Old Bailey Proceedings, 30th June 1831.
Reference Number: 18310630
Reference Number: f18310630-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN KEY , MAYOR.

SIXTH SESSION, HELD AT

JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 30th DAY OF JUNE, 1831, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLEH.

London: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TIFTHRON , No. 74, CORNHILL;

AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE,

1831.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX

Before the Right Honourable JOHN KEY , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir James Parke , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; John Thomas Thorpe , Esq.; William Heygate , Esq.; and William Venables , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; and Sir Peter Laurie , Knt., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

John Waite ,

George Heath ,

John James Playle,

Thomas Crickmore ,

Williams Brayley ,

William Witt ,

George Y. Hadley,

John Dempsey ,

William Hunt ,

Henry Dennis ,

Thomas Eston ,

James Garnett .

Second

William Leschallas ,

James London ,

John Thodey Hobson ,

Samuel Appleby ,

John Wilson ,

Richard P. Higham ,

Geo. W. Rudrick ,

George Hodges ,

John Hodges ,

John Hood ,

William Cullock ,

Charles Gill ,

Samuel Walden .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John Gcikie ,

Philimore Harvey ,

Richard Knap ,

John Hooker ,

Edward Knight ,

James Little ,

Thomas Glascott ,

Thomas Elton ,

William Hems ,

Henry French ,

John Cusel ,

William Goodwin .

Second

Robert Fergusson ,

Frederick Edwards ,

John Howard ,

John Jenkins ,

Thomas Johnson ,

Thomas Fenwick ,

William Fenn ,

Abraham Goimer ,

John Gilles ,

John Dixon Hancock

Richard Gordon ,

James Haines .

Third

Jeremiah Thos. Ilsley ,

George Lamert ,

Henry T. Harford ,

Henry Hopper ,

William Larkey ,

John Larke ,

George Furby ,

Charles Francis ,

Samuel Gorbel ,

John Jenkins ,

William Ireson ,

James Key .

Fourth

Joseph Evans ,

William Field ,

Richard Fawcett ,

Richard Lamb ,

John Knight ,

Robert O. Halliday,

Joseph Huken ,

Henry Lee ,

Isaac Leith ,

Henry Hancock ,

Charles Liewin ,

George Hobbs .

Fifth

Henry Evans ,

James Hume ,

Wm. Saml. Jenkins ,

John Harrold ,

Edward Hall ,

Thomas Lulham ,

George Levitt ,

William Latchford ,

John Lawrence ,

Thomas Jackson ,

John Fuller ,

Richard Lowfinch .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JUNE 30, 1831.

KEY, MAYOR. - SIXTH SESSION.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

Reference Number: t18310630-1

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1190. JOHN SHEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May , at St. Giles without, Cripplegate, 1 gelding, price 20l.; 1 chaise-cart, value 10l.; 1 set of harness, value 3l.; 1 whip, value 2s. 6d., and 1 horse cloth, value 1s. , the property of John Macbeth .

JOHN MACBETH . I keep a livery-stable in Eagle-street, Holborn, and have no partner. On the 3rd of May the prisoner came to me, and hired a horse and chaise-cart, which I let him, and he took them away the same day - the horse was property harnessed; he said he wanted it to go to Chelmsford, to the election, and he should be back in seven days - he agreed to pay me seven guineas for the week, and said if I went to the Bull, at Aldgate, he should get some money from the committee to pay for it - I agreed to let him have it for the week for seven guineas; he said his expences would be paid by the committee, who sat in Whitechapel, who would advance him the money - he had the horse, cart, harness, and a whip to drive with. I never saw him again till the 23rd of May, when he was at Worship-street - he was to have been back on the 10th; I made inquiry after him, but heard nothing of him - he gave me his card as living at No. 75, Aldersgate-street; I inquired for him there, and found he had lived there, but had left there some time - it was not his address at the time he hired the horse and cart; I saw him at Worship-street on the 23rd - the cart and horse were there: I had advertised them, offering 5l. reward, and found him in custody two days after - my horse was worth 20l., and the chaise-cart 12l., including the harness.

Prisoner. I wish him to produce the advertisement. Witness. Here it is, in the Morning Advertiser of the 21st of May.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not in treaty between two and three years ago, to purchase the horse and cart of you? A. It may have been nearly two years since I saw him; after I bought the cart he came and asked if I would part with it, and I never saw him afterwards - there was no bargain about it - he only hired it for a week; I have a memorandum here in his own writing - he gave it to me at the committee-room; I saw him write it - (read) - "Mr. Macbeth, I agree to pay seven guineas for the hire of the horse and cart for one week, Thomas Shearman, Stretton Arms, Carthusian-street, Charterhouse-square;" I inquired there, and found he had lodged there, but not at the time - here is another note, which he wrote to me from Chelmsford; I cannot swear it is his writing.

Prisoner. I admit the letter, and wish to have it read;(read.)

To Mr. Macbeth, stable-keeper, Great Red Lion-street, Holborn, London. Chelmsford, 7th of May, 1831. SIR, - The election is all over at Colchester, and I am here; there is an old gentleman here, who has taken a fancy to your old horse, and if you will set the lowest price you will take for him, you may have a customer for the set-out altogether, and I will give you an order for the money on a house in Lombard-street - send an answer by return of post, directed to me, to be left at the Post-office here till called for. SHERMAN.

JOHN MACBETH . I sent no answer to that letter, but went down to Chelmsford; I could not find him there, nor hear any thing of him at the Post-office, or of the horse and cart; I made inquiry about him from time to time, without success.

Prisoner. Q. Do you ever get tipsy, and forget what you do? A. I always attend to business first.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. I am ostler to Mr. Macbeth. I saw master and the prisoner go out of the yard together in the cart, and on the 23rd a man came and gave information that he knew where the horse and cart were - I went and found the horse in Moor-lane, at Salt's livery-stables; the prisoner was not there - I saw him at Worship-street; the same horse and cart were there, and the same harness, except the collar, which was changed - the breeching was gone, also the whip and horse-cloth; the whip had the name of Charles Fowler on it - I have since seen the whip in the Policeman's hands.

JOHN MOYE . I am an oilman and grocer, and live at Hornchurch, in Essex, about fifteen miles from London. -I saw the prisoner first about three weeks before he offered this horse and cart for sale - he then told me he had been down to Essex, to an election; and I think about a week before I saw him in custody he drove up to my house, No. 8, Church-street, Mile-end New-town - he said he had been to Chelmsford and Colchester elections, and had driven up two or three publicans - I said, "Is this your horse and chaise-cart?" he said Yes, it belonged to him - I said I wanted one, and asked what he wanted for it; he asked thirty-four guineas - I called out a friend who was a judge

of it; he thought it would suit me, and I was to meet the prisoner at the Grey Hound, Smithfield, to go to Hampstead-road, where he was going - I was to go there to see how the horse would go; I said I wanted to go to Webber-row, Blackfriars - he said he wanted to go to Hampstead-road, and said he would drive me round there; I was to meet him at three o'clock on the Sunday following, to try the horse and, drive there - I did not go, as a person stepped up and said I had better have nothing to do with him, and the bargain went off; as I did not go to the Grey Hound, the prisoner called at my place about nine days afterwards, on a Friday - I was not at home, but heard he had called.

Q. When did you hear the prosecutor had lest his horse and chaise? A. On the Sunday - I was at Hornchurch, and when I returned my wife told me of the advertisement; I went to Machin's stable, in Fann-street, Aldersgate-street - I made inquiry, but did not see the horse and cart there; I went to Macbeth's on the Monday, and told him what had passed between me and the prisoner; I afterwards saw him at Worship-street, and am quite sure of his person - I took Macbeth's ostler and three Policemen, and found the horse at Salt's livery-stables, Moor-lane, and the cart and harness in a court in Whitecross-street, in possession of two men named Page and Crowder; they were moving it away while I was in the yard - I offered to buy it, to stop its being carried away, and Crowder offered it to me for 12l.; when the Policemen came up, I said I would have nothing to do with it - I had watched them remove it from Salt's stables to Whitecross-street.

Prisoner. Q. How many men have you hailed above in a night at Sergeant's Inn, in Term time? A. None at all - I have justified bail three times; I never bought any stolen blue; I was never advertised as a swindler.

COURT. Q. You have said you are an oilman and grocer, at Hornchurch - do you carry on any business there? A. Yes, I bought the lease of the house - I live there, and carry on business.

Prisoner. He goes by the name of Smith, a notorious swindler. Witness. John Moye is my name - Edward Smith had the shop before me, but I never went by his name; the prisoner was not intoxicated - I asked what he wanted, and he said thirty-four guineas.

Q. Did you not offer to pay me in brick-dust and sawdust, which your stock consists of? A. I offered you the money if the horse would suit me; a person stepped up, said you had been in the pillory, and told me to have nothing to do with you - I had not a farthing for bailing the three men; they were customers of mine.

JURY. Q. Have you a residence at Mile-end? A. I lived there at the time the prisoner made me this offer, as well as at Hornchurch - I left Mile-end about a week ago; my family have gone down there - I carried on the oil and colour trade in Church-street, but I carry on that and the grocery business too at Hornchurch.

TRUEMAN MACHIN. I keep stables in Fann-street. The prisoner brought the horse and cart to my stables on the 10th of May, and took them away on the 18th - they were within a mile and a half of the prosecutor's all that time; he did not say who they belonged to - he paid for the keep; he only went out with them once, and returned in the evening; he never used them again till he and another person took the horse and chaise away - he paid for the keep, as if he was the owner; I did not know that they were the prosecutor's at that time.

CHARLES CROWDER. I am a publican, and live at No. 45, Golden-lane - I have known the prisoner some time. On the 18th of May he came to my house, and told me he knew of a horse that would suit me - he took me to Machin's stables, the White Horse, in Fann-street; I saw the horse and cart there - he asked if I thought the horse would suit me; I said I did not know till I rode it- I lent him 2l. to pay for the keep at the livery-stable; Machin would not let it came out without - I then drove it to my house, and went from there along Old-street; I observed the horse was lame, and told him it would not suit me - no price was set on it; he told me to take the horse, cart, and harness to my stables till he paid me the 2l. - he did not mention Macbeth's name to me; I was to work the horse for its keep - I drove it to Epsom races, and the following Monday the prosecutor claimed it; the prisoner was then at my house, and I sent for him to answer for himself; I was where the cart was found, and directed my servant to go and have him apprehended - it was done.

Prisoner. Q. I believe I asked you to lend me the money till I could make my payment good for the hire of it? A. I knew nothing of his having hired it - I supposed it to be his own; I lent him the money to pay for the keep - he never told me he had hired it.

Prisoner to TRUEMAN MACHIN. Q.Did you object to the horse and cart coming away till the keep was paid for? A. Yes - I make it a rule that the keep should be paid for before 1 part with a horse.

JESSE TUSTIN . I am a Police-constable. I received information, and found the horse in Crowder's stable - I took possession of it; it was claimed by the prosecutor.

JAMES GRADY . I am a Police-constable. I took the horse and cart in charge - it was afterwards claimed by the prosecutor, and produced at Worship-street.

GEORGE GREEN. I am a hair-dresser. The prisoner wanted to borrow 2l. of me to release the horse and cart from Machin's stable - I knew him before; I did not advance it.

WILLIAM PATEMAN. I am a cheesmonger. I took the prisoner in charge in Crewder's house, Golden-lane; I told him it was about a horse - he said nothing.

JOHN MACBETH . The horse and cart are still in my possession - the cart had my name and address on it in full when it went out, but when it came back it had no name, nothing but the number.

Prisoner. Q.Did you not rub out the City Arms and your name yourself, for fear of being informed against for lending them out without a stamp-ticket? A. No - the City Arms were on it when I bought it, but they have been taken off these two years, as I am not free; I did not know of the name and address being off till it was at Worship-street - I did not ask fourteen guineas for the week's hire; I agreed the week before to let it to you for 3l., but you did not tell me where it was going - when I let it you were to pay seven guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. My intentions were truly honourable; the committee did not settle with me, so I could not settle with him, which was the reason of my delay -

I paid 3l. 10s. for the keep of it; if the Committee had settled with me I should have paid him honourably.

Prisoner to JOHN MOVE . Q. I believe you are to have 5l. for coming here, and 5l. more if I am convicted? A. I have not had a farthing to give evidence, and do not expect a farthing on his conviction; I have received the reward which was advertised for the discovery of the property.

[July 1.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 56.

Reference Number: t18310630-2

Second London Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1191. JAMES COLES was indicted for that he, on the 23rd of May , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did forge a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows: viz:-

15, Lombard-street, London, May 19, 1831.

Messrs. Robarts, Curtis, Robarts, Curtis, and Co., pay Garnett and Co., or bearer, One Hundred Pounds.£100. J. SMITH and SON. with intent to defraud Abraham Wildey Robarts and others; against the Statute.

2nd COUNT, for feloniously uttering, offering, disposing of and putting off a like forged order, well knowing the same to be false, forged and counterfeited, with a like intent.

3rd COUNT, like the first, only calling the forged instrument a warrant instead of an order, with a like intent.

4th COUNT, like the second, only calling the instrument a warrant, with a like intent.

MESSRS. BODKIN and BALL conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES WALTON COARD . I am clerk to Messrs. Abraham Wildey Robarts and Co., bankers , Lombard-street; there are four other partners. Messrs. John Smith and Son, wholesale grocers, of Aldersgate-street, kept an account at our house in May last, and were in the habit of drawing cheques on our house - we have no other customers of the name of John Smith and Son, or J. Smith and Son; (looking at a cheque) this cheque was presented to me at our banking-house on Monday. the 23rd of May, by the prisoner, and on my taking it from his hand, I said, "How will you take it?" he said, "Short;" I said, "A 100l. note" - he rather hesitated, and then said, "No, two fiftys;" I perceived the signature was different from the usual way of signing, and inquired if he took it himself of Messrs. John Smith and Son- he answered No, that he brought it from either Messrs. Garnett, or Mr. Garnett, I do not know which he said; the prisoner was standing in the front office, outside the counter - I took the cheque into another office, to show Mr. London, another clerk; I then showed the prisoner into the room in which Mr. London was - it is my belief the name on this cheque is not the signature of John Smith and Son, our customers; this happened about three o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? A. No, I had never seen him before to my recollection; I do not know how long Messrs. Smith have kept cash at our house - the front shop is the place you come into first from the street; I might perhaps be three minutes in the other office before I came back to the prisoner - he was all that time in the outer shop by himself; people were most likely coming in and out during that time - cheques are not taken into the back office unless there is some suspicion of their not being genuine, or that the account is over-drawn - there was nothing to hinder his going out at the door.

MR. BODKIN. Q.Before you went into the back room, did you tell the prisoner you had any suspicion of the genuiness of the cheque? A. I did not.

THOMAS LONDON . I am a clerk in this banking house. On the 23rd of May I was in an inner room, when Coard came and made a communication to me about this cheque(looking at it) - the prisoner was brought into the room in two or three minutes after, and I asked him for whom he had received it, or from whom, I forget which; he said he received it for Garnett and Co. - I asked him what Garnett and Co.; he said the wholesale grocers - I had no knowledge of them; I do not recollect that I knew there was such a firm - I left the room, and went to Garnett and Co., in Turnwheel-lane, a short distance from the banking-house; I believe I looked into the Directory for their address, but am not sure of that - Mr. Garnett came to the banking-house immediately after my return, and on his arrival the prisoner was given into custody at our banking-house, which is in the City; I might have told him that I was going to Smith's or Garnett's, I do not know which - I had told him I was going to make inquiry, and he then said he had another cheque to receive at Barclay's, and he would call as he came back; I requested him to wait till I returned, and left him in the inner office - Sir William Curtis ' son was there, nobody else.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you acquainted with the prisoner before? A. I never saw him before, to my knowledge; whether any body else heard him say he was going to Barclay's I cannot say - he said it at the door, and I went out directly; he made no attempt to follow.

MR. JOHN GARNETT . I am one of the firm of Garnett, Underwood, and Co., wholesale grocers, Turnwheel-lane.(Looking at the cheque) this cheque was never in our possession - we never had any dealings with John Smith and Son; I never saw the prisoner before the 23rd of May.

WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am a marshal of the City. I was sent for to Messrs. Robarts and Curtis', and took the prisoner into custody for presenting a draft for 100l. - I searched him, and found some letters and pocket-books on him, a pair of ear-rings, a snuff-box, several memorandums, and a sheet of blank cheques on Messrs. Curtis and Co.'s, also a small piece of paper; the cheques were in a pocketbook in his coat pocket, folded up together - I think the smaller paper was loose; I found no draft upon Messrs. Barclay on him - I asked where he lived; he said he had no residence - I then asked where he had been living; he said with Messrs. Smith, of Aldersgate-street, grocers - I took from him twelve sovereigns and some silver, which were given up to him by order of the Magistrate; I believe I said to him, "How could you be so foolish?" he said he was in great distress - I said that could not be, it was impossible he could be in distress, as he had 12l. or 13l. in his pocket.

Cross-examined. Q.Before you asked how he could be so foolish, had he not told you he had found these things, and certainly very improperly attempted to get money for the draft? A. No, he did not; I can safely swear he did not - I never heard him state that at all.

MR. JOHN SMITH. I am a wholesale grocer, in part

nership with my son Robert - we carry on business under the firm of John Smith and Son, in Aldersgate-street. In May last we kept an account at Messrs. Curtis', and have done so for some years; we were in the habit of drawing cheques on them - the prisoner was in our employ for three months and nine days; we discharged him on the 23rd of May, at half-past two o'clock in the afternoon - I have his receipt for his wages; we kept our cheque-book in the counting-house, but not under lock and key: the prisoner could have access to it whenever he pleased - I produce the cheque-book.

Q. Look at this cheque - is it in the hand-writing of yourself or your son? A. Neither - I believe the signature "I. Smith and Son," to be in the prisoner's handwriting - I have not a doubt of its being his hand-writing; we sign our cheques " John Smith and Son, "in full - the prisoner had no authority to sign cheques on behalf of our firm; we had no transaction with Messrs. Garnett and Co. - I only knew the house by name: in consequence of a communication made to us, I looked at our cheque-book, on the 23rd of May, and found a leaf abstracted - here is the book; there are five cheques on each leaf.

Q. Look at this piece of paper, which is a memorandum of a cheque - you see the word "Turner," and the figures"100l.," whose hand-writing do you believe that to be? A. The prisoner's.

Cross-examined. Q. He parted from you of his own accord, did not he? A. Yes; we had a good character with him, which I have in my pocket.

MR. ROBERT SMITH. I am the son of the last witness, and am in partnership with him. The signature to this cheque is not my father's writing, nor my own - it looks very much like the prisoner's; I have frequently seen him write, and my belief is that it is his writing - I believe the writing on this memorandum to be the same; I never authorized the prisoner to draw cheques for our firm.

Cross-examined. Q.Do you mean the cheque and the memorandum are the undisguised writing of the prisoner? A. I believe them to be so - I have compared them with his writing.(The cheque was here put in and read.)

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY on the 2nd and 4th Counts. - DEATH .

Aged 22.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth and previous good character.[July 2.]

Reference Number: t18310630-3

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1192. WILLIAM YOUNG was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Gordon , on the 12th of May , at Harmondsworth, and stealing 24lbs. of bacon, value 15s.; 6lbs of pork, value 3s.; 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 jacket, value 2s., and 1 coat, value 8s. , his property.

MESSRS, PHILLIPS and CURWOOD conducted the prosecution.

MARY GORDON . I am the wife of Robert Gordon - we live in the parish of Harmondsworth , and rent the house. On the night of the 12th of May, between one and two o'clock, our house was broken open; I know that was the time, because we have a clock in the house, and I heard a noise, and then heard a lump; I got up, and opened the window, but could hear nothing, and next morning when I got up, I found the sash window on the ground floor back room up - it had been left shut the night before, but there was no fastening to it, except the hasp, which was forced down and broken, and the window up - we missed the articles stated in the indictment (repeating them) and on the Saturday afternoon when the constable took the prisoner out of the cage at Hounslow, I saw the jacket on his back, and on the Monday following, the constable produced the bacon at Bow-street; I knew it to be ours.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Does your husband occupy the whole cottage? A. Yes - we have been there eighteen years; the house was broken open on a Thursday night.

THOMAS FLURRY . I am labourer to Mr. Cane - the prosecutor is his bailiff. On Friday morning, the 13th of May, in consequence of something I heard, I went to Barrett, the constable of Whitton, and went with him to the prisoner's house - the prisoner was at home, and in bed; Barrett took him into custody, and left me in charge of the house - Barrett returned in about an hour; this was between ten and eleven o'clock - about twenty minutes after he returned, I saw him find two parts of a flitch of bacon, which I knew - I had seen it every day in master's house, which the prosecutor lives in; I can safely swear it is the bacon I had seen in Gordon's house - it is his bacon.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the bacon in the house a whole flitch, or part of one? A. Part of a flitch - it was in one piece in the house; I know it by its appearance - I saw a piece cut out of it the night before, and when the constable drew it out from under the bed he said, "Do you know this?" I said Yes - I had seen it so many times in the house I can swear to it - the two pieces found join together. I have no mark on them.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody - he had a flannel jacket on when I took him away; I found the bacon under the bed - I put him in the cage at Hounslow; Harmondsworth is in Middlesex; I have had the bacon in my possession ever since.

WILLIAM BEECHAM . I am a labourer, and live at Hatton. I know the prisoner's person; I heard of Gordon's robbery - I worked for Mr. Cane, his master, the day before the robbery, and the prisoner was at work with me up at Cane's farm; we parted about half-past ten o'clock at night - I left Young on the common about half a mile from Gordon's.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known him? A. I worked with him three days, and only knew him by that.

COURT. Q. When were you paid your wages? A. On the 12th of May, about half-past five o'clock; we were paid in Gordon's house, in the room where the bacon was- the prisoner was there with me at the time.

JOHN HILL . I am a labourer. I heard of Gordon's robbery, and saw the prisoner in the cage at Hounslow on Thursday afternoon - he asked me if I would change jackets with him - he said "Because the old woman can swear to that jacket;" he said he would send my jacket back again, and his wife was to have his back - he said his was better than mine; I did not change with him: he put the jacket between the bars, between eight and nine o'clock, and told

me to strip; I would not - his wife took it away: I went up the street, leaving it in her possession.

Cross-examined. Q. The jacket, I believe, has never been found? A. I have not seen it; mine is here, which he wanted to exchange for it - he told me he had had the jacket in his possession about two years - that it had been laying about in his box, and he had never worn it, but he said the old woman said she could swear to it; I had been looking out for work two or three days before this - I had not been at Gordon's; I live at Hounslow - I did not tell the officer of this conversation; I told my father of it at breakfast next morning - he went and told the constable, and they sent for me.

COURT. Q. What sort of a jacket was it? A. A white flannel one, such as labourers usually wear.

DAVID ANDERSON . I was a constable of Isleworth. -On Monday, the 16th of May, I accompanied Cook, the high constable, to the prisoner's house - it was the Monday after the robbery, and in the prisoner's bed-room. I found this table-cloth, under the bed; I gave it to Cook, and have got it back from him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know that the prisoner kept pigs? A. He had a sow there.

MARY GORDON . I know this bacon - I have examined it, and am certain it is mine; I had the whole hog from master - I helped the butcher to cut it up; I salted it myself; I am certain of it - here is the mark where I cut it on the Tuesday before it was taken; here is my mark on the table-cloth - it was marked J. C., and here is a rent where the mark was, and a patch put on: here is the mark of some liver and crow on it, by which I know it - the constable brought the prisoner out of the cage at Hounslow to me on the Friday afternoon, about one o'clock; I observed the jacket he had on, and knew it - it was my husband's: I knew it by the mark where the binding was loosened behind - the constable said, "What do you think of it?" I said, in the prisoner's presence, "That will do;" the constable sent me out of the room while he had some refreshment, and then put him in the cage again.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

[June 30.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Reference Number: t18310630-4

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1193. ANN HYDE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May , at St. Anne, Westminster, 20 carats weight of rubies, value 30l., and 12 carats weight of emeralds, value 10l., the goods of James Mackie , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLOTTE CATHERINE MACKIE . I am the wife of James Mackie , a goldsmith and jeweller - we live at No. 16, Queen-street, Soho, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster . The prisoner was three weeks in our service. - On Saturday night, the 21st of May, I went with my husband to Cooke's-circus; we returned about a quarter-past twelve o'clock, and about two the next day the prisoner came up to me in the bed-room, and said dinner was ready- I asked her to fasten my dress, which she could not, and after she was gone down I stooped down, and observed something shining on the bed-room floor; I picked it up, and found it was a ruby - I then found several more: I went down stairs to my husband, asked if he had been to his drawer that morning, and told him what I had found; I found the keys of the drawers in a drawer which I had placed them in the evening before - my husband opened the drawer with the key, in my presence; the prisoner had seen me place some rubies in that drawer about a fortnight before - when my husband examined the drawer there were still some rubies and emeralds there; I could not tell how many were missing - we searched all over the floor of the room, and found a few more rubies: I asked the prisoner if she had been to the drawer - she said she had not; she said Mr. Meredith, a lodger, had asked her a great many questions, and she should not be surprised if it was him; the constable was sent for Mr. Meredith, and his room was searched, but nothing was found either on him or in his room - this was at half-past three o'clock that afternoon: I afterwards went to my father's, and returned about halfpast eight o'clock - I saw the prisoner in the back parlour- the constable was searching her boxes: she asked him to allow her to speak to me - I said nothing to induce her to confess: I did not either threaten or promise her, nor did my husband or the constable - she said she had been to the drawer out of curiosity, to look at the stones, and if I searched the room farther I should still find the remainder of the stones that were missing; I told her she knew to the countrary of that, as we had searched before there - she then said she had taken them, and thrown them away down the water-closet, and into the dust-hole; she begged I would plead for her - I told her I would as far as prudence would allow me: that was after she made this statement; that was all she said to me about it - I afterwards had the dust-hole and water-closet examined, but none of them were found in either place; she did not tell me how the drawer was opened.

Prisoner. You told me you had been robbed twice before I came, and you did not think I should do it, became I did not know a ruby from glass. Witness, I said we had been robbed twice before she came - we had lost a writing-desk out of the front parlour, and a table-clock.

Prisoner. All the lodgers had access to your bed-room, and you were very careless in letting property lay about - there were things in the kitchen and in my bed-room, which I could have taken. Witness. There are many things laying about at a jeweller's house which it is impossible to lock up - a gentleman left a gold chain in the kitchen for a week; there might have been rings in the prisoner's bed-room at times - I never knew her to go to my drawer; I am sure she saw me put some rabies into my drawer about a fortnight before, and saw the stones in the drawer - I had her character from Mr. Payne, a butcher, of Lamb's Conduit-street.

Prisoner. Your brother was at work in the house till eight o'clock, and complained to me that Mackie had gone out, and there were seven lodgers besides. Witness. A brother of mine was at work there - we have a lady lodging on our first floor; we had only one lady in the house at the time of the robbery, but we have four ladies lodge in the house - they are respectable; all the lodgers have access to the room; the drawer is in the second floor front room, which is my bed-room; Mr. Meredith lodged in the back room second floor - we found nothing in her boxes.

Prisoner. Mr. McCree lodged there, and was going away the day before - master told me to look sharp after him. Witness. Mr. McCree left on the Saturday night,

about half-past eleven o'clock - he was a medical student; he boarded with us, and slept on the third floor - he is a youth sixteen years old.

JURY. Q. Do you know of your husband telling her to look sharp after him? A. No - I knew him to be a very respectable young man; the keys were kept in a drawer in the bed-room; she must have occasionally seen me put the keys in the drawer.

JAMES MACKIE. I am the prosecutor. I kept my loose stones in a drawer in the bed room - they were polished; in consequence of what my wife said I went up about two o'clock and looked at the drawer - I had slept in that room the night before, and got up about half-past eleven; on examining the drawer I found it locked - I opened it with the key, and found nothing the matter with the lock; when I unscrewed the ruby-box, which was kept in that drawer, I found full half of them were gone - there had been about seventy carats in the box; there now remains forty-one - I had not seen the box for four or five days; I opened the ruby-box in the prisoner's presence - I took the drawer out, and set it on a chair by the window, and on opening the emerald-box, I said, "Why, half of these are gone;" she immediately said, "Oh Jesus Christ! it was not me, as God is my judge it was not me!" I examined the emerald-box in her presence - there were fourteen carats left out of thirty; I had not seen that box for four or five days - I never go to it unless some of the workmen want them; I cannot say when I had seen them last, in fact Mrs. Mackie put the rubies and emeralds there the last time - I had weighed them about a week before; the box was so full that the lid would hardly go down on it - the ruby-box was particularly full; I put twenty carats in one evening, and I think two more - it was so full I could scarcely get the lid down, and I thought to put them into another box; some of the rubies cost me three guineas a carat, some 40s., and some 25s. - I had seventy or eighty carats of the emeralds at one time; I had worked them down to the worst, and I would not have given above 20s. a carat for them.

Q. When the prisoner used the expressions you mentioned had you charged her with stealing them? A. I had not, and I said, "Why, Ann, what is the use of your using those expressions, have I charged you with it, but your conduct appears very strange, I must confess.

Q. Did she mention any other person whom she charged? A. Mr. Meredith - she mentioned his name; I sent for a constable, and searched Meredith's person and his room, but found nothing - I afterwards had a conversation with a Mr. Burgess; I have three rooms on a floor, and the conversation was in the middle parlour - I do not know that it was in the prisoner's hearing; Burgess had come about half-past eight o'clock that evening - I told him what had happened, asked him to walk up stairs, and I would show him where the things were taken from; I called to the prisoner to bring up a candle - I went up with him into the bed-room, and showed him our drawer; the prisoner did not go up with us, not to my knowledge - I went into Meredith's room; I got the candle, looked on the top of his bed, and when I came out of his room the prisoner walked into the room, and said to me, "Sir, what colour is a ruby, is it red or green?" I said, "Ann, you know the colour as well as I do, you saw me open the boxes to-day;" she then said, without stooping, "There lays a ruby on the floor," and there was one - I had said to Burgess before she came into the room, that if I was to find a ruby in the room. I should certainly suspect, but as it was I could not - I am not certain whether the prisoner heard this; I had not seen her from the time she gave me the candle, but she followed me up stairs though she was not required there - when she said there was a ruby on the floor we were in Meredith's middle room, the sitting-room; she picked it up herself, and put it into my hand - it was a ruby of the same description as I had lost; I had searched that room before for three or four hours - I searched it with the officers, and after they went away I searched it myself; I searched the place where she picked up the ruby, but I had found none - I had searched it down on my knees with my fingers all over the ground, with accuracy, and I am certain there was nothing there - when she picked it up she said, "Are you now satisfied who stole them?" I said, "I am satisfied now;" I immediately sent for a constable, and had her taken - the ruby found in the room might be worth 8s. or 9s.

Prisoner. Q. Directly you went up to the drawer to search, did you not say, "I know who has done this, it is Mr. McCree has been and spilled this about out of spite to me?" A. I did not - McCree had lodged with me six months; I had a dispute with him, and I believe I struck him - I said to Mrs. Mackie, "Surely Mr. McCree could not have gone to my drawer and spilled these about out of spite;" I did not say I would have him searched - I did not say, "I don't suspect you, Ann, you don't know a ruby from glass;" I said the best of the stones were gone - I did not say McCree had gone away in such a sly way I was determined to find him out, nor that I would find out Meredith's connexions - I said nothing, except that I was sorry the gentleman had been searched - I did not search the prisoner.

JURY. Q. I think you say Mr. McCree was highly respectable? A. Yes - he lodged six months with me; he was a very passionate young man - he did not leave London for a fortnight or three weeks after the robbery; I found nothing in the prisoner's possession.

COURT. Q. What portion of the rubies and emeralds were actually found? A. Those about the room were about two and a half carats, which, put to what were in the box, made forty-one carats - none of the emeralds were found- I had no reason to believe Mr. McCree had done this out of spite; I merely said at the moment, "Surely McCree could not have scattered them out of spite;" no money was found in the prisoner's box.

MRS. MACKIE. I cannot say to a few days when I had last seen the property - the prisoner saw me place them in the drawer about a fortnight before; I had been to the drawer about a week before - I did not unscrew either of the boxes; I had not seen the rubies or emeralds for some time - it was rather more than a fortnight before that I had placed them there in her presence; I placed them there in her presence for a particular purpose - she came to me on the Saturday night, and on the following Tuesday I let Meredith the apartment, and two or three days after she came down and said, "Dear me, ma'am, it is a

very strange gentleman we have taken in, he is always asking me how many rooms there are in the house, and how many lodgers;" I said, "You could very well tell him that;" she said, "Then he asked me how many workmen ther were, and how much gold there was in the shop;" I said, "There is not much gold;" I said so, thinking to deceive each party - I was rather alarmed at it, and said, "Ann bring the candle, I will go up into the shop and lock up what things I think are portable;" and as we were leaving the room my husband said, "Charlotte, I have left my ruby and emerald box by the side of my place; there are a great many rubies in the box; 20l. worth might be taken out, and I might not miss them;" this was in the prisoner's presence - I then brought the ruby and emerald boxes from the shop and locked them in this drawer; she asked me at the time the value of some stones there, particularly a yellow crystal - I told her they were of no value.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not bring a large stone to the bed and show me, then take me to the closet where the silver spoons and things were, and show me some pieces of gold in the shop, and say you should not like them to be lost? A. I might have said I should not like it to be lost - she held the candle while I locked the things up- we have left the key of the shop on the back parlour mantel-piece when we have gone out; there has been valuable things in the shop at the time - I did not make the prisoner any promise; I asked her in the morning if she had been to the drawer out of curiosity, and in the evening she made use of my words and said she had been out of curiosity.

MR. MACKIE. I never used any threat or promise to her in the morning when she was stating she was innocent - I said, "Ann, if you have been to the drawer from curiosity, and spilt the stones on the floor, and I find them all, I will say no more about it."

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come into the parlour and fall on my knees, crying? A. You never fell on your knees till you were taken into custody at eleven o'clock at night; you then tell on your knees and begged for mercy, and I said I would have nothing to say to you - I did not hear her make any statement that night.

JOHN COOK MEREDITH . I went to lodge at Mr. Mackie's on the 3rd of May, a little more than a fortnight before the robbery - I had not the slightest knowledge where he kept his rubies or emeralds; I had none in my room on the Sunday, nor did I ever drop any on the carpet - I did not take these rubies or emeralds; I recollect asking the prisoner how many lodgers there were in the house, but never asked her about gold or jewels, or put any question to her bearing any resemblance to it - I went home on Saturday evening, about seven o'clock I think; I did not leave my room that night, nor on the following morning, till after this investigation took place - I went to bed between eight and nine o'clock on the Saturday night, and about twelve I was awoke by a great noise in my outer room, my sitting room, and immediately after the prisoner opened the bed-room door, and seeing me in bed she seemed much alarmed, and was going out; I told her not to be alarmed, but to hold me the candle that I might see the time - I saw it wanted twenty minutes to twelve - my sitting room is between my bed-room and Mr. Mackie's bed-room; they are all on the same floor - mine is the back room, and his bed-room is in front; I said nothing more to the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q.Did you not, when you came in to tea one evening, ask what lodgers and what rooms were in the house, and say, "I suppose there is plenty of gold in the house?" A. The first part of her question is true, the latter is totally false.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I went to Mackie's house on the Sunday night, about twelve o'clock - I went up to the sitting room on the second floor, and asked the prisoner how she came to place that ruby on the floor; she said, "To make it appear as if Mr. Meredith put it there;" those were her words to me - she said, "As he might be apprehended;" I took her into custody, and took her down to the kitchen to get her bonnet - she resisted being taken, and said I will tell my mistress all about it; I did not make her any threat or promise; as she was shutting the kitchen door, I heard her say, "I did go to the drawer;" that was all I heard then - I pulled her up stairs to get her away; she then went into the parlour where Mrs. Mackie was sitting - she threw herself on her knees, and begged for mercy - Mrs. Mackie expressed herself very angry with her, and desired me to take her away; she then took hold of Mrs. Mackie, and took her into the front parlour - I overheard her say in a loud tone,"I threw them into the dust-hole;" and I think she mentioned the privy at the same time - I then went into the room and took her away, and on the way to the watch-house, she said, "I know I told my mistress I took them, and threw them down the dust-hole and the privy, but she said it was Mr. Meredith that had stolen them;" I afterwards had occassion to ask her what man she had had in the house on the Saturday night; she said it was a man who I saw she had a letter from in Green-street, a sweetheart - I said, "I understand you had him there late on Saturday night, and that he was seen to go in there early on Sunday morning" - she said he was there.

Prisoner. You said, "If you have not done the robbery, Meredith has;" Witness. I did not; I knew nothing about Meredith till the next day - I searched the prisoner and found nothing on her.

MR. MACKIE. The last time I saw the rubies and emeralds was the evening my wife brought them down to put them into the drawer, which was about eight or nine days before the robbery - I saw the rubies in particular, and the emerald box also - it was then I found a difficulty to screw the ruby box up; I saw the emeralds about a day before- that box was half full; (looking at a ruby produced by Schofield) that is the ruby she picked up on the floor.

BURGESS. I called on the Sunday evening, about hald-past eight o'clock, at Mr. Mackie's - the prisoner let me in; I asked her if Mr. or Mrs. Mackie were at home - she said Mr. Mackie was, but Mrs. Mackie was gone out; she immediately began to tell me that Mr. Mackie's drawer had been forced open over night, and a quantity of stones taken from it, and that suspicion fell on Mr. Meredith - I told her I did not wish to know further about it; I wished to see Mr. Mackie as she seemed to wish to press the subject very much; I afterwards saw Mr. Mackie, and had some conversation with him; he asked me to go up stairs to see the confused state in which the lodger's apartments were, and said if he could find one

stone in the lodger's apartment he should be satisfied - the prisoner was standing close by at the time; she asked Mr. Mackie what colour the stones were - he said she knew very well, and about a minute afterwards she said, "Here is a stone on the floor;" and picked it up - what Mr. Mackie has said upon that subject is quite correct.

JURY. Q. Had you heard of Mr. Mackie's loss before you called at the house? A. No - the prisoner told me without my asking any questions.

COURT. Q.When the prisoner apparently picked up the ruby, did you say any thing? A. I asked if she picked up the ruby, or whether she had placed it there - she swore by G - d she had found it there; I afterwards saw her in Schofield's custody - she said, in my hearing, that she had taken the ruby from Mr. Mackie's room, and put it into Mr. Meredith's room, in order to have him taken into custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come up after master with a light? A. Yes, but he had got one already, and had not called for one - you came into the room after us.

Prisoner. I said I had found a ruby in Mr. Mackie's room - you said, "Where is it?" I said, "I have let it drop on the carpet, and there it is;" you said, "Are you sure you picked it up?" I said, "Yes, I picked it up in mistress' room, and put it there;" Witness. Yes, that is true - she said she had put it into Meredith's room, in order to have him taken into custody.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury - I am here, unfortunately, charged with robbing my master of rubies and stones, which I am innocent of: I unfortunately went to live with Mr. Mackie, with a good character, on the 30th of April last - I had not been in the house three days before my mistress took in a gentleman-lodger, without any reference; there were six lodgers in the house besides him - he came about one o'clock in the day after the lodging, and at six o'clock the same evening - he came to stay; he had not been in the house four days before he questioned me several times how many lodgers there were in the house, and if there was not plenty of gold up in the shop - I told him I did not know any thing about it, as I had not been long in the house myself; I instantly went and told my mistress of it, and she thought it a very strange question to ask me; she then went up stairs, and looked over all her things - the lodgers had all access to her bed-room, except Mr. Meredith; my mistress was very careless with her property- her keys and jewellery used to lay over all parts of the house; I often told her that she was very careless in letting her things lay about - my mistress told me that she had been rubbed twice within three months before I went there, and how is it possible that I can be answerable for her property? I had plenty of opportunities if I was that way inclined - my mistress has been out plenty of times, and left the keys about, and never any thing lost before; I solemnly declare that I am innocent of the crime that I am charged with on the fatal night that I suppose the robbery was committed, as it could not be done on the Sunday morning, as my master was in bed all the morning previous to my mistress finding it out: my master and mistress went to the play on Saturday night - they returned about a quarter-past ten o'clock; Mr. Meredith came in about seven o'clock with a latchkey, and it so happened that a gentleman-lodger went away the night the place was robbed; my master gave particular orders to watch the gentleman that went away, which I did not take any heed of, as I knew he was embittered against him concerning some words which occurred the night before - when my master and mistress came, it was about a quarter-past ten, and my master asked me if Mr. Meredith was in; I said No, as I did not know that he was in at the time, not having been up stairs; my mistress said, "You must get him a rushlight," which I forgot, and they went out again - in the meantime I was ironing; a thought came into my head, that I had not turned down her bed - I ran up stairs to do it - I was not two minutes in the room, nor I never saw her keys, nor never such a thought came into my head; I also went into Mr. Meredith's room, and to my great surprize I found him in bed, which frightened me very much, and I screamed out - he appeared very much confused- he told me not to be alarmed, but to bring the light, for he wanted to see what o'clock it was; he held the watch in his hand - I went down stairs, and my master knocked at the door; I told him that I had been very much frightened, and likewise told them how frightened Mr. Meredith was, which they laughed very much at; we all went to bed - on the next day my mistress was dressing herself - she came down to my master, and told him how she saw the little stones lay about the carpet; they both went up stairs, and I went up to see what was the mattermy master took the drawer out in my presence, and said that he knew very well who had done this - he said, "Mr. McCree has been to the drawer, and spilt them out of spite;" my mistress said, "Is there any lost?" he said, "No, I do not think there is any gone;" my mistress said she did not think that Mr. McCree would do such a thing - they then had suspictor of Mr. Meredith; my master then recollected what Mr. Meredith asked me about the gold - I was called up to face him before my mistress, that he did say so; he denied it, but I could take an oath he said it - my master said, "If any one else has got my property I will go on my knees, and beg your pardon;" they then had him searched, and my master said, "I cannot give him into custody, or else he will bring an action against me for false imprisonment;" about six o'clock he took his leave to go away - my master and all of them said, that he behaved very strange in going away as he did; my master said to me, in the kitchen, "Your mistress has done a very wrong thing, for she told him that she had been robbed;" after an hour had elapsed she sent for an officer, and him and me were searched, but they found nothing on either of us; my master said, "Whoever has robbed me is a judge of those things, for they have picked out the most valuable stones;" he said, "I do not suspect you, as you would not know rubies from glass;" it all passed on until nine o'clock - I went up stairs to turn down the bed, and I was looking about the carpet; I found a small stone, and on my oath I never had one in my hand before, nor saw one; my master suspected I had more about me, and he sent for an officer, and gave me into custody - they searched me again, but found nothing about me, nor at any of my friends; my mistress said that she would forgive me if I would say I was guilty, but if not she would send me to Newgate, which so frightened me that I did not know what I said - she asked me if I had put them down the water-closet, or the dust-bin, or if I had them any where - I told them they had better go and look, which she immediately did, but found none; the officer was sent for to take me into custody - I fell upon my knees, and begged her not to send me, as I knew I was innocent: I solemnly declare, Gentlemen of the Jury, as I shall have to answer before that awful Judge, when all hearts will be open, that I am quite innocent of the crime alleged to me, and must, therefore, throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

JAMES MACKIE . I am sure the two carats and a half which were found about the floor were worth full 5l.

[June 30.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, considering the Prosecutor guilty of great negligence in leaving property exposed.

Reference Number: t18310630-5

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1194. JAMES EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , at Friern, Barnet, 1 calf, price 3l. , the property of Christopher Holman .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

CHRISTOPHER HOLMAN . I am a farmer , and live at Friern, Barnet, and have a farm at Edmonton. On Friday, the 20th of May, I had a calf, which was kept in a pen at the farm at Edmonton - I locked it up myself that Friday night, in a pen; it had white feet - about half-past four o'clock on Saturday morning I missed it: I found the cow-house door, which I had locked, broken open - I went out on the road, and saw footmarks on the road - I traced it a very little way, and then found the track of a horse, which I suppose had carried it away; after tracing the horse about a mile I came to a stile, and found the track of a calf's feet again very fresh down to the prisoner's but - this was about seven o'clock on Saturday morning; I knew him before, and knew he was at home at that time -I left my son to watch; I went to get a warrant, and on Sunday morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I went to his house - I met the prisoner on the high road; he was leaving his house - the constable and headborough had joined me with the warrant; the constable said, "Good morning, Evans, I have a little business with you - Mr. Holman has lost a calf, and suspects you; we are going to search your place;" he said, "Well, you may search without me;" the constable said, "No, we cannot - you had better go back with us;" we took him back, and when he got there he said, "Show your authority;" the constable showed him the warrant, and said, "Now I shall search you first, Evans" and he found an old apron in his pocket with two calf's hind feet in it - they were white, but the hair was off them: they were badly dressed: the skin was quite white - I think there was no hairs left on them, but there might be a few; I examined a ditch about twenty yards from the hovel, and found the two fore feet of a calf, also a calf's head, with the hair on it, and the hair was on the two feet found in the ditch; the head was white, and had a mark where it had been tied with a cord by the nose - it was particularly marked, and I am positive it was the head of my calf; it was about seven weeks old - it was all shown to a butcher afterwards; the value of the calf was 3l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. That is a good price? A. No, it was a very good calf; I had two more calves - they were not marked in the same way; it was very uncommonly marked with a blaze of white in the face- there are not many with such a blaze as that; it was a particularly white mark that I knew it by; (looking at the skin) you do not see a mark like that in one in five thousand, but this skin is dry now - it was narrow at the middle, and wide at the end; if I had seen it fifty miles off I should not have sworn to it - the meat and all was on it when found; the meat and the bones made it all perfect.

Q. Are not calves always tied up by the nose? A. No, not exactly that tie; if I had seen it in Yorkshire I could have told it was my calf's head - there is very little hair on two of the feet, but I know it was white; I had seen the calf twice every day for seven weeks.

Q. Had the feet found in the prisoner's pocket been boiled? A. I do not know - they had been in scalding water I dare say; the hair was off - they could not have eat them without boiling them; I did not fit the feet to the marks - part of the road I traced them in is public, but some of it is a bye road.

MR. BARRY. Q. You do not speak so particularly to the skin now, as you do to the head; had you any doubt of it when it was found fresh? A. I was positive of it; I should say that the feet found in the prisoner's pocket had been white.

COURT. Q.Why, is the colour of the skin different, when it had been covered with white hair, than with black? A. The skin is generally white; if the calf had black legs the skin looks black.

JOHN MILLER . I am a constable of Friern, Barnet. On Sunday morning, about seven o'clock, I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's cottage - I saw him coming up the lane; I said, "Evans, I want you - I have business with you;" he said, "What do you want?" I said, "I have a warrant to search your house for a stolen calf;" he said, "You can go without me;" I said, "You must go with me," and took him back - I found the two feet in his pocket, and went to a ditch near the hovel, where I found two calves' feet and the entrails - a little further I found the body of a calf; a little further on Holman found the head and two feet; he said, "That is my calf's head, any how."

Cross-examined. Q.Were the feet found in the prisoner's pocket boiled? A. No - they were not, for there were white hairs left on; it had been partly hooked off, and warm water put on - they had not been boiled, but coddled; I found nothing in the prisoner's house - the prisoner did not say he was going to Brook-green: the ditch is about twenty yards from the hovel, down at the bottom of his garden - the hovel was on his premises; nothing was found there, but by going into the hovel I saw the window was open and nettles broken down, as if something had been dragged out to the very place where the calf lay - it gave me a fair track; I do not think I mentioned that before; any body might have access to the ditch - the hovel was unlocked and the key hanging loose to the door.

ANN RUDD . My husband is a labouring man, and lives seventy or eighty yards from the prisoner. On Sunday morning, the 22nd of May, a little after seven o'clock. I saw the prisoner going out of his hut three times, from the door of the hut to the window, and from the window to the ditch, where the calf was found; soon after he had gone three times, I saw the constable and Holman come.

MR. HOLMAN. It was Saturday morning that I traced the marks, but I took the prisoner on the Sunday morning, and then we found the calf - I did not get the warrant till late at night.

ANN RUDD . He went to the ditch three times in about a quarter of an hour.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know he was in the habit of going to cut down nettles and things in the ditch? A. Yes, but he had not any thing to do it with that morning - he went through empty handed; he could not have had his tools in his pocket.

Q. Would not his pockets hold a pair of scissors or a knife? A. Yes, but they would not cut enough to clear a ditch out - he did not drag the calf there when I saw him- he had no jacket on; he was dressed in breeches and shirt-sleeves.

JOHN HOLMAN . I am the prosecutor's son - he placed me in a cabbage-field on the Friday night; I was watching the field, not the prisoner's house - I was in the field from ten till near three o'clock, and about one on Saturday morning I heard Evans' hut door closed.

Cross-examined. Q.How near were you to the prisoner's door? A. Within one hundred yards; it was quite a clear moon-light night - I could see to his door; I saw nothing go in or out; I left that place a little before three o'clock in the morning.

GEORGE PLUME . I am journeyman to Mr. Young, a butcher, of Baker-street - I have been a butcher seven years; I saw the different parts of the calf on Monday morning - they are all here; I have not a doubt that they all belong to the same animal; the two hind feet and one fore foot were cut off at the proper joint, the other was not - they all corresponded; the two fore feet were white: the two hind ones had been scalded, but I think they were white for they have white tufts corresponding with the two fore feet; if they had not been white feet they would have been a darker colour - I have not a doubt all the feet belonged to the same calf.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you call the feet which were found on the prisoner white? A. Not now, because they have been laying so long; there is as much hair on them now as when found - they have been scalded too much, and then the hair does not come off properly; a good deal of the flesh has been taken off with a sharp knife - I will not swear the hair on this leg may not have been black; there is very little grazing in that part of the country - my master has two or three calves every week; there are six butchers in the place.

MR. BARRY. Q. Were the two feet dressed as butcher's would dress them? A. No - I fitted the bind feet to the joints; they fitted exactly - I have not a doubt they belonged to the same calf.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I feel it a duty incumbent on me, as well for the preservation of my character as for the ends of public justice, that I should make a few observations on the evidence that has been adduced to sustain the present charge, and I beseech you, as a British Jury, who believe in the divine attributes and value the sacred obligations of an oath, that before you come to any decided conclusion respecting such evidence, you will give it a mature deliberation. The evidence that has been adduced to you against me certainly appears suspicious, but I do most solemnly assure you that on the night of the robbery I was in my bed, and that I am entirely innocent of the charge brought against me; the constable and headborough, my Lord, have both known me a number of years, and never knew any thing wrong of my character - I have lived upwards of thirty years in the neighbourhood, and always bore a good character for honesty and sobriety. I humbly submit that it is not likely that a man of my time of life should be induced to commit so henious a crime for which I am now unfortunately arraigned at this bar. Since I have been in prison there have been frequent robberies committed in the neighbourhood, and no person has been found that committed them. As regards the tracing of the calf's feet, it was very easy for him to do it, being a regular road way, and fifty or sixty carts passing in the course of the day. and therefore I submit it was very easy.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[June 30.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 50.

Reference Number: t18310630-6

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1195. GEORGE BEEDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of June, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, 4 watches, value 6l.; 1 watch-chain, value 1l.; 2 ear-rings, value 5s., and 45 sovereigns, the property of John Boakes , in his dwelling house .

JOHN BOAKES. On the 2nd of June, 1829 . I kept a public-house , in Nelson-street, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green - I have now left the house. I never saw the prisoner in my house in my life; this property was up stairs in a drawer in my bed-room - there were four watches, worth 6l., a gold watch-chain, worth 1l., two ear-rings, and forty-five sovereigns; they were all in the same drawer as the watches - I had seen all the property secure about two days before the 2nd of June, and missed it all at twelve o'clock on the 2nd of June, when I went to bed; there was a window which looked into the skittle-ground - whether the thieves got in there, I cannot tell; Norris, the officer, showed me part of one of my watches about a fortnight afterwards - the outside case was gone; I took it into my possession, and now produce it - it is part of one of the watches which I lost; I never saw the prisoner till he was at Worship-street, a fortnight or three weeks ago - I had never seen him in my house.

THOMAS GOODING . I am an officer of Queen-square. I had information of this robbery, and went on Friday, the 19th of June, 1829, with Mrs. Francis to Lambeth-street office, where she gave information about a robbery; a warrant was granted to search a house, No. 5 or 6, Fives-court, Fleet-street, Bethnal-green, kept by George Beedham, the prisoner - I knew him before by sight, but not by name; Norris accompanied me, and he, in my presence, found part of a watch; I think it was in a cupboard, on a shelf, up stairs - the house consisted of two rooms; the prisoner was not at home at the time - I did not then know of the prosecutor's robbery.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer. I accompanied Gooding to Fives-court, on Friday, the 19th of June - I found several articles; among the rest there was part of a watch in a cupboard; I gave the same part of the watch to the prosecutor - we searched for the prisoner, but could not find him; I was looking after him for some months - I did not return the watch to the prosecutor for six months; I had been looking for the prisoner during that time, but could not find him - the prisoner's wife and two children were left in the house; I took them to the workhouse as his wife and children, and they were taken in - he was apprehended about three weeks ago.

Prisoner. The officer said he was looking after me for six months, and he does not know me. Witness. He had been described to me; if I had met him be would have found out whether I knew him or not - I did not know him by name.

GEORGE DUPEN . In 1829. and before that, I was owner of the houses Nos. 5 and 6, Fives-court, Bethnal-green - the prisoner occupied one of the houses with his wife and two children.

MARY PEARSON . I lived in Fives-court, and know the prisoner lived there with his wife and family - after Mrs. Francis' robbery he left the house; it was about the time that the officers searched the house - I did not see him again till he was at the office.

ROBERT ENTWISTLE . I am master of the workhouse. I received the two children there as the prisoner's - his

wife was taken into custody for a short time, and then discharged.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 20th of May last, in Bread-street, Cheapside; I told him I wanted him for a robbery - he said he knew nothing of it, and was willing to go any where.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I am a weaver by trade. -About four years ago I was a journeyman, and by dint of industry saved a small sum of money, when I set up some looms, and became a small master for myself; as I had not a very extensive connexion, I was obliged to let my goods go to any person that was recommended to me, and by that means I used to sell many silk dresses, and at times I was obliged to barter for other commodities. A Mr. Rogers came to me, who lived in Quaker-street, Spitalfields, and offered to dispose of a silk dress for me, if I had one by me, and as he had done so before, I let him have one, but could not let it go under 1l. 16s., as there were twelve yards at 3s. per yard, and he said he would try and get it for me, as he supposed I had no objection to barter - I said No, providing the goods suited me; I accordingly let him have the dress, making him promise to return it or the money at night, as I was very short of business, it being on the decline at that time - he took it, and in the afternoon returned, said he had sold the dress, and the woman that he sold it to said she had not sufficient money to pay for it, unless he took something in exchange, and he promised to do so, when she showed him several things that was of no use to me; she at length showed him a watch, and wanted 1l. for it, but he objected to allow her so much, as it had no case, but offered to allow her 16s., when the bargain was made, and he brought me the watch and 1l. in money, making together the 1l. 16s. I have a family of four young children, and my wife is expected to be confined with a fifth daily; I was only away fifteen months - I went to Braintree because I could not maintain my wife and family; Tyrrell has known me eighteen or nineteen years.

ROBERT TYRRELL. I have known him about seventeen years - he was a weaver; I always considered him honest till this occurred.

[July 1.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18310630-7

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1196. THOMAS HORNER STONE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Barrett , the elder, on the 28th of May , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and stealing 38 yards of silk, value 3l. 16s., the goods of the said William Barrett, the elder; and 15 yards of silk velvet, value 5l. 13s. 6d. , the goods of William Barrett , the younger.

WILLIAM BARRETT. I live in Edward-street, Bethnal-green . On the 28th of May, about a quarter before nine o'clock, I went out, leaving every thing safe - I left my son in the house; my work was all safe - I had left the shop about half-past eight; I returned home a little after ten, in consequence of something I heard, and found the made-work all gone - it appeared to have been cut from the looms; I afterwards saw the property which I had left in the looms at the station-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Have you any other Christian name? A. No, nor any partner; I occupy the whole house - it is in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green.

WILLIAM BARRETT , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son. On the night of the 28th of May I left the house, leaving nobody in it - I double locked the door, and was very particular in doing so; I took the key with me - the shutters were bolted fast, and fastened at the bottom besides; I went to a public-house in the neighbourhood, and in about ten minutes I was alarmed - I went directly towards my father's house, and found the door open - no violence had been committed; the shutters and the back door were as I had left them - I went up stairs to the looms; I had left some silk velvet safe in my loom - I found the made-work cut out and gone; I missed fourteen or fifteen yards of silk velvet from my loom, and thirty-eight yards of silk from my father's - we call it three singles; I afterwards saw the property at the station-house - we were working it for Mr. Walters; I afterwards saw the Policeman try a key to the lock - it opened it as easy as the right one.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you in your father's service? A. No. I work for my master, and am paid for what I do; there is no partnership between us.

ESTHER RIMES. I am single, and live in West-street, Bethnal-green. On Saturday night, the 28th of May, I went to the prosecutor's house to pay a visit - it was about half-past nine o'clock when I got to the door; my sister, who was with me, said something, and I observed two persons come out of Barrett's door - the prisoner is one of them; the other man came out first - the prisoner had a basket in his hand, with something black hanging out at the end of it; they both ran out of the house - when the first ran out I had no suspicion, but when the second ran I thought it was the work that he had, and I screamed out Stop thief! the prisoner ran in the opposite direction, more in the middle of the road - he then turned the corner, ran down another street, turned another corner, and in the next street I saw him taken; I had followed him, and never lost sight of him till he was taken - he put the basket down immediately before he was taken, and then walked; a person passing stopped him - the Policeman came up, and he was given into custody; the basket was picked up, and given to me- I took it to the station-house, and gave it in the charge of a person there; I saw that it contained silk.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this? A. Halfpast nine o'clock - I live a good way from Barrett's; I went to tell him I was coming to dine with him on the Sunday - the prisoner ran down three streets; I never saw him before - I was on the step of the door when they both came running out right facing me; I swear to him from seeing him at the door - I did not lose sight of him in turning the corner; I never lost sight of him - I had not knocked at the door.

MARY ANN PLAYER . I am Rimes' sister, and was with her - her evidence is correct, but I cannot identify the man; two came out of the house - the second had a basket.

WILLIAM REED . I am a broker, and live in Hare-street, Bethnal-green. I was in Edward-street about twenty minutes after nine o'clock - I passed the prosecutor's door, and saw two men about six feet from the door; I lost sight of them in a moment - I went about fifty yards up the street, came back again, and when within fifteen yards of the door, I saw two women at the door, and saw two men come out of the house; the second one had a basket - the females called Murder! Stop thief! I saw the man run across into Thomas-street - I was opposite,

I went into Busby-street, and met the prisoner full butt with the basket; about twelve feet before he came up to me he stopped and dropped it - I collared him, he asked what for, I pointed to the basket, and said, "Look at what you have dropped;" he said he knew nothing about it, and said,"There he goes," pointing to the other who was running - I took him back about forty yards; he then made a desperate resistance, and got his hand into his pocket- I said, "He has got a picklock-key or something in his pocket, let us search him;" the mob said, "It is more than you dare do," and at that moment he threw something out of his pocket - I afterwards returned to the spot, and saw Moore pick up a key; it was given to a Policeman, who I saw try it to the prosecutor's door, and it opened it.

