Old Bailey Proceedings, 7th April 1831.
Reference Number: 18310407
Reference Number: f18310407-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN KEY , MAYOR.

FOURTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY,

ON THURSDAY, THE 7th DAY OF APRIL, 1831, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER. London: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY STOKES & TITTERTON, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE,

1831.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN KEY , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Charles Lord Tenterden, Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; John Ansley, Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Christopher Smith, Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Henry Winchester , Esq.; William Tayler Copeland, Esq.; and Thomas Kelly, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justice of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Sidney Mount Cassel ,

Edward Wentworth ,

Richard Arnold .

Philip Farebrother ,

Richard Heare , Jun,

Wm. Parker Nutt ,

William Hone ,

George Orchard ,

Henry C. Harford ,

Henry Langton ,

William Nicholls ,

James Goodwin .

Second

George Ritchie ,

William Choppin ,

Daniel Hazleden ,

John Harris ,

William Lewis ,

Robert Laidlaw ,

George Rowley ,

John Payne ,

Charles Hood ,

William Smith

Josiah Nice ,

John Ellerby .

MIDDLESEX JURIES

First

John Lamb ,

Richard Lambert ,

John Lloyd ,

James Lahee ,

Thomas Latter ,

Henry Kilby ,

John Knill ,

Charles Kingston ,

William Kensitt ,

George Thos. Keys ,

William Langdod ,

John King .

Second

Stephen Law ,

William Loggins ,

Joseph Lugg ,

Joseph Lipscomb ,

Thomas Larner ,

Samuel Laney ,

John Kendal ,

George Little ,

John Kelly ,

Thomas Lockington ,

James Littlejohn ,

John Lowe .

Third

Robert Laxton ,

James Large ,

John Lucas ,

Thomas Lewis ,

Ezra Livermore ,

Thomas Lodge ,

John Layfield ,

William Lightfoot ,

Richard Lloyd ,

George Lone ,

William Leader ,

David Lord .

Fourth

Samuel Keaton ,

Samuel King ,

Samuel M. Kipps ,

Robert Larkin ,

William Lerrow ,

Benjamin King ,

John Kelly ,

John Kennedy ,

Jeremiah L. Keeble ,

Samuel Kirby ,

Daniel Kitching ,

Isaac Kirby .

Fifth

John Lamb ,

James Linney ,

John Loveridge ,

Thomas Lodge ,

George Lee ,

James Livesey ,

Joseph Lumley ,

John Lane ,

Edward Linford ,

Robert Lock ,

James Lawrence ,

John Wm. Langley .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 7, 1831.

KEY, MAYOR - FOURTH SESSION.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

Reference Number: t18310407-1

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

698. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , at St. Faith, under St. Paul's, 5 sacks, value 10s., and 600lbs. of fat, value 10l., the goods of William Collingwood , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH BRASSINGTON . I am in the service of Mr. William Collingwood - he is a butcher , and lives at No. 10, Newgate-market ; he and his family reside in the house. On the 25th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came there, and asked for some fat; I told him it was ready, and he took away five sacks of fat - I heard it thrown into a cart, but I did not see it: I had known him before - he used to fetch Mr. Morgan's fat, and I thought he came from him then; there was another female servant at home at the time.

Cross-examined by Mr. CLARKSON. Q.Have you always told the same story? A. Yes, Sir, as far as I could- I was examined three times; they asked if I heard it thrown into a cart, and I said Yes, that was on the first examination; I said I thought the person had a smock-frock on, but I was not rightly sure, and did not swear to that - he had a fustian jacket on, but I did not swear particularly to his dress; I do not know that I stated to the Magistrate that he had a shooting jacket on - I said a fustian jacket; I did not say it was a shooting-jacket - (he appeared to me to be in a smock-frock) but he had been in the habit of wearing such clothes; I did not say I did not know the man, though I believed him to be the prisoner, nor any thing of the kind - the gentleman asked if that was the prisoner, and I said Yes; I do not know how I came to be examined three times - I never said I only believed him to be the man.

Q. Now, which had the man on, a fustian jacket, or what you have now called a smock-frock? A. I thought he had a smock-frock on; I will swear he had a fustain jacket on - I have seen a Mr. Colney; I do not know whether he was examined before the Magistrate - he took his oath before the Magistrate.

COURT. Q. Should you have given a stranger your master's fat? A. No, Sir; I had been about two months in the place, and during that time I had seen him come backwards and forwards for the fat several times.

GEORGE MORGAN . I am a tallow-chandler, and have had fat of Mr. Collingwood; the prisoner had been in my service, and was employed to get fat from there, but I had discharged him on the 20th of February.

Cross-examined. Q.How long had he been in your service? A.Two months, or rather more.

WILLIAM COLLINGWOOD. I am a butcher - this is my dwelling-house; it is in the parish of St. Faith, under St. Paul's. I had sold fat to Mr. Morgan for four weeks, but Messrs. Marshalls had had it before him, and they had it again for a week before the 25th of February, and should have had it that day - the prisoner used to come for the fat for Mr. Morgan; when I went out on the 25th of February I saw the five sacks with a note on them, and when I returned home in the evening they were gone; the fat was worth rather more than 10l. - the next morning Mr. Marshall sent to know why he had not had the fat, and I sent for my servant to inquire about it - I was present when the prisoner was taken - he did not deny it, but said it was a pretty go.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you state to the Magistrate that the prisoner said it was a pretty go? A. I did not- he was taken in a turning up Hanway-yard, a place called Pepys-court, I believe, in the first floor of a house in which he lived; the Policeman was with me at the time, and Mr. Morgan, to recognize him - the fat had been sold to Messrs. Marshalls for a week before the 25th of February, and they were to have it that day; there was a note on the sacks stating the weight - I went out about six o'clock in the evening, but left no orders whatever; it was left for Messrs. Marshalls, and booked in their names; I left Brassington in the house, and my family; in general my men are there when the fat is fetched, but they were gone then - the prisoner was examined before the Magistrate; he was remanded to give an opportunity of getting hold of the receiver if we could - we have no doubt who was the receiver: we searched the premises of Mr. Colney, and we summoned him before the Magistrate - I do not remember charging him with any offence.

Q. Do not you know you examined him as a witness against the prisoner? A. I deny it - I do not know whether he was sworn; his examination was taken down - we have no hesitation in saying he was the receiver of the fat; I told the Magistrate I had no hesitation in saying that the fat went to Colney's - I did not see it go there; I never saw Colney before we searched his premises - Colney said no

fat had come into his house for twelve minutes; we summoned him to answer before the Policeman, who swore he saw the prisoner delivering fat at Colney's that night.

Q. Then it was as a criminal you took him there? A. I have no doubt he was one; I told the Magistrate my opinion of him; I did not have him examined on his oath against the prisoner - I believe his deposition was taken down, but I do not remember that he was sworn; he was not a witness of mine.

Q.Did you not cause Colney to be taken before the Magistrate, and there examined as a witness against the prisoner? A.Certainly not, he was examined as a receiver - I cannot remember whether Brassington stated on the first examination whether the man had a fustian jacket or a smock-frock on; it is most likely that I had some conversation with her between the first and second examination- I think the officer had told me before the second examination that the man he saw at Colney's shop had a smockfrock on; I might probably tell that to Brassington - I do not know whether before I said that she said he had a fustain jacket on - I told her he had a smock-frock on, because the person where the prisoner lived said he had on a smock-frock when he went from the premises, which was a thing he never had on before; I think before that Brassington had said the man had on a fustain jacket, but I would not take upon me to swear which she said.

JOHN YOUNG . I took the prisoner in Pepys-court -I asked where he had been on the 25th; he said over at Lambeth, and not at Newgate-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you summon Colney? A. He was summoned by the Magistrate, and appeared on the second examination - he was sworn, and the clerk was present, but I cannot say whether what he said was taken down - I have a doubt of it; I cannot say whether he was examined as a witness - the prisoner was not at the bar when he was examined - I swear that; it was on the second examination - the prisoner was examined first, and left the room in charge of the officer; then Colney was called up, and accused of receiving stolen property - I cannot swear that; he was accused of being a receiver, and then examined upon oath; I do not know whether his examination was taken in writing - I did not see him put his name to it: there was a third examination: Colney was placed in temporary custody for about five minutes - I am not the person who saw the prisoner take a cart of fat to Colney's house; Colney denied that any fat had been taken to his house - I do not recollect that he was present on the third examination, he might have been - I do not know whether there was any attempt on the part of any other officer to apprehended him.

JURY. Q. Did you state what he said about where he had been on the 25th? A. Yes, he said he had been at Lambeth, and not at Newgate-street.

WILLIAM BENTON . I live at No. 4, Lower-marsh, Lambeth - I have a horse and cart which I let out. On the evening of the 25th of February, about six o'clock, the prisoner and another person came to my house; the prisoner had a white smock-frock on, and a long apron - he said he wanted my horse and cart to fetch some fat from Westminster; I let him have it - the other person paid me, and they went away.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? A.Two or three years; he had a very respectable pesses with him, or I do not know that I should have lent it him.

JOSEPH VINTON . I was a Policeman, but have left. On the 25th of February, between half-past six and half-past seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner at Strutton-ground, Westminster, carrying a sack into Colney's shop - he had a white smock-frock on, and a white apron; I do not know what was in the sack.

Cross-examined. Q.Were you discharged from the Police? A. No, I left it to go after a situation which I have not got, but I shall have it; it is gardening at Mr. Appleton's, at Bromley - I left the Police about a month ago; I cannot say the day - I was ill at the time, and Mr. Appleton promised me a situation; I shall go to it, but I do not think proper till I have done my business in London; I did not hear that the Magistrate was about to discharge Colney till I was examined - I was applied to by an officer of the E. division to appear as a witness in the case; I believe the first time the whole of my statement was not taken down; they took a part of it - I was examined as a witness; Young came to our watch-house two days before the examination, and asked who was on duty there, and I recollected the circumstance of the prisoner carrying in the sack, and running against a boy; when I got to Hatton-garden I identified the prisoner as being the person who carried the sack - I looked in his face, and knew him - then a summons was issued for Colney to come; he did not contradict on his oath, every word I said - he denied that the prisoner had been there that evening - I do not know whether Colney was charged as a receiver; I was not present all the time of the examination - I did not see what he said taken down in writing; he was allowed to go home after it was settled- I only saw him once at the office; I have seen him several times at his shop in Strutton-ground.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not call my witnesses to character together, the case has come on so quickly.

ROBERT COLMEY . I live at No. 50, Strutton-ground, Westminster. I received a summons to attend before the Justice when the prisoner was to be examined; it was a fortnight or three weeks ago; I cannot say whether I was summoned as a witness or charged with any offence; I do not think the summons specified that, it ordered me to be and appear before the Magistrate; I was not taken into custody - no charge was preferred against me - I saw Mr. Collingwood there; I do not recollect that he told the Magistrate I was the receiver - I was examined and sworn by the clerk; the prisoner was before the Magistrate at the time - I did not sign any thing after I was sworn; I heard the officer state that he saw the prisoner carrying a sack into my house on the night of the 25th of February, but I do not know what I was summoned for, and I think he was mistaken - it was not true; I told the Magistrate it was not true; I was allowed to go home - I did not see the prisoner on the night of the 25th of February, nor for twelve months before, or longer.

COURT. Q. What is your trade? A. An oil and colourman; I recollect that on the 25th of February I received some logwood of a person over the water - I mentioned it to him, and he recollected it perfectly well; the young man who brought it is here - I asked him to step with me;

he was decently dressed, but I really cannot tell what coloured coat he had on - he had no smock-frock on; I have melted fat.

[April 8.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18310407-2

First Middlesex Jury,

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

699. GEORGE HENRY RALPH and GEORGE POTTER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sherwood Cushion , on the 28th of November , at St. Leonard, Bromley, and stealing therein 10 silver spoons, value 3l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 1 tea-caddy. value 3s.; 1 bonnet, value 2s.; 6 table-cloths, value 2l. 8s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; I pair of spectacles, value 10s.; 1 whip, value 2s.; 5 pairs of boots, value 50s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 10s., and 1 basket, value 3s., his property; 2 pairs of shoes, value 10s.; 1 umbrella, value 7s., and 1 hat, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Cushion .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

MARIA CUSHION . I am the daughter of Sherwood Cushion, who lives at Bromley, in the parish of St.Leonard, Bromley , Middlesex - he occupies the house. I was at home on Saturday, the 27th of November last - the articles enumerated in the indictment were all safe in the house that night; they were all in the kitchen - I am confident the house was locked up safe that night; I was the last person in the wash-house that night - the window was fast, and the bolts in the door; I came down first in the morning, between seven and eight o'clock, and discovered the robbery- on preparing breakfast, in about half an hour, I missed the spoons; I found a small pane of glass taken out of the wash-house window, exactly over the handle of the door, and the bolts of the door opened - the pane of glass laid in the yard, outside the window; I saw part of the property afterwards at Lambeth-street.

COURT. Q. What sort of a yard is this? A. It is a small yard; there is a large garden, which is parted from the yard by a paling, and at the end of the garden is a wall - there is a wall all round the garden; I looked to see if there were any footsteps, but it had rained very hard, and was a very tempestuous night, and there were no footsteps.

ROBERT CUSHION. I am the last witness' brother, and son of the prosecutor, who is clerk at Currie's distillery, at Bromley. I was at home on the night of the 27th of November - I cannot speak to the house being secured; I went to bed first, and know my own property was safe at night - my umbrella, hat, two pairs of high ancle shoes, and a pair of low shoes were all in the kitchen when I went to bed; I have seen some of them since.

EDWARD PALMER . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended the prisoners on the 17th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, near Woodford-bridge -I found a crow-bar on Potter, a whole candle in his pocket, a sack round his body, and a handkerchief in his pocket; I produce them - I asked him where he was going; Ralph said they were going to Stratford - I felt Potter, and asked what he had got under his smock-frock; he said his walking-stick, but I found it was a crow-bar, which is here -Ralph had a knife slung round his neck with a string, and a crow-bar in his pocket - I found a pair of shoes on his feet; I have stated all he said to me that night.

Potter. Q.Where did you find the sack? Did you not take it out of Ralph's pocket? A. No, it was next your shirt.

Ralph. You took it out of my pocket.

JAMES WALKER . I am a Bow-street foot patrol. On the 17th of December I was with Palmer, when the prisoners were taken; I have heard Palmer examined - what he has said is correct: I saw the sack found on Potter, between his waistcoat and shirt, and he had a handkerchief; a pair of shoes were taken from Ralph; I saw Lea take a pair of shoes from Potter at Ilford, after they were confined.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 1st of January I saw the prisoners before the Magistrate at Ilford, under examination, and had some conversation with both of them: I saw them in the lock-up room, before they went into the Magistrate's presence, and asked Potter where he got a handkerchief which I took off his neck - he said he had bought it at Deptford several months ago; I found a pair of ancle shoes on his feet - I took them off, and he said he bought them at Deptford, and had had them some months; I said nothing more to him then - I looked into Ralph's hat, and found a handkerchief, which I took from him, and asked where he got it; he said Potter gave it to him - Potter was present, and made no reply to it; I then took a pair of shoes off Ralph's feet, and asked him where he got them - he said they were made abroad - that he had them when on board a ship; I returned them to him, and Palmer afterwards took them from him - I believe those produced to be the same; I have no doubt of it - I asked where they lived; they both said they lived at Deptford - I received a letter that day, and showed it to the prisoners, about a fortnight or three weeks afterwards, at the lock-up room at Lambeth-street; I showed it to Ralph, and asked him if he had written a letter to Mary Berry - he said No, he could not write himself, but he and Potter had got one written when they were in Barking prison; Potter was in the lock-up-room, and he was at the door - I cannot say whether Potter could hear our conversation; I showed Ralph the letter - he said that both his and Potter's names were to it: I had received it from Miller, the governor of Barking gaol. (Letter read.)

Barking Gaol, 20th N - , 1830.

MRS. BERRY, - I am sorry to inform you that on Friday last, as we were coming towards home, the patrol took us up, and got us committed to Barking gaol for another hearing on Saturday week; I will be very much obliged to you if you will send us some tobacco - we shall be glad if you will come and see us, and bring Charles' discharge; I hope you will not neglect to come as quick as possible, for we are very unhappy at this time - we had our two copper-strippers with us, and they want to say that they are housebreaking tools, until a man came and told them what the use of them were; then we were remanded for a fortnight, to have another hearing, or else they were going to commit us for three months, under the Vagrant Act. So no more at present, from yours, Cus. POTTER and GEO. RALPH.

ROBERT CUSHION . I know these high shoes by this black leather, which is a particular mark; I had had them about twelve months, but had not worn them more than three months - they have been very much worn since I

lost them, but still I know them by this mark; and these low shoes I have no doubt are mine, but I cannot speak positively to them - they have been very much worn since lost.

MARIA CUSHION . (Looking at the handkerchief found in Potter's pocket) I know this handkerchief - it was in the dresser drawer; I had seen it in the house shortly before; it was very much torn in the middle when they took it - I also know these two other handkerchiefs; they were in the house on the night of the 27th.

JAMES LEA. I took one of these handkerchiefs from Potter, and the other out of Ralph's hat.

MARIA CUSHION . I am quite sure of these two handkerchiefs, they are hemmed - some part of the family hemmed them; I believe it was my youngest sister's work.

SAMUEL PRENDERGASS . I belong to Lambeth-street office. I was at Barking gaol on Friday, the 28th of January, and saw the prisoner Ralph in a private-room, belonging to Mr. Miller, the governor; I was sent there by Mr. Walker, the Magistrate - when Ralph was brought before me, I told him I came down because I heard he wished to make some disclosure; Mr. Miller said that he(Miller) had received some information about some burglaries being committed - I then asked Ralph whether he was willing to make any disclosure to me - I told him who I was; he at first said No; he then said,

"I have told Mr. Miller all I wish to say;" Mr. Miller said, "Have you any objection to tell this person what you said to me?" he replied, "I have no objection to tell him what I have stated to you;" I then told him that I held out no threat or promise to him, but whatever he chose to mention I would take down, and I took it down as he related it - here is the paper; I have had it in my possession ever since - (reads.)

"On the following Friday we all met at Smith's house, crossed over the water at Deptford, to the Isle of Dogs; we stopped at two or three public-houses and had some beer and gin, which Smith paid for - we went to Bromley; we got over a gentleman's garden wall - the wall was very high at the top of the garden, we got over the pales; we got over another, to the back of the house - Smith broke a pane of glass and undid the door; Potter and myself then entered - we went through the washhouse into a room, and took a woman's bonnet and an umbrella; in a cupboard in the same room, we took two table-spoons, about eight or ten tea-spoons, a pair of sugar-tongs, an old tea-caddy, two or three table-cloths, six cotton handkerchiefs, a copper teakettle, an eye-glass, two half quartern loaves, two eye-glasses,(spectacles) a cake, half a cheese, a small riding whip, a basket, a little glass, hanging in the summer-house, a fustian jacket, and a beaver hat - we got back to Deptford on Sunday morning; I think it was Smith took the property home - on Monday, Smith gave me 1l. 3s., and asked me if I was satisfied - I said Yes; Potter had the same - Smith said, 'I shall have three pairs of boots, and you and Potter may have the other boots, shoes, and handkerchiefs,' we had part of them on when taken from us in the gaol; at this time Smith's wife came in with a lot of duplicates, and threw them in the fire."

Ralph. Q. Did not you and Miller sit down and write that yourselves, and then wanted me to sign my name? A. I told him to write his name, and he refused - he made that statement to me.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Derham, a pawnbroker, of Deptford. I produce two pairs of boots, pawned on Monday, the 29th of November - I took them in from a man who gave his name as George Thompson ; I asked if they were his own - he said No, that they belonged to a man named Robert Field , and that each of them lived at No. 5, Old King-street; I do not think it was either of the prisoners.

SHERWOOD CUSHION. I have no doubt of both these pairs of boots beings mine - I had them on the 27th of November.

ABRAHAM ROBINS . I am a boot and shoemaker, and live at Bow, in Middlesex. I know these two pairs of boots - I believe I made them for Mr. Cushion, and I made these low shoes for young Mr. Cushion; they are all shoes and boots of my make.

RICHARD PARRY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Flagon-row, Deptford. I produce a pair of boots and an umbrella, which I took in pawn of a young woman named Harrington, whom I knew - she lived in King-street, Deptford; she said she pawned them for a person named Smith - the umbrella was pawned on the 8th of December, and the boots on the 24th - I did not take in the umbrella, and do not know who pawned it; I have known Harrington several years - she always gave her residence in King-street; I know her mother-in-law lives in King-street - her name is Harrington; here is a tea-caddy produced by Lea - I took that in from a person of the name of Smith, on the 29th of November; I gave it to Prendergass to take before the Magistrates, with a pair of spectacles, in the name of Berry - I did not take them in- I produce the duplicate which was attached to them; I made a further advance on the boots on the 30th of December, to Harrington.

SHERWOOD CUSHION. These boots are mine, also the tea-caddy and spectacles - I know them well.

ROBERT CUSHION . This is my umbrella.

SARAH MURRAY . I am a widow, and lived in New-street, Deptford, in November and December. I know the two prisoners perfectly well, and I know Mary Berry and Harrington very well - in December last the two prisoners lived directly opposite my house, with those two women, and Smith and his wife - the whole six lived together.

COURT. Q. How lately did you see Berry there? A. I cannot recollect - it was after Christmas.

FRANCES BEARD . I am single, and live in King-street. Deptford. I know Ralph, but not Potter - I know Marry Harrington and Mary Berry perfectly well; I saw both of those women in company with Ralph some time before Christmas, on the Greenwich-road, and I have since that seen them together in King-street - I do not know Potter.

Ralph's Defence. Mr. Prendergass came to me in Barking gaol - he sat down in a chair; Mr. Miller pulled out a sheet of paper, gave it him, and he began to write - I do not know what, and after he wrote it, Mr. Miller asked me if I was dry; I said not particularly - he sent the turnkey down to draw me the best there was in the cellar - I drank it; he kept writing, I do not know what - after he had finished it, they wanted me to sign my name to it - I would not, and did not.

Potter's Defence. I know nothing about it; the shoes

I had on my feet, and the handkerchief I bought at Deptford for 4s.

One witness gave Ralph a good character.

RALPH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

[Apr.7.] POTTER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of the absence of personal violence.

Reference Number: t18310407-3

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

700. THOMAS WALL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Carson , on the 26th of January , at Enfield, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 50s. , the goods of the said Mary Carson .

MARY CARSON. I live in Baker-street, Enfield , and keep a shop there; my sister, Amelia Pond , lives with me. On the night before the robbery, which was on the 26th of January, I remember going to bed, about ten o'clock; my sister was the last person up - we went to bed much about the same time, and left the doors and windows all secure; I had a watch in my possession, which I left over night in the table drawer in the parlour below stairs; I found it gone in the morning when I went to look for it; I got up about nine o'clock - when I first came down we found every-thing as we had left it the night before, as we thought, and I had my breakfast; I missed the watch as soon as I came down, about nine o'clock, and looking about afterwards I found the bricks had been taken out at the end of the house, and an opening made large enough for a man to get in at - I have since had my watch shown to me, and know it again; (looking at it) - this is it; there was the word "Aberdeen" on it, and I find that there now.

AMELIA POND. I am sister to the last witness, and stop at her house sometimes. We went to bed nearly together on the 26th of January - I fastened the house up myself; there was no hole in the brick-work then - when I got up in the morning, after some time, my sister's watch was missing - on examination a hole was found in the brick-work; I had gone to town, and it was bricked up before I returned - I had not seen it before I went; I had left some milk in a jug in the back kitchen, and when I got up in the morning the milk was gone, and I found beer in the jug - I know my sister's watch; I had taken it to Ogston, the watch-maker, to offer to sell it to him, and he was to come to the house to look at it.

GEORGE OGSTON . I am a watch-maker, and live at Enfield. Pond brought me a watch to sell about the middle of January - I told her to take it home, and I would call and talk about it the first time I came that way; I saw it sufficiently to identify it - I am perfectly sure that this is the watch.

PHILIP ANTHONY . I am a journeyman baker. In January I was employed by Mr. Young, a baker, at Enfield- the prisoner was in the same employ; he was apprehended on the 16th of February, and I saw a watch in his possession - I inquired how he came by it, and he said it was formerly his grandfather's, and his grandmother had given it to him since his death; (looking at it) this is the same watch - I have not the least doubt of it.

JOHN MEAD . I am constable of Enfield. I took the prisoner into custody in February, and while he was in my custody this watch was delivered to me; I afterwards attended before Dr. Creswell, the Magistrate, and heard the depositions given by the witnesses, in the prisoner's hearing - nothing whatever was said to induce him to make a confession; I heard what he said before the justice, saw it taken down, and saw Dr. Creswell put his name to it -(read.)

"The prisoner, being asked what he has to say in his Defence, says 'I did steal the watch.'

(Signed) D. CRESWELL."

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

[April 7.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth.

Reference Number: t18310407-4

First Middlesex Jury, Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

701. MARY McMAHON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , at St. James, Westminster, 1 watch, value 20l.; 1 coat, value 4l., and 1 dress, value 2l., the goods of Henry Ward , in the dwelling-house of Augustus Hoffman ; and JOHN JONES and CATHERINE COLLINS were indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

EMMA MATILDA WARD . I am the wife of Henry Ward - we lodge at Mr. Augustus Hoffman 's, in Broad-street, Golden-square, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . The prisoner McMahon lived with us as servant from the 29th of January to the 15th of March - I wound my watch up between nine and ten o'clock that night, gave it to her, and told her to put it under my pillow; I sent her out on an errand, and as she did not return I went to look at the watch to see how long she had been gone, and it was not there; I afterwards saw it at Union-hall.

PARSLOW ALLEN . I am an officer of the Police. I met the three prisoners on the 15th of March, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, in Bermondsey-street, near Tooley-street, between three and four miles from Golden-square -Jones had got a coat tied up in an apron or handkerchief; Collins had a gown tied up in something - McMahon had nothing that I saw then; I asked Jones what he had in his bundle - he said a coat; I examined and found it was a very good coat, lined with fur - I asked Collins what she had; she said a gown, and it was so - I asked them where they had brought the things from; they said from Lisson-grove, and were going to take the coat on board a ship, that the gown was the woman's sister's - I told them I should take them to the station-house; they consented to go-in going along we met Hack, the inspector; he examined the coat and gown, and told me to take them on to the station, which I did - I showed the things to him there; I then searched McMahon, and found a gold watch inside her cap.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Who said they brought it from Lisson-grove? A.They all said so; the two women said they were sisters, and that Jones was their brother - she had the gown in her hand not concealed at all.

THOMAS HACK. I am inspector of the Police. I met Allen in conversation with the three prisoners - he said he had stopped them to inquire what they had got; I put my hand into Jones' bundle, and found the coat was a very valuable one - I then examined the bundle containing the gown, which Collins said her sister had given her; I told Allen to take them to the station - I followed them there, ordered him to search them, and done up in the knot of McMahon's hair, I saw him find this gold watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the distance from the prosecutor's house to where they were taken? A. About two miles and a half or three miles, I should think.

MRS. WARD. This is my watch; I had it a few days after McMahon came into my service - it cost about thirty-five guineas; it is no doubt worth thirty guineas - this is my husband's coat; I saw it that morning in one of the drawers in the bed-room - this gown I saw about two o'clock, laying on my bed; I did not miss any thing except the watch till the morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it your gown? A. Yes - it cost nearly 4l.; I wore it but once or twice - the coat has been worn a good deal, but was very expensive when made.

McMahon's Defence. The other two prisoners are innocent.

Collins and Jones put in the following written Defence:- "On the 15th of March, about eleven o'clock at night, as John Jones and I were returning from the Olympic theatre, we met Mary McMahon , who asked us to go with her, as she was going to Chatham on business for her mistress; we said it was too late, and wondered what she could go for - she told us it was of consequence, and that she should go as quick as she could; she at last persuaded us to accompany her - we walked on as far as Westminster-bridge; she then said she was tired of carrying the bundles, and asked us to carry one each, which we did, and kept on until we came to Bermondsey-street, where a Policeman stopped us, and asked what was in the bundles - we replied only some things we were taking to Chatham; he then searched the bundles - in one was a merino dress and a velvet cape, in the other a coat; in the mean time the inspector came up, and ordered us all to be taken to the station-house - when we got there they asked our names, and Mary McMahon told us to say we were sisters, and John Jones our brother; so we all said our name was Jones; while the night-constable was talking to us, the Policeman said he heard the ticking of a watch, which was afterwards found on the person of Mary McMahon - we were then locked up till the morning; after we were locked up about two hours, she told me she had stolen the things from her mistress - I told her she ought not to have brought us into trouble, as most likely we should all suffer for it; in the morning we all gave our right names, and Mary McMahon acknowledged she had taken all the things from her mistress, and gave her address to the Policeman; we were then sent to Union-hall- the Magistrate there said the case must be taken to the County where the robbery was committed; we were then taken to the office at Marlborough-street - the Magistrate asked Mary McMahon what she had to say for herself; she said she was guilty of robbing her mistress, and that she met John Jones and me as before stated - we were then fully committed for trial."

McMAHON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

[April 7.] Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-5

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

702. JOSEPH COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , at St. Pancras, 20 shillings, and one 5l. Bank note, the property of John Dearlove , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN DEARLOVE. I live in Paul's-terrace, Camden-town, in the parish of St. Pancras , and am a baker . I knew the prisoner by seeing him about the neighbourhood; I never saw him at my own house. On Tuesday, the 15th of March, at seven o'clock in the morning, I missed all my silver out of my till; it was 20s. or 30s., and a 5l. Bank note out of my breeches pocket - the till was in my shop, and my breeches up stairs on the bed; somebody must have come up stairs - I had the 5l. note safe at nine o'clock at night I am quite sure; the keys of the kitchen, the shop, and the till were all brought down stairs; I found them in the doors and in the till - two of the keys were in the back room, and the key of the till was in my bed-room the night before; I slept with my little boy, who got up before me - he is twelve or thirteen years old; Gorton, the Policeman, has since shown me my note, (looking at one), this is it - I have written Mrs. Jones, Randall-street, on it, of whom I took it at six o'clock the night before.

JOHN DEARLOVE , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son, and slept with him. I got up about seven o'clock in the morning, and when I came down into the shop, I found the till drawn out and put on the counter; some papers and a knife laid on the counter - I had heard nobody come into the bed-room in the night.

Q. Was any body up in the house when you came down? A.Frederick Hardy, the journeyman, was at work in the bakehouse under the shop - he is not here; he works for my father now.

EMERY MOORE . I am a tailor, and live at No. 47, Oxford-street. On the 15th of March, about seven or eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to me and bought a pair of trousers and a waistcoat - he gave me a 5l. note: this is it (looking at one) - I wrote on it the name and address he gave me, and who he worked for; I have written"John Watts, No. 19, Barbican, at Mr. Gillett's;" I am sure he is the person - I never saw him before; the things came to 23s., and I gave him three sovereigns and a half and some silver in change.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I keep the Black Horse, Kentish-town, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Dearlove's, the prisoner lodged with me ever since about Christmas - he was a journeyman baker, as I understood from him. I remember his going out on the Monday night, the 14th of March, at eleven o'clock, when I shut up - he did not return that night; I fastened up the house - he came the following morning rather intoxicated, and treated a person with something to drink at my house - he paid me 7s. 6d., which he owed me - I said he was rather flush of money that morning; he said he had met an uncle that morning, and drew him of 1l. - I heard him ask a man in the evening to accompany him to meet his uncle in Oxford-street; it was a man named Devereux, and another whose name I do not recollect.

JOHN GORTON . I am a constable. I got the note produced from the Bank of England.

[April 7.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18310407-6

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

703. THOMAS SMITH , ELIZABETH SMITH and LOUISA AKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , at St. Marylebone, 2 sovereigns and three 5l. Bank-notes, the property of Richard Phelps , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD PHELPS. I am a paper-stainer , and live at

No. 67, Earl-street, Lisson-grove , in the parish of St. Marylebone, and am a housekeeper . On the 18th of October I had occasion to sell some stock, and my broker paid me 62l. 15s. 6d. by a cheque on his banker; I received eight 5l. notes, and the rest in cash - I delivered the notes to my wife to put away for me; I did not notice the numbers of them myself - I only know the number of one. and I have seen that one since (looking at two 5l. notes produced by George Dyer) - I know both these to be the notes I gave to my wife; one is No. 17.745, dated the 26th of August, 1830, and the other No. 27,469, dated the 27th of August; here is another note, No. 18,097, dated the 26th of August, 1830 - I know this to he one of those I lost, I am sure of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q.How do you know it? A. I am positive of it: I took two away from the eight, and this was left - I could not have told the numbers of these notes before I saw them, but I can safely say this is my note; there is no writing on it - my wife had deposited the notes in the drawer.

COURT. Q.Are you sure you gave her the same notes as you received? A.Quite certain.

ELIZABETH PHELPS . I am the prosecutor's wife. When he sold out the stock he delivered me eight 5l. notes to take care of - I paid one away to my landlord, and one for my child's clothes; nobody else lived in our house - I know all the prisoners; the females are daughters of a woman named Harbour, and the man is the husband of one of them; in February I came to the Old Bailey with Mrs. Harbour and the prisoners to give a character to one of Harbour's daughters, who was on trial - we all returned together to my house; I entertained them with dinner, and sent Thomas Smith out for some beer - I gave him a sovereign to change to pay for it; I took it out of the front of the drawer - the notes were in a little box in the same drawer, but not in the same place - when Smith brought back the change I put it into my pocket; after dining I found myself very ill, and was obliged to be put to bed -Thomas Smith went into the room with me; all the prisoners and Mrs. Harbour were in my apartment at the latest time I have any recollection of; I believe it was between three and four o'clock that I was put to bed; when I returned home from the Old Bailey I did not look for the notes - I saw them that morning before I came here; I am sure they were there when I came out with the prisoners - when I got home I found nobody there, except my own family; I have no reason to suppose any thing had been done to the notes at the time I became insensible- I have every reason to believe they were safe; the next morning I missed three of the notes - there were only two remaining, and they were in the place where I had put the whole - the prisoners were apprehended on the 24th; it was Tuesday, the 22nd, that I came here with Mrs. Harbour, and on the Wednesday morning I missed the notes; it was after I came from the Old Bailey that I gave Smith the sovereign to pay for the beer - before I left home to come here I had given Louisa Akins a 5l. note to get changed- I took that from six, which there were, and five remained; she brought me back sovereigns and silver - I was obliged to spend the silver in different things; she saw the place I took the note from - the notes were one on the other; the sovereign I gave Smith to pay for the beer was not out of that change.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was the drawer you put the notes in? A. In the bed-room where we sleep, and next to the front room, which we live in; we have only a sitting and a bed-room - Lousia Akins and Smith went with me to get on our things to come here; Akins was in my bed-room when I gave her the note - the notes were in a little box in a little drawer; while I was here I went over the way to drink - I cannot exactly tell what I drank nor what it was in; it was a pot or something - I drank spirits and beer; I drink a little at times - I noticed nothing particular in the beer, nor the spirits; I do not drink very much - I sometimes do not drunk for a week together: I went from here home to my own house, and it was there I got so overcome - Louisa Akins and my own child helped me to bed.

COURT. Q.Could you form any judgment whether the quantity of beer or liquor you drank, if it had been fair liquor, would have produced the effect it did - you became totally insensible, I understand? A. I cannot say.

FRANCES PHELPS . I was twelve years old last November. I remember when my mother came with Harbour to the Old Bailey, and remember their coming home; they had dinner - I was in the room with them, and in the afternoon Elizabeth Smith gave me and my sister a penny each- the other prisoners were present; she desired us to go out of doors, and spend it - we made a feast up stairs; w were called down in about half an hour - my mother had had a little liquor, and she was worse then; she was very much intoxicated - Louisa Akins, I and Mr. Smith helped to put her to bed.

Q. Did they appear as insensible as your mother? A. No - they did not remain there above a quarter of an hour afterwards; the prisoners went home in a quarter of an hour, and Mrs. Harbour remained behind, asleep, in the parlour - she is the prisoner's mother; the next morning, as soon as my mother got up, I heard she had missed something.

Cross-examined. Q. Mrs. Harbour had been drinking with them? A. Yes - she went to sleep in the parlour; I helped my mother into bed with Akins and Thomas Smith.

Q. You could see any thing that was done there, I suppose? A. Yes - they came out of the room afterwards, and went away; I had seen my mother a little overcome with liquor before - my sister is only eight years old.

MARY HARBOUR . I am the mother of the two female prisoners. I came here to hear how my daughter got on when she was tried, and we went in a coach from the top of this street to my house - we afterwards went to Phelps'- we had no dinner there; none was offered: Mrs. Phelps gave Thomas Smith a sovereign to fetch 1s. worth of gin, which he did, and gave her the change - on the Thursday morning Louisa Akins gave me a sovereign, four half-crowns. and two gold rings to take care of for her; I had seen her with two rings before - I said if I thought that was Mrs. Phelps' money I would take it back, and have nothing to do with it; she desired me not to do so, and said it was not hers - I gave it to Webster, the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you all drink? A. Yes, all out of one glass - Mrs. Phelps did not drink any thing different to us, only she had had three glasses in the morning before I got there - she told me so.

DANIEL GURLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Picket, of Ox

ford-street, a jeweller. I know the prisoner Elizabeth Smith, from seeing her once on the 22nd of February, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, when she desired he served with a gold wedding-ring, which I showed her: she tendered me a 5l. Bank of England note - I asked her name; she said, "Mrs. Smith, Bryanstone-street," which I wrote on the face of it: (looking at a 5l. note, No. 17,745) this is the note she gave me - here is that name and address on it, also 22-2-31, and my own initials - I was not able to give her change, and endeavoured to procure it, but could not; I returned her her note, and she went away - I am quite sure of her person; she afterwards returned, and paid me in silver for the ring.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know her before? A. I never saw her before to my knowledge - I am quite sure of her person: I saw her for about ten minutes, and swear she is the woman.

ELIZABETH BROWN . I am shopwoman to Mr. Nunn, of Oxford-street. On Tuesday evening, the 26th of February, a person came to purchase a bonnet and a cap, and paid me a 5l. note; I asked her name and address - she gave me "Davies, Bryanstone-square," which I wrote on the front of the note, with the initial of my Christian name, and my surname at full length: I have no knowledge of the person, so as to speak to her.

Q. Have you seen the prisoners before? A. I have.

THOMAS EDWARD WOTTON . I am a clerk at Messrs. Williams and Co.'s banking-house. I have a cheque, drawn by Phelps' broker, which I satisfied with eight 5l. Bank notes, and 26l. in cash - I have the book here in which I made the memorandum; one note was 17,745, dated the 26th of August, 1830; another, 27,409, the 27th of August, 1830, and another 18,097, the 26th of August, 1830.

Cross-examined. Q. To whom did you pay the notes? A. I cannot recollect - I took the numbers down at the time. I have the cheque here.

GEORGE DYER . I attend from the Bank, and have produced two notes, which have been shown to the witnesses; they correspond with two of the numbers which the last witness has named.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the person who pays the notes? A. No - they were paid in by bankers, one by Jones and Lloyd, and the others by Herries.

ELIZABETH BROWN . This is the note which I took of the woman.

DANIEL GURLEY . That is the note I spoke of.

Thomas Smith's Defence. On the 21st of February I went to my mother's house, and found Mrs. Phelps there, drinking - she asked me when I came in if I had any money; I threw down a shilling, and sent for some liquor - we remained drinking there till half-past twelve o'clock at night, and made an appointment to go and meet a party to go to the trial; in the morning, when I got up, I went out with my father-in-law - I had not made up my mind whether I would go or not: I went with him to the Caledonian Arms, and by; his advice came down here - I met Mrs. Phelps at the King of Denmark public-house: she said,"Let us go and have some drink;" I said she had had quite enough and persuaded her to stop till Mrs. Harbour came out of the prison, from seeing her daughter; after that Mrs. Phelps told me to go and ask the prosecutor if he would have any thing to drink - I did so, and we drank over at the Rose - we sat there from eleven o'clock till two, eating and drinking, both beer and spirits: when she came out she was intoxicated, and unable to walk - I said, "Let me conduct you, and I will get you a coach:" she had torn her gown - she had offered me money several times, but I made her put it into her pocket; I put them all into a coach, and I rode on the box - near Sobo-square she desired more drink; they sat in the coach, and had a pint of gin - I got on the box again, and drove them to No. 24, Hawkins-street, where they had more liquor, and being late, I led her home; she said, "Well, we have not had much dinner - I have got a bit of pickled pork, will you partake of it?" she gave me a sovereign to fetch a pint of gin - I gave her the change: as to the money she lost, I know nothing of it - I certainly put her on the bed, at her daughter's request, and left the daughter in the room.

Three witnesses gave Elizabeth Smith a good character.

E. SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

T. SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

AKINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-7

Third Middlesex Jury, Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

704. RICHARD FLANNAGAN and JOSEPH SPRAGGS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Nathaniel Smith Machin and others, on the 12th of February , at St. Paul, Covent-garden, and stealing therein, 90 watches, value 130l.; 9 gold chains, value 30l.; 36 gold seals, value 15l.; 12 gold keys, value 3l.; 30 gold rings, value 3l.; 2 diamond rings, value 5l.; 10 pairs of ear-rings, value 5l.; 9 brooches, value 2l.; 3 lockets, value 4l.; 2 eye-glasses, value 8s.; 3 gold pins, value 6s.; 10 necklaces, value 10l.; 1 gold watch-case, value 5l.; 1 waist-buckle, value 1l.; 9 snuff-boxes, value 6l.; 6l foreign coins, value 4s.; 115 silver spoons, value 40l.; 4 silver forks, value 2l.; 6 silver ladies, value 4l.; 3 silver fish-knives, value 5l.; 2 pairs of silver snuffers, value 3l.; I pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; 2 silver salt-holders, value 1l.; 3 silver mugs, value 1l.; 2 silver milk-pots, value 1l.; 3 pairs of trousers, value 1l.; 3 coats, value 3l.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 15 handkerchiefs, value 1l., and 1 pair of boots, value 10s. , the goods of the said Nathaniel Smith Machin and others.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BRUMFITT STORR . I am a partner in the house of Nathaniel Smith Machin and Mr. Debenham; we are auctioneers , and reside in King-street, in the parish of St. Paul, Coyent-garden . The prisoner Richard Flannagan has been in our service about three years, and was so at the time of this robbery. On the 12th of February I retired to rest about twelve o'clock at night; I live in the house - we pay the rent out of the partnership funds; about twenty minutes before eleven I saw the outer auction-room door fastened in the usual manner - the auction-room is under the same roof as the dwelling-house; there is a door communicating between the auction-room and the house - it was originally under the same roof, and part of it is still under the same roof and part is under a separate roof; when I went to bed I left the property safe in that room as usual, and about a quarter or twenty minutes after six o'clock in the morning of the 13th, I was called

from my bed, and found the greater part of the plate, all the watches, and all the jewellery, were removed and gone - there are desks in the office, which is separated from the auction-room by a glazed sash; I found four of those desks broken open, and missed about 6l. 3s. in silver and copper, from my own desk, which I am certain was locked the night before - I saw Flannagan when I was called up; he was up, and had only his shirt on - I asked him how it was possible that he could have slept during the noise which the wrenching open the desks must have made; he slept within three or four yards of the desks, in the auction-room from which the jewellery and property had been taken - the property was totally gone; there was also a cupboard in the office where the desks, were that was broken open, and the greater part of the contents of it taken away, and one other desk was not broken open that contained private papers of my own; among other things which were taken was a fine gold chain - the value of all the property taken was about 300l.; I had seen it in the course of Saturday, the 12th - this was on Saturday night.

COURT. Q. Had your other partners rooms in the house? A. Mr. Debenham has, and sleeps there three or four times a week.

JOHN CONROY . I am a Police-constable. On Sunday morning, the 13th of February, I observed Machin and Debenham's door open, about a quarter or twenty minutes after six o'clock - it was the outer door of the dwelling-house, leading to the suction-room; one door leads both to the auction-room and the dwelling-house - I rang the bell, and gave an alarm; the prisoner Flannagan answered the bell - he was dressed in his shirt; I did not observe that he had any thing else on - he came down to the other door, and exclaimed, "Oh, my God, the house is broken open, and all the property gone."

Q. Had you said any thing to him before he made use of that observation? A. No - I went into the auction-room with him, and saw some wearing-apparel strewed on the floor; among other things I saw a pair of old boots, which I have here - I found them opposite Flannagan's bed; I saw him get out of that bed - I asked Flannagan if those boots were his: he said not - I am sure of that.

RICHARD GARDNER . I am a Police-officer of Bow-street. I took Flannagan into custody at the prosecutors' house, on Tuesday, the 15th of February - I did not in any way threaten or promise him any thing; he stated to me that his heart was ready to break, and he wished to speak to me in another room-Mr. Debenham and some other gentleman were in the room where I had taken him; I went into another room with him on the same floor-he stated that he had let two men into the house on Saturday night, at twelve o'clock, and that a third man named White, watched at the door; that Spraggs and a man named William Casley , came into the room, and took a light from him - that he sat at the bed-side while they packed up the things; that Spraggs took some clothes, some handkerchiefs, and a new pair of boots, and left his own boots behind - he said Casley and Spraggs took two great coats, and put the things into the pockets; that he met White on the Monday, and he told him the property was sold for 62l. - he said they told him if he would allow them to come in to commit the robbery, he was to have half the produce of the property.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS . I am a superintendent of the Police-station, Covent-garden. I remember the prisoner Flannagan being brought to the station-house, on Tuesday evening, the 15th of February - on the next morning he was brought into a private office at the station; I had seen him the night before, and sent for him in the morning, on account of the state of mind which he appeared to be in -I first asked if he was any better than he appeared to be the night before; he said he was very wretched, and his heart was breaking - I then asked if it was true that he had made any thing in the shape of a confession to one of the officers; he said Yes, it was - I then told him it was a point of duty with me to report every thing of consequence connected with my duty to the Commissioners of Police, and if he had no objection, I would take the substance of that confession in writing, to transmit it to the Commissioners of the Police - he said he would tell me all with pleasure, as he had no desire to conceal any thing: I took down in writing what he said, and he signed it, (looking at a paper), this is it, here is his signature to it.(read) -

Confession of Richard Flannagan - I have been engaged at Messrs. Machin and Debenham's as porter , for two years and ten months; I have been acquainted with John White , who formerly lived in their service, about three years - on Saturday last White came to me, and urged me to agree to rob, or consent to the robbery of my employers; I at last consented to admit them in on the following morning early - about twelve o'clock, two young men named Spraggs and Casley, whom I had previously met at the White Hart, White Hart-yard, knocked at the door: I admitted them - the gas was burning in the sale room at the time; I first showed them the desks in the counting-house, containing cash, plate, and jewellery, which they forced open with a screwdriver, after which they broke open a cupboard, and stole therefrom about forty gold and silver watches; they then went behind the counter, having put on two great coats and one under coat,in the pockets of which they put in the plate and jewellery from behind the counter - they took forty-eight gold and silver watches, besides other articles of plate and jewellery; Spraggs changed his boots for a new pair, and left his old ones behind - I was promised for my consent one half of the produce of the robbery, but I never received more than one sixpence; I have seen White since - he told me it was all sold for 62l.; during the robbery White was walking about the neighbouring streets.

R. FLANNAGAN.

Signed in the presence of us

J.S. THOMAS, Superintendent, J. E. ROGERS.

MR. STORR re-examined. A person named White had lived in our service.

COURT. Q. Is your auction-room a place for the sale of unredeemed pledges? A. It is - wearing-apparel of various kinds is sent for sale, as well as jewellery, and every description of property.

GEORGE AVIS . I am a Police-officer of Marlborough-street. I apprehended Spraggs on Saturday, the 26th of February, and took from his person a watch, with a gold chain, two seals, and a gold key attached to it, and I took a gold finger-ring off his finger - I took this pair of boots off his feet, a coat and pair of trousers off his person, and a black silk handkerchief off his neck: he was wearing them - I took the clothes off his back at a public-house opposite the office, and the other things when we were in a coach - on Monday, the 28th, I went to a house in Great Barlow-street, Marylebone, and there I saw a female, from whom I received sixteen sovereigns; I afterwards commu

nicated to Spraggs what that woman had said to me - she told me he had left 18l. with her, and that he had had the other 2l., and spent it.

Q. I believe, after taking the prisoner up. you had some conversation with him? A. I had - I neither threatened him nor made him any promise - when I took him I told him he was charged with robbing Machin and Debenham, of Covent-garden; he was perfectly sober - I questioned him as to how he got possession of that watch, chain, and seals (this conversation was in the coach) - he told me be had bought it, and given 2l.10s. for it; I took the boots from his feet, and asked how he came by them - he said he bought them also, he did not say when or where - this was on Saturday, and on the Monday I took the coat and trousers from him - he said they were his own; I then took him before the Magistrate, and after he had been examined he sent for me, and told me he wished to see the Mogistrate - I took him into a private room before Mr. Roe, the Magistrate, who told him he had been given to understand by me that he wished to say something to him; he said Yes, he did - he stated that the robbery had been planned nearly two months previously, that Flannagan had let him and Casley in, while White stood at the door watching.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Was this confession made under an idea that he should be admitted as an evidence? A.Certainly not.

Examination continued. He said they were let in about twelve o'clock on Saturday night, the 12th, and that he had been led completely into it - that Flannagan lighted the candle, while he himself forced open the desk (where some of the property was) with a screw-driver; he also said that the property which I had taken from him was property taken from the prosecutors' - that the sixteen sovereigns I had got were part of the produce of the property.

Q.Then this was after you had been to the woman, and got the money? A. Yes - he said he had been given to understand the property had been sold for 62l., but he was not present at the sale of it; he said the boots I had got were what he had brought away, and that he had left the old ones behind; here are those I took off his feet.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was this statement made when the Magistrate was present? A. It was - it was not taken down in writing; there was no one but the Magistrate, the prisoner, and myself present - I gave it in evidence after.

ABRAHAM JACOBS . I am a general-dealer. and live at No.16, Devonshire-street, Bishopsgate. (Looking at the boots taken from Spragg's feet) I know these boots - I had sent them on the 11th of February to Machin and Debenham's for sale; there has been a mark on them, where I mark all my boots, but it has been scraped out - I know them from their particular shape and make: here is where the mark appears to have been erased - I mark all my boots in that place.

ROBERT WINTER . I am porter to the prosecutors. I do not know this coat, which was taken from Spraggs - it is a brown body coat: I have the catnlogue of the sale which was to take place, and can tell by it that a coat of that description was there - here is "lot 53 a brown coat," "lot 200 a fine gold chain," "lot 250 a silver hunter. capped and jewelled," which the watch produced is - "lot 331 a pair of trousers," "lot 444 a pair of boots and shoes;" I can state that lots corresponding with those numbers were there about half-past eight o'clock that night, when I left, and they were missing on Monday - I do not identify the property.

JAMES BELL . I am Birmingham agent. I know this watch, it was mine - I pawned it with Mr. Muncaster, on Snow-bill, in December, 1829 - the term of redemption had expired.

WILLIAM WARRE . I am shopman to Mr. Muncaster, a pawnbroker, on Snow-hill. I sent a watch similar to this to be sold at the prosecutors' with the same maker's name, on the Thursday or Friday before the Monday on which they were to be sold; I also sent a chain, weighing exactly the same as this does, 1 oz. 11 dwts.

WILLIAM TARRANT . I am a pawnbroker. I believe this to be a coat which I sent to the prosecutors' for sale, in February last.

JOHN HART . I am a tailor and salesman. and live at No. 319, in the Strand. I have seen this pair of trousers before - I sent them to the prosecutors' previous to the robbery, and am sure they are the same.

Flannagan delivered in a written defence, of which the following is a literal copy:- Gentlemen of the Jury - I announce, with deep regret, my deplorable situation cannot meet with defence equal, I trust, and well know, to what I deserve. for want of pecuniary means. which alone disables me of benefit of Counsel; consequently, I hope to rely on confidential hopes of justice and ultimate mercy being administered to me, by the hands of a humane and impartial Jury - and I beg briefly to state true facts which flow alone from my own distracted breas. Gentlemen, I am truly innocent - I am not guilty of the crime imputed to my charge, and which is particularly enlarged by the press; nor was it ever my intention to rob or defraud although my situation, subject to my juvenile years, has exposed me to many temptations beyond expectations, which up to the present hour I have peremptorily rebutted, but must confess my aged employers were not altogether justified in placing so large and valuable a stock to the safety of only a boy; it likewise afforded a wide opening for attempts by duplicious associates; nor did I ever think that ever any of my connection would rob, until I was threatened with instant death, which took place after the door was opened. I certainly did open the door, but thought at the time that it was either my employer or alarm of fire, or some casual event or other; at this moment the parties rushed in, and put me into bodity fear - I did not participate nor share in the robbery; and true it is, I did not expose after the fact, being at all times in jeopardy and bodily fear by John White , whose desperate threats to blow my brains out if I divulged, was one cause that prevented me, and another, the fear of losing my situation; had the perpretrators of this dreadful deed not been discovered, I should have continued my situation - I considered I could not afford by confession my employers any benefit, as I never knew where any of the property was conveyed; as such, my intentions I considered could not be unjust nor fraudulent; I consider not to be fairly dealt with by the officers when taken, as undue insinnations and alarming threats were placed to me, containing many falsehoods, by way of forcing confession, and in my agitated moments - I could not now rehearse what I then said, although I own my situation at that time might cause them strongly to imagine that I was a guilty party. I have a list of my former employers. who have kindly volunteered to certify my honest conduct, as well as my prosecutors (Messrs. Debenham, Machin and Co.) the latter with whom I faithfully served as an assistant youth for three years, and I feel entitled to call my masters to my character for that time, and have been en

trusted by them and hundreds of gentlemen in and about town, with various articles, and with considerable sums of money in their absence, and with extensive conveyance of property to very large amounts, of valuable descriptions, such as plate, jewellery and so forth, to some thousands of pounds - which, if I had been dishonest, afforded every opportunity, and this to all parts of town occasionally. And if it pleased God I am once returned again for the benefit of society, and my poor mother and her small family, whom I have much assisted at times, I am stedfast and firm I never will commit crime, or place myself under so great a charge of importance as my worthy employers eatrusted to my care. Gentlemen, hoping and trusting to your humane decision, I submit myself, most humbly, to remain your unfortunate youth and servant.

Two witnesses gave Flannagan a good character, and four deposed the same of Spraggs.

FLANNAGAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

SPRAGGS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Flannagan particularly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth, and the very valuable property entrusted to his care.

MR. STORR. I had two men sleep on the premises, Flannagan and another, but the other sleeps on the first floor in the adjoining house.

Reference Number: t18310407-8

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

705. ELIZABETH BROWN and ANN BIRD were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Daniel Fallshaw , on the 18th of February , at St. Luke, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 12s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 12s.; 2 drinking-glasses, value 1s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 7s., and 1 jug, value 6d. , the goods of John Castle .

JOHN CASTLE. I am a labouring man . In February last I occupied the second floor back room at No. 21, Playhouse-yard, in the parish of St. Luke , in the house of Richard Daniel Fallshaw; I am a single man, and had that room to myself - nobody else had any right there; I kept it locked. On the 18th of February I went out at half-past five o'clock, to my labour - I locked the door of the room, and left the key in the lock, for my sister Ann to come and make my bed for me: I received information from her, and returned home about half-past seven o'clock in the evening - I went into my room, and missed a coat, a pair of trousers, two glass tumblers, a pair of shoes, and an earthen jug, which were all safe when I went out in the morning; the prisoner Brown lodged in the front room, on the same floor as me - I procured the assistance of a constable, went into Brown's room, and found her sitting by the fireside; I went from there to a house in Golden-lane, with the constable, to a room on the ground floor - it was Bird's room; she opened the door to us - I saw my two tumblers on the mantel-piece; I said, "These are mine;" she said, "My sister brought them here in my absence;" the prisoners are sister - the constable took them, and we took her into custody; I asked Brown about the tumblers- she said a woman had given them to her - that she did not know her name, nor where she lived, but that she had known her for four years and a half; she was given in charge - these are my tumblers; they were my mother's before she died - I have had them about four months, and know them by the pattern; (looking at a coat and pair of trousers) I know these to be mine - they are my Sunday clothes; I have not found the other articles.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far does Bird live from you? A. Nearly half a mile.

COURT. Q. When you saw the prisoners did they appear the worse for liquor? A. Yes.

ANN FISHER . I am married, and am the prosecutor's sister; I was in the habit of going to make his bed - I went there on the 18th of February, and found the key in the door, as usual; I only made the bed - I saw the articles produced there then - I locked the door and took away the key, and in consequence of information I received in the course of the day. I gave my brother information when he came home; I went with him to the room, found the door unlocked and shut - I missed the articles which have been produced; the door appeared to have been opened by some key - I know the tumblers; they were my mother's.

SARAH DART . I live in the same house with the prosecutor; it is kept by Fallshaw. OR the 18th of February I was at home in my own room, which is under Castle's room; I heard somebody up stairs in his room - I heard his door open, which is the next door to Brown's room; there is a latch to Castle's room, but none to Brown's - I heard Castle's latch go; I had heard the key fall, by which I was satisfied that it was Castle's door - the prisoners at that time were both together in Brown's room; I had heard them go up stairs together about a quarter of an hour before - I am sure two persons went up; I did not see them, but after hearing this I saw them both come down stairs - Bird came down first and went out, and in about ten minutes Brown came down and went out; I did not observe whether either of them carried any thing out - they were both in liquor.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you speak to either of them? A. No; I followed them down stairs - I came down after Brown and after Bird; I merely saw their backs, and did not observe their faces - they were very tipsy in the evening, and they were tipsy at that time; I saw Bird afterwards in the evening, about six o'clock, and then saw her face; it was between three and four o'clock that I saw her going down stairs.

MARY ANN FALLSHAW . My husband is landlord of the house; we both live in it - Castle occupies one room on the second floor, and Brown the other; in consequence of information from Dart I went up to Castle's room - I found it latched; on raising the latch it opened - it was not locked - I looked into Brown's room, and saw Bird walking up and down the room; I asked her what she wanted there- she went away directly; this was between three and four o'clock - Brown returned that evening between six and seven o'clock; the prisoners, when I saw them, appeared in liquor; Castle came home about half past seven - I went up stairs with him to Brown's room, and told her I suspected she had robbed Castle's room; she denied knowing any thing about it - I have since that tried the key of Brown's door with Castle's lock; it locks and unlocks it quite easy - the key has been there ever since the house was built, which is nine years; it unlocks one door as well as another.

JURY. Q. Are there any other keys in the house which will open the lock? A. Not to my knowledge.

DANIEL STEPTOE . I am shopman to Mr. Peachy, a pawnbroker. This coat and trousers were produced to Castle by me - they were pawned with me on the 18th of February, between three and four o'clock, to the best of my knowledge - I am certain Bird is the person who pawned them; I know her well - she has dealt at my shop for three or four years.

Cross-examined. Q.Was she not in the habit of pawning with you? A. Yes; I knew where she lived, and could have identified her at any time.

