Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th May 1831.
Reference Number: 18310512
Reference Number: f18310512-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN KEY , MAYOR.

FIFTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 12th DAY OF MAY, 1831, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY STOKERS & TITTERTON, No. 74, CORNHILL: AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1831.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN KEY , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Vaughan , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bernard Bosanquet , Knt., One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; John Ansley, Esq.; George Scholey , Esq.; John Atkins, Esq.; John Garratt, Esq.; and William Thompson , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Tayler Copeland , Esq., Alderman of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden of the said city and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Dennis Shut ,

William Stobart ,

Edward Gregory ,

James Hutten ,

John Williams ,

Thomas Chapman ,

John Payne ,

Lawrence Thompson ,

William Steads ,

Joseph Wilson ,

Joseph Phillips ,

Joseph Peacock .

Second

James Brown ,

John Thompson ,

John Crump .

Edward Scholefield ,

Samuel Powel Beaton ,

John Stutter ,

Joseph Paul ,

Job Orton ,

Jeremiah Town ,

William Lee ,

William Ball ,

Robert Cockburn .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John King ,

John Kirk ,

Thomas Knight ,

Robert Kenneth ,

John Kemp ,

George King ,

James Langridge ,

William Henry Lewis ,

Samuel Laskey ,

George Lawrence ,

James Latham ,

Richard Lacey .

Second

Joseph Hunt ,

Charles Halfyard ,

James House ,

Silvester How ,

William Hildersley ,

George Healey ,

John Hollywell ,

Hugh Hughes ,

William Hogg ,

John Goodbody ,

Richard Harland ,

Daniel Hindley .

Third

Charles Edwards ,

Robert Ecket ,

Edward Francis ,

Richard Frankham ,

Robert French ,

Joseph Fenton ,

James Ford ,

John Fulford ,

Joseph Gummer ,

David Groves ,

W. Walker Gilbertson ,

Henry Hollier .

Fourth

Thomas Houchin ,

John Hayward ,

William Henshaw ,

John Hallam ,

John Hildred ,

John Hare ,

John Hunt ,

Benjamin Hastey ,

George Hawksley ,

James Hay ,

William Hive ,

John Jeffrey .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY,

MAY 12, 1831.

KEY, MAYOR. - FIFTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18310512-1

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

987. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May , at St. Peter Cheap, 13 1/2 yards of Woollen cloth, value 10l., the goods of George Shoobridge , in his dwelling-house .

MR. GEORGE SHOOBRIDGE. I am a draper and tailor , and live at No. 41, Cheapside , in the parish of St. Peter Cheap; it is my dwelling-house. On the 3rd of May, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come into the shop - he took this cloth off the counter, and marched out with it; it was just at the time my young man was lighting the gas, and he could not see any body; I did not see him take up the cloth, but saw him carrying it out at the door; I proceeded after him, and overtook him- he then had the cloth under him arm; he was quite a stranger - the cloth is worth about 10l.

GEORGE SHOOBRIDGE , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son - he has no partner. I saw the prisoner come into the shop, take up the piece of woollen cloth, and walk away with it; I was at the further end of the shop - I immediately followed him, gave an alarm, and seized him with it under his arm; the officer has the cloth.

JOSEPH RENSHAW . I am an officer. The cloth was delivered to me at Guildhall - Mr. Shoobridge accused the prisoner of stealing it; I have kept it ever since.

MR. SHOOBRIDGE. I have seen the cloth - it is mine; I never lost sight of it till the prisoner was taken with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was by the Jerusalem coffee-house, trying to get a ship; I went there to see the captain - I was coming back, and by the Mansion-house a gentleman asked if I wanted a job, and said he would satisfy me for my trouble, for he had some things to take to the west-end of the town; I went to Cheapside with him; he said he had bought a piece of cloth - that it laid on the end of the counter, and he was going to buy more things, and would wait at the corner of Friday-street till I came out with it.

MR. SHOOBRIDGE. When he was taken he said something about a man at the corner of Friday-street, having sent him for it - I never saw that man.

[May 13.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

Reference Number: t18310512-2

988. JOHN HAYES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Johnson , on the 12th of April , at St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate, and stealing 1 watch, value 8l.; 1 watch-chain, value 4l. 10s.; 2 seals, value 2l.; 1 watch key, value 5s., and 1 watch case, value 1s., his property .

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am a silversmith , jeweller and pawnbroker , and live at No. 184, Bishopsgate-street without , in the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, in the City. On the 12th of April this gold watch, gold chain, two gold seals, and gold key were in the window, exposed for sale; the lowest value of them is 15l. - I had seen them safe in the course of the day; about twenty minutes past four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner striking at the window - he was a stranger: he struck three times before he broke the window, as it is plate glass; the watch hung within a few inches of the glass - he could easily take it; he appeared to be alone; there was a gentleman and lady looking at the window at the time - I ran out, and seized the prisoner the moment it was done; I seized him with the watch in his hand; he had just stolen it - he had not time to move from the window: I sent for a constable, and had him secured - I have kept the watch ever since; here it is - it has the chain, seals, and key fixed to it.

JURY. Q. You seized him before he moved - he might have got away before you got out? A. No, he had not time, for the moment I saw him striking at the window, I ran out; he appeared sober - there were two persons standing by the window at the time he did it; when I seized him I had not time to hear what he had to say, as I wished to take care of my window - I sent for a constable, and had him taken.

THOMAS SAPWELL. I am a constable of the City. I was sent for, and took the prisoner on a charge of stealing the watch; I took him to the watch-house - I asked what he did it for; he turned round, and said, "I suppose it was a fit of delirium;" he appeared to me to be quite rational - I said, "What made you take such a watch as this?" he said, "Oh, I thought I might as well have that as any other - it looked a very good one;" he was quite sober; I knew him about the streets as a beggar - I found a knife in his side pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress; I could find no employment - I was in need of money to find bread.

[May 13.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Reference Number: t18310512-3

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

989. GEORGE OSBORNE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George William White , on the 3rd of May , at Christchurch, and stealing therein 1 shirt, value 2s.; 1 sheet, value 1s. 6d.; 1 gown, value 2s., and 1 pair of boots, value 8d., his property .

MARY ANN WHITE . I live at No. 15, Shepherd-street, in the parish of Spitalfields . On Tuesday, the 3rd of May, about a quarter before two o'clock in the afternoon, I went to Mrs. Burket's, a Neighbour, leaving nobody in the room - I left the street door open; other lodgers were in the house - I occupy only one room, which is at the top of the house; I am sure my room door was shut, and latched - it opens right on the stairs; there is no passage - I was not absent more than a quarter of an hour, and as I returned I observed the prisoner in the street; I am sure he is the man- he was about six doors off, picking up a pair of boots in the street - I did not see a child with him; I did not then know I had lost any thing - when I got to my room, which is up two pairs of stairs, I found the door latched, as I had left it; I looked for my shawl, to put on to go out to work - I had left the shawl on the top of the bed, and I found a blanket on the top of it; this made me look about, and I missed a sheet, which I am sure was there when I left the room - I went down stairs, received information from the neighbours, and went to Petticoat-lane; I was informed the prisoner had gone down Rose-lane - I went and got information there, and found the prisoner in Petticoat-lane, with a child in his arms; this was about half-past two o'clock - he was then selling the boots for 4d.: the man gave the boots into my hands, in the prisoner's presence, and said he had bought them of the prisoner for 4d.; the prisoner said he had given 1s. for them in Petticoat-lane - the boots were my husband's, and I am sure are those I missed from my room; I also lost a gown, a shirt, and a sheet, all of which I had left safe in the room.

THOMAS SAVAGE. I am thirteen years old. On Tuesday afternoon, the 3rd of May, about half-past two o'clock, I went to Petticoat-lane, and saw the prisoner selling the boots for 4d. to an old Jew; I saw the man give him 4d. just as we went up, and caught hold of him - immediately that I saw him I ran and told Mrs. White, as I had seen her running about, and heard what she had lost; the prisoner was taken into custody.

THOMAS BISHOP . I was with Savage. I saw the prisoner sell the boots, and receive 4d. for them - he was afterwards taken into custody.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I was in Petticoat-lane, and saw the prisoner sell a cheque shirt for 6d.; I do not know who he sold it to - I was close to him when he was taken.

ANN PRICE. I live in Wentworth-street, and am a pawnbroker, I produce a gown and sheet, which I received in pawn from the prisoner, for 1s. 6d., on the 3rd of May, between two and three o'clock; I asked who they belonged to - he said to himself - that the gown was his old woman's meaning his wife.

ANN WHITE. This is my gown and - sheet - they are my husband's - I know the sheet by a mark on it; I mended it myself - I know these boots to be his; his name is George William White - he is a seaman : the shirt has not been found - the house is in the parish of Christchurch.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[May 12.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 37.

Reference Number: t18310512-4

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanqnet.

990. JOHN REDFORD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Timothy Bligh , on the 13th of April , at St. Luke, Chelsea, and stealing therein, 1 coat, value 14s.; 1 vest, value 5s.; 1 pair of boots, value 12s.; 2 pairs of boot-tops, value 7s., and 2 brushes, value 2s., the goods of William Carroll .

WILLIAM CARROLL . I am servant to Mr. Timothy Bligh, who lives in Gloster-place , in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsee - he rents the house; there is a stable a little way from the house, in Jubilee-place - it is about two hundred yards from the house; the stable is inclosed, and I live in it alone - I have a bed-room there; it is quite detached from master's house - I pay no rent for it; I am master's outdoor servant and live there - he has three horses there; the stable belongs to the house of Mr. Ellis, who lets it to master - it joins the bottom of Ellis' garden, about twenty yards from his house; there is no passage from Ellis' house to the stable; a paling parts the yard the stable is in from the garden, and in the street there is a wall and gates - I keep my clothes and every thing I have in the stable in my bed-room, which is up stairs. On Thursday morning, the 14th of April, I left the stable, about a quarter to eleven o'clock - I did not lock the stable-door, but am sure I shut and latched it; I looked the gates, and put the key into my pocket - Mr. Ellis' People have nothing to do with the yard; I returned about one, and found the gates still locked - I unlocked them, and went to put the horse into the stable, and the stable-door which I had left unlocked, was looked, and the key taken away; I had left the key inside - as I could not get in, I got over the fan-light of the door, and went up to my room; I missed a pair of boots, a coat, waistcoat, two pairs of boot-top covers, and two brushes - I have not found any of them; the prisoner had come into the yard that morning, and asked if I had got any dunk, as he wanted it for a man - I was then just going out with my master; I told him he could not have the dung, as I was just going out- he said he must have it, because they wanted it to top up a load; I put the horse in the gig, came out of the yard, and the prisoner came out with me - this was about a quarter to eleven o'clock; he saw me lock the gate - he was then outside the yard; I told him be could not have the dung that day - I knew him before by his coming with a man to fetch the dung; I then drove master to town, and on returning, found the stable as I have stated- I have not seen the property since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known him long? A. Only by his coming for the dung ever since I have been at Mr. Bligh's, which is about a year and a half, but not for the last three months - I was robbed about six weeks before: I did not know where the prisoner lived - he was taken on the Saturday night following and searched, but nothing found.

JOHN MORAM. I am a gentleman's servant out of place, and lodge in Jubliee-place, Chelsea, close to where these stables are; I do not know what parish it is in. On

Thursday, the 13th of April, between eleven o'clock and half-past, I saw the prisoner get over the gate of Mr. Bligh's stable into the yard, and in four or five minutes I saw him come out - he got over the wall; he had something apparently under his jacket, but what it was I could not say; he went out into King's-road.

Cross-examined. Q.How far were you from him? A. I should think twenty yards, as near as I can say; I never saw any body go over there before - I was once in the yard.

JOHN KING. I am a Policeman. I was on duty when the prisoner was brought to the station-house, in Milman's-row, St. Luke's, Chelsea - I did not either threaten or promise him any thing; he said he had stolen the articles from Mr. Bligh's stables - One pair of boots, a coal, and some other things, which he named; he said so to me, and said he had sold some and pawned some - he said some were in Marylebone, but he did not know the place, and that he had done it through distress; this was on Sunday - he had been taken on the Saturday.

Cross-examined. Q.Tell us what you said to him? A.Being the serjeant on duty, I had occasion to go to the cells; I said to him, "This is a bad job;" he said,"Yes, it is," and immediately made the confession - no body else was present; I have been s serjeant in the Guards twenty-five years - he made the same statement before the Magistrate, and it was taken down.

Prisoner's Defence. The Policeman came to me in the watch-house, and said it was a bad job; I said it was - he then told me if I would tell the truth the young man would forgive me - that he only wanted his boots, and that was all. On the Thursday, as I went to the stables, I was employed by a man to work - he sent me to the stable to ask if he could have the dung; he said I could not - I said I particularly wanted it; he said I must come on Saturday - I said I would come on Saturday; this was about half-past nine o'clock, and I could prove I was in doors from ten till half-past eleven - on Saturday night I was with a Life Guardsman at Knightsbridge; the prosecutor came and looked in - a Policeman came and caught hold of me - I asked what it was for; he said I should know by and by - I will take my oath I never saw the things.

JOHN KING re-examined. I did not say the young man would forgive him if he told the truth, and he only wanted his boots - I said nothing of the kind.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know the stables? A. I was never at them till this happened; I know the parish it is in, because I live in the parish.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[May 12.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his character and youth.

Reference Number: t18310512-5

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

991. SAMUEL PANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August, in the 10th year of the reign of His late Majesty, George the 4th , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, 1 mare, price 20l. , the property of James James .

GEORGE WISE . I live at Portobello-farm, in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington . In August, 1829, I had a mare from James James - it was a grey mare; I took her in to grass - he was to pay so much a week for it: I put her in my fields, with other horses of my own - I missed it on the 28th of August that year, about seven o'clock in the morning; I had seen it safe about nine the evening before - the other horses were safe; there are two gates to the field, one at each and - I found them shut and locked; I traced the mare over a bank about four feet high, across an adjoining field to the Paddington canal, and there I lost it; I traced it a very little way along the side of the canal - the shoes were smooth behind, and not turned up, by which I could trace it; the mare's legs had been blistered - I had hand-bills circulated, and in consequence of information I went to some stables belonging to Panton, the prisoner, three or four days after; they are at the back of the Grand Junction water-works - he lived over the stable - when I got there he was not at home; I looked for the mare, and saw footsteps corresponding with the shoes the mare had on, within a few steps of the stable door, where the ground was clayey; I did not find the mare - Amelia Harris gave me the information.

Prisoner. Q.Is there not a thoroughfare right by my stable door, where you saw the horse's feet? A. I never knew it was a thoroughfare - it is a sort of passage between some houses; horses and carriages can go along there, but the public thoroughfare is adjoining it - his stable is a mile and a half, or two miles, from my house; I was never there till I went to look after the horse.

AMELIA HARRIS. I live at Notting-hill, Kensington, at the potteries, with my mother, and work at Mr. Knight's, close to Mr. Wise's. In 1829 I was going through the fields to work, at the second hay-making time - I used to go through there every day; it is Wise's fields - there are a great many horses kept there, and there was this grey mare; I took particular notice of it, because it was generally about the footpaths - it was a pony; I noticed it, because it had bad legs - there was no other grey mare in the field; I saw a hand-bill on Mr. Wise's gate - I did not see the mare after seeing the bill; I went to Panton's stable, and asked his daughter for a book belonging to me -I looked through the key-hole, and saw the pony in his stable; I did not know it was that pony then, not till his daughter came and let me in (the prisoner was up stairs); I asked his daughter for a book, which had been left there for me by a person - I got the book: I saw the prisoner up stairs - they were at breakfast; it was between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of the 1st of September, 1829; I had to go through the stable to go up stairs - it is a very small place, and there is a step ladder: I saw Mr. James grey poney in the stable - it was the same as I had seen in Mr. Wise's field; I was not a quarter of a yard from it; I knew it to be the same by its legs, having seen it so often; I had seen it for about a fortnight almost every morning - I said nothing to him or his daughter about it, but went and told Wise what I had seen directly.

Prisoner. Q. Did you look at it to see that it was a mare? A. I saw it was a mare - I do not tell you where I looked at it; you hit her to turn her further on, to let me come out of the door, because the place was so small; I saw it was a mare.

JAMES JAMES. I keep the Duchess of Clarence public-

house, in Vauxhall-bridge-road . Mr. Wise had a mare of mine at grass on the 5th of August, 1829 - it was an iron grey colour, under fifteen hands high; I heard of the loss on Saturday morning, the 29th of August, and went to the prisoner's stables between twelve and one o'clock on Tuesday, the 1st of September, in consequence of information; Wise was not there then - Cooper, the officer, of Queen-square, was with me, and demanded admission at the stable door; the prisoner's wife answered us through the window - we got admission; I saw the marks of the shoes of my pony in the stable - it was a very remarkable shoe; it was flat, and about half an inch wide; the mark came out of the door - it was a very clayer place - I traced it about sixty yards in the clay, towards Tyburn turnpike, just close by the water-works reservoir, between some posts, which a horse could hardly go between; I traced it between the footpaths, and then lost it - I returned to the stable, and found several grey hairs answering the description of the hair of my mare; I can swear the marks were the marks of the shoes of my pony - I had such shoes put on for a very particular purpose; she was a very fast trotting pony - the ground was quite wet; it was a very clayey place, and there was no thoroughfare whatever out of the place without turning back.

Prisoner. You swear there was clay at the stable door, and it is hard stones, the same as any turnpike-road - a place where dung carts and waggons may go over. Witness. It is no such thing - it is not a road, only a passage - there is a foot thoroughfare behind the water-works; a waggon cannot go along - it is not above twenty inches wide between the posts, and the place is not above five or six feet wide altogether; it is a complete bye place - I have never found the mare.

BENJAMIN BROWN . I am a hay-binder. On the 28th of August, 1829, I saw a grey pony and two men, between nine and ten o'clock at night, on the tow-path, in the direct road to Paddington, just by Wilton-green-bridge, about a quarter of a mile from Wise's - I do not know where the prisoner lived; I passed a joke with the two men, saying, "Where are you three going together?" meaning the two men and the pony; one was on the pony and the other running behind - that man stopped behind, and said, "What is it to you?" I cannot swear to either of the men.

EDWARD CATTLE. I live in Praed-street, Paddington, in the same street as the prisoner. On Sunday morning, the 30th of August, 1829, I saw a grey mare pony in the prisoner's stable, between nine and ten o'clock - he was cleaning it; the leg appeared to he blistered up as high as the hock - I observed the pony again in the prisoner's stables on the Monday.

Prisoner. Q.Did you not live opposite to me? A. I did at the time; my window faced his stable - there is a piece of waste groung there, and my carts used to pass his stable to be placed in the waste ground; nothing used to pass by there except our earts - it is not a thoroughfare; there are posts put up at the bottom to stop them from going out.

COURT. Q. Is there a road for horses? A.There is a road for horses, but nothing else.

JOSEPH COOPER. I am an officer. In August, 1829, I received information of this mare being stolen from Mr. James; I went to the prisoner's house about the middle of the day on Tuesday, the 1st of September; he was not at home - I endeavoured to find him afterwards: I searched for him in several places, and went several times to that house for him. but he had removed with his wife and family; I apprehended him on Saturday, the 9th of April last.

Prisoner. You was with me at Westminster two months before you apprehended me. Witness. Yes, I was - he was then in custody on another charge of felony, stealing ducks; this charge was preferred also, but Mr. Wise did not appear in time, and he was the principal witness.

Prisoner's Defence. This pony I never had in my possession - it never was in my place in the world; another thing is, I never saw it, and it never was in my possession first or last; it does not stand feasible for a man to steal a horse and keep it within a mile and a half of where it was stolen from.

[May 12.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 49.

Reference Number: t18310512-6

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

992. HENRY BRADFIELD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Martin Webber , on the 9th of April , at Ruislip , and stealing therein 6lbs. of cheese, value 3s., and 3 loaves of bread, value 2s. 3d., his property .

MARTIN WEBBER. I am governor of the workhouse , of the parish of Ruislip. Middlesex - I live there, myself and family, and the paupers live under the same roof - I have the management of it; the poor are kept by contract - the house belongs to the parish; the paupers have a great many rooms; I hire the servants - the overseers come there sometimes, but there is no particular room for them - there is no committee-room; they meet in the vestry of the church to do their business - the overseers and church-wardens send a note to me with the paupers, but I place them where I think fit; I buy the provisions, and am paid at per head - I pay no rent; It is part of my remuneration - I have the house and garden, and a small field ineluded in the bargain; the bread and cheese is kept in a room, called the pantry. On Saturday night, the 9th of April, we had eleven fresh loaves brought in - they were placed by themselves in the pantry; I fastened the pantry door myself, between nine and ten o'clock that night, and took the key up to my sleeping room - it is an inside door; I saw that the outer door of the house was barred when I went to bed - I got up next morning between six and seven o'clock, and found the pantry door broken open; the servant maid came down just as I did - I found it out first; the outer door was still barred, but on looking round in the kitchen I saw the casement open, which I had seen fast over night - a small square of glass had been broken before, and mended with a piece of paper; the paper was cut - a person could then put a hand through and open the casement, which was fastened the night before with a hasp; I looked about, and missed three new loaves and a piece of cheese, weighing 6lbs. or 7lbs. - I saw the cheese again the same night, about eight o'clock, in John Weatherley's-possession; I could not swear to it, but thought it very much like ours.

DANIEL COLLINS. I am a labourer. On the Sunday in question Mr. Webber sent for me - I saw the prisoner

afterwards on that day, between twelve and one o'clock, and asked him how he came to get into the workhouse -I did not say he had better tell me, or that it would be worse for him if he did not - he asked who told me; I said, "There is talk enough about it;" he said it was not done with yet, that the same men that were in on the Saturday night would be in again on the Sunday night, and he asked if he had any thing to sell on Monday morning if I would buy it - I said I would, and then went and told Mr. Webber - he told me he had sold the cheese for 1s. to John Weatherley, and he had sold half a loaf of broad for 3 1/2d. to George Aires - I told Mr. Webber what had passed.

JOHN WEATHERLEY . I am a labourer. About half-past ten o'clock on this Sunday night I saw the prisoner against a blacksmith's-shop, at Ruislip - he said he had got a piece of cheese, which his sister had given him at Uxbridge, and three half-quartern loaves, and he should he very glad to part with a bit of it to buy him a little beer - I told him to cut off 6d. worth; he did so - I sent that home to my house by my grandson; I paid him for it; I went into Doughty's at the Bell, and saw him; he had the other bit, and said, "Well, you may as well have the other bit for 6d., for I shall only let it get dry and waste it;" I bought it - that is here now; I put it into the bar at the Bell - it laid there till the constable came; I went home when I came out of church and found the other piece of cheese there, but that is not here.

GEORGE AIRES. I am a labourer. About a quarter-past eleven o'clock on the Sunday in question, I saw the prisoner in a waggon in Mr. Lee's, my master's shed - he had a quartern loaf, and told me he had met with a very good friend, that his sister had given it to him, and he would sell it to any body for 6d. - he would sooner have the money than the bread; I told him I had no money in my pocket but a few halfpence - he said,"How many have you?" I said 3 1/2d., which I gave him; there was a piece broken off the loaf, and he kept that back - I had part of the loaf, and eat it.

EDWARD SCEENY . I am a constable. I have a piece of cheese, which I got from William Doughty , who keeps what used to be the Bell, but it is now a beer-house, without a sign - the prosecutor sent for me, and went with me and Weatherley to the Bell for the cheese; I found it in the bar.

JOHN WEATHERLEY. I was at the public-house when Sceeny took possession of the cheese - I gave it to the landlord to put in the bar; it was the same as I bought of the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Did you notice its being marked when you bought it of me? A. No; I knew it to be the same by the shape and quantity.

MARTIN WEBBER . This cheese is mine - I generally buy 1 cwt. at a time, and put my name on it; I know this to be part of what I lost.

Prisoner. You say I took three loaves - I acknowledge myself guilty, but there were two quarterns and a half which were cut, and as soon as I got out of the house, being in a state of starvation, I devoured the half-quartern - now I consider your evidence is very false. Witness. I am not certain whether I lost more, but I only lost three new loaves.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a large ham and a piece of bacon there, but I always considered an honest man was the noblest work of God, and wished to keep myself honest - I was promted by stasrvation to do it; in my own parish there were new overseers, but they would not take office, and the others had not cleared their accounts - I went to one of the gentlemen, and said if he would give me 1s. I would go off - he refused; I was in want of victuals, and throw myself on your mercy, hoping you will pity a man who has been driven to this.

[May 12.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18310512-7

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

993. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , at St. Andrew, Holborn, 1 mare, price 15l. , the property of Charles Harrington Twight .

CHARLES HARRINGTON TWIGHT . I am a livery-stable keeper and hackney-master , and keep the Black Bull, Gray's Inn-lane . On the 29th of April I was called up by two Policemen, between two and three o'clock; I got up and went to my stable - I found a brown mare gone, and another standing in the ride, with a bridle on and a halter round its neck - I called my man up; he got on the mare, which stood on the ride, and went in search of the other towards Whitechapel; I got on another horse, and went towards Hampstead - I returned, and in consequence of information from a little boy, I went to Islington station-house about eight o'clock, and saw my mare in the yard of the station-house; it was the mare I had lost - I knew it; it was fired behind the near hind legs, and there had formerly been a pole run into her chest, which left a mark, and she had two broken knees.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a Policeman. On the 29th of April, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner riding a brown horse through Baron-street, Pentonville, going towards Holloway; I did not see whether it was a horse or mare - it had a bridle and halter on, but no saddle nor cloth that I perceived; I had no knowledge of him before, but I had a good look at him under the gas-light - he had on a blue coat; I saw him again in about an hour and a half, turning out of Barnsbury-mews, on foot - I knew it was the same person.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. How long have you been a Policeman? A. Ten months - before that I was coachman to Mr. Gatten, of Marylebone-lane; I do not know what I left him for - I had no words with him; I was discharged at a minute's notice - I was standing within a yard and a half of the gas-lamp when I saw the prisoner; the lamp is in the centre of the street - I saw him some distance before he came to me, ten or twelve, or perhaps twenty yards; he was riding at a sharp trot, just out of a walk - he went very steadily; the horse had a winker bridle, and a flat headed halter, which is called web-headed, and brass on the front; I cannot tell what waistcoat the prisoner had on, but he had another coat on under his blue coat - I am not to have any thing on his conviction that I know of, and do not expect any; there was a reward of 5l. offered for a grey horse of Ings', which was found in the same stable with this, but I am not a witness on that business; I know of no reward being given at our office on a conviction of house-stealers - I never saw a table of rewards at our office; I never was charged with theft in my life.

WILLIAM PICKETT . I am a Police-constable. On the morning of the 29th of April, before four o'clock, I saw the prisoner riding along on a brown horse, at the top of Barnsbury-mews, Islington; I cannot say whether it was a horse or a mare - he went down the mews, and I went part of the way down, but did not see which stable he went into; I came back again, and went round my beat - I saw the serjeant of my section and an officer going up my beat; I ran and spoke to them - we three went to the mews and searched it, but found nothing; we got into one or two stables, but most of them were locked, and we could not examine them - I stopped at the top of the mews while the serjeant and officer went down, and I saw the prisoner come out of the mews; this was about an hour after I had seen him go in - I went, and caught hold of him by the arm; I knew him by his having a blue coat on, which hung down a about three inches below his other coat - I am certain he is the man; I asked what he had done with the horse he had taken down there - he said,"What horse?" I said, "Why, the one you have just rode down;" in the mean time the serjeant came up, and took hold of him by the arm, (he had not time to answer) and said, "You are my prisoner, what have you got in your pocket?" the serjeant said to me, "You go off to Gray's Inn-lane, where the horse is lost from, and let them know we have got the horse, and the man we suppose who took it;" I went, leaving him in care of the serjeant, and when I returned I saw at the station-house the same horse as I had seen the prisoner ride, I am certain, for I was not a yard from him when he passed me - I took particular notice of him, and the horse too.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been a Policeman? A.Twelve months - before that I lived in Barmondsey-square, and kept a broker's shop; not an old iron, but a furniture shop; I had a partner - he is not in the Police.

Q. Are there not several houses in this mews? A. I believe not - the back doors from some houses come into it; I have not spoken to Collins these three days - we have not talked about the prisoner's blue coat, or his under coat, or any thing of the kind; I did not speak to the prisoner when he was on the house - I followed him part of the way down the mews, but lost him, as it is crooked, and there was a lot of carts there; he was riding rather fast at first, but when he saw me he went very gently - he had no saddle, I am certain; it was between three and four o'clock in the morning; I do not know that any body lives in the mews - I stood watching at the top about an hour, then saw him come up the mews; he had not dressed the horse, for it was quite dirty - he came up to me; I turned round, and caught hold of him.

GEORGE HAVELL. I am a Police-serjeant. On the 29th of April I saw the prisoner running up Barnsburymews, and saw Pickett stop him - he afterwards left him with me; I took him to the station-house, and told him it was my duty to tell him not to say any thing to injure himself, for I should give it in evidence against him - I made him no threat or promise; I asked what he had been doing down the mews - he said he had not been down the mews; I asked if he had the key of the stable, and to give it to me to save further trouble - he said he had no key; on searching him I found a key in his pocket - I left him at the station, went to the mews, opened the lock of a stable door with that key, and found a brown mare there in the stable, and in the coach-house we found a grey horse - I took the brown mare to the station; Mr. Twight's ostler saw it there, and I believe Twight saw it there - I was present when he saw it at Hatton-garden; he claimed it - there was no saddle on it when I found it; Collins took this and the other horse to the station-house; I took a bridle and horse cloth.

Cross-examined. Q. How many Policemen were in the mews? A.Three - there had been four; the prisoner walked out of the mews, and Pickett laid hold of him - he told me he had not been down the mews at all; I asked him for the key of the stable - I did not say the stable where the horse was; I do not think I told him the horse was stolen - there may be a thousand keys like this, but it is not a very common one; I went with the horse to the station, and afterwards rode it to Hatton-garden, but I then fetched it from a livery-stable.

WILLIAM SHEEHY. I am a constable, and live in Gray's Inn-lane. On the morning of the 29th of April, about three o'clock, I was at the Black Bull stable, between Liquorpond-street and Portpool-lane, and saw a man ride out of the gate of the Black Bull yard on a horse - I did not notice the colour of it; he wore a dark coat, and I saw the skirts of a white coat underneath it - he turned towards Holborn; I saw another man come out of the gate, and turn down a Portpool-lane - I came to the gate, and saw a horse with a halter about its neck, which the other man left there; I called the coachman, but nobody answered - I rand the bell, then got my comrade, and alarmed the master.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been in the Police? A. About fifteen months - I was recommended from the army; I have not seen Collins since he has been examined - I have talked to him about coming down here against this man; we did not talk about a reward of 5l. -I do not recollect his saying a word about it; there was something in the Hue and Cry about a bay horse - he never told me about the prisoner's light coat or his blue one; Portpool-lane leads into Leather-lane, and then into Gray's Inn-lane - the stables are sometimes open from one to two o'clock in the morning, which made me not take notice till I saw this horse; people do not go in there at all hours - I do not know how the other man was dressed; I thought he was the coachman, and let him go on - it was ten or twelve minutes before I could get the people of the house up: I rang twice.

SAMUEL WOOLFE. I am a wheelwright, and live at No. 11, White Conduit-terrace, Islington, and work in Barnsbury-mews. On the 21st of April two men came to me there - the prisoner was one of them; they asked if I knew of a stable to be let - I recommended them to a person at No. 25, Islington-row; they went together to hire the stable, and next morning I saw them both again - I asked if they had hired the stable; they said Yes - it was in Barnsbury-mews; the other man borrowed a hammer of me while the prisoner was in the stable - whethen he heard what he said I do not know; I was in the coach-house - I saw the prisoner several times after that; he attended the stable daily till he was apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you quite certain of his per

son? A. I am certain - the other man was well dressed, and appeared to be the master.

Q. A gentleman in appearance? A. Yes, a very good looking man, with several pock-marks in his face - I should know him again; he had a drab coat on, with a velvet collar.

WILLIAM JENKINSON . I am a hackney-coachman. in Twight's service. On the morning of the 29th of April I came home with my coach, about a quarter-past one o'clock, with two mares, one brown and the other black; they were put in the stalls in the first stable, under the gateway - I went home, leaving them safely locked in the stable; I went again about ten o'clock next morning, and the brown mare was gone - I did not see it again till it came home on the Thursday following; the black one remained.

C. H. TWIGHT. I first saw my mare again on the 29th- I saw it at the station, and then at Hatton-garden; I do not think I saw the serjeant at the station - it was the mare I had lost, and I claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw that brown mare - I went to Smithfield on the Friday; there was a gentleman who asked me to mind a horse and gig, which I did, and when he returned he asked if I was out of employ; I said Yes - he said he wanted a young man to look after a nag; I said I should be glad of it - he said he had sent a friend to the north end of the town, to look after some stables; I went with his friend, and saw this stable; the following day I went to it, and on this night I was taken and accused of stealing the mare, which I never saw - I have not seen my master since.

[May 12.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18310512-8

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

994. JOHN LANGSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , at St. Andrew, Holborn, 1 organ, value 20l., the goods of Giovanni Robaotti , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Holmes .

GIOVANNI ROBAOTTI. I am an Italian, and lodge at No. 12, Tothill-street , in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn - Thomas Holmes keeps the house; I have lodged there almost six months - I play an organ; I have known the prisoner eight or nine months - he tunes organs, and had tuned for me three or four weeks before this happened. On the 12th of April, about ten or eleven o'clock in the morning, he came to me, and said, "Will you be so kind as to lend me 1s., to get some dinner," which I did - on that day my brother brought my organ home, and put it in the front parlour, in a kind of passage; I did not see it in the room, but saw my brother bringing it home - I missed it about eight o'clock in the evening; it was afterwards found by my brother.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. At what time did you see your brother bring the organ home? A.About a quarter to eight o'clock - I saw him in the street, coming home with it; my brother has an organ, and another brother another - I sometimes let one out at 6d. a day- I employed the prisoner to alter the tuning of the organ about a month before; he came to my house almost every week - he had no right to the organ; I never said that it was my opinion that he did not intend to steal it; I did not suspect him till it was found, for he was like a brother to me, but I heard he had some money, and then suspected him - somebody said, "Jack took your organ;" I could not say it was him until it was found - I did not say whether I did or did not believe it was him.

LUIGI ROBAOTTI . I am the prosecutor's brother. On the 12th of April I brought the organ home at half-past seven o'clock, and put it into the front parlour, by the side of the bed - I locked the door, and opened the window; my brother came home five or ten minutes afterwards, and the organ was gone - it was worth 20l.; I afterwards saw it at the pawnbroker's.

Q. Did you see any body about the place? A. No; it would fetch 20l.

JOHN BENNETT. I live with Mr. Clark, a pawnbroker, in Old-street. On the 12th of April a person brought an organ in; we are not in the habit of taking them in, and I asked him if it belonged to himself - he said No, the person belonging to it was outside; I told him to fetch him in - the prisoner came in, and I knew him as a customer; I asked if it belonged to him - he said it did; "I said,"Why did you not come in yourself?" he turned to the man, and said, "Why did not you tell me I was wanted?" I lent him 3l. on the organ, and gave him the duplicate.

Cross-examined. Q. He was a regular customer? A. Yes - I had taken an organ in from him before - he did not give his right address; he pawned it in the name of Clark - I understand his name is Langshaw.

WILLIAM BARRETT. I live at No. 6, Tothill-street, Clerkenwell. On Tuesday evening, the 12th of April, I was coming down the street, and saw the prisoner and a man stouter than him; one said to the other "Come along, Jack;" they had the organ, and went down Gray's Inn-lane with it.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you observed them? A. Not above two minutes - I thought the other was a man named Marsh; he was taken on suspicion, but I did not swear to him.

CHARLES PALMER . I am a Police-constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Moor-lane on the 13th of April - I found 22s. 9d. on him; I told him he was charged with stealing an organ - he said he knew nothing of it.

GIOVANNI ROBAOTTI. This is my organ.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[May 13.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

Recommended to mercy on account of his character.

Reference Number: t18310512-9

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

995. WILLIAM TINNEY and CHARLES CROCKWELL were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Stephens , on the 11th of April , at St. Mary, Islington, and stealing there in 5 silver spoons, value 30s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 10s., his property .

JAMES WARROYS . I am a gardener, and live at Ball's-pond. On the 11th of April I was at work very near Mr. Stephens' house, and saw the two prisoners, about ten o'clock in the morning; Crockwell had two or three apples in his hand - they were going towards Kingsland; I saw Crockwell go into the front court of Mr. Stephens' house, and come out again - he went in and came out three different times, and then the gave the apples to Tinney - he had only three apples that I saw; Tinney then went in with the apples, and came out of the fore court in about

five minutes, with a pair of drab trousers under his arm - they had white buttons at the bottom of them; I was too far off to see the house - my nephew, who is ill, and unable to attend, went to the house, and gave an alarm; they were pursued - that is all I saw: I am quite certain of them both - I never had a doubt of them.

MARY INKSON. I am servant to Mr. John Stephens, who lives at No. 2, Brunswick-place, Ball's-pond , in the parish of St. Mary, Islington. On the 11th of April I was at home, and went up stairs about ten minutes before ten o'clock in the morning, I left the kitchen window shut down - it is a sash window, and looks into the fore-court; I cannot say whether it was fastened - it was shut close down, and the street door was shut; there is a flight of steps to the door -I do not know how the gate of the fore-court was; there was no window or door open leading to the front yard - I remained up stairs ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, when a man rang the bell; I came down, and he gave me information; I found the kitchen window half way open - I should think it would not admit a man's body - I think it must have been pulled partly down after him; I missed a pair of drab trousers, with white buttons, off a hamper on the left-hand side of the kitchen - I missed nothing else then; the prisoner Tinney was taken - he was searched at the station-house, in my presence, but nothing was found; while he was being searched four tea-spoons and a mustard-spoon were brought to the station, and I knew them to be Mr. Stephens' - I had put the tea-spoons into them kitchen-closet, on the left-hand side of the fire-place, the last thing before I went up stairs; the closet was shut, but not locked - the mustard-spoon was in another closet on the other side of the kitchen - I had seen that at supper time the night before; the trousers were worth about 10s., and the spoons 30s. - there is no place they could have got in at but the window, which I am sure was shut down when I went up stairs.

WILLIAM BRAZIER. I live in Kingsland-road, and am a porter. On the 11th of April, about a quarter before eleven o'clock in the morning, I had just left my door, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned, and saw the two prisoner running from Ball's-pond-road towards Kingsland-road, in a direction from Mr. Stephens' house - they were about three hundred yards from the house; I ran into the road, and ran after them to Kingsland-road - one turned to the right, and Crockwell to the left; I caught him - I did not see him do any thing: I did not understand the person who was in pursuit - I thought he said he did not want the boy, and I let go of him to follow the other.

JOHN BUMPSTEAD. I live in Kingsland. On the 11th of April, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was standing at my door, and heard a call of Stop thief! I saw Tinney running, and pursued him till he was taken - he ran down Rosemary-place, away from Kingsland, and from Mr. Stephens' house; I called a witness, who took him, and delivered him to me - I gave him to the Policeman; after he was taken I received information - I had seen him lift his hand up, as if to throw something over Mr. Skinner's garden wall, in consequence of which I searched over the wall, and found five silver spoons, just opposite where he appeared to throw them, and about two yards from the wall - I gave them to Clark, the Policeman; the mustard-spoon had mustard quite wet on it - the others were teaspoons.

ADAM GLENNIE . I live at Kingsland. I heard a cry of Stop thief! about eleven o'clock on the 11th of April, at Dalston - I turned round, and saw Tinney running; I went back to meet him - he turned the corner of Crosby-place, which leads to Dalston-lane, and before I overtook him, I saw him throw a quantity of tea-spoons over the garden wall - I overtook him, and detained him till Bumpstead came up; I gave him into his charge - the spoons were found on the spot I pointed out.

MATILDA HARRIS. I live with my aunt Scraggs, and am the daughter of Mr. Harris. On the Monday in question I saw a pair of trousers in the area of No. 5, Elizabeth-terrace, Ball's-pond; I took them up, and showed them to my aunt - she beckoned to Mr. Millichap; they were drab trousers, with white buttons.

WILLIAM MILLICHAP. I am a Policeman. I took Tinney into custody about eleven o'clock in the morning - I took him to the station; I found 2 1/2d. on him, a latch-key, and four apples.

FRANCIS PROTHEROE. I am a Policeman. I apprehended Crockwell by Shoreditch church, on the 11th of April, about a quarter-past twelve o'clock - I asked if he had been up to Kingsland that morning; he said he had not.

JAMES CLARK. I am a Policeman. I produce four tea-spoons and a mustard-spoon, delivered to me by Bumpstead.

MARY INKSON. I know these spoons very well to be Mr. Stephens' - they were in the cupboard at ten o'clock that morning; these trousers are also his, and were on the hamper - they were found about twenty houses from ours, and in a direction towards Kingsland.

Tinney's Defence. I know nothing of Crockwell - he was never in my company; I was selling apples in the street, and the Policeman ran and took me.

Crockwell's Defence. I had been to Tottenham to see my sister; I staid there all night - I was coming down Kingsland: I heard a cry of Stop thief! they were pursuing another lad - a gentleman took me; a person said it was not me, it was another lad, and he let me go - when I got home my master sent me for a bushel of peas; as I returned, the Policeman took me - they asked the gentlemen if it was me; they said they did not know, but I was as much like him as two peas.

JAMES WARBOYS. I never had a doubt about him.

TINNEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

CROCKWELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, an account of their youth.

Reference Number: t18310512-10

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

996. MARY KELLY, now called HANNAH , the wife of MAURICE (KELLY), was indicted for that she, by the name of Mary Kelly, at the General Quarter Session of the Peace, holden by adjournment at the Session-house, Clerkenwell-green, in and for the county of Middlesex, on the 22nd of October, in the 8th of year of George the 4th, was tried and convicted as a common utterer of counterfeit coin, and was thereupon ordered to be imprisoned and kept to hard labour in the House of Correc

tion, at Clerkenwell, for one year, and to find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more; and that she, having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money afterwards, on the 16th of April , at St. George, one piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a piece of good, lawful, and current money and silver coin of this realm, called a sixpence, as and for a piece of good, lawful, and current money and silver coin of this realm, called a sixpence, unlawfully, unjustly, deceitfully, and feloniously did utter to one Sarah, the wife of William Ward, she well knowing the said sixpence to he false and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only omitting the words printed in italics.

MESSRS. SCARLETT and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

SARAH WARD . I am the wife of William Ward , who keeps a pastry cook's-shop , in Cannon-street , in the parish of St. George, Middlesex. On the 16th of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my husband's shop and purchased 2d. worth of plum-cakes - she took the cakes off the plate, and gave me a sixpence into my hand - I immediately saw it was a very bad one, and gave it her back; I saw Wakeling, and I suppose he was at the door, for as she was going out with the sixpence in her hand he apprehended her - it was between nine and ten o'clock, to the best of my recollection.

COURT. Q. What makes you say it was a bad sixpence? A. I knew it to be bad, and gave it her back -I had not given any information to the officer; he knew her before.

FRANCES WILDBORN. I am a widow, and live at the Seven Stars, Rosemary-lane - my father keeps the house. I know the prisoner - I saw her at my father's house on the 16th of April, between nine and ten o'clock at night, to the best of my knowledge - she came with a man and woman, at least I saw her at the counter with them - they were decidedly in company; they called for a pint of porter - I cannot say which it was; a sixpence was offered me in payment - I have every reason to believe it was the prisoner gave it me, as I directed my conversation immediately to her, and she stood immediately before me.

Q.What was the conversation? A. On looking at the sixpence I observed it to be bad, and told the prisoner so- she was the person immediately before me; I said,"This is a bad sixpence: this is the second bad coin offered me within these ten minutes;" she immediately snatched up the sixpence, and ran away with it - I am sure it was her who santched it up; she ran to the door, and called to some woman inside to follow her - she called her by a Christian name; the other two persons went out in about two minutes - they seemed to wish to engage my attention to them; I gave information of this - the porter was not paid for, nor drank.

ELEANOR PARKER. I am a widow, and keep the Blue Anchor public-house, Rosemary-lane. On Saturday, the 16th of April. between nine and ten o'clock, the prisoner came to my house for a pint of porter - she had a child in her arms; nobody else was with her - I served her; she put a bad sixpence on the counter - I took it up, tried it, found it bad, and returned it to her - the Policeman came in at the time, and took it out of her hand.

PIERCE DRISCOLL. I am a Police-officer. On the 16th of April, about ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner go into the Blue Anchor public-house, Rosemary-lane, kept by Parker - I had my eyes on her before, in consequence of information; I stood at the door, and saw her offer the sixpence - I saw Parker try it on the counter, and return it to her; she had put it into Mrs. Parker's hand, and she put it on the counter, bent it, and returned it to her - I took it out of the prisoner's hand, as the landlady returned it to her - I have it now, and have had it ever since eleven o'clock the next day; I took her to the station-house, searched her myself, and found 2s. 3d. in copper, and a good sixpence in her pocket - she was discharged by serjeant Norman; I gave him the counterfeit sixpence - he returned it to me next day about eleven o'clock; I had marked it before I had parted with it, and knew it to be the same, as far as I could judge - I produce it; here is the mark which I put on it - it is a triangle, and it is bent at the edge.

Prisoner. He told the landlady I had given her a bad sixpence - they searched the till, and took it out of a cup in the till. Witness. I did not go near the till; I took it out of the prisoner's hand.

JOHN NORMAN . I am a Police-serjeant. I was at the station-house, in Denmark-street, on the 16th of April, at half-past ten o'clock, when the prisoner was brought in by Driscoll - I saw him find a good sixpence and 1s. 5d. in copper on her; she had no counterfeit money but the sixpence he produced - I cautioned her, and discharged her; I instructed a Policeman to follow and watch her - Driscoll gave me the counterfeit sixpence: I returned it to him next morning - I put a mark on the reverse side of it, and know this to be the same: she was brought in again at eleven o'clock the same night by Wakeling, for uttering a counterfeit sixpence to Mrs. Ward - Wakeling gave me the counterfeit sixpence; I returned it to him next morning - he charged her, in her presence, with uttering it.

JAMES COOK. I am a Policeman. I was at the station-house, and the prisoner was discharged on the 16th of April, about a quarter or ten minutes after ten o'clock- I then followed her up Denmark-street into the New-road, where I saw her meet another woman; she was in conversation with her; I was about a stone's throw from them - I cannot say what the other woman was doing: I merely saw them, and saw something pass between the two: the prisoner put her hand out to the other woman- they both put their hands out together; the prisoner saw me after this took place, and they directly parted, one went one way, and the other another; I followed the prisoner to the corner of Cannon-street, where I met Wakeling - I told him to watch her, and I went back to look for the woman who had parted from her, but could not find her; I saw the prisoner brought to the station-house, in Denmark-street, in about two minutes - I searched her, and found one counterfeit sixpence, and 1s. 5d. in copper on her - I gave Wakeling the counterfeit sixpence.

SAMUEL WAKELING. I am a Policeman. On the 16th of April, about half-past ten o'clock, I met Cook, and in consequence of a communication from him, I followed the prisoner at the corner of Cannon-street, to the pastry

cook's shop, kept by Ward - I saw her go into the shop, the door was open; I could see what was going forward - she asked for two penny worth of plum-cake; I heard that - I was close to the door - she took the two cakes up, and offered Ward sixpence; Ward took the sixpence into her hand, and told her it was bad - the prisoner said she had no had money about her, and she believed it was good - she put it into her right-hand pocket, and came out; I took her into custody, and told her she had just come from the station-house for the same thing, and she must go back again - I laid hold of each of her arms; she had a child in her arms, which prevented her getting her hands into her pocket on the road - I saw Cook search her, and take 1s. 5d. in copper, and this bad sixpence from her right-hand pocket, which was the pocket she had put the sixpence into - only one sixpence was found on her; I marked it, and then gave it to Norman, who returned it to me next morning - I have had it ever since, and now produce it; it has my mark on it.

JOHN FIELD. I am an inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint. This sixpence (produced by Driscoll) is counterfeit - it is made of white metal, known by the name of Britannia metal; it is not washed, but white all through - it was not made at the Mint; this sixpence (produced by Wakeling) is also counterfeit, and is made of white metal.

CALEB ENWARD POWELL. I am assistant solicilor to the Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the convic - of Mary Kelly, together with Ann Fox, at the Middlesex October Session, 1827: the original record was read over to me while I examined the copy, and then the copy while I examined the original - (Read, see indictment)

GEORGE BRAND . In 1827 I was chief turnkey of the House of Correction, in Cold Bath-fields: the prisoner was in my custody there - she was convicted as a common utterer of base coin, at the October Middlesex Session, 1827; she was imprisoned for one year, by the name of Mary Kelly ; I am certain of her person - a woman named Ann Fox was convicted with her; I have not a doubt of the prisoner's person.

Prisoner. You know very well it was my sister, and not me - I was put to bed with a child there, seven years ago.

Witness. I was present, and saw her tried - she is the person.

Prisoner. If Colton, the officer, was here, he could swear it was my sister, and not me; he is the man who took my sister - I had six months, and she had twelve.

Witness. I have not a doubt of her being the person; I had her in custody for one year.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never there for twelve months - I leave it to the mercy of the Court; I have six children and a sick husband - if you will send for Mrs. Atkins, of the House of Correction, and Mrs. Kelly, she will prove it was not me - my sister went in the name of Mary Kelly , and had twelve months, and I had but six, at the same time; I am sure the head turnkey woman will tell you the truth - she knows my sister very well, my sister used to wash for Mr. Brand at the time, and I was the woman who afterwards bailed my sister out - Mr. Atkins died two months before I went there.

GEORGE BRAND. Mr. Atkins died in November, 1822- she must be speaking of some former time.

MATTHEW HENRY LANGLE. I am assistant overseer of the parish of St. Giles. I was present at the prisoner's trial at the Middlesex Session, 1827 - I believe it was in October; it was the close of the year - I repeatedly went to her in prison about her children - I cannot say how long she was in prison.

Prisoner. Do not you believe a word that he says - he would swear my life away for 1s. - that is the way in St. Giles'.

[May 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Reference Number: t18310512-11

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

997. THOMAS NORRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , at St. James, within the liberty of Westminster, 4 sovereigns, the monies of Henry Dison , 1 Bank post-bill, for payment of and value 10l.; 1 Bank note, for payment of and value 10l., and 1 Bank note, for payment of and value 5l., and his property, the said notes being due and unsatisfied to him .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HENRY DISON . I am a lace-maker , and live in Regent-street . The prisoner came into my service in July last, as servant or clerk - he left me some time after, and I took him again, and had occasion to discharge him, without reference to any crime; I heard he was in the habit of coming to and fro. On Saturday, the 23rd of April, between five and six o'clock. I was in the counting-house, and put a 5l. note into my till there; there was at that time a 10l. Bank note and a 10l. Bank post-bill in the till, some sovereigns, and some silver - I had taken the Bank post-bill of Lady Turner, and wrote her name close against the word "Ten" I went up to tea between six and seven o'clock, and a little after seven I returned from tea, when all these notes and four sovereigns were gone - on the Tuesday following I received information from a Sheriff's officer in Kent.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe on a farmer occasion you trusted him to carry 200l. in gold to your banker's? A. Yes, and he did it honestly.

AUGUSTUS COLE . I am servant to Mr. Dison. I was at the shop on the 23rd of April, and saw the prisoner there; about half-past six o'clock; he said he wished to write a note, and he went into the counting-house for that purpose - and he left in five minutes, while I was serving a customer.

SAMUEL BRIANT. I keep the Haunch of Venison, at Maidstone. On the 25th of April the prisoner came to my house, and tendered me a 10l. Bank post-bill, which I immediately sent to the bank, at Maidstone - I saw "C. Dundas" written on the back of it; he left my house.

HENRY KIPLING . I am an officer to the Sheriff of Kent, and live at Maidstone. On Monday, the 25th of April, I saw the prisoner - his conduct excited my suspicion; he came into the Three Tuns, at Kingston - he was rather tipsy, and went to bed: after he was gone to bed, in consequence of suspicion, I went into his bed-room, and searched his-clothes, in the presence of the landlord, and found four sovereigns and a half in his waistcoat pocket, and 17s. in his trousers pocket, 4d. in copper, and an old pocket-book, containing bills and receipts, with Mr. Dison's name - I wrote to him that evening by post, and

the following morning, when the prisoner awoke, he asked why I had taken his clothes; I told him I bad done it from suspicions circumstances which I had observed, and that I had written to Mr. Dison; he said, "Then I am overtaken at last;" he was about to make a statement to me - I said he had better not; he said, "No, my mind will be the freer for it;" he said he knew when Mr. Dison went to tea, that he went to the shop under pretence of writing a letter - he saw the shopman engaged in serving a lady, that he drew out the till, and took out a 10l. Bank post-bill a 10l. and a 5l. Bank note, and four sovereigns - he then went to the Borough, bought a coat, which he had on, went to Maidstone, and then further, where I took him into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not appear in very great distress of mind? A. Yes - he said he had robbed one of the best of masters, and was very sorry for it; he did not appear distressed the night before, but in the morning - I never saw a young man show more contrition; I obtained the Bank post-bill from the banker, and asked him if the one he had paid to Cole was the same he had taken from his master - he said it was.

MR. DISON. This is the Bank post-bill which I lost from my till - it has my hand-writing on it; the house is my dwelling-house, and is in the parish of St. James'.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - having been informed that by pleading not guilty, any extenuating circumstance which might palliate my crime, would be urged, and give me the advantage of witnesses of character, are the sole reasons which, after the confession I had made, induced me to stand my trial; the unhappy man who stands before you, though respectably educated my brought up, has, unfortunately, not a single relation to stretch out a hand to assist him in the season of adversity and distress: previous to the time in question I have frequently been compelled to walk the streets of London for want of a bed, and the means of procuring one - the constable, not willingly, I believe, but by mistake, has stated that I said I went into Mr. Dison's shop under the pretence of writing a letter - I said, "For the purpose of doing so."

Three witnesses gave the prisoner an irreproachable character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character.

Reference Number: t18310512-12

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

998. JOHN ATWICK , FRANCIS ROBERTSON , and GEORGE WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April , at St. James, Westminster, 20 yards of woollen cloth, value 20l.; 30 yards of kerseymere, value 15l., and 1 waistcoat, value 20s., the goods of Thomas Dicketts , in his dwelling-house .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS DICKETTS. I am a tailor , and live at No. 4, Ryder-street , in the parish of St. James, Westminster. On Friday, the 22nd of April, I went out at eight o'clock in the morning, and left this woollen cloth and kerseymere nearly opposite the shop door, on the right - it is my dwelling-house; a great many workmen are employed there - I returned in about twenty minutes, and found the shop door wide open; I had left it is shut - nobody could open it from the street; there was only a handle to pull it too - I immediately missed a piece of black cloth and a piece of black kerseymere off the counter, a piece of brown cloth off the cutting board, and on looking further I missed a kerseymere waistcoat; the black cloth was worth 20l., the brown 6l. or 7l., the kerseymere 15l., and the waistcoat 1l. - I saw some cloth at the Mansion-house, in possession of Forrester.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any other Christian name or partner? A. No; I live in the house.

ELIZA COLE . I am single, and live at No. 9, Ryder-street, directly opposite Mr. Dicketts. On Friday morning, the 22nd of April, as near half-past eight o'clock as possible, I saw the prisoner Atwick go into Mr. Dickett's shop - he remained there a very few minutes, and came out with two rolls of dark cloth, which he took away.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q.You did not give information of it? A. No - I was in the balcony of the drawing-room; he had a hat on - it is a narrow street, and leads out of St. James'-street; the cloth was on his left shoulder - I was on the right-hand side; his hat did not hinder my seeing his face; I saw him very plainly for five or six minutes - I did not know him before; I saw him before he went in and after he came out.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How soon afterwards did you see him before the Magistrate? A. The next day; I was certain of his person the moment I saw him - I only saw one person.

MARY AUSTIN. I live at No. 29, Towle-street, St. Giles', and am single. On Friday morning, the 22nd of April I was in Ryder-street, a little before eight o'clock; I saw the prisoner Robertson there - he was three or four feet from Mr. Dickett's door; I did not see Atwick go into the shop, but I saw him come out - Robertson was then three or four feet from the door; he stood there as if he was waiting for somebody.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. He stood three or four feet from the shop? A. Yes - I also stood there.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I am a hackney-coachman - I drove No. 1057 at the time in question. On Friday morning, the 22nd of April, near half-past eight o'clock, my coach stood in Piccadilly, opposite Duke-street, about five minutes walk from Ryder-street; the prisoner Atwick came up, threw two pieces of cloth into the coach, and got in himself - he desired me to drive to Sun-street, Bishopsgate; I did so - when I got there he got out and took the cloth; he paid the fare, and I went about my business - when I got to Sun-street a cab passed me, and I saw both the other prisoners in Sun-street; it was then near nine o'clock - they had got out of the cab about fifty yards from where Atwick got out; they had arrived there a little before me - Williams came up, and took one roll of cloth from my chariot; he said nothing - they then went away together; I cannot say where to.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You cannot say in what street Williams might have got into the cab? A. No - it was on a Friday; I do not know the day of the month.

JAMES PIGGOTT . I am servant to a tailor, at No. 23, Sun-street. On Friday, the 22nd of April, I saw the pri

soner Atwick get out of a coach, nearly opposite Mr. Wait's mercer's shop, Sun-street - I saw Williams and Robertson in a cab behind the coach; Williams got out of the cab, and took one piece of cloth and another small piece out of the coach - he took them into Guest's house there; Atwick took one piece in also - they both went into Guest's; Robertson got out of the cab and stood opposite the house, and after Atwick and Williams had gone into Guest's, Williams came out to fetch Robertson in; he went in, and they remained there about half an hour, they followed one another out - I watched them into Crown-street, and there told Weatropp, the Policeman; I followed them to Finsbury-square, and saw them divide some money - they each had some money.

HENRY WESTROPP . I am a Policeman. On the 22nd of April, I was on duty in the neighbourhood of Crown-street - Piggott gave me information; I followed the prisoners to Finsbury-square, there saw them divide some money, and took all three into custody in about five minutes, with assistance.

ANDREW MACMANUS. I am a serjeant of the Police. I was at the station-house on the 22nd of April, when the prisoners were brought in, it was near ten o'clock - I searched them; 3l. 7s. was found on Atwick, 3l. 1s. on Robertson, and 7s. on Williams.

JOHN FORRESTER. I am an officer of the City. On Friday, the 22nd of April, I went with a search-warrant, and examined Guest's house, in Sun-street - Mr. Cope, the marshal, and my brother Daniel were with me; Guest was not at home - I got there about a quarter-past twelve o'clock; I found some cloth there, which I brought away - I now produce all that the prosecutor speaks to.

MR. DICKETTS. This is my property - I have minutely examined it, and compared it; it is all of a colour and width - here is some of the kerseymere as well as the cloth; it was safe in my house at eight o'clock in the morning, when I left - here is not above half of it.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q.Does the property correspond with what you lost? A. No - I did not lose it in such lengths as this; it is black - I have found none of the brown; there are thousands of pieces of the same width - there is no mark of my own on it; it was a whole piece - I cut the ends of the piece off, and have them here.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You had cut the end pieces off before? A. Yes, just the fag-end, the list - there is nothing in that to make it correspond; I never sent any cloth to Guest's.

ANDREW MACMANUS. When I went to Guest's there was a smoke issuing from the kitchen - it smelt as if cloth was being burned; I had a party of the Police trying to get in at the time, and a pistol was presented at me.

Atwick's Defence. I am innocent.

Robertson's Defence. I am innocent.

Three witnesses gave Robertson a good character.

ATWICK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

ROBERTSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

WILLIAMS - NOT GUILTY .

[May 17.]

Reference Number: t18310512-13

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

999. EDWARD BROWN , alias EDWARD ROWLEY , BENJAMIN GRIMLEY , and THOMAS CHALK were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Augustus Katenbeck , on the 22nd of April , at Edmonton , and stealing therein 50 yards of silk, value 12l.; 140 yards of satin, value 24l.; 20 handkerchiefs, value 10l.; 10 scarfs, value 2l.; 350 yards of ribbon, value 25l.; 2 shawls, value 3l.; 60 yards of persian, value 4l.; 1 time-piece, value 2l.; 15 silver buttons, value 10s.; 2 silver spoons, value 4s.; 1 pair of clasps, value 1s.; 1 silver buckle, value 2s.; 1 AEolian harp, value 1s.; 2 silver castor tops, value 5s.; 16 hanks of knitting-worsted, value 3l.; 50 yards of gauze, value 3l., and 7 sovereigns, his property .

MESSRS. RYLAND and BODKIN conducted the prosectuion.