JOHN MOORE . I saw the struggle between two men on the Saturday night near Edward-street - I looked about where the struggle took place, and found a picklock-key, which I gave to the Policeman.

JOHN MILLER . I am a Policeman. I have a key, which I got from Moore - I tried it to Barrett's door, which it opened easily; here is the velvet and silk which I saw taken out of the basket.

WILLIAM BARRETT, JUN. This velvet was in my house- I am sure of it being the same.

WILLIAM BARRETT, SEN. This is the silk which was in my loom - I know my own work.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to my aunt's, and was coming towards home - I was walking up the street when that man laid hold of me; I said, "What are you taking hold of me for?" I was full three parts up the street, walking at my usual pace - he said, "Look what you have dropped;" I said "I have dropped nothing, if any body has dropped any thing it is that man who is running up Hare-street;" well, there were about eight of them all seized me - I said, "I will not go further till a Policeman comes, and then I will go any where you choose," and about an hour afterwards they brought a key forward from Thomas-street, where two men had run up - I was at my aunt's house at a quarter-past nine o'clock on Saturday night.

JANE WRIGHT. I live in Baker's-row, Whitechapel, and am the prisoner's aunt - it is about five minutes' walk from Bethnal-green. The prisoner was at my house the night he was taken; he came about eight o'clock, and left about a quarter after nine.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[July. 1.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18310630-8

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1197. JOHN TIERNEY was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alicia Sills , about ten o'clock in the night of the 15th of May , at St. Luke, Chelsea, with intent to steal the goods and chattels therein .

WILLIAM SILLS . I live with my mother Alicia Sills, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea - she rents the house. I went out about eight o'clock in the evening of Sunday, the 15th of May, leaving my mother in the house - I saw the front parlour window was shut when I went out; it is a sash window - I cannot tell whether it was fastened; there were inside blinds to the window - I returned home about ten o'clock, and saw a man at the door; I do not know what he was doing - the door was shut; I did not speak to him - I examined the door after he went away, and saw some chalk marks on it; I had not examined it when I left - I went into the house; my mother opened the door to me, and on entering the parlour, I saw the prisoner in the act of jumping out of the window, which was open - I had not looked at the window before I went in; I ran out at the door, saw him in the garden, and followed him - I did not lose sight of him till I gave him in charge, which was about twenty yards from the house; it was dark - I am sure I did not lose sight of him from the time he left the garden.

Prisoner. Q. Was the window fastened when you left the house? A. It was shut, I do not know whether it was fast - the man at the door asked me if Mr. Taylor lived there; I said No - he then went out of the garden, asked me what number the house was, and I said No. 69; he said that was not the house - I did not lose sight of you; I never said the window was not fastened - I do not know whether it was or not.

LUKE NIXON . I am a Policeman. On the night of the 15th of May I heard a cry of Murder! about one hundred yards from Mrs. Sills' house - I ran up directly, and saw the prisoner in conversation with Mr. Sills and another man; it was rather after ten o'clock at night - I searched the prisoner, and found a phosphorus-bottle, some matches, and a small piece of candle on him; I went into the kitchen, opened the area window, and found a handkerchief and hat down in the area - the prisoner owned them directly I brought them up; he was without a hat when I took him.

Prisoner. I leave it to your merciful consideration.

[July 1.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18310630-9

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1198. WILLIAM VINCENT and WILLIAM RICHMOND were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , at St. Mary, Islington, 5 table-cloths, value 12s.; 6 knives, value 6s.; 8 forks, value 8s.; 6 silver spoons, value 2l. 10s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 15s.; 1 umbrella, value 3s.; 1 book, value 5s.; 1 basket, value 1s., and 1 piece of flannel, value 1s., the goods of Cornelius Pugh ; 1 bonnet, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 5s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Ann Price , in the dwelling-house of the said Cornelius Pugh .

SAMUEL RICHARD EATON . I live in Chapel-street, Pentonville, and am a Police-constable. I was on duty in the Lower-road, Islington, on the 27th of May, about a quarter before three o'clock in the morning - I saw three men cross the road in a direction from Tuffnelplace towards Green Man's-lane; I followed them, suspecting them - they saw me, and ran away; I sprung my rattle, and called Stop thief! in my pursuit I picked up a hat, with a piece of flannel in it - I lost sight of them for about a minute at the bottom of the lane, and then saw some constables in pursuit of them; I did not see them taken, for I went in another direction, thinking to meet them - they were taken before I came up; I found the prisoners in custody of Canty and Meadows - when I came up Vincent said, "That is my hat, but you have put something into it;" we took them to the watch-house,

then went to Tuffnel-place, and found Mr. Pugh's garden-gate ajar - I went in, and found some things scattered about on the lawn; the kitchen window was up, and the shutter was bored with a centre-bit - the bar was bent; the shutter was lined with iron, but the centre-bit was used as far as it could be - I went into the dining-room, found the drawers open, the things in confusion, and thrown about; I have brought what I found on the lawn here.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You lost sight of the persons for three or four minutes? A. No - I lost sight of one of them; I never said I could not swear to them, I said I had not the least doubt of them - they were out of my sight for a minute; I do not swear to them certainly.

JOHN CANTY . I am a Police-constable. On the 27th of May I heard a rattle spring in the Lower-road - I stood where I was in Tibberton-square; I heard a foot advancing to me, and three men ran right abreast of me - I sprang my rattle, crying Stop thief! I was immediately assisted by other officers, and stopped them; they took two roads - I stopped Richmond, and Meadows stopped Vincent, who had no hat on - Richmond did not get out of my sight; I found on him three table and three desert spoons, one tea and one caddy spoon, one pair of sugar-tongs, and one shift; they were in his body coat - also a pair of woman's lace boots, a pair of child's shoes, and he had an umbrella in his hand; he said I had a prize, nothing more - I gave the things up to the inspector of our division, and got them from him this morning; I know they are the same as I gave him.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know that? A. I marked them all, except the umbrella, and that mark is worn off by the heat of my hand to-day - I marked the shoes J. C. on the soles.

WILLIAM MEADOWS . I am a constable. I heard the rattle spring, and stopped Vincent - I saw him drop a bundle, which I now produce; he held up his hands, and told me not to stop him for he had been ill-used, and the moment he said so he struck me; I took him by the collar, and struck him - I picked up the bundle, and opened it at the watch-house; it contained five table cloths, eight forks, and five knives, tied up in a black silk handkerchief - I searched him, and found a small memorandumbook on his person; I marked them, and delivered them to Mr. Bronkhurst, the inspector, who gave them to me this morning.

WILLIAM HORNSBY . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty, and saw Vincent drop the bundle - I went to assist Canty to take care of Richmond, and saw something white drop from him; it was this cap - I took it up, marked it, and delivered it to the inspector.

CORNELIUS PUGH. I live at No. 2, Tuffnel-place, Lower-road, in the parish of St. Mary, Islington - I rent the house; it was broken open on the night in question I lost several articles - the value of what has been found is about 5l.; I lost other things, which have not been found; I value these produced at 5l.; they are mine - here are five-table cloths, worth 12s.; six knives, worth 6s.; six forks, 6s., I lost eight - six silver table-spoons, worth 2l. 10s.; they have been worn; a pair of sugar-tongs, 15s.; a Walker's dictionary, 5s.; and one umbrella, 3s. - I rent the house, and live in it; I have not weighed the spoons.

ANN PRICE . I live in the prosecutor's house, and am his servant. I lost a pair of boots; here they are, they are worth 4s. - this bonnet is mine, and worth 2s.; I am single.

Richmond's Defence. I was at a party on the night previous to the robbery, and as I came along the Lower-road I heard a rattle spring - I ran to see what was the matter, and saw some things lay in the road; I picked them up - I had not got far before the Policemen came, and said I was the man they wanted; they took me to the station, and produced the property - the Policeman went back to where the robbery was done - he came back, looked at my shoes, and said he was perfectly satisfied about the marks; the marks in the garden had nails in them, and my shoes had not.

Vincent's Defence. I had been beyond Ball's-pond - I was returning home, and saw some things lay in the road; I looked at them, another man came, and said he thought they had dropped from a cart, and there would be a reward for them - we picked them up, came on, and saw two men in the road; he then said, Run; I became alarmed, and ran - this man struck me, and in warding off the blow I struck him, and he fell down; he took a memorandumbook from me at the station, which was my own - I had nothing but that.

CORNELIUS PUGH . I slept in the house that night, and know all the property was safe - I heard nothing till the Policeman alarmed me, between three and four o'clock - I then found the house broken open.

One witness gave Vincent a good character.

VINCENT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

RICHMOND - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

[July 1.]

Reference Number: t18310630-10

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1199. JOSEPH BACKLER was indicted for that he, on the 24th of May , at St. Anne, within the Liberty of Westminster, feloniously did forge a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows: that is to say -No. 24.

No. 43, Lothbury, London, May 24. 1831.

Messrs. Jones, Loyd, and Co., pay to - Newman, Esq. or bearer, Ten Pounds.

L 10. G. ANDREWS. with intent to defraud Thomas Blackwell and another.

2nd COUNT, for uttering the said forged order for payment of money, knowing it to be forged, with a like intent.

3rd COUNT, the same as the first, only stating the intent to be to defraud Samuel Jones, Loyd , and others.

4th COUNT, the same as the second, only stating the intent to be to defraud Samuel Jones , Loyd, and others.

THOMAS BLACKWELL. I am an oilman , and live in King-street,. Soho. On the 24th of May the prisoner came to my shop, and said he came for change for a 10l. cheque for Mr. Newman, of Soho-square; he told me who it was for without asking - he gave me the cheque; I looked at it, and told him I did not know him, but called my young man, who was gone down to dinner - I had possession of the cheque, crossed it with the name of Drummond, and told my young man, in his presence, to go up to Mr. Newman's with him; I apologised for sending him there, but

said I did not know him - he went out with my young man, who returned with him in about a quarter of an hour, and said, in his presence, that he had been with him to Soho-square, and that when he got there he would not go in- I then went to Mr. Newman's myself, leaving the prisoner in the counting-house; I locked one door, and told my young man to take care he did not go away - I went up to Mr. Newman's, and in consequence of what I heard there, the prisoner was detained, and given in custody; I have the cheque (producing it) - Mr. Newman's name is written on the back, and when the prisoner presented it he said Mr. Newman had backed it - he said he lived with Mr. Newman then, and had lived with him for three weeks.

CHRISTOPHER ROBINSON . I am clerk to Mr. Newman. I know nothing of the prisoner - he was never in Mr. Newman's service; I have been in his service about twenty years altogether, and am so now - I was so on the 24th of May, and for some time before; Mr. Newman was in town at that time: (looking at the cheque) this endorsement is not his hand-writing - he is out of town now.

GEORGE KERBEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Samuel Jones , Loyd. and Co., bankers, of No. 43. Lothbury - there are four partners; no person of the name of George Andrews keeps cash at our house, nor any person named Andrews whose Christian name begins with the letter G. - (looking at the cheque) we have no customer of this name - no person is authorised to draw cheques on us in this name.

THOMAS BLACKWELL re-examined. Q.Did you inquire of the prisoner who Andrews was? A. I asked him if he knew the parties; I asked him if he knew who Andrews was - he said he did not - I do not know whether this was before I went to Mr. Newman's; I have a partner, and carry on business with him at the shop where this cheque was presented - my shop is in Middlesex.(Cheque read, see indictment.)

GUILTY on the 2nd Count only. - DEATH . Aged 18.[July 2.]

Reference Number: t18310630-11

1200. JOSEPH BACKLER was again indicted for that he, on the 13th of April , at St. Luke, Chelsea, feloniously did forge a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows: that is to say -No. 24.

No. 43, Lothbury, London, April 13. 1831.

Messrs. Jones, Loyd, and Co., pay to Dr. Lauder, or bearer, Five Pounds.

£5. G. ANDREWS. with intent to defraud Eden Bowler ; against the Statute.

2nd COUNT, for uttering the said forged order, knowing it to be forged, with a like intent.

3rd COUNT, the same as the first, only stating the intent to be to defraud Samuel Jones, Loyd , and others.

4th COUNT, for uttering the said forged order, well knowing it to have been forged, with intent to defraud Samuel Jones , Loyd, and others.

EDEN BOWLER . I keep a shop at No. 197, Sloane-street, Chelsea. About the 13th of April the prisoner came to my shop with this cheque; he asked me for change for a 5l. cheque for Dr. Lauder opposite - Dr. Lander lives at No. 22, opposite to me; I asked him no questions about it, nor about Andrews the drawer, as I turned it over, and saw Dr. Lauder's name endorsed - I received the cheque from him; this is it, I gave him five sovereigns for it - I saw him again when he was in custody at Marlborough-street.

WILLIAM PRESTON LAUDER . I live at No. 22, Sloane-street. I did not send the prisoner to get change for this cheque; I never saw him before he was in custody.

GEORGE KERBEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Jones, Loyd, and Co. No person named Andrews keeps cash with them - this cheque is signed more like G. Andrews than E.; no person of that Christian name keeps cash at our house, nor is any person of that name authorised to draw cheques on our house.(Cheque read, see indictment.)

GUILTY on the 2nd and 4th Counts. - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.[July 2]

Reference Number: t18310630-12

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1201. EDWARD SMEETHAM was indicted for that he, on the 28th of May , at St. Margaret, within the Liberty of Westminster, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did make an assault in and upon David Phillips , and with a certain sharp instrument, did strike, stab, and cut him in and upon the lower part of his belly, with intent to kill and murder him .

2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable him.

3rd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grevious bodily harm.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

DAVID PHILLIPS . I am a Police-constable . On the 28th of May. at one o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Tothill-street, Westminster, and saw a person named Elizabeth Howard standing inside an eating-shop in Tothill-street , kept by Mr. Dyer - I called her out, and said,"I want to speak to you;" she came out, and then the prisoner jumped out, and said I should not speak to her - I told him I only wanted to speak to her for a minute or two, and she should come back again to him; he then jumped between me and the woman with his hands extended, and said I should not speak to her at all - I said, "Don't break the window, come round on this side of the door;" and then he turned round to me, and seized me by the arms - I told him to let go of me, which he did, and I then took out my staff - I thought he was joking in a foolish way, and did not take it to be any insult; I crossed over the road, and called Elizabeth Howard across the road to me, to speak to her - she came over to me, and the prisoner followed her; before I had time to speak to the woman, the prisoner came up to me, and stabbed me in the bottom part of my belly - the blood ran down; I found I was stabbed, and hallooed out, "I am stabbed by this man!" I went into Dyer's shop, and the prisoner crossed the road after me - I saw no more of him till he was at Queen-square office; the wound appeared to have been given by a knife with a square back to it; I had not struck at him, or committed any violence whatever - I took no offence at what he did; I thought he was joking.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Then, if he is the person who struck you, you had done nothing at all to give him a motive for it? A. I had done nothing whatever - Elizabeth Howard was there at the time; I do not know whether she was subpoenaed here; she was not be

fore the Grand Jury - there were a good many more people about.

Q. Did you not draw your staff across this man's face before this happened? A. I did not - I pulled my staff out after he let me go - I did not draw it across his face.

HARRIET AUSTIN . I lived at No. 8, Almonry, Westminster, when this happened. On the night of the transaction I was in Dyer's shop, Tothill-street - Howard was there; Phillips stood at the side of the door - it was a little before one o'clock in the morning; the prisoner was in the shop - Phillips said to Howard, "I want to speak to you, Betsey, if you please;" she said, "I am coming;" the prisoner said, "What charge have you against this woman?" Phillips said, "I shan't detain her a minute," and they both walked out of the shop - the prisoner said nothing then; Phillips said again, "I want to speak to you, Betsey" they stood for a few moments, and the same words were repeated again, "I want to speak to you if you please," and the prisoner said to her, "You shan't go;" Phillips took his staff out of his pocket, and said to the prisoner, "Go back, or you will break the window."

Q. Did he strike him, or strike at him, with his staff or any thing? A. No, nor was there any angry words, not in the least; Phillips and Betsey, and the prisoner likewise, then crossed over the road - they stood there a few moments, and the prosecutor again said, "I want to speak to you, if you please;" the prisoner said again, "You shan't go."

Q. Was this after the staff had been drawn? A. Yes, and in a few minutes I saw him put his hand into his lefthand pocket, and with his right hand he stabbed Phillips; I could not see whether he took any thing out of his pocket - Phillips instantly exclaimed, "I am stabbed! I am stabbed! protect the prisoner, for that is the man that has done it;" he reeled as well as he could into Dyer's shop, holding his two hands where he was wounded - he was bent double, and the blood was running down; the prisoner exclaimed, "I have done nothing, so help me, God; what have I done?" I said, "You have stabbed Mr. Phillips, the Policeman, and he is in the cook-shop, having his wounds looked at;" I still remained in the cook-shop- I saw the prisoner secured at last by Ando.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the Policeman make any charge against the woman? A. No, not any in the least; nothing had been done when the Policeman took his staff out - he took it out to protect himself; nothing had been done to him.

Q. Is it true that the prisoner had put his hands on him, or attempted to touch him at all at the time he took his staff out? A. No, not in the least - Elizabeth Howard was about five yards from the Policeman; he was not speaking to her at the time the prisoner struck him - I will swear that; I was very near Phillips - I cannot exactly say how near; I was near enough to see the deed done, not more than three yards off, and perfectly sober: I am an unfortunate girl; Mad Harriet is a nick-name that has been given me - I never told any body that I knew nothing of this transaction, nor any thing of the kind- I never said I did not see the prisoner stab the Policeman for any thing to that effect, to any body: I do not know Mary Parker - I never said so to Elizabeth Howard- I have seen her here to-day; she was not examined at the Police-office.

Q. Had there been a scuffle of any kind before the man said he was stabbed? A. No, not the least in the world; I did not tell any body that I was in the cook-shop at the time, and did not see the transaction; I never said so to the prisoner's mother, nor any thing to that effect - I never spoke to her or Howard about the transaction, I am quite sure; I have seen Howard since in the street, but have not spoken to her - she did threaten me; my life has been threatened by a great many persons.

Q. Did you not swear you had not spoken to her since the transaction? A. Yes, but not about the transaction -I have spoken to her about twice; they came up and threatened my life - I was obliged to speak; I did swear that I had not spoken to her since the transaction, that is not true - I did not speak to her about Phillips' concern, but they threatened my life, because I was up against the prisoner; I did not speak to Howard of my own accord -I have not spoken to her above twice about Phillips' concern, nor about any thing else; I did not know the prisoner before - I was not long in the cook-shop; I had not drank any thing the whole day - I went in to get a basin of soup; I had no beer nor gin; I had not been to any public-house - I have not spoken to the prisoner's mother about this transaction.

COURT. Q. Has the mother threatened you at all? A. No, but she came to me to make it up, and I said I could not.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you examined at the Police-office about the transaction? A. Yes, about a week after it took place - it happened on the 28th, and I was examined on a Saturday morning; I stated the same as I have now - I was at the Police-office twice, but was only examined once; I was to wait till the Policeman was able to come to give his evidence.

JOHN ANDO . I am a waiter at Dyer's cook-shop, in Tothill-street. The prisoner was there with a girl on the 28th of May, at very near one o'clock - they stood having a conversation together, when Phillips came up to the door and called Bet out - she went out; the prisoner followed her out - I thought I heard a few words, and went out to see what was the matter, but did not see any thing particular; Phillips said to the prisoner, "Come away, don't break the window;" he said so to the prisoner - Phillips and the girl crossed the road, and the prisoner followed after them; I went in doors to serve my customers, but had not been long before I heard Phillips sing out, "Stop him! stop him! I am stabbed! I am stabbed!" I went out, and the prisoner was walking some distance down the street, very deliberately - I went after him; Rierdon, the serjeant, came up - I took him into custody, and he was taken to the watch-house directly.

Cross-examined. Q.How near were you to them when they crossed? A. I was close against the door; I suppose I was twenty yards when they crossed the way - the noise I heard certainly induced me to look out; when I saw them crossing I saw three or four women, but no other man - the women are here; I do not know the name of any body but Howard - there was Austin close along with them; she had been in our shop - she did nothing, to my know

ledge; I did not see the Policeman's staff out, but he might have drawn it out.

Q. How near were you to him at the nearest time? A. About half a yard; I really do not recollect seeing the staff in his hand - it might have been, and I not noticed it.

DANIEL RIERDON . I am a Police-serjeant. On the night in question I had just come off duty, and went into the cook-shop to a person named Jacobs, who is in Court- Phillips came in, and said, "Oh, my God! I am stabbed!" holding his hand to the lower part of his belly; I immediately looked, and saw blood coming from him -I immediately called the people in the cook-shop to assist him, and I ran out into the street; I saw the prisoner at a distance from the shop, going down the street- he was the first person going down the street; nobody was before him - some women were behind him, but I saw no other man; he was going at a quick pace, neither running nor walking - I came up to him, and immediately seized him; I said, "You villain, what have you been at?" he immediately swung out, I think, his left arm, and I called to Jacobs, who I thought had followed me -I said, "Jacobs, lay hold of that arm;" Ando said,"Hold him, that is the man who stabbed the Policeman;" the prisoner said, "So help me God, it was not me, I did not do it;" I brought him back to Dyer's cook-shop, and from there took him to the station - I left him in care of two men on duty there; I tied his hands - he said I had no occasion to do that, he would not run away; I left him in custody - I have a knife, which was given me by John Dyer ; I was not present when he found it - he pointed out to me the spot where it was found; that spot is between the cook-shop and where I took the prisoner - I took him to the Police-office next morning, and had some conversation with him; I did not use any threat, or say any thing to induce him to say any thing - he said, "I am very sorry for doing such a rash act; if I did do it I must have been mad. and I don't recollect any thing of it."

Cross-examined. Q. Of course you have kept the knife precisely in the same state in which it was given to you? A. Yes, except that there was mud on it - there was nothing else.

COURT. Q. What state was the prisoner in? A. To my belief he was as sober as I am, but when I went back half an hour afterwards he appeared to be in liquor.

JOHN DYER . My father keeps the cook-shop. About three quarters of an hour after this transaction I went into the street, and found a knife - it was about the spot where I saw the prisoner taken by Rierdon; it was shut when I found it - there was nothing on it but mud; I gave it to the other Policeman, not in Rierdon's presence.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you open it, and examine it? A. I did not.

GERARD DAVIS . I am a surgeon. I was called about one o'clock to examine the prosecutor - I found a stab to the extent of about an inch long; I did not ascertain the depth - the wound was bleeding profusely; I stopped the hemorrhage, and bound it up - the injury done to the abdomen might be destructive of life.

COURT. Q. How long did you attend him? A. Till the Saturday week - I attended him about a fortnight, till he was able to go to the Police-office; the prisoner was remanded twice till he could attend.

GEORGE GRIFFITH HOWELL . I am an inspector of the Police. I remember the prisoner being brought into the watch-house that night - he appeared sober when he was first brought in; I went out for about half an hour, and when I came back he appeared drunk - I said to him,"How soon you can be drunk," for I was satisfied he could have had nothing while I was away; his drunkenness appeared to me to be feigned.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you smell his breath? A. No.

MR. PHILLIPS to DAVID PHILLIPS. Q.Have you any other Christian name? A. No.

COURT. Q.When was the first moment that you took your staff out? A. When I called the woman out - I said, "Bet, I want to speak to you;" the prisoner came behind, and said, "You shan't speak to her;" he put his arms out, extending them - I went towards the window; he came behind me, and laid hold of my arms - I took that in good part, and said, "Let go my arms," and then I took out my staff; I did not do any thing to him with it -I did not put it against the window at all.

Prisoner's Defence. If I did it, it was under the influence of drink - I was not aware that I had done it till I was told of it in the morning; I was drinking all that day.

MARY PARKER . I know a woman who goes by the name of Mad Harriet - I had some conversation with her in the Broadway, Westminster, on the Wednesday, as the prisoner was coming up for his second hearing on the Saturday; I asked if she was going up against him - she said No, she knew nothing about it; she said she never saw any of the transaction at all - I never threatened her life.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who was present at this conversation? A. Elizabeth Howard - there was nobody with Harriet; there were two people on the other side of the way - I do a little needle-work, and take in a child to nurse; that is the only way I get my living at present -I do not get my living by obliging gentlemen; I did so a good while ago, but I have been living with a young man for about twelve months, and do not go out - this conversation was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon: it was on the Wednesday after the man was stabbed - I was at the Police-office, but not concerning that; I was not there when Mad Harriet was examined - not further than about Queen-square; I did not know about her being called in to be examined - I was not examined at all; I now live in Castle-lane, near Westminster infirmary, about a quarter of a mile from Howard - I did not go and tell the Justice about the conversation; she told me she never saw a knife, nor did she see the prisoner stab - she said she was coming up Tothill-street when the prosecutor fell in her arms, but she did not see the knife, nor see him stabbed.

Q. Did she begin the conversation with you? A. No, we called her - she did not say she had been in the cookshop; she said she went into Dyer's to call assistance for him.

Q. Can you tell us any thing else she talked about, except the stabbing? A. No, for a Policeman came up and took her away; no other conversation took place between us.

HARRIET SMEETHAM . I am the prisoner's mother. I

have seen Mad Harriet - I never offered her money not to give evidence - she told me she was asleep in the cookshop at the time of the transaction, and did not see any thing of it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Where do you live? A. At Old Brompton - I had this conversation with her at Westminster, in one of the streets leading to Tothill-street; it was in the street - she was a perfect stranger to me; my son was with me, not the prisoner - he heard part of the conversation; he is not here - he was not acquainted with Austin.

Q. You and your son, being perfect strangers to her, met her in the street, and began a conversation? A. Yes - nobody else was present; I met her the first time by myself, and some time after my son came up - I was talking to her then; I had seen her once before about the same place; the last conversation was a night or two before the second hearing; I had not been introduced to her at all.

Q. How did you know her? A. She was sent to me in the street by my young man or my son - I do not know which.

Q. Who do you mean by your young man? A. A young man I sent to her - he was a stranger to me; my son sent the young man to fetch her out, but I do not know who he was.

Q. You have spoken of a person by the title of your young man, who do you call your young man? A. My son is my young man, and he sent this young man - I objected to his going into any house to her, and he sent a young man, but I call my son my young man - my son was not present at both the conversations; I do not know that he knew Austin; he was to find somebody that knew her to send her to me - he left me to find the person.

Q. Now, what passed at your first conversation with Austin? A. I asked what she knew of it - she said,"Nothing at all;" that is all that passed - she repeated the same thing each time; she said she was not present at the transaction, and therefore could say nothing, for she knew nothing; I did not have much conversation with her - I did not suppose she was going to swear my son's life away - the first conversation was a few days before the second.

Q. Then in a few days you walked from Brompton to Tothill-fields to see her again? A. I did, and the same conversation passed - I asked what she knew of the transaction; she said, "Nothing at all;" she was not present, and therefore could say nothing, for she saw nothing - she said both times that she was asleep in the cook-shop; I was not present when she was before the Justice - I did not tell the Justice that she was swearing false, for she had said she knew nothing of it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did the Justice examine any body for your son? A. No - there were only two witnesses examined; I was only at the second examination.

ELIZABETH HOWARD. I am a girl of the town. I was in conversation with the prisoner at the cook-shop on the night this happened; the Policeman came there, and I went out - I did not see the Policeman stabbed; I saw the staff in the Policeman's hand - he was speaking to me at that time; he made no charge against me when he took me out of the shop - the prisoner asked what he took me for; I then saw him draw his staff across the prisoner's face - I afterwards saw him on the opposite side of the way, and he hallooed out that he was stabbed - I never saw Austin there at all.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You knew the prisoner very well at the time of this transaction? A. Yes - we were not living together then; we have not lived together for two years - we had met that night at Knightsbridge, and then went to a public-house; he had several half-pints of ale - we then came to the cook-shop, and had something to eat; Phillips came in, and said he wanted to speak to me - the prisoner asked what he wanted me for; he said he only wanted to speak to me outside the door - I did not go out then, and he came in again; the prisoner had said if he had any thing to say he was to say it within; Phillips came in again, and called me - I went out then; the prisoner came out, and asked what he wanted me for, and then they had some words.

Q. Did he lay his hands on you to prevent your going? A. No, he never touched me - he did not put out his arms; I never heard the prosecutor say, "Take care, or you will break the windows," nor any thing of the kind; the Policeman made no charge against me - he spoke to me civilly; I crossed over with him - he wanted me concerning a half-sovereign that was given to me by mistake for 6d.; the prisoner came across directly afterwards.

Q. When was it the prosecutor pulled out his staff? A. Opposite the cook-shop - it was after we crossed; I did not see him touch the prisoner's face with it.

Q. Do you mean in drawing out his staff he crossed the man's face? A. Yes; he did not strike, nor did I hear him threaten - I saw no blows struck on either side; I went some distance off.

Q. Then did you hear any thing of the Policeman being stabbed? A. He said, "They have done me! they have done me at last! I am stabbed!" that was about five minutes after I had began to walk down the street - I mean it was a very little while; I dare say it was a quarter of an hour after the staff had been produced- I do not suppose the transaction lasted half an hour altogether; I did not go away when he said he was stabbed - there were several people near when he called out, both men and women; I have not seen any of them here - several came out to see what was going on; none of them went to assist him: the Policeman drew his staff across his face, so (drawing her hand across her own face, close to her eyes.)

Six witnesses deposed to the prisoner being of a mild and inoffensive disposition.

GUILTY on the third Count - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his previous good character.

[July 2.]

Reference Number: t18310630-13

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1202. JOHN BOURNES was indicted for that he, on the 26th of April , at All Saints, Poplar, with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did strike, stab, cut, and would James Lightfoot , in and upon his left leg and thigh, with intent then and there feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder him .

2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable him.

3rd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JAMES LIGHTFOOT. I am a sailor . In April last I belonged to the Alfred barge, which laid in the West India docks; the prisoner was a boy on board the same vessel, and had a brother on board - on the 26th of April I saw him and his brother fighting; his father was a mariner on board the barge, but was not on board at that time - I interfered and parted his brother and him twice; they were fighting both times in the cabin - when I parted them the second time I took the prisoner away; I held him in the cabin, and told his brother to go on deck - the prisoner struggled, but I held him till his brother went on deck; I then released him, and he took up a quart pot to heave at me, or hit me with it - I took it from him- he then took up a poker, and said he would knock my brains out with it; I took the poker from him, and then he said he would go on deck and chuck the young b - r overboard - his brother is five or six years younger than him; I told him he should not go on deck to throw his brother overboard - he said he would be b - gg - red if he would not; he was going to pull me out of the scuttle down into the cabin to go on deck - I pushed him from me down the ladder into the cabin to prevent his going; he did not fall in the cabin - he sat down - he had offered to fight me before this; I said I would fight him if he would go on shore, but I would not fight on board - he struck me when he offered to fight, but I did not strike him again, but held him down in the cabin; his brother was in the cabin at that time - it was before I had separated them, and before he attempted to throw the pot at me, or strike me with the poker.

Q. Then this happened when you were parting them the second time; after the brother had gone on deck you let the prisoner go? A. Yes, and then he wanted to go up to throw his brother overboard; I stood in the scuttle, and said,"Jack, you shan't" - he wanted to pull me out, but I pushed him down into the cabin; he sat there a minute, then pulled out his knife, and said, "You b - y b - r, I will cut your guts out" - he got the knife out of his pocket, and opened it; he struck at me, and I fell on the locker in the cabin - he kept hitting at me; I held up my feet to defend my body from the knife - I kept him off with my feet; I jumped up and caught hold of his left hand instead of the right - he caught hold of me and stuck me in the thigh, just above the knee, and after stabbing me in the thigh he had the knife up ready to hit me with it; I caught hold of the hand which held the knife, and held him till he was secured - he only struck me once with the knife; I drew the knife up through his hand till I got it - I did not cut his hand in so doing; the Policeman came in then, and took him - a doctor was fetched; the officer has the knife.

JOHN SUTTON . I am one of the Thames Police-officers, I went on board the Alfred barge; I went into the cabin. found the prosecutor lying on the locker, and the prisoner standing very near him - the knife was then in the hands of some other person; there were several in the barge -I asked for the knife; it was handed to me - I asked the prisoner if that was the knife he had done it with; he said, Yes, it was - I did not make him either threat or promise; I said, "Is it possible you have been stabbing with this knife?" he said, "Yes, I did" - there was a medical gentleman there who had just done the wound up; it was not bleeding then - the medical man is not here - the prosecutor was sent to the hospital by his direction; I asked the prisoner if he was using the knife for any purpose, or if he had opened it on purpose to stab him with - he said he had opened it on purpose.

JAMES LIGHTFOOT. I received the wound right in the bend of my knee; the knife entered the bone - the doctor said so; it was a deep wound - I was five weeks in the hospital, and have been at home not able to do any thing till now; I feel a stiffness in my leg now.

Prisoner. When I first went into the cabin I slapped my brother's head, for striking a light to light his pipe, when no lights are allowed in the docks - he struck me and knocked me down on the locker.

JAMES LIGHTFOOT . I struck the light myself - his brother did not strike one at all; he came and called over to his brother, and said he would give him a d - d good hiding - I said, "What is the use of quarrelling? you are always quarrelling directly your father goes on shore;" he took the tinder-box and flung it about, then went to his brother, and his brother begged me to take him away; I am sure I never struck the prisoner - I pushed him down, and held him down while his brother went away.

GUILTY on the 3rd Count - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18310630-14

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1203. JOHN CRONIE was indicted for that he, on the 22nd of April , at St. Andrew, Holborn, in and upon Thomas Fuller , feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously, &c. did strike, stab, cut, and wound him, in and upon his left side and back, with intent to kill and murder him; against the Statute .

2nd COUNT. the same only omitting the word strike and the assault.

3rd COUNT, like the second, only charging the intent to be to disable him.

4th COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS FULLER. In April last I was in the employ of the Metropolitan Police . On the 22nd of April I was on duty in the neighbourhood of Red Lion-street, Holborn; I got on duty about half-past two o'clock - I had known the prisoner about thirteen months previous to that day -I have had him in custody three or four times; frequently when I have had him in custody, and when I have met him in the street, he has used violent threats to me, and about three weeks before I was standing in Theobald's-road, when he said I should soon be from there, I should not be there long, for he would do for me; he shoved me off the curb at that time, and on several occasions before that he has used similar expressions - I went on duty that day about half-past two o'clock, and saw the prisoner almost directly coming from Red Lion-street into Theobald's-road; he was on the opposite side of the road; he saw me, but nothing passed - I went up Red Lion-street and returned in about a quarter of an hour; I saw him, but nothing passed then - I passed down Lamb's Conduit-street, and again saw him at the end of Red Lion-street and Theobald's-road; this was about half-past three o'clock - he then began to abuse me, and followed me down part of Lamb's Conduit-street, nearly to East street; he asked if I should not like to have him again, if I should not like to take him

- he called me a b-r, and said it would not be long that I should be there; I made no reply, but passed on, leaving him on the other side of the road - I turned back, taking no notice whatever of him; my duty rendered it necessary for me to remain in the neighbourhood, and I saw him hanging about the neighbourhood till five o'clock - nothing more passed till five; he made use of some words across the road to me, which I did not understand, a little after four; I took no notice of it - at five I saw him take a key from a boy and a girl, who I believe to be his son and daughter, at the corner of Red Lion-street and Theobald'sroad; I heard him say it was the key of his shop, and he had been looking for it - he gave the key of his shop, and he on receiving the key he went down Theobald's-road towards Gray's Inn, and I lost sight of him till near seven o'clock - I saw him again then at the other end of Red Lion-street, next to Holborn; I then saw him coming up Holborn from towards Gray's Inn - I turned my back to him, and looked the contrary way, towards St. Giles', and let him pass me; I was standing in Holborn, just by Red Lion-street - I turned my back towards him, and he passed in the rear of me, and turned up Red Lion-street, on the other side, which was the way I had to go back; he said nothing to me - he crossed to the opposite side of the road, and began to use the same abusive words as he had in Lamb's Conduit-street, saying should I not like to have him again, and he would take care I should not be there long.

Q.Were these expressions uttered loud enough for persons round to hear? A. I heard them - I was only the width of the street from him, and in a second or two I crossed the street towards him, and told him to go about his business, for I wanted no altercation with him; he said nothing, but faced to the left and went right up the street twenty or thirty yards, and I following him on the same side as he was - seeing me following he crossed to nearly the other side of the road, and put his hand into his coat pocket, but which pocket I cannot tell; he pulled out a shoemaker's knife, and flourished it at me, making a kind of bravado with it two or three times with his hand - he then excaimed, "By Heavens! if you come near me I will do for you!"

Q. Had you at that time any weapon in your hand? A. I had none - I was on the opposite side of the street, on the left-hand side of Red Lion-street , going from Holborn: when I saw him flourishing the knife at me, and making use of expressions, I pulled out my staff, made an advance towards the prisoner, and he made a step or two towards me; I help my staff up in front of me, nearly to my breast, not quite perpendicularly - I went towards him, and made a catch at his right hand, which had the knife in it, with my left hand; he made a kind of feint with his right hand, and I missed it - he immediately threw his left arm round my neck, and made a thrust at me; he struck me with his right hand, and I received the principal wound in my left breast - he made a second stab. which did not penetrate my body, but cut my clothes through on the same side of my person; I then disengaged myself from him, and in so doing we both crossed over to the opposite side, I endeavouring to secure him, and at the same time I received another stab on my right side - I believe I then struck him over the head with my staff, which is the only time I recollect striking him; I never struck him till after I received the first stab in my breast - the second stab I received about the time I struck the blow.

Q. Do you speak from your recollection of that, or are you certain you had not struck him before you received the first stab? A. I am quite confident of it - I had not offered to strike him before I received the first stab; I had done nothing more than holding my staff in my own defence, as I have described.

Q. At the time the third stab was made you both got on the other side of the way? A. I call that the second stab; I do not call that a stab which only cut my clothes - when I received the second stab in my side, I was endeavouring to secure him, but finding my force of no avail I cried Murder! and tried to make my escape from him; I extricated myself from him, and went towards Holborn - he then pursued me; he over-ran me, and stabbed me in the back as he ran by me - I might have got ten or twelve yards at that time; the knife entered my back - I still kept running to the end of Holborn; I staggered across Holborn, and recollect seeing him make his escape - he ran down Holborn towards Gray's Inn: I fell in Holborn from the loss of blood and being faint - I was confined five weeks and two days in St. Bartholomew's hospital; I still feel the effects of it, and always shall do so. I am afraid - the prisoner appeared quite sober, and knew what he was doing; he walked as well as I could myself every time I met him that day.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Where did you live at that time? A.In Cromet-street, near Judd-street; I should have come off duty at nine o'clock - I have known the prisoner more than a year.

Q. Did you always have him in custody at your own complaint, or the complaint of other people? A. The first time was at the complaint of his wife and youngest son, the other times were at my own complaint; I believe his wife sits in the street with oranges and fruit.

Q.Did you on the day this happened call him an old cuckold? A. I did not, nor tell him I knew as much of his wife as he did; I never told him any thing of the kind, nor to that effect - I never called him an old cockold.

Q. And all the three or four times he abused you, you never used any offensive language to him? A. I never did; when he was on the opposite side of the way, with the knife in his hand, he said if I came near him he would do for me - he once made a complaint to the Commissioners about me; it might be about three months before this happened - I do not know the date; he told me afterwards he should complain again when I met him in Red Lionsquare, and said I should not stay there long.

MR. BODKIN. Q.Was any inquiry made by the Commissioners? A. Yes; he was down there with me, and the complaint was heard - I was continued in the Police.

FRANCIS COX. I live in Red Lion-street, Holborn - my father is a printer and bookbinder. On the 22nd of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was at my father's door, and saw Fuller pass down the street, towards Holborn - he walked down as far as Mr. Kettle's, the bookseller's shop, which is the first door out of Holborn, and looked at the books: he was on the same side of the way as I was - I then saw the prisoner come down from Holborn, on the opposite side of the way, on the left hand side, coming from Holborn - he began stamping and

swearing at Fuller; I do not remember what he said -Fuller turned round to him, and walked over towards him- the prisoner kept going up Red Lion-street, towards the Foundling, still stamping and swearing, and Fuller following him; the prisoner then walked a little further on, and jumped into the road, saying "Catch me if you can," and at that instant the prisoner pulled out his knife -Fuller, when he saw the knife, went towards him, pulling his staff out of his pocket - then the prisoner made a stab at him.

Q. Did you see what Fuller did with his staff? A. No- he went to catch hold of him, and after the prisoner made a stab at him he hit him over the hat - I could not tell whether the stab reached him or not; Fuller did not make any blow at the prisoner before that stab was made.

Q.Which hand did the Policeman use when he tried to catch hold of his knife? A. He put his left-hand out to the prisoner, they then closed, and the prisoner had his left arm across the Policeman's back, and with his right hand he was stabbing him in the side - I did not see how many times he stabbed him; fuller then got away on the pavement, on the other side of the way - I was still on the right-hand side of the street, going from Holborn; when they got on the pavement they were fighting, and Fuller cried Murder! he got away, and ran down the middle of the street, towards Holborn - the prisoner followed him, and just as they got down close by Holborn, the prisoner stabbed him in the back; Fuller crossed Holborn - the prisoner then ran down Holborn, towards Featherstone-buildings, and there two men got hold of him, one took hold of each arm; he was carrying the knife in his hand - a man struck him.

Q.Before he was stopped in Featherstone-buildings, did you observe any body try to stop him? A. No, we all got out of his way - he was secured, and then I went home.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.How many people were there about the spot when the Policeman took the staff from his pocket? A. I saw a few there, but not many.

Q. Was he walking away when the prosecutor followed him? A. Yes, he was walking on, and kept stamping and swearing - I did not hear the Policeman tell him to go away.

Q. He might have gone away if Fuller had not followed him? A.No; directly he saw the Policeman he began stamping and swearing at him - he walked on; they were face to face - the prisoner was jumping backwards; Fuller did not take his staff out till he saw the knife - he then went with his left hand to catch hold of the prisoner; the prisoner made a stab at Fuller before he struck him - I am sure the blow was not given at the same instant: he stabbed at him with the knife - he aimed towards his body, and then the Policeman struck at him; I did not state to the Magistrate that the first thing done was the Policeman's striking the prisoner on the head - the prisoner held the knife so (holding his hand out) and stabbed under; the Policeman did not strike at the same time as he went to seize the knife - the prisoner's head was bleeding as he laid in Featherstone-buildings, after he was stopped; I did not see him bleed while he was engaged with the Policeman.

Q. You do not know of his receiving any injury to draw blood while he was engaged with the Policeman? A. No, I do not know one way or the other.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Where did the man strike the prisoner when he was stopped? A. On the forehead, and knocked him down.

MR. BARRY. Q.Where did the Policeman strike the prisoner? A. On the crown of his hat - he did not touch his face with the staff at that time; I stood nearly behind the prisoner, but not quite - I was within a yard of him.

COURT. Q.Were you within a yard of him at the time you saw the prisoner making the first stab at him? A. Yes.

GEORGE RILEY . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in the Holborn division on the 22nd of April - I came up after this happened, and saw the prisoner running down towards Brownlow-street; I saw him stopped by Plume the officer - I did not see him struck by any body; I assisted to secure him, and when we picked him up, he said,"I hope the b - y b - r is dead;" he said he went home on purpose to sharpen a knife to do for him, and said, "If I am committed and tried for him I shall die happy, for now I have had my revenge, for he called me an old cuckold;" I only heard him use that expression once going along - he had been drinking, but was sober enough to know what he was doing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did any body hear these expressions besides yourself? A.Not that I know of - I had hold of his arm at the time, leading him to the watch-house; Plume, the officer, had hold of his right side, but people were coming round him so that Plume was engaged in keeping peace and quietness - the prisoner was speaking to me all the way along very softly, very quietly; I paid every attention to what he said - I stated all this conversation at Hatton-garden; I did not see him struck in Featherstone-buildings, but I know he had been struck - I saw his head bleeding in front, but do not know who struck him.

Q. Let us have the expressions again? A. He hoped the b - y b - r was dead; that he went home on purpose to sharpen the knife to do for him, and if he was committed and tried for it he should die happy, for now he had had his revenge, for he called him an old cuckold.

HENRY PLUME. I am a Police-constable. I was in Holborn on the 22nd of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, but not on duty - I saw Fuller running up Red Lion-street; he crossed Holborn, put his hand to his side, and said, "Oh!" I did not know he was stabbed - I directly after turned my head, and saw the prisoner running up on the left-hand side of Red Lion-street, with a knife in his hand - he turned the corner, and ran directly towards Featherstone-buildings; I was at that time at the corner of Red Lion-street, the opposite corner to that he came round - I pursued him, and attempted to take him, but he held the knife up to me in this manner, (over his head); I jumped off the pavement into the road, and seeing me going from him he turned his head and ran again - I immediately turned on him, and seized him by the arm; I saw Taylor strike him over the forehead with something - the blow produced blood; I had not noticed any blood on the prisoner's face before that blow was struck - other persons came up, and he was secured; I saw the knife fall from his hand when I seized him, and I have it here, (producing a shoemaker's knife) - it was

bloody at that time; I went with him to the watch-house, and at the watch-house I heard him say, "I hope the b - r is dead, and I shall be hung, and I shall die happy;" he said that Fuller had laid with his wife, using a much coarser phrase, and he used similar expressions while going to the watch-house, to the same effect - I have had the prisoner in my custody before this; I never heard him say any thing with respect to Fuller before - he had been drinking, but not so as not to know what he was about.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Were there several people at the watch-house at the time he used these expressions? A. Yes, seven or eight - he spoke in a loud tone; Riley was there - Riley and I had led him to the watch-house; I did not hear him say any thing to Riley on the road to the watch-house - I mean I did not hear him address Riley, but what he said he hallooed out in the street in a loud tone.

Q. Was there any disturbance among the people which rendered it necessary that you should keep them off? A. There was a great mob following us, but I held the prisoner - they did not press on us; I had to push one or two that were rather in my way walking along - all the prisoner said going along was said in a loud and angry tone.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you mean that all you heard him say was in a loud and angry tone? A. Yes.

THOMAS BAKER. I am a Policeman, and was on duty in Theobald's-road. I saw Fuller at the corner of Lamb's Conduit-street, about half-past two o'clock - I spoke a few words with him; the prisoner came on the opposite side of the road, and walked over to the corner of Red Lion-street - he turned round, placed his back againt the post facing me, stamping with his feet, shaking his fist at us, and saying he should be hung for those two blue devils yet; Fuller afterwards turned up Red Lion-street - the prisoner followed him up that street as far as Princes-street, then stopped, and came back to me.

Q. What was he doing when he followed Fuller? A. Nothing that I saw - he was out of my hearing; he then came back to me, and asked if I knew his son - I said I did not; he said a little boy had got the key of his shop, and he wanted to go to work - I gave him no answer; he said, "I mean to let them know it;" that is what he said when he turned from me - I do not know what he meant; I still kept him in sight till half-past three o'clock, because he kept on my beat, but he said nothing to me - I saw him again about four, at the corner of Red Lion-street; he stamped his feet, shook his fist in the same manner, and said he would be hung for those two blue devils yet - Fuller was then on the opposite side with me; he then returned down Theobald's-road to his wife, who sat with a stall at the corner of Great James-street, and Bedford-row - I lost sight of him then till five o'clock, and then saw him at the corner of Lamb's Conduit-street; he said nothing to me - he took a key from his little boy, and went away towards his shop; I saw him again at half-past six, in Theobald's-road - I do not know where he lives; he was coming from Gray's Inn towards Red Lion-street, between Bedford-row and Gray's Inn-lane - after passing me about three rods, he said, "I will stab the long b - r the first opportunity," and turning round, he said, "And you too if you don't mind;" Fuller was not present then - this was near Gray's Inn; he went over to his wife's stall, had a few words with her, and then went away - I followed him to the extent of my bear, which ends in Kingsgate-street; I do not know whether he observed me - I left him in Kingsgate-street, about five or ten minutes before seven o'clock; he stood stock still when I left him - he had been going in a direction towards St. Giles'; I left him at the upper end of Kingsgate-street, next Theobald's-road - I saw him at Hattongarden the next day, and there he said he hoped he had killed the long b - r, and then he should die happy.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is "Blue devils" the expression usually used to Policemen? A. I cannot tell, I never heard it before - I do not think Fuller heard the expression; he was standing with his back towards me, and about a stride from me - what he said at Hatton-garden was in the room before he went before the Magistrate; there were some people there, but not a great many - I do not know any body else who heard it; I was sitting close by the side of him - he spoke inwardly, so that I could hear, as I sat by his side.

WILLIAM TAYLOR. I am a smith, and live in Red Lion-street. I saw the prisoner come into Red Lion-street a little after seven o'clock in the evening - I was standing at my door, which is four or five doors out of Holborn, on the left-hand side from Holborn; I saw the prisoner coming up the street, and as he got about opposite the butcher's shop, three or four doors from me, he ran into the road, in a kind of flustering attitude - I did not particularly notice him then, till the Policeman crossed into the road towards him, and when he got opposite to me, he (the prisoner) pulled a knife out; I heard him calling the prosecutor a blue b - r, or a black b - r, or something, when he took the knife out: he said, "I have been looking for you a long time, you b - r, and I will give it to you now;" he had the knife in his hand at that time, holding it out towards him, and said, "If you come near me I will stick you;" the Policeman then went towards him, and whether the Policeman struck him before he stabbed him, I do not know, for when I saw the knife in his hand jabbing at him, it gave me such a turn that I ran into the shop.

Q. Then directly you saw the stabbing begin, you ran into your own house? A. Yes, to get something to assist the Policeman - I armed myself with the poker, and when I came out the Policeman was running down the street, and the prisoner after him; I did not see him do any thing to the Policeman during the pursuit - they had got nearly to the end of the street; the prisoner turned round the corner - I followed, and took him at the end of Featherstone-buildings; I made a blow at him with the poker - I will not say whether I struck him on the head or shoulder, but I believe on the shoulder; the blow did not knock him down - he was stopped at the time by a person in a brown coat, who turned out to be a Policeman; the prisoner's face was towards me when I struck him - I did not observe any blood on his face before I struck him, but cannot say whether there was or not; he bled profusely afterwards, when we brought him into Holborn, to tie his hands.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.How far was Fuller from the prisoner when you first saw him? A. I suppose he was full the length of one of the houses, eighteen or twenty feet - he was following the prisoner.

Q. When the prisoner went into the road he went up to him? A. He did not go up to him, for the prisoner ran faster than Fuller; he got up to him beyond my door - the prisoner was running from him till he got the knife into his hand; I was three or four yards from them when he had the knife in his hand; I saw the staff in Fuller's hand, and saw him strike, which struck first I will not say - I saw a boy in Holborn. I do not know his name; there were several people about when the prisoner used those expressions - I do not know whether the boy was there.

Q. Did the prisoner use that expression immediately before Fuller advanced to him, and when he had the knife in his hand? A. It was; he said, "I have been looking for you a long time, &c.," immediately before Fuller advanced to him - after coming out with the poker, I ran after the prisoner from my shop to the end of Red Lion-street, and to Featherstone-buildings; I might have lost sight of him just in turning the corner - I did not see him strike Fuller after I came out with the poker; I think I struck the prisoner on the right shoulder.

MR. BODKIN. Q.When this expression was used, was the prisoner standing still, or moving on? A. He was advancing towards the Policeman, having the knife in his hand.

MR. JOHN WOOD . I am a surgeon of St. Bartholomew's hospital. I attended the prosecutor on the night he arrived in the hospital; he had a recently inflicted incised penetrated wound on the left side, between the fourth and fifth ribs, near the breast-bone - he had a similar wound in the integaments of the chest, on the left side, lower down, and a slight wound in the skin on the back of his chest, on the back of his shoulder - that was a slight wound; those were all the wounds which I noticed; this knife would be likely to produce such wounds - the first wound in the breast-bone was a very dangerous wound: he was about six weeks under my care - I conclude that that wound penetrated the lungs; I considered his life in danger from that wound - I could not pronounce him out of danger for a fortnight or three weeks.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.How many other wounds were there? A. Two; I did not consider either of them dangerous - the one on the back was very slight - that could do no great bodily harm.

CHARLES KETTLE . I am a bookseller, and live at No. 3, Red Lion-street, three doors from Holborn, on the righthand side. About seven o'clock in the evening, I was outside my door, and observed Fuller a little below my house towards Holborn - the prisoner was on the same side of the way; my notice was attracted by seeing what I supposed was a tipsy man crossing the road, with a kind of shout or halloo - when he got on the other side he began shouting out in a kind of frantic way: Fuller followed him a little distance, keeping perhaps a dozen yards from him; I heard the prisoner call him a b - y b - r, and several names of that kind; he kept prancing backwards, or sideways - Fuller still followed, keeping about the same distance - he then said he would fight the b - y Police, he would fight the whole of them, he would take the whole body; by this time he had got a little below Mr. Taylor's house - he then crossed over to my side of the way; he was abusing the Policeman, and when he got on my side of the way he halted, and still kept on the same abusive language - a mob began to collect; I saw Fuller pull out his staff, merely, as I thought to keep him at bay.

Q. Did you notice at that time whether the prisoner had any thing in his hand? A. Not at that time, to the best of my knowledge - I was looking more at the Policeman at that time than at the prisoner; directly the prisoner saw the staff he put his hand into his pocket, and pulled something out; he then advanced into the middle of the road, and the light shone on the knife - he held it in his right hand, held it out, and said, "Come on now, you b - r, I will fight you;" he advanced to the Policeman in the middle of the road, from the pavement - he was exactly in the middle of the road when he used the expression; the road may be twelve yards wide - the Policeman was on the pavement: he advanced half way across the road to the Policeman, and struck out his right foot in the attitude of defiance, daring him to come on - the Policeman advanced to him then, and struck him over the head, at arm's length, keeping his chest open - the prisoner attempted to stab as fast as he could.

Q. Can you say positively whether the prisoner stabbed or attempted to stab before the blow was struck? A. No, I believe the Policeman struck him first, but he was daring him to come on; the prisoner kept attempting to stab as fast as be could - they came to a struggle, and fell; I afterwards found the Policeman stabbed - I did not see the wound given, though I saw the prisoner attempt to stab him several times: his hat fell off, and he ran - he turned his back, and ran towards Holborn; the prisoner followed him as close as he could, and when he came by the public-house door he made a thrust at his back with the knife.

HENRY BROKENSHIR. I live at Mount Pleasant, and am a clerk. I was passing down Holborn about seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner annoying Fuller just at the corner of Red Lion-street, in Holborn - I cannot recollect the expressions he used, but they were very violent; the prisoner went down Red Lion-street, and Fuller also - the prisoner was on the right-hand side of the way, going from Holborn; previous to that Fuller had made several feints, as if to pursue him - I did not hear Fuller say any thing; the prisoner passed over towards Fuller, and Fuller drew his staff; I cannot say whether the prisoner had any thing in his hand when he crossed over towards Fuller- I saw him come quite close to him; Fuller struck him on the head with a staff.

Q. Did you see whether the prisoner attempted to do any thing to Fuller before he struck him? A. No - I did not see the prisoner strike any blow before Fuller struck him; I was about twenty-five or thirty yards from them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.After the prisoner had been struck did you see him then do any thing? A. Yes - I did not see him put his hand into his pocket, or take any thing out; I saw him make two thrusts at the Policeman.

COURT. Q. Did you see whether either of those thrusts took effect? A. They took effect, for the Policeman appeared faint when he ran away, but I cannot say even that the prisoner had a knife in his hand.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see the prisoner's head broken from the blow with the staff? A. Yes, it was bleeding from the wound in the forehead.

MR. BODKIN. Q. When did you see him bleeding?

A. Not till I saw him captured and laying down; I have no reason to believe his head was broken from the blow, except from seeing it bleed after he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived nine years within two hundred yards of Hatton-garden office, and was never there in my life till this Policeman put a hand on me, through my wife, and what happened between them I cannot tell; the first time he attacked me I never said a word - he came up, and said, "I want you;" I said,"What charge have you?" he said, "I will tell you directly;" I said, "I won't go unless somebody gives charge of me;" I said, "I work for several houses in the neighbourhood, and every gentleman knows me;" he would not let me know the charge, but took me to the watch-house, and took 1s. 6d. from me - I never saw that money again; he took me before the Magistrate, and charged me with being disorderly in the street - the Magistrate asked if any body gave me in charge; he said "No - he struck me in the breast;" I was locked up, and had to get bail - in a month or two after wards I was in the street, and he took me again - I live about twenty yards from Lamb's Conduit-street; I was waiting there for a pair of shoes to mend - when he saw me he attacked me that day about complaining to the commissioners: after I had made the complaint I went with my wife to a public-house, about six o'clock one morning - he and a lot of Policeman were there drinking gin, and we had some; he said, "We are having a parting drop here, as we are going to leave the district, old woman: I know this old fellow," (calling me an old b - r); he said, "I know this old fellow is glad of it;" I said, "I don't care where you are going, if you let me alone;" a month or two afterwards my wife and I had some words - she said, "Police, come and take him;" he dragged me to the watch-house every time he chose and locked me up, and after taking me another time I was in the office yard waiting for my business, a serjeant was with him, and he said, "There's an old cuckold, I have his wife whenever I like; I know her well, and now I have buried my wife, I will keep her for a week, and then turn her up;" my little girl was by at the time; when I was taken before the Magistrate he asked what I had been doing - he said I was disorderly; the Magistrate said, "You have charges constantly against this man;" the officer said, "Your Worship. he is quite an innocent man, but takes a little drop of drink now and then;" the Magistrate said, "Well, discharge him" - this man saying he had buried his wife, and would have mine when he chose, I came home and broke my wife's stall, out of passion, then went to Mr. Mayne, the commissioner, who took down my complaint, and desired me to come at eleven o'clock the next morning - this man was there before me; I was outside in the hall - I was taken in, and not Mr. Mayne but some gentleman heard me; I told him he was constantly annoying me, and calling me a cuckold - I was ashamed of hearing the language before my children; I was turned out, and that was all the satisfaction I got - when I got back as far as Charing-cross he ran after me, and said,"You old cuckold, I will serve you out; if I can do nothing else I will swear you broke a window;" I told two or three neighbours of it, and begged him not to disgrace my children - one Saturday night, about a month after I made this complaint, I came out to go to a public-house, in Lamb's Conduit-passage - I had nothing on but my shirt; my waistcoat and coat were off - he caught me rapping at the public-house door; he said, "I have you, old fellow, and will be revenged on you;" he would not take me home, but took me round into Bloomsbury-square; another Policeman came behind me, and knocked me down - I declare it is as true as the Bible; I was looked up that night - I said, "Do you want to kill me?" for they all kicked me about - I got some bread and cheese in the morning, and next day, on my going up, he said to one Policeman, "You charge him, and I will swear to him;" they both swore against me, and said, I struck him in the breast - the Magistrate said, "Fine him 20s., or lock him up for a month;" the money was made up between my son and myself - I came out of prison, and about a week after he said, "Oh, you are out again, I will have you in again;" and when he met me he said, "Oh, you old cuckold, I will serve you out for going before the commissioners;" I said nothing to him - I came down to Jones', in the King's-road, and was talking to a young man; a ballad was being sung in the street, and he began to cough at me - I said, "It is a shame to persecute a man like me in that manner;" he said, "I know more than you are aware of; I will stick to you" - when he caught me alone he began langhing at me; I went to St. Giles' watch-house, and told the serjeants - they said, "Come up to-morrow night, and complain to the commissioner;" I went to the commissioner's room, and said, "I have been getting my living in the neighbourhood for nine years, but I must quit the place on account of this man, and I can bring a character from the neighbours;" the superintendent said, "I am bothered with you and Fuller, I would not believe you on your oath:" he took me in charge whenever he liked, and one morning in Lamb's Conduit-street, I saw him coming, and ran away - and on this day I was waiting to get something to eat, and he began laughing at me, about three o'clock; I believe I had had a glass or two of gin, and afterwards I was buying two pairs of upper leathers - when I got somedrink; I pawned the upper leathers, and have the duplicates to produce - I was coming home that night, and had 9d. in my pocket to get my supper; he met me, and said, "You are a cuckold, your wife was out last night," and that made me vexed - we began to jaw each other; I saw his staff, and ran away from him as fast as I could - he pursued me, gave me that stroke, cut me, and broke my hat - here is the cut he gave me, and the stroke of the staff; I staggered, and do not know what happened afterwards - I declare, as true as God is in Heaven, this is true - he said my wife made him take me at first, I know nothing about that; I do not know what is his reason for it at all.