WILLIAM PATEMAN . I am headborough of St. Luke's I was applied to on the evening in question, and went to Fallshaw's house, to Brown's room; I found her very much intoxicated - she was questioned about this robbery, and denied all knowledge of it; I afterwards went with Castle to Bird's apartment - she opened the door to us; I found the two tumblers on the mantel-piece, and have had them ever since; I afterwards tried the key of Brown's room door, and found it opened Castle's as easily as if it had been made for it.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you or the other officer asked Bird for her keys? A. I was the only officer employed; Bird's drawers and places were all opened - she gave me one key; her drawers were not locked -Mrs. Fallshaw searched them, and 6s. were found in them.

Brown's Defence. I am quite cast away for want of counsel, which my husband promised me; Mrs. Fallshaw ordered the woman out of the place who gave me the clothes, which I wondered at, because I knew my husband paid the rent every week; she gave me the clothes, and asked me to pawn them - I knew I had been drinking; she said she expected to be seized upon for rent - I said I was in liquor, and not capable, but thought I would go and ask my sister to do it, as she was in the habit of pawning at Peachey's

BROWN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

BIRD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 37.

Reference Number: t18310407-9

Third Middlesex Jury, before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

706. TIMOTHY CRONAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , at St. Giles in the Fields, 1 box, value 1s.; 1 coat, value 3l.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1l. 5s.; 1 jacket, value 14s.; 4 yards of stuff, value 6s.; 1 shawl, value 8s.; 1 ear-ring, value 2s.; 4 napkins, value 5s.; 2 frocks, value 2s.; 3 shirts, value 3s.; 3 cambric caps, value 3s.; 2 bonnets, value 2s.; 1 slip, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 6d., and 1 pair of stays, value 1s., the goods of John Healey , in the dwelling-house of Edward Huntley .

HANNAH HEALEY . I am the wife of John Healey : we lodged at No. 26, Crown-street, in the parish of St. Giles , in the dwelling-house of Edward Huntley . I know the prisoner perfectly well; he came to my room on the 8th of March - my husband was not at home; he said there was a lady waiting to see me at the Flying Horse, in Oxford-street, which is not two minutes' walk from my lodging - I went out to go to the lady; he came down stairs with me, but I did not see which way he went - he left me- I went on to the Flying Horse, but found no lady waiting there for me - I returned home instantly; I had left three children in the room, and had left a box there with the several articles mentioned in the indictment - on my return the box and its contents were gone; I have never seen them since - Ellen is one of my daughters; she is nine years old.

ELLEN HEALEY . I am the daughter of Hannah Healey. I have known the prisoner ever since he lived in my grandmother's house, which is five years; he came, and told my mother a lady wanted her, and after she was gone he came up, and knocked at the door - I took no notice of it; the door was fastened but then a voice said, "If you don't open it, I will burst it open;" I did not know the voice - I then opened the door, and it was the prisoner; he came into the room, and I then saw two lads on the stairs - he took my mother's box from the room, and carried it away; it was not a very large box - he took hold of the box and said," Your mother sent me for the box;" I said,"You shan't have it," and took hold of it - he then said,"I must have it;" he pushed me down, and carried it away - I went down stairs, but he was gone, and the other two lads - my mother came back very soon; my two younger sisters were in the room with me.

HANNAH HEALEY . The box contained a coat of my husband's quite new; it was very good cloth, and cost 14s. 6d. a yard; there were two yards or two yards and a quarter of it - he is a tailor, and made it himself - it would be worth 3l.: it had a black silk velvet collar and silk facing - there was a waistcoat quite new, the cloth was worth 9s. without the lining and making - a pair of black kersey mere trousers, quite new, worth 26s. - a boy's jacket, quite new, made of superfine cloth worth 14s.; four yards of stuff, worth 6s. 6d. - a shawl, worth 8s.; a gold ear-ring, worth 3s. - six napking, worth 9s.; children's frocks and shirts, worth more than 3s.; two cambric caps, worth 2s.; a hat, worth 5s. 6d.; a child's bonnet and a slip, 2s. 6d.; a pocket, 1s. 6d.; 16s. and various other articles.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

[April 8.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18310407-10

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

707. JAMES REEVES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Peter Pinching , on the 13th of March , at St. Mary Matselon, otherwise Whitechapel, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 comb, value 4d.; a quarter of an ounce of tobacco, value 1d.; 1 half-crown, and 1 sixpence , his property.

PETER PINCHING . I am a shoemaker . On Sunday morning, the 13th of March, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was in Whitechapel-road , going to No. 30, Whitechapel-road, where I live - as I went along three men came up to me, and wished me to go and take something to drink with them; I knew nothing of them, and refused to go - one took hold of each side of me, and held me for about two minutes, while the other robbed me; they took hold of my coat, and tore it, put their hands into my pocket, and tore the pocket right out - they took half a crown, and sixpence, 1d. worth of tobacco, and a pocket-comb; I had my hand in that pocket about five minutes before they laid hold of me - the money was all safe when the two men came and laid hold of me; after they got my property they all three ran away - I followed the prisoner, who was one of them, and took him; he ran into Wentworth-street- he went through a court, stopped as he ran, and said if

I followed him, he would knock my head off - I told him I should follow him, let him go where he would; he then started again, and I after him, calling Police several times, and a Policeman came in about ten minutes - I never lost sight of him till the Policeman stopped him; the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Where had you been? A. To Lambeth, taking a pair of shoes home to a young man - it was half-past twelve o'clock at night; I gave over work at ten, and had to go to Lambeth - I was not in any public-house; I had nothing to drink before I left work - I had part of a pint of beer with the young man I took the shoes to at Lambeth.

Q.Was either of the men smoking when they came up to you? A. Yes - I did not ask him for any tobacco; the prisoner was searched immediately he was apprehended - he is the man who put his hand into my pocket, and took the money out: they all ran away directly - I did not hear any communication between the prisoner and the other two, nor see any thing pass between them; when he was searched I believe some halfpence were found on him - I did not search him myself; I was not tipsy.

Q. I am told you went away for ten minutes, and afterwards came up to the prisoner and charged him with robbing you? A. No, you are told wrong; I had never seen him before - I never said I would hang him if possible.

COURT. Q. Did you lose any tobacco? A. Yes, a quarter of an ounce - I had just bought it, and had it in a paper.

WILLIAM TRENAMAN BRAUND . I am a Police-constable. My attention was called by a cry of Police - I went into Wentworth-street, and saw the prosecutor and the prisoner in contention; he had secured the prisoner when I came up, and accused him of picking his pocket - they appeared as if they had been running; I took the prisoner into custody - the prosecutor was quite sober; he did not appear to have been drinking at all - I searched the prisoner, and found a sixpence, and 3 1/2d. in copper on him.

Cross-examined. Q. You say positively he was not drunk? A. Yes - he was struggling with the prisoner; he was not holding the prisoner - he could have got away if he chose; there was a contention between them in words - he was denying the charge; I found no half-crown, tobacco, or comb on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor was right intoxicated - when first he took me to the station. he charged me with robbing him of 2s.; I was locked up, and on Monday morning he charged me before the Magistrate with robbing him of half a crown, a comb, and tobacco, and when he went up stairs the short-hand writer said to him, "You seem a very vicious sort of a man:" he said,"Yes, and I will hang the prisoner if I can."

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[April 8] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18310407-11

Second Middlesex Jury.

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

708. GEORGE WIDGET was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 5 sheep, price 5l., and 46 ewes, price 46l. , the property of William Stow , the elder.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of Richard Tyler.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM STOW . I live at Chepsteald, in Kent, and am a farmer - it is about five miles below Bromley. On the 29th of November I sent fifty-one sheep to graze at Mr. Tyler's at Lewisham - there were about forty-seven ewes, and four or five were wether lambs, which were culled from different flocks; they were lambs about fourteen months old - we call them taggs; we should call them sheep about a month later, when they get two teeth, which is when about fifteen or sixteen months old - I had marked the whole fifty-one myself before I parted with them; the greater part of them were marked with the letter S. on the rump, and the other on the side with the same letter - that was only three or four; I have the brand mark here - three or four were marked in two places with S. on the side, and on the rump with the same letter; I have not seen the sheep since - I have seen some skins, which I believe to be the skins of my sheep.

JOB GREGORY . I am shepherd to Mr. Stow. I took the sheep in question to Mr. Tyler's, at Lewisham, to graze, and delivered them to Mr. Tyler's foreman, who I have since seen.

RICHARD ELLIOTT . I am servant to Mr. Tyler, at Lewisham. I received these sheep from Gregory, the latter end of November - there were fifty-one of them; I saw them on Thursday, the 3rd of March - they were all in master's field; I had counted them on the Tuesday, and missed none on the Thursday - I went into the field on Friday, the 4th of March, about six o'clock in the morning, on later; none of the sheep were there then - I have since seen some skins marked in the same way as the skins of those sheep were; they were what we call taggs.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? A. No, I never saw him till he was in custody; I never saw him at Lewisham - it is seven miles from the Standard, Cornhill.

RICHARD TYLER . About six o'clock on Thursday night, the 3rd of March, I happened to be in the field in which Mr. Stow's sheep were grazing; I shut the gate of the field after me - it is a common barred swing gate; it will not stay open unless it is kept back - I counted the sheep as they were put there to be drawn by Mr. Stow on the following morning; he was to take them home - I left home about seven or half-past seven o'clock the next morning; I passed by the field, but did not notice whether the sheep were there - I returned about one o'clock, and hearing they were gone I went to the field, and could see that they had been led out, not driven out in a flock; I could tell that from the footsteps - we should not have suspected them to have been stolen if that had not been the case; they had driven one or two away from the rest, and then the others had followed, as if they were going to water; they naturally follow in that way - they had gone out at a swing gate; there was no other way for them to get out - they were nearly full bred Southdowns; they were what I should call Southdowns. On Friday, the 11th of March, I accompanied Attfield, the officer, to a butcher's-shop in Long-alley, near Worship-street office; young Mr. Stow. the prosecutor's son, was with me - I saw eighteen sheep skins there; they appeared quite fresh, as if the sheep had

not been killed above five or six days; I desired Mr. Stow, Jun. to wash one of the skins, which he did, and I observed the letter S. distinctly on the rump - from that mark and the quality of the wool, I have not a doubt of their being the skins of the sheep which were lost; I did not observe more than the mark of one then; I have since - the quality of the wool was an age, which is not usually sent to market; the whole flock were not more than fourteen or fifteen months old; the prisoner is the person who kept the shop in Long-alley - I went to Deptford that day, before I came to London, and found twenty skins at Mr. Agutter's the fellmonger, in Mill-lane, Deptford; they were undergoing the process of limeing - I had them taken out, and then discovered the letter S. on them distinctly, on the rump, and on the side of one - I found the mark on the whole twenty, but more distinctly on four, which the officer brought away; I had them marked by the fellmonger - an officer named Smith and young Mr. Stow were with me; the wool is precisely the same quality as that on the skins that were in Long-alley.

Cross-examined. Q.The skins had undergone some process? A. They had been put into line, which is to take the wool off, but I had gone over on Thursday night as soon as I had got information, to stay the process, and they had not been long enough in the lime to injure the mark - they had not been in lime more than four hours, I should judge; I selected four of them - three were marked on the rump, and one I think on the rump and side; I am able most-certainly to say they were the marks which were on Stow's sheep - I never saw the prisoner in Lewisham or the neighbourhood.

WILLIAM STOW , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son. I had seen the sheep which my father had sent to Mr. Tyler's to graze, and I believe I assisted in branding them. In consequence of information on Thursday, the 10th of March, I went to Worship-street office, with Attfield; I went from there to a butcher's-shop opposite the Dyer's Arms, Long-alley - I went into the back yard of the butcher's premises, and saw blood and other filth at the corner of the yard; I examined the privy in the yard, and found what I suppose to be the entrails of sheep - this was about noon; in consequence of what happened there, I went with Attfield to Leadenhall-market - Attfield apprehended the prisoner there: I did not see the sheep skins at the butcher's yard at that time I believe; Attfield said to the prisoner, "You are my prisoner," and asked him where he got the thirty-eight sheep - he said, "I bought them in Old-street-road, of a man," but he did not know the man - he said he gave 30l. for the thirty-eight sheep, but he did not inquire the man's name; after taking the prisoner to the office we returned to the butcher's-shop, and found eighteen skins - that was the same day.

COURT. Q. Who first mentioned the number 38? A. The prisoner; we found eighteen skins in the front shop - they were in a very dirty state; I went next day to the same shop - we had left the skins there, and found them there; I washed part of one of the skins, and found the letter S. on the rump - I do not myself know whose shop it was; we searched, but found nothing more; we searched the privy more minutely; we found nothing but the entrails; there was no me it hanging in the shop for sale - it had the appearance of a butcher's-shop; we saw no meat there on the Thursday - there was no meat of any kind in the shop; I found a cleaver, a saw, weights and scales, a jacket, and other wearing-apparel there - Attfield took the jacket away with him; I went down to Mr. Agutter's at Deptford, on Thursday evening - I went to his yard, and found twenty skins in lime; I examined four of them particularly that evening, and saw the letter S. - we desired they might be taken out of the lime, which was done; the wool was of the same quality as that on my father's sheep.

Cross-examined. Q.Have you ever been able to find more than thirty-eight skins? A. we have not - my father has no partner; when we saw the prisoner in Leadenhall-market, he gave the answer I have stated in reply to the questions at once - I did not know him before.

EDWARD WOOD. I am servant to Mr. Warmington a hide and skin salesman, of Leadenhall market. It is part of my business to go round to the butcher's-shops to collect skins for my employer; I do not know where the prisoner lived on the 8th of March, but I fetched on that day twenty skins from the house in Long-alley; the prisoner himself and two more younger men delivered them to me; there was a conversation between him and the other two, about the valuation of the skins - I brought them away, and delivered them to Devonshire, my master's foreman.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your master here? A. Devonshire is - I was present when Mr. Agutter bought the skins of Devonshire; we collect skins, and sell them by commission - this transaction was in the ordinary course of business; I fetched the skins from Long-alley about one o'clock in the day.

COURT. Q. Had you been in the habit of fetching skins from that place? A. No, I had never been there before.

JOHN DEVONSHIRE . I am foreman to Mr. Warmington, a salesman. On Tuesday, the 8th of March, I received twenty skins from Wood - they were Southdown taggs; I disposed of them the same day to James Agutter , of Deptford - I had no other lot of the same kind of skins; they were an unusual description of skins to come to market - they were younger than are usually brought; I received them on account of Mr. Widget - it is a regular thing to go round to our connexion for skins; we had been in the habit of sending to Widgett before for skins, but never received so large a quantity on the prisoner's account before - we generally had two or three, and in one instance five from him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was this transaction in the ordinary course of business with Widget, with whom you had dealt before? A. Yes.

JAMES AGUTTER . I am a fellmonger, and live at Deptford. On the 8th of March I purchased twenty skins from Mr. Warmington - I observed at the time of buying them that they were badly butchered, and said so; I afterwards gave Smith, the officer, four of those skins - I had the twenty skins washed before I gave Smith the four; I observed they were marked with the letter S. on the rump, and I marked them myself before I gave them to him, so as to identify them; Mr. Stow and Tyler saw the whole twenty.

Cross-examined. Q. Had they all been in lime the same time? A. There was not any lime on the four I gave Smith - they were only washed in water before.

COURT. Q. When they first saw them were they not in lime? A. No, they were limed afterwards, to preserve them - I had not put them into lime before that, only in water, which is a preparation for limeing; the four had undergone no other process than the sixteen - the letter S. was visible on the whole twenty; they were all marked.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable of Southend, Lewisham. I went with Stow, Tyler, and others, on the 11th of March, to Mr.Agutter's at Deptford - I saw twenty skins there; I afterwards went to a butcher's-shop in Long-alley, and found eighteen skins - I took them to the office, and delivered them to Attfield; among other things in Long-alley I found a jacket, which was shown to the prisoner, and he said it was his; I made a private-mark on the four skins brought from Agutter's and on three which were taken out of the eighteen found at the butcher's-shop, so as to identify them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever in your life see the prisoner before he was apprehended? A. I have seen him at Lewisham within a month or two before he was apprehended: I have seen him there more than two or three times - I have noticed him passing my house, and have endeavoured to get into conversation with him; I cannot precisely say when I saw him.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD. I am an officer of Worship-street. I went with young Mr. Stow to Leadenhall-market on Thursday, the 10th of March, and apprehended the prisoner, who was pointed out to me near a butcher's-shop, and pointing to some carcases of sheep which bung there, I asked him if those were part of the sheep which he had sent to market - he said Yes; I then took him into custody, and told him I took him on suspicion of having stolen fifty-one sheep from that gentleman, pointing to Mr. Stow- I then took him to a public-house close by, and asked how he came in possession of those sheep; he said he had bought thirty-eight sheep for 30l. of a man in Old-street-road, near the City-road; I asked if he knew the person whom he bought them off - he said No, he never saw the man before in his life, and did not know where he lived; I then sent for a coach, and took him to the office - he said he lived in Long-alley, opposite the Dyers' Arms; I am sure he said he lived there - I went there: the door was shut - I opened the shutters, and found eighteen sheep skins there, and a little room adjoining the shop had every appearance of sheep having been there for I saw wool there - I locked the shop up, returned next day, and took the skins away; there were lodgers in the house - while I was there a person, who I believe to he Mrs. Widget, came with the key of the door, and I took it from her - I fetched away the skins next day, and kept them in my possession at a public-house next door to the office till the Tuesday following, when I delivered seventeen of them to John Reed ; there was no household furniture in the shop or apartment- there were knives and a chopper.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner, in the conversation, tell you he had sold twenty of the skins to Mr. Warmington? A. I cannot recollect, I am not quite sure- I went to Warmington from information I received from Stow, Jun.; he took me there - I cannot say whether he had been there before; I believe the prisoner did say we should find eighteen skins in his shop in Long-alley - he told me they were there without my asking him.

Q. Did he not say the other twenty would be found at Warmington's? A. I cannot recollect whether he did or not - such a conversation might pass, but it has slipped my memory if it did.

WILLIAM STOW . JUN. re-examined. The prisoner told me he had sent twenty skins to Warmington, but Leadbetter had been there before and given me information, which induced me to go there; when we took the prisoner he told us he had sent twenty skins to Warmington for sale.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I produce the knives, chopper, saws, and two drover's sticks found at the butcher's-shop; they were in the shop where the skins were.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not salesmen in the market use such sticks as those? A. I do not know - I have seen drovers use such.

CHARLES BARRETT. I live at No. 7, Harding's-buildings, Long-alley, and am a private watchman in that neighbourhood. On a Friday morning in the beginning of March, about five o'clock, I was on duty near Finsbury-market, and met a flock of sheep - two persons were driving them at the time I met them; I firmly believe the prisoner at the bar to be one of those persons, but I cannot swear to him - the sheep were in a very dirty state, and on one or two of them there appeared to be a mark on the rump, but what mark it was I cannot swear - I saw them driven into a house opposite the Dyers' Arms; I cannot say how many there were.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not said there were between thirty and forty? A. I never named any number to a correct quantity; I might have said there were between thirty and forty, but I cannot swear to the number; Finsbury-market is about two minutes walk from Long-alley - it is not in the direct road from Old-street road to Long-alley; I saw them come down South-street into Long-alley.

Q. Is Finsbury-market in a direction from Old-street-road to Long-alley? A. No, it is not - it depends on which way you go; Friday is a market-day at Smithfield, and a morning on which cattle are brought to London.

RICHARD GOODHAND . I am a drover, and lodge in the prisoner's house in Long-alley - I pay him 1s. 6d. a week for my lodging. On Friday morning, the 4th of March, I was disturbed by some sheep coming into the house, between five and six o'clock, and the noise of people; I did not go down stairs then - I went out between eight and nine that morning, and saw in the yard between forty and fifty sheep, as I should guess; they were smallish sheep -I came home again between four and five o'clock in the afternoon - the prisoner was at home, killing the sheep; he was assisted by three persons - they continued killing the sheep till eleven o'clock at night, and next day, when I came home to breakfast, at eight o'clock. I found them killing sheep; they did not cut up any of the carcases - they skinned them; the prisoner had no furniture in the house.

Q.Then the prisoner did not live there himself? A. No - the place is much like a slaughter-house; one of these sticks is such as salesmen use in the market, to keep sheep together - the other is a drover's stick; it is not mine; another man lodges there, but he is not a droven - I had never seen the prisoner kill sheep there before; I had

only lodged there about six days when this happened, and had just paid him 1s. 6d.; I have not said that I believed there were between thirty and thirty-five sheep - I do not recollect saying before the Justice that it was thirty or forty.

WILLIAM ROBSON. I am landlord of the house in Long-alley which the prisoner rents. On the 4th of March I remember seeing the prisoner and some other persons killing sheep in his yard - I did not observe any marks on their backs; I saw some skins there the next day or the next day but one - they were fresh skins, but dirty; I saw the letter S. on the rump of them.

JOHN ABBOTT . I am a constable of Lewisham, and am paid for watching on some nights. On Friday morning, the 4th of March, I remember being on duty at Lewisham, and about a quarter before one o'clock, at midnight, I saw a drove of sheep coming along - I consider that there were from forty to fifty of them; only one person was driving them - I believe the prisoner to be the man; he was in quite a different dress to what he is now - I have not any doubt of his being the man; they were small sheep - I know Tyler's field very well; the sheep were being driven in a direct road from Tyler's field towards London - they were driven unusually fast; they seemed very fresh under foot, not at all fatigued - they were about a mile and half or a mile and a quarter from Tyler's field.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you before the Justice? A. Yes; there is no other Lewisham watchman here that I know of - I have a distinct recollection of what I said before the Justice; I did not say there were four beasts with the drove of sheep - I believe there was another watchman before the Justice, but I did not hear him examined; I am quite certain there was but one person with the sheep I saw at Lewisham - I spoke to the prisoner, but did not stop him; I had a dog with me, which frightened the sheep, and he swore at the dog - I told him the dog would neither hurt him nor the sheep; he bade me good night, and went on - this was a little before one o'clock in the morning, between the White Hart and the Castle, beyond the watch-house; it was higher up the town of Lewisham than the White Hart - I am employed as a night constable and a private watchman as well, occasionally; there is a private subscription for watching at night - he was perhaps three or four minutes passing me; he went along very swiftly, swifter than drovers go in general - I thought he drove them too fast for a regular drover; I had never seen him before with sheep to my knowledge.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you ever seen him before without sheep? A. I have seen him before - I know his face familiarly by seeing him about, but I cannot exactly recollect where.

COURT. Q.Had you ever spoken to him before so as to know his voice? A. No, I heard his voice at the Justice's.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. About how near were you to him when you had the conversation about the dog? A. About four yards - it was a star-light night.

JURY. Q. Did the prisoner stand opposite to you during any of the time? A. I was about four yards from him - I stood still and he was moving on; I swear positively to him.

JOHN PINKS. I am servant to Mr. Hulme, a meat-salesman, in Leadenhall-market. On Saturday morning, the 5th of March, about five or six o'clock, I found the carcases of seven taggs left at my master's shop for sale, and on the Monday following I spoke to the prisoner about those sheep; I told him they were dressed very bad, and he had better pay a man 1s. to have them dressed as they should be - he said his son did not come home till late at night, and he was in liquor, but he was very well satisfied with the prices he got, thought he got nothing by them.

Cross-examined. Q. Has your master been in the habit of selling sheep for the prisoner before? A. yes, several times before.

One of the skins found at the prisoner's house, and one found at Mr. Agutter's were handed to the Jury, with the brandmark.

MR. STOW. The growth of the wool in the sheep would extend the mark - they were marked seven months ago; I have no doubt of the skins being mine - I swear to them.

Prisoner's Defence. When the officer took me I told him where the skins and things were, and where I bought them - I bought them in Old-street-road, joining the City-road; I drove them home into Long-alley, killed them. and sent them to market, some to Pinks, and some to another gentleman's - he asked what I gave for them; I told him 30l. - he asked if I knew the man I bought them of; I told him I did not - he asked if I had got any witness: I told him yes, and I believe they will be here - when I got to Worship-street the Magistrate asked me where I bought them; I told him in Old-street-road, and what I gave for them.

Six witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character.

Reference Number: t18310407-12

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

709. JOHN BROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , at St. Luke, Chelsea, 3 books, value 30s.; 7 table-cloths, value 3l.; 23 napkins, value 20s.; 2 gowns, value 30s.; 1 shawl, value 20s.; 1 scarf, value 20s.; 1 saucepan, value 3l.; 1 morocco case, value 1s.; 2 pairs of bracelets, value 20l.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 3l., and 3 gold chains, value 15l., the goods of John Paterson , in his dwelling-house .

CAPTAIN JOHN PATERSON . In October last I lived at No.49, Cadogan-place, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea . I had occasion to leave town - Mrs. Paterson and the family left on the 7th of October; I followed in a few days, and occasionally came backwards and forwards - I had known the prisoner from his birth, and his father and mother before him; I had a most excellent opinion of him, and on leaving town I left the house under his special care - he recommended me a person to be in the house, but I explained to him that I relied on him himself for the safe custody of every thing there; I remained out of town till December - I occasionally came back, and then went to Cadogan-place; the bed-rooms were kept in order for me - I returned to town a few days before Mrs. Paterson, and on her coming to town I discovered a new key in her wardrobe, in the lock of the drawer - it was a strange key; I know the gold chains were missed, but I had not put them away myself.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Were there workmen employed about your house? A. A good many painters were employed - there were perhaps half a dozen; I do not exactly know the number - they were there some weeks; they had access to the rooms they were to paint - the wardrobe was in the bed-room, which was painted and papered; I cannot say how many were employed in that room, I left that to the master - I have called on the prisoner since he has been in prison; I told him I did not make any proposals to him - I went to induce him to give up my property; I held out no inducement to him - I represented to him his ingratitude in robbing me when he had been born in my father's house.

Q. Did you say nothing of this kind to him, that if the things had been taken by him, if they were conveyed to you secretly, so that by any direction you might not be presumed to know from whence they came, you would do him all the good you could? A. I did not say any thing in those terms, I will tell you what I said - he asked me how he might convey them; I told him I would not tell him how to convey things to my house without it being known from whom they came, but I had no doubt he was cunning enough to know.

COURT. Q.Then the conversation arose from his asking you how he was to convey property to you? A. Certainly, and not from me.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not request that your interview with the prisoner should be in secret? A. I did not, at least I do not know that I request it - the governor immediately told one of his men to show me into a private room; I do not know that he said

"private," but there was no third person present - in fact I had previously asked the Magistrate if I should do wrong in going there.

Q. Did you state to the prisoner or his wife, that it would be better for him to assign over any property he possessed to you? A. No - she offered it; I only went to the prisoner once in prison - I had only one interview with him on the subject, in the prison or elsewhere; his wife called on me twice - I have never received any property from the prisoner, nor seen any but what will be produced; I have received none from him, nor any body connected with him - I was absent from the 7th of October till the 12th of December.

MRS. JESSE PATERSON . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the family leaving town in October, among other things I put away three volumes of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - I kept the first volume to take with me, and put the second, third, and fourth in the book-case, which I locked; I left the key in a secure place in the house - I put a box containing jewels, and some of my personal ornaments into a drawer in the wardrobe; among them was a gold chain.

MARY ANN DALE . My husband is a carpenter. On the 22nd of October, I went to Captain Paterson 's house to take care of it - I was recommended by the prisoner; there was only me and my husband in the house - I remained there during Captain Paterson 's absence till December; I had no key in my personal care, except the key of the street door, and that I could not lock outside - Mr. Broach had the keys of the several doors of the house, except the street door; he was there frequently doing upholsterer's work and other things - I remember Captain Paterson coming home in December, and I went to find the prisoner, as Captain Paterson wanted him; I searched for him for some time, and called for him, but received no answer to my call - I then went down stairs; I came up again, went to the drawing-room door, and heard a door unlocked - I then went up stairs, and saw the prisoner at the bed-room door, locking the bed-room door: he was coming from Captain Paterson's bed-room, and had a hammer and screw-driver in his hand - I told him I had been calling for him several times; he made no answer to that - while I was looking for him, I had tried the door of Captain Paterson's bed-room to see if he was there, and could not open it - there was a press which used to stand in the nursery bed-room.

Q. Do you remember any morning soon after the day you have spoken of seeing the press in the nursery bed-room? A. Yes - I went in again in the course of that day, and saw the press had been removed about an inch and a half or two inches, and I saw a small piece of calico laying there which had not been there before; I do not know whether the street door has a spring lock - the prisoner could go out without being let out, and used to do so; he could not come in again without knocking - he kept the key of Captain Paterson 's bed-room; it was only in my possession when the Captain was in town - when I wanted to make the bed the door was unlocked for me; on all other occasions the prisoner kept the key, and I never had it.

Cross-examined. Q. About how many persons were employed about the house? A. I cannot exactly say the number - there might be seven painters, or there might be more; the painters only had one assistant.

Q. You called at the door of the bed-room on a particular occasion, is there any small chamber off that bed-room where he might be, not choosing to answer exactly at that moment? A.There is a closet near the bed-room where might be.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a bookseller, living at No. 103, High Holborn. I know the prisoner well; (looking at the second, third, and fourth volumes of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire ), he brought these books to me about the beginning of February, with some others, to sell, as I understood - on their being produced I purchased the others, but refused to purchase these, not being complete; he left them with me to endeavour to make the set complete, and called on me two or three times afterwards to see if I had completed them - I did not succeed, and they remained in my hands; I afterwards, in consequence of information, delivered them to Woodbery.

Cross-examined. Q.How long had you known him? A. About ten years - I knew him as a customer, and knew where he lived for the last two months; he told me where he lived - there was no disguise or secrecy about the transaction.

WILLIAM WOODBERY . I am an officer of Queen-square. In January last I went to Captain Paterson's house, and received from him a key, but I made a mistake and put the wrong one into my pocket - I went to Mr. Taylor's on the 16th of February, and received from him three volumes of Gibbon's Rome, which I have produced; I went again to Captain Paterson next morning, and found the prisoner there - I asked if he had lately sold any

books; he said he had, that he was in the habit of buying and selling books - I asked if he had taken three volumes of Gibbon's Rome to Taylor; he said he had, but that they were his own property, and he had bought them with other books - I said, "If you have bought them, you will have the goodness to tell me who you bought them of, there can be no harm in that;" he considered for a bit and then said,"Well, I did not buy them, I took them out of that closet," pointing to a closet joining the book-case in the library - I then took him into custody.

THOMAS NEATE . I am shopman to Bilborough and Co. pawnbrokers, in South Audley-street. I merely produce two duplicates of pledges; on the 16th of October the prisoner pawned a pair of bracelets for 7l.; I am quite sure of his person; I looked at the article carefully before I advanced the money - five or six rows of gold chains composed the bracelets, and it had a snap set with turquoise; each chain was separated from the rest - on the same day I took in from him two gold chains and a pair of ear-rings, for 5l.; on the 22nd of December he redeemed the two gold chains and one pair of ear-rings - I am the person who delivered them out to him, as well as received them, and on the 24th he redeemed the bracelets - (looking at a case of jewellery produced by the prosecutrix) these are so much like the articles, that I should have said they really were the same; that observation applies as well to the bracelets as to the chain - there were two chains.

MRS. PATERSON. These are the three volumes of Gibbon's Rome, which I left behind, and here is the first volume, which I did not lock up - the articles of jewellery which I have produced are an accurate representation of the bracelets and chain which I lost from my wardrobe; I have procured these from a friend - there is no perceptible difference between them; I could not have distinguished them from my own - I knew my friend had such ornaments, and having lost mine, I applied to her to lend me these.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know where your friend bought them? A. They came from India, and so did mine - I never saw any of them but my own and this set- I call the bracelets produced one pair; mine were not under any lock except the lock of the wardrobe in which they were deposited - the property might have been taken part at a time.

COURT. Q.Besides the articles produced, did you iniss some table-cloths? A. I did; also twenty-three napkins, two gowns, and a shawl - I think the two pairs of bracelets were worth at least 15l.; the two gold chains were given to me and I suppose them to be worth more than 5l.; I consider one pair of bracelets to be worth 10l. and this gold chain I should think a jeweller would charge ten guineas for.

Prisoner's Defence. Unfortunate as I am in being placed here to answer a very serious charge, I hope I shall not be more unfortunate in having to encounter a prejudice against me, from having been described as a wholesale robber, and my case having been six months on the town, as it is said - I hope you will feel for me; you may consider what is my case to-day may be yours hereafter. My connexion with the prosecutor has been very ancient; my father and mother lived with his father and mother - when my father and mother came to town, they settled in business, and his house was a home for these young gentlemen to come to; they used to come to our house, and stop there waiting for ships to India, though their father and mine were in different situations in life, such is the affection of Scotchmen for each other; when about twelve years old, I went with the captain as midshipman - I was accustomed to see his property in my father's possession, and was accustomed to make free with it for my own use, and I certainly did not consider I was doing wrong in taking the books, which I declare I only took to read, having no copy of my own; on going home I met a person, with whom I stopped; I laid these books down behind my back in the parlour where I sat, and taking the books up, I went home, without noticing the number, and when I got home I found only three volumes; I looked about in the Captain's house to see if I had left one volume there; not finding it, I took them to Taylor to make up the other volume - I never took them to him to sell; it was a rule with him and me that I never left books for sale; I called on him two or three times to know if he had made up the books, as I was anxious the Captain should have his books back perfect. Another fact I apprehend you will notice, I took no money on the books, therefore there was no selling; as for the other things, I know nothing whatever of them. I remember in October a lady who lodged in my house, and who came from India, had run into arrears with my wife, who had expressed her displesure at not having her money; she was separated from her husband; she told me she was short of money, brought out a jewel-case, and asked me to raise her money on it; I took the case - I did not know the contents; she asked me to get about 15l., and I got 12l.; at Queen-square the pawnbroker's man had Woodbery at his elbow, talking to him about the five chains, and all those minute descriptions, and then he could describe accurately about the turquoise, as he had had the description given him; he said, after a little hesitation, he should not like to swear to them if he saw them, and when he was called up, the prosecutor was sitting by the Magistrate, and I believe if it had not been from some secret hint he received, he would have sworn they were the identical things pawned by me; the only thing I remember among them was, there was some chain like a guard chain, from which the lady took a locket, and let me take the chain; but as far as I remember, they were as much like those things as I am like that door; when he was checked, as I believe, for swearing to them, he said he thought the case was not so fiesh; "No, (said the prosecutor,) it was an old case, a semicircular one;" "Yes,(said the witness) with the corners taken off;" but they were juggling, and determined to make the thing pass if they could. I am perfectly innocent. I admit taking the books under the circumstance stated; it is for you to say whether I took them feloniously or not. I left them with a man I was well known to, and did not go out of the way to dispose of them. I knew they were exposed in his shop. I was not afraid of them; and with the things I pawned I gave my own name and address. I am as perfectly innocent of the robbery as any individual Court. As for myself, the result is of little conse

quence to me; I am bankrupt in every thing. I have lost my character, and am down. I certainly have a wife, with whom I have lived on very good terms, and it is for her sake, and not my own, that it is of any consequence to me.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[April 9.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 39.

Reference Number: t18310407-13

710. JOHN BROACH was again indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November, 1824 , 3 watches, value 30l.; 1 pen-holder, value 1l.; 2 pairs of scissors, value 25s.; 3 seals, value 2l.; 1 gold chain, value 3l., and 1 miniature picture, value 1s., the goods of Alphonse Joseph Marie Morel de Champemont , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLOTTE JEMIMA MOREL DE CHAMPEMONT. I am the wife of Alphouse Joseph Marie Morel de Champemont. In 1824 I and my family had occasion to leave town - we lived at No. 17, Edward-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone ; we left town during September, October, and November - the care of the house and furniture was entrusted to Mr. Byewater, an upholsterer; among other things I left two gold watches, a pair of gold handled scissors, three gold seals, and a gold pen-holder - they were all in the writing-table in the drawing-room; I returned to town early in November that year, and among other articles those mentioned were missing; (looking at a gold watch produced by Thomas Neate) this is one of the watches I left in the drawer - it is made by Barwise; I have no doubt of it - here is the pair of gold scissors which I lost, in a shagreen sheath; I have not a doubt of this being one of the articles I lost - here is a pair of common scissors, which I believe to be mine.

Cross-examined. Q.Have you any doubt of the watch? A.None.

THOMAS NEATE . I am in the employ of Mr. Bilborough, a pawnbroker, in South Audley-street. The gold watch which I produced I received in pawn from the prisoner on the 6th of May, 1829, with two chains, two seals, and a key - I lent 10l. on the whole, and on the 1st of September, 1830, the time for redeeming it having gone by, it was renewed by the prisoner; I am certain of him - I would advance 5l. on the gold watch alone; I might have been induced to have lent 6l. on it - I think it would be worth 10l. to a wearer; I could have sold the watch for 6l. or 7l.

Cross-examined. Q.There is great caprice in buying things of this kind? A.Things do not always fetch their value - I should not have liked to have sold the watch for 5l.; the maker's name would justify the value - the value depends on the gold and the works.

COURT. Q.Suppose that were sent to a pawnbroker's auctioneer to be sold with other condemned pledges, what sum should you have restricted it to be sold at? A. I should not have liked to let it be sold for less than 6l.

WILLIAM PACKER. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pair of gold handled scissors, which were pawned on the 20th of July last, for 5s., and I believe by the prisoner, in the name of John Broach - I have a doubt about him.

WILLIAM WOODBERY. I am an officer of Queen-square. In consequence of information obtained from different prosecutors, I went to the prisoner's house, and found there a small miniature and a pair of steel spring scissors; the prosecutrix was with me - she pointed the scissors out, and claimed them; the miniature might be called a brooch - I found that in the little back parlour on the ground floor; I found the duplicate of the gold watch produced by Neate; when I apprehended the prisoner I asked him to what watch the duplicate belonged; he said it was his father's watch.

ANN PHILPOTT . While the prosecutrix was out of town I was at the house; the prisoner was in the habit of coming there from Mr. Byewater's, and seeing the furniture put up and down, he went into the different rooms without being watched during all the time the family were absent.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you tell what year it was? A.1724 - I have got it down; it was 1804 - no, 1824.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent; I never was near the house during the time this lady says she lost her property - Mr. Byewater, in whose employ I was, never did a single job for her during that time; he was not employed that year - the lady employed another person at that time; when she left the house, the room she says she lost the property from, was left open, for the purpose, as I understood, of having a conservatory added to the end of it, and a number of persons must have been employed there - I never saw that conservatory, except from the next house; there was a very curious circumstance happened about a year before 1824 - a certain gentleman, who lived in that house, had this lady's keys; the witness, who has just left, could have answered to that - the gentleman had access to every thing in the house, I suppose, for he carried a very large bunch of keys about with him, and one night in particular he happened to fall into company with a woman in the street, (it is a matter of newspaper history,) she either robbed him, or he said she robbed him of a gold watch - he made a noise about it in the street, and the watchman took her into custody and requested him to leave his address to answer the charge the next day - the gentleman scribbled out something, but instead of leaving that he gave his real name and address at this lady's house, and next morning, when applied to by the officer, he said he never lost his watch, and had never met a woman that night - the fact is, my house is open to every body, and it is a wonder they did not swear to my chairs and tables.

MR. PHILLIPS to the PROSECUTRIX. Q. At the time you went out of town were you married to the present prosecutor? A. Yes.

[April 9.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 39.

Reference Number: t18310407-14

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

711. JOB DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , at St. Marylebone, 8 yards of woollen cloth, value 9l., the goods of John Loyd , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LOYD. I am a mercer , and live at No. 22, Burr-street, Marylebone ; it is my dwelling-house - I have known the prisoner above twenty years; he was a tailor , and formerly dealt with me, but he had ceased to deal with me for four years. On the 22nd of February, between ten and eleven o'clock, he came to my shop with another man, who, he said, was a carpenter and undertaker - they both came in together, and Davis said to me, "Have you got any good superfine black cloth?" I said I had - he said, "I

want nine or ten yards of the best, and as much more of inferior;" I said I was very low of the very best superfine cloth, but what I had I would show him - I took out a piece of fine, which measured six yards, tight measure, and told him I had got another length of the same quality, about two yards and a half - I showed it to him, and told him the price was 22s.; he told me to measure it off - I put it all in at eight yards and a quarter, as it was tight measure, and I told him so - he said he was in a very great hurry, for the carpenter had got a job to finish at some coffins, and I was to make it up as quick as I could - he called the man a carpenter and undertaker; I put the cloth into a paper, and chalked out on the counter "9l. 1s. 6d." - I put my hand on the bundle, and said, "Now, which of you two is going to pay for this cloth?" Davis said, "I will, but I want to look at some single kerseymere; a low one," meaning a cheap one - I told him I had no low single kerseymere, but I had some low double-milled at 8s. a yard, and would cut it to him at 7s. 6d. - I brought three ends of kerseymere forward, one single and two double - I told him the price of all three; he approved of them, and told me to unroll and measure the whole - I did so, and rolled them up again; I made out my bill, and said, "Mr. Davis, if you will wait a moment I will send my girl out for a stamped receipt; the bill amounted to 26l. 8s. - he said,"Oh, you need not mind, you can draw upon me at a month for it."

Q.What had become of the carpenter? A. When the prisoner said, "Oh, I will (meaning he would) pay for it," the carpenter went away with the first parcel of cloth, and the prisoner said to him, "All the small pieces you get out of the cloth bring them back to me;" he took it away at the time I asked who was to pay me for it; when I said I would send for a stamped receipt the prisoner said, "You may draw upon me at a month or two if you like;" I said"Draw a bill upon you you vagabond, scoundrel - draw a bill upon you, now you have got my property out of the place; I shall send for a Policeman directly for you;" I sent for one directly - he came, but did not think it a case he could interfere in; I told him the prisoner and another had robbed me of 9l. odd worth of cloth - he did not search him; I never intended to part with the goods without the money - I would not have suffered it to go out of my shop- I expected him to pay for it immediately; I never intended to trust him with it at all, nor give him credit for it any way whatever.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. The prisoner has dealt with you for twenty years? A. I have known him twenty years - he may have dealt with me that time for trifling articles, till within these four years; I never gave him a year's credit, but he has taken it - he has not spent 50l. with me all his life; he used to be foreman to a man in Holles-street - he might buy 7l. or 8l. worth of goods of me in a year; I gave him about six months' credit - I never had but one bill of him, and that was the last transaction; I could get nothing but a bill from him - the upmost I gave him credit for was about 3l.

Q.When the cloth was folded up. you, for the first time, talked about the payment? A.Of course; I had my elbow on it, and if they had mentioned bills then I should have turned it on one side, and told them to walk out - I let the man go out with it because he said Davis wanted to look at other goods; the carpenter took away the parcel with my consent, because the prisoner promised to pay me- he used not to bring a person with him when he dealt with me before; I had my hand on the cloth, and asked who would pay me for it - the prisoner said, "I will," and as he said the man was in a hurry, I let it go; if he had said, "I will give you a bill," I would have thrown it aside, and said, "Walk out of my place;" 13l. is the greatest amount he ever owed me, and I was a year and a half before I got that; it was not likely I would trust him after that - I have never said that he had dealt with me eighteen months ago; he got very bouncing when he found the Policeman would not interfere - he gave me a bill in 1827 for 20l., though he only owed me 13l.; he wanted the balance out of my pocket, but I would not give it him - I did not negotiate the bill; the 13l. was paid me - when I first knew him he was foreman to Mr. Tenpenny, which is a respectable firm; he was with them many years - I never knew him in business for himself; the Magistrate gave him an opportunity of bringing the cloth back, to me, but that was before I found it in pawn; he said he kept a shop in Well-street, and I see there is a shop there, but I was never in it - the Magistrate asked if I wished to prosecute; I said I had no ill will to him, all I wanted was my property.

DANIEL DUTCH. I am a Police-constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 23rd of February; I have a duplicate in the name of Wilson, who is a carpenter, and lives in Homer-street I believe; it was given to me by Wilson's mother.

HENRY GIBBS. I am shopman to Mr. Jenkins', of Crawford-street, Marylebone, about a mile from the prosecutor's. I produce two pieces of cloth, pawned on the 22nd of February, about one o'clock in the day, by a woman, in the name of Mary Wilson.

Cross-examined. Q.How far is your shop from Wilson's? A. Not above three or four minutes' walk.

JOHN LOYD. It was about half-past eleven o'clock when the Policeman was sent for - here are my initials on the paper the cloth is wrapped in; it is the paper I wrapped it in at the time - here is my name on it, and the cloth is mine; it does not appear to have been cut at all.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether the prisoner made any endeavour to find Wilson? A. I cannot say - I have endeavoured to find him, but cannot - Dutch and I were looking after him, and find he lived where they gave the pawnbroker his address, but his absconded; I believe the prisoner was apprehended at his own house.

Prisoner's Defence. I have dealt with Mr. Loyd full twenty years, from the commencement of business - I was foreman to the late Mr. Tenpenny, and used to buy all the trimmings; indeed, I carried on the business - I set up in business, and paid him ready money, which I received from my master, for sixteen years, and at times, having a few jobs of my own, he gave me credit, and I paid him when I received my bill, till the last time, when Mr. Tenpenny failed, and owed me 222l.; I came in with the creditors, which made me poor - I was to have received 14s. in the pound, but had only 6s., which made me run rather longer credit with Loyd; he never intimated in the least manner whatever to deny me credit when I asked him - I left off dealing with him, because my son was in the habit of going

to Mr. Tenpenny's, who once sent him to Loyd's with half a crown too much - he gave me credit for it, and that was the reason I did not deal with him; this undertaker had been fitting up my place in Well-street for three months, till I was apprehended, since then I have not seen Wilson: Mrs. Wilson says I ordered her to pawn the cloth, but I never saw her in my life - as to Loyd, he will swear any thing; he has been in Clerkenwell three months for buying stolen goods, and would have been sent over the herring pond if he had not had Counsel to plead for him - he learnt so much at Clerkenwell that he said he should treble his way of laying out his money.

JOHN LOYD. I bought some goods of a man, and got into a hobble with them: I am sorry to say I have had an accident of that kind - I have lived eighteen years where I now do; many traders have fallen into an errer, and I do not deny it, but I was never in Clerkenwell; I was confined twelve months - I never heard the least thing against the prisoner's character.

[Apr. 9.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 58.

Reference Number: t18310407-15

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

712. JAMES WALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , at St. Paul, Shadwell, 10 sovereigns, 16 half-crowns, 20 shillings, and 20 sixpences, the property of John Leatherdale , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LEATHERDALE. I live at No. 4, High-street, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell - I rent the whole house, and keep an eating-house . I had known the prisoner for a fortnight or three weeks before this happened: the money in question was kept in my bed-room, on the second floor- the prisoner did not lodge at my house; he came there on the 2nd of February, and represented himself as the master of a ship; he said he had been drinking with the owner of his ship, he was out late, and could not get to his ship - he wanted a bed, and he went to bed in my house; I saw my money safe at nine o'clock in the morning of the 3rd, when I went into the bed-room - he was at that time up stairs in the room over my bed-room, where he slept, but I did not at that time know he was there; I went into the City immediately, and returned a little before twelve - he had been gone a few minutes, and I heard the money was gone; I went to my bed-room, and missed the money from the drawer, which had been opened by a picklock-key, I think, as the lock seemed to have been prized open by force - I missed ten sovereigns, sixteen half-crowns, twenty shillings, and twenty sixpences; I never saw him again till I found him in custody at the Thames Police, nearly two months afterwards, in consequence of an advertisement in the newspaper; I am quite sure he is the man who had a bed at my house - I gave information to the inspector as soon as I lost the money.

ELIZABETH LEATHERDALE . I am the prosecutor's wife. I know the prisoner; I saw him at the house on the 2nd of February, about eleven o'clock at night; he asked for a bed, which my husband allowed him - he slept in the room directly over our bed-room; I did not exactly know what money was in the drawer - I had observed ten sovereigns there the night before, with some silver, but how much I do not know; the prisoner did not stay to breakfast next morning - he paid for his bed over night, which is usual; I saw him leave the house; he asked me what time it was; I told him between eleven and twelve o'clock - my husband had been out, and came home just after the prisoner was gone; I had not then discovered the loss - I examined the drawer after he came home; but before he did, I found the lock injured, and the money gone - I could open the drawer; none of the money was marked - I saw the prisoner at the Thames Police, on the 7th of April - we had no other stranger in the house at the time; the bed-room was shut, but not locked; any body coming down stairs might open it - I found the door open when I went up; I had left the room about half-past eight o'clock - the door was then shut: my husband had gone out before ten - when I went up, I found the door wide open; I knew nobody in the house could go into the room without my knowledge - our front door is kept shut, and nobody goes out but what we let out - I let the prisoner out - we serve no customer till after twelve o'clock in the day.

Prisoner's Defence. I can only say I am entirely innocent - I throw myself on the mercy of the Court; I have no friends in London.

ELIZABETH LEATHERDALE re-examined. We have a servant girl, who slept in the kitchen, and a servant man up stairs - they are still in my service.

JURY. Q.Had the servants access to the room? A. They could not go up stairs without my seeing them - the servant girl was at work with me, providing dinner, all the morning - I was directly opposite the staircase with her all the morning, and saw the prisoner come down; there is no back staircase; the man servant slept in the top garret - he came down stairs before me, and could not have gone up without me, or the female servant seeing him.

[April 9.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

Reference Number: t18310407-16

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

713. MARY ANN LEE was indicted for that she, on the 26th of March , at St. Andrew, Holborn, feloniously did assault Ellen Foulkes , and with a certain sharp instrument did strike and cut her in and upon her right thigh, with intent to kill and murder her ; against the Statute, &c.

2nd COUNT, stating the intent to be to disable her.

3rd COUNT, stating the intent to be to do her some grievous bodily harm.

ELLEN FOULKES. I am the wife of William Foulkes , who is a labouring man; we live together in Field-lane -I keep one room on the ground floor. On Sunday morning, the 27th of March, between eight and nine o'clock, this happened - I have known the prisoner between two and three months; we have been very good friends; I believe she is married - she lived in Water-lane, Fleet-street, and was in the habit of calling on me and I on her - I had met her on the Saturday in Field-lane, with another woman, and she quarrelled with me in Holborn; but we were good friends after that - I quarrelled with her through her being ungrateful, for I have been a good friend to her, by giving her a home and victuals when she could not support herself - I had done that that very week; I do not know how she gets her bread - we afterwards became good friends, and there was an end of that quarrel - I met her in Holborn on Sunday morning, a

little before eight o'clock, and brought her home with me to have breakfast; we were good friends till we got home - I made a fire, put on the kettle, and was going to get breakfast, when she quarrelled with me again; she struck me three or four times.

Q.What did you quarrel about? A.She said I had said she was ungrateful - I had told her so before, and she began again about it; she struck me in the face with her hands, and I said, "Mary, you are ungrateful;" she hit me in the face three or four times with her hand - I struck her again when she struck me so many times; I am sure I hit her again - I do not think the Magistrate asked me that question.

Q. Well, you sat down to breakfast, did you? A. No, I put the frying-pan on the fire to fry some meat - this was immediately after we struck each other; we were good friends, and had made it up, not to quarrel any more; I was standing by the fire, and saw her put her hand into her pocket - this was full ten minutes after she had struck me, and we had become good friends.

Q. What made you good friends? A. I told her as it was Sunday, I did not wish to have any quarrel, and she said, "Well, I will drop it;" she said we should not quarrel any more - I said very well, I was agreeable, and did not wish to quarrel, as it was Sunday; the frying-pan was on the fire when I said this - I was preparing breakfast, and going to give her breakfast; we both became quite reconciled; I was standing by the fire, frying the meat for breakfast, and saw her put her hand into her pocket without saying any thing to me; she then stooped down without saying any thing, put her hand under my clothes, and when it was done, I said, "Mary you have stabbed me!" I said so instantly - I felt that I was stabbed; I felt the blood come from my right thigh - I exclaimed immediately, "Mary, you have stabbed me!" it was done all in a moment; she said, "No I have not, let me look?" I took up my clothes, and let her look - she said, "Let me tie it up - it will be no worse;" the blood flowed very rapidly, and I called for Mrs. King, who lives in the next room - she came in directly, and I said, in the prisoner's presence, that she had stabbed me; she said she had done it, and would do it again, and spit in my face three times - when I called Mrs. King in, she attempted to go out, but I fastened the door and prevented her; she wanted to go away - I stood before the door - I let Mrs. King in at that door; the neighbours came in, a constable was sent for, and a surgeon looked at my wounds; I had three wounds, one on the thigh, one about my knee, and the largest wound was up in my thigh, that wound bled profusely; the surgeon has attended me ever since it happened - he dressed it on Sunday, but has not seen it since - it is very nearly healed now.

Prisoner. Q. How long have you been the wife of William Foulkes - you are only living with him? A. I have been lawfully married to him these eight years - you did not meet me in Shoe-lane, talking to a man on Saturday night.

Q. Did I not take you and the man you live with, and another man who lives in the court, into the Red Lion, in Plumtree-court, and pay for half a pint of spirits for you? A. She did not; she took me in on Sunday morning before eight o'clock, and paid for some liquor; my husband and another man were with me then - it was a little before eight; I cannot say how much liquor she paid for - I did not drink with her on Saturday night - I did not buy any beef on Saturday night, nor did you sleep in my house that night.

Q. Did I not go into a wine-vaults, at the corner of Bear-alley, and pay for three separate quarterns of spirits, some cheese, and biscuits on Saturday night, for you and the men? A. It is not true, you were not at my house all that night - you slept at my house on Wednesday night, but not afterwards.

Q. How many times have you been in custody for robbing different gentlemen, and obliged to fly from England? A. I never was charged with robbing a gentleman - I do not know Mr. Powell; I was never tried, nor in custody, nor before a Magistrate till I was at the office about her - she is capable of swearing any thing.

JURY. Q. Can you recollect how much you had drank on the Sunday morning? A. I had two glasses of gin with her, and nothing more; I cannot say what she drank, but she had no more in my company than I had - she was perfectly sober when this happened.

SUSANNAH KING . I am a widow, and have been so these four years - my husband was a sawyer. I live in the next room to Foulkes; it is in the next house, but the partition is so thin I can hear any thing - on that Sunday morning I was sitting by the fire, and heard them in conversation; then they were quiet, and presently I heard the prosecutrix call out, "Mrs. King, come in, I am stabbed;" I went immediately to the door, and Eleanor opened it - she stood behind as I went in; there had been words between them, but they had been quiet for full ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - when I went in I said, "What is the matter?" she said, "Mary has stabbed me;" she was sitting on a chair, and so was Mary - I asked her who had done it; she said Mary had stabbed her - I turned round to the prisoner, and she said, "I have done it, and will do it again," and spit at her several times in my presence; I then went down to look for an officer - the prosecutrix took her hand from her thigh, and the blood was pouring down profusely; her hand was over the hole in her thigh when I went in - I went down the steps immediately, and found the Policeman, who came in; neither the prisoner nor the prosecutrix were perfectly sober.

Prisoner. Q. At what hour on Sunday morning did I go with you and the tall woman Eliza, into Davies' public-house on Saffron-hill? A. I never saw her till I went into the room - I had not been out of my house till I came in to this woman when she called.

Q. Did you not, on Saffron-hill, call me a scaly b -, because I would not pay for more than a quartern of gin, and Eliza put down 6d. to pay for it? A.There is no truth in it - I did not see her till I saw her in the room when Ellen was stabbed.

JOHN HURLEY . I am a Police-constable. On Sunday morning, the 27th of March, Mrs. King came for me - I went up to Foulkes' room, and found the prisoner and Foulkes there; Foulkes said she had been stabbed - the prisoner denied having stabbed her; this pen-knife (producing it) was taken from her pocket by another constable, in my presence - it was shut at the time; the point was all over blood, which appeared fresh, and after I took her to the station-house I found two more knives on her.

Prisoner. Q.Were they not all in liquor? A. They appeared to have been drinking, but none of them were drunk, except a man who was laying on the bed, he was quite drunk - Foulkes told her story quite sensible; she was bleeding at the time - the man on the bed was William Foulkes; he was quite drunk, and knew nothing about the affair.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I am a surgeon, and live at No. 24, Hatton-garden. On Sunday morning, about half-past eight o'clock, the Policeman came to my house - I saw the prosecutrix about half-past eleven, at the house in New-court; my young man had seen her before, and dressed her wounds - I examined her wounds then; there was a hemorrhage which had returned - the wound was opened out and re-dressed; she had three wounds, but one was the principal - it appeared to have been done with a sharp instrument; the upper wound in the thigh was about two inches long, and about a quarter of an inch deep through the skin and integuments - it was over a dangerous part if it had cut deeper, but being superficial there was no danger in the wound itself; the others had been done by a sharp instrument - they were small wounds just cut through the skin; I have attended her ever since - I dressed it last Sunday, and think it well now.