AUGUSTUS KATENBECK . I am a linen-draper , and live in Edmonton parish. On Friday night, the 22nd of April, I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock - I saw my house and premises secured; between five and six in the morning Pitts, my servant, alarmed me; I went down stairs, and found the house broken open - they had broken through the brick work, by the side of the back door, and made an entrance - I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of the shop - (enumerating them); the time-piece was a very peculiar one; the bottom of it was made of wood, and painted to imitate bronze - it had a figured brass band round the top; it was made out of a few materials, which I fitted up myself - it was old-fashioned, and stood on three brass legs; I missed many other articles of linen-drapery, and an Eolian harp - the value of all the articles stolen is not less than 100l.; I should think considerably more - I found an old tinder-box left behind, which did not belong to the premises - I saw the greatest part of the property before Mr. Mores, the Magistrate, about a week after the robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any second Christian name? A. No, nor partner - I reside in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q.Did you examine the house to see that it was fastened? A. I did - I examined the street door and the back door; I only keep one servant - she locked and bolted the door, and placed two chairs against the back door, besides locking it, and it had a chain, a bar, and bell - we had placed chairs there for a long time, as we had heard of an attempt at robbery being discovered by chairs being thrown down - I never saw Chalk near my house - the door was not insecure.

SARAH PITTS. I am servant to Mr. Katenbeck. On the 22nd of April, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I fastened the doors and windows - I fastened the back door with two bolts, a lock, and chain, and placed two chairs against it; I came down about twenty minutes before six o'clock in the morning - it was then light; I found the little shop door open, which was shut over night - the chairs I had placed before the door I found in the kitchen when I came down - I had not removed them there; the alarm-bell, which hung on the door the night before, was taken off, and put in the garden - I observed the brickwork taken out of the wall by the side of the door; the space was not large enough for a man to get in, but he might put his arm in and open the door.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The door was locked, bolted, and chained? A. Yes; a hand could

be put in to remove the bolts and chain - they got the door shutter down, and then broke a pane of glass - the bottom bolt could not be undone through the hole in the brick work; I was the only servant.

MR. RYLAND. Q. Was the hole on the side where the lock was, or the hinges? A. On the side where the lock was - the chain fastened on the side of the hinge - the hole in the wall was about half a yard from the floor; an arm put through it could unlock the door, undo the top bolt, and unscrew the shutter; a pane of glass was cut- all the fastenings might then he undone.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Is it true that the door was not bolted? A. It was bolted; the chairs were put to make a noise if any body came.

SAMUEL PATRICK . I keep the White Hart, at Tottenham-hale - there is also a White Hart at Tottenham; my house is about two miles from the prosecutor's - I know all the prisoners by sight, by seeing them at my house; I saw them all three at my house on Friday night, the 22nd of April; Chalk was at work in the neighbourhood - they came to my house for the purpose of drinking, and left about nine o'clock; it might be a little after - they were in company together, and left together.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I dare say you made them pay for what they drank? A. I gave them credit for one pot of beer.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q.Did you see Robert Merry at your house that night? A. I saw Merry -I do not know his Christian name; he worked with Chalk - I do not see him pay Chalk any money, or see them settling any account - they came in about seven or half-past seven o'clock.

WILLIAM POOL. I am a retailer of beer at Tottenham; I know all the prisoners. I saw them all three at my house on Friday night, the 22nd of April - they came in about a quarter-past nine o'clock; my house is about a mile nearer to the prosecutor's than Patrick's - I believe they all came in together; they had some porter, drank together, and staid till about five minutes after ten, which was my time to clear the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.They went, because you turned them out? A. Yes; I told them it was my time to shut up, and they went.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Have you not known Chalk some time? A. He has frequented my house about six months.

THOMAS BRADFORD. I am a labourer, and live at the prisoner Brown's house - this is the eleventh week I have been there; neither of the other prisoners lodged there - it is Brown's house, and is in High-cross-lane, Tottenham. On Saturday morning, the 23rd of April, between three and four o'clock, just as it got day-light, I saw the three prisoners there together - I was up.

Q. What first attracted your attention? A. I was up stairs in my room - the house has only one floor; I heard somebody come in - I did not know who it was, and I went to the stairs to see; they had no candle when they came in, but a little bit of candle was lighted in the back washhouse - I saw them all standing in the wash-house; they were not doing any thing, or bring my any thing in.

Q.Recollect what you stated before the Magistrate, and be careful, did you see any thing in the wash-house that night? A. Yes, I saw the time-piece while the prisoners were there - the time-piece appeared to be on brass standings, and it had some brass about it - I saw several things laying down, but do not know what they were, not to swear to it - there might be a little ribbon, but I was not near enough to see exactly what colour they were; I am certain I saw something there resembling ribbons - I was not on the stairs above two minutes.

Q. Was what resembled ribbons, rolled up or unrolled? A.Unrolled - there was a goodish lot of whatever it was; I saw some worsted - there seemed a goodish bit of it; I saw nothing else - the things were close to the three prisoners; it is a very small place - I stood there looking about two minutes; I then left them, went up stairs, and went to bed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What distance were you from the wash-house? A.About four yards - I was looking through the bannisters, not through a window - I did not speak to them; I peeped down, and went back; I could tell the colour of the worsted, because it was dark blue; I cannot tell the colour of the ribbon, it might have been white, black, or green, for what I know; it was as near to me as the worsted, but when a lot of things are together, you cannot see them all alike - there might he different colours of that, but the worsted was all blue; I am a labourer, and do any thing I can get to do - I have been in trouble before for getting tipsy, and been locked up for it - I have been in the cage once or twice - three times is the utmost; I was taken to the cage with these three prisoners - I will not swear it has not been four times, five, or six; I do not think it requisite to swear about it - I have not been locked up six times; you would make a person tell a lie.

Q.Did you not say you would not swear you had not been six times locked up? A. I told you I would not swear to it - I was never locked up for any thing but drunkenness, except when I was taken with these prisoners - I was never accused of theft in my life; I was in the employ of Mr. Fiddler, of Tottenham, before this happened.

Q. Now, justly or unjustly, were you never accused of theft? A. Not any thing but drunkenness.

MR. BODKIN. Q.How long have you lived at Tottenham? A. I was born and bred there, and have lived there all my life.

JOHN DELLARS. I am a labourer, and live at Southgate. I know the prisoner Grimley; I heard of this robbery on the Sunday morning, as it happened on Friday -I saw Grimley on the Saturday after the robbery, at the Red Lion, at Tottenham, when I was getting my dinner, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon; I had not then heard of the robbery - he had a little bit of music in his mouth: he played it, and one and another asked him to let them look at it; I asked him to let me see it - he said he would sell it, and I gave him 4d. for it; I gave it to Griffiths, the officer, last Friday week - I kept it in my possession till then; I saw him take a few shillings out of his pocket, as they appeared to be - he said nothing.

WILLIAM SAVAGE. I am shopman to Mr. Murray, a pawnbroker, of East Smithfield. On Saturday, the 23rd of April, the prisoner Brown, came to sell some old silver, which I bought of him, and have got here - it is silver buttons, a silver clasp, a spoon, and part of another, a silver pencil-case, and a broken silver buckle - I broke that up

to weight it; I gave him about 39s. for the articles - he did not tell me his name; there was some silver coin among them, which the prosecutor cannot identify, and I have not brought them; I gave 39s. for the whole - there were several shillings - it was all mixed with other old silver; Mr. Katenbeck picked out what he thought was his -Grimley brought in a time-piece the same morning and offered it in pledge; I am quite sure of his person - I did not take it in; it was a very old fashioned one, made of wood, and a little brass-work about it - I thought it like an urn; I did not notice what it stood on - Grimley came first and offered it, and in half an hour Brown brought the silver; they were not in the shop together.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You do not remember how many coins you bought among the silver? A. No; a dollar was worth 4s. - there were several shillings, I cannot say how many; I put them all into the scale together, and weighed them; there might be 20s. or 30s.; they were old shillings; I do not think there were thirty; I would rather swear there were not than that there were; Mr. Katenbeck saw all my silver, and pointed out what he could identify; what I have brought is worth about 20s., and the whole weighed about 8ozs. - Brown was dressed very respectable, and gave a good account of himself; he told me he came out of the country, and that they were given him by his father, and that he was going into the country - they were old fashioned buttons, and Prussian silver, not worth 3s. an ounce; there was not crest on the spoon - it is an old fashioned spoon, and Prussian silver.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were these things sold you by weight? A. Yes - I gave 4s. an ounce, which is the value for Prossian silver; it is silver mixed with tin.

JOHN THOMAS. I am a watchmaker, and live in New-road, St. George's East. I know Grimley and Brown; on Saturday, the 23rd of April, about ten o'clock in the morning, they came to my shop together, to dispose of some silver; one of them, I do not know which, produced two Spanish dollars and two 3s. tokens to sell, which I put into the scale; I am not quite certain whether there was any more or not, but after that, one of them chucked a piece of a spoon into the scale - I do not know which of them it was - the scale was as near as possible on a balance, and I took the piece of spoon out, threw it back, and said I would do business with one of them at a time, as it was a different man who threw the spoon in - after that the one who threw in the broken spoon pulled a time-piece out of his pocket, and asked me to purchase it; one of them produced some old fashioned buttons, but which it was I do not know - these are them (looking at some) - in consequence of seeing so many different pieces from one and another, I refused to have any thing to do with them; the time piece was on a wooden stand, painted like bronze - there was a figured brass round the edges, and it stood on brass feet - it was rather old fashioned; I refused to deal with them, and after a good bit they left the shop, taking the property with them - I afterwards found in the box of the scales which I had used at the transaction, the top of the spoon, and I gave it to the officer; it was the same as was chucked into the scale, as I suppose, for it did not belong to me, and I do not know how else it came into my shop; I believe it to be the one they brought - it might be two or three days after they came that I found it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you keep any shopman? A. No - the buttons are silver; I cannot say if I bought them whether I should weigh them with spoons - I should buy old silver by the ounce, but I might reckon the buttons as useful articles; I do not consider them so good silver as spoons - the shanks are soldered on: spoons are generally reckoned the best silver - there is a difference in the quality even of coin; I cannot tell whether there is any thing in silver to depreciate it, unless it is assayed - I should not consider them such good silver as spoons, but I have not tried them - I should not call them Prussian silver.

JOHN CAMP . I am a constable of Edmonton. On Monday, the 25th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was at the Horse and Groom there; I heard a noise, which induced me to go into the house; I saw the prisoners Chalk and Grimley, in company with others, drinking - I went into the bar, and they saw me; Chalk followed me to the bar-door, and asked if I would have any thing to drink - I told him No; he afterwards went into the tap-room, and in a few minutes he came again, and asked if I would have any thing to drink; I refused - he then asked if I had found out any thing of Katenbeck's robbery; I told him I had not - he said, "Oh, they must be some Londoners - us country folks cannot do that;" I told him he might make some people believe that, but he would not me; he then said, "You may as well say it was me;" I replied, "I believe you was one of the party;" he afterwards asked me to drink again, which I refused - he then put his hand into his pocket, pulled out some money, and said, "Here you b - r, here is some of Katenbeck's money, and I have got plenty more of it in my pocket," and he pulled out some more - I replied, I thought he had never spoken a truer word in his life; he then called for a glass of brandy or a bottle of wine, saying he would treat me with either - he ordered the landlord to bring it; I still refused having any, and he said, "You b - r, come out, if I could get you out here I would run a knife into your bl - dy guts, and rip you open;" I told him if he said that again I would come out, take him into custody, and take him to the cage; he then denied saying so, and said he did not mean any thing, and would give me any thing to drink - it there ended, but he afterwards struck a person in the house, and I went in to take him out.

Q. Had Grimley left when this conversation took place? A. He was there, in the tap-room; I have not a doubt of his being able to hear it, from his manner of speaking; I did not see Brown that evening - Mr. Reed, a farmer, and Shadbolt, the landlord, were in the bar with me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Grimley take any part in the conversation? - A. I did not hear him - he was talking, but did not hold out any threats to me; neither Mr. Reed nor the landlord took any part in the conversation; I was not in any fear of my life; when I went to turn him out of the house they helped me; Chalk was against the bar door, and Grimley was in the tap-room, which joins the bar - a great many others were there; Grimley was drinking with them - there was nothing between them but the bar door; every body in the tap-room could hear the conversation - Grimley took no share in the conversation.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. How often have you been a witness in a Court of Justice? A. I

cannot say; I have been an officer ten or twelve years - Chalk knew I was an officer perfectly well; I drank that evening, but not with them - no man ever saw me drunk; I was perfectly sober - Chalk spoke in a very loud tone; I have no doubt Grimley heard it - he seemed to care nothing about what he said; I should think there might be a dozen persons in the tap-room - I thought it very extraordinary, but I thought it was true; I suspected he was one of them from the first morning I was sent for - he told me this was some of Katenbeck's money, but I wanted stronger proof, and that we had in a few days, and I gave information to the officers - I should have taken him that night, if I thought I had proof enough; it was not said in a joke.

Q.Might he not have been hear saying this at the distance of twenty yards? A.Perhaps he might, for he was in a violent passion, talking about ripping my guts open; I saw no stick or knife in his hand - he threw half a crown out of his hand, and I saw a great deal more silver; he was not perfectly sober, but he was not drunk - he was the worse for liquor; I believe he knew what he was about - he said what I have stated exactly.

COURT. Q. Had you known Chalk any length of time? A. Yes - he is a sawyer; he follows that business sometimes.

JAMES HENRY SHADBOLT. I keep the Horse and Groom public-house, at Edmonton. I remember Camp being in my bar on Monday evening, the 25th of April - there were about nine people in my tap-room, including the three prisoners; they were all three in there at the time Camp came in - he went into the bar; Chalk came to him, and asked him to drink - he refused, and Chalk called him an old b - r; the prisoners had two or three pots of beer - Chalk asked Camp to drink, and after that asked him to have a bottle of wine; he refused drinking at all with them - nobody but Chalk asked him to drink; Chalk pulled out a handful of money, and said, "D - n you, you old b - r, here is plenty of old Katenbeck's, money, we have got more when this is gone, in Mr. Reed's hollow tree in one of his fields;" I heard nothing more - I had the house cleared shortly after.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Camp hear all that you heard, for it was addressed to him? A. Yes- he told Camp that he had got more in Mr. Reed's hollow tree; Camp must have heard that - I have been out of Court while he was examined; I should think he must have heard all about the rest of the money being in the hollow tree - there were only Chalk and Grimley at the bar when he spoke of the hollow tree; nobody was drinking then - Grimley was standing up at the bar door; they were all three together at the bar door, or walking about by the side of the bar - they had nothing to drink then, for I would not draw any thing.

Q. If Camp has said that Grimley and Brown were sitting with the rest of the people drinking near the bar, he must be mistaken? A. They had been drinking together at the first part of the conversation; there were about six of them there - I should think they were within hearing; I am satisfied that at the time of the conversation, Grimley was standing at the bar door listening to it- I cannot say that he took any part in the conversation; I should think Camp must have seen him at the bar door.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Did you mention to any body what you heard about the money? A. He mentioned it to Camp, the officer, shortly after he came into the house; I gave this evidence before Mr. Mores - I should think they were sober; nothing whatever was said to them about Katenbeck's property - they brought it up themselves; I can swear to the very words Chalk used - I did not write them down, but I took notice of them; he put his hands into his pockets, and the observation he made, made me remark it - he was sober, I should think; I do not think it was said in a joke - I was in the bar at the time, and listened to what they said; my attention was not called off.

MR. RYLAND. Q. You say, at the time of the conversation, the other prisoners were either at the bar, or walking about near it? A. Yes - the tap-room joins the bar: Grimley was leaning against the bar door, which opens into the tap-room; nobody could be in the tap-room without being close to the bar.

MR. J. ALLEY to JOHN CAMP . Q. Have you told Chalk at any time that you would ruin him if you could? A.Certainly not; I never said I would get him transported - I never took any money from his father or mother, unless it has been when he has been before a Magistrate, and there have been fees to pay for serving warrants, and I received the money for the warrants from the Magistrate's clerk; I never took the money from his father or mother - I never expressed any dislike to him, or said I would do him an injury.

STEVEN REED . I am a farmer, and live at Edmonton. I was in the bar at the Horse and Groom on Monday night, the 25th of April, about eight o'clock; I saw Grimley and Chalk there - I saw Chalk put his hand into his pocket, take out a handful of silver, and shake it; he said to Camp, "Here, you b - r, here is some of Mr. Katenbeck's money, and when that is gone I will go down to a hollow tree, which stands in Steven Reed's field, and get more;" he was then leaning over the bar door, and Grimley stood by the side of him - he told Camp if he had him outside he should like to let his bl - dy guts out; a man, named Gregory, a gardener, was also in the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Gregory here? A. No - Camp was about three yards from Chalk when he said he would go to the hollow tree; he was addressing himself to Camp - I and Camp did not go down to the tree to see if there was any money; I could not tell whether there was any there or not - I did not believe him; he was rather in liquor - I cannot tell his meaning for saying what he did; I had no reason not to believe him - I thought it was malice towards Camp, which made him talk of ripping his guts out; he said if he had a knife he would do it - Camp had given him no offence; he pressed him very much to drink ale, and then brandy, rum, or wine.

Q.Had you the least doubt he was so drunk that he did not know what he was saying? A. I cannot say that; I should think he did know what he was saying - there are a great many trees in the field; I cannot say which tree he meant - I do not know a tree which goes by the name of the hollow one; I did not consider I had any occasion to ask him which tree it was in - Grimley was standing by; he was drinking at times - he had a pot in his hand,

and was passing it to the rest at times; I am sure of that- I should think there were six or eight people in the tap-room; they all heard about the hollow tree - they were not all drinking with Grimley; I should think two or three were not drinking with him - Brown was not there at all; I did not see him - I saw all the persons in the room; he was not one of them.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. You have said Grimley was drunk? A.No, Chalk was; I rather thought it was some of Mr. Katenbeck's money that he had - that did not strike me as being so curious as the rest being in a tree; I did not give him in charge - there were others present besides me.

Q. What made you believe the money was Katenback's? A. From the character of the man; I did not believe the money was in the tree - I thought that a curious place; I certainly thought it extcaordinary that he should say he had got Katenbeck's money, and I had reason to believe it true from his character.

MR. BODKIN. Q.Extraordinary, or not, did he say so? A. Yes.

JURY to MR. SHADBOLT. Q. How long have you known Chalk? A. I have seen him at my house once or twice- I have not seen him drinking with other people, except on this occasion; the statement about the money was made to Camp.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am a constable. On the 20th of April I searched Brown's house; he was not present, but his wife was - I know it was his house; I had seen him living there - I went into the bed-room, and while I was searching a box Mrs. Brown was behind me; I turned my head, and she snatched something out of another box, which appeared to be muslin; she goes by the name of Mrs. Brown, and I knew her to live there with him - I instantly seized her hand, and asked what she had got; she said it belonged to her baby, and put it into her bosom - I took it from her, and it was a piece of black satin; this was at a quarter before five o'clock in the afternoon, and about seven the same evening I apprehended the three prisoners at the White Hart, Tottenham-hale - they were altogether then; when I found they were there I called Coffee, Webb, Knott and Camden - they went in with me, and we apprehended the three prisoners altogether; Chalk was rather obstinate - he used no fowl language nor threats, but said he would not he taken; we secured them all.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLET. Q. Did you see Chalk enter the house? A. No; he swore I should not take him - I laid hold of his arm to put the handcuffs on, and he struggled; he did not strike, but, when I held his arm, he laid hold of me, and I suppose would have tripped me up if he could - I found 13s. on him; I searched his house, and found nothing but two duplicates belonging to his wife.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I am a constable of Tettenham. I went, accompanied by other persons, to search Brown's house on Friday night, the 29th of April, after the three prisoners had been apprehended; the first time I went, a man, named Wiseman, was there, but not Brown's wife - I found nothing the first time; I went again the same day, and looked on the roof of his house outside - I borrowed a ladder, got on the tiles, and, by the side of the chimney, I found the mortar, which is called the pointing, had been removed; I lifted up one of the tiles, and saw a bag full of something under the tiles - I produce it; I found a wrapper full of goods in the same place, and a bundle of worsted - I found a chisel in the back washhouse; I have been to Mr. Katenbeck's house since the robbery, and examined his back door - I could not see any marks on the door, because the boards had been removed, and new ones placed; Mr. Karenbeck gave me this piece of wood, which has marks on it corresponding with the chisel.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This, you say, exactly corresponds? A. Yes, if you turn it the right was you will find it does; nobody could get on the roof without a ladder; the prisoners were in custody at the time I made the search; I knew the people in the house - they were not strangers to me.

JURY. Q. Was there no trap door to the house? A. No; nobody could get to it from the inside.

COURT. Q.Were the things in the bag the same as are now in it? A. Yes; I saw it opened, and it contained the name things as now.

MR. KATENBECK. I gave this piece of wood to the officer; it is part of the door-way of the house, which was removed by the persons who broke in.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I dare say fifty thousand chisels might fit this mark? A. There are other instruments of the some size, no doubt.

MR. RYLAND. Q. Have you inspected all this property? A. I have; it is mine, and part of the property I lost that night - it consists of a great part of what was stolen; I am certain every thing here is mine, except the wrapper, which does not belong to me - this silver is my property, decidedly; I lost a number of old coins, some plain shillings, some had money, and, I rather think, there was a dollar - it was in a small drawer in my desk, where I used to put all those sort of things; these buttons I know, they are sixty years old - I know this pencil-case, this part of a spoon, and the salt-spoon; the buckles are German silver.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you any private-mark on the goods? A. Yes, I have on the gnetest part of them.

E. R. MORIS, ESQ. I am a Magistrate of this county. The prisoners were brought before me at the Petty Sessions; Brown was called upon in the usual way, and asked if he had any thing to say in answer to the charge; he was cautioned not to say any thing that might injure himself - what he said was taken down, then read over to him, and he signed it in my presence; this is the paper.(looking at it), it has my signature to it - the other prisoners were present when he made the statement,(read) -

The examination of Edward Brown , a prisoner now in custody, on suspicion of having robbed the house of Augustus Katenbeck , at Edmonton, this 29th of April, 1831: - I this day week, went into the skittle-ground of the White Hart public-house, in Tottenham-hale, between the hours of four and five in the afternoon, and after playing in the skittle-ground with Benjamin Grimley and Thomas Chalk , *we all three went together into the tap-room; Benjamin Grimley proposed to Thomas Chalk and myself to go to Mr. Katenbeck's, know-

*In reading this document, the names of Grimley and Chalk were omitted.

ing the situation of the house, to get property out - I considered for about ten minutes, and at last was persuaded to go; Chalk and myself went to Poole's beer-shop, and Grimley went to Edmonton - a little before ten o'clock, Grimley having returned to us there, we all three went together to a shed at the bottom of Cow-lane, in Edmonton, and remained there between two and three hours; we then went to a hedge in Water-lane, where Grimley got a chisel - we then went towards the back of Mr. Katenbeck's house, and got over a fence into his garden; Grimley then with the chisel took off some boarding near the back door, when he found a brick wall, in which he made a hole, but could not make it large enough to get through; he then cut a grape-vise away, and it was proposed to take the shutters off the glass-door, which we did, and a pane of glass was broken, by which means we opened the door and got into the house - two or three chairs were placed against the door, which we pushed away; we then went into the kitchen, and opened the cupboard door and drawers; we took a silver mustard-spoon, some halfpence, and silver from one of the drawers - we then went into a parlour, and took away a time-piece, which Grimley put into my pocket; we then proceeded through a passage into the shop, where we took away the property now produced, and some old silver coin, which I sold at a pawnbroker's near St. Katharine's-dock; I retained 13s. of the money, and gave the remainder of the money afterwards to Grimley - the goods now produced were taken by all three of us to my house, and placed under my bed, where they remained two or three days, when I removed them into the roof of my house; the bag and apron are my own property - it was about one o'clock on Saturday morning when we broke into the house; we afterwards returned into the marshes, and from thence to my house - after I had got the silks and shop goods I did not know what to do with them; I did not know what became of the time-piece.

EDWARD BROWN.

The bell on the door was taken off and given to me, which I laid down on the ground in the garden.

EDWARD BROWN.

Taken before me, the prisoner Edward Brown, having been first asked what he had to say in answer to the charge, and cautioned as to his statement.

E. R. MORES.

JAMES GRIFFITHS re-examined. I received from John Dellars this piece of music, which Mr. Katenbeck has seen.

MR. KATENBECK. This is mine - it is an Eolian harp, I call it so; I lost it with the goods - I have had it about five years.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are these not very common things? A. I think not, made in that way; they were common five years ago - I know it by one of the pegs having been broken and mended again; there is no mark where it was mended - it is a note in playing.

MR. RYLAND. Q. Have you tried, by playing on it, whether you can discover that it is a mended instrument? A. No, it is quite out of order, and I cannot play it.

MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Is there any private mark on the silks or satin? A. The greatest part of the silks have my private mark - here are the tickets, with private marks on them, and some are in my own hand-writing; here is this crape scarf I know.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You sell them with the marks on them? A. Yes, but these have not been offered for sale, and I have sold none of exactly this pattern, to the best of my knowledge, but I may - I had one of this colour the night before the robbery; to the best of my belief I had not sold this scarf, and I found it with the goods which I lost that night.

MR. BODKIN. Q.Had you, the day before the robbery, an article of that kind? A. I had, and missed it the next morning - I have scarcely two patterns slike in my stock; I had thirty or forty different scarfs or handkerchiefs, all of different patterns - they nearly emptied the whole box; I have not a doubt that the goods now produced belonged to me.

Brown's Defence. If I had not been persuaded by others, I should not have thought of doing what I did - we were all three together in the White Hart, and Grimley proposed to go to Mr. Katenbeck's - he persuaded me, and I believe Chalk woudl not have done it if he had not been persuaded; I always bore a good character, and never did any thing till I got into company.

Grimley's Defence. I know nothing of Brown, further then seeing him, the same as others; what he says is false, with regard to me - what has been stated here to my prejudice is false; I never was in Mr. Katenheck's premises, nor near them, except being once outside the house.

Chalk's Defence. I never saw Brown that night, after we went out of Pool's house - I should like to ask the constables if they knew any thing wrong of me before; I had been at work all day, and at night went into Pool's to get a pint of beer - I met a bargeman or two there; Brown and Grimley came in, and we had a pot of beer together; the day I was taken I had been working for - Hun, Esq. - the beer-shop was in my way home; I went home, went to bed, and saw no more of Brown - my sister would have come and proved this, but I did not know the trial would come on.

Brown. I wish to know if the constables know any thing wrong of me.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I knew Brown before, and always considered him a hard working industrious man.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I always considered Brown honest till this time.

Three witnesses gave Brown a good character, ten deposed the same for Grimley, and one for Chalk.

BROWN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

GRIMLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

CHALK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

All recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of their characters.

[May 17.]

Reference Number: t18310512-14

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1000. GEORGE DENT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , at St. George, Hanover-square, 2 beds, value 10l.; 5 sheets, value 20s.; 6 blankets, value 18s.; 6 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 cupboard, value 20s.; 1 chest of drawers, value 3l.; 1 set of china, value 5l.; 6 chairs, value 10s.; 1 tea-kettle, value 5s.; 1 scuttle, value 7s.; 1 watch, value 1l.; 5 saucepans, value 4s.; 6 knives, value 1s.; 6 forks, value 1s.; 1 ring, value 10s.; 2 spoons, value 5s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 10s.; 4 umbrellas, value 4s., and 2 yards of silk, value 4s., the goods of Sarah Davies , in her dwelling-house .

SARAH DAVIES . I am a widow , and live in Little Grosvenor-street , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - it is my dwelling-house; I keep a small butcher's shop there. The prisoner was in my service for about a month or six weeks - he lived in the house; he went away on Easter Monday, the 4th of April - he returned in about a week, and I told him I must do my work myself; I did

not owe him any money - this was about the 7th of April.

Q.Then, on the 4th of April, there was an end of your situation as mistress and servant - he wanted to come back about the 7th, and you would not let him? A. Yes - I did not owe him any thing; I had lent him money on the 2nd of April, to take his clothes out of pawn, and he had not paid me - his duty was to carry out meat , and call on the customers for orders; he owed me about 5l. 9s., some of which was money lent, and the rest he had received for meat, and not paid me. On the 12th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock, he came to my house - I did not see any horse and cart there; he asked if I knew what an awkward predicament I stood in - I said No; he said there was a man coming to arrest me at twelve o'clock - I did not know what he meant; he told me it was a man, whom he considered I owed money to for rent - I was very much agitated when he told me that, and went out to call on a friend to endeavour to get some money; I called at a place in Market-street, St. James' - I went to endeavour to berrow some money towards paying this man.

Q.When the prisoner said this, did you not ask him who the man was? A. I knew his name very well; he said a person named Barron was coming to arrest me.

Q. Did you owe Barron any money? A. I had left him 7l. worth of fixtures, and asked him to let the house, which I occupied of him, before I went to Grosvenor-street - he was the landlord of that house; there was 7l. between us for fixtures - it was not a disputed debt; I left him 7l. worth of fixtures, and asked him to let the house, and make the best he could of the fixtures - I had paid the other quarter's rent, and there was a current quarter running; I was answerable for the ensning quarter, and he was answerable to me for the 7l. worth of fixtures, which would just over the quarter's rent - it was 28l. a year; the prisoner said he had seen Barron, and that he was coming to arrest me; I went to Miss Bunn, a relation by marriage, to borrow the money - she could not accommodate me; I was alarmed, fearing I should be arrested, and went further, but did not get the money that day - I got some lent me the next morning, and went and paid Barron some.

Q.When you went out, who did you leave in care of your property? A. The prisoner - he was to remain there till I returned; he was in care of my house and furniture, and nothing was to be toueched till I came back - he promised to stay and take care of my house till I returned; I was absent two or three hours, or rather better, and then returned, but my son, who is fifteen years old, had come down to Market-street; when I returned I found all my property gone out of the house - the place was completely stripped of every thing that was there; there was not a thing left.

Q.Had the prisoner shown you any paper or any thing? A.Nothing at all; he merely said Barron was going to arrest me - the prisoner was gone as well as the property; I went to look for my property immediately - I called on Mr. Eley, in Henry-place, Waterloo-road, about a bill, and there found a pair of sheets; I went there because my son directed me there - Eley's is a private house; I went there again with a Policeman, and found a tea-cannister there, which was mine; I had left the sheets safe at home when I went out - I afterwards found my drawers, my china, blankets, sheets, beds, and almost every thing there; I still miss a number of things; I value all I lost at more than 20l.

Q. Did Eley produce any receipt to you? A. No - I gave him a receipt for 11s. 9d. for meat, because he said he had paid that to the prisoner; the prisoner had no right to take away my property - he was not permitted by me to take it.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.Have you ever gone by the name of Simpson? A. No; I know Wooley - he is an attorney; he was employed by me to recover money from one Hill.

Q.Look at this, which is Wooley's receipt for the debt and coats in an action, Simpson Q.Hill? A. Yes; it was a debt left to me by the will of David Saunders , and Mrs. Simpson went to the court, and administered for me - the prisoner was four or five weeks in my service, and he had formerly lodged with me; I thought him an honest young man - the house I formerly lived in is in Eaton-lane, Pimlico; it was a green-grocer's shop, not a butcher's - I sent the prisoner to give up the key a few days before quarter-day - my property was removed from there at different times; I began to move about the 21st of January, and finished two or three days before quarter-day - I removed some things in the day time; at any time that was most convenient - some were removed after dark, and some in open day; the only reason for removing as I did was, to save the expence of a cart - the greatest part was moved in the day; one bed was taken at night for them to sleep on - I told Barron, a few days after Christmas, that I was going to leave; I often saw him - I did not tell him I was moving things, but he knew it; I gave him a bill to put up in his window at Christmas, to let the house - Barron did not agree to buy the fixtures; I asked him above six weeks before I left to let the house, and make the best he could of them, and he said he would - the greater part of my property was there then; I paid 7l. odd for the fixtures - they are not sold yet, and the house is still on my hands; Barron had one of my cards before I moved.

Q.You say when you found your things gone, you went to Eley's? A. Yes; I went there as soon as I possibly could - my son had found out the carman who moved them; I did not know Eley - I never saw him but twice in my life before; he had been to my house on the Saturday night before, and bought a piece of beef.

Q.Had he not been there taking an account of your property? A. No; he did not come and take an inventory of my furniture - I never knew him take an account of it; the first time I ever saw him was on the Saturday night -I never made over my interest in the furniture to the prisoner; I am quite sure of that - a receipt for 20l. was produced to me before the Magistrate, but I knew nothing about it whatever; I saw it at Queen-square.

Q. Had not that receipt your name to it? whether you choose to admit it was your writing is another question? A. I do not know, for I did not particularly look at it; I said I knew nothing about it - it was put into my hands; I did not swear it was not my hand-writing; I said I knew nothing about it.

Q.Eley showed you the things at once when you went? A. No, he did not.

COURT. Q.The receipt could not be yours, because you had given none? A. I had given none, and never agreed to sell my property to any one.

JOHN COLLISON . I am a Police-constable. On Tuesday night, the 12th of April, about eight o'clock, the prosecutrix applied to me, and said her property was gone; I went to Eley's with her - Eley was not at home then; I found a pair of sheets there, which she identified; I brought them away; I went again in about an hour, and waited round the house some time; and as Eley was coming home I stopped on the road with the prisoner, and took them both to the station - they were both going together towards Eley's house, and within one hundred yards of it; I searched them, and found some papers on them, in consequence of which I went to Eley's house, and found in three or four different rooms the prosecutrix's property mentioned in the indictment - when I went before there were several girls there, who refused to let me into the rooms, saying the rooms belonged to them; here are the papers - on Dent I found this one, marked A; when he was locked up I searched Eley, and found this one marked B - Dent had told me he had written a paper and given it to Eley; he told me he wrote this paper after he heard I was in search of him - here is another paper which Dent produced before the Magistrate, when asked what he had to say; I was desired to put my name on it, and produce it on the trial.

The papers A and B were here read;

A, dated 12th April, 1831, was a receipt for the sum of 15l., from Thomas Eley , for value received signed, G. Dent.

B was, "I desire Mr. Eley to give up to Mrs. Davies all her wearing-apparel, &c.; as to the house-hold goods, they are not to be given up till I have seen Mrs. Davies - G. Dent."

THOMAS ELEY . I live at No. 18, Henry-street, Waterloo-road. I wait at different tavern dinners in the City- I rent the house; I have known the prisoner about twelve months.

Q.When did he first speak to you on the subject of these goods? A.About a fortnight before, I think: he showed me a receipt for the goods - he first mentioned about them about ten days or a fortnight before the officer came to my house; he showed me this receipt (looking at it) - he told me they were about to let the shop, and he had got those goods, and did not wish to dispose of them if he could put them somewhere for a short time.

Q.What shop did you think he meant? A. The butcher's shop; he said he expected a man to give him 15l., and asked if I thought I could take the goods in, and take care of them for him - I told him I did not know whether I should have room, unless I saw what they consisted of; he asked if I would take the trouble to walk up to the house, and look at them - I said I would; he said, "If you go up you had better just set down what there is, and then you will be able to judge whether you can take care of them."

Q.Could you not have told if he had said, there were so many of such and such things? A. He wished me to go and see; I went to the butcher's shop that evening, and received the goods the day after I went.

Q.Then it was on the 11th? A. Yes - I never went to look at the property till the night before it was taken; Mrs. Davies was at home - I asked her if George was at home; she said he was not - I asked if he had said any thing about my coming there; she said he had - I had been there before; I asked if George had said any thing about my coming there to look at the things - she said Yes, and she told me what they were as near as she could judge; I just penciled them down in a little book before her.

Q.And, of course, told her that George was to bring them to you the next day? A. I thought she understood that; she agreed readily to my taking the inventory; I told her that would do - she asked if I would take any thing, and I had some gin; I did not pencil down her wearing-apparel - I put down the shop fixtures, the household goods, beds, and blankets - she quite agreed to it, and told me what they were; she pointed them out herself; they were in the back parlour - I was to take care of the goods for Dent; he had told me he was to dispose of the shop - I saw Dent next morning, and told him what I had done, and in the course of the day Dent sent a note over to me by a lad, and asked me to go and assist to remove the goods - I accordingly went there, and saw Dent; he asked where I could get a van - I said a man lived close by who let vans; the goods were brought to my house - I was at home when they arrived; I have four rooms and a kitchen; Mrs. Davies came to my house about two hours after they arrived, and asked me where George was and the things - I told her I did not know where George was, but part of the things were in my house; I asked her down stairs - she went down and saw a pair of sheets and some little things laying about; I was at home - she said, "These are my sheets;" I said I understood they were Dent's, and all the things - she said,

"No such thing, they are mine, and I will take them away if you will allow me;" I said, "You had better wait and see Dent, or appoint a time, and when Dent comes in, I will keep him till you call."

Q. How came you to distribute the property in different rooms? A.I could not put it all into one room - I put some into the yard, some into the back kitchen, and some into the back parlour - I have two lodgers; the things were not found in the girl's room - I have a girl in my house; she is no relation of mine - part of the things were in the back parlour where that young woman was, the rest in the back kitchen and in the yard.

Cross-examined. Q.About the 2nd of April this young man first made a representation to you about the things? A. Yes; he told me where the shop was, and said they were his things - he showed me the receipt when he spoke about them; I cannot say it was the 2nd of April - my shop is two miles from the prosecutrix's; I went there about seven o'clock the evening before the goods were moved.

Q. You have not heard the woman examined to-day; she has sworn she never saw you but once in her life before they were moved, and that was about the purchase of some meat - now is the representation you have made true; did you go the evening before and look over the things? A. I did - if she has sworn I did no such thing in her presence, it is quite a falsehood - I think the goods were moved about two or three o'clock, and the van was hired close by, of a man, within a hundred yards of her house -I have two female lodgers; it was the prosecutrix's son who brought the note over to me the day they were moved- Dent gave me the paper about returning the wearingapparel - when he heard she had been to me, he said, "I

order you to give up nothing, but what I have put here"- when I was looking over the things Mrs. Davies told me what there was; I asked if there was any thing particular in the drawers - she said only the sheets that were worth putting down; I did not look at them - she lives in a populous neighbourhood.

COURT. Q.When you took the inventory, was the son there? A. Yes; I recollect Collison and Mrs. Davies' coming to my house, and claiming the goods - I was taken before the Magistrate; when I came in, my wife said Mrs. Davies had been with an officer and taken the goods- I said she ought not to have done so; I told my wife I should go to the station-house, and inquire about it, which I did, and met Dent as I went - I said, "Do you know Mrs. Davies has been and taken the sheets?" he said,"Has she?" I said I was going to the station - we went together, and asked if they knew she had been and taken the sheets - they said Yes, that she had sworn it was her property; Dent said, "I will let her know it is my property," and as we came back an officer said, "George, you are wanted at the station-house," and we went there.

JOHN ALLEN . I let out vans. Eley applied to me on the 12th for a van to remove goods, and I went into Little Grosvenor-street, to a butcher's shop - I found the prisoner and Eley at the house; they put the goods into the van, and I loaded them - I considered the things belonged to them; I took them to Eley's house - the prisoner and Eley both followed the van behind I believe; when I got there I unloaded - Eley and Dent were there; the things were taken into Eley's house - I got my money, and went away; I did not see Davies's son when I moved the things.

Cross-examined. Q. How near do you live to the butcher's shop? A. About one hundred and fifty yards off; there were not many things certainly - I saw no room but the back parlour; I saw the prosecutrix's son the same day, and told him where I had moved them to - Dent followed the van, as far as I knew; there was not the least attempt at concealment.

COURT. Q. I suppose your name was on the van? A. Yes, and the prosecutrix's son came to me.

WILLIAM BROWN DAVIES . I am the prosecutrix's son, and live with her - I assist in her business. Dent lived servant with her; he went away to Greenwich fair, came back again, and then my mother and him parted - I was at home when he said my mother would be arrested for rent, and mentioned Mr. Barron; he said Barron would come the next day at twelve o'clock, with a writ, and arrest her- this was the night before the goods were removed; he came the next morning, (the day the goods were moved) - he said mother had better go out of the way, and she went out to get the money to make up the rent; she spoke about going to Mr. Barron, but he said she had better not - she went out, and I then went over to the Waterloo-road, to take a loin of veal and a shoulder of mutton to Eley's; he (Eley) had come and ordered it the over night - I cannot say how much it came to; I took it over there, leaving Dent at the house with all the goods - I saw Eley's wife at his house when I took the meat, and she said he was not at home; I had not seen him at our house that morning - I had seen him over night; I delivered the meat to his wife and came away - I was at home when it was ordered the night before; Eley ordered it himself - he was about half an hour in the shop; he did not say he had come to take an inventory of the furniture, or any thing of the kind - he came out of the shop into the parlour, and had some tea; I did not see him taking an account of the furniture with his pencil - he did no such thing in my presence; I found him there when I came home - I was not there when he first came; I was there when he had tea.

Q.Did you return in the morning before your mother came back? A. I returned first - my mother had been to Whitechapel; when I returned I found Dent there - he said somebody had been there wanting my mother, that she was at St. James' market, and I had better go and fetch her; I went, she was not there, and as I came back I met Dent in Bond-street, and asked him who was minding the shop - he said nobody, adn that he had locked it up; he said they had been and taken the goods for mother's rent, and afterwards he told me that he was arrested for 50l., and he did not owe half the money; he said somebody had been, and said it was his shop, and they had come and arrested him for 50l., and come and taken the goods - then he asked me to go with him; I refused, and asked him to give me the key of the shop - he said he should not give it up to any body but my mother, and said he had chucked my clothes on one side, and that was all he could save; he said the goods could be got back for a little money, and then he gave me up the key - I went home, and found the house stripped, but before that he told me he should go to St. James'-market, and wait till my mother came - I told him if he would wait at the market I would go home, and come to him there; I went home, and found the house stripped - I then went to the market; he was not there.

Q.Had Eley dealt at your shop before? A. I believe on the Saturday night before he bought some meat, but I did not see him then; when I came from St. James'-market I asked the people who moved the goods, and found out Allen - I waited till my mother came home, and told her what had happened; she said she would go over to Eley, and get what he owed her for the meat, towards paying the rent, and on going over we found the prisoner had drawn the money.

Cross-examined. Q.You are quite sure Eley had bought meat twice at your mother's? A. Yes, on the Saturday, and on the night before the goods were removed- I found him there the evening before the goods were removed; I do not think he had been there long - my mother asked him to have tea, because she was at tea; he was there about half an hour after I came home - he was talking about the meat; Dent came there that evening after Eley had been, and it was then he mentioned about the arrest - what I heard about it was that evening; he spoke of it again in the morning when he came, and told my mother she had better go out - he did not say to get the money; when I came back he told me my mother was gone to St. James'-market - I knew she was in the habit of going there; when I met him in Bond-street, he at first said the landlord had been, and taken the goods for rent - he then said he had been arrested for 50l.; there was no van with him - he did not say where the goods were moved; I did not ask him - I took a note to Eley, by Dent's desire, after I came back from taking the meat.

COURT. Q. You found out the goods by finding Allen; A. No - my mother went for the money, and found the sheets there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was locked up separate from Eley, and different people came to me, trying to get a different statement to what Eley had given; I said I would say nothing there - I was spoken to by one inspector and another - they said Eley said different things, and I said different; I said I had spoken the truth, and should say no more to any of them.

THOMAS MORRISON . I am a butcher, and live at Pimlico. The prisoner was about sixteen months in my service, and left about March, last year; I recommended him to my brother-in-law, and knew him down to the present time - I give him an irreproachable character; I know the prosecutrix perfectly well, and have seen her write - (looking at a receipt) I believe the signature to this to be her hand-writing.

Q. On what occasion have you seen her write? A. While the prisoner lived with me I provided him a lodging at the prosecutrix's, at 2s. a week - there was a dispute about a week's rent; I said if she would send a receipt for what I owed her I would pay it.

COURT. Q. Have you seen her write more than once? A. I had a bill for the lodging sent to me by the boy - I went to her, and she wrote a receipt before me.

Q. Having seen her write once, you know her handwriting better than she does herself? A. I swear to the best of my belief; the person who wrote it certainly ought to be the best judge - I never saw this recipt till to-day; I was informed of the prisoner being in custody last Friday week or fortnight - I came merely to give him a character; I only speak of this from having seen her write once - it is more than twelve months ago.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a journeyman butcher. I know the prosecutrix, but am not related to her - I have seen her write about three months ago; I cannot say whether the signature to this receipt is her writing, or no - I have no belief about it.

SARAH DAVIES re-examined. Q. On your solemn oath, had you ever sold the property in question to any one? A. To no human being, nor ever had a penny for any part of my property; I never sold it to Dent, or to any body.

Q. The receipt says, "7th of March, 1831, received of George Dent , 20l. for the business, and for all the household goods and shop fixtures there, that house, No. 13, Little Grosvenor-street, contains, signed this 7th day of March, by my hand, Sarah Davies ;" did you, at any time whatever, sign such a receipt? A. I never did, on my solemn oath, and never sold my business to any one; no part of it is in my hand-writing - here is an r more in Sarah than I ever write, it is Sarah.

MR. BODKIN. Q.Is this your hand-writing? (handing her the signature to her deposition, folded up.) A. No.

COURT. Q.Did you sign that before the Magistrate? A. I signed a long roll of paper, in a long sheet, on parchment; I wrote my own name - the signing at the bottom is not the same as I wrote; perhaps I might have a much better pen.

Q.Look at that? (opening the paper at full length.) A. That is my hand-writing, it is like it; Eley did not come and examine my furniture - the night before he bought a loin of veal and a leg of mutton - that was all; I asked him to drink, and sent for some gin - he did not examine my furniture.

JOHN COLLISON. I have the goods locked up at the station-house, except the sheets, which are here.

SARAH DAVIES . The goods are all mine.

[May 18.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18310512-15

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1001. JOHN ANTHONY DOBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , at St. John, Hackney, 1 gelding, price 20l. , the property of George Kersey Blofield .

JOHN TANN . I live in Suffolk, and am bailiff to Mr. George Kersey Blofield . This gelding was lost from a farm of his at Newton flocks, Norfolk - I saw it safe in the stable on the night of the 27th of April, and missed it at half-past four o'clock the next morning; I traced it about a mile towards London, till we came to four cross-ways, and we could not trace it any further - I saw it again last Tuesday week, at the Fountain inn, Lower Clapton; I knew it to be my master's - he had bred it; I had had it about for two years and a half - I had brought it up; I know the prisoner - I believe he went down to see his friends in Norfolk; I do not recollect that I saw him in the month of April, but I had known him from a child - I never knew the prisoner claim this gelding as his; the stable was not broken open - the horse went in and out; this horse had not been sold by my master, to my knowledge - it was taken out of the stable or the yard.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Is your master here? A. No; he is well enough to come to town; he lives in Suffolk- I knew the colt well; my master sometimes buys and sells horses - I do not know a man named Johnson; I have heard of him, and heard he deals in horses; I cannot say whether he might have taken this horse on sale from my master; I am quite certain I knew the horse again - the place I missed it from was about seven miles from Norwich.

HENRY CARTER . I remember this colt being brought to the Fountain inn, Lower Clapton, by the prisoner, on the last day of April - he was on the back of it when he came to me and asked if I had any stabling - I said Yes, and he put it into the stables; I asked how long he was going to stop - he said he might stop, perhaps, till Monday, and said he suspected it was going to Dixon's; he did not offer it for sale, or any thing of that kind - he might say he was going to take it to Dixon's, and he said he expected there were two or three coming up besides; I did not see any one else - I am not able to say whether he said he himself was going to take it to Dixon's, but he said it was to go to Dixon's; I did make my mark to my deposition before the Magistrate, and what I stated before Mr. Alderman Kelly was true, to the best of my knowledge - the prisoner took out the colt to exercise it; he did not seem to keep it concealed in any way - he took it out with a halter to walk it about in the main road; he had no opportunity to take the horse to the repository- he did say he was to take it to the repository on the Monday, but it was swollen under the girths, on Mon

day and he said he should not take it till such time as the swelling went down.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the horse rather unwell? A. He broke out with heat bumps, and the prisoner led him about; he said he was going to Dixon's repository, and he expected two or three more to come up, but he did not say that horse was going with others - he said he expected two or three more were coming up, but whether he expected them to come there or not, I do not know; the Fountain is opposite Clapton-green, near the reservoir- the prisoner never crossed the horse from the time he brought him into the yard; he walked it to and for in the main road; he never offered it for sale, to my knowledge- I never heard him say a word about Mr. Johnson; he said he expected a person there - he said the horse came from towards Norwich.

COURT. Q. Is not Glapton the high Norfolk road? A. am not able to say whether that, or the Romford road, is- the mail does not go through there, but the Telegraph and the Magnet do; I do not know how many miles it is from there.

JOHN BUNCE . I am an officer of the City. On Monday, the 5th of May, the prisoner was given into my custody.

Prisoner's Defence. (written) I knew nothing of the horse being stolen; it was placed with me to bring to town from Norwich, by a horse-dealer, whom I had seen for several years at the Norwich market, and whom I knew; I knew him by the name of Johnson - in case I had had the least idea that the horse had been stolen from the prosecutor's farm, I would immediately have delivered it to the owner, or Tann, who has known me ever since my childhood, and he well knows that there never was at any time the least charge against my character; I lived at Dunston, in Norfolk, till within the last two years, when I left there and obtained a situation with Mr. Edenborough, of Milk-street, with whom I remained one year - I then went to Mr. Sampson's, and remained with him till I went into the country, and was entrapped into my present unfortunate situation: on the 13th of April I left London to see my relatives, at Wilbarton, in Norfolk - I remained with them till the 27th of April, when I went to Norwich for the purpose of taking the coach to London; I went to a public-house, in St. Stephen's, Norwich - I there saw Johnson, and told him I was going to London; after some conversation, he said he was going to Dixon's repository in London, and I might ride one horse there for him; I slept there that night, and the next morning he placed the horse in question saddled and bridled, in my hands, and said he should catch me on the road before I got to London, this was on the 28th of April - I took the horse and proceeded to London very slowly, expecting Johnson to overtake me; he did not, and I arrived at Lower Clapton, on Saturday, the 30th, at eight o'clock, by day-light; I asked the other to accommodate me till Monday - I told him I brought the horse from Norwich, and how long I was going to stop; he has told you I was not at all private - I led the horse about publicly, and did not secrete myself for one moment; the horse was unwell, and I led him about several days, waiting for Johnson; he did not come, and I took the saddle, went to Dixon's, and inquired for him - I could not hear any thing of him; I then went to Mr. Duffield in the morning; I left the saddle there, called again in the evening, and was given in charge of a constable - had I have been guilty I should not have gone a second time; these are the facts of the case - I did not steal it, it was placed with me by Johnson; I am innocent of the charge, and look with confidence to your verdict for my acquittal - this is the first charge against me.

JURY to JOHN TANN . Q.Had you traced the gelding by the foot-marks? A. Yes, for a mile from the place it was stolen from - there may be persons of the name of Johnson, who frequent the Norwich market.

JURY to HENRY CARTER . Q.Was the colt shod when it arrived at the Fountain? A. Yes; it is still there.

JOHN TANN re-examined. Q. Was it shod when you tracked it? A. No - I had done some little work with it; I had never had it shod - I made inquiry, and found Elder at the Fountain last Monday week.

JOHN DUFFIELD . I am a saddler and harness-maker. The prisoner came to me on the 5th of May to dispose of a saddle; I stated to him a suspicion about the saddle and horse - he referred me to Dixon's; I asked where he came from - he said from the Fountain inn, Clapton; that he had a horse there, which he brought from a man named Johnson, near Norwich - I gave information; he came again in the evening, and I detained him. (See Fifth Day, New Court.)

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[May 17.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be his first offence.

Reference Number: t18310512-16

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1002. JOHN HARKNETT and WILLIAM WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Davies , on the 21st of April , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 shillings, and 12 halfpence, his monies .

JOHN ALLPORT . I live at No. 71, Kingsland-road, and am an undertaker. I was in Shoreditch on the night of the 20th of April, or the morning of the 21st - it was a quarter-past twelve o'clock; I was going home - I got very near to Plough-yard, and saw a man, whom I did not then know, but who afterwards proved to be George Davies - he was walking along very slowly, with his hat in his hand; I saw three men approaching him behind- they were before me: when they approached Davies one of them, (I cannot swear which) put his hands on the back of his shoulders, and gave him a gentle push, so that he fell down on his face; he laid straight with his face on the pavement - when he was on the ground they all three, as with one accord, turned him over on his back - I then saw his pockets rifled, and some halfpence fell out, shattered on the pavement: the three men were close to him at the time, all round his person - I can swear to the two prisoners being two of the men that were round the prosecutor; the three men stooped to pick up the halfpence off the pavement - I saw no money except the halfpence; they then walked off, at least I do not know exactly whether they walked or ran - they did not go fast; a Policeman came across the road - I told him of it, and pointed out the three men; I never lost night of them from the time I saw them go from the prosecutor till I told the Policeman - he followed them, and I went with him; I saw him take the two prisoners - I had not lost sight of them; a watchman came up after the Policeman seized the prisoners, and he assisted in taking them to the station - the

third man ran away down Plough-yard; I saw the prisoners searched, and some halfpence and other money was taken from one or both of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is the length of the street in which you saw this transaction? A. It was in Shoreditch, which is a long street; it was not near the end - the prisoners did not turn any corners before they were taken - I do not know why I did not cry Police! or Watch! it was no amusement to me - I was sober; Harknett did not go without my resistance - he did not attempt to ill - use any one, but he made use of very threatening language to me; he said in the morning that he would serve me out; the prosecutor fell down in his way to the station, and I helped him up - I did not see Harknett help him up; I think he could not have assisted him up without my seeing him; I would not swear it did not happen, but I did not see him.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. How came you out at that time? A. A lady came to see my grandfather, who was very ill, and is since dead; I went to see her home - the prosecutor was pushed down; but he fell of his own accord, when he got very near the station; Williams went very quietly, for what I saw - I did not see the Policeman till he crossed; he came over very soon after the men had gone on.

GEORGE DAVIES . I now live in Rose-lane, but I lived on Saffron-hill at that time. A month ago to-day I was on my way home, in Shoreditch - I had gone a few yards past Plough-yard; there were three men, who let me just pass them, and in the course of two or three minutes I was pushed down right upon my face, and it grazed all the side of my face upon the pavement - they rifled my pockets of an ounce of tobacco, within a couple of pipes, two shillings, and 6d. or 9d. in halfpence; I know there were two shillings, which I had had given me, and which I had never touched - the tobacco was in one waistcoat pocket, the silver in the other, and the halfpence were in my breeches pocket - I identified the prisoners the next morning, and said, "You are the two gentlemen;" I did not particularly observe either of the men who were about me- there was one on one side, and the other on the other; that is all I can say, and I felt them riffing - I had a glimpse of their faces; I could swear to them as soon as I saw them the next morning - the prisoners are the two men; I never said to the contrary, and if it was wrong I would not say it - I was groaming, and the Policemen came up before ever they could make their exit - they caught two of them; as soon as I got up there was a tall Policeman there; I felt my pockets the moment I got up, and said, "My money is all gone;" I had not a sixpence or a halfpenny left.

Q. Are you quite correct about that - did not you afterwards find some of your halfpence in your pocket? A. No, I was fairly cleaned out; I did not find 2d. or more, to my knowledge, and I never related any such thing before the magistrate - I might say so, but I am sure I cannot remember it, in my florry; I was stunned - my tobacco was in whitey-brown paper, which will be produced; the prisoners are dressed in a different kind of way now, so that I cannot exactly recognize them, as I could on the first examination; one of them had a fustian jacket on, neither of them have it now, but to the best of my belief, it was Williams; I am a Welchman.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Shoreditch is a long way from Saffron-hill? A.Very good Sir, we know it is - I cannot say what distance it is; I suppose it is about two miles - it was rather a late hour for me to be out; I had been in company and had had a drop, but I knew what I was about - I was not exactly compus menlis; I was what we call rather fresh - less, perhaps, would have been better- I had a very slight glimpse of them; I was frightened- it was enough to frighten any man; I was hurt, and my face was grazed - there was a watchman and two Policemen, or three, about me when I got up - I think there were three Policeman, to the best of my knowledge; they were dressed in their uniform - I could not mistake a gentleman for one of them; I did not see any gentleman there - I might fall down in going to the station, but I have no recollection of falling and being assisted up by one of the prisoners - my memory is not good enough to tell you; I will not pretend to say - I am sure I do not know that I swore before the Magistrate that I found 2d. in my pocket - I do not remember it; I went before the Magistrate the next day, and I was sober then - what I swore was read over to me; I did not find 2d. in my pockets, to my knowledge - if I swore the next morning that I did, it was not true - I have a great bore, and that is a bad memory; I had drank two or three pints of beer and half a quartern of gin, and it made me a little lively.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Perhaps the beer was good strong Welch ale? A. That is very good, Sir- I will not swear I had not had four pints.

JOHN MCWILLIAMS . I am a Police-constable, (No. 181 H.) I was on duty in Shoreditch on the night of the 20th of April - my attention was drawn to the opposite side of the way, by hearing a person moaning - I looked towards the spot, and saw, apparently to me, three or four men on the pavement, on the ground - on going over I saw one man raise himself up, and run off or go off at a quickish pace; Williams then raised himself up and went after him, and Harknett was the last man who left; they rather ran at first, but after they had got a little way they stopped a little, and went on at a walk - I saw Davies laying on the ground, and blood on his face; Mr. Allport spoke to me, and said, "Those three fellows have been rifling this man's pockets," and I ran after them - the third man, who is not here, turned round, saw me coming, and gave Harknett, who was nearest to him, a nudge with his hand, and he started off as fast as he could - I sprang forward, caught the two prisoners, turned them round, and told them they had been robbing the old man; a private-watchman came up at the time, and I told him to take care of Williams - another officer came up, and assisted is taking them down to the station-house; I searched Harknest, and found on him 1s. in silver, 8d. in copper, and a knife, which has not been claimed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. By your account it was your own observation that directed you to this poor man? A. It was the morning - I was not directed to him by any one; I have stated all that happened in my presence - I have measured the distance from where the prosecutor laid to where the prisoners were taken; it is between sixty and seventy yards - there

was no turning till you come to Plough-yard, where the third man shot up; I followed the prisoners, and the private watchman and Crawley came up afterwards - the prosecutor was walking fast to the station; be stumbled, and fell - Harknett assisted him - I believe Mr. Allport went to the station, but he went rather first.

GEORGE CRAWLEY . I was at that time a Police-constable. I was in Shoreditch on the night of the 20th of April - I went to the assistance of McWilliams; I searched the prisoner Williams at the station-house - I found on him two half-crowns, three shillings, and one farthing; I asked him afterwards whether he had not some tobacco - he said No, he had none; he then put his hand into his waistcoat pocket, pulled out a piece of leaf-tobacco, and said that was all he had; I afterwards made a further search, and found some tobacco rolled up in whitybrown paper, in his inside coat pocket - I had seen it before, but I did not meddle with it, because I did not then know that the prosecutor had lost any, but he described the paper it was in, and said he had lost some.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Williams did not make the least resistance to your searching him? A. No- when I asked for tobacco, he put his hand into his pocket, pulled out a piece of leaf-tobacco, and I afterwards found this other; I think here is more than a pennyworth of tobacco, and this is a common sort of paper to put tobacco in.

GEORGE DAVIES re-examined. Q.Look at that tobacco and the paper, was your tobacco wrapped up in that way? A. Yes, my Lord, and I firmly believe this to be the parcel I had in my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. You have bought hundreds of ounces in your time? A. I cannot say I have not, but this I did not buy, it was given me - it is common shag tobacco, which I always have.

Harknett's Defence. I am quite innocent - one shilling which I had in my pocket I got of my master when I left work at night, and I had one shilling of him at dinner time, which I had changed.

Williams' Defence. When the prosecutor was examined at the office, he swore he had 2 1/2d. in his pocket; I bought I oz. of this tobacco at the first tobacconist's past Plough-yard.

Five witnesses gave Harknett a good character.

HARKNETT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.[May 18.]

Reference Number: t18310512-17

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1003. SAMUEL BYHAM, alias PYHAM , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Killick , on the night of the 20th of April , with intent to steal .

JAMES KILLICK . I live in St. George's-place, Hyde Park-corner , and am a silversmith and jeweller . On the 20th of April, about half-past eight o'clock, I was standing in my shop, and heard the window violently crash outside - I ran into the street, and saw two large squares of glass dashed in, which were whole before; I perceived a soldier running away - a gentleman at the window told me something; I pursued, crying Stop thief! and collared him about three hundred yards from my house - he fell down, and then struck me violently in the body several times; he turned himself over, and caught me by the throat with one hand - he thrust the other hand into my mouth, and pulled my jaw; I was compelled to bite his fingers to get them out of my mouth - after struggling three or four minutes he got up, and ran away; I was exhausted, but followed him as well as I could, and by the Lock-hospital he was stopped by some persons, and I gave him in charge; he is the same person as I had seen when I first came out of the shop; I returned to the shop, and found things very much deranged; he had dashed at the silver spoons and forks, which hung on wires and a brass rod - they could not easily be got down; two toast-racks hung behind them, and were much bent and twisted in trying to get them down, but they still hung there; the spoons and forks were knocked down into the window, but not taken out - I am sure a hand had been inside the window; there was no day-light at all when it happened.