THOMAS FULLER here produced his clothes, which were bloody, particularly the shirt.

STEPHEN ROADWAY. I am a horse-keeper, at the George and Blue Boar. On the evening the Policeman was wounded I was coming home - I live in Eagle-street; it was as near five minutes after seven o'clock as possible; I was carrying three stone bottles - I saw the Policeman and prisoner together in Red Lion-street; there was a crowd round them - when I first entered the street they were jawing, but I could not hear what they said; I walked on as fast as I could. and just as I got up within

twenty yards, the prosecutor pulled out his stick, and hit the prisoner over the head.

Q. At that time had the prisoner struck him? A. I had seen no blow - the prisoner struck him again, and in stopping the blow to defend himself, knocked his hat off; the prisoner hit him three or four times after that - he resented it with his fist, as I thought; I saw no knife in his hand - I was about five yards from him; I heard the prosecutor give a screech - I did not hear him cry Murder! I then went on with my bottles, as a crowd gathered.

JAMES HUTCHINSON. I am a carpenter, and live at No. 20. Devonshire-street, Queen-square. I was at the corner of Red Lion-street on the 22nd of April, about seven o'clock, and saw two men standing talking, one of them had a leather apron on, the other was a Policeman - I do not know what they were talking about, but there was a Policeman came and took him by the arm, spun him round, and said, "Go along with you;" the man turned round, and resented it, and the Policeman gave him a second push, and said, "Go along with you, you d - d old cuckold;" with that the man turned round, and resented it again - he d - d him and said, "What do you mean by calling me a d - d old cuckold?" the Policeman laughed in his face, gave him a push, told him to go along, and said he could always get a good natured woman like his wife at any time, and laughed in the man's face - I never saw either of them before; a scuffle ensued between them - the Policeman pulled out his staff, struck the man over the head several times, knocked his hat off, and blood came from his ear, I believe - I saw the blood.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you go to the Police-office? A. No - two Policemen wished me to go, but I told them I did not like to interfere; Fuller did not wish me to go - he was not there; there was a stoutish man near Red Lionsquare, wished me to go, and a man who is now in the passage, wished me to go - I said I did not wish to go, as I had nothing to say in his favour, for he certainly insulted the man first; I did not wish to mix myself up with the transaction - I said that was my reason.

Q. In which direction were you going - were you going down Holborn, or Red Lion-street? A.Red Lion-street; I first saw them in Red Lion-street, near Holborn; the man who was talking to him was on the same side of the way - that was another man, and then the Policeman came up - that was the beginning of it, to the best of my knowledge, at least it is what I saw - I did not hear the prisoner use any abusive language till after the prosecutor struck him- I did not hear him speak to him; I was only just going up at the moment the Policeman came up; they both used bad language - the man was irritated; before any blow was struck I heard the prisoner say, "D - n you, what do you call me an old cuckold for?" - there were so many words passed, I do not know what; I am sure the Policeman said he was an old cuckold - he was then within a yard and a half of me; I am sure Fuller is the man who used that expression, but he was not dressed as he is now - I saw two woman, and a man with two jugs there; I cannot say whether the man with the jugs was there when he called him a cuckold; I should think there were one hundred people there in the course of five minutes; I do not know any of them - I did not see the prisoner after he was taken into custody - the blood was about his forehead; his hat fell off, and with lifting up his arm the Policeman stuck, and I believe both their hats came off.

Q. Are you quite sure you saw blood on his head in Red Lion-street? A. Why, I can almost take my oath of it.

Q.Almost take your oath? A. Well, I am sure of it then; I can take my oath of it conscientiously - I meant to say I dare take my oath.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. The Policeman asked you to go to Hatton-garden; you said you could say nothing in the Policeman's favour, for the man had been used ill - did they afterwards send a summons for you to come? A. No - two men came to my house, but I did not see them; and who they came from I do not know.

JAMES SULLIVAN. I am in the employ of Mr. Perry, who keeps a public-house in Red Lion-street; I know Fuller - before the day on which he was stabbed I heard him call the prisoner an old Irish cuckold; the prisoner was not by at the time - I do not know where he was; I once saw him disputing with the prisoner, who was standing near a post - he said, "Go on, Irish," and,"There is an old cuckold;" the prisoner could hear that, I have no doubt - Fuller came to our house next morning, and was talking to our bar-maid; he said what he had done yesterday, and what a row he had with the Irish thief - he said if he had an opportunity he would knock him down with his staff, and that he insulted him first; I said, "No, you insulted him first."

COURT. Q. How long was this before the 22nd of April? A. About three weeks.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What is the name of the bar-maid? A. I do not know - she has left; some more Policemen were there at the time - when Fuller used these words in the street, the prisoner was on the opposite side of the way.

JOHN BYRNE. I am a journeyman boot and shoemaker, and live in Smith's-court, Brewer-street. I have known the prisoner from his infancy - he is a good hearted humane man as ever I met with in my life; I know he was in the habit of carrying a shoemaker's knife about seven years ago; he used to take it backwards and forwards to his house to cut his soles with - on the morning of the 22nd of April, between seven and eight o'clock, I met him and a young man coming from his stall; I asked him for some money which he owed me - he said he had some shoes to make, and to-morrow he would pay me; he showed me some leather he was going to cut, and he had the knife also - he went to a currier's shop; I met him coming out, rolling up some upper leathers - he said,"Now, if you have any money treat, and I will pay you altogether;" we went into a public-house, and had two pots of ale, which I paid for - I saw the blade of the knife coming out of his waistcoat pocket.

JAMES LOWE. I am a currier and leather-cutter. I have known the prisoner seven years - he dealt with me; he always appeared mild and agreeable - about seven o'clock on this morning he came to my shop, and cut part of his leather, which he had bought the night before; I supplied him with a knife, or he used one of his own, I cannot say which.

WILLIAM HOWELLS. I know the prisoner. On the morning of the 22nd of April, about seven o'clock, or halfpast, I saw him with this knife in his possession going to the leather-cutters; I was with him nearly the whole day - he had the knife with him.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How late in the day did you see him with the knife? A. I left him at half-past twelve o'clock, and returned to him again at three, when he was looking after his son for the key; I did not see him get the key from his son - he did not go to his stall while I was with him; I left him after the accident happened - I was walking on a few paces, and saw what took place.

COURT. Q.Who struck the first blow? A. Mr. Fuller - I suppose I was fourteen or fifteen feet off; he had not his knife out at that time, to my knowledge - he very frequently carried the knife about with him.

Prisoner. I carry the knife about to cut old boots and shoes with.

CHARLES KETTLE re-examined. I was about twenty - five yards from him when I saw him strike.

Five other witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[July 4.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his previous good character.

Reference Number: t18310630-15

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1204. ROBERT SCUTTON was indicted for that he, on the 14th of May , at Paddington, feloniously did forge a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows:-

No. 86.

No. 5, Henrietta-street, Covent-garden, London, May 13, 1831.

Messrs. Wright and Company, pay Mrs. Fonbloque, or bearer, Six Pounds Six Shillings.

£6: 6s. A.FONBLOQUE.

with intent to defraud James Cowderoy ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering a like forged order, knowing it to be forged, with the same intent.

MARY COWDEROY . I am the wife of James Cowderoy- we keep a butcher's shop at Paddington. On Saturday night, the 14th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to our shop, or it might be later; I knew him before - he said he came for change for a cheque for 6l. 6s. for his master or mistress, I do not know which - he said that without my asking him who it was for; he produced a cheque to me, which I afterwards gave to the officer - this is it (looking at one); I told him the name was not spelt as I had seen it spelt before - he said, "The reason you think that is, because you never make the bill out in the right way;" I gave him six sovereigns and six shillings - I had repeatedly given him change for cheques for Mr. or Mrs. Fonblongue; he was in their service.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then you knew him to live with Mr. fonblongue? A. Yes - I am sure that when I remarked about the spelling he did not say he knew nothing about it, as he got it from the cook; he said it came from his master or mistress, but in the hurry of business I cannot say which.

Q. Did he not come to you afterwards with his father, when he heard there was something said about the cheque? A. He came with a Police-constable - he came with his father on the Friday night; Mr. Fonblongue and all were present - he was not in custody; I did not say if his father made up the money nothing would be said about it - I said nothing of the kind, and never heard it said; I understood the father offered to do it - they went away about their business; I am sure he did not tell me that he got it from Elizabeth Barrett - the only remark he made to me was, that I did not make the bills out properly; we live three quarters of a mile from Mr. Fonblongue, but he dealt at our shop.

ABANY FONBLONGUE. The prisoner was in my service for three months, and quitted on the 16th of May; I think he had warning about a fortnight before, and was to quit on the 16th, when his three months were up, as I was dissatisfied with him - (looking at a cheque) this is not my hand-writing; I did not send him to get change for it - I have frequently sent him with small cheques, as I give Mrs. Fonblongue a cheque every week for current expences -I may have sent him seven or eight times with cheques, and on those occasions he brought the money to me, or generally to my wife; on Saturday, the 14th of May, about three o'clock, I sent him with a cheque for four guineas -I have my cheque-book here with the margin on it; I have entered here, "14th May, Mrs. Fonblongue, 4l. 4s., No. 85;" I have occasionally left my cheque-book out, and I recollect that it was left out on the Saturday, for I took it off the dining-room mantel-piece to write this cheque - I find there is a leaf torn out very close to the binding; I discovered that on the morning of the 21st, the day after this forgery was made known to me - the cheque uttered is No. 86 - I have seen the prisoner's hand-writing, but never saw him write.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your lady here? A. No - my Christian name is Abany William, but I always sign my name Abany; I have dropped the William some time - I sign deeds as Abany only; I do not remember signing the name of William for many years - I have at some period of my life; the Police-officer came to me on the morning of the 23rd, stating that the prisoner had surrendered.

RICHARD WILLIAMS. I am an inspector of the Police. On the 21st of May I was in Lower-street, Lisson-grove, and saw the prisoner - he said that he had come to point out a fellow-servant, who gave him a forged cheque; her name was Elizabeth Barrett , who had been his fellow-servant in Mr. Fonblongue's employ - I took him with me, and apprehended Barrett; before I went to her lodgings I took the prisoner to Mr. Cowderoy's, and there saw the cheque; on seeing it the prisoner said the name was spelt wrong, it was not spelt as his master spelt his name - he said he got the cheque from Elizabeth Barrett , between nine and ten o'clock on the previous Saturday; that she desired him to go and get it changed for his master - I asked him how his master did spell his name; he spelt it over so quick I could not understand it - I gave him a piece of paper, and said, "Write it down as he spells it," which he did - this is it; it being so similar to the writing on the cheque I took him into custody - in my opinion, the hand-writing is very similar to that on the cheque; I afterwards apprehended the woman.

Cross-examined. Q. He wrote it for you without the least hesitation? A. Yes; he came to me of his own accord, to assist me in apprehending the woman; it was between nine and ten o'clock in the morning - he met me in the street; he had been to the station-house with his mother and father.

ELIZABETH BARRETT. I was in Mr. Fonblongne's service at the same time as the prisoner, and left the same

day as he did - I was taken up by the Policeman, and discharged.

Q. Did you give the prisoner that cheque on the Saturday evening, to get change for your mistress? A.As I hope to see the Almighty God on his throne, a paper, black, white, or red, I never gave him; on my oath I did not give this paper to him, nor did I ever know Mr. Fonblongue write papers for money.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you never saw the cheque-book laying about? A.Never, so help me God; I used to go into the parlour at times - I cannot write, not at all.

JOHN CHANNER. On the Friday night before the Monday that the prisoner left Mr. Fonblongue, he told me Mr. Fonblongue's book and cheques were laying about loose on the table - he told me this at the gate; he made no proposal to me about the cheque.

Q.What led to this being told you? A. I am a pot-boy, I was bringing the beer, and he began the conversation with me; that was all he said - I was not examined before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q.Nor before the Grand Jury? A. No - he came out for the beer, and said this, but nothing more.

COURT. Q.Are you sure no proposal was made by you or the prisoner about the cheques? A. No.(Cheque read, see indictment.)

Prisoner. I have a witness to say that Elizabeth Barrett can read and write well.

MR. PHILLIPS to ELIZABETH BARRETT . Q. Did you ever live with a Miss Huggett, a school-mistress, in Lisson-grove? A. Yes.

Q.Now, on your oath, can you not both read and write? A. On my oath I can do nothing but scribble; I can just read my Prayer-book - I cannot write my name.

Q. You swear that, do you? A. No, not as it ought to be - I never gave a receipt, nor ever wrote in Miss Huggett's presence.

Q. You cannot even scribble? A. No - as God is on his throne, I cannot write; I never forged a bill or note, and never had any thing to do with it - I cannot write, to call it writing; I suppose I make an attempt to write, but am not a writer - I never in my life wrote a letter to a friend, not with my own hand.

Q. What did you mean by swearing you could scribble a little, when I asked if you could write? A. I had no meaning for it - I cannot write, and never took part in the bill; any child may scribble - I cannot write, (a pen and paper were here handed to the witness, upon which she began to make a mark); I cannot write indeed - I cannot do any thing in the writing way; I did not swear I could scribble - you cross-examined me; any body can scribble - I write nothing that any body can make any hand of; I never wrote a word in my life - I do not know any thing about writing, and that is all I can say.

Miss Huggett was called. but did not appear.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY on the second Count. - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth.

[July 4.]

Reference Number: t18310630-16

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1205. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Harry Charrington , on the 17th of May , at Hornsey, and stealing, 1 desk, value 2l.; 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 14s.; 1 book, value 1s., and 1 hone, value 1s. , the goods of the said Harry Charrington.

HARRY CHARRINGTON. I am a coal-merchant in Thames-street, and live in the parish of Hornsey - I keep the house. On the 17th of May I returned home about two o'clock in the morning - I unlocked the gardengate, went in, and saw a light in the parlour; I knocked at the door, and received no answer - I heard a noise in the parlour, went back to the gate, and rang the bell; the light in the parlour was then gone - I rang a second time, then heard a noise at the back of the cottage, and perceived a man run down the garden; I jumped over the paling, and ran down to the stable-yard gate, expecting he had set those gates open for a retreat, but they were closed - I stood there, and saw him drop from the paling into the road; he was fifteen or twenty yards from me - I followed him, halloning Stop thief! and after he had run about one hundred and fifty yards, he threw off something; it was a cloak or a coat - I still pursued, and in about one-eighth of a mile I overtook him; I continued to cry Stop thief! while in pursuit, and when I came up to him I took hold of his coat - I was then so out of wind I could not speak; he turned round, and struck me instantly on the head - it was a severe blow; it turned out to be a hone that he struck me with - he still kept striking; I closed upon him - I fell into a ditch, and he was on the top of me; in a little time I got him under me, and took the hone from him - I then struck him on the head myself with the hone; I remained in the ditch twenty or twenty-five minutes, struggling with him nearly the whole time, till assistance came, and about that time the witness Cain came up - I sent Cain for another man, who came, and the prisoner was secured and put in the cage; I was cut on my head in the scuffle; and bruised very much on my arm - I was attended by a surgeon, and kept my bed for about two days and a half; the hone I wrenched out of his hand was my property - I had seen it in my house, perhaps a month or two before; I lost a writing-desk from my house, which was found in the river fifty or sixty yards off, in the direction he had run - he ran over the bridge; it was not light enough for me to see the writing-desk in his possession - I had seen it in the house the morning previous; it contained papers of mine - I lost a Prayer-book, which was found by a witness where we had scuffled, and a great coat; I had had the Prayer-book on the Sunday, and kept it in my house - this was Tuesday; there was a pair of boots taken, but not off the premises - one was found in the garden, and the other in the house; there was a handkerchief taken belonging to my father - on the third day afterwards I found the house had been entered by a pasnel being cut out of the door with a centre-bit; I was not up till then.

THOMAS CAIN . I am a labourer. I heard a cry of Stop thief! about half-past one o'clock in the morning - I went in the direction of the sound, and when I got up the prisoner was sitting on the bank, and Mr. Charvington

standing over him; the prisoner was all over blood when I saw him in the cage; I cannot say he is the man - Mr. Charrington stood on the path, and he was bleeding from the head: I went at his request, and rang the workhouse bell, then went and got Moyes, and as I went along I picked up a great coat, between the spot where I saw the prosecutor and his house; I gave it to Chambers.

JAMES MOYES . I live at Hornsey. On the night in question I went to assist Cain, and took the prisoner in custody in the ditch - Mr. Charrington stood by him, and was bleeding; the prisoner was bleeding very much; I found a centre-bit about one hundred and twenty yards from Mr. Charrington's house, between the house and where I saw the prisoner - it laid in the road; I found a Prayer-book in the ditch, eight or ten yards from where he was taken, and between that and the prosecutor's house; I tried the centre-bit that morning to the marks in the pannel of the kitchen door, and it fitted them; the pannel was taken out of the door large enough for a man to get through - it is a back door.

GEORGE CHAMBERS . I am beadle of Hornsey. On the Tuesday morning I was called up to go to Mr. Charrington's - I found him at his house; he had just got into bed - he was bleeding at the head: he told me the spot where the struggle took place - I went there, and picked up the cover of the hone, laying in the path; it was split in two pieces - I observed marks of blood there; I also found in the ditch two hats and this silk handkerchief - the prisoner owned one of the hats - it has got his name in it; I saw him in the cage without a hat - I found a sixpence on him all over blood; I found the writing-desk in the river, about forty yards from the bridge, under a barge, about two hours after - it had floated down the stream; I got the hone from Cragg, Mr. Charrington's servant; I found one boot outside the kitchen door in the garden, the other was inside the door, on the mat; the pannel of the kitchen door was taken out, and fitted the centre-bit which I received from Moyes.

Prisoner. He took one of the hats out of my hand in the road. Witness. I never saw him till he was in charge.

ANN CRAGG . I am servant to Mr. Charrington. On the 16th of May I went round the house, locked the garden-gate, and barred and bolted the kitchen door - the parlour doors were locked, but the keys were in; the front door was made fast. I heard no noise till Mr. Charrington came home - my mistress called me down between two and three o'clock; I found master in his bed-room: mistress thought he was murdered - I went down to the kitchen to get him a glass of water, and found the pannel of the kitchen door out, and the boots out by the kitchen door; I know this hone - I had seen it in the house on the Saturday; the boots hung in the back kitchen when I went to bed - I saw the desk the night before; it was kept in the front parlour - the Prayer-book was by the side of the desk, the coat and silk handkerchief hung in the passage; I know the silk handkerchief - this is it: I found four phosphorus-matches outside the kitchen door, and a phosphorus-box; I found them as soon as I opened the kitchen, on coming down - I know this hone and boots to be my master's.

MR. CHARRINGTON. This hone is mine - this great coat, boots, and the Prayer-book are mine; the Prayerbook has my name in it; the handkerchief is my father's - I never lost sight of the man from the time he dropped over the palings till he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence, (written). From the evidence you have heard I am convinced you must feel satisfied that I am not the person who committed the robbery - I beg leave to state that I am a mechanic, who was returning to the arms of my family after walking many miles in search of employ in my honest avocation; that I should be seized, beat, and most unmercifully treated, then dragged to a prison, to be tried for an offence which my very soul shudders at the thought of - my principles have not deviated so far from the paths of virtue as to commit a crime so heinous in its nature; I trust the gentlemen of the Jury will consider my awful situation, and examine with attention the imbrobability of the prosecutor's evidence, for the darkness of the night in question was such, that it was impossible to see any one at ten yards distance from the place you might be in - nor was I aware that any one was coming after me, until I was collared by a powerful man, which naturally alarmed me; considering myself attacked by a robber, I tried all the resistance in my power, and struck him with something I had just picked up, which proved to be a hone, but his strengh so far exceeded mine he overpowered me, and struck me with the hone till I was quite insensible - thus my Lord, stands my situation; the desk and great coat I know nothing of - I also beg leave to state that I never was in a Court of Justice in my life, and have always heretofore been considered and known as an honest, sober, and industrious man; I therefore submit my case to the wise dictates of an omnicient God, whose more weighty influence may induce this honourable Court to deem me worthy of their mercy.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[July 4.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18310630-17

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1206. GEORGE WHYBROW was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June , at St. Clement Danes, 46 forks, value 46l.; 50 spoons, value 59l.; 8 ladles, value 10l.; 1 fish-slice, value 30s.; 1 salt-cellar, value 1l.; 11 salt-spoons, value 3l. 10s.; 3 knives, value 1l.; 2 gravy strainers, value 10s.; 1 silver knob, value 5s.; 2 handles, value 2s.; 1 coat, value 4l.; 4 pairs of trousers, value 4l.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 2l. 10s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 1l.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s., and 1 billiard-cover, value 5s., the goods of James Green , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS MURPHY . I am a Police-constable. On the 23rd of June, at five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Titchfield and Mortimer-street, with a bundle on his shoulder; I asked what he had in his bundle - he told me it was clothes he was bringing from his master; I am sure he said he brought them from his master - I asked where his master lived, and he said "No. 39, Holborn," and that it was Mr. Capon; I asked where he was going with the bundle - he said,"To No. 39, Devonshire-place;" I asked who to there - he said, "Mr. Curtis;" I asked if he would let me see what he had in the bundle - he said Yes; I opened it, and found some new clothes in it, and an immense quantity of plate at the bottom of it - I tied it up again, and said, "To satisfy myself, I shall see you to No. 39, Devonshire-place;" we went there - I rang the area bell; a boy came up to the gate - I asked if Mr. Curtislived there; he said Yes, but he was out of town - the house was undergoing a thorough repair, and his mother had the care of it; I went in, met a man in the passage, and asked if he

knew any thing of these clothes and plate coming to Mr. Curtis's - he said he did not; there was a woman in the passage; I asked her about it - she said, "If you will leave it with me, I will take care nobody shall meddle with it till I hear from my master;" the bundle was put into the room - the prisoner and I walked up the area steps; the prisoner went one way, and I the other - I crossed the street, and looked to see if he was looking after me; I then went as far as Tottenham-street, and met my serjeant - I told him, and then went back to the house in Devonshire-place; the woman who had the care of the house gave the bundle up to me in the same state, and about a quarter of an hour after the prisoner walked into the house in Devonshire-place, and I took him into custody - I have had the property ever since.

WILLIAM DARLASSAN . I am principal waiter at Green's hotel, Lincoln's Inn-fields . I have known the prisoner about seven months - he was a waiter at our house about two months, and was discharged about four months ago; he had no business in the house - I did not see him there on the 23rd; I was the last person up that night, and went to bed about a quarter after two o'clock - the prisoner knew the way of the hotel; there are a great many doors to it - I got up about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and just as I came down the Policeman came into the house; I then missed the plate stated in the indictment, which was worth about 115l. - the prisoner knew where it was kept; the linen belongs to a gentleman in the house - I left the clothes in the waiters' pantry, and the plate was in a drawer in the waiters' pantry - it is a very large house, and the thief must have secreted himself in the house, for I examined every door; there are many parts of the house in which a man could conceal himself; I swear this plate is my master's property.

MARY ANN -. I have the care of Mr. Curtis' house, No. 39, Devonshire-place. I never saw the prisoner till he came about the bundle, after it was left; he was a perfect stranger to me - I was in bed when the Policeman came the first time.

JAMES GREEN . I am master of the hotel - I live in the house, and sleep there; the part where the plate is kept is in the parish of St. Clement Danes. This is my property, and worth more than 120l. - the prisoner had been discharged about four months.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the plate given me to take to this place.

[July 5.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18310630-18

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1207. THOMAS HOWE was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Royle Cummings . on the 21st of May , at St. Luke, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 coat, value 3l. 12s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of John Cummings .

JOHN ROYLE CUMMINGS. I was nine years old last May - my father is a carver and gilder . (The witness being questioned, appeared aware of the obligation of an oath.) On the 21st of May, about half-past one o'clock in the day, my father sent me to fetch a coat from Mr. Boys, tailor, New Church-court, Strand - I got it; it was wrapped up in a silk handkerchief; and as I came home I met the prisoner opposite the pump in Barbican: I had seen him before at times, going through the alley; he asked me what o'clock it was - I told him I did not know; he followed me into Whitecross-street, and asked me to go for some tobacco for him; I said I would not - he asked me again to go for some tobacco; he put his hand into his pocket, pulled out a shilling, and said he would give me 2d. if I would fetch the tobacco, and let him hold the bundle - I said I would not; I then saw him call a man from the other side of the way - he followed me into Chequer-alley; I went up a place called George's-court , and at the corner he stopped me with two men; he put up his fingers, and said, Stop! he took hold of the bundle, and pulled it - I held it fast, and he called the other two to help him; he then took it away from me- the other two came; they all three pulled at it, and took it away - I held it as fast as I could; the other two ran one way, and the prisoner ran straight on - I ran after him, and called out Stop thief! he was the one who had the bundle - he ran up Gloucester-buildings, and got away; I saw him again three weeks afterwards, in custody at Worship-street; when he took the bundle he had a white flannel jacket on, a yellow handkerchief, and corderoy trousers - I have never seen the coat again; I had seen him about once or twice before the robbery; I know he is the man, because I saw him so long, he followed me so far.

JOHN WILLIAM PERKINS . I am the son of John Perkins , a baker, of Swan-yard, shoreditch. On the 21st of May I lived at No. 7, Chequer-alley, Bunhill-row - I was eating my dinner about half-past one o'clock, and saw the prisoner pass by our window; I had known him about three months - in less than five minutes after he passed I heard a cry of Policeman! Stop thief! I got up from my dinner, and ran out; I saw the prisoner running past me- he had the bundle under his arm, and the sleeve of the coat hanging out of the handkerchief; I ran after him along with the rest, but we missed him after he went into Gloucester-buildings - I did not see him go into any house; I did not see him again till he was in custody at Worship-street - when he first passed our house he was walking, and had no bundle; the last witness lost his bundle at the corner of George-court - the wall of that court faces our window: the prisoner had a white flannel jacket on, corderoy trousers, and a yellow handkerchief - I am sure I knew him; he had lodged at my father's house for a fortnight, but not at that time.

MARY ANN SIVEWRIGHT . I am married, and live at No. 19, Gloucester-buildings, Gloucester-court, whitecross-street. On Saturday, the 21st of May, at near two o'clock, the prisoner ran into my house, the door being open - he ran in with a bundle under his arm, and begged and prayed of me to let him stop; I said, "What have you been doing?" he said Nothing - I said, "You shan't stop in my place, you have been thieving," and told him to go about his business - he would not; he said, "If you will let me leave the coat till the evening, I will give you any money; I will come and fetch it in the evening:" I was alarmed at the time and called my opposite neighbour; she came into my room, and said, "you have been thieving that coat;" she untied the bundle, and he said he took it from a shop in Bunhillrow - we drove him out of the house directly with the coat;

he was dressed in a flannel jacket, a yellow neck-handkerchief, and corderoy trousers - I never saw him before, but am sure of his person.

FRANCES JENKINS . I am the wife of William Jenkins, and live in Gloucester-buildings, Whitecross-street. On the 21st of May Sivewright called me in; I saw the prisoner behind the door, with a bundle in his hand - he said,"Don't say a word, mistress, don't say a word - I am a poor man out of work;" I said, "From where did you steal this coat?" he said, "From a shop in Bunhill-row;" he also said, "If I leave the coat I will come in the evening for it, and pay you for your trouble;" I said No, and told him to get out of the house with it - he went away.

JOHN CUMMINGS. I am the witness' father. I sent my son to get a coat on Saturday, the 21st of May, from Mr. Boys, Church-court, Strand; he came back with two women, without the coat, which was new, and worth 3l. 12s.

WILLIAM HOOPER. I am a constable of St. Luke's. -In consequence of information I apprehended the prisoner, on Monday morning, the 13th of June, at No. 10 or 11, Playhouse-yard, Whitecross-street; I went up stairs to him, and said, "Tom, you are the man I want;" he asked me what for - I said, "For the coat;" he said he knew nothing whatever of it; he had a yellow handkerchief on at the time - I have not got it here: he called to a female in the adjoining room, to give him the handkerchief which he had lent her; she brought him a black handkerchief - he pulled the yellow one off his neck, and put a black one on; he had corderoy trousers on, and a waistcoat with sleeves - he made no resistance.

Prisoner's Defence. Last Monday three weeks, in the morning, I was at home - the officer came up to where I lodged; he locked the door, and said he wanted me - he took me to the office, and stated the case to the Magistrate, but I knew no more about it than a child; at the time of the robbery I was twenty-seven miles from here, at work at my trade at Bagshot - I came to town, and was taken; the witnesses have sworn they saw me take the coat from the boy in the street, but I never saw the boy before, nor these two women; I had not been in town for two months - I have got no witnesses, for I was ashamed to send for any.

FRANCES JENKINS . I never saw him before, but I am sure he is the same man - I took particular notice of him; I thought he was a tidy young man to turn out a thief.

MRS. SIVEWRIGHT. I never saw him before, but he is the same man, I am confident.

JOHN WILLIAM PERKINS . My father is not here - I have known the prisoner these three months.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his youth.[July 5.]

Reference Number: t18310630-19

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1208. GEORGE HAMMOND was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Hall , on the 21st of June , at St. Marylebone, and stealing therein 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, and 1 half-sovereign , the property of the said Peter Hall.

JANE HALL. I am the wife of Peter Hall - he is a shoemaker , and lives in the parish of St. Marylebone . On the 21st of June, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out of my room, fastened the parlour door, and went down to the kitchen - the street door was shut and fastened with a catch, but not locked; while I was in the kitchen I thought I heard a noise in the parlour - I came up quick, and saw the parlour door ajar, which I had locked; I pushed it open, and saw the prisoner in the parlour - he came towards me: I seized hold of the collar of his coat with both my hands, and asked what he did there - he said, "Let me go;" I said I would not, that he was a thief, and had robbed me - he insisted on my letting him go; I would not - I struggled with him in the passage for a minute or more, and then he tore my gown; I then called Murder! I had not then observed whether my drawers were open - he put his foot to mine, threw me down, and went out at the street door; I followed him immediately, and did not lose sight of him till he was taken by Sibley, the officer, who brought him back to my house- I then examined my drawer, which was open, and he went towards the drawer to throw a purse into it; I had lost from the drawer a brown silk purse, with a sovereign and a half in it - I had put it in there about an hour and a half before; the drawer was locked, and I had the key in my pocket; I did not see the purse in his hand till he went to throw it into the drawer - it was the same purse as I had lost; he tried to put it into the drawer, but it went into the officer's hands before it got to the drawer - when I came up stairs the street door was shut - it opened with a latch-key.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How long had you had the purse? A. About ten years; my husband is not here - he is ill: I swear that the purse is mine - I never heard that the prisoner claimed it; I have no family nor servant: I never let any body look at my purse - there is a stitch or two dropped in it, which has caused a hole, and it is changed into different clours; I was single when I married Mr. Hall - I was only seventeen years old: I was never married to a Mr. Holmes - I do not know such a person.

COURT. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before? A. No.

WILLIAM SIBLEY . I am a Police-constable. I was next door to the prosecutor's, endeavouring to apprehend a woman, and saw a man run out of her house - I heard a cry of Murder! I pursued the man directly, and finding him gain upon me, I called out Stop thief! a sort of milkman caught hold of him - he said, "I am not the thief - the thief has turned round the corner;" I still pursued the prisoner, and overtook him - he said, "I am not the thief, he is gone round the corner;" I, however, took him - the prosecutrix came up, and said, "You good for nothing rogue, how dare you enter my premises?" I searched him, and found a chisel put up his coat sleeve - I took him back to the house, searched him again, and saw a brown silk purse in his hand; I saw him heave it towards the drawer - I caught it in my hand, and the prosecutrix identified it; it contained a sovereign and a half - he threw a handkerchief away, which I lifted up, and found a key; I tried it to the parlour door, and it fitted it - I found on him a bag, with a latch-key, and that opened the street door; a boy gave me a key, which he said he found in the street.

JANE HALL . This is my purse - I will swear to it; it was my mother's.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent - the purse in question, with the sovereign and half-sovereign, are my property, and nobody else's.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[July 5.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 46.

Reference Number: t18310630-20

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1209. MARY HETHERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , at St. marylebone, 5 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns, the monies of Ellen Herring , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Cragan .

ELLEN HERRING . On the 21st of May I lived in Calmell-buildings, in the parish of St. Marylebone - I lodged there; I lived in the same room with David Pickley and his wife - Ellen O'Donnell also lodged there; we all lived in the same room; Thomas Cragan is the landlord of the house, and lived in it. On the 21st of May I lost my money out of my box - I do not know the date, but it was about six weeks ago; it was on the Saturday before I went to the Police-office the box was broke open; there was a little box in it, containing five sovereigns and two half-sovereigns; the prisoner had been taking care of the room from Monday till Saturday - she went away at twelve o'clock on Saturday, and I missed my money between twelve and one, within an hour of her leaving - I had seen my money on the Thursday morning; the box was locked, and I had the key - I had not been to it since the Thursday; the little box was taken away, as well as the money - there was nothing in it but the sovereigns and half-sovereigns; I did not see the prisoner again till Monday, when she was in custody at Marylebone-office - the Policeman showed me my money; she had been taken on the Saturday.

DAVID PICKLEY . I am a labourer, and had a room in Cragan's house; the prosecutrix, another woman, and I and my wife lodged in that room - there are two beds in it. On Saturday, the 21st of May, the prosecutrix told me of her loss - I went with one Maloney in pursuit of the prisoner as far as Brentford, getting into Hounslow - John Carr, the officer, was with me, and he took her; I saw her searched - five sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and 7s. 4 1/2d. were found upon her - she had the sovereigns and half-sovereigns in a little tin box, but not the other money - as we came along she said, "I don't know what is to become of me now about this here money;" I did not threaten or promise her any thing - I said I did not know what would become of her, but she had behaved rather foolish to have any thing to do with the money; she said nothing more to me.

Q.How came you to pursue her? A. She had left the house at twelve o'clock - I understood she was going into the country again - she had been with me from the Monday morning till the Saturday, as a servant, and slept in my room; I had hired her by the week, which would not be up until the Monday - she left of her own accord, and did not let me know she was going.

JOHN CARR . I am a Police-constable of the Kensington division. I was on duty at Brentford on the 21st of May, and saw Pickley running through the streets at Brentford, in his shirt-sleeves, about ten minutes after six o'clock in the afternoon, another man was with him - he was coming in a direction from town; I went, and asked him what was the matter - he said a woman had robbed him of six sovereigns; in consequence of his information I followed the prisoner, and took her going into Hounslow, about two miles and a half from where I first saw Pickley - I laid my hand on the prisoner, told her I had ran far enough after her, and that she was my prisoner - I brought her into a public-house to search her; she took this tin box out of her pocket, and thought to conceal it; I caught it in her hand, took it from her, opened it, and found in it five sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and two rings - Pickley was present, and when he saw the sovereigns turned out he said, "That is the money;" she was present, but said nothing - I brought her to Brentford, kept her there till the 23rd, and then brought her to Marylebone-office; Pickley walked with her from Hounslow, but I did not hear what passed between them - I beard him say to Mr. Rawlinson, the Magistrate, that she took 6l. from this woman; I did not see that taken down - this ribbon and two rings were in the box.

ELLEN HERRING. I am single . This is not the box my money was in - mine was a wooden one; I have not seen it since - I have no mark on the sovereigns, but it is the same quantity of money as I lost.

Prisoner. She has a half-sovereign and two rings belonging to me.

ELLEN HERRING. Here are five sovereigns and two half-sovereigns, which belong to me - there are no other half-sovereigns: this piece of ribbon is mine, and was in my box with the money - my box was locked all the week - when I found it broken open, the hasp was drawn out; I did not find it out till I went to the box.

DAVID PICKLEY. We all go in at the same outer door.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.[July 5.]

Reference Number: t18310630-21

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1210. THOMAS HAYWARD . MARY JACKMAN , HANNAH GRAHAM , and PHOEBE HYAMS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry McFarlin , on the 26th of June , at St. Lnke, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 10 shillings and 17 sixpences , the monies of the said Henry McFarlin .

HENRY McFARLIN . I hold a situation under the Honourable East India Company . On the night of the 26th of June I was in Goswell-street, and met a girl of the town, named Mary Ann Gray - I went with her to a house about a quarter-past one o'clock; I had met her about one - I went with her into a house in Bell-alley, Goswell-street ; the prisoner Graham, who was the servant , walked before us up stairs, with a light in her hand, to the second floor front room - she demanded half a crown for the room; I gave her 2s., which she took - she went down, returned, and said her mistress would not take less than half a crown - I desired her to return me my money; I put it into my pocket, and told her I should not stop - she walked down stairs, and Jackman, the mistress, came up immediately, as if she were at the door - Gray asked her why she would not take 2s., as she knew she let the bed for that money at

times; she said, "If I had known it was you I should have taken it;" Jackman came into the room - Graham was not in company with her then; when she found Gray was there she said she would take the 2s. - I pulled my silver, 18s. or 19s., out of my pocket - I might have left some in my pocket; I handed Jackman a shilling and two sixpences, which she received - I had got back my 2s. from Graham: Jackman put the money into her pocket - she had the sheets there with her, and put them on the bed I gave her (Jackman) 5 1/2d. to send out for a pint of halfand-half, which she brought in, drank part of it with us, and asked me if I had settled with the girl - I said that was none of her business, that the young woman and I would settle ourselves; she turned round immediately - I looked about, and saw Graham stanaing at the door; she said, "Sir, you must pay me for the bed;" I said, "Did I not pay you not a minute ago 2s. for the bed, and you seemed to feel satisfied?" she immediately appealed to Graham, and said, "Did you see him pay me?" Graham said No, and Jackman denied having received it - she made use of the most out of the way sort of oaths, and swore I had not; I said, "Well, ma'am, I will wish you good night, keep the money, and I will go away, and say no more about it;" I attempted to go away, and told Gray I should stop no longer - Jackman had a candle in her hand; Gray was standing there, and at the time I made to go to the door Hyams stood there - she came up and said,"Oh, you cannot go, Sir;" I said, "What have I done? what do you detain me for?" and Jackman immediately blew out the candle - before she blew out the candle she had her left hand on my collar, pushing me back, and the other two women held me hard - I attempted to go down stairs, but Jackman never let go of my collar, and struck me a violent blow in the eye; I received several blows - she is the only woman who struck me, but the other women scraped at me - they all of them fastened on my collar, pulled my coat over my shoulders, scratched my face, and held my throat; the blood came down in torrents from every part of my face - I attempted to get down stairs all I could, but I could not get their hands off my collar; I screamed out Murder! and dragged myself down backwards - Jackman was holding me by the collar with one hand all the time, and striking me as hard as she could, like a man - with great difficulty I got down; Hyams and Jackman stuck to me particularly till I got down to the landing - when I got down to the first floor landing I saw a reflection of light from a room; I looked about as well I could, and saw three men coming up - they began pushing me, beating me about the head, and asking me what I did there - I was screaming Murder and Robbery! all the time - when the men came behind my back I found Jackman's hand in my pocket - the men came behind me.

Q. Did you find Jackman's hand in your pocket before the men came up, or after? A. She attempted it before, but after the men came up I caught her hand in my pocket- I held it, and cried out Murder! - she tore my waistcoat from my back in getting out her hand, and got my money out of my pocket; my waistcoat pocket was turned inside out.

Q. Do you know any of the men? A. To the best of my knowledge, Hayward struck me on the lip as I came down; after screaming for a considerable time at the door, calling Murder and Robbery! and knocking and kicking at the door, and they using very sort of language to me, the door was opened, as if by magic, and I got out into the street; I found I had lost all the silver in my pocket - I had about 21s., in shillings and sixpences, loose in my pocket when I went into the house; I know that twenty minutes before I had 21s. - I afterwards found a Policeman, and gave him information; he returned with me to the house immediately, and I pointed out the persons who had robbed me - the prisoners were taken into custody immediately in the house; they were sitting in the kitchen, quite composed, as if nothing had happened - they were all four there, with another young man, but the Magistrate let him go, as I considered he was not one of them; I had given 2s. for the bed, and 5 1/2d. for the ale, and when I met Gray I treated her with a glass of port; Gray hallooed out Robbery and Murder! and took my part as well as she could- I had thirty-eight sovereigns wrapped in a piece of newspaper in my watch-pocket; I did not lose them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You were quite sober and collected? A. I consider so - I have brought my waistcoat here on purpose to show the Judge and Jury- I am gate-keeper at one of the East India warehouses now; I am not married - business had called me out; I believe Gray to be a respectable person in the character she was - I do not know the sign of the house where we had the glass of port; I did not treat myself with any thing - it was perhaps a hundred yards from the house; it was a public-house - I did not sit down; I paid 4d. for the port.

Q. Did you ever say you were robbed of the thirtyeight sovereigns? A. I did - I never swore it; I put my hand to all my pockets, (and in the deranged state of mind that I was in, I was all blood, and could scarcely see out of my eyes - I felt round all my pockets,) where I am in the habit of keeping money, and could find none; I told the Policeman I had lost both silver and gold - he asked how many sovereigns I had lost; I said I had thirty-eight, not that I was robbed of thirty-eight - I did not swear positively to the male prisoner at the office, and I do not now- I swore to the best of my knowledge; I was in such a deranged state; I did not know but I was stuck with a knife.

Q. Might you not then be mistaken about the man? A. No - the man came and met me about three stairs high, struck me behind, and when I called Murder! Jackman struck me in the lip; I was beat and scratched by the women, and nearly choked before the men came behind me- by the reflection of the light on the stairs, Hayward is the man.

Q. Were not the people endeavouring to keep you in the house till you paid 2s. for the trouble you had given them? A. I paid 2s., and treated her with half-and-half.

Q. Now did you mention a word of the quantity of silver you had lost till a sum of silver was found on one of them? A. The sovereigns which I thought I had lost absorbed my mind, for they were only entrusted to me; I said I had lost all the silver and gold I had - I did not hear what silver was found on the prisoner; I said I had lost 18s. or 18s. 6d., or something there about - I stated that when I went before the Magistrate, but I told the Policeman I had lost all the silver and gold I had; it was the sovereigns that were my greatest trouble.

Q. The sovereigns in your fob would make a pretty good bulk; did you not feel them? A. I put my hands all round, and never till three o'clock, when I got home, and threw my trousers down, did I find that the sovereigns were still in my fob - I did not feel them before; you must consider that the blood was flowing from my wounds - I did not swear to the man who was discharged as being one of them; when the Policeman called next morning, I said,"There are my sovereigns, thank God! I don't care about the rest - I have lost 18s. or 18s. 6d.;" they had not searched me at the station-house at night - I left the station about twenty-five minutes after the robbery, and stated that they had robbed me of all my silver and gold.

COURT. Q. Had you a watch about you? A. No, nor any pocket-book; I had a pocket-handkerchief, which was not lost - I was leaving Gray behind me at first; I told her I should go - they were preventing my going down stairs.

MARY ANN GRAY. I met the prosecutor on the night of the 26th of June, and went with him to this house - he was not intoxicated; I had been there before, and knew Mrs. Jackman - I have seen Hayward at the house - he lives there; we went up stairs - Graham followed us up; I told her we wanted a bed for the night, if she would take 2s.; she said she would go down, and ask her mistress - the prosecutor pulled out a handfull of silver, and gave her two sixpences and a shilling; she brought the 2s. up again, and gave it to him - Mrs. Jackman came up; I said, "Mrs. Jackman, won't you take 2s. for the bed?" she said, "Yes, I did not know it was you, or I would have taken it at first;" the prosecutor gave her 5 1/2d. to get a pint of half-and-half, and gave her 2s. again for the bed- he gave it to Jackman; Graham was gone out then -Jackman went and fetched a pint of half-and-half; we all drank of it - she put the bottom sheet on the bed, and said,"Has the gentleman given you any thing?" I said,"Never mind that, if he has not, he will;" the gentleman then said, "I shall not stop here;" Jackman said, "You have not paid for the bed yet, Sir;" he said he had, but she was welcome to the 2s., he should not stop at all - she called up the servant, and said, "Graham has this gentleman paid you for the bed?" Graham said, "No, ma'am, he has not," and then two girls came into the room - one of them took the gentleman by the collar, and said, "Why do'nt you pay for the bed?" he said, "I have paid it - you let me go;" the candle was then either put out or knocked out, I do not know which; Mrs. Jackman and they together, pulled the gentleman down stairs, and I was left there in the dark by myself - when they got nearly to the bottom of the stairs, I looked down, and there were three men there as well as the women: at the time the prosecutor paid the 2s. to Jackman, he pulled all his money out in his hand - I cannot form a judgment how much there was; it was silver - I did not see any half-crowns among it; I could not distinguish the men at the bottom of the stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen the prosecutor before? A. Never; nothing was said about what he was to give me - we went to a public-house at the corner of Fann-street, where I had a glass of port, which he paid 4d. or 5d. for; I never saw his gold - we did not sit down in the public-house; I do not know the name of it - I had met him about a quarter of an hour; I do not know the time exactly - I did not stop long enough to see who the men were on the stairs; I never said there were but two men - I was fetched to the station about six o'clock in the morning; Mrs. Jackman told them where to find me, and desired I should be sent for.

THOMAS JONES . I am a Police-constable. About ten minutes before two o'clock, on the morning of the 26th of June, the prosecutor met me in Goswell-street - he was in a dreadful state, bleeding from his eye-brows completely all down his front; his waistcoat was torn all down - I did not notice whether the pocket was turned out; he told me he had been with a young woman, and the parties in the house had robbed him of all he had - I accompanied him to the house, knocked at the door, and Jackman opened it; I went in, and called the prosecutor to follow me - I said, "Now point out which is the person who robbed you;" he pointed to Jackman, and said, "That is the person who blew out the candle and began the attack, and the others aided and assisted;" he pointed out Hayward among the rest - he said he had thirty-eight sovereigns, and had been robbed of the whole that he had; I called my fellow-servant while I went up stairs to search, and when I came down I took them all to the station.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you swear that McFarlin said positively that Hayward was one of the parties? A. I do positively - I was at the office when he was sworn; he said there, to the best of his knowledge, Hayward was one - he said no more at the station; I mean to say that he pointed him out - in the agitated state he was in he said he was the man, but when he came to himself, he said to the best of his knowledge; he was standing by in the station-house when they were being searched - I searched Graham and Hyams, and found nothing; he was present when Jackman was searched.

Q. Did he mention any particular sum that he had lost in silver till she was searched? A. No, he did not - I cannot say whether he saw what silver was found on her; he might be about two yards off - there was a light; there was 18s. 11 1/2d. found on Jackman - it was handed to the inspector, but not to the prosecutor; it was handed to the inspector, who counted it - the prosecutor was not actually near enough to see what it was; he was within two yards - I mean to say it could be done without his seeing what it was; it was handed between the rails to the inspector-I did not search the prosecutor; I cannot say how long he staid there, because I returned to search the house - we never search prosecutors.

WILLIAM ROWLAND . I am a Policeman, and assisted Jones. The prisoners were all taken into custody; I asked Jackman who did it - she hesitated, and said she did not know; I said it was impossible for her not to know who did it, and who brought him to the house - she said Country Polly brought him there; I asked where she lived; she said somewhere in Playhouse-yard - she said Graham knew a little about it; I said, "Well, I shall take you all to the station;" I searched her pocket, which was behind her, and found 18s. 11 1/2d. - the prosecutor said at the station that he had been robbed of thirty-eight sovereigns, but he spoke in that flurried way I could hardly hear how many he said; I heard nothing of silver till we were at the Police-office on the Monday - I considered they were charged with stealing the sovereigns.

Hayward's Defence. I am totally innocent; I was in bed at the time, and saw nothing of the prosecutor till he

came in with the Policeman - I knew nothing of the thirtyeight sovereigns till I went to the station-house; I was not taken into custody, I followed behind - at the station the prosecutor swore a young man who was taken with me was the man that hit him on the stairs; I thought I was detained for belonging to the house, but at Worship-street I heard a different statement, that he had been robbed of 18s. 6d.

Jackman's Defence. I am as innocent as a baby unborn - what he has sworn is very false.

Hyams' Defence. I was not in the house when it was done; I came in just after the Policeman.

THOMAS JONES . Hayward was up, smoking his pipe, when I took him.

One witness gave Jackman a good character.

JACKMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

HAYWARD - NOT GUILTY .

GRAHAM - NOT GUILTY .

HYAMS - NOT GUILTY .[July 5.]

Reference Number: t18310630-22

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1211. JOHN CARNEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Linch , on the 14th of May , at St. George, and stealing therein 1 gown, value 15s.; 1 shawl, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , his property.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house and property of Elizabeth Linch .

ELIZABETH LINCH . At the time in question I lived in Denmark-street, in the parish of St. George in the East - the landlord does not live in the house. On the 14th of May I went out at nine o'clock in the morning - I locked the door, and left this property secure; I returned about two, found the staple forced in, and the door open; I missed the property stated in the indictment; the prisoner's father and mother lived in the room over mine - the prisoner worked at a cow-house; I found some of my property at the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM HENRY FOLKES . I am shopman to Mr. Barker, a pawnbroker, of High-street, Aldgate. I have a gown and shawl, which I believe was pawned by the prisoner, in the name of John smith - I cannot swear to his person; I saw him before the Magistrate on Monday - they were pawned on the Saturday, and believe him to be the man.

WILLIAM PENNY. I am a constable. On the 14th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prosecutrix gave the prisoner into my custody; she said he had burst her door open, stole a shawl and things, and pawned them - I found 2s. 6d. on him, and a handkerchief; I asked what the money was - he said it was part of the money he had pawned the shawl for, and he had exchanged the handkerchief with John Berry , an acquaintance, that the prosecutrix should not know it.

ELIZABETH LINCH . This gown and shawl are mine; the staple was secure when I went out, I am positive - my husband has been away for fourteen years - his name was John; I do not know whether he is dead or alive - if he was alive, I think I should sometimes hear from him.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[July 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth and character.

Reference Number: t18310630-23

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1212. CHARLES PENROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , at St. George, Hanover-square, 8 silver forks, value 4l., and 4 silver spoons, value 4l., the goods of Richard Hart Davis , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LOCK . I am a Policeman. On the 24th of June, I received information and saw the prisoner in Upper Berkeley-street, about a quarter to six o'clock in the evening; on seeing me he ran away - I pursued, overtook him, and took him into custody; I searched him, and found eight silver forks and four silver spoons on him; some were loose in his pockets, and some at the bottom of his trousers - he told me he had received them from another boy, not knowing what they were at the time; he was more than a mile from Mr. Davis - he appeared to be a chimney-sweeper.

ROBERT PANNELL . I am butler to Richard Hart Davis, Esq., who lives in Conduit-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . I know this plate to be his - I have not the least doubt of it; it is the exact quantity we lost, and worth between 8l. and 10l. - it was taken from the pantry; the last time I can swear to seeing it safe was the Wednesday before the Friday when it was taken; I missed it on the Saturday - it might have been taken on Thursday; the pantry is down stairs; the area door is occasionally open -I do not know the prisoner.

[July 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18310630-24

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1213. JOHN LEA was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Gauntlett , on the 5th of June , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing therein 12 spoons, value 5l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 4s.; 1 set of bed-furniture, value 50s.; 9 yards of cotton, value 7s.; 5 sheets, value 40s.; 8 shifts, value 2l.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 scarf, value 2l.; 6 shirts, value 18s.; 16 half-crowns, 60 shillings, and 20 sixpences , his property.

JOHN GAUNTLETT . My house is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch , I live there with my wife. On Sunday, the 5th of June, exactly at a quarter to two o'clock, we went out; I locked the two bed-room doors - the back door was bolted; I double locked the outside door myself, and put the key into my pocket; I returned about nine o'clock, alone - I found a crowd about the door, and the house broken open; I went in at the door, and found a private watchman inside - I found a great deal of property taken away from different rooms, and the drawers all pulled about; I lost about 30l. worth of goods, and have got none of them back - I never saw the prisoner till the day of the robbery; I saw him standing about my door about half an hour before I went out, talking to another man - I am certain he is one of them.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.How long was the prisoner standing there? A. I saw him there about half an hour before I went out - I said two men were standing there, and I did not like the looks of them; they stood there talking and picking their finger nails - I was in this Court some years ago, but cannot tell when, for I am no scholar; I cannot tell how many years ago it is; I was tried and sent to the hulks at Sheerness for six years - I was discharged on the 4th of April in some year.

EDWARD RICHARDS . I am a carpenter. I live oppo

site the prosecutor's house - I saw him and his wife leave the house; I cannot say whether he locked the door - it was shut, and about four o'clock I saw one man come out of the house with a large bundle, and a moment after the prisoner came out with a large blue bag - he could hardly get it under his arm, it was so very heavy; they pulled the door too, and went off together - I had nobody at home; I went over to the house, found every thing in confusion, and the contents of the drawers strewed about; I got somebody to mind my shop, and went in pursuit of them - they were not out of my sight at that time; I swear positively to the prisoner - they saw me looking at them, and the prisoner looked me full in the face; I pursued him as quick as I could, and we caught him just down by Eastroad - they turned a corner short, and we lost them for about three minutes; then the prisoner came up the street again without any thing - I said, "That is the man that had the blue bag, I would swear to him among a hundred;" we had all got to the end of the street at the same time, and he was taken - we all said he was the same man; he had said, "What do you want with me?" he was all in a perspiration - the street is no thoroughfare, which made him come back.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. No; he went across by the brick-field - I might be one hundred yards from him when he had the bag under his arm; the prosecutor's door is about eighty yards from my shop - I saw his face plainly; I am fifty-six years old - it was day-light; he returned up the very street which the man with the blue bag had gone down, the very direction that the people were in pursuit; I do not suppose I was nearer to him than eighty yards -I swear positively to him; he looked at me.

ROBERT HAWKINS . I am apprentice to Mr. Rogers, a jeweller. I was walking with my brother by this house about four o'clock in the afternoon, and saw the prisoner, in company with another man, running up the Shepherdesswalk - the prisoner was carrying a blue bag, and the other had a bundle in a handkerchief; I walked between them some steps - it was raining; the prisoner said, "I can't put up the umbrella, I can't go so fast;" they were just upon the run - the other said to him, "Never mind, run on, we have not far to go;" I turned round, and saw Taylor the officer running - I ran also, and saw the prisoner taken into custody, but he had no property then; I am quite certain of his person.

Cross-examined. Q.There was no pursuit after him when you first saw him? A. Yes; I, my brother, and the officer followed him, but it was on account of suspicion from what I heard them say - there was no hue and cry after them then; he just turned down the street, he returned in about three minutes without any thing, and was taken - he was walking back, and the persons who had pursued him were waiting at the top of the street, to see if they could learn what house he had gone into with the property.

JAMES HAWKINS . I was with my brother, and saw the two men - the prisoner was carrying a large blue bag - the other had a bundle under his arm; I was close to them - they passed us; I heard them say, "Don't put up the umbrella, we can't go so fast, we have not far to go;" I positively swear to the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you an opportunity of seeing him? A. About six minutes - he held the umbrella up, but I could see his face.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a headborough. On the Sunday in question I saw the prisoner about noon, alone - I saw him again about half-past four o'clock, in Edward-street, in company with a respectably dressed man; the prisoner had a blue bag on his back - the other man had a bundle under his arm: I thought it was not altogether right - he got to the corner, turned round, looked back, and then ran; I followed, and lost sight of him, saw him again, and lost sight of him again - I ran to the end of New Hoxton, and saw them between Allerton-street and Union-street, and when I got there I saw nobody; I turned round in five minutes, and saw the prisoner in Hoxton New-town - I went up; Richards said, "That is the man who robbed the house - I will swear to him;" he was wiping his face, and was in a perspiration.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there no means of his getting out of that street without coming back? A. He must go through houses if he did - there are gardens at the end of the street, but they are always locked; people belonging to them have private keys.

Prisoner. At the first examination he said he saw me two hundred yards from him, and at the next examination he said it was four hundred. Witness. I always said it was two hundred yards.

Prisoner's Defence. About a quarter-past five o'clock on the Sunday in question, I left home for the purpose of getting my wife some medicine, she being extremely ill, and near her confinement - I was passing the corner of the street, and observed a number of people collected, and on getting towards them I heard Richards say, "Come back, for they have not gone this way;" on my getting near to Richards, Taylor turned round, and said, "I think you are the person who committed the robbery, and I must take you;" I went to the station without hesitation. I respectfully submit to you, is it likely if I had been the person that I should have gone down the street, get out of sight, and then come back into the arms of the persons in active pursuit of me, which I must have known? and now, my Lord, if there is any discrepancy in the evidence, I trust you will give me the benefit of it.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[July 6.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18310630-25

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1214. ALPHONSE REPPIEN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , at St. James, within the Liberty of Westminster, 6 rings, value 18l., the goods of Christopher Rowlands , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM BROAD ROWLANDS . I am the son of Christopher Rowlands, a jeweller , who lives at No. 9, Coventry-street, Haymarket, in the parish of St. James . On the 29th of June, about four o'clock, the prisoner and another person came into the shop; neither of them spoke English - they appeared foreigners; they pointed to some rings in the window; I showed them some rings - they purchased one at 1l. 12s.; the prisoner's companion bought it, and paid for it - I had occasion to stoop down to get a paper box, to put the ring in, and some cotton, and as I stooped I heard the rings in the tray being pulled about - the tray of rings was at that time on the counter before them; I

heard a rattling, as if they were looking at the rings again- they went out of the shop, and I then missed two rings; they were two particular ones which I could miss in a moment - they had looked at a great many rings, and given me more trouble than usual; I sent Davies in pursuit, and the prisoner was taken immediately; on directing my attention to the tray more particularly, I missed seven gold rings altogether, which were safe before in the tray I had shown them - I am sure both the persons were foreigners; the six rings which are found are worth 18l. - we have lost one entirely; the seven are worth 20l.

Prisoner (through an interpreter). Q. Was I present when you stooped down to get the box? A. Yes, when I stooped for the box he came to the counter.

EDWARD DAVIES. I am in the prosecutor's employ. -Mr. Rowlands sent me in pursuit of the men, and in Leicester-square I saw the prisoner and his companion trying the rings on their fingers - I saw about half a dozen in their hands; they saw me, and walked off the pavement to the railing of the garden in the middle of the square; I then saw the other man give the rest of the rings to the prisoner - they walked a little way, and then separated; I gave an alarm of Stop thief! one went one way, and the prisoner ran another - I gave an alarm; he ran into Mr. Gregory's, a baker's, in Panton-street, and was taken - the rings were found under the sofa, where he ran.