Prisoner's Defence (written). I trust you will take my distressed situation into your merciful consideration, and allow me to state a few facts as they happened in this case - I am entirely innocent of the crime, as I expect mercy from the Almighty, who known the secrets of all hearts. On Saturday night, the 26th of March, I went to the lodgings of the prosecutrix for some duplicates I had left there, intending to release them; the prosecutrix was not at home - the man she lives with told me she was just gone out, for she had no money - I asked him to come out and look for her - I proceeded to the pawnbroker's, desiring William Foulkes to try to find her, and come towards Gray's Inn-lane (that being the way I was going), and that I would meet them after I got my things: on my return I met Foulkes, who told me he could not find her, but he did not doubt of meeting her, as she desired him to come out to her about one o'clock - I then walked down Holborn and Farringdon-street with him in search of her; Foulkes met with a person who told us that Ellen, meaning the prosecutrix, went down Shoe-lane about ten minutes before - we accordingly went that way, and saw her standing with a man at the gate of Mr. Pontifex's manufactory; I then took her, William Foulkes , and the man, who told us where to find her, into the Red Lion, in Shoe-lane, and gave them something to drink - I then advised them to go home: the prosecutrix denied doing so, as she must get some money before she went home; I told her I would give her 3s. or 4s. to get what she wanted the next day, as there was nothing else but drunken blackguards about the streets, and that she would only get herself ill-used - I then took them both to a wine-vaults, at the corner of Bear-alley, Farringdon-street, and treated them with several glasses of spirits, some biscuits, and cheese; I then gave Foulkes 3s. 6d. to get some meat for their Sunday's dinner; I took some boiled beef for supper - we all went together to their lodging; when we had been there about an hour three men came and knocked at the window by mistake - the prosecutrix ran out, and abused the men most scandalously, until a neighbour of theirs advised her to go in and not expose herself at that hour in the morning - she then brought the men in with her; I then, by their desire, sent for some beer and spirits, which I did three or four different times - about seven o'clock we all came out together, and went to a wine-vaults, kept by a person of the name of Gurney, in Farringdon-street; they there asked me to lend the other man 1s.; I did so - I then begged of them to go home, as I would not stop any longer about the streets on a Sunday morning; they came part of the way, but would not go any further if I did not give them a drop more, as they termed it - I then paid for more spirits at the end of Field-lane, Holborn; Foulkes and the other man left us. The prosecutrix and myself were going towards her home, but going along Field-lane we met the witness King and another woman - the prosecutrix asked me for 6d. to treat them, saying, with an oath, that many a cold night they had given her a glass - I told her I thought she was making a complete dupe of me, but still I consented to go with them to a house on Saffron hill; I called for a quartern of spirits, which did not suit them; one of them then called for half a pint and paid for it, at the same time calling me scaly, and every other name they could think of - I made them no answer, as I was quite sensible enough to be ashamed of my conduct, being about the streets on a Sunday morning - I begged of the prosecutrix to come home and give me some things of mine, which were at her room, and that I would go to my own room - she came with me, but the moment she got in she began raving like a mad woman, struck me repeatedly, and tore my cap off my head, which I could not bear without retaliating - I told her I was very well served for being a fool. I could not understand any other than that the woman was jealous of me - I came out to look for William Foulkes to send him home to pacify her, but could not find him; I went back again, and the man was laying on the bed: the instant I entered the room she screamed out, and accused me of stabbing her, and said she would have her revenge of me now - I was struck with astonishment, and sat down until the two Policemen came in; the witness King stated before the Policeman, and the first time she came before the Magistrate, that she saw me do it, then that I said I had done it, and would do it again: this, if the Policeman speaks the truth, he knows to be false - even the officers at Hatton-garden said on Saturday, when I was committed, that it was a great pity their two former statements had not been taken down, for they never heard stories so widely different - the other Policeman, who is not present, stated before the Magistrate that he took the one particular knife out of my pocket; why did he not take the others? that was taken from me at the station-house - one of those knives I have carried in my pocket these four years, and the other is my husband's: had I been conscious of having done wrong I could have thrown them away, which the Policeman very well knows, while I was going to the station-house. This is all I have to say - I throw myself on your mercy, and trust you will notice the oaths of the prosecutrix and the witness, as they are two of the best known characters in the City, having many times been tried for robberies - there is not an officer or watchman through the City but knows them; the prosecutrix, by the appellation of Yorkshire Ellen, and the witness as Old Suke - there is not a part of England the prosecutrix has not been obliged to run from, in consequence of robbing different men, she was obliged to fly from Manchester, for giving a gentleman drugs to stupify him, while she robbed him of 17l. and his gold watch - the man, who for years has lived on this prostitution and robbery, was taken for it, but as they could not find the woman he was acquitted. These are the characters who are doing their endeavours to swear away the life of your unfortunate petitioner.

JURY to ELLEN FOULKES . Q. At what time on Sunday morning did you get up? A. About seven o'clock - my husband got up about the same time; he was very drunk between eight and nine - he had gone out; he was neither drunk nor sober when he went out - he got drunk out; he was not drunk when he went to bed the night before, which was about half-past eleven o'clock.

JURY to SUSANNAH KING . Q. Did you see the prosecutrix and prisoner together on Saturday night? A.No, not till Sunday morning - I have frequently seen the prisoner in Foulkes' room; I did not see Mr. Foulkes on Saturday night, but I heard them when they went to bed, which was a long time after I went to bed - I cannot be certain of the time, but I dare say it was about eleven o'clock; they were up in the morning, and gone out about seven - they returned about eight, as I heard them; I had heard no men knocking at their window.

JURY to ELLEN FOULKES. Q. I believe you have said your husband went to bed sober, but went out partly drunk in the morning, how do you reconcile that? A. He had a little beer the night before, but I do not think he had any spirits - he had nothing to drink in the house in the morning, nor was any brought in.

GUILTY - DEATH . on the 3rd Count. Aged 27.

[April 13.]

Reference Number: t18310407-17

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, APRIL 7.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

714. JANE ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 1 glazier's diamond, value 15s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 14 sovereigns, and I half-sovereign, the property of John Miles , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN MILES. I am a carpenter , and live on Saffronhill . The prisoner came to lodge with us about three weeks before this happened - my wife had known her nine years ago; she went out washing when she lodged with us - she lodged in the second floor back room; I occupy the first floor - I had fourteen sovereigns in a bag, which was in a box; my wife missed them on the 29th of November, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning -I was out at work at the time; I had gone out at six, and I did not miss it myself till I came home at one - I had seen it all secure on Wednesday night, the 28th, the night before; the box was locked - I found it broken open, and I also missed the other articles stated in the indictment; on the 8th of January I found the handkerchief in the prisoner's box, which was down in the kitchen - she had left the house on the 29th, leaving her things behind; I did not miss the handkerchief till I found it - she had left the house as soon as the money was missed, but my wife followed her, and found her with the money in her hand; she was taken up then about the money, but nothing was found on her, and she was liberated by Mr. Laing, the Magistrate - that was in November, and when I found the handkerchief in her box, she was taken before Mr. Laing again, and I believe he would have committed her, but an officer came forward; I then indicted her.

CATHERINE MILES . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I have known the prisoner nine years - she lodged with me before I was married; I saw the fourteen sovereigns and a half safe in the box in my first floor room, on the Saturday night and Sunday morning, in a red bag - I locked the box, and had the key in my pocket; on Monday morning, about half-past ten o'clock, the prisoner told me to go and make my bed, fetch the water, and do what I had to do, and she would sweep up the room - I did not go out of the house, only into the yard: I was not gone above a minute, and when I returned she said she was going out - I said."Where are you going?" she said she would be back again between one and two, and on my opening the box to put my husband's coat in, I found it unlocked, and missed the money - not a soul had been into the room besides her; a man and his wife live up stairs, and the prisoner lodged in the back room - I ran out immediately, and found her in the witness' room with the money in her hand; she would not open her hand to let me look at it, but she had it in her hand - I asked her to return me what she had not spent; I saw a sovereign and some silver in her hand - she would not open her hand to show me the whole of it; she only just opened her hand, and said she would not give me a bit of it - this was about one o'clock; she had left me about half-past ten; I brought her back to my house, and was going to shut the door to take the money, but she abused me - this was about two o'clock; I lost the handkerchief out of the same trunk - she said she saw a great many more good things in the trunk, and she was to blame that she did not help herself to more; she never came for her things - she never called for her trunk.

GEORGE KNOTT . I am a Policeman. I was called into Miles' house on the 8th of January, in the evening - he said he suspected the prisoner had a handkerchief and some money of his; she went in with me, and opened her trunk herself - she looked to see if her things were correct, and threw this handkerchief out of her box, saying "This is not mine;" Miles picked it up, and said, "It is mine." and that he knew it by a mark - I found some loose silk run into the edge of it.

JOHN HEMUS. On the Sunday before the prisoner was taken she came into my mother's - I think it was in December: she told my mother she had no money, and was very poorly off - she drank tea with us, and next day, at one o'clock, when I came home to dinner, she was very much intoxicated, and asked me to go to the play with her- she said she would treat me and my mother, for she had plenty of money; I said I had to go to my work - this was two or three days after the prosecutor lost his money.

MARY CHITTY . About Christmas I heard a man who was with the prisoner, and who she called Harry, say,"What a fool you was, you had not taken all Miles' money;" and she said, "Was not I?" - I did not go before the Magistrate.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, denying the charge, stating that she had left the house in consequence of the prosecutor's ill-temper, and had summoned him afterwards for 1l. 19s. 11d., for things detained.

JOHN MILES . She did summons me three weeks after the robbery, and I was ordered to pay it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-18

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

715. JOHN DOWNIE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 time-piece, value 2l., and 1 coat, value 4l., the goods of James Wells Taylor , in his dwelling-house .

AMELIA -. I am servant to Mr. James Wells Taylor, a solicitor , of Great James-street . On the 15th of January, about eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner

rang at the bell - I went to the door, and he asked me if Mr. Taylor was up; I told him No, and asked what he wanted - he said Mr. Carter wished to see Mr. Taylor as soon as he got up: he was to wait for an answer - I went and told Mr. Taylor, leaving the prisoner in the passage; Mr. Taylor said he did not know such a person - I came down, and asked him where Mr. Carter lived; I forget where he said - I went and told Mr. Taylor where he said Mr. Carter lived; I came down, and found the prisoner still in the passage, and asked him to walk into the office, and wait till Mr. Taylor came down; he did so - I went down, leaving him there: I heard Mr. Taylor come down in about a minute, it was a very short time - Mr. Taylor called me; I came up, found the street door open, and these things gone - I was down on the basement; Mr. Taylor said some things were gone - I went up to the office, and missed a great coat and a time-piece off the shelf - I had seen them safe when I showed him into the office; I saw the prisoner in custody at Marlborough-street on the 3rd of March, and am quite sure of him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. The man who called was a stranger to you? A. Yes, I never saw him before; I left him on the mat the first time, four or five yards from the office door - Mr. Taylor sleeps on the second floor; the coat was on a rail in the back office, which he was shown into - when I saw him at Marlborough-street he was brought out of the lock-up room to me alone, and I was asked if he was the man; I never said I only believed him to be the man - I am quite sure of him.

JAMES WELLS TAYLOR . I am a solicitor. On the 15th of January, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock, I was called down to a person - when I came down I went into the back office, and found nobody there; the street door was ajar - I missed a great coat and time-piece, which I had seen overnight; the time-piece was worth 1l., and the great coat 5l. - I had only worn it once: it cost more than 6l.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I have a time-piece, which I found on the 6th of February, at a house belonging to Gast, a muffin-baker, in Hanway-street, Oxford-street - I was seeking for other property; the time-piece was delivered to me by Henry Taylor, who was in Gast's employ - he took it from under a counter or dough-bin, in the bakehouse; I took the prisoner in charge on the 25th of February.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you produce him to the prosecutor's servant? A. No - I do not know who did.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I am as innocent as you are yourself; I worked with Mr. Brown, of Spitalfields, till the 1st of February - he has now gone to Manchester.

GUILTY (of stealing, to the value of 55s. only.) Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-19

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

716. CHARLES KITCHINS , JOHN TRIGG , and EDMUND FENN were indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Robinson , on the 16th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 seal, value 10s.; 2 keys, value 4s.; 1 chain, value 1s., and 1 hat, value 5s. , his property.

ROBERT ROBINSON. I am a painter and glazier , and live in Praed-street, Paddington. On the 16th of March, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening. I went to a house at the corner of Bryanstone and Cumberland-streets, and got very much intoxicated; I went out, and in Edgware-road, going towards home, I met three young men; the prisoner Trigg was one of them: I knew him before well by sight, by his being at a fishmonger's, in Dover-street; Marylebone - I had never been in his company; as I passed them I received a knock on my hat - I turned, and asked what that was for, and they came up towards me; I said, "Trigg, is that you?" he said, "Yes, what are you going to stand to drink?" I said it was late, and there was no house open - they said they knew of a house, and took me to a house in Adam-street, which I believe is the Carpenters' Arms, but I am not certain - we had two half-pints of gin among us; I paid for it - I had my full share - we came out together in about ten minutes, and walked together to the corner of Praed-street , where I live- my hat was knocked off there, and at the same time a snatch was made at my watch-chain; I directly called out for the Police - I cannot tell who knocked my hat off, or snatched my chain; I felt my watch drawn in my fob, put my hand down, and felt my watch safe, but part of the chain and seals were gone - I called Police! as bard as I could, and followed one of the men till he was taken, but where he was taken I cannot say, or which of them it was, for I was so much in liquor; I know nobody but Trigg: I received a sovereign next morning to settle it - I gave that sovereign up to the officer; I received it to make up my loss, and being poor, I did not wish to prosecute; I have not found my hat or any of the property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You were very drunk when you met them? A. Yes, but not so much so as afterwards; they were in custody when I received the sovereign - I recollect paying for three pints of ale and a glass of rum and water; I had nothing more to my knowledge till I got with the prisoners.

MARK HARRIS. I am a Police-constable. On the 16th of March I was on duty in Praed-street, and saw several persons coming behind me; I thought they were in familiar conversation - I heard somebody say, "What do you mean? - Police!" I heard several repeated blows on the crown of a hat - I went to the spot, saw the prisoners Trigg and Fenn running, and saw the prosecutor still running after the others; I saw three persons running, and a fourth following them; the two ran into a shed in Irongate wharf - I kept my eyes on that shed till a serjeant of our division came; we then went in, and found Trigg and Fenn - I was afterwards in the watch-house; Robinson was there - all the prisoners were then in custody; Robinson pointed out Kitchins distinctly to me, and said, "You are the villian that attempted to rob me of my watch, but got my chain and seals, and struck me;" Kitchins denied it -I have received a sovereign from the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the prisoners searched? A. Yes, minutely - nothing was found on them.

THOMAS BRUCE. I am a Policeman. I was in Edgware-road, at the corner of Church-street, and heard a cry of Police! and Stop thief! for about ten minutes - I went to the corner of Bell-street, and saw the prisoner Kitchins come through the passage - Robinson was running, as if trying to overtake him, and calling Police! they appeared

to have been running a considerable way - neither of them could speak for a time; they were out of breath - I stopped Kitchins, and Robinson said, "You d - d villain, you have robbed me of my watch;" he then said, "Not my watch, it is my chain;" I searched him at the watch-house, and found five keys on him, of rather a peculiar description.

Kitchins' Defence. I was walking through White Lion-passage when the Policeman stopped me - the prosecutor was coming behind, hallooing something.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-20

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

717. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 1 watch, value 6l., the goods of Thomas Shaw , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS SHAW. I am a watchmaker , and live at Limekiln-hill, Limehouse - the prisoner is a seaman , and I have had dealings with him. On the 27th of February. at eight o'clock in the evening, he called, and stopped some time with me as an acquaintance - he looked at a watch, and said he should like to have such a watch - I had occasion to leave him alone in the shop; the watch was then in the window with several others; the shop was closed, but not the door - I returned in a short time, and found him still in my room; we then went to a public-house together - my brother, who had been left at home, came there to me, and said something, which I told the prisoner, and took him to my house, and while I was consulting somebody what was best to be done, the prisoner went away unexpectedly - I did not see him for two days, when he was apprehended, and my watch produced.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Where did you go with him? A. To the Royal Sovereign to spend the evening - there was no ribbon to the watch; its intrinsic value would not be above 30s., being a perishable article, but it is worth six guineas to me - I had known the prisoner eight or nine months, and knew nothing against him - six guineas is the fair selling price; I had sold it for that, but it was not paid for.

JOHN OLLEY . I am a pawnbroker. On the 24th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came, and offered this watch in pawn for 3l.; I had received information, and communicated with my young man, who went out for a constable - the prisoner then ran away; my young man ran after him, and in a very few minutes he was brought back - I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q.Had you agreed to advance him any money? A. No; I should think 3l. a fair sum to advance.

COURT. Q. You never advance the full value? A. No; I should think I could have sold it for 70s., not more.

JAMES SHEPHERD . I am a Police-serjeant. I was on duty, heard a cry of Stop thief! pursued, and got information, which led me into Black Boy-lane - I went into a house there to look for a person, who was supposed to have run in, and as I came out of the room, I found the prisoner behind the door - the pawnbroker's man, who was in pursuit, said, in his presence, that he was the person who brought the watch to pawn.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly took the watch, but not with intent to steal it - I should have returned it.

GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 4l. only . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18310407-21

718. JOSEPH PAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 1 pair of ancle shoes, value 8s. , the goods of John James Playll and another.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of John James Playll only.

JOHN JAMES PLAYLL. I am a shoemaker , and live in Bishopsgate Without; I have one person who receives a share of my profits. On the 29th of March I lost a pair of ancle shoes; I found them in possession of Pratt about two o'clock that afternoon - he had taken the prisoner; I was not aware of the circumstance before; the price is on them in my own writing.

JAMES PRATT . I am a watchman. I was opposite Mr. Playll's shop, about a quarter before three o'clock, and saw the prisoner, with another person, near the shop- his companion took the shoes off the hook at the door: post, and gave them to the prisoner, who immediately wrapped them in his apron - I crossed, and collared him, took him into the shop, and took them out of his apron - his companion went in another direction.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310407-22

719. LEWIS LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 21 lbs. of cheese, value 10s. , the goods of Mary Andrews .

MARY ANDREWS. I am a widow ; I live in the Borough and keep town carts . On the 3rd of March I had a load of cheese loaded at the Steel-yard, Thames-street, to go to Aldgate - my foreman loaded it; I was not present - an officer afterwards gave me information; I saw the cheese produced when the prisoner was in custody; he was a stranger to me.

GEORGE WILLIAM MORGAN. I am a constable. On the 3rd of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw a waggon standing in the middle of the road, opposite Aldgate church; the prisoner and four or five others were standing about the pavement, opposite the waggon- I passed them, went on a few yards, and saw one of them go behind the waggon, take something out, and give it to the prisoner, who was towards Church-court, and I caught hold of him; the others ran away - I found this cheese on the prisoner; he said, "Let me go; I did not take it."

JAMES EDWARDS . I drive Mrs. Andrews' waggon - I left the waggon, but was never out of sight; I saw a cheese had been shifted, and stopped to see if I could see any body about - I was going to get into the waggon when the officer called to ask if I had lost any thing; he had the prisoner in custody, with the cheese - I am sure it is one of those cheeses I had in my waggon, as it was marked No. 5, in a diamond.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along; a man stopped me, and asked me to be so kind as to hold the

cheese while he laced his boots - I held it for him about three minutes, when the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-23

720. WILLIAM WILLATTS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Ladson , on the 31st of March , and stealing therein 1 pair of lustres, value 2l.; 3 spoons, value 30s., and 2 coats, value 10s. , his property.

JAMES LADSON. I live in Primrose-street, Bishopsgate Without . On the 31st of March I went to bed at ten o'clock; I fastened the doors and shutters myself - I let the kitchen and first floor to Bracher, who went to bed before us - I was not alarmed in the night; I got up about seven; Bracher was up first - when I came down the house was perfectly secure, as far as I saw; but in about half an hour I missed a pair of lustres, worth about 2l., from the parlour mantel-piece, also two silver spoons and a mustard spoon, worth 30s., and two coats, which hung in the passage - the party had got into the house by cutting open the glass of the kitchen window, and putting through their arms to remove the fastening; the kitchen window looks into an area in the street - when Mrs. Bracher came down, she found the place in confusion, and called my attention to the window; her things were displaced - on the following day, the 1st of April, about noon, I took the prisoner myself; I found one of my coats on his back; it was one of two coats stolen from the passage - he had been in my employ about four years, and has fastened these shutters scores of times; I am certain it is my coat - I had worn it the night before; he was not an apprentice, but paid by the week; he had absconded himself from me on the 8th of March, without notice.

Prisoner. I never fastened the shutters. Witness. I am certain he fastened them oftener than I did.

WILLIAM BRACHER . I lodge in the prosecutor's house with my wife - we have no servant; I occupy the kitchen and first floor. I went to bed a few minutes before ten o'clock - the kitchen has inside shutters, and a wooden bar; I am quite sure the shutters were secure when we went to bed; I saw them safe at half-past seven in the morning - I found the curtain rod displaced, and the square of glass broken; a person could get in by putting his arm over, turning the cross of the bar, and get into the house - my wife went down before me.

MARY ANN BRACHER . I went to bed with my husband; I came down about half-past seven o'clock in the morning - I went into the kitchen before him; I found the iron bar displaced, and the window broken, which enabled a person to get into the house - the tinder-box was moved; a brass tobacco-box and pack of cards were taken away - every thing was perfectly safe when we went to bed; I do not know whether the prisoner ever fastened up the shutters.

WILLIAM HENRY MARSH . I am a Policeman. On the 1st of April I was in Red Lion-street; Mr. Ladson delivered the prisoner into my charge - he said nothing to the charge; I took the coat off his back - Mr. Ladson claimed it - the prisoner made no reply to that.(Coat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought that coat on the Wednesday before the robbery, in Petticoat-lane - the prosecutor did not live in that part of the house; what could I have to do with the shutters?

MR. LADSON. He had repentedly fastened the shutters, which were broken open.

JURY. Q. Did you employ him to shut up your lodger's window? A. No; it was at a time when the lodgings were unoccupied for a quarter of a year - I have not found the other property.

MRS. BRACHER. I fastened the shutters that night.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-24

721. MARY ANN GARFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 18d.; 1 seal, value 6d., and 1 yard of ribbon, value 6d. , the goods of Sarah Miffling .

SARAH MIFFLING. I lodge at No. 3, Bell-court, Bellyard, Doctors'-commons , on the second floor - the prisoner lodged in the same room; Maria Chester lodged in the same room, and another female who was a servant - I am a dress-maker . On the 24th of January I missed these articles, which I had seen about the 2nd of January in my box, which I always kept locked - I had been to the box after that, and on the 12th of January I missed two sovereigns and a half - I did not miss the other articles till the 24th; the prisoner left on the 24th - I knew of her going, but did not miss them till after she left; I did not see her again till about five weeks, when she was in custody, land the articles were found in her box, which she had left behind her at the room - it was not opened till then; I opened it myself, in Chester's presence; I had not inquired after her, nor sent for a constable - I saw these articles in her box with her own clothes: she had not called at my room before she was taken - I was not present when she was taken; I am quite certain the articles are mine; the handkerchief was not marked - the stockings have my initials on them, but not in my own work; the ribbon is mine: I have more of the same pattern.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How many young women had you in your room altogether in January? A. Three; the prisoner left her box under the bed in my room - she slept with me; I was not in the habit of lending my clothes - her box was not locked; there was full 10s. worth of her own clothes in it.

MARIA CHESTER . I lodge in the house - I have part of the house; these persons were tenants of mine - I did not sleep in the same room; Eliza Porter also lodged there - on the 24th of January Miffling complained of losing things; the prisoner had left the lodgings about ten o'clock that night; I did not know but she was going to return - her box was always unlocked; a constable had been sent for before, but not on that day; she was taken into custody about five weeks after - she is a servant out of place.

Cross-examined. Q. You talk of an officer having been called - was she taken into custody then? A. No - she promised to give up the money and property she had taken then; I never asked for a promissory note for 5l., nor for any money, nor has my husband; I know when he found her, after she ran away, she wished to pay the money she

had robbed us of - she tells me she has pawned my things, and torn up the duplicates; we wished her friends to pay for things stolen from me.

JOHN HURLEY . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 2nd of March, on Saffron-hill, on the charge of James and Maria Chester - she was examined on the 4th; the property was delivered to me.

SARAH MIFFLING. I can swear to none of the property in this indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-25

722. MARY ANN GARFIELD was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 shift, value 5s. , the goods of Sarah Miffling .

SARAH MIFFLING. On the 17th of January the prisoner lodged with me - I missed this shift, and told her of it; she denied it - I found it on her person that day, and charged her with stealing it; she promised to return it to me, and I did not give her in charge, nor take it from her; I did not see it again till she was apprehended - my initials are on it; I never gave her permission to wear it - I saw it produced before the Magistrate, and identified it; it was found on her person.

Cross-examined. Q.You did not take it from her when you first found it? A. No, she was to return it in the course of a week; she had three or four of her own in her box - she slept with me with it on; we could not have exchanged shifts by mistake when we got up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-26

723. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 2 baskets, value 1s., and 100 lbs. of raisins, value 34s. , the goods of John Frederick Fixen and another.

EDWARD PASSEY. I am carman to John Frederick Fixen and another, wholesale grocers , Garlick-hill. On the 26th of February, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was going down to Botolph wharf, with thirty baskets of Malaga raisins, in fifteen packages, in my waggon - I stood in Thames-street , waiting for some carts to unload, and saw the ladder at the tail of the waggon loosened down: it was hooked up before - a person could then reach into the waggon, and take the baskets; I walked to the back of the waggon, and saw the prisoner walking off with two baskets at his back; he was about five yards from the waggon, or hardly so much - he appeared alone - I caught him eight or ten yards from the waggon; he was not out of my sight at all - he had two baskets of Malagas on his back; they formed one package and weighed about I cwt. - he asked what I wanted with him; I said I could not tell yet - he began to tussle, and finding he could not get from me, asked me to let him go, which I refused, as carts are robbed there every night; I had seen him actually take them from the waggon.

Prisoner. It is false. Witness. I am certain I saw him take them from the waggon, and put them on his back.

JOHN WRIGHT. I am warehouseman to the prosecutors. I delivered to the waggoner, in Garlick-hill, a little after seven o'clock, thirty baskets of Malaga raisins, made into fifteen packages - I afterwards saw the package before the Magistrate, and know it to be part of the contents of the waggon, as I had marked them T. M., Colchester.

EDWARD DANDO. I am a constable. I received the prisoner in custody - he said nothing to the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Last Saturday five weeks a young man came to my mother's, and said a young man was wanted at the Elephant and Castle - I went there: they were engaged, and as I returned, in Thames-street, by the waggon, I saw two baskets on the ground, and the prosecutor standing over the way, watching them - I thought he was going to steal them; I tried to lift them, but they were so very heavy, and he instantly came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-27

724. CHARLES SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 1 lb. of bristles, value 14s. , the goods of Thomas Kent and another.

ROBERT HIGGINS . I am foreman to Thomas and George Kent, who are general merchants, and deal in bristles . These bristles were in my room, which is called the foreman's room, on the first floor, in Falcon-street, Falcon-square - I have known the prisoner a long time; he is the son of a customer, and very frequently came to the warehouse; on Saturday, the 19th of March, I received 28 lbs. of bristles, and placed them on the counter - Saturday being a busy day, I left them there till Monday, when I counted them, at a quarter to one o'clock, and put them into a hole on a shelf: they were correct - the prisoner came into my room about a quarter-past two, and I served him with bristles of a common quality, to the amount of 17s. 8d. 8d.; they were a very different quality to these, but were in the same room - he could take 1 lb. without undoing any package; I did not see him take them - I missed them not five minutes after he left; nobody but him had been into the room - I immediately went down and informed my fellow-servants, then put on my clothes, and went to his father's house, No. 70, Rahere-street, Goswell-road; I knocked at the door, and he opened it to me - I said, "Oh, Mr. Sheppard, I suppose you are not surprised at seeing me?" he said, "Walk in;" I said, "Is your father within?" he said Yes, and opened the front parlour door where his father, who is a brush-maker, was at work - these bristles were prepared for shoemakers and not for brushes; I said to his father, in his hearing, "Mr. Sheppard. I am the bearer of bad news, but want to see you privately;" he asked me into his front parlour, and I communicated my suspicions to him - the father looked up at the top of a high cupboard, and said, "They have been bringing hairs here, which they are allowed 2s. in the 1l. for selling," and he reached down from the top of his cupboard the 1 lb. I charge the prisoner with stealing - the prisoner was not present when he first produced it to me; his mother was brought in, and placed two chairs for the two sons to be brought in before me, and I charged the prisoner with stealing it - he said, "It is a pretty thing indeed, that I should be charged with stealing bristles;" I said, "I am certain you have done it;" he looked at the top of the cupboard, and said, "Then I dare say you have seen them;" I said, "I have, and now, Mr. Sheppard, will you bring them down?" he then said he had taken that pound.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you not ask him if he had sold the bristles? A. No - he might say he

never stole nor sold any thing; he came frequently to our warehouse, bought bristles to some amount, and usually brought a bag for them, which I generally put them into- he might sometimes put them in himself when he bought a single pound; he bought three or four bundles that day- this bundle was about five yards from him, and behind a counter; I was with him the whole time, but the counter goes up the side of the room - the bristles came from St. Petersburg; I had received 28lbs. of them - they were marked H. by the person we bought them of, but I understand we had every pound that was imported.

SAMUEL SEAGER . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner for stealing the bristles, at his father's house - I heard the charge made against him; he said nothing to it, and would answer no questions I put to him - I asked his father, in his hearing, how it was that he had not questioned him as to how he had become possessed of them; the father said he had been a most undutiful son, and that he had told him he had them from a friend, and was to receive 2s. in 1l. for selling them - the prisoner made no reply to that.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent to the prosecutors' for a quantity of bristles - a quantity laid on the counter, and in putting what I had bought into the bag, I put in these; I assure you it was quite a mistake - I did not discover it till I got home, and fearing to tell my father I had made a mistake, I put them away, and thinking there would be an inquiry I kept it secret, but when the foreman came I immediately confessed the whole matter.

SAMUEL SEAGER . He never said, in my hearing, that he took them by mistake.

ROBERT HIGGINS. He did not say he took them by mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310407-28

NEW COURT. THURSDAY. APRIL 7.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

725. SARAH WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 watch, value 30s. , the goods to William Hargrove .

WILLIAM HARGROVE. I keep a lodging-house in the Almonry, Westminster , The prisoner lodged in my house about three days - on the last night in February, I went to bed, having put my watch, chain, and seals on a nail against the wall; I awoke between one and two o'clock, and missed them.

WILLIAM MACKENZIE . I am a private in the Coldstream Guards. On the 1st of March I was sentinel at the King's palace, St. James' - I saw the prisoner a few minutes before four o'clock in the morning; she showed me a watch, which she took from her bosom - I asked her to allow me to look at it; she gave it me - I detained it, informed the serjeant, and gave him the watch.

JAMES BROWN . I am the serjeant. I received this watch from Mackenzie - I went out, and asked the prisoner if it was her's she looked at it, said it was, and that a gentleman had given it her - she then took the seals out of her bosom; I took them, and said I thought she had stolen them - I took her to the station-house.

WILLIAM HARGROVE . This is my property - I know the prisoner had been in and out the night before; she had not a room to herself, but lodged there - there were other women in the house.

JURY. Q. Did she sleep in your room? A. No - my room was not locked.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-29

723. GEORGE WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 pistol, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Lang .

JOSEPH LANG. I am a gun-maker , and live in the Hay-market. This pistol was sent to me by Mr. Probin - I have no doubt it is mine; I had seen the prisoner at Wood's livery-stables, where my house is kept - I had seen a man at my shop about three weeks before this was sent to me, but I cannot say it was the prisoner; I only saw this back - the stable he works at is just opposite my house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When had you seen the pistol safe? A. I cannot speak positively to having seen it since last April, when I took stock, though I have no doubt of its being mine - when the pistol was sent to me I made some inquiry, and the prisoner came two or three times to my place, to explain what he knew of it; he said he bought it in the street for 2s. about three weeks before.

JOHN PROBIN . I am a gun-maker, and live in Lisle-street, Leicester-square. I bought this pistol of Puddle, for 13s. - I saw a private mark on it, and supposing it was Mr. Lang's, I sent it to him by his errand-boy, when he came on some business; it being an odd one, is not of much value - I sent it to see if Mr. Lang had the fellow; the pair might have been worth 2l. 5s., with the mould and key, but I should have sold this for 1l.

Cross-examined. Q. A stranger might have had the pistol without seeing the private-mark? A. Oh, yes, certainly.

JOSIAH CRAMIS . I am in the service of Mr. Lang. I received this pistol from Mr. Probin, to take to my master.

CHARLES PUDDLE . I am in the service of Mr. Collins, a gun-maker, in Vigo-lane. I bought a pistol of Hale about the 15th or 16th of March, for 5s., and I sold it to Mr. Probin for 13s. - I believe this is it.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you gave what you thought a fair value for it? A. I did.

WILLIAM HALE . I live in John's-court, Golden-square, and am a stable-helper. I have known the prisoner about four years, and was often at his lodgings; I was there last Friday three weeks - I cannot say the day of the month; he came home to get his dinner, and opened a drawer, took out this pistol, and said, "I have a pistol - do you know any one who will buy it?" I said I would should it to a person, and on the Sunday following I showed it to Mr. Puddle, who gave me 5s. for it; the prisoner is a helper in that yard - he told me he bought the pistol at the top of the yard.

Cross-examined. Q.Was the prisoner an honest man? A. He was always considered such; there was no secrecy in the business.

JOSHUA FREDERICK CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I

took the prisoner in charge, and received this pistol from the prosecutor - the prisoner said he purchased it for 2s. of a man in the street.

Cross-examined. Q.And he had gone to Mr. Lang's two or three times, I believe? A. Yes; he was there when I took him.

MR. LANG. Though I could not speak to the person of the man I saw in my shop, yet my boy took in some harness of him.

JOSIAH CRAMIS . I received a piece of harness from the prisoner at my master's shop, in the month of March.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons were in the shop? A. One other man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-30

726. WILLIAM SEABY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 tippet, value 4s., the goods of Maria Gouldsmith , spinster , from her person .

MARIA GOULDSMITH. I live with my father, who is a dyer - I am single. On the 19th of February I was at Stanhope-gate , going from our house in Duke-street to Chelsea; just as I was going in at the gate I met two soldiers coming out - I had a parcel in my hand, and one of them snatched it from me; it was in a brown paper, and a part of the paper was left in my hand - there was a muslin tippet in the parcel: the soldiers went across the road, and down Park-lane - I called to a gentleman, and pointed out the person who took it, and still had it in his possession - I had not lost sight of him; I got it again in about five minutes - I have no recollection of the person who took it- he had a surtout coat on, but I did not notice his other dress.

Prisoner. Q. Was I the person who took it? A. I cannot tell from his appearance, but the moment it was taken I turned, and kept my eyes upon the person who had it till it was taken from him.

COURT. Q.Then you saw it taken from the man who took it from you? A. Yes.

THOMAS PENN . I live in Bedford-street, Vauxhall. I saw the prisoner and another soldier at the gate - they had been before me for about two hundred yards, and appeared intoxicated; at the time they got to the gate I saw the prosecutrix there - they were close to her; she appeared to me to be falling, as if the men had run against her; I came up, and she said, "The soldier had taken my parcel from me" - I saw the prisoner with the parcel in his left hand; I went to get it from him, and he struck me, but I got it from him - another person came to my assistance, and I followed the prisoner to Portman-street barracks - when he went in I called the serjeant, and spoke to him on the subject; I am certain the prisoner is the man - I gave the parcel to the other person who came to my assistance; I did not see him give it to the prosecutrix, but she says he did - I have no doubt the prisoner and the other were both intoxicated, though he denied it, and so did the serjeant - it was as near nine o'clock as possible when they got to the barracks.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-31

727. JOHN WOODBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 3lbs. weight of worsted crewell, value 12s. , the goods of Thomas Clark .

THOMAS CLARK , JUN. I am fourteen years of age, and live with my father, Thomas Clark , a haberdasher , in Charlton-street, Somers'-town . On the morning of the 25th of March, about half-past eight o'clock, I was in the parlour behind the shop, and heard a noise; I went into the shop, and saw the till laying on the floor behind the counter, and 2 1/2d. in it - there had been more in it before; the prisoner was behind the counter, kneeling on one knee, and he had a parcel under his arm - he flung it down, and ran out of the shop, towards Wear's-passage; I followed him, and gave an alarm - I came home, and seeing my sister at the door, I went again to Wear's-passage, where I saw the prisoner standing between two or three men; I am sure he is the man - I had left the parcel laying on the ground, where he threw it.

THOMAS CLARK . I keep the shop. I was at home at this time - I missed some coppers out of the till, and saw this parcel of crewell laying on the ground - it had been taken out of one of the holes behind the counter, and the till was on the floor; I missed the parcel from its place - this is it.

JOHN DIXON . I am a Police-serjeant. On the morning of the 25th of March, about half-past eight o'clock, I was in Wear's-passage, and heard an alarm - I saw the prisoner standing between three or four persons; I took him back to the shop, and asked the boy what he had taken - he said a parcel from the shelf, and thrown it down; here is the parcel he gave me - I found 2s. 0 1/2d. on the prisoner in copper, and a latch-key.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the passage, and heard a cry of Stop thief! a man caught hold of me, and said, "Have you been thieving any thing?" I said No, but I was detained, taken back to the shop, and the boy said I was the person, but I had not been into the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-32

728. JOHN WILDING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 spade, value 3s. , the goods of John Larkin .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of the overseers of the poor of the parish of Ickenham .

JOHN LARKIN . I live at Ickenham, in Middlesex - I am overseer of the parish, and surveyor . I missed a spade in December last, which I saw in possession of Bunce on the 24th of February - it was one of those that had been in my care; there is a private-mark on it, and it is a different size to others; I had the prisoner at work digging up trees and pitting potatoes - he would have access to this spade; he does not belong to our parish, but I gave him the job.

WILLIAM BUNCE . I am a labourer, and live at Ickenham. I bought the spade of the prisoner about six weeks before he was taken.

WILLIAM BALL. I am an officer. I received the spade from Bunce, and took the prisoner on the 24th of February - I have known him twenty years, and never knew any thing against him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the hedge by the side of the footpath - there is no mark on it.

JURY to JOHN LARKIN. Q. Are your tools left out? A. No; they are put into some building when the men leave work.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined One Week .

Reference Number: t18310407-33

729. JOHN JAMES WOODWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 pair of trousers, value 14s. , the goods of Robert Plant .

THOMAS BARDWELL HORSEFALL . I am a Police-constable. On the 15th of March I was on duty in Jermyn-street; I saw the prisoner, in company with two others, in St. James'-street; I then saw him again in company with one person - I followed them on to Mr. Plant's, a hosier's shop, at the corner of the Haymarket, in Piccadilly - I saw the prisoner near his door; a person passed by; he left the door, and joined his companion; the prisoner then returned to the shop door, and took a pair of drab trousers off a rail - he rolled them up, and ran down the Haymarket; I followed him, but did not get the trousers; he fell, and I took him - I do not know what became of the trousers, but I am quite clear he is the person who look them off the rail; I had never lost sight of him from the time I first saw him in St. James'-street; I had seen him for nearly three-quarters of an hour - I took him back to the prosecutor's door, and inquired if they had lost any thing, and they said "Yes, a pair of drab trousers.

Prisoner. Q.Where were you when you say the person took the trousers? A. On the other side of the way - it is not very wide; it was after eight o'clock- there was not a great many people or carriages at that time; I never lost sight of you, but I never saw the trousers afterwards.

COURT. Q.Had you known him before? A. No, but I had him in view for three quarters of an hour.

CHARLES JONES BURDEN . I live at Mr. Robert Plant's near the corner of the Haymarket. On the evening of the 15th of March the officer came to our shop with the prisoner, about eight o'clock, and I missed a pair of drab trousers, which I had seen on a small iron rail within the door, about an hour before - a person going by could reach them by stretching out his hand.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the Policeman ask you if you had lost any thing? A. Yes, and I said I did not know - he then said he saw them taken from the left side of the shop; I looked, and missed them; he told me the colour of them.

Prisoner. My friends have been to the prosecutor, and asked if he would take the money for the trousers, as it would be the means of my losing my work; the witness said his master told him if they brought the money he would take it, and my friends took 17s. 6d., and he said he would say the trousers were sold. Witness. Two young women called on the day after the prisoner was taken, and said they would pay for them on condition that I would not appear; I said Mr. Plant was not there, and I could not make any promise, but he would be there the next day; when he came, I told him, and he said they might leave the money if they liked, but I was not to compromise the matter; they then came, brought the money, and a stamped receipt; but I would not wirte any receipt, nor make any promise; I said I would not take the money on a promise not to a appear, but if I was called upon, I must go.

COURT. Q. Did you keep the money? A. It lays in the till now; but I particularly expressed for them not to leave it, unless they pleased; but they wished to leave it, and they wished me not appear at Marlborough-street.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening in question I was going to my employer's, in Duke-street, to finish some work; as I was going down the Haymarket, a person ran violently against me, and knocked me down; the Policeman then came, took me to this shop, and said what you have heard.

JURY to T. B. HORSEFALL. Q.Did you see the prisoner with the trousers in his hand? A. Yes; I saw him take them down, and roll them up - he joined his companion at the corner, and I suppose gave him the trousers - the prisoner then fell, for me to fall over him.

COURT. Q.How near was his companion to him when the trousers were taken? A. About twenty yards - the prisoner ran in the direction he was standing.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-34

730. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 1 half-crown and 3 shillings , the monies of Alexander Mackey .

ALEXANDER MACKEY. I live in Little Stanhope-street, May-fair . On the 21st of March, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was washing myself in the corner of my shop, and when I had done, I went into my back parlour to get a towel; I was standing against the door, and heard something - I saw the prisoner, with a box out of the till in the counter, in his hand; I went up, and missed from the box a half-crown and three shillings, which I had seen in it a few minutes before - I detained the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. On which side of the counter was I? A. On the side next the door; you had the box out of the till, and your left hand was in your pocket - you asked what was in the box; I told you; you pulled the money out of your pocket, and said, "It is my own money" - there had been 5s. 6d. in silver, and another sixpence among the copper; there was 8s. or 10s. more in the till; I took you by the collar, but did not take the money from your pocket - you produced it yourself; the till was half shut - the box had been in the middle of the till, in the back part; there was no other money in the box - the box was on the counter; one of his hands was in the box, and one in his pocket.

JOHN CULLY . I am an officer. I was called in, and took the prisoner - this half-crown and 3s. were given me by the prosecutor's wife; I did not see any other money; she said a sixpence dropped among the half-pence when this was taken from the till.

Prisoner. Q. Did she not take this out of the till? A. It was in the box, and I did not see any other money but the sixpence; this is the box.

COURT. Q. What was said? A. It was said that he had robbed the till of this money, which he said was his own - he said it was the remainder of 2l. which he had when he left Liverpool.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Saturday fortnight I came up from Liverpool; I had two sovereigns when I started; I happened to go into that shop; the prosecutor seized me by the throat, and said, "If you do not give up the money, I will make you; "he put his hand into my pocket, and took out this money, which he gave his wife, who put it into the till.

MR. MACKEY. I cannot be mistaken in what I say - I am certain he had the box in his possession, and his hand in it - the box had before been in the till to keep the silver away from the halfpence; a sharp pointed pair of scissors were found on him.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310407-35

731. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 jacket, value 10s. , the goods of Nathaniel Dias .

NATHANIEL DIAS . I am a clothes-salesman , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the evening of the 17th of March, about half-past five o'clock, two men came to the shop - I was at home; they asked for some jackets - I showed them several, to which they made objection, and wanted me to show them something else - the prisoner was not one of those men; he was at the door at the time - I had a jacket hanging near my door, within reach of a person outside - while the two men were engaging my attention I saw that jacket go - I laid hold of the two men, who were in the shop, and put them out; I saw the prisoner by the light of the next shop putting my jacket into the breast of his own jacket - I am sure he was the person doing that; I pursued him, and just as I got up to him he threw it at me - I did not pick it up; I followed him, and just as I was taking him the Policeman met him, and took him - on my return to my shop I took up the jacket; this is it.

Prisoner. Q.Was I in your shop that night? A. No- I saw you with this jacket; you were placing it under your own jacket, and when you saw me coming you threw it at me - I still pursued till you were taken - I did not say four or five persons came into the shop - I said only two; I saw the jacket go, but I did not see you take it - it has a tear where it was torn from the line it hung to; I was not quick enough to take you when you threw it at me.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner - I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw him running; the prosecutor gave me the jacke and said he had robbed him of it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me drop it? A. I saw you throw something at him.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-36

732. MILES McGUIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 pair of trousers, value 8s. , the goods of Nathaniel Sheath .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH GAINES. I live at Edmonton, with my father and mother, Mr. Sheath keeps a clothes shop . On the 11th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I was walking on the footpath, and saw the prisoner snatch a pair of corderoy trousers from Mr. Sheath's door-post - he put them under his arm, and ran away as far as Water-lane; I then lost sight of him - I saw him again on the following day, before Mr. Mores, the Magistrate; I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. How could you tell what they were, it being so late? A.There is a lamp over the door.

NATHANIEL SHEATH. I keep the shop. On the 12th of March this little girl came and told me something - I looked and missed a pair of corderoy trousers, which had been safe ten minutes before, hanging at my door; I saw the prisoner the same night, and gave charge of him.

JOHN CAMP . I am a constable. On the 11th of March I took the prisoner from the watchman, who had him in charge - I took him before the Magistrate the next morning, and the little girl identified him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went on the 11th of March, to the Three Tuns to have a pint of beer - the prosecutor and the watchman took me to the cage, where Camp searched me, but they did not say what it was for.

JOHN CAMP . Water-lane is about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's shop, in a straight line - Gaines could see him all the way; it leads down to the bridge - he was seen to come back from the lane to the Three Tuns, which is one door from the prosecutor's, and there he was taken; I found a few halfpence on him.

JURY to ELIZABETH GAINES . Q.How near were you to the prisoner when he took them? A.On the other side the way - it is not above half the width of the Court; I could plainly see his face, and I knew him before very well.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-37

733. BENJAMIN STANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 basket, value 6d.; 3 saws, value 10s.; 1 rule, value 1s. 6d.; 1 hatchet, value 2s., and 1 plane, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Woodland .

THOMAS WOODLAND. I was at a public-house, at Totteridge , in Herts, on the 18th of March - I staid there about a quarter of an hour, and when I came out, I missed my basket of tools, which I had set in the window; I received information, and went to No. 12, Kingsland-road - I got there at near six o'clock in the morning, on the 19th; I saw the prisoner there, and asked him for the basket of tools which he took from the Orange Tree Pulbic-house, at Totteridge: he said, "What tools?" I said, "Don't deny it, for I have several witnesses who saw you take them, and if you don't give them up I will give charge of you" - he went up stairs, and brought the basket of tools down; he then dressed himself, and took them back with me to the public-house where he took them from - he set them down, and was detained.

Prisoner. Q. Have you any witnesses who saw me take them? A. No, I believe not; it was a quarter-past six o'clock when they were lost - we stopped two or three times in going back, and gave him a glass of spirits, and had some ourselves; when I got back to Totteridge two witnesses said you might go, but you must wait till I came in - I stopped some distance behind; I said it was not my wish to prosecute, as I had got my tools - it was a servant at Mr. Paget's who induced me to prosecute.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had found the tools on the road from Totteridge.

THOMAS WOODLAND re-examined. Q.Where did you place the tools? A. On the form under the window outside; and the saw was just over the window.

JURY. Q.How did you come to suspect the prisoner? A. A gentleman's bailiff told us he saw such a person carrying a basket, and we got his address from the overseer and found him in the morning - it is nearly eleven miles from Totteridge to his house; I think he might have disposed of some of them - I think it impossible for another person to have removed the tools and placed them on the road-side, as I went out immediately; nd one had seen the prisoner near the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-38

734. WILLIAM SAVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 1 pair of boots, value 12s. , the goods of John Salmon .

JAMES CROUCH. I am footman to Mr. John Salmon , a fruiterer , in Piccadilly . On the morning of the 21st of March, about half-past seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner taking some dust from the back area into the street; he had to come up the kitchen stairs - there was another man with the prisoner; I saw the boots hanging on a nail on the top of the kitchen stairs while they were there - when the prisoner had got out the last basket or the last but one I missed them; I inquired of the servants about them, but could get no information - I then followed the prisoner and the other man to the top of Dover-street; I asked them about them - they said they had not seen them - the prisoner said, "when I described them, that he had seen them on the Monday before, but not that day, and if they were in his cart they had tumbled into his basket in coming up stairs; I saw the Policeman - he brought them and the cart back to our door; when we got there the prisoner took the tail-board out of the cart, and the boots laid there - both the soles were plainly to he seen; they were laying one upon the other, and the upper leather appeared to have been doubled underneath - they are my master's property.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I am a Policeman. On the morning of the 21st of March, in consequence of information, I went to the prosecutor's house - I saw these boots taken out of the cart, when the tail-board was taken down - they were folded up, and appeared as if they had been placed in between the dust and the tail-board, among some leaves.

Prisoner's Defence. There were a great many sticks and rubbish in the basket, and the sticks might have taken them off the hook; I know not how they got in unless they did so.

JAMES CROUCH re-examined. Q. Did the other man carry any dust out? A. No, he did not come in till all the dust was removed - he did not pass the place where the boots were.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-39

735. CHARLES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 silver spoon, value 10s. , the goods of William Edwards .

WILLIAM EDWARDS. I live in Newland's-terrace, Kensington, and am a fishmonger . The prisoner worked in my shop for five weeks - I gave him in charge on another transaction on the 21st of February; I saw a tablespoon taken from him, which I had seen safe on the Sunday before, to the best of my belief - it was kept in a safe which he had to pass in going to the bottom part of the house; he used to work in my shop - I had no reason to suspect him before.

THOMAS QUICK . I am an officer. On the 21st of February I received the prisoner - this spoon was found on him.

The prisoner pat in a written Defence, stating that he had left his master, and gone to a public-house; that his master followed him there, and brought a Policeman, who to his surprise, found the spoon in his pocket, which his fellow-servant, with whom he had quarrelled, must have put there.

THOMAS QUICK . The spoon was in his waistcoat pocket, his coat was buttoned over that, and his apron over the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-40

736. JOHN ROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 chaise-harness, value 2l. , the goods of John Bailey ; and JOHN LEVER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN BAILEY . I am a coach-maker , and live in London-wall. I have known Rose seven or eight years. On Sunday, the 5th of September, he came about eleven o'clock, and said his father would be much obliged if I would lend him a harness, as Mr. Chapman wanted to go to Tottenham, and had no harness - I gave him a harness, but no collar, as he said his father had plenty of collars; the harness could not be used without a collar - if I had been asked for a chaise-harness, I should have supposed it meant every thing necessary to equip a horse and chaise, and I should have looked for an old collar.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-41

737. JAMES ORAM was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of James Oram , from his person .

JAMES ORAM. I live at No. 74, Newgate-street, and am a draper and tailor . On the 7th of March, I left home - I had then a handkerchief in my left-hand coat pocket; I went to James-street, Covent-garden - it was the night His Majesty went to the theatre; I was standing with a friend, waiting the return of His Majesty, and I saw three persons - the prisoner was one of them, but he is very much altered now; they were standing talking together about five minutes past twelve o'clock- I got home about half-past twelve; My friend missed his handkerchif, but I did not miss mine till the next morning - I had not used it while I was our; the officer afterwards produced it to me - it is worth 4s.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. I suppose there were a great number of persons about at this time? A. Yes - I had not used my handkerchief while I was out; I used it at home, while I sat at supper - when I saw the three persons together, they were talking about the Duke of Wellington, and other things; the prisoner appears altered now - I observed them for full three quarters of an hour, but I did not see them do any thing but talk to each other, and I was very much surprised how my handkerchief could get from me, as I had a very large cloak on; I saw no action which led me to suppose they took it - I saw it again on the Wednesday afterwards (I believe;)

when the Police-officer came to my house, and asked me if my name was Oram; I said Yes - he then asked if I had been robbed, and I said Yes.

WILLIAM READER . I am a Police-officer. On Tuesday, the 8th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Newton-street, Holborn - I saw the prisoner and two others; the prisoner was exhibiting a handkerchief to the others - he had his hat off at the time; I saw him put the handkerchief into the hat - I took him, and found two handkerchief on him; I was taking him to the station-house, but when we got to Took's-court he ran away - I pursued him, and did not lose sight of him till I saw him stopped by two persons, one of whom had a basket, and the other appeared a gentleman - one of these handkerchiefs is red and yellow, and has the name of James Oram on it: the prisoner answered to that name, and said it was his own - here is the letter F. on the other.

Cross-examined. Q. This was on Tuesday morning? A. Yes - the other two persons went away; I asked his name, and he said Oram - I do not know whether it is usual for persons of the lower classes to carry handkerchiefs in their hats; I have done so - I knew nothing of the prisoner before; he said he did not know the other persons - I did not see him take this handkerchief from his hat - he might have received it from one of the others; I am quite certain he did not offer to go with me after either of the other persons.

COURT. Q. When was it that the prisoner answered to the name of Oram? A. I took the handkerchief from him, and said, "What are you going to do with this?" he said,"It is mine;" I said, "It is marked Oram" - he said,"My name is Oram."

JAMES ORAM . This is my handkerchief - I know it by the mark; it is one of a piece which I had, and my neice marked it - I have another here marked the same way.

Cross-examined. Q. How can you undertake to swear it is your niece's marking? A. It is my name, which is not a very common one, and I missed just such a one.

Witnesses for the Defence.

EDWARD FAYLAN . I am a ladies shoe-maker, and live at No. 12, Smith-street, Somers'-town, I have known the prisoner five years - he had a good character.

COURT. Q. What is his name? A. James Povey.

JOHN COOPER . I live at No. 6, Newton-street. The prisoner worked for me ten or twelve years, and had an honest character - his name is James Oram Povey.

COURT. Q. Do you know his friends? A. Yes, they are respectable - I do not know that he went by the name of James Oram; I did not know his silk handkerchiefs - he bore the name of Oram; he was Christened so after an aunt of his, who died with a cancer in her breast about five years ago - I was not surprised at his answering to the name of Povey - she was called Mrs. Povey; she did not bear the name of Oram to my knowledge.

Three other witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, and stated his name to be Povey.

GUILTY . - Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-42

738. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Reginald Amphlett Packer , from his person .

REGINALD AMPHLETT PACKER . On the afternoon of the 24th of March I was in Wych-street, Strand - I distinctly felt a hand in my pocket; I put my hand into my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I turned, and saw the prisoner and two boys behind me; I saw my handkerchief behind the prisoner, on the ground - I laid hold of him, and said, "You have my handkerchief;" I had seen one of the boys give it to the prisoner just before - I took hold of him; the prisoner and that boy were within reach of my person - I did not see the handkerchief in his hand, but I saw his hand in the act of giving something to the prisoner; it was all done in a moment.

PROTHEROE TOWNSEND . I reside at the Herald's College, Doctors'-commons. I was with the prosecutor on the 23rd of March; I saw him turn round, and saw the handkerchief drop from under the prisoner's coat tail at the instant I laid hold of him - I kept him till the officer came; I saw the prosecutor take up the handkerchief - I did not see the other boy at all.

THOMAS WILLIAM ANTHONY . I am a constable. I was on duty at the Olympic theatre - I was fetched, and took the Prisoner from this gentleman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310407-43

739. FRANCIS THOMAS ROBERTSON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 13th of March , 150 yards of silk, value 15l., the goods of Joseph Foot , well knowing it to have been stolen .

JAMES BAINTON . I am in the employ of Mr. Joseph Foot - he lives in Church-street, Spitalfields. I missed about a hundred and fifty yards of silk on the 13th of March; I believe it was on a Sunday - on the Thursday following it was brought to the warehouse by a constable - I knew it again; it was in two lengths, and one of them has a particular border - I superintend the manufactory, and I gave a different coloured silk for the border, to show the silk better; I can speak to it as being the same we lost from that, and from other circumstances - I did not know the prisoner before, but I have ascertained that he lives in Wellington-street, and is in the silk line.

GEORGE ROGERS . I am in the employ of Mr. Foot. I made this silk for him - I took this piece home on the 13th March.

THOMAS GODWIN . On Thursday, the 17th of March, a person inquired of me if I wanted a piece of parasol silk -I said I did not know that I did, but in consequence of what I said, a piece of silk was brought to me; I told the person who brought it that I was authorized to stop it, and I sent it to Mr. Foot's, by one of my own men, who is also named Thomas Godwin - I did not see the prisoner.

JAMES BAINTON . This is the piece brought by Thomas Godwin, and the other was brought by John Chick.

THOMAS BICKNELL . I am a superintendent of Police. I took the prisoner on the night of the 17th of March - I asked if he had had any dealings in silk with Denoird - he said No; I asked if he had sold any duplicate of silk to him - he said he had not: I then asked if he had pawned any - he said he had not; I took him to the watch-house; he lived at No. 29, Wellington-row, at the bottom of Pollard's-row, Bethnal-green - I found no silk there relating to this indictment; I had taken Denoird before that.

JOHN DENOIRD . I live at No. 11, Hunt-street, Mileend New-town. I know the prisoner - I had no transaction about silk with him till the 16th of March, when I purchased a duplicate of him; I redeemed the silk from Mr. Harrison. in Tottenham-court-road - I offered it for sale at Mr. Godwin's, and he detained it; I was to give the prisoner 25s. for the duplicate - I gave him 10s. in part; we made the bargain at his house - he had come to my house the day before, and asked my wife if I would buy it; Mr. Godwin's detained the same silk which I got for the duplicate.

Prisoner. Q.Did not you go to Mr. Foot's, and give the name of Simmons? A. I went to Mr. Foot's with Mr. Godwin's servant, and did give the name of Simmons, though I knew I bought it of the prisoner; I went with the Police-officer, and waited for Simmons coming home - we waited at Mr. Brown's, the Turkish Slave, in Brick-lane, till nearly eight o'clock; we went to several other houses, and as we could not find Simmons, the officer looked my up - I had no doubt I bought the duplicate of the prisoner.

COURT. Q.Did he ever go by any other name than Robertson? A.Not that I know of; I stated I had it of Simmons because they took me in a moment, and I hardly knew what to say - I said that wherever the silk went I would go, as I had actually borrowed the money of my wife's mother; I should not have offered it for sale at Mr. Godwin's, No. 7. Tottenham-court-road, when I had only redeemed it at No. 5, if I had known it was stolen - it is worth 2s. 6d. a yard, and there is nearly sixty yards of it.

JOHN PIERSON . I live with Mr. Joseph Harrison , a pawnbroker, No. 5, Tottenham-court-road. I have a duplicate of some silk pawned by the prisoner - it was similar to this, but I could not swear to this; there were sixty-four yards in one piece, and thirty yards in the other - I lent 5l. 10s. on it; I only know Denoird by his redeeming the silk.

Prisoner. Q. You say there were ninety-four yards of silk? A. Yes - I do not know what became of the rest.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-44

740. ANDREW MELVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 jacket, value 12s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 2 shoes, value 6d.; 2 shirts, value 3s.; 1 comb, value 1d.; 1 handkerchief, value 3d.; 1 sovereign, and 1 sixpence , the property of Peter Watt .

PETER WATT . I belong to the smack, Triumph - it was laying at Miller's wharf . I missed the articles stated from my chest, in the forecastle, on the morning of the 8th of March; when I went to bed, about twelve o'clock the night before, I had put them safe in my chest - the prisoner did not belong to that smack, but I had seen him the day before, in a barge, about twelve yards from the vessel; in consequence of suspicion, I went in search of him, and found him at a public-house in Ratcliff-highway - he had my shoes on his feet; I took him to the smack, and sent for a constable - my handkerchief, cotton shirt, and comb were found on him.

Q.Where did you take him? A. I saw him in a public-house, and ran for a constable, but could not find one; I kept my eyes on him as he came out of the house, and went on towards the London-dock gates - I thought he would get away, and took him myself.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know the shoes belonged to you? A. By a private-mark on them - I told you I had lost a shirt and handkerchief, but did not notice whether you had them on or not.

NICHOLLA JOHN . I bought a waistcoat of the prisoner on the 8th of March, in a coffee-shop, close to the London-docks, for 1s. - I went to work, and when I came back the master of the shop said an officer had been for it; I gave it up before the Magistrate.

Prisoner. Q. Did I sell it to you? A.You and another man; you took up the shilling which I put down.

JAMES WHITE . I am a Police-surveyor. I produce this waistcoat - I went on board the Triumph, and searched the prisoner; I took from him this shirt, handkerchief, shoes, and comb; he said if I would go to Rosemary-lane he would show me where he sold the jacket -I went there, but he could not point out the shop; he said he had sold the waistcoat to the foreigner at the coffee-shop - he said the other man was with him, and he must have had the sovereign, the sixpence, and the flannel-shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I had come from sea, and being in distress I went to the Refuge, and was there the very night these things were stolen - I bought the things for 3s. 6d., and paid for them out of 5s. which I had received.