FRANCIS FIELD . I am a medical-student. I was looking in at Mr. Killick's window, about half-past eight o'clock on this evening; there was no day-light - I heard somebody come in behind me; I immediately heard the glass of the window crashed above my head, and on looking up immediately I saw the prisoner withdrawing his hand from the window - I distinctly saw his hand within the window; I am sure of his person - Mr. Killick immediately ran out; I pointed out the prisoner to him - he followed, and overtook him; they scuffled, and came to the ground together.

Prisoner. I must be very near for you to see my hand through the window, if it was dark. Witness. I was close to him; there was plenty of light from the gas above the door.

JOHN BARKER. I am a Policeman. On the 20th of April I saw a crowd in Grosvenor-place; I ran up, and took the prisoner from Mr. Killick - I searched, but found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot recollect breaking the window, I was so much in liquor - a gentleman collared me as I was going to my barracks.

GEORGE TRIPP . On the 2nd of April, about half-past eight o'clock, I had been to Hammersmith - I live in the Strand, and am out of a situation; I was out of a situation then - I have been a Policeman, but was discharged for a piece of work with another officer at the station. A soldier passed me at the top of Sloane-street, very drunk, and as he was going across the road he made a stumble, and, I suppose, stumbled four or five yards before he could save himself; I went to him, and said, "Keep yourself up, you are very near the barracks;" I followed him till he came to a pawnbroker's shop - he then passed either a man or woman, I cannot say which - they met him; they struck off the road, and he went to strike the same way, to let them pass - he kicked his toe against his heel, and went sprawling right up against the window; he cleared himself from he window, and ran towards Hyde Park-corner - I went

up to the shop window; a young man came out, and followed the prisoner - another came out; I went up, and said, "You have lost nothing;" he said No; I said,"Well, I consider it is an accident - the soldier was very much in liquor;" I went on, and saw no more - he was walking before this happened, but was very much intoxicated; I do not recollect seeing Field.

FRANCIS FIELD . I did not see the witness.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-18

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

1004. THOMAS PARKINS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wright , on the 6th of April , and stealing 8 bobbins of silk, value 5s., his property .

JOHN WRIGHT . I live in Hare-street, Bethnal-green , and am a journeyman silk-weaver . On Tuesday night I was at my master's house in Hunt-street, Mile-end - I got home about half-past ten o'clock, and found the street door open; I went up to my room, which is the back room on the first floor, and found the door open - I had left it locked a little before ten that night; I had been absent above half an hour - my wife was out; I found the prisoner in my room, and another man with him, who escaped - that man was stooping down apparently putting his shoes on; the prisoner was standing alongside him -I asked how they came there; he said my wife had brought them home, and he had sent her down to get a drop of gin - I did not know them before; I asked them to follow me down stairs, and I would go and look for my wife - they followed me down; I knocked at Mr. Johnson's room on the ground floor, and told him I had caught two men in my place - the one who escaped said, "Why you ayn't going to be the fool, as to say we came to rob, have not you been drinking with us all day long?" I said, "No, I have not seen you all day;" Johnson told me to call a Policeman - I opened the door to call one; the prisoner and the other man shoved Johnson down, and ran out, but I caught the prisoner - Johnson came to my assistance, and took the prisoner into his room; they both tried to escape - the Policeman came in about a quarter of an hour; I found two bobbins of shute silk removed off the shelf, and put on the table - the Policeman took it to the station with the prisoner; the serjeant returned with me, and I found I had lost six hobbins of shute, which had also been on the shelf with the others -I have not found them; a skeleton or picklock-key was found in Johnson's room, but not in my presence - I had given my key to the woman in the front room in the morning, and my wife had it afterwards.

CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON . I lodge in the same house. On the evening in question Wright knocked at my door; I came out with a light, and saw two men in the entry -Wright said he had found them in his room; I said he had better get a Policeman - the door was bolted; he unbolted it, and called one - they rushed out, and pushed me down; I got up, and assisted in securing the prisoner - there was a scuffle between us; I kept him till the Policeman came.

ELIZABETH CHARLEY . On the evening in question, I saw a skeleton-key in Johnson's room, and gave it to Mrs. Johnson - I did not try to open the door with it.

PHOEBE JOHNSON. Charley gave me the key; I gave it to the Policemen when they came back.

ROBERT NEALE . I am serjeant of the Police. I was at the station when the prisoner was brought there - I went back with the prosecutor; I found no marks of violence on his door - I tried the key; it went into the lock, but would not shoot the bolt - it appeared as if the key had been strained; the lock was unlocked.

SETH EASTWOOD . I am a Policeman. I produce the two bobbins found on the table, and a skeleton-key, which I received from Neale.

ROBERT SENECAL . I am in the employ of Messrs. Giles. These bobbins belong to them - the prosecutor works for them; I had given him the bobbins, and silk of this description was on them - those which are missing also had silk on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of a court where I live, about nine o'clock - a man and woman came; I was all over whitewash, being a bricklayer - the man asked if I could whitewash a room for his friend; he said it was for the prosecutor's wife - I went to Hare-street; the woman said that was the house- the man went up stairs with me, and in two or three minutes I went up after him, and had hardly got up when the prosecutor came; I never was in the room - it was very dark; I could see nobody - the prosecutor knows the man very well.

JOHN WRIGHT . When I left at ten o'clock, my wife had the key - she was at her mother's all night; I cannot say she did not leave the door unlocked.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 29.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310512-19

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1005. CHARLES JONES, alias SILVERTHORNE , was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Coles Dutton , from his person .

WILLIAM COLES DUTTON . I live in Duncan-terrace, Islington, and have an appointment in the Custom-house . On the 18th of April, at half-past ten o'clock, I was in Harp-lane , walking with Mr. Major, who said my pocket was picked - I had not felt any thing; I turned round immediately, saw the prisoner at my heels, and my handkerchief on the ground at his feet; it had been taken from my outside coat pocket - he appeared to have two associates at a little distance; they went away immediately after he was taken - on my seizing him he said I had taken the wrong party, but nobody was near enough to take it but him; the other two were about thirty yards from me.

WILLIAM POOLE MAJOR . I belong to the Custom-house. I was walking with Mr. Dutton, and, towards the end of Harp-lane, I observed the prisoner exceedingly near him, and on turning to see what he was at, I saw the handkerchief drop to the ground - it could not have dropped from any body but the prisoner; nobody else was near enough - I collared him, and took up the handkerchief at the same time; he denied having taken it - there were two boys, evidently his associates, who dispersed immediately he was collared; I saw the handkerchief in the act of falling, before it reached the ground.

MR. DUTTON. I am not aware that my handkerchief was hanging out - this is it.

SAMUEL HYDES JEFFRIES . I am a constable, and received the prisoner in charge with the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down the lane, and picked up the gentleman's handkerchief at his feet - he turned round, and caught hold of me; I threw it down.

GUILTY . - Aged 16. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310512-20

1096. HENRY WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 ream of paper, value 22s. , the goods of Joseph Bonsor .

HENRY LAWN . I am in the employ of Joseph Bonsor , a stationer , of Salisbury-square . On the 13th of April, about twelve o'clock, I was at the bottom of the warehouse, and heard a noise; I ran forward, and missed a ream of paper from about six yards from the door - I ran into the square, and received information; I went into St. Bride's-passage, and there saw the prisoner - I overtook him in Fleet-street, with the paper on his shoulder; I collared him, and made him bring it back to the warehouse; he said a person had given it to him to carry to Shee-lane, but he was not going towards Shoe-lane - we gave him in charge.

WILLIAM LUCAS . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge; and as he was coming to Newgate, he said he was in distress, and had not had food for two days.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-21

1007. EDWARD BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 60 lbs. of raisins, value 25s., and 1 box, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Rawlinson .

JANE YATES . I am in the service of Thomas Rawlinson , wholesale grocer , No. 63, Snow-hill . On the 12th of April, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was in the kitchen, which is under the warehouse, two men came and stood on the iron grating, watching at the warehouse window; the box of raisins was on some bags behind the warehouse door - the porter was in the warehouse; I saw the two men go from the window - I saw one go by the door, the other stepped into the warehouse, came down the step with the box, and gave it to the other; I could see all this from the kitchen - I ran up, and asked the porter if he had given any box out; he said he had not - I said, "Then a man has taken one, and given it to another;" he ran out, and brought the prisoner back in twenty minutes or less with it - I could not distinguish the features of the man I saw.

CHARLES EDWARDS . I am porter to Mr. Rawlinson. On the 12th of April, about nine o'clock, Dale came up, and gave me information - I immediately ran out, and saw the prisoner going towards Holborn with the box on his shoulder - he turned up a court on this side of Field-lane; I saw nobody with him; I followed, and took him; the court leads into Snow-hill again; he had got into Snow-hill before I took him, and thrown the box down, as he saw me - I pursued, and overtook him in about two minutes in King-street - I called Stop thief! and he was stopped; he had dropped the box in the court, where I found it - I knew it to be my master's by the letters I. C. which I had put on it myself; it contains 65 lbs. of raisins - he said some man had given him 6d. to carry it; he did not name the man.

THOMAS PIKE . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge - he said nothing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-22

1008. PETER DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods Frederick Arthur Magnay , from his person .

MR. FREDERICK ARTHUR MAGNAY . I live with my brother, in College-hill. On Sunday, the 17th of April, about a quarter-past twelve o'clock, I was walking with my brother in Queen-street , and had a handkerchief in my pocket, marked F. M. I had left home about five minutes; it was safe then; I did not feel it taken, but my brother asked if it was safe - I felt my pocket, and it was gone, and in about a minute I saw the prisoner in company with two others, about his own age - the others were laid hold of, and the prisoner ran away - my brother and I followed him; I saw him in about eight minutes in my brother's custody - I saw my handkerchief down in a cellar, and the servant gave it to me; I know it to be atime.

MR. GEORGE MAGNAY . I was walking with my brother up Queen-street, and saw three lads following us - on a sudden I felt a slight touch at my elbow; I turned round, and accused them of picking my pocket, which was not the case - I then asked my brother if his pocket had not been picked; two of them immediately said, "You may search me;" the prisoner, who was the third, immediately ran away, and I after him - I merely lost sight of him in turning the corners; I am confident he is the person - I laid hold of him in about eight minutes, at the corner of Turnwheel-lane, but he had thrown the handkerchief down Mr. Hale's area - I did not see him do that, but am certain he ran by there; it was only just round the corner - my brother saw it in the area; when the prisoner was stopped he asked what business I had to call Stop thief! after him, and when he found we had got the handkerchief he endeavoured to get out of his coat and run off.

WILLIAM HUGGINS . I am a printseller. I was returning from St. Paul's, and in Cannon-street I saw the prisoner run up Turnwheel-lane, and in about two minutes saw Mr. Magnay running after him - I saw him turn round the corner, take something out of his bosom, and throw it down the area of Mr. Hale's house; he immediately turned back, and met Mr. Magnay - I looked down, and saw the handkerchief lay there; he denied the charge, and said he had not got the handkerchief about him, and did not know why Mr. Magnay pursued him - the handkerchief was produced from the area.

- - - - I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310512-23

1009. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 3 cloths, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Carvill ; and 2 coats, value 5s., and 1 waistcoat, value 1s , the goods of Thomas Lyford .

THOMAS LYFORD . I live at Mr. Carvill's, a butcher , in Great New-street, Fetter-lane . On the 13th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, when I came home, I missed two old coats and a waistcoat, which I had left safe

about a quarter to seven o'clock in the parlour, behind the shop - I found the prisoner in custody with them at Guildhall next day; they were old clothes.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Is your master here? A. No; when I went out I left the parlour windows open - they are about four feet from the ground; it was my business to fasten up, but being out, my master forgot to do it - it was day-light when I went.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I live with Mr. Carvill; he keeps a butter-shop , opposite his butcher's shop. I was in the butter-shop, about nine o'clock, alone - two strange men came in, and asked for a pen and ink to write a receipt - my mistress, who was in the parlour, told me to give it them; they wrote something at the counter, and staid a very short time - they staid outside a little while, and then one said to the other, "You have not written the date;" and they came in to do it - I stood at the corner of the counter, watching the butcher's shop, which is on the other side, but I saw nobody go into it - the property was stolen from there; the door of that shop is taken off during the day - the prisoner is not one of those who came into the butter-shop; I saw a man come out of the window of the butcher's-shop with a bundle - I ran out, calling Stop thief! he ran down Fleur-de-lis-court; two boys, at the top of the court, ran after him, and when I came up I saw he was stopped - I did not see his face when he came out, but he appeared the same in size and dress, rather thinish; nothing was found on him - the prisoner is the man who was stopped.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.If the two men, who came to you, had any thing to do with it, they came away just in time for you to see the man come out? A. Yes; the window is in Feather Bed-lane - there were lights in the butcher's-shop; the shop doors were off, and the window open - I do not swear the prisoner is the man who came out of the window.

JURY. Q.When you pursued, did you see any thing in the man's possession? A. I saw him throw the things down, but lost sight of him as he ran down the court.

COURT. Q. Was the bundle thrown down by the person who came out of the window? A. Yes, he dropped it as he ran, about a yard up the lane.

JOHN FERGUSSON . I am fifteen years old, and live in Fetter-lane. I was in the service of Mr. Shaw, a copperplate engraver, but lost my place through attending at Guildhall on this business - I was at the top of Feather Bed-lane - I saw the prisoner running, and heard Adams crying Stop thief! the prisoner ran up the lane, and turned down Fleur-de-lis-court - nobody else was running from the cry; I laid hold of his coat in Fleur-de-lis-court, and assisted in stopping him; I afterwards saw the bundle produced - Lyford claimed it; it contained two coats, a waistcoat, a piece of canvas, and two stall-cloths.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to say you were turned away for coming against the prisoner? A. Yes, it was the first week that I had been with my master - the prisoner was the only person running; the bundle was picked up by the Press coffee-house; the front of which is in Feather Bed-lane - Adams came up in about a moment after; I caught hold of the skirt of the prisoner's coat - there is a gas-light in the lane, and more in the court.

THOMAS COUCH. I live at No. 141, Fetter-lane, with my father, who is a carpenter. I was at the top of Feather Bed-lane, and saw a person running up the lane with a bundle under his arm; he threw it down in Feather Red-lane - I heard somebody cry out Stop thief! he ran down Fleur-de-lis-court, and I after him - I did not lose sight of him till he was stopped; Adams was running behind him, calling Stop thief!

Cross-examined. Q. How old are you? A. Thirteen- the person had a green handkerchief spotted with red, and I think he wore shoes.

GEORGE FREDERICK P - I am superintendent of St. Bride's watch-house. The prisoner was delivered to me with the bundle, which I have had ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had come from Grosvenormews to call on Mr. Crawford for a pair of shoes, which he was making for me - he lives three doors from the prosecutor's; I knocked at the door several times, nobody answered; I came away, and as I turned the corner, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran with several people - the two boys laid hold of me; and at Guildhall Mr. Crawford came and said he had a pair of shoes to make for me.

WILLIAM ADAMS . He went back to the shop with me- he did not resist, because I held him with some more.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-24

1010. JEREMIAH PIERCE was indicted for embezzlement .

HENRY BRICKNALL . I am the son of John Bricknall , and live in Crutched-friars - he is a cork-merchant , in partnership with his three sons. The prisoner was six or nine months in our employ; Mr. McManus is a customer of ours - he carries on business in the name of Devine; the prisoner never accounted to me for 15s. received from him - he left our service on the 21st of April, without notice; he came to us as errand-boy , with the understanding that if he answered he would be our apprentice; we were satisfied with his character.

JOHN GEORGE. I am in the prosecutors' employ. On the 21st of April , between two and three o'clock, I gave the prisoner ten gross of ginger-beer corks, with a bill, in the name of Devine, for Mr. McManus; he was to receive the money if it was offered - I did not see him again till the 25th, when he was in custody.

THOMAS MCMANUS . On the 21st of April the prisoner brought me ten gross of corks: I paid him 15s. for them; he brought a bill - I saw him write this receipt (read); I carry on business in the name of Devine.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost the money, and was afraid to go home - my mother promised the prosecutor the money the same day, but he would not receive it.

MR. BRICKNALL. I did not hear a word of this till he was before the Magistrate - his mother did not offer to make it good in my hearing; we frequently trusted him with larger sums, which we found correct, but latterly he has fallen into bad company.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18310512-25

1011. MARY ANN BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 11 yards of ribbon, value 6s. , the goods of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN. I live in Beech-street, Barbican ,

and am a linen-draper and haberdasher . On the 21st of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop, with another woman, and asked to look at some ribbons - I showed them four pieces, the first of which I opened a few yards; they asked to look at some more - I left the four pieces on the counter, but noticed them, suspecting them; I went for more, and turned my back to them - I brought two more pieces to them, and saw the prisoner's bonnet thrown on the counter; I saw her shuffling something under her shawl - the prisoner offered me 4 1/2d. for a ribbon I asked her 7 1/2d. for; I refused, and they went to the door - I went to the door with two ribbons in my hand, and asked the prisoner to walk in and I would show her a ribbon; she still walked on - I then laid hold of her shawl, and said she must return, for I suspected her - I took her to the counter, and a piece of ribbon, which I had first shown her, dropped from under her shawl; I sent for an officer, and she was taken in charge; I believe the other was liberated, with a promise to attend at Guildhall next day, which she did, and was discharged- there were eleven yards and a half of the ribbon; the prisoner had some liver in her handkerchief, and the ribbon was stained with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who did you send for to take them? A. I sent for an officer, and Horton came; I do not know that he became answerable for the appearance of the other woman - I gave them both in charge; I never said I took the ribbon from under the prisoner's arm - I said it dropped from under her arm on my taking hold of her shawl; the bonnet appeared new, and was without trimming - the prisoner had a bonnet on her head, but the other had not: the prisoner said the bonnet on the counter was hers; Saunders was in the shop - I sent him for an officer, but not particularly for Horton; a message was sent to me from the Quest-house, to know if the other woman might be liberated; I do not know who came - I have been so long in this hall, I may have forgotten something; I do not recollect whether it was Horton who came to know if she might be liberated - I said she might; I knew who came at the time, but cannot now recollect - it was a man, as far as I can charge my memory; I was perfectly rational at the time, and am so now.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I saw the prisoner in the shop with another female - they both made their way to the door; Mr. Brown went and turned the prisoner back; he said she had a piece of ribbon, and he took it from under her shawl - when she stood by the counter where he served her I saw it in his hand; I do not know whether it dropped from under her shawl or not - she said, "What do you want to detain me for? I have nothing to do with it, I have got none of your property;" her companion said nothing, to my recollection- I went for an officer, and found Horton, who took them both in charge; the other was suffered to go that night, and appeared before the Magistrate next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Horton give his word for her appearance? A. I cannot say.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am a constable. I met the last witness - I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner and another woman; Brown stated that this piece of ribbon had fallen from the prisoner's person, and that the other woman was with her - I took them to the watch-house; the other woman had a child in her arms - I went back to Mr. Brown, and stated about her having a child; he said as the ribbon was not found on her, he wished her to be at large, if she promised to come next day, which she did, and was discharged.

Cross-examined. Q.Were you the person who went to ask him to discharge her? A.I did not ask him - I stated what I have said; I found 16s. or 17s. on the prisoner - she had a handkerchief with cod's liver, and there were stains on the ribbon.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-26

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, MAY 12.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1012. HENRY MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of George Metcalfe ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 45. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-27

1013. JOSHUA DAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 5 pairs of shoes, value 15s. , the goods of John Hall ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15. - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18310512-28

1014. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 jacket, value 2s. , the goods of John Loomes ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-29

1015. THOMAS COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of April , 5 silver spoons, value 40s., and 1 silver fork, value 10s. , the goods of Francis Cresswell .

MR. CRESSWELL conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM KNIGHT. I am servant to Mr. Francis Cresswell, of Flemming-house, Old Brompton . The prisoner was in the habit of coming to my masters - he came there on the 23rd of April, to ask after the butler's health; I left the prisoner alone that day on two occasions, for about five minutes, in the pantry where the plate was - when I returned the second time, I asked the prisoner to walk out into the servant's hall; I then counted the plate, and missed three table-spoons - I sent for Mr. Perceval Cresswell, and he missed the spoons; the prisoner gave up three table-spoons - the constable, Mr. Perceval Cresswell, and myself were present, and the servants; the prisoner did not deny that he had them, but denied having any more property about him - he was then taken to the station; he there denied having any thing on him - he was then searched, and two desert-spoons and a large table fork found on him.

COURT. Q.Was it in consequence of what you said that he went into the pantry? A. Yes, I asked him to go in and assist me, because I had suspicion of him, and after the second occasion, I missed the plate.

MR. PERCEVAL CRESSWELL . The witness sent for me- I went into the butler's pantry, and found he had the prisoner by the collar; the prisoner was crying, and begged I would forgive him and let him go - I said if he had stolen any thing I certainly should not; I thought it necessary to prosecute him for the protection of the other servants - the constable came soon after; I desired him to take him into the servants' hall, and search him - I went in with him; the constable said, "If you have taken

any thing, you may as well give it up, without giving me the trouble of taking it from you;" the prisoner again asked me if I would forgive him and let him go - I said if he had taken any thing I certainly should prosecute him; he then took three table-spoons from his pocket, and handed them to me - I gave them to the constable, and desired him to take him to the station-house, and the servant to go with him; I called there the next morning, and saw this fork, and these two desert-spoons, which I can speak to as my father's; the fork has not initials on it- I cannot swear to that.

RICHARD COPELAND . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and produce the property.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I missed a table-fork - I had eighteen in the morning, I missed one, and this matches the others, but it has no mark on it; I missed the spoons, and know them by the mark.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-30

1016. ALFRED BARTHOLOMEW was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE HAWKINS . I am a butcher . I had a shop in Clement's Inn-passage , and placed the prisoner, who had been apprenticed to me for seven years there, to sell meat there on my account, on credit and for ready money, and it was his duty every night after the business of the day, to render me a due account by note, specifying the sums of money taken, and what was sold on credit, and also to keep a counter account in a book which he rendered to me every week - the money he received daily he was to bring to me, with a note; here is the book in which he has accounted for the sale of two legs of mutton to Mr. Ridley - on the 23rd of February , here is one leg of mutton, 8lb. 6oz., 5s. 3d., and on the 8th of March, one leg of mutton, 8lb. 8oz., 5s. 4d., to Mr. Ridley - they are only entered here as being sold; here is another book in which the money received is entered - on the 23rd of February it states, taken 1l. 18s. 6d., booked 13s.; this is the account for the day.

COURT. Q. Are you able to say that the prisoner never paid you the 5s. 3d. for that leg of mutton? A. I am, my Lord.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had Mr. Ridley furnished the house with beer? A. No - the prisoner went and fetched a pint of beer when he wanted it; I have a house in Eastcheap, and I live there - I have given up the shop the prisoner was at from the losses I met with; I do not know that he was about to set up in business - he gave notice to his father, and his father came to my house; we had an argument - we had some words; he threatened to take his son instantly out of the house - I deny that I begged him to let him stay a fortnight longer, or I should be ruined, not having a man; I said, "If you please let him remain another week, and I will send my son down to take the money, and see if the charge is well founded;" the shop then answered - his father did not wish to take him away; he gave me the offer - I said,"Let him stay another week," and that I had no one but him to manage the business; I was not in the least intimate with Mr. Ridley, except speaking to him as I passed him.

COURT. Q.Did you after this charge make a request that the prisoner should remain with you? A. Yes - he has struck the pen through that 5s. 3d. for the leg of mutton, and he has struck out twenty things that I can get no account of; it is a late invention of his own - the 1l. 18s. 6d. was the money I received that day.

SARAH ANN BROWNING . I am daughter of Mr. Ridley, who keeps the Lord Nelson, next door to the prosecutor's shop, in Clement's Inn-passage; we were in the habit of dealing there - we had a leg of mutton on the 23rd of February, but I have no recollection of paying for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-31

1017. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Henry James Parsons , from his person .

REV. HENRY JAMES PARSONS . On the 6th of May I was residing in Welbeck-street. I was in Vere-street, Oxford-street , about eleven o'clock in the morning - Mr. Howell spoke to me, and in consequence of what he said my attention was drawn to the prisoner, who produced a silk pocket handkerchief, which I knew was mine; I gave it to the officer.

EDWARD HOWELL . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Wilson , a saddler, in Vere Street. On the morning of the 6th of May I was at work, and saw the prisoner through a window which has a view of the street - I saw him pass on the opposite side of the way, and he was taking a red silk handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket; it was similar to this - he put it into his right-hand trousers pocket; I ran out, took him, and called the prosecutor - I said to the prisoner "You have robbed that gentleman;" he said "Let me go - let me go" - he produced the handkerchief from the same pocket, and I gave it to the gentleman; the prisoner lifted up the pocket with his left hand and took it with his right.

WILLIAM MURTON. I am an officer. I received this handkerchief from the prosecutor - I searched the prisoner at the station; I found two silk handkerchiefs in his right-hand pocket, and one round his neck - I found 10s. in silver and 6d. in copper on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it on the ground, close to his heels.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-32

1018. HOLLAND HINES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of April , 13 yards of kerseymere, value 4l. , the goods of Alexander Guthrie and another.

JOHN STROTHER SHOTTER . I was in Bond-street on Saturday, the 23rd of April - I saw the prisoner looking into Mr. Guthrie's shop window; he then stepped back, looked in at the door, walked a few paces, and returned again - I watched him; he went into the door a second time, brought out a piece of kerseymere under his arm, and went off - I gave notice of it; Mr. Gutbrie and I pursued and took him in Conduit-street, with it under his arm.

ALEXANDER GUTHRIE. I keep a shop in Bond-street . I went with Shotter to Conduit-street, where we took the prisoner with this piece of kerseymere - it belongs to me and my partner; it is worth about 4l. - it was in

the possession of the officer till we were at the office; the officer is not here.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-33

1019. MARY AVELEIGH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 2 table-spoons, value 20s. , the goods of Abraham Rees .

ABRAHAM REES. I lodge at Mr. Solomons', No. 52, Strand . The prisoner was in his service - I used to send plate into the kitchen to be cleaned; I missed two tablespoons about three weeks ago - they are perhaps worth about 1l.

THERESA BAKER. I lived with Mr. Henry Solomons . The prosecutor's plate used to be cleaned in the kitchen - the prisoner was in the habit of visiting at the house, and I have occasionally left her alone in the kitchen; I have seen two table-spoons, which we used to have in the kitchen to clean - they were the prosecutor's, and I missed them about three months ago.

Prisoner. She has known me six years, and has been at my house when she was out of a situation. Witness. Yes, I have. I never knew her to be dishonest.

GEORGE WILLIAMS. I am in my father's service, he is a pawnbroker, in Great Chapel-street, Westminster. These spoons were pawned by the prisoner in January -I cannot tell the day, as a person came on the 21st of April and had a fresh duplicate in another name; I know the prisoner's person, and think I had seen her before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Poverty and distress drove me to it; I am a widow with two children.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

1020. MARY AVELEIGH was again indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 4 table-spoons, value 35s. , the goods of Henry Solomons .

THERESA BAKER . I live with Mr. Henry Solomons , in the Strand . The prisoner visited me, and was left alone in the kitchen - the plate was brought there to be cleaned; it was sometimes left on the dresser, and sometimes put into the drawer - I missed two spoons seven or eight months ago, they were in my care to clean.

SAMUEL SMITH. I live with Mr. Debenham, a pawnbroker, of Queen's-row, Pimlico. I know the prisoner - she has been there three several times; I have two silver spoons, which are not marked, and two which are - they were pawned at different times by the prisoner; one of the plain ones was the last that was pawned - that was on the 23rd of April.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress and poverty drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-34

1021. WILLIAM GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 3 quarts of wine, value 18s., and 6 bottles, value 1s. , the goods of James Smith , his master; and CHARLES SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute , &c.

JAMES SMITH . The prisoner Gibson was in my employ for eight weeks - he came to me about March; in consequence of information I examined my wine cellar and missed some port wine from a bin - there was a hole in the bin, which communicated to the ale-cellar - it was large enough for a person to put an arm through, and draw a bottle of wine out.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What are you? A. A licensed victualler . Gibson was my pot-boy - he lived in my house; I knew to a bottle what wine I sold - this was taken from the bottom of the bin.

MARK PEACOCK. I lodge at the Tallow Chandlers' Arms, kept by the prosecutor. A few weeks before the 9th of May I saw Gibson in my room - he brought up a bottle of wine, and Smith received it of him; Gibson took out part of the cork and left the other in - they drank part of it; they asked if I would have a drop of wine - they poured some into a tea-cup; I took half a tea-cup full Gibson then went down; I asked Smith how he came by the wine - he said there was a rat hole in the cellar, and they could put their arm through and take a bottle of wine out; I said, "You are robbing Mr. Smith of this wine" - he said, "Never mind, he is a d - d old rogue;" that was all I saw done that day, but I saw four bottles of wine brought up at different times - I told the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. What day was this bottle of wine brought up, of which you say you partook? A. I cannot tell, it was about three weeks ago - Smith said it belonged to the prosecutor; I do not deny partaking of that, but I did not of the four bottles - I went before the Magistrate against these prisoners, but I was not charged with stealing the wine; I told the prosecutor of it about three weeks after I had partaken of it - seeing more wine coming into the room, I thought it my duty to acquaint him; I had talked to Smith, and advised him not to take it - it was red port wine; I do not know of my own knowledge where it came from - they did not say whether it was paid for.

COURT. Q. Had you any conversation with Gibson, as to where it came from? A. No further than hearing him speak in the room, and say it came from Mr. Smith's cellar - I am quite clear both he and Smith said that; it was after we had partaken of the wine - Gibson made no secret of it; he said in the room that he was going away very soon, and he would have a bottle or two more.

GEORGE AVIS. I took the two prisoner into custody; as I was taking Smith before the Magistrate in the morning, he said he had received the wine from Gibson, the pot-boy, and the old man (Peacock) was worse than he was.

Cross-examined. Q. Was that in Gibson's absence? A. Yes.

Gibson's Defence. Peacock made me drunk two or three times, to get the wine - I kept telling him my master would miss it; he said, "Never mind, you are going away- it won't be missed; and if it is you will not be here to answer for it."

Smith's Defence. Peacock charges me for not correcting Gibson, when an old man like him did not correct him, but kept giving him liquor and money to get the wine.

The prisoners received good characters, and one witness engaged to take Smith into his employ.

GIBSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Ten Days .

Recommended to Mercy.

Reference Number: t18310512-35

1022. DAVID WHITTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Edward Leech , from his person .

MR. EDWARD LEECH. I am a surgeon , and live in Poland-street. I was in Bedford-square on the 18th of April, when Smith gave me information; I felt my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - he pointed out the prisoner, who was in the square with two other boys; I came up with the prisoner in Charlotte-street, and taxed him with having my handkerchief - he pulled it out; this is it.

FREDERICK SHAW. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and received this handkerchief from the prosecutor.

SIMEON SMITH . I live with my parents in Rhodes'-buildings, York-street, Pentonville. On the morning of the 18th of April I was in Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury; I saw the prosecutor going along, the prisoner and a little boy were behind him - the little boy put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and took out his handkerchief- I ran and told the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner go round the corner - I came up when he was stopped, and saw the handkerchief.

Prisoner. I did not take the handkerchief; it laid against my feet in Charlotte-street. Witness; He was with the boy who took it, and could see what was done - he was close to the prosecutor.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310512-36

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1023. THOMAS EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 tub, value 1s., and 46lbs. weight of butter, value 46s. , the goods of Charles Jacques .

THOMAS GREEN . I live in Leather-lane , and am a tallow-chandler. On the 15th of April Mr. Jacques' cart called for a box of candles - I was packing them in my shop, and saw the prisoner shoulder a tub of butter from the cart - I immediately pursued him; on finding that, he threw the tub of butter into an empty cart, and ran on - I called a neighbour to take him; I stopped the cart, and took the butter out of it.

GEORGE BEAN . I saw the prisoner with the tub of butter on his shoulder - he threw it into a cart; I pursued him, by direction of the witness, and took him in Holborn.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am carter to Mr. Charles Jacques . I had put the tub of butter into the cart, and then went to Mr. Green's - the tub was taken from the cart while I waited there; I did not see it taken, but I saw it afterwards, and knew it was the same which had been in the cart.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the witness' door, and when I had got forty of fifty yards he came and said I was the person he wanted.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-37

1024. JOHN DUDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Holmes , from his person .

JOHN HOLMES. I was in Dean-street, Soho - between four and five o'clock on the 14th of April, I missed my handkerchief, turned, and saw the prisoner close behind me; I collared him, and found my handkerchief between his coat and waistcoat; I took him myself to the station.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Were there many people passing and repassing? A. Yes, but the street was not thronged; I felt my coat move, and then missed it - the prisoner was twenty or thirty yards from me; it was a yellow handkerchief, with red spots - I do not know whether it has any mark; I took it from the prisoner, and gave it to the officer - it is by no means a common handkerchief.

JAMES WALSH. I am an officer. I received this handkerchief from the prosecutor, and have had it ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Dean-street, and saw the prosecutor pass; there were two young lads on before me - I do not know who dropped the handkerchief, but I found it at my feet, and the prosecutor took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-38

1025. MATTHEW CANTLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 6 shillings , the monies of Thomas Studman .

CHARLOTTE STUDMAN . I am the wife of Thomas Studman , a gardener , who lives at Tottenham ; I keep a fruit-shop . Between twelve and one o'clock, on the 30th of April, I was just gone into my back parlour, and heard a noise of my till, which is behind the counter - I saw, by the reflection of a glass door, the prisoner's hand shutting the till - I went to him, and accused him of opening the till; he denied it, and asked for a halfpenny orange - I drew out the till, and missed the money; he ran away, I pursued - he turned a corner, and I saw him throw something away - Mr. Griffiths brought him back; I missed 6s. from my till.

JAMES GRIFFITHS. I am a neighbour of Studman's I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running - I apprehended him, and found 3 1/2d. on him, but no silver.

JOSEPH WEBB. I went to a place near the prosecutor's shop, which I had seen the prisoner run past - I did not myself see him throw any thing away; but I found 6s. there.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going with a boy to Tottenham to help him carry a parcel, as I was out of work - I went to the prosecutor's shop, and saw a man coming out - I asked him for a halfpenny orange, thinking he belonged to the shop; this witness then came out, and said I robbed the till - I denied it; she made a dart at me - I ran up the town, and this gentleman took me; she said she had lost 4s. 6d., that she had had 5s. 6d., and there were two sixpences left - the gentleman then said he had found 6s.; she then said she had had 7s., and she thought this was hers

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-39

1026. JOHN COMERFORD and WILLIAM BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 1 blanket, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Newbury .

JOHN SHEPHERD. I am a Police-constable. On the 24th of April I fell in with the prisoners in the City-road, coming towards Finsbury-square; Baker had a bundle under his arm - they were above a mile from the prosecutor's; it was then about half-past two o'clock - I asked him what he had there; he said a blankets, and that his sister, who was servant to Mr. Newbury, at Islington , gave

it to him - the other prisoner made the same reply, and said they had it to take to their mother's, in Kent-street; I took them to the station, and found the prosecutor out.

Comerford. Q. Did I tell you his sister gave it him? A. Yes.

EDWARD NEWBURY . I am master of the workhouse . This blanket belonged to there, but it is my own property- the two prisoners had been there about six weeks; they were there on the 24th of April, and dined there - I believe Baker to be a good young man, and led into this by others.

Comerford's Defence. On the 23rd of April Baker was talking to a man in the out place - I saw him give the man 2s., and the man gave him this blanket, tied up in this handkerchief - he took it up stairs, and the next day he took it out, and asked me to go with him.

COMERFORD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-40

1027. MARY COTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 2lbs. weight of mutton, value 1s. 2d. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

ANN LETCH . On the 14th of April I went to Mr. Somers' shop to buy a piece of meat - the prisoner stood in front of me; I saw her take two pieces of mutton, put one on the other, and place them in her apron - the man looked at me, and I said, "That is the woman who has taken the meat;" she had not been in the shop - she took it off the board; she passed the shop door, and went up Skinner-street .

Prisoner. I went into the shop. Witness. No, you did not - you turned and passed the door.

SAMUEL ABORN SOMERS. This meat belonged to my father, Samuel Somers, and it was on the board; I was at the books at the time the witness gave me information - I went, and found one of our men had got the prisoner; I found in her lap a pillow, a piece of bacon, and under that the pieces of mutton.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my own.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-41

1028. MICHAEL BAGLEY was indicted for stealing on the 5th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Francis Crew , from his person .

THOMAS FRANCIS CREW . I am an attorney . On the 5th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Lincoln's-Inn-fields - I felt something touch my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - I took him into a butter-shop, and the officer came and took him.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not two more young men between you and me? A. No; there was another lad by the side of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am without father or mother.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-42

1029. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 shirt, value 10s., and 1 sovereign , the property of John Hay .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of John Hay , the younger .

THOMAS CHAPMAN. I am a carter to Mr. John Hay , of Wickham-marsh, in Buckinghamshire. I drove his waggon, and on the 28th of April I fell in with the prisoner at Hillingdon, just on this side of Uxbridge - he was a stranger; he introduced himself to me, and asked if I was going to town, and what time I should get there - I said at seven o'clock in the morning; he then asked the turnpikeman if there was a coach going to town - he said there was not; he then called to me, and said he should overtake me on the road - before I got to Hillington he came up, and attempted to get into the waggon, but I would not let him; he then went on, and when I stopped he called for a pot of beer - I drank once out of it; there were several local soldiers, whom he seemed to know - we then went on again, and he wanted to ride; I said he might sit on the hay-band - he said he was so beat out that he should like to sleep; he got up into the waggon, with his feet hanging out, and appeared very drowsy - he then asked me to have some more beer or brandy, which I refused; I then got on near the night-house I called the prisoner out, and he came out with a bundle under his arm - I knew he had nothing before; he gave me two sixpences, and bade me good night - when he was gone off I got up into the waggon, and put my hand to feel for a box - it had been within one yard of the front on the near side, and I found it moved to the back and broken open - I ran, and caught the prisoner about two hundred yards from the place; he tried to get away as much as he could, and I told him he had broken open the box - he denied it; I said he should go back - I called the Policeman, and gave him into custody; he wanted to put his hand to his trousers - the officer would not allow him; I saw him take the parcel, containing this shirt and sovereign, from his trousers.

TIMOTHY LAWTON. I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner put his hand to his trousers - I said, "What are you about?" he said, "I have something here;" I said,"I will take that" - he gave me this shirt and sovereign; I found another sovereign in his pocket, some halfpence, and a key - he asked where they would send him; I said, "I don't know, perhaps let you go;" he said,"No, they will send me to the Old Bailey, and I shall see some of my palls there."

MARY HAY . I am the prosecutor's wife. I gave this box to the witness; it was corded with a new cord - it had this shirt in it, which I made for my son William Hay, who lives at Brighton - the sovereign was in it; it is the property of my eldest son, John Hay .

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-43

1030. JOHN FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Edward Holditch , from his person .

EDWARD HOLDITCH . I am a butler to Matthew Wilson , Esq., of Ashton-hall. On the 29th of April I was in Holborn - I felt something at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner run away up New Turnstile - he ran on to the end, and was taken in Princes-street; I saw my handkerchief picked up in a place where he could have dropped it.

JAMES MATTHEWS. I live with my parents, in Gate-street. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from

the prosecutor's pocket, and run down New Turnstile I do not know what he did with the handkerchief, but it was found in Princes-street.

HENRY CUTHBERT. I live in that neighbourhood. I saw the prisoner run away - I pursued; he was stopped against a little doorway of a plumber's yard; I saw him draw his hand back, but did not see what he threw away- the gentleman came up; the prisoner said he had no handkerchief and he might search him; I said, "There is no occasion for that, there is the handkerchief."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief was brought in half an hour after I was taken - I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-44

1031. EDWARD DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 pair of blinds, value 8s. , the goods of Henry Aldwincle .

HENRY ALDWINCLE . I live in Exmouth-street . I lost these blinds from within my door - I was informed of it, ran out, and saw the prisoner with them; I came up with him within a yard and a half of my house - he dropped them, and ran on; I lost sight of him, but called Stop thief! and the officer took him - I am certain of his person.

RICHARD AYLIFFE. I saw the prisoner take these blinds from the prosecutor's, and I told him of it.

JOHN BRAY . I am a Police-constable. I heard Stop thief! called, and saw the prisoner running - I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-45

1032. WILLIAM SHARPE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 pair of breeches, value 5s. , the goods of Alexander Jones .

ALEXANDER JONES. I live in Tothill-street , and am a clothes-salesman . I saw the prisoner and another pass my shop, at a quarter-past eight o'clock, on the evening of the 13th of April - I was doing a little business with a neighbour; I saw the prisoner take these breeches from my shop.

WILLIAM BLOCKLEY . The prosecutor was talking with me - I saw the prisoner, and took him with these breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310512-46

1033. PETER WILLIAM PEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 saddle, value 30s.; 1 bridle, value 9s., and 1 key, value 1s., the goods of Alexander Barker ; and 1 coat, value 3s. , the goods of John Green .

JAMES GOODMAN. I am servant to Mr. Alexander Barker . John Green is a young man out of a situation; he left his coat with me - my master keeps a horse and gig in Grosvenor-mews ; the prisoner was employed in a stable a little below ours - he was out of a situation, but he used to help the coachmen in the morning; on the 7th of May he was there, and while I was talking to him I missed the key of the coach-house off the corn-bin - I asked him about it; he swore he had not got it; I went to clean my master's clothes - I then went out, and did not return till eleven o'clock at night; I then found a saddle on the ground - I heard the prisoner groan; I got a light - the prisoner had then left the stable, but he was taken in the mews next to the stable, and the saddle was taken from his feet; the jacket was round him, and the key was in his pocket - I have known him two years; he has been in the mews a great while - the coat was left in my charge, and the saddle was tied up in it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-47

1034. HENRY MONTGOMERY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Richard Watson .

RICHARD WATSON . I live with Mr. Phillips, in Hill-street - the prisoner assisted in his stable . On the 28th of April I lost my coat from the room over the stable - the prisoner had gone away on the Saturday night; he came home at half-past nine o'clock, quite drunk, and I gave charge of him.

WILLIAM STEED . The prisoner was given into my charge - he was very tipsy; I locked him up - I went to him about eight o'clock at night; I asked him if he knew any thing about the coat - he said Yes, that he had sold it at No. 4, Monmouth-street; I went there and got it.

SAMUEL HARRIS. I live with Mr. Harris. The prisoner came and sold this coat at our house on Sunday morning - he said it was his own, and he was out of employ; he had 1l. 4s. for the coat - it is not much worn.

Prisoner's Defence. They gave me but 10s. for it, and they were to keep it till next day, when I was to have it for 2s. more - the coachman had made me drunk.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-48

1035. HANNAH PARKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 3 shirts, value 8s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 3s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of William Mason .

WILLIAM MASON. On the 8th of April I lodged with Mr. Thomas Davis , in Glasshouse-yard - he is a greengrocer; I went there the beginning of January - I am a groom , and work in a stable. The property stated is mine, and was in my box, which was not locked - I had it all safe on the 3rd of April, and missed it on the 8th; the prisoner came to lodge there on the 4th of April, and these articles were in her room; she was in the house at the time, and these duplicates were found on her, with some others - a man lived with her.

DANIEL GARDINER. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Aldersgate-street. I produce these shirts, handkerchiefs, and waistcoat, pawned by the prisoner, at different times.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Judgement Respited .

Reference Number: t18310512-49

1036. JAMES SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 18lbs. weight of soap, value 9s., and 1 frame, value 6d. , the goods of William Lamburn .

WILLIAM LAMBURN . I live in Upper Lisson-street, Lisson-grove, St. Marylebone . On the 25th of April I lost a frame and six bars of soap from inside my shop - I saw them in the evening, and they were taken about nine o'clock; the Policeman brought them to my house, and I

believe the soap to be mine - the frame I can swear to; I have seen the prisoner before.

GEORGE FRANCIS . I am a Police-constable. I was going by a wall in Lower Lisson-street on that evening, about one hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutor's - there is on the other side of the wall a garden, attached to a chapel; I saw a bar of soap come over the wall; I stood still, and five more came over - I looked over with my light, and saw the prisoner; I asked what he did there - he said he came over the wall; I asked how he meant to get out - he waved his hand, and said, "Over there;" I went round, through a gentleman's house, and took him in the garden; I had taken up the soap, and took it into the gentleman's house - I did not find the frame, but it was found in the garden, and the soap was thrown from that garden into the street - it was about ten o'clock or a quarter-past.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Was it a dark night? A. Not particularly so - I had a lantern; I did not see another person in the street - it was a public street; I will swear there was no other person but the prisoner in the garden - it is not so large as this Court; the wall is, 1 suppose, twelve feet high from the garden, and about five feet six inches from the street - I got on the wall, and inspected it; the prisoner was taken within five minutes of the soap being found - he was laying his length in the garden; I saw the soap come over the wall, and looked in the garden - there was no one there but the prisoner.

WILLIAM ELLIOTT . I am a Police-constable. I went to the garden at half-past eleven o'clock, and found the frame - I afterwards found the prosecutor.

WILLIAM LAMBURN. This frame is mine, and I suppose the soap is mine.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you a manufacturer of soap? A. No, I retail it - I and my wife serve in the soap; she is not here - I am sure this soap had not been sold, because I was in the shop all that night; it was on a cask inside the shop door - I did not see any one come in; here is no mark on the frame, but it is my own manufacture.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-50

1037. BRIDGET MONAGHAN , alias ANN WILLIAMS , was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , 10 yards of lace, value 2s. 6d.; 15 yards of ribbon, value 3s. 9d.; 6 caps, value 6s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 2 brace buckles, value 1s.; 1 comb, value 4d.; 1 work-bag, value 2d.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 pocket, value 3d.; 3 pincushions, value 1s.; 12 yards of cord, value 1s.; 2 table-cloths, value 2s.; 5 petticoats, value 5s.; 3 napkins, value 1s.; 1 window-blind, value 6d.; 2 pillow-cases, value 6d.; 3 shifts, value 5s.; 5 aprons, value 3s.; 1 bolster-case, value 6d.; 1 frock, value 6d.; and 2 pinafores, value 6d., the goods of Ann Thomas , her mistress .

ANN THOMAS. I keep a public-house in High-street, Shadwell . The prisoner had been in my service three months, as servant of all work ; I missed two aprons about the 20th of April - I suspected the washerwoman; I afterwards saw a person who gave me information - I sent for an officer, and charged the prisoner with robbing me; she denied it - I went up stairs with the officer; the prisoner said a box, which was locked there, was hers - the door of the room was also locked; I found in that box a variety of articles of mine, and some duplicates - she said the duplicates related to her own property; I sent to the pawnbroker's, and found some more of my property there.

GEORGE DEVERELL . I am a beadle of Shadwell. The prosecutrix sent for me; the prisoner produced the key of the room, and the key of the box; I found in the box some articles which the prosecutrix claimed, and fourteen duplicates, seven of which related to the prosecutrix's property - the prisoner said they related to her own property, and the things in her box she said she had picked up about the place; I took the prosecutrix's daughter with me, and found some things at the pawnbroker's - I went back to the prisoner, and she said, "Well, I suppose you have found enough against me now;" I said I had found a good many things; she then said, "It was Maria's fault;" I took her to Maria, and then the prisoner said, "I pawned these things by your direction, and put the money into the till, to make it appear that we had taken so much;" Maria is dangerously ill.

DANIEL KENNEDY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Shadwell. I have two table-cloths, five petticoats, three napkins, a window-blind, and several other articles, pawned by the prisoner, at four different times, in the name of Ann Williams.

MRS. THOMAS. This is all mine - I never permitted either of them to pawn any thing; I never received the money - I am certain the person she mentioned never gave her the things to pawn.

Prisoner's Defence. I slept in the same room with her sister, and was never out of the house but one day, except before my mistress came down in the morning - her sister Maria always had the money; Mrs. Thomas always had the money again; I never locked my box before that day; her sister used to get up in the morning to serve in the bar, and when she could not get enough money to take up to mistress at eight o'clock, mistress used to complain that we had been feasting ourselves; she used to give me these things to go and get money on them, as she said she should get scolded for not taking more - I got part of the things out again; a person once saw me at the pawnbroker's, and Maria told me to deny it.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-51

1038. SAMUEL MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of April , 1 shirt, value 1s. 8d. , the goods of Richard Law .

THOMAS ANDREW CAMAEOUX . I am a Policeman. I met the prisoner on the 23rd of April, in Pitfield-street. with a bundle under his coat, and having seen him before with bad characters, I stopped him, and asked what he had - he said what was that to me; I insisted upon seeing - I unbuttoned his coat, and took out this shirt, with his duplicate on it, which he tried to get off; I took him to the station, and found Mr. Law.

RICHARD LAW . I am a pawnbroker , and live at Hoxton . This shirt and ticket are mine - I do not know where it had been, but I think on the counter; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up coming from Islington.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-52

1039. ANN KELBY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 8lbs, weight of bacon, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of William Hindley .

JAMES EDMONDS. I am shopman to Mr. William Hindley, a cheesemonger , who lives in Gray's Inn-lane . On the 5th of May the prisoner came to his shop - I did not notice her come in, but a witness saw her take a cushion of bacon; it was on the shop-board, within the glass in the shop.

MARY COLEMAN. I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner come in, take the bacon, and run away with it I told Mr. Edmonds of it; he went and took her two doors off - she was going to put it down on the step of a door; she put it under her shawl.

JAMES EDMONDS . This is the bacon - the prisoner was drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking with Coleman before - I do not know whether I did it or not.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-53

1040. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Pryce Mottrem , from his person .

PRYCE MOTTREM. On the 15th of April I was near Temple-bar, in the Strand , at a quarter-past seven o'clock- a lady tapped me on the shoulder, and pointed out the prisoner, who had taken my handkerchief; I immediately pursued him - he was not more than two yards from me; he then ran away, and was taken - I have not seen my handkerchief since; I knew it had been in my pocket two minutes before - I saw no other person run.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was it not dusk? A. Yes, rather so, and a great many people were passing - it was on Fleet-street side of the bar; the lady is not here.

JOHN COLE. I am a Police-constable. I was off duty and merely coming up Fleet-street - I saw the prosecutor, who had a handkerchief a little way out of his pocket; I saw the prisoner, with another person in his company, dog the prosecutor's pocket - the prisoner drew the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket with his right hand; I went to make a grasp at him, and the other man put up his leg, and I fell down - I then lost sight of the prisoner for about half a minute - I took him just afterwards, but could not find the handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q.Where was this? A. It was between Temple-bar and St. Clement's church - the gentleman made a mistake when he said it was on the Fleet-street side of the bar; I lost sight of the prisoner for about half a minute, but he had not got more than thirty yards from there before he was taken - I cannot be mistaken in his person; I knew him before.

Prisoner's Defence. That man is swearing my life away - he took me into a bookseller's shop in Carey-street, and said a woman saw me pick the pocket; then he went to Bow-street and said he saw me do it.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310512-54

1041. JOHN HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Whitbread .

JOSEPH WHITBREAD. I am a farmer , and live at Tottenham. On the 8th of May, I was at the Cafe Francois, in the Haymarket - I had left my horse and gig at a livery-stable, and sent William Parkhouse for it at half-past one in the morning; I had been to the Opera, and was taking my supper - the porter brought the gig, but my great coat was missing from it.

HENRY PARKHOUSE. I went to Mr. Cox's livery-stables for the gig at half-past one o'clock - I got the gig and the coat in it; I did not get in - I led the horse, but kept my eye on the coat till the horse made a plunge; I looked at the horse, then turned to look at the coat again, and it was gone - I saw a man running about ten yards from the gig; I believe it was the prisoner, but I cannot swear to him.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Have you not sworn that it was a person stouter than the prisoner? A. No, not who stole it, but a person who had it, and I said directly, "This is not the man who stole the coat" - I did not see any person in company with the prisoner.

SUSAN WARNER. I was in Cockspur-street - the prisoner and another man were crossing the road - I saw the prisoner take the coat out of the gig; the other man was taller than him - I told the Police-officer; he pursued, and took the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. It was a late hour for you to be out? A. I had been spending the evening with a friend- it was moonlight; I was eight or nine yards from the prisoner - I was on the pavement, and the gig in the road; I looked at the gig - there was a third person there.

JOHN CARTER. I am an inspector of the Police. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running with the coat on his shoulder - I ran about twenty yards, and I saw Park-house running; I said, "What is the matter?" he said,"I have lost a coat;" I pursued the prisoner, who had then got on to the Admiralty - I saw a tall man with this coat; I said, "That is not the man I saw with the coat"- he said, "No, I have picked it up;" I said, "The man I saw was a short man, with white stockings" - the prisoner was brought back in a minute, and I took him to the watch-house; he feigned drunkenness.

(Coat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor - I heard Stop thief! called and ran, like a good many more.

FRANCES RAGES . I live at No. 33, Vine-street. I do not know the prisoner - I know Susan Warner; she is unfortunate like myself; I saw the coat on the ground - she ran, and a man ran to pick it up; I cannot say who got it - I believe the man was the prisoner, but I am not certain.

COURT. Q.Had you any doubt that some one stole it? A. No, I saw only one man and the woman.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-55

1042. ELLEN HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 cloak, value 4s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Nichols .

JANE NICHOLS. I am the wife of Thomas Nichols ; we live at Woolwich - my husband works at the gas-house ; I knew the prisoner when quite young, but had not seen her for some years. On the 11th of April I came to Ratcliff-highway to settle a little business - I met the prisoner, who knew me, though I did not know her; she said she was hungry and thirsty - I took her to the Ship and Unicorn

public-house , to treat her; I had a bundle with me, containing the articles mentioned - I put it on the settle, and told her to give an eye to it while I went into the yard; I returned in ten minutes - the prisoner and the bundle were gone; I gave information to a Police-officer, and the prisoner was found.

JAMES PEACHEY. I am a pawnbroker. I have a gown and cloak, pawned by the prisoner on the 11th of April.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I saw the prosecutrix at the Paviors' Arms, and she wanted to get a room, and not to live with her husband - she has been a prostitute all her life.

JANE NICHOLLS. I have been married seventeen years, and have a good husband. I was unfortunate in my younger days.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the things to mind while she went with a sailor, and told me to pawn them.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-56

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1043. EDWARD BOULLY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April , 1 bag, value 2d.; 1 shirt, value 2s. 6d.; 79 sovereigns, and 6 shillings , the property of Charles Michaud .

The prosecutor and prisoner, being natives of France, had the evidence interpreted to them.

CHARLES MICHAUD. I am master of the French vessel Le Jumelle , lying at Limehouse . The prisoner was employed on board that vessel - on the 22nd of April I had seventy-nine sovereigns and seven shillings in my locker, in the cabin where I sleep, and the key was in my pocket; I went on shore that day with my crew, leaving the prisoner on board - I returned at ten o'clock at night; the prisoner was then gone - I missed all my money but one shilling, which was left; some boards under my bed were so removed so as to enable a person to reach the money in the locker, by extending his arm - the prisoner did not return to the vessel; I have seen the bag in which the money was deposited, at the Police-office, in the hands of the officer.

JAMES CRAIGIE. I am a Police-officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 27th of April, in Mason-street, Lambeth - I received this canvas bag, and seventy-three sovereigns, from Mrs. Ginnett, in the prisoner's presence.

ANN GINNETT . My husband is a Frenchman - we live at No. 10, Mason-street, Lambeth; the prisoner came home to tea with my husband on a Saturday, but I do not know the day of the month - he had tea with us; he had seventy-three sovereigns in a canvas bag, and he shot them out for me to take care of them for him; I gave the bag and sovereigns to the officer - the prisoner left this shirt in the room he slept in, and I gave it to the officer.

JAMES GINNETT. I went on a Saturday to the house of a tailor, next to Astley's theatre; I do not know the day of the month - I met with the prisoner there; he went to my house to lodge, and there produced some money, which he said was prize-money.

CHARLES MICHAUD. I know this bag by this little knot - I can swear to it by that mark.

The prisoner handed in a petition for a lenient sentence, expressing his contrition for the offence, which he had unconsciously committed in a state of intoxication.

CHARLES MICHAUD. He has served me four months, and I will freely take him home to his family - I believe if he had not been drunk he would not have done this; he has had the care of my money, and was honest till this time; I do not recollect whether it was on a Saturday or not, but it was the 22nd - I had received eighty-three sovereigns, and taken four of them; I had seventy-nine taken from the locker - this shirt is mine; I have the fellow to it on.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310512-57

1044. JANE ARUNDEL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 sovereign , the money of Robert Arundel .

ROBERT ARUNDEL. I live in Maxwell's-buildings, Long-alley, Shoreditch ; the prisoner is my eldest daughter of four - she has behaved very well, and been a second mother to my other children since the death of my wife; but within the last two or three years she has got into bad company, and taken bad steps; I have reproved her for it, and called in respectable persons to speak to her - she slept in the next room to me with the children. On the morning of the 28th of April she awoke me at an early hour, by taking my trousers from under my head, where I had placed them over night; I missed a sovereign from the pocket, which I had seen safe when I laid out some money the evening before - I had gone to bed about eleven o'clock; she left the room immediately after the trousers were drawn from under my head - I went after her, and found her in a gin-shop with some low characters; the officer found 8s. 6d. on her - I wish to do her no injury, but to bring her to repentance.

THOMAS PETCH. I am a superintendent of the watch. On the morning of the 28th of April, at a quarter before four o'clock, I was near the corner of Sun-street, and saw the prisoner coming towards me - she was in company with a man, and appeared to me to say she should not go with him that distance for the small quantity of liquor he had given her; she then came towards me, and said she would not go with him while she had that in her hand, and produced a sovereign; I thought it was copper, but she showed it to me again, and I saw it was good - she said she had plenty more at home, and she went skipping towards Spital-square; she told me she lived in Long-alley - I said that was a long place; she then said it was in Maxwell's-buildings - I saw her father about half-past six o'clock, and took her at the Phoenix wine-vaults: the place I saw her at is two or three hundred yards from her father's - she had 8s. 4d. when she was taken.

GEORGE GRAVES . I am a Police-constable. On the 28th of April the prisoner was taken to Worship-street office, and when she had been there half an hour she produced a half-sovereign, and asked me to get her some drink.

Prisoner's Defence. My father said at the office that he awoke while I was going down stairs; the door is never locked - it is free of access to any one.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-58

1045. JAMES GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May , 3 bars of iron, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Matthew Stapley .

MATTHEW STAPLEY. I lost three bars of iron on the 3rd of May - they are worth about 1s. 6d.; the prisoner had come to my place a day or two before, to work at peeling ozier twigs - these are the iron bars.

GEORGE PALMER. I am a Police-constable. On the 3rd of May I saw the prisoner on the high road at Kensington-gore, at ten o'clock in the morning; I saw him take these bars from the prosecutor's shop, and took him in about ten minutes - he threw them at my feet, and said he did it on purpose to get into custody; we have had him at our place three times for having no place to sleep in.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-59

1046. MARGARET GILES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May , 20 yards of cotton, value 25s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

JOHN SPINKS . I am a shopman to Messrs. George Drake Sewell , and Thomas Cross, linen-drapers , in Old Compton-street, Soho . On the evening of the 3rd of May I saw the prisoner at the counter - the shopman was showing her a piece of calico, and while he turned for another piece, I saw her take a piece of printed cotton off the counter, and conceal it under her gown; she was taken out at the shop door and into the private door - about twenty yards and a half of cotton was found on her.

MATTHEW HARDING. I am a Police-constable. I received this property and the prisoner on the 3rd of May, at the prosecutor's - I asked her what she did it for; she said the devil possessed her just then, and she meant to take a smaller bit just to make a child a frock.

HARRIET MILTON. I am in the employ of Messrs. Sewell and Cross; I saw the prisoner in the private house adjoining their shop - I found this piece of cotton between her gown and petticoat.

Prisoner. I gave it to you. Witness. You untied your gown yourself, and the piece of print dropped from you.

Prisoner's Defence. I took this piece in my lap to look at - I rolled my clothes round me, and begged of them to take me out, that I might not be exposed as a thief in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 65. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-60

1047. GEORGE FISHER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of Abraham Isaacs , on the 7th of May , and stealing 6 pecks of almonds, value 20s., and 1 bag, value 1s., his property .