JOHN GREGORY . I am a baker, and live in Panton-street. The prisoner ran into my parlour - he was a stranger; he was taken into custody and taken away, and after he was gone I found six rings under my sofa, close to where the prisoner stood.

MARTIN DYER. I took the prisoner into custody. I went to Gregory, who gave me six rings, which I have had ever since - I was at the office when the prisoner was examined - he did not speak English there.

WILLIAM BROAD ROWLANDS . These are my father's rings; I never sold them to the prisoner or his companion.

Prisoner's Defence (through an interpreter.) I got acquainted with the other man on coming over to this country, as I could not speak English; he took me to an hotel, and a few days after he asked me to go with him to buy a ring or two for his wife - I went, and this happened; I do not know any thing about their being stolen, but when I came out the other gave me the rings into my hands; I took them, and he ran away, hearing a cry of Stop thief! I thought something was wrong, and ran away too - I went into the house, and put the rings down, as I saw my companion was not honest - I recommend myself to the mercy of the Court.

[July 7.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18310630-26

1215. MARGARET SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , at St. Maylebone , 1 watch, value 2l.; 3 seals, value 10s.; 1 key, value 1s.; 1 brooch, value 1l.; 3 rings, value 2l.; 7 silver spoons, value 30s.; 1 eyeglass, value 5s.; 1 topaz cross, value 1l.; 2 bracelets, value 1l.; 1 shawl, value 15s.; 2 veils, value 10s.; 4 pairs of silk stockings, value 15s.; 1 half-sovereign, and 9 shillings, the property of Jane Walls , in her dwelling-house ; to which she pleaded

[July 4.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18310630-27

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, JUNE 30.

First Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1216. THOMAS SAWYER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Hugh Grimes , on the 9th of April , at Edmonton , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 3 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 9 sixpences , his property.

The same evidence was given in this case as on the trial of William Sawyer and others, who were tried last Session (see page 581); the prisoner was then in custody, but too ill to be tried. None of the witnesses had seen him present at the time the robbery was committed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-28

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1217. THOMAS BARTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 watch, value 12l., the goods of Susannah Dwerrihouse and other, in their dwelling-house .

JOHN HENDERSON . I am clerk to Susannah Dwerri-house and Co., watch-maker , Davis-street, Berkeleysquare . On Thursday evening, the 12th of May, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, and presented a paper - I asked him what it was, if it was a petition; he would not answer, but requested me to look at it - I returned it to him: he still requested I would open it, which I did, and seeing it was a petition craving charity, I returned it to him, and he left the shop - he had not left more than a second before I missed a gold watch off the counter, which I had packed up to send to a customer; I sent a workman and the porter in search of him: they did not find him, but I met him the following morning, about twelve o'clock, on Westminster-bridge, and had him apprehended by a Policeman - I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you live in the house? A. No; Mr. Ogsden, one of the firm, occupies the whole house, except the shop.

JAMES OGSDEN . I am one of the firm of Susannah Dwerrihouse and Co. - we have one other partner; I live in the house - Mrs. Dwerrihouse lives in Edgware-road. -After the prisoner was apprehended I went to a place supposed to be his lodging, and from what I heard there, we went to a pawnbroker's over Westminster-bridge, and there saw a gold watch, which is ours.

Cross-examined. Q. You occupy the dwelling part of the house yourself? A. Yes, I pay Mrs. Dwerrihouse rent for it - she has not lived there these two years.

GEORGE RODOLPH . I am shopman to Mr. Hobbs, a pawnbroker, of Richard-street, Westminster-bridge-road. On the 13th of May the prisoner pawned this gold watch with me for 3l. - it is worth 70s.; I can sell some gold watches for 30s. - I am quite sure the prisoner is the person who pawned it.

Cross-examined. Q. You had never seen him before? A. I had not.

HENRY MARSH . I am in the prosecutors' employ. I was in the shop when the prisoner came in with a petition, and am certain he is the man.

MR. OGSDEN. I know this watch quite well - it was in our possession the day the prisoner came; it is worth about 5l., but the nominal value I cannot tell.

Cross-examined. Q.Why do you charge it 12l.? A. Because many years ago, when I sold it, I charged that for it.

JOHN HENDERSON . This is the watch I packed up.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-29

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1218. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , at St. Clement Danes, 13 rings, value 15l., and 1 ring-case, value 2s., the goods of George Binns , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE BINNS . I am a watchmaker , and live in the Strand, in the precinct of the Savoy , which is not in St. Clement Danes. On Monday, the 16th of May, at four o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked me if he could have a ring engraved, how soon it could be done, and what would he the price; I told him 2s. - he immediately left the shop, saying he would call again at halfpast seven to leave the ring to be engraved; a boy came into the shop almost at the same moment as he did, and asked some question of my boy, who was cleaning jewellery at the counter, and they both left the shop almost instantly; my boy came to me, and said something - I immediately missed thirteen rings, which had laid on the counter in a case, and were worth about 13l.; I had seen them within half an hour of the prisoner's coming in - I ran into the street to look for the prisoner; I went out a second and a third time, and then met him in Wych-street, Strand, with the identical case in his hand, but the rings were gone - I endeavoured to seize him, but he ran away- I got the case from him, caught hold of him, and gave him in charge; he was taken to the watch-house, and afterwards to Bow-street - I have not got one of the rings back; I found him within half an hour of his being in the shop - I never saw him before; I have not seen the boy since.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not you state before this that two boys came in? A. My boy and man stated so, I believe; I did not see the other boy - I said two came, as they said they saw two; I never said I picked the case up - I took it out of the prisoner's hand; Wych-street is a very little way from my shop - there was a Jew arm-in-arm with him, and they both made their flight; I told the Magistrate I saw the Jew - I saw the two boys at a public-house in Holywell-street, where the prisoner ran to, and I seized him; I had no opportunity of seizing the boys, as the Police did not come in time for me to take them; I held the prisoner fast, and he went into the public-house with me - the boys ran away; before I could well see them they were out of sight - they were the same description of boys as were in the shop, and the prisoner took me to them for the purpose of getting the rings; he said, "I will get your rings," and took me in there; I mentioned this at Bow-street - I am positive he said he would take me to where I could get my rings back; I am positive of that - a bag was found on the prisoner, which the Police call a swag bag.

COURT. Q. Have you got the case here? A. Yes, my Lord; I am positive it is the case - it has never been out of my possession since I took it from him - I have had it about six months; I took him three or four hundred yards from my house - I never spoke to the boys either in my shop, or elsewhere.

THOMAS JONES . I am fourteen years old - I have lived with the prosecutor about eighteen months. On the 16th of May, about half-past four o'clock, I remember the prisoner coming to inquire about engraving a ring; I never saw him before - I was cleaning a ring at the counter; there were fifteen altogether on the counter in a case - the prisoner was about four yards from me- a boy came in about a minute before him, and another came in just at the same time as the prisoner, and that boy asked me the way to Oxford-street; I stood where I was, pointed over the way, and said it was somewhere over there - he went out; the boy who came in first wanted 1d. worth of watch-springs - I knelt down behind the counter to get them out of the drawer, and before I gave him the watch-springs the prisoner went out, after Mr. Binns had given him his answer; immediately after the other boy went, I turned round to clean the rest of the rings, and they were gone - I had seen them just before the boy came in for the watch-springs; I had emptied them all out of the case, and put them back as I cleaned them - I had put them all back but two; on missing them I told Mr. Binns directly - he put on his hat, and went out; I went out also, but could not see them -I saw the prisoner at Bow-street afterwards, and am quite confident of him; he was not above three or four minutes in the shop - I have not seen the boys since; I am quite confident neither of them could reach the case - this is the case.

Cross-examined. Q.Both the boys came to you for what they wanted, and the prisoner, if he is the person, went to your master? A. Yes - master was sitting at the board next to me, working behind the counter, close to the window - we have only one counter; I was about the middle of it - the prisoner did not speak to me.

Q.Nor come to your end of the counter? A. That I do not know, for I turned round to Mr. Binns to ask how many springs I should give the boy, and turned my back to the prisoner then; my master sat with his face to the window, and his back to the top of the counter - his side face was to the counter; he turned round to give him an answer - he sat at the workboard, and I at the counter lower down, near the back part of the shop; the prisoner stood about the middle of us - I turned my back to the end of the counter, and to the rings, when I asked how many springs I was to sell; the prisoner was not in conversation with master at that time - the prisoner and the boys were all about the same place; one of the boys had gone away - the other is about fifteen years old; there was a show-glass on the counter, and the counter is about a yard and a quarter wide, which he would have to reach over - I tried myself to see if the boy could reach the case, and it was impossible; the two rings which remained out of the case were left, only the thirteen were taken - I did not go into Wych-street after him; I have not said I was not quite sure of the prisoner.

COURT. Q. Was the prisoner near enough to reach the rings? A. Yes - he had been looking into the glasscase, and if he put his hand over he could take them; the case was exactly opposite to me, but the boy asking for the springs drew my attention from it.

WILLIAM FLEGG. I am a watch-maker, and work for Mr. Binns. I was at work in the shop, within two yards of Jones - a boy came in and asked for 1d. worth of watch-springs; there was nobody else there then, but almost at the moment he entered, the prisoner came in, and inquired of Mr. Binns the price of engraving a motto on a mourning-ring - he told him 2s.; Jones came to Mr. Binns, asked how many springs he should give for 1d., and the prisoner left the shop the moment after - I had seen the lad cleaning the case of rings a moment before; the prisoner was within a yard of it - the boy missed them directly: I saw Mr. Binns pick a diamond ring off the floor behind the counter - it was one which had been in the case; I do not know how it came on the floor - I did not see the prisoner again till he was at Bow-street; I am sure he is the man, for he went out of the shop, looked at the goods in the window, and then walked off- I had a full opportunity of identifying him.

Cross-examined. Q. Your attention was not directed to what was going forward? A. Not particularly - my back was to the case of rings, but I was within a yard of it; I turned round once or twice, and could see the prisoner.

GUILTY of larceny only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-30

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1219. WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , 1 coat, value 13s. , the goods of John Stafford ; and that he had previously been convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-31

1220. GEORGE POULDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., and 1 snuff-box, value 2s., the goods of William Wooly Simpson , from his person .

WILLIAM WOOLY SIMPSON. I have an office in Bucklersbury, and live at Chelsea. On the 13th of May, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was returning from my banker's to my office; by the back of the Mansion-house , I felt something - turned round, and saw a lad with my snuff-box and handkerchief in his hand - they had been taken from my pocket; I made an effort to lay hold of him, and he dropped them immediately - there were three of them in company; immediately as I turned round I saw the prisoner - he was in possession of my property afterwards; the one who dropped it ran away, and the prisoner took them up immediately - I pursued, and was very near the prisoner when he was laid hold of; he had put the box into his pocket, for while I was in pursuit I saw him take it from his pocket, and throw it down - I saw part of my handkerchief hanging out of his pocket at the time he was taken; the box is silver, and worth 2l.

THOMAS HUTCHINS . I am a hair-manufacturer. About four o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a cry of Stop thief! in the Poultry; the prisoner was running as hard as he could - I went and caught hold of him; he instantly struck me in the eye - I then let go of him; he got about twenty yards further, and was secured - I have no doubt of him.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am under beadle of Cheap ward. I was at the bottom of the Poultry, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned round, and saw Hutchins catch hold of the prisoner; he struck him a violent blow in the eye with his fist, and I suppose the box was in that hand, for I saw dust fly - Hutchins let him go, and I saw Neale take him; I am certain of him.

SAMUEL NEALE . I am one of the City Police. I was opposite the Mansion-house, heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running in the middle of the road, between the coaches - I pursued, and took him; I searched him at the Mansion-house, but he had nothing then.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-32

1221. JAMES COWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Biden , from his person .

THOMAS BIDEN . I am a clerk . On the 8th of June, about a quarter-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was in St. Paul's church-yard , going from home; an officer stopped and gave me information - I felt my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone; I immediately saw it in the prisoner's hands - the officer had hold of him at the time; he said it was not him, that he took it from the hand of another boy, and was going to give it to me.

ROBERT TVRRELL. I am a constable. About a quarter-past nine o'clock I stood at the corner of St. Paul's church-yard, and saw the prisoner in company with another about his own age, following Mr. Biden, and about half way down the church-yard I saw the prisoner attempt his pocket, but he did not succeed - he went a few yards further, and then took the handkerchief from Mr. Biden's pocket; I laid hold of him, took it out of his hand, and his companion ran away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). I was passing through St. Paul's church-yard, and saw a boy pick the gentleman's pocket of a handkerchief; I immediately went towards the gentleman intending to inform him, when the boy threw it down - I took it up, and was in the act of giving it to the gentleman, when the officer accused me of taking it; I solemnly protest my innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-33

1222. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 2 combs, value 9s. , the goods of Mary Brock and another.

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-34

1223. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. 6d., the goods of William Beddome , from his person .

WILLIAM BEDDOME. I am a woollen-draper , and live in Fenchurch-street. On the 15th of June, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Devonshire-street, Bishopsgate ; a person behind said, "The lad who is running away has picked your pocket;" I immediately followed the prisoner, who was two or three yards from me, and never lost sight of him - he was stopped going into Cutler-street by an officer, and at that moment I saw my handkerchief at his feet; it is silk, and has my initials on it.

Prisoner. It is quite wrong, it was not near my feet.

JOHH PARKER. I am a watchman. I saw the prose

cutor running after the prisoner, crying Stop thief! - nobody else was running away; he was coming towards me - I stopped him, collared him, and saw him drop the handkerchief at that moment; Mr. Beddome claimed it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me throw it away? A. I saw you drop it the moment I collared you.

JOSEPH STONE. I am one of the City Police. The prisoner was given into my charge with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running along - somebody said Stop thief! I ran, this man stopped me, and accused me of it; I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-35

1224. GEORGE SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 crown and 6 shillings , the monies of Charles Plumbe .

CHARLES PLUMBE. I am a corn-dealer , and live in Lime-street . On the 6th of June, between three and four o'clock, I was dining in my counting-house - my young man, hearing a noise in the shop, went out; he called me, and I found the prisoner, who was a stranger, behind my counter - the till, which was closed before, was partly open; I accused him of stealing some money- he said he had not stolen any, but had dropped a halfpenny behind the counter, and came there to look for it; I sent out for a constable - I inquired of my servant what was in the till, and missed a 5s. piece; the prisoner turned all his pockets out, but I thought one waistcoat pocket was not turned fairly out, and in that I found 3s. - he was taken to the watch-house, and three more shillings were found in the same pocket; he stood round the counter for a quarter of an hour, with his hands behind him, and after he was taken away, I found the 5s. piece behind the counter in the bin - he could easily have dropped it.

ROBERT HOUSE. I am in Mr. Plumbe's employ. I did not see the prisoner till he was behind the counter close to the till - I knew there was a 5s. piece and a quantity of shillings in it; I called Mr. Plumbe, and then went for a constable, who was not at home - I returned and examined the till; there was no 5s. piece, and there appeared less shillings than when I saw it last, but how many I cannot say - I had examined the till about a quarter of an hour before; I do not recollect whether any customer had come afterwards, but I had given no change - I said I was certain there was a 5s. piece in the till; he said he was willing to be searched - the 5s. piece was not found on him, but after he was gone, I found it in the bin, near to where he stood, a little covered over; nobody but master and myself had access to the till.

JOSEPH SWAINSON. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner at the watch-house - he said he knew nothing of the 5s. piece; I went back and found it among the tares behind the counter.

Prisoner's Defence. I had 6s. 0 1/2d. - I went in to ask for some peas, my halfpenny rolled over the counter; I ran round to pick it up - this man came and collared me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-36

1225. BOAZ RUDD and MICHAEL MULLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 2 lbs. 14 ozs. of brass, value 1s. 6d., and 6 lbs. 14 ozs. of copper, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Edmund Pontifex and others.

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SHARPE . I am foreman to Edmund Pontifex and others. On the 19th of May Mr. Pontifex came from Mr. Betts', and I sent for Corby, who came - the prisoners were employed at our manufactory, repairing a drain; they left at six o'clock, and I observed that Rudd had something under his jacket - I was in conversation with him a long time, and when he was gone I told the gate-keeper, who followed him; I saw Rudd join Mullins, who had gone away while I was talking to Rudd - they joined company on Holborn-bridge; I and Corby followed them to the corner of Smithfield together, and there Rudd stopped; Mullins went on towards an old house, next door but one to Mr. Betts', at Smithfield-bars, but I did not see him go in - I continued to watch Rudd - I passed him while he stood at the corner of Smithfield; he then turned round, and went towards the old house - I crossed over to the other side, and lost sight of him while he passed a waggon - I afterwards saw him standing at the corner of the old house; I think he must have seen me, for he appeared confused, and almost immediately Mr. Betts brought Mullins out by the collar - Mullins had a bag in his hand; I then went up to Rudd, and told him he had something about him which he had not honestly come by - he said he was very much astonished I should suspect him; I told him we suspected him of taking property out of our manufactory, but if he would go into Betts' distillery he might be searched, which would not expose him so much - I do not think he made any reply; Corby then took him into the distillery - I saw nine pieces of copper, and I think four pieces of brass found under his jacket, on the left side, except a small piece or two, which was in his coat pocket; I saw five pieces of copper found in Mullins' bag; it was different sorts of copper - it is impossible to say what that found on Rudd was formed of; I cannot say whether I had seen it on our premises, we have so much of the same sort; I can identify one or two pieces, and some which were taken from Rudd - I asked Rudd what he had done it for; he said he knew he had done a bad job for himself - I asked where he got it; he said he had dug part of it out of the old drain, and he hoped Mr. Pontifex would consider his wife and family - the copper found on Rudd weighed 6 lbs. 12 ozs. and the brass 2 lbs. 14ozs. - on Mullins we found 12 lbs. 6 ozs. of copper.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he say where the old drain was? A. No - I did not examine the old house to see if there was a drain there; I cannot say whether I stated at Guildhall that he said it was a bad job - I said I could identify some of the copper, and pointed out a pattern which it was cast from: I identified some, and said there was more found on Mullins, which very likely I might fit to the place it was cut from - the officer took it home with me; I did not see Mullins with a bag before he went into the old house - he had a pole on his shoulder, I had instructions to see where he went, as we suspected he took metal to this old house; I was in hopes of detecting the receiver.

Q. Did you take the trouble to see if there was any body in the old house? A. No; there were persons on the watch - I was not near enough to Mullins to see if he

was bulky; the copper is not a common pattern - these are for making screws for pumps; we have made hundreds from it, but never sold any of them - they are constantly being used, and re-cast: this will be a screw when finished.

COURT. Q.Were the prisoners at all concerned in the copper manufactory? A. No, they are bricklayers - we sell by retail, but not this sort of material.

JAMES BETTS . My father is a distiller, and lives at Smithfield-bars - he has an old house near his premises, going under a repair. On the 19th of May I discovered something in that house, and sent for Mr. Pontifex - I watched the old house that day, from about six o'clock, and saw two persons come into the house - there was a boy standing before me, so that I could not see where they both went, but I saw Mullins come out of the cellar with a bag in his hand - I seized him when he got near the door; he trembled, and said "Pray let me go, I will never do so again;" I said, "You are done" - I took him into the distillery; I emptied his bag, which had copper in it - I had seen that copper in a cupboard in the old house, between nine and eleven o'clock that morning, and in consequence of that sent to Mr. Pontifex.

Cross-examined. Q. For what you know, somebody might have put it there, and told this man to go and get it? A. It might be so - I never saw him take copper in there; we keep a French brandy distillery.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. Were the prisoners at all employed at the old house? A.They had been at work there some time.

GEORGE CORBY . I went with Sharpe, and followed the prisoners - I received Rudd into custody, took him to the manufactory, searched him, and found this metal on him -I saw the bag, which was found on Mullins; Rudd said he had dug part of the copper out of the drain.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the distance from the prosecutors' to the old house? A. I could walk there in three or four minutes - I followed them from Holbornbridge to the house.

JOHN SHARPE here pointed out several particulars by which he identified part of the copper.

MR. BETTS. There was a painter at work at the old house - Mullins was not working there at the time of the robbery - nobody but the painter worked there.

JOHN SHARPE . We never suffer copper to go out in an unmanufactured state - it could never be sold in this state; it was to be made into pump screws - every founder has his own mold.

GEORGE THEOBALD . I live in Brewer's-yard, near the Bell, Smithfield, and am in Mr. Betts' employ. On the 18th of May I went into the old house, and found the copper in one corner of the cellar - I told the painter of it; I heard a noise in the cellar on the night of the 18th - I went down, and Mullins came out of the cellar door with his arms out, pretending to frighten me; he went away, and bid me good night - both of them did: Rudd was there, but not in the cellar - I went up stairs, and in five or ten minutes I heard a noise again; I came down, and Mullins came out of the cellar door again - I and the painter went into the cellar next day, brought the copper out, and locked it in a closet.

Cross-examined. Q. How could they get it then? A. My young master took it out of the closet, and put it in the same place again in the cellar - I saw no copper nor bag about Mullins; the copper was not covered in the cellar, it could be seen with a light - I had no candle when I saw him; he saw me, and spoke to me - the painter worked there after the bricklayers had done; I saw Mullins bring the copper out of the cellar in a bag on the 19th - the prisoners had been working there.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Was the bricklayers' work done before the 18th? A. Yes - neither of them had any business there on the 19th that I am aware of; other bricklayers were also at work there about a fortnight before.

Rudd's Defence. There were several workmen at Betts' besides me, two bricklayers, a carpenter, and two painters; we took some scaffolding from Pontifex's to Betts', as Mr. Betts had given me leave to put it there - I went there for nothing but to take the scaffolding.

MR. BETTS. I had not given leave for scaffolding to be put there; I do not know whether my father had.

The prisoners received a good character.

RUDD - GUILTY . Aged 49.

MULLINS - GUILTY . Aged 41.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-37

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, JUNE 30.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1226. HENRY CURTAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 1 watch, value 30s.; 2 seals, value 20s.; 1 watch-key, value 1s.; 1 ring, value 2s., and 2 steel chains, value 1s. , the goods of John Harris ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310630-38

1227. CHARLES HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 1 pair of shoes, value 7s. , the goods of Robert Hughes .

FRANCES CONNER . I live in Peter's-court. Rosemary-lane , and am a widow - the prisoner lodged with me. On the 15th of April I saw him going out in the morning; I knew he had been to the overseer and got relief - I saw him the next morning standing near Shoreditch church, with the pair of shoes on, which I had bought for Robert Hughes , at Mr. Pedley's, in Whitechapel; his name is on them - Hughes lodged with me, and slept in the same bed with the prisoner.

JAMES HARDEN . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner on the 16th of April, in the Hackney-road; Mrs. Conner and Robert Hughes were with me - Hughes said the prisoner had his shoes on; he denied it, but on the road to the watch-house he said of his own accord, that he had done it through distress, and was sorry for it, but he could not help it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out with two other men - they had a suspicion of me, and said I had stolen them, but nobody saw me steal them; I bought them of a man at the corner of Shoreditch church.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 10 Days .

Reference Number: t18310630-39

1228. JOHN ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 6 handkerchiefs, value 12s., and

8 yards of ribbon, value 8s. , the goods of Samuel Morris and William Harrison .

JOHN DAVIES. I am shopman to Samuel Morris and William Harrison, silk mercers , of Tottenham-court-road. On Saturday morning, the 9th of April, I was at the shop of Mr. Rees Rees, (who is since dead.) in Monmouth-street; in consequence of what Rees said, I returned to my master's house - the prisoner was at that time their porter , and slept in their shop; I returned to Rees' shop in about an hour, and saw the prisoner in custody - the officer produced to me some silk handkerchiefs and some ribbons; I did not at any time see the goods in the prisoner's possession - here is my employers' mark on the handkerchiefs; here is no mark on the ribbon, but we have some of the same pattern, and I believe it to be my employers' - the prisoner said to me, "I wish you would go home to Mr. Morris, and say I am very sorry, and I hope they will forgive me;" no mention had then been made to him of what he had done, in my hearing - I was with Mr. Rees when he died.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Was Rees a dealer in marine-stores? A. No; he dealt in clothes and haberdashery - I knew him for twenty years, and was six years in his employ; I was in his parlour when the prisoner was taken into custody - the prisoner is a raw country lad, and has been but a short time in town; I have heard he has fallen into the hands of a woman of bad character.

COURT. Q. Were you present when Rees Rees was examined before the Magistrate? A. Yes; I saw Rees sign his name to his deposition - this is it; the prisoner was present, and had an opportunity of putting any question to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the Magistrate ask the prisoner if he wished to put any question? A. Yes, I recollect it; I saw Rees write his name in a book, and afterwards on this paper - what was done on this paper was in the absence of the prisoner; I cannot recollect whether this paper was read in the prisoner's presence.

COURT. Q. Did you sign the paper? A. Yes; I believe the prisoner was there at the time, but I cannot exactly speak to that fact - I cannot positively swear that this paper was read in the prisoner's hearing; the evidence was first taken in a book.

WILLIAM PRITCHARD . I am a Police-constable. The prisoner was put into my custody - I asked him where he got the things from - he said he brought them from the country; I asked him where his master lived - he said he did not like to tell me, for fear I should take him to his master, and directly after that Mr. Davies came in; - this took place at Mr. Rees Rees ' house; he gave the prisoner into my custody - the goods were at that time laying on the table in the back parlour; the prisoner spoke of these goods when he said he had brought them from the country.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was then in the parlour? A. The prisoner, Mr. Rees, and a female, but the prisoner was nearer to the goods than the others were.

GUILTY of stealing the handkerchiefs only . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310630-40

1229. JOSEPH SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of April , 1 portrait, value 5s.; 1 print, value 2l.; 3 pictures, value 1l.; 2 boxes, value 3s.; 1 caddy, value 3s.; 1 draft-board, value 1s.; 1 ring, value 3s.; 1 trunk, value 7s.; 1 panagram, value 5l.; 1 punch-bowl, value 10s: 1 set of china, value 9l., and 1 shilling , the property of Henry James Conway .

HENRY JAMES CONWAY . I am a solicitor , and live at my father-in-law's, in Farringdon-street. About three weeks before the 25th of April, I was removing from my residence, and I delivered to the prisoner, who was a porter , a variety of articles - he was to keep them at his house in Robinhood-court for me, till I authorised him to remove them; I delivered to him a portrait in oil, a print of the death of Nelson, three pictures in frames, one of which is needle-work, two boxes of law papers, a caddy, a draft-board, a trunk, a china bowl, and a panagram to teach the blind music, which cost ten guineas; the things were found in Union-street, Middlesex-hospital - the prisoner was taken at Hoxton; I only charge him with stealing these things, because he had removed them from his residence; but whether he did it with the intention of stealing I am sure I do not know.

MARTHA SIMMONDS. I saw the prisoner bring some of these goods to my brother's, at No. 45, Union-street, Middlesex-hospital - he brought no other goods but what the prosecutor has claimed; my brother wished him to take them away, and go away himself - he said they should he removed on the Monday morning; he gave the goods to me, and he said he was going out of town, and should be gone a fortnight or longer, then he intended settle.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-41

1230. JAMES DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 24 yards of silk, value 4l. , the goods of Henry George Hill .

SAMUEL GUYNN . I am in the employ of Henry George Hill, woollen-draper , St. Martin's-lane . On the 18th of May the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for a nail of silk velvet, at 8s. a yard - there were twenty-four yards of silk laying on the counter, and I went round the counter to look for a piece of velvet: I was stoping to get some, and saw him stoop at the same time - I told him we had no velvet at that price; he was then going out, and I saw some silk under his arm - I ran after him, but there was no one in the shop, and I did not pursue him; I came back and missed some silk from the counter - I waited till some one came into the shop; I then went after the prisoner again -I stopped him, and when I took hold of his coat he dropped this silk; I took it up - it had been laying on the counter, and is worth 4l.; I gave him into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. You saw the silk under his arm? A. I pursued him within three minutes - he had got about sixty yards; I did not call to him to stop when he went out - he had a great coat under his arm: I saw him drop the silk about where I stopped him in St. Martin's-lane - he did not drop it till I took hold of him: he was walking fast.

JOHN RATTRAY. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner into custody in the prosecutor's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare I never was in the shop till I was taken there and accused of this robbery.

SAMUEL GUYNN. I did not lose sight of him from the time he dropped the silk till he was given into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-42

1231. THOMAS COCKRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 2 spoons, value 3s. , the goods of Ralph Gallon .

ANN WALTER. I am servant to Mr. Ralph Gallon, who keeps the King's Head, Orchard-street, Westminster . The prisoner came there on the 8th of June to lodge - when he came down the next morning I heard him go into master's first floor room, which we called the club-room: I did not see him come out, but I went into the club-room and missed a silver desert-spoon and a plated tea-spoon, which I had seen safe at ten o'clock the night before, on the table; I went out at the front door, and the first person I saw near the public-house was the prisoner - before I could charge him with taking them, he walked to the corner of the house, took the spoons out of his pocket, and threw them down - my fellow-servant took them up; the prisoner was taken - he begged of my master to forgive him; these are the spoons.

JOSEPH WORMALD . I took the prisoner, and have the spoons.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-43

1232. BENJAMIN BATEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Henry Owen , from his person .

HENRY OWEN . I live near Romford, in Essex. I am a gentleman . On the 17th of June, as I was in Silver-street , passing from Marlborough-street to Regent-street, somebody told me I had had my pocket picked - I felt and missed my handkerchief; I turned and followed the mob into Golden-square - Mr. Charlton, who had the prisoner, gave me the handkerchief which I had had in my pocket, and it is marked with my name.

WILLIAM JOHN CHARLTON . I was in Golden-square between three and four o'clock - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running up Upper John-street, towards me: I pursued, and saw him throw something into an area - I lost sight of it while I pursued: I took him and brought him back, and in my way I asked a person (I believe a servant) at the door of the house where I saw the handkerchief in the area, and they gave it me - I gave it to the prosecutor, with the prisoner: I saw it picked up.

ELIZABETH HUGHES . I was in John-street, leading to Brewer-street, on the 17th of June. I saw the prisoner take a yellow silk handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket who was walking along - it was such a one as has been produced.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-44

1233. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June , 1 cap, value 2s., the goods of William Earles , from the person of John Earles .

PHILIP JONES . I am a Police-constable. On Thursday last I was on duty in London-fields - there were some soldiers and a crowd of persons there; I saw the prisoner in company with two lads - he tried a lady's reticule-basket, and a gentleman's pocket; I then saw him go behind a young gentleman, take his cap off his head and put it on his own head - he then got into the crowd; the others who were with the prisoner, stood before the young gentleman - I followed the prisoner into the crowd and took him; I said I wanted him for a cap - he said, "What cap?" I said the one he had on his head: he said he only took it for a lark - I had seen him take a rough hairy cap off his own head, about five minutes before that, and give it to his brother.

JOHN EARLES. I am eight years old, and am the son of William Earles , of Cambridge-place, Hackney-road: he is a clerk in the Bank of England. On Thursday last I was in London-fields - there were some soldiers there; a person took my cap off my head - I turned, but could not see them; in about five minutes the constable brought the prisoner and my cap; this is it - I know it by the red lining, and this mark in front.

Prisoner. He said at Worship-street that he did not know how the cap was taken off his head - I never was in custody in my life before; I did not mean to steal it.

PHILIP JONES . He had got ten or twelve yards from the prosecutor when I took him, and was mixing in the crowd, which was very thick - he could not have got out very well.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and his master engaged to take him into his employ again.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined One week , and delivered to his master.

Reference Number: t18310630-45

1234. JOHN CULLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 1 purse, value 2s.; 5 sovereigns; 18 shillings, and two 5l. Bank notes, the property of Charles Robertson Hyndman , from his person .

CHARLES ROBERTSON HYNDMAN, Esq. I am an officer of the 11th dragoons . I live at Gloucester Lodge, Brompton. About noon on the day I was at the Police-office, I was walking in Princes-street : I cannot be certain as to the day, as I have had many affairs to attend to, being on the point of going to India - while walking along I felt some one touch me, and thinking it was done from mischief, I turned round with a degree of irritation, and saw two persons behind me, who appeared confused; I suspected something was wrong, and put my hand to my pocket - I missed my purse from my left-hand coat pocket, containing a sum of money which I was not exactly aware of; I knew there were notes, gold, and silver - the purse was afterwards produced, and the money counted in my presence; there were five sovereigns, two 5l. Bank of England notes, and, I believe, seventeen or eighteen shillings in change, but I had taken five shillings from it before I counted it, to give to the person who brought it to me - the prisoner is one of the person who were behind me in a state of some confusion when I turned round; the other ran by me towards Soho-square, and the prisoner towards the Haymarket - I followed the prisoner in preference, from a particular circumstance, and cried Stop thief! - while I was running a person called, "Here is your purse;" I, supposing it was the prisoner's confederate, continued to pursue him, till the purse was delivered to me - I then gave up the pursuit and lost sight of the prisoner - I went into Mr. Hamlet's shop, and was brushing myself, when the

officer came in and took me to an office, where I saw the prisoner; this was in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - I believe it is called Mr. Baker's office; I had been purchasing some goods in a shop near Regent-street, in Piccadilly - I there put my purse into my pocket and walked on to Princes-street - when I turned the second time in Princes-street, I saw a sort of shuffling between the prisoner and the other man's hands; I pursued the prisoner from this circumstance - while I was speaking to my mother's coachman, at the shop door in Piccadilly, a person passed by me very close, who I at first thought was the servant, but seeing he was not, I did not notice him particularly, but when I turned in Princes-street, the impression on my mind was, that the prisoner was that person, which was my reason for pursuing him: the first time I turned in Princes-street, they both stopped when I did; I then felt my pocket, and turned again - they separated, commenced running, and I followed the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you swear positively to the prisoner at the office? A. Yes, as positively as I could - I spoke with a perfect conviction that he was the person; I think that was taken down, and I signed it - but I am really so unused to these things, that I do not know; the impression on my mind is, that I did sign it - I think I did, but I do not wish to swear to any thing I am not certain of; what I swore was read over to me; but I am in some confusion, as I went to two offices - what was read to me was at Marlborough-street, but I think what I signed was at the other office - my only doubt is at which office; I am positive the deposition was read over to me, and that I signed it, and in that I identified the prisoner - I believe that was taken down; I have evidence that it was taken - it appeared to me that that was what I had stated; all that I stated was correet.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure that you stated at the office that you believed the prisoner to be the person who brushed by you? A.When I went into the office the prisoner came up with great violence, and said, "Do you mean to say it was me?" I said, "Stop, stop! this room is dark, let me see you in the light;" he was then taken out into the light, and I said, unhesitatingly, "That is the man I pursued," and I had a vague impression that he was the person who brushed by me.

MARTIN BEAN . I am a servant; I did live in Poland-street. I was in company with Thomas Lee on the 30th of May - I saw the prisoner running down Princes-street, and the prosecutor pursuing him; I saw the prisoner throw something into a gig, which was standing in the street, opposite Mr. Hamlet's door - I went to the gig, and found on the rug a purse, which I gave to Mr. Hyndman, in the same state as I found it; the prisoner was pursued some distance further, and was then taken - I am quite clear he threw something into the gig, and I found nothing in it but the purse.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner stop to throw the purse into the gig? A. No, Sir - I am quite sure I did not throw it there myself; I was not about to leave town - I never stated so; I was not going to Scotland or Liverpool- I lived as servant with a Mr. Wallis two years ago; I have since then been in the Police for about six months - they would not keep me any longer; I was too found of drink, that was the only reason - no thieves got off through me; the commissioners did not charge me with that - I had been drunk once or twice; I was reported once or twice - I cannot say how often I had been drunk; the prisoner told me where his father and mother lived, and I went to them - I dined and drank tea with them; I did not coax them out of any cash.

Q. Be careful, I have witnesses here, I tell you? A. I did get 1 1/2d., but not from them; it was on the table - the prisoner's wife told me to take it up - she wanted to speak to me, and told me to come to her down Holborn; I said I would go home, and get shaved - she said, "There is 1 1/2d., take it and go and get shaved;" I did not, at the dinner, or tea, or in the conversation with the prisoner's wife, say that the witness Lee had false-sworn himself from beginning to end, nor anything of the kind - there were persons at dinner and tea with us; the dinner was then ready, and I took some - I drank some beer and some gin; Lee was in the Police, but he has resigned of his own accord - he told me so; after I gave the prosecutor his purse, he gave me 5s. - I did not ask him for money.

MR. HYNDMAN. He did not ask me for any money at the time he gave me the purse, but he afterwards called at my house, and said he wished to see me particularly - I met him afterwards in London; he said he wished to go out of town, and if he was obliged to go who would pay his expences.

JAMES LEE. I am a porter at present - I have been in the Police, but left it on the 21st of March. On the 30th of May I was near Mr. Hamlet's shop: I saw the prisoner running down the street, in front of the mob - he went up to an empty gig, and threw something into it; he was running - he inclined to the left, and threw something into the gig; Mr. Hyndman was in pursuit of him at the time; Bean and I went up to the gig - Bean took the purse out in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q.Whose porter are you? A. Mr. Downing's, the floor-cloth manufacturer, in King's-road, Chelsea - I have been there a fortnight; I was out of employ when this happened, and had been so nearly three months - I formerly belonged to the Life Guards, and I have a pension of 6d. a day - I had drawn my quarter's pension just before this happened; I was in the Police ten months, but I had bad health - I do not know that there was any complaint made against me; there might be some frivolous things, such as being too late - there was a complaint made against me; I forget whether I was put on my defence before the commissioners - I cannot recollect what the complaint was; I will not swear there were not two complaints against me - I was only once before the commissioners; it was for quarrelling with an officer - I went to see the prisoner in Tothil-fields prison, by the request of his wife, as he was very ill and low - I do not know what I was to do; I did not ask him for money, but he offered me money to go out of the way - he said he would give me as much as I liked; I never said before any body that I would do my best to convict him - I went to the prisoner's father; they sent for me - I did not dine there, nor did Bean, in my presence; I once or twice drank some beer there - I was not going to Scotland.

COURT. Q. Were you at any time suspended from your employ as a Police-officer? A. No, I resigned through bad health.

THOMAS PROSSER . I am an inspector of the Police. On the 30th of May I was in Oxenden-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - I went to Panton-street; it was a little after twelve o'clock in the day - the prisoner was pointed out to me, and I took him; I received this purse from Mr. Hyndman - there is now one 5l. note in it, the other was delivered to Mr. Hyndman; when I took it there were two 5l. notes, five sovereigns, and some silver in it - I searched the prisoner, and found a gold mourning-ring on his finger; a pin, and one sovereign and a half in an inside pocket, on the left of his waistcoat, and half a sovereign in his left waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny all knowledge of the robbery - I was coming down Panton-street; there was a mob, and a young man running - the officer came and took me; I was taken to the house, and the prosecutor said, "I cannot be positive, but there is a person outside can recognize him;" - they came to me for money - I had none, and they went to my father and mother, and had money - when they told me of it, I said, "They have been to me and wanted money, have nothing to do with them."

JOHN LELEY . I am a house-painter, and live at No. 15, Denmark-street. I was at the prisoner's father's, in the Coal-yard, Drury-lane - I saw Bean there; there was some meat and vegetables on the table - I did not hear Bean ask the father for any money; I do not know whether Bean had been sent for - I heard the prisoner's wife say to Bean, "You know you told me that the Scotchman had foresworn himself at the Police-office;" Bean did not seem to wish to own to it, as there were other persons there - he was sitting in his chair, and moved his hand back, as if to stop her speaking; she asked Bean to come out from the father's house - I had seen him there twice; we were talking about this case, and he said he could not tell what the prisoner threw into the gig, and if he had any sort of counsel, he could get him through; he told me afterwards, that he did not like to speak in the presence of the prisoner's wife, but if she had offered him a sufficient sum of money to bear his expences, he would have gone out of town long ago - I have known the prisoner ever since he was quite a lad.

COURT. Q.What way of business was he in? A. I cannot swear to that, but his father told me he was a painter and glazier.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-46

1235. JANE WIDGEON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 2 wineglasses, value 1s.; 1 pinafore, value 6d.; 1 veil, value 3s.; 1 lb. weight of sugar, value 6d.; 1 towel, value 6d., and 1 pair of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of William Duerdin , her master.

WILLIAM DUERDIN. I live in Gerrard-street, Soho . The prisoner was in my service for about seven weeks; she was going away on the Friday after the day in question - my wife and the other servant missed some articles; I went down stairs one night after the prisoner was gone to bed, and I found 1 lb. of moist sugar, in a napkin, marked D. No. 12; my wife made inquiry of the prisoner on the day following, and the Policeman was sent for in the evening - I went with him to the prisoner's bed-room to have her box searched; she produced the key of it - it was corded as well as locked; she opened it herself, and these two wine-glasses, the pound of sugar, this lace veil, these silk stockings, this towel, and this pinsfore of the children's, was found in it, and some handkerchiefs, and one or two other things of the other servant's, which were given up to her - this soap was also found; we had had 18 lbs. of soap in a day or two before, and it was all gone; I know these two wine-glasses.

MARY ANN DUERDIN . I am the prosecutor's wife. I know this veil, stockings, and towel to be mine, and I believe the other articles are - I have missed such things; my stock of glasses is deficient by two - I believe this sugar is mine; we give 3 lbs. every week for the use of the kitchen, and there were only 2 lbs. left - we had a good character with the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. Sometimes my box was left open.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-47

1236. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 1 wine-cooler, value 50s. , the goods of Joseph Smith .

JOSEPH SMITH . I live in Seymour-street , and deal in furniture . On the 30th of May I had a variety of articles at my door, and among the rest a wine-cooler, or a sarcophagus, worth 50s. - it is leaded, for the purpose of putting ice into.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever see ice in such a thing as this? A. Yes, many times - it is called a sarcophagus or a wine-cooler; wine-coolers are made in different shapes - here is no hole to let out the water; this would not be called a cellaret by one person in twenty who knew what it was; this is intended to be put under dining-tables and side-boards.

GEORGE TURNER . I live in Seymour-street, and am a green-grocer. Mrs. Smith sent me after the prisoner, who she said had taken a sarcophagus; I went down Drummond-street, and found the prisoner with this on his shoulder - I followed him till I came to a Policeman; I gave him in charge.

RICHARD HOLLAND . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner with this article about five minutes walk from the house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing down Drummend-street, and saw a man resting this article - he asked which way I was going; I said to Russell-square - he said if I would carry this as far as I was going he would give me something to drink; I took it from knowing him, by having seen him at my shop.

GEORGE TURNER . I did not see any one with him.

RICHARD HOLLAND . There was no person with him when I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310630-48

1237. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 3 muskets, value 36s. , the goods of James Grigg .

CHARLES KEMP . I am captain of the Surrey, free trader to the East Indies; the owner's name is Mr. James Grigg .

The prisoner had been on board the ship for a fortnight or three weeks - he had no authority to remove any of the stores; I saw three muskets at Lambeth-street Policeoffice, which had been separated from the stores.

WILLIAM CHAMBERS . I am a Police-constable. On Monday, the 30th of May, I was on duty in Mill-wall, Poplar; I met the prisoner and another person - the prisoner was given into my custody; I had met him three or four days before with two muskets - I asked him then what he was going to do with them; he said he was going to take them to be cleaned, and he had brought them from a ship called the Surrey, lying in Mr. Blakey's dock; he said the mate was on board, and I might go to him - there is no other witness here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-49

1238. BENJAMIN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 2 live tame fowls, price 4s. , the property of William Pridmore .

JAMES GEORGE. I am a Bow-street patrol, stationed at Palmer's-green, Edmonton. On the 8th of June I saw the prisoner on the road leading to Edmonton, with a bag on his shoulder - I stopped him, and found three fowls in it; he said his aunt gave him them from Hadleigh - he first said her name was Webb, and then Webber; I found on him a pair of stockings, seven keys, two phosphorus-boxes, and a bit of candle - in his hat I found some children's things; I went to where he said his aunt lived, but could not find her.

MATTHEW PRIDMORE . I am the son of William Pridmore, who lives at South Mimms . On the 8th of June I went to the hen-house - I found one lock wrenched off, and another broken; I missed some fowls - this is one of them; I brought it seventy-one miles, and this other is my father's - I know them both.

Prisoner. On the third examination he swore they were his fowls, and he said there were three locks broken, and at the fourth examination, when his father came, he said there were two broken. Witness. I said there were two broken; my father's place is seven or eight miles from Palmer's-green.

WILLIAM PRIDMORE. I locked up the hen-house on the over night; the next morning it had been opened and the lock broken to pieces, and two hens, four chickens, and a rabbit were taken - the lock of a duck-house was broken, and the slaughter-house door was open; I know these fowls to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them as I was crossing Hadleigh-common.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-50

1239. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 12 lbs. weight of beef, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

WILLIAM SHEPPARD. I keep a pork butcher's shop, in Skinner-street, Somer's-town , next door to Mr. Somers. On Saturday night, the 28th of May, I was passing his shop about eleven o'clock, or a little after - I saw the prisoner standing by the side of his shop with a piece of meat of some description in his hand; he put it into his basket and went away - I gave information to Mr. Somers, Jun., who pursued him, and brought him back; I saw the basket examined - it contained a piece of salt-beef and a loin of lamb; he begged forgiveness - he said he took the beef from distress, and the lamb he had bought and paid for.

SAMUEL ABORN SOMERS. I am the son of Samuel Somers . I remember the piece of beef being produced from the basket - it was my father's; it was cut different to other butchers - I am confident it had not been sold to the prisoner, nor to any other person; I had seen it safe half an hour before.

CHARLES STEWART . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and took the beef out of the basket - the prisoner begged Mr. Somers to forgive him, as it was his first offence.

The prisoner received a good character, and pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18310630-51

1240. ROBERT PRIDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Farindon Lane , from his person ; and that he had before been convicted of felony.

JOHN CHALLICE . I am assistant to Mr. Coates, of Hart-street, Bloomsbury , a surgeon. On the 14th of May, in the afternoon, I was in his shop, and saw Mr. Lane passing on the opposite side of the way; I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from his pocket - he put it under his coat; I ran and secured him - we took him to the station-house.

FARINDON LANE. On the 14th of May I lost the handkerchief from my pocket - Mr. Challice found it on the prisoner, and gave it me; we took the prisoner to the station, and I left my handkerchief with the officer - this is it.

WILLIAM PRICHARD . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction, which I got from the clerk's office(read) - I attended the trial, and swear the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 16 - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-52

1241. JOHN MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 2 planes, value 5s., and 1 screw-driver, value 1s. 6d., the goods of James Martin ; and 1 plane, value 3s. , the goods of William Henderson .

JAMES MARTIN . I am a constable. I was at work at a building in Manchester-square on the 18th of May; I left my tools there safe, and on the following morning I missed two planes and a screw-driver - William Anderson worked with me.

CHARLES CLARKE . I am a Police-constable. On the morning of the 19th of May I was on duty in the New-road, and saw the prisoner at twenty minutes before five o'clock carrying these three planes; I found on him two screw-drivers - one, I believe, belongs to himself; he said he was going to work in the fields - I know nearly all the buildings there, and I asked who he worked for; he could not tell me - he afterwards said he brought them from a house next to a shop; I went there, and found the prosecutor.

JAMES MARTIN . These two planes and screw-driver are mine - this other plane is William Anderson 's, not Henderson.

GUILTY of stealing the planes of Martin . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18310630-53

1242. GEORGE McLOCHLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 3 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the monies of Thomas Everall .

EAAH EVERALL . I am the wife of Thomas Everall - he keeps the Trumpet public-house . On the 14th of June I left my bar, and went into the back-room; I then saw the prisoner going out at the door - I went and looked at the till, and missed a bowl with some silver in it; I know it had contained 4s., and I think more - John Shaw ran after the prisoner, and brought him back; my husband searched the prisoner, and found 6s. on him - I have not seen the bowl since; the till is behind the counter -I had seen it safe a very few minutes before, and I think there was not time for any one else to have gone in; there was another boy, but I did not see him.

JOHN SHAW . I lodged at Mr. Everall's, and saw the prisoner come from behind the counter - there was another boy with him; I saw them go into the street - I took the prisoner, and delivered him to the landlord; I told him to come back - he said he did not think it was there; I told him it was.

THOMAS EVERALL . I searched the prisoner, and told him he had robbed the till - he said he had not, and he had no money; I found on him 6s. - he said he had been with his uncle and sold rabbits to that amount, and he had received that from his uncle, which he owed his mother.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by the house, and the gentleman came and said, "I want you;" I went back with him - he called to two more boys, but they would not come; I said I had 6s., which I got from my uncle, who owed it to my mother for rent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-54

1243. RICHARD REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 2 seals, value 4l. 10s. , the goods of Bernard Granville .

BERNARD GRANVILLE . I live in the County of Warwick. On the 18th of May I was lodging at Leman's hotel, in Park-street - I had two gold seals, which I kept in my desk occasionally, but generally loose on my writing-table- the prisoner was under-waiter or boots at that hotel; I had seen him in my room two or three times - I did not miss these seals till the officer told me of them.

BENJAMIN WARBURTON TIMS . On the Thursday before the 23rd of May Batchelor offered this seal in pledge at my master's shop, in Tottenham-court-road; I did not lend any thing on it - he came with the prisoner on the following day, to demand the seal; I refused to deliver it till I had been to a Magistrate - the Magistrate advised me to come again the next day; the prisoner said he had bought the seal of a young man for 10s., but knowing the value of it I had suspicion of him; he said he sent Batchelor with it.

WILLIAM BATCHELOR . I have known the prisoner about a month - he lodged where I had lived, at the Boar and castle; he asked me whether I wanted to buy a seal; I said I had no money - he said he gave a gentleman at Brighton half a guinea for it, and I should have it for 8s.; he then said I should have it for 6s. - I said, "I dare say I know a young man who will buy it;" I took it to him, and he said he was not certain it was gold; I took it to Mr. Tims, who detained it - I was to meet the prisoner the same night, and the pawnbroker told me to look in the next day; they then said they had not heard any thing, and I was to go again - they then told me to bring the man I got it of.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I give you the seal to pawn or to sell? A. Yes.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; I told him Batchelor was in custody for offering a seal to pawn - he admitted that he had sent Batchelor; I asked him if he had taken any thing else - he said he had taken another: I had not made him any promise or threat; he said the other was at a cousin's of his, and I went and got it - he said they belonged to Mr. Granville, and he took them out of his room, either off the sideboard or the table.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not state that they belonged to Mr. Granville, nor that I took them out of his room - about three months ago I was employed at the hotel for three weeks; I then left, and lodged with Batchelor's mother, in Praed-street - about four nights afterwards I was coming across the fields, and was stopped by Avis; he said, "You are my prisoner" - I was thunder-struck; he said would I tell him the truth, it would be all the better for me, as I should be taken before a Magistrate, and by telling him the truth I should, no doubt, be acquitted; I was frightened, and said, "What am I to tell you the truth about?" he said, "You have been accused of stealing two seals from the hotel;" I said I had not - he said, "You gave them to a young man to pawn;" I said, "I gave him one seal, which I bought of a young person at Brighton, and gave him half a guinea for it;" he said no more to me, but took me before the Magistrate, and stated nearly the same as he has to-day.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-55

1244. JAMES WHITTAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 6s. , the goods of William Wright .

WILLIAM WRIGHT. I live at Cambridge, and was lodging at Mr. Clarke's, in Jermyn-street . On the Tuesday before the 31st of May I missed a handkerchief; the prisoner lived with Mr. Clarke, and was employed to clean boots .

WILLIAM COWIE . I have known the prisoner some time, and on the 24th of May I met him at the corner of Well-street, about eight o'clock in the evening - he asked if I would go and pawn a handkerchief for him - he gave me this handkerchief, which I pawned for half a crown at the corner of Well-street and Mortimer-street; I gave him 2s. 3d., and was to have the 3d. myself - he said he did not like to take it himself, but did not say why.

THOMAS HUGHES . I have the handkerchief, pawned by the witness at our shop, for 2s. 6d., in the name of John Chandler .

WILLIAM COWIE. I pawned things for my mother in that name sometimes.

GEORGE AVIS. I took the prisoner on the 26th of May - he said he picked it up on the stairs at the house to which he belonged, and he did not know whose it was.

MR. WRIGHT. This is my handkerchief - it could not

have fallen on the stairs - it had been in a particular drawer in my bed-room.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310630-56

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1245. MARY ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 carpet, value 10s., and 1 brush, value 2s. , the goods of John Lettsom Elliott .

THOMAS ALLEN . I am in the service of Mr. John Lettsom Elliott, a brewer , who lives at Pimlico . This carpet and brush were in his green-house, and were missed on the 18th of June; the green-house is in an enclosure near the house - I had seen the carpet safe at half-past twelve o'clock, and I saw it and the prisoner in custody at a quarter-past four - I knew nothing of her.

RICHARD NIX . I am a house-painter. I know the carpet and brush were safe at four o'clock, when we went to tea.

WILLIAM BLAND . I am a Police-constable. On the 18th of June I saw the prisoner in Mr. Elliott's yard - she had the carpet, and was carrying it from the premises; I followed, and asked where she had got it from - she said where she had been at work; I asked where that was - she made a great hesitation, and then said she did not know; as we were going back we met the witness, who said it was taken from the Octagon green-house - we took it there, and it fitted in all respects.

Prisoner. I do not know how I came to do it.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310630-57

1246. WILLIAM LIQUIR was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 16 brushes, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Green .

ROBERT GREEN . I live on Back-hill , and am a brushmaker . I was up stairs on the 4th of June, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I looked out of the window, and saw the brushes in the street, ten or fifteen yards from my house- I went down; my wife had picked them up - the prisoner had run away, and was brought back.

JOHN WINSTANLEY . I am a smith. I saw the prisoner throw the brushes down - I had seen him take them off the wall at the prosecutor's; he walked off with them, and when there was an alarm he threw them down - I saw them picked up; he was a stranger.

JAMES WARD . I was watching the prisoner and two more, as I came up Back-hill; I watched them half an hour, then went into Mr. Winstanley's house, and watched them again; I saw the prisoner unhook the brushes from the prosecutor's door - I ran out, and took him.

THOMAS SINNOTT . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have the brushes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was never in possession of the goods, and declaring his innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-58

1247. JOHN FARQUHAR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Stikeman .

THOMAS STIKEMAN . I live in Great Dean-street, Westminister. This coat was taken from my chaise while it was standing in Leicester-square , on the 10th of June, at a linendraper's shop, about eight o'clock in the evening - the master of the shop had left the chaise in care of one of his young men; no notice was given to me, but on my return home, and going from my house to the stable I missed my coat - I saw it again on the 11th of June.

GEORGE DANN . I live with the linen-draper - my master gave me the care of the chaise; two men came by, and the prisoner, who was one of them, took the coat and ran away with it - he was in the road; I followed him, and he threw the coat away at the end of the square - I still followed, and he was taken in Green-street; he begged to be let go, as he said he took it from poverty, and two soldiers who then had him, let him go - I went up to him, and he said it was for want; he ran on, and I followed him again - the Policeman took him in St. Martin's-lane; I had lost sight of him, but I swear he took it.

JAMES RYMER . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner running, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I pursued, and took him in St. Martin's-lane - the witness identified him as the man who took the coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-59

1248. WILLIAM CARVER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 3 shillings and 3 sixpences , the monies of William Palmer .

CATHERINE PALMER . I am the wife of William Palmer - we live at Ealing , and keep a shop in the general line; the prisoner had been four times at my shop before - he pretends to live somewhere near London. On the 21st of May I was in the room next to the shop, and the door was open - the prisoner got in by stealth; a woman came in for a - lb. of soap - I went to serve her, and the prisoner came from behind the counter; that woman saw his hand in the till, and I saw the money in his left hand - he asked me for a pound of plums; I looked into the till, and missed the money - the prisoner said it was my money, and he had taken it from the till, but if I would let him go then, if I caught him again, I might hang him.

STEPHEN MARCHANT. I am a Police-serjeant. The prisoner was brought to me - he said he knew he had robbed the prosecutor, but he had returned the money, and if we let him go then, we might hang him if we found him again: every inhabitant of the place knows him.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-60

1249. JAMES BUTLER was indicted for embezzling the sum of 1l. 2s. 10d. , which he had received on account of his master.

JOSEPH JOHNSON . I am a publican . The prisoner used to do my work in the house, and carry out beer - he received money and bills now and then; he was to return the money to me or my daughter - he ought to account twice a day.

GEORGE WILSON . I owed Mr. Johnson for about seven pots of beer - I had paid the prisoner about 2s. on the Friday before his master called on me, which was about last Friday fortnight or three weeks - I never paid him 1l.

PETER SMITH . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in the City-road, and the prisoner was given into my charge for embezzling 1l. 2s. 10d.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON. I am the prosecutor's daughter. The prisoner never told me about receiving these 2s., nor paid it to me.

JOSEPH JOHNSON. He never paid me the 2s. - he had not quitted my service: I said to him, "Mr. Wilson is running more than he has done for three years;" and in a day or two afterwards he told me that Mrs. Wilson desired me to make out a bill - I gave it to him; it was 1l. 0s. 8d. - he look it, and said she was quite satisfied, that she had kept an account against me, and that she should receive money in a fortnight, and would pay me; I said, "They are very respectable people, let it go on till Christmas;" in a few days the prisoner was taken ill - I went out with the beer, Mr. Wilson took it in, and said "This is three days' beer;" I said, "It is a mistake, there are four weeks."

GEORGE WILSON . I had paid for the beer up to the time I told him - sometimes my niece paid for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-61

1250. THOMAS BAGOT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 1 box, value 1s.; 1 bed, value 2l.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 blanket, value 2s.; 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 2 pairs of sheets, value 4s.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d.; 1 whittle, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 2s.; 14 gowns, value 20s.; 1 looking-glass, value 3s.; 2 shifts, value 2s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s.; 11 spoons, value 2l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 3s.; 6 rings, value 20s.; 1 seal, value 2s.; 1 brooch, value 2s.; 2 chairs, value 2s.; 2 baskets, value 6d.; 1 tea-kettle, value 3s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; 1 umbrella, value 1s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 10 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 1 bonnet, value 2s.; 1 bonnet-box, value 2d.; 1 pack of cards, value 6d., and 1 trunk, value 1s. , the goods of Daniel Dell .