PETER WATT . I missed my things about seven o'clock in the morning, and took the prisoner about eleven - there was nothing to prevent a person getting into the vessel from the barge which I saw the prisoner in.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-45

741. SARAH MAYNARD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 2 lbs. weight of pork, value 10d., and 8 ozs, weight of cheese, value 4d. , the goods of John Spooner .

WILLIAM WHITE . I live with Mr. John Spooner, in Hampstead-road . On the 16th of March the prisoner came to his shop, and had a few trifling articles; she then had a small piece of pork weighed, which came to 4 1/2d. - she said she had not money enough to pay for that; the Policeman came in at that time as a customer - while I was serving him I sent a boy to see what the prisoner wanted; when the Policeman went to look for his cheese which he had bought and paid for, he could not find it; he taxed the prisoner with it - she said, "Upon my soul, I have not got it," and ran away; he followed, and took her with the cheese, and this piece of pork, which I had put in the tray into the window.

Prisoner. I paid for some butter and cheese, and being rather intoxicated, I did not know whether I took my own cheese or not. Witness. She had the cheese which she had bought in her basket - she had not bought the pork; she had not paid for the pork she had a weighed - this cheese was about 3 ozs. larger than the piece she bought, and the pork was about 1 1/2 lb. more than what she had weighed; she was rather the worse for liquor - she paid 2 1/2d. for her cheese, and the constable's cheese came to 4d.

GEORGE GALWAY . I am a Police-officer. I went to

the shop to purchase some articles, and among the rest a 1/2 lb. of cheese - when I went to take the cheese it was gone; I accused the prisoner of it - she denied it, and ran off; I pursued, and took her - I asked if she had taken the cheese; she said No, and opened her basket to show the piece she had bought, but my cheese was under her arm under her cloak, with a piece of pork - she was a little intoxicated, but not drunk; she had been served at a different part of the shop, a short distance from me.

Prisoner. I asked him to go with me, and said I would show him where I bought the pork - he took me to the station, and I said I would meet him the next day. Witness. She was let go that night, as the prosecutor did not come, and she came the next day - she did not tell me where she bought it.

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned my shawl to buy this bit of pork - I gave 8 1/2d. for it; I then went to the prosecutor's shop, where I bought a - lb. of cheese, and 3d. worth of butter; I took up this cheese, and did not know but that it was my own.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310407-46

742. JOHN LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 5lbs. weight of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of William Harding .

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Lower Sloane-street, Chelsea . I had seen the prisoner about our neighbourhood for a week before the 22nd of March, and on that evening I saw him near the shop about half-past seven or a quarter before eight o'clock - I was at my private door, watching him, and saw him take a piece of bacon from the window; it weighed 5 1/2 lbs.; he ran across the road, and threw it down - I caught him close by it, and brought him back.

GEORGE THATCHER. I am a Police-officer. I received the prisoner and this piece of bacon.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home - I never had the bacon.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-47

743. ROBERT LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 4 bushels of coke, value 2s., and 2 half sacks, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Hancock .

HANNAH BETTEL . I am the wife of Thomas Bettel , a shoemaker, who lives in Grenville-street, Somers'-town. On the night of the 9th of March I was going up Grenville-street , and saw the prisoner take half a sack of coke from the prosecutor's door; he carried it on his shoulder up Clarenden-street - I told the prosecutor what I had seen.

ANN HANCOCK . I am the wife of Edward Hancock - we live in Grenville-street. On the night of the 9th of March I went out, in consequence of what this witness told me, a few minutes before six o'clock, and missed a half sack of coke from the door - I had seen it safe a quarter of an hour before.

WILLIAM COLE . I am a Police-officer. I went to No. 18, Little Clarendon-street, on the 9th of March, at half-past nine o'clock; the prisoner came to the door when I knocked, and Bettel said, "That is the man I saw take the half sack of coke;" I took him, and went with him into a back room, where I found one half sack of coke in the sack, and another half sack over a wall adjoining his premises.

Prisoner's Defence. I am indicted for stealing four bushels of coke, and that is neither one half sack nor two half sacks - two half sacks would be three bushels.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, having a wife and family.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18310407-48

744. HENRY JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Keipper , from his person .

JOHN KEIPPER. I am servant to Messrs. Green and Co., of Huggin-lane; they are dealers in china and glass. On the evening of the 6th of March I was in High-street, Whitechapel , and felt something against my pocket - I looked, saw a little boy, and at the same time the prisoner ran past me on the right, with my handkerchief in his hand; I ran after him; he fell, and was taken in my presence - when he fell down, this handkerchief, which is mine, flew into the road wide open.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you have your initials on it? A. Yes; here is I. K., No. 3.; I did not see any lady walking behind me - I did not bear the prisoner say that a lady had given it him, and said a person before had dropped it - he said so at the office.

LUKE COLEMAN . I live in Little Somerset-street, Aldgate, and am a ginger-beer-maker. On the 6th of March I was going towards Aldgate, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and in my trying to catch him he fell down, and the handkerchief flew from his hand - the officer came, and took him; this was in Middlesex, before you get to the City stone.

ROBERT CARR . I am a Police-constable. I heard the cry of Stop thief! went up, and took the prisoner - I had seen him run by me with a handkerchief; the witness knocked him down, and this handkerchief flew from him.

Prisoner. Mr. Coleman threw me down, and he said the handkerchief came out of my hat.

LUKE COLEMAN. No, I said it was as if it came out of my bat.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you sure it did not come out of your hat? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking home, and saw a man nning along; he dropped this handkerchief from behind him; a lady said, "That gentleman has dropped a handkerchief, pick it up, and take it to him" - I was running on, and this gentleman was crying Stop thief! I did not know it was his, or I would have given it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

Reference Number: t18310407-49

745. JOHN FARQUER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 1 carpet-bag, value 10s. , the goods of William Frederick Randall and another.

WILLIAM RANDALL . I am the son of William Frede

rick Randall - he keeps a shop in Burlington-arcade , and has a partner. On Wednesday, the 23rd of February, I missed a carpet bag, which I had safe about twenty minutes before; I went out, and saw the prisoner about twenty yards from the shop, with it under his arm - I took him back, and gave him into custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it away from the door? A. No; you were walking when I saw you - you did not attempt to escape; you went back quietly; I said I did not wish to give you in charge, but merely that the officer should take you out of the arcade, and turn you about your business - I am sure it was my bag; I identified it at the office - it is not here, because the officer is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-50

746. GEORGE TOMKINS and JOSEPH BISHOP were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 28 lbs. weight of wax, value 30s. , the goods of Samuel Childs and Charles Freeman .

SAMUEL CHILDS . I am a wax-chandler , in partnership with Mr. Charles Freeman - we live at Kensington; the prisoner Bishop was in our employ for two or three years - he has been with our cart, and before that he was in our shop in London; I know nothing of Tomkins. On the 28th of March I was taken to the watch-house, and saw this wax, which is now in Court - I believe it to be ours.

Cross-examined by MR. STURGEON. Q. You do not swear to the wax? A. No, no manufacturer can - we all have it in the same shape as this.

JOHN HERRING. I am a Police-officer. On the 28th of March I met the two prisoners about nine o'clock at night; Tomkins had this wax when I met them - Bishop said to him, "Come along, come along;" He knew me, though I was in my private dress, but Tomkins did not; I then saw Tomkins give the wax to Bishop - they were then about one hundred yards from the prosecutors' premises; I took them into custody; Bishop had the wax then - in going to the station-house we passed the prosecutors' premises, and Bishop confessed he had stolen it from his masters', and very much wished me to let him call and leave it there - he said things would be all right.

BISHOP - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Months .

TOMKINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-51

747. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March ,. 2 1/2 lbs. weight of butter, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Brown .

RICHARD BROWN . I live in Park-terrace , and am a cheesemonger . About three o'clock in the afternoon, on the 20th of March, the Policeman brought this butter in with the prisoner, who was in my service - I asked him if he took it, and he said he did; I asked if he took it from a tub there, and he said he did - he had been with me eight weeks, and conducted himself middling.

HENRY SAUNDERS . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in Upper Park-place; I saw the prisoner and another boy running together; the prisoner took off his hat, took out this butter in this handkerchief, and gave it to the other; I went over, and asked what he had got; he said butter, which he had bought a mile off - I said if he did not tell me where, I would take him in charge; he took me to Mr. Brown's, and said he had it from there.

Prisoner. I never said I bought it.

GUILTY Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310407-52

748. SAMUEL FLEMARE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 21 yards of printed cotton, value 12s. , the goods of John Harvey Knight and Samuel Knight .

ANN DUNCAN . I know the prosecutors' shop. On the 28th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was near their house in Crown-street, Bishopagate - Jane Davies was with me; I saw the prisoner, whom I have known some time - I watched him, and saw him take a piece of something white from the bar of the prosecutors' window; it appeared to me to he cloth or calico - he did not go into the shop, but he shifted it round the bar, and took it - he ran across the road, up Clifton-street, and took it to a place in Angel-alley; I kept watching him, and afterwards told the officers, but he had come out before I told them; I do not think the property has been found.

JURY. Q.Was the bar outside the window? A. Yes, it was.

Prisoner. Q.What did you say to me when I was taken? A. I asked what you had done with the things you took from the shop; I had drank with you before I told the officer.

COURT. Q.What are you? A. My husband belongs to the gas-works; I have an unfortunate sister who has cohabited with the prisoner - he did not carry this article above half a mile; I did not call Stop thief! because I was well aware I could find him.

JANE DAVIES . I was going into Bishopsgate-street on an errand, and called on Duncan - we went out together; I had never seen the prisoner but twice before; I saw him in Crown-street - he crossed, and took this article from Mr. Knight's; I supposed it to be a roll of calico or linen - I did not see the house he took it into, because I had Duncan's child, and I was rather behing her; he ran away with it - I did not tell the officer of it; I saw the prisoner in about ten minutes at a public-house -Mrs. Duncan said to him, "Sam, what have you done with that?" I cannot tell exactly what he said, but I think he said he had made it all right - she told him the Police would he after him, and he muttered something which I could not understand; I swear positively that he took something from the bottom rail of the door, and ran away directly.

JURY. Q. Did you have something to drink? A. Yes - he asked us to have something.

THOMAS ALFRED SMITH . I am an apprentice to John Harvey Knight and Samuel Knight . I had put this cotton at the door on the 28th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning; it was light lilac, and on the wrong side it appeared nearly white - I saw it safe on the rail about four o'clock in the afternoon; I did not know it was gone till very near two in the morning, when the

officer came, and called us up - I have never seen it since.

CHARLES FRANCIS RURDETT WOOD . I live with the prosecutors. I missed the piece of print when the officer came; I had seen it in the morning, and had shown it to a customer.

ROBERT DICK . I am an officer. On the 28th of February, about a quarter before twelve o'clock at night, I received information that the prisoner had committed a robbery in Crown-street; as his person was well known to me I looked out for him, and soon afterwards I met him - I asked him if he had any thing about him; he said No - I asked if he had any thing in his mouth, and I found he had 1s.; Duncan told me of the robbery about half-past eleven o'clock, but I had heard of it before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking with a friend, and got a little in liquor; I went home, and went to bed - I then got up again, and went with two or three more friends down to the Unicorn; Mrs. Duncan came there, and said something to me - she stopped drinking with me till the house was shut up; I then went home to her house, and went out for something more to drink before I was taken; when I came out with her and her sister she gave charge of me - I have her own sister outside, who will swear she took a half-sovereign from me.

CHARLOTTE FLEMARE . I am the prisoner's sister-in-law. About three months ago I was going, through Shoreditch, and met the young woman he used to keep company with; she said, "If I could only find out a plan to get that thief out of the country" - I said, "Forget and forgive;" She said she never would, and once within seven years she would do for him - he had a good character, and I was astonished to hear her say so; she said she would not mind taking any one's life away so long as she could live - I never was here before; I could get my character where I have worked for nine years - I swear the prisoner has borne a good character; I heard that he fell into a misfortune about twelve months ago, but I cannot tell where he was tried - I did not speak to the family at that time; the person he lived with is worse than he is.

ELIZABETH HURLEY. I have kept company with the prisoner six or eight months - his father, mother, and sister mustered up half a sovereign towards doing him good; I brought it to him, laid it under my pillow, and in the morning it was taken away by Duncan, my own sister, who is far worse than the prisoner is.

Prisoner. The officer knows when I was taken before I was innocent - I was only having a pint of beer in the house where a robbery was committed.

JURY to JANE DAVIES . Q. Did you go to drink with him? A. Yes; Duncan asked me to go with her on an errand, and as we were going by a public-house he was at the door with some liquor in his hand - I was across the road when I saw him take the article; I support my mother and myself by selling a little fruit.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-53

749. THOMAS McGILL was indicted for bigamy .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BIRCHALL. I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 24th of March I examined the register of Marriages, in the parish church of Croxton, in Lincolnshire - I and Mr. Jennings compared this certificate with the register - (read) May 1, 1826, - Thomas Walker McGill , of the parish of St. Pancras, Middlesex, bachelor, and Ruth, Jennings, spinster, were married in this church by licence, by consent of parents, in the presence of F. Jennings, Jun., and Jane Hoyle , by me,

ROBERT FOSTER , Minister.

ROBERT AUSTIN . I am parish-clerk of Croxton. I saw the prisoner on the 1st of May, 1826, in the church in which I officiate - I saw a person, who went by the name of Ruth Jennings , there, and I was present at her marriage with the prisoner; I saw her the day before yesterday - she was alive, and in good health.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.How long have you been parish-clerk? A. Six years next May; I did not know the person who married Ruth Jennings before, and I did not see him again till I came here, but I undertake to swear to him - I am justifiable in doing so- I am confident he is the person; they were married by the Reverend Robert Foster .

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the certificate taken from the register? A. Yes; I have not the slightest doubt that the prisoner is the man - I know him as well as if I had seen him every week.

ELIZABETH CAMPBELL . I live at No. 17, Pollard's-row, Bethnal-green. I first became acquainted with the prisoner seven or eight months ago, in one of the Paddington coaches - I had two letters in my hand, and when I was quitting the coach he offered to get the letters conveyed to the post for me - this was the way our acquaintance began - I was living at that time with my mother in clifton-street; she is separated from my father - she does not follow any occupation - he called at my mother's house some days afterwards; he gave the name of Tournage - he afterwards stated that he was with a brother in as office; he first stated he was a ship-broker - he then stated he had retired with his brother, and a few days afterwards he gave me to understand he had been a post-captain, at least he wrote a letter to that effect, and he stated in words to me that he had - he told me his name was Henry Augustus Tournage ; he did not say whether he was a single or a married man, because it was never suspected - when he married me he said he was a single man, and I never suspected any thing else - my mother knew of his visits to me - we were married in Shoreditch church, on the 26th of August last; he married by the name of Henry augustus Tournage - it was with my mother's consent; he lived with me for about a fortnight after in my mother's house - I think it was in July that I became acquainted with him - I afterwards found, from his own mother and father, that he had been married; when he was taxed with having a wife he went away, saying he would get sufficient proof that he was not married, and he never came back to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Your first acquaintance began in an omnibus? A. It was a Paddington coach - I think it was an omnibus; I was going from Paddington to the City - I cannot say on what part of the road he first spoke to me; when I got out he followed me- I do not know whether I went to Bridge-street, but I crossed the water with him in a boat; I saw him again in two or three days, for the purpose of knowing about my letters - I afterwards saw him by appointment; I did not

go to the play with him the first time - I did not introduce him to my mother, he introduced himself; I cannot say how long I had been acquainted with him then; I should think it was more than a week.

COURT. Q. Did you go to the play with him before he had seen your mother? A. I did; he wished to speak to me about seeing my mother - I said he could not, being a stranger; he said he would - he left me, knocked at my mother's door, and walked in.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Then you think it was a week or more before he introduced himself to your mother? A. Yes, a week or ten days - I had been twice to the play with him before that; I think this was in July, and we were married in August - I think I could swear it was three full weeks before we were married, but I should not like to swear it; I could not tell where my father was at the time I saw the prisoner - I believe during my acquaintance with the prisoner he was at an aunt's of mine in sloane-street; he was not a prisoner in Whitecross-street: he was not in the habit of visiting us - I never was acquainted with my father's residence; the only time I ever saw him in Whitecross-street was about two months after my marriage - I was twenty-one years of age in January last, which was five months after my marriage; my father never consented to my marriage, to me, because I never asked him, but he did to a part of my family - my name is Elizabeth Sarah Campbell ; my uncle made some inquiries about the prisoner, but he is not here; neither my mother nor I ever got any of the prisoner's money - I dare say after we were married we had 2l. or 3l. of him in the whole, merely for things he sent out for; he was living at our expence - I saw him after he left me, at the end of the fortnight, perhaps twenty times; I saw him after I knew he was married - I never concealed him in any room, nor did his father ever pull him out; his father has been more than once to our house, but he never saw the prisoner there but once - he did not break into any room; the door was opened by the servant; (looking at some letters) this is not my hand-writing - it was written for me by my brother - this one is my sister's writing; these others were written by my brother - some money was borrowed of the prisoner's family by my mother, which has yet to be returned - I was not there when the servant opened the door of a room in which the prisoner was; it was not the door of my own bed-room - the money borrowed was about 20l., I think - the time for paying it has not yet arrived; my mother was once in a sponging-house - We got 3l. of the prisoner; it was from a house in Thomas-street, Hackney-road, that the prisoner's father took him out.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you quite certain he represented himself as a single man? A. Yes; I was not of age when I was married; my mother consented to the marriage, but my father did not know of it from me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-54

750. EMMA DODD , MARY MARSHALL , and MARY WRIGHT were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 watch-chain, value 6d.; 1 seal, value 1s., and 2 watch-keys, value 6d., the goods of Robert Mackey , from his person .

ROBERT MACKEY . I am captain of a ship . I fell in with Wright at a house in Ratcliff-highway - she spoke to me: I had been two hours in bed in her house, when she offered to treat me, and we went to the public-house together - I lost my watch in the street; I cannot be positive whether we were talking at the time, but it was only a few minutes after we had been in conversation when I missed my watch - I went home to bed after I had been to the watch-house; I had lost ten sovereigns in Wright's house - we came out of the public-house together; I lost my watch after that - I went to bed alone in Wright's house; I was rather drunk - I stripped: I had the nine sovereigns and about 17s., to the best of my knowledge, and when I awoke they were gone; my watch was then safe - I got up, went down, and accused them about the money; I do not recollect what she said; I went out into the street with her - I had my watch when I went out, but I cannot tell how I lost it; I did not get into conversation with any one.

WILLIAM HICKINBOTTOM . I am an officer. I had information from a private watchman, that the captain had been robbed - I went in search of Dodd and Marshall; I found them at No. 2, Twine-court, Shadwell; as the watchman and I came out of the house, Dodd came with us, and I saw her lay something in the kennel - I looked over my left shoulder, and saw it; I said, "What is that, Dodd?" Dodd said, "Oh, my God! it is a watch;" this was four or five hundred yards from Wright's.

JAMES KENNEDY . I was the watch-house-keeper. When Marshall was brought in I was giving her some water, and she said it was a pity the old woman (meaning Wright) was not locked up, for if it had not been for her they should not have robbed the man of his watch, for she told them to do it - I went and took Wright; she was drinking some coffee with a man, and told him it was the last she should drink with him, for she was sure to be transported.

Dodd delivered in a written Defence, stating that she had met the prosecutor, who told her he had been robbed at the house, and would give her the watch to keep till morning, if allowed to accompany her home - that she was in search of him to return it when she was apprehended.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-55

751. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 basket, value 2s., and 15 loaves of bread, value 8s. , the goods of William Mears .

ALEXANDER COOPER . I live with William Mears , a baker , in Davies-street, Berkeley-square. On the 14th of March I left my basket in Shepherd-street, May-fair - I returned in about ten minutes, and the basket and fifteen loaves of bread were gone.

DAVID WILLS . I am a baker. I saw the prisoner in Piccadilly, carrying this basket, with fifteen loaves in it -I asked where he was going with it; he said did it belong to me - I said I would let him know; he put it down, and begged me to let him go - I also work for the prosecutor, and his name is on the basket.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. A man came along with the basket, and asked me to help him to carry it, as he was going a good way with it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310407-56

752. WILLIAM DAVIES was indicted for stealing,

on the 28th of March , 30 plants, value 2l., and two flowerpots, value 6d. , the goods of the Honourable Juliana Curzon .

JOHN PRESTON . I am a labourer to the Honourable Juliana Curzon , at Hayes . I had known the prisoner before, at Hayes. On Saturday, the 26th of March, I saw these plants safe in the Honourable Miss Curzon's greenhouse, and I missed them on the Monday; I saw them again at Southall - the prisoner was there in custody.

WILLIAM FAIR . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at a public-house in Hayes, on Tuesday, the 29th of March; I had information that some plants had been left at Southall - I went there and saw Dennis Conner , who told me the prisoner had left these nine plants there; these are all that have been found.

DENNIS CONNER . I live at Southall, and am a gardener. On the Monday morning the prisoner brought these plants to me, a little before four o'clock; I was not up, but he called, and I came down to him - I had gone to the window first, and he said he had a parcel for me, and was to have 1s. for leaving it; I asked what it was - he said he brought it from Mr. Wye; I said I did not know such a person, and desired him not to bring them at such a time, as I had no doubt they were stolen, and the sooner he was off my premises the better - he went away, and I went to a Magistrate and told him of it - he told me to detain the plants, and if the prisoner came again for the 1s. to detain him.

Prisoner's Defence. I overtook a waggoner just before I got to Southall; he asked if I knew where Mr. Conner lived - I said I did, and he told me to leave these plants with him, and I was to have 1s. for it; I went, and Conner told me to come again at day-light - I did not go again till I was taken.

JOHN PRESTON . I can swear to these plants, as the property of the prosecutrix; they had been in pots, and were torn out - here is a myrtle and a lemon tree, and some others, which are valuable plants.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-57

753. JOHN DERRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 35 yards of printed cotton, value 13s. , the goods of Joseph Thompson .

JOSEPH THOMPSON. I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 14th of March I was behind my counter, in my shop, and heard a person say,"Here is a man taking your printed cottons;" I ran out, and saw the prisoner about four yards from my door, with a piece of print in his hand, training on the ground - he said the man has run up this street; a voice behind said,"No, that is the man, I saw him take it;" I detained the prisoner till the officer came and took him - I then discovered that another piece had been stolen.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was he not raising it from the ground? A. He had one part in his hand, and the other on the ground - he was trying to take it up; he said the man was gone.

Prisoner. He said a man came into his shop and told him of it. Witness. No, he only came on the step, and then I ran out.

WILLIAM BIGGS . I was passing the prosecutor's door; I saw the prisoner and another man at his door - I went on to Palmer-street; the person I wanted to see there was not at home - I returned, and again saw the prisoner near the prosecutor's door, looking into the shop, as though he was looking to see if any one was there - he then turned, and spoke to the other man who was at the door; I passed them, turned, and went back - I then saw the prisoner take hold of one piece, which was blue, and he seemed feeling the quality of it; I then turned again, and went towards the prisoner and the other man - I saw the prisoner take the blue piece, snatch it down, and give it to the other man, who wore a white apron; he said to him, "Go along, go along;" I said, "Mr. Thompson, here are two men taking your prints;" the prisoner took hold of this other piece, but part of it was on the ground, and he could not get away from it, till Mr. Thompson came and took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he was stooping, as though he was taking it clear from the ground? A. Yes - I live in Park-street, Limehouse; I did not say I lived at the West India-docks, I said near the West India-docks - I did not give an address where I could not be found; I said I must go home, but Mr. Thompson said, "I must beg the favour of you to go to the office," which I did that night - I told the Magistrate, I was a foreman at the West India-docks, and that I lived at the place I have now stated; I did not say I was not certain the prisoner was the man -I saw him do it.

Prisoner's Defence. While he was going to the shop he must have lost sight of the person - two men ran up the street, and I was taking up the print to give to the prosecutor, and the witness said, "I think you are the man - yes, I am sure you are;" I was then detained.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-58

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, APRIL 8.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

754. WILLIAM JACKAU was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 2 boots, value 20s. , the goods of John Kirkpatrick ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-59

755. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 7 spoons, value 2l. 10s., and 1 pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10s. , the goods of Lawrence Sullivan , Esq.

WILLIAM LOWMAN . I am servant to Lawrence Sullivan, Esq., of Fulham . The prisoner was employed there as a journeyman locksmith - he had to repair the lock of a cupboard, and about an hour after he left we missed this plate from it; I went and informed an officer, who took him, and in my presence found all the property on him.

WILLIAM CLEAVER . I am a Policeman. I searched the prisoner at his master's house, and found seven spoons and a pair of sugar-tongs on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They were given to me before I came out of the house, to put into my pocket, by a young man, and he said he would come after me - I was out of work, and have been starving.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-60

756. GEORGE MOIGUE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 1 crown and 2 sixpences, the monies of Charles Holland , from his person .

CHARLES HOLLAND . I am a seaman , and so is the prisoner. I did not know him till the 3rd of March, when we both shipped on board the Quebec - we took our things on board, and then came on shore; we were walking arm-in-arm together - I felt his hand in my waistcoat pocket, where I had my purse; I said, "Don't be skylarking in that way, give it back to me," as I felt him take it out of my pocket - he said he had not got it; I said he had, and took him home to my lodging - the landlady called in a Policeman; he said he had not got it, and had not taken it, but before the constable came he took it out of his hat - he had heard the constable sent for.

JOHN NICHOLAS . I am a constable. I was sent for, and have the purse, with a crown-piece and two sixpences, but it was found before I came.(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. If I had been sober I would not have done it - I was quite drunk, and so was he.

CHARLES HOLLAND . I was not drunk, nor was he - we had two glasses together; I had nothing else, but a pot of beer that night.

JOHN NICHOLAS . I thought they had both been drinking - the prisoner seemed the worst.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-61

757. THOMAS KIRBY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 2 saws, value 11s.; 4 planes, value 12s.; 1 oil-stone, value 4s.; 2 hammers, value 2s.; 15 chisels, value 5s.; 1 pair of compasses, value 1s.; 1 square, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of pincers, value 1s.; 4 gimblets, value 9d.; 2 files, value 9d. and 1 tool-basket, value 1s. , the goods of Matthew Headen .

MATTHEW HEADEN . I am a carpenter . On Saturday night, the 27th of March, I left my basket of tools in care of Cooper, at the Swan, Commercial-road - the prisoner was a stranger to me; I never authorized him to fetch them away - I went for them on Monday morning, between six and seven o'clock, and they were gone.

JOHN COOPER . I keep the Swan, Commercial-road. The prisoner came on Sunday morning, about half-past ten o'clock, and said he came for his mate's tools - he was quite a stranger; I asked if there were any saws on the top of the basket - he said two, and I gave him Headen's basket.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a rope-maker. I met the prisoner by Stepney church, on Sunday evening, with a basket of tools - he was drunk, and beckoned to me, and said he would satisfy me if I would carry the basket for him; I carried it for him to Rosemary-lane - he went into Hadden's shop, and offered the tools for sale for 10s.; Hadden asked if he would take less - he said a crown; Hadden went out, and fetched two officers.

THOMAS HADDEN . I deal in marine-stores. The prisoner offered me the tools - I suspected him, and fetched an officer.

ROBERT CREABAR . I belong to the Thames Police. I asked the prisoner whose the tools were - he said they were his own - that he was carpenter of a ship, and lived on Cock-hill.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of the docks on Saturday, and met a carpenter who I was formerly acquainted with; I went into two public-houses with him, and got too much liquor - he left his basket of tools in care of the landlord, and said he would come for them in the morning, but in the morning he could not find the house; he came and asked me to go and look for the house - I went, and asked this gentleman if I and my shipmate had not left a basket of tools there, and he gave me these; I did not know but they were my mate's, as there were two saws in his basket.

JOHN COOPER . It was the only basket I had in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 52. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-62

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Gurrow .

758. HENRY KIND was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Griffin , on the 11th of March , and stealing from his person, 5 sovereigns , his monies.

THOMAS GRIFFIN. I am a private in the Grenadier Guards - the prisoner was in the same company. On the 11th of March I was stationed at the King's-mews barracks - we went out in company together about ten o'clock in the morning, to the Blackmoor's Head public-house, Whitcomb-street, then to the North Pole, and then to the Greycoat Boy, at the end of St. Ann-street, Westminster - we continued there about three-quarters of an hour; another of my comrades was there - there was a dispute between him and the prisoner, and blows passed; a glass was broken in the scuffle - the landlord wanted to be paid for it, and I left my watch as security; the prisoner and I then came away together - we had drank a good deal; I was perfectly sensible, and when I got about three-parts of the way along St. Ann-street , he knocked me down with his fist, and took five sovereigns and a purse out of my waistcoat pocket - he then ran away; I proceeded to the barracks - I did not report him that night; he did not come in that night - he was absent five days; it was his duty to be there every night - I reported him next day; he was apprehended on coming into the barracks - I was employed by Mr. Payne to assist the paymaster, and got an extra allowance, which enabled me to save my pay up; it was known among my comrades that I had saved money - I sent Moore next morning to the Greycoat Boy to redeem my watch, but did not find it there; I had not authorized the prisoner to go and get it, nor to pledge it any where.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. At what time did you go to the Greycoat Boy? A.Between five and six o'clock - I staid there about three-quarters of an hour; I was taken into barracks myself that night by the patrol, for being dirty, as he had knocked me down in the street, and for being drunk - I do not know how much we had drank, but I was perfectly sensible; I had seen the sovereigns not half an hour before - I left my watch for the glass, because I did not like to change; the prisoner had broken the window - I am quartered out of barracks, at the North Pole, and slept there the night before; I was confined in the guard-room the night this happened for being dirty - some of my comrades asked where my watch was, and if I had lost my money; I told them I did not

know where it was, or what had become of my money, as I did not mean to report him, and never should have done so if he had not fetched the watch, but as soon as the man who went for my watch came back, and said he had taken it, I said I had lost my money, and reported him; I did not call out when he knocked me down - it was in a back street; I was picked up by two women and an old man - I did not tell them he had robbed me, because I expected he would have given me my money back; I may have spent 5s. or 6s. in liquor - I believe I had been with a woman the day before at Taylor's, in the Almonry, and on the day of the robbery the prisoner, I, and Moore we, In a coach from the North Pole; we treated some women with liquor - it was Moore who quarrelled with the prisoner, and broke the glass; I lent the prisoner 5s. at the Blackmoor's Head, and 5s. at the North Pole - I took it out of the purse which I afterwards lost; I kept the silver and gold altogether, and am sure the purse and money were in my waistcoat pocket when I left the house.

JAMES COOPER . I was bar-man at the Greycoat Boy, at the corner of Peter-street and Ann-street, Westminster. On the 11th of March the prisoner and Moore were there in company with the prosecutor - a young woman came in with them; there was a quarrel, and blows passed between the prisoner and Moore - in the scuffle a square of glass was broken; the prisoner gave me the watch and appendages as security for the payment - I saw him take it off the prosecutor's neck, to which it was suspended by a chain; it was deposited till the damage was paid for - I saw the prisoner and Griffin go away together between six and seven o'clock; I do not know what became of Moore; they were all in liquor - they had drank more than they ought, but were able to take care of themselves - the prisoner came back in about an hour and a half, or two hours, and redeemed the watch; I am sure of his person - he told me the prosecutor was in the tilt guardroom, and had sent him for the watch; he paid me 2s. for the blind which was broken - I gave him up the watch.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. On the 14th of March Sullivan pawned this watch with me for 37s.

WILLIAM FRAZIER . I keep a public-house in Brick-lane. I have known the prisoner about seven years - he frequented a house which I formerly kept; he came to me on the 14th of March, and requested this watch might be pawned; it was sent by Sullivan, my pot-boy.

JAMES SULLIVAN . I pawned this watch at Sowerby's, by the prisoner's desire; I gave my master 1l., and the rest of the change to the prisoner.

JOHN COLE . I am a pay-serjeant of the 4th company of Grenadier Guards. The prisoner belonged to that company - it was his duty to be in barracks, unless he had leave of absence, every night; he was absent from the 11th of March till the 16th - he did not sleep there; on his coming to barracks on the 16th, he was apprehended; I had paid him something on account on the 10th or 11th - it did not exceed 2s.; only 1s. or 2s. was due when he absented himself; Griffin was employed under the quarter-master, to clean the officers things, and wait on them, for which he had extra advantages - I knew he had saved money.

Cross-examined. Q.Was he paid in money or advantages? A. I cannot say; but he received full pay from me - he was quartered out of barracks; I saw him the day after this happened, and he stated that his watch had been obtained, and pawned against his consent - he did not tell me of his being knocked down, but he reported it at the order-room; I was not present.

THOMAS MOORE . I am the prisoner and prosecutor's comrade. I got into their company about twelve o'clock at noon, at the North Pole, where Griffin was quartered - we went from there in a coach to the Greycoat Boy, with another comrade; there was a dispute there between Griffin, me, and the prisoner - blows passed between us, and a pane of glass was broken; Griffin's watch was left as security; he took it off his neck directly after - I left them in the house between six and seven o'clock, and saw no more; I had not seen any money lent to the prisoner -I was sensible when I left; I went to another public-house, got washed, and went to my barracks.

Cross-examined. Q. If sensible, you can tell who began to quarrel first? A.Griffin and me - it was between us all three; I began to quarrel with Griffin, and the prisoner took his part - Griffin did not tell me next morning that he had been knocked down, and robbed of five sovereigns.

The prisoner, in a long Defence, stated that he had been to several public-houses with the prosecutor, and drank a considerable quantity of beer and spirits; that they afterwards went to St. Ann's-lane with Moore and two girls; a scuffle ensued at the Greycoat Boy, and the window and blind were broken - Moore had knocked the prosecutor down, and a gentleman told him (the prisoner) to take care of his watch, which he took off his neck, and gave to the landlord to mind, that they then returned to St. Ann's-lane, when the prosecutor sent him to fetch the watch; he pulled out his purse, and a sovereign and a half fell on the ground, and he gave him 3s. to pay the landlord for the window, telling him to say he was in the tilt guardroom, and could not come himself; that on returning to St. Ann's-lane, he was told the prosecutor had been turned out of the house, and had fallen down in the street, and that he pawned the watch, intending to redeem it as soon as he could.

LEWIS FOY . I belong to the 4th regiment. I was in the guard-room when the prosecutor was brought in by a corporal, very much in liquor, and dirty; he fell down in the guard-room, and there he lay - he said nothing about being knocked down, and robbed; but in the morning, when he was sober, he said he had lost some money, and wished to send for Moore, to know if he knew any thing about it - he said nothing about the prisoner.

SAMUEL CLARKE . I was in the guard-room about an hour after Griffin was brought in - he was then laying there, very much in liquor; we could make nothing of him; I saw no marks of violence on his head - he was laying on my bed next morning, and said he had lost some money, but did not know where, and he wished to send for Moore, to know if he knew any thing about it - he said nothing about the prisoner.

WILLIAM GUMMER . I was in the guard-room - the prosecutor was very much in liquor, and in a very dirty state; he said he had lost some money; I asked if he knew where he had lost it; he said he did not know whether he had left it any where, or what had become of it - I asked him again next morning, when sober; he then said he did

not know - he never told me he had been robbed; I asked if he had any suspicion of any body; he said he had not, and desired me to go to the station where he had been the day before, and inquire if he had left his money any where.

ISAAC SCHOFIELD . I am in the 1st Regiment. I saw the prosecutor come in in the evening - he was very much intoxicated, and said he had lost his money; I asked where; he said he did not know - I asked nothing further that evening, as he was so much in liquor; but in the morning he said he did not know where his watch or money were.

ROBERT LEGG . I was in the guard-room, and heard the prosecutor say he had lost his money, but did not know where - I questioned him next morning, when he was on Clark's bed; he said he did not know where he was, or where he lost it - there were no marks of violence about him; he said nothing about a man and woman picking him up - he was punished for being drunk.

JAMES COOPER re-examined. I was present when the prisoner came to redeem the watch - he was charged 2s. for repairing the blinds, which he seemed to think too much - he went to the carpenter, came back, and gave me 2s.; he paid 5s. in all.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-63

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

759. JOHN BANNISTER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Hawkett , on the 17th of March , and stealing 20lbs. of bacon, value 10s.; 3 gowns, value 3l.; 1 shirt, value 2s. 6d.; 2 gownbodies, value 3s.; 1 apron, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 9s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 tippet, value 10d.; 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 pair of breeches, value 5s. , his property.

SARAH HAWKETT . I am the wife of Samuel Hawkett , and live in a cottage at Stanwell-moor . On the 17th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out with my sister - I locked the door, and left the windows quite fast, leaving nobody in the house; my husband was gone to work - I and my sister-in-law went to the Anchor, about a quarter of a mile from our house, to see her off to Uxbridge - while waiting there, a man, who I did not know, brought in the body of a silk dress, which I knew to be mine - he said he had met two men with large bundles, and had picked that up; I immediately went home, and found a pane of glass taken out of my kitchen window, on the ground floor - the window had been opened, and closed again; the door was still locked - I unlocked it, went in, and missed these articles; the bacon was a small bit, which had been cut off a flitch.

WILLIAM PIGRUM . I am a constable of Hamptonwick, which is eight or nine miles from the prosecutor's, On the 18th of March I apprehended the prisoner at Hampton-wick, at work as a carpenter at a gentleman's -I searched his house with Newman, and found a small bit of bacon; we also searched the house of a man, named Cramp, a very little distance from the prisoner's house, and found some dresses in his box - we did not apprehend him - I searched for him afterwards, but he has absconded; I do not know whether he was acquainted with the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you have been ever since endeavouring to find Cramp? A. I have.

THOMAS EDWARD NEWMAN . I produce the bacon, which has been in my custody ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe there was some more bacon there? A. Yes, a small piece thinner.

RICHARD WILLIAM COKE . I am a constable. I produce a piece of bacon, which I have brought from the prosecutor's, to compare with what Newman found at the prisoner's; I have not a doubt of its belonging to the same piece.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known the prisoner long? A.Five years - I never knew any thing disreputable of him.

ANN GREEN . My husband keeps the public-house at Stanwell, which Mrs. Hawkett came to with her sister-in-law - a man brought in a piece of silk - I had seen two men together, about an hour and a half before at the door in the road - they did not stop to have refreshment; they had nothing with them - it was before Mrs. Hawkett came; I did not see which way they went; I am sure the prisoner was one of them - he came into the house, and asked how I did; I knew him before.

Cross-examined. Q. He had been in the habit of coming to your house? A. Yes, several years ago; he did not stay on this occasion.

SARAH HAWKETT . This appears to be part of the bacon I lost; it fits exactly with what was left behind - in our absence my brother had cut off a small rasher, but some part corresponds now; here is a piece I have brought from home, which corresponds with it - the dresses and things found at Cramp's are ours.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw that bacon till it was produced at the Magistrate's - I understand since, that it was brought to my house by somebody.

RICHARD W. COKE . I know the prisoner and Cramp have been fellow-workmen.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-64

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

760. WILLIAM LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 16 hooks, value 20s.; 1 handle of a jack, value 18d.; 1 laper, value 2s.; 12lbs. of twine, value 10s., and 1 bag, value 3d., the goods of Robert Elam ; and 1 cap, value 1s. , the goods of George Elam .

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am a Policeman of Hoxton. On the 3rd of March, at half-past ten o'clock, I met the prisoner in Harris-place, Hackney-road, carrying a sack - I stopped him, and asked what was in it; he said some rope, and that it belonged to his brother, who had been at work at Well-street - I took him to the station, and found he had one bag within another; I found a cap and a piece of candle concealed in his hat - the bag contained the articles stated in the indictment.

ROBERT ELAM . I am a rope-maker , and live in Shoreditch. I have known the prisoner some time - he is a shoe-maker ; I did not miss this property till Thomas produced it to me - these sixteen hooks are mine, and what we make ropes with; here is also a handle of a jack, and a bundle of twine - I saw them all safe on the evening of the 3rd of March, and next morning they were gone; one of the bags is mine.

GEORGE ELAM . This cap is mine - I lost it on the 3rd of March, from a cupboard.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Well-street, and was overtaken by a young man, who asked if I would earn 6d. to carry these things - he said, "If any body meets you, say I am your brother;" I said, "That is a curious thing too;" he said, "I dare say nobody will meet you, but if master does, say I am your brother;" he ran away directly the Policeman stopped me - he gave me the cap to put into my hat, to carry the parcel on my head with.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Months .

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18310407-65

761. RICHARD CORNELIUS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 trunk, value 2s.; 5 sheets, value 8s.; 6 pillow-cases, value 4s.; 4 shirts, value 8s.; 3 collars, value 1s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 1 night-cap, value 3d.; 1 gown-body, value 6d.; 1 cravat, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Charles Smith .

JAMES PRICE . I am servant at the Saracen's Head, Friday-street . On the 28th of February, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come from the tap-door into the yard - my master's chaise was opposite the tap-door; the prisoner got under the horse's head, went on the other side of the chaise, and took this box out of the chaise, in which it laid, with a cord round it; he went away with it on his shoulder, as quick as possible - I went after him: he turned down Friday-street -I did not lose sight of him; I overtook him in the arms of the constable, who stopped him as he turned the corner, as I was following him, calling Stop thief! I saw him throw the box down in Friday-street - I afterwards saw it opened- it contained the articles stated in the indictment; they belong to Mr. Charles Smith and his family.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has your master any other Christian name? A. No - he is a builder ; the prisoner turned a corner, but I was as quick round as him, and did not lose sight of him - he was not more than a yard from me; I was about two yards from him when he took the box - he threw it down about a hundred yards from the chaise; I could not seize him the moment he took it - he was on the opposite side of the chaise, and I had slippers on.

BENJAMIN WILKINSON . I am a porter, and live in Great Trinity-lane. About ten minutes to nine o'clock I was under the gateway of the Saracen's Head, and saw the prisoner walk past me very quick, with a box on his left shoulder - I heard a person call Stop thief! turned round, looked towards where he was running, and saw him fling the box off his shoulder; I took it up, took it to the yard, and afterwards to the watch-house, where I saw the prisoner, and was quite sure he was the man who threw it down.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. No; he went rather fast - I could see his face; he had a coloured neckcloth, and oval gilt buttons on his coat - I am quite sure of that; I cannot say the colour of his coat; it was similar to the one he has on, I am certain - he might be a minute under my observation; there was a gas-light in the yard, about twenty yards from where he passed me- I will swear to the colour of his coat; there was also a lamp in the street.

SAMUEL ALBURY . I am a constable. I was in Watling-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I stood there for a moment, and the prisoner came running round the corner - nobody was running before him; the patrol were pursuing him - several persons stopped him, and took him to the watch-house; Price gave charge of him for taking the trunk out of Smith's chaise - it was brought to the watch-house by Wilkinson.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the prisoner turning round, as if to go to the persons who were crying Stop thief? A. No - he had a dark handkerchief on, a green one, not black, and he had a green coat.

JAMES PRICE . This is my master's box, and his initials are on all the things - they are marked C. H. S.; I believe his wife's name is Hannah - I cannot swear that.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear his name is not Charles Henry ? A. I will - the H. is for his wife's Christian name; I will swear her name is Hannah - I recollect I have seen her sign her name Hannah within these twelve months.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that as he passed a waggon in Friday-street, he heard something fall on the other side of the way: he heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a man running, whom he followed, and was taken when he turned the corner.

MR. PHILLIPS to SAMUEL ALBURY . Q. How far was he from the corner when you took him? A. He might be twenty yards - I did not see Price at that time; the patrol came up first, and said, "That is the man;" I took him to the watch-house - Price came there, and gave him in charge; I understand that as soon as he saw him in my arms, he turned round to look for the box.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-66

762. ANN KEATING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 watch, value 3l. 18s.; 1 chain, value 9d.; 1 seal, value 1s., and 1 key, value 3d., the goods of Caleb Dawson , from his person .

CALEB DAWSON . I am a carpenter , and live in Lower Northampton-street, Clerkenwell. On the 27th of February, after two o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in Cow-lane; I was sober - I had been with some friends, but was not insensible; I had not drank to excess - the prisoner was a stranger: she stopped me in Cow-lane, and asked me to accompany her home, which I refused - she walked with me to West-street; I desired her to leave me, but she wished me to go up a narrow turning, and I went just under a gateway, but refused going further with her; I was not there above a minute or two - a watchman came and said we must walk on; I told her to go her way, and I would go mine, but she would go the same way as me - she walked by my side to West-street ; I was a few steps before her, and on turning my head I suddenly missed her- I then felt, and missed my watch from my fob; there had been nobody but her near me - I looked about, and a watchman, seeing me agitated, asked what was the matter; I told him - he ran, and told me to wait where I was; he returned, and told me the prisoner was at the watch-house - I found her there with my watch; I took so little notice of her, I could not swear she was the same woman, had she not got my watch - I did not recollect her features or her person; I stated the maker's name and number before I saw the watch.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Who were the friends you had been with? A. I was with various shopmates, at a public-house in Park-street, at the foot of Southwark-bridge - it was a supper; I went there about eight o'clock - we supped at nine: a pot of porter passed round; there were about a dozen of us - I cannot say how many pots were drank; I drank nothing at supper but porter; and after that a glass of brandy and a glass of gin and water, nothing else; I swear that is all I had - I left the house about a quarter to two o'clock, and was sober enough to know what I was about; I could have made the woman go away if I had been inclined, but she pressed me to go under the gateway - I am not a bachelor; I was not more than two minutes under the gateway, as I suppose - we were doing nothing but chatting; she was pulling me about, but not I her - I did not say I had no money; nor that if she could find a house I would deposit my watch till morning; I did not feel her take it - the watchman came up almost immediately I missed it; the gateway is between King-street and West-street, but there is a turning leading into Smithfield before you get into West-street - I met the watchman in West-street; I was not in any court with her except the gateway, which leads out of King-street into West-street, I believe, but I was never through there - I turned out of my way to go there, but was not willing to go; she pulled me by my clothes - I swear nothing happened in the gateway; she had the watch grasped in her hand at the watch-house, and said I had given it to her, but I deny it.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am a watchman - my beat is between West-street and King-street, which was formerly called Cow-lane. About a quarter-past two o'clock I saw the prisoner and prosecutor in company between King-street and West-street, against the wall - I ordered them away; the man said, "You go your way and I'll go mine," but both went towards Cow-lane, and I saw no more till I called half-past two o'clock - I then saw them in West-street, at the corner of Phoenix-court, in West-street; I passed them - the man had been drinking, but could walk well enough: I said nothing to them then, because they were off my beat, but before I got round to John's-court, my inspector came running, and saying "Where is that woman gone?" I did not see the prosecutor then, not till he got to the watch-house; I found the prisoner in a privy about one hundred yards from Phoenix-court, with the watch in her hand - she asked me where her friend was, and said he had given her the watch; I told her he was near at hand, and took her to the watch-house - she never loosed it out of her hand till she got there, and said again at the watch-house, that he had given it to her for an improper purpose; I do not recollect what he said.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were they together about your beat? A. Why, half an hour or more - she would not give the watch up till it was taken from her; she told me all the way along that he gave it to her, and pointed him out as her friend.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-67

763. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Lockington St. Laurence Bunn , from his person .

LOCKINGTON ST. LAURENCE BUNN. I live at the Assay-office, in Hatton-garden. On the 1st of April, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was going through Smithfield-market to Barbican, and missed my handkerchief a little past St. John-street - I am certain it was safe half a minute before, in my outside coat pocket; I did not feel my coat move, but I usually swing my arm in walking, and on touching my pocket missed my handkerchief; there was nobody near me but the prisoner - I turned round, and seized him by the collar; I found the handkerchief concealed in the breast of his coat - he said a little boy had picked my pocket, and ran out there, pointing, but nobody could be seen; it is quite a new silk handkerchief.

THOMAS CUST . I am a constable. I was in Smithfield, and received the prisoner in charge with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking just behind the gentleman; two young lads were behind him - they ran back as soon as they took the handkerchief, and dropped it- I took it up, put it into my pocket, and walked by the gentleman's side, which I should not have done if I had picked his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-68

764. THOMAS JOHNSON and JAMES TAYLOR were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 cap, value 5s., the goods of Joseph Nelson , from the person of James Powell .

CHARLOTTE NELSON . I am the wife of Joseph Nelson , and live in Coleman-street-buildings . James Powell is the son of a friend, and was brought up with my children. On the 12th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock, he was playing about the door with my children, with a cap on belonging to one of my sons, as I could not find his own; he ran in crying, and saying a boy had taken his cap - he is four years old; I ran out, but have never seen it since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How old is your child? A. Six years; I am quite sure it was not Powell's cap - there were about a dozen children playing about.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I live in Swan-alley, with my father, who has been a constable. I saw Powell, about eleven o'clock, about one door from Mr. Nelson's, playing with other children; I saw Johnson take the cap off Powell's head, and give it to Taylor, who wrapped it up in his apron, and ran away; I did not follow him, but went in and told Mrs. Allen, at No. 1, Swan-alley, just round the corner; I knew Johnson lived in a court by the National schools, in Chiswell-street - I saw him in his own house about half-past one o'clock, and told Allen, the constable; he called me up stairs, and asked if he was the boy -I said Yes, and he took him; Johnson took us to Taylor's house, and I knew him to be the boy who received the cap- it was a seal-skin cap; it has not been found - I am sure I saw Johnson take it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the prisoners play-fellows of your's? A. No; the prisoners and two others were hanging over one-another's shoulders, not at play - Taylor kept close to Johnson; he did not touch the boy himself - he was standing still, looking at the child - I never played

with them, but I had seen Johnson, and knew his name; I never spoke to him - I never said I was not sure Taylor was the boy who had the cap; I spoke to a man at the door of this Court - I told him I knew Taylor did not take it, but Johnson took it, and Taylor wrapped it in his apron; the man spoke to me: I am fifteen years old - my father was a constable, but has been removed; I have spoken to no young woman about it, nor to any boy.

JAMES ALLEN . I am a constable, and live ten or twelve doors from Mr. Nelson, in Great Swan-alley. About half-past twelve o'clock my wife informed me what Herdsfield had stated - I went out, and found the boy had lost his cap; Herdsfield said Johnson had taken it, and another one had received it, and he knew where one lived - he took me to No. 3, Reynold's-court; Herdsfield was at the bottom of the stairs - I went up, found Johnson, and said, "You have robbed a boy of his cap;" he denied it - I called Herdsfield up; he said, "That is the boy who took the cap off the child's head, but another boy received it;" I said, "What boy was it?" Johnson went with me to Taylor's, thirty or forty yards off, and Herdsfield said that was the boy who received it - they both denied it; the cap has not been found.

Cross-examined. Q. How soon after you had the information did you go to Johnson? A. In about an hour and a half - I did not search for the cap.

Taylor's Defence. I have witnesses to prove it was a quarter-past eleven o'clock when they came to Johnson's house.

JESSE TAYLOR . I am a plasterer. I have been talking to Herdsfield to-day about this case, and he said he was not certain that Taylor was the boy who received the cap.

COURT. Q. Are you any relation of Taylor's? A. His brother - I asked if the case of the cap was coming on this afternoon; he said he expected it was - I asked how he thought the prisoners would get on; he said he rather expected my brother would get acquitted, because he could not say positively he was the boy who received the cap, as there were four of them in company - I asked if he could swear positively to my brother, and he said he could not; he did not tell me any thing more, or that he saw it taken by any body - I did not ask him.

JOHN ANGUS . I heard Jessee Taylor talking to Herdsfield, and heard him say he was not certain Taylor was the boy who received the cap, as there were three or four boys together.

COURT. Q. How came you here? A. I was in company with Taylor - I know Herdsfield was a witness for the prosecution; he was not asked in my hearing if he had seen it taken from any body - he was not asked if the boy had had the cap taken from him; I am a paper-atainer, and live in Long-alley - Taylor's brother called on me today, and I came here with him to bear him company.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-69

765. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 pair of trousers, value 12s. , the goods of Nathaniel Dawson .

NATHANIEL DAWSON . I am a clothier , and live in Cornhill . On the 30th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw these trousers about a yard within my doorway - I was sent for about nine, and found the prisoner in custody with them; I saw them in possession of the officer that night, and am certain they are mine - my privatemark is on them; they had not been sold.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a jeweller. I was standing at Mr. Lake's door, in the Minories, where I live, and saw the prisoner come by; he had got nothing then - I had seen him several nights following gentlemen, and I followed him up the Minories, down Lombard-street, as far as Mr. Dawson's shop, and saw him aiming at something inside the door - I saw him suatch the trousers from inside the shop, and run up a court at the corner; I ran up the court after him, and brought him back to Mr. Dawson's with the trousers under his arm - a constable was sent for, and took him; I am sure he is the person - there were two more in his company, who ran away directly they saw me run up the court.

Prisoner. Q.Did you find the trousers in my possession? A. I did.

Prisoner. A young man collared me, and the trousers laid in a door-way - he told the young gentleman to pick them up; he said I went up the court, put my arm round, and took them. Witness. I saw him take them - he did not drop them; they were in his possession till I took him into Dawson's shop - I never gave any other account of it than I have now.

RICHARD SAMUEL EDE . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - Smith came and made the same charge against him as he has now.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My mother was very ill - I went over the water to my aunt, and as I returned I passed this unfortunate place, and saw the trousers lay in a door-way; this gentleman came, attacked me, and called to another, who he said was his shopmate, to take the trousers up off the floor, which he did - I have no friends, therefore they impose on me by saying what is wrong.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-70

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, APRIL 8.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

766. JOHN BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 pair of scales, value 5s. , the goods of Benjamin Barber .

BENJAMIN BARBER . I live in Great Chapel-street, Soho , and keep a little shop . On the evening of the 15th of February, a little before seven o'clock, I was in the parlour behind the shop, but I did not hear the door go - these scales were taken from my counter; I had seen them safe five minutes before - they were brought back by the Police-officer: my house is one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards from Queen-street - there is one of the chains broken, and tied with a bit of string, by which I know they are mine.

JOHN FERNS . I am a Police-constable. On Tuesday evening, the 15th of February, I was in Queen-street a little before seven o'clock - I saw the prisoner run past me; I heard something chink as he passed me - I pursued him to the corner of Greek-street, where I took him with the scales, which he was then tying up in his apron; he said he picked them up in Soho-square - I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going from Osnaburg-street to Soho-square, and picked up these scales; I put them into my apron, and the officer asked what I had got - I told him I had picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-71

767. THOMAS BAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 painting, value 30s. , the goods of Samuel Lee .

SAMUEL LEE . I live in Down-street, Piccadilly , and deal in foreign china and prints . On Monday morning, the 14th of March, I went out about ten o'clock - I returned a little before eleven, and missed a picture which had hang up in my shop, within reach of my door - I have one window taken out, and a person on the step of the private door might reach to where this picture had hung.

GEORGE MACKEY . I am shop-boy to Mr. John Wells , a pawnbroker, in Broad-street, St. Giles'. I have a painting brought by the prisoner on the 14th of March, about half-past one o'clock, for 5s., in the name of Thomas Harris - I am quite sure the prisoner is the person; he asked 1l. for it, and said it belonged to himself.

Prisoner. I never pawned that picture with you. Witness. Yes, you did.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure you saw him? A. Yes - he was five or ten minutes in the shop; I was writing the duplicates - I have the counterpart of the duplicate; I had not seen him before.

JOSEPH COLE . I am a Police-serjeant. On Friday evening, the 18th of March, I apprehended the prisoner-I searched him at Marylebone office; I found on him a pocket-book with a number of duplicates in it, and among them is the duplicate of this picture.

GEORGE MACKEY . This is the one I gave.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. That is my book, and was in my possession - about half-past one o'clock, on the 9th of March, I picked up this bag, which I have here, with these duplicates in it.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Reference Number: t18310407-72

768. THOMAS BAIN was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 dial, value 4l. , the goods of William Stiles .

WILLIAM STILES . I live in Tottenham-court-road , and am a silversmith . On the evening of the 17th of March I missed this eight-day dial from my shop - I saw it safe near six o'clock, and missed it soon afterwards; it has my name and address on it - it is worth 4l.; I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Messrs. Young and Luxmore, pawnbrokers, in St. Martin's-lane. I have an eight-day dial, which I took in pawn on the 17th of March, of the prisoner, about seven o'clock in the evening; I lent 1l. 10s. on it - I asked where he got it; he said he had made it for Mr. Stiles, whose name was upon it, but he was not within, and he would take it out again when he was within - I have not the least doubt of the prisoner's person; this is the counterpart of the duplicate I gave him.

JOSEPH COLE . I took the prisoner on the 18th of March, about seven o'clock - I found on him this duplicate of the dial.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had it in my possession, nor saw it before - this prosecutor was convicted here himself twelve months ago.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Transported for Seven Years for each Offence .

Reference Number: t18310407-73

769. HENRY BRUFT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 2 smelling-bottles, value 7s. , the goods of Samuel Gale .

FREDERICK SPURGIN . I am an assistant to Mr. Samuel Gale - he lives in Judd-place, St. Pancras , and is a chemist and druggist . In the afternoon of the 28th of March the prisoner came, with another boy - they asked the price of colt's-foot lozenges; I told them, and they went away; they returned again, and asked whether we made a half-penny worth of tamarinds - I said we did not; they went out; I looked into the glass-case on the counter, and missed two smelling-bottles - I rang the bell for young Mr. Gale to come down, and I went after them; I overtook them about fifty yards from the shop, in the New-road; I took hold of the prisoner first, and told them to come back with me - I then took hold of the other, and the prisoner ran off; I ran after him, and caught him - these two smelling-bottles were found on him; they are my employer's, and had been in the glass-case.

Prisoner. That gentleman cannot swear to the bottles but by the price being inside. Witness. One is marked 5s. inside, and the other C.D. and 2s. 9d., in young Mr. Gale's writing.

JAMES SIBLEY . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and found these two bottles on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the other boy; but as I came up to the shop, he told me to go and ask the price of the lozenges, which we did; he then asked me to go for some tamarinds, which we did - when we came out, and got some distance, he showed me these bottles, and told me to carry them for him.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310407-74

770. ESTHER COX was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Watson ; and EDMUND BUCKLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM RETFORD . I am a Police-constable. On Sunday, the 13th of March, I was on duty in Kingsland-road - I saw Buckley with a bundle; I spoke to him; he said he had a bottle and a sheet in the bundle - I told him to open it; he put it into my hands; I found in it an empty bottle and a sheet - I have the sheet, but he threw the bottle into the road, and broke it - he said he got the bottle from a person named Waters, in Church-street, Newington, but the sheet was his own, and he had lent it to a person - I asked if there were any marks on it; he said he did not know; I looked, and found a W. on it - I asked his name; he said Buckley; I said that did not correspond with his name, and I should take him - he ran off, but I pursued, and took him; he said he had a wife over at Walworth, and she knew whether there was a mark on the sheet.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.Did not he

say his wife knew more about the linen than he did? A. Yes; he did not object to my seeing the bundle - he told me to open it; I inquired at Church-street, Newington, and could not find such a person.