JOHN GREEN . I am a Police-constable. About half-past one o'clock on the morning of the 7th of May, I was at the corner of Bell-lane, Spitalfields - I saw the prisoner with a bag, and asked what he had got there; he said a bag of almonds - he was carrying them on his shoulder; I asked where he brought them from - he said Duke's-place, and he was going to take them to No. 21, Wentworth-street, where his father lived; I asked what he gave for them - he said 12s.; I took him to No. 21, Wentworth-street - I knocked at the door, but no one came; I took him to the station, and made inquiries, which led me to Mr. Isaacs' warehouse, near Lamb-street, Spitalfields, which is about half a mile from where I took the prisoner - the prosecutor's warehouse had about a dozen tiles taken off it.

ABRAHAM ISAACS . I am a fruit-merchant , and live at No. 11, North-street, Spitalfields-market . The prisoner had been employed on my premises, but was discharged about a month or six weeks since; he had to attend a horse in my yard. On the 7th of May I received information, and went to the station; I saw the bag of almonds- I knew the bag; it is marked R. - it is a particular mark that we buy; I missed almonds of this description - I had such in my warehouse the night before; I went to the prisoner - as soon as he saw me he said, "Mr. Isaacs, I hope you will have mercy - I took the tiles off the warehouse, and took the bag and almonds;" my warehouse is in the parish of Christchurch, Spitalfields.

HENRY WHITE. I am a porter to Mr. Isaacs. On the evening of the 6th of May, I put a bag of almonds into the barrel in his warehouse, to colour them - this is the bag; I know it by having cut the tops of the twine - I locked it up at half-past eight o'clock; the roof was then all secure - I went in the morning, and saw about a dozen tiles had been taken off.

THOMAS BICKNELL. I was at the station-house. The prisoner was brought in there, and when the prosecutor came he said, "Is that Mr. Isaacs? pray do not he too hard with me;" I told him what he said must be told to the Magistrate - he then said he took the tiles off, took the bag of almonds, and that to get into the yard he was compelled to get over the yard door.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather tipsy; I met a sailor, and went to play at skittles with him - if I had been sober I should not have done so.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-61

1048. ROBERT CLAPBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of April , 7 panes of glass, value 14s., the goods of John Bridge , and fixed to a building of his ; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN HICKEY. I am a Police-constable. I met the prisoner in the Uxbridge-road on the 23rd of April, at half-past five o'clock in the morning - he had some squares of glass; I asked what he had got - he said some glass, and that he was a plumber and glazier; I knew him - we had had him in custody before, and he then stated that he was a bricklayer; he said he found the glass on the road - I took him to the watch-house; he had seven squares of glass and two knives - here is one of them; it had marks of putty on it.

JOSEPH GRANGER . I am a gardener to Mr. Bridge, of Shepherd's-bush . On the morning of the 23rd of April, I missed seven squares of glass from a summer-house -I have seen one which the officer brought; it was tried, and fitted the place exactly - it had been fastened in with putty, which had been cut away; the summer-house is about four hundred yards from the road - there were eight squares missing; the colour and state of the putty appeared the same on the glass as on the frame - it had been painted green on the frame, and on the glass.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Uxbridge, and found the glass in a ditch, wrapped up in a cloth -I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-62

1049. THOMAS CRISP was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 pair of ear-rings, value 10s., and 1 pin, value 10s., the goods of Mitchell Wertheim , his master .

MITCHELL WERTHEIM. I live in Little Newport-street, Leicester-square , and am a lace-dealer - my brothers, with whom I live, are jewellers. The prisoner has been employed about nine months as my errand-boy - this pin is my own property, but the ear-rings are the property of myself and my partners; the pin is two gold pins chained together, and is worth 10s. - I had the prisoner searched, and it was found on him, with the pair of ear-rings.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.How long had the prisoner lived with you? A.About three quarters of a year - this pin fell from the lower part of his shirt; he said he found it in the street - it was in a little bit of paper.

DENNIS FRITH . I am a Police-constable. I searched the prisoner, and this pin fell from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the cupboard to wash my hands - this pin was among some dirt, and not knowing it to be of any value, I took it up, and put it into my pocket.

MR. WERTHEIM re-examined. Q.Had you asked him any questions about the pin? A. My brother asked him where the pin was which had been on the table, and he said he did not know.

The prisoner received a good character, and a former master engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-63

1050. RICHARD EAST was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 wheelbarrow, value 6s. , the goods of Edward Branson .

EDWARD BRANSON. I live at Hampton-common, Middlesex . I lost my wheelbarrow on the 9th of April - I had worked with the prisoner for a good while, but not at that time; we live in the same house - I have seen my barrow in the possession of Samuel Lodge; I do not know how it was taken.

SAMUEL LODGE . I heard the prisoner saying that he had a barrow to sell in a new beer house, and I offered to buy it - he brought it to me where I live; I bought it of him for 8s. - I think it was on a Wednesday or Thursday, on the 9th of April.

EDWARD BRANSON. I saw the barrow, and knew it was mine - I saw it in the presence of the prisoner and Lodge before the Magistrate.

WILLIAM FRITH. I am a constable. The prosecutor came, and said his barrow was at Lodge's - he told me to go and detain it, till he got a warrant; I took it to Mr. Matthews', where it is now - it is the same I got from Lodge; the prosecutor claimed it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-64

1051. WILLIAM ELMER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , 7 books, value 3s. , the goods of John Faulkner .

JOHN FAULKNER . I keep a shop in Great Titchfield-street; Marylebone , and sell old books . On the afternoon of the 2nd of May the prisoner came to the shop door, and looked to see if there was any one inside - he looked at the books, and put one into his apron; he then took another, and so continued till he took seven - I knocked for my son, who was then gone to dinner, and asked for my hat; I followed the prisoner, and found him with the books in his apron - he threw them down, and said, "If they are yours take them;" they are worth 6d. each - these are them.

JAMES FORD. I took the prisoner - he said he was drunk, or he should not have taken them.

Prisoner. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-65

1052. MARY BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 3 half-crowns and 1 shilling, the monies of Joseph Day , from his person .

JOSEPH DAY. I am a livery-stable keeper , and live in Hunt-court, King David's-lane. On the night of the 28th of April I was in the Commercial-road - I saw the prisoner in company with another woman; they came up to me - the other woman laid hold of my umbrella, which was in my left hand; I cautioned them to let it alone, or I should take them before Mr. Baker - the other woman pinioned my arms, and the prisoner unbuttoned my trousers pocket, and took out three half-crowns and a shilling; as soon as I could get my hand at liberty I seized the prisoner by the arm, and gave her in charge - I know I had the money safe twenty minutes before; the other woman escaped.

JOHN PEDDER. I am a Police-constable. I heard the prosecutor call for assistance - I came up to him by the White Horse turnpike; I took the prisoner into custody - on the way to the watch-house she gave me two half-crowns, and when I got there I found two sixpences on her - the prosecutor said she had robbed him of three half-crowns and one shilling.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor wanted to prevail on her to accompany him up a court, and that the money found on her had been given her by a gentleman.

JOHN PEDDER re-examined. I told her if she had robbed the man to give the money up - she persisted that she had not any thing belonging to him; she delivered two half-crowns to me, and I found two sixpences on her - she did not then say that the prosecutor wanted to go with her - she did before the Magistrate; the prosecutor told me two women came up to him.

JOSEPH DAY re-examined. Q. Did you ask the prisoner to go with you? A. No, my Lord, it is false, and she was in company with another woman, who took my umbrella; I was quite sober.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-66

1053. GEORGE BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 table-spoon, value 10s. , the goods of James Price .

MARY EVANS . I am servant in the family of Mr. James Price , who keeps the Green Dragon, in Villiers-street, Strand ; On the 14th of April I saw the prisoner in his kitchen, and told him to walk out, which he did; I went to get some water to wash the dishes, and when I turned

in again I missed a spoon from the dresser - I followed him into the tap-room, and accused him of having it; he threw it from his left-hand under the settle - he then took it up, and gave it to me.

HARRIET PRICE. I am the wife of James Price . I saw the prisoner at our house; the witness came to him -I had before taken the spoon into the kitchen: she said asked him for it; he took it up, and gave it to me; he said he was playing with the dog, and dropped it.

JOHN PURDY. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have the spoon.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-67

1054. CHARLES CLAXTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 2 coats, value 20s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 cloak, value 15s., and 3 handkerchiefs, value 3s. , the goods of Elihoenai Newbold .

ELIHOENAI NEWBOLD. I live in Park-street, Grosvenor-square , and am a tailor - the prisoner is my wife's son. On a Tuesday in April he left my house a little before seven o'clock in the morning; when I came out of my bedroom I missed a coat - I came down, and found my pocketbook laying on the cutting-board; I then missed another coat, some silk handkerchiefs, a cloak, and a waistcoat - I saw the prisoner on the 14th, in Great James-street, Lisson-grove - when he saw me he ran away; I called a Police-constable to stop him, which he did - I asked what he had about him, and he produced a purse, which was my property, and had 2s. in it, some trifling articles, and some duplicates - I went to a pawnbroker's, where I found my two coats, the cloak, waistcoat, and one handkerchief.

EDWARD DRY. I am shopman to Mr. James Kember, a pawnbroker, of Knightsbridge. On the 12th of April the prisoner came in about a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning; I lent him 2l. 10s. on two coats and a waistcoat, and 15s. on the cloak - he wished them to be done so, that his parents might redeem them separately; he gave the name of George Newman, lodger, No. 10, New-street, and said he was the son of Charles Newman .(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, who engaged to take him home.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-68

1055. MARY BOLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 1 pelisse, value 8s.; 1 gown, value 5s.; 3 necklaces, value 6s., and 1 brooch, value 2s. , the goods of Emily Steers .

EMILY STEERS. I live in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Kirby, in Bloomsbury-square. I lost a pelisse, three necklaces, a gown, and a brooch, from a small straw box, which was in a large box, at Mr. Tremain's, in Southampton-row - I saw them at Hatton-garden, in possession of the pawnbroker.

DAVID TRAIL. I live with Mr. Aldridge, a pawnbroker, in Orange-street. I have a gown and a pelisse, pawned on the 23rd of April by a woman, but I do not know who.

JAMES BOLAN. I am a Police-constable, (No. 68, E,) and lodge at No. 14, Castle-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday last, in Maynard-court, Borough - I went with Mr. Tremain in search of her; I asked her a great many questions - she denied every thing she had taken, except the box of beads, which I found under her pillow in that house; I did not find any thing on her.

Q. Did you see who put that box of beads under the pillow? A. No; I did not see the prisoner do any thing with regard to that pillow - there were two empty boxes in the room; I did not see the prisoner do any thing, with regard to them.

Q. Is this your name and hand-writing? (handing him his deposition.) A. Yes, Sir.

Q. Now did you see the prisoner do any thing to any box? A. No, Sir - in going up stairs my foot slipped, the prisoner went forward, and I suspect she went to the box, took it out, and put it under the pillow.

Q.Then if you have sworn that you saw the prisoner go to a box in the corner of the room, take something out of it, and then slip it under the pillow of the bed, is that true? A. No, Sir - I had no conversation with her; I questioned her a good deal - I am sober; the prisoner said nothing.

Q.Did you not ask if she had any thing about her? A. I asked where the duplicates were, and she said she had destroyed them.

SUSAN BAYFORD. I am single, and live in the same service with the prosecutrix - my master has the occupation of a room at Mr. Tremain's, in Southampton-row; I am sent there occasionally. There was a trunk there containing these articles, and some other things - it was not locked; I recollect the pelisse, the gown, and the little straw box, containing the necklace and brooch, being in it- I went to that room on the 5th of May; I saw something on the table, which directed my attention to the trunk - I found the things had been taken out of it, and were very much rumpled; I missed these articles - I saw the gown and pelisse at Mr. Aldridge's; I had not known the prisoner.

GEORGE TREMAIN. The prisoner was in my service, at No. 6, Southampton-row. She came on the 16th of April, and left on the Monday week following - the property stated was in a trunk in my front attic, which belonged to Mr. Kirby - it was there while the prisoner was there; I went with the officer when the prisoner was apprehended; I saw the officer coming down stairs with the little straw box in his hand - the prisoner's father and mother lived there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-69

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, MAY 13.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1056. THOMAS GALLAGHER , EDWARD GALLAGHER , MARTIN MORAN , and ANN MORAN were indicted for the wilful murder of James Dockery .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH WHITE . I live in Lumley-court, Strand. On Sunday morning, the 24th of April, between eight and nine o'clock, I saw the prisoners and the deceased, in Brewer's-court, Bedfordbury - I saw Thomas Gallagher , who wore

a straw hat, holding the deceased by the collor, and as the deceased was trying to make his escape the prisoner, Thomas Gallagher, caught him by the collar and struck him several times with his fist - the deceased did not strike again, but only tried to escape; Edward Gallagher was there and struck him once on the neck with his fist - that is all I saw him do; I heard the people round say that the quarrel began on account of the man's religion - I did not hear either of the prisoners say any thing; I saw Thomas Gallagher strike him twice on the head with a stick - he then fell to the ground; it was a long stick, a good deal like a broom-bandle - this was after Edward struck him; he fell to the ground, and then the people round cried Murder! I went away, and saw no more - Thomas Gallagher put his hat over his face (shouched,) and walked up Bedfordbury - Thomas Gallagher did not appear in any way in liquor; he walked up the street very steadily - I did not notice the others.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.How far from Bedfordbury do you live? a. It is a good way - my is huband was not with me; I had just got up, and was going on some business for myself.

Q. What was the first you saw of the transaction? A. I heard a noise; I was then in Bedfordbury, one or two doors from Brewer's-court - I cannot tell when the quarrel began; I did not go quite close to them - Thomas Gallagher did not appear very angry; I saw them in the court, not in any house - I was there about a quarter of an hour, there were seven or eight people there when I first went up - I knew none of them; they did not go in doors, while I was there - I am sure Thomas Gallagher had the back in his hand when he struck him; I cannot tell where the stick came from - I never saw it till it was in his hand, just before he struck him; he struck him with his fist at first - he had no stick in his hand when he held him by the coller.

Cross-examined by MR. BROKIN. Q.Are these people natives of Ireland? A. I have heard so - a great many irish live there; I do not know where Edward Gallagher lives.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Gallagher struck him first with his fist, how long after that did he strike him with the stick? A.Two or three minutes - this is the stick (looking at the handle of a bricklayer's server, produced by Wilson); this iron part, which is now broken off, was not on when I saw it - when he was struck he fell to the ground, and was bleeding at the mouth and nose; what had happend before I came I cannot tell.

MARY WRIGHTSON. I am single, and live in Brewer's-court, Bedfordbury. On Sunday morning, the 24th of April, I was looking out of window, and saw Thomas Gallagher draw the deceased out by his collar, and throw him on the stones in a very violent manner - he dragged him out of the house where he lodges; Thomas Gallagher and the deceased lodge in the same house - I went in and saw no more; I merely saw him drag him out by the collar - he chucked him down in a spiteful manner on the stones, on his face; I observed nothing further - I saw nobody there but Thomas Gallagher and the deceased; I knew them both by sight, but had no acquaintance with them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you lived long in the court? A. Yes, six years - the Irish live in that house; I was drawing up the window when I saw this - I had heard no noise; I was accidentally looking out of window - I am certain nobody else was there.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many houses are there in the court? A.Seven - I live at No.8; the Irish live at No. 4, which is next door.

PETER GILLDAY. I live in Brewer's-court. On the 24th of April, I saw Thomas Gallagher drag the deceased Dockery out of the outer door of the house - neither of them said any thing; he had hold of him by the collar, and let him fall down on the stones on his back.

Q. Do you mean that he let him fall by his own weight? A. I cannot say; I suppose he meant to put him down out of his hand on the flags - he was apparently dead then to me; nobody else was there - I immediately went and fetched a Policeman; I came back with him, and found in my absence the deceased had been taken into No. 4 again - I did not see him again till he was in his coffin.

Q. Then at the time you saw him brought out of the house there was no scuffle? A. No - Thomas Gallagher dragged him out by the collar, with his heels on the door cill; he appeared dead then - this was between eight and half-past nine o'clock; I saw nobody by.

JEREMIAH CORCORAN. I live in Doke's-court, Little Dean-street, Westminster - I did not know the deceased, but I know all the prisoners. On Sunday morning, the 24th of April, I was at my brother's, and heard a cry of Murder! I put my head out of the window, which is in the next court - there is only a wall between; I could see into Brewer's-court, and saw Thomas Gallagher draw the deceased out by the collar, and throw him on the stones - he seemed to me quite helpless; I could not say whether he was dead or alive - he did not strike him then; he only threw him on the stones - he then went down the court; I came down stairs, went into the court, and he came back again towards where the man was, and said to the deceased, "If you recover yourself, I will come and see you at night again;" the deceased was taken in doors by somebody, and I saw no more of him- I was there when the Policeman came, which was in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; before the deceased was taken in I observed blood on the side of his head, and about his mouth - this was after he was thrown on the stones; I cannot say whether it was there when he was first brought out of the house - he appeared to me to be dead when he laid on the stones.

JAMES FOX. I live in Brewer's-court, on the second floor. On the 24th of April I got out of bed about ten minutes before eight o'clock, or ten minutes after, and on coming into my sitting-room, I heard a screaming in the court - I put my head out of window, and saw Thomas Gallagher drag the deceased out into the court, and drap him on the pavement, right opposite the door; I walked down stairs directly, in my shirt-sleeves, came down as far as the body, and he seemed apparently dead - I saw no marks of violence, except a little blood on his face; I turned from the body, walked down towards the court, and stood close to the pump - shortly after Thomas Gallagher walked down to me, and said, "Fox, why have you not been to the row?" I said, "I don't want to be;"

he told me that Meran and his lodger, (meaning James Dockery , the deceased,) had been pitching it into him and said, "Would you take it ill of me to take my own part?" pitcking means striking or assaulting him - he walked down towards the bottom of the court, and shortly after a Policeman walked into the court, passed him, not knowing him, and went up to where the deceased laid - Gallagher walked towards the bottom of the court, and shortly after Martin Moran, the prisoner, walked from Bedfordbury into the court; the body had at that time been moved into Moran's apartment - I did not see it moved, but afterwards saw it there, and have no doubt of its being James Dackery 's body; when Martin Moran walked into the court, I asked him where he had been, as a man was apparently dead in his house - he said he had been in search of a Policeman, to give charge of Thomas Gallagher and Dockery for having a row in his house; that is all I saw - I was taken up by the Policeman, and discharged by him on promising to give evidence.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Thomas Gallagher told you Moran and the deceased had been pitching into him, and Moran said the deceased and Gallagher had a row in his house? A. Yes.

JOHN WILSON. I am a serjeant of the Police. On the morning of the 24th of April I was fetched to this court by Gillday; I got there about nine o'clock in the morning, and found the court full of people - I inquired where the fight was, and was told at No.4; I went to No.4 - the door was closed; I asked for admittance - Mrs. Moran asked my business; I said I understood a man was either killed or dying - she said there was nothing the matter, there had only been a spree with a couple of her lodgers, and that the man was not dead - I then shoved the door, and it opened; she then said, "Now you may come in;" I said, "I don't thank you for that," because I had opened the door myself - I entered the front room on the ground floor, where Mrs. Moran lived, and there saw a corpse laying across the bed; I felt the man, and he was quite cold, both his breast and forehead - I then saw blood on Mrs. Moran's arm, from her elbow to her wrist, and took her into custody; I took her to the station-house, when I got assistance; I went for a surgeon to inspect the body - Moran's husband had gone away then; I had seen him when I first came into the court, but did not know he was her husband; after I came from the station I took Moran into custody - I found him at the bottom of Bedfordbury; he had not gone away - he also had blood on his hands, and was apparently in liquor; I could not say he was drunk, but he had been drinking - I took hold of him; he said he would not be handled by a Policeman, but I still held him, and took him to the station; by order of the superintendent, I went back to search the house - I then found the stick produced under the bed where the deceased was laying; the superintendent came afterwards, and found the iron server belonging to it, not far from where the stick was; he turned the bed up, and found it - when I found the stick it was in the state it is now in, with a few drops of blood on it, and the server had some hair to it; it appears to me to he human hair - it adhered to it quite close, as if it had been a blow.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Have you had that stick ever since? A. No, it has been locked up in the superintendent's room - we have not washed it; here is the mark of blood - the stick is split at one end - I only know that I found it; I cannot say in whose hand it had been - Mrs. Moran might have soiled her hand with blood if she had laid hold of it; human hair is sometimes used with mortar, I believe, for a shift - the server is used to scoop mortar; it had been in mortar - there are only small particles of mortar on it now.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.You expected to find the deceased at No. 4, living or dead? A. Yes - I pushed the door open with my hand; I gave one push, and it opened - the room is four or five feet from the outer door.

Q. If a man had received an injury, and was taken into the house, is it not very probable he would be taken into that room? A. Yes; there is another room on the side, but that is a sitting-room; there were a great many lodgers in the house.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was there any fresh or moist mortar on the server, to which the bair could be? A. No- the bair was on the edge of it; I did not compare the hair with any thing.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS. I am a superintendent of the Police. I went to Brewer's-court with a party of officers, on receiving information, about a quarter-past nine o'clock - I found a great number of persons assembled in the court, and considerable confusion; I entered the house No. 4, and found a dead man laying on the floor - I observed his face and neck greatly discoloured, and a slight contusion on the right side of the nose; his face appeared to have been recently, but very imperfectly, washed - I inquired who had done it; the female prisoner was present - I was answered by several voices "Thomas Gallagher;" I inquired for him, and was answered by Ann Moran, "Oh, he is off - you will not get him;" I then ordered the officers to guard the house, and suffer nobody to escape; I secured every person in the house - Wilson took Mrs. Moran and Martin Moran came, having promised Wilson he would do so; I examined the apartment, and in the room facing Moran's, on the left, I perceived marks of fresh blood on the wall - there were three beds in that room; I found the server in Moran's room, under the bed, which was then turned up - the body was on the floor when I entered; I examined the body more particularly, and found a wound on the back part of the skull - it appeared a sort of bruised wound, which might be made with a stick, and certainly not with an iron cutting instrument; I found this hair on the server (producing three hairs) - I saw several spots of what appeared to me to be blood in the front of Ann Moran's dress; it might have happened by her moving the deceased about, if he had been brought in wounded; on the following morning she had either sucked or washed out those stains - I sent an officer for Thomas Gallagher, and he brought him in in half an hour.

JOHN MURDOCK. I apprehended Thomas Gallagher at the Three Augels, in Long-acre, about half-past nine o'clock that morning - it is about five minutes' walk from Brewer's-court.

JOHN NATHAN BAINBRIDGE . I am a surgeon. I was called in to view the body of the deceased; two other gentlemen were present - I made notes of my examination; he

appeared to have been a stout, well-formed, healthy man - I found a wound on the head, which had penetrated some depth into the scalp; on moving the scalp, there was a considerable quantity of blood or serum, also on the chest; it is my opinion that the cause of his death was the extravasation of blood on the brain, and that external violence such as blows or a fall would cause.

GEORGE DOUCHEZ. I am a surgeon, and assisted Mr. Bainbridge - I agree perfectly with his evidence.

PATRICK BARRETT. I am a surgeon, and was present; I agree with the evidence given.

Thomas Gallagher's Defence. I struck in my own defence - he struck me first for not giving him some of the gin which the women sent me out for.

Edward Gallagher's Defence. I stand before the bar of justice with a clear conscience, and am innocent of the charge; on the morning in question, between seven and eight o'clock, I, and one of my fellow lodgers, went into the Black Horse, at the corner of May's-buildings - I returned home about eight o'clock with three loaves under my arm; I brought them into the second floor front room of the house, where this transaction happened, and from that time was never in the court nor down stairs till the Policeman came, about nine o'clock, so that I know no more about it than a man in France; White has merely come for the sake of her expences, to swear my life away - no man in the court can say there was a row there when she says she saw me and my brother strike the deceased; she could not identify me at the first examination, when Sir Richard Birnie told her to point out the two men whom she saw strike the deceased - she could not point out one; I am a very remarkable man, and can be known among two or three people - she could not identify my brother, till Mr. Thomas said, "Did the man wear a straw hat?" Yes, said she - whatever Thomas asked, she said yes to, whether it was right or wrong; she did not point me out- I was remanded from the first examination till Wednesday, when I was brought up, but not examined; I was brought up on the Thursday, and discharged with others from the bar, and as I went home to my lodging, by the Horse and Groom, two Policemen came and said, "You are the man we want," and that I must come back - I went with them to Covent-garden watch-house; Mr. Thomas had the woman up stairs - he fetched her down, and pointing to me, said, "Is that the man?" "Yes, (said she,) that is the man who struck him in the court," and on the inquest she swore there were four men, besides me and my brother, striking the deceased - but at Bow-street she swore it was only two men holding him, and the others striking him; the witnesses against my brother can swear there was no row in the court - I have proof that I was in my chair, fast asleep, when it happened; my landlady and three others can swear I was not down after I brought the loaves up, till after it happened - I did not know what was the matter till I was in the watch-house; I never saw the deceased in my life, to the best of my knowledge - I hope, my Lord, you will weigh it in your bosom; why did not the woman identify me at first? I am remarkable enough to be known - White, I understand, is a very bad character; I sent a person to her last week, and she said she might make a mistake.

Martin Moran's Defence. I know nothing of the business - I went out at half-past six in the morning, and left two lodgers in the room with my wife; I never came back till half-past eight or a quarter to nine, and all the people in the house were then taken prisoners - the Police man asked if I was landlord of the place; I said, I was - he told me to come with him.

Ann Moran. Dockery brought in two women in the morning, and he had the bonnet of one of them in his hand - I said, "Who owns that bonnet?" he said, "That is my business" - I said, "I don't want you bringing in women intoxicated to my place;" one woman said, "Never mind, sendout for 6d. worth of gin" - I said "I don't want gin;" he told Tom Gallagher to go out for 6d. worth - he was a long time gone; the women asked what kept him so long - somebody said something about the women taking the gin in the street; Dockery said, "Never mind, if Gallagher don't bring it in he will be sorry for it" - one of the women said, "Never mind it," and the two women walked out; when Thomas Gallagher came in, they began words - I told them not to be at words on Sunday, and if my husband came in he would kick up a row with me; Dockery said they had a right to do as they liked in their own place - Dockery struck Tom Gallagher; he returned the blow, and struck him - the back of his head came against the bedstead; I ran out and said, "I will not have a row in my house" - I went to the bottom of the court, but could not see a Policeman; I said, "Oh, Murder! here is Tom Gallagher will be murdered! send for a Policeman to take them away" - as I came back Tom Dockery had the man out at the door; I saw no wounds - I asked what was the reason they were going so far with it, and who brought him out - "Who did, (said Tom,) but those that were able to do it?" - Mrs, King and I brought the man into my house; no Policeman was to be found - I have plenty of proof that my door was wide open when the Policeman and doctor came; some of the blood came on my arm in carrying him in, but I had no part in it.

ELIZABETH WHITE. When I was first examined on this charge, my deposition was read over to me, and I made a mark to it - I was so agitated I did not say any thing about Edward Gallagher at the first examination; I could not distinguish him, and could not bring him to mind.

WILLIAM BURNABY. I am a clerk at Bow-street office. On the Thursday Edward Gallagher was discharged with others - White, at that time, could not identify him; she had seen him with others; but about half an hour afterwards he was brought back with White, and it was then she said he had struck a blow - she had a full opportunity of seeing him before, and on the Monday.

ELIZABETH WHITE re-examined. I did not see Edward Gallagher on Monday - I went only twice on the Thursday, and I described him to Mr. Thomas before he was brought in - I was not there when the men were discharged; I was not there on Thursday, till after they were discharged - I never saw Edward Gallagher till I saw him in the watch-house; Mr. Thomas was there - he sent for him after I had described him; I did not know what I was going to the watch-house for - he stood alone when he was shown to me; my husband is a labourer, and I sometimes go out to work.

MR. BURNABY. I do not exactly recollect whether she was at Bow-street twice on Thursday.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS. I sent for White to the station on Thursday morning - she did not come in time to go to Bow-street; she described Edward Gallagher before she saw him, and when he was produced she immediately recognized him, without the slightest difficulty - I then took her to Bow-street, and she swore to him firmly; she was only there once that day.

MR. BODKIN. Q.Were you there on Monday? A. Yes; Edward Gallagher was at the bar when she was examined, but he stood back, and she was considerably agitated - she described him as having a defect in his nose - Edward Gallagher had the appearance of being asleep when he was taken.

T. GALLAGHER - GUILTY of manslaughter only . Aged 25. Transported for Life .

E. GALLAGHER - NOT GUILTY .

M. MORAN - NOT GUILTY .

A. MORAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-70

1057. JAMES CARTER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Garland , on the 1st of May , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, 1 half-crown, 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence, her monies .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-71

1058. EDWARD DE PEWTRISS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Miller , on the 25th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 half-crown, 10 shillings, and 5 sixpences, his monies .

RICHARD MILLER. I am a private in the West Middlesex militia . On the 25th of April I was at the Red Lion public-house, Uxbridge , about ten or eleven o'clock at night - I was going to sleep there; I went from the bar into the yard - I returned from the yard, and was coming into the tap-room, when the prisoner met me; I did not know him before - he met me, struck me violently in the mouth, and knocked two of my teeth out - he struck me with his right fist, put his left arm round my neck, then his right hand into my pocket, pulled my money out, and threw it behind him - I immediately seized him, and he fell down like a dead man; he had got his hand away from my pocket when I seized him - I had half a crown and 12s. 6d. in shillings, and sixpences; I had felt my money safe five minutes before, when I changed a sovereign at the Carpenters' Arms, Uxbridge - I had taken all the silver out of my pocket at the Red Lion, to pay for a glass of gin and water; the prisoner was then in the tap-room - he had not been in my company; he threw my money behind him towards some persons, who had been in his company - I believe they picked it up; I directly felt in my pocket, and found only 1s. left - he did not pick any of the money up himself; I secured him till the landlord came - Redding, who was with me, assisted in taking him; I had had a dispute with my comrades about three-quarters of an hour before.

JAMES REDDING. I am a private in the militia. I was at the Red Lion when Miller was coming in at the door from the yard; I saw the prisoner hit him, put his arm round his neck, shove his hand into his waistcoat pocket, and then put his hand behind him - Miller got up, and threw him down; I went, and fetched a constable - I did not see the money, nor see any body pick it up; Miller asked him to give him the money back again - the prisoner said No, and Miller told me to fetch a constable; he charged him with taking his money - the prisoner laid down on the floor, and pretended to be asleep.

Prisoner. Q.What time was it? A.Between ten and eleven o'clock - I was in the back place, where the lodgers sit; it is called the tap-room - I was never in prison.

JAMES DARVILL. I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor was in company, not with me, but his comrades - I and two or three shopmates were in the back place; I am a tailor - he came in, threw his money down, and said he could buy all the tailors in the place; one of my shopmates struck him, and a quarrel ensued - he threw off his clothes, and threw them about - my shopmate called to me, "Ned, don't see me used so by this man;" I went to part them, and the prosecutor struck me - I hit him, and he hit me in the stomach and knocked me down; I laid there senseless, and when I came to myself the prosecutor was standing over me - Johnson, the landlord, said, "I don't believe the man has robbed you; I shall let him go into his room;" I had hired a room there - Johnson searched me, and said,"Well, go to bed, and if you are wanted you will be ready" - I went to bed, and in half an hour Johnson came and said I must get up, for the constable was come.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-72

1059. MARY LOCKWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 pencil-case, value 2s., the goods of John Flood , her master .

JOHN FLOOD . I am a boot and shoemaker , and a Policeman , and live in St. Ann's-court - the prisoner was apprentice d to me for two years, and employed at shoe-binding . On the 20th of March I missed a pencil-case and handkerchief; I spoke to her about them, but she denied all knowledge of them - she remained with me three weeks after that; I kept losing property, and said it must be her- she absconded on Sunday evening; I saw her again on the Wednesday following, the 20th of April, at her sister's, Mrs. Foster's, Liquorpond-street, and gave her in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.She was bound to you by the parish? A. Yes; I was not a Policeman then - I went into the Police last September twelve months, and gave up my business, but my wife instructed her in binding; I occasionally follow the business now, when I get a job - she was not apprenticed to my wife; when I missed her I went to look for her - her sister said she lived in Elm-street, but I could not find her there - her sister afterwards fetched me to where I found her; I asked what she had done with the pencil-case - she said she had never seen it; she never confessed it to me - I did not intreat her to return to me, saying I could not go on with my business without her; I saw her at her sister's on the Wednesday - I asked if she had not sold the pencil-case for 2s. - she said No; I asked what she had done with the handkerchief - her sister said, "Oh, that is all right - she has

pledged it;" I did not say she worked better than my wife - I thought it would be indecem for me to take her into custody; I felt for her, and believe if she had good parents to instruct her, she would be a good girl - I prosecute her because this plunder has been carried on for two years; she had not been a month with me before she destroyed her indentures - Mrs. Green lives opposite me; I never spoke to her till the Tuesday. when she told me she had seen the prisoner with the handkerchief; the prisoner's sister came on Tuesday, and said she would be answerable for her appearance on Wednesday, and on Wednesday I went there by appointment, to take her into custody.

Q. Do you mean that you went by appointment to give her into custody? A. Not to give her in custody; I have not sworn so - I did not meet her to know if she would accept my pardon, and return to my employ; not a word of the sort passed - her sister wished me to do it, but I said I would not, for I said I thought some punishment was necessary, and I took an officer there with me - she denied taking the pencil-case till she was in custody.

Q. When she was in your service, how many rooms did you keep? A. I at first had two parlours, a back room, and kitchen - the prisoner slept in the front parlour, with my wife's mother; but when I joined the Police I moved to the west-end of the town, and I had but one room for myself, my wife, three children, and the prisoner; I find no fault with her for work.

MARY GREEN. I live in St. Ann's-court. The prisoner came to my house, I think in March - she said she was going to her mother's, and had no pocket-money - she wished to sell this pencil-case, which she said was given to her by a lady as a keepsake, with a Hymn-book; I gave her 6d. then, and afterwards 2d. 3d. and 1d. - she gave me the handkerchief to keep till next day, when she had it.

Cross-examined. Q.How long had you known her? A.Since Christmas; I merely bought this to oblige her, promising she should have it again at any time, if she gave me the money - I offered to lend her the money and not take the case; it was of no use to me - she pressed it on me; she had shown it to me nine days before, and said Mrs. Flood was in the habit of taking it from her, and giving it to the children to bite when they were cutting their teeth; none of the shilling I gave her was spent in gin on my premises, but that evening Mrs. Foster sent for a quartern of gin; she insisted on doing so - I am not in the habit of drinking; Mrs. Foster paid for it.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST. I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner in charge on the 20th of April; Green gave me the pencil-case.

JOHN FLOOD . This is mine - I know it by the bite on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not state, in the presence of Jane Lockwood and John Nidsey, that if the prisoner would return to her work, and confess where the articles were, no further steps should be taken? A. No.

Witnesses for the Defence.

MARY FOSTER. I am the prisoner's sister - she was apprentieed to Flood two years ago, and about six months after that he left his business, and joined the Police; the prisoner called at my house on the Tuesday after she ran away, and I immediately sent my sister for Flood; Mrs. Flood had been in search of her before that, and when I sent, Mrs. Flood came - Nidsey was there, and we went to Mr. Flood's house; he said if she would return to work, and state where the articles were, he would forgive her - he said she was as clever as his wife, according to her age, and could earn 7s. a week; I then returned to my sister, and got from her what had become of the pencil-case - I saw Mrs. Green at the time she mentions, but she did not require to be pressed to take gin; I certainly sent for it - it was not paid for out of the sixpence.

JOHN FLOOD. Mrs. Foster did not come into my house on Tuesday - she came into the court, and sent for me out of bed.

JOHN NIDSEY. I live near Croydon. I was at Mrs. Foster's on the Tuesday night, when Mrs. Flood was sent for - she came with Jane Lockwood ; we accompanied her to Mr. Flood, and saw him in a public-house opposite where he lives - we were there an hour and a half, and he promised several times that if Mrs. Foster could ascertain what the girl had done with the pencil-case, and she returned to his service, he would forgive her - that she was a clever girl, and could earn 7s. a week.

JANE LOCKWOOD. I am the prisoner's sister. I went to tell Mrs. Flood the prisoner was at our house - she returned with me, and then we went to the public-house opposite Flood's: his wife sent for him - he said if she would state what had become of the pencil-case, and returned to him, he would forgive her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-73

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1060. JOHN HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 12 pairs of stockings, value 28s. , the goods of William Stephen Drew and another; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 37. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-74

1061. WILLIAM DRAPER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 1 cheese, value 13s. , the goods of Joseph Prime ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-75

1062. GEORGE ROGERS was indicted for embezzlement ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-76

1063. MARY PARR was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 cap, value 18d. , the goods of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN. I live in Beech-street, Barbican . -On the 25th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in my shop, with two other women; Church was serving them - he came and gave me information before they left; I counted a quantity of caps on the counter, and found there were eighteen - a cap was missing; a constable was sent for, and she was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.Were there not three women besides the prisoner? A. Only two - they were detained, and afterwards discharged; a third woman came in and went out again - I believe they were all close together when the charge was made; I did not detain that woman.

THOMAS CHURCH . I am apprentice to Mr. Brown. I saw the prisoner come into the shop with two other women - one of them wished to see some caps; I believe it was the

prisoner's sister - they were all strangers to me; I showed them twelve, at different prices - they did not suit; I went to the window and got six more, which they did not approve of - I went and fetched two others from the window; my back was turned each time - they chose one of the two almost immediately; it came to 2s. 6d. - they purchased lace and handkerchiefs, which came to 6s. 8d. together; as I went to the window the first or second time. I saw the prisoner have a cap in her hand, which was missed when I had done serving them - I counted the caps and found eighteen instead of nineteen; I gave them to the boy Parrott to count, thinking I might make a mistake - he made but eighteen; I called Mr. Brown, and asked him to count them - I examined them, and found the cap missing, was one I had put a pin through the private-mark; there was no pin in any of the others - I then finished serving them; I made out the bill - they did not pay me, for I immediately missed another cap; I went from behind the counter, and said the caps must be found - I requested them to walk into the passage; Mr. Brown opened the door, and they went into the private passage - the prisoner sat on the stairs; they had not been in the passage ten minutes when the servant came up from the kitchen stairs, and I saw her pick up a cap - those stairs go down quite close to where the prisoner sat; the cap was rolled in a ball, as if squeezed up in the hand - I put it into my pocket; it was one of the caps they had not approved of; I had sent for an officer, who searched them, but we did not find the other cap - the two other women stood by the shutters; if they had thrown the cap down I think I must have seen them - they were about three quarters of a yard from the prisoner; she could have thrown it down without my seeing her - she was nearest to the stairs; they were all taken to the Compter and searched, but the prisoner's sister was discharged at the Compter to appear at Guildhall, which she did.

Cross-examined. Q.Where did you stand when they were in the passage? A.Opposite them and nearer the door than them - the prisoner was nearer the stairs than I; I cannot say I had my eyes on them all the time - the cap could not have fallen where it laid if the others had thrown it down; as the servant stooped down, I went to the stairs and saw the cap laying - I went and told Mr. Brown, leaving them in the passage, but the door was locked; I said to the servant "This is the cap I have lost," - I whispered.

JOHN PARROTT. I am twelve years old. When Church went to the window I saw the prisoner take the cap off the counter - I was standing close by her; I had not time to mention it - I counted the caps, by his desire, on the counter; there were only eighteen - the prisoner went into the passage with the other women; I did not go with them- I saw the prisoner slide the cap off the counter on the floor, and then stoop down to where it dropped, but am not positive that she took it up; I only judge so by the motion of her arms - I went for an officer, and they were all three taken.

Cross-examined. Q.Where were you standing? A. Against the passage door - the counter was between me and them; there is a counter on each side the shop - they were at the counter nearest the passage; I cannot say which cap I saw in her hand, whether it was the one she bought.

LUCINDA PLACE. I was in the prosecutor's service. -While the prisoner and two others were in the passage I came up from the kitchen, and went into the parlour with the tea things; I saw something on the second stair - I took it up; it was a cap - Church took it out of my hand; the prisoner stood nearer to the stairs than the other women.

Cross-examined. Q.What did you say to Church when you picked it up? A. I said, "This is not mine" - he said, "That is the cap I lost;" I do not know that he spoke low - I should think every one in the passage must have heard him.

Q. Did he address himself to you or the prisoners? A. To me.

JOSEPH PARROTT. I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner and the others - one was allowed to go and appear next day: the other woman was her mother - the cap was delivered to me; there was nothing pinned to it.

Cross-examined. Q.There was one pin? A. I did not notice any.

THOMAS CHURCH. This is the cap - here is the paper pinned on it now, in the same state as when shown to the prisoner.

The prisoner received an unexceptionable character.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-77

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, MAY 13.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1064. THOMAS BRANDON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 3 printed books, value 18s. , the goods of Francis Crew ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-78

1065. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 4 bushels of oats, value 14s., the goods of Alfred Lucas , his master ; and JOHN MANTELL was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute , &c.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FIELD. I live at Dockhead - Mr. Alfred Lucas lives in Blackfriars-road, and is a corn-dealer ; Taylor was his carter . On the 6th of April I delivered ten quarters of oats to Taylor for Mr. Lucas - he had a cart with him, but there were no oats in the cart till I delivered the ten quarters, which were twenty sacks; I am a porter to Mr. George Potter, a corn-factor.

HENRY HODGES. I am in the service of Mr. Lucas, in Blackfriars-road. On the morning of the 8th of April I delivered ten sacks of corn to Taylor, and he had brought ten quarters from Mr. Potter's - he had twenty sacks before, and the ten I delivered to him made thirty; I saw that there were thirty - he was to deliver them to Mr. Francis Brewer , at Kensington Gravel-pits; I delivered them on Mr. Lucas' account.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.You saw the sacks on the cart tied up? A. Yes, and I counted them tied up - I saw thirty sacks on the cart.

FRANCIS BREWER. I am a corn-dealer, and live in Kensington Gravel-pits - I ordered some corn of Mr. Lucas; I think more than fifteen quarters, but I am not

certain. On the evening of the 8th of April Taylor brought some corn - he gave me a note of ten quarters of one sort, and five of another; I saw the cart was loaded, and asked him if that load was all for me - he said it was; I saw him unload it, but while I was counting the sacks he brought in, I was called to speak to a person, and I lost my tale - when the person was gone, I said to the prisoner,"How many more sacks of that sort have you unloaded?" and he said, "I will count the sacks, and see;" while he was doing that he said to a lad, "Here is one sack, marked R.M., which is not to come out;" I did not see any mark on it myself - I did not say any thing to him; he went on unloading till he had finished all that he said was the five quarters - he then unloaded the ten quarters till I think there were but three sacks left in the cart; I said to him, "How many more sacks are for me?" he said two more; it was then I observed that there were three sacks in it - my attention had been called away, so that I had not observed what were delivered of the first five quarters; I saw the ten delivered - he then proceeded to deliver the two sacks, and I asked him how far he was going with the other sack; he said not far - I again said,"Who is it for?" he said, "For Mr. Sturm," who is a baker, living in the Gravel-pits not far from me - I had not at that time any means of knowing that I had not received the fifteen quarters, and I signed the return-note of the fifteen quarters; part of the oats were shot in the shop, and part up stairs - they were not disturbed till they were afterwards measured; Taylor shortly afterwards passed by my house with the cart, but it was dark and I could not see whether any thing was in it; in consequence of the return of Taylor I went myself to Mr. Sturm, and then desired my brother to follow the cart - in consequence of what my brother said, we measured on the Saturday the five quarters of oats which had been first delivered, one sack of which had been pitched in the shop, and the others had been delivered up stairs; we found one sack short of those which were shot up stairs -I did not measure the ten quarters, as I had seen them delivered, and was satisfied.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.How soon after the delivery of the whole was it that you signed this note? A. Directly - the ten quarters I did not measure; they were not of the same description as the five quarters, which were Irish oats, and the ten were Scotch potatoe oats - I should think a sack of the five quarters was not shot amongst the ten quarters; I do not see that I can swear it was not - two other persons serve in my shop; the corn which goes out I as often serve myself as any body - it was on Friday night I received the corn; Saturday is sometimes a busy day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.You say he went on, and it was dark - now, supposing he had a sack in the cart when he went away, could you tell that he had not disposed of it before he returned by your door? A. No, I cannot - I did not observe whether he had or not.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is there a great difference between Irish oats and Scotch potatoe oats? A. Yes - if I had seen any Irish oats mixed with the Scotch potatoe oats, of course I should have known them.

MR. ALFRED LUCAS . I am a corn-dealer, and live in Blackfriars-road - Taylor was in my service. I remember his going with these oats to Mr. Brewer's, but I was out the whole of that day; he had no orders to deliver oats to Mr. Sturm, or any other person.

WILLIAM BREWER. I live with my brother, Francis Brewer , at Kensington Gravel-pits. In consequence of what my brother said on the 8th of April, I followed Taylor's cart, (which had gone past his house,) to the Swan, at Bayswater - it there stopped; I concealed myself on the opposite side of the road, and in a few minutes I saw Mantell come over the road and take a sack of something up from behind some heaps of dirt, near to where I was concealed - he took it down the Swan stable-yard; he then came out, looked cautiously around him, took an empty sack from under his arm, and threw it into Mr. Lucas' cart; I was about twenty yards from the cart - it was dark; I saw there was something in the cart, but could not tell what - Taylor soon after came out of the Swan; Mantell and he had some conversation while Mantell put the reins on the horses' heads - Taylor then went on with the cart; I followed, and overtook him - I asked him to let me have a ride, that I might see if there was any corn left in the cart; he gave me leave - I got into the cart; there was no corn in it, but some empty sacks put into one sack, and one single sack close on to the tail-ladder, where I supposed the sack was thrown by Mantell.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Were the lamps lighted? A. Yes - it was between nine and ten o'clock.

HENRY LAPTON. I am a Police-constable. I took Taylor at Mr. Lucas' on Saturday. the 9th of April, between twelve and one o'clock, and asked what he had done with the sack of oats.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Did you hold out any hope or threat to him? A.None; I did not tell him it would be better to tell the truth - I did not caution him that what he said would be given in evidence; Mr. Lucas was present.

MR. LUCAS. I was with the officer when Taylor was taken; I told him I would know the truth, and that I knew more than he was aware of - I said if he would tell me the receiver of the corn, I would pass over this.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.How long was that before you delivered him to the officer? A.About ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour; I did not hear him say any thing to the officer.

Mantell's Defence. I went over the road, and took up the sack which Mr. Johnson's waggoner had thrown out of the waggon; I took it into the stable to their horses - three or four persons come and leave their corn there.

THOMAS HARRIS. I am waggoner to Mr. Johnson, a carrier. I bait at the Swan, where my master rents a stable - Mantell is ostler there; on the night of the 8th of April, I stopped there as usual to bait - I took the sack of bait there that evening, and threw it on the ground, as I do every night; Mantell is no relation of mine - I recollect this was on a Friday, because I go three times a week; I stopped there about nine o'clock in the evening - I did not carry the oats into the stable, because I had to secure the things in my waggon, and fasten it up behind; there was no cart of Mr. Lucas'

there at that time - the sack was taken up while I was there, and I went into the stable and gave the horses the oats.

WILLIAM BREWER re-examined. Q. How far from your brother's premises is the Swan? A. About one mile - it is in the way back to Mr. Lucas'; a waggon drew up to the Swan at the time I was there, but I did not see what it was loaded with, or who was with it - I did not see any thing put out of it; the sack that was on the ground was ten or fifteen yards from Taylor's cart, exactly opposite to it, not on the side the Swan is - the waggon was on the same side as the sack, and nearer to it than the cart.

JURY to THOMAS HARRIS . Q. You call at that house? A. Yes, always - my master's name is on the waggon, and the sack I left was marked with his name; it was not a whole sack of corn - I had filled a nose-bag out of it.

Each of the prisoners received a good character.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Four Months .

MANTELL - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-79

1066. WILLIAM MATTHEW was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 7 live tame fowls, price 14s. , the property of Thomas Bamford .

JAMES WANSTALL. I am a Police-constable. On Saturday night, the 30th of April, I saw the prisoner near to No. 19, Canonbury-square, Islington, with a bag in one hand and a fowl in the other - as soon as he saw me, he dropped the bag and the fowl; he ran, and I pursued -I saw him stopped by another officer; I brought him back to where I had seen him at first - I found one fowl on the road, which was dead, but quite warm, and this bag was close to the door with six fowls in it; they were dead, but quite warm - their necks had been broken; I took the prisoner to the station, and took the fowls to the owner.

THOMAS SHAW. I am a Police-constable. I stopped the prisoner that night - what this witness states is correct.

THOMAS BAMFORD. I live at No. 19, Canonbury-square - I keep fowls , and usually feed them myself. In consequence of an alarm, I got up on the night of the 30th of April, and found the prisoner in custody; I went to the fowl-house, and missed seven fowls - the fowl-house is close to the garden door; I saw the seven fowls and the bag - I knew the fowls were mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the place, and saw the bag on the ground - I was going to give an alarm, and I heard some one inside.

JAMES WANSTALL. He was not giving any alarm - he was attempting to put the fowls into the bag.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-80

1067. LOUIS THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s. , the goods of Abraham Wyvill .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-81

1068. JOSEPH BAGSHAW and WILLIAM JAMES FREEMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 14 live tame fowls, price 30s. , the property of William Varley .

THOMAS HOBBS KING . I am a Police-constable. On the morning of the 13th of April I was on duty in Maiden-lane, about a quarter-past five o'clock - I saw the prisoners coming across the fields from Holloway; they had each of them a bag - when they came in sight of me, they put their bags over Mr. Brand's garden wall; I took hold of Bagshaw by the collar, and made a grasp at Freeman - I caught hold of the sleeve of his coat, but he got away; I took Bagshaw into Mr. Brand's house, and asked what was in the bags - he said he did not know, they had picked them up, but had had no time to see what was in them; I found the two bags in the garden - one had six fowls it, and the other eight; they were quite warm - I found this wrench and a knife in a small bag in Bagshaw's pocket; in consequence of some information from him I sent after Freeman, and I am quite positive he is the man who was with Bagshaw - I described a piece sewn in the back of his coat collar, and his shoes were cut as if he had corns; I decribed him to my brother officer, and identified him in the yard.

Bagshaw. Q.What time was it when you first saw me? A.About half-past five o'clock - you were coming towards the lane, and I hid myself; there was a hay cart going along; I followed it till I got near you, when you threw the bags over the wall - I was within twenty or thirty yards of you.

Freeman. Q. Did you say you tore the sleeve of my coat? A. No - I caught it, and you got from me; you had light shoes on, and they were cut - I do not know what for; I asked Bagshaw who the man was who was with him - he said he had no one with him; I asked him again; he said it was Freeman, and asked if I knew Nelson-street; he said there was a little passage, leading from there to Pickford's wharf, and if I went there between nine and ten o'clock, I should find him - I have no doubt of Freeman's person; when I took Bagshaw by the collar, I struggled for five or ten minutes with him - I took him into the house, and tied his hands, then went and got the bags.

JAMES COLLINS. I am a Police-constable. In consequence of information from King, I went to No. 3, George-place, City-road, and apprehended Freeman - his shoes were cut as my brother officer had described, and they had a deal of dirt on them, which was quite wet- I did not take much notice of his coat.

Freeman. When he came in, he said I was wanted at the station-house, to prove that a man named Bagshaw was going out that morning with a person named Jones; he felt my things, and they were quite dry. Witness. I did not mention any name, for I did not then know the name - I said he was wanted, and then he began to scrape his shoes, which were wet and dirty, as if recently worn; I did not feel his things.

JOHN QUINCEY. I am in the employ of Mr. William Varley - he has a farm at Holloway . The fowls the officers produced to me were Mr. Varley's; I had seen them alive when they went to roost, between eight and nine o'clock at night, on the 12th of April - they were then locked in; there are some fields which lead down to Maiden-lane - I missed the fowls, and spoke to some

officers; I then heard that some men had been taken with fowls - I saw them, and knew them; I had seen the whole fourteen alive the night before - the staple of the hen-house had been drawn; it had always been kept locked night and day - there is a large pair of gates to the stable-yard.

Bagshaw. Q.When had you seen them safe? A. Between eight and nine o'clock at night - I did not take a light, bat I know they were there; I saw them all go to roost - it was a very wet night, and I tracked you downs two of our fields; you had stood under a hedge in the corner of one of the fields - the marks of feet in the hen-house were the same as those in the fields.

Bagshaw's Defence. I had appointed to meet a man named Jones, to go bird-catching, at Kentish-town - I saw these bags over the wall, and told the Policeman; he collared me.

BAGSHAW - GUILTY . Aged 19.

FREEMAN - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-82

1069. ANN ANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 2 pairs of sleeves, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Price .

SAMUEL PRICE. I live in Playhouse-yard, St. Luke's - I keep a second-hand clothes-shop . On Saturday, I think the 16th of April, in consequence of information, I left my shop, and went after the prisoner; I came up with her twelve or thirteen doors from my house - I said,"What have you got?" she said, Nothing - I said, "Yes you have, for the good lady saw you take something from my door;" while I was talking I saw her throw down two pairs of sleeves which are my property - I took them up, and had her taken into custody; we sell them in the trade at 8d. a pair - I had seen them safe on the door-post three or four minutes before.

THOMAS BLAIR. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have the property.

SAMUEL PRICE. These are mine - they could not have fallen unless they had been unhooked off the nail; when I took the prisoner she said she had neither father not mother, and had not broken her fast all day - I have made inquiry; she bears an excellent character, and is in great want.

The prisoner received a good character, and two persons offered to take care of her.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s., and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-83

1070. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 2 pewter pots, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Fores .

HENRY EGERTON. I am a Police-constable. On the morning of the 12th of April I was in Mansfield-street - I saw the prisoner, and stopped him with these two pots in this rag, under his arm; I asked where he got them - he said he had taken them from Berners-street.

CHARLES FORES. I keep the Cambridge coffee-house, in Newman-street . These two pots are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-84

1071. ELLEN BRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 1 table-cloth, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Griffiths .

ELIZABETH GRIFFITHS . I am the wife of Joseph Griffiths. The prisoner was servant to Sarah Bowden , who lodged in my parlour - she left on the 18th of April; I had seen her in my kitchen two or three times in the course of the day, and within a quarter of an hour after she had left, I missed a table-cloth off a shelf where it had been placed; I went with my lodger to the prisoner in Bethnal-green-road - she desired having taken it; I talked to her for some time, to induce her to confess, and said if she did I would forgive it; she then said I should go to her mother in Rosemary-lane with her - I was rather unwilling, but I went to near the top of the lane with her; she then ran away, and I last her.

SARAH BOWDEN. I lodge at the prosecutor's house -The prisoner was my servant; I went with the prosecutrix in search of her, and after wards had her apprehended.

JOHN PROBERS. I am apprentice to Mr. Elliott, a pawnbroker. I have a table-cloth, pawned on the 18th of April - I cannot say by whom.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-85

1072 JOHN DENNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 1 writing-desk, value 18s. , the goods of Thomas Parker .

JESSES PARKER. I conduct the business of a broker's shop in Judd-street, for Mr. Thomas Parker , my uncle -On the 4th of May I saw the prisoner three or four doors from the shop, with a writing-desk under his arm; I went to the shop, missed the desk, and went out in pursuit of the prisoner - I saw the Police-constable; we went to the bottom of the street - I did not see the prisoner; the officer went one way, and I another - I then saw the prisoner with the desk; I followed him, but lost sight of him - I went through a public passage, and saw him again in Bagnigge-wells-road; I am quite sure the prisoner is the person I first saw with it - it might be a quarter of an hour from the time I first saw him till I got the desk from him; this is it - it is Mr. Thomas Parker's.

JOHN ABRAHAM THOMPSON . I am an inspector of the Police. I saw the prisoner running in Bagnigge-wells-road - he had a razor, but no desk then; a number of persons were running after him - I was in plain clothes, and he ran up to me; I took him - he put the razor into my hand, and said, "For God's sake, let me go - it is only this;" he left his hat in my hand, and got away, as it was raining, and I had my umbrella, but I took him again.

JESSE PARKER. I am certain he carried the desk - I was behind him, but I know he is the person.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18310512-86

1073. DANIEL DUGGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. 6d., the goods of David Shearman , from his person .

DAVID SHEARMAN. I live in Belgrave-terrace, Pimlico. On the 2nd of May, about twelve o'clock. I was in St. Martin's-court , and was told something - I felt in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; it was safe five minutes before.

WILLIAM SAVAGE. I am a tinman, and live in Holiday-yard, Creed-lane. On the 2nd of May, at twelve

o'clock, I was in St. Martin's-court, and saw the prisoner busily engaged in looking into different gentlemen's pockets - I saw him put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take out his handkerchief; I took him by the collar, and gave him to the officer.

JOHN HENRY CARB . I am a Police-constable. I was in St. Martin's-court on the 2nd of May - I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief, and took him with it; I found this other handkerchief round his neck.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It is the first time I have ever been in trouble.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-87

1074. MICHAEL DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 3 bundles of iron hoops, value 16s. , the goods of James Richmond .

GEORGE DUNNICLIFFE . I live in Willow-walk, and am in the employ of Mr. Richmond, a cooper . On the 9th of May I was on my return from breakfast, and saw the prisoner coming out of his gates, at a quarter before nine o'clock, into Great Leonard-street - he had these three bundles of hoop irons on his shoulder - I followed him about two hundred yards, and stopped him with them; I asked where he was going with them - he said a man gave them to him to carry to Finsbury-square; I said he must go back and show me the person who gave them to him -I took him back, and he said a man had engaged him at the corner of the gate, and promised him 1s. to carry them- there was no man in sight.

SAMUEL GOODSON . I am foreman to Mr. James Richmond . I missed six bundles of hoops from a shed near the gateway on his premises; I did not see the prisoner till he was brought back - he said some person employed him to take them to Finsbury-square; these are the hoops- they have no marks on them, but we missed six bundles of this length and size from the place.

TIMOTHY RYAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner with these hoops.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a man at the corner of the gate to carry them to Finsbury-square - they do not belong to this witness, nor his master, any more than my old hat does; I know the man did not come out of their yard - if they would advertise, you would be sure to find the owner.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-88

1075. MARGARET DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 cheese, value 3s. , the goods of Bloomfield Webb .

JAMES CALLENDER . I am shopman to Mr. Bloomfield Webb, a cheesemonger , of Great Queen-street, St. Giles' . I saw the prisoner come to his shop on the 7th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock at night; she concealed this cheese under her shawl - I touched my master, and he stopped her with it; the officer came in, and took it from her.

Prisoner. I went to ask for a quarter of a pound of cheese. Witness. She did when she was detected.

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I am a Police-constable. The prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner; I took the cheese off the bench, where it stood by itself.

GUILTY . Aged 52. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-89

1076. JOHN DUNBAR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 23lbs. of cheese, value 13s. , the goods of Elizabeth Parker .

MARY DORWARD . I live with Elizabeth Parker, who keeps a chandler's shop , in Brook-street, Ratcliff . On the 18th of April I was in the parlour behind the shop, and saw a person turn out of the shop with something under his arm in a handkerchief - my cousin said to him, "What do you want?" but he made no answer - I looked on the counter, missed half a cheese, and followed the man out; I lost sight of him at the corner of a street - the prisoner was afterwards taken; I cannot speak positively to him -I did not see his face.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.What time was it? A. About ten o'clock at night - the prisoner had nothing when I saw him; there were a good many people running in the street.

JOHN NICHOLAS . I am a Police-constable. On the night of the 18th of April I saw the prisoner four or five doors from Mr. Parker's shop, coming from it with something under his arm - I could not see what; I heard Mary Dorward call Stop thief! I pursued the prisoner, but lost sight of him turning a corner - he was stopped by a brother officer; I know he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q.What distance were you from him? A. About twenty-five-yards - I pursued him instantly; I thought it was a joke - we often have false alarms; there were other persons running - there were none running before him; when I gained sight of him again I think there were two men running before me - I did not know the prisoner.

COURT. Q.There were several persons nearer to him than you when you first pursued him? A. Yes, but I passed them in running - the prisoner was the foremost of all the persons running; I had only a back view of him coming from the shop - he kept running till he was taken; I lost sight of him at a turning - my brother officer got before me there.

BENJAMIN CHAPMAN . I am a hoop-header, and live in Caroline-street, Brook-street. I heard an alarm of Stop thief! from a female voice, upwards of one hundred yards from Parker's shop, and found a piece of cheese six or eight yards below my door - it was picked up about half way between Parker's shop and where the prisoner was stopped; the crowd passed in that direction, but on the other side of the way, I presume, I did not see them.

Cross-examined. Q.About how many persons did you see altogether running? A.About four or five, I suppose - a neighbour was standing at his door, and some other persons were standing about; I set the cheese on the step of the door, and spoke to my neighbour - I then took it to the prosecutrix.