DANIEL DELL . I live at Pinner , and am a carpenter I have known the prisoner these dozen years - my wife and I had a quarrel; I told her she might go where she liked- I cannot say what month that was in; she asked me for a plate or two, three or four knives, and some things - I told her she might take them, and go; the prisoner had been too intimate at my house - I missed my wife about six o'clock on Thursday morning, the 4th of June; the prisoner undoubtedly knew my wife was going - I saw him there on the night before; I slept at home on the night of the 3rd of June - my wife did not go to bed; I had told her she might have some of her clothes, but not mine - I had not permitted her to take any furniture; I was in bed and asleep when my wife went away - when I awoke I missed all the articles stated in the indictment; I have found them since in the prisoner's possession, and I found my wife there on the spot - that was in a cottage at Drayton; I did not speak to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you think this looks very like a crim. con.? A. I do not know what to think of it - my wife had left me before, and had come back again; she took some things away before, and brought them back again - she staid three days or a week - she had gone two or three times; I have got all the things stated in the indictment - my wife is here; I will take her home - I dare say the prisoner was present when I gave my wife leave to take some things.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-62

1251. WILLIAM PURDY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 3 half-crowns , the monies of William Hunter .

WILLIAM HUNTER . I am a tea-dealer , and live in Gerrard-street - the prisoner had been my shopman , and did business on commission for upwards of two years. On the 28th of May I watched him, and saw a customer come into the shop - I was standing near the door, and he was behind the counter; just as the customer was leaving the counter I saw the prisoner draw his hand clenched from the till - I walked up to him; another customer came in, whom I told him to serve - he turned to take a canister down, and I saw part of a half-crown in his hand; he put the canister down, put his hand into it, and served 6 ozs. of tea - I then searched the paper he put it into, to see if there was a half-crown in it; there was not - I then called my other assistant, and told him to spread a sheet of paper on the counter - I emptied the tea out of the canister, and I found among it a half-crown with a black mark, which I had before put into the till - I accused the prisoner of taking it, and said I had suspected him for some time; he made no answer, but said he wished to speak to me in the parlour - we went on towards the parlour, and as we got to the door, I said "I suppose you have robbed me before?" he said, "No, not for a fortnight;" I said, "To what amount; I suppose 100l.?" he said, "No, upon my soul, not 30l. altogether;" he said there was more money in the tea - I looked, and found two more half-crowns; I then sent for a Police-constable - I marked them with a brad-awl.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long had he lived with you? A. Upwards of two years - I have given the same account as I did before the Magistrate; I think I did not then state that he said he had not robbed me for a fortnight; I did not feel disposed to do him any injury; I have not said that I should be glad to have him back - my assistant and one customer were in the shop at the time; I did not mention to the customer what I had seen - I had before sent the prisoner out for 4l. worth of silver, and then I remarked this half-crown, which has a dull sound and a black mark on it - I did not employ a Mr. Cole to draw up a warrant of attorney, nor authorize him to write to the prisoner or to his brother about his defence in this case - I did not recommend an attorney of the name of Howard, but I think Mr. Cole recommended some attorney to the prisoner's brother; I do not remember having seen this letter(looking at one) before, but I verily believe Mr. Cole wrote some letter and gave it to the prisoner's brother, for the purpose of his having a solicitor - I never authorized Mr. Cole to say, "My prosecutor, Mr. Hunter, is anxious that the prisoner should not be convicted;" in the course of his business, as a traveller, there are debts contracted; I look to him, I do not look to others for them - there are debts on my books, for which I have had a warrant of attorney signed by the prisoner's brother; I have not since then applied to the prisoner to sign a warrant - I never sent any person to say that if a sum of 50l. was paid by him I would not appear to prosecute - I never told his brother so.

COURT. Q. Is it customary for you, or any of your shopmen to put the ready money you receive into the canisters? A. By no means, my Lord.

JOHN CHILD . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I was at the end of the shop, grinding coffee; I saw Mr. Hunter at the door - a customer came into the shop: Mr. Hunter came and examined the tea which the prisoner served - he then called me to bring a sheet of paper, and turned out the tea from the canister, and found the half-crown: he took the prisoner into the counting-house; when I take money I put it into the till.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons are in the prosecutor's employ? A. Only the prisoner and myself: I did not go into the parlour - I had no conversation with the prosecutor about this case before I gave my evidence: I had not forgotten what I had to say, and had to consult my master - I talked to my master about several things, but not about this case, nor what I was to prove; this is my hand-writing, (looking at a letter,) I went to the prisoner in prison, respecting some debts he had contracted, and neither Mr. Hunter nor myself knew where the parties lived: they were due to Mr. Hunter, but the prisoner was answerable for them; he had a commission on them - I had summoned some of the persons, in Mr. Hunter's name, in which they were contracted; I was not sent to ask the prisoner to join in a warrant of attorney - I did not hear the sum of 50l. mentioned by Mr. Hunter.

WILLIAM BENNETT. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge.

MR. HUNTER. The prisoner was a shopman till the last eighteen months, and since then he has had a commission on the business - he sold to whoever he chose; I looked to him for the gross amount - he had no share in the profits, only on what he sold - when he first began he had a couple of guineas a week, but he has only served in the shop on a Saturday of late, and for that he was paid; he did not participate in the profits on a Saturday - he drank tea and supped there, if he chose to stay, and I gave him what I thought proper - he had a commission on what he sold out of doors, but he had nothing to do with that indoors.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you when he took the half-crown? A. I was at the post of the door - I saw him take the half-crown, and he likewise acknowledged having robbed me to pay the debt he owed me - I forgot to state that; here is the mark on this half-crown, which I had noticed particularly.

JOHN PURDY . I am the prisoner's brother, and am a house-painter. I have become responsible to the prosecutor for a debt of 66l., due from the prisoner; I signed a warrant of attorney for it since this charge was made against the prisoner - Mr. Hunter expressed a wish to Mr. Cole, his attorney, for my brother to sign the warrant while he was at the bar, and he said if it was not convenient to have it done in the office he would send his clerk down here to get it; Mr. Hunter made a proposal about going out of town; he and I went and saw the prisoner after he was locked up at Marlborough-street, and Mr. Hunter proposed to me that if he had 40l., to pay the expence of his recognizance, and 10l. to take him down to the north, he would go out of town; he said that within a few yards of his own house.

MR. HUNTER re-examined. As I came from Marlborough-street his brother was very much distressed, and said what could be done - I said nothing, that I was bound in a bond of 40l., and so was my servant, and if I had so much to spare I would go out of town; I had no animosity against him, and I hear him none at the present moment.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-63

1252. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 1 saw, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Fitch .

ROBERT FITCH . I am a carpenter . I left my saw on the 10th of June, at twelve o'clock, in Three Colt-lane , where I had been at work, and locked the door; I returned at one, and found a pane of glass out and the saw gone - I went to the pawnbrokers to tell them to stop it - I did not know the prisoner.

FRANCIS SOMES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Green-street, Bethnal-green. On the 10th of June the prisoner brought this saw to my house - I asked whose it was; he said his father's, and he had sent him to pawn it for 2s. -I had received information and stopped it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The window was half broken.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-64

1253. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 2 sovereigns , the monies of Thomas Gaynor .

MARY GAYNOR . I am the wife of Thomas Gaynor - he keeps the Queen's Head, in Duke's-court, Bow-street, opposite Covent Garden Theatre . The prisoner was a stranger - I had never seen him to my knowledge till the 18th of January, when he came with a woman of the town: he came to the bar between nine and ten o'clock, I should think, and said he wished to speak to me in private - I went to the bar door; he said he wished to speak to me in private, and I then opened the door and he came into the bar - he then took a watch from his pocket, said he was in company he did not like, that he had some valuable property about him, and asked if I would take charge of it for him till the morning; I said I should have no objection if he would call for it himself in the morning, and he said he would - he then put what I supposed was a valuable watch and seals into my hand; he did not say that it was gold, but he said he had valuable property - I took it into my hand, and I thought, and still think, it was a gold watch, chain, and seals; he then asked if I would give it him back, and give him a piece of paper to wrap it in - I gave it him, and a piece of printed paper; he went into a little room adjoining the bar to wrap it in it - he then asked me for another piece of paper like that, (it was a printed circular,) I gave him another, and he said he would put that into his pocket, to produce it on the morrow, when he came for the watch - he then gave me the watch in the paper, and I put it in a little drawer which I had in the bar; he then came and said, "Mrs. Gaynor, will you oblige me with a couple of pounds, I am out for the night, and I don't think I have sufficient money with me:" I do not consider that I lent him the money on the strength of the watch, but I lent it him on the supposition that when he came for the watch he would return it to me - I certainly should not have lent the money unless the watch had been

deposited with me; he then asked for a small glass of brandy, which my sister served him with, and I was rather doubtful, and thought I ought to have looked at the watch before I lent the money: I took it out of the drawer, and stepped back into the passage to see if it was the same as he had shown me - directly I opened it I felt convinced that it was not the same; the moment the prisoner saw me take it out he was off - he went away directly; I sent in every direction, but could not find him - I found in the paper the watch which I now produce, which I do not suppose is worth 1s.

Q. Are you enabled to say positively, or otherwise, whether this is the watch he first produced to you? A. It is my conviction that it is not, but upon my oath I would not say it is not - the prisoner ran quickly out of my house - I gave every information, but he was not taken till the 22nd of May.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.What is your husband? A. He is a publican , and very likely you may have heard of him in the ring: he was not at home when this happened - the prisoner had been two or three times to the bar, and had a small glass of brandy, and part of a glass of brandy and water before this happened - I had not taken any with him; I think the first time he came was between seven and eight o'clock; I think I had the watch between ten and eleven - I had seen the woman before come to the bar to drink; I thought the prisoner might be respectable - he was very well dressed; I did not have the watch an instant before he asked me to return it - the gas was burning at the time: from the momentary glance I had of it I considered it a valuable watch - I could feel the weight of it - he asked me for a piece of paper, and I gave him a piece - he said, "This is a bill, if you will give me a counterpart I will produce it to-morrow" - he then wrapped the watch in paper and I deposited it in the drawer - not a syllable had then been said about his wanting to borrow money; I received it without any condition, as something valuable which he was to call for - when he asked for the two sovereigns he said, "When I call for the watch in the morning, I will return them you;" I should think this watch is not gold - I have had the watch by me these six months; I cannot swear whether this mourningring, which hangs to it, is gold - I do not consider this fancy ring to be gold.

COURT. Q.But for the deposit of the watch you would not have advanced the 2l.? A. No.

ROBERT BANKS. I keep the Wrekin tavern, in Broad-court. On the 22nd of May the prisoner came to my house - I had known him before; he produced a watch to me -I had happened to be at Mr. Gaynor's at the time he left the watch there, and knowing that I detained him - he offered a watch to me for 1l.; I told him I never did any thing of that kind - I locked the door, and sent for Mr. and Mrs. Gaynor; the prisoner tried to go out.

Prisoner's Defence. If it had been a gold watch, would it have been a case of felony? I borrowed the money.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-65

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, JULY 1.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1254. JOHN IRVING was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Arthur McGinnis .

THOMAS BATES . I am a jobbing tinman. I had known Arthur McGinnis about eighteen months; on the 24th of May I called him out of his own room in Cottage-court, Orchard-street, Westminster, to go with me and Matthews to have some beer, and as we went along he and I were walking together - Matthews was just before us; I heard a man say, "You are Arthur McGinnis , I should like to have a round or two with you" - the man came up to us; I did not know him before - he said, "I should like to have a round or two with you;" I saw him make a blow at McGinnis' face - I cannot say whether it bit him or not; I looked after Matthews, who was a few steps a-head, and when I turned round again they were both down on the ground - after that I saw them both up again; they were struggling and McGinnis was calling for the Police - he had hold of the man; a Policeman came up - McGinnis' hold was loosened, and he walked on to the watch-house: I followed after him, and heard him desire them to send for a doctor - he said he had been kicked, and was a dead man; the other man had gone away - it was McGinnis who called for the Police; he walked by himself to the watch house - I cannot swear to the man; the doctor ordered McGinnis to the hospital.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the prisoner's mother there? A. I do not know her; I was sober - I do not recollect seeing a tipsy woman there; he was at work when I called him; he held the prisoner by the collar - I did not notice that he was nearly choked; there might be thirty or forty people about.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a labourer; I went with Bates to ask McGinnis to go and take some beer - he came out with me, and was going by the White Horse, Orchard-street; I heard a man say, "Is not your name Arthur McGinnis ?" - whether he made any answer I do not know; I heard the man say, "I should like to have a round or two with you" - I saw no more till I saw McGinnis holding the man by the collar, and calling for the Police, who came, and they were separated; the man got away; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner - I saw no more of McGinnis till he was in the watch-house.

JOHN TUSTIN . I am a labourer, and live in Corder's-court, Orchard-street. On the 24th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening I was in Orchard-street, and saw McGinnis - he had got hold of Irving with one hand when I saw him; the Policeman had got hold of Irving's right arm, and as they were staggering back I saw Irving kick McGinnis up between the legs, right in *** - it was after the Policeman had got hold of him; he kicked him again, but missed his kick that time, and his foot went up outside - the mob then broke in, and rescued him from the Policeman; I am sure McGinnis was sober; he went down to the watch-house, holding both his hands to the part where he was kicked, and said he was a dead man - I afterwards carried him in a sedan-chair to the hospital.

Q. Was McGinnis holding the prisoner by the collar the first time you saw him? A. Yes - I saw no blows pass before; the prisoner is the man - I have known him sixteen or eighteen years.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you there when they fell down on the ground? A. No; I was about twenty yards

off - I did not see him on the ground; I cannot say whether he fell down.

SAMUEL BANNISTER . I am an inspector of Police. I was on duty at the watch-house at the end of the street, and could see a disturbance; McGinnis came down to the watch-house, threw himself on the bench and said,"I have been very much injured; I shall soon die," or words to that effect - I sent for the surgeon of our division, who directed him to be sent to the hospital.

JOSEPH CLARKE . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Orchard-street, and heard the deceased, or somebody, call out Police! - I was a hundred yards or more from the place; I turned round, seeing people gathered - I ran to the spot as fast as I could, and found the deceased had hold of Irving by the collar; I endeavoured to separate them - McGinnis said, "Take this man into custody, I am an injured man;" I said I could not take him, in consequence of not having seen the assault committed - they still had hold of each other in a very violent manner; he again wished me to take him - I refused, as our orders were not to take any body, without seeing an assault committed; I separated them - Irving and his friends went home; McGinnis walked to the watch-house - I should suppose him to be sober; I cannot say whether the prisoner was drunk or sober - he is a shoemaker; I knew them both before.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it true, that after you came up the prisoner kicked the deceased, as the man has described? A. I cannot swear that he kicked him - I was trying to separate them; the deceased had hold of the prisoner by the collar, about the breast of his jacket, not his cravat - I saw no tipsy woman about, and heard nothing about the prisoner's mother.

Q.Was he not held so as to prevent his breathing? A.He spoke to me; I cannot swear whether Irving kicked him or not - Irving said, "Part him, take him away from me."

EDWIN HENRY THOMAS . I am house-surgeon of the hospital. I was in the accident-ward on the evening of the 24th of May, when the deceased was brought in - he in great pain, and said he had received a violent kick in the lower part of the abdomen, from a man in a quarrel; there was no external mark at the time, but he complained of great agony - he was put to bed immediately; I attended him till he died, which was between one and two o'clock in the morning, on the 30th, I think - he was examined afterwards; there was an extensive inflammation of the peritonceum, also inflammation throughout the whole course of the intestines; the stomach was much inflamed - there was also an ulceration of one of the intestines, with adhesion to the peritonoceum; the other parts of the body were healthy - the severe inflammation was the cause of his death, and that was the result of some external violence; a violent kick would certainly produce such consequences - the ulceration must have been going on some time, on account of the adhesion which was under the particular part where I understand he received the injury; a blow given shortly before he was brought in, would produce that ulceration by the time I examined it - the inflammation could not be of long standing; a kick in that part was certainly sufficient to produce death - a fall, or any violence, would do it.

Cross-examined. Q.If in the struggle he had fallen on some hard substance, it might have caused those appearances? A. It might - the violence was rather about the groin; I conceive the ulceration to be the result of the inflammation - if inflammation had existed before, he would have complained of pain; no inflammation could be going on without pain - I should not think him addicted to drink; the liver was healthy - he was stout, and predisposed to inflammation; such an injury would be more likely to be fatal to a stout man.

JOHN TUSTIN. I had known the deceased about twelve months - he was a very hardy, strong man; I saw him two days before this - he did not complain of any thing.

THOMAS BATES. The blow was made at the deceased's face by the man who said he should like to have a round with him; whether the blow struck him, I do not know - I looked for Martin, and when I turned again, I saw the man who struck the blow and McGinnis on the ground; there were about twenty people about.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

THOMAS YOUL . I am a shoemaker, and live in Orchard-street. I have known the prisoner these twelve or thirteen years - I heard a noise, opened my window, looked out, and saw the deceased; he had hold of the prisoner about the neck handkerchief - I saw the Policeman come up; I have frequently seen the deceased - he was very much addicted to drink, and to quarrelling; I saw a tall woman there - I do not know whether she was the prisoner's mother; she did not appear particularly tipsy.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-66

Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1255. THOMAS KINGSMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 1 mare, price 18l. , the property of Abraham Hale .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

ABRAHAM HALE . I live at Hourne in Surrey . On the 17th of January, 1829, during the night, I lost my mare out of my yard - she was fastened in the yard with some bullocks; I found the gate closed in the morning, and every thing right but the mare - I saw her again the beginning of February, 1830, at Russell's stables, Westminster, and am sure it was mine; it was worth from 16l. to 18l.

RICHARD COLEMAN . I am a constable of Croydon. On the 9th of February, 1830, I found a black mare at Russell's stables, Westminster, which Hale claimed - I went with Russell to the Obelisk stables, to apprehend the prisoner, or to learn from him where he got the mare - I did not find him there; I searched for him at a great many places for a long time, and found him in custody at Unionhall about three weeks ago.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever hear of a man named Hyder? A. Yes - he was transported either in January or March, 1830.

JOHN RUSSELL . On the 22nd of February, 1829, the prisoner brought me a mare to sell - I then lived in Bellstreet, Westminster; I was in the habit of buying horses of him - he said he considered it would suit me, and left it with me to try; he did not say whose it was - he dealt with it as his own; I bought it of him on the 23rd. and gave him 11l. odd - he lived somewhere over by the Obe

lisk at that time, I think; Coleman, the officer, afterwards came to my stables with Hale, but we could not find him - I did not see him till he was at Union-hall: I showed Hale the same mare as I bought of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Had he been well known to you as a horse-dealer? A. Very well for some years - he was known all round the neighbourhood; I found him honest and punctual - there was no concealment in this transaction; it was about three o'clock in the afternoon - I did not go to look for him at the Obelisk for nearly twelve months after; I dealt with him for about six months after I bought this mare, and could have taken him if I had known it was stolen.

ROBERT CURTIS . I am an officer of Union-hall. I was informed of the prosecutor's loss about twelve months ago - I went to several places in pursuit of the prisoner for about twelve months, and on the 1st of June he was apprehended at the Rising Sun, at Brighton, where I understood he went by the name of Turner; Goff, who was with me, said, "Is your name Kingsmore?" he said, "It is, but some call me Turner," and asked what he was wanted for; we said for the horse he had sold to Mr. Russell - he said he bought it of Hyder.

Cross-examined. Q. Hyder has been transported? A. Yes, before I took the prisoner; but whether it is since the horse was stolen I cannot say.

GEORGE GOFF . I was with Curtis - his evidence is correct.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

WILLIAM HAYWOOD . I am a butcher. I was present about the middle of last February two years, when a man(who went by the name of Wood, but) who I have no doubt was Hyder, sold the prisoner a black mare for 9l.; the prisoner had a receipt from him - I did not see the prisoner again till he was at Union-hall; I was sent for, and gave evidence there.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you keep a beer-shop? A. Yes, and keep a butcher's-shop in Alfred-terrace, Cambridge-heath-road; I came this morning from a booth at Fairlop-fair - he bought this mare at the Anchor and Hope, Devonshire-street, Lambeth; I had never seen Wood but once before - I then lived in Regent-street, Lambeth-walk - I kept a private still there - I got into trouble about that, which strengthens my recollection as to the time; I never saw Wood afterwards - I described his features and dress to those who knew Hyder, and have every reason to believe it was him; I wrote the receipt - I had known the prisoner five or six years, but not particularly: I advised him to have a receipt for the money, as the man's appearance caused my suspicion; I asked the prisoner if he knew the man - he said he had seen him before - I am not able to speak to the day, or the week, but it was shortly before I lost my still; it was on a week day - there was a good deal of cross-chopping at the office as to whether it was on a Sunday, and, to the best of my knowledge, I swore it was not; the transaction occurred in the parlour, four or five others were there - I have not seen them here to-day; they were strangers - I do not know a man named Cutts, nor his daughter; I have not been in any difficulty, except about the still - I was once in custody about four years ago, for having a 21l. bill, and charged with a conspiracy to defraud; I was only in custody one day and a night - I saw the prisoner pay for the horse a 5l. note, and the rest in sovereigns; I cannot say it was the horse in question - it was a black mare, about fourteen hands and a half high, with a cut tail; it had one white foot I know - I did not take particular notice of it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did any thing ever come of the bill? A. I went into Court, and the prosecutor refused to appear.

MR. HALE. Mine was a black mare, with two white hind feet - the near fore foot was grizzle hair; it had a nag tail, and a streak of white down the face.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-67

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1256. THOMAS LEE , SARAH LEE , WILLIAM TAYLOR , and MARY TAYLOR , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Martha Read , on the 30th of April , and stealing 7 unfinished brushes, value 28s., and 3 baskets, value 4s. , her property.

MARTHA READ . I am a widow . On the 12th of May I lodged in College-street, Chelsea ; the landlord did not live in the house at the time of the robbery, but he did when I first went there - I had only had the shop and parlour, and slept in the parlour; there are two doors in the house; the other lodgers came in and out at the passage door - I had a separate door from my shop into the street, and a door from the shop into the parlour - I carried on the brush-making business . On Saturday, the 30th of April, I went out about ten minutes past nine o'clock, leaving nobody in the house; I locked the shop door, and took the key in my pocket - I came home at half-past ten o'clock, and found the door open; I got my next door neighbour to go in with me; I missed some brushes, but could not tell how many, and three baskets - I looked at the passage door, and found that open; that door had been tied with a cord, as there was no lock to it - I used to go out at that door into the passage, for water, and only fastened it with a cord when I went out; the lodgers entered the house through another passage door, which they had a key of; I told a Policeman of my loss, and showed him some brushes which were left - the lodgers were out at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was not the key left in the passage door? A. The lodgers took it out with them - they left it in the door when at home; I was in the habit of using the passage door as well as the shop - they had no exclusive right to the passage.

COURT. Q.When you agreed with the landlord for the shop and parlour, did you keep any right to go through the passage door? A. I had a right to go into the passage for water: I could open the street door of the passage if any body knocked - I had no key of that door; the lodgers used to leave the key in it.

MARY ANN EWERS . I live in New-street, Kensington. On the 7th of May, at half-past five o'clock in the morning, my husband and I went out to market; I returned about eight - the prisoners Lee lodged in the house: I found my house robbed - I gave an alarm, and about half an hour after I got home I met Mary Taylor coming down stairs, out of Lee's apartment, with a handkerchief in her hand - I said, "What have you here? let me see - it is some of my property, I have no doubt;" she then gave me

the handkerchief, and ran away; I found in it two brushes and some cigars - I gave them to the Police; they were not mine.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Taylor did not live in your house? A. No, she lived in Charlotte-street - she frequently came to Lee's; she gave me the bundle, and said it was a dirty handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Lee live over you? A. She lived in the second floor front room - Taylor would pass my door to go up; my door was locked- there were other lodgers up stairs - Taylor said she had been to see the Lees, who lived together as man and wife.

ADAM McDONNELL . I am an inspector of the Police stationed at Wandsworth. On the 7th of May the prisoners were taken into custody by Page - I saw them all at Ewer's house, and took them to Queen-square, on suspicion of Ewers' robbery: they were remanded - I then returned, and searched Lee's apartment in Ewer's house, and found in this basket five unfinished brushes, some tobacco, and a quantity of duplicates in a snuff-box - they were by the side of the bed on the floor in their room -I found another basket there, which I left at the time, as it was empty - here it is - it was brought to me by the serjeant in the course of the next week; I know it to be the same.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not Lee tell you the brushes had been left there by George Potter, a friend of his? A. He did not - he said he had purchased them: he mentioned some name - I do not swear it was not Potter; I think this conversation was at Queensquare - it was in the course of that morning.

COURT. Q.Had you seen the brushes before you went to Queen-square? A. Not these, but I had seen two more, which were taken from there previously.

MRS. EWERS. I saw McDonnell find these things in Lee's bed-room.

STEPHEN PAGE . I am a Policeman. I went to Mrs. Ewers' on the 7th of May, as her place had been broken open - she gave me some cigars and two brushes; I took Lee, his wife, and Mrs. Taylor, at Ewers' house that day, and found William Taylor at his own lodging that day, it is one or two hundred yards from Ewers'; I have the two brushes here - I went with the prisoners and McDonnell to Queen-square; I do not recollect hearing any conversation.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Which of them had you in custody? A. They were all in my charge; I walked very close to them - McDonnell walked alongside of us.

ADAM McDONNELL . Mrs. Read lives about a mile from Ewers'; I asked the constable if he had searched Lee's room minutely - he said he had; I went there in the morning, and found the five brushes in this basket.

MRS. EWER. I saw this small basket hanging in their room in the morning, when looking for my property - I did not observe the one by the side of the bed.(Property produced and sworn to.)

T. LEE - GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

S. LEE - NOT GUILTY .

W. TAYLOR - NOT GUILTY .

M. TAYLOR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-68

Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1257. WILLIAM TAYLOR and MARY TAYLOR were again indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Ann Eames and Elizabeth Eames , on the 30th of April , and stealing, 4 lbs. of cigars, value 5l.; 50 snuff-boxes, value 5l.; 12 lbs. of tobacco, value 50s.; 10 shillings, 2 half-crowns, 10 sixpences, 40 pennies, and 16 halfpence , their property.

EDWARD EAMES. My sisters Mary Ann and Elizabeth Eames keep a tobacconist's shop , at Knightsbridge ; they merely rent the shop and parlour - nobody slept there at the time of the robbery; I have slept there since - I attend the shop; on Saturday night, the 30th of April, I locked up the shop, and on returning at seven o'clock next morning, I found the door open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment, also a pair of trousers and a new hat - the property belonged to my sisters; I had seen it all safe on the Saturday evening, and saw the trousers half an hour before I left the shop - some cheroots were also missing; I saw some of the articles at Mrs. Ewers' on the Saturday following; and my trousers on the Wednesday or Thursday after that.

MARY ANN EWERS . On the 7th of May I took part of the cigars from Mary Taylor, with two brushes.

ADAM McDONNELL . I found the prisoners in custody on the 7th of May - I went to their lodging, and found in a saucepan at the head of the stairs, some snuff-boxes, and cigars; the lid of the saucepan was on, and on, searching the wash-house, I saw Pointing the serjeant, find in a washing vessel, a quantity of snuff, some cigars, and snuff-boxes - they lodged more than a quarter of a mile from Eames'; I found a duplicate in their bed-room.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know where they lodged before? A. No - I understood from the constable that was his lodging; I have seen the daughter of the woman who lives with him there - she told me the female prisoner was her mother.

COURT. Q.Had you any conversation with the male prisoner about that? A. No, I never saw him there.

WILLIAM JOHN BIRD . I am shopman to Mr. Masters, a pawnbroker, in Westminster-road. I have a pair of trousers, pawned on the 2nd of May, with a waistcoat - I believe the male prisoner to be the person who pawned it, but cannot swear to him; it was a young man very much like him - I believe this is the duplicate I gave the person: it is in my own writing.

STEPHEN PAGE . On the 7th of May, about nine o'clock in the morning. I went to this lodging, and found the male prisoner there, dressing himself, in the room the duplicate was found in - the female prisoner was in the same room dressed; they live together as man and wife.

CATHERINE ANN WOOD. I live with Mr. Lyons, a tebacconist. I sent 4 lbs. of snuff to Eames' shop on the 30th of April - I wrote on the parcel in which it was contained; here is my writing on this parcel - it is what I sent there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

STEPHEN PAGE . It was a small house - there were other bed-rooms in it: I was present when the prisoners were examined, and saw what William Taylor said taken down in writing, (looking at the examinations), I believe

this signature to be Mr. Gregorie's writing - I saw him write it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he write the whole? A. I cannot say, I believe not all - I believe the clerk wrote the rest.

ADAM McDONNEL. I have seen Mr. Gregorie write - this is his signature; I was present when the prisoners were examined before him.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you seen him write? A.Times innumerable - I know the character of his hand-writing, (read) - "William Taylor says I found the duplicates in the street."

W. TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

M. TAYLOR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-69

Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1258. ANN WELCH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Land , on the 9th of June , and stealing, 1 lace collar, value 2s. , his property.

MARY LAND . I am the wife of John Land - we live in Hector-row, St. Marylebone . On the 9th of June, about two o'clock, I left the parlour, and went up stairs to dinner, leaving a great many things in the parlour - I had left the street door open, and the parlour door locked, with the key outside; I heard a sort of snap, and in two or three minutes heard the parlour door open and shut -I went down, but did not miss any thing; I went out, and saw Goulding on the leads next door - I asked if he had seen any body come out of my place; he said Yes, a woman, and she had gone into the next door - I went there, and saw the prisoner; I asked what she had been into my house for - she said she had not been in; I said she must, for she had been seen to go in and come out - she then said she was looking for a lodging; I said she ought to have knocked before she went into my place - she said she did not know there was a knocker; Clark, a Policeman, called that evening, and produced a collar, which I had left in my room when I went up stairs.

WILLIAM GOULDING . I am a labourer, and live at No. 61, Crawford-street. On the 9th of June I was on the leads which lead to Hector-row, and saw the prisoner, about two o'clock, go into Mr. Land's house, and come out in four or five minutes; I afterwards saw Mrs. Land, and told her; I followed the prisoner round into the New-road, and saw her go into a house in Newland-street - she came out, and went into No. 6, Little Queen-street: I afterwards saw her in George-street with a bundle - I told the Policeman, who took her; she had some things loose on her arms - I am sure she is the woman who went into Lands.

CHARLES CLARK . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and found on her several articles belonging to another person, and among others this lace collar - she had a bundle; she said her bundle contained tea and sugar; there was some sugar, but no tea - she said the articles were her own.(Collar produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to inquire for a person who I lodged with, but never went farther than the door.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-70

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1259. WILLIAM MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 1 ream of paper, value 12s. , the goods of Joseph Bonsor ; and that he had before been convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-71

1260. GEORGE FRANCIS BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , 1 ring, value 10s. , the goods of Philip Novra , his master.

PHILIP NOVRA. I live in Finsbury-square, and have a warehouse in Lad-lane . The prisoner was in my employ for nine weeks; about six weeks ago I missed a ring, which was kept in a jewellery-box on a shelf in the ware-house - I cannot exactly say when I missed it; I saw it again on the 24th of May at a pawnbroker's - I knew it to be the ring I had missed; I am certain of it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.How long had you had it? A.Twelve months; I swear to its being mine - I bought it of Mr. Lazarus, a manufacturer; I discharged the prisoner on the 20th of May - I did not then charge him with any thing, but I had missed things.

STEPHEN STEPHENS . I am shopman to Mr. Whittaker, a pawnbroker, in Long-lane. On the 2nd of May the prisoner pawned this ring, in the name of John Butler , St. John-street, for 2s. - it was claimed by the prosecutor on the 24th of May; the prisoner was then in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Is that a common pattern? A. I have seen many of exactly the same pattern; it is of very little value, as the pearls are vspoiled - they have never been of much value; I should think it might be bought at a pawnbroker's for about 7s. 6d. - the prisoner did not tell the Magistrate in my hearing where he got it.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 20th of May, at his father's, in St. John-street, charged with obtaining a watch in his master's name - Mr. Novra did not charge him with this ring then; I found a number of duplicates on him, and among them one for this ring - I said nothing to him about it; I went to Whittaker's with the prosecutor - the ring was produced, and he claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. On the 20th of May did the prosecutor tell you he had lost a ring? A. No; he said he had lost several articles, he could not tell what; the prisoner said the whole of the goods pawned were his own property - some were musical snuff-boxes; the prosecutor said, "It is impossible - some of them have been obtained in my name; I deal in musical-boxes - they may have been taken from my warehouse - I will go with you and see;" when I told him a ring was pawned, he said that might be his, as he dealt in jewellery.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the ring of Mr. Hooper, of Clerkenwell-green.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a pawnbroker, and live on Clerkenwell-green. I had a ring of this pattern in August last - it is a very common pattern, or I could speak to it more positively; I believe it is the same, but as there are many of the same pattern, I do not swear positively to it - I sold it in August; here is the book in which I entered the transaction - I cannot say to whom I sold it; the prisoner's friends applied to me about it about a month ago - I have entered here, that on the 30th of Au

gust I sold a ring for 7s. 6d.; the buyer's name is not entered, as it was sold in the shop - I believe it to be the ring I sold that day.

COURT. Q.Was the ring defective in any respect? A. Not when I sold it; there is one stone out now - I must have had it above twelve months in my possession; it was out of time, and was some months in my window -I have no private mark on it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. From the materials it is made of, is it likely one of the pearls might drop out? A. It was very likely - I made no communication to the prisoner or his friends till they applied to me.

JURY to MR. NOVRA. Q.Have you any private-mark on the ring? A. In the gold there is a little hole at the bottom - I did that myself; my wife wore it, and lost the pearl out of it - she gave it me to put one, and I put it into the jewel-case and forgot it; she had worn it for twelve months - I did not intend to sell it; I made the hole to try if it was gold or silver.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.How was it you never mentioned that to the officer? A. I had not looked over my stock, and did not know I had missed it; I did not mention the mark to the officer - I only told him about the pearl; I did not try it with aqua-fortis.

JURY to STEPHEN STEPHENS. Q. Did you perceive this hole in the ring when you took it in? A. No; one of the stones were deficient.

WILLIAM HENMAN . Mr. Novra had the ring in his possession about half a minute, but made no mark on it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-72

1261. CHARLES SIMMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May , 1 silk bag, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 key, value 1s., the goods of Ann Russell : and 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Everett , from the person of the said Ann Russell .

ANN RUSSELL . I am single , and live in Bagnio-court, Newgate-street, with my friends. On the 23rd of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was coming home from Whitechapel, with my friend Elizabeth Everett - we were near Aldgate-pump , and saw the prisoner and another following us a long while; then they rushed by us, and as the prisoner rushed by me, I lost my bag, which hung over my arm, containing a handkerchief of Everett's, and a handkerchief and key of my own - I turned round, and caught hold of the prisoner; he had part of the string of the bag in his hand - his companion picked up the bag, and ran away; I charged the prisoner with having taken it - he used some very bad expressions, and said he had not taken it; I have not found it - the other man was not secured; they had been vfollowing us near ten minutes, directly we came out of the house we had been to.

ELIZABETH EVERETT . I am the wife of William Everett. I was walking arm-in-arm with Miss Russell - she had a black silk bag hanging on her arm; the prisoner and another man followed us some time - by Aldgatepump they pushed against us, and all at once the prisoner cut the string of the bag, which fell on the ground; the other took it up, put it into his hat, and ran away - there was a red handkerchief of mine in her bag, worth 2s.; the string was in the prisoner's hand at the time we caught hold of him; we never let him go - a gentleman fetched an officer.

WILLIAM PLAISTOW. I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - I found a pair of scissors in his coat pocket, and a leather purse.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a drover, and carry the scissors to mark the beast.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-73

1262. DANIEL CUNNINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of George Collison , from his person .

GEORGE COLLISON. I am clerk to Mr. Allan, of Frederick's-place, Old Jewry, solicitor. On the 21st of May, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I felt a jerk at my outside coat pocket, in London-wall ; I felt, and my handkerchief was gone - I had felt it safe three minutes before; I turned round immediately, and saw the prisoner within two yards of me - there was a small crowd attracted by an accident; the prisoner was in the act of buttoning up the breast of his jacket, which created my suspicion, and I charged him with stealing my handkerchief - he denied it; I opened his jacket, and my handkerchief laid concealed under his left arm - I gave him in charge; his employer is too ill to attend - he gave him a good character up to within two months; since that he has been out of employ.

WILLIAM ASH. I am a superintendent of the watch. The prosecutor brought the prisoner to the watch-house, and charged him with stealing his handkerchief; the prisoner said he had picked it up - I have known him some years, and up to the last few months he was an industrious boy, but has got into bad company.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310630-74

1263. SARAH DARBY and MARY EBBS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 13 yards of printed cotton, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Hall .

THOMAS HALL. I am a linen-draper , and live in Bishopsgate without . On the 6th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners come into the shop in company, and from their manner and appearance, I was induced to take them from the young man who first served them; I showed them several pieces of goods - they asked for prints, and said they each wanted a gown; after showing them several, Ebbs made two or three attempts to draw a piece of print off the counter, without effect, and during that time Darby endeavoured to draw my attention to some goods at a little distance on the counter - at that time I saw Ebbs draw a piece of vprint off the counter; it fell on the floor, vbetween her and the counter - she then sat down on a chair, put her hand down, and drew it up under her clothes; she then said it was only an apron that they wanted, and they would come another day - they bought nothing; I went between them and the door and stopped them in the passage, close to the door - Ebbs let the print fall from her; it was thirteen yards of printed cotton in one piece.

WILLIAM RILEY . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took them; I searched them both, and found no money on either of them to buy goods with, nothing but an empty purse.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Ebb's Defence. I went to buy two yards of print - I looked into my purse, and found I had left my money at home; when I came out the print dropped off the others by the door.

Darby's Defence. I went with her to buy the print; I had 2s., but had left it at home.

DARBY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

EBBS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-75

1264. JOHN SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Turner , from his person .

HENRY TURNER . I live in Princes-street, Rotherithe and am a master-mariner . On the 23rd of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I was in Bishopsgatechurch-yard - I had used my handkerchief in Houndsditch; I was walking with a friend, and did not perceive it taken - I saw a boy running before me, and a man pursuing him; the man touched my friend on the shoulder, and said something which I did not hear - I felt my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone; I kept the prisoner in sight till he was stopped; the person who pursued showed me my handkerchief.

JOHN LEACH . I am a porter. I was in Bishopsgate church-yard, near Broad-street. I heard a person call Stop him! and I stopped the prisoner; I saw him throw the handkerchief away about two yards before I stopped him - he was alone; I never lost sight of him - I saw the officer take up the handkerchief.

GEORGE WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a City-officer. I was in Houndsditch, and saw the prisoner with two boys; they all three turned up Bishopsgate church-yard after Mr. Turner and a gentleman; the two boys walked first and Sheen behind them - nearly opposite the church-yard they made a stop, and some man that was going on before them ran forward; I went to catch hold of Sheen and the other - Sampson, who was taken, stopped; he did not run; I saw Sheen throw the handkerchief away as he ran: it was produced, and Mr. Leach claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Limehouse to look for work - there was a cry of Stop thief! several boys ran round the corner; the gentleman laid hold of me, and accused me of throwing down the handkerchief; I know nothing of it.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-76

1265. JOHN SILK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Goulding Ramsay , from his person .

THOMAS GOULDING RAMSAY. I am a wine-merchant , and live in Mark-lane. On the 9th of June, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking up Harp-lane , and on getting to Tower-street, Mitchell informed me my pocket was picked - he pointed out the prisoner; a friend who was with me ran over with me, and I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from his side, and throw it on the ground - it was picked up, and given to me immediately; the prisoner ran up Mark-lane - I did not lose sight of him - a gentleman stopped him; I am certain he is the person who threw it down.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM MITCHELL. I live in Harp-lane, and am clerk to Mr. Prosser, a wine-merchant. I was up at my desk, and saw the prisoner and another in the lane - Mr. Ramsay and a gentleman were walking before them; I saw the prisoner go up to Mr. Ramsay's pocket, lift it up, put his hand in, and take out the handkerchief, which he put into his right-hand pocket; I immediately ran out, and told Mr. Ramsay in Tower-street; I pointed the prisoner out, and directly he saw me point, I saw him take the handkerchief from his pocket, and throw it down - I pursued, and caught him at the corner of Mark-lane, without losing sight of him; he struck me a blow in the chin - I had done nothing but endeavour to apprehend him; I do not know what became of his companion - he was behind him at the time of the theft, but I could see what he was doing; the prisoner was secured opposite the new Corn -exchange, by a gentleman.

THOMAS DEVY. I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The young lad came up and collared me - he shook me, and knocked me down; I struck him for it, and then he said I stole the gentleman's handkerchief.

WILLIAM MITCHELL. I did not knock him down - I collared him.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-77

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, JULY 13.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1266. SAMUEL AYRES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence , the monies of John Hill , Jun.

JOHN HILL, JUN. I live in Lower Frederick-street, Connaught-square. On the 14th of June I went to Shepherd's-bush , fishing; I saw the prisoner there, begging -I gave him 1d.; I then bathed in the water - I left my clothes by the side, and saw the prisoner at that time on a hedge by the side; I had left 1s. 6d. loose in my trousers pocket - I am quite sure that in drawing off my clothes I did not throw it out; while I was in the water the prisoner came down to the water-side - he saw me looking at him, and he ran up again to where I had left him; when I got out of the water I found the canvas case of a fishing-rod, which I had rolled tightly up, and put into my pocket upon my money, was taken out, the pocket drawn partly out, and the money gone; the prisoner had then left - when I put the case into my pocket I am sure my money was safe - it was a very large case, and filled my pocket completely; I saw the prisoner and two other boys in a lane near there - I asked if he had my money; he said he had not, but he ran away as hard as he could directly I turned my back - I gave information to a Police-constable.

JOHN GANNON. I am a Police-constable. I received information from Hill - I went to the prisoner's father's house, I saw his sister at the door - I asked her if she knew any thing about her brother; I thought from the description that he was the boy - she said he had run down Wood-lane; I was not satisfied, and went to the back of the house, where I found him concealed behind a door in

a back room - I asked what he did with the money which he took out of the gentleman's pocket: he said he did not take the money out of his pocket, but he found 1s. by the side of his waistcoat - I searched him, and found on him 9d. in copper, and a knife; the lads who were with him are not here.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not rob the gentleman - I found 1s. 6d. by the side of the clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-78

1256. DAVIS BAILEY and MARY (HIS WIFE ) were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 2 pillows, value 2s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 carpet, value 10s.; 3 blankets, value 6s.; 1 hearth-rug, value 3s.; 2 sheets, value 4s.; 1 cloak, value 6s., and 1 counterpane, value 3s. , the goods of Stephen Horncastle Geldard .

REBECCA GELDARD. I am the wife of Stephen Horncastle Geldard - he lives in Wilderness-row, Chelsea , and is a traveller . On the 21st of July the female prisoner came and took my first floor, at 7s. 6d. a week - it was furnished; she promised to come the next day to tell me where to apply for a reference - next day both the prisoners came, without any bundle; they lived there till the 11th of November - they had paid me 1l. 2s. 6d. for rent, and when they went away there was about 3l. owing; I had not seen them from the night of the 10th of November - I had repeatedly asked for my rent; the woman borrowed a cloak of mine to go to Mr. Bailey's agent, in Suffolk-street, Strand; her husband had told me that he was a lieutenant in the Navy - when she came back she told me the agent was out of town, and she had to go again early in the morning, and if I would let her have the cloak she would pay me the money early in the morning; her husband was then up stairs - he was never to be seen; he never left my house from the 21st of July till the 11th of November - he always pretended to be ill; when they were gone I missed all the articles stated in the indictment - they had all been let to them except the cloak: I missed them between nine and ten o'clock in the morning - I went up and knocked at the door, and not receiving any answer I tried to look through the key-hole, but it was filled with butter; I had repeatedly been in the apartment before, but had not missed any of the articles till that day - I saw the female prisoner on the 3rd of June, and I saw my cloak the next Tuesday at Queen-square office.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Were you good enough to offer to Mrs. Bailey the loan of your gown and bonnet also? A. She said she had not a gown and bonnet to go to the agent in, and I lent her mine on the day before, but on that day I declined lending her them, and only lent her my cloak; she was living with her husband all the time - her husband was never out.

BENJAMIN BIRDSEYE REEVE. I live with Mr. Lowther, a pawnbroker, in Tottenham-court-road. I have a cloak, pawned on the 10th of May, I think by the male prisoner - I am not certain of his person.

JOHN TARRANT . I live with Mr. Thompson, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of pillow-cases, pawned on the 18th of November, a carpet on the 9th of November, also three blankets, and a hearth-rug - I do not know who pawned them.

JOHN GAMMON . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pillows, pawned by a female, on the 30th of October, and on the 3rd of November.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Davis Bailey's Defence. I never had a felonious intention in taking these things; I was bound to the earth by disease and poverty - I would have redeemed them had the prosecutor given me time: I was under the necessity of taking them or absconding for a time - I never denied I had taken them, and the things could not have been found had I not furnished a list of them - they were sent for, and produced at the office.

D. BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Six Months .

M. BAILEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-79

1268. HANNAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 4 yards of ribbon, value 2s. 6d.; 6 yards of lace, value 5s.; 1 lb. weight of soap, value 6d.; 1 frock body, value 1s., and 1 gown-sleeve, value 1s. , the goods of John Willder .

JOHN WILLDER . I am a linen-draper , and live on Kensington-terrace - the prisoner was my servant of all-work . On the 13th of June I gave her into custody for being intoxicated - we could not get her to bed nor out of the house, she was so riotous and abusive; the articles stated have been produced to me by the officer, and I can swear to them - it is a particular sort of soap which washes with hard water: we send for it out of the City -I have the fellow sleeve to this one, and the ribbon and lace are what I had sold Mrs. Willder out of my own shop.

GEORGE TILLEY. I am a Police-constable. On the 13th of June I was called by the prosecutor, and found the prisoner intoxicated; I went up stairs with her - she got her bonnet off the table, then unlocked a drawer, and pulled out a shawl; she locked the drawer again, and when she got to the door she said, "I have a bob in the drawer, and it is of no use to go to quod without blunt;" she then went to the drawer, and took out a purse - there was an eye-glass in it, which she took out, and was going to put it into her pocket; I took that and the purse from her, and brought them down - the prosecutor said the glass belonged to one of his children, and the purse was claimed by Mrs. Willder; I took the prisoner to the watch-house - I searched her, and found some of these articles on her; I then went to her room again - she gave me the key of her drawer to fetch a pocket-book, which had some writing in it, which she did not wish her mistress to see; I found in the drawer, this ribbon, lace, frock-body, and shoe-horn - she said her mistress desired her to put all the things laying about in the drawer.

MR. WILLDER. This key is the key of the beer, which she purloined to help herself - I know these things to be ours; we had two or three of our children in that room, but the prisoner had the drawers exclusively to herself.

The prisoner, in a long defence, stated, that the prosecutrix had desired her to put any thing into the drawers which she might find laying about, and having found some of the articles she had done so; that the drawers were for the use of the children, who slept in the room, and some of the things had been given to her by the prosecutrix's daughter.

MR. WILLDER. My wife did not keep her drawers locked - part of this lace is quite new.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-80

1269. HENRY LEVEN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 1 sovereign , the money of William Inwards .

The prisoner, being a native of Greece, had the evidence explained in Arabic by an interpreter.

SARAH INWARDS. I am the wife of William Inwards - he lives in Upper Seymour-street , and is a baker . On the 15th of June the prisoner came into our shop, about eleven o'clock in the morning - he had a bag with him; another man came in afterwards, who was dressed like a Turk - the prisoner took up two 1d. loaves, and laid down a sovereign; I took out a purse or bag to give him change - I put the money into my hand to separate the silver from the sovereigns, to see if I could give him change; I had then twenty-one sovereigns and some silver in my hand - the prisoner knocked my money out of my hand, and it fell upon the counter; I put both my hands upon it, and made him understand by my looks that I was very angry with him for taking such a liberty; he would keep meddling with the money on the counter, and he took his hand off in a flat direction, as if he had something between his fingers, quite like a slight of hand trick - he took his hand up, and his thumb was under his hand; I did not see any sovereign in his hand - I supposed his thumb was in such a position as to conceal something between that and the rest of his hand, and with his other hand he took up the sovereign which he had laid down; that was at a distinct part of the counter from my money - the other man with the turban was not there then; he had been in, and asked me to buy some spices, which I refused, and he went out - the prisoner then turned his back to me, and went out, putting his hand up to his mouth as if he placed something in it; he did not wait for his loaves or change - I had counted my sovereigns twice over just before, as I do every morning to set them down in the book; I counted them twice over again when he was gone, and I missed one.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is the man, who stands here, the man who had the Turkish dress on? A. Yes - I knew nothing of the prisoner before; the prisoner knocked my money out of my hand, and it fell on the counter - none of it fell off; it was not a very severe blow, but it caused the whole of it to fall - I suppose he had, in his language, asked me for change, but I could not understand him - he put down the sovereign, and I took it for granted he wanted change; he kept meddling with the money, as if he was going to look out change for himself; his own sovereign still laid on the counter - I did not see him take any sovereign up but that; but when he was gone I counted, and missed one - there was no other person in the shop at the time; the man in the Turkish dress left before the prisoner - I had not, at that time, produced any money; I believe this was about eleven o'clock - I gave an alarm immediately I had an opportunity - our young man came into the shop, and I said "James, a man has been here and taken a sovereign, run after him;" but he did not go the right way - I then ran over to a neighbour at an opposite shop; a young man then ran after him, and had him taken by the Policeman, who found some silver on him - I had counted my money twice just before he came in, as I do every morning to set it down in the book - it was not ten minutes before he came in; no other customer came in, I am sure - I had counted all my money - I knew I had about 13s., but I did not know whether I had a half-sovereign or not - I had counted the silver, it was all in shillings: I had twenty-one sovereigns - I had no halfsovereign; I took it out to convince him that I had no half-sovereign - he asked me for a half-sovereign, and I did not know whether I had one or not - I gave an alarm within five minutes. I think.

THOMAS LUDEGREEN. I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in the New-road on the morning of the 15th of June - I saw the prisoner and another man with a turban on; in consequence of information I took them both into custody - I took them to the baker's shop, in Seymour-street; I searched the prisoner in the parlour, and found in his left-hand waistcoat pocket two sovereigns loose - this is the bag which the prisoner had with him; I searched it afterwards, and found in it four 1d. loaves and four papers of tea - it has been in my possession ever since.

Cross-examined. Q.Where did you take him? A. In the New-road, about twenty minutes or half-past eleven o'clock, hardly so much as ten minutes' walk from the prosecutor's - they were both walking; the other man had a box; I found on the prisoner a silver snuff-box and a watch - he returned very willingly; the other man understood English, and I told him they must go back.

Prisoner's Defence, (through the interpreter). The other man is my assistant - I gave him 7s. 6d. a week, because he understands English, and he knows places; I gave him my box - when I went to the prosecutrix's shop I had nothing but two sovereigns in gold - I asked her to let me have a 3d. loaf; I took out a sovereign, and gave her to change - she sounded it well, and said she had no change; I said, "Give me a half-sovereign, and the rest in silver;" she said she had not any silver, and I went away - my assistant and I went into a house, and sold a coral necklace for 17s. 6d., which he keeps till the evening, and then he gives me an account of it - I know what is sold; he then said, "I am quite hungry;" I said, "We will go, and get four 1d. loaves," as we had the silver - we were then going to a public-house, and the officer took us both.

ABRAHAM COHEN. I am a native of Alexandria. I was in the prisoner's employ; I carry his box of spice and necklaces - I go to every public-house and shop; I went into the prosecutor's shop before he did, and asked the lady if she wanted any thing - she said No; I came out, and he then went in - I did not see any thing he did in the shop: I went to a public-house opposite to sell some goods, and by the time he came out of the prosecutor's I was in the street again - he walked away as other people do; Seymour-street is a long street - we went together; he did not attempt to run or to conceal himself; we sold a coral necklace, and bought some bread - we received silver for the necklace, and paid 6d. for the bread; I had the rest of the silver in my pocket - I do not know what money the prisoner had when he went into the prosecutor's shop; the lady said he asked for change, and she had not change - that she put her money on the counter, and he wanted to take some; I told him so, and he said he took nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-81

1277. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for steal

ing, on the 24th of June , 11 lbs. weight of beef, value 6s. , the goods of Benjamin Griffin .

RALPH GRIFFIN . I am the son of Benjamin Griffin - he keeps a butcher's shop , in High-street, Hampstead . On the afternoon of the 24th of June we had a piece of beef hanging in front of the shop - I saw it safe about five o'clock, and missed it in about half an hour; I received information, went to a baker's shop in the neighbourhood, and found the piece of beef in the oven - there were about 11 lbs. of it.

Prisoner. Q.How many butcher's shops are there in Hampstead? A. Five - they might have beef of the same sort, but this was cut different to what it generally is.

WILLIAM SEAGRAVES . I am servant to Mr. Robert Pilcher , who keeps the Horse and Groom, at Hampstead. On the 24th of June the prisoner came there with a piece of beef, about a quarter after five o'clock - my master asked what he gave for it; he said 6s. - that he had bought it at a butcher's shop, and he asked master to cook it for him - my master said, as he was so tipsy, if he would go up to bed he would send it to the baker's, and I took it.

PHILIP MOSE. I am a constable of Hampstead. I found the prisoner in bed at the top of Pilcher's house - I told him in coming down stairs if he would take me to the butcher's shop I would let him go; he had at first stated that he bought it at a butcher's shop, but when I got him out he said he bought it of a person in the town - I took him to the baker's, and then to the cage; he said, before the Magistrate, that he gave 2s. 4d. for it, but I understood him at first 1s. 2d.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day before, I had received part of my bounty, and got intoxicated - I never made mention of 6s.; I was stupidly drunk when I went to the public-house, and there I had some more drink - the landlord said if I would go and lay down on the bed he would let me know when his dinner came from the cook-house -I went up, and in fifteen minutes the officer came and took me; I had bought the beef for 1s. 2d. of a man who said he was a brick-setter, or a brickmaker - he said a butler had made him a compliment of it.

RALPH GRIFFIN . The public-house and the baker's were in the same street - I got the beef back about six o'clock.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310630-82

1270. WILLIAM WARE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 1 live tame drake, price 1s. 6d., and 1 live tame duck, price 1s. 6d. , the property of William Barlow .

WILLIAM BARLOW. I live in North-place, Kingsland-road. On Sunday, the 19th of June, I was on my way to church, and saw the prisoner and another young man in a field near a dung-heap - I have some ducks which run in and out of that field; on my return from church I missed one duck - about three o'clock I went again into the field, and saw the prisoner and another person driving the ducks about and trying to catch one; I set a watch, and went for a Policeman - on my return I missed a drake, and found the prisoner and the drake in my house: they had been taken there while I went for the Policeman.

GEORGE BARTRAM. I am servant to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner and another man in his field that Sunday, hunting the ducks - when the prisoner went away I pursued him, and Benfield took him, and took a drake from his pocket; the other man ran away.

CHARLES BENFIELD. I was in the prosecutor's field on the Sunday afternoon. I saw the prisoner and another laying by the side of the pond; they then got up - I moved and looked over a wall; I saw the other feeding the duck with bread, and when they got between the two, the prisoner took one and put it into his pocket; they then went away - I pursued, and took the prisoner with the drake in his pocket.

CHARLES WALLER . I took the prisoner and have the drake.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I was taken the duck was ten or twelve yards off me.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-83

1271. WILLIAM WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 1 bag, value 1s., and 2 quarterns of flour, value 20d. , the goods of James Topley .

SAMUEL EDWARDS. I am in the employ of Mr. James Topley , a baker . On the 9th of June I left my truck at the corner of Coburg-street, Bow-road - there were two quarterns of flour, in a bag in it.

THOMAS HALPIN . I am a Police-constable. I received information on the 9th of June, and stopped the prisoner in the Bow-road, about a quarter of a mile from Coburg-street - I had seen him for about five minutes coming from that spot: this is the bag and flour which he had - I understand there are two quarterns of flour in it; he said he had a quartern of flour for his sister and another for his mother.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Mile-end-road, and got in company with a person, who had this bundle; he said he was tired of carrying it, and he would sell it for 1s. 6d.; I said I had only 1s. 1/2d. - he said he would take the 1s. for it, and he then told me to make the best of my way home - I was walking on and the Policeman called me; I told him where I had got it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY .

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 10 Days .

Reference Number: t18310630-84

1272. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for embezzlement .

ALFRED JAMES FOWLER . The prisoner was in the employ of Messrs. John Sherborn and another, as porter , for twelve months - he was to go out in the morning to take orders, to take them out in the afternoon, and occasionally to receive money from the customers who might pay him; he was to account for what he received, to his masters or to myself, or to any person in the house; I am the principal cashier; he was to pay to me or another clerk, or to the shopman - I do not recollect his accounting to me for the money stated in the indictment.

WILLIAM HARDY . In the beginning of May I paid the prisoner 19s. 6d. for Sir Henry Halford - it was to be paid to Messrs. Sherborn and Sams; I had been in the habit of paying him, and he knew it was for them; in the following week I paid him 1l. 2s. 6d., for the same persons.

A. J. FOWLER re-examined. Q.How do you know

that neither of the other persons received this money? A.From his own confession, and from its not appearing on our books; I went to him on the night of the 16th of May, with his father, as he had absented himself - I asked him what he had done with the money, and he said he had appropriated it to his own use; I do not know that I mentioned these sums of money, but I considered that he understood it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-85

1273. MARGARET SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 1 pair of trousers, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Robertson .

JOSEPH ROBERTSON. I live in East-street, Lambs Conduit-street. I lost a pair of trousers on the 7th of June, which my daughter had to carry to a person we had to sew them for.

FRANCIS REYNOLDS . I am a Police-constable. I have a pair of trousers, which I got from Mott.

WILLIAM MOTT . I received these trousers from John Bellison .

JOHN BELLISON . I found these trousers in the cupboard, on the second floor, at the house I was at work at - I had only seen the prisoner twice before.

NENERILLA ROBERTSON . I am nine years old; I live with my father, the prosecutor. On the 7th of June my mother gave me a bundle, which I had seen a pair of trousers put into - I was to carry them to Mr. Jones, in Drury-lane: I met the prisoner in Great Queen-street - she came up to me, and asked me to carry a letter to Mrs. Merrit's, and if the lady was at home she would give me 1s.; she said she would give me 1s. when I came out - she said there was half a crown in the letter for a little boy: I was to take it to a court in Queen-street - she asked me to let her hold my bundle till I came out; I went to the place, but only went up a step or two of the house; when I returned the prisoner and my bundle were gone - I was looking for her, and saw William Mott; I told him what had happened, and went with him to a house in Queen-court - the prisoner was up stairs there, and Bellison went and fetched her out.

JOHN BELLISON. I found the trousers in the cupboard of a room, the door of which was shut; the prisoner was on the landing-place.(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-86

1274. MATTHEW HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Henry Albert Loscombe , from his person .

HENRY ALBERT LOSCOMBE . I am an attorney - I live at Andover, but am now residing in Houghton-street, Brunswick-square. On the 25th of June, about half-past eight o'clock, I was in Regent-street - I looked round, and saw the prisoner - I continued walking on, and in a few seconds I felt something touch my coat; I turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief clenched in his hand - he put it round under his left arm; I took hold of him, held him a few seconds, and when the officer came up I gave him in charge.

Prisoner. Q.Can you awear I took it? A. I cannot swear it, but I have every reason to believe it, as there was no other person there.

STEPHEN TAYLOR . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

MR. LOSCOMBE. This is mine - my initials are on it; when I turned the second time the prisoner was close to me - it was not possible for any one to get between him and me; when I took the prisoner he asked me to let him off, that was all.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two little boys, and a big boy, go and pick the gentleman's pocket - one of them said,"Here is some one coming;" they threw the handkerchief down, and ran down Warwick-street; I took it up, and was going to ask the gentleman if it was his - he turned, and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18 - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310630-87

1275. GEORGE STAPLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 table, value 2l. 8s. , the goods of James Peachey .

THOMAS HURANKS . I live at Stoke Newington, and am a smith. The prisoner's mother quitted a house in High-street, Newington, a few weeks before the 9th of June - there was a dining-table in the house; she delivered the key up to me - I am executor to the prisoner's deceased father; the table belonged to Mr. James Peachey .