JOSEPH MELLISH . I am a Police-serjeant. In consequence of information I went to Mason-street, Lambeth, on the 22nd of March - I did not find Cox that day; but I went to a house in the same street the next day, and found her concealed in a closet; I said I had a charge against her for stealing a sheet belonging to her employer, and I told her she was charged with being concerned with a person named Buckley; she said she did not know any thing about the sheet, or of such a person; I asked if her name was Esther Cox - she said it was not; I took her to the station-house, and on the way she said if I would not say any thing, she would tell; I cautioned her not to say any thing to me, for I should have to tell that before the Magistrate - she then said she had been led astray, and had taken the sheet.

Cross-examined. Q. How was she concealed? A. In a cupboard, in the further end of it, and the door was shut - I had not been at that house the day before, but I had been close to it, and inquired in the neighbourhood.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. Buckley was brought to our office, and was examined - he gave directions, and I went to No. 4, Church-street, Newington, but I could not find Esther Cox there; there were several No. 4's -I afterwards found she had lived at the fourth of some large houses, at Mr. Watson's.

MARY ELIZABETH WATSON . I am the wife of Joseph Watson - we live in Church-street, Newington; Cox was eight months in my service - my property was in her care, and she kept some trifling accounts of money for me. This sheet is my husband's, and is worth 4s. or 5s.; I gave Cox leave to go out on the 18th of March, but I did not miss this sheet till the officer came.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-75

771. GEORGE MAYHEW was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 7 yards of carpet, value 5s. , the goods of John Bovey .

JOHN BOVEY . I keep a coffee-shop in New Compton-street, Soho . The prisoner lodged near seven weeks with me, and left me about the 22nd or 23rd of March - he paid me, and told me he was going to leave his lodging; on the day after he left, one of the lodgers told me the carpet was gone - I looked, and missed it; this is it; I saw it in possession of the pawnbroker.

HARRIET RANWELL . I am the wife of William Ranwell , a tailor, he lives in Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields, On the 18th of March the prisoner came and brought this carpet, which he desired me to pawn for him - he said he had had it made a present to him by a housemaid, a married woman, whom he knew; I pawned it with Mr. Edgar for 3s. 6d., which I gave to the prisoner - I then said, "Shall I put it into my drawer for you?" he said"Yes," and I gave it to Mr. Bovey.

EDWARD PURCELL . I am an apprentice to Mr. Edgar, a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane. I took in this carpet from the witness for 3s. 6d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I only had two days work that week, and I took it with the intention of making it good again the following week, but I had no work - I have not had an opportunity of making it good since.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-76

772. WILLIAM TINGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 15 penny-pieces , the monies of John Alexander Cox , his master.

JOHN ALEXANDER COX . I deal in coals and potatoes , and live in Broad-street, Ratcliff . The prisoner was in my employ for the last twelve months, and for the last few months he slept in my house - my wife was confined about a month before he was taken, and in consequence of that he slept in my room; on Sunday night, the 20th of February, his bed and mine were about half a yard from each other, but he put his clothes on one side of his bed, and I mine on the other side - on the Monday morning I got up about half-past six o'clock, and between eight and nine I examined my trousers pockets, and then found but 14s. 6d. in them - I knew I had 16s. 6d. in them the night before; I had taken 3s. or 4s. that morning, so that I should have had about 1l. in my pocket; in consequence of this, I marked fifteen or sixteen penny-pieces, which I put into a desk in my room below, with some others - there were 4s. worth put up in shilling piles, and five over, all penny-pieces - seventeen of them were marked; four in cash of the shilling piles, and one in the 5d.; I locked my desk, put the key into my pocket, and the next morning, between six and seven o'clock, I went to it again - I found it locked; the key of the room in which the desk was had been in my sister-in-law's possession; the door had been double locked that night - on opening the desk I missed fifteen or sixteen penny-pieces, and five or six of them were those I had marked; the prisoner could not have got to that room in the night, but in the daytime he frequently had his meals there; he could not have got the key of the desk; I never left it unlocked - when I missed the money, I sent for Mr. Wayling, the officer; he searched the prisoner, found some copper money on him, and among the rest three penny-pieces, which I could swear to - he also found some silver, and eight sovereigns on him; I have a stable to my house; I saw the officer find some copper between the joists and the brick-work, and among them two which I could speak to, as I had marked them - the prisoner was almost always in that stable; I allowed him 4s. a week with board and lodging; he could not have saved these eight sovereigns - I suppose I have lost 40l. in all; I have lost form 1s. 6d. to 8s. or 10s. a day; when the prisoner had been with me some months, he purchased a seal of me, for which he was go give me a guinea, and he agreed to pay me 1s. a week; he paid me the first week, and the second week he gave me a sovereign; I asked where he got it, and he said some person had paid him some money.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Who kept the key of the room the desk was in? A. My sister-in-law, but I kept the key of the desk; the prisoner used to go out with my horse and cart, and carry out goods - he very rarely paid money for me; I do not know that he ever did - he has received money; my desk has not been

left open for three or four months, as I had lost so much money - I think no one but the prisoner and myself had access to the stable; it was not locked, but no one could go to it without going through the shop.

COURT. Q. You did not put the penny-pieces on the rafters? A. No.

JAMES WAYLING . I am a Thames Police-constable. I went with Mr. Cox to his house on the 22nd of February; I took the prisoner into custody - I went into the stable, and there told him to empty his pockets, and produce what he had about him; he pulled out two half-crowns, a sixpence, and six penny-pieces - three of them had a cross on the head, as Cox had described to me before I got to the house; I asked the prisoner how he came by them, and he said he had taken them at different public-houses, but he could not tell where - I then asked if he had any thing else about him; he said No, but I searched, and found a small lump in some black stuff - I found in it eight sovereigns; he said they were what he had saved from his wages - I then searched the stable, and on one of the rafters I found a watch; I asked if that was his - he said Yes, and alongside the watch I found ten penny-pieces: I asked if they were his - he said they were, and two of them were marked as Mr. Cox had described; I asked the prisoner how he got them - he said at different public-houses; I then searched his box, and found plenty of good clothes, another watch, and a new dressing-case, which I am confident cost 30s.

Cross-examined. Q. Did his master claim the dressing-case or the sovereigns? A. No. I found plenty of keys on the prisoner, but none that fitted the desk - I had to hunt to find the penny-pieces; he made no hesitation in producing the sovereigns.

JURY to MR. COX. Q. Did you mark these penny-pieces yourself? A. Yes, in the presence of my sister - they are all marked in the same way, with a cross; they have been in the possession of the officer ever since he took them: I can safely take my oath this is the money I marked - I never paid the prisoner any money that I had marked; I never marked any before - they were all marked on the head side, but I have not had them since.

COURT. Q.What money did you miss from the desk? A.Sixteen penny-pieces, I think.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

The prisoner received a good character, and one witness engaged to take him into his employ at the expiration of his imprisonment.

Reference Number: t18310407-77

773. RICHARD WAGSTAFF was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 17lbs. weight of flour, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Jelly , his master.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS JELLY . I am a baker , and live at Enfield . -The prisoner came into my service as journeyman in 1826, and had been with me between four and five years - in consequence of information I searched my premises on the 8th of March, and found a bag of flour in the hay-loft, which, with the bag, weighed 17 1/2lbs.: I wrote my name on a piece of an old post-office bill, and either I or Mr. Leach put it into the bag; I then tied it up again, and my brother-in-law gave notice to the Bow-street patrol - I afterwards saw the bag of flour, with my ticket in it, in about half an hour - the flour was worth 3s.

Q.After the prisoner was in custody did he send for you? A. Yes, and in consequence of an answer I sent, he came to me in the office, before the Magistrate came; he asked me to forgive him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you promised to forgive him? A. No; I had had no conversation with him - I cannot swear to the flour or the bag - I believe it is mine.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Repeat, as nearly as you can, the words he used? A. He came into the office, and said,"Master, I hope you will forgive me;" I said, "Richard, how can you expect that after the hundreds of pounds you have robbed me of?" he then turned about, and made no answer.

RICHARD WATKINS . I am a horse-patrol of Bow-street. I was stationed at Enfield, and in consequence of information, about ten o'clock in the morning of the 8th of March, I watched the prisoner when he left his master's premises; he had a cart with him - when he had got a short distance I took him into custody, and searched the cart; I found the bag of flour at the bottom of it, under some straw, where it appeared to be concealed - the prisoner did not say a word; I showed the bag to Mr. Jelly - I found a small piece of paper in it, with Mr. Jelly's name on it.

Cross-examined. Q. He was going along the street? A. Yes, and seemed surprised when I found it.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. JELLY. Q.Had any body access to this loft? A.Nobody had any busines there but the prisoner - it was over the stable; the door was not kept locked - I have trusted the prisoner to collect King's taxes, and was well satisfied with him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Had you a servant named Rogers? A. Yes; he did not make any communication to me; my wife did the evening before, and in consequence of that the search was made. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-78

774. SAMUEL HARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Phineas Coyne .

PHINEAS COYNE . I live in Manchester-street, Manchester-square. On the afternoon of the 1st of March I was in the Regent's-park , and the prisoner was pointed out to me - I saw my handkerchief in the breast of his jacket; I had had it in my pocket a short time before - I believe this is it - I could not swear positively to it; I have a dozen such, but they are not marked - I lost one on that day; I had not used it for a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes.

GEORGE JOHNSON . I saw the prisoner and another person go up behind the prosecutor and pick his pocket of the handkerchief, which the prisoner put into the breast pocket of his jacket.

Prisoner's Defence. He did not see me take the handkerchief - I was in Argyle-street, and saw it laying there; I picked it up, and put it into my pocket - the gentleman caught hold of me; another boy ran away.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character, and engaged to take him into his service.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310407-79

775. THOMAS MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 1 portmantean, value 10s.; 1 dress, value 3l.; 2 shawls, value 6l.; 1 ring, value 5l.; 4 pairs of ear-rings, value 2l.; 1 chain, with an eye-glass, value 3l.; 6 collars, value 2l. 16s.; 8 handkerchiefs, value 30s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 1l.; 1 pair of stays, value 10s.; 3 caps, value 30s.; 2 fronts of hair, value 14s.; 1 gown, value 10s.; 1 box, value 1s.; 10 sovereigns, and 1 half sovereign , the property of Mary Bliss Slater , widow .

MARY BLISS SLATER . I am a widow, and live in Upper Gower-street, Bedford-square - I came to town on the 16th of March, from Farringdon, by the Stroudwater coach; I had two trunks and a portmantean, which contained all the articles stated in this indictment - they were all my property, and there were three medals which were not mine - I remember a passenger getting down from the coach at Knightsbridge , and soon after the coachman got down and told me my portmanteau had been cut from the coach.

JOHN THOMAS PRATLEY . I am a Police-constable. On the night of the 16th of March I was on duty, and saw the prisoner about a quarter-past nine o'clock, in the rear of Lyons-terrace, Knightsbridge; he was coming into Knightsbridge from the fields - this was about fifty yards from where the portmantean was missed; he had nothing with him; but I saw this portmanteau against the wall in the field from which he had come - he was walking when I first saw him - I followed him; I saw a woman named Howard, who directed me in my pursuit, and I took the prisoner on the opposite side of the way, about forty yards from where I first saw him - he tried to get away from me; I laid down the portmanteau, and told Howard to mind it while I secured the prisoner, but it was in my sight all the time.

Prisoner. He said at Queen-square that it was laying across the path, and he fell over it. Witness. I did tumble over it, but it was laying against the wall - the prisoner was about five yards from it when I first saw him.

ELIZABETH HOWARD . I live at No. 2, Jeffry's-buildings, Westminster. On the night of the 16th of March I saw the prisoner run across the road from the field - the Policeman followed him; I told him which way he had gone, and saw him take him; there was a young man near the prisoner when he was stopped, and he said to the prisoner, "We are done;" the prisoner was about ten yards from the officer when I pointed out the way he had gone.

ELEANOR ARCHER . I am the wife of Henry Archer . I came up by the Stroudwater coach on the 16th of March - I was sitting on the dicky with another female; we came on beyond Hammersmith, and I felt a blow on my left side; I cannot say what time that was, nor how near it was to London - I turned round, and saw a man in a dark coat, getting off the coach with a trunk in his hand; I called to the coachman, and the coach stopped.

HENRY THOMPSON . I live in Great Turner-street, and drive the Stroudwater coach. When I got to Slonne-street, on the night in question, I heard the alarm given by the witness opposite the Foot Guard Barracks; I got down and missed Mrs. Slater's portmanteau - it had been strapped to the iron; I had seen it safe about two hundred yards back.

COURT to J. T. PRATLEY. Q. How long would it take a person to have carried it from the place the coachman speaks of, to where you found it? A. About three minutes - I did not see him nearer than two yards from it -I found no knife on him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-80

776. JAMES SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 watch-chain, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 1s., and 1 watch-key, value 2d., the goods of Lawrence Goodwin , from his person .

LAWRENCE GOODWIN . I am a labourer , and live in Chancery-court, Ratcliff-highway . On Sunday, the 6th of March, I was going along Ratcliff-highway, and within a few yards of my own place I saw the prisoner standing in the middle of an arch-way, talking to a female; I had known him by sight before, but not to speak to him - I saw a Policeman who came by, spoke to them, and parted them; the prisoner said something to the Policeman, but I do not know what; I said he had better take the Policeman's advice, and go home - I went down that arch-way to go home; the prisoner walked along-side of me - when I got to my door I bade him Good night! and said I lived in there; I had a pipe in my mouth - he asked me to give him a light; I put my hand into my trousers pocket, and took out a bit of paper to light at my pipe - while I was doing that, I did not feel it taken, but I saw him take his hand from my pocket with the watch in it; I had seen it safe not more than two or three minutes before - I gave an alarm, and followed the prisoner, who ran like lightning; I could not catch him - he was not taken till the Wednesday following.

Prisoner. This is entirely a made up piece of business. What occasion had you to take an acquaintance of your's with the officer to point me out? Witness. I took him to find where you lodged.

Prisoner. And previous to that he sent that man to me to know if I would make up the matter. Witness. There was a man came to my house this very morning, brought the watch, and gave it to my brother-in-law.

COURT. Q.Did you know the man? A. No.

JURY. Q.Is Chancery-court a thoroughfare? A. No, but he ran towards Angel-gardens.

JAMES DYKE . I was a Police-constable, but am not so now. I took the prisoner in a court in Rateliff-highway; the presecutor was with me - I had known the prisoner some time, and the moment I saw him I knew he was the man, from the prosecutor's description; he denied the charge.

JURY to LAWRENCE GOODWIN . Q.You say you did not feel your watch go from you? A. No, but I saw a watch in his hand at a very short distance from me; I was sober.

COURT. Q.Was it as if he was drawing it from your person? A. Yes, and he had a watch in his hand, just as he plunged from me.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor,

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-81

777. WILLIAM LANGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 ham, value 7s.; 5 lbs. weight of cheese, value 4s.; 5 lbs. weight of mutton, value 2s.;

part of a pie, value 6d., and 2 lbs. weight of bread, value 6d. , the goods of John Horton .

DAVID QUARY . I live in Prospect-terrace, Gray's Inn-lane, and am a milkman. On the morning of the 14th of March, a little after six o'clock, I was at the door of No. 5, Frederick-street - I saw the iron bars of the area bent up; I called the Police-officer, and we called up the gentleman - I went with the Policeman into the area and into the vanlts, where we found the prisoner in one of them, with the articles which have been described; the officer took them, and detained the prisoner.

HENRY SKINNER . I am a Police-constable. The witness called me to the area of No. 5, Frederick-street, and I went into one of the vaults, where I found the prisoner - the bam was loose, and the other things were tied up in this blue apron; the prisoner had no shoes on.

JOHN HORTON . I live at No.5, Frederick-street , and am a merchant . These articles were mine - I had seen them in the safe the day before, and they were found in one of the vaults in my area.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work a month, and saw the victuals - I was very hungry, and got down to take a little; I had been to the workhouse, and could get no relief.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-82

778. MARGARET MAITLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 10 yards of silk, value 25s. , the goods of Sarah Feast , her mistress.

The same evidence was given in this case as on the prisoner's trial in the Old Court (See page 419.) the prosecutrix not being able to identify the silk, the prisoner was, on this indictment,

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310407-83

779. HENRY PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of James Greig .

JAMES GREIG . I am a baker , and live in Clipstone-street, Marylebone . On the 2nd of April I was in the parlour behind the shop - I saw the prisoner in the shop; he asked me the way to Weymouth-street, and I directed him - he was shortly afterwards brought back with two loaves, which I knew to be mine - I know my own bread.

JAMES TURNER . I live in Upper Marylebone-street. I was a constable. On the evening in question I saw the prisoner in the prosecutor's shop: the prosecutor spoke to him, and then went into the parlour - the prisoner left the shop, returned again directly, and took the two loaves from the window - I took him back with them.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Battle-bridge, and got up behind a coach; a young man got up likewise - I said I was rather hungry; he said he would get me something to eat - he left me for about five minutes, and then put the two loaves of bread into my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-84

780. JOHN LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 wooden till, value 6d.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 2s., and 58 pence , the property of Sarah Lea .

JAMES HARVEY . On the 27th of February I was in the tap-room of the White Lion public-house, in St. Alban's-place, between two and three o'clock - I heard a noise in the bar; I got up, looked through the bar window, and saw the prisoner with this till in his hand - I went into the bar, collared him, and took the till away from him; I sent for the officer - I counted the money in his presence; there were halfpence, pence, and farthings in it, to the amount of 4s. 10d., and these spectacles - Mrs. Sarah Lea is the landlady of the house, and the property is hers; she was out - I was taking care of the house for her.

CHARLES POOLE . I am a Police-constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutrix, on account of his good character.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-85

781. ANN HIPWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 36 yards of ribbon, value 4s., and 19 yards of lace, value 19s. , the goods of James Nunn .

ELIZABETH BROWN . I am shopwoman to Mr. James Nunn , of Oxford-street . On the 8th of March the prisoner came to the shop - she asked for black ribbon, and I served her with two yards; she then asked for some wide net, but did not buy any of that - I had shown her the box, in which the lace and net were - she then asked for some lace-caps, and she bought one of them - she then asked for some lace, and bought three yards of that, out of the box I showed her - she paid me 7s. 1 1/2d. for what she bought, and went away; a short time after she was gone another customer came in, who asked for some wide net - I took down the box, and missed a piece of figured net, I think about three yards - it was in the same box as I had previously shown to the prisoner; I had not shown it to any other person - while I was serving that customer the prisoner came in again; I went to her - she said she wanted half a yard more of lace, the same as she had bought of me, as her sister said there was not enough to trim a cap - I cut off half a yard for her, and while I was doing that I saw her take two cards of lace, and put them into her pocket; I went round the counter, took hold of her and said, "You have taken two cards of lace;" she put her hand into her pocket, took out the lace, and said, "Here is your lace, I don't want to steal it;" we sent for the officer, and she was detained -I gave the lace to the officer then - there are nineteen yards of it, it is worth 19s.; they are Mr. Nunn's property.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Is this a large shop? A. A middle-sized shop; there are three young persons in it besides myself - she had a cloak on; I missed a piece of net from the box, which was the reason I left my customer to go to her - she said she was a widow, and had seven children; she gave it into my hand directly I accused her of taking it - I did not let her go, because we have lost so much - I was behind the counter when I saw her take it; I am quite sure it was in her pocket - she was forced to put her cloak on one side to get it out.

WILLIAM SHARPE . I am shopman to Mr. Nunn. I saw the witness go round the counter, and take the prisoner - she took her hand from beneath her cloak, and gave the two pieces of lace to her - I took the prisoner into the back room, and heard her ask one of the shop-women to go and get her umbrella from the shop, which she did, and gave it to her - when the Policeman came the prisoner attempted to get away, and dropped her umbrella - I took it up, and in it I found this piece of ribbon, which I know, from the marks, to be Mr. Nunn's; here is a pri

vate-mark on it, which we use in the shop - there are thirty-six yards of it, and it is worth 4s.

Cross-examined. Q.Have you known fine ladies come to your shop and take things, and you have sent their husbands a bill for them? A. No; I have heard of such things.

DANIEL LONARGAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court - I never had the lace in my pocket; I had it in my hand, and was looking to see which piece I should buy - I can assure you I never put it under my cloak.

ELIZABETH BROWN . I am quite sure she put it into her pocket.

JURY. Q.Were her hands clear before? A. Yes.

Cross-examined. Q.Have you made inquiries about her? A. Yes, but we could find no one to give her a good character, or Mr. Nunn would not have prosecuted.

GUILTY . Aged 48. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-86

782. THOMAS DEADMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 2 pairs of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of John Reed .

JOHN REED . I live in Pell-street, Marylebone , and sell second-hand shoes . On the afternoon of the 9th of March, at a quarter before three o'clock, I saw the prisoner in company with another lad about the same age - they came to my window, reached over the area, and each took a pair of shoes from a board before the window; the prisoner ran off with the shoes which he had taken - I followed, and he dropped them from his coat; I overtook and gave him in charge - he denied having done it, but I am quite sure I saw him take them; I did not lose sight of him.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a Police-officer. The prisoner was given into my custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-87

783. WILLIAM BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 watch chain, value 3d., and 2 watch keys, value 3d. , the goods of David Hewitt ; and ELIZABETH BALL was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

DAVID HEWITT . I am a journeyman baker , at No.6, Neptune-street, Rotherhithe - William Ball was my fellow-servant . On the 16th of February I missed a watch, a steel chain, and two keys, which had been hanging close by the oven's month in the bake-house; I went out at half-past nine o'clock that morning, leaving the watch safe, and the prisoner in the bake-house - I returned before eleven, and the watch was gone; Ball came home about one o'clock - I said, "William, give me my watch if you please;" he said, "I have not got it, it is in the bake-house, I suppose;" on the next day I was at work, and he told me, about three o'clock, that he would go up as far as St. Paul's, and right down to Shadwell, and see if he could find the watch - he said his master had told him to do so; on the 18th, while we were at work in the morning, he said he thought he had found the watch at Poplar - on the same morning he showed me the shop; I went and found my watch there; the pawnbroker, in my presence, asked the prisoner what his name was - he said William Ball ; on the 21st I went to the same shop alone, and in consequence of what I heard there, I told the prisoner that I should want him in the afternoon - he said very well, he would go any where with me, but he afterwards said he would not go.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. This watch used to hang up in the bake-house? A. Yes - I have said to the prisoner, when he went out, "If you want the watch, I will have it at one o'clock when you come home;" I did not say I had given him leave to use it, but not to pawn it; I have lent it to him - I might be a little irritated at what he said.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a Thames Police-constable. On the 21st of February I went with William Ball and the prosecutor to a pawnbroker in Poplar - Ball said he had walked from St. Paul's to Poplar, and had gone into every pawnbroker's; I asked how he came to Poplar - he said he met his brother with a barrow of bread, and he went with him.

JOHN OILEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Poplar. I have a silver watch, steel chain, and two keys, which were brought to my house on the 17th of February, by Elizabeth Ball - I lent 1l. on them; she said she wanted to borrow 1l. on the watch; I asked whose property it was - she said her own, that her name was Ann Smith, she was a housekeeper, and lived at No.23, Gill-street: one of my apprentices was standing at my elbow, and I desired him to make the duplicate - he put the same questions to her which I had, and she answered him precisely in the same manner; shortly afterwards William Ball came in and inquired if I had taken in a watch made by Linton, (the name on the watch is Preston) - I said I had not that day or the day before; this watch and another were laying on the mantel-shelf - he did not seem satisfied; he looked very hard at the two watches, and said one of them he thought was the one he meant; I gave it to him to look at - he did not seem quite satisfied about it; I desired him to go home, and send the person who brought it - he said it belonged to a mate of his; he mattered that he had been into every shop from St. Paul's to my house - I thought from the general appearance of Elizabeth Ball , that it was not all right, and when I could spare my apprentice, I sent him to No. 23, Gill-street, as he would know her if he saw her - he returned and said there were two No's. 23; I went myself, but could not find her - the prosecutor came on the 18th, and claimed the watch; I then again asked William Ball if he had inquired at all the shops between St. Paul's church-yard and my house, and he said he had- it was about seven o'clock in the evening the watch was pawned, and William Ball came in about fifteen minutes after; Elizabeth Ball said before the Magistrate that William Ball gave it her to pawn.

Cross-examined. Q. It is not unusual for persons who pawn not give their own names? A. No.

BOYD SILVESTER . I am a Police-constable. I took Elizabeth Ball, in Mill-wall, Poplar - she said she had pawned the watch, her nephew gave it her, told her he gave 3l. for it, and he went with her; that she left him in a public-house, got 1l. on it, and delivered the money up to him, and they had a pint of beer; she said she had pawned several things in the name of Ann Smith, and they were all honestly come by.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-88

784. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 2 books, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Stenson .

WILLIAM ROWE . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Stenson , a bookseller , of Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 11th of March, a little girl told me a man had stolen two books; I ran out, and saw the prisoner walking at the corner of a court about twenty yards off; I pursued him - he ran as fast as he could, and I called Stop thief! he was stopped, and upon coming up to him I found these two books, which are Mr. Stenson's - I had seen them about five minutes before, on the stall outside the shop; they are Buchan's Domestic Medicine, and another on the study of the Bible; he said he was very sorry for what he had done, but he was out of work.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-89

785. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 2 tubs, value 8s., and 1 wheelbarrow, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Wakefield .

PHILIP JONES . I am a Police-officer. On the morning of the 11th of March I was in London-field. Hackney, about a quarter before seven o'clock; I saw the prisoner about a hundred yards before me, with two tubs on his head, a wheelbarrow under his arm, and a broom in his hand; I followed him, and stopped him at Cambridge-heath turnpike - I asked where he brought them from; he said from a gentleman at Homerton-terrace, and he was going to take them to his master at Mile-end, who had borrowed them for the purpuse of brewing - I asked what he was going to do with the barrow; he said that was made a present to his master's little child - I took him to the station-house.

Cross-examined by MR. STURGEON. Q.Did he attempt to run away? A. No - he said he could not go with me, as he was delaying his master's time; I said I would go to his master, or take a note for him - I am sure he said the barrow was a present to his master's child.

JOHN ALLEN . I assisted in taking the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. What did he say? A. He told the serjeant at the watch-house that he was going to carry them for a person at St. George's in the East, and that they were for the purpose of brewing; he gave the name of Knatchbull, but he could not tell where he lived, nor where he was to be found, but he said he was hired to carry them, and he was to have 1s. 6d. for it; he did not say any thing about the barrow or the broom to me.

COURT. Q. Did he say he was employed to carry them by Knatchbull? A. Yes, but he did not know where he was to take them, and that he was to meet him.

MARY LAMBERT . I am servant to Mr. Robert Wakefield , of Clapton-square - he is a clerk in an insurance-office. I know these tubs to be my master's, and this barrow is his little child's - we did not lose any broom; I missed these tubs about half-past six o'clock in the morning on the 11th of March - London-field is about half a mile from my master's; the tubs were kept in one cellar, and the wheelbarrow in another - the cellar door in which the tubs were had been shut, but in the morning it was standing open, with a tub against it; I have been in the habit of using the tubs four years for washing.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any private mark on the tubs? A.This one has been newly hooped, and there is a bend in one stave; I know this wheelbarrow - I had seen them safe on the night of the 10th of March.

COURT. Q. You say the tubs were kept in a cellar? A. Yes, a cellar outside the house - it comes into the area- it would not be necessary to break into the house to get there.

Cross-examined. Q. How are the cellars separated from the house? A. There are two steps from the kitchen door to the cellar - a noise from the cellar might not be heard in the house; the house is in the square.

Prisoner. She said the area was nine feet deep. - Witness. It is a deep area, but I do not know how deep; the cellar door was shut, but not locked, the night before.

Witness for the Defence.

SARAH PHILLIPS . I am a nurse, and have known the prisoner six years - he has been employed in jobbing for me and others; he has lodged in the same house with me since Christmas - he did not get up on the morning of the 11th of March till the clock had gone six, and he had been in bed by half-past nine o'clock the night before; if he had got up I must have heard him, as I had a child ill with the hooping-cough.

COURT. Q.Where is your house? A. In James-street, Bethnal-green; I have rented it six years; the prisoner slept in the room which I live in down stairs, and I sleep in the room up stairs; I went to bed at half-past nine o'clock the night before - we were all in bed by that time; I did not get up till half-past six or seven o'clock, to get my son's breakfast - I heard the prisoner go out at six, and told him to shut the door; I had gone down in the night with the child - I went down at half-past eleven o'clock, and then I went down again; I cannot exactly say at what time, but I was detained till near half-past three: I did not go into that room again from half-past three o'clock till six, but I was not asleep, and could hear every thing; I had made a fire in that room in the night.

PHILIP JONES re-examined Q. How far is the place at which Mrs. Phillips states she lives, from where you saw the prisoner? A. About five minutes' walk, and the place I saw him at is about twenty minutes' walk from the prosecutor's - it wanted a little more than a quarter to seven o'clock when I saw him.

JURY. Q.What is the depth of the area? A.About six feet, and the rails are about three feet - the door of the cellar was propped open with a very high tub; I think one person might have got these things over one at a time.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-90

786. ELIZA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 1 watch, value 4l.; 2 seals, value 30s., and 1 watch-key, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Turk , from his person .

THOMAS TURK . I am a labourer , and live in New-street, Vauxhall-bridge. On the 29th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, I was going home down Rochester-row - Richard Darling was with me; he was more sober than I was; I fell down in that row, and when I got up I missed my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q.Had you been

drinking a great deal that day? A. No; I never left work till half-past five o'clock.

RICHARD DARLING . I live in Rochester-terrace - the prosecutor works with me. On the night of the 28th of March we went to the Jolly Millers public-house, in Millbank-street - we left at near eleven o'clock; he was rather tipsy; not very tipsy - we afterwards went to another public-house in Peter-street; we there had something more - we went to a friend of his in New Peter-street, but had nothing there; he was quite tipsy at the public-house in Peter-street - I saw the prisoner at the Jolly Millers, and she went with us to the public-house in Peter-street - the prosecutor said, in Rochester-row, that he had lost his watch; the prisoner was by, and she said, "The watch is all right;" I afterwards saw it in the constable's hand.

Cross-examined. Q.What did she say in answer to his saying he had lost his watch? A. She said he had left it at the public-house for half a pint of gin, and it was all right - she did not offer to go away, but persuaded him to come on, and go home; I did not hear the prisoner advise him to leave his watch at the public-house till morning, as he was tipsy; but I will not swear it did not pass - I was a little elevated, but could take care of myself.

WILLIAM HEDGES . I am an officer. I was in Rochester-row between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, on the 29th of March; I saw the prisoner and three men there - the prosecutor was one, and Richard Darling was another; I saw the prosecutor fall down, and the prisoner and the other two men assisted in getting him up - the prosecutor said he had lost his watch; the prisoner said,"Never mind, come along, your watch is left at the public-house for half a pint of gin;" he said the half pint of gin was paid for; the prisoner said, "Come along, and see if the watch is there" - I crossed the road, and asked the prisoner if she knew the prosecutor; she said Yes, he was her husband; I then asked the prosecutor if he knew her; he said he never saw her till that afternoon -I searched the prisoner, and felt something in her bosom; she put her hand in, pulled out this watch, and said,"This is the watch, he gave it me;" I took her to the watch-house - the prosecutor said it was his watch, and he could swear to it.

MR. PAYNE to THOMAS TURK . Q.Will you swear you did not give her the watch to take care of for you? A. Yes, I will - she did not tell me I had had quite enough to drink, and I had better leave my watch there; I went to Peter-street to see a friend, a distant relation; I had a job for him - Mr. Darling and his son were with me, and this woman would make herself bold to go in, and sit down, which I would not have done for 5s.; I did not go there to borrow 5s. on my watch - I was rather short, and I said, "I wish you would let me have 5s.; on my watch;" but that was only in a bit of a game; he did not let me have it, but if I had been sober, I might have had the money in a moment - I distinctly swear I did not give her the watch to hold; I had seen my watch about half an hour before I missed it - I did not stop as I went along - it was not a frosty night, but I fell down.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the prosecutor in Millbank-street: he and some other persons were having a glass of liquor, and they would make me have a glass - we then went to another public-house in Peter-street; he wanted 5s. on his watch, and the landlord would not let him have any more - he then went to a friend of his, and wanted the money on the watch; the woman would not let him have it; he then went out, fell down, and his friend took his watch, and gave it him - he fell down again, and asked me if I would take him home; I said,"You had better go to your wife;" he gave me his watch; I gave it to his friend, and he gave it to the Policeman - it was not taken from me.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310407-91

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

787. WILLIAM COPELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 lb. weight of sole leather, value 2s., and 4 pieces of other leather, value 6d. , the goods of Frederick Richard Mayo , his master.

FREDERICK RICHARD MAYO. I am a wholesale boot and shoe manufacturer, and slop-seller - I live in Houndsditch ; the prisoner was a cutter of slops occasionally, and had been two years and a half in my employ - I had always placed the greatest confidence in him till since Christmas. On the 26th of March he came to work at a quarter-past eight o'clock at night, his usual time; he went down into the cellar, which is kept for the purpose of cutting - we have two counters there, one for cutting leather, and one for cutting slops; it was the prisoner's duty to go to the slop counter; but I went down in two or three minutes, and he had not his coat off, as he should have had - he was at the leather counter, and seemed much agitated; I staid two or three minutes, and the went up into my warehouse - something struck me that all was not right; I looked through a window, and saw him putting something brown into his pocket; I went and told my wife what I had seen; I then went, looked again, and saw him go to a rack, where I keep four or five hundred, or one thousand pairs of soles, and saw him take two or three pairs of soles from there to his own counter; he tried them, and put them into his pocket - I went and told the watchman to be at the door five minutes before ten o'clock, which was the time the prisoner would leave; the prisoner came up at that time, and took his umbrella, (which he always brought and took away with him,) and was going out; I called him back - he did not come the first time; I called him again; he then returned - I shut the parlour door, and told him to produce what he had of mine; he said if I would step out, he would settle it with me - I said I should not give up possession of the door till he gave up what he had; he then took out two pairs of soles, and said that was all he had; the watchman, who was close at the door, came in, and found two more pairs of soles on him; we then desired him to pull off his hat - he said there was nothing in that, but the watchman pulled it off, and it was full of pieces of leather - the watchman then took charge of him, and said, "If you will behave like a man, I will behave so to you" - we all went out; in going along the prisoner made his escape, and ran about one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards; he then fell down, and was taken to the watch-house - I took a cab, and went to Marylebone;

this is the property found on him, and I never permitted him to take it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Was he your regular servant? A. He sometimes came occasionally, and sometimes more regularly - he sometimes came for a day or two, sometimes for a few hours; and when he was out of a situation. I have employed him for a fornight - these pieces of leather are worth about 6d. each; he did not say any thing to me about mending his shoes.

COURT. Q. What did you pay him? A. If he worked a day I paid him 5s., and for an hour I paid him 6d.; he was at that time working for another person, and had for a fortnight, but used to work over hours at night for me.

JAMES ALDERS . I took the prisoner on the 26th of March, at ten o'clock in the evening; I found on him two pieces of stiff leather, and some soft leather in his hat - I took him to the watch-house, and gave it to Forrester.

JOHN FORRESTER . I have had the leather in my custody ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have slaved very hard for the prosecutor, and the emolument I had would not pay me for doing it; but as I was anxious to do all I could for my family, I thought I would go on - I left him at one time, and he fetched me back; I have a wife and five children.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Reference Number: t18310407-92

788. WILLIAM COPELAND was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 20 lbs. weight of soleleather, value 23s.; 23 pieces of other leather, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 2 yards of duck, value 10d.; 21 yards of cotton cloth, value 10s.; 1 1/2 yard of marseilla, value 2s.; 3 1/2 yards of toilinet, value 1s. 6d.; 4 1/2 yards of woollen cloth, value 16s., and 14 pieces of cloth, value 21s. , the goods of Frederick Richard Mayo , his master.

FREDERICK RICHARD MAYO . The prisoner was in my employ. I went on the 26th of March, to No. 20, High-street, Marylebone; he was at that time in custody, but I knew he lodged there - I found fifty pairs of soles and a great quantity of other articles - part of them have my mark on them, and the rest I believe are mine.

JAMES ROBARTS . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor, and found this property at the prisoner's lodgings.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. These remnants are what I have had left at different times; I have done business for myself these twenty years. and some of these I have had three years in the house.

GUILTY . - Aged 52. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-93

789. CHARLES SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing on the 1st of March , 1 purse, value 4d.; 1 sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 3 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 3 penny-pieces, the property of Lawrence Hardy , from his person .

LAWRENCE HARDY . I am a private in the 1st regiment of Lite Guards , and am a servant to Lieutenant West, in the same regiment. On the 1st of March I was in the Old Bailey, about half-past four o'clock - I had come on a short stage from the White Horse cellar - I got off at the Bells Sauvage; I there pulled out my purse, paid 1s., tied the purse up again, and put it into my coat pocket - I was in my master's livery, and the pocket of the coat I had then on was behind; when I had got a short distance up the Old Bailey I felt a pull at my pocket - I put my hand to my pocket, turned, and saw the prisoner behind me; I exclaimed, "I am robbed - my purse is gone;" the prisoner immediately went up a passage by a butcher's-shop - there is a parlour on the left side, and on the right front are some steps; I followed him, and he threw my purse down those steps - I seized him, made him pick it up, and give it into my hands; I called an officer, who came and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I suppose you were-sober? A. Yes, quite; I had no handkerchief in that pocket; it was rather a long purse - I did not hear the prisoner inquire for Mrs. Smith; I am sure it was the prisoner who picked up the purse - he went on his knees, and begged for merry; I saw a woman in the butcher's-shop, and I believe there was a woman on the stairs - it was the prisoner gave me the purse; I was asked at the Compter what I had in it, and I said I believed 1l. 8s. or 1l. 9s., and it turned out to be 1l. 8s. 9d.

COURT. Q.What was the distance from the place you were robbed at to those stairs? A. I should think about fifty yards - the stairs are in New-court.

JOHN IYERSON . I am an officer. I saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner, and I took him to the Compter; this is the purse - it has a sovereign, two half-crowns, three shillings, a sixpence, and three pence in it.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Did the prosecutor describe what was in it? A. He said 28s. or 29s. - I had it in my hand at the time he said that.

Witnesses for the Defence.

ANN TAYLOR . My husband is a stationer, and has worked for thirteen years in Skinner-street, Snow-hill. I saw the prisoner on the day in question; he came through my place which is like a thoroughfare - my house is at the corner of an alley, leading to New-court, and the private door is as public as the shop door - you go through a covered way; the stairs are on the left-hand side as you go through - I suppose ten persons had been through there within half an hour of the time the prisoner came; when the prosecutor came in, he first said it was a book, then he runimaged his pocket, and said it was a purse - my daughter found the purse on the stairs; I am quite sure she picked it up, and gave it into the prosecutor's hand - he shook the prisoner, and the prisoner drew himself back, and said he would not be shaken by him.

COURT. Q. Do you live up stairs? A. No, I keep the ground floor - my daughter is thirteen years of age; I have lived fifteen or sixteen years in London, and am the mother of six children; I never picked up a purse before - I never saw the prisoner or the prosecutor before; I did not cry "halves" - the prosecutor said he thought the prisoner's hand had been in his pocket; there was no other man in the place at that moment - the prisoner was standing by the prosecutor, and the prosecutor took hold of him and shook him; the prosecutor said it was his purse - I did not go before the Magistrate; I was not sent for - the prisoner did not stop in the passage till the prosecutor stopped him; he was going through pretty quick, as all

persons do - he said the prosecutor was mistaken, and begged he would let him go about his business, as he was deceived in the person; there was no person on the stairs: a great many people go through - it is not a regular thoroughfare.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR . I am daughter of the last witness. I saw a scuffle on the 1st of March, and my mother called me to get a light to look about the passage, and the stairs - I found he pause, and gave it to the prosecutor, who had hold of the prisoner; I am sure the prisoner did not pick up the purse - I did.

COURT. Q. Who threw the purse there? A. I do not know; I was at my tea - my mother went forward first, and then called me to get a light to see if I could find a purse or a book, or any money - I looked on the stairs, and found a long purse with money in it; I could not find it without a light - the prosecutor said it was his purse; I saw the prisoner there - he kneeled down, and prayed for forgiveness.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-94

790. CHARLES ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 1 jacket, value 5s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 5s., the goods of James Harding , from the person of William Harding .

JAMES HARDING . I keep a chandler's-shop in Windsor-street, Lower-road, Islington - my son William is between seven and eight years old. On the 23rd of March he went out at a quarter-past one o'clock, to play till dinner was ready - we missed him, and did not see him again till a quarter-past six, when he was brought home without his jacket and trousers; my wife and I were in great alarm about him.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I live with my father, who is an orange-merchant. On the 23rd of March I saw the prisoner and the little boy come to our house, between two and three o'clock; the prisoner brought the little boy there, and asked for a little orange for him; I gave him one, and they went away together - I knew the prisoner well by coming to our house.

CATHERINE DUGGIN . I live in West-street, Smithfield. On the 23rd of March I was coming in at my street door, and this child ran against me naked;" I said, "What makes you naked? you don't belong to this place;" he said,"He has taken my clothes, and gone to clean them;" the woman next door took him to the workhouse - I do not know the prisoner.

ELLEN SHAW . I saw the child standing in the privy, stripped of every thing but his shirt and shoes - I went and told the publican, and he told me to take him to the workhouse - I wrapped my apron round him, and took him there.

WILLIAM HARDING . I go to church, and know the necessity of speaking the truth. I was at my father's door, and the prisoner came and asked me to go with him - he took me to Islington, and then took me to some house; I do not know where - it was where that woman found me: the prisoner put some nastiness on my clothes, then he took them off, and said he would clean them and bring them back - he did not return to me.

Prisoner. I have dealt with Chapman's father four years.

JOHN CHAPMAN . Yes, he has.

HENRY ANDREWS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Middle-street, Cloth-fair, crying "Wild ducks;" he was pointed out to me by Chapman.(See Fifth Day, New Court.)

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-95

791. JOSEPH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 shirt, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Gardner , the younger.

THOMAS GARDNER . I live in Dorset-street. I sent my wife to get lodgings for my father, who was ill.

MARY GARDNER . I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 19th of March the prisoner was sent to me by my father-in-law, respecting some lodgings - I gave him 1s. to give him, which I believe he did; I could not go then to see the lodging, but I said I would when my husband came home; the prisoner said he would wait at the Grapes- I went there, and saw the prisoner and my father-in-law; we were going out, and the prisoner said, "Your father wants to go into the hospital;" I said, "I don't understand getting a person in there;" the prisoner said, "I do, and if you will pay for a coach I will get him in;" I said I should be much obliged to him - we got a coach; I followed them to the gate, and saw them go in; I waited some time, but the prisoner did not come out - he came to my house on the Sunday, and said my father wanted a shirt; I said I would give him a new cotton shirt on Monday - he said he was going back to him, and he did not like to go without a shirt; I then took one of my husband's shirts out of the drawer, and gave it to him - he took it, and went away; he came again on the Monday, said my father was going on well, and I need not make myself uneasy about him; on the Thursday he came and said he was very poorly, and was removed - on the Monday following he came and said he was dead and buried; I went with a friend to know the particulars, and the nurse told me that the prisoner had had the body away, with William Johnson ; the prisoner was no relation of my father's - I gave him the shirt to take to him in the hospital; when I went there I asked for the shirt - they produced a shirt, but not the one I gave the prisoner.

ISABELLA KING. I am one of the sisters in the accident ward of St. Bartholomew's-hospital. On the 19th of March the patient Thomas Gardner was brought in there, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, by the prisoner, who stated he had slipped off the curb, and hurt his loins; he was removed from that ward on the 22nd - the shirt which was brought to me was a very old one, and had been worn once.

MARY FOULGER . I am one of the sister. I remember the patient being under my care - he died on the 25th of March, at two o'clock in the morning; the prisoner came to me, and said he would take him out and bury him - I said he must go to the beadle; the patient had a very old shirt on, quite a rag.

THOMAS EAST. I am one of the beadles of St. Bartholomew's-hospital. I remember removing the body to the dead-house; it was taken away by the prisoner on the Friday evening - I do not know what became of it afterwards.

MARY GARDNER re-examined. Q.What sort of a shirt was it you gave the prisoner? A. A linen shirt, with a full bosom, small-plaited with the fingers, and it had a frill

on it - it had never been mended, only darned; I believe the prisoner has not buried my father.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-96

792. HENRY ARBERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Cooke , from his person .

WILLIAM COOKE . I was in the Minories between ten and eleven o'clock on the 18th of March - I felt a tug at my pocket, and a blow came against my thigh, just at the time that I turned aside to let an elderly lady pass me; I saw the prisoner close to me, with my handkerchief in his hand - this is it; I took him, and gave him to the officer.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-97

793. RICHARD BROOKER and JOHN CLARKE were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. , the goods of Jesse Wilkie .

JESSE WILKIE . I keep a baker's-shop in Aldersgate-street . On the 22nd of March, in the evening, I saw the prisoners take two loaves from the window (I thought I had seen them take two in the morning) - they each took one; the window was open, and they took them from outside - I called my brother-in-law; he and I went out - I caught one prisoner and he the other, with the loaves.

JOHN BUNCE . I was called, and took the prisoners.

BROOKER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

CLARKE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 6 Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310407-98

794. HENRY PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 2 cloaks, value 36s. , the goods of William Welsford .

GEORGE WILLIAM MORGAN . On the 25th of February I was in Leadenhall-street , and saw the prisoner and another person standing against Mr. Welsford's shop - it struck me they were at no good; I passed them, then turned back, and crossed the road - I saw the other one go into the shop, and bring out something, which he gave the prisoenr; I caught the prisoner, and took him back with the two cloaks, which he was rolling up - he had a kind of fisherman's jacket on; the other ran away.

EDWARD TYLER . I live with Mr. William Welsford . These are his cloaks, and were inside the door on the left-hand side - I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up the street, and in crossing some person came by me with something in his arms - this witness went to stop him, and he threw down this and got away.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-99

795. LEWIS GREENWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 butter-boat, value 3l. , the goods of Thomas Grainger , his master.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of John Leach .

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I am a Police-officer. On Saturday evening, the 19th of March, I saw the prisoner about half-past nine o'clock, go into a shop near the bottom of Tottenham-court-road - he staid in a short time, and then came out; I suspected all was not right, and took him - I found on him this butter-boat in a handkerchief; I asked who authorized him to sell that - he said, "A very intimate friend of mine in Creed-lane, in the City;" I said, "What number may your friend live at?" he then said, "He don't live in Creed-lane; but a young woman I have been living with sent it me from Oxford to sell:" I took him to the station-house, and then he said it was a man - I at last found the owner.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he not tell you afterwards that he had been employed by Mr. Leach? A. Yes.

SAMUEL COLLIS . I keep a silversmith's shop in Tottenham-court-road. On the night in question the prisoner produced this butter-boat to me, and offered to sell it - I objected to purchase it; he went out, and was taken.

THOMAS GRAINGER . I am one of the chief waiters at Mr. John Leach 's, the London coffee-house. The prisoner was an occasional waiter , and was there on the 19th of March - this butter-boat was one he would have to clean; I have known him six months - I employ the occasional waiters; they are my servants in fact, and I am responsible for the property.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you miss this butter-boat? A. Not till the officer brought it in - I never stated I had missed it before; I know it by its passing through my hands every day - it has a mark of a greyhound's head on it.

Prisoner. He had not the boat in his hand that morning - he never inquired after it, though he might be responsible for it; there might have been a considerable quantity lost, and he never the wiser - he stated at Hatton-garden that he had it that morning, and I think he will find out he has committed a great many errors.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-100

796. RICHARD SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Nicholl and others, on the 24th of March , and stealing, 28 yards of mixture lustring, value 2l. 10s. , their property.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of John Nicholl and another.

JOHN NICHOLL . I live in Aldersgate-street , and have two partners - we are worsted-stuff manufacturers . On the 23rd of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was writing at a desk in the warehouse, and saw the prisoner come into the shop - a person might come into the shop and not see me: I am certain the door was shut, because it will not keep shut unless it is fastened with the latch - it is the dwelling-house of myself and partners; the prisoner took a piece of lustring off a pile, and was walking away with it - I came from the desk, and came to him; the piece was then laid against the house-loor - he stood before it and asked me for some name in the street; I took hold of him, turned him round, and the piece was behind him - I asked him about it; he denied all knowledge of it - he had removed it about a yard from the place he took it from; I took him, and sent for an officer - this is the stuff; it is mixture lustring.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the court - my late employer has left town; he called on my prosecutors, and gave me a character.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-101

797. JAMES CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Wyles , from his person .

JOHN WYLES . I was in Fleet-street between eight and nine o'clock, on the evening of the 26th of March - I was walking past St. Dunstan's church; I felt some person brush by me rather abruplly - I felt, and missed my handkerchief; the prisoner passed by me - I took hold of him, and said he had picked my pocket: I unbuttoned his coat, and there was my handkerchief.

Prisoner. The handkerchief was thrown at my feet, and I took it up. Witness. There was a woman in his company at the time - the street seems to he very much unprotected at that time of night; I had to drag him a long way before I could find an officer - I inquired at several shops before I could find where the watch-house was.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-102

798. CHRISTOPHER SCRIVENER was indicted for stealing out the 6th of April , 1 tea-chest, value 1s. and 82 lbs. weight of shew, value 22l. ; the goods of Thomas Simpson and others.

RICHARD BOHLEN . About a quarter-past eight o'clock in the evening on the 6th of April, I saw a waggon coming from Wood-street , up Cripplegate-buildings; there was a tilt on the fore part - it was going towards Fore-street : I saw some persons about the waggon, and the prisoner was in the waggon; he removed a chest of tea from the front of it to the tail - he then jumped out, and as the waggon turned round Fore-street, he tried to take the chest on his shoulder, but it was too heavy; he took it in his arms, and threw it on the pavement - I ran over to seize him, but he and the others ran away; I took charge of the chest of tea, and called the waggoner; there was an alarm raised - the prisoner was pursued and taken; I am sure he is the man; I had seen him frequently about that quarter.

Prisoner. When he saw me at the watch-house the officer asked if he knew me, and he said he did not. Witness. No, I swore to him as soon as I saw him - I have not the least doubt of him.

STEPHEN RATFORD . I was the waggoner. The goods belonged to Messrs. Slinpson, Graham, and Co.; it was their ten, and their waggon and horses - this chest had been in front of the waggon, and I found it on the pavement; there were 82 lbs. of tea in it; it could not have fallen out - I did not observe any one about.

ISAAC NEWTON . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Simpson , Graham, and Co.; there are four or five other partners - they are wholesale grocers and tea-dealers and live in Bridge-street. The waggon and goods were theirs.

JACOB BOTFIELD . I took the prisoner to the watch-house, when he was identified by Bohlen.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Little St. Thomas Apostle; at the corner of Cripplegate-buildings a man pushed against me, and struck me; I struck him again, but he was too big for me, and I ran away - he ran after me to give me a good thrashing, I suppose; I was taken to the watch-house; the witness was asked if the knew me; he said he was not certain - they then asked a little boy, and he said he was not certain; the witness then said I was the man.

JACOB BOTFIELD re-examined. Q. Where did you see the prisoner? A. At the corner of London-well; he was running, and fell down at the end of Aldermanbury- he was the first person running, and I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-103

799. SAMUEL BRITTON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 cask, value 1s., and 172 lbs. of white lead, value 1l. 19s. , the goods of Samuel Clay and others.

WILLIAM BRIGHTIER . I am a carman to Samuel Clay and others, oilman . On the 21st of February, about ten minutes or a quarter-past seven o'clock, I was going to the George Inn, Smithfield, and to the Elephant - I had several articles in the cart, and among the rest four casks of white lead just as I got to the coach-stand in Smithfield , I looked under the cart, and saw a man's legs; I went behind he bad got a cask out of the cart, and was going towards the pens; I was going after him - he threw down the cask, ran through the gates, and knocked me down backwards with the gate; I did not cry Stop thief, as I did not see any one to stop him - I went home, and told my masters; they employed two of the City officers to look after him, but he was not taken for three weeks or a month - I know the prisoner is the man; I had seen him often before, but had no acquaintance with him.

JAMES TERRY . I am a parish-constable. I heard of this business, and took the prisoner on the evening of the 11th of March, about half-past nine o'clock, in Cow cross- the moment I took hold of him, and told him of the business, he knocked me down, and another officer came to my assistance.

RICHARD MILLIN . I had information of this; on the evening the prisoner was taken I saw him knock Terry down; I went up to him; he said he would go quietly if he knew what he was taken for; I said it was for stealing a cask of white lead, and he must go to the station - he said if that was the case he must go to the Compter, not to the station, as that was a City job.(Prisoner's Defence, written.) On the 21st day of February last I was in Smithfield, when, from a cart which was passing. I saw a cask fall; I immediately took the cask up, and was about to heave it into the cart again, when the driver of the cart came to me, struck me a violent blow on the back with the butt end of his whip, and at the same time accused me with having stolen the cask; I, being fearful of the consequences of such a charge, certainly did, in my confusion, drop the cask, and make off as fast as I possibly could. About eighteen or twenty days after this, being present at a street quarrel, a constable who was there took me into custody, and the driver of the cart came forward to Hatton-garden Police-office, and preferred this charge against me.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-104

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, APRIL 9.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

800. JOSEPH NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the

5th of March , 1 copper scale, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Philip Rowden .

ELIZABETH ROWDEN. I am the wife of Philip Rowden . On the 5th of March, in the evening, I saw the prisoner take this scale from the front of my shop - he stood outside, and took it; I knew him before - he ran towards his own house; I ran after him, calling Stop thief! and asked a man to stop him - he then threw it at me, and asked me to forgive him; he looked at me when he took it.

Prisoner. Q.Did you not tell Mrs. Higgs that you did not see me take it? A. No - she saw you with it, and called Stop thief!

WILLIAM THWAITES. I heard the prosecutrix crying Stop thief! saw the prisoner running, and collared him with the scale - he threw it down, and made great resistance; I held him till the Policeman came - he then said he had picked it up, and asked the prosecutrix to forgive him- she said, "I am sorry for you, but you are in the hands of the Police."

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you the man had run round the corner? A. When he got to the station he said a man ran round the corner, and he had picked up the scale.(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner's Defence. I live opposite the prosecutrix - I went out for some candles, and as I crossed the road I saw a man take the scale, and run off - he threw it down, I took it up, and was going to take it to her.

ELIZABETH ROWDEN. I never lost sight of him.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310407-105

801. CHARLOTTE SOUTHWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 1 ring, value 15s. , the goods of William Clapp , her master.

WILLIAM CLAPP, I am a surgeon , and live at No. 35, Castle-street, East, Oxford-street - the prisoner was my servant of all work, and lived with me about twelve months- she left on account of illness, about a fortnight ago; I have three servants. In August, while she was with me, I missed a gold ring; I suppose it was taken from my bed-room, but am not certain where it was - I inquired about it, but could hear nothing of it till the day after she had left; I then had information, and found it in Beer's possession.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you had an excellent character with her? A. Yes; since I have discovered this, the prisoner informs me another ring was missing, and had been stolen by another servant, but we have since found that.

EDWARD BEER. I keep a tripe-shop, in Duke's-row, Pimlico. I have known the prisoner two or three years - she gave me this ring last summer, and told me she had just picked it up near Blenheim-steps.

Cross-examined. Q.You knew her well? A. Yes - she bore a good character.

MARY SMITH. I am the prosecutor's servant. The prisoner was there before me - I have seen this ring on my master's finger; I saw it in the prisoner's hand, on Sunday, the 29th of August; she took it out of the drawer in master's bed-room - she afterwards told me she had given it to Beer, who came to the house to visit her sometimes - my master spoke about the ring on the Sunday evening, before I knew about it - I did not tell him when I saw her with it; I was afraid it would cause words in the house, and I should lose my place.

Cross-examined. Q.She tells me you gave her the ring to sell? A.It is false; she said she was going to give it away - I did not tell of it, because I have been in the habit of speaking to the young men in master's shop, and I was afraid she would tell mistress of it, and that would cause words - I have lived there ten months; there had been no words about another ring - I did not take any ring; she mentioned about that, because she knew it was lost.

MR. CLAPP. I was in the habit of wearing this ring I often put it on the drawers and dressing-table; both the servants would be in the habit of seeing it from day to day- it was the prisoner's duty to make the beds; the other servant is nurse-maid.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you accused Smith with having men into your house? A. No, the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not on Sunday; she came down to me on Wednesday morning, and said, "Charlotte, I have had a ring in my pocket three or four days, and you might sell it for me;" I said, "I dare not, as I might be taken on suspicion," and when I went out I gave it to Beer - she said I went out on Sunday, but I never saw him on Sunday - she took the ring out of the drawer herself.

EDWARD BEER. She gave it to me in the middle of the week.

GUILTY Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of her character.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310407-106

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

802. MARGARET MAITLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 4s., and 1 brooch, value 20s., the goods of James Feast ; and 1 watch, value 2l., the goods of John Feast , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Feast .

SARAH FEAST. I am a widow, and live in Church-street, Stoke Newington - I keep a butcher's shop; the prisoner was nearly twelve months in my service - my two sons, John and James, live with me. On Tuesday morning the 8th of March, between seven and eight o'clock, I was sitting in the parlour, by the side of my shop, at tea, with another son - James was gone into the shop to serve a customer, and John was not at home; the prisoner opened the door, and said, "Do you know, Ma'am, the front door is open?" we have a private door - I was so very much alarmed I ran out, and found the door open; there was no dirt on the stairs, she then said, "There must be somebody in the house;" I took the candle to look; there was no dirt on the stairs, nor any appearance of any body having been there - she said, "There must be some person in the house;" I went up with my youngest son, George, and the prisoner followed me up - as soon as I got on the landing-place I saw my bed-room door open, my drawers open, and things strewed about; I screamed out, and my son James, and the man he was serving, came up - I was very much frightened, and as soon as I recovered I saw a Policeman and strangers round me; I went up to a room on the

second floor, and found the drawers pulled out and things strewed about in both the right and left-hand rooms - my son James called out, Mother, my watch and brooch, and John's watch are gone, the prisoner then walked into her own room, which is on the same floor - the Policeman and I followed her; her room was not in disorder, but she went to her box and said, They have been here too, the Police-man said, "Have you lost any thing?" she began talking hold of something, when was wrapped up? I think it was an old gown, and put it between her feet, on the floor - the Policeman said, "What have you got there?" she said, Nothing that belongs to my mistress;" he then took hold of it, opened it, and the two watched and brooch fell out - the man in the room said"No stranger has done this, you must be the person;" the Policemen said they must take her - I begged they would not, but they took her to the watch, she put her things loosely into her box, and went away with the key - a pair of silk stockings, a silk handkerchief, and a pair of under stockings, were found in her box, while she stood there - they were under the bundle the watches were wrapped in; the watches and all the things had been in my son James room, in a drawer - the Policeman came next morning, and asked if I missed any thing, I said, "Yes, a bit of silk," and I thought the paper, it had been in, laid in her bed-room - he fetched her key, and the silk was found at the bottom of her box, under the rest of the things.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. What day of the week was this? A. Tuesday - she was acquitted yesterday of stealing the silk, and I then preferred this indictment; it was the fault of the persons at Hick's-hall that this bill was not found before - I should not have gone up stairs if she had not told me the door was open; it was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - she once brought me a brooch of my son's which she found; she was going to leave me on the Friday.

