - the prosecutor was not sober, but was capable of walking and talking; in about a quarter of an hour I saw the prosecutor with a hat on, which I had seen Drover wear the same evening, and that caused suspicion; I took Hartin on the 13th of August - I had seen both the prisoners in company before, and knew they were associates.

Hartin. Q. Did you not see the prosecutor stripped, in the act of fighting? A. I saw him taking off his coat; he was having an altercation with some person - I did not see you pick up his clothes from under feet.

M - MOSES. I keep a clothes-shop. I bought this coat of Drover about half an hour before the officer came - there was some other man with him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Drover's Defence. The prosecutor took my hat off, put his hat on my head, and put mine on his head, to disguise himself, to go to fight a porter at the gate of the lun- the handkerchief was in his hat, and I put it into my pocket.

Hartin's Defence. I and a friend went into the public-house opposite the Angel Inn; I heard an altercation, went out, and saw the prosecutor fighting - the Policeman came up and separated them; he was beastly drunk: no man would have behaved as he did in his sober senses; the Policeman sent him towards Temple-bar, but he returned once or twice - I went into the public-house again, and he came in with his coat off, and Drover's hat on; the porter, and two female servants were in the house, having a glass of ale; the prosecutor insisted upon fighting the porter - the man behind the bar jumped over, and turned him out; a respectable person, who was with me, came to Bow-street, and proved that I was not out of his company till half-past eleven o'clock that night, but he was sent by the Scotch society to Scotland, the next day.

DROVER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

HARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310908-208

1735. SUSAN CRESSWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 1 silver spoon, value 1l. , the goods of Count Jerome De Sails ; and JANE GAZEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen , &c.

JAMES BROADWAY . I am a Policeman. On the 2nd of August I was in a pawnbroker's-shop in Sloane-street, and while I was there Gazey came in, and brought these two pieces of a broken spoon to pawn - they refused to take it, and then she wanted it mended; when she went out I followed her - she crossed, and joined three or four girls of the town; after some conversation with them she went on, and I followed her - I asked what she had got; she said Nothing - I said I had my doubts about that - she then said, "I have a spoon, which is my own property;" I said I should take her to the watch-house - she said she would not go, but she would take me to the house-