JANE PEACHEY . I am the wife of James Peachey. I left a table of my husband's at the prisoner's mother's house, in High-street, Newington - it is worth 2l. 8s.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I received possession of the table from a house where the prisoner was lodging; he was then in custody - the prisoner took my brother officer to the place, and I waited at the door; I went again afterwards - we broke the door, and I took possession of the table; the prisoner said that he had taken the tiles off the house and got it out, and then he said there was a square of glass broken and he put his hand in.

JOSEPH DOSSETT . I am a constable of Hackney. I went to the Weavers' Arms on the 6th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening; I saw the prisoner in the tap-room, and said I wanted him about a table - he said if I would go into the parlour he would speak to me about it; he then said he saw the parlour window of the house open, that he got in and took the table to his own lodging, and if I would go with him he would show it to me; I took him to Mrs. Peachey, and she identified him - I then went to his lodging; he took the key out of his pocket, opened the door, and showed me the table - he told me in the room, and also on the way to the station, that he went to the back of the house, got up the tiles, got in at the one pair back window, and took the table to take care of; he then said it was on the Sunday evening - he had before said it was on Saturday; he made no difficulty in showing me the table, but I had a good deal of trouble to coak him away - I took him to the station-house, and got from him a knife which he had; I then wanted the key of his lodging, but he said the whole five of us should not get that.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) On the 3rd of June last I was going towards home - I found the shutters, door and window of my mother's house open; I went into the house, found no one there, and all the goods were gone with the exception of a table, which I took away, for fear some person should go and take it away, when I took it to my lodgings three doors off - on

Monday I was taken into custody; I had not the least intention of making away with the table - when the officer came I immediately took him where the table was, knowing myself innocent of any intention to steal.

ROBERT BROWN . There was a washing-tub, a tablecover, and one or two trifling things in the house; I do not know whether there was any thing of value.

THOMAS HUBANKS . When I received the key every thing of value was out of the house - his mother was obliged to leave the house through his behaviour; he told her he would take the table, and sell it - the house had been left secure, and I had the key.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-88

1276. WILLIAM ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 sheet, value 2s., and 1 blanket, value 4s. , the goods of Elizabeth Robinson .

ANN STOREY . I am the wife of Thomas Storey, a butcher, of Lizard-street, Old-street . The prisoner lodged in the same house, in one of the rooms belonging to the landlady, Elizabeth Robinson - I let it to him in her absence on the 1st of June; it was the back room on the first floor, and was furnished - I occupied the front room on the same floor: on the Monday following I saw the prisoner go out with a large parcel wrapped in two newspapers - I went into the back room, looked at the bedding, and missed a blanket; I followed, and came up to him in Orchard-street - I tapped him on the shoulder, and said, "Bring those things back;" he said, "Don't say any thing, I will go back with you and make it all right" - Mr. Orpen then came up, asked what was the matter, and I asked him to see the prisoner back to No. 21, Lizard-street; I went into the room with them, opened the prisoner's bundle, and found the blanket - he said he did not take it with an intent to steal it; I then examined the bed, and missed the sheet - he said if the two females would leave the room he would produce it; I left with another female, and when we returned he had produced it out of his hat, as Mr. Orpen said, in his presence.

JOHN ORPEN . I assisted in going back with the prisoner - I saw the blanket and sheet found as has been described.

MARY WHITFORD . I am the wife of John Whitford - we live in Lizard-street. I saw the prisoner come to the street door, and look out - he then went in, and came out with a bundle under his right arm; I was in the room when this blanket was produced.

GEORGE GLADWELL . I am a Police constable. I took the prisoner, and have the sheet, which I got from another officer who brought it out of the house, and the blanket from Mrs. Storey.

ELIZABETH ROBINSON . These are my property, I believe, but I cannot swear to them - I am out a great deal, and my house is left in the care of a child; here is an R on the sheet, and some of my things are so marked.

Prisoner's Defence. I believe the prosecutrix is well aware that it was not my intention to steal them; she has called on my friends, and stated that she would not have thought of prosecuting me but for the Policeman.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310630-89

1277. MARY PICKNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 basket, value 2s. 6d.; 9 shirts, value 5l. 8s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 4s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 6s.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s.; 3 window-curtains, value 3s.; 1 cravat, value 1s., and 1 remnant of linen, value 1s. , the goods of Elizabeth Gallin .

ELIZABETH GALLIN . I am a widow , and live in Reliance-square, New Inn-yard - I have known the prisoner six years, and employed her as a washer-woman . On Saturday, the 7th of May, I sent her with a basket of linen, containing all the articles stated in the indictment, to Mr. Clarke, in Goswell-street-road - I have never seen them since; the prisoner did not return - I went in pursuit of her; I left word at her lodgings for her to be brought to me when she came home, and her landlord brought her between ten and eleven o'clock; she said she had been in a public-house - that when she came out two men took her basket away, and she had been to Mr. Clarke's to see if the things had been delivered, which they had not; she said she knew one of the men, and had given them the bundle to carry - she had another bundle to carry to Mr. Archer's, and that went safe.

SARAH ARCHER . I live with my uncle, Mr. Archer, in Banner-street. I was in Featherstone-street on the 7th of May, and saw the prisoner and a man come out of the Green Man - she had a basket of linen, and he asked if he should carry it; she said, "No, I can carry it" - he put it on her head, and said, "What a heavy load!" the prisoner saw me, and I knew her - they then went on.

ANN AUSTIN . I was servant to Mr. Clarke, in Goswell-road. I delivered the prisoner this linen on Monday, the 2nd of May, to go to Mrs. Gallin's to be washed and brought home clean on the Saturday, but it never came; the prisoner generally brought it in the afternoon - about five o'clock that Saturday she came crying very much, and said she did not know what she should do, she thought she should go out of her mind, as she had lost the linen; I asked how she came to lose it - she said she met a man, named William Ingley, whom she knew by sight, and he had another man with him - that they asked her to go to a public-house, where they had something to drink; that she then went and delivered one bundle of linen - that she then went into another house, at the corner of Tabernacle-walk, and while she was drinking there with the man she knew by sight, the other man went off with the things; she said the man asked where she was going, and she said to Goswell-street - he said he was going to Islington, and he would carry them for her, and then he went off with them; she has brought home the linen safe before.

ELIZABETH GALLIN. This linen was delivered to me to wash, and I am answerable for it; I employed the prisoner to carry it home - it was a light bundle.

JOSEPH CLITHEROW . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have inquired at the house she says they went to - I find William Ingley has used the house, but he is now out of the way; I inquired if the prisoner had been seen there with two men, but I cannot learn.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking home the linen when I met the two men - I knew one, but not the other; I never had a farthing of the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-90

1278. CHARLES PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 watch, value 16l.; 2 gold chains, value 28l., and 1 gold cross, value 11l. , the goods of Christopher Rowlands .

WILLIAM BROAD ROWLANDS . I am the son of Christopher Rowlands , a watch-maker and jeweller , in Coventry-street . On the afternoon of the 7th of May, the prisoner came to my father's shop - he was then dressed in a blue frock-coat, and light trousers; I was behind the counter, and he asked to look at a gold watch which he pointed out - I took it out of the window, showed it him, and told him the price was seventeen guineas; he then asked to look at a gold chain, and a gold cross, which were in the other window; he then said, if he left the money, would we allow him to take the things to show to his lady, who was confined to her bed - I said certainly; he then said he was going a little further, and he would call as he came back - he returned in about five or ten minutes, told me to put up the things, and said he had a coach waiting at the door, and if I would go with him, the lady could see the things, and settle the business at once; while I was packing up the things, he asked to look at a gentleman's gold chain which was in the window, which I told Davies (our lad) to reach - I showed it to the prisoner; he asked the price, I said 8l. 10s. - he told me to put that up with the rest, which I did; before I had finished putting them up, he got into the coach - told me to follow him, which I did; the coach then drove to Jermyn-street - while we were in the coach he said his lady was confined with a little boy, and he wished to make her a present on the occasion; the coach stopped at the door of No. 103 - the servant opened the door; he went into the passage, and went up stairs - I asked if I should follow him; he said, "Yes, come up;" we went up, and he asked me for the things - I said should I show them to the lady; he said he would step in and see - he then went into an adjoining room, came to me, and said the lady was in bed, it would not be prudent for me to go in; I thought I heard him talking in the small room where he said the lady was in bed - I sat down and waited some time, till the servant came up and said there was a young man waiting for me; I went down, and found our young man, who had come after the coach, and had been waiting outside - he then knocked at the door, and the servant let him into the passage; he asked me if the gentleman had settled, as he was gone - I ran up stairs, and opened the door of the room the prisoner had gone into - I saw a bed, which appeared not to have been touched, but a little cane which the prisoner had had in his hand was laying on it, and I saw there was another door in the room, leading to the landing-place; I then went down, and asked the servant if that gentleman lodged there, or if there was any lady there - she said No, the gentleman had only come a little before to look at the lodgings.

Prisoner. He says I was dressed in a blue frock-coat - it was just the contrary; he says again that I asked for a gentleman's chain - this is contrary to the statement he made before. Did you feel satisfied that I was speaking to a person inside? Witness. Yes.

CHRISTOPHER ROWLANDS . I live in Conventry-street. I was not in the shop the first time the prisoner came, but I came down while the articles were packing up. I said to my son, "I suppose I need not give you any caution, be careful;" and I afterwards said to the lad, "Do go after them and keep watch, for I am not satisfied that this is right;" the property was worth full 50l.

Prisoner. Q.Can you tell what dress the person had on? A.You had a blue coat and a black stock; I have no kind of doubt you are the person - I know you from your general appearance; I said before Sir Richard Birnie that I was quite certain of you - I had a description of the mark over your right eye, from the lady to whose house you went to look at the lodging.

EDWARD DAVIES . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I am quite certain the prisoner is the person I saw at my master's shop; I remember the things being taken in the coach by my young master - I happened to be in the Temple on the 9th of June, and saw the prisoner there; I knew him the instant I saw him, and followed him to Fleet-street, where I met Jenkins, the Police-constable - the instant the prisoner saw me speak to Jenkins, he turned and ran into the Temple; Jenkins and I followed him - I called Stop thief! and he was taken in one of the squares in the Temple; he was dressed as a gentleman, in a blue coat, when he was at my master's, and when I saw him in the Temple, he was dressed as he is now, except that he had a black stock on - I have not the least doubt he is the man who came to my master's.

Prisoner. Q. Was it a frock coat, or a dress coat I had on at your master's? A. I believe it was a dress coat, but I am not exactly confident - I recognized you in the Temple before I spoke to the officer; there was no one with you then - I saw you give a letter to a man; I believe you took the same course to go back again - you did not stop at all; you ran as fast as you could till you got to a place which was no thoroughfare - I knew him in a minute.

ROBERT JENKINS . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, who was pointed out to me by this witness - what he has stated is correct.

LUCY BRENNANE . I live at No. 103, Jermyn-street. The prisoner came to my house on the 7th of May, about halfpast eleven o'clock, and made some inquiries respecting a lodging; he said he would call again, and he came about three - he told me he should call again with his brother about three; I am quite sure he is the person.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect what dress I had on? A. Yes, a blue coat, and I think it was a dress coat, but I am not sure; I recollect these young gentlemen coming, but I knew nothing of their business.

ELIZABETH LEAHY . I am servant at the house. The prisoner came to my mistress on the 7th of May, and I let him in to look at the apartments which were then to let on the first floor; he came a second time at half-past twelve o'clock - he came a third time between two and three, with young Mr. Rowlands, and they went up stairs; the prisoner desired him to follow him up - the prisoner then came down stairs; my mistress told me to take him up some pens and paper, which I did, and he was gone - the young man then came; I went and told Mr. Rowlands - I am certain the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner. Q.What do you know me by? A. By your face; I do not recollect your dress - I told you twice that I always let the apartments, but you asked to see my mistress.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a native of the United States - there are some gentlemen at Liverpool who would give me a good character, but I have not sent to them, feeling conscious of my innocence; I am not the man - I do not know that I ever wore a blue frock coat.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-91

1279. THOMAS OLAVE was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 20th of June , 1 barrel of a butt cock, value 2s., the goods of Frederick Braithwaite and others, well knowing them to have been stolen .

FREDERICK BRAITHWAITE. I am in partnership with Henry Nicholson and two others - we keep the Crown Brewery, Regent's-park . In consequence of information, I went to the prisoner's shop, in High-street, St. Pancras, on the 20th of June, and asked him whether, in the course of the afternoon, any boys had been there to offer any metal, or part of a cock for sale; he said, No - I then asked whether he had not been employed as foreman to Mr. Champ, a butcher in the Hampstead-road; he said, Yes -I said, "Then I am right, you have bought part of a cock that was stolen from my premises this afternoon;" I said I had the boy in custody, that I had the key of the cock in my possession, and he had given 4d. for it - he then said,"Oh, yes, I recollect I have purchased such a thing;" he asked his wife for the key of the wash-house - he went backwards, and returned with the barrel of the cock which I had had stolen; I value it as old metal at 1s, but when new it cost me 9s. 6d, with the key - I know this is the one I had lost, as we had three of these made to a particular order, and the other two are safe; it is made of gun-metal.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.When you brought the circumstance more minutely to his memory he said he did remember it? A. Yes; I certainly should not have bought it for any thing but old metal - I did not take the prisoner; I said, "I am going to the Policeoffice to-morrow," and he was there, and met me - I did not go with him to his back premises.

PATRICK QUIGLEY . I am a Police-constable. In consequence of information I apprehended Collins, Brooks, and Cook; in consequence of what they said I found the prosecutor and the prisoner.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am turned ten years old. I got over some palings into Mr. Braithwaite's stable-yard, and fetched this cock; I dropped the key in carrying it - I gave it to Brooks, who was with me, but did not get over the palings; he staid outside - we went on, and met a sailor-boy, whose name I do not know, we then went on and met Cook in Henry-street - the sailor-boy asked Cook if he knew where to sell this cock, and Brooks and Cook went to sell it; I waited on the opposite side of the way - that was a place in Little Albany-street, near the Police station; it was refused there - we at last sold it at the prisoner's; I did not see what was given for it.

Cross-examined. Q. His wife, I believe, keeps a shop, and deals in little articles? A. Yes; I had not known the prisoner before - he did not set us on this; that was the first thing I ever stole - Brooks persuaded me to go and get it; Brooks went to the prisoner's shop with it.

JAMES BROOKS . I was with Collins when he got over in Mr. Braithwaite's yard; when he first got over three men hallooed to him, and he dropt the cock, and came out without it - he then put his arm through, and reached it; he carried it to the shop in Little Albany-street, and because they would not buy it he began to swear at the little girl - we then went down the street and met Cook- we asked him where to sell it; Cook and I went in the prisoner, and sold it - Collins was at that time waiting on the other side of the way; Cook asked the prisoner if he bought old brass - he said, Yes, and asked to look at it; he put it into the scale, said it was 1 1/2 lbs. and it came to 4d. - we were coming out of the shop, and the prisoner said, "I will give no more than 4d. for it;" Cook then turned back and took that - the prisoner asked where he got it - Cook said his mother was moving and found it, she had lost the key, and it was not of much use; the prisoner asked if he was quite sure of that - he said,"Yes;" he then asked him where he lived - he said, "At 42. Henry-street:" the prisoner said, "This is 48;" Cook then said, "It is the other Henry-street, up by Regent'spark:" he gave him the 4d. and we came out.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say, "I hope this has not been stolen?" A. Yes; he said he had been served so many tricks, and the mothers came and claimed the things back, and he must be cautious: I was going to get the cock myself, but Collins said he would go - the sailor-boy and I persuaded him that we had seen it for a month before.

JACOB COOK . I live with my mother, at No. 12, Fitzroy-place, New-road. Brooks and Collins asked if I knew where to sell a brass cock - I took them to the prisoner's, where it was sold.

Cross-examined. Q. You went in to sell it? A. Yes; the prisoner asked my name, and where I got it - I said I got it from home; I did not say my mother was removing, and found it and had lost the key - if any one has said I said so, it is false; Brooks said I got it from my mother -I do not know how he knew that; it was for the purpose of deceiving the prisoner; he asked where I lived, and I believe I said, No. 42, Henry-street - that was to deceive him: he did say he hoped it was not stolen; we were going away, because he refused to give us more than 4d.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-92

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1280. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 34 yards of crape de Lyons, value 3l. 5s. , the goods of John Southgate ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 42. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-93

1281. JOHN HERBERT M'CABE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 13 printed books, value 6l. , the goods of the London Institution .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating them to belong to different persons.

MESSRS. ALLEY and ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE ANDERSON . I am in the employ of the London Institution, as porter, and have been so for upwards of twelve years. Its rooms were formerly in the Old Jewry, but they are now in Finsbury Circus, in the parish of St. Stephen, Coleman-street, in the City of London: I know the prisoner perfectly well - he was in the habit of attending

our library some few years - he was introduced by Mr. Horace Grant , and put down his name in a book appropriated for visitors: he had been there so often as to be well acquainted with the rooms - I had lost sight of him for some time, but from the 9th of April till May he used to come almost every day; he had liberty to go into all the rooms without being watched.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.He was not a member? A. No, only a visitor, and visitors enter their names; there is another porter besides me - our business is to be at the door, unless we are sent with messages: there is always a porter at the entrance to the news-room; the library is straight on - when I am on duty, persons leaving the library generally pass me; it is probable that a person could not pass with books of any size without my seeing them, but I did not see them - the members are not allowed to take books to their own homes; we often miss things, and find them again on the table - I cannot say who does it; I had not missed these books.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Although regularly and properly a man could not take books without your seeing him, could a dextrous man have done it? A. I do not know.

PHILIP LORTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. The prisoner pawned these thirteen books with me for 10s. on the 26th of April: that was all he asked for them, I believe.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that you thought he was the man? A. I was not before the Magistrate - I was in the shop, and can state positively he is the man.

COURT. Q.Did he bring the whole thirteen at once? A. Yes - we questioned him how he came to bring so many, and he said these were nothing to what he had been possessed of; he said he had bought a person's library.

WILLIAM MALTBY . I am principal librarian of the London Institution. I have examined these books - they all belong to the Institution: the marks have been erased very dexterously - looking at them in this general way I should say they were worth 3l. or 4l., but it would cost a great deal of money to replace them - some of these quarios cost 3l. or 4l. a-piece; this one has the mark clumsily taken out - this is more neatly done.

MR. BARRY. Q. Can you see any mark in this book? A. Yes, here are some pencil marks in it of my own making - I have known them these twenty years.

Prisoner. My Lord and Gentlemen. I have duty considered the perilous situation in which I stand, and I will beg to withdraw my plea and plead guilty - the distress of my family induced me to do it, my father and mother being thrown on my hands; I beg to leave myself to your mercy while you are considering your verdict, and I hope you will recommend me to the Court, in consequence of the distress of my family - we had been nearly one day without food; I had parted with every thing except my clothes, which I kept to apply for a situation, and then I adopted this step.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

There were six other indictments against the prisoner for stealing books from the Insitution, to which he pleaded Guilty.

Reference Number: t18310630-94

1282. ANDREW SPOOR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Charles Edward Tuck , from his person .

CHARLES EDWARD TUCK. I am studying in an attorney's office. I was in Fleet-street at seven o'clock in the evening on the 18th of June; I felt something tug at my coat, turned, and saw the prisoner running off - I missed my handkerchief, and called to the prisoner to stop; he ran up Bell-yard - I called to him again, and I saw him pull my handkerchief from his pocket and throw it down; I did not stop to pick it up, but pursued him - I fell down, and then I called Stop thief! a constable came up and took him; I got my handkerchief directly, and gave it to the constable.

THOMAS CAREY. I am a constable. I saw the prisoner run past my shop door in Bell-yard; he was stopped forty yards higher up, and given to me - this is the handkerchief; I have made inquiries and I believe this is his first offence.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman cannot swear I took it out of his pocket.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-95

1283. JACOB STEEL and JOHN CARTER were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Joseph Smart , from his person .

WILLIAM JOSEPH SMART . I live in St. Martin's-le-grand. I was in St. Paul's church-yard between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning on the 2nd of June - I had a handkerchief in my pocket; I cannot say how I lost it -I knew nothing of it till I saw it in the witness' hand; I have no recollection of seeing the prisoners near me till I was touched on the back by the witness - they were then close to me.

BENJAMIN CHARLES MURRAY . I work for my father, and live in West-street, Smithfield. I was collecting jobs in the cutlery business, and was in St. Paul's church-yard - I saw Carter put his hand into the prosecutor's left-hand pocket; the other prisoner at that time had his hand on Carter's shoulder - Carter drew his hand out of the prosecutor's pocket, and put it behind him; his hand was close against the other prisoner's hand - I took hold of Carter's hand, with the handkerchief in it; I touched the gentleman, and said he had lost his handkerchief - the officer came up, and took the prisoners; Steel never had possession of the handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.What are you? A. A journeyman steel letter-cutter. Carter said I took the handkerchief myself; he would say any thing, but I did not take it - he said before the Alderman that I took it and threw it on the ground, but he did not say it at the time; I do not know whether any of the persons are here: I believe the officer saw it - I cannot tell how many persons were about; it was by the corner at the Goose and Gridiron - it was the day the charity children went to St. Paul's; there were a great many people about - I served my time to my father; I have been a street-keeper, and have been a witness several times - I cannot tell how many times - it might be half a dozen; I cannot say it has not been four dozen times - an officer is often a witness; I

have not always been a witness as an officer - I believe I have been sixteen or eighteen times a witness in this Court, and three or four times in the other, and three or four times at Westminster; I have not been a common cad to an informer - I was a constable in St. James', Westminster, six months, and left because my time was up; I was in the Police at Lambeth, and was dismissed for being asleep on my post - I had been in the country, and was put on duty directly I came back; that was the only charge against me - I was not an old watchman; I do not know what a cad to an informer is.

THOMAS PROTHEROE . I am an officer. I was in St. Paul's church-yard, and saw Carter put his hand into the gentleman's pocket - I rushed forward, and saw the handkerchief in his hand; I caught him by the wrist, and Murray took the handkerchief from him - Steel was pressing against him at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Did you know him before? A. No - there might be thousands of persons in St. Paul's church-yard; I have been a witness at Guildhall sixteen times, but this is the first time I have been here - I was a witness in cases that were not sent here.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.There was a considerable crowd? A. Yes - all I saw Steel do was to press against Carter; that might be from the effect of the crowd.

MR. SMART. This is my handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You never saw it in possession of either of the prisoners? A. No - there was a great crowd about, I could hardly pass.

Carter's Defence. I picked up the handkerchief, and held it some time - this gentleman came and said I took it out of the prosecutor's pocket; the officer then came up and said he saw me take it, but he was not up for three minutes afterwards.

JURY to THOMAS PROTHEROE . Q. Did you see Carter take out the handkerchief? A. I saw his hand in the pocket, and saw the handkerchief in his hand afterwards; there was only one person between us.

CARTER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

STEEL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-96

1284. PETER CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Samuel Goodchild , from his person ; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

SAMUEL GOODCHILD. I am a salesman . On the 20th of May I was on Blackfriars-bridge , between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I was told by a boy that I had been robbed - that the man who had taken my handkerchief had run off, and the prisoner had helped him to take it: the prisoner was at that time very near, within hearing of the boy - I had used my handkerchief just before; I have never seen it since - the prisoner turned round, put himself before me, and said he knew nothing of the matter; the boy said to him, "You do, for I saw you lift up the skirt of the coat, while one of your companions took the handkerchief out;" I said, "I will have you taken care of:" he then said, "I will show you the person who has the handkerchief;" he turned, and ran off - I pursued, but he out-ran me, and I raised a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was shortly afterwards brought back.

HENRY PAGE . I was passing over Blackfriars-bridge. I saw the prisoner and two others following the prosecutor - I saw the prisoner put his hand into the pocket, then he took up the skirt of the coat, and another man took the handkerchief out; he wiped his nose with it, and then went off directly - I told the prosecutor of it.

WILLIAM LONG WARD . I am an officer. I was coming from the Temple, and going up Primrose-hill I saw the prisoner running, and took him into custody.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am an officer. I know the prisoner - I have had him in custody before - I have a certificate of his former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office - (read); I know the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking close to that young man when I heard him tell the gentleman that I was with the man who picked his pocket; I asked him if he would come with me and the gentleman, and perhaps we might see the man who took it - I came over the bridge, and not wishing to be taken, I ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-97

1285. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 2 half-crowns , the monies of William Palmer , his master.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am a publican . The prisoner was my bar-man - he came to me on the 19th of April; I was to give him 25l. a year - he had to receive money for me; in consequence of suspicion I marked some half-crowns, and gave them to Mr. West, telling him to purchase some brandy, and pay for it with the half-crowns - I marked two half-crowns on the 30th of May, one with a W., and the other with a T.; on the following morning he was to get the brandy - on the night of the 30th, when I was going to bed, I examined the till; there were three sixpences in it - I saw the prisoner early the next morning, when he came into my room for the keys; I went to the till about a quarter-past eight o'clock, and found in it 7s. in shillings, and one sixpence - I got an officer, and then called him into the parlour; I said, "John, I suspect you have acted dishonestly, what money have you about you?" he expressed his surprise, and said he had only two half-crowns about him - I desired him to produce them, and found my marks on them; I gave them to the officer - I said, "You took these half-crowns out of the till this morning;" he said, "Yes, but I put small change in for them;" I said, "What occasion was there for that, as there is always 2l. worth of small silver at the back of the till?" he said he did not think of it at the time - I desired the officer to take charge of him; he fell on his knees, begged pardon, and said he hoped I would forgive him - he said he would stay and finish his work and then go away.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Had you not at that time intended to give him in charge? A. I had not fully determined on it - he had the key from me a little before seven o'clock; I examined the till as soon as I came down - I think the bar-maid was not up; I cannot tell who had been in the house as customers from the time the prisoner had the key, as I was not up.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had this reservoir been known to him? A. Yes, he was in the habit of giving change from it every morning.

GEORGE WEST . I received two half-crowns from the prosecutor, to buy brandy; I gave the same to Mr. Rose - I had seen them marked.

WILLIAM ROSE . I am clerk to an attorney. I received two half-crowns from Mr. West, to buy brandy; I paid them to the prisoner, who put them into the till.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you told the kind of errand you were going on? A. Yes - I went about ten minutes before eight o'clock.

MR. PALMER re-examined. When the prisoner said he had put small silver into the till for the two half-crowns, I said it was highly improbable, as in that case there would have been only one sixpence taken that morning - he said, when he was before the Magistrate, that he had paid the baker and the milk-woman in silver.

CATHERINE STANNICKER . I am servant to the prosecutor. I was in the parlour on the 31st of May, cleaning it- I had a view of the bar; I saw several customers come in that morning as usual - I do not know how many came in; I saw no difference between that and other mornings.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you know what they bought? A. No - I only know that silver and copper were taken; I believe 1 1/2d. is the price of a glass of gin, but I do not know the price of liquors - I sometimes go into the bar, but did not that morning.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - he fell on his knees, and asked forgiveness.

Cross-examined. Q. What were the words he used? A."Mr. Palmer, pray forgive me;" I will not swear whether he used the word "Pardon me;" these are the half-crowns.

MR. PALMER. These are what I had marked - there was some copper in the till, but we never count that; the morning takings vary from 5s. to 10s.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they not sometimes less than 5s.? A. For a fortnight after, I made a point of opening the house myself, and found them never less than 5s.

Prisoner's Defence. All the time I was there we never took more than 3s. 6d. in a morning - I had paid the milk-woman that morning, and given the baker a shilling or two sixpences from the till, and I received 2d. change from him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-98

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, JULY 2.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1286. THOMAS MACDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Bernard Cooke , from his person .

WILLIAM BERNARD COOKE. I am an engraver . On the 17th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was at Limehouse , and felt a pull at my coat pocket - I looked round, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand; he dropped it, and ran away - I followed, and took him about twenty yards off, without losing sight of him.

WILLIAM MAY. I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge, with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-99

1287. JAMES HENRY McMILLAN was indicted for embezzlement .

EDWARD ROACH . I am in the bottle trade , and live in Turk-street, Mile-end. The prisoner came into my service on Easter Monday - his duty was to account for money as soon as he received it; I sent him with a note to Mr. Wells on Whit-Monday.

THOMAS WELLS . I am a wine merchant, and buy bottles of Roach. On the 23rd of May the prisoner brought me this note from him, desiring me to let him have 1l., which I gave the prisoner.

EDWARD ROACH. This is the note I sent him with - he never returned; I have not received the 1l. - I found him in custody on the following Monday.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Did he tell you he had lost the money, and was afraid to return? A. He told the Magistrate so; the Magistrate asked why he did not return and tell me - he said he was afraid; I was never in trouble myself.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-100

1288. WILLIAM NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 1 half-crown, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Patrick Clench , from his person .

PATRICK CLENCH. I have been a pensioner . On the 25th of May I saw the prisoner at the Duke of York public-house, Chelsea. He wanted to sell his stockings, as he had no money - I gave him a drop of ale not to sell them; I went to the Snow Shoes, and he came in there -I fell asleep with my head on the table; I was drunk, and do not know how much money I had - I had changed a sovereign; the prisoner was setting at my side; I was awoke, and two knives shown to me, one of which I claimed.

THOMAS TOWNSEND . I am a labourer. The prosecutor and prisoner came into the public-house; I saw the prosecutor asleep - the prisoner put his hand into his lefthand pocket; I took hold of his hand, and he got up - I said,"What have you in your hand?" he said, "D-n you - what do you want to know for?" I said I would know - he said I should, and let a half-crown, two shillings, and a sixpence fall out of his hand - he was given in charge; the knife and 4s. 2d. was found on him.

SAMPSON MILLS . I am a Police-constable. I went into the house, and took the prisoner; I have the knife -I forgot to bring the money.

PATRICK CLENCH. This is not my knife, nor is it the one which was produced at Queen-square; the Policeman had two knives.

SAMPSON MILLS. The prisoner's serjeant took the other knife, as the prosecutor could not say it was his, but this knife he swore to; I swear it is the same as he saw before the Magistrate.

PATRICK CLENCH. (Looking at his deposition) I signed this before the Magistrate - it was read over to me, but there was no flaw in the knife I swore to there, no hole - I had bought it the day before - this knife was not shown at Queen-square at all.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw this man in the public-house, and sold him a pair of stockings and a waistcoat - I was to meet him in the afternoon to sell him more clothes; he took me to two public-houses, and had three or four pots of beer - he threw the knife down on the table, and threw his money down; I picked them up, and put them into his pocket - he said he had no money to pay for the beer; he treated three or four men - I took a half-crown from his pocket, and this man said I wanted to steal it.

THOMAS TOWNSEND . There was nobody with them - they called for ale; the waiter wanted the money for it - they would not pay, and the waiter was going away; the prisoner said, "I have 2 1/2d. if the prosecutor will pay the rest;" they were in a box alone; I saw him feel Clench's pockets on both sides.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-101

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1289. THOMAS YATES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William John Green , on the 20th of May , and stealing 1 gown, value 1s. , his property.

ESTHER GREEN. I am the wife of William John Green, a labourer - we live in Tottenham-street, in the parish of West Hackney . On the 20th of May, between twelve and one o'clock, I went out, leaving my little girl in the house - the back door was open; I returned in about half an hour, and met my little girl coming to me at the corner of the street - I saw the prisoner come from my back door, out of the garden gate; I said nothing to him then - I went into my bed-room, looked into my box, and a gown, which I had seen there half an hour before, was gone - the box was not locked; I ran out, caught him by the arm, and told him he had been into my bed-room, and taken a gown out of my box; he said he had not, that he had picked it up in the garden; and then said a brick-making looking man gave it to him; I said it was no such thing, that I had seen him come out of the house - my little girl said, "You have got the gown between your black bag;" he said he had not - he took the bag from under his arm, and the gown dropped down; I picked it up - I sent my girl for the Policeman; he got from me, and ran up Tottenham-street - he was out of my sight for five minutes; I then saw him in the custody of the Policeman - I am positive he is the man; when I went out I had left my bedroom door latched, but not locked - it is on the ground floor; I left nobody but my little girl in the house - she is not twelve years old.

Prisoner. I gave the girl the gown - I was going to look for the Policeman.

EDWARD HARROP. I am a Policeman. I was in Kingsland-road - the prosecutrix's daughter called me; I pursued, and took the prisoner - Mrs. Green gave charge of him for stealing the gown, which she gave me.

Prisoner. I was stopping there for him to come, but he did not, and I went on purpose to see him. Witness. He was running, and I stopped him.

REBECCA GREEN. I was left in care of the house by my mother; I had been out about ten minutes, and was coming back with my mother; I saw the prisoner come out of the house - I know the bed-room door was shut when I left, for I tried it, and am positive it was latched.

MRS. GREEN. I found the bed-room door shut when I came home; this is my gown - there were other things in the room, but not in the trunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man drop the gown in the garden - he came out of the gate; "I said, "You have dropped something;" he went off - I took it up, and went to the house, knocked, but nobody came; I came out of the gate, and stopped some time - there was no officer; this girl came and said the gown was her mother's.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 60.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-102

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1290. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Jonah Smith Wells , from his person .

JONAH SMITH WELLS. I live in Zion-gardens, Aldermanbury. On the 30th of June, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was on Ludgate-hill , coming home, and felt something at my coat pocket - I turned round, saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hands, and collared him; he was alone - I saw a Policeman, and gave him in charge - he endeavoured to secrete my handkerchief.

FRANCIS WARDEN. I was in company with Mr. Wells. I saw him collar the prisoner, and take the handkerchief from him.

WILLIAM BECK. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the gentleman's handkerchief - he turned round, said it was his, and took it out of my hand.

MR. WELLS. It was in his hand when I seized him and he put it into his breast - he did not say he had picked it up, but complained of my tearing his clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-103

1291. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 3 pairs of slit-tranks, value 6s. , the goods of George Bullock Watts , his master.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be 37 pieces of leather.

GEORGE BULLOCK WATTS. I am a wholesale glovemanufacturer , and live in the Old Jewry. The prisoner was my foreman , and had been so nine or ten months - I missed property, but could not charge any person with it. Last Tuesday fortnight, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner's coat was in the warehouse; I examined it, having missed property, and found in it three pairs of unsewn gloves, enclosed in a piece of paper - I replaced them; he was in the house at the time - I obtained an officer, and placed him in the street, opposite my door; I then went up to dismiss the prisoner for the day - he went out without my saying any thing to him - I followed him, and when he had got a short distance up the Old Jewry, I called him back, and said I believed he would find something in his pocket which belonged to me: at that time I was not certain the gloves were mine, not having looked at the marks - tranks are gloves before they are sewn: I desired him to take them from his pocket, and he did so - I examined them, and found they were mine, by the cutter's mark in each of them: it is the writing of King, my cutter - I desired the constable to detain him.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. He was nine month

in your employ? A. Yes - I did not inquire his character, having a recommendation from a third individual; he has been in the employ of Mr. Gardener, of Baldwin's-gardens, and others, I believe - he acknowledged that he put the gloves into his pocket; the other men had access to his coat.

Q. Did he not go out to speak to a relation? A.Somebody called him out, and that enabled me to examine his coat pocket - I had been robbed very frequently, and could not ascertain who it was.

JOHN KING. I was in the employ of Mr. Watts for sixteen months. I know nothing of the offence - I saw the prisoner in custody at the Mansion-house; the officer showed me a pair of tranks, and the mark on them is the letter K., which is like my writing; I cannot be on my oath that it is my writing - I would not swear to my handwriting on leather; I cannot say it was written by me - it is like mine, that is all I can say.

Q. Then, as far as you can judge of the writing on the gloves, do you believe it to be your writing? A. Yes, I believe it to be.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw it in the officer's hands at a distance? A. Yes.

ABRAHAM HAM . I am a street-keeper of Coleman-street ward. The prisoner was given to me, charged with stealing these gloves; he did not say a word to me - he would not say any thing - I have had the gloves ever since.

WILLIAM HENMAN. I am an officer. I have thirtyeight pairs of silk tranks, which I discovered on searching the prisoner's lodging, directly after he was taken.

MR. WATTS. Three pairs of gloves would consist of thirty-six pieces of leather - these found on the prisoner are leather tranks: I found two marks on them, one is the letter G., another K., which is the cutter's mark; I can swear to it being King's hand-writing - I have been familiar with his writing ever since he has been with me; the same mark is on each pair - I see his hand-writing every day.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear positively that letter K. is his writing? A. I will - I have not a doubt on earth of it; I am quite sure it is his writing.

JOHN KING. I have seen these before - it was a pair of the larger parcel that I saw at the Mansion-house; here is the letter K. on these three pairs - I think the K. here has been written by me; it is like mine, and corresponds greatly with it - I believe it to be my hand-writing.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

JURY to MR. WATTS. Q. Was the prisoner in the habit of taking goods out to work-people? A. Not for the last two months, but he had been previously, only to get them embroidered, and that was always by my direction.

Q.Has there been any malice existing between the prisoner and the men? A. I have frequently heard men quibbling, but am not aware of that with respect to him - his coat had been in the warehouse from tea time - very few persons had been there that day; they could not have placed the gloves there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-104

1292. THOMAS ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 printed book, value 16s. , the goods of John Knight .

EDWARD SANGER . I am clerk to John Knight , a bookseller , of Paternoster-row . On the 28th of June, about a quarter to eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop alone, and saw the prisoner looking in at the window, which was open - he took a book off the shelf, which is at least two feet within the shop, put it under his coat, and made off with it; I went out - he ran very fast, but I secured him in St. Paul's church-yard, without losing sight of him, and took the book from under his coat; it is Egan's Life in London - he said nothing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-105

1293. SARAH GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 1 blanket, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Bilbrough .

THOMAS BILBROUGH. I am a dairy-man . The prisoner occupied my first floor room for a fortnight, and had the use of this blanket - her husband is engine-keeper at the Norwich Union; on the 20th of June I missed this blanket - she was continually intoxicated - I suspected her, and told her she must get another lodging, and every thing must be made right previous to her leaving; I charged her with taking a blanket and other things - she did not deny it; her husband had told me to take the rest of the things out of the room, or they would all be gone - I have lost a variety of things, which she confessed to taking.

LEONARD MATTHEWS. I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket, pawned by a female named Green, on the 9th of June - I did not take it in, and do not know who did; I was present at the time, and believe the prisoner to be the person - I frequently took this blanket from her, but will not positively swear that she pawned it on that particular day; the duplicate is in the hand-writing of my foreman, Perry, who is not here, because I have another case here - I am sure I have taken this blanket from her before.

THOMAS BILBROUGH. I have the fellow blanket to it here.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you enter the room with a false key while I was out? A. I deny it - she came home intoxicated, and was found sleeping in the privy, with her two children; she had lost her key - all the lodgers tried their keys, and one opened her door, which I was not aware of before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not intoxicated - is it possible he could know what was gone without entering the room? I pawned the blanket to support my husband, who was ill with an accident.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-106

1294. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of John Sawyer , from his person .

JOHN SAWYER . I live at Enfield. On Friday, the 13th of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing over Blackfriars-bridge , and felt a snatch at my pocket - I put my hand to my coat, turned round, and saw the prisoner walking leisurely behind me, alone, dressed in a butcher's apron; I collared him, removed the apron, and found my handkerchief concealed under it - I am certain it is mine - I gave him in charge.

MICHAEL HARNETT. I am an officer. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-107

1295. SAMUEL PYHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 8 yards of printed cotton, value 3s. , the goods of James Bailey and others.

RICHARD ATKINSON. I am in the employ of Mr. James Bailey, a linen-draper , of St. Paul's church-yard - he has two partners. On the 16th of May the prisoner was brought into the shop, charged with taking this cotton, which I had seen on a pile, about a foot within the door; he must have put his foot into the shop to take it.

TIMOTHY DARLEY. I am a ship-joiner. I was in St. Paul's church-yard, and saw the prisoner take this printed cotton from Mr. Bailey's shop, and walk off with it; I was going the same way as him, and when he turned down Newgate-street, I tapped him on the shoulder, and told him he had better take it back; he was very unwilling, and threatened to strike me with his fist, but did not - several people came up, and I gave him in charge; I went back with him - he had the cotton under his coat; he said I had nothing to do with it - he is a soldier.

JOHN CHURCHILL. I am a constable. I saw some persons collected, and took the prisoner - he was charged with taking this print; he said he was not going to give it to the witness.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-108

1296. ALFRED SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 7 handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Venables and another, his masters.

THOMAS VENABLES . I am a linen-draper , and live in Whitechapel - I have one partner. The prisoner was about three months in our employ as porter ; we have sixteen persons serving in our shop - I received information, and gave orders that nobody should go out till I saw them; before I had the information the prisoner had taken out a parcel in the course of his duty, and asked leave to be out for two or three hours in the afternoon - when he went out I followed, and overtook him in Leadenhall-street; I stopped him, and told him that he or somebody in my employ was a thief, and I must search him - I put my hand outside his pocket, and said, "You are the man, you must step a little farther with me;" I took him into a grocer's shop, and he pulled out these handkerchiefs - he had three or four in a small bag; he pulled out altogether seven - they were in three pieces; I am certain they are ours - he said he was going to get them hemmed for himself; we should charge about 30s. for them - he never bought any of me, nor appeared to have them; we do not let servants take goods without their being entered.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. He took them out immediately you spoke to him? A. Yes; I am certain my partner did not give him leave to take them - we have a shop in Lamb's Conduit-street, but that is quite another concern; we had an excellent character with him.

COURT. Q.When you charged him with it did he say your partner gave him leave to take them? A.Never.

GEORGE GARDNER . I am a constable. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310630-109

1297. ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 purse, value 3d.; 1 half sovereign, and 1 half-crown, the property of James Wilmott , from his person .

JAMES WILMOTT. I live in Ropemaker-street, Moorfields, and have been a gentleman's coachman , but am out of employ - I lived fifteen months with Mr. Brown, in France. On the 20th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night I was coming from a friend's on Addlehill - I was sober; I went into Fleet-street, for a walk - I had left my friends about ten o'clock; I met the prisoner in Fleet-street - she came up and asked if I had any objection to go with her; I went with her to No. 5, Crown-court, Fleet-street - I was there about half an hour: I did not give her any thing - it was a friend of hers that I was with; I had met them both together - they said they were sisters; the prisoner asked if I objected to her going with us - her sister was sitting by my side on the bed, and as I turned to speak to her, the prisoner put her hand into my waistcoat pocket, where I had a purse, with a half-sovereign and a half-crown in it - I turned round, and she walked off with my purse; I got up, and said, "You have robbed me of my purse" - the sister got up, stood before me, and prevented my going after her; I saw the purse in her hand - she was taking my money out of it, and threw the purse on the bed; there were candles in the room - she was secured that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Were they not on the same bed with you? A. Yes; I was sitting on the bed-side - neither of them took off her gown; I did not promise them the half-sovereign for any thing - I had given the other 1s., and took out my purse to give it her; I am not married.

MARK ADAMS. I am a watchman. On the 20th of June I was on duty in Crown-court; this is a common brothel - I was called in by the landlord, about twelve o'clock, who said a gentleman up stairs accused a woman of robbing him - I went up; the prosecutor appeared to be sober, he said he had been robbed of half a sovereign, and accused the prisoner of it; there was another female in the room - he had half a crown in his hand out of the purse, and said the half-sovereign was taken out of the purse and gone, that he had found the half-crown and purse on the bed; the women undressed, in my presence, to satisfy me - the other had 1s., which he said he had given her; I said he had better give her into custody, and leave it to the decision of the night officer, which they all agreed to - I took them there and left them there.

JAMES CHICKELDAY. I was the night-officer. The prisoner and another were brought to the watch-house -Wilmott charged the prisoner with robbing him of a halfsovereign; I took her back and searched her, but could not find it - he made no charge against the other; she said to the other girl, "Oh, what a bother this is about this half-

sovereign, you may as well tell," or something to that purpose - the girl said, "I know nothing whatever about it, you know I don't:" I had not done searching her before she (the prisoner,) said again, "Oh, if you go to the house you will find the half-sovereign under the mattress;" I went immediately, and on turning up the bed, on the mattress, I found the half-sovereign, which I have had ever since - the prisoner did not claim it.

Cross-examined. Q. This conversation was in the presence of Mary Madden? A. Yes; she said, "If you know where it is, give it up to him;" and afterwards the prisoner told where it was.

Prisoner's Defence. It is impossible that man could see my hand more than the other, we were so near together.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-110

1298. RICHARD CARVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 1 portmanteau, value 2s.; 1 blanket, value 1s.; 1 quilt, value 1s.; 4 jackets, value 4s.; 3 pairs of trousers, value 3s.; 2 shirts, value 1s., and 2 waistcoats, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of James Smith .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Robert Walker .

GEORGE MORGAN . I am a City-officer. On the 21st of June I was coming from Whitechapel: the prisoner and two others ran by me - I saw something like a knife in his hand; they went along Aldgate High-street, and overtook a cart loaded with baggage - they were all three together; I saw the prisoner go behind the cart, and put his hand on the things which were in it - I did not then see any thing taken; they followed the cart on, and by the church met three or four others - they all followed the cart down Houndsditch, and when it got opposite Gravel-lane the prisoner went behind it, took something out, put it on his shoulder, and went down Gravel-lane with it; they all went down the lane - I was about thirty yards off; I secured the prisoner with this portmantean on his shoulder; the others ran away - Walker was driving the cart: I opened the portmantean - it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

ROBERT WALKER. This was my cart; I was driving it - I was employed to carry this portmanteau and other goods; I had tied the portmanteau on the cart, and on receiving information I jumped down, and found they had cut the ropes and taken it.

WILLIAM SCOTT. I am clerk to Messrs. Fosters, brokers. I know this portmantean belonged to Mr. James Smith , an officer in the East India free trade - it was under my care; I employed Walker to fetch it from the docks.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Houndsditch - some boys came up and asked if I would carry the portmanteau for them for 1s.; I was out of work and jumped at the job, having had no victuals all day.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-111

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, JULY 2.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1299. THOMAS DALY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 5 lbs. of bacon, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Stephen Munday ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18310630-112

1300. JOHN MORRIS and EDWARD MOLLOY were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 1 frock, value 18s.; 1 handkerchief, value 7s., and 1 penny, the property of Joseph Ferry , from the person of Harriet Ferry .

HARRIET FERRY . I am the daughter of Joseph Ferry ; I am nine years old - my father is a bricklayer , and lives in White Lion-street, Norton-falgate. On White-Tuesday I was carrying a frock in a silk handkerchief, from my father's to Back Church-lane, Whitechapel, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning - I had got to Wood-street, Brick-lane: I there saw the two prisoners, and they followed me from there to opposite Wentworth-street - Molloy then knocked my hand and I dropped 1d., which I had in my hand; Molloy took it up - Morris then pulled down my pinafore, took my bundle, and threw it over to Molloy; he ran down Wentworth-street with it, and Morris said,"If she runs after you I will stop her while you run;" I had not known them before, but I am quite sure of their persons - they had walked one on each side of me from Wood-street; they then came facing me; I am sure they are the same boys - they both ran down Wentworth-street.

MARY GRANT . I am the wife of Thomas Grant - we live in Brick-lane; he is a Police-constable. On Whit-Tuesday I was looking out at my window, between ten and eleven o'clock; I saw the two prisoners together - this little girl was coming along; Molloy hit her hand, and then Morris took a bundle from her, which was in a silk handkerchief, in a little blue pinafore, and they ran down Wentworth-street; I ran after the prisoners, but I was not quick enough - I am sure the prisoners are the persons.

JOSEPH FERRY . I am the father of this child. On Whit-Tuesday she went with the bundle, between ten and eleven o'clock, to go to Back Church-lane; she came back crying, and said she had lost it between Old Montague-street and Wentworth-street - it was a very handsome lace frock, worth about 15s., and the handkerchief was worth about 6s.

SETH EASTWOOD . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoners, with another officer.

Morris' Defence. I never saw the girl before I was taken: I went for a pair of trousers, and Thomas Warren told me he took the bundle

Molloy's Defence. The boy who took the bundle is in the middle yard now, it was Thomas Warren .

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

MOLLOY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life . (See 5th Day.)

Reference Number: t18310630-113

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1301. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 3 pints of wine, value 5s. , the goods of the St. Katharine Dock Company , his employers.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of a person or persons unknown.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD BAXTER . I am a superintendant of the Police in St. Katharine's-docks; the prisoner was a watchman in their employ. On the 28th of May I was going my rounds, and saw him about ten minutes before six o'clock in the morning - he was not on his proper beat; I asked him to come and show me where the casks of wine were which had been broached - he was intoxicated,

and not able to show me; as he was going along he gave his great coat, which he had in his hand, to Porter -I saw Mr. Thompson afterwards take that coat, and search if; there was in the pocket of it a bottle, containing sherry wine - I asked the prisoner how he came in possession of that bottle of wine in his great coat pocket; he said he knew nothing at all about it, either one way or the other - I then locked him up; I examined the sherry casks, and found one of them three pints deficient - there were three casks, one was port wine and the other two sherry; they were on the prisoner's beat, and it was his duty to watch them - the cask which was deficient seemed to have been recently plugged with a gimblet; I did not see any leakage.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am night-constable in the St. Katharine's-docks. The great coat was brought from the prisoner to me, and I found in the pocket of it a bottle, with sherry in it.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not do my duty that night correctly? A. You were very correct in your calls, and I always found you on the alert in your rounds; a little before four o'clock that morning he reported that he had found a cask turned on one side, and on turning it up he found it had been broached - he appeared then intoxicated; I looked at the spot, and found two other casks turned - he said he knew nothing about them; I saw him again about five o'clock - he was then more intoxicated; I saw him again at a quarter before six, and told him to be particular to give the cask which had been broached up to the watchman who would relieve him - I then saw him and Porter doing something with the great coat, as if they were buttoning it up.

EDMUND JOHN PORTER . I am one of the watchmen at the docks. I got the great coat from the prisoner, and saw the bottle of sherry found in the same coat.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am the foreman cooper in the docks - I had examined these casks on the 27th - they were all safe; on the 28th I found one had been plugged, and a deficiency in one of the sherry casks.

MR. TOOKE. I am solicitor to the St. Katharine's-dock Company. It is constituted by Act of Parliament - here is the Act.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going round in the night, and saw a bottle behind some old cans - I took it up, and it had wine in it; I had been drinking rather freely before with some friends, - I made free to drink part, and put the rest into my pocket; but as to the cask being broached, I know nothing about it, only that I saw it had been turned up and broached - I asked Porter what to do, and he told me to call Mr. Thompson, which I did.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutors.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-114

1302. JOHN JOHNSON and JOHN THOROGOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May , 12 bottles, value 1s., and 13 quarts of foreign spitituous liquor, called Hollands, value 20s. , the goods of the St. Katharine's-dock Company , their employers; to which the prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutors.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-115

1303. HENRY COLLIER and WILLIAM ROSE were indicted for stealing on the 16th of June , 1 purse, value 6d.; 9 sovereigns; 10 half-crowns, and 5 shillings, the property of Coulson Bell Pitman , from his person .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT PARLAMAN . I am porter to Mr. Gast, of Oxford-street. On the 16th of June the prosecutor had been making a purchase at his shop, and I had to follow him down Oxford-street; I saw the two prisoners follow him, and when they came to the corner of Regent-circus , I saw one of them, but I cannot say which, lift up the pocket of his coat - they were close together and in company; I had followed them about a quarter of a mile - after they had lifted the pocket they separated; I did not at that time speak to the prosecutor, as I meant to give charge of them had I seen a Policeman - they met again between Old Cavendish-street and Vere-street; they again walked behind the prosecutor, and when they came to the corner of Vere-street, I saw Collier take something out of the prosecutor's pocket, but I could not say what; Rose was close by him at the time, and he ran up Vere-street - I followed Collier, and never lost sight of him till he was taken; as he was going along I saw him throw something into Mr. Gray's yard.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were they strangers to you? A. Yes; I am porter to Mr. Gast, the gunmaker - this was about half-past two o'clock; I was ten or twelve yards from him - there was no person between me and Collier at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. If there were other people about him could you see this? A.There were some persons between us occasionally, but not at the time the act was committed; Rose had a dark coat on, and a black hat-band round his hat - Rose was not taken at the time; they were in Company together.

Re-examined. Q. Have you the slightest doubt that Rose was the other man? A. I have no doubt whatever.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a Police-constable. I was in Oxford-street on the 16th of June, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw Collier run down Oxford-street, and into Shepherd-street - Parlaman and another were following him; I ran and took him - they both identified Collier as the person who did it; I went to search the stables, but could not find the purse - I heard it was found by a woman.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you speak to the two young men who were in pursuit of Collier? A. I did at the watch-house; I do not know whether I did before - they did not tell me of the purse being thrown into the yard at the time I took Collier; I did not search the yard for about an hour.

THOMAS FARRAND. I am a Police-constable. I was in Oxford-street; in consequence of information I received, I looked for Rose, and apprehended him - I had seen the two prisoners in company many times, but not on that day.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q.Had you ever been in company with them? A. No; I have watched them about the street, and seen other thieves with them.

COULSON BELL PITMAN . On the 16th of June I had been to the gun-maker's, and Parlaman followed me with two guns to try at Bayswater; I had a purse in my coat pocket, containing 9 sovereigns, and about 1l. worth of

silver - in going along I felt something raise my pocket like a gust of wind; I put it down, and in about a minute I heard a cry of Stop thief! and my purse was gone - it was safe just before.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you absolutely feel the purse in your pocket at that time? A. I felt the weight of it.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Had you passed some distance from the shop? A. Yes, I suppose a mile.

Collier's Defence. I deny all knowledge of the robbery, or being with Rose.

Rose's Defence. I was not with Collier.

COLLIER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

ROSE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-116

1304. WILLIAM MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 6 brushes, value 5s. , the goods of Harry Hopkins .

CLARA KINGSLEY . I know Mr. Hopkins' shop, in Middlesex-street . On the 30th of May, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and another boy near it - I watched them for about a minute, and saw the prisoner cut a string of brushes at the door: the other boy took them, and they ran away together - the prisoner was taken in about ten minutes; I swear he is the boy.

GEORGE FARNS . I am a silversmith. I saw the prisoner hold the brushes up while the other cut the string - the prisoner carried them a little way, then the other took them, and they ran off; I followed the prisoner, and he was taken about a hundred yards off - the other got away with the brushes.

JOSEPH COOMBS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

ANN HOPKINS . I am the wife of Harry Hopkins . I was at home - I heard the alarm; I pursued the prisoner - he was brought back; I have never seen the brushes since - I had seen them ten minutes before, hanging on a form at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 9. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310630-117

1305. THOMAS HICKSON was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. PHILLIPS Conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE COTTAM . I am in partnership with Mr. Hallen, we are iron-founders and machine-makers , and live in Winslow-street, Oxford-street. The prisoner was our collecting clerk - he had been about one year and threequarters in our service; he took out the accounts, and received debts deaily - it was his duty to enter in a cashbook, which I have here, what he received, every night, or in the day, if he came home sooner; I have searched this book for the monies stated in the indictment, and they are not entered there - the prisoner was paid a salary as a servant; he was not a partner in any way - he absented himself on the 23rd of January; I had no interview with him after that, and I never received from him the sums specified in the indictment - he came to our house after he had absented himself, but I did not see him; I afterwards had him taken, and went to the Police-office - in going along I made him no promise or threat, but I said to him, "By the date of some of the accounts, it appears you commenced pocketing the money about three months after you came;" he said, "No, I think it was about the first two months."

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I believe it was in May, 1829, he came into your service? A. Yes; he had not to do the duty of two clerks, or any extra duty - he might in my absence have accounted to my partner, or to other persons; he was not always at home in an evening; he used sometimes to go out as a traveller for a day or two - I do not know that he was ever out for a week, or that I ever allowed a period of two weeks to pass without requiring an account; I always asked him what money he had when I saw him in the office - on the 23rd of January I showed him a letter from a gentleman, stating that he had paid his account; he had entered some money two or three days before that, and I had gone through his books with him about a weeks before -I had gone through the books weeks and weeks after Christmas, as some were behind hand; I never entered into any negotiation with him to treat these sums as a debt, and for him to give me security; I did mention the name of a Mr. Abbot, an attorney, but I did not direct him to go to him - I did not speak of a bill of sale, or warrant of attorney; he mentioned them to me - I did not send any person to take an inventroy of his effects - I authorized Mr. Abbot to hand over to the prisoner a small sum of money due from Dr. Phillimore, after the discovery; I know there was some money paid to the firm -I believe there is a bill of 25l. from Mr. Bryan; at the time he was taken, he stated there was about 15l. due to him for wages - there was not a bill of 20l. for disbursements; there was about 4l. for some trifling expences.

Re-examined. Q. Did he ever account to you for the three sums mentioned in the indictment? A. No - the sums alleged to be due to him would not cover the sums he has received by eight or ten times; he has received above 300l. for which he has not accounted.

COURT. Q.Should the sums he receive be entered in a book? A. Yes - he enters them himself, and then hands them over to me; he left us abruptly, without notice.

BENJAMIN HALLEN . I am clerk to the prosecutors'. I remember the prisoner producing his book, and dictating a list of names from whom he had received money, and not accounted for it; this is the book and the list: here is 7l. 3s. received from Mr. Bull; 7l. 16s. from Mr. Wilson, and 9l. 0s. 6d. from Mr. Ball.

REUBEN BULL . I was a customer of the prosecutors'. I owed them in September last 7l. 3s.; I paid it to the prisoner, and he wrote this receipt, in my presence.

GEORGE WILSON. I am a customer of the prosecutors'. I owed them some money on the 5th of October; it was 8l. - I gave the money to Bevington, my shopman, who brought me this receipt - there was a discount of 4s.

- BEVINGTON. I paid this money to the prisoner, and he gave me this receipt.

GEORGE MARTIN . I am in the employ of Mr. Ballhe was a customer of the prosecutors'; I paid the prisoner 9l. 0s. 6d. for them - he gave me this receipt.

Prisoner's Defence. My prosecutors told me if I would sign a bill of sale, they would not prosecute me, and they requested me to go to Mr. Abbot for that purpose; he objected to a bill of sale, and proposed a warrant of attorney.

GUILTY . Aged 56. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-118

1306. ALEXANDER WALLIE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 1 frock-coat, value 10s.; 1 hat, value 5s., and 1 pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of William Hawthorn ; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

PETER HAY . I was warder of the Penitentiary, at Millbank . On the 8th of April the prisoner was confined there - on that night I saw him in custody of the governor and Mr. Russell; he had on a frock-coat, a hat, and a pair of boots, belonging to Mr. Hawthorn, the assistant task-master .

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose the Penitentiary dress is well known in that neighbourhood? A. Yes - if he had gone out in that dress there is no doubt he would have been known instantly; I heard that after he had got away himself, he came back to assist a friend - there was nothing to prevent his going off when he was out.

Re-examined. Q. Had he behaved so well that he was made a wardsman and a teacher? A. Yes, he was a well conducted man in every respect.

THE REV. WHITWORTH RUSSELL. I am chaplain to the Penitentiary. The prisoner had behaved well, and had the good opinion of all the persons in the prison - his full time of imprisonment was but twelve months longer, and if he had behaved well, no doubt it would have been shortened; a little after ten o'clock on the night in question, I was writing in my study, and an alarm was made that some prisoners had escaped from Pentagon 5 - I hastened to the garden, and there joined the patrol, (Young,) and the governor: we went to the outer wall, and there found a piece of linen, used in the prison, placed against the wall as a sort of ladder - it was linen which had been woven in the ward where the prisoner had been; it was then supposed that the prisoners had escaped, and the governor directed search to be made outside, but I suggested they might be in the garden; we proceeded to make search, and against the wall of the prison I found the prisoner and Thompson, who immediately surrendered themselves to us - I saw the clothes taken from the prisoner; they belonged to Mr. Hawthorn.