RICHARD THOMAS DOBBINSON . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner in Caroline-street, and Nicholas was pursuing him - he was nearest to him; I followed him, and stopped him on Stepney-causeway, about fifty yards from Caroline-street; he said, "I am no thief' - I saw nobody running before him; Nicholas was eight or ten yards from him when I saw him first - he turned a corner, but I did not lose sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you told all that occurred from the time the prisoner came in sight? A. I have an

swered every question that has been put to me - when I took the prisoner he was in liquor; he walked very steadily to the watch-house - I did not see him throw any thing away, and do not think he could without my seeing him; there might be eight or ten persons following him.

COURT. Q. How near was it to the corner when you first saw him? A. I should think ten or twelve yards.

BENJAMIN CHAPMAN re-examined. How far from the corner in Caroline-street did you pick up the cheese? A.About fifteen yards - the prisoner went up several turnings.

Cross-examined. Q. How many turnings are there? A. Three.

JURY to THOMAS DOBBINSON . Q. Where did you first see the prisoner? A. In Caroline-street - I was going down and he was coming up: he turned down Brunswick-place, and Nicholas was within a few yards of him - he had turned a corner before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-90

1077. CHARLES RUSSELL & JOSEPH HAYNES were indicted for embezzling 14 shillings, the monies of Thomas Cunnington , their master .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the same.

THOMAS CUNNINGTON . I am a butcher , and live at High-street, Hampstead . Russell was in my employ, as carter , and hired by the week - he had been off and on in my employ for three years; Haynes was employed to work in fields and other things. On the 18th of April I sent the two prisoners with my cart to Kentish-town, to fetch half a dozen water-pipes from the water company - I gave Russell 2l. in silver to pay for the pipes; Haynes was not present - I afterwards met Russell on Hampstead-heath; he appeared rather fresh in liquor - he told me he had put the water-pipes into a field, which I rent of Mr. Platt; I asked him for the bill - he said Haynes had got it; I called him back, and said, "You must have it;" he then gave me a bill, amounting to 1l. 18s. - Haynes was afterwards brought to me by a Policeman; he was not intoxicated - I showed him the bill; he said it was correct - he said I was not going to take him to the watch-house, he had done nothing wrong; I told the officer to take him - I said the right price for the pipes was 1l. 4s.; he did not say that he had nothing to do with the bill - he had only had a little beer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You say Russell was quite in liquor? A. Yes; so much so that I would not trust him to town with my horses and cart - that was before I knew how this transaction was; he can write; I have seen him set down things - I should not have liked to take a bill of his writing in that drunken state.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long was it after this that Haynes was brought in? A. I saw Russell between one and two o'clock - Haynes was brought about five; I had spoken to Haynes about the pipes on the Sunday, and asked what they would come to - he said about 2s. a foot, which proved to be as near the price as could be; Haynes can neither read nor write - he said he knew nothing about the bill, but when I stated the amount of it he said it was all correct - I had been to Kentish-town, and got the right bill; this case was heard at High-street; they admitted Haynes to bail, and strongly recommended me to drop the prosecution, as the men were in that state, but I have lost a great deal.

COURT. Q. In what money did you give the 2l.? A. All in silver; there were shillings and half-crowns - I do not charge the prisoners with having received any money for me - I can swear I gave him 2l. in silver; I cannot swear I gave him any shillings.

PETER CARTY . I am foreman to the Hampstead waterworks, at Kentish-town. On the 18th of April I saw Haynes at our door - he said he wanted some pipes; I told him I was very ill and could not attend, but I would send one of our men - Russell was with him; I received eight half-crowns and 4s. in silver from Russell - he had some other money, but I do not know what.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-91

1078. JOSEPH DEARLOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 40 ostrich-feathers, value 4l. 10s., the goods of John Foster , his master .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES DUNCAN . I had the management of Mr. Foster's business in April last, during his absence - he lives in Wigmore-street, Cavendish-square ; the prisoner had been in his service, I think, a year, as a cleaner and dyer of feathers - I had given him notice to leave; he was to leave about a week before Mr. Foster returned. On the day he was to leave, the 4th of April, I asked to search his box, which was in the room he slept in, to which he agreed - I went with him to the room; he went to his box, turned different things about, and said he was not quite ready for me to see the contents - I waited some time; he turned different things over, and when I approached the box he said he was not quite ready - he then left the room, returned with a purple bag, and, I believe, the bag which was afterwards found; I had not then looked into his box; when he brought the bag he took it to his box, and filled, or partly filled, it from the box; I did not see what he put in - I suspected they were articles belonging to Mr. Foster - I went down stairs, and went for an officer; in my absence the prisoner quitted the room - I had left him in charge of one of the porters; I believe he had nothing in his hand then - when I returned he was in the room where the boxes were; several persons were there, and inquiry was made for a bag, which could not be found - the box was then searched; some black feathers were found, and some pink saucers, used for dying - the prisoner was employed as a dyer in a room under that; I made inquiries, and this bag was brought, which contained several white ostrich feathers and a piece of velvet; these are the articles - I believe the articles in the bag are the prosecutor's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe they are difficult to identify? A. I cannot say that I can swear they are Mr. Foster's - the prisoner locked the box when he left the room; other persons had access to that room - the prisoner's bed was there; I could not identify pink saucers - I have heard the prisoner has said that persons go down to Wapping and purchase feathers of sailors, but I do not know it.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did any body but the prisoner sleep there? A. I cannot swear they did not, but no one but him usually slept there; I should think no one but him could have access to the box.

CAROLINE FRENCH . I am the prosecutor's niece, and am employed by him. On the day stated I found this blue bag behind a knife-board, near the kitchen; I had not seen the bag before - it was given to the officer, but I did not see it opened.

FRANCES JOINER . I am in the service of Mr. Foster. On the day in question I saw the prisoner with something in his arms; I cannot say what it was - he went across the room I was in, and out at a door towards the stairs, which leads to the kitchen; that was after Mr. Duncan went out.

WILLIAM IRELAND . I am an officer. I went to take the prisoner - I said to him, when he came down, "What a pity it is for a young man like you to commit yourself in this thieving way;" and he said there were two or three more in it, but he should not say any thing about them; this was after I had found this property - I found in the box these black feathers and pink saucers; this bottle of perfume, these white feathers, velvet, and flowers were in the bag which Duncan gave me - the prisoner said they were all his own property.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear him say he was in the habit of going to ships? A. No.

JOHN FOSTER . I live in Wigmore-street. I was absent when this happened; it is impossible for me to say that these are my feathers - I had thousands of them; the prisoner had the dyeing of them, but they should not be in his bed-room; we use a great many of these saucers - I cannot swear to these white feathers; the last lot I bought of them was three thousand five hundred, and I cut some notches on four or five of them with my pen-knife, and delivered them to the prisoner to try an experiment; this is one of them that I notched - I could not swear to the others; I suppose they are worth 3l. or 4l.

COURT. Q. Was the prisoner employed to dye feathers? A. Yes; they should be kept in the regular place, which we call the dye-house, till they were dyed; he was not to keep any of them in his room - some of these black feathers are not well dyed, but they are finished.

FRANCES JOINER . I can swear to these flowers, by having made them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You would scarcely know these from French flowers? A. Oh yes, I know my own work; I cannot say but these might have been sold.

JOSEPHINE VIDET . I know these roses; I had seen them at Mr. Foster's.

Cross-examined. Q.These are made in Paris? A. Yes; great numbers of them come to this country - there is no mark on them.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Whose velvet is that? A. Mr. Foster's; I had used some of it - I made these other flowers- it is Genoa velvet; there is no private-mark on these flowers - some are made with a machine.

CHARLES DUNCAN re-examined. Q.Is this the bag that the prisoner came in with? A. I believe it is; it was like this, in appearance, colour, and size - I left him in the room with it; I do not know what he put into it.

COURT. Q. Could you not see what he put into it? A.No, I was not close to him, and the lid of the box was between us - I did not observe what he put in; I did not think he was so bad, and thought it might be dirty linen.

Cross-examined. Q. Would not these waving feathers have shown? A. No - I was within three yards of him; the box was on a table; he was about five minutes filling the bag - there was not any thing to have prevented my making a snatch at the bag, and calling for assistance, but I did not.

ANN DAWSON . I was servant to the prosecutor - the prisoner gave me this plume of feathers about three months ago.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been respectably brought up in the country - I had made discoveries in dyeing feathers, and got a connection; I used to buy feathers of sailors and others - the whole of this property is mine; the room door was open - any one could get in.

COURT to MR. FOSTER. Q.Was you stock deficient? A. Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-92

1079. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 5 live tame pigeons, value 10s. , the goods of Adam Burbidge .

ADAM BURBIDGE . I am a watchmaker , and live in White Horse-street, Commercial-road . On the 13th of April I missed five tame pigeons, which had been safe in my yard the night before - I have since seen them, and knew them.

THOMAS SYKES . I am a labourer, and live in Compass-court, Stepney-causeway. I saw the prisoner about five minutes after six o'clock in the morning of the 13th of April - he asked if I wanted to buy any pigeons; I bought these five of him for 2s. 6d., which was what he asked - I sold two of them to Isaac Clark , in Montague-street, and the other three I gave to the officer; the pigeons I sold Clark were produced before the Magistrate, and claimed by the prosecutor.

ROBERT BUSSELL . I received the pigeons from the witness and from Clark - These are them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310512-93

1080. JOHN ELLISON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 2 brushes, value 4s. , the goods of John Bridges .

JOHN BRIDGES . I am a broker , and live in Great St. Andrew's-street, St. Giles' . On the evening of the 6th of May I was in my parlour, from whence I can see into my shop - I saw the prisoner take these two brushes and put them under his coat; he ran off - I and my son pursued him; my son seized him, but he got from him - he then took one of the brushes and threw it at me; I took it up, and still pursued him - I lost sight of him for a short time; he afterwards fell down, and was stopped.

JOHN BRIDGES , JUN. I live with my father. I pursued the prisoner - he got from me, and threw one brush at my father; he ran on, and I after him - he fell over a chair in Broker's-alley, and then threw down this other brush; the officer took him.

EVAN OWEN . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner into custody - I saw him throw two wine glasses out of his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-94

1081. WILLIAM DARLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Samuel Read Ludlow , from his person; and that he had before been convicted of felony .

SAMUEL READ LUDLOW . I am in the employ of a merchant in the City . About ten o'clock on the 22nd of April, I was opposite St. Dunstan's-church , and felt a pull at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner jump from the curb towards a door way - I asked him to give me what he had got; he said he had not got it - the officer came by, and I gave charge of him; I missed my handkerchief - I did not see it in the possession of the prisoner, but he was close to me.

ROBERT BRYANT . I am a watchman. On the night of the 22nd of April the prisoner was given into my charge about half-past ten o'clock, and I took him to the Compter - in going along he stooped and picked something up from his legs; I asked him what it was - he said, "An old handkerchief - this is it."

JOSEPH BATCHELOR . I am an officer. I received the prisoner from Bryant, at the watch-house - he took him to the Compter, and on his return he brought this handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM MARCH . I am a tradesman, and live in Fleet-street. On the 14th of July, 1827, I was here as a witness against this prisoner - he was tried and convicted; I have a copy of his conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office, (read); he was ordered to pay a fine of 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-95

1082. MARY MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , 1 purse, value 6d., 1 sovereign, 6 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Michael John Benefield , from his person .

MICHAEL JOHN BENEFIELD . I am a grocer . On the 2nd of May, about half-past ten or eleven o'clock at night, I was in Little Moorfields - I had 1l. 6s. 6d. in my purse; the prisoner came and laid hold of my waist, and took my purse out of my pocket - I was stopping at the time; she turned back and went on - I followed her till I saw a watchman, who took her; in going to the watch-house she gave the money into the watchman's hand - nothing was found on her; the purse was found afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Why did you stop? A. I had occasion to stop at the time - only the flap of my breeches was open when the prisoner came up; she did not say any thing to me, nor I to her - I did not take any liberties with her; I was not exactly sober - I was perfectly sensible - I did not call Watch! immediately, as I did not see any watchman near; I had asked the prisoner for the purse - I cannot tell exactly what I had drank; I had had half a dozen glasses of wine, and some ale, but no spirits or mixture - I told the watchman I had lost a sovereign and some silver, and I thought there was a half-crown among it, and that the sovereign had a cross on it, but I had had two sovereigns - the sovereign she gave the watchman had no cross on it, and there was no halfcrown found on her; the watchman asked me several times if I meant to persist in giving charge of her - I had seen the money not two minutes before; I did not say I had seen it at six o'clock in the evening - I was requested to search my pocket; I took a handkerchief out of my pocket, and put it into my hat - I did not after that accuse the officer of having my handkerchief - I am sure of that; he did not tell me to be careful how I spoke - I said I thought the sovereign had a cross on it, and I thought there was a half-crown; I had seen my money just before, but I might have dropped the half-crown - the sovereign she gave the watchman had no cross on it; she gave him 6s. 6d. in silver, but no half-crown - it had been in my pocket a few minutes before; the money I lost was 1l. 9s., but I mentioned 1l. 6s. 6d. because that was the sum I had in my purse, but the half-crown was not in the purse - my pocket was turned out; I did not miss the half-crown, but I knew I had the 1l. 6s. 6d. in my purse - I knew I had a half-crown, and I lost the whole of my money; I gave my right name to the watchman - I believe I gave the address of the persons I had been to; I was asked my name, and I gave my name right, as far as I know; I will not swear that; I cannot recollect what name I gave, I was confused.

Q. Did you not say your name was John Thomas - that you resided at No. 17, Edgware-road, and was not that written down in your presence? A. Yes, I believe it was, but I was confused; I thought they asked where I had been - the prisoner was let go that night; she came the next morning to Guildhall of her own accord - I did not hear her claim her money; I am a grocer, but have been out of business two months - I live now at No. 16, London-wall; I did live in Cannon-street.

EDWARD PAGE . I am a watchman of Cripplegate. I was passing Little Moorfields at a quarter before eleven o'clock - I heard the prosecutor say to the prisoner, "Give me my money;" I asked him if he had been robbed - he said Yes, of a sovereign; I said, "Will you give charge of the woman?" he said Yes - I took her along Fore-street; in going along she passed a sovereign and 6s. 6d. into my hand - the purse was afterwards found in Green Dragon-court, the way she had gone in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prosecutor pass that way also? A. Yes - this was a quarter of a mile from where he said he had lost it; I did not hear what silver he stated at the watch-house, for I went out - the prisoner came to Guildhall the next day, voluntarily.

JURY. Q. Did the prosecutor say how much money he had lost? A. He said about 1l. 7s., in a green purse, and the prisoner gave me 1l. 6s. 6d.

ROBERT SPENCE . I went to Green Dragon-court, and found this green purse, with these three duplicates and a bill in it.

M. J. BENEFIELD . This is my purse.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did you not name these valuable articles which were in it? A. I named what was in the purse - I do not think I mentioned the duplicates; I said there were some papers in it - these are not my own duplicates - I had them from a friend to whom I had lent some money; they are my own now - they are my own, I pawned the things myself.

Prisoner's Defence. The money I gave up was mine; I had it before I met the prosecutor - he first said he had lost a sovereign, and when he saw my money produced,

he said he had lost 1l. 6s. or 1l. 7s.; he afterwards accused the officer of the night of having some money - he was very much intoxicated, and wanted to go with me; I would not, he dragged me about, and then went down a court which leads precisely to my lodging - I waited till I thought he was gone; I then went down to go home, and saw him sitting down - I told him he had better go home, as the watchman was coming; he thanked me, got up, and buttoned up his clothes - the watchman came down with his light; the prosecutor accused me of robbing him.

JOHN PEACOCK . I was officer of the night, on the 2nd of May - the prisoner and prosecutor were brought into the watch-house, between ten and eleven o'clock; the prosecutor was very drunk - the watchman said he had 1l. 6s. 6d. given him by the prisoner; I asked the prosecutor if he knew the sovereign - he said it had a cross on it, and there was a half-crown in the silver he had been robbed of; I found no mark on the sovereign, nor any half-crown - he strongly persisted that he had been robbed, but he did not know that this was the woman; I searched her, but found nothing on her - I asked if he would give charge of her; he said, "No, I don't want to hurt her, nor to be exposed;" he then said, "Give me the sovereign, you can keep the 6s. 6d. among yourselves;" the prisoner said the money was hers - I pressed him to give charge; he said he would not - he was going out, but seemed much dissatisfied; the inspector then searched her again, but found nothing - she still claimed the money; I asked her if I might depend upon her coming the next day to Guildhall - she said I might, and I let her go; in three quarters of an hour the other watchman brought in the purse and the duplicates - the prisoner came to Guildhall the next day as she promised.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-96

1083. WILLIAM FENLEY and WILLIAM CARROLL were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

THOMAS RAVEN . I have been an errand-boy, but I am now out of a situation. On the 13th of April I was in St. Paul's church-yard - I saw the two prisoners there; a gentleman was walking along, and Carroll took a handkerchief out of his pocket, which he gave to Fenley, who was close behind him - he put it in his breeches; I laid hold of Fenley, and wrestled with him a little while -Carroll then came back, and tried to get him away; he left his cap, and I gave the officer charge of him.

THOMAS WAGSTAFF . I am an officer. I saw the witness struggling with the two prisoners - I went to see what it was, and took Fenley; I found this handkerchief in his breeches - Carroll ran away, but a gentleman brought him back.

The prisoners received a good character.

FENLEY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

CARROLL - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-97

1084. JAMES SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 3 fowls, price 6s. , the property of Peter Duval .

PETER DUVAL . I live in Gun-square, Houndsditch , and keep fowls . I missed a cock and two hens on the 26th of April - I found them in Church-street, Bethnal-green, about a mile and a half from my house, on the following morning; the prisoner's father lived next door to me, and worked in the East India warehouse.

SARAH WELLS. I am housekeeper to my brother, Thomas Baker ; he lives in Church-street, Bethnal-green - we deal in live and dead stock. My brother bought the cock of the prisoner, and I bought the two hens for 1s. 6d.; I had seen him before with two children - he said, "You know me;" I said I had seen him, and asked if his father was going to sell the rest of his fowls - he said Yes, as they had them stolen.

EDWARD DARKING . I am a Police-constable. I produce the fowls.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-98

1085. JOSEPH MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 2 sheets, value 10s., the goods of William Walker , his master .

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a stable-keeper , and live in Coleman-street . The prisoner has been in my employ four years - I had a box of Mr. Huggin's to take care of; it was locked - it had been in my care two years; about the middle of February I discovered that it had been broken open, and some articles were missing, among the rest two sheets; the box was kept in my granary, to which none but the prisoner had access.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there a door left open through which persons could get access to your premises? A. No - I believe I had some bricklayers at work.

ANN ELIZABETH HUGGINS . I left my box in care of Mr. Walker - it principally contained linen, and among the rest a pair of sheets; about the 9th or 10th of February I discovered it had been opened, and a pair of sheets and some other things taken out.

Cross-examined. Q. For what you know they might have been gone some time? A. Yes, within twelve months - I was the first person who missed them; when I went to fetch the box, it had been wrenched open - the sheets were marked R. No. 2; they had been left me by a gentleman I was housekeeper to.

JAMES ALLEN . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner; I found in his apartment six duplicates, and among the rest one of this pair of sheets.

JOHN GRIMSHAW . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of sheets, pawned on the 10th of March, by a woman, in the name of Margaret Morris - I gave her this duplicate.

A. E. HUGGINS. These are my sheets.

Cross-examined. Q. You had marked them with no name of your own? A. No, they were marked with the initial R., for Reinmore.

Witness for the Defence.

SUSANNAH ROCHFORD . I am a widow - my husband died on the 5th of November; he was a stay-maker, and worked for Mr. Gold - he left me some furniture and other things; I know the prisoner and his wife - she had been backwards and forwards to her sister and brother, who lodge in my house; in order to send my husband up

to Richmond, I was obliged to sell a pair of sheets to the prisoner's wife, but she was not Mrs. Morris then; I only knew her by the name of Margaret - the sheets were marked R., No. 2; these are the sheets - I know them, but I cannot swear to the mark, as I cannot mark myself; I know these sheets - I sold them in October, and they were marked in this way; I had had them five years - she gave 10s. for them.

COURT. Q. How came you to have these sheets? A. I bought them of Mr. Cockin five or six years ago - I do not deal in sheets; I sold two pairs of sheets in all - I had not had them in my possession above a month; I heard that Margaret left her brother to be married to the prisoner; I knew he lived at Mr. Walker's, as he used to come to his brother's to dinner.

JURY. Q. You stated you had had them five or six years, and then you said one month? A. They had been in pawn three or four years; I had them at home a month - I was going to pawn them again, but I said I would rather sell them; the other pair was marked with red, and they were left me by my mother - this pair are marked R., No. 2, and these I bought in Blackfriars-road.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-99

1086. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , 4 half-crowns, and 4 shillings, the monies of Robert Strutton , from his person .

ROBERT STRUTTON . I am a hackney-coachman , and drive No. 507. On the 2nd of May, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I took four gentlemen to the Hay-market - when they got out of my coach they were jumping on my horses, and one of them tore his trousers; the prisoner, who was quite a stranger, came up to me, and said the gentlemen were having a bit of fun with me - he then asked me to have something to drink, and we did; when we came out of the house where we had it, the prisoner asked where I was going - I said to Whitechapel; he said he lived that way, and asked if I would give him a ride - I said Yes, and welcome; he then asked if I would let two women get into the coach, and he got on the box; as we were coming along Fleet-street I felt his hand in my pocket, and told him to keep it away - when we got on to Ludgate-hill I felt his hand in my pocket again, and he took out four half-crowns and four shillings, which was all I had; I collared him instantly, and held him fast - I never let him go, but I do not know whether he might not turn his hand, and give the money to one of the ladies in the coach; I know I had felt it safe in Fleet-street - I was in liquor, but knew what I was doing.

JAMES GILL . The prosecutor called me, and gave charge of the prisoner for robbing him of some money - he said at the watch-house in Paternoster-row, that it was four shillings and four half-crowns - he was in liquor, but had his senses; he seemed to know what he was about; we found four shillings on the prisoner and one half-crown - it was half-past two o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. The watchman did not take me in charge - the coach took me to the watch-house; I have been but a few months from Liverpool - I told him I lived over Westminster-bridge.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-100

1087. BENJAMIN GODDARD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 watch-ribbon, value 2d., and 1 watch-key, value 2d., the goods of Phineas Borrett , from his person .

PHINEAS BORRETT . I have retired from business , and live on my means. On the 13th of April I went with a friend to the Bull inn, Aldgate ; there is a pastrycook's-shop at the corner, and a door opens into the passage of the yard of the Bull - I was going up the passage or gateway, and saw a coach coming down; the prisoner stood at the door of the pastrycook's - I put my hand on his shoulder, and said, "Go in, or let me go in," but he did not seem disposed to move; when the coach came up to us he made a bolt at my watch, and went out with the horses - I called out "That man has got my watch," and he was taken within twenty yards of the spot - this is my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long before you missed your watch had you seen it? A. I could not see it in my pocket, but I know it was there - I am nearly eighty years of age, but I have not lost my senses yet- I did not feel the watch go, but I felt the jerk, and the bolt he made gave me suspicion - I said, "My watch is gone;" he did it dextrously; I had seen it a quarter or half an hour before - I was going up the gateway, and he tried to place himself in the way, that I should not go in the doorway; there was no push till the horses came up, then he pushed, and took my watch, but he used no violence.

WILLIAM WEST . I was at the Bull inn, Aldgate - I went to the hackney-coach door, let the steps down, and took out the prosecutor's luggage; a coach was coming down the yard, and the prisoner took the prosecutor's watch out of his pocket; he ran off, and very nearly pushed me down - I did not pursue him, but staid with the luggage; I did not see the prisoner stopped, but I will take my oath he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. On which side of the coach was the pastrycook's door? A. On the right side, and I was on the same side; I did not say the coach was between me and the prisoner; I said I was at the door, and the coach was coming down the yard - the prosecutor gave me the care of his luggage; the stage-coach was coming out of the yard as the hackney-coach stopped - the stage was between me and the prisoner; I saw him in custody in about ten minutes - I did not see any strange man come up with the watch, and say to the prosecutor, "Here is your watch - that man is innocent;" I swear it did not pass.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am an officer. I was coming from Petticoat-lane to Aldgate church, and heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner came right up to my face- he was running, and turned short into Black Horse-yard - I pursued, and took him in the gateway; a small struggle ensued, and he stooped to throw something down, but I could not see what - a great crowd collected; I pushed him into Mr. Manning's shop - the prosecutor came, and said, "Have you got my watch?" I said, "No, I saw him drop something, but I don't know what;" I begged a gertleman to go and look, telling him where I had seen something dropped - one of the persons brought in the watch, and the prosecutor owned it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know who brought it

back? A. No, it was a gentleman whom I begged to go and see what the prisoner had put down - I swear he did not say, "Here is the watch - that young man knows nothing of it;" I begged the gentleman to go round the corner and look for the watch, but I do not know where he did go - when I heard the alarm no one was running before the prisoner - some persons were pursuing him; I did not state before the Magistrate that I saw him running with others - I was not running; he faced me - I do not think I stated he was running with others; if I did I did not speak the truth - I really do not think I did say so.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent - I never saw the gentleman nor the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310512-101

1088. WILLIAM WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May 500 sheets of printed paper, value 25s. , the goods of John Wilson .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Thomas Betts .

THOMAS BETTS . I am porter to Mr. Thomas Baynes , who lives in Duke-street, Lincoln's-Inn-fields. On the 4th of May I had left two bundles of paper at Mr. Virtue's, in Ivy-lane - I then had six bundles to deliver in Foster-lane ; I took my truck as near as I could - I took out two bundles, delivered them, and when I returned there were only two bundles left in it; I ran up Foster-lane, and a gentleman said, "Is this your paper? the prisoner is at the top of the lane;" I took the paper to Mr. Wilson's, where it was to be delivered.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know Mr. Wilson's Christian name? A. John, I believe - he has two brothers in partnership with him.

JAMES COX. I was coming up Old 'Change, and saw the prisoner running down; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and some persons attempted to stop him - I pursued, and took him; he had nothing with him.

GEORGE TWINCH . I heard the cry of Stop thief! about half-past six or a quarter before seven o'clock that evening - I saw the prisoner run up Foster-lane, and drop a bundle; I followed him to the Old 'Change, where he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were running? A. I should think twenty or thirty - they were not before me; I was near the prisoner - it appeared to be a bundle, wrapped up in paper, but I cannot say this is the same.

JOSEPH LLOYD. About twenty minutes before seven o'clock I was at the corner of Paternoster-row - I saw the prisoner running, and some persons after him; I pursued him, and when I got to Old 'Change I saw him in custody and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-102

1089. CHARLES KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Richard Henley , from his person .

RICHARD HENLEY . I am a porter . I was in Milton-street on the 24th of April - a female passed, and said a boy was picking my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand - he was six or eight yards off; I pursued, and when I got within five or six yards of him, he threw down my handkerchief - I pursued, and took him; a female took up the handkerchief, and delivered it to the officer - I had it safe ten minutes before.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am an officer. The prisoner was given to me by the prosecutor, and this handkerchief by the female, who said she saw the prisoner rob the gentleman- in going to the Compter the prisoner said somebody gave it to him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up the street, and the prosecutor struck me and knocked me down.

MR. HENLEY. I believe, by my running, I shoved him down.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-103

1090. MARY HODSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 pair of spectacles, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Allmond .

ELIZABETH ALLMOND . I am the wife of Richard Allmond - he is clerk to Mr. Mabely, of Bread-street. The prisoner was employed as a char-woman to me, two days every week, for about a year and a half. The gentleman, where I live, lost some articles, and I missed a pair of spectacles - I told the prisoner of it, and she said she thought I had taken them out when I went to the butcher's, as she had seen me with them in my hand - the gentleman in my house sent for an officer.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I was sent for, and on searching the prisoner's lodging I found a duplicate of a pair of spectacles and a shirt - I showed the duplicate to the prosecutrix; the prisoner said they were not the prosecutrix's spectacles - I said I thought they were- she afterwards said they were, and she had pawned them through distress.

JAMES FOLEY . I am in the employ of a pawnbroker, in Whitechapel. I have a pair of spectacles, pawned by a female, in the name of Mary Smith .(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

1091. MARY HODSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 shirt, value 4s. , the goods of William Allmond .

ELIZABETH ALLMOND . My son William lost this shirt.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I found the duplicate at the prisoner's lodging, which led me to the pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM KENNEDY . I have a shirt, pawned on the 11th of February by a female - this is the duplicate I gave her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

Reference Number: t18310512-104

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, MAY 14.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1092. SAMUEL DEXTER was indicted for the wilful murder of Jane Markham .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS & BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MARKHAM . I live in Diamond-row, Stepneygreen, and am the son of the deceased, Jane Markham , by a second marriage; she was a widow - the prisoner was her son by her first marriage; she was about sixty-seven years old, and lived at No. 1, Foster-street, Lisbon-street, Dog-row, Bethnal-green ; she dealt in household furniture , and resided there alone - the house was her leasehold, but of very small value; she had 40l. in the Savings'-bank, and about 20l. in debts - her stock was of trifling value; she had a leasehold house in Devonshire-street, worth 30l. - I am not aware that she possessed any other property; the house she lived in consisted of a bed-room, parlour, kitchen, and shop - there is only one door from the street, which enters into the shop; the parlour is in a line with the shop - there are four rooms on the ground floor, and there are entrances into three of the rooms. I saw her alive on Monday morning, the 7th of March, about eight o'clock - she appeared in her usual health; I saw her dead on the Wednesday - after her death was discovered I went up stairs, found the place all ransacked, and things taken out of the drawers - she had two feather beds in the house, one she slept on, and the other belonged to my sister, and was there for sale; I found both those beds gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. CLARKSON. Q. Is Dexter a good-tempered kind of man? A. Yes, a very good temper indeed - I always saw him kind and attentive to his mother; I never heard him speak an angry word to her - I have received the money from the Saving's-bank; I found the document which enabled me to do so on the premises; it appeared to me that the parties had been there to ransack the house as well as destroy her.

MR. BODKIN. Q.What kind of a document was this? A. It was a book, and was in the same box with her leases - I have administered, or should not have got the money; I have five brothers and sisters, two by the first marriage, and three by the last.

WILLIAM TUDDENHAM . I am apprenticed to the prisoner. On Wednesday, the 9th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock, he told me I was to go with him to do a job, but I did not know when I went out where I was going- he took me to his mother's house, Lisbon-street, Dog-row; he knocked twice, and the second time the door seemed to open a little, and then he went in and called Mother! mother! - I was outside the door, about two feet from it, on the pavement; I could see into the room, and saw blood on the floor - he told me afterwards that it was blood; I should not have known it was blood - it was a yellowish cast; he first said Mother! mother! then said,"Oh, God! my mother is murdered, run and get assistance" - this was before he told me it was blood; it had a cloth upon it - he was not out of my sight all the while he was in the house; when he said "My mother is murdered," he was just on the near side of the blood, which lay close up to the cupboard, (here the witness pointed out, on a plan of the premises, the siluation where the prisoner entered); I could not see, where I was, whether the door leading to the adjoining room was open or shut - the door opens towards the outside of the shop; he never went out of the first room; he said, "Look there is the blood," and then I came away with him and went to the public-house - he then ran over to Mr. Cross at the chandler's shop, and spread an alarm about the neighbourhood; he sent me to the doctor.

Q. How long was the prisoner in the room? A. It was so momentary I cannot tell - I should think about three minutes; I went to several doctors, could not find any, and at last went to the hospital and brought three - I waited outside the house some time, and then went about my job; I do not think the prisoner could have opened the door of the inner room without my seeing him, but I can hardly tell.

COURT. Q. You say he knocked at the door twice, and the second time it seemed to open a little - how is that? A. It seemed to give a little to his knocking - he put his knee against it, and it flew open.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. About what size is this front room? I should think about ten feet square - I stood about two feet from the door, on a piece of pavement; I could see the blood quite plain, the door being open would throw light into the room.

THOMAS DREW . I am an inspector of the Police. On Wednesday, the 9th of March, I was on duty in the Mileend-road, and was called on to go to Foster-street, Dogrow, between eleven and twelve o'clock, by a man named Stone - I found a few persons round the door; the window shutters were closed - I went into the room called the parlour; there was a large stain of blood between the fire-place and staircase in that room - the prisoner was about the centre of the room; I said nothing to him then; I heard him say twice that his mother was murdered - when I got to where the blood was, I could see into the kitchen, where the deceased lay; I went in - she was then laying in rather a reclining state, in the corner, between the door-post and the copper; her shoulders were against the corner, and nearly eighteen inches high from the floor - there was a cord suspended from the latch of the back door, and it hung down towards her head; it had been cut there - I saw she had a very severe blow on her forehead, and her face was nearly covered with blood; her lips were very black - I saw no other wound on her head; the wound appeared to have been infticted with a heavy jack-towel roller, which laid just by her side, and was nearly covered with blood; Dexter was in the room - he came as far as the door, but not into the kitchen, and requested that the body might remain in the state it was in, and the cord suspended from the latch.

Q.What did he say or do? A. He was making a noise, and calling out that his mother was murdered - I then went with one of his sisters up stairs into the bedroom; a double chest of drawers there were open, and things scattered about - the whole place appeared completely ransacked, to see what property could be found; there was a small chest with linen in it, but I saw no papers - the prisoner did not accompany me up stairs; the sister told me what things were missing - I came down, and after being there a short time, asked Dexter "How long ago is it since you saw you mother last before this morning?" he said, "I have not been here for the last fortnight, and have not seen her;" I afterwards heard he had been there, and told him he must consider himself in custody - I took him to the station; I took a handkerchief off his neck, and at the corner of it there were two or three little specks of blood; I found no marks of blood on his clothes or shirt - there were several stains of blood

in his hat lining; I could not judge whether the specks of blood were fresh or not - I said, "Dexter, what is all this?" looking at the handkerchief; he gave me no answer whatever.

Cross-examined. Q.Stone, I believe, came for you? A. Yes - he is a publican, but has left the house; he kept the Lord Collingwood, very near the deceased's house, in fact both houses join almost - here is the handkerchief; the specks of blood are at this corner - there were three specks of blood when I took it off; they might be produced by the prick of a pin, or in shaving - some of it may have rubbed off; I was before the Coroner, but not examined.

MR. ADOLPHOS. Q.It is more than two months since you saw the blood on the handkerchief? A. Yes - I have had it wrapped in paper since; here are several marks of blood visible on the hat - I gave my evidence at the Police-office, before the Coroner sat; the roller is here, that has marks of blood on it - the blood on that, the handkerchief, and hat, is faded a good deal.

CHARLES CROSS . I live in Lisbon-street, very near the deceased's house. Between five and six o'clock on the evening before the Wednesday, on which this murder was discovered, the prisoner called on me to make inquiries about the deceased - I had seen him before, and knew his person, by his standing at his mother's door several times before; he asked me if I had seen the old lady at the broker's shop that day - I said No I had not; he said he thought it strange, seeing the house shut up, as he was in the habit of calling every day - nothing further passed; I wished him good night - this coversation was against my door; I was writing at the counter, and he came in -I could see part of the deceased's house at the time; it was shut up, and had been so all day - I saw the prisoner again next day, about eleven o'clock or later; he came and asked me if I would go over with him to see his mother, as she was in a fit, or otherwise dead - I refused at first, but he persuaded me and I went; when I went in he said, "It is not in this room, it is in the next one;" I could not see the body from the first room, unless I was so placed as not to be seen from the front door - this was about a quarter of an hour before Drew, the inspector, came; I cannot say whether any additional light had been let into the place - when I first went in it seemed very dark, but when I had been there some time it seemed a great deal lighter; I went to the door where I could see the body, and exclaimed, "Yes, it is right, that she is dead, and it appears that she has been dead some time;" I said I thought she had been murdered, as I saw the blood in the parlour as I passed through - those are the words I used; I said, "I think she has been murdered in this room (the parlour) and dragged from there into the kitchen," where I saw her - he exclaimed, "For God's sake, you don't say so!" clasping his hands together; I said, "Well, I must go to my business, I cannot stay any longer;" he said, "For God's sake don't leave me;" I was coming out - the front door opens against the wall; he turned round, pulled the door back, and said, "Look here, they have stopped the key-hole of the door up;" there was tow or something in the key-hole, but that could not be seen without pulling the door from the wall, unless you went behind the door, which is not likely - before I got to the door, I said, "Which way did you get into the house?" he told me how he got in - nothing was done about cutting the cord before I left.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You say he came to you between five and six o'clock in the evening, and said, "The old lady at the broker's shop?" A. Yes, those were his words, but on the Wednesday he said, "Come with me to my mother's;" I was examined before the Coroner and the Magistrate - I did not state till Thursday, that Dexter was the man who called; that was after he was committed - I knew him by his standing at the door; I had seen him a great many times - I always said he called in the afternoon; I said I could not say whether the person who called was Dexter or not - I am sure I said it was in the evening; I did not say he had a basket on his head - I said I could not swear it was not Dexter; I told the Coroner I would not swear it was Dexter till I was obliged, and that I would sooner swear it was Dexter, than that it was not - I swear to him from his features; I had very little conversation with him, and cannot say about his voice - when he came on Wednesday a boy stood at the door; I cannot tell his name.

JOHN GOODEY . I am a lath-render, and live in Bethnal-green. I saw the deceased alive last on the Sunday before the Wednesday in question - she was drinking led with her daughter; I saw her in her room alive and well - on the Wednesday following, about five minutes to twelve o'clock, I heard of her death; I went to her house, and saw the prisoner there - he was standing on the step of his mother's door, directing a lad to go to Dr. Cane, of Whitechapel, and fetch him immediately; he then turned round to a man who was going towards the Collingwood, and said, "For God's sake come in here to me, somebody has been murdering my mother;" I entered the room - he went on before me, and as soon as he got up to his mother he said, "Here she is, here she is," before I could see her - she was laying in the kitchen; there was a copper on the left-hand side of her, a door at her back, and a line round her neck, suspended to the latch of the door- the prisoner then said, "She has either been murdered or has hung herself;" I said, "Oh, that woman has been murdered - see how she has been bent about the head;" Dexter said, "Oh, the wretches!" he said, "I will cut her down;" I said, "I would do no such thing;" he said, "Why not?" I said, "You have sent for Dr. Cane, and let her remain till some person comes and sees what state she is in;" I said, "Look at the blood laying here in the front room by the fire-place;" he made no answer, but said again, "I will cut her down;" I then left the room - I did not see her cut down; I felt ill at the sight, and went home - I did not ask how he found her dead; he did not say how he came to go to the house that morning.

ROBERT MAXEY . I live in Philip-street, St. Georges' in the East. On Wednesday, the 9th of March, I saw persons standing at the deceased's door, and went up - I saw Dexter with his foot on the door; I said, "What is the matter?" he replied that his mother had hung herself; I immediately shoved him aside, and said Where! I got into the room, saw her, took my knife out, and cut the cord, which was fastened round the neck - one end of

it was very long; it was twisted round, and fastened to the latch, and the other end round her neck - the body was sitting in the corner on the ground; but on my cutting the cord, which was tight, the head fell down, and a great explosion of wind came from her, by which I thought she was alive; the cord had kept her head upright - the prisoner said, "Stop, it is not my mother;" I said,"Stand on one side, gentlemen, and let him see;" then he looked and said, "Yes, it is my mother - my God! it is my mother:" I asked how he came into the house - he said he had been in the room before I had, and called out Mother! and that he went to the stairs and called out Mother! - but he had no occasion to call up the stairs for his mother, for he must have seen her if the door was in the same situation as it was when I entered; that is only my opinion - he could not get to the stairs without going by the door where the deceased lay; the room was light enough by the door she was suspended to- it had two or three panes of glass above, and the light comes down from what is called the black ditch, and showed her legs; he must have seen the body if the door had been open.

ROBERT JENKINS . I am a Policeman. I was with Drew at the deceased's house, and heard him ask the prisoner when he had seen his mother last; he said he had not seen her for a fortnight.

THOMAS GUNTEN . I have known the deceased for twenty-three years, and know the prisoner by sight perfectly well; I remember seeing him on Monday, the 7th of March, at his mother's door, at the corner of Foster and Lisbon-streets, at ten minutes past six o'clock in the evening; he was standing on the threshhold of the door, with a rush basket in his hand.

MARY POTTER. I live in Lisbon-street, at the tap - the deceased lived close by me; I saw her on Monday evening, the 7th of March, after nine o'clock, at my window, where I sell beer - she had some beer of me.

ROBERT SHEFFIELD . I am a broker, and live in Bethnal-green. I have known the deceased thirty-five years, and the prisoner more than twenty; I met him in March- I think it was on the Thursday previous to the murder, I saw him before he came to the bar, which is about thirty yards from his mother's house - he was coming in a direction from her house; I think he asked me for a job, but we got into conversation, and I think my nephew said, "Have you not got too many, Sam?" he said, "No, I have been down to my mother's for a shilling, and she will not let me have a bob," which means a shilling.

ELIZABETH FELTON . I live at Bethnal-green, and knew Mrs. Dexter. On the Friday before I heard of her death, I had some business with her - I went to know the price of a bedstead which was in her possession for sale; she said it was 6s. - I went back a second time, and saw the prisoner there; I said I would give 5s. for it - she said it was worth more; I went back, came again, and offered another 6d.; there was a jarring at the door, and Dexter said to his mother, "D-n it, I want you, and it shan't go for less than 7s.;" his mother said, "This is my son, and he has come for something," but what she meant I do not know; she spoke loud enough for him to hear - I saw no more of him then, but the same evening I saw him in the Globe, at the corner of Globe-lane, Mile-end-road, drinking with three men; he went out a little while, and when he returned they asked him how he got on - he said he could raise another pot of beer, and he would have more in the evening.

HANNAH CARR . I live in Foster-street, and am a dressmaker, when I have work - the house I live in joins the deceased's; I can hear the voices of persons in her house, but better up stairs than down - I have heard persons talking in her house; I heard a very great disturbance three times, and heard a man's voice; when I heard the prisoner's voice at Lambeth-street I recognized it - I never saw him near the house on those occasions; the first disturbance was in the Christmas week, but at what time I cannot say - it was between seven and eight o'clock at night, I think, but am not sure - I was up stairs, and heard some female halloo out "Let loose my hair - don't do what you have often threatened me, murder me;" she called out Murder! and with that I heard somebody pushed down stairs - it was the female, for I heard her squall, and then I heard the voice which sounded like Dexter's; it was just the same voice - he said he would either have money or the papers; she said she was not going to work for him to have the benefit of it while she lived - I do not know whose voice the female's was, but the man's voice I do know; I heard but two voices - I heard no more then; one night, about three weeks after, just after she had taken in her things from the door, (which I had not seen her do, but heard it, if she stirred her fire I could hear it) I heard a noise down stairs, but could hear a deal plainer up stairs; I heard footsteps of two people going up stairs- I went up stairs, listened against the wall, and heard something similar to what I heard before; it appeared as if he came for money, and she said he should have no more money, he had had enough; I heard no reply, but upon that the woman was knocked down, for she hallooed out, and somebody fell down stairs, as if she was shoved down, and then I heard the door of the house slam - I heard no more then; these quarrels were always at night - the last time was three weeks before the murder; I cannot tell the date - it was at night; there was a very heavy quarrel - I heard her say he should not have any more money from her, and she would not let him in if she knew it was him, she would not open the door; he said he would find plenty of ways if that was all - he would get up the ditch; there is a ditch at the back of the house - he then said,"Give me the papers, or I will do what I have threatened"- she said he was worse than a bad husband to her; I went down, and heard no more - I always thought she was quarrelling with her husband till one night, when I spoke to her.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner till he was in custody? A. I saw him one day pass our house twice, with a bottle, as if he was going for liquor - he went as if from the Bricklayers' Arms towards home; that was on the Christmas week, on the day of the quarrel, in the afternoon.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you married or single? A.Single; I sometimes go to the play with strangers - I did some dress-making about a fortnight ago; I made a gown for my sister - I work for any one who brings it, and do not ask their names; I have a bill up in my window - I do sometimes get my living in the

street - I never saw the prisoner and heard him speak at the same time, except before the Justice; I spoke to the deceased once, but was never in her house till after her death - I do not know John Markham or his wife, nor Mrs. Kean; I heard voices in the house in the Christmas week, and was well aware somebody was there; I heard two voices, and never more - I could count every footstep that goes up stairs; I only heard two persons go up - I cannot tell the day that I heard the quarrel, but it was in the Christmas week - my sister always lived in the house with me; she is not here - I have been there three months, but do not live there now; my sister was not at home at the first quarrel, but she saw me listening one night, and asked what I was listening for; I told her - I cannot tell whether that was the second or third time; it was not the first - I told her to he more careful of the back door than she had been.

Q. How came you to come forward? A. Mr. Young, the inspector of Police, asked if I ever heard any words, about three days after the murder was discovered; I have not received any money from any one for giving evidence; I was ordered by several Policemen to go before the Coroner; I swear I have had no money on this case, nor has any been offered me.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you any quarrel with Dexter? A.Never - I know none of his family, and never spoke to him.

COURT. Q. You heard his voice at the Police-office? A. Yes, and recognized it directly - I said that was the voice I heard; I heard the same voice in all three quarrels.

ROBERT BIRCH . I am a silk-weaver, in the employ of John Smith ; I live with him, and sleep in the same bed with him - I am nineteen years old; I have done porter's work for the deceased, when I have had nothing to do -I have known the prisoner about nine months, and Mrs. Markham a good while. On the Sunday night before she was found murdered, I had been to my mother's; it was just upon dusk, while I was in the street, near the Collingwood, I saw Dexter and another man; I am quite sure Dexter was one of them - I was going by, and another man at the same time; as I went by I heard Dexter say to the man he was talking to, "If I cannot have either money or goods, I will have her," and he said, "If I cannot get in any other way I will come up the black ditch;" and he said to the other man."So help you G-d, you won't deceive me;" the other man made some reply, which I could not understand, as his voice was so low - all I could hear was"No," and then the prisoner said, "There is one place I have a suspicion of money, and that is in the clock;" the prisoner raised his head higher, and said again, "So help you G-d, you won't deceive me, but meet me at the time;" I could not hear what the man answered - Dexter then raised his head up so that he could see me; I was standing between the two door-posts of Mrs. Markham's shop, listening to what they were talking of; he raised his head so that he could see me, and made a motion to the other with his head, to look at me standing there, and then Dexter said, "Enough said, good night;" as soon as I saw that he saw me, I pretended to be calling a dog, and on whistling my mother's dog ran up to me; I went home to my master's - he was in bed when I got there, and while I was undressing I said something to him about what I had seen and heard - I went to my mother's on the Monday evening, a little after ten o'clock, for some money that was due to my master; he had sent me for it - I am sure it was Monday night; when I went by Bethnal-green new church the clock struck something, but I do not know what, and at my mother's door the clock struck - I looked at a public-house clock, and it was about ten; I knocked at my mother's door, and she opened the window - I just saw her, but she did not speak to me; she was in bed - I hallooed out "Never mind," and went away; she lives about fifty yards from Mrs. Markham's, but not in sight of her house - I passed Mrs. Markham's as I came back, and saw Dexter coming out of his mother's door, with a bed on his right shoulder; I saw nobody else - I am as sure it was him as that I see you now; I heard of Mrs. Markham's death on Wednesday morning, and said something to my mother on the subject; when I heard of her death I knocked at the door, and asked for West, the Policeman; I did not see the prisoner there - it was about ten o'clock at night I saw West - I told him part of what I knew of the matter, entirely of my own accord; I went with West before the Coroner and Justice.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Endeavour to fix the time on Sunday as well as you can? A. I can only say it was just upon dusk, when I came by the deceased's house - I called at my cousin's, and two or three places; I was never in custody about a dog - a person lost one, and desired me to attend at Lambeth-street with it; I was in custody about two years ago, at Worship-street, but not for two hours - it was on occasion of my father-in-law, who would not let us live at home; I and another young chap took a house, and my mother found the furniture - the other chap stole a broom, but I knew nothing about it till the Policeman came and took it out of the cupboard - I was never in custody at any other time; I was never here before - I was bound over as a witness against a brother-in-law, at the officers tell me, but I did not know it; I was out of work at the time, and two men said they would give me 1s. to go to Stratford with them to sell pens for them - I do not know whether my brother-in-law got off; I did not come back for a month - I know Carr by seeing her before the Jury, but did not know her before, nor her sister; I did not state at the office that I had been four or five times at the office, nor that I heard my mother's clock strike ten on the night I saw him with the bed; she has no clock - I said I heard a clock strike ten coming from New church, Bethnal-green, and when at the public-house I saw the clock wanted ten minutes to ten, and as I stood at my mother's door I heard Spitalfields clock strike, but what it struck I could not tell - I knew Dexter nine months before I went to sea, which was in October; I told the Justice I never heard the prisoner's name till the Thursday after the murder - I did not know his name till he came up there; I knew one of her son's names was Dexter, but did not know which - when I stated this to my master I told him it was a man who I knew to be one of the woman's sons, and I said so before the Coroner.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.When you appeared before the Justice about a dog, it was against a man supposed to have stolen one? A. Yes - I was discharged about the broom in two hours.

JOHN SMITH . I am a silk-weaver, and live in Grosve

nor-place, Bethnal-green. Birch had been three months in my service, and still continues with me; he sleeps in the same bed as me - he said something to me on Sunday night, as he was going to bed, about what he had heard out of doors; and on Monday, after dark, he went after a little money which was owing to me, by my direction - I do not know at what time he returned, but it was after ten o'clock, I believe - he slept with me that night, but made no communication to me; on the Wednesday evening, when I was in bed, he made a communication to me.

WILLIAM GALE . I am a private watchman of Whitechapel. On Monday, the 7th of March, I was on duty in High-street, about thirty yards from Five Inkhorn-court, and saw a person, either that or the following night, carrying a bed - it appeared a feather bed by the bulk of it; I do not know the person - I do not know Lisbon-street - I never saw the prisoner till he was at Lambeth-street, that I know of; the person was coming from Whitechapel church towards Aldgate; he might be coming from Dog-row - I turned, and saw him go up Five Inkhorn-court; I am sure it was either Monday or Tuesday.

DAVID HARRIS. I am a Policeman. I was at the deceased's house from half-past nine o'clock on Wednesday night till eight o'clock in the morning; Birch knocked at the door on Wednesday evening, and said he could make a communication to me next morning, which he did.

WILLIAM WEST . I was a Policeman. Birch came to me at the deceased's house on Wednesday, and communicated what he knew.

MARY FULL . Birch is my son - I saw him on the Sunday evening before the murder was discovered, and on Monday evening I went to bed about nine o'clock, and after that saw him out of my bed-room window; I had most likely been asleep, and cannot tell the time - he informed me what he had seen, on the Wednesday evening.

FREDERICK AGER . I am a surgeon, of St. Mary, Whitechapel. I was called in on Thursday, the 10th of March, to see the body of the deceased, and made a written statement of the examination, (reads) - I found two mortal wounds on the top of the head, at the back part, with fractures of the bone, penetrating the brain about a quarter of an inch; the large wound on the left was the fracture of the posterior superior part of the parallel line, forcing in a circular portion in fragments, about two inches in diameter, which perforated the membrane and penetrated the substance of the brain - the smaller wound was to the right; it had also fractured and forced in a portion of a bone, about an inch diameter, in a circular form, also penetrating the brain - there was a slight contusion of the right eye-brow, and marks of pressure on the fore part of the neck at the sides, but not extending to the back of the neck, and an indentation on the right side; it had the appearance of a rope having been tied- the indentation I suppose to be where the knot had been; on the 11th of March I stripped the body, and could not discover any other mark of violence or appearance of injury - I have no doubt her death was occasioned by the wounds and fractures, either one of which was sufficient of itself to produce death, by pressure on the brain; I should imagine the indentation in the neck was not the cause of her death, because she did not exhibit the appearance of having died from strangulation - if the cord had been tied round her neck when alive, there would be a mark to show it, which there was not; I should suppose it had been applied to her neck after her death - I am satisfied she could not have destroyed herself.

THOMAS DREW re-examined. The prisoner lived at No. 4, Five Inkhorn-court, High-street, Whitechapel.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my counsel - I have witnesses here; there is a deal of prejudice in the case from the first beginning.

SAMUEL CLEMMINGER . I am a hawker of earthenware, and live at No. 4, Thrawl-street, Brick-lane. I know Ann Garniss , a dress-maker and monthly nurse, who lives at No. 4, King-street, James-street, Thomas-street, Brick-lane. On Sunday, the 6th of March, I went to visit her; I took tea there, but not in her company - I had tea just at the commencement of dusk; Bruin, the landlord, and his wife, took tea after I went there, and before the candle was lighted, before dark - before tea I was about to leave the room with Ann Garniss ; there was a knock at the door, and Daniels, a carpenter, came in - I was at that time going out of Garniss' room into Bruin's, which induced me to stop and see who it was; Daniels came in, and at his heels the prisoner, and he went into Garniss' room -Bruin and his wife had not then began tea; they then took tea, but Daniels went into Bruin's room, and Dexter into Garniss' - after that a candle was lighted, and I took tea in Bruin's room; about a quarter of an hour after Dexter came in he went out - I heard him say what he went for; I take on myself to say it was not five minutes before he returned, and it might be less - he staid there till between nine and ten o'clock.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you always live in town? A.Generally, for the last nine or ten years - I should judge that the deceased's house is about twenty minutes, walk from Garniss'; I once walked from there to Garniss', but we called on the prisoner in our way - I have known the prisoner four years; I was at the Coroner's Inquest, but was not examined - I was at the house.

Q. Did you send up your name to desire to be examined? A. By the inspector of the Police I did, but I was rejected by the Policeman - that is him, (pointing to Drew), and Ann Garniss was there; I believe nobody else was there the night we went down - I cannot charge my memory with Bruin being there or not; I have known Garniss about four years, by travelling round, being a hawker - I was in the habit of going to her house and Dexter's; I am confident the prisoner and Garniss lived in separate houses while I knew them - I have seen them in the same house together; I went with Garniss to the Inquest - I was sent by Miller's (the officer) order on the second day; I was not sent the first day - I attended at the office, and the officer advised me to go before the Coroner; I told the inspector I was come down by order of Miller, to give what evidence I could, and he rudely told me I was not wanted - he asked if I was for or against the prisoner; I did not know exactly what answer to give, and said I was neither for or against - he said I was not wanted.

ANN GARNISS . I live in New King-street. On Sunday, the 6th of March, the prisoner came to my house, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, to meet my brother, who did not come; he left my house

about two, and went home to dinner - he said he would come again after dinner, to see if my brother came or not, and he returned about ten minutes past six; I opened the door to a strange man named Daniels, who inquired for the person of the house, and Dexter came in at the same time - he went into the lower room, which is mine; he went out about seven o'clock to fetch a candle to burn and returned in four or five minutes - he went for it, as I was ill at the time, and while he was gone I went up and borrowed a book, and he sat down and read it; two men up stairs went away about eight, and then, as it was Bruin's book, they had it up stairs again - the prisoner left my room about half-past nine that night; Clemminger saw him come in, and Ann Blake , Bruin, and two strange men saw him - I think my house is about three quarters of a mile from Foster-street.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have known the prisoner some time? A. About eleven years - I lived with him, as his wife, between five and six years - that has ceased five years; since that we were merely acquainted - I called on his wife at times; he and Daniels came to the door about ten minutes past six o'clock - I am sure it was the 6th of March; I have not the least doubt of it - it could not be twenty minutes after six o'clock, for it was quite light; I asked Daniels the time, and he said it struck six when he came by Shoreditch-church, that he had been speaking to a woman for about five minutes, and it must be about ten minutes past six - I know it was day-light; I am sure it was after six - it could not be twenty minutes after, on account of the light; it was from six to twenty minutes after - this was first called to my memory on the Friday following; he went out for the candle after dark - the small shops are open on Sundays; I went to the Coroner, but was not allowed to go into the room - I went to ask if I could go in; Drew, the inspector, asked what I knew about it - I said I knew the boy Birch was mistaken in the man, I could prove he was not the man; he asked how I could prove it - I said, "Why Dexter was in my house at the time;" he said I knew nothing about it, and that Dexter's hand-writing would prove I was a liar.

SAMUEL CLEMMINGER . I wish to say I have not come to swear positively to the time, but I swear it was day-light.

ANN BLAKE . On Sunday, the 6th of March, I was in Bruin's service, at No. 4, King-street. The prisoner was there that morning - he went away and returned in the afternoon from six o'clock to a quarter-past; it was quite day-light when he came - he went into Ann Garniss ' room; he afterwards went out to fetch a candle - he was gone about five minutes, and went into Garniss' room again, when he returned; he left from nine o'clock to a quarter-past.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Who was there? A.Clemminger, Mr. and Mrs. Bruin, and two strange men, who came to see them - Daniels was there; there were three strangers besides Dexter - I did not see him come in in the evening; it was quite day-light when he came - I was coming down stairs when Garniss let him in; I did not see him come in, but saw him in her room - the two men left half an hour before him; I let them out - I did not let him out; I was asked about this by the prisoner's solicitor, last Saturday, and before that Lee, the officer, asked if I knew any thing of it; he said, "Can you prove he was there on Sunday?" I said, Yes; this was the Saturday after the murder - I had no conversation with any body about what time Dexter came.

LOUISA BRUIN . My husband keeps the house in King-street, in which Garniss lives. I recollect Clemminger coming there on Sunday, the 6th of March, in the afternoon - I cannot exactly say the time, but suppose it was between three and four o'clock; it was before tea a good bit - the prisoner came between eleven and twelve in the morning; and again, as near as I can tell by the time, about a quarter-past six; I was up stairs when a knock came at the door - I went down, expecting a friend to call; I was half way down when Daniels, a friend of mine, came in -I met him and Dexter on the stairs; Dexter went into Mrs. Garniss' room, and remained there till nearly seven o'clock, when he went for a candle, and returned in about five minutes - a book was borrowed of me for Mrs. Dexter to read, but Mr. Dexter read it; by Mrs. Dexter I mean Garniss - he remained there till about half-past nine o'clock.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Is Dexter the name the woman always goes by? A. She has gone by that ever since I have known her - she has lived in my house six months; Dexter did not live there, he only came now and then - I and Daniels were in a separate room, but Garniss came up to me and said Dexter was gone out - the door cannot go without my hearing it; Mrs. Garniss borrowed the book- I went down two or three times in the course of the evening, and saw Dexter with it in his hand; the church bells had done ringing a good bit when he came in the morning - I went to the Inquest, but they would not let me stop; I went with Clemminger - we all went into the house together, Mrs. Garniss, Clemminger, and Ann Blake- Mr . Bruin, my husband, was there, but he did not come to speak; I did not apply to any body about going into the room - I left it to Mr. Clemminger; I did not go out to see who he applied to - he went out of the tap-room into the passage.

SARAH BULL . I live at No. 54, Fuller-street, which joins Brick-lane, and keep a chandler's shop. On Sunday, the 6th of March, about half-past six o'clock, or a quarter to seven, I remember selling a candle - I do not know who to; it was a man.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Was your shop open, or did any body knock? A. Open - I remember that I went to cut the candle; I could not reach them, and asked him to do it.

SARAH STOCK . I am single, and lived with the prisoner on the 6th of March, at No. 4, Five Inkhorn-court, Whitechapel. On Sunday, the 6th of March, he went out about ten o'clock in the morning, and returned about two to dinner - he laid down after dinner, and did not go out again till after five o'clock; we live about twenty minutes walk from Garniss' - he returned about half-past nine o'clock that night, or from that to ten, had his supper, read a chapter in the Bible, then went to bed, and I did the same.

RICHARD DAWSON . I am porter to the Billericay waggon. On Monday, the 7th of March, I was at the Swan public-house, Whitechapel, between five and six o'clock- it was getting dusk; the prisoner came in there about six, or a little after; there were other persons there, and there was ajoke about a woman who Knowles was going to be married to, and something was said about a parcel, in con

sequence of which I went out with Dexter for twenty minutes or half an hour - I do not know how long it was after he came there; we went to Mr. Knight's, an oilman, and there he got a piece of brown paper - we went from there to his house in Five Inkhorn-court, and made a parcel of it, tied it up, and directed it for a joke; we left there and went to the Elephant and Castle, kept by Mrs. Graham - we did not stay there more than ten minutes, then returned to the Swan; Dexter had not left me at all in that time - we had been from the Swan twenty minutes of half an hour - when we returned, the parcel was produced; Knowles was there then, and some gin was had - I left the Swan about nine o'clock, and left Dexter there; he had not left my company all that time - I presented myself for examination before the Coroner and the Magistrate, and gave this statement.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.It was between five and six o'clock when he first came to the Swan, and it was then growing dusk? A. Yes, I never looked at the clock - it was not dark; I cannot call it dark till between seven and eight o'clock - it was between six and seven when I went out with him; it was not right dark then - I cannot say whether the oilman had lights; the direction was written at Five Inkhorn-court, by the light of the Heavens - I cannot say whether I mentioned getting the brown paper before the Coroner; I cannot say on what day I went there - I was not hindered from going; I saw Drew there.