JAMES FEAST . I was serving a customer; I went up stairs - I saw the Policeman open the gown, and the watches and brooch fall out; one of these watches and the brooch are mine; I had seen them between nine and ten o'clock that morning, in my room, in my drawer, which is never looked - here are some stockings and handkerchiefs of mine, which were found next day; my brother's watch had been in the drawer with mine - mine is silver, and worth 4l. - I gave six guineas for it more that four years ago; I value the brooch at 1l. - it was made in memory of my father, and cost 28s.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the room at the time the prisoner's box was searched? A. I went in with the Policeman; her room was not in confusion - the things were strewed about in every room but the prisoner's.

GEORGE FEAST . This is my watch - I had had it four or five years; I bought it new, and gave five guineas for it - it is silver.

JAMES CLARKE . I am a Policeman. These things were found in the prisoner's box; the watches and brooch dropped from the bundle, which I saw her take out of her box, and place under her feet - I took the watches and brooch out of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they tied up in a bundle? A. No, wrapped up - she opened the box in my presence; it was not locked, but merely shut down - she was the first person who went to the box, and drew the things out, the box is eighteen inches or two feet long and about fourteen inches wide.

Prisoner. The Policeman has not spoken one word of truth.

GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years . See page 111

Reference Number: t18310407-107

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

803. RICHARD ROWLAND , was indicted for stealing on the 2nd of April , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Matthews .

SAMUEL OXLER . I am a shoe-maker, and live in York-street, Camden-town. On the 2nd of April I was standing near Mrs. Matthews' shop in Ray-street, Clerkenwell , about five o'clock in the afternoon, and saw a person with a black apron on, go into her shop and come out; I observed something in his apron, which he had not got when he went in - I told Mrs. Matthews, what I had seen, and then pursued the prisoner till the officer took him which was in three or four minutes - I saw him throw something into a timber yard, and I picked up these shoes; I only lost sight of him while I stooped to take them up - I called Stop thief! and Raven stopped him; I am quite certain he is the person I saw come out of the shop.

WILLIAM RAVEN . I am a messenger at Hatton-garden office. I was coming up Little Saffron-hill and saw the prisoner running and Oyler in pursuit; he came towards me, and I stopped him - Oyler throught up the shoes, and said he had found them in the timber-yard.

MARY MATTHEWS . I am the wife of Joseph Matthews , and keep a broker's-shop in Ray-street; Oyler brought these shoes to me, which were safe two minutes before - I had followed, and saw the prisoner taken.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310407-108

Before Lord Chief Justice Tewterden.

804. MARY MORRIS and ELIZABETH CHRISTIAN were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 2 sovereigns, one 20l. and one 5l. Bank-notes, and a 5l. promissory-note, the property of John Ames , from his person .

JOHN AMOS . I live at Wisbeach, in Cambridgeshire. I came to town on Friday, the 18th of March, and about ten o'clock that evening I met Morris in Bishopsgate-street- I looked very earnestly at her; she came back to me, and after some conversation, took me to a house in Gun-alley ; I was quite a stranger to her - I was not in liquor - I went into a room, and found an old woman, who, I believe, is called Robinson: I sent her for a quartern of gin, and then the prisoner Christian came in, and asked for a light which Morris gave her - we then had another quartern of gin, as the old lady was very much inclined for more, and she fetched it; I paid for it - Morris and I then went into another room on the right-hand side; she then said, "We must have a little more gin:" I gave her half a crown, to fetch half a pint, but I never had any of that gin - she went out, as if to fetch it, and while she was gone I took my notes out of my pocket-book, and put them into my fob, with two sovereigns; there was a 20l. and a 5l. Bank note, and a 5l. Wisbeach note - (none of them have been found;) Morris returned to the room, and laid on the bed a little while - I did not feel her pick my pocket; she called out some name, and Christian came into the room - Morris then jumped up, and ran away; I immediately felt, and

missed my money and notes - I told Christian I was robbed, she said, "Not you;" I said "I am of 32l." I went out of the house, and saw another woman at an up stair window - she came down; I told her the same - she went up again, and then an old woman came halfway down the passage, and began had using "Murder! he says he is robbed;" a parcel of Jews and people then came up, and I ran away, but when I got to the top of the passage two of them knocked my hat off, and I ran out of the passage; I saw two respectable women standing at the corner, and asked them the name of the place - they said Sandyhill; I wrote that down, and went to the station in Spitalfields - I was directer there; I returned from there with Pillington - we found Christian that might at a chandler's-shop; she was taken into custody, and next day Waters and I went to the house I was robbed at, and found Morris up stairs.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. You say you were not drunk? A. No; I had breakfasted on the road from Birmingham, and had tea at my aunt's - I had no dinner; I drank nothing on the road - I got to London about two o'clock, and had part of two pints of porter at my cousin's in Houndsdrich; I had no gin before I met them - I went to no gin-shop with them; I drank only two glasses at the house - I know the money was safe when I went on the bed, and directly Morris was gone I missed it; my trousers were not off - they were down, the notes could not have fallen out of my fob - I did not unfold the notes in the room, but I had seen them at Birmingham the day before, and am certain I put the same bundle into my fob in her room - they had before been in a pocket-book in my side pocket; I never said I put them into my great coat - the Policeman took me to a room where there was a woman in bed - he said, "Is this her?" I said I could not tell till she got out of bed, and when she was up I said she was not; I was never in London but twice before - the woman who kept the house was at Worship-street, and asked a few questions; I was about half an hour with the prisoners - Morris had a bonnet on; I remarked her features particularly - I positively swear they are the two- I have not expressed a doubt of it.

THOMAS POLLINGTON . I am a Policeman. I went with Amos that night, and found Christian in Essex-street, within ten minutes' walk of where he was robbed - she was up; Amos said she was the woman - I desired him to be particular; he looked at her again, and said, "I am positive that is the woman who came in and took the candle, while I was with Morris."

Cross-examined. Q. Did he go to a house to look at another woman? A. Yes - he wished her to dress, and then said she was not the woman.

THOMAS WATERS . I am a Police-officer. I went next morning with Amos, to a house in Gun-yard, Sandy-hill, Spitalfields - he pointed the house out, and I found Morris on the first floor, with two women; he immediately identified her as the woman who was with him the evening before - I found 18s. on her, and on her feet a new pair of shoes; I asked where she bought them - she took me to the shop, and said she had bought them the day before.

Cross-examined. Q. She knew you was an officer? A. I told her so - she said she changed half a sovereign to pay for the shoes; I know Jane Wimfrey - she was shown to the prosecutor before the prisoners were taken; he said she was not the woman.

ELIZABETH STOREY . I sold Morris a pair of shoes on Saturday, the 19th for 3s. 3d. - she paid me a half-sovereign.

Morris. I am innocent.

Christian. I am innocent.

SARAH STBNSER . My husband keeps the Founder's Arms, Brick-lane. On the evening of the 19th of March Christian came into my house at half-past nine o'clock, and remained till half-past eleven - I am sure of that; I have known her ever since we have kept the house.

COURT. Q. Was she at your house on Thursday? A. I really cannot call to mind; nor whether she was there on the Wednesday.

HENRY STENSER . I kept his public-house at the time in Question. On Friday night (I think it was the 18th of March.) I saw Christian - she came to my house at half-past nine o'clock, and did not go out till half-past eleven; I held the door open for her to go out and my wife stood at the side of the door - I did not attend at Worship-street, but my wife did.

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

CHRISTIAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-109

Second London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

805. DANIEL TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 2 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 1 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the monies of Deborah Tyler

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the monies of John Challis .

MR. PAYNE conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS GARDNER . I am a hay-salesman, and live at Mile-end. On the 10th of February, I received a load of hay to sell on commission for Mrs. Deborah Tyler , of Hornchurch, Essex - John Challis brought it up; I sold it to George Nuttman , of the Borough - Challis took it there; I gave him a paper with the price, and Nuttmat's Direction on it, to deliver with it - I had not received any money for it from Mr. Nuttman, jun.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What was Challis to do with the money when he got it? A. I told him to receive the money and come back to me - I should then have taken my charges off, and given him the rest for his mistress, with a return note; he came back to me with this piece of paper, but no money.

JOHN CHALLIS . I am carter to Deborah Tyler , of Hornchurch. On the 10th of February, I had a load of hay to take to Mr. Nuttman's, in the Borough, and just as I got into Tooley-street, I saw the prisoner look at another carter's note, who was going on before me; he then came to me, took my note out of my hand, and looked at it - he said, "You are going to Mr. Nuttman's - both to one place." I went and delivered my hay at Nuttman's, which is a little further on, and received from him two sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, two sixpences, and a shilling - he returned one truss, which was bad; I met the prisoner again as I came back, coming down the new arch of London-bridge- he said, "You have been gone a long while;" I said,"Yes, I had to stop in the yard, as Mr. Nuttman was not ready to unload;" he asked how the load of grass hay un

loaded - the first load was grass hay; I said I did not know, for it was not unloaded when I came away - he asked if his father was at home; I supposed he meant Mr. Nuttman and said Yes he was - he then left me, and I went on; he came to me again as I came over London-bridge, and on the London side he touched me on the arm and said, "My father has paid you for that pay;" I said Yes he had - he said, "I have paid Mr. Gardner for the hay, up in the market before I came away you give me the money, and I will give you a note to Mr. Gardner to take back;" I can not read writing but know figures(looking at a paper) this is the paper he gave me - it has the figures 3l 5. and 6 on it; I had no other paper besides that - Gardner had given me a paper, which I gave Mr. Nuttman; I gave the prisoner 3l. 2s. - I told him I had not got 3l. 5s. as Mr. Nuttman returned one truss; I had no other money - he said, "My father will make it all right with Mr. Gardner next market day;" he asked if his father had given me any thing - I said No. and he gave me 6d. for drink for myself; he went away with the money, and I saw no more of him - I have paid Mrs. Tyler the money; I was quite sober - it was one o'clock in the day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not your mistress believe your story? A. Yes; such a thing never happened to me before; I took the paper to Mr. Gardner, thinking to receive the money from him, but he told me it was lost - I did not ask any body to read the paper before I gave the prisoner the money; I never saw him before - I sometimes bring hay to town once a month, and sometimes not for twelve months; I have been up six or seven times - I am twenty-seven years old; I never parted with any money before; I took so much notice of the prisoner's face, that I am certain of him; I never said I knew him because he was blind with one eye - I knew his face; I did not notice his dress - he had a short coat on, with a cape to it, and a black hat.

MR. PAYNE. Q. You looked at his face? A. Yes; I had seen him twice before he got the money - I am still in Mrs. Tyler's service, and have been so nearly three years - I saw the prisoner again in a fortnight.(Paper read.)

Pay back to Mr. Nuttman's son the sum of 3l. 5s. 6d., having received the sum of him.

GEORGE NUTTMAN . On the 10th of February Challis brought some hay to me - I paid him 3l. 2., having deducted 3s. for a bad truss, which I returned; he brought a paper with the hay, which I did not preserve - the prisoner is not my son; I never saw him till he was before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Challis offer you a damaged truss? A. I rejected it - he was perfectly sober; I never saw him before.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18310407-110

806. ELIZABETH HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 purse, value 6d.; 6 sovereigns, and 11 shillings, the property of John McKenzie , from his person .

JOHN McKENZIE , I am a draper , and live in Ivy-lane, Newgate-street. On the 24th of March, about a quarter-past eight o'clock, I was in Cheapside, going home; I had six sovereigns and eleven shillings in my purse, in my breeches pocket - I met the prisoner, and asked her where she was going, supposing her to be a woman of the town; I had never seen her before; I went with her to No. 3. Bromley's-buildings, Bread-street-hill , and staid with her in a room alone for about a quarter of an hour; it was not a bed-room - there was a sofa there; I missed my purse before I left the room; I had not given her any thing - I charged her with taking it - the witness Long came in, and found the purse on her person; I saw it taken from her; I was sober - I swear she took the purse out of my pocket; I did not perceive it taken; she denied having it before it was found on her - I had not agreed to give her any money.

Prisoner. He gave me the purse - he had another gentleman in the room. Witness. A gentleman went with me, but did not go into the same room as I did; he went to another room in the house; I did not give her the purse or money - I told her if she delivered it up I would pay her handsomely; she said I made her laugh at my saying she had taken it.

MARY LONG . I had been a servant at this house for only one week. I did not see the prisoner and prosecutor come in - about nine o'clock my fellow staid there were two gentlemen and a lady in the parlour - I did not go in then; but when I went in I found two gentlemen and the prisoner; the prosecutor said he had lost his purse; his companion was then with him - he charged the prisoner with having taken it; she said she had not got it - he said if she delivered it up he would pay her a good compliment: I advised her to return it, but she denied having it - I found it concealed about her person; I do not wish to state where; McKenzie claimed it - I gave it to the officer, without looking at it.

WILLIAM PURKISS . I am an officer. I was called to this house - I went into the room; there was a gentleman with Mr. McKenzie, Long, and another servant - Mc Kenzie said he had lost his purse, but they had searched the prisoner, and could not find it - I said, "Long must search her again;" she did so in my presence, and after taking off her clothes, she produced it from the prisoner's person - it contained six sovereigns and eleven shillings; I took her into custody.

JOHN McKENZIE . This is my purse.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked him for my money, and he gave me the purse - I did not know what was in it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-111

807. DANIEL COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 1 whip, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Benjamin Gunter .

BENJAMIN GUNTER . I live at the White Horse, Friday-street. On the 3rd of March, about a quarter to seven o'clock, I was going to unload my cart in Pudding-lane , and put my whip by the side of the cart; I went into a house, shut the door, looked through the glass of the door, and saw the prisoner pull the whip out of the side of the cart - I immediately opened the door; he had the whip in his hand, doubled up; I caught hold of him; he flung it down on the ground - I held him; he gave me a violent blow in the mouth; I still held him, and he was delivered to a constable.

HENRY GIBBS . I live in the neighbourhood. I ob

served the last witness collar the prisoner; I saw him throw the whip from him, and strike the prosecutor in a most desperate manner - I crossed the lane, and helped to secure him; I received a most desperate beating from him, assisted by seven or eight companions, who endeavoured to rescue him - they came up on his giving a signal.

Prisoner. It was the people passing who interfered. Witness. I am certain he called out something, which I could not understand; they then came up, and endeavoured to rescue him.

WILLIAM HENRY BUXTON . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my custody; we were obliged to shut him into a gateway to secure him; his companions said, "Let us get him away;" I got assistance, and took him to the Compter.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing; the whip laid on the footpath; I picked it up - the prosecutor collared me, and held his knuckles in my throat before I touched him.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-112

808. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , 1 firkin, value 6d., and 66 lbs. of butter, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of William Crossley and others.

WILLIAM CROSSLEY . I live on Holborn-bridge , and deal in butter - I have other partners. On the 2nd of March, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, this firkin was in front of a cart to go out; I stood in my shop, and saw the prisoner take it off the cart, and walk away with it in front of him - I saw nobody with him; I sent two men after him - they brought him back with it; I saw him taken with it, and am sure he is the person - I had lost sight of him for about a quarter of a minute.

JACOB BROOKS . I am in the prosecutors' employ. I was sent after the prisoner, who was pointed out to me I overtook him about a hundred yards down Farringdon-street, carrying the firkin before him; he put it dow - when I caught him - I never lost sight of him.

JOHN LAWS . I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was quite intoxicated.

JOHN LAWS . I think he was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-113

809. ROBERT POLDEN and ROBERT FORSTER were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 5 lbs. of wool, value 15s. , the goods of John Betts and another.

The wool not being identified the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310407-114

810. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Mason , from his person .

THOMAS MASON. I am an upholder , and live in Castle-street, Leicester-street. On the 2nd of April, between twelve and one o'clock, I was coming towards the City, and had my handkerchief in my outside coat pocket- when I got a few yards on this side of Temple-bar, a person asked if I had lost any thing; I felt, and my handkerchief was gone - I saw the prisoner in the custody of West, who produced my handkerchief from the prisoner's breast; I have not a doubt of its a being mine -I had not observed him near me.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am a Policeman. I was passing under Temple-bar, and saw the prisoner in company with two boys, following the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's left-hand coat-pocket, and put into his jacket on this side Temple-bar; I secured him, and took him up to Mr. Mason, who missed his handkerchief - I took it from the prisoner; his companions made their escape - I saw them again as I was taking the prisoner to Newgate, but could not take them; I should know one of them again - they were about his own age, they bade him Good bye! as we went along.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy, on account of my poor mother.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years to the Prison Ship .

Reference Number: t18310407-115

811. JOHN SAWARD was indicted for embezzlement .

HENRY WILLIAM DINSDALE . I am a warehouseman , and live in Bread-street, Cheapside. The prisoner was in my employ - he was not generally entrusted to receive money for me. On the 9th of July, about five or six o'clock in the evening. I sent him with a note to Mr. Early, who was indebted to me 200l., but did not expect he would receive it - the note requested the payment, without stating whether it was to be sent by the prisoner or otherwise - he had lived six or eight months with me; I did not expect him to return that evening - I did not see him again till he was apprehended, which was some months afterwards; he had given no information of his intention to leave - he had 12s. a week; I have received no part of the money: as he did not return I called on Mr. Early next morning, and learnt that he had paid him.

THOMAS EARLY , On the 9th of July I owed Mr. Dinsdale 200l.; I received a note from him - the prisoner was the bearer, and 1 paid him seventy-five sovereigns, a cheque for 35l., another for 25l., and the rest in Bank of England and country notes - I saw Mr. Dinsdale next morning, and told him what had happened; I knew the prisoner quite well in Mr. Dinsdale's service - I did not see him again till he was apprehended.

Prisoner. Q.Did you pay the money? A. Yes - I paid it to you; I have not said a young man who paid it had gone out of the country.

GEORGE DOWNIE. I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 30th of January, and told him it was for a robbery in Bread-street, Cheapside - I did not explain it further; he made no reply - I found nothing on him but three thimbles and a garter, which they gamble at thimble-rig with.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of selling thimbles and needles; I was robbed of all the money, and never had a halfpenny of it myself.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-116

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, APRIL 9.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

812. ELIZABETH FULCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , part of a gold chain, value 10s.; 1 brooch, value 10s., and 3 handkerchiefs, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Vardon , her master: to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310407-117

813. JOHN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 5 pewter pots, value 7s. , the goods of Samuel Cordeux .

CHARLOTTE DAWS. I am a servant to Mr. Samuel Cordenx - he keeps the Masons' Arms, Devoashire-street, Marylebone . On the evening of the 6th of March I was up stairs, where I could see into the street; I saw the Prisoner take one quart pot and two pints from the upper part of Charlotte-street, No. 41 , where they were put out at a door - he put them into a bag; I told my master.

SAMUEL CORDEUX. I received information from Daws- I went out, and stopped the prisoner in Charlotte-street, with a bag under his arm; I took him into my tap-room, and found in his bag three quart and two pint pots, which are all mine.

HENRY BOLTER . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-118

814. JOHN WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 1 chair, value 15s. , the goods of Levi Oughton .

LEVI OUGHTON. I am a chair-maker , and live in Bridge-row, Lambeth . On the 22nd of March, I missed a chair about four o'clock in the afternoon, which I had seen safe about three.

JOHN HALE . I am a broker, and live in Old-street. On the 22nd of March the prisoner brought this chair to my shop - he offered it for sale for 3s.; I said, "Are you a chair-maker?" he said, "I am a caner;" I said, "What would you cane such a chair for me for?" he said 2s. - I knew it could not be done for less than 4s.; I then said,"Could you take 2s. for the chair?" he said, after some hesitation, Yes - I thought it was not right, and I took him to the station; the officer found the prosecutor - he came to me about seven o'clock in the evening.

EDWARD MESSENGER . I received the prisoner and the chair from Mr. Hale.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been sent to sell the chair for 8s. by a man who lodged with him in James-street, New-cut.

JOHN HALE. He did not ask 8s. for it; he said he lived in James-street, New-cut - that his brother made the chairs, and he did the caning.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-119

815. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 watch, value 20s. , the goods of John Woodward .

JOHN WOODWARD. I live in Frederick-place, Newington, Surrey , and am a shoemaker - the Prisoner lodged with me from last May till the 10th of March, when he left without notice. On the night before my watch hung on a nail over the mantel-piece, in the back room, which looks into my garden; I saw it safe on the Wednesday night - my son sleeps in that room; on the Thursday morning I heard the door of that room unlock, and heard a step go out of the prisoner's room door; I then heard the street door go - I went down, and the prisoner was gone; I went into the back room, and missed the watch.

JOHN ROBINSON. I am a Police-constable. On Friday the 11th of March I took the prisoner to the station-house - I made him no promise, nor used any threat; but in going along he said he was very sorry, but he had pawned the watch in some street going out of Drury-lane, but he did not know the name - I had the duplicate in my possession at that time; it had been given me by his wife - he had not told me where the duplicate was.

Prisoner. I never spoke to the officer in going to the station. Witness. I have stated correctly what passed -I asked him no question; he mentioned it himself.

FREDERICK LANCE . I am in the employ of a pawnbroker, in Clare-street, Clare-market, near Drury-lane, On the 10th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning, this watch was pawned with me for 7s., I think by the prisoner, but I cannot swear positively; this is the duplicate I gave the person who pawned it - I have the counterpart.

JOHN WOODWARD . This is my watch - it is worth 1l.; the prisoner left my house about half-past six o'clock, or between that and seven.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-120

816. WILLIAM TUNSTALL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 basket, value 3s.; 3 blankets, value 6s., and 1 shawl, value 2s. , the goods of William Margrave Tickell .

WILLIAM MARGRAVE TICKELL. I live in Drury-lane, and am a porter . On Thursday, the 10th of March, I met the prisoner in Clare-street. Clare-market - he asked if I knew a person named Thomas, a porter; I said,"Not by name, but most likely I know the person;" I then asked if he wanted any porter's work done, as I should be glad of the job; he said that man had been engaged in moving some goods; I asked what they were; he said some pier-glasses, and other things, which were to be removed from Chancery-lane to Mr. Macklin's, in Clare-street; I said I could undertake the job, and provide blankets and other things, which I knew were wanted; he went with me to my house, and a large basket, a shawl, and three blankets were produced - I put them into the basket, and went immediately with him towards Chancery-lane; as we were going along, he asked if I knew of a good stout lad, which would be a great acquisition, to get the job done quickly - when we got to the end of Bream's-buildings, he took the basket from me, put it on a man's head who stood there, and he said to me, "You wait here, and as this man comes down, you take the things, and pack them up;" I waited there nearly an hour - I then saw the other man; I said to him, "What have you done with our master;" he said,"He turned the corner, and I saw nothing more of him;" but that was the man who had the things when they left

me - I met the prisoner in Old-street on the Monday following; I took him by the collar, and held him till I got an officer; he said what could I do with him, that I only lent him the things, and there was no law in that - I gave him in charge.

ANN TICKELL. I am the prosecutor's mother. The prisoner is the person who came to my house on the 10th of March, and he assisted in taking the blankets off the bed - I saw them go down together with the basket, blankets, and shawl; they were my son's property.

JOHN SLATER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Old-street, on the 14th of March - the prosecutor was scuffling with him, and gave him into custody; the prisoner said he could not hurt him; he only lent him the things, and he could only make a debt of it, do his worst.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress and want of employment led me to do what I have done.

WILLIAM MARGRAVE TICKELL re-examined. Q. Did you intend to let the prisoner have these things only for the purpose of moving the goods? A. I lent them him for that purpose only; he was not to keep them.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-121

817. WILLIAM STOCKDALE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 2 jiggers, value 2s.; 2 rules, value 2s.; 13 awls, value 2s.; 1 hammer, value 6d., and 1 pair of pincers, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Norfolk .

WILLIAM NORFOLK. The prisoner came to lodge in my house on the 17th of March, and left on the 21st, without notice. I got up about seven o'clock that morning to go to work; I then missed him, with all these tools, a great coat, and several other things, every thing he could lay his hands on.

THOMAS RAND. I live at Mitcham. The prisoner came to me last Monday fortnight, about twelve o'clock in the day; I cannot positively say the day of the month - he brought with him some shoemaker's kit, as he called it; I bought them for 2s.; I told him I did not do any thing in the second-hand way, but I was a shoemaker, cutter, and binder - I delivered the things I bought of him to the officer.

THOMAS TIPPEY . I am a Police-constable. In consequence of information I went to Thomas Rand 's, on the 25th of March, and got these tools from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-122

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

818. THOMAS SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 2 books, value 10s. , the goods of John Stenson .

EDWARD DEWEN . I live with Mr. John Stenson , a bookseller , in Prince's-street, Soho . On the 31st of March the prisoner came to our window, took two books off the shelf, and was running away with them; I pursued, and did not lose sight of him - when he got to the corner of Great Windmill-street, he saw a Policeman, and turned into a place which was no thoroughfare; I seized, and held him till the Policeman came - he had thrown down the books, and a gentleman took them up.

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM . I am an officer. Dewen caught the prisoner, and I went to his assistance.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310407-123

819. EDWARD STENNINGFORD was indicted for that he, on the 10th of February , feloniously, by force, did lead and take away James Legrove , a child under the age of ten years, to wit, about the age of five years, with intent to steal certain articles upon and about the said child, to wit, 1 jacket, value 5s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 5s., the goods of Charles Legrove ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, stating the child to have been taken by fraud.

ELIZABETH LEGROVE. I am the wife of Charles Legrove - we live in Long-alley, Finsbury-circus; my husband is a labouring man . I have a little boy named James - he was five years of age last old Michaelmas-day- he goes to school in an alley not far from Long-alley , and went there on the 10th of February; he came home about half-past twelve o'clock that day - he took his cap to go to the top of the alley, and I saw no more of him till five o'clock in the evening, when a Police-constable brought him home; I had been in the greatest distress about him - when he went out he had a jacket and trousers on, which were very good ones; when he returned he was without them - he had only his shirt, which was an old one, and his pinafore on; I do not know the prisoner.

Prisoner. The first time this woman ever spoke to me was in Long-alley, when she said her child had been stripped of his jacket and trousers a fortnight before, and she asked me to stop - she sent for a boy to know if I was the man. Witness. Yes, I saw him, and said I thought he was the man.

JAMES ARMSTRONG. I am ten years of age - I know the necessity of speaking the truth; I live with my father, at No. 9, Chapel-court, Finsbury-square - he used to live in Long-alley. I used to play with little Legrove - I saw him on the day he was taken away, in Hill-street, Windmill-street; he had his jacket and trousers on, and the prisoner was leading him - I said to him, "Jemmy, where are you going?" but he made me no answer - the prisoner turned round, and looked very severely in my face; he had a great big coat, of a whiteish colour on, and three capes to it - he had trousers on, with little buttons at the bottom; he was leading the little boy by the hand - they walked away up Windmill-street, and I went to school.

MARY CHERRY . I am the wife of James Cherry . On the 10th of February I was at my own door, No. 102, Saffron-hill; I saw this little boy - a man had hold of his hand, who had a black coat on, very much worn, and the child had an orange in his hand; about twenty-five minutes afterwards I saw the same child in the Policeman's hands; I cannot swear to the man who had the child, but I can to the child - he was crying when I first saw him, and was very well dressed; when I saw him again he had nothing on but his shirt, pinafore, and shoes - I said I knew it was the same child I had seen about two o'clock; my attention was drawn to the child more than to the man.

JOHN HURLEY . I am a Police-officer. On the 10th of February I was on duty on Saffron-hill, and a female told me there was a child at No. 108; I went there, and found

this child in the front room up stairs, without jacket or trousers on - he had, only a cap, a pair of boots, a shirt, and a pinafore; I took him to the station.

FRANCIS SARSFIELD . I am a Police-officer. I found where the parents lived, and took the child home - as I was returning I met the mother in Finsbury-square.

JAMES BROWN. I am a Police-officer. I received information, and had been looking for the prisoner - I found him on the 24th of February, in the custody of Mrs. Legrove, in Long-alley: I asked where he lived - he said at Chingford; I asked if he knew any thing about the charge - he said No, that he had been stopped by the woman before, but the little boy could not swear to him (that was the youngest child); I then took him to the back parlour of the public-house adjoining the office, where there were from a dozen to fourteen persons - I sent for little Armstrong, and told him to go and look in the back parlour, and see if he could pick out any person there who took away little Jemmy Legrove; he went into the room, looked all round, fixed his eyes on the prisoner, and said, "This is the man that took little Jemmy up Hill-street," and he said the coat he had on had three marks on it - when I took the prisoner he had this light coloured great coat on, which has three capes to it; and a pair of overalls, buttoned outside down to the legs - I found on him two knives, one of which I have found a witness who can swear to; I have made inquiry, and found the prisoner had taken off this great coat, and left it at a stall, and that he bought an orange at a stall where there were three women sitting.

MARY ANN WELCH. I lodge in the prosecutor's house, and know the little boy - this is the knife he had been in the habit of using; I had handled it so often that I know it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up that knife in Blackfriars-road a week or nine days before I was taken - I never saw the child.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-124

820. CHARLES RAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 6lbs. of mutton, value 3s.; 3lbs. of dripping, value 1s.; 2 plates, value 4d., and 2 brushes, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Ling ; and 3lbs. of mutton, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Mason .

MARY MILNER. I live with Mr. Thomas Ling, near Fitzroy-square . On Sunday morning, the 13th of March, about half-past six o'clock, I missed these articles from the area; I had seen them at eleven o'clock on Saturday night - I saw the prisoner at the office on Monday morning; I could swear to all the property taken.

WILLIAM PRICHARD. I saw the prisoner in Tottenham-street at half-past six o'clock on Sunday morning, with a basket - he said it was some meat and other things, which he had brought from his mistress in York-street, Regent's-park, and he was going to take them home to Titchfield-street - I showed the property to the witnesses on Monday.

ANN HARDING. I live with Mr. Robert Mason , in the same house, at No. 31. Saville-street. There were 3lbs. of mutton of my master's, which was taken from the same safe - I saw it again, and knew it.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man asked me to carry the basket.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-125

821. JAMES ROCKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 12 shirts, value 3l.; 1 sheet, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 pair of window-blinds, value 1s.; 1 half-sovereign, and 3 half-crowns , the property of George Lonton .

GEORGE LONTON. When this happened I lived in Catherine-court . I have known the prisoner ten years, and he had lodged with me eleven weeks - he is a coalporter ; on the 13th of February I had no other lodger but the prisoner - he went to bed that night about ten o'clock; he asked for a candle; my wife gave it him, and she went to bed about half-past ten - I went to bed about eleven; I double-locked the door, and bolted it - I looked round and all was safe; there was 17s. 6d. laid on the mantel-piece, under a little image, and the articles stated were in a bundle in the room - I got up first the next morning, about eight o'clock; I found the street door unbolted, and these articles and money were gone - I went into the prisoner's room; he was gone and the bed appeared not to have been slept in - there had been no one else in the house: I did not see him again till the 11th of March, when I met him, and said, "Jemmy, I have caught you at last; I thought I should drop upon you;" he said,"Now you have met me, what can you do with me?" I collared him, and gave charge of him - I said, "You know I am a hard-working man, where are my things?" he said,"That you have got to find out."

ELIZABETH LONTON. I am the prosecutor's wife. What he has said is true - there was no one in the house but the prisoner.

MARY WETHERSTONE. I live opposite the prosecutor. About ten o'clock on the night in question, I came home - the prosecutor and his wife were having a few words; I said, "What is the matter?" and they told me to go and see - the prisoner came home, and they told him to go to bed.

WILLIAM CART . I am an officer. I took the prisoner from the prosecutor - he asked him where his property was, and he said, "That you have got to find out."

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-126

822. JOHN MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , 1 bead plane, value 1s. , the goods of William Plant .

WILLIAM PLANT. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Grey Eagle-street. I lost this bead plane from Mr. Farrer's work-shop in Holywell-row , but I did not miss it till I discovered it at a pawnbroker's shop.

JOHN BATEMAN. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Providence-row. I took in this plane from the prisoner on the 4th of March.

Prisoner. Q.Will you swear that to be the plane I pawned at your shop? A. Yes - we never mislay tools.

CHARLES SCOTCHMAR. I took the prisoner, and found on him fifty - nine duplicates - here is one for this plane.

WILLIAM PLANT . This is my plane - I think I had seen it on the shelf while the prisoner worked shopmate with me.

Prisoner's Defence. That plane I never had in my hand - planes and other tools often get mislaid at the pawnbroker's; I pawned a hand-saw at the same shop where

this was found - I lost the duplicate; I then saw one at their door for sale, and found it was my own saw, which was not out of date.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Reference Number: t18310407-127

823. JOHN MILES was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 chisel, value 1s., and a pair of plyers, value 6d. , the goods of William Cox .

JOHN BATEMAN. I am a pawnbroker. I have a chisel, pawned on the 3rd of March, by the prisoner - I gave the duplicate of it.

CHARLES SCOTCHMER . I took the prisoner, and found this duplicate and fifty-eight others upon him.

WILLIAM COX . I am a cabinet-maker . This chisel is mine - I had had it about two months before I lost it; the prisoner worked at the next bench to me - I never allowed him to pawn my property.

Prisoner. It is entirely false, and I should like to know why he has not indicted me in his own name - he goes by the name of William Williams. Witness. Cox is my name, and I have my indentures here to prove it - I know this chisel by the handle, which I made myself.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years for each Offence .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18310407-128

824. MARY JEFFS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 sovereign, 1 crown, 2 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the monies of Nathaniel Derbyshire , from his person .

NATHANIEL DERBYSHIRE . I live at Islington, and am a carpenter . On Sunday, the 6th of March, I was in a coffee-shop - the prisoner's sister came in there; I went with her home to the prisoner's lodgings, in Chequer-alley, Bunhill-row - this was a little after eleven o'clock in the morning; I was quite sober - her sister took me to her lodgings; I there saw the prisoner, and staid with them till about three o'clock, when I left them, intending to go home - the prisoner followed me and my friend who was with me, and prevailed on us to return; we returned, and had some tea and toast - I had not returned long before I was robbed of my purse and my money; I felt it taken from me - no one was near me but the prisoner at the time - I had given her some money in the morning to fetch some half-and-half, and some steaks; she had her share of what she fetched - I had nothing else to do with either of them; when I felt my money taken, I got up in a moment, took fast hold of the prisoner, and the bag dropped from her - I thought she had something in her mouth; I strangled her very severely - the shilling came from her mouth, but I could not get the sovereign; I then got my friend to assist me, and we got the crown-piece and two sixpences out of her hand - the purse was still on the floor; I had it safe an hour before - I had not seen her open it; it has no drawing - it is merely a bag; I believe she swallowed the sovereign - I sent for an officer.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me half a crown, about eleven o'clock, to fetch some breakfast things? A. You fetched some half-and-half and steaks.

EDWARD GRIMSDALE. I was at the coffee-shop with the prosecutor; the prisoner's sister was there - we went home with her, and had some half-and-half and some gin- we were there from eleven o'clock till about three; we had not been in bed the night before - we had been the worse for liquor open night, but we sad got sober in the morning - I did not make the sister any compliment, or take any liberty with her; she asked as to go and have breakfast, and we went - we had only been in one public-house the night before; we staid there till eleven o'clock- we then stopped - a bit about the street, and at four o'clock we went to the coffee-shop. I saw the prosecutor had a sovereign in the purse about ten or half-past ten on the Saturday night - I was sitting by the fire when he accused the prisoner of stealing in purse; he took her by the thrown - I saw no sovereign, but assisted in taking the crown and two sixpences out of her hand.

EDWARD MESSENGER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; I found 7l. 6d. on her, a men was given back, as the prosecutor said he had got his silver, and he had nothing to alledge against the prisoner but the sovereign.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor gave me half a crown to fetch some breakfast things, and then 8s. - I fetched some porter, liquor, tea, &c.; he did not give me any money - the 7s. 6d. was my own; in the evening he said he had lost a sovereign - I had not seen one, but I took off the bed-clothes and said it would be found in the room - I took up the 5s. and the other silver, and gave him; he had been at a public-house in Whitecross-street, and had two quartern of gin, and treated people.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-129

825. WILLIAM HARDINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 1 portmanteau, value 40s. , the goods of John James .

FREDERICK KELLY . I live with Mr. John James , a trunkmaker , in Piccadilly . On the 5th of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, we missed a portmanteau from the corner of the door - I had seen it safe an hour before; a female gave some information, and I went to Chelsea and saw it.

ELIZA REVEARD. I am married, and lodge at my father's, in Terrace-court New Road, Chelsea; Mary Smith lives in the house - on Saturday night (I believe, the 5th of March,) there came a knock at the door; I heard my father open it, and the prisoner asked if Mr. Smith was at home - my father said he believed not, but the prisoner came in, and I lighted him up stairs; he had a portmantean in his hand, and he asked Mrs. Smith to let him leave it for one hour - she said he might leave it for an hour, but he must fetch it away then, as she went to bed very early; I had seen the prisoner before.

WILLIAM SULLIVAN. I am a Police-constable. On Friday, the 11th of March, I went to the house, and found this portmanteau under the bed.

THOMAS BAIRNES. I took the prisoner on the 16th of March; he asked me if I knew where Smith was - I said Yes, he was in custody, and had had one hearing, because the property had been found at his house; I had been after the prisoner for five days.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard there were two officers looking after me, and I went to the Red House; I told them I could be taken there at any time, but they took me at the Star and Garter.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-130

826. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of James Alexander , from his person .

JAMES ALEXANDER . I was at the corner of Drury-lane on the 26th of February, in the evening, and felt something at my pocket; I turned round, and a female behind me said, "There is the man who has your handkerchief;" the prisoner ran, and I pursued him - I saw him putting the handkerchief into his trousers; I seized him, and desired him to give it me - he hesitated, but at last gave it me; he said he had picked it up.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD . I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

JAMES ALEXANDER . This is my handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Has it any mark? A. Yes, my initials are on it - I am certain he was putting it into his trousers; I am sure he was not pulling up his trousers - he took it out of the flap; I took him in Long-acre.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310407-131

827. JOHN HAWKES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 1 plane, value 2s. , the goods of George Andrew Fox .

GEORGE ANDREW FOX. I am a shipwright , and live at Wapping. About eight o'clock last Monday morning, I had to leave my yard to go opposite - I turned my head, and saw the prisoner go into my yard very quick; he soon came out - I stopped him, and found this plane on him; I had seen him before, standing about the place - he had gone about fourteen yards; there were eight duplicates for tools found on him.

GUILTY . Aged 50. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310407-132

828. ANN HARVEY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 14th of March , 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of William Brooks , well knowing it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM BROOKS. I live with Mr. Shillitoe, at Tottenham. On the 14th of March I lived at Laytonstone - I came to town that day, and at eleven o'clock at night, I fell in with two women, who asked me for something to drink; I said I had no objection to give something, but I did not like to go to a public-house so late at night - they said I could go to their apartment; I went with them, and sat down, and being very much fatigued, I fell asleep between eleven and twelve o'clock - I then had 1l. 15s. about me, and my watch; I awoke, I should think, a little after twelve o'clock - my watch was gone, and the two women also; this was on Monday night - I walked down stairs, and stood at the door till I saw a constable; I told him what had happened - I had not given the girls any thing; the constable told me to stand at the door while he got a light - we then went up stairs, and found the prisoner in bed in another room, not above six or seven steps from the room I had been in; she appeared to be asleep when we went in, but I believe she was awake - the constable said he never meddled with any bed clothes, but he looked round the room, and saw nothing - she was taken afterwards, but I was not in London then.

THOMAS CARMAN . I am a Police-constable. I was called in by a pawnbroker on the 15th of March, to take the prisoner, who was offering this watch - I asked her who gave it her; she told me her husband; but in less than five minutes she said she had no husband, but that her sister's husband gave it her.

GEORGE GILES. I am a pawnbroker in the Commercial-road. On the 15th of March the prisoner came in with this watch, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock- I looked at her, and asked some question, to which she gave me very unsatisfactory answers; she first said she brought it from one person, and then another; I sent for the officer, and gave her in charge - I advertised the watch twice, and the owner came forward.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of cleaning and doing for this woman, and she told me if I found her door open to lock it and take out the key; I went into the room that night, turned down the bed, and there was the watch; I took it away, and did not hear any thing of it till the next day - my place was not safe to keep such a thing, and I took it to pawn; the gentleman must have been in bed with one of them, or his watch could not have been under the bolster.

GUILTY . Aged 47. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-133

829. RICHARD GOODCHILD and JAMES SERMON were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 11lbs. of wool, value 22s. , the goods of George Meyer and Joseph Trueman .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Mary Vestry and William Cobley .

JOHN BAKER . I am foreman at No. 3 warehouse, London-docks - the prisoners are carters , and used to have their carts backwards and forwards there - Vestry and Cobley are the owners of the carts. On the 29th of March I was at the back of No. 2 warehouse, and saw Goodchild in a cart, with another man, who is not here - the man took some wool out of a bale which Goodchild held, and put it into a bag; there were about 11 lbs. of it - I saw Sermon at a little distance from the cart; he appeared to me to be in company with Goodchild - he could see very well what he was doing; I had seen the two prisoners together the day before, in front of No. 3 warehouse, and I had seen Goodchild draw up his cart in the same position the day before - I went to the deputy warehouse-keeper, and informed him of what I had seen.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know whose the wool was? A. Not at that time.

JOHN CLEMENT . I am a constable at the London-docks. On the 29th of March I was on duty at the London-dock western gate, and about ten o'clock I received information that Goodchild was coming up with his cart loaded with wool; he came up, and presented me a pass for eight bales of wool, from No. 3 warehouse - I said, "Stop your horses," and he did; I said, "Did you load this cart?" he said Yes - I said, "Did you tie the bales on?" he said Yes; I said, "Have you any thing in the cart more than you ought to have?" he said No, not that he knew of - I then got on the top of the bales of wool, and found this bag of wool thrust down between the two top bales, and covered over with a tilt; I should not have seen it unless

I had searched for it - one of the top bales had been cut, and a quantity of wool had been taken out; I took a sample of the wool in the bag and in the bale, and it corresponds exactly - I said to Goodchild, "You see this bag - what have you to say?" he said he was innocent of it, and it must have been put in while he went to get his pass.

MR. PHILLIPS to JOHN BAKER . Q. Did you go off to give information, leaving these two men in the cart? A. Yes; of course I lost sight of them - the other man might have gone off with the little bag.

SAMUEL ROBINSON. I am clerk to Messrs. Meyer and Joseph Taueman - they live in Bishopsgate-street, and are general merchants. We employed the two prisoners to get the load from the London-docks - they are in the employ of Vestry and Cobley; I saw the bales, and there was a deficiancy of 13 lbs, in one of them, but there had been a sample taken out, and there was some loose wool in the cart, which might probably have been dropped in plundering; I saw the prisoners at the docks that morning, waiting with the cart - I went to the docks again about eleven o'clock, and then the information was given me; the bale had been cut and tora across, right in the middle - I have had a good deal to do with wool, and I have no doubt that these are both the same wool.

Cross-examined. Q.What kind of wool is it? A. German wool; it is not all of this quality - I would not venture to swear to it twenty or thirty miles off.

Sermon's Defence. I had been speaking to Goodchild, and that is all.

Goodchild's Defence. I loaded the eight bales, and left my cart to get my pass; when I was driving away the officer came and asked what I had in my cart - I said eight bales of wool; he said, "Any thing else?" I said, "Not to my knowledge;" he said, "I must look:" I said, "You are welcome" - he found this bag, and said, "How did this come in?" I said, "I don't know - it must have been put in by some one while I was getting my pass."

JURY to JOHN BAKER . Q.Was Sermon with this cart? A. Yes, he was; there were other carts of Messrs. Meyer's there that day, I believe.

GOODCHILD - GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

SERMON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-134

830. ISABELLA COMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 basket, value 6d.; 3 shoes, value 2s.; 1 yard of linen, value 1s.; 1 wrapper, value 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 1 ball of cotton, value 1/2d.; 1 leather strap, value 2d., and 1 halfpenny , the property of William Ranger .

WILLIAM RANGER. I am a carpenter , and live in Rosemary Branch cottages. On the 26th of March I went into a public-house, with a basket containing the articles stated - I only called to take my supper beer home to my children; two women followed me into the house, and followed me out - I believe the prisoner was one; I took my beer, went out, and forgot my basket - I went back, and it was gone; I did not hear of it till the Tuesday following, and this was on the Saturday.

MARY HILL. I live in Foster's-buildings. The prisoner's sister lodged with me upwards of two years - the prisoner came backwards and forwards to see her, and sometimes slept there; the prisoner came on the 27th of March, and said her husband had bought a pair of shoes and stockings for her girl, which were too short for her; she asked me to buy them - I said I did not want them, but took them; I gave them to the officer.

GEORGE COLLIER. I am a Police-constable. I went to the prisoner's sister on the Tuesday morning - I found the prisoner there, and asked her if she had been at the Plough on Saturday evening - she said she had not; I then asked if she knew any thing of a basket taken from there - she said No, but on searching the room I found this basket hanging on a nail; I showed it to the prosecutor's son, who said it was his father's - I opened it, and found a shoe and a strap; I then asked the prisoner what had become of the other pair of shoes - she said she knew nothing of them, that was all that was in the basket.

JAMES GLIBBERY. I am a Police-officer. I asked the prisoner how she came by this basket - she said, "I found it outside the door;" I said, "There was some other property;" she said, "No, there was no other property," but after some time she said, "Well, I did take it, and sold the property to Mrs. Hill."

WILLIAM RANGER. This is my basket, and these are the shoes.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, stating that she had found the basket outside the Plough public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-135

831. WILLIAM STEWARD CUMMINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 4 gold rings, value 3l., and 30s. , the property of Mary Ann Cummins .

MARY ANN CUMMINS. I am single , and live with my father in Medway-street - the prisoner is my brother, and lived in the same room. On the 26th of February these rings and money were safe in my pocket, which I placed under my pillow when I went to bed, at half-past ten o'clock - he slept in the next room; I awoke at half-past six in the morning, and my property was gone - I inquired for my brother, and he was gone; he was taken into custody on the Sunday night, three days afterwards.

THOMAS WALTERS . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner at his father's on the Sunday evening; he had these rings, a bunch of keys, and several other articles in his possession, but only 14s. in money.

MARY ANN CUMMINS re-examined. He came home about eight o'clock on Sunday evening - he told me he had the rings, and stated how much silver he had; we called in a Policeman - we took the prisoner to the Magistrate, and he advised us to proceed, in hopes to get him into some asylum; I do not think he meant to make away with the property - I think he would have returned it; his father found him some distance from home.

THOMAS CUMMINS . I am the prisoner's father. I found him in St. George's-fields, opposite the Orphan Asylum - his schoolmaster had sent four boys to look for him; I can do nothing with him - he has been the same by night and by day for three years past; he has been away for a month or six weeks together - if this had been the first time by one hundred it should never have come

to this; it has been a great trouble to me to do what I have done, but the Magistrate and my friends advised me to do it - his master has logged him for a week together, and the moment he has slipped the log he has been off again.

GUILTY . Aged 11. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-136

832. WILLIAM BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Charles Bohag .

CHARLES BOHAG . I keep an old clothes shop , in Tothill-street . On the 24th of February Elizabeth Hudson gave me information, and I missed these boots from the door-post.

ELIZABETH HUDSON . I lodge in the prosecutor's house. I saw the prisoner standing at the street door - he looked at the boots several times as I was waiting to go in; he then unhooked them, put them under his apron, and walked away - I called the prosecutor's wife, and then took the prisoner by the right arm.

Prisoner. Q. Did I go away? A. Yes, you had got as far as the next door, to the butcher's shop - I suppose nine or ten yards; there is a passage between there and where you took them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 67. - Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-137

833. JOSEPH BRITTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of George Wright , from his person .

GEORGE WRIGHT. I was in St. James'-park on the 24th of September - I did not feel my handkerchief taken, but a gentleman standing behind me told me the prisoner had taken it - he was then alone, and about a yard from me; I went up to him, took him by the collar, and asked for my handkerchief - he denied that he had it, but both his hands were in his pockets; I pulled out his hands, and my handkerchief was found in the bottom of his breeches pocket.

FREDERICK TYRRELL. I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

GEORGE WRIGHT. This is my handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Is there any thing particular about it? A.There is no mark on it, but it was wet at the time - I had a very bad cold; I had just such a handkerchief as this in my pocket - there was a great crowd there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-138

834. JOHN BOWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 10 lbs. of bread, value 2s. , the goods of Elizabeth Yeend .

JAMES WHIPP . I am a Police-constable. I was in Blandford-street, on the 1st of March, about a quarter-past three o'clock; I met the prisoner with a sack, and asked what was in it; he said some bread, which he had bought at the corner of Marylebone-lane, but he did not mention any name - I went there, and the woman said he had bought no bread there; I took him to the station - there were two quartern-loaves and a half-quartern.

JAMES HOME . I am a baker. The bread was under my charge - it is the property of Elizabeth Yeend; I had left my basket in Harley-street while I went down an area; I had another basket which I took with me- I was away about ten minutes, and then missed the bread; I saw it again at the office - there is no mark, but I believe it to be what I lost.

THOMAS LARGE. I saw the prisoner going along with a bag; some boys stole the bread, and he received it; he was fifty yards from the basket, and could not see what the boys did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-139

835. ISAAC WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 1 leather apron, value 1s.; 20 pieces of leather, value 3s.; 1 rasp, value 6d.; 1 awl, value 2d.; 1 seat-iron, value 6d.; 1 knife, value 1s., and 1 pair of pincers, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Foster , his master.

THOMAS FOSTER. I am a shoemaker , and live in Layton-place, Church-way, St. Pancras - the prisoner had been my journeyman from Friday to Wednesday. I went out about half-past three o'clock, and left him at home at work; I had no other person working for me - when I returned, he and this property were gone; he was apprehended this day month - I have never seen the property since - I took him out of charity more than any thing else; he had scarcely a shirt to his back.

ELIZABETH ISAACSON . I work for Mr. Foster. On Wednesday, the 23rd of February, I saw the prisoner at work there when I went up to clean the room, and when I went down, he had absconded with all these things from the upper room - Mr. Foster had been out about two hours.

Prisoner's Defence. On the afternoon these things were missed I asked for a pair of upper leathers, which were not ready - Mr. Foster said it would be a good opportunity for Mrs. Isaacson to clean the room; I went to take a walk, left the children playing in the room, and the things all safe - I had not so much as would pay for my lodging while I was there; had I had the tools I could have got work - I need not depend on Mr. Foster's charity.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-140

836. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 basket, value 2s.; 3 shirts, value 8s.; 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 4 collars, value 3s., and 2 caps, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Nelson .

GEORGE CURTIS . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Willow-walk. On the 19th of February, about half-past seven or eight o'clock at night, I saw a cart going along Old-street-road ; a person emerged from the tail of it - when I first saw him there appeared to be something descending from the cart; he ran against me; I passed him, and he stopped, as if to pull up his shoe; he then whistled, and some person on the other side whistled - I crossed the road, and told the Policeman; we crossed, and pursued the prisoner, who then had this basket; he turned a corner - we lost sight of him for a moment or two, but got sight of him again; he was taken; the Policeman asked where he was going; he said Home; he then asked what he had got; he said he did not know - he asked where he got it; he said he found it in Old-street-road.

WILLIAM ARKELL . I am a Police-constable. Curtis spoke to me; I crossed, and saw the prisoner carrying this basket - he was going at full speed; we pursued him- he turned, and we lost sight of him - we then caught sight of him again, came up, and took him; I asked what he had there; he said he did not know, and that he found it.

SUSANNAH NELSON . I am the wife of Robert Nelson - we live in Andrew cottage, Hornsey-road. On the 19th of February I put this property into the basket - it was put into a cart to go to Ely-place, Holborn; the boy who drove the cart is not here - it was a square cart, without a tilt, but about three feet deep; I was in the cart, and saw the basket safe about five minutes before it was taken - it could not have fallen out; the tail-board was up.

Prisoner's Defence. I live with my father, who keeps the Five Inkhorns public-house, in Shoreditch; I was returning home, and saw this in the road; I took it up; when the officer took me I said I did not know what I had got; I deny that I whistled, and who dropped it I do not know.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-141

837. SARAH WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 1 blanket, value 3s. , the goods of James Lunn .

MARGARET LUNN . I am the wife of James Lunn, a Greenwich pensioner , who lives in the College. I have a house, and let lodgings by the night; the prisoner and some man came and lodged there on the 3rd of April - the man went away early; she came down at half-past nine o'clock, wished me good morning, and went away; I went up stairs, and missed a pillow and blanket.

GEORGE NEAL. I am a Police-constable. I had information, and took the prisoner in Blue-gate-fields - I searched her, and found this blanket wrapped round her, under her clothes, with this pillow-case.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-142

838. GEORGE WORKINGTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a certain building, within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Robert Phillipson , and occupied therewith, on the 11th of March , and stealine 6 live tame fowls, price 15s., and 1 live tame rabbit, price 5s. , his property.

WILLIAM BARBER . I am a Police-constable. On the 11th of March I was on duty, and met the prisoner in the Bow-road, about three miles from Hackney, at five o'clock in the morning - he had a bag with six fowls, and a rabbit - I asked him what he had got there; he said he did not know - I said, "Let me look;" he then pulled out the rabbit - I asked where he got them; he said he found them at Stratford - the fowls were quite warm.

Prisoner. Q. Did I say I picked them up at Stratford? A. Yes, you did.

ROBERT PHILLIPSON . I keep the White Hart inn, Temple-mills, in the parish of St. John, Hackney - I kept fowls and a rabbit. On the evening of the 11th of March they were all locked up in a range of buildings, which surround my yard - the whole yard is paled in to keep all secure; my wife fastened them up, but I saw them after they were fastened - my lad got up first in the morning, and called me; I found the coal-house staple broken off, and the hen-house had all the fowls, which were six, taken away - the rabbit was taken from another place; I could swear to the fowls and to the rabbit, but they would not keep.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-143

839. WILLIAM WHISKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 watch, value 14s.; 2 seals, value 10s.; 1 watch-key, value 5s.; 1 ring, value 5s.; 1 crown, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence , the property of Ann Johnson .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Joseph Johnson .

ANN JOHNSON. I live at Bromley, in Middlesex - my son Joseph lives with me; I have known the prisoner's family many years; they have lived in great respect, but are now in the workhouse - the prisoner has been accustomed to go to sea, and I took him into my house out of charity, knowing the family - he came there on the 13th of January, and staid till the 24th of February; he slept in the same room with my son - I supported him the whole time - my son told me had lost his watch and money.

JOSEPH JOHNSON. I slept with the prisoner on the 24th of February - I missed my watch from the box under the bedstead - I had seen it safe the night before - the prisoner went away in the morning; I missed the money from my pocket - 1 lost 7s. 6d. in all; the prisoner did not tell me he was going for good - the box had been locked, but the key was in the pocket of my trousers when I went to bed; the prisoner never returned to the house - my mother is a widow; we have no servants.

HARRIET BRISCOE. I lodge in the prosecutor's house, and sleep under the room where this took place. I heard a box moved about half-past six o'clock that morning - I remember the prisoner going out, and he did not return.

GEORGE KING. I apprehended the prisoner at Bromley on the 16th of March - he denied all knowledge of the theft.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310407-144

840. WILLIAM WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 pair of boots, value 14s. , the goods of Thomas Childs .

WILLIAM HENRY SIMS . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Childs, of Middle-row, St. Giles' . On the 30th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner come to his shop - he looked in at the window, and at the same time he was unhanging a pair of Wellington boots; he took them, and ran away - I followed, and called Stop thief! he ran down a court, and I lost sight of him for about three minutes, when he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q.Had you seen him before? A.No - I know him by his face; I saw him about five minutes - I lost sight of him for about three minutes while he ran down a court; he had brown coloured trousers, a blue coat, and a black hat - his hat fell off in St. Andrew's-street: he had the same trousers on when he was taken - I can tell he is the person by his face and by his nose - he has a round nose.

WILLIAM HARRIS. I am a Police-constable. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running up St. Andrew's-street with the boots - he threw them down - I took them up; he ran into a court - I pursued, and took him.

Cross-examined. Q.Where did you see him throw away the boots? A. In Great St. Andrew's-street - I saw him running with the boots in his right hand, about forty yards from me; he threw them from him - there were many people pursuing him, but the prisoner threw the boots away; he was a head - it is a crowded part, but he was running alone; I will swear positively I saw him throw away the boots, and I pursued him through tcourt into Queen-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-145

841. JAMES THOMPSON and JOSEPH LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 2 books, value 3s. , the goods of Jeremiah Box Stockdale .

JEREMIAH BOX STOCKDALE. I live in Carlton-street , and am a bookseller . These books were taken from my counter on the night of the illumination - I did not know it till the officer brought them; the prisoners were then in custody.

HENRY WILLIAM MORRISON. I am a special constable. On the evening of the 25th of February I called at a public-house, and received some information - I went out with an officer, and saw the two prisoners; I went and looked into the prosecutor's window - one of the prisoners came and looked me in the face; he then went and joined his companion on the other side - I gave notice to the Police-constable; I followed, took Thompson, and in his jacket pocket I found these two books, but nothing on Lawrence - I had seen them both near the prosecutor's shop, but did not see either of them go in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Did Thompson say that the other gave him the books? A. He did not, in my hearing.

WILLIAM DRANE. I was with Morrison, but I stood a little back - I saw Thompson look into his face, then go and join his companion on the other side; they then went on to the corner of Norris-street, where they were taken.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see Thompson in the shop? A. No. nor the other - Thompson did not say that the other gave him the books.

JOSEPH DUTTON. I saw the two prisoners together near the prosecutor's, but did not see either of them go in.

MR. STOCKDALE. These books are mine - I know I had such on my counter; they were bound to a particular binding for a gentleman that day.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not this a common sort of binding? A. Yes, but these had been some time in the house, and were a little soiled - we have not sold any of these for some years; they were withdrawn from circulation.

Thompson received a good character.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

LAWRENCE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-146

842. JAMES WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 2 quarts of wine, value 4s., and 2 bottles, value 6d. , the goods of James Sadd .

JAMES SADD, JUN. My father keeps an hotel , at Poplar . On the 22nd of February, we had four dozen of champaigne in - the prisoner brought it; he is servant to Mr. Bulroy - it came in four baskets, and there was a pipe and a hogshead of other wine; the prisoner took it into the cellar I saw him and one of the men unpack it, and they deposited it in the wine-cellar; there was other wine there - I saw the prisoner go on into that cellar; the straw was not returned to the baskets - it was put up with the champaigne; I saw one basket which was not taken out of the cellar, and I took that out - nothing was said about that basket; I believe the men took the baskets out of the cellar - I went up to the bar, and sent our lad down; I did not see any straw left in the baskets - I found one bottle of red wine, and one of white in the bottom of one of the baskets tied down; the prisoner said that basket was broken, and that was the reason it was tied down - I could not say whose wine it was, but my father had that description of wine in his cellar.