Cross-examined. Q. The prison clothes, I suppose, are decent warm comfortable clothing? Yes, they are partly green and partly brown - it is a uniform that is known, and would have at once advertised to persons outside where they came from; the prisoner had been appointed by myself a monitor of one of the classes in the schools - there was plate and other things of value in the prison, but he could not have access to that.

WILLIAM HAWTHORN . I am assistant task-master in the Penitentiary. On the 8th of April I went out, having locked my door, and deposited the key with the task-master; I returned at ten o'clock, and found my trunk had been broken open, and the lock forced off - I missed a coat and a pair of boots; I afterwards found a skeleton-key in the prisoner's prison clothes which he had left behind; it appeared to be made of mixed metal, such as the cups which the prisoners use - these clothes were taken from the prisoner, and are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Was that the room you reside in? A. It is the room I sleep in, and the trunk was there - there were other articles in my trunk; I had taken my linen out that evening to wash - there were other things he might have stolen.

Re-examined. Q. Is it an inconvenient thing for a man who has a wall to climb to have a bundle? A. Yes - the wall, I suppose, is twenty feet high; these are my clothes, and the prisoner had them on.

Prisoner's Defence. They were not stolen with an intent of getting gain by them, but to assist in gaining my liberty - had I had any other means I should not have done it; when I got out I should have got some clothes of my own, and these would have been returned, or full restitution made - there were other articles, which we did not take.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-119

1307. ALEXANDER WALLIE was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 1 pair of overalls, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Godfrey .

THOMAS GODFREY. I am a wardsman of the Penitentiary . On the night the prisoner made his attempt to escape, my room had been opened, and these overalls taken, which were found on the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.What is the prison dress? A.Green and brown - it would lead to detection.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this gentleman's room because Mr. Hawthorn's trousers were white, and I thought in a dark night I should be more easily discovered in them than in these dark ones.

NOT GUILTY, believing he took the articles merely for a disguise to escape, and not to steal them .

Reference Number: t18310630-120

1308. ROBERT THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 4 half-crowns; 1 pocket-book, value 6d.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 5s. , the goods of Peter Hay ; and that he had before been convicted of felony.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HAWTHORN . I am assistant task-master at the Penitentiary. The prisoner was confined there - I saw him when he was brought in after his attempt to escape - I took a waistcoat, a pair of trousers, and a pair of boots from him, which belonged to Mr. Hay.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. The prison dress is green and brown? A. Yes - that is very conspicuons.

THE REV. WHITWORTH RUSSELL . I was present the moment the prisoner was discovered; he had in his hand this pocket-book, which he delivered to me; there were four half-crowns in it, which are in it still.

PETER HAY . This waistcoat, trousers, and boots are mine - this pocket-book is mine, and these memorandums: I had left it safe in my box on the evening of the 8th of April, when I went out; when I returned my box was broken open, and these articles gone - this book had been thrown carelessly into the bottom of the box.

Cross-examined. Q.Might it not have fallen into one of the pockets? A. The waistcoat pockets would not hold it, and it would not have gone very well into the trousers.

WILLIAM TONGUE . I came from Salford. I produce a copy of the former conviction of the prisoner there - I was present, and know he is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. An opportunity of making my escape being offered, these clothes were taken for that purpose - the pocket-book was thrown down in the garden, and it was found there - it had been taken with the clothes, which were only taken to make my escape; there were other things I did not take.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-121

1309. MARY ANN CORKER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 1 spoon, value 10s.; 1 tablecloth, value 2s., and 1 window-curtain, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Lloyd , her master.

SARAH LLOYD . I am the wife of Thomas Lloyd - he is a merchant's clerk , and lives in Walcot-place, Hackney-road . The prisoner lived with me two different times, as servant of all-work - I missed a cap on the Friday before Whit-Sunday; she had left me that day, saying she was ill, and would return when she got better on the Tuesday following I found her at quite a different address to what she had given me, and her name was also changed; she had never lived with me by the name by which she appears here, and her friends and every thing was changed - when I took her she asked what she was accused of; I said I missed an infant's cap, and some other things - she said she had never taken them; I had missed the spoon long before that, and suspected another servant.

THOMAS HARVEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Goodburn, a pawnbroker, at Islington. I have a table-cloth and curtain, pawned by a female, in the name of Ann Lloyd - I cannot say who.

JOHN COX . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 24th, and found twelve duplicates on her, but none for these articles; I found a silver thimble on her, and three keys and this window-curtain in a room in which I was informed she had slept the night before - as I was taking her to the office, we passed a pawnbroker's, and she said, "The spoon is in here, which I pawned in my mistress' name;" we went in, and found it - she said she had burnt the duplicate.

JOSEPH BOOKER . I have a spoon, pawned with me by a female, in the name of Ann Lloyd.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Lloyd held out a promise that if I would confess, she would forgive me, and take me back again, and on those terms I owned it.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-122

1310. MARGARET MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 gown, value 5s., and 1 spoon, value 2s. , the goods of Sarah Pollard .

SARAH POLLARD. I live in Well-street, Marylebone . The prisoner came into my service on the 5th of April, and on the 11th she went out on an errand, and never returned - I did not miss any thing for a few weeks, till she was in the service of Mr. Miles; I then missed a gown and a spoon - I have seen them since at the pawnbroker's.

HENRY LAMBERT . I am in the service of a pawnbroker, in Wardour-street. I have a spoon, pawned by a woman on the 6th of April, in the name of Ann Marshall .

WILLIAM MARCHANT. I am a pawnbroker. I have a gown, pawned by a female on the 11th of April, in the name of Margaret Marshall - I have no recollection of the person.

MARGARET FOREMAN . I took the prisoner to lodge with me, and she left the duplicates with me of the gown and spoon; I gave them to the officer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Reference Number: t18310630-123

1311. MARGARET MARSHALL was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 1 table-cloth, value 8s.; 1 brooch, value 9s., and 1 yard of silk, value 15s. , the goods of John Miles , her master.

CHRISTIANA MILES . I am the wife of John Miles. The prisoner came into my service on the 26th of May, and about the 14th of June, I sent her out on an errand, at eight o'clock in the morning - I expected her to return about one, but I heard nothing of her till eight at night, when the Police-constable came, and asked if I had lost any thing; I looked, and missed a brooch, a piece of silk, and a table-cloth.

HENRY CLITHEROW . I am a Policeman. I found the prisoner intoxicated, in Windmill-street - she had a small basket with her, in which I found this piece of silk, and in her pockets were two duplicates of the other articles.

WILLIAM PARKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. I have a table-cloth, pawned by the prisoner on the 14th of June.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-124

1312. JOHN LASHAM , HENRY LEE , and RICHARD NORTON were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 27 yards of printed calico, value 14s. , the goods of James Leigh .

JAMES LEIGH. I am a linen-draper and live in the King's-road, Chelsea . On the 20th of May, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, my neighbour came and asked if I had lost any thing: I looked at the door, and missed a piece of printed cotton of twenty-seven yards - I ran out along the road, and saw the cotton thrown over the palings of a garden, within three or four doors of my house; I did not stop to look particularly at it, but ran on, and asked the prisoner Norton, who was then thirty or forty yards from my shop, if he had seen any one take the linen - I still ran on, and a person told me, the person who had thrown the print over the palings, was the first of two persons who were still on before me; they were all walking - I cannot say whether Lee was one or not, but Lasham was the person who was first; I ran on to him, tapped him on the shoulder, and said I wanted to speak to him - I brought him back to where the print was laying, and then, as I had not hold of him, he darted furiously from me, ran back again in the direction I had brought him, and knocked down two or three persons; he was stopped in a few minutes and brought back to my shop, where I gave him to the constable: this print is mine.

WILLIAM PLYM. I am a stationer, and live next door to the prosecutor. Between twelve and one o'clock I saw Lasham, and two others whom I could not swear to, near his shop - I thought they were waiting for some person: I saw Lasham put his face close to the glass, as if to see if there was any one in the shop - the other two persons were

on the other side of my shop door; I then saw Lasham ran past my shop, twisting the cotton round his arm - the other two ran with him; I told the prosecutor of it - the cotton I saw afterwards appeared to me to be the same.

JAMES JERVIS . I am a coach-maker, and live in the King's-road. I saw Lasham throw the print over the palings; the other two were then six or seven yards before him - I am sure the other two prisoners are the persons who were with him; I did not see any of them run till Lasham was taken the first time.

SAMSON DARKIN CAMPBELL . I am a Police-constable. I took the other two prisoners, from the description given of them, as I knew they were companious of Lasham - I found them in company together outside Tothill-fields; I took hold of Norton and said, "I want you;" he said, "It was hot me took the print, it was Lasham:" I said, "You were all in company;" he said, "We had not been together above two hours:" I had not said any thing to them about the print, but I knew them perfectly well as companions.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Norton's Defence. I said I knew nothing about it, but it might have been Lasham, as I heard he was in custody for it.

Lasham's Defence. I most solemnly assure you the evidence is grossly false - I know nothing at all of the robbery; I had not been out of my father's house ten minutes, and was going to my brother's, in the same road, when the prosecutor came and look me - he was going to give me to the Policeman, and I ran away.

LASHAM - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

NORTON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-125

1313. JOHN KEEPER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May , one pair of trousers, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 6d., and 2 pairs of gloves, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Hughes .

ROBERT HUGHES . I am a gardener , and live at Upper Clapton . The prisoner had been two or three weeks in my employ, as a carter - he was hired by the week; I sent him to a field to mind some horses, and he went away - I then missed these articles from a little building attached to my house.

CHARLES COOPER . I am a Police-constable. Another officer brought the prisoner to me at the Nag's Head - he said he had not been at the prosecutor's; but when I told him he had been seen in the lane, he said if I would let him go he would fetch the articles - I said I must detain him.

PHILIP JONES . I took the prisoner, and got these things from his mother's drawers - he told her he got the things instead of his master paying him any money.

ROBERT HUGHES . I owed him no money.

GUILTY . Aged 17. Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310630-126

1314. CHARLES HARRIS and ROBERT MILLS were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Martin , from his person .

WILLIAM MARTIN . On the 24th of June I was walking with a friend in Great George-street. Westminster - we got clear of the gate going into the Park, when a Policeman touched my friend and asked if he had lost any thing; he said he had not, but I put my hand to my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone - the Policemen then went after the prisoners, who were walking down the street; my friend and I walked after them, and I saw this handkerchief come down Harris's trousers - they were fifty or sixty yards off when I first saw them.

DANIEL BUCKLEY . I am a Police-constable. I saw the two prisoners in company, between eleven and twelve o'clock - a boy came and told me they were trying this gentleman's pockets; when they saw me they walked on quite smart - I spoke to the prosecutor; I told them to follow me, and I took the two prisoners - I saw the handkerchief come down Harris's trousers; this was between eleven and twelve o'clock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Harris' Defence. I picked up that handkerchief round the corner - Mills was not in company with me.

HARRIS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

MILLS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-127

1315. LOVINA HARES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 9 yards of printed cotton, value 8s. , the goods of Eliza Pike .

ELIZA PIKE . I am single , and live at Wood's-lane, Shepherd's Bush - the prisoner lives next door to me. On the 14th of June I went out to see a funeral; I did not lock my room - it is at my mother's house; this printed cotton was mine, and was in my bed-room - I was not absent more than a quarter of an hour; I missed the cotton on my return, and suspected the prisoner - I went and found her leaning over an arch in the New-road; I asked her if she had my gown-piece - she said she had not; I asked her again, and she again denied it - there was not any one with me; I saw something bulky under her apron, and I asked what she had under her apron: she said nothing of mine - my cousin then came up and asked her; she said nothing of his - I said I would send for the Policeman; she then opened her apron, and I took out this cotton, which is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.Have you any mark on it? A. No, but I know it is mine; I do not know whether the door was shut - I had left my brother and sister at home; I had not been out above a quarter of an hour.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18310630-128

1316. WILLIAM HEWKE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 25 yards of linen, value 2l. 18s.; 4 lace collars, value 24s.; 6 yards of bobbin net, value 15s.; 1 dress, value 1l. 6s., and 6 sheets of printed paper, value 7s. , the goods of Joseph Ingo .

The goods not being the property of Joseph Ingo, the prisoner was on this indictment

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310630-129

1317. JOHN HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Ward .

RICHARD WESTLAKE . I am pot-boy to Mr. Robert Ward - he keeps the William the Fourth, Exeter-street,

Lisson-grove : I missed this pot off a shelf in the yard on the 16th of May - the prisoner was then in the privy, and I found the pot in his hat; this is it - I have known the prisoner about the place these five years; he is a labouring man, but had no beer in the house that day - I had met him about five minutes before, as I was going out for my pots - we have lost two dozen pots within the last two months.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-130

1318. THOMAS HATCH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 pair of scales, value 3s. , the goods of James Parish .

JAMES PARISH . I live at Bromley, in Middlesex , and keep a shop . On the 18th of June, while I was at dinner, my son said, "Father, there is a man playing with the scale;" I said, "What man?" he said, "There he goes:" I went out and saw the prisoner - I followed him; he left a companion he was with, ran into the road, and threw these scales down - he then ran to a hedge and got through the quick into a field, in which there were seven or eight men: I called Stop thief! and they said, "It is all right, we have him;" I saw an officer. and gave him in charge.

WILLIAM HENRY PARISH . I was at home, at dinner -I saw the prisoner with one foot on the threshold, and told my father; I saw him take the scales from his pocket - I am sure he is the same boy.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing and saw them on the threshold - I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310630-131

1319. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. 6d. , the goods of George Nash .

JAMES BOYLE . I am a chimney-sweeper. On the 3rd of June I went with George Nash to bathe - we met the prisoner, who asked where we were going, and said he would go with us; I went into the water first, the prisoner next, and then he said he would mind Nash's clothes while he went in - Nash then went in, and when he came out the prisoner was dressed, and sitting by the clothes; the prisoner had an apron on when we first saw him, and when he got a little way he began to catch butter-flies with it - he then gave it to another boy; the prisoner took the shoes, and put them under the other boy's apron, who ran away; we called the prisoner, and he stopped - we asked if he knew any thing about the shoes; he said No - we asked if he did not lend his apron to the other boy; he said he had no apron, but I know he had, and had given it to the other - we saw him put Nash's shoes under it; I saw the Policeman, and he took him -I went to the watch-house, and he said he would tell the truth if we would let him go.

GEORGE NASH. I live with my father. I went to bathe, and lost my shoes - I have never seen them since.

PHILIP JONES . Boyle gave me charge of the prisoner; he said he would tell the truth if we would let him go - he owned he was to receive half the money for the loan of his apron; when the boy got home safe with the shoes, he said he only knew him by playing with him.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310630-132

1320. WILLIAM GOULD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 5 lbs. of bacon, value 2s., and 2lbs. of pork, value 1s. , the goods of John Loveridge .

CHARLES CLARKE. I am a Police-constable. On the 28th of May, at half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner near the prosecutor's house, in Crown-street - he took a piece of pork and a piece of bacon; he had a basket, which he pulled the pork into, placing it close against the board - he then went into the shop, and bought a knuckle of ham; he was going to pay for it - I went in, and said, "You have more than you ought to have;" he said what he had, he had paid for.

JOHN HEATHWAITE. I am in the employ of the prosecutor. The prisoner asked me to weight him a knockle of ham - the Policeman came in, and took him; these are my master's property.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310630-133

1321. RICHARD DEANE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 2 live tame pigeons, price 2s. , the property of Charles Andrews .

HENRY POPLIN . I am a pigeon-fancier. I went to Andrews' shop, in Brick-lane , on the 28th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, to sell a pigeon of my own - the prisoner came in, and took a pigeon out of a pen, in a way that attracted my suspicion; I called to him, and said, "What are you after there?" he then took another pigeon, and ran out with them - I pursued him; he threw down the pigeons - one flew away, and the other went on the ground.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you taken a fancy to pigeons? A. Ten or eleven years: I did not know he was going to steal them - it was dark; I know the prisoner is the man - he had a blue coat on.

SAMUEL BOWDEN . I was in the shop, and saw Poplin run out - I had before heard him say, "What are you after there?" I ran out, saw the prisoner running, and when I turned the corner I saw him throw the pigeons away - one flew over a wall, and the other struck against a wall; I pursued, and took the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it dark? A. Yes - I did not see his face; I did not take up the pigeons.

CHARLES ANDREWS . I had two pigeons in my shop - Poplin was there, talking to me; my back was turned towards the place where these pigeons were - I heard a scuffle; I ran to the door, saw the pen door open, and missed two pigeons, one a blue dragon, and the other a mealy tumbler - I have seen the prisoner at my shop many times; I believe he was there every day in the week.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to have a pint of beer, and I felt rather sick - a man rushed by me, and hit me on the shoulder; I heard Stop thief! called and ran after him - some person said, "He has let something fly."

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18310630-134

1322. JAMES CALLAGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 3 waistcoats, value 6s.; 1 shirt, value 5s.; 5 neckcloths, value 5s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of William Lindley .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Thomas Hayes .

ALEXANDER BROWN . I am a Police-constable. On the 4th of June I was on duty in Oxford-street - I saw the prisoner and another, and watched them; they went down Henrietta-street, and into Welbeck-street - the prisoner went into a house without any thing under his arm - he came out again with this bundle; I asked where he got it- he said from a man in that house, and he was directed by that other lad to go and get them; the other was then gone - I took the prisoner.

SOPHIA JONES . I live in this house; it is in a mews. These things had been left in my care for a young man to call for them - I was absent for a short time, and then missed this bundle - I know nothing of the prisoner.

ELIZABETH HAYES . I am the wife of Thomas Hayes . I washed these things for William Lindley - I left them in Jones' care while I went to the Duke of Portland public-house to work - these are the articles; they are wrapped in my apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of Welbeck-street, and a woman came and asked me to carry a bundle to Cavendish-square - I went to this house, and she gave it me to carry - when I came out the Policeman took me; I said a woman gave it me.

ALEXANDER BROWN. No, he did not,

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-135

1323. MARIA COWHARDING and REBECCA COURTLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 1 child's waggon, value 22s. , the goods of John Wilson .

JOHN WILSON . I am a shoemaker, and let out children's waggons . On the 11th of May the prisoners came, and Cowharding asked me what the waggon was an hour - I said 2d. - she gave me 2d., and took the waggon, which she was to have the use of for an hour, and then return it - she said she lived at No. 15, Oshorn-place; they did not return it, and I went to the place - there was no such number, and I have never found the waggon since; I am quite sure I went to the address she gave me - it was worth 22s.

SARAH MORGAN . I was washing at my window on the 11th of May, which is not far from the prosecutor's - I saw the two prisoners go and look at the waggon; Cowharding drew it away.

HENRY BOLTON . I am a Police-constable. I received information, and took the prisoners in Wentworth-street.

Cowkarding's Defence. I never was near the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-136

1324. ANN CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of June , 1 breast-pin, value 12s., the goods of Samuel Hosier , from his person .

SAMUEL HOSIER. I am a servant , but was out of place at this time. On the morning of the 22nd of June, at halfpast one o'clock, I was going to my lodgings, and saw the prisoner talking to some man; the man then left her - she came and asked me to go with her; I refused - she still kept talking to me, and said she wanted to speak a word to me - I stopped a minute, and she put her hand up to my breast, and took my pin out of my handkerchief; I accused her of taking the pin - she denied it: the Police-constable came up - I told him she had taken the pin; he took her to the watch-house, and took this pin, which is mine, from the back of her gown.

ROBERT CURRIE . I am a Police-constable. The prosecutor charged the prisoner with robbing him of a pin - I took her to the station, and found this pin in the back of her gown; she denied that night that she had had it, but she said the next morning she could not think what could induce her to do it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is quite false - I never said such a thing, Witness. Yes, she did.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor had taken her to a house of ill-fame, and given her 5s., which he afterwards wanted back, and gave her in charge, but that he must have placed the pin in her gown himself.

SAMUEL HOSIER. I did not enter any house with her, nor ask her to go.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteens Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-137

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1325. HANNAH BARBER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , 1 veil, value 6s.; 6 pairs of stockings, value 5s.; 3 tippets, value 3s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 3 petticoats, value 3s.; 2 night-dresses, value 5s.; 2 shifts, value 5s.; 2 bed-gowns, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 9d.; 1 pair of pockets, value 1s.; 3 caps, value 4s.; 3 thimbles, value 1s.; 1 towel, value 6d.; 1 pincloth, value 6d., and 3 yards of silk, value 6s. , the goods of Harriet Reeves , her mistress; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-138

1326. GEORGE MUNDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June , 48 pairs of stockings, value 1l. 16s. , the goods of John Alpe ; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN CHIPPENDEN . I am a porter to Mr. John Alpe, who lives in Love-lane, Aldermanbury , and is a hosier . On the morning of the 3rd of June I was going into his premises, between eight and a quarter past eight o'clock -I saw the prisoner coming out with forty-eight pairs of stockings under his arm; he was coming out of the passage - I called to a man, and said the man had got my goods; the prisoner ran up Silver-street, and in Monkwell-street he dropped these stockings, which I took up and carried to the Compter - they are worth 9s. 6d. a dozen; the warehouse door was locked and I had the key in my hand - it had been entered by a wooden square which had been forced in, and the stockings laid within reach of it, on a counter.

CHARLES DAVIS . I am warehouseman to Leach, Tweedy, and Co. I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's with these stockings - I pursued, and took him in Hart-street; I never lost sight of him.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRALL . I am a constable. -I received the prisoner and these stockings.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES SNOW . I am an officer. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - (read) - I know him to be the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-139

1327. THOMAS TRIMMER and THOMAS STENNETT were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 49

lbs. weight of pork, value 12s. , the goods of John Hawney ; and that Thomas Trimmer had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS TRIMMER pleaded GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

WILLIAM HALL . I am a labourer, and live in Kent-street, Borongh. On the morning of the 24th of June I left two sides of pork in a truck, in Ivy-lane , for about five minutes - when I returned it was gone; I had seen Stennett about five yards from my truck before I left it.

JOSEPH FITTEE . I am shopman to Mr. Cross, Leadenhall-market; he is a meat-salesman. On the 24th of June Trimmer brought two sides of pork to my master, about ten o'clock - he was taken into custody about eleven.

CHARLES WRIGHT , I am clerk to Mr. Cross. I was present when Trimmer brought the pork, about ten o'clock- I saw Stennett between twelve and one the same morning; he asked if we had received a pig in the name of David Jones , which was the name Trimmer had given - I asked Stennett into the counting-house; he asked if the pig was sold - I said, Yes, and he asked for the bill - I asked him who had brought it, and he described Trimmer; I asked how he came by it, and he said, "We bought it on Tuesday;" I called an officer, and gave him in charge - Trimmer had been taken before; Trimmer said Jones lived in the Borough.

JOHN HAWNEY . I bought the pork in Newgate-market - I afterwards saw it at Mr. Cross's, in Leadenhall-market; I know it by a mark on the sparerib, which I put on it - William Hall was in my employ, and he had to take the pork home.

JOHN FIFINCH . I took Stennett into custody between twelve and one o'clock - I made him no threat or promise, but he said a man in Gracechurch-street had given, (or was going to give) him 6d. to come for the money for the pork; I had not told him any one else was in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer would not take me to where the person was who had sent me.

STENNETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-140

1328. SAMUEL MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of David Stroud , from his person .

DAVID STROUD. I live in Tottenham-court-road, and am a hosier . On the 17th of June, about half-past six o'clock, I was passing Holborn-bridge , and felt a push against my pocket - I turned round, and saw the prisoner close by me; I asked what he pushed against me for - he denied it; I told him he had - he denied it a second time; I said I knew he was the man, and insisted upon his giving me my handkerchief, which I then missed - he said if I would go up a turning he would give it me; I refused, and said he had better give it me - after some few words he did: I crossed the road, and saw Mr. White - I told him, and the prisoner ran down Field-lane; White took him.

Prisoner. Q.How far was I off you? A.Close by my side - I felt the push, and turned immediately; you had not passed me, but was rather behind me - you was the nearest person to me, and was going to turn into Field-lane.

JAMES WHITE . I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the road - I saw the handkerchief, and picked it up; the prosecutor then accused me of robbing him - I wish to ask whether I picked his pocket.

MR. STROUD. I could not tell who took it - I felt the push, and then accused you of having it, and you denied it.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-141

1329. WILLIAM HART was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 1 sovereign , the money of John Dagger .

JOHN DAGGER. I live in Prospect-place, New Kent road. On the 16th of May I went to the George, in West-street, Smithfield - I called for a quartern of gin; the prisoner brought it to me; I gave him a sovereign to take for the gin, and told him to bring back the change - he went off with it; I did not see him again till he was in custody, on the 26th of May - he came to me as a waiter at that house.

Prisoner. You came in with two females, and they said, "Bill, a quartern of gin;" you gave me the money under your hand that they should not see it - I gave you 4d. change, and you sent for 1d. worth of sugar. Witness. I did not hand my money in the way he describes - there was no change brought to me; he came, and asked me what I pleased to want; I told him - he went, got a quartern of gin, and I gave him the sovereign.

JOHN DENDY TELL . I keep the Green Dragon, in Half Moon-street, Bishopsgate. I was attending at the bar of the George, in West-street - the prosecutor came in with two persons; I cannot tell whether he was connected with them or not - the prisoner then came to the bar, said he wanted a quartern of gin, and he would bring me the money directly - I gave him the gin, and told him to bring the money: he went away, leaving his hat and gaiters behind him - I did not see him again till he was taken; the prosecutor came, and asked for his change soon after he was gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave him change of 1s.; he was there with two bad characters; whether they took it or not I cannot tell; Mr. Bird was my master, hot Mr. Tell - he had only been there two or three days; I had lived nearly six months at the Crown, and not knowing what a place Mr. Bird's was I went there to get a better birth - I always wore a seal-skin cap; the two women were not strangers to the house - Mr. Bird knew them well; the prosecutor gave the girl a penny to get some sugar.

JOHN DAGGER . I am quite sure it was a sovereign I gave him; he had no cap on.

JURY. Q.Was it before or after you gave the sovereign that you gave the penny for the sugar? A.After -I had only 1 1/2d. in my pocket.

COURT. Q.Did you give the gin to the women? A. Yes; I expected a person to come, and he did not - I could not drink at all.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-142

1330. JOHN MINCE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , 2 blankets, value 18s.; 4 sheets, value 22s.; 2 pillows, value 4s., and 2 pillow-cases, value 6d. , the goods of George Wrecks .

MARY WRECKS. I am the wife of George Wrecks , and live in Little Moorfields . I let the prisoner a first-floor

back room, furnished; I believe he is married - it is two years last November since he took the lodgings, and he went away last September; he was to pay 5s. a week - they were 4l. 15s. in my debt - I missed one pair of blankets, two pairs of sheets, two pillows, and two pillowcases, and I believe the bolster went, but I am not certain; I have only seen one pair of sheets since - I think I missed them two days after they were gone; I went up stairs, saw the key outside the door, and not hearing the child cry, I took the liberty to go in - I did not know they were gone then; I had three other lodgers in the house -I saw Mrs. Mince on the premises the first time I went up, which was the 9th of September; I then missed some things, and they went in the course of a fortnight - I went to ask Mrs. Mince for an extra pair of sheets which I had lent when she laid in, as I had another lodger come; I likewise asked for some rent - the prisoner was there at the time; I had some suspicion that my things were gone, and missed every thing but the bare bed - I called in an officer - he said to them, "What have you done with this lady's things?" the prisoner's sister, who was there, pulled out a whole load of duplicates, and she and his mother said if I would not put him in prison, they would pay the rent by instalments, and get the things out that week or the week after; the sister then went out, and fetched a 3d. stamp - nothing more was said about these things till they went away, and they were still missing; they left the house without giving any notice - the officer took the duplicates, and gave them to me; I got out one pair of sheets, which were pawned for 2s. - the other things are all run out, and are sold; I do not think this pair of sheets are mine - I never gave the prisoner any authority to pawn any thing of mine, nor any of his family, and they never told me they had pawned them; they dented it, and would have prevented my turning down the bed - they did not own it till the officer was sent for; I found the prisoner about four months after he quitted, at a public-house near Moorgate - he said, "Oh, Mrs. Wrecks, how do you do? I am waiting for you;" I said, "I am very glad you are;" I took hold of his arm, thinking he was going home with me - we got about half way up Moorfields, and he said what was I going to do; I said I wanted to know how I was to get my rent and my things - he said he had not a halfpenny in the world; I said,"You will have no objection to go and see my husband;" he said, "I suppose you are going to put me into the Compter" - he gave me a shove, and ran off; I cried Stop thief! and a gentleman stopped him - I came up to him; he gave me another shove, and ran off again; he was not taken till last Friday.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Was the prisoner, during the whole time he was in your house, in the greatest possible distress? A. I never had any reason to think he was in distress - I sent for an officer on the 9th of September; that was to see for my property. and I took the duplicates - I should think there were fifty; I did not bargain that if he would give me the duplicates, and give security for the rent, that the officer should be sent away - I received the duplicates, and the officer went away; I said if they would give me a note of hand for 3l. I would forgive them the 1l. 15s. - some of the duplicates were not run out at that time, but it was not in my power to get the things out; I received a note of hand, and they remained between a week and a fortnight afterwards - my husband did not turn the prisoner out of his house without any covering for him or his wife, and say he would break his neck if he did not go out; I never received any money on the note of hand - his mother would not stand any more than 3l. for him; I did not agree to discharge him of all he owed me on receiving the security for the 3l. - I have not been to the prisoner since he has been in prison; I do not know whether my husband has - I do not know that my husband has offered to take 3l.; my husband has told the prisoner, when he was out of work, that he would employ him as a labourer, and he said he was not brought up to hard work - the prisoner was in work, holding up his finger at the back of an omnibus; I got a pair of sheets out for fear I should get no more, but I do not know that they belong to me.

JAMES GRADY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Chiswell-street, and when I got him to the station-house, he said he was very much put about, and was obliged to pawn these things - he gave Mr. Wrecks a promissory note for the rent, and the property he had pawned.

Witness for the Defence.

JAMES BONNER. I am the officer who was sent for in September. The prisoner's mother and sister came there, Mrs. Wrecks said that he owed 3l. back rent, and if the mother would give a note to pay 1l. a month she would discharge them, and she said if they would give up the duplicate she would forgive them.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined One Month .

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his extreme poverty.

Reference Number: t18310630-143

1331. JAMES HARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William White , from his person .

JOHN GIRTON . I am a constable. On the 1st of June I was in Newgate-street, about half-past ten o'clock - I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, at the corner of Butcherhall-lane; he dropped it: the prosecutor turned round, and picked it up; the prisoner then ran down the lane, and I after him, crying Stop thief! he stopped in about two minutes, and I took hold of him - I had not lost sight of him.

WILLIAM WHITE . I live in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn, and am a coach-painter. I was in Newgate-street ; I saw my handkerchief on the ground, and took it up - this is it; a man was pursued and taken, but I cannot say whether it was the prisoner; I have inquired, and find the prisoner had had a good character before, and he has been a great support to his parents.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-144

1332. TIMOTHY IRELAND and JOSEPH BOULTON were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 1 pair of trousers, value 7s. , the goods of Stephen Whitetaker .

STEPHEN STEPHENS . I am shopman to Mr. Stephen Whittaker , a pawnbroker , of Long-lane, West Smithfield . I received information on the 24th of June, from Sarah

Cole, and went into Long-lane; I saw Boulton running with something under his jacket - he turned round, and seeing me running after him, he gave the article he had to Ireland, who was running in the same direction - I collared Ireland. and found they were these trousers, which are my master's - I had seen them safe a minute before; Boulton came back of his own accord.

SARAH COLE . I am the wife of Charles Cole, of Greenwood's-rents. On the 24th of June I was in Mr. Whittaker's shop, and saw Boulton take a pair of trousers from the door: he ran off - I gave information to Mr. Stephens - I did not see Ireland in the shop; I know Boulton is the person.

JOHN RHODES. I am an officer. I took the prisoners.

IRELAND - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BOULTON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-145

1333. RICHARD DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 1 purse, value 1d.; 2 sovereigns, 11 half-crowns, 1 shilling, and 4 sixpences, the property of John Mason , from his person .

JOHN MASON . I live in Queen-street, King's-road, Chelsea. I was between the pens, in Smithfield-market , on the 27th of June; I had occasion to stoop, and some one pushed me behind - I felt a person's hand in my pocket; I jumped up as quick as possible, collared the prisoner and said "You rascal, I know you have been robbing me:" he said, "How can you think of such a thing, Sir?" and in the meantime I saw my purse hanging out of his breast pocket about half an inch - I seized it, and gave him in charge: the purse contained eleven half-crowns, two sovereigns, four sixpences, and one shilling.

Prisoner. You said, at first, you saw two of us behind you, and you took it from between us, hanging on one of our arms. Witness. I took it out of your pocket.

CHARLES WINGROVE . I am a butcher. I was close to Mr. Mason, and saw him take the purse from the prisoner's pocket - the prisoner said, "It is very ridiculous of you to say I robbed you;" he was much agitated, and began to cry.

JOHN BROOKSBANK . I was close by the side of Mr. Mason - I heard him say, "What are you at?" I turned, and saw him take the purse from the prisoner.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-146

1334. ISAAC PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of William Henry Ablett .

JOHN WHEELER . I am shopman to Mr. William Henry Ablett . who lives on Fish-street-hill , and keeps a readymade linen warehouse . On the 13th of June the prisoner came to his shop, and asked for some silk handkerchiefs which were in the window - I took them out; he chose one - while he was doing that, I observed him concealing something under his apron, and when he was going out I got over the counter, and stopped him; this is the handkerchief he had chosen, and this other I took from his person under his apron - he had paid 1s. 6d. for one; the one he took is worth 3s. 6d. - it is silk; he appeared to be trying to tuck this one under his apron.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.Was that handkerchief laying loose on the counter? A. No, it was hanging up behind him - it might have fallen down; I only saw him fumbling - I had not seen this particular handkerchief to notice it the whole day, but I know I had hung it up there the day before.

COURT. Q. Had you some of that pattern hanging in the window? A. No, they were tied in a bundle, but this one was hanging up singly, apart from the bundle - there were several other handkerchiefs hanging in the same place, but not of this pattern.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18310630-147

1335. JOHN BROWN and WILLIAM BENNETT were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 snuffbox, value 2l., the goods of Philip Phillips , from his person .

CHARLES THOROGOOD . On the 18th of June I was at the Royal Exchange, about half-past eleven o'clock - I saw the two prisoners following several gentlemen at different times; I then saw them and another person follow Mr. Phillips out of the Royal Exchange into Threadneedle-street , and at the end of the New England coffee-house I saw the other lad pass sometimes to one of the two prisoners; they were all three in company, and close to the prosecutor - I saw Brown then run away; I pursued him into Bartholomew-lane, near the Auction-mart - I called Stop thief! and he turned round; I was close upon him, and took him - I put my hand into his righthand trousers pocket, and said, "What have you got here?" - he said an old box which he had picked up in the road; I took this box out of his pocket - it was then about half-past one o'clock; I suppose the other two had gone another road - I had seen the three together for several days; I am quite sure the prisoners were two of them.

PHILIP PHILLIPS. This box is my property; I had it about me at the Royal Exchange, on the 18th of June - it is worth about 40s.

Brown. Q.Might it not have fallen from your pocket? A.It is not very likely - it was in my inside coat pocket, inside the flap of my coat; there was nothing else in the pocket.

Brown's Defence. I was coming along Throgmorton-street, and picked it up where the men were paving; two or three men saw me pick it up - the officer called; I took it out, and showed it to him.

Bennett's Defence. I had been looking after the omnibusses in the City; the officer took me three days afterwards.

CHARLES THOROGOOD re-examined. They were looking after different gentlemen; they were about the prosecutor's person for five minutes, and followed him ten yards; I did not see Bennett touch the prosecutor.

JURY. Q. Do you know what became of Bennett at the time? A. I do not; I took him on the Monday following at a house in Moor-lane.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

BENNETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-148

OLD COURT. MONDAY, JULY 4.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1336. SAUL RANSOM was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s., and 1 shuttle, value 1s. the goods of George Johnson .

FRANCES JOHNSON . I am the wife of George Johnson , a weaver , of Newcastle-street, Bethnal-green . The prisoner worked for us - we lost a pair of shears, not shoes; I saw him go down stairs with the shuttle - he went out, and I have not seen it since; we do not allow workmen to take them out.

ROBERT LANDER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and heard him say to the prosecutor, "Say no more about them - I will bring them back."

Prisoner's Defence. I took them out to be repaired, and meant to bring them back in the afternoon, but they were not done.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-149

1337. GEORGE O'NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 1 coat, value 30s.: 1 pair of trousers. value 10s.; 1 pair of braces, value 4d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, 1 half-crown, 5 shillings, and 60 penny-pieces , the property of Jeremiah Heffernan .

JEREMIAH HEFFERNAN . I live in Princes-street, Rosemary-lane - the prisoner lodged with me. I went out on the 30th of May, about six o'clock, returned, and found my trunk broken open, and this property gone - I found it at the pawnbroker's, in a bundle.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am a Police-constable. The prisoner was brought to the station, and in his hat I found a 5s. paper of halfpence, which the prosecutor identified, and in his pocket a sovereign and a half.

ANDREW CURRY . I am a Police-constable. I went into a pawnbroker's shop in Rosemary-lane, and found the prisoner there; this bundle laid on the counter - he acknowledged that he brought it there, and said it was his own.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-150

1338. ELLEN CRAWLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Samuel Chattell , on the 21st of June, and stealing 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 6d., and 1 pair of scissors, value 2d. , his property.

MARY ANN CHATTELL . I am the wife of Charles Samuel Chattell - we lodge in Lower Queen-street, Islington , on the ground floor. On the 21st of June, between four and five o'clock, I went to my mother's, next door - my husband was in bed and asleep in the back room; this property was in the front room - I locked the door, and left the key in it; I was not absent ten minutes, for while I sat at my mother's, the prisoner and another came and asked me for a person named Dunn; I told her she lived at No. 5, which is my house - they went away, but returned and asked if it was on the one or two pairs of stairs; I said the two pair back room - they were both strangers: I went home in less than three minutes, and saw them turning the corner - I found my door wide open, and this property gone; the gown had been in a box, which was shut, and the other things in the cradle - I went out, and met Harvey with the prisoner in custody, with the gown.

JOSEPH HARVEY . I live at the Duke of Clarence. Rotherfield-street. I saw the prisoner with some things tucked under her petticoats, and part of them hanging down; I heard this place was robbed, ran after her, and took her - the other woman ran away; I found the gown and shawl under the prisoner's clothes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I waited outside the door - the other woman went up stairs, brought the things out to me, and put them into my apron to go to the pawnbroker's - they were not under my clothes.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-151

1339. JAMES FLANNAGAN was indicted for breaking and entering the warehouse of John Joseph Brown , on the 15th of May , and stealing 7 yards of woollen cloth, value 3l. 12s.; 1 wrapper, value 6d., and 1 sheep skin, value 4s. , his property.

NICHOLAS GRIM . I am a Policeman. On the 15th of May, about twenty minutes past ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Nelson's-court, about fifty yards from Mr. Brown's warehouse, with a bundle under his arm: I stopped him, and asked where he came from - he said he had brought it from Mr. Roberts', two doors beyond Shadwell church, which is a mile and a half off; I took him to the station, and about one o'clock Mr. Brown came there.

JOHN JOSEPH BROWN. I am a coach-builder - my premises are in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel . I left them safely locked up about ten o'clock on Sunday night, the 15th of May; this property was then on a shelf in the counting-house - I returned in about ten minutes, and found the warehouse door unlocked; I am certain I had locked it - the lock must have been picked; I found the prisoner at the station about one o'clock that morning, with the property; he is a stranger.

Prisoner. Q.On your oath, did you lock the door? A. I did - my boy was with me; he got there about a minute before me - he had not time to unlock it.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310630-152

Before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1340. GEORGE COATES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May , 2 seals, value 8s.; 3 rings, value 10s.; 10 sovereigns; 3 guineas, and 2 half-guineas, the property of Thomas Blatcher , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH BLATCHER . I am the wife of Thomas Blatcher - we live in Castle-street, Leicester-square , and rent the house. On Sunday, the 22nd of May, about three o'clock, I went to Harrow-on-the-Hill - I fastened my drawers in my bed-room on the second floor; I returned on Tuesday, about five, found my drawers broken open, and the property stated in the indictment gone - I had put the money into the drawer on the Saturday night, and never opened it afterwards; I had not noticed the watch and seals for a month or so - I had seen the earrings in the box which I put the money into on the Saturday, and saw the gold rings in the drawer then; they are all my husband's property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to swear that wholesale, that they are all your husband's?

A. I do; I saw a watch at the office - I did not swear that was my husband's, for I did not know the number. but the two seals I saw, and will swear to them; I had no doubt of the watch. but did not swear to it - my husband is at home; he did not wear the watch, nor yet the seals, and does not know them so well as I do, for I bought them - no money was found.

MARY ANN BLATCHER . The prisoner was working at the next house to us on Monday, the 23rd of May; his master asked my father to let him go through our house to repair the roof - that was not in my presence, but I have heard him ask leave on other occasions; he is a jobbing plumber, and was mending the leads of the next house - I was in my mother's bed-room at twelve o'clock, and all was safe; I went up again between two and three, and found the room door had been unlocked - I did not take particular notice of that, but went into my own room, which is the adjoining one, and when I came back, I saw a drawer in my mother's room open; the lock was wrenched quite off - it was hanging loose; three drawers were broken open; I wrote to my mother, and she came home - I know the seals belong to my mother; I had seen the prisoner come in, and heard him go up stairs, a little after one o'clock that day, while I was engaged with a lady in the shop - I did not see him come down, for I went to dinner.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there a carpenter at work at your house? A. Yes, but he had gone to dinner; we have four lodgers.

JOSEPH OSTELL . On the Tuesday evening, about six o'clock, I searched the prisoner, and found these two seals and a key attached to his watch - the prosecutrix and her daughter swore to them.

Cross-examined. Q.Was he not wearing them openly? A. He was - the watch was returned to him; the prosecutrix thought that she recognized it, but would not swear to it - the prisoner's brother was there, and said it was his watch.

Q. Had the prosecutrix sworn to the seals at the first examination? A. No; she partly swore to them at the second - the question was not put to her at the first examination, and she did not understand it; she saw them on the bench, and said to me, that to the best of her knowledge they were her seals - I do not think she was sworn at the first examination; the seals are cast.

ELIZABETH BLATCHER . These are my husband's; I have a son who carried that seal a year and a half ago; I was not asked to swear to them at the first examination -I have not looked at them since the officer had them, and will describe them - one has a snake round it.

Cross-examined. Q.Now, on your oath, did you not look at them in your hand this instant? A.My sight is so bad I could not swear to them without a glass; I have not seen them since they were in the officer's possession - I have not looked at them close enough to see if the snake is round them; I swear they are mine.

MARY ANN BLATCHER. These are my mother's seals; I swore to them at the last examination - I did not swear to the watch.

WILLIAM BLATCHER . I am the prosecutrix's son. These are her seals; I have worn them - I particularly know one, because it has two snakes, one on each side, with a tail in each mouth; I told the officer so before I saw it - there is nothing else which I swear to it by.

Cross-examined. Q.Can you describe the one which has no snake? A. No; I wore them a year and a half ago - I am now fourteen years old; they were in my possession about a fortnight - I particularly noticed the one with the snakes, it is a green stone; I cannot tell what is engraved on it - there is nothing on it.

JOB BATEMAN . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner on Tuesday. and saw the seals taken from his person; I was called up into the room which was broken open, and found these two chisels in the next room, they agreed with the marks on the drawers - there were marks of whitening on the floor, and the print of nails on the carpet; his shoes were taken off, and had nails in them -I did not count the nails.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know the chisels belonged to the carpenter? A. Yes; I have not been drinking to day - I do not say that I tried his shoes to the marks.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent; it is not likely I should wear the seals to my watch if they were theirs when I was working next door - I was obliged to go up their stairs to do the gutters, and when I came down. I did not go up again.

NAYLER MORRISON . I am a silversmith, and live at No. 47, Great Surrey-street, Blackfriars-road. I know these seals, by having sold them on the 2nd of March, by the pattern, and having them in my possession; I believe the prisoner to be the person I sold them to, but have not seen him since, and did not know him before - I have brought my book to prove the transaction; here is entered"Two seals, a key, and a ring, 18s."

COURT. Q.You do not enter the name of the person you sold them to? A. No, but I believe his name was Coates, for he pawned a silver watch with me that day in that name; I swear these are the seals I sold on the 2nd of March.

WILLIAM PEARCE . I keep a public-house at Camberwell - I have seen the prisoner wear these seals; he was going out one Saturday evening. and left them in my possession till Monday, with a silver watch - he wore them openly.

GEORGE GIBSON . I am a bricklayer. I have seen the prisoner with these seals - he wore them openly.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-153

1341. JOSEPH RICHARDSON was indicted for embezzling the sum of 755l. 2s. 3d. , which he had received on account of William Phillips and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-154

1342. JOSEPH RICHARDSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a 50l. Bank note , the property of William Phillips and another, his masters.

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-155

1343. JAMES BROWNE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 saw, value 3s., the goods of Henry Sparks ; and 1 plane, value 2s. , the goods of Benjamin Campion .

HENRY SPARKS . I am a carpenter , and was at work in Plough-court, Seething-lane . On Saturday morning, the 18th of June, I left my saw safe on the bench in a loft - I returned at half-past eight o'clock, but did not miss it till ten; the door was left locked, and I found it so - I saw the prisoner about one, and charged him with taking it; he said he had not been up in the place.

BENJAMIN CAMPION . I was at work in Tower-street, about thirty yards from this loft - I had left my plane on a shelf in the work-shop, but did not miss it till Monday, the 20th, when the Policeman brought it to me; the prisoner was groom at a stable.

JOHN CARELESS . I am a broker, of Whitechapel-road. On the 18th of June, before seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came, and asked if I would buy a plane - I questioned him about it, and suspecting him I detained it; he went away, leaving it with me.

WILLIAM WYBERT . I am a Policeman. On Saturday night, about seven o'clock, I followed the prisoner, in consequence of information, from Whitechapel-road, down different courts, and took him - I said, "Where did you get that plane from?" he said, "I stole it," and told me he took it from Plough-court - I found the saw on the Thursday following in the shop the plane was stolen from.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310630-156

1344. EDWARD COOPER and JOHN FAGAN were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 butter-firkin, value 10d., and 66 lbs. of butter, value 3l. , the goods of David Yeates and another, their masters.

MICHAEL GUNSTONE . In consequence of information I watched the premises of Messrs. Yeates and Acocks, wholesale cheesemongers , in Old Fish-street , on Friday, the 27th of May, and perceived a man named Barnard take a ham away - the prisoner Cooper was in the prosecutors' service, and while I was watching about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I saw Cooper at the warehouse door make a signal to the prisoner Fagan, who was standing at the corner of Little Distaff-lane - Fagan went to him; he entered the warehouse, and came out with a firkin of butter on his head - he was not in the prosecutors' employ; Cooper remained in the warehouse - I followed Fagan to the Magpie and Stump, Newgate-street, and he booked the firkin for a man named Ware, at Hampstead, which direction it bore; the carrier called there - I came in immediately, and asked where he brought it from; he said he did not know - I gave him into custody, and sent him to the Compter; the firkin was claimed by the prosecutors, and weighed upwards of 60 lbs.; there is nobody here from the Magpie and Stump.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Is the firkin here? A. Yes, but the butter has been taken out - it was full when I saw it, but I did not see any butter; I cannot say under what circumstance Cooper delivered the butter.

Fagan. I did not understand what questions he put to me; I thought he asked where it was going, and not having seen the direction I did not know. Witness. I am certain I asked where he brought it from: I was quite close to him - he must have understood me.

ELIZABETH DULY . I live at Mr. Holmes', Old Fish-street, opposite to the prosecutors' - Cooper was in their service, and I knew Fagan by sight before, I had seen him at Mr. Yeates'. On the 27th of May, about twenty minutes to nine o'clock in the morning, I was at the drawing-room window, which was open, and saw Fagan waiting about as usual by Fish-street church - Cooper beckoned to him; he crossed over, and waited by Distaff-lane - I then saw Cooper beckon to him, and he directly went into the ware-house - I saw him come out with a firkin of butter on a knot, which he carried on his shoulders; I could not see the butter - I gave information of this on Thursday, and attended before the Alderman on the 28th.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you live with Mr. Holmes? A. Yes, as cook - I was not acquainted with Cooper, further than saying "Good morning;" I was not at all acquainted with Fagan - Gunstone was watching in our house; I told him what I had seen before - I have seen a great deal of goods go out, but not for men to be beckoned to take them.

ALEXANDER DAVID YOUNG . I am an apprentice to the prosecutors. Mr. Yeates having received information, desired me to watch - I went over to Mr. Holmes', and saw Cooper come out of the door and stand on the stones; he went back again, and Fagan came up - he went in, and I saw Cooper put a firkin of butter on his (Fagan's) head; I know it was butter - he put it on his head, just about the counting-house door, which is a very little way from the street - I saw Fagan carry it away; I remained at Mr. Holmes', I told Mr. Acocks what I had seen, and soon after Gunstone brought Cooper to Mr. Acocks' house, in Trinity-lane, from the warehouse - Mr. Yeates' Christian name is David - he has only one partner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.When had the firkin come into your premises? A. It was weighed on the 24th of May; I know there was butter in it - I never opened it, nor saw the butter; Cooper weighed it - the invoice calls it 66 lbs.; I did not hear what passed between the prisoners - Cooper went back into the counting-house, to the desk, directly; here is the weighing-book in which Cooper has entered the weight - I know it is his own writing; he has written "58 firkins," with other numbers, and 58 is branded on the firkin - here is, against the 58, G. x B.B., which shows that it is the mark on the firkin - we deal in cheese, butter, and lard.

COURT. Q. Do you put cheese into firkins? A. No; we sometimes put lard in - here is butter sticking to the sides of the firkin now; it has been in Mr. Smith's custody.

JOHN EVANS . I am a clerk to the prosecutors. On the 27th of May I was coming to my employ, and saw Fagan come out of the warehouse door with a firkin of butter - I followed him to the Magpie and Stump, saw him put it down on the counter, and saw him given in charge; I returned to the warehouse, and saw Cooper - nothing passed between us; I had given information on the Thursday before this - Cooper was taken into custody that morning and taken to Mr. Acock's private house; I did not see the firkin opened - a firkin weighs from 66 to 67 lbs., and at that time was worth about 3l.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you ever see any butter in it? A. I did not; it was charged as

butter - I know it was full at the Magpie and Stump, for I pulled it on one side to see the mark.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I took Cooper on Friday, about nine o'clock in the morning, charged with stealing a tub of butter - he said nothing to the charge; I saw the firkin at the Magpie and Stump, and before the Alderman, but did not see it opened - I did not see Fagan; he had been searched - here is the firkin; it was very heavy - I felt the weight of it.

GEORGE PENSON . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors. After the prisoners were committed the firkin was brought to our warehouse; I sent it to one of our retail shops, and charged it as 67 lbs. of butter; if it had contained any thing else I should have heard of it - it now has a little butter at the sides; I was at Mr. Acock's when Cooper was brought there, charged with stealing a firkin of butter - I do not exactly recollect what he said, but I am sure I heard him beg for mercy.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. A great many things were talked of besides butter? A. Yes; the firkin was not produced there.

Fagan's Defence. I am a poor man, and work in Newgate-market; Cooper employed me to go down to the warehouse at half past eight o'clock, to take a firkin of butter - he gave me 1s. to carry it, and 4d. to pay the booking; it is very hard for me to be brought into trouble - Cooper promised to exonerate me before the Court, but he has not said a word.

Cooper. He is totally innocent - I received the order from Mr. Ware, and employed him to carry the butter; it was my intention to book it if I had time.

JURY to JOHN EVANS. Q.What direction was on the firkin? A.Mr. Ware, Hampstead - he was a casual customer of the prosecutors, for ready money only; I know nothing of his having ordered a firkin of butter that morning - when we send butter to an inn, we always send a porter's book to have a receipt; if this had gone out regularly the book would have been sent to be signed.

GEORGE PENSON . I took Cooper before Mr. Acocks; he said he meant to have entered the butter, but he begged Mr. Acocks, for God's sake, to forgive him - he had plenty of time to enter it, for I was gone half an hour or more.

JONATHAN WARE . I live at Hampstead. I had given Cooper an order to send me a firkin of butter on that day - I should have paid Cooper for it; I had been intimate with him, and he had offered to serve me, but I thought it was in the regular way - I never paid any body but him.

COURT. Q. Did you ever tell the prosecutors that you had dealings with Cooper? A. No - I confined to him to procure the goods; I understood he was authorised to sell on their account.

JURY to JOHN EVANS . Q. Is it customary for your house to employ extra porters? A.Never any but our own porters - we keep them entirely to take out goods; Fagan was never employed by us - I understand our porters had been sent to breakfast a few minutes before; if they had been wanted they could have been detained - we have four porters, and keep carts and waggons.

COOPER - GUILTY of stealing the firkin only .

Aged 26.

FAGAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-157

1345. The said EDWARD COOPER and JOHN BARNARD were indicted for stealing, 1 ham, value 14s. , the goods of David Yeates and another, their masters.

MICHAEL GUNSTONE . On the morning of the 27th of May, I was at Mr. Holmes', watching the prosecutors' premises - all the men had gone to breakfast, except the prisoners; it was between half-past eight and nine o'clock - Barnard was a porter in their employ; before the firkin of butter was taken, I saw Cooper in front of the warehouse, and Barnard behind; I saw Barnard come up the ware-house to Cooper - he appeared to communicate with Cooper: he made a stop as if to speak to him - Barnard then immediately went up stairs; I saw him come down with a ham on his shoulder - he went to where Cooper stood, and there they both put it into a bag, and Barnard took it away out of the warehouse; I was not near enough to see the direction on the bag - I followed Barnard, and saw Fagan waiting at the corner of Distaff-lane; I desisted, and waited to watch the other transaction - while Cooper was at Mr. Acock's house, we asked him about the ham Barnard had taken away; he said he had sold it to Barnard, and he was to pay for it out of his wages on Saturday night - Barnard came in in about half an hour, and I asked where he had taken the ham to, which he had taken from his master's premises; he said he had taken it home, that it was taken by Cooper's directions, and he was to take it out at dinner time, to some place where Cooper had sent it to - he did not say where; Cooper was present - I afterwards went to Barnard's lodging, found the ham in the bag, and brought it away; Cooper afterwards pleaded for Barnard, and begged his master to let him go.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Cooper told you it was to be paid for out of the man's wages? A. Yes, and Barnard said he was to take it where Cooper was to direct him.

Cooper. When I spoke of the ham, I said Barnard was to take part of it, and I was to take the other - I weighed it, and should have entered it at the same time as the firkin; he says half an hour elapsed, now I was at the book when Gunstone came - I had it in my hand, intending to enter both the articles.

ALEXANDER DAVID YOUNG . I saw Barnard bring something out in a bag, in the shape of a ham; I saw him go down the warehouse first - I did not see the bag afterwards.

WILLIAM SMITH . I was called in, and took Barnard on the 27th of May - I do not think the ham was mentioned to him.

Cooper's Defence. The ham was a similar transaction to the firkin - it certainly was my intention to enter both, but a very short time had elapsed; I had taken the numbers on a piece of paper, and was about to make the entry when Gunstone came, and desired me to go to Mr. Acocll's - I told Barnard if he liked part of the ham, I would take the responsibility of the payment on myself, and enter it on my account, the whole being too much for my own use; it was not done with intent to defraud my employers.

Barnard's Defence (written). I am entirely innocent of any intention to defraud my masters; I never in my life, either directly or indirectly, robbed my employers of a single farthing,

or property of any description, or suffered any one to do it with my knowledge; I considered, my Lord, when I obeyed the order of Mr. Cooper, their clerk, I was doing no more than my duty; I had no conception, when ordered to take the ham to my house, there to remain until called for, but that it was perfectly consonant with every honest intention.

MR. THOMAS ACOCKS . I am in partnership with Mr. Yeates - it is not customary to allow servants to book goods to themselves; it probably may have been done by the clerks, but certainly none of these men would be allowed to do it - Barnard was seven years in our employ, and always behaved well; Cooper never applied to have goods booked to him; there is no entry of this.

COOPER - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

BARNARD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-158

1346. EDWARD COOPER was again indicted for embezzlement .

MR. YEATES. The prisoner was our under warehouseman , but did not receive money on our account, by our direction - Mr. Ware was not a customer of ours; Cooper did not pay us 10l. 8s. 4d. on the 24th of April - I do not know that it was due to us.

MR. ACOCKS. The prisoner did not pay me this money - Ware, from whom it was received, was not a customer of ours; he was Cooper's customer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-159

NEW COURT. MONDAY, JULY 4.

Fifth London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1347. ELIZABETH BYRON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 1 pair of sheets, value 10s.; 1 pair of blankets, value 10s., and 1 counterpane, value 10s. , the goods of Jonathan Langford ; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-160

1348. JOHN JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , 120 lbs. of veal, value 45s.; 75 lbs. of mutton, value 30s.; 30 lbs. of lamb, value 16s.; 50 lbs. of beef, value 25s., and 12 lbs. of pork, value 6s. , the goods of George Wyatt .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Robert Thompson ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY. Aged 26 - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310630-161

1349. JOSEPH CATANACH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , 3 crowns, 10 half-crowns, 40 shillings, and 20 sixpences , the monies of Felix Felix , his master.

THOMAS PETTIT . I am assistant to Mr. Felix, tea dealer , Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner was employed by him on Saturday, the 11th of June, to serve behind the counter - he has been employed to assist on a busy day for about two months back; I saw him take some silver from a customer - he went to the till to put his change in, and put half a crown into his pocket; he had no change to give the customer - I asked him to walk with me into the warehouse; I there accused him of taking the half-crown: he said he was very sorry for what he had done, that it was owing to the great distress he was in, and he hoped I would not tell Mr. Felix - I said I had suspected him all the evening; he then gave up 1l. 9s. 6d. which he laid on a hogshead - he said he had taken it from the till, and be hoped I would not tell Mr. Felix; there were half-crowns, shillings, and, I believe, a 5s. piece or two - I wished him to walk into the kitchen, and told Mr. Felix to go down; next morning I sat in the same chair as he had sat in the night before, and found a paper under it with 1l. 17s. in it.

FELIX FELIX . I live in Tottenham-court-road. I received information and went into the kitchen on the 11th of June - I found the prisoner there: I heard he had given up the 1l. 9s. 6d., and I charged him with having more money - I made no threat or promise, but said, "You may as well give it up to me now as when you are searched;" he then gave me up 1l. 3s. 6d. in silver - I think there were crowns, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences; he confessed he had taken them from my till, and said he hoped I would forgive him, as I had taken him from charity - he was in a great distress, having been long out of a situation.

EDWARD BARKER . I am a Police-constable. I was called into Mr. Felix's shop on the 11th of June; I received 2l. 13s. in half-crowns and other silver - I took the prisoner, and before we went to the Magistrate he said he had laid some silver on the floor where he sat when I took the charge, and he hoped Mr. Felix would not prosecute him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell me that 16s. had been found under a chair in the kitchen? A. I did not - I did not ask you any question,

COURT. Q. Did you tell him any precise sum? A.No, my Lord, no sum was mentioned; he only said it was silver - this is my name (looking at his deposition) - it is here stated that I said he told me he put 16s. in a paper, but I did not.