- CADMAN. I am a labourer, and live in Drum-yard, Whitechapel. I went at the Swan on Monday, the 7th of March - I went between five and six o'clock; the prisoner came in while I was there; there was a joke about a parcel; it was to be played on a man named Knowles - Dexter and Dawson left the house between six and seven, to the best of my recollection; they returned in twenty minutes or half an hour with a paper parcel; I left the house at a quarter or half-past ten o'clock, and left the prisoner there - he had not left my presence, except when he went out with Dawson; I should think Foster-street is about three quarters of a mile from the Swan.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you any particular reason for observing the time you went away? A. Yes, because a young man went with me, and we looked at the clock in the bar, and by that it was between a quarter and twenty minutes after ten o'clock - I went before the Justice and stated this.

JAMES KNOWLES . I am a porter. On the 7th of March I was at the Swan, and saw Dexter there, between five and six o'clock; Dawson and Cadman were there - Dexter and Dawson went out between six and seven, and returned in twenty minutes or half an hour with a paper parcel; there had been a joke with me about a wedding - I paid for a pint of gin; I remained there till five minutes past eleven- Dexter was not absent a quarter of an hour from seven till then, and when I left he came out to go home with several persons; I stated this before the Coroner.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say he was not absent a quarter of an hour, did he go out then? A. He might, but not to my knowledge; but nature will call a man to go out at times, but it did not, to my knowledge.

JAMES BACON . I am a butcher, in Tewkesbury-place, Whitechapel. I went to the Swan on Monday, the 7th of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening - I saw the prisoner there, and left him there about ten minutes to ten.

JOHN SPENCER . I am a porter, and live at the Elephant and Castle, Whitechapel. On the 7th of March, about half-past seven o'clock, I went to the Swan; Dexter, Dawson, Cadman, and Knowles were there - Bacon and I had a pint of beer together; there was a joke about Knowles being married to a widow - I staid there till twenty minutes past ten; Dexter was not out of my sight all that time - he went to the bar, but not further; I left him there.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It was twenty minutes past ten o'clock by the house clock? A. Yes; I left Knowles there.

JOHN READER . I keep the Swan public-house. Dexter came there on the 7th of March, about five o'clock, as near as I can recollect - he left about half-past six, returned about seven, and remained there till a quarter-past eleven o'clock.

LEWIS CONSTANT . I am a cripple. I was at the Swan the whole of the day on the 7th of March, and saw Dexter there - he left about half-past six o'clock, and returned within half an hour; I left at five minutes past eleven, and left him there - he had not been out of my presence the whole time.

THOMAS HUTTON . I am a journeyman butcher, and live in Flower and Dean-street, Spitalfields. I went to the Swan on the 7th of March, about five o'clock, and saw Dexter there - he went out, returned before seven, and remained there from then till a quarter-past eleven, when we came out together; I parted with him about a hundred yards from the Swan, and one hundred and fifty yards from his own residence.

JOHN WILLIAM BISHOP . I am a hay-salesman, and live at Stratford. I was at the Swan on the 7th of March- the prisoner was there smoking his pipe when I went in about ten o'clock; I left about eleven by the clock in the bar, and he was there then.

JOHN MARKHAM . Mrs. Kean is my sister. On the 6th of January, Twelth-day, I was with her at my mother's, and that evening there was a quarrel between me and Mrs. Kean - she got a warrant out against me in consequence of it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. That was not in the Christmas week? A. No; we quarrelled down stairs; I did not threaten to murder her - no words of that kind were mentioned; I said nothing about papers or money, or any thing of that sort - it was a quarrel between her husband and me, and she took it up; it was about eleven o'clock at night, after supper - my mother was there, but not the prisoner; there were only three of us.

THOMAS DREW re-examined. I never saw Clemminger or Garniss in my life, to my knowledge, till now - I attended the Inquest, and was particularly attentive to the Coroner and Jury, but I was not at the door, and had nothing to do with it; Clemminger did not apply to me to be examined, nor did I refuse him, saying he could do no good; nor did any woman apply to me, nor did I refuse any woman - I sent one or two persons up, who were sent down again by the parish authorities.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Who were they? A. One was a constable; I only know one that was refused - I did not say it was two; I never went to Bruin or Reader to try and prevent their coming here - I went to Reader's house

and asked if he knew Dexter, on the Wednesday night that he was taken; I went to him again on the Sunday following, with a brother inspector - I did not state that he could know nothing about it, because he was up stairs, nor any such thing, to any body.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-105

1093 WILLIAM STIGWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , two hats, value 6s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Herepath .

ARTHUR GERRISH . I am in the employ of Samuel Herepath , a hatter . On Saturday night, the 16th of April, between nine and ten o'clock, there were six hats standing about an inch or two inside the door; I saw the prisoner come and take the two top ones - he was just off the pavement when I caught him by the collar, and asked him to give them to me - he would not, but made use of foul language, and struck me in the face; we had a struggle for about a quarter of an hour - he got about a yard from me, and dropped the hats behind him, but I never lost sight of him; a lad picked them up.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Was the price marked on the hats? A. Yes - he could see the price without coming in; I was outside the window - the prisoner was looking into the window.

ROBERT LESTER . I work at Mr. Pawley's, on Holborn-hill. I was passing the prosecutor's shop, and saw Gerrish holding the prisoner by the collar, and on looking into the road, I saw two hats at the prisoner's heels, and took them up - he made great resistance.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Gerrish charge him with stealing the hats? A. At the watch-house he did; I was not close to him before; a mob came up, when I took the hats up, and the prisoner made great resistance - I did not say that he was drunk.

CHARLES SIMONS . I am a watchman of St. Andrew's, Holborn. I saw a mob about nine or ten o'clock at the corner of Field-lane, which is nearly opposite the prosecutor's shop; a gentleman said, "Watchman, go into that mob;" I made my way, and saw the prisoner striking Gerrish, who charged him with stealing two hats, and the prisoner wanted to give charge of Gerrish for assaulting him - I laid hold him, but when I came to look at the prisoner, I knew him, and secured him.

Cross-examined. Q. He charged him with an assault? A. Yes - but Gerrish said, "I will not let him go, he has robbed my master;" he was quite sober.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am constable of the night. I was at the watch-house - the prisoner was brought in charged with stealing two hats; he made no charge against Gerrish there - he said nothing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-106

1094. JOHN CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May , 1 basket, value 3s. 6d.; 1 wrapper, value 1s., and 60lbs. of butter, value 3l. , the goods of George Harrison Jones .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Peter Knight .

GEORGE HARRISON JONES . I deal in butter , and live in Bridge-street, Vauxhall. On the 3rd of May I bought 60 lbs. of butter, with a basket and cloth, of Mr. Knight, in Newgate-market, about eleven o'clock in the morning, but never had it away - I paid 3l. 0s. 6d. for it, and about five in the afternoon I heard it was gone; part of it was sent to my house on the Wednesday night.

PETER KNIGHT . I keep a shop in Newgate-market . On the 3rd of May Mr. Jones bought 60 lbs. of butter of me; I was to send it to Brown's, the poulterer, in the market, which was done about one o'clock - Jones' lad was to call there for it; next morning I was informed it was taken - I saw 28 lbs. in possession of the officer, with the wrapper, but not the basket - I knew the wrapper to be the one I sold the butter in; it was to have been returned to me - I did not see the prisoner about; he was a stranger.

Prisoner. Q. Are you in the habit of opening the flats of butter which come to you? A. Yes - I looked at the ticket, and sold it myself.

EDWARD MORRIS. I am a porter. On the 3rd of May, about twenty minutes to three o'clock, I came out of my master's warehouse - I stood against Lumley's liquor-shop, opposite Newgate; the prisoner came and asked if I wanted a job - I said I did not, that I attended a warehouse, but said, "What is it to do?" he said, "I want somebody to go up to Newgate-market, to Mr. Brown's place, and fetch a flat of butter for Mr. Jones, the Vauxhall carrier;" I asked why he could not go himself, as he was so near; he said, "I have a horse and cart standing at the corner of Farringdon-street, and am afraid that might start away in the mean time;" he had no horse and cart with him then - I went to Brown's, and got the butter; I told them who it was for - I brought it to the priprisoner, who I found at the corner of Farringdon-street - it was in a flat, which was fastened down; I told him I had not seen Mr. Brown, but I asked somebody to see the direction to see that it was right - he asked what I charged, and said, "Will 3d. do?" I said I did not know; he put a sixpence into my hand - I went and got charge; he said, "Stick to the sixpence, I may have another job another time, perhaps" - I left him; he left the flat of butter just round the corner, some little distance from the cart, and came away; I said, "Now, it is quite foolish for you to leave it in that way," and asked why he did not put it into the cart, supposing the cart belonged to him, as he represented - he said, "Oh, I am waiting for somebody;" he wished me good afternoon, and I returned to the warehouse - I saw him at the Compter next morning, where I went, on hearing the butter was stolen - I knew him immediately, and am quite sure he is the man; when he saw me coming, he shifted back, but I said he was the man.

THOMAS SAPWELL . On the 3rd of May, about nine o'clock at night, I was sent for to the Robinhood, in Skinner-street, to look at some butter which two young men had brought there; there were fourteen lumps tied in this cloth, and tied in a blue apron, which I believe the prisoner has now got on; while I was sitting in the bar the prisoner came up, and asked for the apron - I had not time to examine the butter well; another person, named Bathe, was with him - they said they were going to Leadenhall-market; the prisoner took the apron with him - I followed them up the street, and lost them; as they said they would come back in an hour, I went back, and waited till between eleven and twelve o'clock, but they did not come; on the Wednesday morning, between ten and eleven

I was sent for - I went there, and found the prisoner and the other; the butter was there - I suspected it was stolen, as it was not wrapped up as it should have been; I asked where they got it from - they seemed very much confused at the moment, but afterwards said they bought it; it was then in this turbot basket, not in a flat - I asked Carter who he bought it of; he at first said he bought it at a shop in Newgate-market - I asked who kept the shop; he made no answer, then said he had bought it outside the shop, but gave no name - I asked where he lived; he said any where - the other said he lived in a court on Old Fish-street-hill; the prisoner afterwards said, before the Magistrate, that he bought it of a countryman in Newgate-market - it weighed 28lbs.; I made inquiry, and found Mr. Knight, who claimed the cloth - he said, "If the butter belongs to me it is two creams (meaning dairys), and it was so. The bill against Bathe was not found.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the butter of a countryman in Newgate-market; he comes up with butter twice a week.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-107

1095. JOSEPH WEEDING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 piece of stamped paper, value 30s., and 3 pieces of stamped paper, value 6s. , the goods of Samuel Jacobs .

SAMUEL JACOBS . I am a fruit-salesman , in Farringdon-market. I first saw the prisoner ten or eleven years ago, and have seen him in all about ten times since; he has called on me several times, and told me his mother-in-law was dead, and had left him something very handsome - that he had some money to put out, and did I know any body who wanted any; I said No, but on the fourth or fifth application he offered to lend me 100l. on my own warrant of attorney, and said if I would go and dine with him at the Belle Sauvage he would give me the money - this was on the 17th of September; I said I could not, but I would be there about four o'clock - he told me to bring a 30s. stamp for the warrant of attorney; I went, and he said, "We will go into the other room, and have a bottle of wine," which we did, and then he asked if I would pay for a bottle - I said, "With all my heart," and another was brought; I had taken a 30s. stamp and three 2s. ones- while this bottle was drinking he wrote something on the 30s. stamp, caught them all up, and went out - I said to a person there, "Why he has taken the stamps;" he said, "Oh, he is only gone to the water-closet;" I waited there three hours, but he never returned - he had left his bill unpaid; I did not see him again till the 23rd of April - I never saw his 100l., or the stamps either.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was it in 1817 that you first knew him? A.About that time - I had to receive 200l. from him, paid by his mother-in-law, about twelve years ago; I understood he was an attorney - I had orders from my agent to go to Colchester to receive the 200l. - I went, and was introduced to the person who was to give it to me; as soon as I had signed the document, he said, "Where do you dine?" I said at the Cups - he said he would bring me the money there in half an hour - he never came; I posted up to town, sued his mother-in-law, and got the money.

Q.Was the name of Johnson mentioned as the person who was to lend this 100l.? A. No, not at the coffee-house; he mentioned some name to the Magistrate - the prisoner is the person who was to lend me the money; Mr. Carpenter, a confectioner, of Fleet-street, was in the room when I produced the stamps - I wanted the 100l. for a particular use; Carpenter was not to join in the security; I had got him to purchase the stamps and go with me as a witness - we had two bottles of wine between us three -I paid 14s. for what the prisoner drank; he did not say he was going to Peele's coffee-house, to Johnson, for the money - Mr. Halls, the Magistrate, offered to admit him to bail, if he could procure it; as he was going to the station he wanted me to go to a friend of his in Stanhope-street, to settle it, but I refused.

Q. Did he not say "I am sorry I did not come back -I could not get the money, and was ashamed; it is true I used the stamps, but here is the money for them?" A. No - I never asked 5l. to settle this; I was tampered with by several persons, but would not accept any thing - the bill-stamps were not written on; I cannot say what he wrote on the 30s. one.

COURT. Q.The prisoner knew well were to find you? A. Yes.

WILLIAM CARPENTER . I am a confectioner, and live in Fleet-street. I know Jacobs - I never saw the prisoner till the 17th of September, when I called on Jacobs, and he was in the counting-house - Jacobs gave me two sovereigns, and asked me to buy the stamps; I bought a 30s. and three 2s. ones - the prisoner came out, and Jacobs introduced me to him; I afterwards went to the Belle Sauvage with Jacobs - the prisoner asked if we had taken dinner; we said Yes - he said, "Well, perhaps you will take a glass of wine;" we had a bottle in the drinking-room - Jacobs produced the 30s. stamp, and hauded it to the prisoner; I understood the prisoner was to lend him 100l., and I was to witness it - Jacobs took out the other three stamps, and laid them on the table, with his pocket-book; the prisoner talked to him about Essex, and he appeared to be writing on the 30s. stamp - he handed the wine round very fast, and then proposed that Jacobs should stand a bottle, which was brought in; I took my share of it, and when it was about half drank he said something to Jacobs - he had the 30s. stamp in his hand, and went out with that and the other three; we stopped there till eight o'clock at night - he did not return - we called in the waiter, who brought in a bill of 14s., including the dinner, which Jacobs paid; I never saw the prisoner again till he was at Bow-street, on the 27th of April - he said the stamps were to be produced - Mr. Halls gave him time to produce them, but he never did.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you yourself been negociating in this way? A. No - I have borrowed hundreds and thousands in my life; I was not to join in the security - Jacobs did not tell me what was to be done with the billstamps - I only went to witness the warrant; I smoked a pipe - I can sometimes drink three bottles of wine when I go to cook a dinner, and be steady after it; I was perfectly sober.

JOHN WEEKS . I am a Police-constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 23rd of April, in Picket-street, Strand; Jacobs gave him in charge - they were standing talking together when I came by; Jacobs said he had

robbed him of some stamps - I took him before Mr. Halls- on the road to the watch-house he wanted to go to a friend's house in Stanhope-street, to settle it, but Jacobs refused.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he had failed in getting the money, was ashamed to return without it, and unfortunately kept the stamps? A. He never said a word of the kind.

Prisoner's Defence. I had seen the prosecutor three weeks or a fortnight before - he asked me to procure him the loan of 100l.; I said I would speak to a friend of mine, Johnson, of Stratford, who I expect here - he was at Bow-street, but Mr. Halls did not think it necessary to call him- I wrote to him last night, but do not see him about the Court; if he is here, I shall staisfy the Jury I am perfectly innocent - I asked what security he could give, and I solemnly declare Carpenter was the security; the warrant of attorney was filled up, and I read it over to them before I took it away; the stamp on it was allowed at the stampoffice.

WILLIAM CARPENTER . I never was asked to become security, and never intended it - nothing of the sort was ever mentioned, neither by the prisoner nor Jacobs.

SAMUEL JACOBS. The value of the stamps has never been returned to me by any body - the prisoner told Mr. Halls they were allowed to him at the office; Mr. Halls told me to make inquiry, but we could make nothing out- he never offered me any money as being allowed for them.

Q.Where did you find the prisoner? A. I was passing in the Strand, and saw him - I said, "Mr. Weeding, you are the person I want, stop, for I have an officer;" he said, "Why, I owe you something, and will pay you;" I said, "No, you have robbed me - you owe me nothing."

MR. BARRY. Q. Did you pay him any money for preparing the warrant of attorney? A. No - I have not seen the stamp since; it was a printed one - I do not know that it was ever filled up; the bill-stamps were provided in case he should require to draw bills on me for the amount.

Prisoner. The bills were to be given at different dates, and the warrant was the security - if the deposition before Mr. Halls was brought forward, that is very different to what he has said to-day; Carpenter declared there that I took the stamps with the consent of Jacobs, for the purpose of going to read the warrant to the person who was to advance the money.

WILLIAM CARPENTER . If the deposition is produced, it states what I have said here - I never said he took the stamps to show the person; I said he took up the stamps in a moment - Jacobs said "He is gone with the stamps;" I laughed at him, and said, "Well, you know him, an old friend of yours - he will not run away with them."

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-108

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, MAY 14.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1096. JOHN PURDY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of April , 1 table, value 3l. , the goods of Richard Crowdy ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 39. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-109

1097. MARY TANSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 7 bottles, value 1s., and 6 quarts of wine, value 24s., the goods of William Hawes , her master .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HAWES . I am a music composer , and live at Royal Terrace, Adelphi - the prisoner was in my service; in consequence of information I went to Mr. Thomas- he came to my house, and he found some wine.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS . I am superintendent of the Police. I went to the prosecutor's house last Monday evening; I saw the prisoner - I searched a box which she said was hers, of which she produced the key and unlocked it- I found two bottles of wine in it; the bottles were corked - I asked the prisoner if that was Mr. Hawes' wine; she said, "I will tell you the truth, yes it is" - she said she was not the only person to blame, there was another to blame as much as herself, and if I would look in Eugenia's box I should find more there; she said the wine came from Mr. Hawes' wine-cellar - I sent for Eugenia, and the prisoner said, "This gentleman is an officer; he is come to search all our boxes, and it is no use to disguise the truth - you have got wine as well as me;" Eugenia was in a terrible agitation, and said, "Yes, I have got Mr. Hawes' wine - why did you make me put it into my box?" she then took out her keys, opened her box, and I found five bottles of wine, and part of a sixth; this is the wine - the seal is cut off the cork of one of the bottles, found in the prisoner's box.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You do not know who cut that off? A. No; there were five bottles and a half in Eugenia's box, and two in the prisoner's.

EUGENIA COLVILLE . The officer came to my master's house; he found some wine in my box, which the prisoner had put there on the Sunday morning.

COURT. Q. Did you know where it came from? A. No, I did not then; I asked where it came from - she said,"Never mind; we will drink it - it is nothing to you where it comes from."

Cross-examined. Q. When did you first see it? A.Between half-past six and seven o'clock in the morning - my master was not up then; I had been once or twice to the wine cellar with my mistress - my mistress took out the wine, but once or twice she gave me a bottle to take up to the parlour; I looked at the corks once, because Miss Emma gave me one to draw - I have been thirteen or fourteen months in the prosecutor's service, and the prisoner has been about one month, as cook; I did not have wine with the last cook; I did not see the name on the cork of the bottle which Miss Emma gave me to draw - I cannot read; I thought the wine the prisoner brought to my box was Mr. Hawes', because it looked very dusty, and the same as his did - I told Miss Perkins to take care of the keys, because I suspected they were taken down stairs, as I saw the prisoner touch the sideboard key; I did not mention about the wine till the prisoner told the officer - the prisoner said it was not Mr. Hawes' wine; I had not been in the habit of drinking wine with the former cook - the prisoner and I had some of this after we had done work on Sunday; she drank two cups and I drank one - that was in my bedroom; she then told me to keep it in my box; I did not tell any body till the Monday - I did not get the wine; I never saw the prisoner's sister till Sunday night, in the

kitchen - I did not talk to her; I did not give her any wine - I never gave any wine to any body; the prisoner told me that every servant did so - I did not mention this, because I once told of a servant who was thieving in the house, and was treated very ill for that; it was because she picked out the mark of a pocket handkerchief and a pair of stockings, and I was ill-treated by the last cook and house-maid - it was Betsey, my fellow house-maid that I told of; the present cook and house-maid have been there for the last three months, and I have not been so ill-used; the prisoner was not in the house at that time- I never offered the prisoner's sister a bottle of wine.

MR. HAWES. It was in consequence of information that I went for the officer; I have port wine in bottles of this description, and sealed as this is - I have a great deal of wine, and often do not dine at home; I do not see my wine-cellar three times in a year.

Prisoner's Defence. On the book, before a million of people, Eugenia is the person who did it; I had not been in the house five days before she told me of it - she is wicked to the heart; she went into her mistress' bed-room, opened the drawer, and took the key out - that is the guilty person, and if the other cook was here she would say so.

MR. HAWES. The prisoner had been three weeks and four days in my service; my wine-cellar is at the bottom of my house, adjoining a small coal-cellar, and that adjoins the footman's bed-room - the kitchen is at the back of the house, and the wine-cellar towards the front; I have no fault to find with Eugenia's character; I shall retain her in my service - I have four regular servants.

GUILTY of stealing the two bottles . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-110

1098. JAMES LOWING was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Lang , from his person .

JOSEPH LANG . I am a gun-maker , and live in the Haymarket. Last Monday evening, about six o'clock, I was in Regent-street , driving along in my chaise; it is not particularly low, but any person can reach up to the back of it - I felt a pull at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner running from me with my handkerchief in his hand; I saw the corner of it - I followed him, and came up with him in Piccadilly, within about a hundred yards of the place; he was then running as fast as he could, and I saw the handkerchief in his bosom - I collared him, and took it from his breast - this is the handkerchief; he said it was only a lark.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you have a mark on it? A. Yes, my name is on it - I think the prisoner was rather fresh; the handkerchief might be a little out of my pocket, but I sat so much on it that I felt the pull on his taking it.

JOHN BOSTON . I was in Regent-street, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-111

1099. FRANCIS WAIT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 3 quarts of wine, value 10s., and 3 bottles, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Thomas Whitmell .

HENRY ROSE . I am the son of Charles Rose - we live in Purim-place, Cambridge-road. I have known the prisoner about a year and a quarter, by seeing him at a toll-gate; on Thursday, the 14th of April, I was at work, and saw a basket under the window of the toll-house - I saw him take one bottle out of it, take it into the toll-house, and put it under the window inside.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I am porter to Mr. Thomas Charles Whitmell , or Charles Thomas , I do not know which - he is a wine-merchant ; I do not know how he signs his name - I cannot read; when persons call him by his Christian name, they call him Charles, I believe; I have heard him called Charles - he lives in Barford-place, Liverpool-road. On Thursday, the 14th of April, he received some port wine in bottles from the warehouse in Mark-lane; I went with some to Dalston - I asked the prisoner if I could leave two dozen at Kingsland turnpike-gate till I came back; he said I might - I counted the bottles before I went; I returned in three quarters of an hour, and missed three; I asked the prisoner if he knew any thing of it - he said No; I found the basket under the window, where I had left it - the three bottles of wine were worth 10s.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You would be very sorry to swear what your master's name is? A. Yes, Sir - I heard him say before the Magistrate that his name was Charles Thomas ; I do not know whether that was taken down - I did not swear that I did not know whether his name was Thomas Charles , or Charles Thomas; I did say so, and I mean to stick to that still - I said at the office that this was the Thursday fortnight before I was there, and the Magistrate said that was not the time the other witness spoke of; I then said, "Oh, it was Thursday, the 13th," and the Magistrate said that was impossible also, because Wednesday was the 13th - that was two mistakes, but they were not on my oath; I had left wine with the prisoner before, but I took it again almost directly.

COURT. Q. Did you miss this wine the day on which you left it? A. I did.

ANNE OSBORNE . I am the wife of Thomas Osborne - we live in Ball's-pond-road, almost close to the turnpike. I have known the prisoner twelve months; he came to me one Thursday in April, I cannot say the day of the month; he bought a halfpenny worth of nuts, and asked me to take care of a bottle till the evening, when he would call for it - it appeared to be full, and it was afterwards claimed by the witness, Freeman; I delivered it to him in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after I received it, and he gave it to the officer - it was between three and four o'clock; it seemed to me to be a pint and a half bottle.

JAMES CLARK . I am a Police-serjeant. I took the prisoner at Kingsland turnpike, on Thursday, the 14th of April.

ABRAHAM GLADING . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner in the custody of Mr. Clark; I received this

bottle from Freeman - Mrs. Osborne was standing in the road at the time; I believe it contains port wine.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY of stealing one bottle only . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-112

1100. THOMAS NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 2 pewter plates, value 1s., and 5 lbs. weight of iron hooping, value 6d. , the goods of Henry Philip Powys , Esq .

MR. CHURCHILL conducted the prosecution.

JAMES GEORGE . I am a Bow-street horse-patrol. On the 13th of April I went to the prisoner's house, at Southgate, with a search-warrant; the prosecutor's servant directed me there - I found the prisoner's wife there; I found these two pewter plates behind a partition on the mantel-piece, and some iron hooping in a tool-chest - the partition ran up from the mantel-piece to the ceiling, and the chimney is behind it; it seemed to have been used as a cupboard; the plates could not be seen as a person went into the house - the tool-chest was locked up, and the prisoner's father broke it open for me; I took the prisoner the next morning.

THOMAS GUTTERIDGE . I am bailiff to Mr. Powys. I went with the patrol to the prisoner's house - we found these articles; I believe these plates are my master's - I saw the iron hooping found; the prisoner was employed by Mr. Powys as a jobbing carpenter ; my master had bought - cwt. of iron hoop; the prisoner was employed to cut it up and put it on some fences - what was used, and what remains, is about 49 1/2 lbs., and about 5 1/2 lbs. was found at the prisoner's; some of the iron was used on the park fence, but it was wider than this.

COURT. Q.Where does the prisoner's father live? A. In the next house to him - he came in while we were there.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Did you ever hear the prisoner say it was his house? A. No - I know he lives there; I had seen him there six months ago, or more - we did not find him there that day; his wife and family were there - he was not in Mr. Powys' employ at that time; I do not know when he left exactly - there was a heifer killed at Mr. Powys' about Christmas; the prisoner assisted in that - I do not know whether he had permission to take any part of that; I know these plates by the coat of arms on them - they were kept in the scullery; Mr. Powys has some dogs - I do not know whether any dog's meat is ever put on these plates, or whether it was about Christmas; I do not swear to the iron hooping - we guessed the weight of what was used.

HENRY PHILIP POWYS . ESQ. I live at Southgate . The prisoner was in my employ. I think for fifteen or sixteen months - he was regularly in my employ, but if he asked for leave to go for a week I allowed him, or sometimes for a day or two; I know these plates by the coat of arms on them - it is an old family coat of arms of a person whose property was left to me; the prisoner was brought to me in custody, and said he hoped I would be lenient to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you made him any promise or threat? A. No - he was regularly in my employ, and so was Gutteridge; I bought - cwt. of this iron, and what has been used is most trifling - the rest was cut up by the prisoner, and remained in my workshop: there were a dozen of these plates, and they all exactly correspond; there are three of them missing - my servants might take them into the out-house with dog's meat, but it is not right to do so; I remember the heifer being killed, but I have no recollection of giving the prisoner any of it; he stated that he took part of the liver of it home on these plates, but I have no sort of recollection of it - it is very unlikley; I did not see him come to my house on the day after these things were found, but I believe he did come; I rather think for the purpose of interceding with me - when I saw him in custody he said he hoped I would not transport him.

COURT. Q. Do you know from your servants whether he had the liver to take away? A. I have no idea of it; what iron was found at the prisoner's, and what was used, makes up the weight as near as possible.

MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Would it have been necessary to have carried the liver on three plates? A.Certainly not.

MR. HEATON to JAMES GEORGE . Q. When did you take the prisoner? A. On the 14th of April; I had searched his house the day before - I do not know whether he went home that evening; I took him at Mr. Powys', at seven o'clock in the morning - the plates were in a sort of cupboard; there was a powder-flask, and some bottles there.

Prisoner's Defence. The iron hooping is part of my father's property; at the time the heifer was killed the cowman assisted me; he shewed the liver to the prosecutor, and said part of it was not good - he said if it was eatable we might have it; I took the plates, and took part of it home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-113

1101. THOMAS FIELDER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 till, value 1s., 4 half-crowns, 10 shillings, and 9 sixpences , the property of Charles Thomas Taitt .

MARY ANN WRIGHT . I am the daughter of William Wright ; I live with my brother, Charles Thomas Taitt - he is a herald painter , and lives in Old-street-road . I was sitting in the parlour on Thursday evening, the 28th of April - I heard a noise, and saw the prisoner coming from behind the counter in the shop, on his hands and knees; my brother caught hold of him - I saw the till was on the floor, about five or six yards from where it was usually kept; the prisoner was close to the till - there had been no one in the shop, and the street door was open; I looked into the till - it contained 24s. 6d.; none of the money had been taken from it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Whose till was it? A. My brother-in-law's, Charles Thomas Taitt ; I heard a noise, looked in my shop, and saw the prisoner, in a few seconds, crawling round the counter with the till in his hand - I opened the door, and seized him as he was just rising; he dropped the till from his hand.

WILLIAM HOWARD . I am a Police-constable. I was called in - this is the till and money; here are four half-crowns, and 14s. 6d.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by - there was a noise

with a Policeman, and a boy threw my cap into the shop; I went to get it, and the man accused me of stealing the till.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-114

1102. WILLIAM WARE was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD KING . I live at Staines . The prisoner was in my employ - I gave him 4s. to buy pollard, but he did not pay for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-115

1103. JOHN FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of John Horlor .

JOHN HORLOR . I am a hatter , and live in Chiswell-street . On Saturday, the 9th of April, (I think it was,) I was in my shop, and saw the prisoner running away with a hat in his hand - I followed him till he was stopped; I lost sight of him as he turned a corner, but when I came in sight of him again, he was running with the hat in his hand; he was taken with it - it has my ticket on it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. No; I missed it from the shop.

JONATHAN CARLO . I live in Hand and Pen-court, Leadenhall-street, and am a baker. I was in Grub-street, and saw the prisoner running towards me with this hat in his hand, waving it - I stopped him; he fell down, and threw the hat into the street - some one picked it up.

Prisoner. Q. You said at the office that you could not swear that you had seen the hat in my hand? A. I saw it in your hand, and the instant I took you, you fell down, and threw it in the road.

SAMUEL SWAIN . I received this hat from Mr. Horlor, in the street - I had seen the prisoner running with it.

SAMPSON HENRY PERRY . I am a superintendent of the Police. I received the prisoner at the station-house; he said, "I am the man who took the hat, I was in distress."

Prisoner. That is false altogether - I did not steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing him to be in distress.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-116

1104. JOHN FARRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 7 pairs of boots, value 1l., and 4 shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph William Snell ; and BENJAMIN GILES PENNY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

JOSEPH WILLIAM SNELL . I am a boot and shoemaker , and live in the Commercial-road . Farrington was in my service - on the 13th of April in consequence of something I found in my parlour, I sent for an officer; I had some conversation with Farrington while I was preparing to go to the office - he said he had pawned upwards of a dozen pairs of shoes, and that he had been induced to do so by Penny; the shoes had been in my shop or warehouse, which is all on one floor.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not say, if he told you what he had done with the property, you would not proceed against him? A. No, nor did I threaten him - the Police-officer was present.

JOHN JOSEPH REARDON . I am employed at a pawnbroker's. I have a pair of shoes, pawned on the 8th of March, by Penny.

JAMES HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker, in the Commercial-road. I have a pair of half-boots, pawned on the 10th of March, by Penny.

WILLIAM ANDERTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of shoes pawned on the 12th of April, in the name of John Farrington , but I was not at home at the time.

MR. SNELL re-examined. Q. Were there any duplicates found? A. No, my Lord - the property produced is mine - on the 13th of April I spoke to Farrington, and he said he had pawned this pair of boots at Mr. Anderton's, the night before - he had the opportunity of taking them, and he mentioned the pawnbroker's name; Penny was not there then.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What day of the week was this? A.Wednesday; he mentioned this particular quality of boots - I had only sold one pair of that sort, which a man walked away with on his feet; I have an apprentice, and he might have sold some; I had seven pairs of them - I sold one, and found but three pairs left; I did not know Penny - I had never seen him.

Farrington received a good character.

FARRINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Three Months .

PENNY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-117

1105. JEREMIAH GINGER was indicted for embezzlement; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

FRANCIS FOREST . I keep a tallow-chandler's shop , in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell . I took the prisoner into my temporary service after the last Session, having known his father, who had worked for me - on the 15th of April I sent him out with goods amounting to 1l. 18s. 4d.; he was to bring back the money, but I did not see him again till I met him on the Sunday afternoon, on Clerkenwell-green - I asked what he had done with the money; he at first said he had lost it, then that he had spent it in going to the theatre, and playing at pitch with some boys, who lived in the neighbourhood, on Saffron-hill.

MARY ANN CAYLEY . I am the wife of Thomas Cayley - my husband is an oilman. On the 15th of April the prisoner brought me some goods, which came to 1l. 18s. 4d.; I paid him eight half-crowns, thirteen shillings, and 5s. 4d. in copper, on account of his master.

WILLIAM ROOKE . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner on the 17th of April - I asked him what he had done with the money, and whether he had received it; he said he had received 1l. 18s. 4d., and had spent it with some boys residing on Saffron-hill, and other indifferent characters - after that he said he had been to Portsmouth, but there had not been time enough for that.

Prisoner's Defence. My master said if I would tell him what I had done with the money he would forgive me.

MR. FOREST. No, I did not - he had been with me four days, and had received some money before and brought it home.

JOSEPH EDWARD PETTIT . I am a Police-constable. I have a certificate of the prisoner's conviction last Session -I know he is the person. - (Read.)

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-118

1106. GEORGE GEES was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , 1 sovereign, the money of Llewelyn Roberts , from his person .

LLEWELYN ROBERTS . I live in Jew's-row, Chelsea , and am a pensioner . I received my pension, of 2l. 3s. 3 1/2d., on the 2nd of May - I went the same evening to the Three Crowns public-house; I met there a man named Stevens, and went with him to the George the Fourth -I went afterwards to the Hope; I was rather the worse for drinking - George Sibley served me there with a pot of half-and-half; I paid him a sovereign by mistake for a shilling - he returned it to me; a woman who was there wrapped it in a piece of paper, and put it into my pocket - I fell asleep; when I awoke I went into the street, and missed all my money.

GEORGE SIBLEY . I am waiter at the Hope public-house. The prosecutor came there - he gave me a sovereign, and I returned it; a lady wrapped it in a bit of paper, and he put it into his right-hand side-pocket - he then pulled out 14s. or 15s. in his hand, and gave me a sixpence; I saw the prisoner there, sitting next to Roberts - all the other persons went away, but the prisoner and the prosecutor, who had fallen asleep; the prisoner moved from his seat, and went and sat next to the prosecutor - I saw him put his hand into the prosecutor's right-hand side-pocket, which I had seen him put the sovereign into; the prisoner drew his hand out, and put it into his own pocket - he then went, and sat down where he had been before; my master then came in, and the prisoner jumped up, caught the prosecutor by the arm, and said, "He is a friend of mine, I have known him ten years, I will take him out;" I heard him say that, and for that reason, I did not mention to my master what I had seen - the prisoner came there the next night, and we gave him in charge.

Prisoner. There was not room for me to sit near him at all. Witness. Yes, there is room for three persons - you did say I had better take the money out of the prosecutor's pocket, and leave it with my master, but my master was not at home; I did not ask you to help him out.

JAMES SOUTHCOMBE. I am a Police-constable. I was applied to by Sibley, and took the prisoner - I told him what I wanted him for, and he denied the charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was with two or three friends; the prosecutor happened to come in - he went into a little box where there is just room to sit down; I staid sitting by Fisher and his wife - it was near ten o'clock, and they wanted to get the prosecutor out; I got up, and said, "I don't mind helping him out;" I knew he lodged at the Three Crowns - I got him out, and then had to go on duty as a watchman; he wanted me to go and have some more liquor, but I refused, and said I had had enough -I left him, and he went into another public-house or two: he got to fighting, got into a row, and got into the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 43. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310512-119

1107. JOHN GORDON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , 1 watch, value 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 1 shoulder-iron, value 9d.; 1 jigger, value 9d., and 1 pair of pincers, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Wood .

THOMAS WOOD . I live in Shacklewell-row, Hackney . The prisoner came to work at my father's, and had part of my bed on the Sunday night, the 2nd of May - I left the articles stated in the room, when I went to bed; when I awoke in the morning the prisoner was gone, and he had left an old pair of trousers and a pair of boots there - my articles were gone; I went to Aldgate watch-house, where I found him with my trousers and shoes on - I missed, besides these, my watch, a shoulder-iron, a jigger, and a pair of pincers.

HENRY SPARROW. I am a shoemaker, and live in Shacklewell-row. I took the prisoner in the Minories, and gave him in charge to a City officer - he had the trousers and shoes on; I knew the shoes, as I had made them on the Saturday - I saw the watch taken from his right-hand waistcoat pocket by the officer.

JONAS CLAPHAM . I took the prisoner, and produce the articles - the tools were in a bundle which he had with him.

THOMAS WOOD . These articles are all mine, except this knife.

GUILTY . Aged 64. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310512-120

1108. JOHN HICKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 12 combs, value 30s. , the goods of Robert Phillips .

JOHN BANKS . I am shopman to Mr. Robert Phillips, a hair-dresser , in High Holborn . On the afternoon of the 18th of April, I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner there - I asked what he wanted; he asked for the address of a person, whom I did not know - he was then going out, and I asked what he had got; he said nothing belonging to me - I stopped him, and found he had a dozen large combs.

JOHN HOLLINS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner; I saw the witness take six of these combs from his apron.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The officer says he saw six taken from my apron, and he did not come in till I had given them all up.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-121

1109. MARY HAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 coat, value 20s.; 1 waistcoat, value 6s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Challis .

ROBERT CHALLIS. I live with Mr. James, of Foot's-cray, in Kent. I was in Oxford-street on the 15th of April - I saw the prisoner, and went with her to a house in St. Giles ; I went to bed with her, and in the morning she was gone - I missed every thing, but my shoes; I had left them on a chair in the room when I went to bed.

ROBERT CULLEY . I am a Police-constable. On Saturday morning, the 16th of April, I met the prisoner in St. Giles, with a bundle - I asked what she had got; she said nothing but her own - I asked her to show me, but she refused; I looked, and found these articles, which were all claimed by the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He left them with me for money.

ROBERT CHALLIS. No, I did not; I had no other clothes to wear.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-122

1110. ANN HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , three pairs of boots, value 6l. , the goods of William Arthur .

WILLIAM ARTHUR . I keep a shoe and boot-maker's shop , in Wigmore-street ; the prisoner lived as servant with my lodger, for eighteen months or more; I missed several pairs of boots from my shop.

THOMAS BAYFIELD. I keep a boot and shoe shop, in Edgware-road. I bought the duplicate of a pair of boots for 1s. of John Eagleton - I sent my boy to take them out of pawn, and he brought me these boots.

CATHERINE EAGLETON. I live in Paddington-street -I know the prisoner. In the course of last summer she came to my lodging, and brought a pair of boots - she asked Osborn (a man who was there) to pawn them, which he did; he brought me the duplicate and 9s., which I took to the prisoner - she gave me the duplicate, and said,"Give it to your son;" I kept it some time, and gave it to him - I have no knowledge of the boots, and my son is not here.

WILLIAM GOFTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of boots, pawned on the 28th of March by the prisoner, in the name of Mary Brown, No. 7, Queen-square - I have known her some years by that name.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring her innocence.

GUILTY of stealing one pair only . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-123

1111. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 seals, value 18s., and 1 snuff-box, value 2s., the goods of Neil McMillan , from his person .

NEIL McMILLAN . I live in Cumberland-market, Regent's-park, and am a carpenter . On the 24th of April I was drinking in the tap-room of the Compasses public-house, in Drury-lane - I did not see the prisoner there, to my knowledge; I had my watch when I went in there, my snuff-box, a crown-piece, and some half-crowns - I fell asleep, and when I awoke I missed all my property - I saw it again at the station-house, in Covent-garden, in about an hour afterwards; I paid 3l. 5s. for the watch - I gave 5s. for one of the seals, and the other was a present.

JOSEPH KENDRICK . I am a Police-constable. On the 24th of April I took the prisoner in Covent-garden-market, at twelve o'clock - I asked if he had a watch; he said Yes. and he had had it five years - I took him to the station; I had occasion to go out, and on my return I found the prosecutor there, who accused him of having his watch - I searched the prisoner, and found on him this watch, these seals, a snuff-box, a crown-piece, and two half-crowns - the prisoner did not then say it was his watch.

NEIL McMILLAN. These are my property - I awoke between ten and eleven o'clock; I had 18s. or 19s. in my pocket.

ANN BAKER . My brother-in-law keeps the Compasses. I went into the tap-room - I saw the prosecutor asleep, and the prisoner drew his hand from his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-124

1112. SUSAN LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 2 pillows, value 5s. , the goods of Solomon Phillips .

MARY BURTON. I am the wife of William Burton - he is a tailor; we live in Whitechapel-road , opposite Mr. Phillips'. On the 21st of April I was at my window, and saw a woman with a red cloak take two pillows from a board under a gateway on his premises; she put them under her cloak, and walked away - I gave information.

JOHN VAZEY . I am servant to Mr. Solomon Phillips . I went to Wentworth-street on Thursday, the 21st of April, and saw the prisoner with something under a red cloak - I opened her cloak, and found these pillows, which I knew to be my master's; I had seen them safe two hours before - she was then a quarter of a mile from my master's.

CHARLES GRANT . I am a Police-constable. I received the prisoner in custody, with the two pillows; she looked very bad, and was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18310512-125

1113. WILLIAM McGEE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 1 shawl, value 10s., the goods of Samuel Harding , from the person of James Reuben Harding .

JAMES REUBEN HARDING . I live with my father, Samuel Harding , a shoemaker , in Carey-place, Vauxhall-bridge-road. I was in Regent-street one Saturday, a few days before I went to the Magistrate's - I was taking a bundle to go to the mangler's; I saw the prisoner - he came, took the shawl from the bundle, and threw the other things down - I saw him again the next morning, and pointed him out to the officer.

JOHN TUBB. I am a Police-constable. I suspected the prisoner, from the description this boy gave, and I took him - I asked what he had done with the shawl; he said he had not seen it.

JAMES REUBEN HARDING . I had seen the prisoner before in that neighbourhood, and crossing the Park with his father's shoes to the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-126

1114. WILLIAM MOGG and GEORGE PURDY were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 pair of boots, value 20s. , the goods of Esther Elizabeth Luke .

JAMES WILKINSON . I am errand-boy to Esther Elizabeth Luke , who lives in Hedge-row, Islington , and keeps a boot and shoe-shop . On the morning of the 15th of April I saw the prisoners come up to the window, about half-past eight o'clock; they were near together - I saw Mogg taken down a pair of Wellington boots, which were hanging on two nails, separately, for sale, at the window; he gave one of them to Purdy, and they both ran across the road; I pursued - they dropped the boots, and I took them up; I cried Stop thief! they were stopped in about ten minutes - I had such an opportunity of seeing them as to know they are the men; these are the boots.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you a scholar? A. Yes; I know my mistress' name, because she signed it at Hatton-garden, and it is so printed on her cards - the boots were outside the window; I did not say at the Police-office that they had been inside.

JOSEPH TREW . I live in St. Alban's-place, Islington. I was in Hedge-row, and heard the witness call Stop thief! I followed the prisoners; they ran down Paradise-court,

where I detained them, with other persons, till the officer came and took them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you lose sight of them? A. Yes, when they went down the passage, till I got to the corner - they had turned a corner before, but I followed them round about a dozen yards from there - I followed them close.

JOHN COX . I am a Police-constable. I came up when the prisoners were in Paradise-court, struggling with Trew; there is no thoroughfare there - they were dressed as they are now.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Mogg's Defence. I had not the same clothes on then as I have now; we turned a good many turnings.

Purdy's Defence. I am innocent.

Mogg received a good character.

MOGG - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

PURDY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-127

1115. MARTHA NIGHTINGALE was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of May , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 15s., and 1 watch-key, value 5s., the goods of William Stevens , from his person .

WILLIAM STEVENS. I was in James-street, Covent-garden , about nine o'clock in the evening; I saw the prisoner - she asked me for money; I said I had none - we did not walk together: she did not seen satisfied with my saying I had no money - she began to feel about me, and took my watch; a girl came up, and said, "She has your watch;" I took hold of her, and said,

"Give me my watch;" she said she had not got it - I held her till the officer came; the watch had a gold seal and key to it.

Prisoner. He was very tipsy, and he gave it to me as I was coming by the Piazza, to go to a brothel with him. Witness. No, I did not - I was not so tipsy but I knew what I was doing.

JOHN MAGRATH. I am a Police-constable. I came up to the assistance of the prosecutor, at a quarter-past nine o'clock - I took the prisoner, and found this watch, seal, and key in her bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. We walked from the corner to James-street - we met two females, and he pushed up against a little girl, and took hold of her in a very indecent manner; he had given me the watch, and we were going to a house, where I was to leave it all night - he said he could get it in the morning.

WILLIAM STEVENS. I did no such thing.

JOHN MAGRATH. No one told me to feel in her bosom for the watch; a little girl came to Bow-street, and gave her evidence that the prosecutor gave the prisoner leave to search him for money - she gave that evidence the first day, and the case was remanded, but she did not come again; the prosecutor was the worse for liquor, but he had hold of the prisoner, and some persons said he had kept her ten minutes.

Prisoner. He gave me the watch to leave at the Crown, and said he had no money; I said, "I don't like to go with a gentleman who has no money - let me search you," and he said I might.

WILLIAM STRVRNS. Though I said I had no money, I am certain I did not use the expression that she might search me; she did not say what she asked me for money for, but I suppose it was to go with her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-128

1116. MICHAEL O'FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 book, value 3s. , the goods of John Whitehouse .

JOHN WHITEHOUSE. I live at Chiswick , and am a publican - the prisoner was billetted at my house. On the 7th of April he slept there, and went away the next afternoon - I had a book of utility, which was generally kept in a recess of a window up stairs, which the prisoner had to pass to go to his bed-room; the officer came the day after, and brought the book - this is it.

JAMES COOK. I am a constable. On the 8th of April the prisoner came to me, and demanded a billet - I apprehended him, and found, among other things, this book.

Prisoner's Defence. I had that book thirteen or fourteen months - I received it from Serjeant Allen, of the Worcester militia, at Birmingham; there was not a single leaf cut open.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

1117. MICHAEL O'FARRELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 key, value 4d.; 1 stocking, value 4d., and 8 sheets of paper, value 4d. , the goods of George Gregory .

GEORGE GREGORY . The prisoner was billetted on me at Hammersmith, as a soldier - I do not remember by what regiment. I had some suspicion, and applied to Cook - he was searched in my parlour, and this handkerchief fell out of the leg of his trousers, this key of a beer-tap, this stocking, and this writing-paper - I saw him put the paper into his boot myself; they are mine - the stocking has my wife's mother's initials on it, and this handkerchief was given me the day before.

JAMES COOK. I took the prisoner, and produce the property.

JAMES SMITH . I assisted in searching the prisoner - I saw him take the paper from the mantel-piece, and put it into his left boot.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the paper in my cap - there came on a shower, and I put it into my boot, as it is the custom with the cavalry, to keep it dry; that is but a part of a stocking - I tore it off to wipe my sword - I said I would represent the constable's conduct to the Magistrate, when I went down; I have been thirty-one years in the service, and had thousands of pounds in my possession - I was a serjeant twenty-nine years in the Madras Horse Artillery, and since then have been serjeant-major - the book was given me by Sergeant Allin to take to his brother in India; there was not a single leaf cut - I have a good library.

JAMES COOK . He is no soldier at all, but was on a false route, as far as I can understand.

GUILTY . Aged 59. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-129

1118. JAMES PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 22 squares of glass, value 16s.; 4 brass knobs, value 9d.; 4 brass buttons, value 6d., and 1 box-staple, value 1d. , the goods of Samuel Grimsdell .

SAMUEL GRIMSDELL . I was building some houses for Mr. Andrews, in Norfolk-street, Stepney - they were not

finished; I lost some squares of glass, some knobs, and buttons from there.

JAMES HENRY STARBUCK. I was employed by Mr. Grisdell to paint some houses in Norfolk-street - I went there on the Saturday before the 11th of April; I took off some brass knobs and buttons, in order to paint - I left them on the top of a mahogany sideboard; I left them safe that night, and locked the door - I went there on the morning of the 11th; I found the lines of the sashes cut, the sashes taken out, and the glass gone - I went, in consequence of some information, to the watch-house, in Denmark-street; I found some glass, some knobs, buttons, screws, a tinder-box, a handkerchief, a knife, and some screw-drivers - I believe they are all the prosecutor's; the prisoner was there, and was taken to Lambeth-street.

JOHN WRIGHT. I am a Police-constable. I was on duty on the 10th of April, and met the prisoner in Cannon-street-road, coming in a straight direction from the prosecutor's premises, with a bundle under his right arm- he crossed the road, and went up James-street; I stopped him, and asked what he had with him - I lifted up the corner of his handkerchief, and found it was glass; he said he was going to his employer's to put it in - I took him to the station, and in his pocket I found four brass knobs, four buttons, a box of a lock, a knife, and some screws; in his trousers pocket I found a box with tinder, flint, steel, and matches.

JAMES HENRY STARBUCK . This is a piece of the handle of the lock of a door - here is the other know of it; the screw we cannot find - these knobs are of the same description as those we lost; this glass fits the sashes exactly - I cannot be positive about those screws; this staple is the one that was lost, I believe, but it has no mark on it - this hammer was left on the premises.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Six Months .

Second London Jury before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18310512-130

1119. THOMAS BETON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 boot, value 14s. , the goods of Daniel Cox .

JOSEPH BENJAMIN WRIGHT . I live in Princes-street, Rosemary-lane , and am in the service of Daniel Cox. On the 28th of April, I was standing in his shop a little before eight o'clock in the evening - I saw the door open, which was ajar; the prisoner put his hand in, and took one boot out of the window - I pursued him, and saw the boot fall, but I cannot say from whom; I was agitated -I took the prisoner, and accused him of stealing it; he said it was not him - I called the beadle, and then took the boot up; the prisoner had got ten or twenty yards from the shop - he walked; no one but him could have dropped the boot.

WILLIAM PRESTON. I was standing opposite Mr. Cox's shop on the 28th of April - the gas-light was within a few doors; I saw a little scuffle between the prisoner and the witness - the prisoner threw the boot from him, and the officer took him.

THOMAS DEVEY. I am a constable. I was nearly opposite the shop - I took the prisoner, and have the boot; there was no other running.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Crutchedfriars - two young men stood by the door, and began to hustle me; one of them threw the boot down.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-131

1120. WILLIAM JOHNSON, alias RUMSEY , THOMAS PHIPPS , and GEORGE WILLIAMS , alias WALL , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Maynard , on the 10th of April , and stealing, 114 yards of silk, value 10l.; 12 yards of lawn, value 24s.; 36 yards of cambric, value 2l.; 2 pincushions, value 3s.; 2 silk-winders, value 8s.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 2 boxes of puzzles, value 1l.; 2 sets of whist-markers and boxes, value 1l., and 1 cash-box, value 1s., his property .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of James Toplis and another.

MR. BODKIN Conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT MAYNARD. I am proprietor of an out-fitting warehouse . I did live on Ludgate-hill, but about a fortnight previous to this transaction, I had removed to St. Paul's church-yard , to a house which has been parted off from the premises of Mr. Toplis, for the purpose of separate occupation - I occupied the first and second floors; the ground floor was under repair, and was to be occupied by Messrs. Toplis and Son - I enter by the front door, from which there is no direct communication with Mr. Toplis' premises; there is by a back stair case - I believe Mr. Toplis, Sen., Mr. Toplis, Jun., and their families reside there; I have seen them, and had communication with them.

COURT. Q. Do you know whether the Messrs. Toplis sleep there, or any of their family? A. I believe they do, but I do not know it certainly - I have been repeatedly in their premises; I had not seen any part of the premises fitted up as a dwelling-house - I had a servant slept in my part of the premises. On Saturday evening, the 9th of April, between seven and eight o'clock, I went abruptly out of the premises, and saw two persons looking up and watching the premises attentively - on seeing me they instantly turned, and walked away; that circumstance induced me to give some directions - I believe one of those persons was Phipps, the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do I understand you rightly, that you hire part of a house of Messrs. Toplis? A. Yes, the house is theirs; what I hire is a lodging, for the convenience of business - I pay no taxes, nor am I recognized as holder of the house at all; it is a private-contract between Messrs. Toplis and me; there is a communication from my premises to theirs.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You saw two persons, as you thought, looking attentively up at the house? A. Yes - they instantly walked away; one of them is not here, and I might be mistaken in the person of Phipps, having so superficial a sight of them.

JOHN OLIVE CHARLESWORTH. I am in the service of Mr. Maynard, and had charge of his warehouse in St. Paul's church-yard. On Saturday night, the 9th of April, I slept there, and left between ten and eleven o'clock on Sunday morning; I left the outer door on a catch-lock, and took the key with me - another young

man had slept there, but left early in the morning; I left no one there when I went out - I left all secure; I returned about half-past one o'clock, and opened the door with the key; I heard a noise, which appeared to proceed from the first floor - I went and got assistance at the next house; I just pulled the door too - the other door joins it within a quarter of a yard; I got the assistance of James Gunnis and Hamnett Hill' - we returned to the house, opened the door, and went in; I met johnson, the prisoner, coming towards me, within perhaps a yards of the door; he asked me if Mr. Williams lived there - I gave him no answer, but seized him by the collar as he attempted to go out, and so did Hill; he struggled desperately, but I did not leave his collar till Speechley and Rawlinson, the officers, came, which, I think, was near a quarter of an hour - I accompanied them in taking him to the Compter, leaving Smith, and subsequently Willmott, to mind the premises; Gunnis stood by the door -Hill had hold of Johnson at first, but when others came up he went for an officer: after I had been to the Compter I went on the premises - I found a number of articles strewed on the first floor, a crow-bar on the middle of the floor, and this black bag, with this one hundred and fourteen yards of silk, this cambric, this lawn, and these Indian trinkets, which are the property of Mr. Maynard - they are worth 16l., and had before been safely placed among Mr. Maynard's property; this bag is not Mr. Maynard's - the door of the first floor had been forced open, and there was a cash-box on the floor, which had been broken open; the premises are in the parish of St. Gregory, by St. Paul's.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Had you made any noise before you saw Johnson? A. No other than opening the door - not more than a minute had elapsed before I went back to the house; I know no person of the name of Williams lived there, because Mr. Maynard had the entire of that house, and Mr. Toplis had the premises adjoining - there is a communication between them; I had seen part of this property safe immediately before I went out - I am quite sure this same silk was on a table; I was out from between ten and eleven o'clock till half-past one.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What was found on Johnson? A. Two skeleton-keys and a phosphorus-box.

HAMNETT HILL. I am an apprentice to Mr. Hurlock, in St. Paul's church-yard. I went with Gunnis to the house, and saw Johnson coming down stairs - he asked if Mr. Williams lived there, and made a rush to the door: I laid hold of one said of his collar, and Charlesworth the other - he dragged us out, and got us twenty or thirty yards to the west, and while he did that I believe the other prisoners got down; he did not strike us, but strugglad very much.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He offered no violence? A. No, he merely struggled to get away.

THOMAS RAWLINSON I am a City-officer. On Sunday, the 10th of April, I was called to St. Paul's church-yard - several persons had hold of Johnson, and he was given to my care - seeing I was an officer, he said he would go with me; Speechley came up to my assistance; as we were going along Warwick-lane to the Compter, Johnson said, "It is no difference to you, I will give you a sovereign a piece to let me go;" I said, "We don't do business in that way;" he then said, as we went past the Three Jolly Butchers, "Let me have some beer;" I said he should have some at the Compter - he seemed to know what beer he should have there, and he made a rush, but we took him to the Compter; I found on him three skeleton-keys, two centre-pieces, and a phosphorus-box.

JOHN SPEECHILEY. I came up to the assistance of Rawlinson, and took Johnson - what he has stated is correct; he offered us two sovereigns to let him go - we took him to the Compter.

WILLIAM SMITH. I am in the employ of Mr. Benjamin Munday , a tea-dealer, in Old Broad-street. I was in St. Paul's Church-yard on the 10th of April, about twenty minutes to two o'clock - I was desired to look to Mr. Maynard's premises, but I did not see any persons come out.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you watch closely? A. Yes, for a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes - then the witnesses and the officers returned, and I went into the premises with them - I had seen no one come out, and when I went in no one was there.

THOMAS WALTERS. I live at No. 96. Watling-street. I was going up towards St. Paul's church-yard; I heard a hue and cry, and went forward - I saw Phipps, and he was taken at the corner of St. Paul's church-yard; I followed Williams, and saw him brought out of Paternoster-row by a gentleman, who said, "I have brought the prisoner;" the gentleman then let him go - I followed him, and saw him taken by Pocklington; when I first saw Phipps he ran past the end of Watling-street, into St. Paul's church-yard; Williams was with him - they were both running; I saw they were pursued, but there was no person running before them - I was going towards them, and if I had been soon enough I should have met them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Did one of the prisoners appear to be pursuing the other? A. They were so near that I could not tell; they were not on the same side of the street - I only noticed one person pursuing them, and he ran nearly in the centre of the street; he was some distance behind them, crying Stop thief! he was after those two persons - it is rather a populous place, but there were not persons about at that time; it was about half-past one o'clock - I have sometimes walked along there, and not met more than two persons; the moment Phipps was taken I ran on with the intention of pursuing Williams - a strange gentleman brought him back as far as Butler's, the chemist, and then let him go; I did not lose sight of him after he was taken - I walked behind him; any person might have taken hold of him.

MR. BODKIN. Q. How far did he walk? A.From Butler's to St. Paul's school, and then he was taken - I walked behind to prevent his escaping; I saw Phipps taken.

COURT. Q. Was Phipps one of the persons you saw? A. Yes; he came in a direction from Mr. Maynard's, about seventy or eighty yards from it - Williams and him were both running.

JAMES GUNNIS. I am in the employ of Mr. Hurlock. I was fetched by Mr. Charlesworth - I stood at Mr. Maynard's private door, and saw Williams and Phipps come out; I had not been there a minute scarcely when they came - I think Williams came out first; they went towards Watling-street, and one of them was going down Watling-street, but a gentleman held up his umbrella, and he turned

towards Cheapside - I saw Phipps taken; I never lost sight of him; they both ran, and I pursued about five yards behind them - after Phipps was stopped I followed Williams, and was about three yards behind him when he was stopped in Paternoster-row - I had only lost sight of him for a moment, as he turned the corner; a gentleman stopped him, brought him back, and then went away - I followed him as far as Mr. Newberry's door, where he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Where was Phipps taken? A. By Mr. Butler's door; I kept on after Williams - I saw no one pursuing them but myself; I was in the middle of the road - I saw Phipps taken, but I kept my eyes on Williams at the same time; Phipps did not turn any corner, but Williams did - I had not seen either of them before; I stood watching at Mr. Maynard's door, and I did not see any other person watching; I saw Johnson taken in the passage - he struggled outside, and then Phipps and Williams came down when he had got a yard or two from the door; the struggling was taking place when Phipps and Williams came out, but those persons, who had hold of Johnson, might not have seen them as he was struggling with them.

ROBERT POCKLINGTON . I am a butcher. On the 10th of April I was in Old Change - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran into St. Paul's church-yard; I saw Phipps coming into Watling-street - he turned, and went as far as Butler's door, where he was taken; Williams went on, and was brought back by a gentleman - he went as far as Mr. Newberry's door, and I took him; Gunnis said he had robbed a house - I said, "Why don't you take him?" he said, "I dare not;" I said, "Then I will" - I never let him go till I got him to the Compter; in going along the street, I saw him put his hand into his pocket and take out a centre-bit - as we passed the Old Bailey, he stopped down, and wanted to put it into a grating, and shoved me on the pavement, that I should not perceive it - I turned him on the pavement, gave it a kick, and a young man took it up; I went on to the Compter with him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Johnson going to the Compter then? A. Yes. but he was ten or twelve yards before him - I had fast hold of him; I saw him searched - nothing of a suspicions nature was found on him.

JOHN LASSETTER. I am ware house man to Mr. Stubbs. I saw Mr. Pocklington with Williams in custody - he dropped this centre-bit, and I took it up.