JAMES BOON. I live with Mr. Sadd. I was at home when the wine was brought by the prisoner and two tacklemen - the prisoner took two empty baskets out of the winecellar, and wanted to leave one in, but my young master took it out; he then came up, and told me to go down and mind the men - I went down: the prisoner said, "Put these two baskets up the flap," and I tried to do it, but they would not go up - the prisoner then took an empty basket, went into the wine-cellar with it, put two bottles in, and tied it up: I did not see what he did in the cellar, as the door shut immediately after him - he came out and tied it up; I suspected there was something in it - I went out, and told my master; the prisoner threw it up to be put into the cart, and my young master went and took it - I swear it was an empty basket when he took it into the cellar.

Cross-examined. Q.There was no straw in the basket? A. Yes, there was a little he put in - I could not possibly swear it was my master's wine; I told the Magistrate the prisoner took the basket into the cellar, but I did not say I saw him put the wine into it - my master had been holding a candle, but he had gone up to the bar, and sent me down.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. SADD. Q. Did you speak to the other two men about the wine that was in the basket? A. I do not recollect that I did - Boon said he saw the prisoner go into the cellar with the basket, and the other two men said they would attend if they were wanted; it was the other men put the basket into the cart from the flap.

MOSES JOSHUA STONE . I am the officer. I took the prisoner and the wine - there were two vintners' porters there; the prisoner said he knew nothing about it, and so did the men - I took the two men, who took the wine from the prisoner, and put it into the cart.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the wine-cellar putting away the champaigne - Mr. Sadd was holding the light, and the two men stood alongside the binn where they suppose this wine came from; this hamper was tied because it had no binges, but who tied it I do not know - I never went out of the cellar; the porters handed the baskets out, I never touched them - I valued my situation, where I had worked eleven years, more than to do that; I went

into the cellar as the place was nearly up to our knees in water, and I put the basket against the door that I might see with the light where to get the wood - I came out with two pieces of wood and the basket, which I put down against the cellar-door; the two porters were in the cellar the whole time.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-147

843. ANN LARDNER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 chain, value 5s.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 watch-guard, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 sovereign, and 1 half-sovereign, the property of Francis Wardell , from his person .

FRANCIS WARDELL. I belong to the Dutchess of Athol, in the East India service . I have known the prisoner some time - we had lived together on board ship, twelve months ago last December; I met her at a public-house on the 27th of March, and went with her to No. 1, Elbow-lane - we went to bed: I missed her in the course of the night - I think about three, or half-past three o'clock; I had put my watch on the table, and my money was in my pocket - I had put my trousers on the chair by the bedside; I had a sovereign, a half-sovereign, and some silver, but the silver I had made her a present of - when I missed her my watch and money were gone; I got up, put on my clothes, and told the officer - he found the watch: an old woman in the house gave me information - the officer took the prisoner about six o'clock in the morning; she said she had the watch and money to take care of.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. You had known her some time? A. Yes, and was on friendly terms - I think she did say before we went to bed, that she wanted to go out to get something for Sunday; I was not perfectly sober.

WILLIAM WHEELER. I am an officer. The prosecutor said he had been robbed - I told him to stand at the door; I then went up and found the watch, in the drawer in the prisoner's room where the prosecutor had been - I met the prisoner coming home in the morning; I asked what money she had - she said none, and seemed all in a tremble; when she saw the prosecutor she said, "Mr. Wardell, you don't think I mean to rob you;" when she got home she gave me the sovereign and a half out of her pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. She was coming home when you met her? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it with the intention of robbing him - I went to get some tea and sugar; I got a drop of ale, and fell asleep.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-148

844. JOHN MULLFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 1 desk, value 1l., and 1 flute, value 1l. , the goods of Thomas Bagg and William Bagg .

THOMAS BAGG. I live in Hart-street, Bloomsbury , and am an engraver . On the 5th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I saw my street door open, as I was returning from my back premises; I was about to reprimand my servant, when I saw the prisoner come out of my front parlour with this desk under his arm, and the flute in his right hand; he went out - I called after him; he put down the desk and flute opposite the area; I pursued, brought him back, and gave him in charge - I had not lost sight of him for a momant.

WILLIAM BAGG. I was up stains, and heard s voice that I thought I recognized; I saw the prisoner run across the road, and some person after him - I saw my father cross, and take him; I went down, and took hold of him.

JAMES MOORE. I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running, as any other person might do; the gentleman took up the property, and then came and took me, therefore he must have lost sight of me; at the office he said he had not seen my face, but he swore to me by my black coat, and the servant said I had a blue coat; it was a lamplighter stopped me.

MR. BAGG. My house is directly opposite the church, and he crossed to Museum-street - as to his saying I took up the property, I passed by it, and pursued him; when I came up to him he turned round, and I saw his face. GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-149

845. JOSEPH MARTIN was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 20th of March , 2 lbs. 8 ozs. of butter, value 2s., the goods of Richard Brown , well knowing it to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

RICHARD BROWN . I am a cheesemonger . I lost some butter on the 20th of March; the Policeman brought this prisoner and another to me with it.

HENRY SANDERS . I took this prisoner and Green (see page 397) in Upper Park-street, on the 20th of March - they were both running together; Green took off his hat, gave this butter to the prisoner, and I took them; they were then two hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutor's shop.

RICHARD BROWN. I believe it was my butter, and it answered to the size of the piece that had been taken out of the tub, but I could not swear to it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know it was stolen.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks , and Whipped .

First London Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18310407-150

846. JOSEPH MOULDEN was indicted for that he, on the 10th of March , did feloniously send a certain letter, signed "Swing," which is as follows:-

Mr. Michael Parker , Marsh Gibbon, near Bicester, Oxon, with speed.

You must send 10l. to London by the Kidderminster-coach, on Saturday next, or your premises shall be burnt down.

SWING.

Direct, post paid, A.B., to be left at the Bell and Crown, Holborn, till called for.

with intent to extort money .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MICHAEL PARKER . I am a farmer , and live at Marsh Gibbon, in Bucks - I have premises there, which consist of house, barns, ricks, and so forth; I have a house there in which I live; that and the out-houses constitute my premises. On the 11th of March I received this letter by the post; when I came home my people gave it; I

sent it over to the Fire office at Bicester, to do as they pleased about it - I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You never saw him till he was in custody? A. No; this is the Fire-office prosecution; I did not send 10l. up in a letter, nor did any body, to my knowledge - none of my ricks or barns have been burnt down yet; they were all safe when I came away.

CHARLES CRAKANTHORP. I belong to the General Post-office, in London. This letter bears the post-mark of the 10th of March.

THOMAS SHEPHERD. I am a deliverer of letters in the country. This letter came to our office at Bicester, and I delivered it at the house of Mr. Parker on the 11th of March.

THE REV. HALLIFIELD COSGOYNE O'DONNUGHUE. I am a clergyman. The prisoner was employed by me for about three months, to copy manuscripts; I have had frequent opportunities of seeing him write, and know his hand-writing - to the best of my knowledge and belief, this letter is his hand-writing; I have no doubt of it.

Cross-examined. Q.Where do you live? A. I am curate of High Wycomb, Bucks. I have not been in any trouble lately - I was discharged under the Insolvent Debtors' Act, about two years ago; the prisoner was not a creditor of mine at any time, except for his labour from time to time - the last time I had employed him was in June or July last year; I had other persons engaged in copying at the same time - when this letter was first put into my hands I had nothing else put into my hands with it, but I had brought a sheet of his writing with me that as there had been a lapse of some months I might compare it, or I do not think I could have spoken to it, at least I could not have spoken decidedly as to my belief -I had had no dispute with the prisoner about payment till just as I was leaving London, and he had not given me credit for some small sums which I had paid him - there was some dispute about those claims, but I paid him previous to leaving London, about June or July; there is nothing now claimed to be due to him, that I have heard of - his wife washed for me, and the two accounts were mixed up together, and rather than have any dispute I settled the whole; I did not think I owed him so much, and I think so still - I have no unfriendly feeling towards him, and if the Court permitted I could show that I have not, by my subsequent conduct; I do not know how they found me out - I received an application from the solicitor of the fire-office, and I attended; if I had not had the opportunity of making the comparison I spoke of I could not have spoken so positively as I now do, to my belief of his hand-writing- when the letter was first shown to me I said it was not the hand in which he wrote for me, but in a more general scrawling hand, as he had taken pains when he wrote for me; I would not have sworn to its being his hand-writing at that distance of time, but for the comparison which I made.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.What did you do with it when it was shown to you? A. I hesitated a considerable time about it, not from doubt, but looking at the consequence it might be to the prisoner if I gave a rash or hasty answer; the prisoner was not a sufferer by me, or a creditor on my schedule - I never had any difference with him of any nature, sort, or kind, which would induce me to seek to do him any injury.

COURT. Q. You have stated that without this comparison you could not have sworn to your belief, but when you saw the paper now produced what was your belief as to the character of the hand-writing? A.Generally speaking I thought it his, but not with the certainty to swear to it - the impression upon my mind when it was produced was, that it was the hand-writing of the prisoner; if I had been asked as to my belief whether it was the hand-writing of the prisoner, or not upon its first production, and none of those important consequences had attached to it which I have spoken of, I should unquestionably have said it was the hand-writing of the prisoner - when I saw the paper now produced I believed it to be the hand-writing of the prisoner, but thinking it a case attended with serious consequences to him I was anxious to compare it with a writing I knew to be his - having now compared them I have no doubt whatever that this paper is the prisoner's writing, and I believe the address to be the same hand-writing as the other part. (Letter read.)

JOSEPH MARTIN. I am a City-officer. In consequence of information I went to the Bell and Crown, Holborn, to wait for a person who was coming for a parcel - it was on a Monday night, and I think the 14th of March; I inquired for the Kidderminster coach - they said it came to the Bull; I went there, but did not see any person that night - I went to the Bull again on the following morning, and from some information there I went to the Bell and Crown again a little before eleven o'clock; I received information, and went into the street - I saw a woman coming out of the office with a brown paper parcel in her hand; she walked down Holborn, and put it into her right-hand pocket - she walked up Farringdon-street till she got to Farringdon-market; she then took it from her pocket opened it, and put it into a basket she had with her, loose, as she had broken it open, and walked through the market to the further end; I and Herdsfield went up to her, and told her we wanted to speak to her - she told us where she lived; Herdstield took her into custody, and I went, in consequence of what she had said, to No. 32, Kingsgate-street; I knocked four times at the door, and the prisoner himself opened it - I told him I wanted to speak to him; we went up stairs together into his room, which he showed me; I found another person, named Cross there, writing a letter - I addressed myself to both of them, and said, "I am come from a person you sent for a parcel;" the prisoner and Cross both said they did not send any one - I said, "She says so, and you must come with me, and prove you have not sent her;" they came with me, and I left the prisoner at the watch-house while I went with Cross to see what had become of the woman - I found Herdsfield and her waiting at the corner, facing Gray's-Inn lane - I then took Cross and the prisoner to Guildhall, and the prisoner's wife went with Herdsfield; I say his wife, because she acknowledged he was her husband at the watch-house, and he said she was his wife - I do not remember the words she used; I believe she said that was her husband, and they also admitted it on the several examinations - on the first examination the case was not thought to reach the prisoner, and he was remanded till the following Friday - he was afterwards examined and committed.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you find the prisoner to be a shoemaker, and to live at the place to which his wife directed you? A. Yes; I think they said he had lived there three or four months - he gave a true answer to all the questions I put to him; I do not recollect Herdsfield observing that he behaved like a man - it was on the 15th that he went to the office; I asked him to write his own name, and to write "Swing," which he did - I asked him where Mr. O'Donnughue lived, and he took me to where he had lived; the prisoner remained in custody on the first day for about an hour and a half, and was then allowed to go where he pleased - he was not called on to find sureties; I do not know that he told me he would come when I wanted him, but I left word on the night before for him to come and meet me, and I met him the next day in Holborn - I believe he was coming to meet me; the prosecutor did not say that he knew Cross - the woman went to Farringdon-market; a person going from the Bell to where the prisoner lived would not go through Farringdon-market - it is quite a different road; the prisoner appeared again on the Friday, and then he was kept in custody - Cross had not been discharged till the prisoner came in the second time; he is now upon bail - the prisoner's wife is now in Newgate; the prisoner appeared as though he was regularly engaged in work as a shoe-maker; he seemed as if he had just got up.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have been asked if the prisoner told you what was true - have you any means of judging whether what he told you was true or not? A. No; he said he had not sent for that parcel - I do not think his wife, in his presence, said any thing on that subject; from what I had heard, I asked the prisoner if he knew such a gentleman as Mr. O'Donnughue; he took me to where he had lodged, and the solicitor afterwards found him; we had not the original letter then.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD. This is the parcel I took from the woman - it is directed "For A. B., to be left at the Bell and Crown, Holborn, London, till called for;" and on the back "Carriage paid."

Cross-examined. Q. You have heard what was stated by Martin, as to the conduct of the prisoner? A. I was only with him once or twice, but during the opportunities I had of seeing the prisoner, his answers were given readily, voluntarily, and truly.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, only that I am quite innocent; every thing that laid in my power, I endeavoured to trace out, for the satisfaction of these gentlemen, and to prove my innocence; according to the witnesses you will find that to be true.

JAMES GEORGE BUBB . I am a sculptor, and live at No. 22, Grafton-street East, Fitzroy-square. I have known the prisoner from two to three years - I have seen him write more than once or twice; I do not believe this letter, or any part of it, to be his hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You are a sculptor - what means have you had of knowing his handwriting? A. I have known his wife's family - I have employed her brother, and I have gone to the house where the prisoner resides, and seen him write upwards of two or three times - I cannot tell what he wrote, but I have seen him write, and I have some of his writing in my pocket now; I have seen this letter within the last half-hour - I had heard of this affair, and as I knew the prosecutor and the prisoner, I was solicited to come here and say what I knew - he never was employed by me as a writer but I have seen him in the act of writing at his own lodging.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you believe that to be his hand-writing? A. I do not.

COURT. Q. Is that opinion formed on the character of the hand-writing of the prisoner? A. Yes - I think the letters are made differently, particularly the beginning and the ending of the B; I cannot tell whether this is a natural or a disguised hand-writing, but it is a very different hand from what I have seen the prisoner write; not knowing the writer of this letter, I cannot say whether this is the natural undisguised writing of the person who wrote it- I should think it is a natural hand-writing, but that is a mere matter of opinion; I considered I was summoned here to-day, that I might state what I knew of the prisoner's character; I had no intimation that I should be called to speak to his hand-writing - I saw this paper about half an hour ago, for the first time; it appears to me distinct from the prisoner's hand-writing; I should never take it for it - I can trace as little similarity as I can in the features of one person's face and another.

Q. Will you answer this question fairly and openly; do you trace any similarity, or not? A.Very little - I trace none that would deceive me; there may be a little, but I should not have taken it for his hand-writing - there may be a little similarity, but very remote; I do not trace any.

JURY. Q. You have stated you have seen the prisoner write; have you seen his writing so as to form a judgment of his hand-writing? A. Yes, when I have been in his room he has been writing a large portion of time, and I have over-looked it; I have received superscriptions from him, which I have known to he his hand-writing directly I saw it - I distinctly state that I know the hand-writing of the prisoner.

ALICIA ERNBLOUNT. I live at No. 7, New Turnstile, Holborn - I keep a chandler's shop, and my husband is a tailor. I know the prisoner - he lodged in my house nearly two years; I saw him write several times, a dozen times at least; on one occasion I got him to write a letter for me to a charity in Portman-place - this letter is not at all like what I have seen him write; I do not believe it to be his writing - it is not at all the style in which he wrote letters for me; it is not the make of the letters.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.What else did he write for you besides the letter you speak of? A. He wrote bills, and I do not think this to be at all like his hand-writing; I had seen this letter before - a gentleman called on me one Saturday, and showed me this letter and another; I did not tell him this was not at all like his hand-writing- I said I could not say; I did not feel myself obliged to answer.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did that gentleman tell you he came on the part of the prosecution? A. No - I have known the prisoner about three years and a half in all; I have found him a sober, honest, industrious man, and that was the reference I had with him.

JURY. Q. Can you write yourself? A. Yes; the bills

I spoke of were what he made out in his own business for boots and shoes which I gave him to repair.

J.G. BUBB re-examined. Q.You said you did not come here under any expectation of having your attention called to the prisoner's hand-writing, but to his character; how did it happen that you brought any of his writing with you? A. I have had it in my pocket some time -I happened accidentally to feel my pocket-book, and it is in it; a week ago I heard of this, and I looked for a bit of his writing, and put it into my pocket-book.

Q.Then it was purely accidental that you had that writing about you, owing to your having this dress on? A. Yes - I work in one dress, and put on another.

Q. But how came you to bring the pocket-book with that bit of writing to-day, if you had no reason to expect it would be wanted? A. I thought I should like to see the letter, and I thought if there were any doubt on my mind I might compare it - my object in putting it in my pocket-book was certainly to compare it, but to-day I did not know I had it in my pocket till I came; I put it into my pocket first of all with an intention of bringing it, but yesterday I came without it, and to-day I had it - I brought it here intentionally.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? A.From two to three years - his character for honesty, quietness, and uprightness of disposition has been as good as I have ever known of any man.

JOSEPH BUTT . I am a shoemaker, and live at No. 7, Little Turnstile - the prisoner is a cousin of mine. I have known him these twenty years - he lodged with me three years, and worked for me; he has been strictly honest, industrious, and sober.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know your cousin's hand-writing? A. I have seen him write a great many times; I should not like to swear to his writing, but I believe I know his hand-writing - I do not believe this to be his hand-writing; this is more formal than his general hand - the letters are bolder than his, and they are not made in the same way.

Q. Do you believe this other to be his hand-writing? A. No, Sir - I am equally certain about this; I think them both alike (looking at another) - I cannot swear to this; I do not believe it is his - his is a scrawling hand-writing, not like this.

MR. ADOLPHUS to J.G. BUBB. Q. Is this paper the prisoner's hand-writing? A. It is a great deal more like the prisoner's hand-writing than the other - I should rather think it is; it is like his hand-writing more than the other - I should take it to be his hand-writing; (looking at another) I think it very likely to be his handwriting - I should give my opinion in the affirmative; I should say Yes.

MR. ADOLPHUS to MRS. ERNBLOUNT. Q. Do you believe this paper to be the prisoner's hand-writing? A.I cannot say, upon my oath - I think it is not; to the best of my judgment it is not - (looking at another) this is more like his hand, but to say positively I could not; I believe it is not.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I saw the prisoner write these two papers - he wrote one on the first day he was in the Compter, and the other the second day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-151

847. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. SCARLETT conducted the prosecution.

JAMES NICHOLLS . I am servant to Mr. Crease, of West Smithfield, an oil and colourman, On the 22nd of February, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and chose a butter brush, which came to 6d.; he put a 5s. piece into my hand - I saw that it was a bad one, and I handed it over to Mr. Price, the clerk, who came out of his counting-house - the prisoner was close by at the time; he had been in the shop before - Mr. Price sent for a constable; the prisoner attempted to go out, and I collared him - I had sold a brush the day before to a man who I believe was the prisoner.

EDWARD BEDFORD PRICE . I am clerk to Mr. Crease- it is the custom for me to receive money; I keep the key of the till. I saw the prisoner on the 21st of February, but before that another person had come in for a brush, and paid a 5s. piece; I put it into the till - in ten minutes the prisoner came, and bought a brush, which came to 4d.; he gave a 5s. piece, which I put into the till, and the following morning I found the two 5s. pieces were both bad, as there was no other crown in the till - I opened the till between seven and eight o'clock; I took the two crown-pieces, and put them by themselves in one of the partitions in the desk; the prisoner came on the 22nd, about the same hour in the evening as on the 21st- he again asked for a brush, which was served him by Nicholls; the prisoner gave him a crown-piece, which he handed to me, and I discovered that it was the same as the other - I sent for an officer - I recollected the prisoner again.

Prisoner. You said if I could not give a good account of myself, you would give me in charge. Witness. Yes, I did - I forget his answer, but he did not give a good account; I think he said he worked at a baker's - the first brush that was brought came to 6d.; the first the prisoner bought was 4d., and the second he came for was 6d.

MR. SCARLETT. Q.Were these the only three bad crowns you had? A. Yes, the only three crowns.

JEREMIAH HERBERT . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I received this crown, which he was stopped with while presenting, and these two were given me by Mr. Price.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint. These are all three counterfeit; all of the same metal, and I believe cast in the same mould.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop before; I went there for a butter brush - it was to be 7d., not 6d.; what he states is false.

MR. PRICE. I am certain of his being there on the 21st and the 22nd, and I received each time a crown-piece from him.

GUILTY .

Confined 12 Months , and to find Sureties for 2 Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-152

OLD COURT. MONDAY, APRIL 11.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

848. ELIZABETH FLINT was indicted for embezzle

ing the several sums of 2l., 2l. 11s., and 2l. 3s., which she had received on account of Sir George Leman Tuthill , Knt. her master ; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-153

849. SAMUEL DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 carpet, value 25s. , the goods of Richard Fawcett ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-154

850. WILLIAM MAGEE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 sovereign , the money of John Hastings , his master.

JOHN HASTINGS. I am a surgeon , and live in Vauxhall-bridge-road. On the 4th of April I hired the prisoner as an errand-boy , and had his character from his father, who had been an officer in the Penitentiary - I sent him in about an hour after he came in to my employ to purchase half a pound of butter at a neighbour's, and gave him a sovereign to pay for it; he never returned with the butter or sovereign - he was brought to me next day by a boy, who formerly lived with me, and admitted that he had spent the sovereign with some boys at Greenwich fair.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-155

851. GEORGE BLAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , 1 coat, value 14s. , the goods of James Cooper .

JAMES COOPER. I am carter to Mr. Trowers. On the 4th of March I stood with the cart at my master's door, in Montague-street - my great coat was on one of the horses; the butler told me it was taken; I went in pursuit, but did not find it - I returned, and found the prisoner in custody.

JOHN RUSH. I am butler to Mr. Trowers. I was in the dining-room, watching the prisoner and another, who were loitering about - I turned my head, and when I turned back the coat was gone; I ran to the door, and told the carter; he went one way and I another, and at the top of Store-street I saw them both; the prisoner had the coat on his arm, tied in a bundle - I collared him, and brought him back with it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

The prisoner had an excellent character given him for the last ten years.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-156

852. THOMAS LOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 2 cravats, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of John Crawley , his master.

JOHN CRAWLEY. I am a linen-draper , and live in Oxford-street . The prisoner was about four months in my service as porter - on the 10th of March, in consequence of suspicion, I told him to bring his box for me to search; he lived in the house - I went up to his bed-room, he unlocked his box, and in pulling over the things himself, I observed him endeavour to hide one part of the box from me - I searched that part, and found a silk and a green cravat, both of which belong to me; I gave him in charge.

THOMAS CLEMENTS. I am an officer. I received these cravats from the prosecutor, and found this handkerchief in the prisoner's pocket - he said he picked the things up in the shop when he was sweeping it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Where did this take place? A. At the office - I did not use any threat or inducement to him.

MR. CRAWLEY. These handkerchiefs are mine.

Cross-examined. Q.When did you search his box? A.About eleven o'clock in the morning - he did not sleep in the room his box was in; five of my young men slept there - I am sure the box was locked, and he took the key from his pocket; I have no mark on the handkerchiefs, but we have a particular method of folding them, by which I am certain of them - I had a nine years' character with him from Mr. Harper, of Fleet-street.

GUILTY Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-157

Before Mr. Recorder.

853. JEREMIAH GINGER and WILLIAM PAGE were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 waistcoat, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Burgess .

HAYLER NATHANIEL SCRIVENER. I am in the employ of Joseph Burgess, of Chichester-place, Gray's Inn-lane . This waistcoat hung at the door - I saw Ginger attempt to take it, but he failed, and then Page took it; they were together - I followed, and secured them both; I found the waistcoat in Ginger's possession - Page had handed it to him; I had seen them lurking about.

JOSEPH EDWARD PETTIT. I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner in charge - I never saw them before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GINGER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

PAGE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310407-158

854. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Lane , on the 19th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 half-crown, his money .

JAMES LANE . I am a broker , and live in Whitecross-street, Cripplegate. On Saturday night, the 19th of February, about twelve o'clock, I went to Mr. Roberts', the Barley Mow, in Blue Anchor or Chequer-alley , on business - it is out of the City; I was quite sober - I stood at the bar talking for about an hour to him and his wife: the prisoner had also been talking to them - I observed him, and knew his person; he gave Roberts' wife an invitation to spend the next day with him - when I had got about twenty yards from the door (he and another had followed me out,) he called me back; I went back to them, and he said he was going to do a job - at that moment the other man came behind me, and pinioned my arms so that I could not move; the prisoner then turned round, went to the rear of me instantly, and forced his hand into my pocket, where I had half a crown, which he took out - I hand 2s. and some keys left, which he did not get, as I resisted; I called, "Murder! they are robbing me;" Roberts came out, and withdrew his hand from my pocket - he was struck by one of them, and I believe by the prisoner; they got away - I have not a doubt of the prisoner's person; I have not seen his companion since - I should know him again; I saw the prisoner at Worship-street on the 24th, and am positive of him - I never saw him before that night.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q.Have you more houses than one? A. Yes, two in the name street, Nos. 8 and 56 - No. 8 has been shut up since Chrisimas; before that it was a rabbit-shop - I let out two floors; Mr. Parnell, a tailor, lodged at No. 56 - he left because he thought I was embarrassed, and he might lose his things; he did not say he left because he was annoyed by officers coming to inquire for stolen goods - I had drank a glass of ale and a glass of gin with Roberts, and a glass of gin with the prisoner; I staid there till about one o'clock - I cannot be certain of the time; it was not two - there might be four or five persons come in after I got there; I do not know any of them - I think they left about the same time as I did; I did not see the prisoner's face when he took my money - I felt his hand; I felt the money in my left-hand trousers pocket two minutes before - Roberts does not keep the house now; his wife is in possession - he has been in Whitecross-street prison; I believe his license was stopped.

COURT. Q.Was any body near enough to take your money besides the prisoner and his companions? A. Nobody - I was standing up at the time, and was knocked down after his hand was withdrawn.

RICHARD ROBERTS . On the 19th of February I kept the Barley Mow - Lane came there that night about twelve o'clock - the prisoner came in soon after, with another man - Lane stopped there half an hour or three quarters, and was perfectly sober, so was the prisoner and his companion - there were other persons in the house; I believe they were all gone except the prisoner, his companion, and another at the time Lane left - the prisoner and his companion left about the same time as Lane; I wanted to clear the house - I then fastened the door, and heard a person cry out, "Murder! they have robbed me;" I said,"That is Lane, I suppose;" it appeared to be his voice; I opened the door immediately, and saw Lane close by the door - the prisoner and another person were near him; I saw nobody else - if others had been near him I must have seen them; the moment I opened the door and went out, the prisoner struck me a tremendous blow, and he and his companion went off; Lane was then on the ground, I believe - I took him in doors; he complained of being very much hurt, and that they had robbed him of half a crown - I knew the prisoner, as he frequented the house; I understood he lived in the neighbourhood, but did not know his business - he came into my house three or four nights after, and I went down to the Police-office; he left before I returned, but was taken that night - the street was rather dark when this happened; I think he knew me when he struck me - I have been unfortunate, and have come from the debtor's prison - my licence was taken away before the 5th of April, but I was allowed to keep the house open; I think it was on the 5th of April that I went to prison.

Cross-examined. Q. The person who struck you ran away directly? A. I believe he did, but my senses were gone just for the instant; I cannot say whether Lane was on the ground when I opened my door, as it was rather dark, and I was flurried at the moment - I was sober; I had put out the lamp at my door, and it was dark - the house is in a court; there are two or three lamps, but when mine is out it is quite dark - I lost my licence in consequence of such characters as these coming there, and a witness he is now going to bring forward being there; I had frequently fastened them out of my house, and gone to Worship-street to complain of them, but could not keep them out - I generally serve till one o'clock on Saturday nights; I cannot say whether the others went out about the same time as Lane or not - I gave information of this at the Police station on Sunday; the prisoner owes me two or three pounds - I do not know where he lived: he represented himself as having a great many houses, and being very well off - the man with him was Sherring, or some such name, and the prisoner went by the name of Boney and Donkin; he was tried here by that name, for the same sort of concern - I believe he was acquitted; he is a noted body-snatcher.

Prisoner's Defence. A man is outside who was present at the time - Roberts repeatedly threatened to serve me out for owing him money; this is done out of spite: on the morning it took place I left the house alone, to go home, and in Bunhill-row a child was hurt; I took it to the Police-station, and stopped there half an hour or more, at the same station as Roberts says he went to give information - the greatest part of the Police were there; the inspector knew my house - I was not in Roberts' house till a quarter-past one o'clock that morning; four other persons came and stood at the bar, drinking - Roberts, 1, and Lane had rum, gin, and ale together; if I had committed the robbery, it is not likely I should have gone to the same house - I do not live two hundred yards from it; I went there on the morning I was taken - a Policeman whom I and Roberts knew went there to see the fiddling and dancing - I had a glass of rum, and some tobacco, which I paid for; I had a pot of half-and-half; two Policemen were going by, and I gave it to them; if I was guilty, why did not Roberts give me in charge, instead of sending a woman to watch where I lived?

RICHARD ROBERTS . He had some strangers with him when he called at my house - they were not dressed as Policemen; I went out to the station to give information.

Prisoner. The Policemen were in their dresses, and one was the serjeant. Witness. I deny it - the Policemen are not allowed to drink at the bar; there was no Policeman in the house at the time.

WILLIAM BARBER . On Sunday morning, the 20th of February, I got up, because my child had the measles, to get a light at Roberts' lamp, about half-past three o'clock in the morning - I live in Gravel-walk, the first court at the side of Roberts' - I knocked at Roberts' door, and he let me in; the lamp over the door was burning - I took a light home, and then went to have half a pint of beer; I saw the prisoner at the back of the bar, talking to Mrs. Roberts about going to dinner on Sunday morning - I heard the prisoner invite her to his house to dinner; I stood close to the bar - I am sure this was at half-past three o'clock, and they had two, three, or four half-pints of gin; there were six of them together - Mr. Lane and all drank; the landlord took a glass, and they gave me a glass - his wife did not drink; Roberts just came out, and said it was too late to draw any more - they went out, and in a few minutes knocked again.

Q. How came you to wait when your child was ill? A. Roberts told me to stop; he did not say why - I had taken

the light home, returned for the beer, and then I had an other half pint; I always get up at five o'clock on Sunday mornings, and did not mean to go to bed again - I sell milk; Roberts and Lane know it was half-past three well- the second time that they were let in, the Policeman came in in his uniform, and drank a glass; this was all between three and four o'clock - the serjeant came in, caught him there, and reprimanded him; the Policeman and serjeant went out together - Roberts persuaded them all to go, it being late, and they all went out; I remained in - Roberts said to his wife, "Give Daddy a glass of gin;" he put his lamp out before they went out - they had not been out five minutes before somebody cried Murder! Mrs. Roberts, said, "It is Mr. Lane," and Roberts went out - I followed, and saw Lane on the ground, and a big stout man was fighting him; I picked him up, and the man made a kick at him, I think on the shins - he said he had lost his hat; I went back - Mr. Roberts and the prisoner were fighting together; I got Roberts in, and shut the door - he wanted to go out to fight again, but I took the key out of the door, and gave to his wife - I was sober; Roberts and Lane were in liquor - Roberts wanted Lane to treat me and him with a quartern of gin; Mrs. Roberts would not draw any more, as Lane had had quite enough.

COURT. Q. You knew the prisoner very well, did not you? A. No, only for about a week before; I went to Worship-street when he was taken, but I met Roberts at the door, and he said it was all settled without me - I did not tell him the prisoner was innocent; I did not want to have any thing to do with it - I went there to see how the prisoner got on, and if I was wanted; Roberts said it was settled without me: I returned with him and Lane, and had a quartern and a half of gin at the Cock - I did not tell them they had made a false charge; I did not know what they had sworn - Roberts told me at the Baker and Basket that he was committed for the robbery - that was immediately after we left the office; I did not tell them he was innocent - I was quite ignorant, and did not know what to do.

Q. Can you give any reason why you did not go in to the Magistrate, and say you knew it was a false charge? A. I did not - I went home with Roberts and Lane, and had some gin at the Cock; I had seen no robbery committed, and knew he had committed none - I knew if he had he was liable to be hung.

Q. Were you so base as to drink with people who charge a man with an offence affecting his life, when you knew it was false? A. I did not know it affected his life till yesterday - I did not know it was a highway-robbery he was committed for; I live at No. 4, Blue Anchoralley, Gravel-walk.

RICHARD ROBERTS re-examined. In consequence of Lane stating what took place, I thought I was in duty bound to apprehend the prisoner - Barber was in my house that night about the same time as the other party, but I deny that it was three o'clock; I was gone to bed then - I am sure Barber was not sober; I think he was in the tap-room at the time the party were at the bar - he did not come for a light; he was drinking the same as others - he said nothing about a light, nor did I see him take one; I heard no complaint about his child having the measles - he came out of the tap-room after they were gone, and I asked him to wait a bit, as I heard people talking outside; he was rather fresh - I wished him to wait till they were gone; there were no Policemen in my house- I saw Barber at the door of the Police-office, and he told me he did not want to say any thing, for if he spoke the truth it would be all against the prisoner; I drank with him afterwards, and next night a message came to my house, saying they would be the death of Barber if he did not come and speak for Davis - he said he could not for if he spoke the truth it would be against him, and he told me this morning that they had been to him again, and he did not want to come.

JURY to WILLIAM BARBER. Q. Who did you see when you went out of the house? A. The prisoner, brother, and four more - there was nobody but the stout big man engaged near the prosecutor; the prisoner was fighting with Roberts, and the others stood round; what Roberts has said is false - I have not seen him for a week.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-159

855. JAMES LONGDALE and JOHN PARSONS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 live tame fowl, price 2s. , the property of William Green .

WILLIAM GREEN . I live in Peter-street, Cow-cross. On Friday morning, the 18th of March, I missed a fowl from an enclosed yard - I had seen it safe the evening before: I found the prisoners in custody with it at the office on Monday morning - I knew it to be mine; Parsons lodged in my house for three years, and worked at a coalshed; I do not know Longdale.

HUGH NORRIS . I am a Policeman. On Thursday evening, the 17th of March, between seven and eight o'clock, I was fetched to Trevillion's bird-shop, and saw Parsons - Trevillion said he had come to sell this fowl there; I took him to the station, and next day I found Green out - Trevillion said Longdale had been there.

WILLIAM GREEN. I am positive this is my fowl.

THOMAS TREVILLION. I deal in birds, and live in Old-street. On Thursday evening, between seven and eight o'clock, Longdale brought this fowl to me; I asked how he came by it - he said it was his own; I said, "I don't like to buy fowls of boys, go about your business;" he went out, Parsons came in and said, "The fowl belongs to me, Sir, I have another at home;" I caught hold of him, and said, "You have stolen it;" Longdale then ran away - he was taken the same night - I am sure he first brought it.

PARSONS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month .

LONGDALE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-160

856. ELIZABETH GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 4 lbs. of pork, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Simpson .

ROBERT SIMPSON. I am a porkman , and live in Red Lion-passage . On the 4th of April this pork was taken off the stall-board inside the window; I did not see it taken, but when I missed it I detected the prisoner in the shop, with it concealed under her shawl - I understand she was destitute of money.

CHARLES KEMP . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner in charge in the shop with the pork - she did not

deny the charge; she appeared in distress, and is an orphan.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310407-161

857. MARY ELIZABETH FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 half-sovereign , the money of Catherine Sarjeant .

CATHERINE SARJEANT . I lodge in Whitcombe-street , in a stable yard, and take in washing - the prisoner lives in the neighbourhood, and was in service. On the 25th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, she brought me some things to be mangled, which came to a halfpenny - this half-sovereign laid on the dresser-shelf, and could easily be seen; I saw it safe three or four minutes before she came - I was ironing; she remained there five or six minutes - I missed it directly she left; nobody else had been there - I went to her mother's, three or four doors off - she was in the water-closet; I saw her standing in the yard - she denied the charge, and has always persisted in denying it.

CHRISTIANA SARJEANT . I am fourteen years old. I came into my mother's room while the prisoner was there - I was nursing a child; I saw the prisoner put her hand off the dresser-shelf, and put it into her boot, saying,"How bad my foot is?" I did not see the half-sovereign, nor know it was there.

JAMES GREEHALGH . I took the prisoner on the 25th of February, and searched her stockings and shoes, but could not find the half-sovereign, though a woman stripped her - she had been in the water-closet.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-162

858. ELIZABETH COVENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 shawl, value 5s.; 2 caps, value 1s.; 2 collars, value 1s., and 1 ring, value 1d. , the goods of James Sutherland .

JAMES SUTHERLAND . The prisoner lodged in my first floor for a week - I have other lodgers, but not in the same room. These articles were kept in the front kitchen, where I sleep - I saw them on Sunday, about nine o'clock, and missed them on Monday, the 6th of March; the drawers they were in were locked, but I cannot say whether the key was left in them - I was present on Wednesday, the 8th, when the prisoner's box was searched in her room; she opened it herself, took the key from her pocket and put it to the key-hole, but whether it was locked or not I do not know - the shawl was the first thing I saw on the box being opened; I knew it to be my wife's - these other things were found in her box; the ring must have been taken off the parlour shelf - I claimed the things in her presence; she gave no account of them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is not that a brass curtain ring? A. No - it is brass; I do not know whether this is coloured glass in it - no other person lodged in her room; a young woman lodged with her for a few nights - the prisoner came on the 2nd of March; she was very ill, and my wife had to procure her medicine - she was incapable of helping herself; I cannot say whether the other young woman gave notice before she left - she staid but three days, and paid for a week, as she got a situation, and went to it directly; the prisoner complained of losing a sovereign on the Monday - she desired my wife to take her money from the drawer to pay for her medicine - I do not know how much she had; she was not confined to her bed; I do not know that her box was always open; I saw my things safe after the woman left, but cannot tell when - her box was searched in the officer's presence; she did not desire it should be searched; she was in our room - I said her room must be searched first, as she was a stranger; she went up with us, and produced the keys; she had left her service on account of illness; the caps are of trifling value.

THOMAS PEAKE . I am a Policeman. I was sent for; Sutherland said, "Now we will have the house searched;" I asked him, in the prisoner's hearing, if he suspected one more than another; he said, "Yes, the prisoner;" we all went up to her room - she opened her box herself, and this shawl laid in it, just by the lock - Sutherland and his wife claimed it; she made no answer; one cap and a collar were found - the other cap and collar were found under a pair of stays, at the foot of the bed - I afterwards overtook her in the New-road, in care of another Policeman - she gave me this cap out of her hand, and said she hoped Mr. Sutherland would forgive her.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she open the box, or unlock it? A. I cannot say whether she unlocked it.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that her box and the room door were always open till the Wednesday, when she looked it, and that the things must have been placed in it by the person who had stolen her sovereign.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310407-163

859. FREDERICK BOWRY was indicted for that he, on the 31st of March , with a certain pistol loaded with gunpowder, feloniously and maliciously did shoot at Charles Chapman , with intent to maim him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disfigure or do some grievous bodily harm.

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am a cooper , and live in Sutton-street, Commercial-road - the prisoner lodged and boarded with me. On the 31st of March we had been drinking together, and were both a little elated: we had spent the evening together, and came home together about one o'clock in the morning - my servant had given a beer cask to a customer by mistake twelve months before, and the customer had sent a message about it - I spoke to my servant about it, and the prisoner said I should be doing wrong if I deducted it from her wages, which I threatened - I said he had no business to interfere; that affronted him, and he struck me in an indifferent way, and I struck him - I went to the bottom of the stairs, and called to Mrs. Chapman, to know if that conduct was to be tolerated; she was in bed - she dressed partly, and came down; she said, "Bowry, I will not suffer that conduct in my house - you shall go out this instant;" he said he would go - he went up a few stairs, to a little anti-room, where his bed is, and came back with a pistol - I had no idea that it was loaded; he aimed it at me - Mrs. Chapman had found us in combat when she came down.

Q. Did no blows or words pass after he came from his room? A. No - he aimed the pistol at me, and fired; I fell back in my chair - I was not wounded, only something struck my eye; I had no idea he would have done such a thing, in consequence of our intimacy, which was of

so long standing - we had always been good friends: I have no doubt it was nothing but the moment of irritation- the room is small; I could find no mark of a shot or bullet - a Policeman was sent for, who took him, and he was committed for an assault; I do not believe he intended to do any thing but frighten me, and not to do me any personal harm.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-164

860. JAMES CORDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 spade, value 2s. , the goods of William Adamson .

JOHN ADAMSON. I am the son of William Adamson , a market-gardener at Stoke Newington . The prisoner was employed on his grounds for nearly four years - this spade was missed in the course of last autumn; I found it in the officer's possession about the beginning of February - we employ a great number of persons, and each have a spade given them, which is numbered; this spade has been numbered, but it is now defaced - I am certain it has been my father's property; the prisoner worked with us till this spade was found, but then absconded - I suspect it is the spade he had to work with.

No witness being able to prove the spade had been in the prisoner's possession, he was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18310407-165

861. GEORGE COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , 1 pair of stays, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Elam .

JOSEPH ELAM. I am a stay-maker , and live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell . On the 15th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed these stays from the shop window; I went out, and overtook the prisoner before he got to the end of the street, with them under his coat.

THOMAS EDWARD COSTO . I am employed on the Woodbridge-estate. I saw the prisoner loitering about for three quarters of an hour, in company with other persons - I saw him go into Elam's shop; I called the Policemen down, who lives just by, and when I returned the prosecutor was coming along with the prisoner and stays.

THOMAS PHILPOT . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to)

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310407-166

862. JOHN CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 2 nose-bags, value 5s. , the goods of Harvey Combe and other.

CHARLES LAY . I am a horse-keeper to Harvey Combe and others, at the brewery in Castle-street, Long-acre . They often lose nose-bags - the prisoner was in their employ as a labourer for fifteen years, till Christmas; I found him in custody, with a nose-bag, which I knew to be ours.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS. I keep a slaughter-house. I was walking up Queen-street on the 12th of March, at half-past five o'clock in the morning, and as I passed Seven-dials, I heard the drayman complain to a Policeman of losing his nose-bags - I returned to my slaughter-house, and in a quarter of an hour a man came to know if a person wanted to buy any nose-bags; I stepped out, and the prisoner was there - he had none with him; he said he had two to sell - I said, "Have not you three?" he said, "No, only two;" I said, "Why, you have not stolen them above half an hour from Combe and Delafield's dray;" he said he had not; I said, "Where are the bags?" he said at his own house in Clerkenwell - I gave him in charge, and my servant went to the brew-house.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner in charge, having heard the nose-bags were stolen full of corn - I traced them to Neale's yard, where the prisoner had offered them for sale, as I understand; I found them there in possession of the prisoner's wife, who was endeavouring to conceal them - they were full of corn - I took them into my possession; the prosecutors' names are on the straps.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, staring that he had found the nose-bags under some bricks in Ncale's passage, and that the two he offered for sale had been given him at the Red Lion brewery.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-167

863. HARRIET ARNOLD and CATHERINE WHITE were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 37 yards of cloth, value 27s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s.; 3 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns, the property of John Bingley , from his person .

JOHN BINGLEY . I live with Mr. Jackson, an oil-man. On Monday evening, the 21st of February, a little after eight o'clock, I was going home from work, and met the two prisoners in Edgware-road; I had seen one of them several times before - they asked me to give them something to drink, which I did, and drank myself; I had been drinking, but was not the worse for liquor when I met them - I had two or three glasses with them; we went down Shouldham-street , where I slipped down at the step of a door, and they took my purse out of my pocket.

Q. Did you fall from being drunk? A. I do not know - I had the linen and goods with me; my money was in my right-hand pocket - I did not feel that taken; when I got up it was gone, and the cloth laid on the ground - the prisoners had taken it away two or three times; they were trying to get it away.

Q. Did you see them trying to get it away? A. They were close by me - I slipped down at the door; I was rather in liquor - I do not know whether they gave me a push or not; I had felt them pulling at the cloth two or three times before I got to where I fell - I was going home, and not to any place with them; when I got up, the Policeman came and asked if I had lost any thing - I felt in my pocket, and my purse was gone; the table-cloth and linen laid on the ground.

Arnold. Q.When you were at the Coach and Horses did not a gentlemen offer to see you home, and you said No, you knew the person you was with, and she would take care of you, and did you not give the cloth into my hand? A. I did not - I gave her no money.

RICHARD HANCOCK. I am a Policeman. I saw the prosecutor about two doors from the Coach and Horses, Edgware-road, about twenty minutes to eight o'clock - he was alone; I saw the prisoners accost him and ask for drink - he went into the Coach and Horses with them, and came out in about ten minutes; Arnold then had the cloth

under her arm, and had hold of one of his arms, and White the other - he was drunk; I followed them about three hundred yards, and called my brother officer to follow me - I did not see the prosecutor fall, but saw him on the ground, and Arnold ran away; I followed, her, pinioned her two arms, and said, "What have you got here?" she said nothing, but I took out of her hand the prosecutor's money bag - she said she had picked it up; there was no money in it then - I took them all three to the station-house, and searched her again; I could tell there was something in her month - I seized her throat; Clark put his finger in, she bit it, and there was there sovereigns and two half-sovereigns - Bingley claimed the bag, and said, "Where are my sovereigns?" I found nothing on White - she remained with the prosecutor when Arnold ran away; I saw them both carrying the cloth at times - it was on the ground when Arnold ran away; White had it when they went down the street - she did not attempt to run away.

CHARLES CLARK . I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Homer-street - Hancock came to me; I went with him - I kept on the other side of the way, and saw them all three fall together; the prisoners did not appear in liquor, but the man was - when I got up White stood by him, and had hold of one end of the cloth; Arnold had run away- Hancock brought her back; I found three sovereigns and two half-sovereigns in her mouth - I had great difficulty in getting it from her.(Bag produced and sworn to.)

Arnold's Defence. The cloth was given to me at the public-house door - he asked me to see him home; he was so much in liquor I could scarcely keep him up - White came into the house, and he treated us both; we had more drink at the Castle, and in the street he gave me the money to take care of - I took it out of the purse, put it into my mouth, and walked to Shouldham-street with him; he said he lived at No. 27, and then he said he lived in Newman-street - he keeps a house of ill-fame.

ARNOLD - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

WHITE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-168

864. DAVID WREN and REBECCA SHARP were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 snuff-box, value 2s., and 1 sovereign, the property of Edward Smith , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-169

865. ROBERT WATERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 tea-caddy, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Harris .

SARAH HARRIS . I am the wife of Thomas Harris , a broker , and live in Fleur-de-lis-court, Spitalfields . On the 18th of February I went out about four o'clock in the afternoon, and returned at nine, but did not miss this caddy, which should have been in the window which was open - I found it at Worship-street next day, and knew it; it could be reached from outside.

ZACHARIAH BAKER . I am a Policeman. On the 18th of February, between seven and eight o'clock, I stopped the prisoner in Carter's-rents, about a quarter of a mile from Harris, with this tea-caddy under his arm - I asked how he came by it; he said he was going to take it to his brother John - I said, "That is not the question, where did you bring it from?" he said he fetched it from his father; I knew his father, who lived in Quaker-street, about two hundred yards from Harris' - I detained him, and the prosecutrix claimed it next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PAVNE. Q. He had it under his arm? A. Yes, quite careless - it was wrapped in a cloth, but only partly covered; his parents I believe, are not of the best character - I took him before Mr. Broughtonlon the 18th, and he was discharged; but next morning I took him out of bed, as I heard it was stolen.

MRS. HARRIS. I am quite sure this is my caddy.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you been paid for it? A. His father came to me before I missed it - he asked if I was a mother, and said, "You have got a caddy to sell, what is the price?" I said 18d. - he said, "Will you he satisfied with that? I said Yes; he went out brought 1s. 6d. in about five minutes, - soon after somebody came and said I had done wrong in taking the money, for, I was liable to be prosecuted - I really do not think he took the caddy.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310407-170

866. HENRY WALTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Coggs ; and 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Coggs .

WILLIAM COGGS. I live in Pitt-street, Tottenham-court-road , in the back garret - the prisoner lodged in the same room; we were children together. On the 16th of March I pulled my handkerchief off at night, and put it into my box, but did not lock it - the prisoner and I slept together; he got up first in the morning, and went out - my father's apprentice wanted to borrow my handkerchief before I got up, and it was gone; I saw it next week, when the prisoner was in custody.

THOMAS COGGS. I am the prosecutor's brother, and sleep in the back shop. I lost a pair of shoes that morning, which I had worn the night before - I found them at Marlborough-street when the prisoner was in custody.

GEORGE RANDOLPH . I am shopman to Hoggs and Co., pawnbrokers. On the 16th of March this handkerchief was pawned, in the name of William Davis, lodger, Newcut - the person who took it in is too ill to attend.

THOMAS HART . I am a Policeman. On the 16th of March, a little before ten o'clock at night, I took Walters in the Regent's Quadrant, and charged him with stealing the shoes and handkerchief; I found the shoes on his feet, and the duplicate of the handkerchief on him.

GEORGE RANDOLPH. This is the duplicate of the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. William Coggs took the handkerchief off his neck that night, and asked if I wanted to buy it - I said I should like it, but I had no money; he said, "If you like to give me 5s., you may pawn it, and get what you can on it;" I met a shopmate, and spent the money - the brother told me if I was distressed for a pair of shoes, I might take these, and pay 4s. for them when I could.

WILLIAM COGGS . I never said he might have the

handkerchief for 5s., and pawn it - he never said any thing about buying it.

THOMAS COGGS. He did ask me to sell him the shoes the night before; I said I would not unless he paid for them first.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310407-171

867. WALTER TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 10 pairs of clog-boards, value 5s. , the goods of Henry Cottrell , his master.

HENRY COTTRELL . I live on Holborn-hill , and am a last and clog-maker - the prisoner has been my journeyman for some months. On the 5th of April I received information that clogs had been taken - I got an officer, and went to the prisoner's lodging on the 6th, and found ten pairs of clog-boards in a bag. in an unfinished state; he never brought them home to finish - his wife had destroyed herself a few days before, but he has no family, except a married daughter.

WILLIAM KING. I work in the same house as the prisoner, but not in the same shop - the men are not allowed to take work home to finish; I know one pair of these logs by figures on the back, which I made to settle a reckoning - all the clogs appear the same as master's.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge at his master's - he went to his lodging, produced the clogs himself, and said he had manufactured them before he came into the prosecutor's employ.

GUILTY . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18310407-172

First London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

886. JOHN GREEN was indicted for that he, on the 26th of March , feloniously did utter, dispose of, and put off a forged order for payment of money , which is as follows:-

"Pleas to give the bearus six shillings.

March 26, 1831." E. TICKNER."

with intent to defraud William Mott .

SECOND COUNT, for offering a like forged order to John Carvill , with a like intent.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM MOTT. I am master of St. Bride's workhouse , which is in the City. I know the prisoner well, he has never been a pauper in our workhouse, but has been relieved by me repeatedly - it is customary for the overseers to leave in my hands a sum of 10l. to distribute to paupers, according to the orders I receive - the accounts are balanced every week, and the 10l. is left in my hands; the orders are signed by the overseers, and presented to my by the bearers for relief - there are three overseers; Mr. Tickner is one, and acted as such. On the evening of the 26th of March I was absent from the workhouse - Mr. Carvill, the assistant overseer, attended during my absence, in consequence of an arrangement between us - I left the workhouse that day about six o'clock, and know nothing of this occurrence myself - I left from 5l. to 10l. in Mr. Carvill's hands to meet these orders.

Q. Supposing the signature to this order to be genuine, should you have paid it if presented to you? A. Yes, most decidedly - I had relieved the prisoner by order of Mr. Tickner a score times, I may say, before.

HARRIET JONES . On Saturday evening, the 26th of March, I was in St. Bride's workhouse; the out door bell rang about eight or half-past eight o'clock - I answered it; when I got to the gate I saw a man standing there in white trousers, and another man stood behind the gate - the man in white trousers told me to take in the note; I think I should know the note again if I saw it - I can read, but not write; I know this to be the paper (looking at it) - I know it by this mark here (pointing to the top of the letter T, and a flourish under the name) - I took the paper in to Mr. Carvill, the assistant overseer, and gave it to him - I left the two men at the gate; in consequence of what passed between me and Mr. Carvill he went to the gate, but before that I returned to the two men, and the man in white trousers spoke to me - I am sure he was the same man as I had received the order from: he asked if I had got the money - I told him I had not got the money, but Mr. Carvill would be there directly; he wanted me to let him in at the gate - I told him I would not: it was my duty to keep all people out - by this time Mr. Carvill came up, and asked the two men what they wanted; the man in white trousers said he wanted relief - Mr. Carvill told him he could not have relief without an order, and asked him his name - he said John Green; I did not know him before, but the prisoner is the man who gave me the order, I am certain - I know him again, and I knew him before the Justice; he is the man who had on the white trousers, I am quite sure.

COURT. Q. Did one or both the men speak when Carvill came? A. One; that was the man in white trousers.

JOHN CARVILL . I am assistant overseer of St. Bride's, On Saturday evening, the 26th of March, I was left by Mr. Mott with money to relieve the casual poor - I heard the bell ring between eight and half-past eight o'clock; it was the particular duty of Harriet Jones to attend to the bell - shortly after it rang Jones brought me this paper; it is not usual to pay such orders as these without some previous inquiry - the overseers generally direct me to inquire into the circumstances if they give orders for 8s. or 10s., but they have power to give money without inquiry - no communication had been made to me on the subject of this order, and the amount excited my suspicion; I went to the gate, and found the prisoner there (who I myself did not then know), and another man - the prisoner was dressed in white trousers, and I think a blue jacket, a sort of sailor's dress; when I asked Jones who gave her the order, she pointed him out as the person, in his presence, and I asked his name - he said John Green; I cannot be mistaken in his person - I know he is the man: I may have known him as a casual pauper, but never relieved him myself - on his saying his name was Green I opened the gate, and told him he must go with me; Mr. Tickner lives in Bride-lane- the workhouse is in Fleet-street, directly opposite to the new avenue at St. Bride's church; I took the prisoner down Fleet-street, towards Bride-lane, in a direction for Mr. Tickner's; I did not tell him where I was going to take him, or for what purpose, and when we got nearly opposite the crossing to Bride-lane, he asked where he was going to, and before I had time to answer he followed it up by saying he should not go to Mr. Tickner's, it was of no use to go there for he would not give him any thing - that immediately strengthened my suspicion, and I said, "Very well then, you must go with me;" I then turned round Black Horse court, where the parish watchouse is situated; that is in

a different direction from Bride-lane - as I turned the corner of Black House-court he attempted to resist and to escape; I was obliged to take an additionel hold of him, and forced him down the court; he still resisted - I was obliged to produce a staff, had insisted on his going with me; I looked round when he attempted to escape and then saw the other man was close by, for the first time - I am sure it was the same man; on producing my staff the other man ran away - I took the down Black Horse-court, and he attempted to resist again, but I compelled him to go to the watch-house with me - he used very powerful endeavours, to escape; I had the paper in my possession, and have kept it ever since - this is it; the initials E. T. are on it - they were not on it when I received it; I saw Mr. Tickner do that at the Justice room, where I produced it.

COURT. Q. Have you ever paid any order of that description? A. I very frequently pay orders of precisely the same description signed by the overseer, in that forme we pay upon the signature of one overseer.

JURY. Q. Did you ever pay the prisoner any money? A. No - it did not strike me as a forgery at the time; I thought the amount was wrong, but on his refusing to go to Mr. Tickner, I thought it must be a forgery.

COURT. Q. Would this paper, written as it is, and spelt as it is have imposed on you? A. I really did not read it particularly as I saw the name of Tickuer - that was sufficient for me; I did not particularly read the writing, nor should I have done so; I did not notice the word bearns till now - the only singular thing in the order was its not having the name of the person to when it was to be paid; the orders do not always specify a name, but they should do so - I should have paid this order without looking further at it, if it had not been for 6s.; if it had been for 1s. I should have paid it instantly, but not 6s. without inquiry, the amount being unusally large.

Q. Is that order payable without previous inquiry? A. It is payable, and if Mr. Mott had received it he must have paid it, but, I being assistant overseer, knew there had been no previous meury; I am in the habit of receiving a communication from the overseers before an order for that amount is issued; I should not refuse payment in consequence of not having that order, but it being the practice of the overseers to direct an inquiry before they give relief to that amount, and not having been so directed, caused my suspicion - I am in the habit of receiving a communication where more ham 2s. or 3s. are to be paid.

JURY. Q. Had the overseers authority to order that amount? A. Yes - my suspicion was excited by the time of night at which it was given; I considered something particular must have occurred, for an order for 6s. at that time - had it been on a Thursday I should not have questioned it; there is no customary form for these orders - they are written on paper; I never recollect seeing the word overseer added to the signature - either of the overpeers sign orders; they are generally written on such small pieces of paper as this - I am well acquainted with Mr. Tickner's hand-writing, but it did not strike me that it was not his.

COURT. Q. Mr. Tickner has no right to draw on Mr. Mott, except in his character of overseer? A. No.

EDWARD TICKNER ; ESQ. I was overseer of St. Bride's at the these in question, and am a Common Councilman. I knew the prisoner very well previous to the 25th of March- I very frequently gave him orders for relief; I recollect that I gave him an order on the 14th of March - (looking at the order) this is not signed by me, nor by my authority; I never saw it till it was produced before the Justice.

JURY. Q. Have you been in the habit of signing similar papers to this for relief? A. Tickets a bout the same size - they are more vouchers for payments to paupers, given at the moment on any paper that is at hand.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence stating, that he had applied for relief to a Mr. Hobbs on Saturday evening, and was referred to Mr. Carvill at the workhouse, where he went, but could not get in at the gate in Shoe-lane - that he met a man at the gate, and asked if he had an order; he said he had one from Mr. Tickner, that they both went round to the Fleet-street entrance, when the man gave the girl the order in question, and on her return asked if she had brought the money - she replied No, that Mr. Carvill would come and speak to him; Mr. Carvill came, asked the man some question, and desired him to go along - that the man ran away, and the prisoner went with Mr. Carvill to the watch-house, it concluded by solemily declaring he had not presented the order, and knew nothing of the other man.

Prisoner. On Saturday night, before I was taken into the watch-house, I told Mr. Carvill if he would give me the prisoners, or let me be remanded for a day or two, I would bring forward the man who brought the order; he said, "No, I have got the girl who will swear you are the man; I said I could bring the man forward, but they would not allow me, nor to name where he did live - I am willing to write, to prove I am innocent; I never was guilty of any thing, nor in prison before, but for fourteen days, and that was for begging - I had three witnesses to character, but they are not aware that I was to be brought up to-night.

The Jury, upon comparing the forged instrument with the record, appeared to doubt whether it was accurately set out.

MR. CLARKSON. If the Jury are not satisfied that is a fast simile, we are very happy to receive the suggestion, and retire from the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-173

869. THOMAS BECKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 sack, value 1s., and 4 bushels of oats, value 16s. , the goods of Horatio Stevens .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Thomas Smeeton .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HORATIO STEVENS . I live in Cowcross-street. On Thursday, the 17th of February, I sent a sack of black oats to Mr. Smeeton's slaughter-house, in Wheatsheaf-yard, Farringdon-street , by my man Larman - I received a communication from Smeeton on Friday night, and on Saturday night I saw the prisoner crossing the Wheatsheaf-yard with a lantern, I asked if he could give me any information respecting the oats; he said he could not; that he heard a sack of oats had been stolen, but that was all he knew - he was apprehended on the Tuesday following, and a sack was produced before the Justice with his name on it, but I cannot swear it is the one the oats had been in - Mr. Smeeton's house is in St. John-street-road.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he work about that yard? A. I believe he did, as a helper - I am

not aware whether in our conversation I said "the oats," or "the sack" - he was taken in the same yard two days after.

THOMAS EARMAN . I am in Mr. Stevens' employ - he is a corn dealer . On Thursday, the 17th of February, I took a sack of black outs to Mr. Smeeton's, in Wheatsheaf-yard - I deposited them in the passage of the slaughter-house, and put a bill of parcels on the top of the sack, which was marked H. Stevens. Cowcross-street, and I had mended it at the bottom; I afterwards heard the oats were lost, and on the prisoner being apprehended, I attended at the Magistrate's, saw the sack, and knew it to be the same; there were a few black oats hanging to the flue in the sack - they were of the same quality and description as those I took to Smeeton's.

Cross-examined. Q. Had your master a tolerable stock of these oats? A. Yes, and he had fifty sacks marked the same - I had takes on about ten that week, and the same corn in some of them, but this was an empty sack about the place; I was obliged to mend it to take them in - I saw it at Guildhall in about a week - I could not be deceived in the mending; I placed it in a passage leading from the slangliter-house to the yard; it has a door which shuts, but has no fastening - Wheatsheat-yard is a thoroughfare from Farring don-street into Seacoal-lane - a person could not get to the sack without opening the door; any person might carry it away.

COURT. Q. Had you but one mended sack? A. Yes. but they were all out - I am certain this is the one I mended to send to Smeeton's.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the prisoner employed in the yard? A. Yes; I have delivered him sacks of master's several times, but am certain I did not deliver him this particular sack.

JAMES TERRY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 22nd of February, standing at a stabledoor in Wheatsheaf-yard - Millin came up, and he went up to the loft while I took the prisoner; he refused to give me the key of the stable, but Millin said if he did not he should break it open - he said it was his employer's stable; Millin brought the sack down, and the prisoner said he had found it in the yard on the Saturday morning - he saw it in Millin's hand.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Millin come up at once to him and demand admittance? A. He said his name was Beckett, and that he was employed there - I told him to give us the key, or let us in; he refused, and then gave it up; he said he was waiting for his master to come home with the horses.

COURT. Q. Do you know whether any body else worked in the stable? A. I cannot say - I stood at the door while Millin went up and found the sack.

RICHARD MILLIN . I am an officer. I came up when Terry was about to take the prisoner - I asked if he had the key of the stable; he said he had: I asked what sort of oats his master's horses eat? A. he said he would go into the loft and fetch me a sample - I then said, "Where do you live?" he said, "I hardly know where I live" -I said, "Where do you sleep?" he said, "I sleep here, over this stable;" I went up, found a place which he called his bed, and this sack formed a part of the bed - I brought it down, and questioned him where he got it; he hesitated for ten minutes, and then said he found it on Saturday morning in the yard - there are black onts in it now - Larman identified it.

Cross-examined. Q. You found about as many oats as would cling to it? A. Yes; he said he had the care of the place, as the man was ill - there are he other premises in the yard; there are stables there.

Prisoner. I have witnesses to call.

JAMES LIVERMORP . I John about the Wheatsheaf-yard, the same as Beckell - I was coming out of where I live, and saw him sweeping up the yard; he swept up this sack among other things - I asked what he was going to do with it; he said he might as well make a shift which to sleep on, as he was very cold in the lost; I took up the sack, and there was H. Stevens, Cowcross-street, on it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Who is your employer? A. Mr. Barroclongh, a tobacconist, on Ludgate-hill - I look after his horse and chaise, and job about for Mr. Martin - he picked up the sack just by the slaughter-house door, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning - I should not think he could have forgotten it at night - I sleep at No. 1, Wheatsheaf-yard; I was out with my master on the 17th, and came horne about six o'clock - I did not see the prisoner; I did not see Mr. Smeeton on Friday, nor hear the oars were lost; I went out at six o'clock on Friday morning, and remained out till between nine and ten at night - Mr. Barroclough was out with his chaise that day; he came home on Saturday night, and I had nothing to do on Friday nor Saturday; I did not know of the oats being lost when the sack was found - I had been there eight or nine weeks; I never saw any oats delivered there.

RICHARD MILLIN . When I found the sack the name was perfect on it - there had been no attempt to take it out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-174

870. WILLIAM DAVY CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 2 pairs of boots, value 20s.; 3 pairs of shoes, value 6s.; 1 hearth-rug, value 2s.; 12 knives, value 3s.; 10 forks, value 2s.; 1 pair of half boots, value 5s.; 1 basket, value 6d.; 1 knife-tray, value 6d., and 4 keys, value 6s. , the goods of David Wright .

CAROLINE HAYDON . I am servant to David Wright , who lives in Lower Thames-street . On the 16th of March, at a quarter-past seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the house, and asked me to get him the shoes and boots to clean - I had seen him employed on master's premises formerly, and so I delivered him the articles mentioned in the indictment; he was to shake the hearth-rug - he went away the moment he had got them; I saw no more of him till he was in custody.

DAVID WRIGHT. On the 16th of March I missed these articles, when Haydon told me of this.

Prisoner. Q.You have said you lost four keys? A. There was a bunch of keys, the counting-house, the cupboard, and two others.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish not to be indicted for more than there was; there were but two keys - it is my first offence, and I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-175

871. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of James John Downes . from his person .

JAMES JOHN DOWNES. On the 8th of April I was in Skinner-street, Snow-hill , and felt the tail of my coat moved - I put my hand behind me, and caught hold of the prisoner by the arm; he had one end of my handkerchief in his hand - some boys taller than himself were walking behind him; he quitted his hold of my handkerchief - it was not entirely detached from my pocket; about half the length of it was out; it is my custom to put the handkerchief at the bottom of my pocket - the pull was sufficiently strong to draw my attention; it is my opinion that the whole of my handkerchief must have been moved from the position it before occupied, but I am not quite sure of that.

The prisoner put in a petition for mercy, and expressing his contrition.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-176

NEW COURT. MONDAY, APRIL 11.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

872. JAMES HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 12 books, value 20s. , the goods of Christopher Harris ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310407-177

873. THOMAS PREEDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of Abel Rouse Dottin .

JOHN CRONK. I am servant to Abel Rouse Dottin , M. P. , who lives in Argyle-street . On Saturday, the 2nd of April, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner rapped at the door - I went, and he said he was very sorry, he had dropped half a crown down the area, and would I let him have it; I said certainly - he came in and stood on the mat while I went down stairs to procure a light, and as soon as I got into the area I heard the latch of the street door pull back, but the door did not shut; I looked up, and saw him go out with a great coat on his arm - I ran up the area steps, got over the gate, and ran. but I lost sight of him at the bottom of Argyle-street: I have not seen the great coat since - I saw the prisoner again on the Monday morning following; I was quite sure he was the person I had seen on the Saturday - he was then in custody at Marlborough-street office - I had never seen him before; the great coat had been hanging in the hall - there was a light, and I could clearly see his features.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What sort of a night was it? A. Fine - there were not many people in the street; he remained but a second or two with me - I went down instantly into the area; I had not seen the great coat before - I cannot tell when it had been safe; I was in the area, and had a candle in my hand, but I saw the prisoner distinctly before I went into the area - I could not discern him distinctly in the street, but there had been no other person in the house - I can swear the person went out of the house with the coat; I saw him go out at the door - he got to the bottom of the street while I got over the area.

COURT. Q. Did any body else see the person who came to the house? A. The kitchen-maid did, but she said she should not know him.

WILLIAM HANKS. I am butler to Mr. Dottin - he came in between five and six o'clock, with a great coat on; I took it and hung it up in the hall, about five or six yards from the street door - I missed it between seven and eight o'clock.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a special-constable. Between seven and eight o'clock that night the prisoner knocked at the door of General Turner's, which is next door to Mr. Dottin's, and said he had dropped some silver down the area - Mrs. West went to the door to him; she called me(I was at the time in the house), and I took a candle to show the prisoner down into the area - I am certain he is the man; I had seen him before - when he came down into the area I asked what silver he had dropped; he said he did not know, he had been drinking - I said, "I don't think you have dropped any thing;" he said, "Yes, I have - it is all right;" I said, "I don't think it is all right;" he walked up, and went away.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310407-178

874. HENRY PENNYCAD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 9 lbs. weight of ham, value 10s. , the goods of William Jones ; and VINCENT SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

WILLIAM JONES . I keep a chandler's-shop in Euston-street . On the 25th of November I was in my shop, and saw Pennycad at the corner - he seemed to be watching me; I saw him coming and going for five minutes - he was in my view for an hour; I had a party taking some refreshment in my back parlour, and after they were gone I went into my back parlour - while I was there I heard's footstep; I turned round, and missed part of a ham from my shop - there were about 9 lbs. of it.

JOSEPH BAKER . I have been confined in the House of Correction - I ran away from my mother, and was in Queen-square with another boy; the beadle took me, and said I was begging - I was committed: I work for my father, who is a plumber. I was in Chapel-street in November last - I saw Pennycad, whom I knew, and another boy named James Butcher; Butcher had a ham carrying in his apron - he told me he had a ham, which he had got in Euston-street; I said it was a wonder he was not taken - he said he did not care for that; Pennycad was near him at the time - it was about 9 lbs. of ham.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you been in the House of Correction? A. I was there fourteen days - I do not know that I ever made free with another person's property; I did work at Mr. Reeves', an attorney, in Ely-place - I was accused by he Policeman there; he came to ask me whether I knew any thing about Mr. Reeves' pistols - I was not charged with taking them; I told all about them, and they were found on my information - I did not know Mr. Reeves had lost his pistols; they were found in Pennycad's house - I knew where they were; Pennycad took them to his house, but I did not know he took them till I got to Hatton-garden - I went with a person to pawn one of them; I was taken by a Po

liceman in Regent's-park three days after - I did know before that they were pawned, and that they were Mr. Reeves'; I had not told Mr. Reeves, for I was put out of the way - I told the Policeman after I got out of the House of Correction; the pawnbroker's shop was in the New-road - I did not know any thing about them till we were in Hatton-garden, and then Pennycad pulled one of the pistols out of his pocket; the pawnbroker's name was Joyce - I did go into the shop and put the pistol on the counter; I asked him 1s. for it - I did not take it out; it was Mr. Reeves pistol - I was working in his house at that time, as a painter.

COURT. Q. Do you know Mr. Jones shop? A. Yes, my mother used to deal there - I might see that shop on the 25th of November; I was not waiting outside.

Pennycad. He never saw me in Chapel-street - Jem Butcher and I were not there; the truth is he knows more about it than we do.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-179

875. JAMES PENNYCAD was again indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 pair of pistols, value 1l.; 1 snuff-box, value 1s., and 1 pair of studs, value 8s. , the goods of Charles Reeves ; and VINCENT SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 stud, part of the same goods, well knowing them to have been stolen , against the Statute, &c.

CHARLES REEVES . I live in Ely-place . In October last I lost a pair of pistols, from a cheffioneer in the dressing-room - I also lost a pair of coruelian studs and a snuff-box from Mrs. Reeves' dressing-table; my house had been painted - I had left town the middle of September, and returned the middle of October; I have seen one of the pistols, and one of the studs - here is one of them; I can speak most decidedly to it - I do not know Pennycad.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a Police-officer. I took Pennycad in October - I saw his mother at the House of Correction when I was waiting to take him; at the office his father and mother came and gave him something to eat- his father's house is in Brill-row, Somers'-town; I searched the house, and found this pistol, this snuff-box, and a stud - a woman there was whispering to him, and I desired her to stay away; he asked me if he might speak to his mother and father at the office - the man whose house I had searched came forward, and went and bought him a penny loaf; the woman brought him some clothes - while I turned my back the stud I found at that house was taken away; this stud was found at Simpson's, but not by me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-180

876. JAMES BUTCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 120 pairs of shirt-studs, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Nightingale ; and VINCENT SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-181

877. JAMES BUTCHER was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 10 pairs of stays, value 10s. , the the goods of George Hodgkinson .

ANN HODGKINSON . I am the wife of George Hodgkinson - we live in Munster-street ; we deal in stays and shoes . On a Friday, the beginning of December, we lost some stays, which were folded up on a chair in the shop; I thought there was a pair of children's boots gone at the same time - I never saw the prisoner till I saw him in custody; I have seen the stays produced by the pawnbroker - they once were mine; here is my mark on them, but it is impossible for me to say that these are what I lost in December - I have no proof that I have not sold them; they have been marked by the and are such as I had purchased.

WILLIAM BUCKELLOR . I live in Thomas-buildings, with my mother - I was going up to St. John's - wood-road with some butter, some time ago; I cannot tell what month it was - I saw the prisoner and a boy named Wells going along; Butcher stood up against the shop window, while Wells walked up and down; it was a stay-shop, opposite to a public-house and a butcher's-shop - I saw the prisoner go in on his hands and knees; he fetched out a pair of children's boots and two pairs of stays; he gave them to Thomas Wells , who ran away with them - Butcher went in again, and fetched out eight pairs more; I saw a Policeman in the street - he was following behind just as he came out; when we got round the corner, the prisoner said, "Halloo, Buckellor," and I said, "Halloo! Butcher;" he said, "Here is a sway I have made;" and he said, "I will give you something if you will come and hold my jacket while I go and pawn them;" I did so; he went to Mr. Griffith, a pawnbroker, and pawned two pairs - we then went to Mr. Tickner, in Church-way, New-road, and one pair was pawned there.

RICHARD HOWARD . I am an apprentice to Mr. Tickner, a pawnbroker, in Church-way. This pair of stays was pawned at our shop for 9d., in the name of John Butcher , lodger, No. 5, Wear's-passage - I cannot say who pawned them.

GEORGE WARD . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Charlton-street, Somers'-town. These stays were pawned on the 10th of December, in the name of James Butcher, for his mother, but I have not the least knowledge of the prisoner or the witness.

MRS. HODGKINSON. These stays are mine - I lost some that Friday evening, but I was never able to know how many I missed - there was a large roll of them on a chair.

Prisoner's Defence. I was put into the House of Correction for ringing a bell, and while I was there Buckellor came in; he said it was for stealing a till; he said he had robbed a brick-maker's house in Pancrasfields, and he was afraid he should have a detainer at the gate.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310407-182

878. WILLIAM MANLY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 Bible, value 10s. 6d., and 1 Prayer-book, value 7s. , the goods of Samuel Darton and Joseph Harvey .

GEORGE JOHN MOULTON . I am a shopman to Mr. Attenboro, a pawnbroker, of Crown-street. On Saturday, the 12th of February, the prisoner came into our shop, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; he

brought with him a pocket Bible and a Prayer-book; I asked whose they were; he said his own, and that he bought them at a bookseller's in Holborn, and had given 10s. 6d. for the Bible and 7s. for the Prayer-book, and he had bought them either five weeks or five months before; he mentioned one of these times at the shop, and the other at the office - he said his name was Sparkes, and he lived in Earl-street, Finsbury; I sent the boy to make inquiry, and then I heard an alarm; the boy had met the prisoner at the door, seized him by the collar, and brought him back - an officer was sent for, and took him; these are the books.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Was the boy who seized him the same boy you sent out to make inquiry? A. No; the prisoner had quitted the shop, and turned round the corner a short distance; he had got out of my sight - the boy was at that time at the door; we have boxes in which persons go to make pledges - these were other persons there; the prisoner offered to pawn from the first of the boxes - they are rather dark; I cannot be mistaken in his person - I did not see the prisoner stopped outside.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I took the prisoner into custody on the 12th of February - I asked him how he came in possession of these books; he said he had bought them of a strange man; I think he said five months ago - he described where he lived; I went there, and found he worked for Darton and Harvey, which was true.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you think he said five weeks? A. I cannot be sure.

SAMUEL DARTON . I live in Gracechurch-street, and am in partnership with Joseph Harvey - the prisoner was in our service for about eight years, and was so on the 12th of February. These books I believe to be ours - we have a binder named George Matthews; he binds books of this description - the value of the Bible is about 10s. 6d., and the Prayer-book 7s.; the prisoner bore a good character.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he has given you money which he has found? A. Yes, and we have entrusted him to take money to the Stamp-office, under 50l.; we are generally in the habit of marking books when they come from the binder's, but they may lay for a day or two - there is a particular person who has the care of Bibles and Prayer-books; his name is Bowler - there are two others who take them in, but they are not here; the care of these books is left to one of these persons, or the whole of them- I very seldom mark the Bibles and Prayer-books; one of these three persons generally mark them with a private-mark, and also the retail mark - there is neither of the marks on these books.

GEORGE MATTHEWS . I live in Warwick-lane. I have examined these two books - I bound them for Messrs. Darton and Harvey; I know the Bible by the edition, which we do for no other firm - we do not do all the bindings in the same way; theirs is the only house for which we do that edition in this binding - I know my own work - I cannot say when the Bible was bound, but it is since Christmas; the Prayer-book has the prayer for the present King and Queen - that had not been bound five months on the 12th of February.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you will not undertake to swear it had not been bound five weeks? A. No; I have had no Bibles of this edition, (which is the Oxford common edition) to bind since Christmas; we have them by fifties at a time - this is the edition of 1829 - I perhaps did one hundred of this edition in the course of the last year; I send them to the prosecutor by a boy or a porter - the lettering part of this is remarkable, and the headband; we do not put any marks in the book - I was at the office when an examination of these books took place, but I did not hear the Magistrate desire them to be examined with a magnifying-glass - I was only there the two last days.

JURY to MR. DARTON. Q. Are there any books sold from your shop which have not the private-mark? A. A great many are, but Bibles and Prayer-books generally have it - I do not mark them myself, and would not affirm that my shopmen always do it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in Holborn - I did not attempt to leave the shop; while the boy was gone I was necessitated to go to the door, but I did not move from the door, and the boy ran and seized me - I said I was not going away.

G. J. MOULTON re-examined. The prisoner went away towards Sun-street - I had not missed him above a minute when he was brought back; I saw him at the next door - the lad who stopped him is not here.

MR. MATTHEWS. I cannot be positive that I bound this Prayer-book for the prosecutor - we do them for other houses in the same way.

Prisoner. The prosecutor's shopman swore most positively that he did not believe they belonged to him, and that it was not possible I could get at them.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I did not hear the shopman say before the Magistrate that he did not believe they were the property of the prosecutor - here is a faint mark on the Bible now.

Cross-examined. Q.Did not the shopman examine it with a magnifying-glass? A. Yes, and he said this was greatly like the mark, but he could not swear to it.

MR. DARTON. This is the place where the mark should be, but it is not sufficiently legible for me to see whether it is the mark or not.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-183

879. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 11 shillings in monies numbered , the monies of Alexander Young .

SARAH PENFOLD . I am servant to Mr. Alexander Young. A person named Goddard and the prisoner came with a load of straw to my master, in February last; I cannot tell the date; I told the prisoner Mr. Young was not at home, and I had no change to pay for the straw, but I asked him if he could give me 11s. if I gave him a sovereign; he said he had not change, but he would go and get it - I gave him the sovereign, and I never saw him again; the straw came to 9s., and he asked me for the money - the sovereign was Mr. Young's; the prisoner did not propose that I should give him a sovereign and he would get change - I was only to have 11s. back.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-184

880. WILLIAM FOWLER was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE JOHN RICHARD JAMES DICKINSON . I am a surgeon , and reside at Ealing. The prisoner came into my service on the 1st of November, 1828, and left me on the 12th of February last - he was my assistant; he kept my books, and it was his duty to make an entry of every transaction that took place - he made out all the bills, and if money was offered him it was his duty to take it; I had a patient named Rebecca Howard - she resided at Ealing; she is the wife of a labouring man - she had not been a patient prior to the 2nd of August - the prisoner had a salary of 85l. a year; he has entered in the book which I have here that he had attended Rebecca Howard - I saw it as a matter of business; here is the entry "Mrs. Howard's delivery 10s. 6d.," with the medicine sent - when it is paid he enters it as paid; here it is, on the 17th of August, "Mrs. Howard paid 10s. 6d.," and here are my initials placed against it; I believe I did receive a bill for medicine from Rebecca Howard afterwards, but I did not receive 4s. 6d.

COURT. Q. Was he your clerk or servant? A. I should consider him my servant - there was no specific meation about his receiving money for me, but it was understood generally, and he was in the habit of accounting for what he received; there was nothing said one way or the other about his having any cases to attend on his own account.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. On what date was the payment made? A. On the 17th of August - here are my initials against it; I presume it was handed over to me on that day, but it might be a day or two afterwards; most likely I put my initials there on a Monday - I had not seen Mrs. Howard myself; the prisoner is a member of the Company of Apothecaries - I presume he had some notion of setting up in business; he told me before I preferred this indictment that he intended to set up at Ealing -I did not like that, of course; I am the only doctor in that village, but there are others in the vicinity - I indicted him as soon as I found any charge against him: I suppose it was four or five days after I heard of his intention of setting up in business - he had left me four days; I desired my friends to get him to sign a bond not to set up in business within several miles of me, and to refund the money; the message brought back was that he refused point blank to sign any such thing - I have always paid the prisoner in money; he has desired me to get him a bottle of brandy, and when I have done so he perhaps has not been able to pay me till his salary was due; his coal-merchant has called on me, and I think a brewer has, but that was to pay in advance, before his salary was due; I do not recollect that any one called when his salary was in arrears - his milkman never called on me; his baker spoke to me once, but I never paid his baker - I think the greatest number of times he ever had brandy of me was twice; it might have been three times; I had a partner in the beginning of 1828, but the accounts have been settled, and he is dead - the prisoner was in our service at the time of the partnership; he informed me that he expected to attend Mrs. Howard - if he had wished to defraud me, he certainly need not have told me of it; he was in custody last Session, on a charge respecting Elizabeth Reed, but she was not then able to attend.

COURT. Q.What was the charge at which he was allowed to attend a patient in this case? A.10s. 6d. if paid at the time, but if not it was to be 15s. - I was satisfied with the payment of the 10s. 6d. at that time; I am not aware that persons are in the habit of paying more to the assistant.

MR. LEE. Q. You have stated that supposing payment to be made at the time, 10s. 6d. was the regular charge? A. Yes, for my assistant, but 15s. if credit is given - the attendance was on the 2nd of August.

REBECCA HOWARD . My husband is a labouring man, and resides at Ealing. I was a patient of the prosecutor's in August last, and was attended by the prisoner - I paid him 15s. on the 8th of August.

Cross-examined. Q. And you were very well satisfied with this young gentleman's attendance? A. Yes, I liked him very well - I was not inclined to make him any compensation.

COURT. Q. What passed when you paid the prisoner on the 8th of August? A. I gave him the money: I had asked him on the 3rd what was the charge, and he said 15s.; I gave him a sovereign, but he could not give me change, and on the 8th I gave him 15s. in silver - I had never employed him before; I sent for him as Mr. Dickinson's assistant - I met the prisoner walking on Ealinggreen, and asked him to attend me; that was about four days before he attended - I asked him what the charge was, and he said 15s.; the reason I asked him again on the 3rd of August was, because I had had some medicines, and I did not know whether that was in the bill; I paid 4s. 6d. in another bill, for medicine.

MR. DICKINSON re-examined. The prisoner has charged too much in this case - the woman has been the sufferer, and not me. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-185

881. WILLIAM FOWLER was again indicted for a like offence .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

MR. DICKINSON. It was the prisoner's duty to make out accounts, and to receive money for patients he attended - Elizabeth Reed and Eliza Howell were attended by the prisoner, but I did not know of it for some time; I have my book here, from November to the present time - there is no entry of their names at all.

COURT. Q. Is there any entry of sundries? A. There is a small till account in which there would be sundries.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What did you engage him as? A.Assistant generally - I think he did say with respect to Reed, that she had not paid him, and if she had he should not have handed it to me, but that was in the heat of controversy; I discharged him on the 12th of February, and would not pay him his salary till he had handed me a list of his midwifery patients - he threatened to serve me with a writ; I believe the prisoner will not set up in business - I should have no objection to his signing a bond at this instant.

COURT. Q. You demanded of him a list of his patients? A. Yes - he certainly was not at liberty to attend patients on his own account; I offered through my friends, that if he would sign a bond and pay me, I would take no

further proceedings against him, but I found there had been a system of plundering going on for six months - I did not know Reed; I had never seen her as a patient myself, nor Howell either - I never had any dispute with him about his right to attend patients on his own account; he never claimed a right to attend patients - he is married, and that was one of my reasons for not wishing to prosecute him.

MR. LEE. Q. You had not seen Reed or Howell? A. No - I think I may have received money from him from persons whom I had not previously known.

ELIZA HOWELL . I am single, and used to live at Ealing. The prisoner attended me on the 8th of November last - I agreed with him to attend me, which he did, and I paid him on the 9th of November, 1l. 1s.; when I first spoke to the prisoner I did not wish Mr. Dickinson to know where I had lived, because if he knew where I had lived he would have known me by sight, as to my name I did not care - I employed the prisoner as Mr. Dickinson's assistant, and I expected the money would go into Mr. Dickinson's hands, but I did not wish him to know where I had lived; I went to Mr. Dickinson's surgery, and his errand-boy has brought me medicines, which were included in the sum of 1l. 1s., that I paid - I do not know what the medicines amounted to; there were two six-ounce bottles and a small phial.

COURT. Q.Are we to understand that you did not wish Mr. Dickinson to know who the person was that the prisoner delivered? A. Yes - I should not have employed Mr. Dickinson himself; when I paid the prisoner the 1l. 1s. there was a person present - I told him I was very well satisfied with him, and as long as I was in Ealing I should think of employing no one else but him if I was ill; I had agreed with him for 1l. 1s., I think about six weeks before - I asked him what sum was required for attendance and medicine, and he said 1l. 1s.; there was one phial of medicine sent on the 8th of November, and to the best of my remembrance, one of the six-ounce bottles and I think one of the six-ounce bottles afterwards - when I spoke to the prisoner, I told him I had lived servant at a very respectable house, and as Mr. Dickinson used to go there as doctor, I did not wish him to know that I was the person who had lived there: I knew Mr. Dickinson did not know my name, and I told him he might tell that but not to say where I had lived - Mr. Dickinson knew me by sight, and I did not choose to see him; I desired the prisoner to take care that he was not aware I was that person.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not give as a reason for not letting Mr. Dickinson know, that you could not bear the sight of him, he looked so much like a butcher? A. No - I found the prisoner very attentive and skilful.

MR. DICKINSON re-examined. Q. You have looked through your book, can you take upon yourself to say there are not payments to the amount of 1l. 1s. to which no name is attributed? A. I think there may be - there are entries of small till accounts for bleeding, tooth-drawing,&c.; here are entries of ready money for medicines without a name - the price of small phial and two six-ounce bottles would be 7s. 6d.; I could not say that in that book there may not be entries to that amount, but this is the book in which he ought to have entered this.

ELIZABETH HEED. I am married, and live at Ealing. The prisoner attended me in my confinement on the 8th of February, and on the 9th I paid him 10s.; when I asked him what the charge would be, he told me 18s.; the 3s. were for medicine, but he agreed to come to me for 15s.; I said it was a great deal of money, as I was a poor woman, and he agreed to send me a small draught- he said he was going to leave Mr. Dickinson, and then his own charge would he half a guinea.

COURT. Q. Did you pay the money on Mr. Dickinson's account? A. I thought he would receive the money.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a nurse of the name of Rose? A. I live in a very bye place, and a poor woman came down for relief; I was in the greatest of trouble, and I sent her for the prisoner - she did attend to me; I did not pay her 5s. for her trouble; I do not know that the prisoner did - she has never been to me for money; I had not seen Mr. Dickinson myself; I had sent my aunt to him - I believe the prisoner's wife lives at Ealing; he was very attentive, kind, and skilful to me.

MR. DICKINSON re-examined. Q.Did you come to any settlement of accounts with the prisoner on the 12th of February? A. Not in the morning; I think I then owed him about 15l.; I should say we were on bad terms- I had given him notice to leave me, and the time had expired; I think he had made entries in the other book on the 11th, but this is the book in which this 10s. should have been entered - here is an entry of Mr. Tyrrell, "Paid a guinea," and my initials are against it, to show I have received it; he ought to enter money immediately on its being received - there was an unsettled account between us, in consequence of his refusing to give me up a list of patients he had been engaged to attend, and I refused to pay him his salary, but in the evening he sent his list, and I paid him his salary - this could not be an error in the book, because I asked him what became of the midwifery case which he had; he said, "It is not paid, and if it had been, I should not have handed it to you."

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Reed's aunt engaged me to attend her on my own account - I said the fee was 15s.; she sent for me, but before I got there she had been delivered three-quarters of an hour, by Mrs. Rose - I was there about a quarter of an hour; she could not pay me then, but the next day she paid me 10s., and said as Mrs. Rose had had so much trouble, she hoped I would allow her the rest, which I did; she said she hoped I would send her a little medicine, which I also did: she said it was almost too much for her to pay, as she was a very poor woman - I said I was going into business myself, and I would attend her for half a guinea - when I left the prosecutor he sent a gentleman to me to say I was to leave Ealing, and he said I had been attending cases; I said there was one midwifery case, but it was not Mr. Dickinson's; he said if I would leave Ealing, and not set up within so many miles, he would not proceed against me. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-186

882. WILLIAM SURRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Robert Dixon , from his person .

RICHARD JONES. I live in Turner's-court, St. Martin's-lane, and am a helper. On the 4th of April I was at the Castle public-house; Robert Dixon came in, sat down in the settle at the end of the table, and fell asleep; the prisoner got off his seat, walked across the room, at over the table, and sat down by him - he took his hand out of his own pocket, and put it into the prosecutor's right-hand breeches pocket; he then took it out, went back, and sat down; I went to the bar, and told the landlady to let no one out till she had got a Policeman, who came, and took the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Were you perfectly sober? A. Yes; I am a helper in a stable - I only help in a morning; I had been at work the day before in Middle Scotland-yard for an hour or two; I never was in any trouble in my life, not in custody - there were six men in our company, mostly stable men; we were strangers to the prisoner - I did not see any money; I and one of my friends got up, walked to the bar, and told the landlady of it in about five minutes - the prosecutor did not appear very drunk; I did not see him drink any thing there - I paid for one pint of ale in that house, and had about two glasses; this was between four and five o'clock in the morng - Ini was not there above an hour - the prisoner did not leave the room; I had not been in bed that night - I left my work about eleven o'clock in the morning of the day before; I had not been all night in public-houses - I was only in two public-houses; we had all six walked round Covent-garden and the Strand.

JOHN BROWN. I live at No. 6, Blenbeim-street, Chelsea. I am a gentleman's servant out of place. I was at the Castle between four and five o'clock in the morning, on the 4th of April; I saw the prisoner there and Robert Dixon - the prisoner got up, and went across the room to where Dixon was; he sat down by his side, put his hand into his right-hand breeches pocket, and took it out again - he got over the table, and sat down where he was before.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to represent that this man, in the presence of five or six of you, got over the table, and put his hand into his pocket? A. Yes - there were some strangers there; our party sat at one side of the room with our drink before us - none of the strangers are here to-day; I had been out of place some time, as I had been ill - I had been out rather later than usual, and was locked out; I walked back again to town from Chelsea, and I met my companions at Charing-cross, I suppose a little before four o'clock in the morning - they were walking along the street when I met them; they said they were locked out, and we walked about. I was quite sober.

ROBERT DIXON. On the 4th of April I went to the Castle public-house, in Bull Inn-court, Strand, between four and five o'clock - I was in liquor - I had walked from Blackheath-hill, and was fatigued; I asked the landlady for a glass of ale - she made it too warm, and I told her to make a pint of it, and give me a pipe of tobacco - I sat down and fell asleep; I had then two half-crowns in my pocket, and three shillings - I changed one of the shillings at the bar before I went to sleep; I got a sixpence and some halfpence; I put the sixpence into my pocket, and I then had two half-crowns, two shillings, and one sixpence - when I awoke I had nothing in my right-hand breeches pocket in which I had had my money - I know it was all safe when I paid for the pint of ale.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you drink any of the ale? A. To the best of my recollection I did not, nor smoke the pipe; I had not sat many minutes before I went to sleep - I was not very drunk; the last place I had drank at was Blackheath-hill - I had walked up to town; I think I had about 14s. when I went out; I had not spent any money in town.

JURY. Q.Did you take all the money out when you paid for the ale? A. No, only a single shilling.

MARY ANN BLUNDELL . I am the wife of John Blundell - he keeps the Castle. I recollect the prosecutor having a pint of ale and a pipe, about four o'clock - he gave me a shilling; I gave him a sixpence and three-farthings; in about ten minutes the witness came and told me that his money had been taken, and in about half an hour I got the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner there? A. Yes; three of them came in, and had a pint of ale between them - I recollect the other six men being there- they were all strangers to me; the prisoner did not attempt to go out; if he had I should have stopped him; I said I would not allow any one to go out.

THOMAS THORPE. I am a Police-constable. I was called to the house about twenty minutes past four o'clock - I took the prisoner by the desire of the landlady, who had sent for me; I found on the prisoner one half-crown, two shillings, three sixpences, and twopence halfpenny, all in different pockets.

MARY ANN BLUNDELL re-examined. Q.Did you receive any money from the prisoner after you heard of the robbery? A. Yes; in about five minutes he came and brought me half a crown, and I took ninepence halfpenny out of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you receive them, at the bar? A. Yes; he had been sitting in the room opposite the door.

COURT. Q.How far must you go out of that room to get to the bar? A. About two yards - the door does not open between the bar and that room; they are by the side of each other; he had to walk across the room, and the persons there must see him - the street-door is about two yards from the bar; in two steps more he might have gone into the street - I gave him 1s. 8 1/2d. in change.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-187

883. CHARLES STARLING was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 set of union-pipes, value 5l.; 1 sovereign, and 1 half-sovereign, the property of Owen Cunningham , from his person .

OWEN CUNNINGHAM. I play the union-pipes, and live in Charles-street, Drury-lane. On Thursday, the 10th of March, I had been in the Haymarket, but I did not see the prisoner till I got to Charles-street , near my own home - he then came over, and knocked me down; he took my pipes, and walked away - I afterwards missed a sovereign and a half sovereign, which I know I had in my pocket four or five days before, and pinned with two pins.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you quite sober? A. I was - I had drank part of a pot of porter; I do not know where - I have been in London four or five

months, but I should not be able to find the public-house again.

Q. I recommend you to be very careful how you swear; was it not the Crown and Thistle, in the Haymarket, and did not you go to that very house and ask if you had left your pipes, saying you must have left them there? A. I did not go the same night, I went the next day; I was robbed about eleven o'clock at night - the prisoner came of his own accord to me in two or three days afterwards, brought me the pipes, and said they had been left with him by a man.

CATHERINE CUNNINGHAM . I am the wife of Martin Cunningham - we did live at No. 3, Charles-street. My husband came home that night, and said Owen was coming - I looked out, saw Owen laying down bleeding, and covered with the dirt of the street, and the prisoner standing over him - I turned round to call my husband, and the prisoner ran away with the pipes.

Cross-examined. Q.Then he was standing quietly for you to see him? A. Yes, at first; but he took his opportunity to run away - I saw him plainly; I knew he lived in the same street, but I could not say the exact house; he came to our house with the same pipes, in two or three days; we had made inquiries in the meantime, and my husband went every where - I never spoke to the prisoner's wife, till the pipes were got: Owen was not tipsy - he was sensible.

COURT. Q. Did you afterwards see the prisoner and the pipes at your husband's? A. Yes; a man, named Burke, came first, and then the prisoner - the prisoner received 15s. and Burke 4s. 6d.; the prisoner brought the pipes - we were looking at them to see if they were all in their shape and form, and the prisoner said, "If you don't have them as they are, I will take them away, money and all."

MARTIN CUNNINGHAM . On Thursday, the 10th of March, I had been out with my brother, the prosecutor - we had each of us a set of pipes, and we played at a public-house in the Haymarket; we came away together, and went straight home - we got there about a quarter before twelve o'clock; I walked into my house - I met my wife with the candle in her hand; she asked where my brother was - I said he was coming, and to keep the candle there for him; she called me in about three minutes - I saw my brother down, his face bleeding, and his clothes disfigured - on the next Thursday I went to the Sugar Loaf public-house; I saw a man there, named James Burke - I was telling a man, who had pipes there, of my losing my pipes, and that I would not begrudge 1l. to find them - Burke then made a proposal to me; he afterwards came to my house, and after that the prisoner came with the pipes - I gave Burke 19s. 6d.; it was the prisoner brought the pipes - they cost 20l.; I valued them at 7l., but the gentleman valued them at 5l. - they belong to my brother; I had his pipes, and he had mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know a man of the name of Barry? A. Not by name - I knew a man of that name in Sligo, but not in London.

Prisoner's Defence. A relation came to town on the Wednesday, and on Thursday, the 10th of March, after work, I went to a public-house, and had a pint or two of beer - in coming out a man, named Barry, was opposite; he asked a young man to mind these things till the morning - the young man's mother called him up, and I said,"If you have any thing to leave you can leave them with my wife;" he said, "Yes, and thank you too;" the next morning I told Burke the man had left me a set of bagpipes, and on St. Patrick's day I was drinking; Burke came in, and said, "I know who these pipes belong to, if you will give them to me I will take them home;" I said,"No, I will take them;" the prosecutor only lives three doors from me - I took them there openly; the man was very much obliged to me, and said he was very glad - I said, "If any body took my things I should be much obliged to any one to bring them home."

SIMON WESTLAKE . I am the landlord of the Horse Shoe, Titchbourne-street. On a Thursday night in March I saw Owen Cunningham and his brother at my house, at the top of the Haymarket - on the following morning Martin Cunningham called on me, asked for the pipes; he did not complain that his brother had been robbed - I reminded him that he and his brother had gone to another public-house, and he had better go there and look for them.

JOHN FENNELL. I am in the service of Colonel Burke, of St. Alban's-place, Haymarket. Martin Cunningham came to our stables, and asked me if I knew what he did with his pipes; when he parted from me he and his brother were both intoxicated - one of them fell down.

COURT. Q.When were you applied to to come here? A. A woman left the summons with me, I think on the 7th- I never saw the prisoner in my life; I was with the prosecutor and his brother at the Crown and Thistle - I cannot tell the day; I left the house with them - I asked them to leave their pipes with me and the landlady till next morning, as they were not capable of taking care of themselves; I went to the top of the Haymarket with them, and they said they were capable of taking care of themselved, which I knew they were not - I lodged at the Crown and Thistle at that time.

RICHARD ASTLETT. I am a cutler, and live in Charles-street, Drury-lane. On Thursday night, the 10th of March, I was in company with the prisoner at the Bank public-house in King-street - we left about twelve o'clock, or a little after; on coming out a young man asked him if he would be so kind as to take a bundle and mind it for him till the morning - he agreed; the man and I went with him and the bundle to the prisoner's house - I do not know the prosecutors at all, or either of them; I went in with the prisoner, and never left him till the morning - I had been with him from half-past nine o'clock.

COURT. Q.How many yards is that public-house from his own house? A. I cannot tell, it is not many yards - the back of the public-house comes into Charles-street; his house may be pretty well ten yards from it - I am a travelling cutler, and work in the street; I lodge in Charles-street.

JURY. Q.What is the distance between the prosecutor's and the prisoner's houses? A. It may be twenty or twenty-five yards.

EDWARD THURST . I keep the Bank public-house. I remember on the night of the 10th of March the prisoner was at my house till five or ten minutes before twelve o'clock - he had been there, I think, from nine; I was in the house all the time, and had the opportunity of seeing

him every minute - I do not think he could have gone out without my seeing him; he paid for what he had - I have known him twelve months.

COURT. Q. Do you take particular notice of your customers? A. I took notice of him; I was sitting a long time in the room where he was, and drank with him - the last witness was with him; two more persons went out with them; there had been others there in the course of the evening, but they did not stay - in going out they passed the bar where I was sitting; I have kept that house twelve months.

JOHN ELLIOTT. I was the prosecutor's and his brother's landlord at the time they lost these pipes. Owen Cunningham came to me the morning afterwards, and said he had lost them, but he was so tipsy he scarcely knew how he had lost them - I have no interest about the prisoner, but I know the prosecutor was in the habit of coming home drunk; I know the prisoner goes about with a barrow. I am a boot-maker, and keep a general-shop.

MARTIN CUNNINGHAM . These two gentlemen came and offered me money to make a flaw in the indictment, and but for the officer coming in and taking me away, they would have pressed the money upon me.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Upon your oath, did you not go to the landlord of the Crown and Thistle next morning, and ask whether you had left your pipes there? A. I went to him, and was told to go round to the pawnbroker's, and not to mention any thing, I said my brother had lost them - he said, "You had better offer a sovereign reward, and you will get them:" I did not ask if I had left them at the Crown and Thistle.

SIMON WESTLAKE . There is no landlord to the Crown and Thistle - it was to the landlady he put that question, and he also asked me the same - I told him to go to the Police-officers, and offer a sovereign reward, to get the pipes back.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-188

884. THOMAS JACKS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Cradock , from his person .

JOSEPH CRADOCK. I was in the Strand on the 1st of April, about one o'clock, and felt something at my coat pocket - I turned, and saw the prisoner and another running away up Drury-court; he put the handkercheif to the other, and they both ran up the court - I pursued, and took the prisoner; when I first saw them they were about three yards from me - when I took the prisoner I said,"You rascal, you have robbed me;" he said, "You are quite mistaken, for I have not got your handkerchief;" he was searched, but nothing was found - he and his companion were the nearest persons to me.

Prisoner. Q. Can you positively state that I was the person who took your handkerchief? A. I can swear you was running, and gave a handkerchief to the other boy - you ran till I got within five or six yards of you; you said, in the station-house, you were going to get a pint of beer.

JURY. Q. Your handkerchief was gone? A. Yes, and I saw some red in the handkerchief he gave to his companion - there was red in mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys running up Drury-lane; I heard a cry of Stop him! I ran - that gentleman came up, and accused me of picking his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-189

885. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 32 yards of flannel, value 25s., and 7 handkerchiefs, value 3s. , the goods of Ann Hunter .

ELIZABETH OSBORNE . I live with Mrs. Ann Hunter , a widow , who keeps a linen-draper's shop in High-street, Poplar . On the evening of the 3rd of March I was serving in the shop, between seven and eight o'clock - there was a roll of thirty-two yards of flannel there, and seven handkerchiefs were pinned to it, in one piece; there was a mark on the flannel - while I was serving the customer I saw the handkerchiefs flying, as if the wind had taken them - I went to the door, and missed the flannel and handkerchiefs; I gave an alarm, and Nation, who is a neighbour, came to me - I soon after heard that a man was taken - I went to the watch-house, and saw the prisoner, the flannel, and the handkerchiefs; Bow-lane is about five yards from the shop - I never saw the prisoner before.

THOMAS WILLIAM NATION . In consequence of Miss Hunter calling my attention to this circumstance - I went in the direction of Bow-lane, and saw the prisoner in Cotton-street, which joins to it; he had this flannel under his arm - this was about ten minutes after the witness had spoken to me; the flannel had these handkerchiefs pinned to it - I stopped him, and asked where he got it; he said he found it - I took him to the station-house; there was no dirt on the flannel, except just at one end - it was very dirty weather, and was raining at the time - he was about one hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutor's when I took him.

JAMES SHEPHERD . I am an officer. I received the prisoner and this property - this apron was wrapped round the flannel.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me before I got to the station? A. No - he said he found it in High-street; there was no dirt on the flannel.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to take a pair of shoes home to Blackwall; I turned up Bow-lane, and saw two boys throw this on the step of a door - I took it up, and carried it to the end of the street.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-190

886. THOMAS HILLYER and ROBERT HILLYER were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 live tame rabbit, price 2s. , the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I live in Upper Bell-yard, Hillingdon . I had this rabbit and the young ones on the 20th of March- I lost this one; I was sent for, and went home - I met John Yeoman, and my rabbit was found in the Ram gardens; I know the prisoners' friends.

JOHN YEOMAN . My father and mother live in the same row with the prosecutor. I happened to be there on the 20th of March; the dog kept barking - I went into the back yard, and opened the gate; I then saw Richard Hillyer come running down the yard, with a light coloured rabbit in his hand - the other prisoner had run down just

before him; they were going from the prosecutor's premises - it was about nine o'clock at night, but it was moonlight; I saw the rabbit caught afterwards in the Ram gardens.

WILLIAM HENRY BIRCH . I took the rabbit from a boy who caught it in the gardens, about forty yards behind the prosecutor's premises - I had taken the prisoners, but they had nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-191

886. MARIA HENLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , 1 frock, value 2s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 1s. , the goods of George Pearson .

MARY TREVILLION. I am the daughter of George Trevillion . I was minding Mr. Pearson's shop on a Friday - the prisoner came in and asked for Mrs. Pearson; I said she was not at home, but I expected her in every minute- she waited about half an hour; I remember a frock and trousers hanging near the shop door - I had seen them safe about half an before hour she came.

MARY PEARSON. I am the wife of George Pearson. I left my shop in the care of this witness on a Friday - I left a frock and trousers hanging at the door; I was out about two hours, and on the following morning I missed the frock and trousers.

ELIZABETH CASSERS. I keep a clothes-shop in Kingsland-road. On a Friday in March, the prisoner came to my shop, and brought a frock and trousers - she asked 2s. for them; I gave her 1s. 6d. - I asked if the frock was her own; she said Yes, she had three children, and they wanted bread - I hung them up on the Saturday, and on the Monday the prosecutor claimed them.

JACOB LEVY. The prisoner offered me, on a Friday in March, a frock and trousers - I refused to buy them; I think it was on the 5th of March.

WILLIAM JACOBS. I am a Police-constable. I went to Cassers' shop, and found the articles there.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a person in the street - of a person who was in tears, and said she wanted bread; I did not want them, and sold them again.

GUILTY . Aged 50. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-192

887. ELLEN GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 4 sovereigns, 18 shillings, and 8 1/2d. , the monies of Robert Garland , her master.

ANN GARLAND . I am the wife of Robert Garland. The prisoner was in my service - she used to account for what she bought two or three times a week; I found her generally honest, and used to burn the accounts when she gave them to me, and if she had spent any of her own money I paid it her - we paid ready money for every thing but bread; I called on the baker, and said I would pay the bill, meaning the last week's bill - they said there had been a bill ever since the 10th of January, and I had issued money weekly for it to the prisoner.

JOSEPH SMOUT. I keep a butcher's-shop, in North-place, Gray's Inn-road. I have been in the habit of supplying the prosecutor, and used to send with the meat a ticket of the weight and price - I never received any money from the master or mistress, but I received of the prisoner 2l. about August last, which is all I received since the 18th of February, 1839; I have now a bill against the prosecutor for 24l. 16s. 2 1/2d. - I recollect on the 17th of February sending in a loin of mutton.

MAS. GARLAND. I cannot tell what I paid to the prisoner for the butcher's bill - I suppose it might be 12s. or 14s. a week; I used to give her sovereigns and silver for marketing, from 2l. 10s. to 3l. a week - I cannot speak to any particular sum.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-193

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

888. SUSAN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 8 shillings, the property of George Smith , from his person .

GEORGE SMITH. I am a seaman . On the 2nd of March, my ship was at Mr. Green's dock at Blackwall - I fell in with the prisoner and another girl, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening - they asked me to give them something to drink; I took them to a public-house, and gave each of them a glass of spirits - the other girl then went away; the prisoner remained - I went with her and had some oysters and a pot of ale; she then asked me to go home with her - I said No. but I would take a lodging; I went, took a lodging, gave 4s. for it, and gave half a sovereign to the prisoner; I went to bed, and in about an hour and a half she awoke me - she said she wanted to go home and suckle her child; I said why did not she tell me that before - she said did I intend to let her out, or she would break the door open; I then put on my clothes, and missed this money and my pocket handkerchief, which had been in my coat pocket - she had some of her clothes on when she awoke me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure the handkerchief was in your pocket? A. Yes - I did not put it round the prisoner's neck when we left the oyster-shop; I was not quite sober - I had nothing but water on board ship; I had a crown-piece and the small silver in my pocket.

JOHN BAILLIE . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner into custody in the Commercial-road; I found on her a 5s. piece, a sixpence, one penny, a bad half-penny, a small pencil, and a snuff-box - she gave me the handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not she tell you the man had put it round her neck? A. No; she thrust it into my hand, and said, "Put it into your pocket, and say nothing about it;" the prosecutor did not say how much he had lost, nor did he mention about his handkerchief, but I showed it him at the watch-house - he talked about some loose silver besides the 5s. piece.

GEORGE SMITH. This is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the crown-piece in my pocket before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-194

889. JOSEPH FRANKLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 3 books, value 2s. 6d.; 1 stock and bit, value 6s.; 2 saws, value 8s.; 1 plough, value 7s.; 1 basket, value 1s. 6d.; 1 jacket, value 6d., and 1 pair of trousers, value 6d. , the goods of William Champness .

JOSEPH MELLISH. I met the prisoner at nine o'clock in the morning, on the 28th of February, in Kingsland-road; he was carrying a basket of tools and a saw, which

projected out; which made me suspect him - I called him back, and asked whose they were; he said his own, that he had brought them from Enfield, and was going to London to look for work.

WILLIAM CHAMPNESS . I live at Waltham-abbey. These tools and other articles are my property, and were taken from Enfield-lock , where I was at work - I had left them in the shop on the Saturday night, and part of them in a chest; I found on the 28th of February, in the morning, that the shop door had been broken; I then found the chest had been broken open, and the tools strewed about; I had known the prisoner last June or July - he had been working there at haymaking, for Mr. Briggs.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the things to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-195

890. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 6 combs, value 4l. , the goods of William Wilson .

WILLIAM WILSON. I am a hair-dresser , and live in the Strand . On the 26th of March, about nine o'clock, I was coming from Somerset-house, where I had been attending a lady; I met the prisoner and another; an observation passed, which induced me to look at them -I went into my shop, told my young man there were some slippery chaps about, and the window would very likely be cut - I had but just put down my hat, and gone to the fire, when my lad went out, and found the prisoner with his hand in the window; I believe the window had been cut before, though I had not noticed it.

JAMES TIMSON. I live with the prosecutor. About a quarter or twenty minutes past nine o'clock he came in, and said there were two suspicious looking chaps about the window - I looked, and saw the prisoner with his back to the window; I went into the shop, and saw him draw his hand from the window - I went out after him, and as he was walking away, I went after him, and brought him back - I saw the hole cut in the window.

Prisoner. Q.Was it likely I could see you? A. Yes; you had your head turned, and could see me, or else you would not have walked away at the instant - there was no one else at the window.

JURY. Q. Is there any case inside? A. Yes, it is inclosed with a glass sliding sash; there is a gas-light close to the window - I have no doubt the prisoner is the person; we missed six combs, and have never found them.

Prisoner. He said at Bow-street that there were two persons at the window, and I ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-196

891. FRANCIS CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 saw, value 1s. 6d.; 1 square, value 1s., and 1 plane, value 1s. , the goods of Henry Baldwin .

HENRY BALDWIN . I live in Tabernacle-row, St. Luke's- I knew the prisoner twelve or fourteen years ago. I was at work at the Northampton Arms, Goswell-street-road , as a carpenter , on the 28th of February, and left my tools in the skittle-ground, where I had been making some benches, while I went into the house to dinner; the prisoner had been there that morning - he is a saddler ; I found these articles at the pawnbroker's.

GEORGE LANCASTER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker in Goswell-road. I have a saw and a square, pawned at our house on the 28th of February, by the prisoner, in the name of Clarke.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. That is in his own name? A. Yes; I have known him five or six years - I did not observe that he was in liquor; I would not say he was not - this was within three doors of the public-house.

MR. BALDWIN. This is my property - I know it by having it in my possession for twelve years; the prisoner was drinking there all the morning; I saw him there with his companions.

Cross-examined. Q.How many people had been in that skittle-ground? A. I did not observe any but him- I believe his father died deranged, and when he gets a little liquor he is nearly in the same way.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the public-house about ten o'clock that morning, and remained drinking all day; a man called me out, and asked me to take the property to pawn, as I lived in the neighbourhood; when the prosecutor came in, and inquired about his tools I was so overcome with liquor, that I did not tell him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310407-197

892. JOHN BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 1 watch, value 40s.; 30 shillings., and 1 sixpence , the property of Arthur Holladay .

ARTHUR HOLLADAY. I am a mariner . On the 25th of March I was in the Roebuck's Head, Shadwell - I was very drunk, and cannot tell who took my watch and money, but I know I had a watch and about forty shillings in money - I have never seen the watch since; I did not know the prisoner before that day; I saw him before I got tipsy.

DAVID JOHNSON . I am a seaman. I was sitting at the Roebuck's Head, having a pint of beer; I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner come in - they had a quartern of gin, drank it, and were then going away; the prisoner said to the prosecutor, "You had better let me have your watch, because you are too drunk;" the prosecutor said,"No, nobody shall have my watch;" the prisoner then put his hand down, took the watch out of his pocket, and put it into his own - they went out together; I did not see any money; I had seen the prisoner about, but never had any acquaintance with him - he seemed to be about half drunk.

JANE WILSHERE. The prisoner came to my house on the 24th of March; he threw down half a crown, and sent for some gin; he had a handful of silver at the time - he then pulled out a watch, and asked me to take care of it; I said, "Is it yours?" he said, Yes; I said, "All the years I have known you I never knew you had a watch before;" he said, "If you don't like to take care of it, give it me back," and I gave it to him - he said he had brought it from on board a ship called the Hope, and he had brought it from Shields; he then left the house, and took the watch with him - it was a good silver watch, and had a brass chain, I think.

JOHN SCOTT. On the morning of the 25th of March

the prisoner came to my father's, at the Ship public-house, in Shakspeare-walk; there was a seafaring man there whom he seemed to have some knowledge of, and he said to him,"Ever since I saw you yesterday morning, I have been upon the spree - I have spent 2l. and parted with my watch, and all I have is this," (holding up this George the Second sixpence, tied to the ribbon,) and he asked the man what it was, the man said, "I don't know;" I said, "Let me look at it" - I said, "Any one might know that;" the prisoner had some gin and had no money to pay for it; my father said he ought to be ashamed - he said, "Here, d - n you, take this, it is worth it, I will call and have it again" - the officer came, and I gave it to him.

JOHN CRAWLEY . I am a Police-constable. The prosecutor came to me on the 25th of March, and gave me information - I went to the Three Crowns, where the prisoner was; he denied knowing any thing of the watch or money - I took him outside and said I would take him to the watch-house; he said he would take me to the house which he was at the night before - I went to the White Lion, in the same street, not many doors off; the landlord said he knew him, and he had offered a watch in pawn for 5s., which he refused to let him have.

Q. Had you mentioned to him that the watch had been lost? A. Yes, it has not been found since.

(Ribbon and sixpence produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. That ribbon was not on the watch; he laid it down on the table and said, "Take care of that, I am drunk;" I said, "I am not much better;" he then told me to take care of his watch - I said, "You have a watch-pocket, and I have not," but he gave it to me - I put it into my pocket, and lost it - we were both drunk.

GUILTY. Aged 43. - Judgement Respited .

Reference Number: t18310407-198

893. JOSEPH SMITH , alias THOMAS , was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 gown, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas Carman .

SARAH CARMAN. I am the wife of Thomas Carman, a Police-constable . On the 19th of March, about twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner - he was a stranger; when I came down stairs he was standing in our passage - I had hung a gown out in the yard about half-past nine o'clock that morning, and it was then gone.

ELIZABETH BALEY. I am a dress-maker, and live opposite the prosecutor's, which is the Police-station. On the 19th of March I was sitting at work, and my mother was cleaning the window - she said, "There is a boy there, a very suspicious character; he went into the station-house empty handed, and came out with something in his apron" - we looked, and saw the prisoner with a gown hanging out behind him; I ran down, and sent a young man after him - he was brought back; Mrs. Ackroid came into her passage, and we took it from him; I kept him till the Police-officer came down and took him.

ANN ACKROID. On the 19th of March Baley told me what she had seen - the prisoner was brought back, and we took the gown from him.

WILLIAM SHEEN . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have the gown.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing, and saw a man chuck the gown on the stairs; he said, "Pick it up;" I took it up, and put it into my apron.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310407-199

894. THOMAS BROWN & WILLIAM WARDELL were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 2 brushes, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of James Thomason .

GEORGE KEMP. I am a Police-constable. On the 17th of March I saw the prisoners at the prosecutor's house - I watched them; they passed the shop two or three times, and at last they came away with two brushes in their possession - I cannot say where they took them from, but they had been about the house some time; I took them about fifty yards off - I found these brushes on Brown, but they had both been together, and I saw them examining the brushes.

JAMES THOMASON. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in St. Luke's . I keep this shop; these brushes were tied up, and hanging on a nail in a piece of ground opposite my house - they had been cut off; I saw them safe at seven o'clock, and before eight they were brought back.

Brown's Defence. I picked up these brushes - I over took this boy, and was showing them to him - the Policeman then came.

Wardell's Defence. I was coming along, and this young man said he had found some brushes - he pulled one out of his pocket, and was showing it to me when the Policeman took us.

JURY to GEORGE KEMP. Q. Had you seen them together? A. Yes, and had watched them about from place to place for three-quarters of an hour.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WARDELL - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310407-200

895. JAMES BLACKFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 2 hats, value 30s. , the goods of James Hodges .

WILLIAM MATTHEWS. I am a Police-constable. On the 21st of October, about half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another lad near the prosecutor's window, in Bethnal-green-road ; the prisoner went in, and came out with two hats - I pursued him, and he dropped them; I took them up, and then took him.

JAMES HODGES. I keep an earthenware-shop in Bethnal-green-road. These are my hats - I know nothing of the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down the road - I heard the Policeman cry Stop thief! I turned, and he took me to the shop; the people said they had lost two hats, but they did not say I took them from there - he then took me to the watch-house, and as we were going he asked if I had any money; he said if I would give him a few shillings I should not be hurt, he would make it all right.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS. I never lost sight of him; I saw him drop the hats close to his heels - I stopped to pick them up, and he gained ground on me.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310407-201

896. JOHN BARNES was indicted for stealing, on the

22nd of March , 1 watch, value 30s. , the goods of Joseph Matters .

JOSEPH MATTERS. I live in Crown-street, Soho . I have known the prisoner two months or rather more; he worked for me, and lodged in my house - I am a straw and leghorn hat manufacturer ; I lost my watch from my kitchen on the 22nd of March - the prisoner had left me, and said he had got a ship the day before, but he slept there that night, and I missed the watch in the morning - his sister is