The prisoner put in a written defence, denying that he had acknowledged putting the paper of silver under the chair.

MR. FELIX. He had been my occasional servant for a considerable time; his friends are friends of mine; I was told he had been ten years in one situation - he was not under any engagement to attend on Saturdays; he might have got work where he pleased.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310630-162

1350. WILLIAM BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 30lbs. of butter, value 1l. 6s., and 1 basket, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Parker .

WILLIAM TIMS . I am a waggoner in the employ of Mr. Richard Parker ; he lives at Witney. I was driving a waggon on the 25th of May, from Red Hill to London - the prisoner came with me from Red-hill; I missed him on Ealing-common - he had been riding and walking about ten miles; he rode behind the waggon, not in it - I missed him and a basket of butter at the same time; the butter was worth 30s. - it was in the County of Middlesex; I have seen the flat of butter since - this is it; I had seen it about an hour before, and I saw it in the officer's hands the next day - I had given the officer information.

SAMUEL BOYD . I am a Police-officer. In consequence of information, on the 25th of May, I looked for the prisoner, and found him in Webb-lane, just going into Hammersmith, with this flat of butter - the butter was given up; this is the basket - this ticket was with it.(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-163

1351. GEORGE BENTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , 30lbs. of lead, value 2s. 6d., the goods of James Rhodes , and fixed to a building : against the statute.

THOMAS SHAW . I am a Police-constable. On the morning of the 11th of June I saw the prisoner coming from a house belonging to Mr. Rhodes, at Islington - he had this sheet lead concealed in his trousers; I stopped him with it - I should think it weighs 20lbs.; he said he had found it - I went to the premises, and found that a piece of lead had been recently cut out of one of the gutters from which I saw him come.

BENJAMIN SHILLINGFORD . I am foreman to Mr. James Rhodes . I examined the house, which belongs to him - I missed a piece of lead; this piece of corresponds in length and breadth, and the nail-holes in it fit the place.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-164

1352. CHARLES BUTT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , 1 printed book, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas Pickett .

THOMAS PICKETT. I live in Anderson's-buildings, City-road - I have a covered book-stall in front of my house. On the 26th of May I was sitting in my room: I saw the prisoner at my stall: before I got out he had gone off - I followed him, and he dropped a Bible, which I had missed; I saw it in his possession - I came up with him within twenty yards of my house: he had been carrying it wrapped in his apron - it has my mark in it; I had seen him before, and had missed books before.

THOMAS BRENNAN . I am a Police-constable. I produce the Bible which I got from the prosecutor; the prisoner owned that he took it off the stall.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Ten Days , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310630-165

1353. WILLIAM BEASLEY and JAMES STYLES were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 1 truss of hay, value 2s., and 1 truss of straw, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Moseley and Thomas Walker .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

JOHN NETTLETON . I am servant to Messrs. Richard Moseley and Thomas Walker - they are Army accontrement-makers . On the 16th of May I was placed to watch in their yard - Beasley was in their employ, and on that morning I saw a cart of dung in their yard; I did not see Styles go to the yard - the cart was unloaded by order of Hobbs, the Policeman, and under the dung I saw a truss of hay and a truss of straw; it was Beasley's duty to attend to the horses, and to take out property - my employers had hay and straw in their yard; I did not know that the cart belonged to Styles - I did not see it come to the yard - Hobbs told Styles that he must see the cart unloaded, and Styles said he would tell him what he would find when it was unloaded, they would find a truss of hay and a truss of straw; Beasley was close to him - Bates then came up, and I left the matter to the Policemen; I compared the hay found in the cart with that on the prosecutors' premises - I could not swear it was the same.

COURT. Q.Who drove the cart? A. It was standing still when I saw it, but Styles had the whip in his hand, and he unloaded it when the Policeman desired him: when I approached the yard the gate had been opened to let the cart out - as I went up Beasley said to me, "Sir, this person (meaning Hobbs) prevents the cart from going out of the gate;" I replied I supposed he knew what he was doing - Hobbs then directed it to be unloaded, and Styles told him what he would find; the dung is Beasley's perquisite, to dispose of to whom he pleases - Styles signified that he brought the hay and straw from home - that his father sold hay and straw, and he had designed to leave it at a public-house at Brompton; all the hay and straw on those premises belonged to my employers - there was no other stable there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.When was this? A. On the 16th of May - it was a cart boarded all round.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a Police-constable. About five o'clock in the morning of the 16th of May I went to watch the prosecutors' premises, and about six I saw the gate opened - Styles was driving a dung-cart out of the yard; I went up, and told him to stop and back the cart into the yard again - Beasley was there; he said, "What for?" I said, "I have a suspicion something is wrong here, and I shall have it unloaded;" Styles said, "I will tell you what I have got - I have a truss of hay and a truss of straw;" I said I should see it unloaded. and as soon as I saw that under the dung, I should seize it, and take them into custody - I found it, and sent for Bates; Beasley then said to the foreman, "I don't know, it is a bad job;" I took the hay and straw to the station - Styles said he had brought it from his father's, and he was to leave it at the Bell and Horses, at Brompton.

Cross-examined. Q. The foreman, I suppose, knows as well as you do, what Styles said to him? A. Yes - he said it was a bad job; there was not only me to hear it, but others; I do not think I mentioned that till to-day - Beasley said a good many more things that were not mentioned.

COURT to JOHN NETTLETON . Q. You have heard what the officer has stated that Beasley said to you - do you recollect it? A. No, my Lord.

BENJAMIN BATES .I am an inspector of the Police. I went to the prosecutor's premises about half-past six o'clock - I compared the hay and straw found under the dung with that in the hay-loft; they appeared to me to be of the same quality - I ordered the prisoners to be taken to the watch-house; Beasley said it was a bad job for him - he did not put the hay and straw into the cart, but it was another person: I am quite sure he made use of these words.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the foreman present? A. No - if Hobbs has said that was said to the foreman, it is not true - he did not say where Styles had put it into the cart; he said it was the other man - Styles said he brought it from his father's.

COURT. Q. Did you go to the Bell and Horses? A. Yes, in consequence of what Styles said.

ISAAC CUTHBERTSON . I was near the prosecutors' premises at a quarter-past five o'clock in the morning, on the 16th of May - I saw the cart coming up Swallow-street, and Styles was with it; I had watched it, in consequence of what I had heard - I will swear that at the time it entered the yard it was empty; I was not present when it was unloaded.

Cross-examined. Q.Was it not boarded with boards

all round, two feet eight, or two feet ten inches high? A. It might be, but I got on the wheel to look into it while Styles was gone into the yard to speak to the ostlers - he left the horse and cart for a few minutes close to the gate.

Styles' Defence. I have two witnesses who saw me put the hay and straw into the cart, and rode with it part of the way - when I came up Swallow-street the Policeman stood in Regent-street; he never came near me - I knocked, and went into the yard - I had some potatoes and greens in the cart at the time.

Beasley's Defence. I got up and put on my smallclothes to left Styles in - I then went and put on my clothes, and when I came down again the load was partly in.

JOHN NETTLETON . I did not see any potatoes or greens in the cart.

THOMAS HOBBS . I saw no signs of any.

BENJAMIN BATES . I did not see any greens or potatoes, or any leaves of vegetables.

ISAAC CUTHBERTSON . I did not see any.

JOSEPH SMITH . I was coming by Mr. Styles' door about three or half-past three o'clock that morning, and saw young Styles, the prisoner, putting up a truss of hay and a truss of straw into the cart; it was one Monday morning, and I think it was before Whitsuntide - I got into the cart, and rode on to the Swan at Old Brentford; I then got out, and walked home.

MR. LEE. Q.What brought you out so soon? A. I had been to Turnham-green to buy a pony - I do not know the day of the month; I went down on the Sunday, and was then coming back - Carey was with me.

FRANCIS CAREY . I live at No. 11, Jew's-row, Chelsea. I was in this cart, but I do not know the day of the month - Styles gave me a lift; there were some greens and a truss of hay and straw in it - Smith rode in the cart; we came to Old Brentford - we had not bought the pony; it is five or six weeks ago.

COURT. Q.Do you know Styles? A. No, he was quite a stranger; we were passing his father's house, and my partner knew him - I was desired to attend here last Friday, but I had heard of his being in custody about a week before, from some of the neighbours; I live with Smith, but I did not hear it from him.

BEASLEY - GUILTY . Aged 36.

STYLES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-166

1354. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Benjamin Wright .

BENJAMIN WRIGHT . I am servant at the Black Horse, in the Kingsland-road . On Monday, the 23rd of May, I had a coat on the kitchen door - I missed it on the Tuesday; I have known the prisoner eight years - he has frequented that house.

CHARLES PADDON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat which I took in of the prisoner on the 24th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning; he came the next morning for a further advance on it, and I detained him.

THOMAS WHITNEY . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-167

1355. JOHN ABLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 3 spoke-shaves, value 12s.; 1 pair of pincers, value 1s.; 1 plane, value 1s. 6d.; 1 file, value 3d., and 1 set of fire-irons, value 2s. , the goods of Isaac Tucker .

SARAH ANN TUCKER . I am the wife of Isaac Tucker - he was an ironmonger , and lived at Stoke Newington in May last; the prisoner was then in possession, under a distress for rent, which was put in by Mr. Humphreys, for the landlord - I think he quitted possession on the 16th of May; on the next morning I was at my garden door, and saw him at the end of the garden, but I did not know it to be him - he put something into a basket, and went out at the garden gate very quick; I followed him, and called Stop! - when I found it was him I began to accuse him of ingratitude, in taking away the few things he found about the place; he said the broker told him to come and fetch away what things there were about - they had lived, and carried off the premises what they thought proper; I insisted on his putting the things down, which he did - I still followed him, accusing him of ingratitude; the Policeman came up and asked what it was - I told him; he took the prisoner and the basket - it contained the spoke-shaves and the other articles mentioned in the indictment; while we were talking the prisoner ran out of the gate - the Policeman pursued and took him, he was brought back, but I did not wish him to be taken; he let him go, and he ran away again - I did not see him again till he was at the Police-office, I should think it was three weeks after.

WILLIAM HUMPHREYS . I was the broker employed to put in the distress - I gave up possession on the 16th of May; I did not authorize the prisoner to go for these things.

WILLIAM MILLICHAP . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner - what has been stated is correct.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-168

1356. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 1 coat, value 5s., and 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of George Lewis .

GEORGE LEWIS. I am a letter-founder , and live in William-street, Lisson-grove. On the 4th of June I was in Goswell-street-road - I was in liquor, and fell on my knees just opposite the coach-stand; I believe two men came up to me, as I thought, to assist me, but they took my coat, hat, and handkerchief - my coat was dragged over my head by main force, and in getting it off it left the sleeves turned inside out - the officer came up while I was without my coat and hat, and I told him I had been robbed - I said, "There goes the fellow."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you did not know whether it was man, woman, or child had it? A. I knew it was a man; it was not long before the Policeman came up; I did not state it was full a quarter of

an hour before I got any assistance - it was about two o'clock in the morning.

EVAN DAVIS . I am a Police-constable. On the 4th of June I saw the prosecutor in Goswell-street-road - he had no hat or coat on; he complained that those fellows had robbed him - I saw two or three persons at the top of the street, and saw the prisoner run off; he was sixty or seventy yards from me - I followed, but lost sight of him; I took him in a hay-loft, in Black Horse-yard; I knew him by the description of his clothes - I had gone within forty or fifty yards in the pursuit - he had nothing when I took him.

CHARLES KNOTT. I am a Police-constable. About two o'clock in the morning of the 4th of June, in consequence of information, I went to Black Horse-yard; I heard some footsteps in a loft; Davis and another man were there - I went up a ladder, and called to the prisoner to open the door; I called many times, but received no answer - I began to force the door open, and I heard the prisoner making his way through the roof, on the opposite side - I forced the door, and ran across the loft; I found the prisoner three parts out of the loft, through the roof - I went through the same place after him; I followed him along the roof of that loft, over the stable, and then over the roof of a dwelling-house, where I believe his mother or mother-in-law lives - I then saw him lay down two hats; this is one of them - he then let himself down to another roof about three feet from that, and got into another loft, where he was laying concealed between three trusses of hay; when I removed the hay, and found him, he pretended to be asleep - I called to him a great many times, and then removed the hay; I took hold of him by the collar, and pulled him out through the yard, and at the entrance of the yard, I received this coat from some person.

Cross-examined. Q. The prosecutor said it was a dark night? A. It was not particularly dark: it was daybreak; I should not have known a man running seventy or eighty yards from me - I did not see any one else in the loft.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The place I went through is where we go through to mend the tiles.

Six witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 24 - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310630-169

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1357. JAMES ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 2 silver spoons, value 20s. , the goods of William Spratt .

WILLIAM SPRATT . I keep the Royal Hospital public-house, Chelsea - the prisoner had been six months in my employ. On the 12th of May we had a large parish dinner, and we missed a spoon; the prisoner continued with us till the 19th, when we missed another - I then found him intoxicated, and got the Policeman.

ROBERT CHANOR . I am a labourer. I have known the prisoner about three months - he came to me, and asked if I was going to town to buy my things, which I sell - I said I was; he said he had a piece of a silver spoon, if I would sell it for him he would give me 6d., and stand something to drink - I took it to Knightsbridge, and sold it for 6s. - I met him coming down Royal Hospital-row as I went back; he asked if I had sold it - I said I had: I gave him the money - he gave me 6d., and called for a quartern of gin and peppermint - he said they had had a large dinner, and the spoon got broken; he came to my house three weeks after, before I was up, and left word for me to call on him, which I did - he gave me another piece of spoon; I thought it was stolen, and threw it away.

THOMAS LINGHAM VINTON . I am a jeweller, and live in Park-side, Knightsbridge. I bought this piece of a spoon on the 16th of May, of Chanor, for 6s.

THOMAS BAYLEY SMITH . I took the prisoner, and received this spoon from Mr. Vinton.

MR. SPRATT. This is part of the spoon missed on the 12th - the other one has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. Chanor persuaded me to take my master's things, and when I took one he wanted to pursuade me to take another - he wanted me to take money out of the till.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-170

1358. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May , 5 planes, value 8s., and 1 saw, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Parry .

WILLIAM TREWARTHER . I am a Police-constable. I met the prisoner in Drury-lane, about seven o'clock in the evening of the 22nd of May - I followed him to Brydges-street, and when I came up to him, I saw a carpenter's plane projecting from his trousers pocket; he said he was going to take it to his father - I felt his other pockets, and found this other property, which I here produce: this saw was concealed under his waistcoat.

RICHARD PARRY. I am a carpenter , and lost these tools from a drawer under a chest, at No. 27, Clement's-lane, Clare-market - the prisoner lodged in the same house, with two young men, as apprentice to one of them. On Whit-Sunday I went out, and when I came back my place was broken open, my chest broken open, and all my best tools and clothes were gone, also the sheets off the bed - these are all the tools that have been found; these are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I came home a little before seven o'clock, and the two young men were at tea - they gave me some, and asked me to go with them; one of them gave me these tools to carry - one of them turned away; the other was taken, and discharged.

GUILTY. Aged 16. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310630-171

1359. ELIZABETH CRADDOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 2 spoons, value 5s.; 1 pillow-case, value 5s.; 1 blanket, value 5s., and 20 yards of printed cotton, value 10s. , the goods of William Henry Fosbrook , her master.

WILLIAM HENRY FOSBROOK. I live in Tothill-street, Ratcliff ; the prisoner had been my servant for one month - I am a widower . On the 30th of May I returned home about twelve o'clock in the evening; I knocked repeatedly at my door, and could get no admittance - the Policeman told me the serjeant had set him to watch the house, as he suspected there was something wrong; a tall man was going by, and with his help I got in at the window - I went up to the prisoner's room, in which I saw a light; I found her there intoxicated - I went down to let the Policeman in; the prisoner then came down -

the Policeman said she had been having a person there from a house in the neighbourhood; she was going to that place! but instead of that she went away - I found some duplicates in her room, which led to these articles.

JAMES FOGG . I went with the prosecutor, and found the prisoner at a friend's of hers - she said she had pawned the things, and was going to get the money to redeem them, and bring them back.

GEORGE GRAY WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, at Stepner. I have this bed-furniture, a pillow, and two spoons, pawned by the prisoner at different times.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had a son out of employ, and was in great distress - I did this to give him the money to go to Portsmouth, to get on board a man of war.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-172

1360. PETER FAGAN was indicted for stealing. on the 27th of May , 1 waistcoat, value 8s.; 2 shirts, value 5s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 18d.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 2s. 4d.; 1 hat-cover, value 6d.; 1 collar, value 18d.; 1 tobacco-box, value 6d.; 1 stopper, value 2d.; 3 pencil-cases, value 1s.; 1 sovereign, and 10 shillings, the property of George Marvell , the younger; and 1 waistcoat, value 3s. 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of George Marvell , the elder.

GEORGE MARVELL , JUN. I live with my father. at Leicester. We were at the Three Tuns, in Brook-street, Holborn - this bundle was in our sleeping-room, on a table; we went to bed at half-past nine o'clock - I tried to lock the door, but it was not fast; any one might open it - I had seen the prisoner in the tap-room in the course of that evening, and sat in the same box with him; my father got up about eight o'clock the next morning, and the bundle was gone - the door was shut.

FRANCIS SAREFIELD . I am an officer. On the night of the 27th of May I saw the prisoner crossing Charles-street, Hatton-garden; I followed him from there to Saffron-hill, and from there to West-street - he had a large bundle; I came up with him in West-street, about two o'clock in the morning - I asked what he had in the bundle; he said his own property - I asked what it was, and he could not tell me - I took him to the station; I found a sovereign and a 5s. piece, in a purse in his fob - also half a crown and some halfpence, and in the bundle was a soldier's discharge, which it seems he has purchased for 20l.; some of these articles were wrapped round his body, and the rest were in the bundle.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not tell you a man gave it him to carry? A. No, he said it was his own - I was an officer then, but I am now dismissed; I was fatigued, and not fit for duty, and the inspector thought me in liquor.

ANN LEWIS . I keep the public-house. The prosecutor lodged there that night - I saw the prisoner come in about nine o'clock, and leave about twelve.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him leave? A. Yes - I did not see any bundle in his hand; I did not see any person go out with a bundle - my waiter let the prisoner out: I do not think he could have concealed all this property about him, without my knowing it.

GEORGE MARVELL , SEN. This is my property and my son's - I went to bed and to sleep.

Cross-examined. Q.Where was this property? A. On the table in the room.

Prisoner's Defence. When the officer took me there was a man and woman with me; I had seen them before, and the man said to me, "I have just left my mother, and am going with this woman to Saffron-hill;" I went with them to a house of ill-fame, and he told me to take care of this bundle, which I did - we came out together, and I was going to return the property to the man, when the officer came and said whose was it; I said mine while I had it - he then took me, and the man and woman decamped; the officer mentioned the man's name. and I believe he knew him perfectly well - he stated at the office that he was a country man of his.

FRANCIS SAREFIELD . There was another man. whom I had taken before, and when I took this prisoner he escaped.

FRANCIS MILLER . I am waiter at the house. I let the prisoner out - I held the candle while the door was opened; he had no bundle - he could not have had such a bundle as this without my seeing it; I am positive he had no bulky appearance - our house is visited by hawkers and others.

COURT. Q.What time did he come? A. I cannot say - two persons went out just after him; they were the last three that went out - they all went out before I closed the door; they went out together, within a minute or two - I did not rub them down; none of them had any bulky appearance - none of them had a bundle of this dimension, but the things might he divided; I looked at them all as they passed - I do not know whether the prisoner had been drinking with them; I have tap-room, parlour, and all to attend to - it was about twelve o'clock when they went: it was not later - I can swear they did not go out in company.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-173

1361. ANN FRAZER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 2 night-shirts, value 5s., and 1 neckerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Wardle .

MARTHA WARDLE . I am the wife of Thomas Wardle , who lives in Featherstone-street , and is a woollen-draper . On the 14th of June I went into one of the first floor rooms, and found the prisoner there - she was quite a stranger; she had some dirty linen in her hand, which she threw on the bed - there was a large basket on the ground, and an umbrella by the side of my chest; I had been in the room shortly before, and found all correct - she had these two night-shirts, and this neckerchief in her hand; I asked what she wanted there - she asked for some strange name; I said, "You did not expect to find that person in my bed-room, I should think:" I then asked what she did with the linen she had had in her hand - she said she had had none; she tried to get out of the room, and I tried to prevent her - she got me to the top of the stairs; I called a woman, who came - the prisoner then made a sudden

rush, and knocked us all down together - I got up, and held her again, but she was too strong for me, and got out.

MARY ANN LLOYD . I heard the noise on the stairs, and heard somebody call - I ran, and saw the prisoner go out; I followed her - she ran into the first house in Coleman-street, and from there to No. 17; she then cried Stop thief! herself - I still followed her until she was taken.

ESTHER COX . I live in Coleman-street. I was at the end of the street, and saw the prisoner run into the house; I went in - she said she had done something wrong, and wanted me to conceal her; I would not - she went out, and was stopped.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I saw the prisoner running - I pursued, and took her.

WILLIAM DAMEN . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in the room nor had these things; I only went into the passage.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-174

1362. ANTHONY HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 2 shirts, value 8s., the goods of John Taylor ; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Hannah Brown .

HANNAH BROWN . I keep a public-house in Poplar . -On the 13th of June the prisoner was in the skittle-ground - he went near my pantry; I had there a handkerchief of my own, and two shirts belonging to John Taylor ; I missed them, and suspected the prisoner - they were found at his lodging.

JOHN TAYLOR. I lodged there - these are my shirts.

ELIZA HAWKINS. I have known the prisoner four years, but have not lived with him for five months - he brought these shirts to me to wash, and this handkerchief, one Monday evening.

JOSEPH VEAR . I am a Police-constable. I took these things from a cupboard where Hawkins lives.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drunk, and a sailor told me to get them washed for him.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310630-175

1363. MARY KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 other handkerchief, value 2d., the goods of Mary Vernon ; 4 half-crowns, 1 sixpence, 2 shillings, and 2 pence , the property of James Doran .

JAMES DORAN . I am a ballast-heaver . On the night of the 29th of May I slept with a work-mate, named John Macquire , at Mrs. Vernon's - I left my money in my coat pocket by the bed-side; there were four half-crowns, one sixpence, two shillings, and 2d. - I went to bed between twelve and one o'clock; the prisoner came into the room between three and four o'clock in the morning; I knew her by sight before - she awoke us, and asked us to drink some beer, which she gave us out of a mug; I fell asleep again, and when I awoke again all this property was gone - I was present when the officer took her; she denied having any money - she said she had none belonging to me; he searched her, and I told him what I had lost - he found four half-crowns and the apron on her.

MARY VERNON . I keep the house. I cannot tell how the prisoner got in that morning, but she had been in and out a good deal the fore part of the night - the key was behind the door; she might take it and get in - I got up at seven o'clock in the morning, and missed a handkerchief and apron from the table in the front room.

JOHN RANDLE . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner - she denied having any money; I searched her in a public-house, and found three half-crowns in her pocket, one in her bosom, two shillings, and a sixpence - she had an apron on, which she took off, and rolled up; I could not find the handkerchiefs.(Apron produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the money found in her possession was her own, and that she had been drinking with the prosecutor before he went to bed, and paid for what he had.

JAMES DORAN . I did not see her till she came into our room with the beer in the jug.

Prisoner. Mrs. Vernon knows I was ironing at her house, and the apron was one I had to iron.

MARY VERNON. No, she was not.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-176

1364. ANNA SWINCHATT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 4 handkerchiefs, value 2s. , the goods of William Spooner .

FRANCES LOWRY . On the 4th of June I saw the prisoner and an old woman together, talking, at Mr. Spooner's door, in Chiswell-street , one on one side, and the other on the other - I then saw the prisoner put her hand behind her, pull down the handkerchiefs, and put them under her arm - she said, "Good night," and they parted; I told Mr. Spooner, and he took her with them - I live in Gill-stree, Limehouse.

THOMAS SIMMONDS . I am shopman to Thomas Spooner . These are his handkerchiefs - I took the prisoner with them under her shawl; there are four of them.

Prisoner's Defence. They were brought into the shop by a strange person - I never saw them.

THOMAS SIMMONDS . She dropped them on the floor.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310630-177

1365. EDITH RUGG was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 2 forks, value 4s.; 1 bed-gown, value 1s.; 3 napkins, value 1s. 6d.: 1 shawl, value 2s., and 1 apron, value 6d. , the goods of John Bradshaw .

AMEY BRADSHAW. I am the wife of John Bradshaw - we live in Nightingale-lane . I had been very ill, and the prisoner nursed me - she had been there three months, and left without notice; I did not owe her any thing - I should have kept her a month or five weeks longer; I missed the property stated.

JOSEPH HAWES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shawl, pawned by the prisoner.

EDWARD NATHAN . I have a bed-gown and frock, pawned on the 4th of June, by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310630-178

1366. JAMES DURRANT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 1 purse, value 2d.; 5 half-crowns; 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the property of Michael Sweetland .

MICHAEL SWEETLAND . I am a gardener , and live on Uxbridge-common. On the 29th of May I gave Whitton a shilling for three pots of beer, and went to his house and partook of part of it; this was about twelve o'clock at night - the prisoner was there; I have known him from a child - he has worked on the canal, I believe; I had only had about five pints of beer, and five or six of us drank out of them - I do not think I drank more than two pints in all; I fell asleep in Whitton's house, and was awoke by finding the prisoner's hand in my pocket - I saw my purse in his hand; I had five half-crowns, two shillings, and one sixpence - I said, "I know you have robbed me;" he made his escape out of the door, fastened it outside, and locked me in till five o'clock in the morning: Whitton had gone to bed about two - he rose at five in the morning, and I told him of my loss; I then went out, and found the prisoner at the Sun, at Uxbridge, at half-past five; I said, "You have robbed me;" he said"No, I have not" - I said, "You may as well confess, you know you have:" he said, "You be * * *, you can't swear to money" - the officer found 3s. 7d. on him; I have not seen the purse since - I have told all the truth, and nothing but the truth.

JOHN BIRCH . I am a constable. The prosecutor informed me he had been robbed - I looked about, and found the prisoner at the Sun; I found 3s. 6d. and a penny on him - I asked how he came by it; he said it was his brother's, which he took for work the evening before - I asked his brother if it was his; he said No.

Prisoner's Defence. I came out of the Wellington on the Saturday night, about eleven o'clock; the prosecutor caught hold of me, and asked if I would go and have any beer - I said I did not care to have any more; he said,"D-n it, come along" - we went, and had two pints; he then asked if I would take any to my mother - I said No; he then gave Whitton a shilling, and he took three pots to his house - after he had sat there an hour he fell asleep, and fell right athwart the fire; I got him up, left him, and went home - he came to me the next morning, and accused me of this.

MICHAEL SWEETLAND . I never saw him till he was in the house - I did not fall out of the chair.

JOSEPH WHITTON . I was with the prosecutor and the prisoner - we had been drinking together; the prosecutor asked the prisoner if he was agreeable to take some beer to his house - he said No, his mother had gone away; he then asked if he could take some to my house - I said as he liked; he gave me a shilling - we got some beer, and went there; I drank some, and fell asleep - when I awoke the prosecutor was there alone; I went to bed, and when I came down in the morning he said, "Durrant has robbed me of 15s.;" I said, "Let us go and see after him"- I cannot say what time I went to bed: it might be two or three o'clock - I do labouring work, and work on the canal, or at fishing; the prisoner was no friend of mine, only we were drinking that night - I do not think Durrant was in my house when I went to bed; I locked the door inside, and when I came down in the morning it was as I had left it; I have only one door - I found the prosecutor asleep when I came down, and I kicked him on the foot to awaken him; he was laying at full length before the door on his belly, and I unlocked the door - I do not think he had any money but the shilling which he gave me to get the beer; I have known the prisoner ever since he was in his mother's arms - he has worked for the parish the last three months, and before that for his brother-inlaw; he had 10d. a day.

MICHAEL SWEETLAND . I do not know how he got out, but the key was not in the door - Whitton awoke first, and came down.

WILLIAM LIPSCOMB . I am a baker, and live at Uxbridge. On the 28th of May, after I had done my baking, I went out to carry home pies - I went to the Rose and Crown, and saw the prosecutor there, very tipsy, ill-treating an old man - he then went and treated Ann Clayton with half a pint of rum; he treated another prostitute - he was then rolling about, and upsetting every one; I went to bed at half-past twelve o'clock - the prisoner lodged in my house, and was there at two o'clock; I went through his room, and said, "What do you do here not undressed?" he said, "I was so tipsy I could not undress;" I was called up at half-past four, and he was not up then - I was at home from two till half-past four, and he was at home at that time, I am certain, but I do not know what time he came in; my house is about thirty yards from Whitton's - I did not get up to let him in; the key was in the window.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-179

1367. CHARLOTTE HARRIET ENGLISH was indicted for bigamy .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

SOLOMON BALLIN. I am a glass-cutter, and live in Rosoman-street, Clerkenwell. Michael English was my brother-in-law - I was present at his marriage with the prisoner, thirty-three years ago, in Clerkenwell-church; she was married in the name of Harriet Smith - I have a perfect recollection of her person; Michael English died in 1822.

Prisoner. Q. How long is it since we lived together as man and wife? A.They lived together two or three years, and then separated.

WILLIAM HANDS . I married the prisoner on the 7th of September, 1811 ; there was no money on either side - I lived with her fourteen years; I have no wish to have her punished.

COURT. Q.What age were you when you married? A.About twenty; I should think she was thirty, or more - I heard about twelve months after that she had a husband living; she then told me he was alive - she had before said he was dead.

Q.Then you lived with her thirteen years after that, and now prosecute her? A. She troubles me for a maintenance; I do not want another wife - I have a sister lives with me; I did not know where her husband lived, nor any of his friends; I at last found out he had been a furrier - I went to a furrier, and asked if he knew where he lived; he said he was dead, but he could tell me of a person who was present at the marriage - she told me he was alive about twelve months after our marriage, but she

said after he was dead; I asked what trade he was, but she never would tell me - she did not tell me that she had consulted a solicitor to know if she could not legally marry; she knew where to go any day to find her husband, for he lived where he did when they were married.

Prisoner. It was in consequence of my appearing against his sister that he has brought this prosecution. Witness. Yes. she appeared for an assault, but I never found out before where her friends lived.

MR. PHILLIPS to SOLOMON BALLIN . Q. Are you quite certain your brother-in-law was alive fifteen years ago, at all events? A. Oh, yes, but I did not know that the prisoner was alive till last Monday.

THOMAS FARLEY . I produce the certificate of the two marriages, and the burial of her first husband; I have compared them with the original books, and I know they are correct - I showed them to the prisoner last Monday, and she said they were all correct, but there was an agreement between her and her first husband to separate.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she understood her first husband was dead before she married the prosecutor.

GUILTY .

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310630-180

1368. JAMES WARD was indicted for stealing. on the 19th of June . 1 leg of mutton, value 4s; 1 lb. of hacon, value 1s.; 2lbs. of cheese, value 1s. 6d., and 1 plate, value 2d. , the goods of Sir George Tothill , Knt.

The prosecutor's name being Sir George Lemon Tothill, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310630-181

1369. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 1 chest, value 14l. , the goods of William Forsyth .

WILLIAM FORSYTH . In June last I lodged at Tunbridge-wells: the prisoner lodged there one night, and in the course of conversation I said I had a chest of tools at Mr. Edgon's house - I afterwards received information that some person had got my chest of tools: it was worth about 14l. - I never authorized the prisoner to get it; but he volunteered his service to call and see if there were any letters, and if there were, to send them to me - I came to town, but have never seen the chest or tools since.

JAMES TURNBULL EDGON . I live in Buckingham-street, Fitzroy-square . Mr. Forsyth left a chest in my care; the prisoner came to me on the 17th of June, and said he had orders from the prosecutor to send the chest into the country; he gave such a clear account that I gave him the box, thinking it was all true, and he went away with it - I saw him on the Saturday week afterwards, at the office: he told me he was going to Tunbridge-wells the evening he had the chest.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I keep a green-grocer's shop. The prisoner was a stranger, but Mr. Edgon sent for me to take the chest - I took it in my truck; the prisoner then said, "Do you know where you are going?" I said, No - he said, "You are going to Temple-bar," and I made the best of my way there; in going along he said, "I made a mistake, it is in Fleet-street;" I said Where? he said he did not know, but if I followed him he would show me -I followed him on to the Bull-inn, Whitechapel; I took it up the yard, and put it against the booking-office - he then came out of the yard with me, and said, "I am going to get a direction to put on it;" I said, "How am I to be paid?" he said, "Mr. Edgon will pay you;" I came back, and Mr. Edgon did pay me.

WILLIAM GEORGE . I took the prisoner on the 22nd of June; I found on him this neckcloth and two stiffeners, which had been in the chest.

Prisoner's Defence. I have only to state that I had occasion to be at Tunbridge-wells - I met a man, and asked if he knew where I could get a lodging; he introduced me to this man's lodging; they said they had not room for another bed, but I might sleep with the prosecutor - he said he had a chest of tools in London, that his friends were in great distress, and wished to have a little money - I said,"I have no objection to make a bargain with you for your tools, provided I like them;" we made a bargain - I came to London, and went to get the tools, but I did not look at them till I got them home; if I had had any intention to defraud I should not have let Mr. Edgon get a porter.

MR. FORSYTH. The prisoner never slept in the same bed with me, and I never made any bargain with him.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-182

1370. BENJAMIN CLEVESLEY and WILLIAM POULSTON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 ham, value 8s. , the goods of Samuel Corney and William Corney .

THOMAS TOOL. I am a shoemaker; Mr. Corney keeps a butter and cheese shop in Old-street . On the 18th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock at night - I saw the prisoners in company; Poulston walked backwards and forwards by the prosecutor's door, and put his hand to a ham which hung on a hook by the prosecutor's door, and made three or four attempts to get it down - he staid some time, and at last took the ham and the hook down together; he walked away with it before him, and turned down Whitecross-street, and the other prisoner followed him - I pursued; he put the ham on his shoulder, and when he came to a corner I was going to take him - he threw down the ham and the hook; I took them up and still pursued into Golden-lane - he had the advantage of me, and I lost him at a corner; I saw a Policeman and told him - he took the ham and the hook to the station; the prisoners were both taken within an hour - I saw them pass smoking a pipe, and told a Policeman, who took them - they were both together when it was done.

SAMUEL CORNEY . I am in partnership with William Corney . I was at home at the time, but did not miss the ham - it is our property.

CLEVESLEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

POULSTON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310630-183

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1371. JAMES THOMSON and JOHN WILKINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 8 rings, value 10s., and 2 seals, value 4s. , the goods of John Lampard .

MARY JANE LAMPARD. I am the wife of John Lampard; he lives in Church-street, Bethnal-green , and is a jeweller . On the 10th of June the prisoner Thompson came and asked me to let him look at some gold seals,

which I did - he then asked me to rub one of them with a bit of leather, that he might see how it looked; I had the leather close by me, and I rubbed it - he then said it was too large, and he wished to know what I would make him two for, between the sizes of those I had - I said I could not tell him, as my husband was not at home - he then put his hand into his pocket, pulled out a chased gold key, and asked if I could make him one exactly like that, with a cornelian stone in it, for 25s. - I said I could not tell myself; at that time the other prisoner came in, and asked for some shirt-studs - I thought things were not right, and I said, rather abruptly, "When I have done with this customer I will attend to you;" Thompson then asked me the price of this ring which I have in my purse, and I said, "I told you, 5s. 6d.;" he then dropped it down - I told him he had got some more; he said he had not, but I said,"You have, Sir;" he then shook these three rings and this seal out of the cuff of his coat - he said, "There they are, there they are;" I said he had more - he said he had not, and out he ran; I said to the children in the shop, "Look sharp!" and I ran after him - I lost sight of him, but I am able to say he is the same man; I was standing in Swan-street about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards, and saw him coming up - he had changed his coat, but I was quite certain of his features; I followed him to Brick-lane - he went into a house, and was there taken; I cannot swear to Wilkinson, but it was a man much like him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What coloured coat had the man on, who first came about the seals? A. A brown frock-coat; when I saw Thompson in Swan-street he had an old blue coat on - he had the same trousers; about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes had passed - I lost three rings, two smaller ones, and a brooch, and five the officer has; I brought Thompson back to the shop, and delivered him to an officer - I did not at that time charge any body else with it; the other man was not near my goods; I said, before the Justice, that I had no room to suspect him, and I say so still; my servant is not weak in the head - she is not very brisk, but she knows a person again; there was nothing found on Thompson - I think it was on Friday week; there was a charge made against Wilkinson - the Policeman said he knew he lived in the same house with Thompson.

COURT. Q.What time did the prisoner leave your shop? A. I think between one and two o'clock.

JAMES CHIVERTON . I live in Church-street, Bethnalgreen, and am a hair-dresser. I heard a cry of Stop thief! on Friday, the 10th of June, about two o'clock in the afternoon; I went out, and saw Mrs. Lampard - I pursued a man, who I believe was Thompson, but I could not swear to him, as he had changed his coat when I caught him; I followed him to Hare-street, which is thirty or forty yards from Swan-street, and there I lost sight of him; I afterwards saw Thompson in Swan-street, who, I believe, was the man I saw before - I followed him to a green-grocer's shop, where he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q.When you saw him in Swan-street, how was he dressed? A.In a blue coat and brown trousers, and the man I first saw had an olive frock coat on, either an olive brown or an olive green - the man in brown looked round once or twice, while I was pursuing him.

COURT. Q. From the two or three times he looked round, had you such an observation of his face as to be able to give any opinion, as to whether he is the man? A. I believe he is.

JOHN CARPENTER . I am a Police-constable. On the day in question I was in Brick-lane; I saw Mrs. Lampard, and from what she said I took Thompson into custody.

Cross-examined. Q.Where does he live? A. I do not know; I found on him three sovereigns, 7s. 2 1/2d., a watch, and two seals.

JOHN THORNTON . I am the son of Edward Thornton , and am eleven years of age; he lives in Swan-street. On Friday, the 10th of June, I was playing in the street, and saw something glitter in the kennel; I took them up, and gave them to my father; there were some rings and a seal.

EDWARD THORNTON . I received the articles from my son on the 10th of June, about two o'clock - I gave them to Randall.

CHARLES RANDALL . I produce one seal, five rings, and one key, which I received from Edward Thornton .

MARY JANE LAMPARD . This seal, key, and rings, are my property - this ring is a second-hand one, and there are two stones out of it; it was in the case when Thompson came to the shop, and they were exhibited to him - these three rings and a seal are what he dropped out of his sleeve; I still miss two rings and a brooch.

EDMUND HARDWICK . I took Wilkinson in a house on my beat.

Thompson's Defence. I was going into Brick-lane for a pint of small beer; the witness came into the shop, and said I had been robbing somebody; I was taken, but I know no more of it than a child; I do not know where the prosecutor lives.

Thompson received a good character.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Twelve Months .

WILKINSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-184

1372. JOHN DOWDEN and WILLIAM FIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 26 bags, value 7s. , the goods of William Francis and others.

JOHN WILLIAM DENNIS . I am a Police-constable. On the 10th of June I was at Friar's-mount , behind a cart -I saw Dowden come down the mount, and look over the wall of Mr. Francis' premises; I then saw him get over the wall, and come back again - Field was with him, but did not get over the wall; he was close to the wall - I then saw them go to a court; they came back, and Dowden got over the same wall - he handed some bags over to Field, who took them into the court; I took Field, gave an alarm, and Dowden was taken in the court - these are the bags which were laying against the wall in the court.

Field. Q. Will you swear you saw us with this property? A. I saw you within a few yards of the court with some bags - there were no other bags in the court.

GEORGE WELTON . I am in the employ of William Francis and Co., of Old Tyson-street. I hung out these bags on the 9th of June, and on the 10th I missed them; there was a barrow full and a half - I cannot say how many.

CHARLES GRYLLS . I am foreman to William Francis

and others. They have a large number of these bags - I did not miss them; I cannot swear to these, but they had such.

Field's Defence. If he saw us take them, why did he not take us at the time?

DOWDEN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

FIELD - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310630-185

1373. LOUISA HANNAH COX was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 seals, value 15s.; 1 key, value 5s., and 1 watch-chain, value 2s. , the goods of Benjamin Squires .

CATHARINE SQUIRES . I am the wife of Benjamin Squires , who lives in Gibraltar-walk, Bethnal-green . On the 31st of May the prisoner came to our shop, at a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning - I sell a few second-hand clothes; she asked for a child's frock - I had seen her the day before, when she asked the price of the same frock - she asked leave to try the frock on her child, which she had with her - she did so; it was too long; she asked me for a needle and thread, to run it up, which I gave her - while she sat working, she asked me what time it was; I went to a cupboard where my husband's watch hung, and told her it wanted five minutes to nine - the cupboard was close by where she sat; I am not certain whether I shut the cupboard door or not - a woman with a child in her arms afterwards came to the door, and inquired the price of an article - I stood outside the door, talking to that woman for two or three minutes -I then went in again, and in a short time the prisoner left the house; no other person had been in before she left, and there were no inmates in the house but myself - no one could pass me while I was outside; the door opens into the room - as the prisoner was going out, she asked me to let her leave the child's dirty frock, and the key of her streetdoor, till she returned; I did - she had paid me before she run the frock up; she then went out, and in about half an hour I missed my watch, chain, seals, and key - no other customer had been in the interval; my husband had gone out while she was sitting there - he went out before I had looked at the watch; as soon as I had missed the watch, I went to my sister, who lives next door but one, and she went to some pawnbrokers to stop it - I then went to some other pawnbrokers; I had given a description of her, and when she returned for her key and her child's dirty frock, she was detained - I found her in custody when I returned in about two hours and a half.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where was she taken into custody? A. At my sister's, who is not able to attend - I only went on the step to speak to the other woman; I did not say any thing to her - the prisoner did not say she was going to leave her residence; she said she wished to leave the key, because it was heavy - my husband did not return till my sister fetched him to the station-house; while the prisoner was in my shop I took a pair of white stockings out of a drawer, and sat down to mend them - I did not get up till I went to look at the watch again, and it was gone: I deal in nothing but wearing-apparel and shoes - I believe there are idle persons and disorderly boys about: the prisoner said, in my hearing, that she had come back for the frock and the key.

COURT. Q.Was your husband at home when she first came? A. Yes, he was in the garden, and when he came in she was sitting in the chair; there were two rooms below, and one up stairs - I can distinctly swear that no one entered the shop from the time I looked at the watch till I missed it.

PAUL WALSH . I am a Police-constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Gibraltar-walk, about half-past eleven o'clock - the prosecutor's house was shut up at the time; I found nothing on the prisoner - I did not then know whether she was married, but I have since heard she is; I was on duty, and a boy came to look for me - I found her sitting there with the child.

BENJAMIN SQUIRES . I saw the prisoner at my wife's shop - I know the watch had been brought there before, on account of boiling an egg, and hung in that cupboard; the prisoner was there when I went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see it in the cupboard yourself at that time? A. No; I did not return for three or four hours.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning for the frock and the key of the street door, and the prosecutor's shop was shut - I asked her sister where she was, and she said she wanted to speak to me; she took me to her house, and gave me in charge - I said I had never seen it; I had been to look at two houses after I left the prosecutrix's, and called again for my key and frock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-186

1374. JOHN EMERY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 2 sheets, value 4s.; 1 rug, value 1s., and 2 flat-irons, value 6d. , the goods of John Cox .

MARTHA COX . I am the wife of John Cox - he lives on St. Irving's-hill, and is a pensioner . I let the prisoner a room in Snow's-rents, in the month of May, about one week before he was apprehended - I let him the room at 3s. 9d. a week furnished; a neighbour came and told me the prisoner had been seen going out with a large bundle - I went to the room, and missed a pair of sheets, a rug, and a pair of flat irons; he had a wife, as I thought, with him when he took the lodging, and she was there when I missed the things.

WILLIAM MUGGERIDGE . I am shopman to Mr. Harris, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of flat-irons, pawned by the prisoner on the 16th of May.

JOHN TURNER . I live in York-street. I have a rug and a sheet I bought of the prisoner, on the 16th of May, for 1s.

DAVID THOMAN . I am a Police-constable. The prisoner came to me to inquire after the young woman he lived with; he pointed out where I found these goods, which are all that have been found.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18310630-187

1375. TIMOTHY GALLON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , 1 pair of trousers, value 4s. , the goods of Francis Sheppard .

MARY SHEPPARD . I live in Orchard-street, Westminster - the prisoner lived in the same house with me. On the 1st of June I gave his wife a pair of trousers to wash, which belonged to my son Francis; the prisoner's

wife hung them out the first thing in the morning, in front of his window - they were afterwards missed; I spoke to the prisoner about them at night - he said I could not have them till morning; he did not say what he had done with them.

EDWARD NEWSTEAD . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Tothill-street. I have a pair of trousers, pawned by the prisoner on the first of June.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On leaving my work, I went home, and these trousers were in the window - I thought I might get 1s. for them, and replace them in the morning; I did not know whose they were.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-188

1376. WILLIAM HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 1 saddle, value 1l.; 1 bridle, value 10s.; 1 leather wanter, value 2s., and 1 sack, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Pretty .

THOMAS PRETTY . I live in Chapel-street, Somers'town, and have a stable in Isaac's-place . On the 20th of June I locked my stable, and left my harness safe - about four o'clock in the morning, the constable alarmed me; I found my stable broken open, the hasp broken off, and these articles were gone.

JAMES POSFORD . I am a Police-constable. On the night of the 20th of June, I saw the prisoner going down Phillips'-buildings; in about an hour I saw him coming up Phillips'-buildings, following my brother officer up his beat - he went on as far as Isaac's-place, and as soon as he saw my brother officer off his beat, another person came out of Isaac's-place to the prisoner, and they went down together; I followed them down, and when I got to the second corner I met the prisoner with this sack upon his back, containing this harness, which the prosecutor claims - I took hold of him by the collar; his companion then came up, and knocked me down - the blow I received left me insensible, and they both got away; the prisoner had dropped this bag off his shoulder when I took hold of him, and I found it there when I came to myself - I had frequently seen the prisoner before about the fields, gambling and playing at skittles; I took him about half-past eight o'clock the same evening - he denied that he was the man, but said he recollected meeting me in Phillips'-buildings.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.When he met you did he not bid you good night? A. No one bid me good night - I swear they did not; I was near my brother officer - there is a boy like the prisoner who carries baked potatoes about; he wears a light coat - I do not know any others like him; I know the person who knocked me down.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the theatre that night, and then straight home - I was in bed by twelve o'clock.

WILLIAM HOLLOWAY . I live at No. 18, Weston-street, Somers'-town, and am a basket-maker. I have brought up the prisoner from his infancy - his father and mother left him with us to nurse, and they have deserted him - we believe they are dead; we Christened him by our name - there are several boys like him in the neighbourhood; I have been deceived myself several times - I have even raced a boy when I thought the prisoner was not gone on his errand, and have then found my mistake: the prisoner lodged with me, and had a key to let himself in - he was never in prison; he was once taken for tossing, that is all.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-189

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, JULY 5.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1377. SARAH HOOKER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Abbott Kent , on the 7th of May , and stealing 7 sovereigns, 16 half-crowns, 50 shillings, 20 sixpences, and 30lbs. of silk warp, value 52l. , his property.

JAMES HADFIELD . I am foreman to William Abbott Kent, who lives in Wilson-street, Finsbury . On the 7th of May, a little before five o'clock in the morning, the servant alarmed me - I went into the warehouse, and discovered several pieces of of silk laying on the floor in the counting-house, and on going into the back warehouse I found the desk broken open, several bundles of silk taken off the shelf, unpacked, and laid on the counter; several parcels of silk were gone, and about 12l. in money - I found the house had been entered by a centre-bit being bored through the outer shutter, and a piece extracted sufficiently large to enter a hand; the bolt had then been undone, the window-sash thrown up, and the shutters opened; after that they cut through the inside shutter, and threw the shutter back - the inside shutter, to which a large bell was attached, was taken down - the bar and bell were laid in the yard; I saw the property at the Mansion-house that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. From the manner the house was entered, did it not appear to be the act of a man or men? A. I should conceive so - a workshop at the back of the warehouse was also broken open and entered.

SARAH FULLER . I live with my father, in King-square, Horse Shoe-alley, which is nearly opposite the back of Mr. Kent's house; I was up all night at work with my mother, and about four o'clock in the morning I went to the window, and saw two men at a dust-hole in our court, about four houses from the back of Kent's premises - each of them took a parcel out of the dust-hole, and put them into the prisoner's basket - she was there with another woman: the bundles appeared to contain something soft - I am quite sure the prisoner is the woman; it was day-light - I saw her in custody in about a week.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.What time was it? A. I first saw them at the dust-hole about four o'clock; the women were there all the time, from the time she came till she went away; the bundles appeared concealed in the dust-hole, as if they had come to fetch them; I did not see them placed there - they were deposited in the dust-hole; there was not time to break the premises open and bring the property there while I saw them.

COURT. Q.When you first looked out of window was any body at the dust-hole? A.They were going to the dust-hole then - they were passing our window; they came out of Horse Shoe-alley - I should know the men again.

JOSEPH RYAN. I am a Policeman. I was in Bishopsgate-street, nearly a quarter of a mile from Mr. Kent's,

and saw two women and two men - the prisoner was earrying two bundles of silk in a basket; I took her - the men and the other woman ran away into Petticoat-lane.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen the prosecutor's premises? A. I went there about two hours after; it might have been done by women or men, for there are the most notorious thieves in that neighbourhood, in Golden-lane, where they live; I went to the prisoner's place on the Saturday - there is a whole family there in the name of Hooker; I cannot tell whether a man lives with her as her husband - we took a man named Hooker on suspicion, being found walking about that very morning at two o'clock - he had three hearings, and was discharged; I stopped the prisoner in Bishopsgate-street, and asked how she came by the bundles - she said a man she met at that time in the morning, had hired her; I do not recollect whether I stated this to the Magistrate - my deposition was read over to me by the clerk; the dust-hole is on my beat - it communicates with the back of a shed at the back of Mr. Kent's house - there is a wall crosses; a person could step on the dust-hole, and get on the top of the wall, and scale the wall about thirty feet into the premises - the wall may be about twelve feet high.

JURY. Q.How high is the top of the wall from the top of the dust-hole? A.It goes within two feet and a half of the top, I think.

JAMES CASTLE . I am a City watchman. On the 17th of May Ryan came to me; I saw the prisoner, two men, and another woman; the prisoner was carrying two baskets on her head - I crossed Bishopsgate-street, touched her on the shoulder, and asked what she had got in the baskets; she said "Nothing," in a low voice, and then threw them down - I laid hold of her, and the men made their escape.

MR. CLARKSON to SARAH FULLER . Q.Could any body, during the time you saw them, have got over the wall, and broken into the house? A.Not at that time - they came there to take the property away.

COURT. Q.When you first saw them were they walking or standing still? A. The two men were walking towards the dust-hole, and the woman were standing still, six or seven yards from the dust-hole; I cannot say how long the women had been there - the women were furthest from the dust-hole.

JAMES HADFIELD . This is the prosecutor's property: the premises were broken into, the back way - the wall by the dust-hole is not the wall of our premises; a person could step on the dust-bin, and walk along the wall about two yards, then along a building, and from the end of that step on our back wall, and drop down into the yard - the dust-bin is about ten yards from the premises.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What height must a person drop from the top of the wall? A. They could step on a gasmeter about four feet down, and then from the gas-meter three or four feet to the ground.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-190

First London Jury, before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1378. WILLIAM PEARSON was indicted for embezzling 1s. 2d., which he had received on account of John Abram , his master .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner for stealing letters which had come from a General Post receiving-house, upon which indictments no evidence was offered.

The prisoner was convicted last Session on an indictment for stealing a 10l. note, which came into his possession in the employ of the Post-office, (see page 578.) but the Learned Judges, to whom his case was referred, have decided that the conviction was not good.

Reference Number: t18310630-191

Before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1379. JOHN WINDSOR was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Jordan , on the 16th of May , and stealing 1 watch, value 30s., and 3 silver spoons, value 5s., his property; 4 half-crowns, 5 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the monies of Susan Thompson .

SUSAN THOMPSON . I am servant to Charles Jordan , who lives at Hoxton . On the 16th of May I left home at half-past ten o'clock in the morning, leaving nobody in the house; I fastened all the doors - I bolted the back door, locked the street door, and took the key with me; the kitchen window was shut, but not fastened - it is a sash-window - no part of it was opened; I returned about a quarter to eleven, found the back door open, and the kitchen window also: I missed four half-crowns, five shillings, and a sixpence from my box in the kitchen, which was not locked; I had put the money into it that morning - I also missed two tea-spoons, a mustard-spoon, and a silver watch of master's; the garden door at the back of the house was locked when I went out - on returning I found the beading by the lock broken, and the door open; there is a bridge about three minutes' walk from the garden door.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure you did not leave the kitchen window a little open? A. I am confident it was shut quite down.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I am a painter. About a quarter to eleven o'clock in the morning of this robbery, I was on the bridge, about fifty yards from the house - I saw the prisoner standing on the bridge with a young lad not quite so tall as himself; they were talking together - I saw the other one take some shavings out of the prisoner's basket, put them into his lap, and go to Mr. Jordan's; I saw him open the front garden iron gate - he went in, and shut the gate after him; he came out, and came back to the prisoner, put the shavings into the basket, and waited on the bridge while the prisoner went in the same way, through the front garden gate; I could not observe what he did inside - he shut the gate when he went in, but left it open when he came out, and returned to the other boy; they went towards Hoxton new church, talking together - I think I have seen the prisoner once or twice before, and am sure it was him; I could not see the kitchen door, nor the back garden gate.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not certain that you had seen him before? A. No - I know he was on the bridge; he put his arm through, and undid the gate - that is not the gate that was broken: I saw the prisoner again on the Wednesday - I did not suspect any thing till I heard of the robbery.

COURT. Q. How long was the prisoner in the house? A. About five minutes.

FRANCIS FEATHERSTONE . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday, the 10th of May- he said he knew nothing of the robbery, that he was not out either on Monday or Tuesday; I left him in Waller's custody, and went in search of the other - none of the property has been found.

CHARLES WALLER . I am a Police-serjeant. I was present at the prisoner's apprehension, and asked where he had been on the Monday; he said he had not been out of the house in Kingsland-road, but on going to the office on Thursday, he said he had forgotten, that he was wrong, and he had been round that way.

Cross-examined. Q. Hes told you so voluntarily? A. Yes - I went to the Bell and Crown, Kingsland-road, which he uses, but no property was found.

SUSAN THOMPSON re-examined. Q. Is there any means of getting from the front garden gate to the kitchen window? A. You go through the front gate, through the side gate, and then to the window.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-192

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

1380. CHARLES FREDERICK REINHART was indicted for stealing. on the 5th of June , 1 coat, value 1l.; 4 rings, value 2l.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 1l.; 1 brooch, value 1l., and 1 Maltese cross, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Carpenter Evans , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH EVANS . I am the wife of William Carpenter Evans , who keeps the Cyder Cellar tavern, Maiden-lane, St. Paul's, Covent-garden - we let the tap, and occupy the house ourselves. On the 6th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, I missed these articles from a chest of drawers in my bed-room - I had seen them safe the day before, which was Sunday; there were various other things taken from another chest of drawers - they have not been found, except a velvet shooting-jacket, which was taken from the bed-room - the prisoner had slept at our house two nights previous, in a back room on the second floor; I suspected him, went up to his room and in a small store-room adjoining his bed-room, I found three chests broken open, and the shooting-jacket, among other things, gone.

JOHN BUCHANAN . I am servant to Mr. Turner, a pawnbroker, in Waterloo-road. On the 7th of June, the prisoner brought four rings, a pair of ear-rings, and a brooch to my shop - he had left a coat in the morning: he brought the duplicate of it, and requested they might be made into one pledge - I did not take the coat in, but he said he had pawned it; they were all put together for 1l. 6s., in the name of John Smith - I never saw him before, but am certain of his person; I asked him whose property it was - he said he lived with his father and mother, at No. 128. Drury-lane.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What was the coat pawned for? A.10s., it would be worth 15s. to me.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a Policeman. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 15th of June, on this charge, by Mr. Watkins, who keeps a public-house at the corner of Regent-street - I found these duplicates on him.

JOHN BUCHANAN . Here is the duplicate I gave the prisoner for the articles.

BENJAMIN BATES . I am a Police-inspector. I searched the prisoner, and found on him this Maltese cross - he stated to me voluntarily afterwards, that he stole the rings and the cross out of a drawer in Mr. Evans' bed-room; this was at Tothill-fields, when I was inquiring about some sheets and things - I did not threaten or make him any promise.(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner. I know I did do it - the articles are hardly worth half what I have heard mentioned; I have no friends in this country, and distress drove me to it.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only. Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310630-193

1381. DANIEL GULLY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ellen O'Hara , on the 4th of June , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 shawl, value 8s. , the goods of Francis O'Hara .

ELLEN O'HARA. I am the wife of Francis O'Hara, and live in George-yard, Aldgate - I do not live with my husband. On the 4th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was walking down Ratcliff-highway - a man came behind me at the bottom of King David-lane , knocked me down, took my shawl off, and ran away; I did not know him - it was a light night; I was stunned - when I got up I hallooed out Watch and Police! and in about ten minutes the officer came up, with the prisoner in one hand, and the shawl in the other - I do not know whether he is the man who knocked me down; I go out washing and charing .

FRANCES ANDERSON. I am thirteen years old, and live in Mercers-row, Shadwell - my father goes out with vegetables. On the 4th of June I was going to the corn-chandler's, and saw the prisoner go behind the prosecutrix, at the bottom of Mercer's-row, knock her down, take off her shawl, and run up the court; I knew him before - he sits at the bottom of the street with apples and gooseberries; I never saw O'Hara before - she was going along, and she sat on the prisoner's chair; he walked up a street with her - he let her go again, and she was going away, when he came behind her, knocked her down, and ran into his own house, about six yards from his stall - she came to the top of the street, and called Watch! and Police! the Policeman came up, and asked me to show him where he lived -I went with him, and knocked at the door; the prisoner opened it, and gave the shawl out.

ELLEN O'HARA. I never saw the man before, and was not walking with him, nor sat in his chair, nor in any chair; I did not know he had a stall.

GEORGE MILNER . I am a Policeman. On the 4th of June, about a quarter-past eleven o'clock, I was in my room, and heard the prosecutrix sing out Watch! and Police! I ran down to her - she said she had lost her shawl; Anderson told me where the prisoner lodged, and said she had seen him knock the woman down and take the shawl - I knocked at the prisoner's door, which was bolted, and he opened it; his room being dark, I did not know whether the shawl was on the bed, or under it - I asked him for her shawl; he gave it to me, and said he took it to take care of, as she was in liquor, and did not

know what she was doing - he said no more, and I took him to the watch-house; he is a labourer at the docks -I saw his stall there after nine o'clock, but it was not there when I took him; the prosecutrix was in liquor, for I locked her up all night to take care of her - she did not know what she was doing.

FRANCES ANDERSON . The stall was there when the Policeman took the prisoner by - I am sure of it, for I ran and told my mother of it, as he was taken; I saw the prosecutrix in the chair, and she then walked away with him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310630-194

Before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1382. RICH