THOMAS SNELLING. I took Phipps on the 10th of April, at Mr. Butler's, in St. Paul's church-yard - I had not seen him more than a second before - he was running towards Paternoster-row; there was a person pursuing him, and raising an outcry - I took him to the Compter; the officer searched him in my presence - the stock of a centre-bit was found on him, and this cutter; this centre-bit, which Mr. Pocklington found, fits this stock.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 26.

PHIPPS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Of stealing only. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-132

1121. RICHARD JONES and THOMAS BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , 48lbs. of mutton, value 25s. , the goods of William Rutter .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Thomas Fitzgerald .

THOMAS FITZGERALD . I am a private-watchman , and live in Bridgewater-gardens. This mutton was in my care, in the shambles, in Newgate-market , on the 27th of April - it was in my care, and I have to make it good; I did not see it taken, but two young men came and said they met two men with some mutton in Fleet-street - it was between two and three o'clock in the morning; I got a light, and missed two quarters of mutton - there was between five and six stone of it; I saw it again at the watch-house.

BENJAMIN EASON . I am a watchman of St. Bride's. I met the two prisoners in Fleet-street, with this on their shoulders, and Brown shifted it on Jones' shoulder; I thought it not altogether correct - I got a man to assist in taking them to the watch-house; I believe they said they had brought it from a Mr. Strangefield, in Duke-street - we met a man with a truck, who asked if we knew of any meat being taken; we went to Newgate-market, and found Fitzgerald, who identified the mutton.

JAMES HARRISON. I am a night-officer of St. Bride's. The prisoners and the mutton were brought in by Eason - they said they came from, Duke-street with it, and they were going to Mr. Wases', to have it sold; I sent them to the Compter.

THOMAS FITZGERALD. I saw the mutton, and knew it by the marks corresponding with that left behind - I know it was what I had the care of; I saw it about one o'clock, and missed it between two and three, when the watchman came and asked if any was missing; it was marked in the same way as that I had in my care, scored and cut in the knuckle.

JURY. Q.Was it marked in any particular way? A. It is the general way that young Mr. Rutter marks them.

COURT. Q. You missed meat of that description? A. Yes; two hind quarters, and they had the same mark -I had no doubt of its being what I lot.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-133

OLD COURT. MONDAY, MAY 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1122. SUSAN RYDER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April , 2 rings, value 6s.; 1 pair of earrings, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 1 half-crown, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the property of Mary Beney ; and that she had been before convicted of felony .

MARY BENEY . I lodge in Brighton-street - Mr. Searl keeps the house; I have lodged there for two years. On the 21st of April I got into trouble about a quarrel, and was taken before a Magistrate - I procured bail, and returned home; the prisoner had been a servant in the house eight days; I had locked my door, and given her the key to take care of - I was absent from nine o'clock in the morning till nine at night, and on returning she was in bed; she gave me my key - I unlocked the door, and next morning I missed the articles stated in the indictment from a small box under the bed, which was unlocked; I suspected her, and at last charged her with it - she denied it; I informed Mrs. Pope, who lives in the house; I twice told the prisoner if she had any thing she

might go, but she denied all knowledge of it - Mrs. Pope searched her in my presence, and found concealed under her shift the handkerchief, and the other property in her bosom; I lost half a crown, which she acknowledged she had changed.

SARAH POPE . I lodge in the house. The prisoner was accused of stealing these articles - she denied any knowledge of them; I at last searched her, and found the ear-rings, two finger rings, half a crown, a shilling, and sixpence in her bosom, and the handkerchief pinned under her shift, round her waist.

THOMAS GOODYEAR . I am a Policeman. I asked Mrs. Pope to search the prisoner - I took the handkerchief myself from under her shift; she acknowledged having taken a 5s. piece and changed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE KNOX. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction (read) - I remember her being tried here, and gave evidence against her; I am sure she is the woman.

GUILTY . Aged 47. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310512-134

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

1123. JAMES THOMPSON and WILLIAM RICKETTS were indicted for an unnatural crime .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-135

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

1124. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 16th of April , at St. Pancras , feloniously and fraudulently did cut, tear, and get off, from a certain piece of parchment, the impression of a certain die which had been theretofore provided, made, and used in pursuance of a certain Act of Parliament, made and passed in the 55th year of the reign of His late Majesty King George the 3rd, intituled, "An Act for repealing the stamp duties on deeds, law proceedings, and other written or printed instruments, and the duties on fire insurances, and on legacies, and successions to personal estate upon intestacies, now payable in Great Britain, and for granting other duties in lieu there of," for denoting a certain duty, being one of the duties under the care and management of the Commissioners of Stamps, that is to say, a stamp duty of 25l. of lawful money of Great Britain, with intent fraudulently to use the same for or upon other vellum, parchment, or paper, against the Statute .

2nd COUNT, the same as the first, only for feloniously cutting, &c. from a piece of vellum, a certain impression(as in the first Count), with intent to use the same for and upon other parchment.

3rd and 4th COUNTS, like the first and second, only charging the intent to be to use the same for and upon a certain other piece of parchment chargeable with a certain duty, to wit, a duty of 25l., granted by the said Act of Parliament.

5th COUNT, that he feloniously and fraudulently did cut, tear, and get off, from a certain piece of parchment, a certain other impression of a certain die, which had been theretofore provided, made, and used in pursuance of the Statute in that case made and provided, for denoting a certain duty, being one of the duties under the care and management of the Commissioners of Stamps, that is to say, a stamp duty of 25l. of lawful money, with intent to use the same for and upon a certain other piece of parchment, contrary to the Statute in that behalf made and provided.

6th COUNT, the same as the fifth, only charging that he did cut, tear, and get off from a certain piece of vellum. MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL, with MESSRS. GURNEY, ALLEY, and SCARLETT conducted the prosecution.

JACOB JOSEPH. I am a quill-merchant, and live at No. 9, Suffolk-street East, St. Pancras. I have known the prisoner some years - he called at my house on Saturday, the 16th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, and requested me to purchase two skins of parchment of a law-stationer; he said he wanted to get them stamped to send into the country to his father, who is a lawyer, and lives at Axminster, in Somersetshire - I knew his father well; in consequence of this I applied to Mr. Nicole, of Carey-street, and procured two skins of parchment for him that evening, and after Mr. Nicole wrote the beginning of a deed, the words, "This Indenture" on them; I took them home - the prisoner came to my house about nine o'clock that evening, and I gave him the skins; he came to my house again on the Monday, and brought the skins with him - they had then each a 25l. stamp on them; he desired me to take them to a lawstationer in Chancery-lane, and sell them for him, as he said they were stamped wrong - they were too great an amount; I took the stamps to Mr. Nicole, and offered them to him for sale, or asked him to sell them for me - he went out to one place, came back, and said he could not sell them; I took them home again - I saw the prisoner again, and told him I could not sell them; I mentioned no name to him - he said, "I wish you would go out this evening, and try again to sell them, for I want the money;" I took them again to Nicole, and left them with him all night.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Did you ever deal in stamps before? A.Never; I never sold any, nor bought any - I never was in this Court before in my life.

HENRY NICOLE . I am a law-stationer, and live at No. 21, Carey-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields. On Saturday, the 16th of April, I recollect Joseph calling on me to procure two large skins of parchment for him, and I wrote on each of them in German text, the words."This Indenture:" I gave them to him - he came to me again on the Tuesday morning, to ask if I thought I could dispose of two 25l. stamps, and produced the two skins with a 25l. stamp on each - they were the same two as I had written on; I took them to Mr. Matthews, the law-stationer, and left them with him.

Cross-examined by MR. MANNING. Q. At what time on Saturday did he call on you? A.About nine o'clock at night.

CHRISTIAN GEORGE MATTHEWS. I am a law-stationer, and live in Castle-street, Holborn. I recollect Mr. Nicole coming to me with two skins of parchment on Wednesday morning, the 20th of April - they had each a 25l. stamp, and the words "This Indenture" was written on them; I said I would take them on allowing the usual discount - I took them to Mr. Duncan, of Carey-street; I observed that the parchment was not impressed under the blue stamped paper - the parchment had not received the impression of the stamp - that excited my suspicion, and I took them to the stamp-office.

WILLIAM TWYFORD . I am chief clerk in the office for the allowance for spoiled stamps. The prisoner was employed in that office as a junior clerk; spoiled stamps which are brought from the country with an affidavit are examined by me on Wednesdays and Fridays, and on the Saturday they are sent up stairs to the commissioners room, where I attend - I call the stamps over to a commissioner, who has the warrant before him; the stamps are then handed over by me to the junior clerk to cancel - the prisoner was the junior clerk on the 9th of April; it was his duty to cut the stamps off, and throw them into the fire, not to take the blue paper off the parchment.

Q. Is this the mode in which they are delivered?(handing the witness the corner of a sheet of parchment with the blue stamp upon it.) A. That is the mode in which he cuts them off, and he should throw them into the fire; there were two 25l. spoiled stamps allowed on the 9th of April - I know that by my own signature to this warrant (looking at it) - I have no doubt from that that two 25l. stamps were handed to him that day to be cancelled; I say so from my own signature to the warrant, and from the commissioner's signature to the warrant also - that was the first day, the prisoner had acted in that situation for some considerable time; he also attended on the 16th - there were no 25l. stamps that day.

Q. Did you receive of Mr. Matthews, on the 20th of April, any parchments? A. I received two from him; I cannot particularly recollect the day - those produced are them; the stamps on them are genuine, but not genuine on the parchment, because the impression would appear through if it had been impressed on the parchment - the impressions would appear on the other side, which they do not on either of these; I went with the officer to the prisoner's house twice, and the second time I went I found a gluepot under the bed.

Q. Did you look under the bed the first time? A. I might take a casual look; I suppose there was a fortnight between the first and second time - I did not lock the door of his room when I left it; there was glue in the pot- he was apprehended on the day we found the glue-pot.

Q. I thought you said it was on the second visit, which was a fortnight after, that you found the glue-pot? A. No; I consider that if these stamps were glued on the parchment they would appear as they do now.

Q. Are these blue paper stamps, in the course of business, ever impressed on paper? A. I think not, only on vellum or parchment, according to my remembrance.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. This warrant is an entry of stamps brought, to be allowed on Wednesday and Friday? A. Yes - it is an account of stamps allowed by me; it is the prisoner's writing, but has my signature to it - I sign, and the commissioner countersigns as the stamps are allowed; it was not usually, the prisoner's duty to cut off stamps - there was another clerk who should have done it, but he was ill, and had been away about a week: on the 9th of April the prisoner attended in his place - it was the prisoner's duty to cut off the stamps that were to be allowed, in order to their being destroyed, and it was his duty to put them into the fire.

Q.Did they go into another clerk's hands to do that? A. No - he was the person to do it.

Q. In cutting them off he did his duty, and in not putting them into the fire he omitted his duty? A. Yes; there is a private-mark on the die of the stamps, but I cannot distinguish one stamp from another, nor say that any one stamp produced is the very one the prisoner ought to have put into the fire that day; the power which impresses the stamp is a very heavy one.

Q. Can you say that it never may have happened, from any cause, that it failed to make the impression on the parchment? A. I cannot say that - when instruments come to be stamped the office gives the paper, and it is put on with glue.

Q. And, according to the thickness of the glue, the stamp may, or may not, fail to give the impression? A. Very likely - I do not consider myself capable of judging - I do not know what may be; I say such a thing may happen, but it is not in my department.

COURT. Q. The question is, whether that might arise from the quality of glue? A. I never experienced it -I always found, as far as my practice has gone, that it has always gone through; the stamps do not pass through my hands to the purchasers - that is quite a different department.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. The cancelled stamp comes in this form to the prisoner? A. No, he cuts it off- it is his duty not to take, the stamp off, but to cut it off, parchment and all, and throw it into the fire.

Q. If I find this on another parchment, it must have been taken off afterwards? A. Yes; I have no idea that the glue could prevent the impression going through.

ABRAHAM HINDS. I am supervisor of stamps in the Stamp-office. The stamps on these two skins of parchment are the stamps employed to denote the payment of duty under the 55th of George the 3rd; neither of them appear to have been stamped on these skins of parchment.

Q. Does it appear to you that they have been taken off some other skins? A. Yes; when the parchments are first sent in, the blue paper is attached to the skin by paste, and the skin will always bear the mark of the engine; the operation is performed by a fly-engine and a weight - it makes a very strong mark; I am sure these skins have never been under the engine in the office.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you been in the office? A.Fifteen years, and in the stamping-office four years; there were 25l. stamps before the passing of the 55th of George the 3rd - I certainly cannot swear that this may not be one of the stamps issued before the passing of that Act.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Have you got the Commissioners' book? A. Yes (producing it); here is an order of the commissioners made on the 18th of July, 1815 - it is signed by Mr. Kappen, the head secretary, who is now dead.

Stamp-office, London, 18th of July, 1815.

By the Commissioners - On taking into consideration the Act of the 55th year of His present Majesty's reign, cap. 184, lately passed and entitled (here followed the title of the Act),"It is ordered that impressions shall be forthwith struck in this book, of such of the stamps or dies heretofore provided, and now or late in use, for denoting the present or some former stamp duties, or the payment thereof, as are fit and proper to be used for the purposes of the said new Act.

W. KAPPEN, Secretary."

In pursuance of the foregoing order, the following impressions of stamps or dies now or late in use, for denoting the present or some former stamp duties, or the payment thereof, were struck in my presence, and in the presence of four Commissioners,

W. KAPPEN, Secretary.

Here followed impressions of the dies referred to, among which was that of the 25l. die in question.

22nd of July, 1815.

By the Commisioners. - Ordered, in pursuance of the aforesaid Act of the 55th year of His present Majesty's reign, cap. 184., that the stamps or dies, whereof impressions are struck in the ten preceeding pages of this book, shall be used for the purpose of expressing and denoting any of the duties granted by the said Act, of the same amount, with the former duties denoted by them; and for expressing and denoting the rate per cent. of the legacy duties, and the amount of the other percentage duties granted by the same Act, and for denoting or testifying the payment of certain stamp duties thereby granted, without specifying the amount in special cases, as occasion and the law shall require, And it is also ordered that two or more of the said stamps or dies, and of any new stamps or dies, which shall be provided, in pursuance of the said Act, shall be used for denoting the amount of any one duty granted by the said Act, as occasion may require, until a single stamp or die shall be provided for that purpose, save and except that the stamps or dies bearing the word receipt shall be used only to denote the duty on receipts, and that the stamps or dies, bearing the word policy shall be used only to denote the per centage duty on policies of insurance. And it is further ordered, that either of the stamps or dies before mentioned, which denote a duty o 10s., shall be used for the purpose of expressing and denoting the stamp duty of 10s. on licences for keeping stage-coaches, granted by another Act of the 55th of His present Majesty's reign, for repealing the stamp-office duties on stage-coaches, and on licences for keeping stage-coaches, now payable in Great Britain, and for granting new duties in lien thereof.

W. KAPPEN, Secretary.

MR. TWYFORD re-examined. Q. Will you look at these warrants - do you know from them any thing with regard to the time that the two stamps were issued which were given to him to be cancelled? A. No - stamps must be brought to the office within twelve months of the time of their being spoiled.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. But not within twelve months of the time of their being issued? A. No; if they kept them for twenty years before they were spoiled, they still would be allowed.

COURT. Q. If an instrument were brought which was fifteen years old, it might be allowed for? A. It would depend upon whether the stamp was taken under the existing Act of Parliament - for instance, a person might make a deed previous to the passing of the 55th of George the 3rd, and keep it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Using a stamp is what you would call spoiling it? A. If the deed were not executed or signed by any party; the Act directs that it shall be brought within twelve months of that time, but how long the stamp itself has been in existence the office does not inquire, and cannot know.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS, MANNING, and PHILLIPS contended that the offence as proved could not be construed to come within the meaning of the 55th of George the 3rd, c, 184, there being no evidence to show when the impressions of the stamps were made, and that they might have been in existence before the passing of the Act, consequently they could not have been provided under that Act, as alleged in the first four Counts of the indictment, and that the two last Counts were defective in point of law, as they did not allege the prisoner's intent to use them on other parchment liable to a stamp duty, without which liability no fraud could have been intended to the revenue - and, further, that the stamps having been taken off by the prisoner, in the execution of his duty, he could not, at the moment of the removal, have intended to impress them on another parchment, which was essential, to constitute the offence.

JURY to MR. HINDS. Q. Is it usual to have skins stamped before they are filled up? A. Yes, very frequently - it is the genral practice with skins which are to be sent into the country.

The Jury having retired, came into Court, and being asked the usual question, found a verdict of

GUILTY.

MR. JUSTICE BOSANQUET. Q. Gentlemen. allow me to ask whether you find that the impressions of the stamps in question were issued before the passing of the 55th of George the 3rd,(i.e.) 1815? FOREMAN. We have no means of ascertaining that, my Lord.

Q.Then you do not find that they were issued after that time? A. We do not, we cannot tell.

COURT. Then your verdict must be taken on the two latter Counts; now, are you of opinion that the impressions were detached with intent to be annexed to some other parchment, at the time when they were first cut off? A. We acquit him of any fraudulent intention at that time.

Q. Then, whether they were got off the slip of parchment after it was detached from the instrument, with intent to annex it to some other parchment? A.We find him Guilty of that.

Q. Are you of opinion that the impressions were taken off the former parchment with intent to annex it to the other skin of parchment destined to be used as an indenture? A. We find him guilty of that.

MR. JUSTICE BOSANQUET. The Jury acquit him of having a fraudulent intention to use the stamp at the time he first cut it off, but when he detached that from the piece of parchment, he did that with intent to make use of it.

FOREMAN. Yes.

GUILTY on the two last Counts . Aged 34.

This case is reserved for the consideration of the Fifteen Judges.

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18310512-136

1125. ROBERT JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Drederick Ludovig Casper Zacharius Hellmers , from his person .

D.L.C.Z. HELLMERS . I am a merchant , and live at East-Ham. I was coming to town last Monday morning, about a quarter-past ten o'clock, and between Petticoat-lane and Aldgate church , I felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket - on turning quick round I found it in the prisoner's hands; I thought I saw three or four persons of similar description to him about - I saw two suspicious fellows before, and two behind me, who, when I laid hold of the prisoner, walked with him almost all the way to the watch-house - they said nothing; I took the handkerchief from him, and kept it till I got to the watch-house; I then delivered it to the officer - having lost five or six within twelve months, about that particular spot, I had put

it very deep into my pocket; I am certain it did not fall out.

Prisoner. Q. When you turned round was I behind you, or had I passed you? A. No, you was at my side.

JOHN ALFRED CHALK . I am a bill-broker at 'Change-alley, and live at Mile-end. I was walking by the prosecutor's side - he turned suddenly round, and seized the prisoner by the collar, at the same time took a handkerchief from his hand; he charged him with stealing it - the prisoner said he had picked it up; I observed several persons about, but do not know that they were in his company - several low characters followed him to the watch-house, but did not interfere.

WILLIAM PLAISTOW. I am an officer of Aldgate ward. I went into the watch-house after the prisoner was there; he said he picked the handkerchief up - I searched him, and found two other handkerchiefs in his hat, and a piece of silk tied loosely round his neck.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it from the gentleman's pocket - I picked it up, and did not know who it belonged to till the gentleman collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310512-137

1126. JOHN CONNER and ELIZABETH PATTERSON were indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-138

NEW COURT. MONDAY, MAY 16.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1127. WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 1 watch, value 15s. , the goods of Joseph Burgess ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-139

1128. WILLIAM POPKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , 1 book, value 1s.; 2 allumetts, value 2s.; 3 sticks of wax, value 6d.; 9 cards, value 1d.; 1 half-crown, 4 shillings, and 7 halfpence, the property of Thomas De La Rue and others, his masters ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-140

1129. GEORGE PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Charles Wells , from his person .

MARY DONAHOUGH. I am a widow, and live in Field-lane. On the 24th of April I was in Chiswell-street - I saw Mr. Wells walking along with a lady; the prisoner was behind him - I saw him put two fingers of his right hand into Mr. Wells' left-hand coat pocket, and take a handkerchief out; he wrapped it round his hand, and went across a square - I told Mr. Wells, and pointed him out; I saw him taken.

CHARLES WELLS. I am a cutler , and live in Compton-street, Soho. On the evening of the 24th of April, I was in Chiswell-street - I saw the prisoner walking behind me- he afterwards touched my heel; I put my hand to my coat pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I turned, and saw the prisoner walking across the road, four or five yards from me; I followed him, and he was taken into custody: I saw my handkerchief found on him.

CHARLES WELLSTEAD . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner in Finsbury-square, about twenty minutes past seven o'clock; the prosecutor pointed him out - I found the handkerchief in his side pocket; he said he found it on the threshold of a door.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief on the threshold of a door, next to a pastrycook's - I took it up, seeing no one about; I carried it twenty yards, and blew my nose with it - I then put it into my pocket, and went to Finsbury-square; just as I got there the officer took me - a lad came to the station-house, and said I did not take the handkerchief, but he was told to keep out of the way.

MARY DONAHOUGH. I saw him use the handkerchief, and then put into his pocket - I am quite certain he is the man who took it.

CHARLES WELLSTEAD . There was a lad at the station, who stated that the prisoner did not take the handkerchief, but received it from another lad.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-141

1130. JOHN POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 1 pair of boots, value 15s. , the goods of John Brickell .

JOHN LOVICK . I am in the service of Mr. John Brickell, a pawnbroker , in Tottenham-court-road . On Wednesday, the 4th of May, about half-past six o'clock, I saw the prisoner in front of his shop; some top-boots hung outside - he appeared to lift down a pair; he walked away with them - I followed, and gave him in charge, with them in his hand.

Prisoner. Q. What were the boots hanging to? A. To the blind-iron; I did not take you at the time, because I thought you would strike me - you were taken in Rathbone-place; I kept him in view till I saw the Police-constable.

GEORGE JEFFERIES . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner with the boots in his hand, walking with them - it was between half-past six and seven o'clock; I saw the witness walking some distance behind, without a hat, and I stopped the prisoner, as I suspected he had stolen them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. These boots were on the pavement, between two shop-fronts - I took them up, and walked nearly a mile; I never offered to run.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-142

1131. JAMES PUZEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 coat, value 7s. , the goods of Charles Pitman .

CHARLES PITMAN. On the morning of the 13th of April I was at the Coach and Horses, in St. Martin's-lane , between one and two o'clock - there were several other persons there; the prisoner was one - there was a light in the room, and the waiter put it out; I had a coat under my arm, and a handkerchief round it - I felt the bundle pulled from under my arm; I mentioned it to the prisoner, who was then outside, in a watchman's dress; he said he knew nothing about it, so help him God, and there were nothing but bad characters in the house - I went out, found the Police-constable, and mentioned it to him -

the prisoner did not say any thing about any other person, man or woman.

Q. Recollect yourself, you have been examined before, did he not say who he thought had got it? A. No he did not.

JOHN RATTRAY . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty on the 13th of April, in St. Martin's-lane - the prosecutor spoke to me; I afterwards saw the prisoner come out of the public-house - I asked if he knew any thing about the young man's coat; he said he did not know any thing at all about it - that he had been in among a parcel of w-s and thieves, and if he had been robbed of his coat it must be among them; the prisoner is a private-watchman - I said it was very strange that a man should be robbed of his coat, and he be inside and not to know any thing about it; he said so help him God he knew nothing at all about it - I saw something projecting under his coat, and asked what he had there - he said Nothing; I said,"Come, Jemmy, let us look;" I unbuttoned his coat, and took out this bundle, with the prosecutor's coat in it, wrapped up in this blue handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the house - the prosecutor and one or two females had some gin; they wanted more, and the landlord refused to let them have it - they insisted upon having it; he put out the light, and said he would not serve any more - he came round to push them out; I opened the door, and picked up the coat - I thought I had a right to it, as there was another man there, and I did not know who it belonged to; when I came out the prosecutor was gone, and the Police-constable came and took me - I did not do it with intent to steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-143

1132. JAMES WILLIAM ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 1 ham, value 6s. , the goods of James Cane .

WILLIAM JONES. I am a Police-constable. I was on duty. in Oxford-street , on the 16th of April; I saw the prisoner near Mr. Cane's shop - he had two boys with him, and was there twenty minutes or more; I then saw the prisoner go towards the shop, put something into his apron, and run away - I followed, and took him into custody; I found this ham wrapped in his apron - he began to cry, and said he had picked it up in the street.

JAMES CANE . I keep an oil and ham shop in Oxford-street. The prisoner was brought in - I had seen a ham on a board at the door, shortly before; the officer then produced it - I knew it was mine: this is it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from the fields, and two boys, my play-mates, were with me - I picked this up wrapped in an apron.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-144

1133. JAMES SIMPSON and RICHARD WALKER were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 1 silver fork, value 9s., and 8 penny-pieces , the property of John Trossarelli .

ELEANOR TROSSARELLI. I am the wife of John Trossarelli ; he is on the Continent - I live at Highgate . I lost this property out of the kitchen, I believe, but I do not know.

MARY FREEMAN . I am servant to the prosecutrix. This fork laid on the kitchen side-board, opposite the kitchen stairs - the kitchen is under ground, and there is an area; we had used this fork on the 7th, and missed it on the 9th - I had seen the prisoner Simpson once, opposite our door; that was about three days before, breaking wood up - our house is in a row of others; on the 8th the two prisoners came, and brought some wood to our house - they went down the kitchen stairs; I missed the fork the next day, and went to the officer - there were no pennypieces.

THOMAS CHATTERLEY . I am an officer. I heard of the loss of the fork - I apprehended the two prisoners at Highgate, one on the 9th, and the other on Sunday morning -I took Walker first; I made him no threat or promise - I took Simpson on the Sunday, and he told me he had taken it; it was found at Mr. Goodman's, at Kentish-town.

CHARLES GOODMAN . I am a watch-maker and jeweller, and live at Kentish-town - we have a licence, which justifies us in dealing in plate. Walker brought this fork to me, and told me he had found it. while at work at Mr. Roberts, near the archway, in a field amongst the dust and ashes - I gave him 9s. 8d. for it; I went to the field, and found he had been working there - I saw the man be worked with; he gave a very clear account of it; I did not inquire till I found the prosecutrix had lost it - it weighed 1 oz. 19 dwts.; I have not such articles as these in my shop for sale.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Simpson's Defence. I picked it up in the yard, outside the door, and put it into my pocket - I showed it to Walker - he asked a man, who told him it was silver.

Walker's Defence. I saw Simpson with a heavy bundle of wood, and we took some to the prosecutrix's, who gave us 6d. for it - the maid could not lock the door; I tried, but could not do it - I then went to the locksmith's; when we came out Simpson said he had found this fork.

SIMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-145

1134. LAWRENCE SHANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 3 razors, value 3s.; 1 shaving-box, value 4d.; 1 shaving brush, value 2d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 1 chain, value 2s.; 1 seal, value 6d.; 1 hair-brush, value 1s.; 1 comb, value 4d.; 1 book, value 6d., and 1 halfpenny , the property of Elijah Farmer .

ELIJAH FARMER . I am a plumber and glazier - I lodge in Baker's-row, Mile-end-road ; I have been there four or five years. The prisoner came there about eight days before this happened - I believe he is a slippermaker; I went out between five and six o'clock in the morning, on the 13th of April - I left the prisoner there; he slept in the same room - my box was near the bed; it was locked - when I came home the hinges were nearly off, and I missed the articles stated out of it; the prisoner was then gone - I did not see him again till the 26th, when he was in custody at Worship-street; I have not found any of my property - he had given no notice of leaving; I expected him to come home in the evening.

MARY COBB . I am mistress of the house - the prose

cutor has been with me for years. The prisoner came there on the 1st of April, to lodge by the week - on the 18th he left without notice; about half-past seven o'clock after the prosecutor was gone, I heard him come down and shut the door - he never returned; he took away his night-cap and his property - the prosecutor complained of losing his property; I went the same evening to where the prisoner had told me I might have his address, No. 38, Great Garden-street - as I went up the steps I saw him at the window; I went into the passage - the room door was locked; I saw a young woman, who made a sort of stammor - I said I wanted the prisoner, and it was of no use denying it, for I had seen him; she then went into the back room, and said, "You had better come forward, she has seen you;" he then came forward, and I accused him of it - he denied it; I said, "The young man is at the corner of the street, and you had better go with me to him;" he went with me part of the way, and then ran away - my brother, who was with me, ran after him, but did not like to follow him further; we afterwards heard he was at No. 21, Baker's-row - we sent for him; he was denied, but the officer got him.

Prisoner. You said you would give charge of me. Witness. Yes, I did, and I would if I could have got an officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not run - the prosecutor's room door was wide open, and there was free access for any of the lodgers; I had not time to return to my lodgings - she came the same afternoon; I never did such a thing - I was at my father's house, and my sister told me she had come; she did not say she had seen me.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-146

1135. MARY STRINGER and SARAH SPICER were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 2 glasses, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Jones .

JOHN CHAPMAN . I keep a broker's shop in Playhouseyard. The two prisoners came to me on the 28th of April, between one and two o'clock - Spicer offered these two glasses for sale; I took one which appeared to have been recently used, and was very dirty - I wiped it with a cloth, and then saw the name on it; I sent word to the owner.

THOMAS JONES . I keep the Fountain and Still, in Golden-lane . I was sitting in my kitchen, a little before two o'clock, and Chapman sent to me - I had seen the two prisoners come to my bar before; they had a quartern of gin - a little girl served them; they wanted credit for it, which she refused, and they insisted upon her coming to ask me, which she did, as I was sitting at dinner - I said, "Certainly not;" she went back and told them - they said, "Never mind, we will pay for it," and I saw her chink the shilling;" they then went away - when I heard of this loss, I looked, and missed two glasses.

Cross-examined by Mr. CLARKSON. Q.What glasses are they? A.An ale glass and a rummer - the rummer has my name on it.

EDWIN HARDWICK . I am a Police-constable. I received the prisoners in charge.

STRINGER - GUILTY . Aged 32.

SPICER - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-147

1136. EDWARD TAYLOR and EDWARD BLAKE were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Henry John Morgan , from his person .

HENRY JOHN MORGAN . I am a solicitor , and live in Lincoln's Inn. On the morning of the 18th of April, about eleven o'clock, I was going to a chapel in Regent-street - I was asked if I had lost my handkerchief; I felt, and said I had - I knew I had had it half an hour before; I have seen it since - I had not seen the prisoners near me.

WILLIAM BOOTHMAN . I am a special-constable. On Sunday morning, the 18th of April, I saw the two prisoners following the prosecutor in Lisle-street - they were within two yards of him; I watched them - they walked from there to Sydney's-alley ; there Taylor put him hand into the prosecutor's pocket, took out a red handkerchief, and handed it to Blake, who was close by him - he put it into his pocket; they turned down Sydney's-alley - I spoke to the prosecutor, and followed them; they saw me, and took different directions - I told the Police-officer to follow Blake, and I followed Taylor; he was stopped, but he told the people it was about a broken window, and they let him go - I knew him, and took him again.

Taylor. I have witnesses to prove I was not out. Witness. He said in going along that he had been out all the morning, and at the office he said he had not.

Blake. He and the Policeman have been bothering the people to tell me to plead guilty, and then to send in a petition. Witness. The friends have been with me, the prosecutor, and the Police-officer, wanting us to withdraw or to do what we could; I said we could do nothing, that the case I considered was clear against them - and if they pleaded guilty they might get off with a more lenient punishment.

HENRY CURTIS . I am a Police-constable. I saw Blake come from Tower-street, and turn up another street - he made a stop, looked round, took this handkerchief from his bosom, and threw it into a hole in an empty house; I followed and took him there - I came back and took up the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BLAKE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-148

1137. WILLIAM TOMKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 2 pairs of boots, value 1l. , the goods of Daniel Nash .

THOMAS HARRIS . I am in the employ of Mr. Daniel Nash - he lives in the Strand . On the 7th of May I saw the prisoner come into his shop - I was in the counting-house, and watched him - I saw him take one pair of boots from one side of the counter, and the other from the other; he walked out of the door - I followed; he saw me, and put them down on the area; I took them and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Charing-cross, and before I got to the shop, he came and accused me of taking the boots - they were in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years

Reference Number: t18310512-149

1138. JAMES VEITCH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 10 lbs. of figs, value 4s. , the goods of Robert Godfrey .

ROBERT GODFREY . I am a grocer , and live in Union-street, Old Artillery-ground . On the 29th of April I was at the back of my shop, behind some shutters, through which there was an aperture, and I saw the back of a boy going out of the shop - I went out directly, and saw the prisoner and another boy; the prisoner had a drum of figs with him - I went after him, and took the figs; I then missed them from my shop - I had never seen him before; I do not know what had become of his companion.

Prisoner. I was coming down Union-street, inquiring for work, and a boy, rather taller than myself, said to me,"Hold this," I did so, and the gentleman came and took me. Witness. The other boy was about the same size as the prisoner, but he had a lighter coat on - I think this was the boy I saw in my shop: when I first saw him he was about forty or fifty yards from my house, and I took him about one hundred and fifty yards off.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-150

1139. GEORGE WARDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 17 loaves of bread, value 6s.; 1 basket, value 5s., and 1 piece of baize, value 1d. , the goods of David Wyman .

THOMAS BLAND . I am in the service of Mr. David Wyman , a baker , who lives in Crawford-street. On the 14th of April I was out with two baskets of bread, in Park-street, Grosvenor-square - I left them for a few minutes, and when I returned, the large basket, and the bread which it had contained, was gone; I had seen the prisoner loitering about before - I looked for him, and found him in a shop in St. Giles', where he was taking the bread out of the basket and putting it on the counter, in a kind of chandler's shop; I went in, and accused him of stealing my basket and bread - he turned round, rushed out, and knocked my hat off; I followed him, and took him by the collar - we both fell down; he got up and ran away - I ran after him, and a great many people pursued. but they would not stop him; they got before me, and stopped me - he turned down George-street, and the Policeman stopped him.

RICHARD LANGLEY . I keep a chandler's shop. The prisoner came in between one and two o'clock, as I was serving three customers - I had never seen him before; he put the basket down, and sat down on it - when I had served my customers, I asked if it was cheap bread, (I sell stale and damaged bread), and while he was taking it out, the witness came in and claimed the bread; he ran out, they had a struggle, and fell down - I went out as soon as I could get round.

Prisoner. I was going past, another man and you came and asked me if I had any bread. Witness. No -I was serving some potatoes at the time; I did not buy the bread, neither should I, for I examined it, and found no fault with it.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-151

1140. MARIA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 gown, value 7s., the goods of John Burgess ; and that she had been before convicted of felony .

EDMUND HARDING. I am an officer. I was passing Mr. Burgess' shop, - he called me in, and gave charge of the prisoner.

WILLIAM BIRD. I am in the employ of Mr. John Burgess , a pawnbroker , in Old-street-road . I was behind the counter on the 9th of April - I saw the shadow of some person; I came round and saw the prisoner in the act of putting this gown into her apron - I took her with it; I had seen it safe two minutes before.

Prisoner. I did not take it down - I met my sister; we were both at the door, and my sister took this gown and looked at it; when she saw him coming, she threw it on my arm and ran away; he came and took me. Witness. There was another person at the door, who got away.

GEORGE OSTERMAN . I have a certificate of the conviction of Maria Swinchett , on the 8th of July last, which I got from Mr. Clark's office (read) - I attended, and know the prisoner is the person who was convicted by that name.

GUILTY . Aged 16 - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310512-152

1141. LAURA WHITTAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., the goods of Henry Marshman ; 1 shirt, value 3s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; 1 knife, value 6d.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s. , the goods of James Ewington .

HENRY MARSHMAN . I live in Mr. Gray's livery stables, Grosvenor-mews . On the 17th of April, about eleven o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in Regent-quadrant - she asked leave to go home with me; I said she might if she liked, and we went to the mews, where I lodge - we went to bed in the room over the stable; I had given her half a crown, and she gave me 5d. out - I went to sleep, and did not awake till the Policeman awoke me; I then missed a pair of trousers, two handkerchiefs, and a pair of stockings of my own - the other property was also gone, but I did not miss them then; that belonged to James Ewington , who lodged there, but did not sleep there that night - he gave me the key to go there.

JAMES SCANLAN . I am a Police-constable. I fell in with the prisoner in Burlington-gardens, with these goods in her apron - I suspected her, and took her.

JAMES EWINGTON . These other articles are mine - I did not sleep there that night; they were in my care.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me to go with him, which I did, and the Policeman gave us a light - when I got up stairs I asked him for my money; he gave me half a crown, and I went to bed with him - he then said, if I did not give him the half-crown he would say I had robbed him; I said I would not, and he forced it out of my hand - I got out and went to the night-house; he came after me, and had some rum and ale - I then went back with him; when he went to sleep I looked into his pockets, but could not find any money.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-153

1142. THOMAS FOREMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 6 deal boards, value 30s., the goods of Benjamin Dixon , his master .

MR. BODKIN conducted the posecution.

JOSEPH BEAL . I am a Police-constable. On the morning of the 9th of April, at half-past five o'clock, I was on duty in the East India-road, near North-street turnpike, about a quarter of a mile from Stinkhouse-bridge - I saw the prisoner, who ran away; I had not said any thing to him, but I pursued and took him into custody - I asked him about some tools, as I was looking for a man who had stolen some; he said he had a boat load of deals in the canal which he was going to deliver to a person of the name of Baxter, and he had brought them from a Mr. Bainbridge, near Deptford - I asked him at which end he came into the dock, as there are two entrances; he said Limehouse end, and he got there between eight and nine o'clock at night - (I suppose the Friday night, the night before) - he said it had been lying in the lock the whole of the night; I asked him to show me the boat - he took me to it, and I found in it six twelve feet deals - I asked him what time they had been put into the boat, and he said between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; I said that was impossible, as there had been a great deal of rain the day before - it rained all day, and I do not think it ceased till near ten at night; the top deals in the boat were dry, and the lower ones wet - I afterwards discovered that he was in the employ of Mr. Dixon - I had, for another reason, searched that lock at eleven o'clock the night before, and there was no boat of that description in it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you search every boat? A.There was not a boat there - there were two barges; I will swear there was no boat, and I said so before the Magistrate - Baxter was brought to the station-house after the prisoner was there; I did not hear him say to Baxter that he had brought six deal boards from Mr. Bainbridge - Baxter said he expected some that day - the prisoner did say it was on account of a man named Rogers; I tried to find Rogers, and he absconded - the prisoner did not tell me where Rogers and Baxter lived.

STEPHEN STROUD . I keep the lock, at the entrance of Limehouse-cut; I was there on Friday night, the 8th of April, and remained till five or six o'clock on the Saturday morning - no boat, with deals in it, passed that night; I know the prisoner, and am sure he did not pass.

BENJAMIN DIXON . I am a timber-dealer , and live in the Commercial-road , in the County of Middlesex. The officer came to me and said he had stopped one of my men under very suspicious circumstances - I looked, and missed some deals - I had bought three hundred twelve feet deals a short time before; I had no mark on them - they stood up on end against the warehouse: I missed some, but I cannot say how many; I looked at the ground, and saw that some deals had been removed - they had been pitched on end on some ground which had been garden ground - the rain had washed up the ground against the deals, and some of them had been removed, because the ground was dry on which seven or eight might have stood, or more or less, I cannot say how many - the officer showed me some deals; I looked at them - one end of them was wet, and I concluded they had stood against the warehouse; I compared one deal in the boat with one against the warehouse, and the dirt corresponded exactly - I have no doubt they are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. How is it, if you have no doubt, that you will not swear positively that they are yours? A. I swear to the best of my knowledge; do not let me swear to what I bought in a lump, and never marked - it is a difficult thing for a person conscientiously to swear to such things; Rogers was in my employ at that time - I believe he has absconded; I have employed the officers to search for him - the prisoner had been four years in my employ; I had a good opinion of him up to this time - I had sold some of those deals, but none uncut.

COURT. Q.Am I to understand that upon directing your attention to the spot you missed some? A. Yes - the dirt on the boards at home, and that in the boat tallied, and the quality appeared the same - I believe they were mine; the prisoner was my lighterman.

Prisoner's Defence. I met Rogers at a quarter-past five o'clock - he asked me if I could lend him a pair of sculls to row the boat; I said Yes - I took the sculls, went down, and found this boat, with six deals in it; I put the sculls in, and he lent me a hand to row it - when I got to the Stinkhouse-bridge I made it fast, and he got out - he said he was going to four houses near the bridge; I waited a quarter of an hour, but he did not return, and I went to see if he was gone to the four houses - I looked up the road, and saw two Policemen, who had a barrow, with some cooper's tools in it - directly they came to the turnpike-gate they saw three more men, and they asked them why they did not come to their assistance when they heard the rattle spring; they said they heard no rattle - they then said they had better go down the lane and look for another man - I was in the lane, and turned to see if Rogers was gone to look for Baxter, to buy those deals, as he said he was; I passed the Policeman, and then walked on to look for Rogers - the Policeman then came to me, and asked what knowledge I had of that man that was collared in the East India-road; I said None - he said he thought I had, as there were two men in the robbery; I said I had no knowledge whatever of him - he said he thought I must be the man, or why should I be there - I said I had a boat with six deals in it, and I showed it to him; he asked where I brought them from - I said from the lock-gate, and the man who had employed me brought them from Bainbridge's the night before, between nine and ten o'clock, which was what he told me; the prosecutor always gave me leave to earn 1s. if I could, either in the day or night - I had 18s. a week of him.

MICHAEL HENESSY . I am a labourer, but I was in the Police-force on the 9th of April. I attended before the Magistrate, on the part of the prosecution, and gave evidence - I have been subpoenaed here to-day. I saw the prisoner in the place which he has described - I did not speak to him the first time, but I took him afterwards, and asked if he had any knowledge of some tools which I heard had been lost; he said he had no knowledge of the tools, he had a boat laden with deals, and if I would go with him he would show them to me - he said they came from Mr. Bainbridge's, over the water, and a master carpenter had employed him, but he did not know his name - he said he was a master carpenter, and lived at Limehousecut, but he could not exactly tell me where; I had but

very little knowledge of the prisoner before - I may have seen him; I was not bound over, in consequence of the misunderstanding the Magistrate had of my discourse - he thought me not fluent in speech; my superior officer frowned and winked on me that I could not get on; I took a memorandum of the Magistrate's name, but being discharged I threw it away.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you see the prisoner run that morning? A. No, Sir - he did not run, he kept on a regular pace, quite slow; he kept on the same pace as when I first saw him - he did not keep the road, he turned over the fence to the Eel Pie-house.

COURT. Q.What do you mean by a regular pace? A. He was going about three miles and a half or four miles an hour - I was discharged from the Police, as my superior officer made a report that I was not fluent in speech, to explain myself before the Magistrate, on this very charge.

JURY to MR. DIXON. Q.Had you any customer of the name of Baxter? A. No - I never knew any thing of him; I know Mr. Bainbridge is a repectable merchant.

GUILTY . Aged 34. See page 574.

Reference Number: t18310512-154

1143. JOHN BALL was indicted for embezzlement .

JOSEPH MAY . I am a baker , and live at Ratcliff-cross . The prisoner was in my employ for two years and a half, as a journeyman baker - he was entrusted to receive bills for me, and he paid me the money for them. On Monday, the 25th, or Tuesday, the 26th of April, I sent him out with bread, and he did not return; I took him two days afterwards myself - he had given no notice; if he had received a bill it was his duty to bring the money to me.

SARAH BODINGTON . I have bread of the prosecutor. I paid the prisoner 10s. on Tuesday, the 26th of April, for his master - he did not give me any receipt, but said it would be settled next morning.

ELIZA BIRD. I live with my mother - she had bread from the prosecutor. I paid the prisoner 1l. 18s. 6d. on the 26th of April; I had the bill - the prisoner cannot write, but he made a mark on it.

THOMAS SHIRLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

MR. MAY. He never paid me these sums of money - I never had reason to complain of any serious charge against him, but lately he has got associated with some very bad chaps - I believe he has been led into this, and I should rather think, by what he states, that the 1l. 18s. 6d. was received and handed over to the man who was taken with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not receive the 1l. 18s. 6d.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-155

1144. GEORGE EMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 3 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 4 shirts, value 5s.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 1l.; 2 pairs of gaiters, value 8s.; 1 jacket, value 2s.; 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s. 6d.; 2 night-caps, value 6d., and 1 cloth bag, value 3d. , the goods of George Wood .

GEORGE WOOD. I was at Mr. Bird's, the Bowl and Castle, Oxford-street , in the beginning of April - I had met with the prisoner at Market Harborough, and came up from there with him - he took me to Mr. Bird's, and said,"Here, grandfather, take care of this boy's bundle, as I am going to take him a lodging;" he said, "It will be very safe, put it under the table;" the prisoner then took me to another place, and said, "Don't you go out, you will be lost;" I waited, expecting him to return, but he did not - I walked about all day, and at last I found his grandfather's; I said to Mr. Bird, "Let me shift my clothes" - he said, "Have you seen George? he has fetched your clothes;" I had not known the prisoner till I saw him come from Market Harborough.

WILLIAM BIRD. I am the prisoner's grandfather. The prosecutor left his bundle there, and the prisoner came and took it away the second day afterwards; he said he came for it for Wood - I said, "Are you going to take it to him?" and he said Yes - I do not know what became of the clothes; the prisoner's father lives in London.

GEORGE LOWTHER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a boy's jacket, pawned by the prisoner, on the 5th of April.

JOSEPH PIERCE . I live at Mr. Baxter's, a pawnbroker. I have a pair of breeches, pawned by the prisoner.

ROBERT ISAACSON . I took the prisoner, and went to the pawnbrokers with him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-156

1145. ELLEN FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 1 bonnet, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Susannah Mytchington .

SUSANNAH MYTCHINGTON . I am a widow , and keep a little second-hand shop in Orchard-street, Westminster . -On the 16th of April the prisoner came and asked if I had a cheap handkerchief, and I sold her one for 1 1/2d.; she then asked if I had any cheap bonnets - I said I had some at the cleaner's; she waited, and tried one on - I was called to another person, and in a moment the prisoner was gone; I looked, and missed a bonnet - I looked out, and she had got on twenty or thirty yards; I sent a little boy to tell her to come back, and she did - she said she was going to take it to a person to look at it; she had it in her hand, and appeared to have something which she was going to cover it with.

Prisoner. I am an apprentice , but my friends do not know that I am here.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-157

1146. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

RICHARD HAWKES I am a Policeman. On the 3rd of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Old-street , and saw the prisoner and another lad in company; I followed them, and saw them very close to a gentleman; the prisoner drew this handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, and put it inside his breast - I crossed, and asked what he had got; he said a handkerchief, which he was going to pawn, and immediately an attempt was made to rescue him - his brother came up, and asked what I was going to do with him; I said I had seen him take the handkerchief - the gentleman got away in the direction of Hackney-road; the prisoner would have been taken from me if a person had not come to my assistance.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and a boy asked me to pawn the handkerchief - he said he would give me 2d.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310512-158

1147. THOMAS HUSBAND was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 2 sovereigns, and 2 shillings , the monies of John Neat .

JOHN NEAT. I am a servant to Joseph Overbury , Esq., of Mecklenburgh-square. On the 14th of February I was going down Holborn, about three o'clock in the afternoon - the prisoner, who was a stranger, tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if I wanted to buy some cigars, as he had some very cheap; I said I would go and look at them - he took me to the Blackamoor's Head, in Beauchamp-street, Leather-lane, which is now called the William the Fourth ; he showed me to a little parlour - I saw a person there, who was his companion; he addressed him as if he knew him - I did not see any cigars; they said they had a large quantity, but not unpacked; the prisoner showed me some calico, which he said was real holland and worth 5l. at least - he swore twice so help him God it was real holland; his companion said the same, and that they had brought it from Holland - the prisoner gave me his address on this piece of paper (read) - "Captain John Stokes ' ship, Tooley-street, Borough;" the prisoner said he was captain of a vessel, and he had brought this from Holland - I said I would have it, provided it was worth the money, and I was to take it to some friends to have it valued - I asked one of them to go with me; they said they would not go with me, but I must leave a deposit - I am quite sure I offered that one of them should go with me, but they said I must leave a deposit, and they named two sovereigns - I should have said, that when I first went in I said I had no money in my pocket, but they said if I went away I should not return, and I must leave 1s. as a deposit - I at last left two sovereigns, which I put into the prisoner's hand, and went out to make inquiries about it; they said they would let me have it for 2l. 10s., as I was a servant - I took it home, showed it to the cook and lady's-maid, and it turned out to be only calico, worth about 6d. a yard - the prisoner said there were twenty-eight yards of it, but I found it only twenty-two; I went back to the house, and took the holland with me - the landlord said they had left the house directly after I had left it; I have never seen my sovereigns since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you smoke? A. Yes, I smoke tobacco in general - I thought I was buying real holland; I meant nothing but honesty - I did not ask if they had paid the duty; they did say they were smuggled, but this was not smuggled; if I had found it was real holland I should have thought it had been smuggled, and I should have laid an information; at least I could have done so - I should not have thought of buying any thing smuggled; they told me it was smuggled, but their word was not to be taken - I went out, because I was no judge of it; I did not know whether it was smuggled - they swore three or four times that it was real holland; I had an idea of laying an information.

JOHN BLINCOWE. I keep the William the Fourth, in Beauchamp-street, Leather-lane. On the 14th of February some persons were at my house, and I believe the prisoner was one, but I should not have known him if I had met him in the street - my bar is on the right-hand side on entering the door - I should not have remembered the prosecutor if he had not come back again with the piece of cloth under his arm, and said he had been taken in - I had seen him before in company with two men, and I really believe the prisoner was one, but I could not swear it; the men went away soon after the prosecutor did; perhaps in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, not more certainly.

Prisoner's Defence. The fact is, this man bought the cloth of me, and paid me the money for it - I told him it was worth 5l.; he considered it was worth that, and he promised to buy three pieces more, should it turn out as I represented it - I gave him my direction; I did not say I was the captain, but I said a person would meet him at that house - it was a bona fide transaction.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-159

1148. THOMAS HAZEL and THOMAS PARKER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a building within the curtilege of the dwelling-house of Samuel Guest , on the 7th of April , and stealing 3 live tame fowls, price 7s., and 12 live tame rabbits, price 20s., his property .

EDWARD CALVAN. I am a Police-constable. On the 9th of April I was on duty at a quarter before five o'clock in the morning, at Limehouse, near half a mile from Mr. Guest's - I saw the prisoners in company, and each of them had a bundle; I went up, and asked what they had there - they made no answer, but went on; I followed them, and asked them again - they said it was nothing to me; I said I insisted upon seeing - Hazel said,"You shall not," and he said what he had got was his own - I said I would insist upon seeing what they had, and Parker said, "Oh, show him;" they then put the things down against a brick wall, and Hazel began to speak to Parker - I went to the river-ride, and sprang my rattle; I came back, and saw in the bundle some saws and cooper's tools - I went back to the river, and sprang my rattle again lustily; they then each of them ran at me with a cooper's adze in their hands - they struck me on the head several times, and broke my hat down; I cried Murder! a woman opened a window, and she cried Murder! the prisoners ran off; I pursued them, they returned, struck me again, and Parker struck me with a long pole; they then got over a high bank - Hazel stood under the bank, and Parker went across the field; I followed him some distance, and pointed to a man to take him - the man came up, but was afraid to take him; I went up to Hazel; he turned with the adze in his hand, and held it up to me - I told him he had better submit, it would be all the better for him; he cast his eyes down for a moment - I sprang forward, and took hold of him; I took him back to where the tools were; the inspector afterwards went to the prisoner's house with me - we there found eight rabbits, but no fowls.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Who did you find at home? A. Nobody; the people told me the house belonged to Hazel.

AARON GORMAN . On the 9th of April I heard the

rattle sprung on Britannia-bridge - I went up, and saw Parker running first, and Hazel after him; I went to the house afterwards, but I do not know, of my own knowledge, who occupied it.

BENJAMIN WHIFFEN . I apprehended Parker at Bray, in Essex, on the following Sunday evening.

RICHARD NEWMAN . I know the prisoner by living at the house, which the officer searched - I live at the public-house, close by.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.How far do you live from the house? A. Not far; it is at No. 3, Cut-side, Limehouse - I was not there when the house was searched; I do not know whether it is a lodging-house - I have taken beer there, and saw Parker there.

AARON GORMAN . The house this witness describes was the one we searched.

JAMES ROGERS . I heard the rattle spring, and saw the two prisoners; I can swear to them both.

SAMUEL GUEST . I live at Limehouse , and keep rabbits and fowls, in a shed in my yard - it is surrounded by paling about four feet high, and this shed leaned against the wall on the other side my yard, but it is the same yard where my dwelling-house is. I went to bed about ten o'clock on the 6th of April - I had locked the shed, and my fowls and rabbits were all secure - when I got up in the morning I found the shed broken open, and the staple drawn out of the door-post - I missed three fowls and twelve rabbits; I afterwards saw the eight rabbits the officer produced, and knew them - here is one I can swear to.

Parker's Defence. I am a poor hard working young man - I used to work for Mr. Horner, a coal-merchant; I know nothing of this.

HAZEL - GUILTY . Aged 45.

PARKER - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were two other indictments against the prisoners.

Reference Number: t18310512-160

1149. GEORGE MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , 1 tea-caddy, value 18s. , the goods of Benjamin Coote .

BENJAMIN COOTE . I live in London-street, Fitzroy-square - I keep a broker's-shop . I lost this caddy from a side-board, but was not at home when it was taken.

MICHAEL DRISCOLL . I am a Police-constable. On the 19th of April I was passing Charlotte-street, and saw the prisoner running by me with something in his apron - I asked what he had got; he said a caddy, which he got from home - I took him and the caddy; I went to several shops, and found the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-161

1150. JOHN HANNAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Robert Allen , from his person .

THOMAS FARRANT. I saw a gentleman, who gave his name as Robert Allen, standing at the corner of Oxford-street - the prisoner and another boy went behind him; the other took this handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket, and gave it to the prisoner; I made a grasp at them - I took the other, and gave him to the gentleman; the prisoner got away - I pursued, and took him in Crown-street, but he had thrown the handkerchief away; - the gentleman has now gone to Scotland.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from work - the handkerchief was thrown to me, and I ran away.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-162

1151. GEORGE MESSER and ROBERT LAKE were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 5 live tame fowls, price 20s. , the property of Charles Eden .

CHARLES EDEN. I live at Ealing , and am a baker . I missed five live tame fowls on the 17th of April - the lock of the hen-house door was broken, and the heads of the fowls were twisted off and left in the hen-house; - I knew both the prisoners - Messer is a carpenter , and the other a labourer ; I took the heads of the fowls to the Police, and told them what had happened - they afterwards came and said they had got the fowls; I saw them, and knew they were mine.

THOMAS AXFORD . I am a Police-constable. I received information, and went to Messer's house - I knew where he lived: he was not at home, but I found a jacket with some spots of blood on it, which Messer had worn the previous evening - I found no fowls there, but I went to Phillips', and asked if Messer and Lake had been there the night before; he said they had - I said I must search his house; he said I might - I went into a little bed-room, turned up some pavement, and found three fowls without their heads; they seemed recently killed - I took them out, and afterwards took the prisoners.

WILLIAM THOMAS HALL . I am a Police-constable. I searched Messer's bed, and found this jacket, with the spots of blood on it - I then went to Phillips', where Messer had been seen at eleven o'clock the night before, and under another part of the room I found two fowls.

GEORGE WATE. I saw the two prisoners bring the fowls into Phillips' house, when I was having a pint of beer there, as I went home from work.

MESSER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

LAKE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-163

1152. JOHN PEDRO was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Henry Drake , from his person .

HENRY DRAKE . I am a coach-maker . I was in Artillery-court, Chiswell-street , on the 11th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon - I felt a tug at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner draw his hand from it; I seized his left hand, and said he had a handkerchief of mine - the officer came up and asked what he had done; I said he had got a silk handkerchief of mine - he seized him, and he dropped it.

WILLIAM HIGGINS. I am a commercial traveller. I saw the prisoner seized, and drop the handkerchief.

WILLIAM SMITH. I am a constable. I saw the prisoner move the handkerchief from his left hand into his right - he then dropped it from beneath his coat; I received him from the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at a mob of people and this gentleman turned all at once, and accused me of

picking his pocket - he asked if I had his handkerchief; I said No - I was putting a few halfpence into my pocket at the time; the constable then came, and asked what was the matter - he said, "I have lost my handkerchief;" he then let me go, and in about half a minute he came and took me again - the prosecutor put his handkerchief into his pocket, went out, and came in again with this other gentlemen, and he said he saw me drop it.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-200

1153. JAMES ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Squire , from the person of Edward James Pritchard .

EDWARD JAMES PRITCHARD . I am a little more than eight years old - I know I must speak the truth; I live with my father-in-law, John Squires , in Worship-street. I was near Hoxton , between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 25th of April - I had a handkerchief tied round my neck; on a sudden I felt it taken off - it was tied in front; it was not untied - I was walking along; I saw the prisoner running away, and I cried Stop! he had my handkerchief in his hand, and put it into his breast.

ROBERT HAYFORD . I heard the cry of Stop thief! - I came out of my house, and saw the prisoner running; he got over a fence eight feet high - I followed, and took him in East-road; I found the handkerchief in his breast pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief was thrown at me.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18310512-164

1154. LOUISA SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 pair of fire-tongs, value 10s., and 1 shovel, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Harrison .

ELIZABETH SHADWICK . I keep a broker's shop, in Upper Rosoman-street. On the 19th of April the prisoner came and offered a shovel and a pair of tongs for sale - I asked what had become of the poker; she said,"Me and him (I suppose she meant her husband) have had some words, and he threw it out of the window;" I said I thought they were not hers - she said if I would give them to her she would fetch the person; I said, No, I would detain them, and she might go for the person - she went out very quick; I thought it was not all right, and I took them to the Police-constable.

THOMAS MORRIS . I am a Police-constable. I have had the goods ever since.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a fire-iron maker , and live in Coppice-row . The prisoner is a neighbour of mine - her conduct has been examplary for many years, but lately she has given herself up to drink; she has three children, and the youngest is now at death's-door with the small-pox - I missed these irons from a box.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310512-165

1155. HENRY SEWELL was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM GEDDES . I am a baker , and live in Edward-street, Portman-square . The prisoner was in my service, and had been employed to receive money occasionally and bring it to me - Mrs. Hunt is a customer of mine.

MARY HUNT . I am a laundress at chambers, and live in Duke-street. I had my bread of the prosecutor, and owed him some bills, which I produce, but really cannot say when I paid them; I have no idea when it was, or in what month.

MR. GEDDES. The prisoner left me in consequence of a few words, and I afterwards discovered this.

MARY HUNT . I cannot at all state when I paid the bills.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-166

1156. HENRY SEWELL was again indicted for embezzlement , on the 27th of July .

MARY HUNT . I paid the prisoner some bills, but I cannot say when.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-167

1157. MARY WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 1 silver watch, value 3l. , the goods of George Law .

GEORGE LAW . I drive Mr. Wilberforce's cart - he lives in the Edgware-road. On Sunday, the 10th of April, I was taking a walk, and met the prisoner in Brown-street - she made a catch at me, but I went on; in an hour afterwards I was coming down the road - I saw her again; I then went with her - I gave her 6d., which was all the money I had; I did not miss my watch when we parted, but I did in about quarter of an hour.

HENRY GARNETT . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty, and saw the prosecutor and prisoner together in Brown-street - I desired them to go on; the prosecutor came to me about half-past eleven o'clock, and asked if I knew that woman - I said, "Have you lost any thing?" he said, "Yes, my watch;" I found her about half-past twelve - I took hold of both her hands, and asked where George Law 's watch was; she said, "I don't know;" I said, "Nonsense, you do;" she said, "I will give him up his property, I will not give it you;" I felt in her bosom, and there it was - she was in liquor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me his watch to hold - he said he would give me money after I had satisfied him; I was giving the watch out of my bosom at the time I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-168

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1158. THOMAS FOREMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 1 piece of timber, value 3l., the goods of Benjamin Dixon , his master ; and WILLIAM BAXTER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the the same day, the aforesaid goods and chattels, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

STEPHEN STROUD. I am keeper of the lock, on the Limehouse-cut , where the cut comes into the river Thames. Mr. Dixon's wharf is up the cut - Foreman was in Mr. Dixon's employ, and was in the habit of passing the lock very frequently - there are dues paid at that lock, for timber and other things which come through, but latterly we have booked them for Mr. Dixon; on the

8th of April, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I saw Foreman pass the lock, in a direction from Mr. Dixon's wharf, with a stick of timber which was floating - I did not notice it, nor any mark upon it; I did not see him with any boat - he was pushing it into the lock; I drew back the gate, left one lock open, and on account of its being a wet morning, I went in and left him - he told me it was a job of his own, and he would pay me for it in the afternoon; it was entered in Mr. Dixon's name in the afternoon when he paid me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.How many wharfs are up that cut? A. There are several - I do not know what was the length of the timber; I knew him perfectly well - I attended the whole of that morning.

MR. BODKIN. Q.Could any person have got through your lock without your seeing them? A. Not very easily - no other piece of timber passed the lock from any wharf that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you the only person who attends? A. I am the only lock-man; there is another person attends to take the does - I was not up the whole of that night.

JAMES WHITE . I work for Mr. Astley, a wharfinger, at Stone-stairs, Ratcliff. On Friday, the 8th of April, I was at my master's wharf, and saw Baxter the prisoner, about half-past six o'clock, but I did not then know his name - a person they called Mr. Rogers, who had a black coat, came with Baxter; they wanted me to get ready to land a piece of timber for them, and Rogers, who appeared to be the owner of the timber, said he was in a hurry for it, for the sawyers were standing still, and the building was standing still - they were both together; I did not see any timber at that time, but in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, Foreman brought a piece which appeared to me to he Memel timber - it was floating; I noticed the race-mark of thirty-four feet - I did not see in what direction it came; I was getting the handles and things ready - the tide was then coming up, and I consider if it had been half an hour later it could have been landed more conveniently, but they would make me get it up; I told them I thought it was a pity to land it then, to drag it through the mud, but Foreman put the dogs to it - I saw no cart then; we had it landed before the cart came - Mr. Rogers then asked me what was the charge for landing it; I said was he the gentleman that had been at my master's last night, and said he had some timber coming - he said Yes; I said, "You need not pay this now;" he said he would rather pay it now - they then walked with me down to my master, and I said they had landed thirty-four feet of timber, how much was it? my master called out, "One shilling, Jem," and Mr. Rogers asked Baxter for 1s., which he gave him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you sure they did not both pay the shilling together? A. It was very much like it - I have had conversation with Mr. Dixon about this; I have only seen him once before, when I went to Lambeth-street - we landed this timber as quick as we could, as it rained very fast; I do not think there were any more men about the wharf - I would not have been there if these two gentlemen had not persuaded me; I opened the gate, and they asked who was the person to get the timber through - I said I was; it might be five or six minutes in landing - the dogs are at the end of the iron chain which hangs to the crane; the tide was not then up - the prisoners took the dogs as far as the bank, and pulled the timber out; it was some distance from the wall - it was then from half-past six to seven o'clock; I did not see it first come in sight - I was in and out, getting the handles and things ready: I did not see Foreman bring it- the first I saw of him was when he came to put the dogs - I cannot tell the length or width of it; there was thirty-four cut in it, with a race knife - there was other timber there, but we had none come in that night, or the day before; there was no single piece came in for a week before, or a week afterwards, I am certain - Mr. Dixon did not tell me the mark on this piece of timber; I took notice of it, to give an account to my master - I did not know either the prisoners or Mr. Rogers; I heard Mr. Baxter's name at the office - I knew them by their clothes before.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What day was this? A.One Friday morning - to the best of my knowledge, five weeks last Friday - I do not keep account of the days; Rogers acted as master of the timber, as it appeared to me; I have not seen him since.

MR. BODKIN. Q.What became of the timber? A. The carman came, and the prisoners and Rogers helped it into the cart.

JAMES ALLEN . I am a carman. On one Friday in April, Baxter and Rogers came to me, about half-past six o'clock in the morning, and asked if I would take a piece of timber down to Poplar; it was a very wet morning, and I said it was almost too bad to go out - they hurried me on, and said they must have it done, as their men were standing still - they both spoke together; what one said the other heard - they asked what we would do it for; I sent a lad up to ask master, and he said 3s. 6d. - I went to Mr. Astley's, Stone-stairs wharf; the timber was landed, and we all helped to put it on the cart - I suppose it was then a quarter-past seven o'clock; it still rained very fast - I took it just beyond North-street bar, Poplar; I do not know whether it is Mr. Baxter's ground or not, but he told me to take it, and said he would meet me there; I did not take notice of the timber - it was only one stick; Baxter paid me on the ground - he had one foot standing on the log when he gave me the money.

WILLIAM HOPEWELL . I am a soldier and a blacksmith. I know Mr. Baxter, and I know several buildings he has going on in the East India-road, and some cottages at the back of the road. I went to the North-bar, to look for work one Friday morning, about the 8th or 9th of April, I think about half-past six o'clock - I saw Baxter and Rogers there, in conversation with each other; I cannot tell what about - I saw by and by a stick of timber brought there, and it went into a small gate; Allen was the carman who brought it - it was put into Mr. Baxter's yard, and he rubbed his foot on the ground, and then rubbed it on the timber, about the centre of it; I heard Rogers say"Baxter, you have no occasion to grumble, you have got that timber cheap enough;" and he said, "It came by this," holding up his fingers in a booked direction.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long did you look at the timber? A.Perhaps ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - Baxter was building some premises, or he was the master of some buildings in that neighbour

hood - he rubbed his foot on the ground, and then on the timber, probably to take the dirt off his shoe.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You heard it was cheap enough, then of course you understood that some price had been paid? A. Yes, some price.

COURT. Q. Did you see any mark on the timber when the foot was applied? A. No, my Lord, I did not.

BENJAMIN DIXON . I am a timber-merchant , and live in the Commercial-road - Foreman was my waterman and lighterman ; I knew nothing of Baxter. On Saturday, the 9th of April, Foreman was taken into custody - I looked at my stock of timber, after returning from the East India-road; when the Policeman came to me I went with him to where the deals were, and from there to Baxter's -I saw Baxter on his premises, near the North-bar; I said,"Is your name Baxter?" he said Yes - I said, "Of whom did you buy the deals?" he said, "Of Rogers;" I said,"Have you bought any thing else?" he said No - I said,"Have you bought any thing else of him at any time?" he said No - I asked him again; he then said, "I bought some laths of him about a month ago;" I questioned him again if he had not bought any thing else of him at any time - his answer was No, using the word in a positive tone; I then said, "Where did you get the piece of timber from that lies over the way?" he said, "Oh, I bought that of Rogers yesterday;" I went into the yard, and saw the piece of timber of the thirteenth float, thirty-four marked on it, and three strokes, then a cross, and my name raced in with a knife, by Foreman - the letters were robbed out, as if with road dirt, not the mud of the Thames - I rubbed it off with my hand, and then saw the letters plainly; they were about the middle of the timber - we generally mark it there, that none may be cut off; I bought it as Memel timber, but I cannot swear to that - it was Baltic timber; Rogers had worked for me as a lath-render, for about four months, but not at my wharf - Baxter told me he had known Rogers for five years; I asked Baxter what he gave for it - he said 5l. a load, which would be 2s. a foot - that would be 3l. 8s.; I bought the whole float of the timber - he told me afterwards that he gave 2l. 5s. for the piece; that was all I heard him say, except before the Magistrate - it was after I saw Baxter that I examined my stock, and missed a piece of thirty-four feet; I had not sold any timber of the whole float - I had had it about three months.

COURT. Q.From whom did Foreman receive orders to carry out timber? A.From myself only, and then not without a note - I have a young man, but he does not give orders; Foreman never attends to any thing he says - I am the only person who ever gives directions for the removal of timber.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you went to Baxter's, did you make yourself or your business known? A. I asked of whom he bought the deals - I did not tell him my name; I did not mention the name of Rogers - I knew nothing of Rogers with regard to this transaction till he told me - I could not tell whether Foreman or Rogers took them; he said he bought the laths of Rogers, but I did not tell him he was my lath-render - I believe Rogers has absconded; I have not seen him since -I have offered a reward to find him; as I was going down the road to Baxter's, a carpenter pointed out the piece of timber to me, and said there was a piece which had come very suspiciously into the yard - that called my attention to it, and when I asked Baxter he said he bought it of Rogers; I believe Rogers was a thief, but not the only one - I do not recollect that I have said that Rogers was the thief; I will not swear I have not - the piece of timber was thirty-five feet cubic measure; I gave 5l. 5s. a load for it - I gave 3l. 11s. for this piece; it was not a damaged piece.

Q.Now, mind, I warn you, do you swear it was not a damaged piece? A. No, Sir, it was not; there was at one end what we call a blee, which was owing to the frost stinting it in its growth, but it would not be considered a blemish - it would sell for quite as much, and, this being a clean piece, would be preferred to many other pieces - it was in no respect injured; I did not apprehend Baxter -I gave him notice to come against Foreman, to attend and give evidence relative to the piece of timber; the Magistrate had let him go, after two examinations, but we got additional evidence after that - we did not take him before the Magistrate again; the Magistrate said he would not retract his steps. I must take him before the Grand Jury -I had then got the witnesses, White and the carman. Allen; they were not examined till the fourth examination - Baxter was not apprehended at all, when we went before the Grand Jury - he was taken at his own house yesterday - he was discharged after the third examination; I told him, in his own yard, that I should prefer a bill against him, and asked him the reason he did not attend at the office - he said he had no order but mine, and he should not attend to that.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Foreman had lived with you three or four years, and Rogers as many months? A. Yes - I offered a man 1l. to find Rogers; Foreman did not tell me where to find Rogers - I do not think Rogers worked on his own account; he was very much distressed.

COURT. Q. Do you know where Rogers lived? A. No, I do not exactly. This timber was taken from my Limehouse premises - Foreman was principally engaged there - he was all that Friday in that yard; no timber sold on my account has been removed from my premises, only little trifling things, of a few shillings value - Rogers had no authority to sell; he had no authority over the other workmen.

JOSEPH BEAL. I am a Police-constable. I apprehended Baxter at his own house yesterday.

Foreman's Defence. On the Friday morning I was going to work, and went and got 1d. worth of coffee down by the dock-gates - I there met Rogers, whom I had not seen for some time before; he said could I do a job for him - I said I could not, it got too near six o'clock; he said I might as well earn 1s., which Mr. Dixon allows us to do - he said, "Get a boat, and take that timber, and I will go and get the crane ready at Stone-stairs;" the tide did not set till a quarter to seven, and he came twice to me to say what a while I was - I said if he could get a man to do it quicker I would go on; he said, No, as I had the job, I might go on - I took it up when there was water, and then I was asked if I could not book it on; I said, No - I staid a quarter of an hour; they then asked me again, and I put the books, and they took it up, and paid the man for it, I

believe - I then asked Mr. Rogers for the 2s. he was to give me, and he went to Mr. Baxter, whom I had not known before, and got some money of him; he then gave me 2s., and said he would in the afternoon give me a drop of gin. and gave me the 6d. to pay the lock-man - I went and got my breakfast, and went to work, as I had lost a quarter of a day, which is 9d.; I leave it to the Jury to say if I should be guilty of such an error to be torn away from my wife and family, as I have been - Rogers was in the same employ with me, and he had hired a cart of Mr. Dixon, to carry bricks to some buildings of his.

MR. DIXON. He did request that a man might go and get some old bricks, and I told the man to go and do it -Foreman was not at liberty to do any work without asking leave; he must have seen my name on the timber.

Foreman. If I had known it had been Mr. Dixon's I should certainly have stopped it - I was glad to earn 1s. for my wife and family.

Baxter's Defence. Rogers came to me on the 7th of April, and asked if I wanted any timber - I said I did, but I had bought of Christopher and Son for many years; he said, "I have some timber I obtained from over the water, by exchanging laths" (I knew he was a lath-render) - he said he wanted 3l. 5s. a load, and it was good Memel timber; I said, "Where can I see it?" he said, "It will be at Rain's wharf to-morrow morning, at half-past six o'clock;" I went there, and waited till seven, and then it came - I went and helped to land it; I measured it, and there were thirty-four feet - I gave him the price he asked me; it came to 2l. 2s. 6d., and 2s. carriage - it was taken to Poplar, and unloaded in an open yard, next to the East India-road; I know nothing of the timber, except what he told me, that he had obtained it by exchanging laths for it.

FOREMAN - GUILTY . Aged 34.

BAXTER - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .(See page 569.)

Reference Number: t18310512-169

1159. JAMES NANSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 8 bushels of oats, value 30s., the goods of Robert Hollings , his master .

ROBERT HOLLINGS. I am a bargeman , and live at Isleworth. I was employed by Mr. Williams to take a quantity of oats in my barge, from London - I was to deliver fifty quarters at the King's Arms-yard, at Hounslow, on the 9th of May.

JAMES DYCKHOFF . I am wharfinger to Mr. Hollings. I assist in loading his waggon - I was ordered by him to send a quantity of oats to the King's Arms, at Hounslow; I loaded twenty-five quarters in the morning, and twenty-five in the afternoon, making fifty altogether; the prisoner was servant to my master, and he drove the waggon - I saw him go out of the yard with the first waggon, but not the second; they went in two separate loads, twenty-five quarters each.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How many assisted in loading? A. Henry Dalton , William Whitaker , James Thomas , and myself - I counted both the loads.

ROBERT MAY . I recollect the prisoner coming to my master's, the King's Arms-yard, Hounslow , last Monday - he came twice, and each time brought a waggon-load of oats; the first contained twenty-five quarters - the second time I received but twenty-four quarters, and I saw the prisoner throw out two empty sacks, as part of the load; in consequence of what I saw, I gave the constable charge of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not receive twenty-five quarters in the second load, and say it was all right? A. No; some of them had been delivered before the empty sacks were laid down - I cannot say how much; the prisoner, and a person who came with him, unloaded it, and two persons who were in the yard, assisted - they are not here; the corn was shot in the granary - it was all put together; there were not fifty quarters - there was one short; they have not been measured to this day, but I counted the sacks - I put the constable in charge of the prisoner before he left the yard, and he looked to him afterwards.

Q. Did you not, in the presence of the two men who assisted in unloading the waggon, say the corn was right, and let the prisoner take the team from the yard, before you gave him into custody? A. No, I never said it was right - I cannot tell how long it was before he was taken; it might be an hour and a half.

COURT. Q. Did the constable take him in the yard? A. No; I wanted to know who the receivers were - I gave the constable orders to secure him while he was in the yard; he had put out several sacks of corn, and then two empty sacks - I counted the sacks that were put out; the two empty sacks made up the number to fifty - I saw forty-eight sacks emptied, having previously seen them full.

JOHN MASON . This witness gave me information that he was a quarter short, and desired me to take the prisoner while he was in the yard - I saw him come out with a horse, and give the team to another man to take it down to the Coach and Horses; the prisoner took his horse to be shod - I never lost sight of the waggon; I saw the prisoner in conversation with a man at the Coach and Horses; he then went on towards Isleworth, and the man with a green cart went with him - I followed them, I suppose a quarter of a mile; I stopped the prisoner, and the other man went off - I found two sacks of oats in the waggon; they were full, as near as I can recollect - they had no name on them.

Cross-examined. Q. What was the reason you did not take him in the yard? A. I was not in the yard; I do not know how much a quarter of oats is - I found two sacks, nearly full; I took it into my possession, and have a sample here.

ROBERT MAY re-examined. Q. Had all the sacks, the two empty ones, as well as those which contained the corn, Mr. Hollings name on them? A. Yes, Sir, they had -I have a sample of corn taken from the bulk, and one from the two sacks in the waggon; they appear to me to be of the same quality, but I am not so well acquainted with corn as some are - I am foreman to Mr. Williams.

MR. HOLLINGS re-examined. Q.Up to the time of this charge had the prisoner a good character? A. Yes; I always found him honest - he has been with me about twelve months; these samples correspond with each other.

Cross-examined. Q. Do these two samples appear to

correspond? A. No man, who is any judge of corn, can tell by candle-light.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-170

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, MAY 17.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1160. DENNIS HURLEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Norbury , on the 14th of April , and stealing, 8 copper rings, value 44s., the goods of Joseph Norbury and others .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM CARTER. I am apprentice to Joseph Norbury , who lives in Whitechapel-road . On the 14th of April, at nine o'clock in the evening. I was up stairs in the kitchen, and heard the door shut; I ran down stairs immediately, as I knew nobody was in the house - I ran into the street, and saw three men walking away as fast as they could, altogether; they were about eight yards from the house - I was not a minute getting into the street; I knew one of them, which was the prisoner - I had seen him so many times in the road, singing ballads; I knew him well, and could have no doubt of him - he turned round, looked at me, and instantly began to run; they had some copper rings in their hands between them- one man I caught hold of had one in each hand; he instantly dropped them - the prisoner had some in his hand; I had caught the man with his head under my arm - he broke from me, leaving his hat under my arm; I pursued fifteen or twenty yards further, till we came to an open field - they went right across the field; I returned, picked up the rings, and went home - I described the prisoner to the officer next morning, and he was taken; I swear most positively to him - I suppose the house had been entered with a false-key, as I had locked it myself half an hour before, and had not let any body in; my fellow-servant and the apprentice were in the kitchen with me, and had not been out of it to open the door.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The first thing you heard was the door banging? A. Yes - neither the servant nor apprentice are here; I had been up to wash myself, after fastening the door - I swear I did not say before the Magistrate that I saw nothing in the prisoner's hands; I said he had these rings - I first saw him just against the Hospital public-house, when he turned round; that is about twelve yards from master's house - they did not come out of the public-house; I saw them before they got to the public-house door.

COURT. Q. When you came out the three men were together? A. Yes - they were going towards the public-house.

JOSEPH NORBURY . The rings are my property - I am in partnership with my brother.

JAMES LEA. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 5th of May - Carter described him to me on the day of the robbery; I took him in the Commercial-road, at half-past ten o'clock at night, singing songs - I have known him some years.

Cross-examined. Q. You apprehended him more than three weeks after the robbery? A. Yes; I have seen him occasionally singing songs in the street - the Commercial-road is about half a mile from the prosecutor's; he gave me the name of Hurley, but on searching his lodging, I found it was Collins - I had been in search of him some time.

Prisoner's Defence. What made them call me Collins was because that was my mother's name - my father is dead, and I have been reared among my mother's friends.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-171

Second London Jury, before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1161. WILLIAM PEARSON was indicted for that he, being a person employed by and under the Post-office of Great Britain, in receiving letters brought to a certain General Post receiving-house for letters and packets, to he from thence sent to the General Post-office, a certain letter to be sent and delivered to John Foillott Powell, of Turvey, in the county of Bedford, containing ten 10l. Bank notes, came to his hands and possession whilst so employed, and that he did feloniously secrete and embezzle the same , the property of William Gosling .

NINE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, charging him with stealing ten 10l. Bank notes.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL, MESSRS. GURNEY, and SCAR LETT, JUN. conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS RIDLEY. I am a clerk to Messrs. Gosling and Sharp, bankers, Fleet-street - Mr. William Gosling is a partner in the house. On Tuesday, the 19th of April, I wrote a letter to John Foillott Powell, Turvey, Bedford - I wrote a memorandum for Mr. Ewings to give me ten 10l. Bank notes, which he looked out, and I enclosed them in the letter; I sealed it, and addressed it to John Foillott Powell, Esq., Turvey-house, near Newport Pagnell.

WILLIAM EWINGS . I am a clerk to Messrs. Gosling. On the 19th of April, at the request of Mr. Ridley, I looked out ten 10l. Bank notes - here is the book in which I entered the numbers and dates; they were Nos. 5160 to 5169 inclusive, and dated the 17th of March, 1831.

FREDERICK BRADLEY . I am a clerk to Messrs. Gosling. On Tuesday, the 19th of April , a little before five o'clock, I took a letter from our house to the receiving house in Middle Temple-lane , kept by Mr. Abram I observed on it the address, "J.F.Powell, Esq., Turvey-house, near Newport Pagnell;" I do not recollect whether I took the letters into the shop, or dropped them into the letter-box - I usually give them to the lad in the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you occasionally drop them into the letter-box? A. Yes - I take the letters every evening; I took about fifteen or sixteen letters that evening.

MR. GURNEY. Q.How soon after was your attention called to the matter? A. I think on the following Saturday - I take the letters in a bag.

JOHN ABRAM . I am a law-stationer, and live in Middle Temple-lane - my shop has been a receiving-house for General Post letters perhaps more than a hundred

years. In April last the prisoner was in my employ - his business was to take the letters out of the box, and put them into a bag, or, if any body brought letters into the shop, and gave them into his hand, to put them into the bag instantly - that is an unpaid letter-bag, which was to be sent to the Post-office as soon as the clock struck five; after the letters were made up, the prisoner generally tied them up, and put a string round them - he put the wax. and I put the seal to it; he and I were the persons who made up the letters to be sent to the Post-office - his business in the morning was to do any thing we wanted, and, among other things, to clean the boots and shoes; we did not trust him much in the shop, but generally sent him on errands.

Cross-examined. Q. He was rather an under kind of servant? A. Yes - he did not live in the house; I gave him 6s. a week, with his breakfast and dinner - he states himself to be more than eighteen years old; I have four clerks and two servants employed in the stationery business - I have a room across the lane, and at times have eight clerks; none of them make up the bag; I will not swear that has not occasionally happened - my son sometimes makes it up. but nobody else that I know of; it has happened that I have not been at home when it has been made up - the clerks never sealed the bag, to my knowledge; they may have done it.

Q. When was your attention called to the loss of this letter? A.On the Saturday morning my attention was called to the finding of a Bank-note; there was nothing particularly suspicious happened on the Tuesday - the prisoner has been two years and upwards in my employ; I considered his father a respectable man - we had a very good opinion of him, and trusted him with a great deal of property of our own.

MR. GURNEY. Q.On that Tuesday, did you yourself seal the bag? A. I did, and the prisoner assisted me.

GEORGE WHITE. I am a clerk in the General Postoffice . If a letter arrived from the receiving-house, in Middle Temple-lane, on the 19th of April, directed to Newport Pagnell, it would be forwarded the same evening, and arrive on the following morning.

JOHN FOILLOTT POWELL, Esq. I live at Turvey-house, about eight miles from Newport Pagnell, in Bedfordshire - Newport Pagnell is the post-town; I bank at Messrs. Gosling's. On Monday, the 18th of April, I wrote to request them to send me 100l. in 10l. Bank notes - I received no reply or remittance, and on the Thursday, after post, I wrote to them to say I had not heard from them.

Cross-examined. Q.Is there any other Mr. Powell who lives in your neighbourhood, to your knowledge? A. No - I have lived at Turvey-house two years, and never heard of any other; I know the neighbourhood very well; the postman goes from Newport to Olney, and then to Newport Pagnell - I think I can say there is not such a person in my station.

MR. SCARLETT. Q. Is there any other John F. Powell of Turvey-house? A. There is not.

GEORGE JAMES ABRAM . I am the son of John Abram . On Thursday, the 21st of April, I required the prisoner to go with me to the Post-office - he came from a room allotted to him opposite our office, up one pair of stairs, in Middle Temple-lane; the room is not in our house - it is allotted to the prisoner to clean boots and shoes, and doing other affairs; I think that was between twelve and one o'clock - after being summoned by me to come down stairs, telling him he was wanted immediately, he wished to return to his room, but I required him to come instantly - he was in the habit of cleaning my boots; he did not return after going away that morning - after he was gone I put on a pair of my boots, which I got from our office in Middle Temple-lane; his duty, when he had cleaned my boots, was to return them to my private residence in Took's-court, Chancery-lane - I found my boots in the inner office, at half-past eight o'clock, on the Saturday morning after the Thursday on which he left; I put them on, and found a 10l. note in one of them - I took it to the General Post-office, and marked it; this is it(looking at it); I had not worn the boots since the Wednesday - I was present on Friday night, before nine o'clock, when my brother brought them to the inner office; they were left there that night - the office was locked up by my brother, I think, but we left together, leaving it closed; I opened it next morning, but left it before I went to put on my boots - I left Glover there; he is a youth who had come into our service that morning.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you away? A. I should think not a minute - I only crossed the way to the office; all the clerks have access to the office, but not usually to the office the boots were in - I know of nothing that could require them to go there; they can go if they choose - it is not left open; the key is usually hung up when not in use - it hangs under the counter, behind the shop door; my boots had been in the room from Thursday morning till Friday evening, at nine o'clock - I had not looked into them during those two days.

JAMES EDWARD GLOVER . I entered Messrs. Abram's service, on Saturday morning, the 23rd of April - I went to the office that morning with William Abram ; he unlocked the door, and I believe, shortly after crossed to the other office, and returned - I did not put any thing into the boots.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not been in that room since this day? A. Yes - I succeeded the prisoner, but left yesterday week; I am sixteen years old - I used to tie up the letter-bag, and the young gentleman or Mr. Abram used to seal it; I never saw any of the clerks do it - I was there only a fortnight; the door of the room in which the boots were was not locked.

MR. GURNEY. Q. When you went with Mr. William Abram where did you go to at first? A. I had to open the shop - the boots were in the counting-house, and remained there till Mr. Abram put them on; that counting-house door was locked - they were not at that time in the room where they are cleaned.

GEORGE ABRAM. On the evening of Friday I brought my brother's boots over from the room opposite to the shop, where the prisoner had cleaned them - they had been cleaned; I put them into the inner office or counting-house - I believe no use was made of the room after the prisoner left, as the new boy did not come till Saturday; the key hung in the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say the clerks might not have gone into the room during the two days? A. No, it is not usual.

MARY INWARD. I am cook to Mr. Abram. I entered his service on the 19th of April; on Wednesday, the 20th, about half-past three o'clock the prisoner came into the kitchen - I thought I saw something in his hand - I think it was a note; there was a lighted candle in the kitchen - I believe I lighted it for him; I left him in the kitchen, and shortly after returned - the prisoner was there, and there was a letter on the dresser: I think it laid open - he was then standing at the dresser, towards the window; I believe he had a note in his hand - I do not recollect how he was holding it; I believe he was looking at it - his face was towards the window; the lighted candle was then on the dresser - I do not think it was far from him - the kitchen is light; a person can read in it without a candle.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you had your own business to attend to, and did not take much notice of what was going on? A. No; I cannot swear it was a note that I saw in his hand.

WILLIAM EWINGS . This is one of the notes I gave Ridley.

JOHN JAMES BOQUET . I am a clerk in the Bank.(Looking at the 10l. note No.5169, dated 17th of March, 1831) there is only one note of this number and date; this note was issued on the 14th of April, to Messrs. Goslings; here is the entry of it in my own writing, made at the time.

CHARLES VINCENT BARNARD . I am a clerk in the Post-office. (Looking at a paper) the red ink signature or mark on this, is mine, and signifies that on the evening of the 19th of April I opened the unpaid-bag from the receiving-house in Middle Temple.

Cross-examined. Q. You have not put your name to it? A. No, it is not customary - I have put a mark, which signifies that I opened the bag that night; I cannot speak about the paid bag - unpaid letters have, at times, dropped into the paid bag.

ROBERT TYRRELL. I belong to the City Police. I saw the prisoner at the Post-office, on Wednesday, the 20th of April, when there was some explanation about a different matter to this - I searched him, and asked if he had any money; he said No - I found but 6d. on him; I was at Bow-street on Monday, the 25th of April; depositions were taken against the prisoner that day - before they were taken I saw him in the presence of Mr. Peacock, the Post-office solicitor, who told him he had no occasion to answer questions unless he pleased, and if he did it might he taken in evidence against him - no threat or inducement whatever was held out to him; Mr. Peacock said whatever he said might be given in evidence against him, and reminded him of having said, at the Post-office, that he had no money - he said, "Yes, I did, but I have since heard of what has been found;" Mr. Peacock showed him the note produced, and asked if he knew any thing of the writing - he said, "Yes, that is my hand-writing;" he said, "I put it into my master's boot, and I will tell you all about it;" he then said that on Tuesday last, the 19th of April, he was in Fleet-street, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, that he met a female standing at the corner of Crown-court, leading out of Fleet-street, who asked him to give her something to drink, that he did so - they went to a house a few doors down the court, on the right-hand side; that he called for a glass of ale, and she had some brandybitters, and he saw some Bank notes in her hand; that she asked him to write the word "Bank" on them; that he did so on some of them, but he thought not on all, and afterwards she gave him one of the notes for his trouble in writing on them - that that note produced he received from the female, and was one of those he wrote the word "Bank" on - I asked if he knew the woman; he said No. he had never seen her before, nor did he know where she lived - he said when his master called him down on Thursday to attend the Post-office, at the moment he was called he threw the note into the boot - he was asked if he had called for a light from the servant girl, which he denied - he also denied having any note in his hand, or any letter, when the servant brought the light - that was stated to him before he denied it; I asked if he borrowed a pen of the landlady to write on the notes - he said No, the girl went to a house in the court to fetch the pen.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell him the servant said he had a letter in his hand? A. He had heard her evidence stated before the Magistrate; what the prisoner stated was not taken down, I believe.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q.Nothing was stated to him about what the girl said? A. No; he had heard her evidence given.

MR. MARK BEECHAM PEACOCK. I am solicitor to the Post-office. I have heard Tyrrell's evidence - his account of what the prisoner said is correct; I did not hear the whole of the statement - I gave him the warning stated, and said nothing to induce him to confess; he was at the Post-office on Wednesday, and went home after that - on the Thursday he was sent for with Mr. William Abram , and brought to the office - he remained in custody from that period.

WILLIAM LUGSDEN. I am in clerk a the Post-office. The paid bag, for the Middle Temple receiving-house, arrived safe on the 19th of April - I have a check against it here.

MR. POWELL. Turvey-house is in the parish of Turvey, in Bedfordshire - it is a quarter of a mile from Turvey, but in the village; it is a large village - my house stands alone- the parish is only one village.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY on the 11th and 12th Counts only, and of stealing but one note . Aged 23.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310512-172

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

1162. HARRY BOLTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Rogers , on the 7th of November , and stealing 1 blanket, value 15s.; 1 sheet, value 5s.; 1 table-cloth, value 15s.; 1 shawl, value 12s.; 1 skirt, value 2s., and 1 petticoat, value 2s., his property .

MR. BALL conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD ROGERS . I live at Roxley, near Harrow, and am a farmer . On the 7th of November I had a blanket and other things in my possession, at Wood-end, in the parish of Northall - I keep the house, and my son and daughter lived in it, to take care of it; the prisoner worked

for me, and slept in the house, but after the 7th of November he kept out of the way for four months.

JOHN FOLLEY. I live at Wood-end-grove, and am a bricklayer. On Sunday morning, the 7th of November, about half-past twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Rogers' orchard, coming from the back door, with a blanket under his arm - there did not appear to be any thing in it; one corner of it hung down - when I heard of the robbery I gave information; he lived in the neighbourhood.

SARAH FOLLEY . I am the wife of the last witness. I saw the prisoner during Divine Service on Sunday, and on the Wednesday or Thursday following I saw him again I did not say he had better confess - he told me he was a done chap, and that he had put the things into the cut.

ELIZABETH BOWDEN. I live at Wood-end. I was with Mrs. Folley when the prisoner told us he was sorry for what he had done - that he was a done chap, and he had sunk the things in the cut.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am the prosecutor's son, and was taking care of this house. I left with the prisoner about a quarter-past eleven o'clock, on the 7th of November - he came out with me; I left the door shutter down - the door was locked, and I had the key; the bar was across the window shutters - they were all closed, except the door shutter; I bolted the back door with two bolts - I went to dine with my father, and returned to the house about dusk, and saw the prisoner within twenty yards of the door; as I went towards the house - he said, "Bill, there is a pane of glass broken;" I said, "I cannot see any pane broken;" he said, "Why, can't you see it?" and pointed to it - I found it was broken; the shutters were all correct, but a pane was broken in the front door, half of which is glass; I had left it all sound - the glass was broken close to where the door opens; a person could put his hand in and unbolt it - it was shut, and still bolted; every thing seemed right - I missed a blanket, but nothing else, not knowing what there was in the house.

JURY. Q. You came out at that door, how did you bolt it? A. I locked it - I found a trunk broken open in the room, but missed nothing; I had slept in the house the night before - the blanket was then on the bed when I left in the morning, and all correct.

REBECCA CLARIDGE. I am Roger's daughter-in-law, and lived in this house, but was absent for a week; I returned on Tuesday, the 3rd of November, and missed the property stated.

JOHN FOLLEY . I have the blanket; the constable delivered it to me.

JAMES TEMPLE . I am a constable. Mr. Rogers got the blanket out of pawn - the pawnbroker lives at Paddington.

MR. ROGERS. I got the blanket from a pawnbroker named Ross, and this table-cloth from a pawnbroker named Wishart, at the corner of Paddington-street.

JOHN FOLLEY . I saw him with a blanket, but cannot say this is the one.

Prisoner's Defence. I came out of the house on Sunday morning with the prosecutor's son, and never went to it again till seven o'clock in the evening - I then went there, and went to bed; I saw the glass broken as we went to the house - when he entered he said he saw somebody had been into the house; he did not want his friends to know of it till the morning, but I said I would not stop in the house unless he let his friends know, and he went and told a friend - I slept there that night, and till Wednesday, when Mrs. Claridge said she did not care about any body sleeping there, and on Thursday morning, about six o'clock, they took me.

WILLIAM ROGERS, JUN. The prisoner came out of the house with me, and parted from me two or three hundred yards on, between the house and Northall; when I came home in the evening I found him in the neighbourhood, and he walked with me to the house - directly we opened the door he went towards the back door, but I did not examine it, and cannot say whether it was bolted - the front door was fastened, but that shuts on being pulled too; the orchard goes all round the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-173

1163. WILLIAM SAWYER JAMES TAYLOR , and JAMES BUDD were indicted for feloniously assaulting Hugh Grimes , on the 9th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 3 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 9 sixpences, his monies .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HUGH GRIMES . I am a mariner ; shortly before April last, I was in the King's service, and have not been discharged. On the 9th of April I was at the Three Tons, Edmonton - I saw all the three prisoners there, also Thomas Sawyer and Thomas Flood; I was there between four and five o'clock - I called for a pint of beer; none of the men drank with me - Thomas Sawyer asked me to lend him 1s.; I did so - I had a sovereign and 6d. about me at that time; I do not know what he did with the shilling - he said he had spent it, and asked me to lend him two more; I was a good while before I agreed, but he kept bothering so, I went and got change at the bar for the purpose of lending him two more, which I did; I had called for some beer to be sent into the tap-room, and after I got in they backed themselves up against the door - Thomas and William Sawyer, Thomas Flood, and John Taylor, stood against the door; Budd did not touch me at that time - I was sober; as soon as I went into the tap-room William Sawyer came up to me and snatched the ribbon of my hat, and after that he snatched a knife off my neck, cut the string, and took it away - it hung to my neck by a string; I asked him to give me my knife back again, and my ribbon - he would not; I told him to let me out of the tap-room; they were all standing against the door, and William Sawyer gave me a shove, and shoved me out of the tap-room - when I asked them to let me out, Thomas Sawyer took me up in his arms, and carried me out into the skittle-ground; the others had followed him out - Thomas Sawyer threw me down against the dust-hole, in the skittle-ground; John Taylor and William Sawyer came up to me - Taylor was sitting on the publican's barrow, under the shed; William Sawyer came up, and took hold of me by the thigh of my trousers - he took me up, and threw me down again; the others at this time were in the shed - Thomas Sawyer picked me up again, and carried me into the shed, from the dust-hole, where the others were; then John Taylor came up to me, put his two hands round my month, and his two knees against my shoulders - Flood asked somebody who stood round the pailing to lend him

a knife; one was handed round into the shed to him - I could not see by whom, but I saw it was a white-handled penknife.

Q. What was William Sawyer and Budd doing when Taylor had his hands round your mouth and his knees over your shoulders? A. I saw Budd holding my pocket out while Flood cut it out - I did not see William Sawyer at that time; I lost the money which was in my pocket about 15s., a few halfpence, and part of the waistband of my trousers - I saw Budd with my fob and part of the waisthand in his hand; I saw him give Taylor the pocket with the money in it - Taylor went out with it, and I followed him into the White Horse public-house, and asked him for my money; he asked what money I meant - I said he knew what money, I wanted the money he had taken out of my pocket; I shut the door - he opened it, and followed me out - he came as far as Mr. Stauley's, the butcher's, and then knocked me down; when I got up I saw William Sawyer , and he knocked me down again - that was the first time I had seen him after he was in the shed; I went the same evening before the Justice - I did not see Taylor and Thomas Sawyer again till Monday morning; I knew them to be two of the men whom I had seen on the 9th.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.You must have got rid of 5s. out of the sovereign? A. I paid for eight pots of beer for them - I gave the landlord the sovereign, and he took for the eight pots; I cannot tell how much it came to, as I am no scholar - I was quite sober all the time - the waiter was in the house; I was carried into the skittle-ground against my will - I called out to the waiter; he did not hear me - I was crying as loud as I could all the time.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the waiter? A. After I was in the shed. I was laying down in the shed- I have been a sailor about two years, and have been round the Isle of France; I was a sailor in 1830 - this is the first time I have been in a Court of Justice; I was never here before in my life - I was in the other Court about twelve months ago, accused of stealing some hay; I had fetched it for a man who had bought it.

Q. You forgot all that when you swore you never was in a Court of Justice? A. I did not rightly know what a Court of Justice was - I am sure that was the only time; I lived once with a gentleman named Tuck; I did not go from his service to the House of Correction - I was put there for climbing over a hedge; it was for breaking the hedge down.

Q. And taking some wood, I believe? A. No, I had none of the wood - I was with the party that had it, at least I was in one field, and they in the other; I was in the House of Correction two months on that charge - that is the only time I was ever in trouble; I was not in the House of Correction three weeks for stealing potatoes - I have told all the trouble I have been in; I was cast away in the North Seas, and shipwrecked; I was acquitted on the charge about the hay; the jumping over the hedge was twelve months before that.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you quite sure you were sober when you went before the Justice? A. Yes; that was on the evening it happened - I changed the sovereign to lend Thomas Sawyer 2s.; I spent none of the change myself, except paying for the eight pots of beer - I had three half-crowns, three shillings, and nine sixpences in my pocket.

JURY. Q. Did you know the Sawyers before? A. Yes, I knew them before.

EDWARD ROW MORES , ESQ. I am a Magistrate, and live at Edmonton. On the evening of the 9th of April the prosecutor came to my house - I think it was about six o'clock; he was sober then.

HENRY HUGHES. I am a pork-butcher, and live at Edmonton. I was at the Three Tons on the 9th of April, about half-past four o'clock; I saw the prisoners there, and saw the prosecutor there - I saw Taylor, Budd, two Sawyers, and Flood there; Grimes was laying on the ground in the shed of the skittle-ground (I do not think he was drunk), and Taylor had his hands over his mouth - Flood was cutting off part of his waistband and the pocket; they got it off; Sawyer did not interfere at that time - when they had cut off the pocket they both walked away; Grimes got up, said he was robbed, and they all walked out of the yard - I followed them, and Grimes followed me- Budd was sitting on a form in the skittle-ground at the time they were cutting the pocket off; it was done with a white-handled knife.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If Grimes has sworn that when Flood was cutting off the pocket, Budd was holding it out for him, is there a single word of truth in it? A. Budd was not there then - he had nothing to do with cutting the pocket; I should suppose he was nearly twenty yards from Flood at that time - I was sober- I went there, as Gapps' son was going in, and called me to play at skittles.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How many persons were in the skittle-ground besides these men? A. I saw nobody besides Gapps' son and the prisoners - we were not looking on; Gapps' son went to the shed to look for the ball, and could not find it - I went to look for it then, and saw this happen; my mind was not directed to a robbery at first - I never saw men lark in that way; Grimes was on the ground, he was not asleep - I do not think he was tipsy; I will not swear he was sober - I heard him say he was robbed; he did not appear to have been drinking, I am no particular judge of a drunken man - he walked out of the yard very straight.

FREDERICK SMITH. I am pot-boy at the Three Tons, On the 9th of April Grimes was at the house; I saw William Sawyer in the skittle-ground, also Taylor and Budd I saw William Sawyer go to Grimes, pull out his knife, and attempt to cut off his pocket with the knife; I did not see Taylor do any thing, but he was in the place - I did not see Budd, only in the skittle-ground; I saw the waistband about an hour after it was cut off - I was not present when it was cut off.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose, like an honest man, you went instantly for a Policeman? A. No. I thought it was a mere lark.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Where did you see the pocket? A. I saw it picked up down in the skittle-ground - there was no money in it then; one of our little girls picked it up.

WILLIAM STANLEY . I am a butcher, and live at Edmonton. On the 9th of April, between six and seven

o'clock, I saw the prisoner Taylor in front of my father's house, which is between the Three Tuns and the White Horse - he was following Grimes; he was with Grimes - they appeared to be both together, in company - I could not hear what passed; I saw Taylor strike him a blow in the face, and then William Sawyer came up - I saw him( William Sawyer ) trip up his heels, and throw him on the ground; Grimes got up, and came up to me - I was asking the reason of the disturbance, when my father came up, and by our advice he went to Mr. Mores - I should say he was sober when I saw him.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Whether they were quarrelling or larking you cannot say? A. It did not appear a lark - he appeared perfectly sober when he came to me, and quite overcome with grief.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. So sober, it must be impossible but he could tell whether a man was twenty yards from him, or cutting his pocket? A. I know nothing of that - he gave me a very good description of the manner he was robbed; I saw nothing of Budd.

GEORGE WICKS. I belong to Latimer's charity. On the 9th of April I was at Edmonton - I know William and Thomas Sawyer, Taylor, Flood and Budd; between six and seven o'clock that evening I saw all those persons in Water-lane, Edmonton, about a quarter of a mile from the Three Tuns - I saw them dividing something; I could not see what it was - I heard nothing; I heard some money sound while they were dividing it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you been at school? A. Five years - I was between twenty and thirty yards of the men; I could hear it sound - it was silver; I can tell the jink of silver.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you speak accurately as to distance, or to the best of your belief? A. To the best of my belief; I am not much of a judge of distance.

Sawyer's Defence. I was at the Three Tuns - Grimes came in very much intoxicated, all over mad and dirt; he called for a pot of beer, and asked me for my brother Thomas, who was sent for - they sat drinking together, and I know nothing more.

John Taylor 's Defence. I was at the Three Tans, between ten and eleven o'clock that morning, when Grimes came and called for a pot of beer, and asked me to drink; then he asked William Sawyer for Thomas, who was fetched from home - they sat drinking there till between twelve and one o'clock; I went out of the house, and never saw him any more.

SAWYER - GUILTY . Aged 23.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 25.

BUDD - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Of stealing from the person, but not with violence.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310512-174

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, MAY 17.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1164. JAMES MASH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 4lbs. weight of mutton, value 2s.; 1lb. weight of beef, value 6d.; 1 loaf of bread, value 10d., and 1 tureen, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Simmons ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 24. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310512-175

1165. THOMAS POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Mary Ann Comin .

GEORGE COWDEROY . I live in Holywell-lane, Shoreditch , and am a currier. On the 7th of May I was in my shop, and saw the prisoner and another boy standing close by the prosecutrix's, Mary Ann Comin 's shop - they were within a yard of it; I saw an arm reaching up to something - I then looked at my door, and saw the prisoner putting the shoes under his coat; I had not seen any thing done with regard to a nail at the prosecutrix's shop door; my deposition was read over to me when I signed it - the prisoner walked away a few paces, and then he ran; I pursued, and called Stop thief! he then dropped the shoes - Robert Stroulger picked them up, and gave them to me; I saw the prisoner in custody in a quarter of an hour or less - I had seen him before - he was an apprentice in the same street; I took the shoes to the prosecutrix, and laid them on the counter - the prisoner was brought back by the Policeman, and the shoes were given to the Policeman.

ROBERT STROULGER. I am the son of Robert Stroulger, of New Inn-yard, a wine-cooper. On the 7th of May I was in King John-court, which is about one hundred yards from Holywell-lane; I saw the prisoner running as fast as he could, with a pair of boots under his arm - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and pursued him; he threw down the boots - I took them up, and gave them to this gentleman.

JAMES GRADY. I am a Police-constable. On the 7th of May I was on duty in Shoreditch - I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running; I overtook him, and took him to the shop of Mrs. Comin - I there received these shoes.

MARY ANN COMIN. These are my shoes. I keep the shop in question - they had been placed on a nail, on a lath, inside the shop door - I had seen them safe about ten minutes before.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any thing about them, and I did not have them.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-176

1166. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Andrews .

SAMUEL ANDREWS. I am a waiter at the Delaware Arms . On the morning of the 26th of April, at a quarter before six o'clock, the prisoner came and asked for an empty pipe - I said he might take one off the mantel-piece- I had occasion to go from the tap-room to the kitchen, and when I returned he was gone; I had left a red cotton handkerchief on my hat in the tap-room - the handkerchief was then gone; I had given 2s. for the handkerchief the week before.

THOMAS HIGGS. I lodge at the Delaware Arms. In consequence of what I heard I went after the prisoner - I met with him in George-street, a quarter of a mile from the house, and asked him for the handkerchief which he took from the public-house; he said he had not got it, but he afterwards produced it from under his jacket.

JOHN WARD . I was a Police-constable, but have since

resigned. On the morning of the 26th of April the prisoner was given into my charge with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It was distress drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 48. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310512-177

1167. WILLIAM PENNYFATHER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 1 chest, value 1l.; 4 jackets, value 5l.; 12 pairs of trousers, value 8l.; 17 shirts, value 3l.; 10 pairs of stockings, value 12s.; 4 pairs of drawers, value 15s.; 4 waistcoats, value 30s.; 2 pairs of boots, value 30s.; 4 pairs of shoes, value 30s.; 9 books, value 30s.; 6 pillow-cases, value 4s.; 6 towels, value 4s.; 7 handkerchiefs, value 15s.; 1 flute, value 10s.; 4 blankets, value 15s.; 2 pillows, value 5s.; 1 quilt, value 5s.; 1 hammock, value 10s.; 3 caps, value 7s.; 1 shell, value 12s.; 9 pieces of silver foreign coin, value 15s., and 5 sovereigns , the property of Frederick Colepeper .

The prosecutor's name being Frederick Henry Colepeper , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310512-178

1168. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 1 cap, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Elizabeth Potterton , from the person of John Bardwell Potterton .

ELIZABETH POTTERTON. I am mother of John Bardwell Potterton - he will be ten years old next July. On Wednesday, the 4th of May, he left my house between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and he came back at near nine, without his cap, which he had on when he went out.

JOHN NEAL . I live in Philip-lane, with my mother I am ten years of age. On the 4th of May I was out with little Potterton, in Old-street - as we were going along, the prisoner took his cap off, and ran away with it; I had not seen him before, but I am sure he is the person - I saw his face when he took off the cap; I cried Stop thief! and saw him taken.

JOHN BARDWELL POTTERTON . I recollect being in Old-street ; the prisoner came and took off my cap, and ran away with it - I saw him in custody the same day, not long afterwards.

CAROLINE HURST. I live at No. 8, Elizabeth-court, Whitecross-street. On the 4th of May I was at the bottom of the court, and saw the prisoner run up the court; I saw Ann Gazeley pick up a cap behind a door in Mrs. Powell's passage - the prisoner ran in that direction.

ANN GAZELEY. I live in Elizabeth-court. I saw the prisoner come up the court - I found this cap in Mrs. Powell's passage, which is about thirty yards from Old-street.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner apprehended in Elizabeth-court - I took him, and received the cap from Ann Gazeley .

MRS. POTTERTON. To the best of my knowledge this is my son's cap, but I would not swear to it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310512-179

1169. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 1 watch, value 30s. , the goods of Victor Rodrigues .

The prisoner and the prosecutor being natives of Madras, the evidence was communicated by an interpreter.

WILLIAM JUDGE. I am a Thames Police-surveyor. On the 13th of May I went to a house in Cornwall- street, St. Georges' , in consequence of some information - I searched the prisoner there; after having found some articles about him, and some money, I noticed the state of the legs of his trousers; I turned them up, and found some silver near the knees - I took him to the watch-house; I asked what he had done with the watch - he said he did not steal it - it was Antonio stole it, and he pawned it at the corner of Mill-yard for 20s. - he showed me the shop; I found the watch there - the prisoner said that was the watch.

SARAH ROWLEY . I am sister to Mrs. Sowerby, a pawnbroker. On the 13th of May the prisoner brought in this watch - I was in the shop; he pawned it for 1l.

VICTOR RODRIGUES. I came from the East Indies, in the ship Oriental; the prisoner slept in my bed in a room in Cornwall-street. On the 13th of May I wound up my watch while he was in the room, and then put it into my chest - I went down to dress some victuals about half-past three o'clock, and at five I missed my watch - I had left the prisoner and Antonio in the room; I had put the key of my chest under the pillow of the bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was left in the room, but Antonio stole the watch while I was asleep - he then awoke me up, and said if I would go and pawn it I might have half the money, and he would have the other half.

JURY to VICTOR RODRIGUES. Q. What was the character of Antonio? A. I believe he had a good character.

COURT to WILLIAM JUDGE. Q. Did you take the prisoner to Antonio? A. I brought Antonio to the prisoner- he denied it, and the Magistrate discharged Antonio.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310512-180

1170. ANN SPILLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 1 shirt, value 6s., the goods of David Bultitude ; and 1 shirt, value 6s. , the goods of John Prophet .

DAVID BULTITUDE . I live in Chichester-place, St. Pancras , and am a green-grocer . On the morning of the 13th of May I saw the prisoner come out of my private-door with a bundle under her arm - I followed her, and in about two minutes she was stopped, half way up Cromer-street; I found two shirts in her bundle, one of them is mine - they were wet; Jemima Prophet is a washerwoman in my house - the other shirt was hers; my shirt had been given her to wash.

JEMIMA PROPHET. I am the wife of John Prophet . I had been employed in washing these shirts, and hung them up in the yard to dry - I never saw the prisoner till I heard the alarm.

ISAAC SPREADBOROUGH . I am a Police-constable. I received the prisoner, and took these two shirts from her apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in the house; a woman brought them to me, put them into my apron, and went away; I am a distressed widow.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-181

1171. JAMES BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 1 pair of sheets, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Allen .

MARY ALLEN. I am the wife of Thomas Allen - we

live in Belton-street ; the prisoner lodged with me for ten weeks. On the 11th of May he went into his room as usual, about four or five o'clock; some time afterwards he went out - I went into his room, and missed a pair of sheets; the prisoner did not return - I informed the officer, and he was taken on the 12th; these are my sheets.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not always conduct myself with propriety? A. Yes, you was honest as far as I saw.

WILLIAM CRUSH. I live in Museum-street, and am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of sheets, pawned by the prisoner on the 11th of May, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, for 5s.

CHARLES FREDERICK FIELD . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner at the Cock, in St. Giles' - he said he had lost the duplicate, but he had pawned the sheets, and took me to the place.

Prisoner. I have always maintained an honest character; being out of place I was driven to this by distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-182

1172. WILLIAM BURCH was indicted for bigamy .

JOHN PAUX . I am clerk of All Souls' church, Marylebone. I have the register of the marriages in that church - it is kept in my writing; (reads) "On the 16th of January, 1826, William Burch , of that parish, bachelor, and Ann Meeson , of the same parish, spinster, were married by banns;" it is signed by their names - I have no recollection of their persons.

WILLIAM CLAYTON . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner last Saturday week; on the Monday morning I was taking him to the office, and told him the charge- he then said he had been married before these two marriages, to a woman at Portsmouth; that she had been married three or four times before, and as she had no claim upon him, he married Ann Meeson; that they had a few words, and it was agreed that he should go his way and she hers - he said he married Ann Meeson at Marylebone church; he did not say when, only that it was after a voyage - he said his name was Burch, but he had gone by the name of Jones.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. He told you he had been married twice before? A. Yes - he said the first marriage took place at Portsmouth, and that wife was alive when he married Ann Meeson.

COURT to MR. PAUX. Q. Have you the entry of the marriage of any other William Burch and Ann Meeson ? A.No.

BETSEY HOLMAN . I live at No. 94, Pennington-street, St. George's. I married the prisoner at Shadwell church on the 31st of December, 1829; I had known him about six months.

WILLIAM CLAYTON re-examined. Q.Was any person brought forward answering the name of Ann Meeson ? A. Yes, on the examination, in the presence of the prisoner - she is in Court to-day, but she had not made her appearance before the prisoner said he had been married to Ann Meeson - I had no conversation with her; I do not recollect that the prisoner told me whether she was alive or dead.

JURY. Q. You took the prisoner on Saturday week? A. Yes, and on the Monday he said he married his first wife at Portsmouth; he said he married Ann Meeson at Marylebone church, and the words he said she made use of were, that he might go one way, and she the other- he repeated the same before the Magistrate; he asked who gave charge of him, and I said the mother of his last wife - he said he considered the only claimant upon him was his last wife; that he considered himself free from Ann Meeson , on account of her telling him he might go one way, and she the other.

MR. BARRY to BETSEY HOLMAN. Q. Did the prisoner lodge at your mother's house before your marriage? A. Yes - he had been on shore six months; my mother keeps a lodging-house for sailor s - the prisoner had been on board the William Fairlie East Indiaman; I had been on board once - that was a week before our marriage; I went with my cousin - we stopped on board all night, and slept between decks; I slept in a bed - I did not call down the prisoner in the night, but he came to me; this was after the publication of the hanns - he then went to my mother's house; he slept in a room by himself - he laid one night in the room in which I and my mother slept- he had a bed on the floor; I am sure it was another bed - my mother did not want to marry him, and put me off.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-183

1173. HENRY WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 11 loaves of bread, value 6s. 6d.; 1 piece of baize, value 2d., and 1 basket, value 3s. , the goods of William Robertson .

JOHN COOPER . I am a servant to Mrs. Wilkins, of Aldersgate-street - she is a baker. On the morning of the 10th of May I was going into Charterhouse-square, about eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner running out of the square with Mr. Robertson's basket on his back; I followed him to Bridgewater-gardens, where he put it down, and was going to take some bread out of it - I said he should not take any, the basket belonged to me; he said the basket was his own, and he would soon let me know that; he went down a court, put the basket down, and said if I followed him any further he would knock me down - he took the basket, and went down Playhouseyard; I saw an officer, and he took him.

THOMAS BRADFORD. I took the prisoner going along Playhouse-yard at a moderate pace, with this basket; I asked whose bread and basket it was - he said his own; we were counting the loaves - he tried to escape, and almost pulled his coat off; I put the basket down, took him into a butcher's shop, and secured him.

JOHN FORDHAM . I assisted in taking him - I found in the basket this green baize; I had seen him pass my shop with it before he was taken.

WILLIAM ROBERTSON. I was out delivering bread to my customers on the morning of the 16th of May; I had my basket of bread in Charterhouse-square - I left it for six or seven minutes, at the door of No.9; I left in it eleven 2lb. loaves, and two 4lb. loaves - I knew them to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The basket is my own and I bought the bread on Saffron-hill of a man who sold it.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-184

1174. WILLIAM WADMORE and THOMAS THURSTON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of

April , 27 yards of printed cotton, value 14s. , the goods of Joseph Saunders .

HENRY PIPER . I am in the employ of Joseph Saunders - he is a haberdasher in Walker's-court, Little Pulteney-street . I was in the corner of his shop on the 13th of April, near the window; I saw the prisoner standing at the corner of the window watching me, and four others were with him - I turned my head for a moment, and then saw Wadmore with a piece of our print in his apron going up the court; I went round the counter, and when I got to the door he was out of sight - I missed twenty-seven yards of print, which had been hanging at the door; I had seen it ten minutes before - I got a Police-constable the next day; I had in the mean time seen both the prisoners in Peter-street - I did not see Thurston do any thing at our shop; Wadmore did not see me speak to the Police-constable - when I went back Wadmore said to Thurston."It is one o'clock, I am going to have my dinner, and I will meet you here at six in the evening;" when he saw the Police-constable he ran away - I am quite clear that Thurston was in company with Wadmore looking at our window; I had seen them before that standing about in Peter-street.

JOHN JOSEPH GUNNELL. I am a Police-constable. I took Wadmore in Pye-street two days after this.

HENRY PIPER . The Police-constable I first spoke to is not here; he would not go into a house which the prisoner went into.

THOMAS RICHMOND. I apprehended Thurston in New-street.

Wadmore. I was not near the shop, and never saw Thurston that day; it is very strange he should take up five boys before me.

HENRY PIPER. There were three boys taken up besides the two prisoners - they were the boys I saw at our window.

Wadmore's Defence. A witness came and said she saw a boy take the print, but it was neither of us, and he ran another way.

WADMORE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

THURSTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310512-185

1175. HENRY SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 coat, value 1l. , the goods of James Tillman .

The prosecutor's name being James Edward Tillman , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310512-186

1176. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 1 hat, value 5s., and 4 ozs. of tea, value 1s., the goods of Henry Brand , from his person .

HENRY BRAND . I live at Lisson-grove, and am a coachman . On the 10th of April I was going home, and was in liquor, but knew what was passing - I met the prisoner in Upper George-street, Bryanstone-square ; I slipped down, and the prisoner and a woman came up to me; he said, "I will help you up, young man;" I said,"You need not trouble yourself," but they did help me, and one of them, I do not know which, took my hat off my head - it had a quarter of a pound of tea in it; another hat was put on my head - I have seen my own hat at the Police-office; it was worth about 7s. - I am sure it had not fallen off; the woman then went away, but the prisoner remained - I know they had been in company; they had walked together - I have always given the same account of it.

PATRICK BOURKE . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in Upper George-street, about two o'clock in the morning, on the 10th of April - I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner standing together; the prosecutor was drunk - the prisoner was in the act of putting his own hat on the prosecutor's head - I asked him what he was doing with the drunken man, and if he knew him; he said No, but that he saw him on the pavement, lifted him up, and he had put his own hat on him out of kindness - the prosecutor charged him with having taken his hat; one of my comrades came up - I left the prosecutor with him; the prisoner said if I would walk a little way he would give me the hat and tea - we walked on; he met a woman - he said to her "You must give up those things; the Policeman is very civil but he will not be done" - we then went down a mews, and found the hat behind some dung; the woman gave me the tea out of her bosom - I took them both to the station-house; the prisoner said she was his wife, and stated where they lived - the woman pointed the hat out; here is the hat and tea.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man laying on the pavement, quite intoxicated - a woman came up and said he was her husband; she took his hat up, and went away with it - I told the Policeman that a woman described herself as his wife, and I told him the way she went; we went and found her, and she gave up the hat - the man was drunk, and did not know who took it; I never saw the woman before - I never called her my wife.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310512-187

1177. HENRY HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of William Canan .

WILLIAM WESTERN . I am shopman to Mr. Gravenor, a hatter, in High-street, Shadwell. On the afternoon of the 12th of May I saw the prisoner at Mr. Canan's shop, opposite my master's - he is a shoemaker ; the prisoner looked round the door-post, and then unhooked a pair of boots from inside the post; he put them under his apron, and ran away - I stopped him, and took him back to the shop; he put the boots on the counter, and then I went away.

WILLIAM SMITH. I am shopman to Mr. William Canan , a shoemaker, who lives in High-street, Shadwell , opposite Western. The prisoner was brought back to our shop - I saw the boots; they were my master's - they had been safe a quarter of an hour before.

WILLIAM BUTLER. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and received the boots.

(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310512-188

1178. REBECCA EDWARDS and ANN JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 watch, value 30s., the goods of John Tannahill , from his person .

JOHN TANNAHILL. I am a tailor , and lodge at No. 1, Cross-court, Drury-lane. On the 28th of April I met the

prisoners in Long-acre - they asked me to go with them, and they conducted me to No. 4, Church-street, St. Giles' ; I had had some ale, but was none the worse for it - I went with them both into a room; Jones received 2s. from me, and they wished me to stop with them, but it not appearing a place I wished to be in, I declined stopping - Jones then left the room, and the other began to undress to go to bed, which I declined; I sat down on the bed, as there was no other convenience for sitting - I fell asleep, and awoke about five o'clock; the other prisoner was then gone, the door was open, and I missed my watch, which was safe when I fell asleep -Jones had then gone, and the door was bolted inside.

Edwards. He was very much in liquor - he had not a farthing more than the 2s., which he gave to Jones; he told me to take his watch to pawn. Witness. No, 1 did not, and in evidence to the contrary, my watch-pocket was cut - the ribbon was inside; my handkerchief was likewise stolen.

SAMUEL HAMPSTEAD. I am shopman to Mr. Nicholls, a pawnbroker, in Gray's Inn-lane. I have a silver watch, which was brought to our shop on the 29th of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, by the two prisoners - Jones pawned it for 14s.; she said she pawned it for George Baker , No. 24, Queen-street.

JAMES COLLINS. I am a Police-constable. I was applied to by the prosecutor to go to No. 4, Church-street, where I found Edwards in the first floor room - the prosecutor pointed it out to me: I found Jones in the floor above -Edwards was some time before she opened the door; I asked her for the young man's watch - she said she had no watch of his; I then asked her for the duplicate - she said she had no duplicate but what was her own; I said she must go with me to the station-house - she said why did not I take the other girl as well as her; I found this bag laying on the table, and in it the duplicate of this watch - I then went up stairs with her, and she knocked at Jones' door; I was asked what was wanted - I said I wanted her respecting a watch; she said would I allow her to dress herself - I said, certainly; I then took her to the station - it is not a house of ill-fame; it is for travellers and working people - here are the prosecutor's trousers; the watch-pocket appears to be torn.

SAMUEL HAMPSTEAD. This is the duplicate I gave for the watch.

The prisoners put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor h