Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th February 1831.
Reference Number: 18310217
Reference Number: f18310217-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN KEY , MAYOR.

THIRD SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY ON THURSDAY, THE 17th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1831, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT - HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY STOKES & TITTERTON, NO. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, NO. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1831.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON. AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN KEY , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bailey , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Bolland , Knt., one other of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bernard Bosanquet , Knt.; one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; John Ansley , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; William Heygate , Esq.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; and Anthony Brown , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys . Esq.; Recorder of the said City; Charles Farebrother , Esq., and John Cowan , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

John Eversfield ,

Samuel Peck ,

Peter Cloves ,

John Simpson ,

George Ratcliffe ,

Stephen Crouch ,

Thos. Josh. Clarke ,

William Bacon ,

Alex. Fairbaine ,

James Powell ,

Anthony Collins ,

William Wilson .

Second

William Flooster ,

John Frisby .

Thos. Munton Peck ,

George Prowler ,

William Westbury ,

William Yates ,

John Foss ,

Joseph Farmer ,

Samuel Smith ,

Joseph Blake ,

John Pember ,

William Prouse .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John Long ,

Robert Lindsey ,

Thomas Lloyd ,

George Lowe ,

Henry Lovelock ,

Ursta Joyce ,

Charles Judd ,

Thomas Hastings

John Hilson ,

John Hems ,

Richard Harding ,

William Hudson .

Second.

William Harris ,

John Hopewell ,

John Hopkins ,

John Harvey ,

George Hopkinson ,

James Hawes ,

John Hazeldon ,

Thomas Holtham ,

William Hunt ,

George Hitchen ,

Thomas Hancock ,

Samuel Jackson .

Third

Thomas Hasler ,

Robert Hawes ,

Daniel Harrison ,

John Height ,

George Hall ,

James Hodges ,

John Hawler ,

John Hardiman ,

Robert Howitt ,

Joseph Horner ,

Jas. Banks Haridan ,

Richard Hutchinson .

Fourth

Edward Loader ,

William Little ,

Jos. John Luntley ,

Charles Ledsham ,

John Thos. Lewin ,

James Linders ,

Joseph Law ,

George Lee .

Thomas Jones ,

Henry Jewkes ,

Joseph Earl James ,

Thomas Jarman .

Fifth

John Kilpia ,

Charles Lee .

William Lefevre ,

Joseph Lee ,

William Lawrence ,

James Levesque ,

Israel Laws ,

John Grimsell ,

William Garham ,

William Homan ,

Thomas Harris ,

Samuel Hoppen .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY,

FEBRUARY 17, 1831.

KEY, MAYOR. - THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18310217-1

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

436. MATTHEW JACKSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hargrave , on the 24th of January , at St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate, and stealing therein 32 yards of diaper, value 3l., the goods of William Hargrave and another .

JOHN PARSLEY . I am in the employ of Messrs. Hargrave and Theobald, as porter, and was so on the 24th of January - they are linen-draper s, and live at No. 1, Bishopsgate-street without ; Mr. William Hargrave only, lives there. On the evening of the 24th of January, about twenty minutes past five o'clock, I was shutting up the shutters - I saw the prisoner break the shop window, and take out a piece of Irish diaper; he ran about twenty yards, and threw it into the street - I was pursuing him at the time; I do not know whether he saw me - he threw it down, and ran away; I followed, and took him.

Cross-examined. by MR. BARRY. Q. Were there any other persons about? A. I did not notice - it is a crowded neighbourhood, and a great many people passing in general; I did not observe any one in particular - there is another person here who saw him throw the linen down - it is Irish diaper; I saw the window broken - I was within three yards of it; the prisoner could not fail of seeing me, as I was standing there: I think the prisoner ran one hundred and fifty yards before I took him - I was about ten yards from him when he threw the article down; it was nearly dark - I was not above twelve yards from him at any time while he was running; he only turned the corner of Houndsditch, but I did not lose sight of him, as he ran across the street - I could not have lost sight of him, I followed him so close; there were not a great many people in Houndsditch - the part of the house where the window is broken is in the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate without; I do not know what the prisoner was committed for - it was for breaking the window and stealing the Irish: there is a communication from the shop to the house - Mr. Hargrave sleeps there sometimes.

COURT. Q. Is there any communication with the house without coming into the street? A. Yes - the house is in three parishes; the part broken is in St. Botolph's Bishopsgate - the room in which Mr. Hargrave sleeps is in three parishes; the head of the bed is in two parishes - I sleep in the shop.

WILLIAM ARNSBY . I live at No. 21, Charter-house-street, Charter-house-square, and am a commission-salesman. On the 24th of January I was in Bishopsgate-street, near the shop of Hargrave and Theobald - I saw the prisoner skulking under their window, for what purpose I did not know; when I got within half a dozen yards of the shop I saw him drive his fist through the window, and steal a piece of diaper - he passed me within about a couple of yards; I pursued him for a distance, and raised a cry of Stop thief! Stop him! I followed him, and he threw the diaper in the street, in the carriage way - as soon as he threw it down I went and took it up; I took it into Hargrave and Theobald's shop - I gave it to a young man- the bell was rang, and Mr. Hargrave came down.

Cross-examined. Q. The man was a stranger to you? A. Yes - I did not pursue him further when he threw it down and I took it up; he got out of my sight altogether, of course, when I turned my back on him - I called Stop of course, when I turned my back on him - I called Stop thief! Stop him! as loud as I could; I did not speak to the last witness.

WILLIAM HARGRAVE . I am of the firm of Hargrave and Theobald; I sleep in the house occasionally - I have one servant sleeps in the shop, and one up stairs. I heard the bell ring, and came down: I saw the piece of diaper - it contains about thirty yards, and is worth 3l.

Cross-examined. Q. In what parish is your shop? A. In three parishes - the pane of glass which was broken is in St. Botolph, Bishopsgate without; the servant sleeps close to that window, and in the same parish - the whole of that part of the shop is in that parish.

JOHN PARSLEY re-examined. Q. How near do you sleep to this pane of glass? A. About a yard and a half.

WILLIAM HARGRAVE re-examined. Q. How did the goods lay? A. The whole of the goods in that window were in the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate without; this is the Joint property of myself and my partner.

Prisoner. I shall leave it entirely to my Counsel.

[Feb. 19] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18310217-2

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bailey.

437. WILLIAM BARDELL and HENRY BARDELL were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Fairey , on the 5th of Fe

bruary , at St. George, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 10l., his property .

JOHN FAIREY. I am a watchmaker and jeweller , and live in the parish of St. George in the East ; it is frequently called St. George only. On Saturday, the 5th of February, my window was cut, and a watch taken - I had seen the window five minutes before; it was perfectly whole then, and I saw the watch safe - I have not seen it since: I saw both the prisoners about a quarter of an hour before the circumstance took place - they were both together at the window; Henry Bardell was brought into our shop by a neighbour's daughter, immediately after the transaction took place, with his hand cut; the little girl that took him brought him in, and said, "This is the boy that has broken your window, and took your watch, and if you will come out I will show you the boy he gave the watch to;" he denied it - I found nothing about him; I have a piece of the glass which was forced into the window - it appears to have been broken by a nail, or some blunt instrument: the prisoner William was brought in in about five minutes, and when we got them together, they each denied stoutly that they had ever seen each other before - they afterwards said they were brothers.

William Bardell . Q. How soon was I taken? A. As soon as the girl gave the alarm my son went after him, and he was brought back almost immediately - it might be three minutes.

MARY LEAKEMAN . I am fourteen years old, and live next door to Mr. Fairey. On Saturday, the 5th, I first saw the prisoners standing out side our window, together. and heard one say to the other, "Stop till he comes out;" I went to the street door, and saw the prisoner Henry take a watch out of Mr. Fairey's window; I could see that it was a watch - I saw his hand in the window, but do not know how he got it in; he directly gave it to the prisoner William, who went away down Artichoke-hill; I lost sight of him - I went into Fairey's shop; I came out, took the prisoner Henry, and took him into Mr. Fairey's shop - Fairey's son then came out with me, and I saw William come up from Artichoke-hill; I pointed him out, and the prosecutor's son took him - he brought him into the shop; I did not know either of them by sight before - I am sure Henry is the one I saw take the watch, and that he gave it to the other.

William Bardell . She said at the office that she did not see me take the watch, and said she only saw something white, till the officers talked to her. Witness. No, I did not say so.

Henry Bardell . She said my brother gave it to a third person, and she told the Magistrate she never saw the third person. Witness. I did not say so.

COURT. Q. What you said was taken down in writing, and you signed it? A. Yes - I said I went to the door, and saw the little boy take the watch out of Fairey's window, give it to the big one, and the big one went down Artichoke-hill with it.

JOHN FAIREY . I am the prosecutor's son. Leakeman came into the shop, and in consequence of what she said I went out; she pointed out the prisoner William to me - he was in sight when I went out; I brought him into the shop - he was searched, and nothing found on him; the prisoners both denied knowing each other - they said they were quite strangers to each other; they continued to say so for some time, and afterwards confessed that they were brothers - the watch has never been found.

Henry Bardell 's Defence. My brother and I went to the Regent's-canal dock to my father, and as we came back stopped to look into the shop - my brother said,"Come on;" I said, "No, wait a bit;" my brother went on - I stopped to look there, and they dragged me into the shop.

William Bardell 's Defence. We were returning home about a quarter to two o'clock, and passed the prosecutor's shop, and looked in - I was passing on; I thought my brother was gone - I missed him all at once, and was looking round for him; I walked on - that young man came, and told me he wanted me; I asked what for - he said I had stolen a watch, which I told him was wrong -I was taken into the shop; I deny saying we were not brothers - they said we were not brothers, but we said we were; the girl said at the shop she did not see us break the window, but only saw us looking in - then she said at the office she did not see the watch taken, but she thought it was something white, and the Policeman knows she said so the last time when we were committed; she said she saw the watch given to a third person who she never saw- she really did say so.

JOHN FAIREY. I heard the girl examined at the office; she always asserted that she saw the identical watch taken, not that she saw something white: nor did she say she saw the elder prisoner give it to a third person.

JURY. Q. You said the prisoner Henry's hand was bleeding; what do you suppose was the cause of that? A. Being cut by the glass; the blood came from his finger - the prisoners gave two false addresses; we sent and found no such persons were known there.

JOHN FAIREY, JUN. I heard the girl examined at the office - she said she saw the prisoner take the watch; she did not say it was something white, nor that she saw William give it to a third person - I did not go myself to see if the prisoners gave a correct address, nor did my father.

MARY LEAKEMAN. I saw the prisoner Henry with the watch in his hand, and saw him take it out of the window.

W. BARDELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

H. BARDELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 10.

Henry was recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of his youth .

[Feb. 17.]

Reference Number: t18310217-3

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

438. DAVID PETERS and GEORGE GLOVER were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Katherine Lloyd , widow , on the 12th of January , and stealing therein 1 petticoat, value 5s.; 1 piece of linen, containing 25 yards, value 3l.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 4 table-cloths, value 20s.; 1 pair of boots, value 10s.; 1 sugar-basin, value 3l.; 1 pair of sugartongs, value 14s.; 1 spoon, value 1s., and 26lbs. of beef, value 14s.; 1 spoon, value 1s., and 26lbs. of beef, value 14s., her property .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

KATHERINE LLOYD. I am a widow, and live at Southgate, in the parish of Edmonton . I know the prisoners; they had lived at Southgate for some years; I did not know where they lived - they had removed for some time

when this happened; I had left home five or six days before the 12th of January - I had in my possession some nankeen, which I bought at Winchmore-hill; I cut it out to be made into a petticoat - my cousin made it up; it was in six breadths, and one breadth was different to the rest; nankeen is difficult to match - I returned home on Friday, the 14th of January; the nankeen was then gone -I had left some persons in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you lived at Southgate? A. Between twenty-four and twenty-five years; I know the prisoners formerly lived there; they worked for me, and I let them a piece of ground once - the nankeen was bought a few days before I went from home; I was absent about a week - I understand the prisoners had left Southgate two months before the robbery - they were found at Ponder's-end, about three miles and half from Southgate; I bought the nankeen of Mr. Hudal; there were three pieces, which makes the difference in the shade - I saw it in the drawers in the study, where the scrutoire was broken open, the very day I left.

COURT. Q. You cut this out for a petticoat? A. Yes, and gave it to my cousin Lloyd.

PENELOPE LLOYD . I am the cousin of Mrs. Lloyd's husband, and have lived at her house ten years - I made the nankeen petticoat; I finished it the night before the robbery, and put it into a scrutoire drawer in the parlour, which is called the study, as I went up to bed - it used to be called Mr. Lloyd's study when he was alive; Mrs. Lloyd gave me the nankeen - I saw the house secured that night; I was alarmed about twenty minutes to five o'clock in the morning, and found every door broken open - I locked every door the night before; the house had been entered at the front by boring two pieces out of the outer door with a centre-bit, large enough for an arm to be put through - the next door was taken off its hinges, and the lock of the next door taken off - all the drawers and places in the parlours were ransacked - I missed out of the drawer the nankeen was in, two pieces of handkerchiefs and a piece of Irish - I also missed the other articles stated in the indictment; I have since seen a garment made of nankeen.

Cross-examined. Q. Among all the articles you lost nothing has been found but the nankeen? A. Nothing but that and some pork - I bought three pices of nankeen for Mrs. Lloyd the day before she went to town; I bought it for her - I went to the shop for it; I saw it at Enfield afterwards.

HARRIET DYER . I am servant to Mrs. Lloyd. I was in the house on the night of the 12th, and know it was made secure.

JOHN MEAD . I am beadle of Enfield. I have seen the prisoners before, but knew very little about them; I have seen them at Southgate. On Sunday, the 30th of January, I went with a warrant to search their premises - it is a neat little cottage at Ponder's-end, Enfield, a four roomed house; I found the two prisoners and their wives sitting taking breakfast together - there was but one tea-pot, one loaf, and sugar-bason - I asked who the house belonged to; one of the women answered," It belongs to one as well as the other" - that they paid the rent between them; I went up stairs, leaving another person below, and in a tea-cup on the mantel-piece found a duplicate which I produce - Mrs. Glover went with me; she called herself Mrs. Glover - I brought the duplicate down and showed it to the prisoners; all four were present - Glover's wife said the property named in the duplicate belonged to her and her sister; that they bought a piece of nankeen between them, and part of it was made up - the duplicate is for a coat, breeches, petticoat, nankeen, and other things, pawned with Mr. King, of Edmonton, for 6s. 6d.; in the name of Ann Glover, Southgate; I took the prisoners into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. The women told you they had bought it, and you took the men? A. Yes - I have been a coustable of Enfield some years, but know nothing of the prisoners; they did not live at Enfield.

RICHARD WATKIN . I am a horse-patrol. I went to the prosecutrix's house on the 14th of January, and on the 30th I went with Mead and apprehended the prisoners - I took charge of them while he searched the house.

DAVID MONTAGUE WARD . I am servant to Mr. King, a pawnbroker, of Edmonton. On the 28th of January, a woman, who gave her name as Ann Glover, pawned some thing with me, for which I gave her the duplicate produced; there was a white petticoat among the articles pawned - I afterwards saw a woman at the office at Enfield, who I believe to be the woman who pawned them; she also came to my master's house after pawning the things - that was the night after I heard of the robbery.

JOHN MEAD. When Ward was examined at the office, the two women and the prisoners were there - he pointed to Peters' wife as the woman who had pawned the things.

D.M. WARD. I have five napkins, a white petticoat, two towels, a pair of breeches, and a piece of nankeen, which I call a little coat; it is part of the property pawned by Mrs. Peters on the 28th.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any other article in this indictment which you produce, except the nankeen? A. No; the petticoat is white cotton, the nankeen is not a petticoat - it is a child's coat; and here is a piece of nankeen of three breadths.

MRS. LLOYD. I know this nankeen; these three breadths formed half a petticoat - I know it to be the same; I know my cutting out, and the manner in which it is formed; this nankeen coat has the shade of the nankeen I bought, which is a shade lighter than the rest, and here is a tuck which has been taken out - it corresponds in colour, and the size of the tuck which has been taken out; it corresponds with the other part.

Q. Can you say that coat has once been in some other shape? A. Yes - I only judge of its being mine from the mark of the tuck.

Cross-examined. Q. Point out what you swear to the nankeen by? A. By the manner in which I cut it out - I know it by the length; I have not measured it: the three breadths are the length; they were not quite a yard and a quarter long when I cut them out - when I left it was in six separate breadths, not in its present state; the shade of the middle breadth of the coat is lighter than the other two.

PENELOPE LLOYD . I know the nankeen by my own work in it, and by the tucks having been let down - the

tuck in the piece corresponds with the tuck let down in the coat; if you hold this to the light the back breadth is a shade lighter, and I know my own work on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you confident of it from the shade as well as the work? A. I am confident from both circumstances.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-4

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

439. DAVID PETERS and GEORGE GLOVER were again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Acott , on the 20th of January , at Edmonton, and stealing therein 7 table-cloths, value 5s.; 4 spoons, value 20s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 3s., and 1 soup-ladle, value 1s., his property .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ACOTT . I am a builder , and live at Southgate, in the parish of Edmonton , and occupy the house. On the night of the 20th of January, my house was made secure - I examined most of the doors myself; I went to bed between nine and ten o'clock - I cannot state whether this property was safe or not; I was alarmed before three o'clock in the morning, by my daughter ringing a bell - I got up, and found the outer back door broken open; two of the pannels were taken out by a centre-bit - there were people in the house when I came down.

SOPHIA ACOTT . I am the prosecutor's daughter, and live with him. On the night of the 20th of January I know the table-cloths were in a drawer in our sitting-room - the other property was safe; I fastened some of the doors myself the night before, and heard the door fastened which was found broken open: I went to bed at ten o'clock, and about three heard a noise in the house - I stamped on the floor, and then distinctly heard persons running in the house; I think I heard two persons - I sprang the rattle - I went down stairs afterwards, and found the door at the bottom of the stairs fastened: a strong new cord was found outside that door, and by which I understand it had been tied - there was a general alarm in the house; I saw a centre-bit laying in the passage - I missed the articles stated in the indictment; the plate has not been found - the tea-spons were safe the night before the robbery, I am positive.

MARY ACOTT . I am the prosecutor's wife. I was in the house on the night of the 20th of January, and know the table-cloths and plate were safe; I was alarmed in the night, and missed it - the house was broken open.

RICHARD THOMAS HOWARD . I am a baker, and live nearly opposite to Acott. On the 21st of January, about a quarter-past three o'clock in the morning, I heard the rattle spring - I went to the prosecutor's house; two large holes were bored in the outer door, with a centre-bit, and a small door between the parlour and passage was opened - the stair-foot door was fastened with a cord; I saw a man remove the cord, and the family then came down stairs - they could not come down till the door was unfastened.

JOHN MEAD . I am a beadle. I went to the prisoners' house on the 30th of January, I found the prisoners there, and in the room up stairs I found a duplicate in a cup on the mantel-piece - I had some conversation with the women, in the prisoners' presence, when I came down stairs; I asked who the house belonged to; they said it belonged to one as much as the other, for they paid the rent equally alike - both the prisoners were present; I then took the prisoners into custody, and next morning went to King's, and found the things - I asked, in the prisoners' presence, who the table-cloths belonged to; Glover's wife said, "One belongs to me, and one belongs to my sister - they are two old ones, and are not worth much;" I produce a centrebit, which Mr. Acott gave me a day or two after the robbery.

WILLIAM ACOTT . I gave Mead this centre-bit - it was handed to me at my house by Howard.

RICHARD THOMAS HOWARD . I found it in the passage just as I went in at the first door.

DAVID MONTAGUE WARD . I am servant to Mr. King. A woman pawned some things with me, in the name of Ann Glover - this is the duplicate of the articles; I pointed the woman out at the office - she went by the name of Peters; I said I believed she was the woman who pawned them; I saw her after she had pawned them, on the night of the day I received information of the robbery - I produce two table-cloths, which she pawned with other things.

Cross-examined. Q. How far do you live from Acott? A. I live at Edmonton; I do not know how far that is from Southgate - I had not heard of the robbery before she pawned the property.

MARY ACOTT . Here is a great deal of my needle-work on the table-cloths; one of them I have had nearly twenty years - it is patched at the corner with a piece of Irish; the cloth is huckaback - I know the other by the needlework, which is very bad, as it is a very stiff cloth.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you do the needlework on the last one? A. Six years ago.

Peters' Defence. I know nothing about it.

Glover's Defence. I know nothing about it.

PETERS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

GLOVER - GUILTY - DEATH Aged 26.

[Feb.17.]

Reference Number: t18310217-5

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bailey.

440. STEPHEN BRADFORD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Kenny , on the 11th of February , at Edmonton, and stealing therein 1 gun, value 25s., his property .

MICHAEL KENNY. I am a day-labourer , and live at Edmonton - I rent a cottage there. On Friday, the 11th of February, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I went out, leaving my wife at home, and my gun safe; I saw it safe the night before - I came home at half-past twelve; my wife was then at home, and in consequence of what she said I looked about the house, and saw some footmarks, by which I suppose two or three people had been there; I followed the footmarks - they led me to two or three fields from the house, and under some sods of a land-drain, under the hedge, I found my gun; there was a handkerchief tied on the lock of it - two of the footmarks were with nails, and one without; the prisoner was taken up about half an hour after I found the gun - I compared his shoes with the footmarks, and they fitted some of them - I had not seen him about the premises that day; I knew him by sight - I do not know that he was ever in my house; he was often about it.

BRIDGET KENNY . I am the prosecutor's wife. I went out on the morning of the 11th of February, at a quarter to ten o'clock - my husband had gone out before; I left nobody in the house - I secured the shutters, locked the door, and put the key into my pocket; I came home at ten minutes past twelve o'clock, and found the bed-room window, which is on the ground floor, broken - it is a sash window; I had left the lower sash down, and put a little brass knob to prevent its being raised up - there was a hole in the top of the lower sash, and the knob went into the side of the window; a pane of the lower sash was broken, a hand could then be introduced, and the knob taken out - I missed the gun off two nails over the mantel-piece, about three yards from the window - they must have got in to take it.

MICHAEL CARTER . I am a labourer, and live at Edmonton. On the Friday morning, about half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner and two more by Kenny's cottage - they were cutting a stick out of the hedge; the prisoner spoke to me - I knew him before: about a quarter to one o'clock I saw Kenny tracing some footsteps; nobody was with him - I told him what I had seen: I was with Kenny and Ingram, the constable, that afternoon, and came in sight of the prisoner; he ran away, and got behind a tree - I apprehended him.

JOHN CARTER . I live at Edmonton, and saw the prisoner last Friday morning, with two more, between twelve and one o'clock, about a quarter of a mile from Kenny's - one of them had a gun in his hand; I do not know which of them - it was one of the other two; they were all three in company together, walking in a direction from Kenny's - they were not going towards where Kenny tells me the gun was found; they were about a quarter of a mile from there.

JOHN INGRAM. I am a constable. I was with Kenny looking for the three boys, and was with Michael Carter when the prisoner was apprehended - I should think it was between one and two o'clock; the gun had been brought to me by Kenny and Carter before, and was at my house - the prisoner saw the gun and handkerchief that afternoon, and said he had lent the handkerchief to the other two, and that was the only thing that would do him; in the evening, after we had locked the prisoner up, we went to Kenny's house and examined the instrument the window was opened with; it had been found round the prisoner's neck at the watch-house - I was present when it was found round his neck; I campared it with the window, and have not the least doubt of its being used at that window - it corresponded with the marks; here it is - it is a marline-spike, and was tied to a long bit of string, with a knife at the other end of the string - the spike had been used to the window; I did not see his shoes compared with the footmarks.

JOHN FOWLER . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner in custody, about half-past three o'clock, and found the marline-spike on him - Ingram was there; I afterwards took and matched it with the putty on Kenny's window - it agreed exactly; I afterwards went to the watch-house, took his shoes off, and went next morning at day-break and compared them with the footsteps about three yards from the window which was broken into; I compared them with eight or nine footsteps going towards the field, in different places, leading towards where the gun was found - they exactly fitted them; I saw more footsteps nearer the window, but they had marks of nails in them, and his shoes had no nails; he said the sailors use the marline-spikes to splice their ropes.

MICHAEL KENNY. I pointed out to Carter where I found the gun.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not there.

JURY to JOHN FOWLER. Q. How light was it when you examined the footmarks? A. It was quite light - about twenty minutes to seven o'clock.

MICHAEL KENNY. This is my gun - I know it by several marks, and this screw I put to it myself.

[Feb. 17.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Reference Number: t18310217-6

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bolland.

441. CHARLES BRIGGS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Jones , on the 9th of January , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , and stealing there in 1 pelisse, value 6s.; 1 night-gown, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 4d.; 1 gown, value 6s.; 1 pair of sheets, value 4s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 2 caps. value 8d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3d.; 1 cape, value 6d.; 3 yards of rope, value 1d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 1 gown-body, value 2d., and 4 remnants of calico, value 4d., his property .

JOHN JONES. I live in Church-lane, Whitechapel, but on the 9th of January I lived in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. I went out at eight o'clock that evening with my wife, leaving nobody in the house - I locked both the doors, and made the house safe; I returned at half-past' eight, and found the things all scattered about the room - when I put the key in, the door flew open; it was open - on going into the house I saw the prisoner running along the passage; I came out, shut the door, and held the knocker in my hand till I got assistance - I went in again, and heard the back door unbolted; he ran out, I after him, and caught him in the yard - he said it was all up with him; I had said nothing to him then - the people said they had caught him; he said Yes, it was all up with him - I examined, and found a drawer open in the front room; it had been shut when I left, but was not locked - there had been several articles of wearing-apparel in that drawer; the prisoner said he had taken the key out, but none of the things were taken out of that drawer, nor were they pulled about - in the back room a basket was drawn out from under the bed, the dirty linen taken out of it, and scattered about the floor - a box was turned out in the back room; it had been left unlocked, but with the lid down - I found it with the lid up and empty, and the things on the floor - the lease of my house, a policy of insurance, and a blue cloth pelisse were on a chair; they had been in the box - I cannot say whether the pelisse was on the chair or the floor; I saw the Policeman search the prisoner - he gave the Policeman eight keys, which they called skeleton - keys, in his presence.

JANE JONES . I am he prosecutor's wife. I went out with him, leaving the house safe - we returned about half-past nine o'clock, and found the door ajar; I observed the parlour door wide open - my husband had locked that door, and put the key into his pocket; I did not see the prisoner till he was taken - I first went into the front par

lour; a candle was burning on the table - I had put it out before I went out; I found the top long drawer of a chest of drawers open; it was shut when I went out - it was full of wearing-apparel; none of that was taken out- a tin box, which was on the drawers, was all upset; I had left some cap ribbons in it - it was all emptied out, and laid on the drawers; my husband called me - I ran out into the street, and after the prisoner was taken I went into my bed-room, and saw the basket was taken from under the bed, the dirty clothes taken out and laid on the floor - the pelisse had been in the trunk, which was emptied, that stood in the bed-room - the articles in question had been in the trunk; some of them laid on a chair and some on the floor, but I cannot say which - there was a piece of rope, a night-gown, a pelisse, and a few remnants of ribbon - no other places had been rifled; there was a gown in the basket, a pair of silk stockings, a gown body, a pair of sheets, a cap, a shift, and some calico.

JOHN DARE . I live in Nelson-place, Bethnal-green. In consequence of the alarm I went to the house, and found the prosecutor taking the prisoner into the parlour - I went up to him, and asked him what he had come there for; he said for what he could get - I took the light off the table, went into the back room, and found the basket empty on the floor; I was present when the Policeman searched the prisoner and found a phosphorus-box, matches, eight skeleton-keys, and a wax taper on him.

BENJAMIN GOODWIN . I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner in charge, and found on him eight skeleton-keys, a phosphorus-box, matches, and a wax taper - when I was searching him I felt the keys; he said he would give them to me, and did so - as I was going to take him to the station he said it was all up with him, he had done it, and wanted me to go to his father's; I found one of the keys opened the outer door, and another the parlour door - the prosecutor gave me a door key and screw-driver.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

[Feb. 17.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18310217-7

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanguet.

442. JOHN KELLY and SAMUEL RINGROSE were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Thrush , on the 30th of January , at St. Margaret, Westminster , and stealing therein 1 coat, value 20s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 6s.; 3 handkerchiefs. value 4s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 2 salt-cellars, value 2s.; 2 table-cloths, value 10s.; 1 gown, value 2s.; 2 caps, value 6s.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 bag, value 1s.; 7 iron keys, value 1s.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, and 23 shillings, the property of the said Henry Thrush ; and 3 coats, value 6l.; 1 hat, value 7s.; 1 pair of boots, value 10s.; 3 tea-spoons, value 9s.; 1 caddy-spoon, value 2s.; 1 butter-knife, value 5s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 4 waistcoats, value 30s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 20s.; 3 pillow-cases, value 3s.; 1 gown, value 5s.; 2 pictures and frames, value 20s.; 1 snuff-box, value 1s., and 4 shells, value 12s., the goods of James Reed , in the same dwelling-house .

HENRY THRUSH . I am a tin-plate worker , and live in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster. On Sunday evening, the 30th of January, between five and six o'clock, I and my wife left the house and went out together to tea - we locked all the doors; James Reed lodges in our house - we returned about half-past nine or ten, and found the doors all burst open, and some of the locks broken; I found the front door open, and called out,"Reed, are you down stairs?" I received no answer - he was not at home, but came home after us; I went into the parlour first, found a chest of drawers with all the locks forced open, and out of one of the drawers I missed a sovereign, a half-sovereign, a gown, two table-cloths, I also missed a coat, a waistcoat, two pairs of trousers, a pair of glass salts, four pairs of stockings, one pair of which I had seen safe that day, three silk handkerchiefs, one cotton handkerchief, two lace caps, a purse, and a bag - I had seven keys in the bag, which was in the back parlour; I had not seen them that day - there was about 23s. in silver in the bag with the keys, and a few halfpence; the rooms were all ransacked, and the things all thrown about - a Pembroke table, the drawer of which was locked, was turned over and broken all to pieces, and up stairs all Reed's drawers and things were pulled about in the same manner; in the back kitchen I found all the things pulled out of the drawers, the cupboard, and every place- an old hat was found on the bed I sleep in, with hay in the crown of it; a Police-officer, of the T. division, has the hat; an old pair of boots were left in the front kitchen, which Reed occupies.

JAMES REED . I lodge in the prosecutor's first-floor, and have one kitchen. On the 30th of January I went out, about half-past four o'clock, leaving Mrs. Thrush at home; I came home after them, about a quarter-past ten, and found the neighbours and Policemen in the house - I went down to my kitchen, found a drawer opened, I and three silver spoons, a silver butter-knife. a Bath greatcoat, a black frock-coat, a new pair of boots, a hat, half a black silk handkerchief, and two whole silk ones, were all missing; I went up stairs, and found all my doors broken open - the hed-room door appeared to be forced with a crow-bar; I saw the Policeman match a crow-bar to the door next day - I had not locked my drawers up stairs; my clothes, and every things of wearing-apparel, was taken completely out, and gone - I then went into my front room, and found that broken open; two pictures were gone, a snuff-box, a pair of very handsome shells, and four large shells.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I am a Policeman. On the 30th of January I saw both the prisoners in company and conversing together - they passed me about half-past nine o'clock in the evening; I turned round, thinking I knew Kelly's face - I followed and stopped them near the Pontefract Castle, in Chapel-street; I felt Ringrose's coat-pocket, and said, "What have you got here?" - he said, "I will show you;" he immediately made a bob, and began running - I called to my brother-officer, and told him to follow him: (I had met my brother-officer, and told him I was watching them;) he caught hold of him - they struggled together; I took hold of Kelly - We brought them down to the station-house; as we went along Kelly said to Ringrose,"You have brought me into this - if I had known this, I would not have come out with you;" on arriving at the station-house, I searched Ringrose, and found three

tea-spoons, and a caddy-spoon in his coat-pocket, a butter-knife, and thirteen keys in a silk bag; one is a street-door key, five are skeletons, the others are common ones - there is a bunch of small keys; the skeleton keys are to unlock doors - they have no wards; I found a phosphorus-box and matches on him - he said, "I suppose, Thompson, the less I say now, the better;" I told him I wanted him to say nothing to me - I searched Kelly, and found a skeleton-key in his pocket, also a pair of stockings, and a silk handkerchief I took from him - that was at Harcourt-street station-house, where I first took them to - when I took the key from Kelly, I said,"This is all wrong;" he said, "You had better take my head off" - I locked them up in the cells at that station, while some supper was brought for them, and while they were there I had forgot to search the arm of Kelly's great coat - I brought them out again, and took them to Marylebone station, and there I took off Kelly a brown great coat; he was wearing it, also a new black waistcoat, this duster, and a silk handkerchief, and a pair of new boots off his feet; the inspector found in the brown coat a blue cotton handkerchief - I did not see that found; I afterwards went back to Harcourt-street, recollecting I had not searched his arms - I looked down the privy where I had locked them up by themselves, and found a crow-bar there; I went and compared it with the impressions on the doors and places at the prosecutor's house - they had been done with this crow, or one exactly the same size; the street door had been splintered a great deal, but one mark I compared with it- I then compared it with the impressions on the parlour door; it fitted them - it is called a jemmy, but I never saw one like it; I never saw one wider, and I think not so wide without having a claw to it - all the marks in the house appeared to be made with that instrument; there was not only the impression of the sharp point, but of the round part in the door - I believe that to be the instrument that made the marks.

Ringrose. At the office he said there had been a person in the lock-up place before us, and he did not search that man, and could not say which left the crow there. Witness. I did not; I had seen a drunken man carried there - he was quite a gentleman; he was taken into the cell - I went in directly after and found the crow-bar; the gentleman was searched before he was put in there, and all his property taken from him, because he was so drunk.

JURY. Q. Do you make a practice to search the place after every prisoner? A. No; there was no soil on it - it was quite clean; the privy is made on a descent, so that it stuck, and if it had been there any time there must have been soil on it.

HENRY THRUSH . This is my pair of stockings; this black silk bag is mine - this is my street-door key, it was in the bag, and here is my front parlour key, and a bunch of keys belonging to my drawers.

JAMES REED. This pair of new boots are mine, also this silk handkerchief, the caddy-spoon, three tea-spoons, butter-knife, black waistcoat, great coat, and blue pocket handkerchief - I know them all to be mine; I have marks on them - I have had the coat about three years; it is darned - my name is on one spoon, but not on the other two; they correspond in number with what I lost - I know the black silk waistcoat by a particular mark about the bottom; I lost a velvet waistcoat at the same time - the mark is a peek at the bottom; it is quite a new cut - there is no mark on it; it is only the form of it I speak to - I know the boots by their having the mark which my boot-maker generally puts; it is a number - I do not recollect what the number is; I have never worn them - I called at the maker's this morning, and he showed me the private-mark; an old pair was left in the room of these.

Kelly's Defence. The property found on me I bought the same afternoon.

Ringrose. While the witness was at the bar Thompson kept telling him what to say.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I said nothing, but handed the property to him as he wanted it to identify - the Pontefract Castle is about two miles from the prosecutor's house.

Ringrose's Defence (written.) On the day mentioned, being on my return from Hampstead, where I had been to look after work at a master's that I was in the habit of working for, coming through James-street, on my road home, I found a bag, in a hollow part of the road, near Chapel-street; about five minutes afterwards, Mr. Thompson, a Policeman, came up, and asked what I had got - I instantly told him I would show him what I had got, and, without waiting for an explanation, he took me into custody to the Police-station; I instantly produced the bag, and the contents being produced was found to be the property mentioned in the indictment, of which I was entirely ignorant of: with respect to this most serious charge, as it affects mylife, I most solemnly declare I am innocent of it- I have always maintained an unimpeachable character for honesty, and never been before this or any other Court of Justice in my life, on any charge of this nature before; I have, besides, an aged mother, entirely dependant on me for support, likewise a wife and two children in the utmost state of destitution at present, therefore I humbly hope you will take my case into your consideration, and not consign an innocent man to an ignominious fate, for I am totally innocent of the crime imputed to me - I leave my case entirely in your hands, fortified in the innocence of my cause.

KELLY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

RINGROSE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

[Feb. 18.]

Reference Number: t18310217-8

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

443. HENRY WHITTENBURY was indicted for that he, on the 13th of December , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, about the hour of ten in the night of the same day, being in the dwelling-house of Samuel Umfreville there situate, did steal 4 pairs of children's boots, value 10s., and that he being so, as aforesaid, in the said dwelling-house, and having committed the felony aforesaid, two wit, about the hour of ten in the night of the same day the same dwelling-house, feloniously and burglariously did break to get out of the same, and feloniously & c. did get out of the same .

SAMUEL UMFREVILLE. I am a shoemaker , and live in Duke-street, Turk-street, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green ; it is my dwelling-house - the taxes are included in the rent. I have known the prisoner since the Ist of December, when he came to me and applied for work - I took him in, and employed him directly; I paid him by the job - he lived in my house; he was not my servant, but paid me for his lodging, and I paid him for

the work he did. On the 13th of December I saw him in the house last about two o'clock in the day; another workman of mine slept with him - I went to bed about ten o'clock, and did not know whether he was in the house or not - I fastened the back door, and all the doors; I got up between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and about half-past eight found my back door was wide open - I had bolted it inside the night before; there is no lock to it - there was no appearance of its having been broken outside; I went up stairs about nine, and missed four pairs of boots which he had to work on - some of them were finished; they were all gone - he had no right to take away my property, and he had given me no notice of his going away - I went the next morning, and informed the Police; he was taken on the 7th of January - we could not find him before; he never came near me.

JOHN LONEY . I lodged in this house at the time of the robbery - I worked and slept in the same room with the prisoner. On the night of the 13th of December, about ten o'clock, I went to bed, leaving the prisoner at work in the room - I went to sleep, awoke about twelve o'clock, and missed him, but supposed he had gone into the yard for some purpose and would return - he had not intimated that he was going away; I went to sleep, and awoke again about three o'clock - he was still absent; I then concluded that he had left - he could not leave without getting into the yard, and over a wall six feet high - I got up at half-past eight o'clock, and found the room door wide open, which I had shut, and the yard door was wide open - I never saw him again till he was apprehended; four pairs of boots were gone - before I went to bed the prisoner wanted me to go up, and ask Mr. Umfreville to lend him 1s., and while we were talking we heard the door fastened.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not hear a noise in the adjoining place while we were at work that night, and ask me what it was? A. Yes.

WILLIAM FORD . I am a shoemaker, and work for Mr. Umfreville. He informed me of this transaction, and on the 7th of January in the evening I met the prisoner at the corner of Huntingdon-street, Kingsland-road - I followed him to the top of the road, and met a Policeman; I went before him to tell the Policeman to take him, and when I turned round I missed him - I saw him again, and followed him to Shoreditch; I met another Policeman, and told him to take him in charge; he asked what for - I said,"For robbing my master;" he said he did not know that he had robbed my master, and shook his pockets and asked if there were any thing there belonging to my master - I said I did not know.

Prisoner. Q. Did you know what was inside my pocket? A. No, not till you got to the station-house and pulled them out - I saw they were tools.

JAMES FITZGERALD . I am a Policeman. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 7th of January - as we went to the station he said, "I know I am done this time; I have been in prison before - I have been to the Old Bailey not long ago, and if I had had the use of my other leg I should have been hung before now."

MR. UMFREVILLE. I never found the property - they were children's boots; my street door was locked, and the back door bolted.

Prisoner's Defence. He used me very cruel; they were children's half-boots - I went and asked him to give me work, being distressed - I have got the King's evil, by which I lost my leg - he said, "I will give you 13d. a pair, if you like to work for that;" they were doublesoled welts, and it is not the regular price - in about a week he said my work would not do, and I might go about my business - I said if he would pay me I would; he took a week's rent, and gave me 6d. - he said my work was not fit to be seen, and he would give me no more - he afterwards gave me four pairs to make; I told the witness I would not work for him any more, and I must go to the workhouse, I was so bad; I finished the boots, left them on my place, and went away; I took my tools in my pocket, and that is what I asked the witness if they belonged to his master - as to getting over the wall I could not do it, on account of my affliction - I was never here before in my life.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18310217-9

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bailey.

444. MARY DEVEREUX , THE ELDER, MARY DEVEREUX , THE YOUNGER, and BRIDGET (THE WIFE OF JOHN) SWIFT , were indicted for that they, not being persons, or either of them not being a person employed in or for the Mint or Mints of our Lord the King, and for the use and service of the said Mints only, nor being persons or either of them, being a person lawfully authorized by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, or Lord High Treasurer of England for the time being, on the 11th of February , at St. Andrew, Holborn , one mould, made of plaster of Paris, in and upon which then and there was made and impressed the figure, resemblance, and similitude of one of the sides (to wit) the obverse side of the lawful silver coin current within this kingdom, called a shilling, without any lawful authority or sufficient excuse for that purpose, knowingly, feloniously, and traitorously had in their custody and possession, against the duty of their allegiance ; and against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, like the first, only substituting the word "reverse." for the word "obverse."

MESSRS. SCARLETT and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 11th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in company with Myers and Gollocker, who are officers, and went with them to a house on Great Saffron-hill , which I believe to be No.64, but there is no number on the door - the street-door was open; I went up to a room on the second floor - there is but one room on the floor; Gollocker and Myers followed me - the door was fast; I burst it open - I put my hand to it, it was buttoned inside with a wooden button; I tried to open it outside, but could not till I burst it open; there was no other fastening inside; it locks outside with a padlock - there is no other fastening but that and a wooden button; I saw the elder Devereux on the left-hand side of the fireplace, sitting on a flat fruit basket close to the fire - she had a lump of white stuff in her lap, and a piece of black cloth under it in her lap also, one of her hands was under it by the side of the black cloth - I said, "There are the moulds:" the other two women were immediately by her - I spoke loud enough for all the prisoners to hear me;

they were all three in the room when I entered - when I said, "There are the moulds," the elder prisoner said,"O Lord, it is all over with us now."

Q. Describe the situation the other two prisoners were in when you entered the room? A. They were all round the fire, Swift sat in the middle next to Devereux, senior, between her and her daughter, who was opposite - they all sat close together by the fire; I believe Swift was sitting down on a bag which had a few coals in it, and at the other corner sat Devereux, junior, on an old saucepan - there was a fire, an iron pot on it, and a tobacco - pipe in the pot; they had a brisk fire - there was some white metal in the pot in a liquid state; Gollocker went round and seized Devereux, senior - they had a struggle, and rolled down on the ground together; the candle was at this time either put out or knocked out - they had a candle in the room, and we had one, but it went out before we got to the door; before the candle was put out it was in the hands of the prisoner Swift, as they were sitting all round the fire - Myers secured the younger Devereux, and I caught hold of the hand of Swift; I then gave Swift into Myers' hand, and procured a light from the next house - I could get no candle in the house; when I came up stairs with the light I saw Gollocker and Devereux, senior still on the ground, and assisted him in getting her away from the moulds, which were then under her - she was laying on them, for I could feel them under her, and to prevent her from crumbling them all to pieces, I moved her away; when we had removed her, there were the broken moulds under her - they are here; there were several pieces of moulds which form a pair now they are put together, as well as they can - I picked up these six counterfeit shillings before they left the room - they had also laid under her on the ground; I first saw them on the floor just after she was removed, and exactly on the part of the floor where she had been - one was about half a yard away from her; Myers and I brought the other two prisoners to the opposite side of the room, where Devereux, senior, had been placed, and the younger Devereux said, "Spare my mother, I don't care what becomes of me;" Swift made answer and said, "it is of no use, it is all over with us, we shall be transported at any rate;" I searched Swift, but found nothing on her -I then searched the younger Devereux; she objected to my feeling in her bosom - Swift told her it was of no use, for she was sure I would search her; Devereux, junior, then put her hand into her bosom, and took out three of these counterfeit shillings - I told her I was not satisfied, and should search her further; I then untied her apron loosened her clothes, and nine others dropped from her - one had fallen from her before that, and Myers had picked it up; that was before she was searched, and before I found the three - I produce the three and the nine, the twelve are together; I then searched the place, and we then picked up the six shillings - Myers took the pot off the fire; we secured the prisoners and brought them away -Myers locked the room, and took the key with him; the next day, in consequence of what Gollocker told me, I went to the room and brought a pan away - I got the key of the room from a woman down stairs.

COURT. Q. Any body else might have been in the room in the mean time? A. Yes - the woman hesitated at first to give it to me, but I told her who I was; the pan had the appearance of plaster of Paris having been mixed in it - I had seen it in the room when we were there the day before; it was full of dirty water.

JAMES GOLLOCKER . I am a constable of Lambeth. I and Myers applied to Hall to assist in apprehending the prisoners - we all went together; I followed Hall up stairs - when the door was open I rushed past Hall, and seized the elder Devereux; she cried out, "O Lord!" she had got her left arm up, just as if she was frightened - when I entered the room she was sitting down close to the left-hand side of the fire-place, on a basket; she had something in her right-hand - I could not say exactly what it was; her right-hand was in her lap - I seized her hand, and the candle, which Swift was holding, dropped, or went out, and we were left in the dark; Devereux, sen. threw herself down on the ground - I threw myself down also, to keep her quiet; I kept her in that position till the light came, which was in about three minutes - before the light was brought I heard something break; I thought it was the mould - it appeared something crumbling, like the breaking of chalk; the noise proceeded from under her.

Q. Was she perfectly still all the time? A. No, she was very restless all the time she was on the ground; both before and after I heard the crumbling I thought, from her manner of moving about, that she had something under her which she wished to break - I reached across her, and dragged her right hand from under her right hip, where the mould was.

Q. What made you judge it was under her hip? A. She was so very restless - I ascertained that it was a mould as soon as the light came; I did not take it up before the light came, but kept her as quiet as I could - while she was in this position I heard something drop from her; it rang on the ground like money - when she was taken up there were six pieces of coin - Hall picked them up.

Q. State what passed when the light came? A. Hall assisted me to remove her from where she was laying to the other side of the room, which I should think is about twelve feet square - there were also the pieces of mould laying on the floor where she had laid; Myers picked them up, and he has them - Myers and Hall moved the other two prisoners across the room; Hall searched them - I saw the pot on the fire, and white metal in it, which was melted, and there was a tobacco-pipe in the pot; it appeared to be to hand the metal out, and put it into the mould - here is the pot; there was a very good fire - I saw this knife laying on the floor in the room, and in the cupboard there was some plaster of Paris; I produce a file, which was on the mantel-piece in the room - it seemed as if there had been white metal in the teeth of it, and does so now; I produce about 3lbs. of plaster of Paris, which I found in a bag in the cupboard - it is in dust; I found a small piece of white metal among the ashes under the grate, similar to what was in the pot - it appears to have fallen from the top of the mould after the mould was full; I saw a pan that was full of water, but I did not take particular notice of it that night - Myers locked the door, and took the key away when we left; I went back next day with Myers, and saw the pan standing there - I did not go with Hall; I left the pan there - something struck me, as the elder prisoner was sitting by

that she might have put something into it - here it is; there is plaster of Paris in it; there were a few hard lumps in it when I threw the water out - plaster of Paris will make a mould.

RICHARD MYERS . I am a tobacconist, and live in Newington-causeway. I went with Hall and Gollocker -Hall went up stairs first, Gollocker next, and I behind, with a small lantern; when we got to the top of the stairs Hall burst the door open, and the moment he got in he said, "There are the moulds;" he seized hold of Swift, who was in the middle - Gollocker went by him and seized Devereux, sen., who was on the left hand side; I caught hold of the younger Devereux, who was on the right hand side, and at that time a scuffle-ensued between her and myself - the candle was knocked down and went out, and at that moment my lantern went out; at that time I saw Gollocker and Devereux, sen., on the ground - I shifted my hands, and seized the youngest Devereux with my right hand; I put my left hand across the old woman, and took up this shilling, which had just fallen from her, as I suppose, for it was directly in front of her- it was so very hot when I picked it up, that I dropped it, and in dropping, it broke away from the get part, which is the substance it is poured in by; I have got both parts here - the get is the part that is not round; it fits exactly to the coin; there is a little notch over the get, where it fits; it broke in two on my dropping it - it fell on this piece of black rag, which was open, and appeared to be what the moulds had been held in; the rag had some small particles of metal about it - at that time I heard the younger Devereux shifting some money about; I told her it was of no use, she had better be quiet, for I should find it by and by, after we had got them quiet; Hall put Swift in my care while he went down and brought up a candle - after the candle came up I removed Devereux. jun. and Swift to the further corner of the room; I placed them in a chair there, and tied their hands together, one hand to the hand of the other - each had still one hand loose, and while I was so doing, this shilling dropped from Devereux, jun.; I picked it up, and produce it here - Devereux, jun. repeatedly said, "Let my mother go, and keep us;" Hall and Gollocker then removed the elder Devereux, and brought her up to where I was, and underneath where she had been this mould laid, broken in pieces, as it is now- I put them together as well as I could, with Mr. Field's assistance; they are the pieces of a mould which form both sides of a shilling - here are some small pieces, which I could not put together with it; the get fits this thick part of the mould exactly - a small file laid in the black rag; it all laid there till after we had secured the prisoners - we then picked it all up together, before we removed them from the room.

Q. At what time was it you observed the pieces of metal in the black rag? A. At the same time as I saw the shilling, because the shilling laid on the rag - I saw it as soon as I went into the room, and I observed some small marks of metal on it, little splashes; it had fallen from Devereux, sen.'s lap, when I got in, as I was the third - it laid close to her, and I saw the shilling on it; I kept the key after the door was locked - I went back again that night, and saw the earthern pan there, with some water in it; I desired Gollocker the next morning, when we went, to pour the water off, which he did, and at the bottom of it were some hard pieces of plaster of Paris; I had observed the water in it the night before, but could not see the plaster of Paris - no one could have got in without picking the lock.

Q. Hall says he got the key from a woman? A. Yes; after we had poured the water off, and had got every thing away, I left the key with the landlady of the house - we put the pan in a corner, and told Hall to go and fetch it- I should have said that I took the iron pot off the fire; it was in a very hot state, with a long tobacco-pipe in it - it is here, with its contents.

GEORGE BARRETT . I am a dealer in Sheffield and Birmingham goods - I am not a manufacturer. I know the three prisoners by sight - they have each been to my shop and bought goods many times; I cannot say what I sold them, they bought so many articles - they were new articles; I think I have sold them spoons, but I cannot swear that - they each, generally, came alone.

MR. FRANCIS KIRBY . I am a practical chemist, and am the assistant at the London University. I took a part from these moulds while they were in Myers' custody; I examined it - they are made of what is commonly called plaster of Paris: I examined some of the powder which Gollocker produced, and that is the same material - the moulds are made from the same material, and might have been made from this powder; the effect of water on plaster of Paris is to consolidate it - it becomes a perfect solid body, like this mould.

RICHARD MYERS . Mr. Kirby, in my presence, took a part from the moulds - I have the rest here.

JAMES GOLLOCKER . I gave Mr. Kirby the powder out of the bag which I found.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint. I have seen several moulds of this description - I have had some experience in seeing implements for coining; (looking at the moulds) these now present parts of a broken plaster of Paris mould for casting shillings - parts of both the obverse and reverse sides of a shilling are visible on them now; this shilling picked up by Myers is counterfeit in all respects, and appears to have been made from this mould.

Q. Has it the appearance or not of coin which is usually made by moulds of this nature? A. It has in all respects - I have seen a great many shillings which have been counterfeited by plaster of Paris moulds; they usually present this appearance when first cast - it is not finished; it has parts sticking to it, which are generally removed before it is circulated - it has the impression and perfect similitude of a shilling on both sides; nothing remains to be done but to file off the rough edge; these twelve are all of the same sort as the one - they are the same metal, and cast from the same mould, and alike in all respects; these six are the same as the twelve - they all require to have the particles round the edge removed before circulation; it is always necessary to remove the spray, as it is called - plaster of Paris moulds will not produce a shilling fit for circulation, but it will produce a perfect similitude of the figure of a shilling; this get appears to me to fit the shilling exactly; in my judgment, it is the get which was cast with that shilling - I have compared the get with the mould; it appears to fit exactly - the moulds are generally

formed by putting a good shilling into the plaster of Paris; the channel to admit the metal to the impression is generally made with a piece of metal, or scraped out; the channels differ in size in different moulds - the get fitting the aperture of this mould leads me to suppose this shilling was cast in it; the get is the metal which fills the channel - the iron pot contains white metal similar to what the shillings are made of; I should think the metal now in the pot would make twelve or fourteen shillings, or hardly so many; these files are fit for filing the edge of the coin - one appears to have been used at white metal; the other also, in a slight degree - the impression in the mould exhibits the wrong side - the matrix; it is like the impression of a seal, the letters are reversed; the mould is hollow where the impression is to be raised.

Devereux, Sen.'s Defence. I have nothing to say but that I had just come into the room, and a man came in there - I was only two days in the room; he took the room and brought these things there: I did not know any thing about it - he had hardly gone down stairs five or ten minutes when the gentlemen came to the room.

Swift's Defence (written.) On the 11th of February I was on Saffron-hill, and met a woman, named Jones, who stopped me, and asked if I knew her husband - I asked his name; she said they called him Bob, and he wore a white coat; she suspected he was in Devereux's room - while talking he came up; she asked if he was coming home to tea - she asked me to tea, and said it was just by; she pressed me, and I went up - her husband went down, telling her to get tea, and he would be back directly; she asked me to go down, saying, "I think he has gone to Devereux's," she pointed to the door, asked me to go to the two pair, and ask for her husband - I knocked at the door, and somebody answered; I said was Bob there, and they opened the door - I said, "Your wife wants you, Bob," and he went down; Devereux asked where I had met his wife - I said in the street; I asked if she was not afraid to do such things as she was doing - she said,"It is nothing when you are used to it;" she asked me to sit down, which I refused - I took the candle off the chair; I heard somebody coming up whistling, and said, "Here is somebody coming;" Devereux said, "It is only Bob," she knew his whistle - I put the candle on the chair to open the door, and the officers came in; Devereux took the candle off the chair - they laid hold of the mother and daughter, and one took hold of me; I was searched, and nothing found on me- we were sent to Clerkenwell prison for another hearing -Mary Devereux went to her mother, and told her she had twelve bad shillings about her, and would sell them; she told her to do as she liked with them, she had brought her into trouble enough with them; she called Mrs. Foley, sold the shillings to her, and said, "You say it is the last you will buy of me, Mrs. Foley, but I am sorry for it;" Mary Devereux said, "You buy of my sister" - I hear they have carried on this trade a long while, and got many a young woman into trouble.

Swift to MR. BARRETT. Q. Did you not see me at your house the same night that I was taken, on the 11th? A. I cannot speak exactly to the time; I recollect her being in the shop very well with another person, about dusk - I live in George-street, Hatton-garden, which is a very short way from Saffron-hill; it was either Thursday or Friday, but whether it was the day she was taken or not I cannot say - it must have been last Thursday or Friday week; she came with a stout woman, to buy some goods - I do not know her name, but I knew her by sight; it was in the evening - I do not know what they asked for.

DEVEREUX, SEN. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 48.

DEVEREUX, JUN. - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

SWIFT - NOT GUILTY .[Feb. 21.]

The prisoners were again indicted for falsely and traitorously making three counterfeit shillings; upon which no evidence was given.

Reference Number: t18310217-10

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

445. ISAAC MASON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Dinn , on the 28th of January , at St. Mary, Stoke Newington , and stealing therein two coats, value 2l.; 1 pair of boots, value 15s.; 1 spoon, value 2s.; 1 coral, value 14s., and I sovereign, his property .

GEORGE DINN . I am a shoemaker , and live at Stoke Newington - I rent the whole house; the prisoner had lodged in a room at the top of my house for some time - he used to breakfast with me, and used the kitchen. On Thursday, the 27th of January, I went to bed about eleven o'clock; I believe the front door was fastened then, but cannot swear it - I do not remember whether I went to bed before my wife or not, nor whether the parlour door was locked; there is a door from the parlour into the shop, and from the shop into the passage - the door from the shop into the passage was fastened by a bolt inside; the door from the parlour into the shop is never fastened; I have two front doors - they are fastened with bolts and locks; I bolted and locked the shop door myself that night - that is a front door; I did not look at the back door - the witness Fealey came down stairs first next morning; I came down about seven o'clock, and observed the parlour door open.

Q. That is the door which you say was never fastened? A. No - the door between the parlour and the shop is never fastened; this leads from the parlour into the passage - I cannot say whether that had been fastened or not; I went into the parlour, and missed two great coats, which I had seen hanging there the evening before, and a pair of Wellington boots were missing from the shop; I found the lock forced off my desk, which was perfectly secure the evening before, when I went to bed: I missed some gold coin from the desk - I know I had left some there the evening before, but I do not know how much; I missed a tea-spoon, which I have one here to compare with - I missed a coral from the parlour - one bell was broken off when I had it, and the coral part was broken, it was perfect in other respects; I saw the prisoner again on the Sunday evening following, but not before; I spoke to him on the Sunday morning at the station-house, where he was locked up, but I did not see him - there was a partition between us; nothing material passed - I saw him in the evening, and said something about his not being prosecuted; in consequence of what he said I went with the officer to a jeweller's shop in Barbican kept by Mrs. Moseley, and found my silver spoon - he directed me to that shop; I saw one of my coats at Worship-street office, not at any place he had pointed out - that was the best coat of the two, and was worth 35s. or 2l. - it cost me 3l. 10s.; the other was worth 12s. or 14s. - I do not remember what it cost; the tea-spoon is worth 2s., the boots 18s. or 1l., and the coral 12s. or 14s.; I cannot tell how much money there was.

MARY ANN DINN . On the 27th of January my husband and I both went up to bed about eleven o'clock, together; the parlour door leading to the passage was locked - I saw him lock it; I do not know whether the back door was locked - I saw the desk; that was safe over night - I saw the money in it the same evening, but do not know how much there was; I know there was a sovereign, but cannot say whether there was more than one - the next morning, when I came down, I observed the desk was broken open; we missed the great coats, the coral, spoon, and boots - William Fealey came down first in the morning; the prisoner had lodged in our house about a month the last time, and took the lodging by the week; his week had not expired on that day - he did not come back at all.

WILLIAM FEALEY . I am journeyman to Mr. Dinn. On the 28th of January I came down stairs about seven o'clock, before Dinn and his wife - I went up immediately and alarmed Mr. Dinn, as I saw the parlour door open, and the back door which leads into the yard.

GEORGE DINN re-examined. Q. Your wife says you locked the parlour door, what was done with the key? A. I found the key of the parlour door in my trousers pocket in the morning, but I do not recollect having locked it - when I came down in the morning I found a skeleton-key in the door.

LYDIA MOSELEY . I keep a jeweller's-shop in Barbican. On Friday, the 28th of January, in the fore part of the day, a man came to my shop with a broken tea-spoon, and part of a child's coral also broken - the red of the coral was gone, and there were two or three bells remaining, but not attached to the coral; they must have been brought loose - to the best of my knowledge the prisoner is the man; I should feel it rather presumptions to swear to him, having seen him only for a few minutes - he is the man to the best of my knowledge; I do not recollect him saying any thing - I weighed them, and gave him 4s. 6d. for them, which I considered a very fair price; I do not recollect any further conversation.

LEONARD CLARE MATTHEWS . I keep a pawnbroker's shop, No. 104, Whitecross-street. On the 28th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, this great coat was pawned with me for 16s.; I should consider it worth about 25s. in the trade - I suppose a tailor would charge about 3l. 10s. for it; I believe the prisoner to be the person who pawned it, but as I said at the office, I considered him rather taller at the time than he appears now - to the best of my belief he is the man.

WILLIAM JACOBS . I am a Police-constable. In consequence of information which I received, I went on Saturday, the 29th of January, with Collier, my brother officer, to Great Chart-street, Hoxton New-town - we waited there about an hour and a half, and after some time my brother officer saw a person waiting at some distance; I then went up, and saw the prisoner alone - I asked what he did there; he said he was waiting for somebody - I asked what his name was; he said it was Brown - I told him I did not think it was, and asked if it was not Mason; he said it was not - I asked him if he knew Mr. Dinn, of Church-street, Stoke Newington; he said he did not - I told him I thought he was the person I wanted for a robbery there; I called my brother officer, as I thought from the agitation of the prisoner he was the man - Collier came up, and we took him to the station; we searched, and found 14s. 3 1/2d. on his person.

GEORGE COLLIER . I am a Police-constable. I went to Hoxton with Jacobs; I saw a man standing behind some stones, about forty yards from the prisoner's brother's house; my brother officer went and took him - the prisoner did not direct me to any particular place, but I received information from the acting inspector, and went on Monday morning to Mrs. Moseley's; I then sent my brother officer to fetch the prisoner - he brought him there, and Dinn also came - Mrs. Moseley produced a bowl of old pieces of silver; she emptied it out; Mr. Dinn and the prisoner picked out the parts of a coral, and a broken tea-spoon - we found 14s. 3d. on him.

WILLIAM BIRD . I am acting inspector of the Police. I was at the station-house on the Sunday when the prosecutor came to speak to the prisoner; I did not hear what he said to him about showing him mercy.

GEORGE DINN . As soon as I saw the prisoner, I said,"Well, Mason, this is a bad job;" he said he was very sorry for it - I asked what he had done with the property, and I finished by saying I would be as merciful as I possibly could be to him; I asked what he had done with the property.

Q. Before he answered that, did you say you would be as merciful as you could, or was it after? A. It was after; he told me he had pawned one great coat in Whitecross-street, and sold the silver articles in Barbican - the Welington boots, and two other coats he had sold in Petticoat-lane - the conversation dropped, and I said I would be as merciful as I could; I am quite sure that was after he had told me where the property was; there were three coats stolen.

GEORGE COLLIER . I produce the coral and broken spoon, which I found at Moseley's.

GEORGE DINN . I compared this spoon with one of the set at Worship-street, and am positive it is the same; I have not a doubt of the coral being mine - this coat produced by Mr. Matthews, is mine; I have had it nearly twelve months - I have not the least doubt of it.

MRS. DINN. I know this coral to be ours, and the spoon also.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[Feb.21.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18310217-11

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

446. CHARLES TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , at St. Marylebone, 6 silver forks, value 6l., and 6 silver spoons, value 6l., the goods of Henry Saint George Tucker , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT ROBERTS . I am a footman to Mr. Henry Saint George Tucker, who lives at No. 3, Portland-place, in the parish of St. Marylebone . On Monday, the 24th of January, I was down in the pantry; the silver spoons and forks were kept there in a plate cupboard - I had seen them there about half an hour before they were missed - I know the prisoner; he came to my master's house about half-past eleven o'clock that morning, and told me he had come from his mother to say his father would be able to wait at dinner on Saturday, the 5th of this month, when

we were to have company - I had occasion to go up stairs, and left him below; I knew his father very well before, and knew him by sight - there was no one left with him - I was up stairs five or ten minutes; I found him there when I came down - he said, "I shall go now, and I wish you good morning;" he left - that was before twelve o'clock- about half-past two in the afternoon a Police-constable came, and asked if I had lost any silver spoons and forks; I had not missed any thing then - I went to the plate-cupboard, and missed six spoons and six forks, which I had placed there about ten o'clock in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Had he not been at your house more than once that day? A. No, he was not in the habit of calling - he had been there once before while I lived there.

GEORGE PICKETT . I am a silversmith, and live at No. 265, Oxford-street. On Monday, the 24th of January, about a quarter before twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked if I bought old silver - I said we did, and he put into my hand two silver bowls of tablespoons - I saw they had been recently broken, and asked him whose they were; he said his own - I said I could not buy them, but must stop them, and he must give me his name and address - I asked his name, and he said Ford; I told him to wait a moment, but he ran out of the shop; on his going out I heard a quantity of silver rattling in his coat pocket - I therefore pursued him, calling "Stop thief!" he took the first turning out of Oxford-street, down two short streets, and was knocked down by a carpenter; I came up to him immediately - I found he had more plate in his pocket, and told the carpenter to hold one pocket; I held the other, and we took him to Mount-street watch-house - he was searched there, and I saw taken from him four more bowls of silver spoons, six handles, and six table-forks of the same pattern; I asked him whose they were: he said they were his father's; I asked if that was his father's crest on them; he said if I would go to his father it would be all right - he then gave me his right name and address, but I could not find his father, as he was from home; I saw his mother: I have kept the two which he offered to me, and the officer has the others - I consider the value of the whole, before the spoons were broken, would be 12l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have they not been used? A. Yes, a considerable time - the value depends on the weight: I am certain they would be worth more than 6l., if not 7l. for melting - I have not weighed them.

COURT. Q. What would they be worth to sell second-hand whole? A. Any body would give 9l. for them; old silver is worth 5s. an ounce - I weighed the two bowls; they were rather more or less than 2 1/2 ozs. - I think it was more.

THOMAS BRIDGER . I am a Police-constable. I was at the station, and saw the prisoner searched, in the presence of Pickett - six silver forks, the bowls of four spoons, and six handles were found on him; I have kept them ever since.

ROBERT ROBERTS . These are master's property, and have his crest on them - the bowls of the spoons agree with the handles; my master occupies the whole house.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the merciful consideration of the Court.

GEORGE PICKETT . I think it necessary to state that on my coming back, and inquiring whose they were, he seemed exceedingly contrite, and told me whose they were, mentioned the cause which induced him to do it, and said the thought never entered his mind when he first went into the house.

Six very respectable witnesses gave the prisoner a most undeniable character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character, and by the Prosecutor, for his youth, and believing it to he his first offence .[Feb. 21.]

Reference Number: t18310217-12

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

447. RICHARD BUTTERWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , at St. George, Hanover-square, 2 watches, value 13l., the property of Thomas Gillam , in the dwelling-house of Hannah Brooks .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing, on the same day, at the same parish, 1 watch, value 10l., the property of the Princess Sophia ; and 1 watch, value 3l., the property of William Palmer , in the dwelling-house of the said Hannah Brooks .

GEORGE SHEPHERD . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Gillam, who is a watch-maker , and has a shop in the house of Hannah Brooks , in Davies-street, Berkeley-square, in the Parish of St. George, Hanover-square . I have known the prisoner nearly five years; he is an Englishman, and has been in the habit of coming to the shop for some time past for relief - I believe he is a gilder ; he came there on the 29th of December, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, for the purpose of carrying a painting for master; I was at home in the shop- he staid in the shop about three-quarters of an hour; I was absent for a short time while I went to get a light, and left him in the shop - he was there when I came back; we did not miss the watches till next morning, and then only missed one, and the next morning missed the other - he was taken in about ten days afterwards.

JAMES STRINGER . I live with Mr. Gofton, a pawnbroker, in Gilbert-street, Berkeley-square. On the 29th of December, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner came to pawn a silver gilt watch - he offered me only one; he said it was a metal watch, which caused me to suspect him - we questioned him about it, and he said he had won it at a raffle; I detained it, and while we were questioning him he ran out of the shop - I followed him round the corner, but could not see him; a person came from Mr. Gillam's next day, and claimed it - I saw the prisoner at Marlborough-street about ten days afterwards, and am certain he is the man.

THOMAS GILLAM . I have never recovered the other watch; this one is mine - it was left to be repaired by Mr. William Palmer ; I know it well, and can swear positively to it - it is silver gilt; I value it at 3l. - the other was worth full 10l.; two friends saw the prisoner in the neighbourhood on the 8th of January, and brought him to my place - I charged him with taking the watches, which he acknowledged, and I gave him in charge; I used neither threat nor promise to him - he said he was sorry for what he had done - that he had taken the watches, and attempted to pawn one, but was stopped - that he kept the other two

days, and then sold it to a man called hairy cap William, in St. Giles'; I asked him what for - he said for about 15s. - that the man said it was a gilt one; but it was a gold one with two faces, showing the day of the month; Mrs. Brooks is mistress of the house - I pay her the rent.

THOMAS COLE . I am a Police-constable, and heard what passed between the prosecutor and the prisoner at Tothill-fields; he has stated it correctly.

[Feb. 22.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18310217-13

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

448. GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS FREDERICK ELLIS , WILLIAM CLIFFORD , FRANCIS COY , and JOHN JAMES WOODWARD were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Chambers , on the 3rd of February , at St. George, Hanover-square, and stealing therein 13 coats, value 60l.; 3 epaulettes, value 12l.; 60 yards of woollen cloth, value 50l.; 70 yards of kerseymere, value 30l.; and 12 yards of velvet, value 12l.; his property; and 1 pair of boots, value 10s., the goods of David Webster ; and JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 coat, value 3l., part of the said goods ; and CHARLES GAST was indicted for feloniously receiving 8 yards of woollen cloth, value 4l., other part of the said goods, they well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM CHAMBERS . I am a tailor , and live at No. 8, Little Maddox-street, Bond-street, in the parish of St. George Hanover-square - I occupy the whole house. On Wednesday, the 2nd of February, I went to bed about a quarter-past eleven o'clock; the house was then fastened - two female servants and the boy were up when I went to bed; one female servant and the boy are here - it is my invariable practice to examine the doors myself every night; I did so that night - they were all fast; a little after six o'clock in the morning, the boy came up and alarmed me - I went down stairs, and perceived every thing in the front parlour in very great disorder, and a great deal of property gone; there was about 300l. worth gone - I looked over the house, and on going down to the back kitchen, I found an entry had been made at the back door, by cutting a piece out of the door and unbolting it; I had seen that door myself overnight - it was then safe; when it became day-light, we found a ladder from the adjoining house to mine - the two houses join within about four feet; there is an addition of a back room built out at the next house, and at the back part of my house is a yard covered in; the houses are not quite close together - on the back room, which is built out from the next house, I saw some pieces of cuttings of scarlet cloth, by which I suppose the property was taken out that way; I had scarlet cloth in my house - I saw footsteps on the snow, leading to the back of an empty house in George-street; there appeared a good many footsteps - I then went round to the empty house, and saw a female named Woodward, who had the care of it; in the back room coming from that yard, there were several pieces of scarlet cloth and a quantity of wadding, which some of the dress coats that had been taken from my house had been wrapped up in - I found them in the room of the empty house, leading from the yard to where I traced the footsteps, and in the kitchen of the empty house, I found three silver spoons belonging to me - I went into the front kitchen there, and saw there had been the same sort of work at the door of that house as well as mine; a piece was cut out of the centre of the door where the bolt was, exactly the same as mine - that is the door leading from the kitchen to the stairs; there was no mark of any force having been used to any of the outer doors of that house, no appearance of their having been broken open - I returned home, and sent to Marlborough-street Office for Ballard; I missed from my house a full dress coat for the West Somerset Yeomanry, worth about 30l., a full dress coat for the Grenadier Guards, worth upwards of 30l., and the front part of the embroidery of a coat for the Coldstream Guards; I missed altogether about thirteen coats, I think five epaulettes, between sixty and seventy yards of woollen cloth, more than that of kerseymere, and about twelve yards of velvet - that was all my property; some of the coats were made for gentlemen, and not sent home - also a pair of boots belonging to my servant, David Webster: I should know my property again - it was all safe there on the Wednesday evening; I questioned Mrs. Woodward, who was looking after the empty house - she is not here; I was present when Coy and Thompson were apprehended by Ballard - they had property belonging to me in their possession at that time; they were apprehended in Dean-street, Soho, about three o'clock in the afternoon of the Saturday following - Coy had a bundle, with two pieces of scarlet cloth in it; Thompson had a kind of a hand-basket with two coats in it - I do not think any thing was said at that time; I know the cloth belonged to me, and one of the coats - we got a warrant to search a muffinbaker's shop, in Hanway-yard, kept by the prisoner Gast; the officers Ballard, Goddard, Schofield, and myself went there on the Saturday - Gast was in the house, and while we were searching, Ellis came in with a bundle: Ballard took him into custody, and on opening the bundle there was a coat in it belonging to me - we only found in Gast's house about eight yards of cloth belonging to me, in three remnants; we then went to No. 11, Tottenham-court-road, kept by the witness Thompson, a hosier - Ballard, Goddard, and myself went in, and in the front attic of that house we discovered a great quantity of my property; there was all the embroidery of the regimental coats, the epaulettes, five or six other coats, a quantity of blue cloth, and two regimental coats - the whole of them were my property; there was a great variety of other property, which was not mine - I saw nothing of the prisoner Thompson there; they are two distinct persons.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any partner? A. No - my house was broken open on the Wednesday night or Thursday morning, and I went to Gast's house on the Saturday, about five o'clock in the afternoon; he was at home - I believe he is married; there was a family there - I have heard that Ellis is Gast's son-in-law, and lodged in the house; at least when we took the black cloth found there, it was asked whose room that was in, and it was said to be Ellis' - the eight yards were cut or torn into three pieces; I think it was on the second floor - there are no back rooms; I was down stairs at the time, but when I came up it was on a chest of drawers - I think it had been found before I got up; I was called down once or twice; Goddard and Schofield

were in the room - I did not find it; I have the head ends of it, and the list to compare with it, and have a private-mark on one piece - my name is not on it; he certainly could not tell it was mine by any mark - I did not know Ellis before.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How many persons sleep in the house? A. Myself, my wife, three female servants, five children, and a boy; the next house was not empty - it was a house in George-street; a door inside that house had been broken.

Q. Was that towards the back part of the premises? A.No, the front - I cannot tell whether the door of that house had been closed the night before of course; I found the inner door broken the same as my own door - Ballard was present when we took Coy and Thompson.

Q. And you say at that time nothing was said? A. I said I did not hear any thing pass.

DAVID WEBSTER. I am servant to Mr. Chambers. I went to bed on the Wednesday night, between half-past eleven and twelve o'clock - I do not know whether I was the last person up; the house was safe - I got up next morning about a quarter-past six, and was the first person up; I sleep down stairs - the first thing I saw was the parlour door open, which is on the ground floor; I sleep on that floor - that door was shut over night; I saw it shut - I saw the cases the regimental coats were kept in were standing open and empty; Mr. Chambers' great coat and another coat laid on the floor - I immediately went up and alarmed master, who came down; I went with him into the back kitchen on the area floor, and saw a piece was taken out of the door and a hole made to put their fingers through to undo the bolts; the door was open - I went to the front kitchen, and the two female servant's drawers were open, I missed a pair of boots of mine out of the cupboard - on the Friday Goddard and Ballard brought the prisoner Clifford to master's house: I saw him in the parlour - Ballard told him to take one of the boots off which he had on; he did so, and Ballard asked me if they were mine - I said they were; he had both my boots on.

Q. Did you go the same night into the back kitchen again after the examination? A. I was walking through the back kitchen in the dark - it was dusk; I kicked a boot before me - I got a light, and found the fellow to it; they did not belong to me - I inquired of all the men in the house, and they did not claim them; I delivered those boots to Ballard - they were very old ones, and I had only worn mine once.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did not Clifford say, in your presence, that he had bought the boots at the Three Compasses, New-cut, Lambeth? A. No, he did not: I did not see the other boots put on his feet - I do not know of their being an inch and a half too long for him; Mr. Chambers did not, by any promise or threat, attempt to get any confession from Clifford.

MARY ANN STANFORD . I am a servant to Mr. Chambers. I went to bed about twelve o'clock; I was not the last person up - it was Ellen Carr , my fellow-servant; she is not here - every thing was safe when I went to bed; I came down next morning about seven o'clock, after the boy - the house was found broken open; I only lost a purse - I saw the boots in the kitchen; I had gone with Webster to buy his boots on the Saturday night, and took particular notice of them - I should know them again.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am a Police-officer. I went to Mr. Chamber's house on the Thursday morning, and saw the front parlour in great disorder; the things were laying about - the epaulette boxes and things were about; I requested Mr. Chambers to show me which way he conceived they had got in; the entrance of the house was effected through the sky-light of his workshop - it is an upright sky-light; the window opens at the side - it was open; it could be opened very easily - there appeared to be no fastening to that; it opened and shut by pullies from the inside - it could be opened from the outside by a person putting their hands on the frame and pushing it down; there was a string hanging from the inside of the window, by which they could let themselves down, and then descend into the house by a flight of stairs - the strings belong to the window; they could let themselves down into the body of the shop, which is about ten feet, by taking hold of the cord - they then had to descend a flight of stairs, at the bottom of which is a door communicating with the back kitchen - a hole was cut through that door in the corner, just above the bottom stile, sufficient to admit two or three fingers to work back the bolt; it was some holes bored, and then broken through - it had been bored by a large gimblet of this description(producing one), which is broken, and part of it was found on Mr. Chambers' premises; it was given to me by Mr. Chambers' servant - here is the broken piece; this hammer was given me also by Webster, I think.

DAVID WEBSTER . I found this part of the gimblet in the house, and gave it to Ballard; Mr. Chambers found the hammer.

MR. CHAMBERS. I found the hammer in the front parlour, and the head part of the gimblet - I gave them to Ballard.

WILLIAM BALLARD . Outside the sky-light, in the snow, was the print of a person's feet standing and moving about, and marks of their fingers where they had laid their hands in different parts on the top of the sky-light and different parts of the window; there were the marks of persons' feet going over the back premises of other houses to the empty house in George-street - they had to cross one person's premises entirely to get to it; there were the tracks of three or four persons, and in the yard of the empty house were a great number of foot-marks, and in the back room of the empty house I saw some wadding and cuttings of scarlet cloth laying about - I then proceeded down stairs in the empty house, and found a door which communicates from the front kitchen to the foot of the stairs, cut just above the middle stile, where there was a bolt to fasten it; a hole had been bored, and then broken through, so as to admit fingers to get to the bolt to unfasten it the same way as the other, and on the board of one of the windows, inside, was a great quantity of tools belonging to a bell-hanger who had been working at the house at bell-hanging - there were no marks on the door there, but on going into the front area there were marks on the wall of a person's toe, as if a person had scraped it by dropping down into the area, and a mark of one heel in the snow, close up against the wall, and at the window which was nearest to the cistern, there

were marks of a person having got in at that window, the shutters of which were not fastened: I then inquired for the person who had charge of the house, and from information received from Mrs. Woodward, I went in search of the prisoner Woodward, at No. 9, Fullwood's-rents - he was not there; I searched the room, and left Goddard there - I saw Goddard there myself till eleven o'clock; on the following morning, Friday, I went with Goddard to No.53, Cirencester-place - Goddard proceeded up stairs, and brought Clifford down to me in the shop, and upon asking him a few questions I desired him to put his feet up, and said, "Where did you get these shoes?" he said,"I bought them;" I said when - he said yesterday; I said where - he said over in the New-cut; I said where there - he said in the skittle-ground of the Three Compasses, kept by a man of the name of Pople; I asked what he gave for them - he said 10s.; I asked if he knew the person he bought them of - he said No, he did not, he was a stranger; I asked if the landlord was present - he said No; I asked if the pot-boy was - he said the pot-boy came in and out, he did not know that he saw him; I asked what he had done with his old ones - he said he had thrown them over the bridge into the river as he came back; we then took him to Mr. Chambers', showed Webster the shoes, and he claimed them as his - we then took him to the office, where I desired him to take off the shoes he had then on, and to put on one of the old ones which I had received from Webster; the shoe itself was evidently too long for him, but the marks of his toes evidently came where the marks of the toes were in the shoes - here are marks of Jumps or bunions on the shoes at the same place in the old shoes, which were found, as in the new ones, which were taken off his feet - there is the same tread.

Q. Do you mean on the upper leathers, or on the soles? A. On the upper leathers; in consequence of information received I went with Goddard to Rupert-street, on the Saturday, and after waiting a considerable time I saw Coy go into a house; he came out in about half an hour, went down into Princes-street, from there to Wardour-street, and then returned home again to Rupert-street, and after stopping in doors some time he came out, and proceeded at a fast pace, walking fast, and running up to Mr. Young's, Marshall-street, Golden-square, just by Carnaby-market; after some time he came out again, and proceeded faster than before - Goddard and I followed him through Soho-square, across Oxford-street, and into Hanway-street- I did not see him go into Gast's house myself, but after waiting about an hour and a half Goddard left me, and before he returned I saw Coy come out of Gast's house, with a bundle under his arm - he had no bundle when I followed him before; I ran out from where I was standing, and in Oxford-street saw Coy, and then, for the first time, I saw Thompson in his company - he had a basket in his hand; when I got out of Hanway-street they were about the middle of the street, talking together; I had not seen them join each other - Mr. Chambers was with me - I allowed them to go on down Dean-street, as far as Walker's hotel; I then took hold of Coy, and Mr. Chambers secured Thompson - we put them into the hotel immediately; I secured them, and requested Mr. Chambers to go for a coach, which I put them into, and took them to the office; I told Coy at the office there had been a robbery committed, and a great quantity of cloth stolen; this was not taken down in writing - I said did he choose to say any thing about it, he might do as he liked; I untied his bundle, and found it contained this scarlet cloth - he said he had got it of young Gust, and that Gust lived at a muffin-shop in Hanway-street - that he received it from him in the bakehouse, and he was going to sell it for him, for the purpose of getting a few shillings - I asked him if he knew any thing about any coats; he said he did not; I asked if he had been offering to sell any coats to any person - he said No, he had not - that Thompson had two coats to try to sell, but he knew nothing about them; I asked if he knew any thing about any cloth - he said he did not; I desired Goddard to see what Thompson had in the basket, which he did - I had no conversation with him about it; Coy, at the office the same evening, pointed out Ellis as the person he had received the scarlet cloth from; this was in Ellis' presence: I do not think the Magistrate was there, but at all events it was not when any deposition was taken; the Magistrate lives in the house; a message was sent up to say that they were ready, and I think it was before he came down; I am, however, sure that it was not taken in writing - it was said in Ellis' presence, and he made no answer to it; we proceeded to get a search-warrant, and went off to the house in Hanway-street - the prisoner Gast was making muffins at the back part of the shop; I told him we had a warrant to search his house - he asked for what; I told him for woollen cloth and other articles, and while I was searching the front parlour he said, "Well, but what are you searching for?" and shortly afterwards he said, "But I have not seen the warrant;" I showed it him - he wanted to copy it; I said I could not stop to give him a copy at that time; Mr. Chambers, Goddard, and Schofield were up stairs, searching; I was down stairs in charge of the door, and after standing there some time Ellis came in - he had this coat, tied in this handkerchief, under his arm; I said,"Here I am, waiting for you - what have you here?" he said a coat; I said, "Where did you get it?" he said, "I bought it;" I asked of whom - he said of a man named Jones, but he did not know where he lived, he had only seen him at a public-house; I said, "Where were you when you bought it?" he said at his own house - I said"What house do you mean - do you mean this house here?" he said Yes; in a short time time I sent Goddard down to the office with him, and in consequence of what had been found up stairs I told Gast it was necessary he should get ready to go before the Magistrate, to give an account of the things found in his house; he cleaned himself for that purpose - a female came in, and in consequence of information we went to No.11, Tottenham-court-road, and there saw Mr. Thompson, the witness - we asked if he knew Ellis; he took us up to the front attic, where we found a large quantity of woollen cloth; here is a blue cloth in one piece, and four coats, one of which is not finished, three epaulettes and the military dress coats, as stated in the indictment - they were tied in a bundle, and the epaulettes with them; they have been shown to Mr. Chambers. On the Monday following, in consequence of information I received, I went to the house of Mr. Smith, Hop-gardens, St. Martin's-lane, and there received from Mrs. Smith a quantity of cloth and kerseymere; on the 14th Mr. Thompson delivered to Goddard, in my presence, ten yards of velvet.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Gast keeps a muffin-shop of some celebrity in Hanway-street? A. Yes- I believe he has done so for some years; Ellis said he resided there, but the room which was pointed out as Ellis' had neither bed nor bedding in it; it was a second floor room, on the right-hand side going up - there are no back rooms; I searched the shop and parlour, but found nothing applying to this charge.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You found the tools of a bell-hanger at the house in George-street? A. Yes, a great variety of tools; I did not take the bellhanger up - I went to the Three Compasses, and found Pople kept the house - he is here; Coy said he had the cloth from Gust, at the muffin-shop where I had seen him come out - I did not apprehend Ellis in consequence of that; we were determined to search every place he came out of with property; he said Thompson had two coats, which was true - I do not know Thompson to be a dealer in muffins.

HENRY GODDARD . I am a Police-officer. I joined Ballard at Mr. Chambers', on Thursday morning, the 3rd- what he has stated is correct; I went on the day after the robbery with Ballard and Chambers, to Fullwood's-rents, to search for John Woodward - I staid there till one o'clock in the morning of Friday, but he did not return; about nine o'clock on the Friday morning, I went with Ballard to No.53, Cirencester-place, and in the two pair back room I saw Clifford dressing himself; I desired him to come down - Ballard asked him several questions respecting the shoes; I heard what he said, and what Ballard has stated is true - the next day, Saturday, in consequence of information, I went with Ballard to No.27, Rupert-street, and after waiting some time saw Coy come out; we followed and watched him into the house of Mr. Young, in Marshall-street, but before that I had gained ground on him, and went and told Young I thought he was coming there; he went to Young's, and stopped there a short time, then came out, and I saw him go into the house of Gast, in Hanway-street, and some time after I received charge of the prisoner Thompson - I had been watching in Hanway-street some time.

Q. When Coy went into the house in Hanway-street, did not you go in? A. No, I remained watching, and afterwards went to the Police-office, where I received charge of Thompson - he had a basket; I asked if it was his - he said Yes - I opened it, and found it contained two coats; here is one of them - I asked who he got them from, and after some little hesitation he said from a person named Gust - I afterwards asked what he was going to do with them - he said to sell them, and if he sold them he was to have 5s. for his trouble; I afterwards returned from the office with Ballard, Schofield, and Chambers, to Gast's house, in Hanway-street, and in searching the second floor room, on the right-hand as you go up stairs, I found three pieces of black cloth - I asked whose room it was, and was told it was Ellis'; it had no bed in it - the cloth was on the drawers, tied in this handkerchief; it is three remnants - I came down, searched Ellis, and took him to the office; I found upon him about 8l. in money, the key of a clock, and a variety of small keys; I returned to Gast's house, and from information, I went with Chambers and Ballard to Thompson's, in Tottenham-court-road, and found the property described by Ballard; after I took Ellis to the office I showed him to Coy - Andrews, the officer, who had him in custody, was present; the Magistrate was not present - it was in the clerk's office, and before the office hours; the clerk was not writing, nothing passed - I afterwards locked Ellis up. and then went and asked Coy if that was the person who he had the cloth from.

COURT. We cannot receive his answer in evidence.

Witness. After that, in Ellis' presence, about nine o'clock that night, while the Magistrate was sent for, but before he came down, we had the prisoners in the office, ready to be examined, both Thompson and Coy nodded their heads at Ellis, and said that was the person they got the things from - Ellis saw them nod, and heard it, but made no answer; on the Monday following I went with Ballard to Smith's, and received three pieces of kerseymere from Mrs. Smith; I got information from there that some blue cloth had been sent from there that morning to Mr. Eccles, in Spring-gardens, and I got from there two pieces of blue cloth; that is blue cloth which Ballard has not spoken to - it is here; I got it from Eccles the same day; on the 14th I received ten yards of velvet from Mr. Thompson, of No. 11, Tottenham-court-road.

WILLIAM BALLARD re-examined. I ascertained afterwards that the person who Thompson described as young Gust was the prisoner Ellis - he called him Gust, his name being Gustavus.

GEORGE POPLE . I keep the Three Compasses, Lamheth-marsh. I do not know the prisoner Clifford - I never saw him at my house that I know of; there is no skittle-ground at my house; the latter end of last summer I made some extensive alterations, and abolished the skittle-ground altogether; I had none at all at this time.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How many persons serve in your house? A. I have three or four behind the counter - I have no tap-room; all my business is done between the counter and the street door - I have customers who drink there; I have a bar-maid and potboy - the bar-maid serves; they are not here - they were in my service on the 2nd and 3rd of February, and are still with me; there is no entrance to the part of the premises which used to be the skittle-ground, without passing through my counter, where nobody has been allowed to go - for the last six months there has been no skittle-ground there.

CHARLES GEORGE THOMPSON . I am a hosier, and live at No. 11, Tottenham-court-road. I know the prisoner Ellis - he had the use of the front attic in my house, and had done so for about a month; the things found there were brought in by him - I saw him about a month ago bring some medicine-chests there, which he told me he had bought at a sale - there was a key in the door, but the room was not locked; the room the officers went into was occupied by Ellis - he did not sleep there; there was no furniture, only what he brought - I do not know when he brought in any thing in particular, except the medicine-chests; he came into my shop about half an hour before the officers came, and bought a purse - he did not go up stairs; he was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards - I have seen him come in with bundles.

JOHN SMITH . I am a woollen-draper, and live at No. 4, Hop-gardens, St. Martin's-lane. I have known Coy about two months - I am not acquainted with him, and had not dealt with him; he called on the 3rd of this month - I believe it was on a Thursday - he brought some cloth and kerseymere for sale; there was a good deal of it - it was in five pieces altogether, three of kerseymere, and two of cloth; he said he had them to sell, that they were not his own, they belonged to a master tailor - he asked me to buy them, which I agreed to, and measured them; I was to pay 10s. 2d. a yard for the cloth, 3s. 10d. for two of the pieces of kerseymere, and 3s. 11d. for the other - it was broad cloth; I think I paid him 24l. odd: after folding it up I put it on the shelf, with my own goods, and on the Monday morning I took two pieces of the cloth to Mr. Eccles, of Spring-gardens - I gave the other three up to Mr. Chambers and the officers.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you carried on business as a woollen-draper? A. These fifteen years - I do not know that I am in the habit of buying of people who bring things in; I certainly have often bought of people in the shop - the broad cloth is not fine Saxony; Mr. Chambers is considered a respectable and fashionable tailor; I can buy very good cloth for 15s. a yard - I have given 28s. for some: this might be about 16s. a yard from the manufacturer, but things are bought and sold cheaper for want of money - this is very narrow cloth, and there would be an allowance for that; I could buy it for 16s., for cash, and should be allowed a yard in the score.

Q. You thought that you were dealing honest by giving 10s. 2d. for it? A. I knew no more of its being dishonestly come by than a child unborn - I am pretty well acquainted with the quality of cloth; it may be three inches narrower than the common broad cloth, which is usually thirty or thirty-one inches, this is twenty-eight or twenty-nine - I was never in trouble; I am sure of that - I have invoices to show my respectability; I was never charged with any offence at any time or place, and was never in custody, or charged with having property improperly in my possession belonging to another person - I was accused of a something once, but I had nothing to do with it, and never was in custody; I forget who accused me - what you allude to I believe was about a Mr. Chambers or Chamberlain, a laceman - I had some lace in my possession, which he claimed - I do not know how much there was, on my life, nor the value; I do not deal in lace - I neither bought nor sold that; Mrs. Smith had taken it to ask the value at a customer's - it had been brought to our house; Mr. Chamberlain afterwards had it - I do not know what the value was; it was twelve or fourteen years back - I did not deal with it; I was astonished to find it in my house -I know how it came there.

COURT. Q. How did the lace come into your possession? A. A man brought it to my house to know the value - I told him I did not know the value; Mrs. Smith took it to a customer of ours; he took it to Chambers or Chamberlain, where it was lost from, and he claimed it - I never bought it, nor agreed to buy it; I did not know the value.

ROBERT YOUNG . I am a tailor. I have known Coy ever since he was born. On Saturday, the 5th of February, he came to my shop, about eleven o'clock in the morning; he brought some black cloth, and asked if I would purchase it - I told him I did not want any, but asked to look at it; he untied the handkerchief - I examined it, and found it to be three remnants - I asked what he wanted a yard for it; he asked me 10s.; I said it would not suit me, and that was nearly as much as it was worth - he then asked if I wished to buy any new coats, and told me they belonged to a master tailor, who wanted money, and they were to be sold cheap - I asked what they were; he said one was a very handsome black frock coat, which had a velvet collar, and was faced with velvet in front - I asked what price the person wanted for it; he said 2l. 8s. - I told him it would not suit me, and he went away, taking the things with him; I had not heard of the robbery in Maddox-street at that time - he had not got the coats with him; about an hour after that Mr. Chambers called at my shop and described what he had lost - I gave him information, and about three o'clock Coy came again; he brought no coat - I had previously been to his father's to tell him I wished to see the coats; he came to my shop, and I agreed that he should fetch the coats for me to look at - he promised to be back in half an hour with them, but I saw no more of him till he was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I suppose you cannot be mistaken in his identity? A. No; the cloth might be worth 12s. or 13s - there was a yard and a quarter of inferior, which I said I would give 10s. for.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a writer and ornamental painter. I have been acquainted with the prisoner Woodward about two years; I do not know his mother, nor where she lived - I never heard from him; I had some conversation with him, about a month ago or rather more, in the street, at the corner of Charles-street and Oxford-street - I met him, and asked if he was going to stand something to drink; he said No, he had got no money - I said how was that, and told him he was gammoning me (he is a tailor, I believe) - I asked if he had any thing to do; he said No, he had done very little for a good while - he said he must get some money somewhere or other very soon, and that he had tried to do something at his mother's, but it was no go, or something to that effect - I said, "Take care you don't get transported;" that is all that passed - this was a week or eight days previous to this robbery - I cannot exactly state the time.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. He was in want of money? A. Yes - I have stated the words he used as near as I can recollect.

MR. THOMAS ANGEL . I live next door to the empty house in George-street. On Wednesday night, about halfpast twelve o'clock, or rather Thursday morning, I saw a person standing with his back against the door of the empty house, talking to a Policeman - I will not take my oath who it was, but I certainly think it was the prisoner Woodward; I did not know him before - I did not know whether he had any thing to do with the empty house; I only saw him while I was knocking at my own door, and going in with a friend - on the following morning when I heard of the robbery I went to Mr. Chambers' house, and saw the condition of the premises, and the remnants of cloth on the top of the premises they had gone over.

ELEANOR IRWING . I slept in the empty house in George-street from Friday, the 28th of January, till last Thursday

night - Mrs. Woodward had the care of the house; I saw the prisoner Woodward for the first time on Wednesday night, the night of the robbery - he was in the back kitchen between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, and his mother asked him to come back to supper; he said he did not think he could as he was going to see for work, but he would call as he came back - he came in that evening a little before ten o'clock, and did not stop many minutes; he went out before ten - I did not see him there then, but I heard his voice; his mother asked him to come in, and eat some supper, but he went away directly - I was in the back kitchen, and so was his mother; he was in the front kitchen, and on the stairs, going towards the door; I and Mrs. Woodward slept together in the front attic - I heard no alarm in the night; Mrs. Woodward went down in the morning a little before eight o'clock - she came running up stairs to me, and said the house was broken open; I went down, and saw the wadding and pieces of cloth strewed about the little room - her bonnet and my cap were laying in the corner; the door that leads to the stairs was cut through to admit a hand - the front area window was open.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You did not see him at ten o'clock, but heard his voice? A. No - I heard his voice on the stairs, passing the door of the kitchen, where we sat; the house is four stories high from the kitchen.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On Friday, after the robbery, I went to Woodward's lodging, No. 9, Fulwood's-rents, Holborn - he was at home, and told me they were his lodgings; it was a first floor front room: I asked if his name was Woodward - he said it was; I asked if he had a mother keeping a house in George-street - he said he had: I asked when he saw her last, when he was there - he said he saw her on the Wednesday night about ten o'clock - I asked if he had any objection to inform me where he had been since that time; he said that was his business, not mine, and he should say nothing till he got before the Magistrate; I then took him into custody, searched him, and found 5s. 6d. on him - I then took him to George-street, to the house his mother had been keeping, for Irwing to see him, and then to the office; I found no property - he gave the Magistrate an account where he had been, which was not taken in writing at that time; he said he had been along with a man named Rogers, at No. 28, Great St. Andrew's-street - I went, and ascertained that he had been part of the time with Rogers, who has since absconded; as we went along I told him I was taking him before a Justice - he asked if the house had been broken into in which his mother lived, and whether it had been robbed; I said No, it had not been robbed, but they had gone through that house, I believed, to a house at the back.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long before had it been ascertained that this house had been broken? A. On the Thursday, and I took him on the Friday.

The prisoner Ellis made no defence.

Clifford's Defence. I assure you I was at home on the night of the robbery; I went home about eleven o'clock -I came out next morning, when I was brought out by Ballard - the shoes I was found in possession of I bought where I stated, paying 10s. for them, and if I had perpetrated the act I might have escaped; Mr. Chambers, on my being taken to his house, promised if I would inform him where to find his property, or to bring to justice those who committed the offence, I might take his word, as a gentleman, he would do what he could for me; and afterwards, in the Magistrate's private room, he told me if I would tell him where to find the property, he would not prosecute; in this he was checked by Mr. Conant and the officer, who used every means to draw from me where the property was, but I knew nothing of it.

Coy's Defence. I called at Mr. Toft's, George-street, Hampstead-road, on the night of the robbery, respecting a parcel he wished me to take to the City, to go to his son on board the Duke of Sussex, off Gravesend. I went there with a young man named Cummings; we got to Toft's about ten o'clock, supped there, and did not leave the house till twenty minutes to twelve - I brought the parcel away with me, went home to bed, got up next morning twenty minutes before eight, took the parcel into the City, and called at Alexander's music-shop, which supplied the ship with music, to ask a young man if the vessel had left Gravesend; he said if I went to Phillips', the agent of the ship, he could inform me - I went to the East India-house; the porter said he had not come, and directed me to a man whom I could not find; I went to the Steam-packet office, paid 3d., and had the parcel booked - I asked the young man there if the ship had left Gravesend; he said he could not tell. but if it had, the parcel would be returned, as he had another one in the same way - I left, and was going to Toft's to tell him the parcel would be returned if the ship had left; I had to pass Ellis' door, and accidentally called to ask him how he was, and he asked me to sell the cloth and kerseymere, which I did - he went with me, and waited till I came out of Smith's, and I gave him the money, which I received of Smith - I have the young man at the music-shop to prove I was there.

Thompson's Defence. Goddard stated that he had found two coats in the hand-basket covered with crumpets, which is false; he took me to the office, opened the basket, and found the coats - be found eight crumpets in my pocket, which I was going to take home to tea; he took four from me, and gave me the rest - he put the crumpets into the basket himself.

HENRY GODDARD . There were some crumpets in the basket, and some in his pocket; I think about eight in all - he said he had them from Gust, who had given them to him to eat.

Thompson in continuation. On the fourth examination Ellis admitted that he gave me the two coats to sell for him - I have been in the habit of going to his house several times; they have bought upwards of 5l. worth of hardware and cutlery of me, and said they should want more - I called at the house for that purpose.

Gast's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen. - I have very little to say in answer to this charge, in which it seems I am supposed to be implicated, because Ellis is my son-in-law, having an apartment in my house; that he had so, I do not deny, but I had no knowledge of any property being there that did not belong to himself, much less any that had been improperly come by, and when it is considered that three small pieces of black cloth, and those lying on the drawers, are all that were found in that apartment, or in any other part of my house, I rely that your

Lordship and the Jury will readily conceive that I had no knowledge of the transaction that has been discovered. I have not had the slightest participation in any portion of it, or any of the property stolen, and I trust, a tradesman like myself, who has borne all his life a good character, will not be found guilty of any crime upon such evidence only, as applies to me in this case.

JOSEPH RUMMENS . I know the prisoner Coy - I saw him on Wednesday night, the 2nd of February, and was with him from half-past nine till nearly half-past twelve o'clock - we went to Mr. Toft's, in George-street, Hampstead-road, about half-past nine; it had not gone ten - I remained there with him till upon the stroke of twelve; we went there about a parcel - Toft's son had gone with the Duke of Sussex ship, to the East Indies - Coy got the parcel from Toft's; when we came from Toft's I went straight to Coy's house, which is in Rupert-street, by St. Ann's church; I left him close by St. Ann's church as near half-past twelve o'clock as I can guess -I left him not more than a few yards from his own house; I did not see him go into his house - I live at No. 27, Warren-street, Tottenham-court-road; Tofts is not here - I did not see Coy again till he was in prison; I happened to go on Sunday morning to his father.

COURT. Q. You passed from half-past nine till nearly half-past twelve o'clock in his company - where were you before that? A. At Mr. Barnet's public-house, North-street. Tottenham-court-road - I was there from eight o'clock; Coy joined me soon after nine; I have known him for ten years - I am a bricklayer; he is a military cap-maker - there were three or four persons in my company at Barnet's; nobody went to Toft's with us - Toft and his wife were there; we staid till nearly twelve; I knew Toft before - he was not exactly an acquaintance, but I have been to his house a number of times; I went that night, because Coy asked me to accompany him, and as I had nothing to do, I went merely to keep him company - nobody was with us; nobody joined our company coming back; I am no relation of Coy's, nor connected by marriage with him.

Q. You passed by your own door, did you not, coming back? A. No; I live at the further end of Warren-street - I passed the end of Warren-street; that is about a mile from Rupert-street.

Q. You went all this way for company? A. I went with him; he asked me to go with him in the morning to take the parcel; I told him I could not come then.

SIBSEY COY . I am the prisoner's father, and live at No. 27, Rupert-street - he lived with me, and was at home on the 2nd of February; he left home at nine o'clock in the evening to go to Mr. Toft's, George-street, Hampstead-road, concerning a parcel; he returned home about half-past twelve, as near as I can recollect - I had been at work myself that night till twelve; when he came home he went through my room up stairs to bed.

Q. Was it a sitting-room or a bed-room that he went through? A. A sitting-room and sleeping-room both; I sleep in the lower room, which he came through to go to his own; he could not come down stairs without my hearing him; it is but a small cottage that I live in, and there is only one floor; he slept in the room over mine - he must pass through my room to go to his own; Mary Ann Lee, my daughter-in-law, was there - she lives with me - he left in the morning about a quarter before eight o'clock - I saw him go with the parcel, and spoke to him; he could not have left my house in the night, after he came in, without my hearing it, and did not.

Q. How high is this room - who sleeps in it? A. Mary Ann Lee, also a brother of his, and two sisters; they sleep in the same room with him - Mary Ann Lee, one of the sisters, is here; the brother is not - he lives with me now, and is seventeen years old; he is a cap-maker, and the prisoner is the same - we are all one business; one of the sisters is twenty-two, and the other twenty-four years old.

Q. When he came home, and went through your room, were any of you up? A. I had just got into bed, and I was the last of the family; my wife sleeps in my room -I had a light when I got up, and let him in; it was already burning; it had not been put out - the rest had gone to bed - the prisoner took nothing before he went to bed; he went straight up; my wife is not here - he did not breakfast before he went out in the morning; I was not up when he went, nor any of the family - we were all in bed; I should not suppose the window of his room is above seven feet from the ground - it is a sash window.

MARY ANN LEE . I am the prisoner Coy's sister-in-law, and am single - I recollect his being taken into custody on this charge, on Saturday, about eleven o'clock in the day; I did not know it before; he was at home on the night of the robbery (Wednesday) - he did not go out till nine, and he returned at rather better than half-past twelve - I was at home when he returned; I sleep in the same room as my brother; we have but one room; it is the top room - he must pass through the lower room to get to the top room; I saw him in that room that night, and spoke to him, he went to bed in the top room - I did not miss him in the course of the night - he left the room about ten minutes before eight o'clock in the morning.

Q. How many of you slept in that room that night? A. Four, the prisoner, myself, and two sisters.

COURT. Q. What are the names of your two sisters? A. Sarah and Eliza - the prisoner has a brother; he is at home, and is very ill, under the doctor's hands, and not able to come.

Q. Where does he sleep? A. In the lower room, and he did so that night - his father and mother also slept in the lower room; he works with his father, who is a chamber tailor - that is his only business; I remember the prisoner coming home that night - he had nothing to eat, nor any breakfast before he went out.

MARGARET CLIFFORD . I am the prisoner Clifford's sister, and live at No. 53, Cirencester-place. I recollect his being taken into custody - I recollect the evening of Mr. Chambers' robbery - it was Wednesday; he came in at eleven o'clock that night, and did not go out again till ten the following morning - he slept in the second floor back room: we do not occupy the whole house - my mother lodges there with me; I am sure he did not leave the house that night - the officers who searched the place are aware that he could not leave without my knowledge.

Q. Why not? A. He would have to go through the room I sleep in if he did; there are only two rooms on the

floor, but he cannot get into his room without coming through mine; it is the same room as mine - he slept in the same room with me - he was not with me long, and we were making shift for a short time.

COURT. Q. How many floors are there in the house? A. Three, and two rooms on each; my brother slept in my room that night, and my mother also - it is not a very large room; there are only two beds in it - they are single beds; they are what are called covered bedsteads, turned up in the day - my brother had been in the habit of sleeping there, and I and my mother also; it had been a common thing for the last fortnight; he had slept in the same room with us for the whole fortnight; before that we were differently situated, as I was in business - I had a shop and apartment - I had left them and taken this apartment; I have lodged there for three months, but my brother had only been with me a fortnight.

Q. Tell us where he had been sleeping before that time? A. He was not with us before that; he was not at liberty, he was in trouble - he came home as soon as he got at liberty, and I will answer for every hour of his conduct since; I can give an account of wherever he has been during that fortnight, at night, and for the day also, because he never went out, except he went on business for me, or that we knew where he did go; when we sent him any where we knew where we had sent him, and when he returned he accounted for the time he had been gone.

Q. Who was in the house besides yourself, your mother, and brother? A. A young person who was at work for me - her name is Emma Adams ; she is a stay-maker - that is my business; she slept up stairs, in the back attic - there were a great number of other people in the house, but they knew nothing of our affairs; when my brother came in that night my mother and Emma Adams were in the room - I was at work, making stays, but put it down to let him in; my mother was not doing any thing - she is sixty-one years old; Adams was at work in the same room.

Q. Well, you said, when first examined, that the prisoner must necessarily go through your room to another - now you tell us that he slept in the same room? A. So he must go through the room I sleep in.

Q. Why, he slept in it? A. Yes, and of course he must come through it to go out; the beds were in the room we sleep in - we have only one room on that floor; my mother and I slept in one bed - the prisoner came in at eleven o'clock that night; he had gone out about four - I did not go with him; I only know where he went by what he told me; he told me he had been to the New-cut, and I had sent him to the New-cut to buy some steels - I gave him half a sovereign to buy them with, and he returned without them; I asked for the money - he told me he had given it for a pair of shoes, which I scolded him for; I had supped when he came back, and so had the rest of us- we seldom take supper, but I took a crust of bread and butter that night; my mother took no supper, nor Adams either - my brother most likely went to bed without supper, for he is in the habit of doing so; I cannot tell whether he had any, I was minding my work - if he had supper he did not lay a cloth for it; he breakfasted with us next morning, and was made a prisoner at ten o'clock, in the room - I was in the act of scolding him for buying the shoes when the officers came; I do not know what sort they were - I only saw them on his feet.

Q. Were they shoes or boots? A. They were up to his ancles. I believe.

ANN CLIFFORD . I am the mother of the last witness, and of the prisoner - we live in Cirencester-place. The prisoner had lived with us for about a fortnight before the officer took him - I live with my daughter; I recollect the circumstance of my son being taken; I heard of Mr. Chamber's robbery - my son came home on that night, (Wednesday,) as near as I can say, between the hours of ten and eleven o'clock, because after eleven there is no admittance to the house without making a greatnoise with the bells - every person answers their own bell; I recollect his coming home - he slept in the same room with us; we made a convenience to have him sleep in the same room with my daughter and me - he went to bed, and did not leave the house till after breakfast the next morning; I cannot say the hour, but it was after breakfast - I have not the least reason to suppose that he left the house from the time he went to bed till after breakfast.

COURT. Q. How long had the prisoner been living in that house? A. It might be about a fortnight, over or under - we were not long there ourselves; we were there before he came - we moved in, I think, on the 17th of November; I and my daughter moved there - Emma Adams is in the habit of coming occasionally to assist my daughter - she does not live with us; my son slept in the same room with me and my daughter every night during the fortnight - I would not permit him to have a lodging till we all removed together: when my daughter had work to do in a hurry, Adams would stay perhaps all night to be ready in the morning - when she staid she continued at her work; she has not slept there since we have been in that house - she often did at the other house.

Q. Then she staid and worked during the night? A. Yes, my daughter was pressed for work at this time, but Adams did not stay there the whole night; I went to bed and left her at work - she never slept in that house to my knowledge; there are three or four different families live in this house, but none of my family but myself and daughter have any apartment there - we rent but one room, and pay 3s. 6d. a week for that one room, and for a few old things being in the kitchen; my daughter went down to let my son in that night, and so did I - I heard the bell ring, and did not know she was gone before me; I saw him come in, and saw him go to bed - I never have any supper; I do not know whether the others had - I believe they had a cup of tea in the dead of the night, to keep their eyes open; my son had no supper, for he went to bed before me - I left the girls at work; he did not get up early next morning, just in time to have breakfast; we breakfast between nine and ten o'clock.

Q. You say he came in between ten and eleven o'clock, how long had he been absent? A. I really cannot say, I believe it was after tea that he went out - he drank tea with us about five o'clock, went out after tea, and was absent during the rest of the time; he was at home all the morning, I believe, but I am out and in on my daughter's business - I was at home all Wednesday morning, and so was he; he was not out in the fore part of the day at all.

EMMA ADAMS . I am a stay-maker. I know Mrs. Clifford, her daughter, and the prisoner - they live in Cirencester-place; I heard of a robbery at Mr. Chambers' the beginning of this month - I remember the prisoner Clifford being taken up on the Friday; I have come to speak of what occurred on the Wednesday night - I was at Mrs. Clifford's all day on Wednesday; I am acquainted with Miss Clifford - we worked in the same shop for two years; I recollect the prisoner coming home that night - I cannot say at what time exactly.

Q. About what time? A. Between eight and nine o'clock - he had been out once or twice during the day; he came home between eight and nine, or I think not so late- it was about eight; I do not recollect his going to bed that night - I staid there till it turned twelve o'clock, and left him in the room; I left him up, I am sure of that - it had turned twelve o'clock; I had to go home as far as Little Chesterfield-street, and it was near one when I got home.

COURT. Q. Had you been there much for some time before? A. Yes, working for Miss Clifford - I had been there for the last month, but not regularly every day, because I work for a shop; I always go home to my lodgings - sometimes I go about eleven o'clock, sometimes twelve; I frequently staid late, as when I went to her it was always in a great hurry, and I always staid till the work was finished - I always went home; I had seen the prisoner for a fortnight before, when I was there; there were two beds in the room, but only one bedstead - the other bed was piled upon chairs; the bedstead was a shut up one - he was out once or twice during the day.

Q. How long do you think he had been out when he came back in the evening? A. He did not go out till after tea - we drank tea between five and six o'clock; he came home about eight - I did not hear him say where he had been.

Q. You did not know where he was going? A. I believe I heard his sister send him to her other sister, Mrs. Davies, in Chapel-street, Soho, to borrow some money, I think - I did not see any money given him by his mother or sister; Mrs. Clifford was up when I went away - that was about twenty minutes after twelve o'clock; the prisoner was up, and so was Miss Clifford.

MR. CHAMBERS. I have looked at the whole of the property produced to-day, and have not the least doubt of its being all mine - one piece of the kerseymere I cannot swear to, but I believe it to be mine; every one of the others have something which I can swear to them by.

MR. BARRY. Q. Have you any private-mark on the broad cloth? A. I have the headings, attached to which is the list, and that corresponds; neither of the blue cloths are of the best quality - one cost me 17s. 6d. a yard, and the other 21s. 6d.

DAVID WEBSTER . I know these to be the boots I purchased - I can speak to them positively; I know them by a stitch dropped in the left boot, and the cut here.

MR. BARRY. Q. You had worn them but one day? A. Only one day - the stitch was dropped when I bought them.

MARY ANN STANFORD . I noticed two or three stitches on the side of the boot being dropped, and this boot is so.

The articles produced were a sort of half-boot, described by some of the witnesses as shoes.

WILLIAM BALLARD . When Clifford stated that he gave 10s. for the shoes, I asked who gave him the money, and he said his mother gave it to him.

MR. BARRY. Q. Did you state this to the Magistrate? A. I stated it to the clerk - it was not read over in my deposition; I should not have thought of it if I had not heard the witness make her statement.

Prisoner Clifford. It was said at Marlborough-street that the articles stolen were hawked about for sale at different public-houses, and is it not as likely that I should have bought them at the Three Compasses, as at any other place? I did not say I bought them in the skittle-ground; it is false; the shoes it is said are too large for me, and have marks of being worn by a person with corns or bunions - I should wish the Jury to examine the shoes I have on now; I have worn them a fortnight. Mr. Chambers employs a great many men, and they, I believe, are in the habit of wearing slippers - might not the shoes have been left behind by some of them?

Four witnesses gave Coy a good character, and twenty-two deposed the same for Gast.

ELLIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

CLIFFORD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

COY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

WOODWARD - NOT GUILTY .

GAST - NOT GUILTY .[Feb. 22.]

Reference Number: t18310217-14

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

449. THOMAS KEEBLE , JOSEPH KEEBLE and WILLIAM NASH were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Morgan , on the 9th of February , at St. James, Clerkenwell, and stealing therein 16 spoons, value 2l.; 1 catheter, value 1s.; 1 pencil-case, value 1s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 box, value 6d.; 1 chain, value 6s., and 18 sovereigns, his property .

JOHN MORGAN. I live at No. 13, Hooper-street, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell ; it is my dwelling-house - I am a medical man, a graduated doctor of medicine, and a member of several medical institutions - the prisoner Joseph Keeble was my errand boy , and had been with me since Christmas. On the 9th of February, about half-past seven o'clock, I went out, locked the door, and left no person whatever in the house - I told Joseph Keeble I was going out, and to keep his eyes on the house and play with the children in the street, that I should be absent about an hour and a half, and he was to give answers to any applications in my absence - I returned between nine and ten o'clock, and he was no where to be found; I found my street door open - there were no marks of violence on it, therefore it must have been opened with a false key - I am sure I shut and locked it when I went out - I went into my surgery, and there saw an iron crow-bar laying on a chair; it is a chair of a peculiar make, and answers the purpose of a scrutoire - the chair had been broken open both with a chisel and a crow-bar: there were marks of a chisel, and the small end of the crow-bar on it - there was a secret drawer in that chair that nobody knew of but Joseph Keeble; he had seen me put eight sovereigns and a half

there about nine days before, but I had taken them out, and there was no money in it then, but a silver pencil case which was taken and a few articles - I called in a Police-constable, went over the house, but only looked about slightly in the confusion - I went up to the second floor where the gold and the plate were locked up in a trunk; I found the trunk unlocked, and all the gold gone - I thought all the plate was gone, but the Policeman found two spoons wrapped in paper, which the thieves had not seen; I lost eighteen sovereigns from one box - the amount of gold in the other box I do not know, only that I had received fourteen sovereigns from Mr. Blizzard; I had used some of them, and put more in - I lost about twenty spoons, but I had not counted them for years; I think my loss amounted to between 60l. and 70l., including the sovereigns - I missed about five shirts, some spectacles, silk handkerchiefs, and a gold watch-chain - I found a screw-driver in the house, which did not belong to me.

JOSEPH HUTCHINSON . I am a Police-constable. I went into Mr. Morgan's house - I have heard his statement; it is correct; I found two silver tea-spoons left in the trunk - there were no marks of violence on the door; we found the crow-bar laying on a kind of scrutoire, or desk, and the screw-driver on a trunk up stairs - while I was in the house I heard a strange voice outside say, "There is his brother;" I went out, and saw Thomas Keeble - I desired him to come in; he did so; I took him into the parlour, asked where he had been, and so on - I cannot tell what answer he made, for I went up stairs directly with Mr. Morgan, and went over the house; I desired Winder, who came in, to take care of Thomas Keeble -I apprehended Joseph Keeble at his parent's house, about fifty yards from Mr. Morgan's, within ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; he was in bed - we sent his mother up for him: he came down in his shirt; I took him to the station - I took the screw-driver and crow-bar down to the station; the inspector held the screw-driver up, and asked Joseph if he knew who it belonged to; he said it belonged to his brother Thomas, who was not present - he was asked who the crow-bar belonged to; he said he had seen it laying about in his mother's cellar.

WILLIAM WINDER . I am a Policeman. I went into the house with Hutchinson; I sent a boy to tell Joseph Keeble Mr. Morgan wanted him; Thomas came, he said Joseph was in bed, and he wanted to know what Mr. Morgan wanted of him - I detained him, and then went and fetched Joseph and took them both to the station - I afterwards went into the cellar, where Keebles lived, and in a rat-hole in the wall found a handkerchief, containing sixteen spoons, a silver catheter, this pencil-case, and spectacles - they were all in the handkerchief; I searched there because Joseph had said his brother had a screw-driver like that in the cellar - I went with Busain to Nash's house.

JOHN BUSAIN . I am an inspector of Police - the two Keebles were brought to the station-house; they positively denied having been near Mr. Morgan's house, or having seen each other during the whole night; Joseph afterwards said he had seen his brother in Slade's passage, and told him his master was out; he said that in the presence of Thomas; Joseph said the screw-driver belonged to Thomas - he said that also in the presence of Thomas afterwards; I directed the constables to go and search the cellar, and they brought the handkerchief and property - I showed the property found to Thomas; he appeared exceedingly confused; I asked Thomas where the gold was; he said, "In the cellar, Sir" -I said, "In the same hole as the spoons were found?" he said, "No, in a hole nearer to the cellar-flap; I said,"Is the whole of the gold there?" he said, "No, Sir, it is all there but six sovereigns or five, and two half-sovereigns" - I said, "Where is that?" he said, "I gave it to a boy who was with me:" I said, "What is the boy's name?" he said, "Nash;" Nash was not present - I said, "Where does he live?" he said, "He formerly lived in Hooper-street, now in Lock's-buildings" - I never found any thing on Nash - I took Thomas Keeble with me to the cellar; he pointed out the hole there, where I found this box, containing twelve sovereigns and this gold watch-chain - I afterwards tried the crow-bar and screw-driver to the drawer which had been broken open; the screwdriver appeared to have been used first, and then the crow; the marks corresponded exactly - I have inquired, and find that the prisoners bear a very good character.

JANE MARY YOUNG . I keep a coffee-shop, at No. 71, Compton-street, Clerkenwell. On Wednesday night, the 9th of February, Thomas Keeble came in and had some coffee, and I afterwards saw William Nash with him - they came about five o'clock, and left about half-past; my house is about five hundred yards from the prosecutor's.

MR. MORGAN. These are my spectacles - this is a pill-box of mine, and contains the gold chain and the sovereigns - the tea-spoons I had made twenty years ago; I have a fellow one in my pocket; this catheter was in my care - I believe every thing here to be mine.

Thomas Keeble . Nash and my brother are innocent.

One witness gave the Keebles a good character.

T. KEEBLE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

J. KEEBLE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of their youth .

NASH - NOT GUILTY .[Feb. 23.]

Reference Number: t18310217-15

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

450. FREDERICK WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , at Harrow , 7 sovereigns, and one 10l. Bank note, the property of John Ewer , in the dwelling-house of John Leach .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN EWER. I lodge at Pinner , in the dwelling-house of John Leach . On Sunday, the 19th of December, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out to church - I left my landlord in the house, and left my room door open, but my box was locked; I went from church, and drank tea with my brother - I returned at ten o'clock at night, found my box broken open, and missed a 10l. note and seven sovereigns - I had received the 10l. note from my brother.

COURT. Q. What parish is the house in? A. Harrow; the prisoner lodged in the house - he passes my room

to go to his own; there is a passage between my room and his - I left him at home when I went out; he is a sign painter. I saw the note safe on the 18th.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How many 10l. notes had you on the 18th? A. Only one; there were two lodgers besides him in the house - the prisoner's mother was at church.

WILLIAM DALGLEISH . I am a timber-merchant, and live at Paddington. On Tuesday, the 11th of January, the prisoner came into my yard - he was a perfect stranger; I was in the counting-house with a customer; I went into the yard, and sold him two six-feet deals - he tendered me this 10l. note to pay for them; I asked him into the counting-house, and asked his name - he said Ewer, of Pinner, which I wrote on the note; I asked if he was a son of Mr. Ewer's, of Pinner - he said No; I said, "Are you any relation?" he said No; I said, "Do you know Mr. Ewer, of Pinner?" he said, "Perfectly well;" the goods came to 5s. 9d. - I gave him nine sovereigns and the rest in silver - Taft was present when I took the note from him; I have had it in my possession ever since, and am quite certain it is the note I had from him.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not expressed a doubt about his identity? A. I did some few days after - I did not before the Magistrate; it was to himself - his features were familiar to me, but he was dressed different; he had a flannel jacket on, and an apron down to his ancles, which changed his appearance - that was about four days after the transaction; I never parted with the note.

COURT. Q. You say four days after, you intimated some doubt about him - are you now certain, and were you certain before the Magistrate that he was the man? A. I was, for he had the identical coat on which he wore then.

JOHN TAFT . I am a stone-mason. I was in Dalgleish's yard when he took a note of the prisoner; I am certain the prisoner is the person who gave him the note - I have not the least doubt of him; I saw the change given to him - Dalgleish put the 10l. note into my hand at the time, to look at it; he was quite a stranger.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was he there? A. Perhaps ten minutes - it was on the 11th of January; I know the day by the different transactions I had that day, and referring to my books, I made no memorandum of this, but when I was called upon I looked back at my books, and the transactions of that day enabled me to name the date - I think it was on the 19th that I referred to my books.

REUBEN SUDERY . I am ostler at the Red Lion, at Paddington. On Tuesday, the 11th of January, the prisoner brought me two deal boards, and asked me to let them abide there a little while, and then asked for a bit of chalk to mark them with - I had none; he said they were to remain there till they were called for - he has never sent for them.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he a stranger to you? A. Yes - nobody else was present; he had no whiskers.

Q. Did you say before the Magistrate that he wore large whiskers? A. I did not take much notice of his whiskers - he is the man; he might have had large whiskers for what I know.

THOMAS EWER . I am the brother of John Ewer . of Pinner. I know this note - I received ten 10l. notes at Ransom's banking-house, Pall-mall, on the 10th of November - they were running numbers; I do not know this one separately - I have a memorandum of the numbers.

MR. BARRY. Q. When did you make that memorandum? A. I went to Ransom's for it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you write your name on the note? A. No - I gave my brother four of the 10l. notes; I believe this to be one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not swear to it? A. Not separately - I only know the number by reference to this memorandum.

JOHN EWER . I am quite certain the note produced is one I got from my brother.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the numbers of the notes you got from your brother? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Does John Leach live in the house? A. Yes - I pay my rent to him.

Q. How many persons live in the house besides you? A. The prisoner and his mother, besides Leach and his wife, five altogether - that is all; I left the prisoner at home when I went to church, and Mrs. Leach was in the house when I went out, but she came to church afterwards.

JURY. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner wear a round jacket? A. Yes, I have.

The prisoner made no Defence.[Feb. 24.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18310217-16

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

451. GEORGE LONSDALE , JOHN HOWELL , EDWARD MALLETT , and WILLIAM ALLEN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Brown , on the 14th of February , at St. Pancras, and stealing therein, 15 dozen knives, value 4l.; 15 dozen forks, value 4l.; 1 fusee-engine, value 10s.; 1 set of bagatelle balls and cup, value 5s.; 3 pistols, value 10s.; 1 map, value 5s.; 9 table-mats, value 4s.; 4 copper plates, value 4s.; 4 knife-sharpeners, value 8s.; 4 turn rugs, value 4s.; 2 pincushions, value 1s.; 1 cup and ball, value 1s.; 18 spectacle cases, value 3s.; 1 set of chess men, value 4s., and 1 caddie-ladle, value 2s., his property .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Upper North-place, Gray's Inn-lane - it is in the parish of St. Pancras ; it is a corner house, one front is in Wilson-street. On Tuesday morning, the 15th of February, between two and three o'clock, I was disturbed by an unusual noise; I got out of bed, opened my bed-room door, and heard that which convinced me all was not right at the top of the house - I went down two pairs of stains, and called the assistance of my young men; I have four - I awoke them all, and armed myself with a sabre; I went up to my ware-rooms, which are the attics - there is a trap-door in the ceiling; I observed the inner trap-door was removed, and a quantity of mortar on the floor - I observed that the ceiling was broken through a little beyond the trap-door.

Q. Was there any thing to prevent the person who had forced the trap-door from getting into the house? A. Yes, some iron bars which I had placed there myself - the aperture in the ceiling was about the size of a man's head; the two bolts of the trap-door had been forced, and the

outer trap-door had been forced open by breaking the wood - I put the sabre up through the bars at the inner trap-door, and made a noise with it against the bars; I then heard a trampling over the roof of the house - I heard footsteps on the roof; I put up the windows, and gave an alarm - the Police came to my assistance, sprang a rattle, and in about twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour, I saw all the prisoners, except Allen, in custody; I saw Allen in custody at the station, about half an hour after the other prisoners were taken - the house, No. 51, North-place, was empty; it is four doors from mine - I directed the Police to watch that house; No. 16, Wilson-street was also empty - that is five doors from me; there is access along the roof of my house to those of No. 51, North-place, and No. 16, Wilson-street; a man might meet with some difficulty in climbing up the houses in Wilson-street - there is access from both houses, but it is more difficult from the house in Wilson-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. This was at two o'clock in the morning - you had gone to bed on Monday, the 14th? A. Yes - the inner trap-door was opened, and the outer trap-door thrown down on the roof; the inner trap-door is about a foot from the bottom of the outer one, which lays flat on the roof.

Q. When you open the outer trap-door, are you out of the house or in it? A. In the house, below the roof - the inner trap-door is over the ceiling.

Q. Was any opening made in the roof or trap-door by which a person could get into the ware-room? A. They had broken the ceiling, but the hole was not large enough for them to get into the ware-room.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you taken the trouble to pass from the roof of your house to No. 16, Wilson-street? A. I have not, but I was with those who did - it was a bricklayer, and one of the inspectors; they went down with a ladder, which they brought.

Q. Except from the assistance of the ladder would it not, from what you saw, be not only extremely difficult but extremely dangerous? A. Not at all, I could do it myself with ease - in raising from the top of the houses in Wilson-street to the roof of mine there would be a difficulty to a person not accustomed to it, but there was no difficulty in going from my house to Wilson-street, because I could drop from my roof to it; the height is about seven feet six inches - I have measured it; a person would only have to drop once - my house is the fifth from No. 16, Wilson-street; the four first houses are two stories high, and mine is three - he would not have to drop the height of a whole story, because the roof in Wilson-street comes above the story; it rises up - the gutter runs in the middle of my house, and reduces the depth very cousiderably - the four first houses are all one height, but No. 16 is a story higher - he would not have to ascend that story, as the back parapet is the same height.

Q. Would he have to run along a parapet without any guard from the street? A. He could go across the top of the houses without being near the parapet; it would not be at all difficult or dangerous.

JAMES WHITAKER . I am a Police-constable. On the morning of the 15th of February I was in Mecklenburgh-square, about a quarter to three o'clock; I heard a rattle spring, went to North-place, Gray's Inn-road and met Mr. Brown; my attention was directed to the roofs of the houses, and I saw three men moving; they were coming from Mr. Brown's house towards No. 51, North-place - I went to No. 51 with the officers, O'Donnell and Sheehey; I got the key from Mr. Morgan, who lives next door, and went in with the two officers - I went up to the third flight of stairs, and saw the prisoners Lonsdale, Howell, and Mallett, and secured them there on the third flight in that house - Mallett had neither hat nor shoes on; Lonsdale had a pair of list shoes on - Mallett said he had left his shoes and hat on the roof of the house - I did not find them myself.

CONSTANTINE O'DONNELL . I was in Swinton-street, and heard an alarm - I went with Whitaker and Sheehey, into the empty house, No. 51, North-place - I had not seen any body on the roofs; I had not looked at the houses - we found the three prisoners in the empty house, and secured them - Mallett had neither hat nor shoes on; I asked where his hat and shoes were - he said on the top of the house.

WILLIAM SHEEHEY . I am a Policeman. On the morning of the 15th of February, about a quarter-past three o'clock, I went into the empty house, No. 51, North-place - we found three of the prisoners coming down from the third floor on the landing; Mallett had neither hat nor shoes on, and one had list shoes - we kept them in custody.

GEORGE DISMORE . I am a Police-serjeant. On the morning of the 15th of February I went into the kitchen of the empty house, No. 51, North-place, and found in the kitchen two skeleton-keys, which I produce - they were wrapped in a handkerchief; I afterwards tried them to the door of No. 16, Wilson-street, and the larger key opened the door of that house.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Has the door a common sort of a lock? A. It has - I did not try it to the locks of the other houses in Wilson-street; I should not have liked to try it on inhabited houses.

Q. The key has been wrenched I see, do you know who did it? A. No, it is precisely in the state I found it - many street door keys are about that size; some are larger and some smaller - it might open other locks, unless there was any thing particular in the wards.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have no doubt that key would open a good many hall doors? A. No doubt of it.

MICHAEL RADFORD . I am a Policeman. On the morning of the 15th of February I heard an alarm, which induced me to go to the top of Mr. Brown's house - I found eleven parcels of property on the roof of his house, and I picked up a handkerchief - I did not find a hat or shoes there; Moody was with me; he followed me - Mr. Brown claimed the eleven parcels of property; they were on the top of his house, outside it.

WILLIAM MOODY . On the night of the robbery I went on the roof of Mr. Brown's house; I found fifteen parcels, besides the eleven found by Radford; I also found a pair of shoes and a hat, which I have now in my possession - the streets were not very dirty, that I recollect.

JAMES CARTER . I am a Police-constable. I searched the loft of the house, No. 51, North-place, and found a

pair of shoes; the place where I found them was dry - the soles of the shoes were damp: I saw Lonsdale in custody afterwards - we fitted the shoes on his feet at Hatton-garden; they fitted him as if they were made for him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I suppose there is nothing particular in the size of his feet? A. Not that I am aware of - he did not own them in my presence; he had a pair of list slippers on.

JOHN ABRAHAM THOMPSON I am an inspector of the Police - I saw Lonsdale and Mallett after they were taken into custody; each claimed a pair of boots, or shoes; one was a pair of lace boots and the other Blucher boots - I cannot say which claimed each separate pair; they were the boots in possession of the Policeman - they are here.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you take Allen? A. No; I was at the station when he was brought in - I saw all the prisoners there nearly about the same time - I cannot say which was brought first.

JOSEPH SMOUT . I am a butcher, and live opposite Mr. Brown - I have the care of No. 16, Wilson-street, and had so at the time; it was empty. On the 15th of February, on hearing an alarm, I went towards that house; when I got to the door, somebody opened it by drawing the lock inside; I instantly drew back, beckoned, and a Policeman came to me - I observed then that the door was about an inch and a half open; I saw it gradually drawn open about an inch and a half; it was instantly drawn open quite, and a person presented himself at the threshold of the door; I instantly sprang forward, and the door was slapped in my face by the person inside (there was no inmate to that house); there was a gas-light opposite the door of No. 17; that light enabled me to see the person - the prisoner Allen is that person; the gas-light is about seven yards from the door, on the same side of the way - Gough-street runs at the bottom of Wilson-street, and is from twenty-five to thirty yards from No. 16, Wilson-street - after he had shut the door in my face, I heard a cry of "There he goes, Stop thief!" and saw a man run past the bottom of Wilson-street, and a Policeman in pursuit of him; I joined in the pursuit, and had a view of his person, and kept him in sight - I got before the Policeman about three parts of the way down Gough-street, and passed Burge's yard to Mount-pleasant, turned the corner of Warner-street, and into Red Lion-yard - I did not lose sight of him as he turned the corner of Warner-street, but as he turned into Red Lion-yard I lost sight of him for a moment - he turned to the left-hand side of the yard at the bottom, and ran through a horse-pond; I followed him on the other side - he ran up three or four steps, and over a brick wall, which separated a private yard from the street; I was then seven or eight yards behind him - I made a catch at his foot as he get over; the gates of the yard were then broken; I entered the yard - one Policeman entered before me; we were together, and he (the prisoner Allen) was from eight to ten yards up the yard, laying on the ground, quite exhausted - we took him into custody - we found nobody else in the yard.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was all the opportunity you had of seeing the man in the house No. 16, the door being open about an inch and a half? A. I did not see him till the door was quite opened - a person could not look out when it was open an inch and a half; it was when he threw the door open, and presented himself at the thershold; I had never seen Allen before to my knowledge - I swear positively that he is the man I saw at the door, and that I saw the same man afterwards in the yard - I did not observe whether his clothes were wet; mine were - it was only a small pond, nearly half leg up - he ran through as I did; the whole of my stockings were wet, because they were down over my shoes -I had not tied them up; nothing else was wet except my skin - I was not wet up to my breeches; I never lost sight of the prisoner except for a moment, at the corner of Red Lion-yard.

JANE WOOD . I am married, and live at No. 28, Gough-street, Gray's Inn-lane, which crosses the end of Wilson-street. On the morning of the 15th of February, between three and four o'clock. I was alarmed by the cry of thieves - I can see from my back window into some of the yards of the houses in Wilson-street, and of No. 16; after the alarm I saw a young man jump over two walls, in a direction of the walls of Nos. 16, 15 and 14. Wilson-street -I then went to the front of my house in Gough-street, and saw a man drop from the wall of the corner house in Wilson-street, into Gough-street - it was a young man in a fustain jacket; I gave an alarm, and cried out, "There he goes;" that was in the hearing of a Policeman, and I saw the Policeman pursue the man down Gough-street, towards Burge's yard, Mount-pleasant.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You were not before the Magistrate? A. Yes.

JOHN PHILIP THOMAS . I am a Policeman. On hearing Mrs. Wood give an alarm I saw a person drop from the wall into Gough-street - I pursued him through Red Lion-yard, to the turning of the horse-pond in Warner-street, accompanied by Smout; when I got to the corner I turned back, and saw him brought to the gate of the yard - it was the prisoner Allen.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. As soon as you got to the corner you turned back? A. Yes, because I thought he would come round - I did not run through the pond.

LEWIS PRINCE . I am a Policeman. Allen was taken in a yard in Warner-street - he was quite exhausted.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you see the butcher run through the horse-pond? A. No - I did not particularly notice Allen's clothes, and cannot say whether they were wet or not

JOHN SPENCER . I am in the employ of Mr. Brown. -On the night of the robbery I accompanied him up to the warehouse; I afterwards looked through the roof of the house, and saw the property there, in parcels, which the Policemen afterwards took possession of - I have since seen them; they had been placed on the top of the stairs, just under the grating where the trap-door was, on the day before the robbery; I know the articles by the duplicates being on them - I wrote some of the duplicates myself; I should think the articles worth from 15l. to 20l. - 13l. had been lent on them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where were

they when you saw them last? A. In stacks under the grating of the trap-door; they were taken off the stacks, and on the roof.

GEORGE DISMORE re-examined by MR. CLARKSON. I saw Allen when he was brought to the station-house - he was brought there about ten minutes before the others.

Q. When the others were brought in, did any body say,"Now we have got all four of you?" A. Not in my presence; I do not recollect it being said - I was engaged in entering the charge.

Q. Did not the other three prisoners state, in answer to that, "There are but three of us?" A. They did not, in my hearing - I am not aware of it; it might pass when I was engaged.

Prisoner Allen. Will you ask the Policeman, No. 235, who took the three men, what observation he made.

CONSTANTINE O'DONNELL . My number is 235; I did not ask the three men if there was any more of them, to my knowledge - the three told me they were not murderers, but they were robbers; I do not think I asked if there were any more of them, or any such question, nor that they said there were but three of them; I did not take much notice of what they said.

Michael Radford and William Moody here produced the twenty-six parcels found on the roof of the house.

JOHN SPENCER . I know this property - here are several duplicates of my own writing on them; they were in parcels, as they are now, when in the house - I have seen the contents; 13l. had been lent on them.

Allen's Defence. I am innocent. I know nothing whatever of these three men - I never saw them in my life till I saw them at the station. I was returning from Camden-town between one and two o'clock; I turned round the first or second turning on the left-hand side of the way from Mr. Cubitt's. to come towards Mutton-hill, on my way home to Finsbury, and as I came under a wall a Policeman sprang out on me, and said, "Here is one of them;" I turned round, and said, "One, what?" he said,"One of the thieves;" I then knocked him down - he sprang his rattle, and three or four more came up towards where I was; I then ran away, with ever so many Policemen after me, first up one street and another; I ran across a sort of mews - I did not know whether there was a turning, and when I got to the bottom there was none; I had no place to get away, and jumped over a gate - I never ran through any horse-pond; I hurt myself in falling off the gate - I found I could not get up, and there I laid; I cannot say how long, for I was stunned with the blow - some Policemen knocked the gates open, and laid hold of me; I said, "Where is the man I have struck?" they said, "Oh, come along," and took me to the station; two of them lent me their shoulders to lean on very kindly, or I could not have walked - they sat me in a chair; I had been there a quarter of an hour, when these three men were brought in - the serjeant or inspector, I did not notice which, said, "So we have got four of you;" one of them, I believe it was Mallett, said, "Which of us is it you reckon as two then, as there are but three of us;" the Policeman stood in a file before me - they moved back, and said, "Why, here is the other sitting in a chair;" the man said, "That man has not been with us - we know nothing of him; it was us three by ourselves;" I told the inspector I knew nothing of the three men, but, without any ceremony, he put as all into the black-hole together; he brought me out first in the morning, and told me I was charged with burglary, with those three men; I told him I was a housekeeper in Shoreditch, and a respectable man, and they might send for my friends; they said Oh, no, I was along with these three men, and laughed at me - they put me into the hole, and I was taken to Hatton-garden; I told the Magistrate I knew nothing of the three men, and they declared they knew nothing of me; the Magistrate sent me back till Thursday, when I was committed - I have plenty of friends; it has been so sudden, but I have no doubt some of them are here - they have heard of it by means of the press; I am a painter, and live at No. 60, Leonard-street, Shoreditch, and keep a shop, which my wife looks after; I have no incumbrance whatever, only one child, and leave the Jury to say whether I should be guilty of such a thing - my reason for running away was because I had struck the Policeman; I do not know the men - they were all strangers to me.

JOHN PHILIP THOMAS . I did not see any Policeman knocked down while I was in pursuit - the first I saw was the prisoner making his escape; I pursued him from the time he dropped from the wall.

Howell. All I have to say is this man is as innocent as a child unborn.

Mallett. I have nothing to say with respect to myself, only I never saw this man (Allen) in my life till he was in the watch-house.

Allen. I lived nine years with Mr. Swain, of the Red House, Battersea, and with Mr. Bright, of the Minories, four years - I married a young woman from his house, and he recommended me to go into business for myself, but I preferred journeywork for him; he has been a very good friend to me - I went to work for myself, and by his assistance have got a good connexion: when I have had nothing to do I have gone back and worked for him, and Mr. Swain gave me a job which came to 70l. last winter.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I live in the Kent-road - I was a mariner in the East India Company's service. I have known Allen from my earliest recollection - he is a painter, and housekeeper; he lives in Leonard-street - he has lived there nearly two years I believe; I never heard any thing against him till this time.

COURT. Q. Do you know Camden-town? A. Yes -I do not know whether Wilson-street is in the way from there to Shoreditch.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you known him? A. His father and mine were boys together - I am not related to him: I swear that - we have known one another boys together; I have been voyages to sea - I was at sea twenty-two months at one time; I have been away from England within the last four years, but not all the time - I never knew him in custody: I heard he was taken up, but the prosecutor exonerated him - it was something about watches, but he was not charged with it; it was something about his brother - the prosecutor's name was Moore, I believe; I do not know where he lived - I never heard of the prisoner being in custody more than once; I have heard him called Jack, the Painter.

Q. Do not you know that he is the pugilist? A. I never heard that he had fought at all - I never knew him fight; I never heard that he belonged to the ring, and was

a prize-fighter, that I swear; he keeps a chandler's shop, and is a painter - I live at No. 3, Rodney-place, Kent-road, and am a sailor; I returned from sea two years ago last May - I have been endeavouring to get a situation since that, but have had nothing particular to do; I have been assistant in a school part of the time, in King-street.

Q. What King-street? A. You go up Princes-street, Gray's Inn-lane to it - I do not know the number; the gentleman's name is Banbury - I left there twelve months ago last Christmas; I was there for a quarter.

Q. That is in the neighbourhood of Mr. Brown's house, is not it? A. No, a very long way; it is King-street, Soho - that is it; I go into Gray's Inn-lane and Princes-street, to go to it - I never noticed the number of the house; I did not live there, but went daily - I do not know whether there is a number on the door.

COURT. Q. Where did you live then? A. In the same place as I do now - I walked there morning and evening: I have lived in the same place ever since I came from sea - I saw Allen last about three weeks before he was taken, at his own house: I swear I have not heard of his being taken up within the last two years - I perhaps saw him once a month or not so often; I used to go to his house - I never had the slightest notion of his being in the ring; I never knew he fought at all, nor never heard he belonged to the ring - I was not in the habit of visiting him oftener than I have said.

WILLIAM ABBOTT . I am a painter, and live in Hackney-road. I have known Allen about five years, I think; he lives in Leonard-street, Shoreditch, and is a painter - I never knew any dishonesty imputed to him.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know him pretty intimately? A. The first two years we worked together, with Mr. Bright, of No. 109, Minories, who is still living; I continued to know him occasionally up to the present time - I never heard of his going by any other name but Allen; I have read of his going by the name of Jack, the Painter, but never heard of it.

Q. How could you tell it was the person you knew, who you were reading of? A. By its being William Allen, alias Jack, the Painter - it was as a prize-fighter I read of him; I never asked how he came to be called by that name - I work for Mr. Bright now; I never heard of the prisoner being in custody.

JURY to JOSEPH SMOUT . Q. Do you recollect in what dress Allen was when taken into custody? A. He had a fustian frock-coat, with pockets on the side, and I believe, fustian trousers - it was a sort of shooting-jacket, such as plumber's wear; a kind of frock coat, nearly down to the knees, I think, but not quite - I am positive he is the person I saw in the house when the door opened.

JANE WOOD. When I saw the young man getting over the wall, he wore a light fustian coat, with pockets at the side - I cannot say it was Allen.

LONSDALE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

HOWELL - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

MALLETT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

ALLEN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.[Feb. 24.]

Reference Number: t18310217-17

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

442. THOMAS CHAD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , at St. James, Westminster, 2 coats, value 4l.; 1 flageolet, value 15s.; 1 watch, value 50s.; 2 waistcoats, value 1l.; 1 shirt, value 10s.; 1 ring, value 12s.; 1 snuff-box, value 6d., and 1 chain, value 6d., the goods of John Boyd , in his dwelling-house ; and MARY ANN ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, the aforesaid goods, well knowing them to be stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN BOYD. I keep the Grapes public-house, in the Haymarket; it is my dwelling-house, and is in the parish of St. James, Westminster - I have known the two prisoners about six months: they have been in the habit of frequenting my house - they were at my house on Christmas-eve; I saw them about nine o'clock in the evening, which was before I missed this property - I missed this property at half-past one o'clock in the morning; the prisoners were then gone - I went up stairs to a cupboard on the second floor, for a coat, and found it broken open; I had been there at half-past nine o'clock - it was then secure, and I locked the cupboard; I cannot say at what time the prisoners went away - I missed from the cupboard two coats, a flageolet, a watch, two waistcoats, and the other articles stated; they cost me altogether 20l. - they might be worth 10l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you not been rather unfortunate in that house? A. Yes; I cannot say how many robbers have been taken out of that house; I do not know of any - no one was ever taken in that house to my knowledge; I have heard of two persons who frequented the house being taken up, but not in the house - the officers have been there, but the house has not been searched, to my knowledge; the officers have been there to look after property - it is not a house in which gambling has been carried on at all hours.

JOHN WHARTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 1, Gloucester-terrace, Vauxhall-bridge-road. I have a coat, a shirt, and a ring; the shirt was pawned by the female prisoner, but I cannot say who pawned the coat and ring; the shirt was pawned on the 30th of December, in the name of Ann Alexander, and the coat by a man on the 28th of December.

Cross-examined. Q. The woman gave you her name? A. Yes; I had known her before - she had been in the habit of coming there.

WILLIAM HENRY LLOYD . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 18, Strutton-ground. I have a waistcoat, pawned for 3s., by a woman who gave her name as Ann Gardner, and said she brought it for Ann Alexander .

Cross-examined. Q. It was not this prisoner? A. No.

JAMES MARNHAM . I am a hay-salesman and farmer. I have known Chad for some time; I was in company with him on the 8th of January - he showed me two duplicates, one of a black coat and one of a waistcoat, one in the name of Lloyd, and the other in the name of Page: he showed them to me at Kneesdon, in the parish of Wilsden; he wanted me to purchase them, but I did not- I did not inspect them much, but I saw the names on them; one was similar to this of the coat for 1l. 5s., and one was similar to this for the waistcoat.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell any body what the name on the duplicate was, till you saw these? A. No; I described them when I saw them.

HENRY WILLIAM MORRISON . I went to a house, and searched it - I found this chain there, but I did not know from the prisoners that it was their residence.

WILLIAM DRANE . I am a Police-constable. I searched a room at No. 3, Coburg-row - I found this snuff-box there; the two prisoners and another woman were in the room - the snuff-box was in a drawer; I charged the prisoners with the robbery, and took them to the station-house, and from there to the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. They were in the room when you got there, but you do not know whether it was their room? A. No.

JOHN BOYD. These articles are my property and are a part of what I lost.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any thing particular about this chain? A. Here is a link or two broken, but it is a common chain - the articles were taken between half-past nine and half-past one o'clock, but I cannot say the chain and snuff-box were there then - I had not seen them that day to my knowledge; the clothes were there - there are a great many people at my house sometimes.

Chad's Defence. I am innocent; I know nothing at all about it.

CHAD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

ALEXANDER - NOT GUILTY .[Feb. 24.]

Reference Number: t18310217-18

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

443. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Harriet Dee . on the 29th of January , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , and stealing therein 4 lady's dresses, value 2l.; 1 cloak, value 6s., and 1 pair of bracelets, value 9d., the goods of the said Harriet Dee; and 1 lady's dress, value 6s.; 1 watch, value 1d.; 1 cloak, value 8s.; 1 brooch, value 1l.; 1 diamond pin, value 10s., and 1 chain, value 2s., the goods of Caroline Inggall .

HARRIET DEE. I live at No. 3, Mary Ann-place, Finsbury-market , and am single . On Saturday the 29th of January, I went out about half-past two o'clock - Caroline Inggall is a friend of mine, and resides in my house; it is my dwelling-house - I am mistress of it; it is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch - I am a dress-maker by trade; I returned at half-past eight o'clock in the evening - I left Caroline Inggall at home when I went out; when I returned I found my street door wide open, and no one in my house; I went in, and missed the property stated, from the bed-room and from the front room down stairs - part of the property was mine and part was Caroline Inggall 's, as it is described - I knew the prisoner; his wife washes for us: I have known him since September last - the prisoner came to my house that night, about nine o'clock, with the linen they had washed, but I had not then missed any thing - about half-past nine Caroline Inggall came in, and then I missed the property; when the prisoner came at nine o'clock he said he had been there about half-past six, and we were out - he told me that of his own accord; I went to him on the Sunday, and asked him if the door was open when he first came; he said it was quite fast, he was sure - I then asked him if he would come and mind the house that day, as my friend and I had to go out - he came about four o'clock that Sunday to mind the house - we left him there; he said he would take care of the house - we returned at half-past ten; he said no person had been there - he then left the house; I had missed the property on Saturday night - he came on the Monday night for the linen as usual - on the Tuesday I missed a duplicate, and on the Saturday after this robbery he asked me if I had lost a duplicate; I said I had - he said he had found one by the street door on the Sunday when he had to take care of the house - I had missed it on the Tuesday, and went to the pawnbroker's to stop the article; it was a brooch - he said on that Saturday."I hope you will not be angry at what I am going to say, but I found this duplicate on the mat at the door, have you lost one?" I said, "Yes, I have had one stolen from me;" he said he did not think it belonged to me or he would have given it to me - he said it was in the name of Deane, not Dee - I had seen it safe on the Saturday evening, after the robbery, in a mustard-pot on the mantel-piece, and on the Sunday I suppose it was taken - on Sunday, the 7th of February, I went to the prisoner's house and I saw my bracelets were made into a necklace, and were round his child's neck - I had not missed them; I had not seen them for a week before, but he said he had taken them from the drawer on the Sunday - they had been in the front room; I told the Police-officer to come to my house on the Monday - the prisoner was not in my house then; he was taken in Finsbury-market - I pointed him out: he walked away, and I sent the officer after him -I went to his house with Inggall that Monday evening - I found there this child's watch, which was part of the property lost on the Saturday night, from the box, from which the dresses were taken - I cannot tell the exact value of all we lost; the dresses were worth 2l.; the officer took the bracelets off the child - we have found no more of the property.

CAROLINE INGGALL . I live with Harriet Dee. She went out on the 29th of January, and I went out about three o'clock - I shut the street door after me; it shut with a spring lock - we each have a key; I returned about half-past nine, and as soon as I came home Harriet called me up stairs and said the things were gone - they had all been safe when I went out, and I left no one in the house; I was present when these articles were found at the prisoner's.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. How long have you lived in the house? A. She has been there about five months, but I have not been there so long; she left me in the house that day - I have sometimes occasion to dispose of things for a short time, but I am quite sure I did not part with these that day; I staid about an hour after she went out - her things were hanging up, and mine were in my box; I am sure I shut the door - I pulled it by the knocker, and tried it afterwards.

JAMES BROWN . I am a Police-officer. I was with the prosecutrix when the prisoner was pointed out to me - he had been listening under the window while I was in the house; when I came out I saw him running away, I pursued and took him - I found at his house this toy watch, and these clasps of the bracelets; this part of the bracelets were made a necklace of, and put round the child's neck, and this remaining part was on the mantel-piece.

Cross-examined. Q. You say he was listening under the window? A. Yes, we heard something of a footstep on the pavement - as we were going out he flew from the door, and away he ran.

HARRIET DEE . This watch belongs to Caroline Inggall ; it was taken at the same time that the dresses were; my bracelets were taken on the Sunday - there was no mark of violence on the door; it had been opened with a key.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the value of your property altogether? A. 8l. 1s. 9d. - I had been to the prisoner's house, but we were not on particularly friendly terms; this watch is of no value, but I suppose in the hurry he had mistaken it for a valuable watch.

COURT to CAROLINE INGGALL . Q. Are you sure you fastened the door? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I have witnesses to prove that at the time the robbery was committed I was at work, from nine o'clock in the morning till six in the evening, and was not out of the house.

MICHAEL CRAWLEY . I am a weaver. On Saturday. the 29th of January, the prisoner was in my room, and never went out from half-past two o'clock till five in the afternoon - I then went out, and left him in my room; I have known him ever since the August after the battle of Waterloo - he has borne the character of an honest lad.

ELLEN CRAWLEY . I am daughter of the last witness. On Saturday, the 29th of January, the prisoner came to his house between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and was not five minutes absent till after five in the evening; I have known him some time - he is married, and is a very honest young man.

ANN SAYERS . I live at No. 22, Willow-walk, nearly opposite the prisoner's. On Saturday, the 29th of January, the prisoner came to me between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and brought me a bundle of clothes to mangle; he came for them again between six and seven in the evening - he had them away, and took them to his own house; I cannot say that I saw him again that evening.

JURY. Q. What part of Willow-walk is No. 22? A. Near the Curtain-road, just past Charlotte-street.

JAMES BROWN re-examined. Q. What is the distance between the prisoner's and the prosecutrix's house? A. About a quarter of a mile - it would take a person about five minutes to walk.

ELIZABETH HAM . I am the wife of Thomas Ham - we keep a baker's shop at the corner of Clifton-street, Finsbury. I know the prisoner as a customer - he came to our shop on the 29th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the evening - he left a basket containing some clean clothes; he said, "Will you let me leave this here, for the people it is for are not at home, and I will call again;" he came again between nine and ten o'clock with his wife and child, and they took away their basket - they bought three hoaves and half a quartern of flour: they left the bread and flour, and he called again in about ten minutes for them.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.[Feb. 24.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18310217-19

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

444. FREDERICK BRITAIN and EDWARD CARTER were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 clock, value 24l.; 1 clock-stand, value 3s., and 1 glass clock-shade, value 20s., the goods of William Robert Syer , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM ROBERT SYER . I am a stay-maker , and live in Tavistock-street, St. Paul, Covent-garden , On the morning of the 12th of January this clock and shade stood in my counting-house - it was worth above 20l.; one side of my house is in Tavistock-court - about a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning I took down my shop shutters myself - I had taken down nine in front of the street, leaving one up there; I was taking the ninth shutter up the court, to put it away on a ledge, and the prisoner Britain came and asked if I knew a person named Evan Davis or David Davis , who kept a straw bonnet shop -I told him I knew nobody of the name except the milkpeople up the court - he then asked if I knew a tailor named McPherson: that McPherson kept the shop, and Davis lodged in the house - he had scarcely uttered these words when I heard something fall very heavy in the street, in front of my house; he was standing in the court, between me and the street - he stood before me so that I should not pass to take the other shutter down; I went round the houses immediately, and the prisoner Carter was leaning over the clock which had just fallen, as I imagine, from his hand - I did not see it fall; I had passed Britain to see what had happened, and then he came round the front of the house - the clock had fallen on the step of Mr. Robinson's door; Carter came more in front of my house, and Britain came close to him - Carter nudged Britain, who then went up the court; I called him back; he came, and I collared them both. sent for a Policeman, two came, and they were secured - I did not purchase the clock; I had had it about five years - it is worth about 24l.; I am certain it cost two hundred and eighty-eight guilders.

Cross-examined. Q. You fix some value to its having been the property of the Emperor of France? A. It never was his - I am confident I told the Justice I saw one man nudge the other; I was in the court on one side the house when I heard the crash, putting up a shutter; I had not seen Carter then - I did not see who had the article; I am sure it was before eight o'clock - I saw a man in a long brown coat; I asked Carter if he had seen any body pass - when I came round, and saw the clock there, he was standing over it - he had not time to leave it; I was as far up the court as four of my shutters when I heard the crash - I asked Carter that question, being very confused at seeing my property there; I am confident there was not a soul on the pavement - I asked the question before I had an opportunity of forming my mind on the subject; I did not repeat the question -Carter answered that he had seen a man in a long brown coat - I did not then attempt to take him; he could have gone away if he pleased - Britain came round to me in front of the house: the clock had fallen on Robinson's steps, which is next door - Carter was stooping over it; I was so confused, I merely asked if he had seen any body pass - the Salutation public-house is at the corner of the street, but it was not open, for I spoke to the young man belonging to the house; he came round with me, and heard all the conversation - the Magistrate thought it unnecessary for him to be here; he had not

opened the shutters of the house - some minutes elapsed before I collared the prisoners; I will not say ten minutes had not elapsed, nor fifteen - Britain returned when I called him - Carter never left the spot.

THOMAS WATSON . I am servant to Joseph Jackson , of Tavistock-street, woollen-draper. On the 12th of January I was in master's shop, which is just opposite Mr. Syer's; I heard the crash - I was cleaning our windows inside, when I heard something fall; I ran to the door immediately - I saw Carter leaning over the clock; I saw nobody else in the street - I crossed the road, and saw the clock laying on Mr. Robinson's steps - Mr. Syer came round the corner immediately after I got out of master's shop; I saw the young man belonging to the public-house, and about five minutes after I saw Britain; Mr. Syer came round from the court with him - I saw no other person in the street - I was there when the prisoners were secured; the young man from the public-house remained there till the officers came, and so did I.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you look out before the crash? A. No, I was standing on the ground, reaching to clean the windows; I should not think more than a quarter of an hour elapsed before Syer collared the prisoners.

Q. Was there any attempt to take them before the officers came? A. Yes; Syer took hold of Carter - the prosecutor seemed agitated, and appeared to suspect Carter - I remained there to see where the prisoners went to, but said nothing to Syer; Britain went up Tavistock-court - I cannot say where he went to; I did not notice him further - he walked round the corner, and walked back, when he was called; I was not above four yards from the clock when I went up - I did not hear Syer ask Carter if he had seen any body pass; I did not notice what he said - I was taking notice of the clock; I got to the spot in two minutes; there was plenty of time for a man to get away.

COURT. Q. Does it take you two minutes to cross the street? A. I think so - I saw nobody but Carter in the street when I looked; I afterwards saw Syer and the man from the public-house, and afterwards Britain - I saw nobody in a brown coat.

CHARLES WARD . I am a labourer. On the evening of the 11th of January, about a quarter to six o'clock, I saw the prisoners together, going in a direction for Mr. Syer's house; a third person was behind them, whom I knew was a bad character - they went towards Brydges-street; they were going on, and the third man ran up and overtook them - I first saw them fifty or sixty yards from Syer's, on the same side of the way; I was coming along the following morning, and saw them brought along in custody - I knew them again; I stated this at the station-house, voluntarily.

Cross-examined. Q. You seem acquainted with bad characters? A. I am a special-constable for part of St. Giles', and have been so these two years; I am also porter to a plate-chest maker, and live at No. 99, Drury-lane - I went to the station without any invitation; I did not go and caution Syer when I saw them - I could from no idea of the house they had come from, except from the evidence; they were more towards Brydges-street - I should think Syer's house is one hundred yards from Brydges-street; I work for Mr. Blackman, Green-street, Leicester-square.

HARRIET MACKENTEAR . I am servant to Mr. Syer. -On the evening before this clock was taken (the 11th), a little before six o'clock, the prisoner Carter (pointing to Britain) came to our door - I never saw him before; he asked me if Mr. McPherson, a tailor, lived there - I said No; he asked me to inquire - I would not leave the shop; I told him no such person lived there, then shut the door, and he went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate Britain was the person who called, or that you could not swear to him? A. I said it was him; I never said I could not swear to him - I mentioned Carter just now because I forgot their names; I heard somebody say something when I named Carter, but did not hear what it was - I did not hear, "No" said.

Britain's Defence. I was coming from Covent-garden, and met Mr. Syer - I asked him for Davis, but deny asking for McPherson; when he said he did not know him I went up the court, when he heard the window crash; I walked up with him. I went twenty yards from Tavistock-court, to the person he told me of; he said, "Aye, young man:" I looked round, and it was him; I came back - he said he was not satisfied; I asked what about, and he said about the clock - I staid there about ten minutes; he sent for a constable, and gave me in charge.

Carter's Defence. When Ward was asked at Bow-street if he saw me, he said he could not positively swear I was with Britain.

CHARLES WARD . I did not say so.

Britain. At Bow-street the prosecutor stood there, and said to his servant, "There is the man - don't you know him?" and nudged her.

W. R. SYER. On my oath I never did - I told her to look at the two, and see who it was asked for McPherson the night before - she said, "That is him, but he has not got the brown coat which he had on at night, and he has changed his handkerchief;" I rent the whole house.

BRITAIN - GUILTY. Aged 20.

CARTER - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-20

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

445. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Christopher Pfeiler , on the 10th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 purse, value 6d., and 1 half-sovereign, his property .

JOHN CHRISTOPHER PFEILER . I am a merchant , and live in George-street, New-road. On the 10th of January, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming from' Change, and going to Finch-lane - at the corner of Finch-lane I was all at once surrounded by a gang of men; they were all strangers to me - I was pressed in such a particular manner that I could not move at all - my arms were squeezed up, and confined; I had a purse in my pocket, containing half a sovereign - I felt a hand in my pocket at the time my arms were confined, and all at once they disappeared; I then found my watch-chain was gone, with

two seals and a key, also my purse, with half a sovereign in it - the watch-chain broke, leaving the watch and one link of the chain behind; I could not distinguish the persons of any of the men - I saw the prisoner the next day, before the Lord Mayor, but had no recollection of him; the identical purse which was taken from me was produced there - the chain and seals have not been found.

Prisoner. Q. Can you positively swear to the purse? A. Yes - I cannot be mistaken in it; I did not see you till the next morning.

JOHN ROE . I am one of the City Police. On the 10th of January, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was near the Exchange, and saw Mr. Pfeiler at the corner of Finch-lane; three or four persons were round him, and the prisoner was behind them; I was on the opposite side of the way at first, but went close to them - when I had been over about a minute I saw the prisoner's right-hand go in the direction of the prosecutor's right-hand pocket, and when he drew his hand back he had a purse in it; I immediately seized his hand, and he dropped the purse; I picked it up - Forrester and I took him to the Mansion-house: we had no opportunity of speaking to the prosecutor, for it was at the time Mr. Hunt was coming through the City, and there was a great mob; the prisoner did not claim the purse - Mr. Pfeiler saw it next day at the Mansion-house, and claimed it; there was a half-sovereign, wrapped in paper, and a button in it.

MR. PFEILER. This is the identical purse which was stolen from me; the contents are the same as when I lost it.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am one of the City Police. I and Roe were at the corner of Birchin-lane, which is nearly opposite Finch-lane; I saw an elderly gentleman crowded round - I believe it to be Mr. Pfeiler, but cannot be positive; I stepped over - I was a little behind Roe, and when he laid hold of the prisoner I observed something drop between the prisoner and the gentleman; Roe pushed the prisoner a little aside, and took up the purse which I had seen fall - the prisoner did not claim it, or say any thing about it; he was taken in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Cornhill, and near Finch-lane Roe collared me - he charged me with stealing the purse; I immediately told him it was not me that dropped it; he shoved me aside, and the purse certainly laid behind me - but, as for Roe swearing he saw me take it out of the pocket, it is false; there were many thousand people in Cornhill at the time.

JURY to MR. PFIELER. Q. Do you recollect whether your hands were held up at the moment you felt a hand in your pocket? A. My hands were forced up prior to my feeling a hand in my pocket: they were held up at that time, and considerably before; I carry my purse in my right-hand breeches pocket.

GUILTY of stealing from the person only . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310217-21

446. REUBEN CHAPLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 7 lbs. of mutton, value 3s. , the goods of James Jeffries .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Henry Daniels .

HENRY DANIELS . I am a watchman of Leadenhall-market - James Jeffries is a meat-salesman , and has a stall in the market; I am employed as his watchman. On the 21st of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner there, with another person, near Jeffries' shop - I saw him take and cut a shoulder of mutton from a carcase which hung in the market; the other was about a dozen yards from him; he did it in about a minute and a half; I was in the middle of the market, and before I could get up to him he had separated it from the carcase, and was going away - I laid hold of him, without losing sight of him; the moment he saw me coming he put the mutton under the benches; I secured and took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any light near the mutton? A. Yes - there was a gas-light within about fifteen yards; he was never out of my sight - I cannot be mistaken in him.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18310217-22

447. GEORGE LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 120 pence and 120 halfpence, the monies of Robert Bays , his master .

ROBERT BAYS . I am a salesman of Leadenhall-market - the prisoner was in my employ; this money was locked in a cupboard - he was not trusted with the key. On Sunday night I saw sixteen 5s. papers of pence and halfpence safe about eight or nine o'clock - I put them by themselves - I sleep at the market: the prisoner does not sleep there - I do not think he was there on Sunday evening; I went to the cupboard frequently on the Monday, and on Tuesday afternoon, about three o'clock, I missed four papers; the prisoner was not there then, but he had been there both on the Monday and Tuesday - he had lived about four years with me; I had seen it all safe about nine that morning - I applied to the officer, and told him who I suspected - the prisoner was on the premises most of the time from nine to three o'clock; I had sent him out at three, and when he returned I charged him with taking it - he said he had never done any such thing: the officer was waiting for him - he was not searched till he got to the watch-house; I went with the officer to his lodging, and found 10s. in copper in two papers, and some loose coppers - my son had marked the coppers; I saw the letter B. at one end of both the papers in his hand-writing, and have not a doubt of their being two of the papers taken from my shop - when they were found he cried, and said he was sorry for it; I had a good character with him, and always supposed him honest.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your son here? A. No - I was present when he wrote on the paper - I have trusted the prisoner several times to carry 100l. or 150l. for me to the bankers.

Q. What did you say to him at his lodging? A. I called him a villain when I found it out, and said he had a good master and I thought I had a good servant - I said I should not spare him; he said he was sorry for what he done - he never confessed taking any thing; he was sorry for being found out - he said he was sorry, and pleaded for mercy; I have often taken coppers out of one paper and put them into another when it was broken; the old papers might be picked up in the shop, but are not fit to put coppers in; the papers found had 5s. in copper in

each of them - he knew I knew where he lived; it has happened when I have sent him to the bankers' with change that he has returned me a few shillings which I have sent too much; I cannot say the sum - I should not have discovered it, but for his honesty.

COURT. Q. Did the paper appear to have been removed from the coppers? A. No.

JOHN GRIMES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - Bays charged him with stealing four 5s. papers of coppers - he denied it; I afterwards went to his lodging, and in a drawer I found two papers of halfpence with each a B written on them - Bays claimed them; the prisoner then acknowledged his guilt - he said he was sorry for what he had done.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you mean by acknowledging his guilt? A. He said, "I am sorry for what I have done, and hope you will not be hard with me"- he certainly did acknowledge his guilt; he said he was guilty in Mr. Bays' presence - Bays was going out of the room very likely at the time.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310217-23

448. EDWARD MILLION was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 water-butt, value 10s. , the goods of John Spencer .

JAMES HEALY . I live in Thornhill-street, White Conduit-fields , and am in the employ of John Spencer , a cooper - this was an old water-butt kept in an out-house, in front of the house. I saw it safe at two o'clock on the 11th of January - the place is fenced round about ten feet high, and in front two large trucks stood: they must get over them - I found it at Cripplegate watch-house on Wednesday, and knew it; the prisoner is a stranger.

CHARLES LEWIS . I was a Policeman. I saw the prisoner on Tuesday morning, the 11th of January, at ten minutes past six o'clock, with a water-butt on his head, crossing Little Arthur-street, Golden-lane, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's - he turned down Bell-alley; I returned into Golden-lane, and saw him in Brackley-street, which is in the City; I saw a City-officer, and called him - I went up, and asked the prisoner where he was taking the butt; he said to No. 2, Pump-court, which is in Bridgwater-gardens, that he had taken a lodging there - I took him there, but could get no admittance; the house was inhabited, but nobody seemed to know him - I then asked where he got the tub from; he said his father had bought it on Mutton-hill - I asked if it was pitched when he bought it; he said No - (it was pitched then;) I took him to Cripplegate watch-house.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am a constable of Cripplegate. I took the prisoner in charge - I showed Healy the butt at the watch-house; he claimed it - I produce it.

JAMES HEALY . It had been pitched about three weeks before - I let a small bit into the top of it, where a piece had been knocked out - I also know it by its general appearance; I described the mark before I saw it.

Prisoner's Defence. The tub was bought - I believe there is somebody to prove it outside.

JAMES HEALY . My master had had it about six weeks or two months.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-24

449. JAMES WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 6 planes, value 14s. , the goods of Stephen Ponder and another.

STEPHEN PONDER . I am a plane-maker and ironmonger - I have one partner, and live at No. 21, Fish-streethill . On the 8th of February the prisoner was brought into the shop with two panes, which I believe to be ours - they are marked S. and T. Ponder; my partner's name is Thomas - the prisoner was a stranger; he said he had been out of work seven weeks, and would beg my pardon on his knees if I would let him go; I know nothing of the previous circumstances.

GEORGE DAY . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I was in the shop; I received information from Hooker and went after the prisoner - I saw him in Monument-yard, about fifty yards from the shop, and the planes laying in the kennel a few yards from him; I asked him where the parcel was - he directly said he had been out of work some time, and had not had any victuals for some time; a person said, "Here is the parcel" - the planes laid in the kennel, in brown paper; I gave him in charge - it was between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; I was in the shop, but not in front.

JAMES HOOKER . I live at the Bells, opposite this shop - I saw two persons come out of the shop; I believe the prisoner to be one of them - I went over to Mr. Day, and minded the shop while he pursued.

THOMAS KELLY . I am a constable. I saw Day collar the prisoner, and take him into the shop; I went and took him - he said he was very sorry, and would beg Mr. Ponder's pardon on his knees if he would let him go; he said he was distressed - I searched him, but he had nothing about him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 20. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310217-25

450. JOHN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 2 blankets, value 20s.; 2 sheets, value 20s., and 1 pillow-case, value 1s. , the goods of Moses William Born .

MOSES WILLIAM BORN . I keep the Flower-pot inn, Bishopsgate-street . On the 29th of January, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner engaged a bed at my house, and paid me one shilling for it; he went to bed about ten o'clock - there were two beds in the room, but nobody else slept there; he said he was going by the Canterbury coach at eight o'clock in the morning - Langridge, the servant, lighted him to bed; he went out in the morning, but was brought back by the officer with these sheets, blankets, and pillow-case; he acknowledged he had stolen them - I gave him no permission to take them away.

MARY ANN LANGRIDGE . I am the chamber-maid. I lighted the prisoner up to his room; nobody but him slept there - he told me to call him at half-past seven o'clock; the sheets and blankets were on the bed - the pillowcase did not belong to the house - I called him about twenty minutes to eight; he was going towards the door to go out, when I went up to the room and missed the sheets; I ran down and gave an alarm; he had got out of the house, but was brought back in a quarter of an hour by Gainbee, with the pair of sheets

and blankets which were on the bed he had slept in; I knew them to be master's by the mark - the blankets were brought back in brown paper; he had brought a similar brown paper parcel in at night, and I found some straw under the bed.

WILLIAM GAINBEE . I am a coachman. I was standing near the bar when the prisoner went out - an alarm was given that the sheets were missing; I went out, and at the bottom of Threadneedle-street, going into the Poultry, I stopped the prisoner and gave him in charge - he had a brown paper parcel, with a pillow-case and the blankets in it: the sheets were wrapped round his body - he had taken in a brown paper parcel the night before, of a similar size, containing straw.

JOHN FREE . I am a constable. I received him in charge, and took these sheets from round his body.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-26

451. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

SAMUEL SHACKELL . I am a house-broker, and live in Lambeth walk. On the 6th of January, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was crossing out of Ave Maria-lane into Stationer's-court, and saw the prisoner in company with four others - they were all together; I watched them, and saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from a gentleman's left-hand coat pocket - the gentleman was coming out of the passage into Ave Maria-lane ; the others were close by him - they were rather taller than him; I was in company with a gentleman, and asked him to see the transaction - I pursued when I saw him rob the gentleman; he ran and knocked every body down before him - he did not give them time to fall; he sidled from one to the other - the others dispersed, two one way, and two another; I never lost sight of the prisoner - I secured him, and saw the officer take the handkerchief from his pocket - I could not give the gentleman information, and do not know who he was; it was all a momentary thing.

JURY. Q. How did he get the handkerchief into his own pocket? A. He put it into his breeches pocket - it appeared the same sort of handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You say you are a broker? A. I have said so - I took a licence out to buy furniture and to sell it; I have been here before - I was here the very day the prisoner was taken; as I was accidentally passing in the Strand, I saw a boy cut a window with a pebble, and was here about that - I have not been here before that for twelve months; I suppose by your manner you are talking to the prisoner at the bar - I hope you will not hurt my feelings because I have come to tell the truth - I cannot say how often I have been here; I think I can swear I have not been here half a dozen times besides.

Q. Has it always been to give evidence against some person guilty of felony? A. I believe not - I cannot recollect what it was; I was in company with a person when the boy cut the glass in the Strand - he was not an officer; to the best of my recollection I have not been here a dozen times - I never was in this Court a dozen times, and never was in the other as a witness; I have been hearing trials.

Q. Do you mean to swear you have not been a witness in both Courts? A. I do not - I believe I have not been on this side of the water on such unpleasant business for the last six years; I will not swear I have not been here within twelve months - I do not recollect that I have; I do not think I have sworn the last time I was here was six years ago - to the best of my recollection, the circumstance in the Strand is the only one; my memory does not furnish me with any other.

Q. Now, what is the name of the person who was with you on that occasion? A. I really cannot tell, though it was a very respectable gentleman who lives in the Strand, a glover, but on my oath I cannot tell his name - he lives within a dozen doors of Charing-cross; he was not before the Justice - he left me to follow the prisoner; he did not know where I was gone - I do not recollect whether I told the Justice I had a friend with me when it happened - he left me when I was fool enough to follow the prisoner; I do not recollect that I have said I called on him to notice what was going on - I do not recollect that I did so; I only saw one handkerchief found on the prisoner - I do not know how much is allowed per day to witnesses here - I do not recollect what I got on the former occasion; the Policeman received it, and the expences were divided.

COURT. Q. How much did you get? A. The gentleman gave me a sovereign for being at Hick's-hall, here, and before the Magistrate.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is the name of the Policeman? A. I do not know - I have received nothing on this occasion; I do not expect any thing - if his Lordship is pleased to give me my expences, if not I must submit to lose my time; I do not come here for the expences - my name is on my door, and my business also.

THOMAS WILMOT . I am a Ward-officer. I was coming out of my door, No. 2, Creed-lane, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - I turned round directly, and saw about fifty people running down Ave Maria-lane towards Creed-lane, pursuing the prisoner, who was running; he went down Creed-lane, and was running from the cry -I stopped him; Shackell came up immediately, and said, in his presence, that he had picked a gentleman's pocket in Stationer's-court - I searched him, and found this handkerchief - he assisted me in taking it out; I cannot say whether it was in his small-clothes or his pocket - he said he had picked it up; he was taken before the Magistrate, and remanded - Sir Peter Laurie did not examine me; he said I was to give my deposition to the clerk - that he was well known, and was to come here.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been a Ward-officer? Q. Not quite twelve months - the prisoner was not present when I gave my deposition; he was locked up - the deposition was read over to him afterwards; I did not mention to the clerk that the prisoner said he had picked it up - I was merely asked if I took him in charge, and had the property; I only found one handkerchief on him - I swear there were fifty people in pursuit of him: Shackell was the only one that spoke about him - the prisoner had a rag, which might serve for a handkerchief; I gave it him back again - he was dressed in a sort of brown frock coat; Shackell did not point out any body who had

lost his handkerchief - nobody came to the office with him to my knowledge; nobody was examined but him.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my handkerchief; I bought and paid for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-27

452. JAMES FOWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 saddle, value 15s. , the goods of Barnett Hart .

BARNETT HART. I live in Crispin-street, Spitalfields, and am a general dealer . I occupy stables at Lyon's, and gave this saddle into his care on Sunday, the 6th of February, between one and two o'clock, and on the Tuesday evening following I was told it was gone; I saw it again on the Friday following, in Long-lane, in the possession of Duffield, exposed for sale at his door - I have no mark on it; it was an old one - I had had it a long time, and have not a doubt of its being mine; it is worth about 15s.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I dare say if you saw it some distance off, and did not know your own was taken, you would not like to swear to it? A. No, because things are often alike, but I have not the least doubt of it - I knew it when I saw it; the prisoner had come on the Monday before, and I gave him a job to repair my harness, which he brought home, and I paid him- he mended it in the stable this saddle was stolen from; I have no servant.

COURT. Q. He mended some harness for you in the stable the saddle was kept in? A. Yes - that was the day before Lyon told me it was gone.

LEWIS LYON . I live in George-court, Stoney-lane, Houndsditch . I let a stable to Hart - I saw his saddle there on Sunday, the 6th; I had it in my possession the day before it was lost - it was in the hay-loft over the stable, where I keep property; I saw it safe at ten o'clock on Sunday night, and missed it on the Tuesday - I went and told Hart: I saw it on the Friday following hanging at Duffield's door - he deals in harness, and is a respectable tradesman; the prisoner had come to the stables on Monday, and said he had a job to do for Hart; I told him to take it home - he said he would rather do it in the stable, and I left him there, telling him to bring the key to me; he kept the key three or four hours, and next morning I found the saddle gone - I went day after day to Kent and Essex-yard. where he occupied premises, and never could see him, till one Friday he came there in liquor, and was apprehended; he had taken all his things away - he had a workshop there; I do not know where he slept.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you been drinking yourself to night? A. No - never mind whether I have, or not. I am as sober as you are.

Q. On your oath, have you been at any public-house drinking this evening? A. No - I certainly have had half a pint of porter, that is all; I may have had two - I will not swear at all about it; I have not sworn I was not in a public-house - I have had some porter at a house over the way: I do not know the sign.

JOHN ELDER DUFFIELD . I live in Long-lane, Smithfield. On Monday, the 7th of February, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner sold me, this saddle - I gave him 13s. for it; I am quite certain of him - he brought it to me; I knew him before; I asked how he became possessed of it - he said he had been at work for a person in Kent and Essex-yard, Whitechapel, who was not able to pay him in money, and gave him the saddle to sell for his trouble; he did not mention the person's name - I hung it at my door, and Lyon claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew him before? A. Yes, or I would not have bought it - I knew he was a harness-maker; I have known him two or three months - he has called to see if I had a job for him; I did not see him after he sold me the saddle.

JAMES FOX . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner in Kent and Essex-yard, on Friday, the 9th - he might have been drinking, but was not in an advanced state of intoxication; I told him I took him on suspicion of stealing a saddle, and after a few minutes he said, "I admit I sold it" - I said, "Well, then, it becomes a question how you became possessed of it;" he made no answer to me - I took him to Lambeth-street; they sent him to the Mansion-house - what he said at Lambeth-street was not taken down; Mr. Wyatt asked what he had got to say - he said, "I bought this saddle of a Jew boy in Petticoat-lane - I am in the habit of buying there;" he told me next morning he thought he should know the boy again, and afterwards he said, "No. I shan't know him, I am sure; for I never saw him before."

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear half-whitted? A. He looked curious - he might be a little deranged, but I do not think he was intoxicated; he had a wild stare about him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I confess I sold the saddle, but I bought it of a Jew lad in the way of trade - as to being drunk, I was never tipsy to my knowledge in my life; it is a great falsity - I am a harness-maker; I buy things. and make them up for sale - there are hundreds of mechanies in Petticoat-lane who do so.

J. E. DUFFIELD . From a conversation I had with him at Guildhall, I thought he was not in his right senses; that was our general opinion, from a conversation which lasted an hour and a half.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-28

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

453. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Hyde ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Ten Days , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310217-29

454. JONAS MARRIOTT was indicted for stealing. on the 14th of January , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Henry Southon ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-30

455. WILLIAM GREEN and THOMAS WILKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 shoulder of mutton. value 2s. 6d., and 2 loins of

mutton, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Edward Phillips , their master ; to whih they pleaded

GUILTY .

The prisoners received good characters from the prosecutor, who said he would take them into his service again.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310217-31

456. JOHN BRYANT was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 29 lbs. of tobacco, value 3l. 10s., and 4 lbs. of snuff, value 14s., the goods of Samuel Fish and another .

EDWARD DUTTON . I live in St. John-street, Clerkenwell, and am in the service of Samuel Fish and William Collins . On the evening of the 3rd of February I was near Whitehall with a cart, loaded with tobacco and snuff - I perceived a sudden jerk of the cart, and saw the prisoner take a bag, containing 20 lbs. of tobacco and 4 lbs. of snuff; he ran, and I pursued him - he was taken in my sight; I saw him throw down the bag.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES WYATT . I live in Regent-street. I was near the Pay-office on the 3rd of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening - I heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned my head, and saw the prisoner coming towards me with a parcel on his shoulder; I tried to stop him, but he got past me - I saw him attempt to throw the parcel over the rails by the Admiralty; he was apprehended in my sight, within about five yards; I took the bag, and delivered it to the earman.

DAVID PHILLIPS . I was going towards Charing-cross - I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running; I stopped him, and Dutton came up - he said, "That is the man, I will take my oath;" the prisoner made no reply.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-32

457. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 10 lbs. weight of tobacco, value 35s., the goods of Samuel Fish and another .

JOHN WELBOURN. I am a servant to Lord Carrington, who lives in Whitehall-yard. On the evening of the 3rd of February I was in the neighbourhood of Charing-cross , about half-past six o'clock, or twenty minutes before seven; I saw Dutton with a cart; I heard him say, "Halloo, what are you about there?" I looked towards the tail of the cart, and saw the last prisoner - Dutton went in pursuit of him; I stood near the tail of the cart, and saw this prisoner come from the Horse Guards, take hold of the head of the horse, and lead him to the Whitehall-yard side - when he got there he got into the cart, and took out a bag, which contained 20 lbs. of tobacco; I pursued, and took him with it - I delivered him to the Police-officer.

GEORGE ADCOCK . I am a Police-officer. I received this bag from Mr. Welbourn - it is in the same state as I received it.

EDWARD DUTTON . I left my cart, and went in pursuit of Bryant - this bag was in the cart; it has 10lbs. of tobacco in it, and is the property of Samuel Fish and William Collins .

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-33

458. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 25 gowns, value 30l.; 1 gold watch, value 10l.; 1 chain, value 10s.; 1 diamond key-brooch, value 15l.; 1 Maltese-cross, value 4l.; 5 ladies' hats, value 6l.; 10 shifts, value 7l.; 15 pairs of stockings, value 6l.; 4 Prayer-books, value 30s.; 1 pair of sheets, value 2l.; 6 shirts, value 6l.; 1 trunk and cover, value 5l.; 1 liquor-case, value 50s., and 1 sovereign , the property of Edward Cohen .

EDWARD COHEN . On the 24th of August I returned to town from Margate - I had nine packages of luggage; I arrived at St. Katharine-wharf about four o'clock in the afternoon - I had a porter named Cooper, who was there; I have a counting-house in Great St. Helens - the luggage was taken there by the prisoner William Smith , and Cooper; in consequence of what my porter said to me at Great St. Helens, I employed Cooper and the prisoner to take the luggage again to Islington - there were between twenty and thirty gowns, worth perhaps 20l. or 30l.; there was a gold watch and chain, worth 10 guineas; a Maltese-cross, worth 4l. 4s.; five or six hats, shifts, stockings a liquor-case and other things, and I sovereign - they were packed at Margate - they never arrived at Islington; I never saw the prisoner again till last Friday - Cooper has been with me ever since; part of the property has been found - when I saw the prisoner he was at the Police-office, Lambeth-street.

THOMAS COOPER . I attended at St. Katharine-dock on the 24th of August, by order of my master, Mr. Cohen - the luggage was taken to St. Helens, and there delivered to me and the prisoner to go to Islington - there were nine packages, and they were put into a truck at the St. Katharine-dock; taken first to Great St. Helens, and then I went with the prisoner as far as Liverpool-street ; I then left him, as I was engaged another way - the prisoner had asked me for a job, and I recommended him to Mr. Cohen; on leaving the prisoner near the Roman Catholic chapel, I directed him which way to go to Islington - he would have to go a good mile and a quarter after I left him; I did not see the prisoner again till Friday last, at the Police-office - I have looked for him a good many times, but could not find him before.

WILLIAM STANNARD . I am a Policeman, No. 12 G. division. In consequence of information I took the prisoner, in company with his wife, in Chiswell-street, on the 12th of February - they made some resistance; I told him I took him for a robbery - a man named Sheen resisted my taking them very much; I took them to Bunhill-row.

GEORGE AVERY . I am a Policeman, No. 175 G. division. I took the prisoner from the last witness; I had him at a public-house near the office, before he was before the Magistrate - I made him no threat or promise; I asked what he was charged with - he asked if I could recollect a robbery in Whitechapel; I said No - he then asked if I recollected a gentleman named Cohen entrusting some property to a porter; I said I did - he said, "Then I am the man, and Sheen (using a horrid expression) assisted me in doing it, and had part of the property;" I cautioned him that his own words might convict him - he said he did not care a d-n, for that, for there were witnesses enough to transport him; but he was sure they could not make it a robbery, but a breach of trust.

Prisoner. I was in liquor. Witness. No, he was quite sober.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. In consequence of some information I went to a house in Cheshire-street, Waterloo-town, which I was informed the prisoner had taken, but I did not see him there - I saw his wife there; she said she was his wife, and I saw her in the lock-up place at our office last Friday; she brought the prisoner something to eat and drink - I found a variety of articles of wearing-apparel, with the marks cut out; they were produced here at last September Session, and sworn to by the prosecutor, when I apprehended two men for receiving part of the property; I found on that woman a key, and went to another house, where I found part of the property - she was admitted an evidence on the last trial.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-34

459. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of George Horatio Howell , from his person .

GEORGE HORATIO HOWELL . I was in Princes-street, Hanover-square , on the 14th of January. about six o'clock in the evening; William Ballard asked me if I had lost a handkerchief; I felt, and said I had - it was produced, and was the one I had had in my pocket.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I was in Regent-street, and saw the prisoner in company with two others - I watched them, and saw Mr. Howell cross Regent-street, and go to Princes-street; they followed him; when he had got half way down the street, two of them kept back, and I was forced to keep back, and go on the other side - when I got half way down, I saw the prisoner running; he was holding his jacket against his person, as if there was something under it - he opened it; I saw something drop: I stooped, and picked up this handkerchief at his feet - I took him, and went and asked the prosecutor if he had lost any thing - he claimed it.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310217-35

460. WILLIAM GEE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 jacket, value 6s. , the goods of George Hall .

RICHARD VALLER . I am an apprentice to Messrs. Powell, coachmakers, Old Bond-street . On Tuesday, the 25th of January, I was in the harness cupboard, and hid myself there for the purpose of watching while the men were gone to dinner - between one and two o'clock I heard some persons come up a ladder which was there; they were coming up towards the harness cupboard; there was a hole in the cupboard; and when the person came up, I saw it was the prisoner - he called out loud "Mr. Hall! Mr. Hall!" twice, and said, "I suppose you are gone to dinner, "three times - Mr. George Hall had a bench there, and he had left his jacket, apron, and cap on it; the prisoner went up towards the bench, and looked on the other side the loft - he took up the jacket, rolled it up, and went down the ladder half way; I came out rather too early - he saw me, and directly up with the jacket, and threw it down; then he asked me for Mr. Hall, and ran down stairs; I hallooed out "Mr. Gee, is it you? I know you;" I went down, and he was gone - he looked up after I hallooed out his name, but did not say any thing - I had seen him several times with Mr. Hall in the factory.

GEORGE HALL . I was employed in the factory of Messrs. Powell, in Bond-street. On the 25th of January I received information from Valler - I know the cupboard; there was a hole bored in the side, to enable any one to see a person coming up the ladder, or in the loft - on the 26th of January I saw the prisoner in High-street; I followed him, and gave him in charge - he denied the charge, and said I was mistaken, I could not mean him; he said he had been over the water - the apprentice was with me; the prisoner had been an acquaintance of mine for five years, but not for the last two - he was in the habit of visiting me at the factory while I knew him; this is the jacket - it is mine; Valler gave it me.

FRANCIS JENNINGS . I took the prisoner; he denied the charge.

RICHARD VALLER . I took up the jacket just by the ladder, on the floor; he threw it up again.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not the person.

JURY to RICHARD VALLER. Q. How long before had you seen the prisoner? A. About twelve months; I have seen him two or three times with Mr. Hall for perhaps an hour - I have no doubt of his being the man; I saw him last about twelve months ago.

GEORGE HALL . He has called on me within twelve or thirteen months once.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-36

461. MARIA COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 bonnet, value 5s., and 1 shawl, value 2s. , the goods of Hannah Turfery .

HANNAH TURFERY . I live in Robert-street, Hampstead-road , and am single - the prisoner was in my service. On Friday night, the 14th of January, I sent her out for my beer for supper, about ten o'clock, and as she did not return I went into the kitchen, and then to her room - I found all her clothes were gone; I missed a shawl and a bonnet of mine, which I had not given to her at any time - I have seen them since, and know them to be mine; she came to my house again on the Monday - I did not use any threat or promise to her; I went up, and said, "Come in, Maria?" she said, "No; you accuse me of robbing you;" I said, "Yes, you have robbed me;" she at first refused, but at last came in, and said she had taken the shawl by mistake, and she understood I gave her the bonnet - I had never led her to believe that she might have it; I had lent it her to go out, but I intended to use it again - I do not think she had worn it to go out for the beer; she was not in the habit of wearing either bonnet or shawl at that time, and she had a good shawl of her own - I gave her into custody.

JAMES BYRNE . I lodge with Mrs. Turfery. I went to No. 17, King-street, Drury-lane, on the Monday after the 14th of January - the prisoner came up stairs; I asked her how she came to rob her mistress - she said her mistress gave her the bonnet, and the shawl she had taken by mistake; I advised her to go to her mistress, which she did - she gave me up the shawl, and had another shawl on at the time.

WILLIAM MULLINS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she had lived with the prosecutrix previously, and was prevailed on to return; that, on the day in question, she had gone to see her child, who she found dangerously ill, she returned to fetch her things, without her mistress' knowledge, fearing she would not let her return to her child, and had taken these articles by mistake.

HANNAH TURFERY . While she lived with me she behaved very well - I advanced her money to get some things; I afterwards saw her in the street with this child in her arms, and agreed to take her again - the child was not ill; she went out that day to get relief from the parish - she should have come home at three o'clock, but did not till eight; I then sent her for the supper beer, and she did not return.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-37

462. JAMES CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 1 pack of cards, value 2s., the goods of David Carvalho , his master .

SHILOH COHEN . I live with Mr. David Carvalho , a bookseller , in Chiswell-street - the prisoner was an errand-boy in his employ. On Saturday, the 27th of January, he left the shop with a pair of boots in his hand - as he was leaving I saw something white in them: I followed and told him to come back, his mistress wanted to speak to him - he said, "I am not coming back any more;" he had said to me, in the middle of the day, that unless he was allowed an hour for his dinner he would leave - I asked if I should tell his master; he said No, if he wished to leave he would ask himself - he was walking, or rather running, and I took hold of his arm; he said, "You need not take hold of me, I have nothing in the boots;" I think I must have collared him - I had not had any quarrel with him; I did not detain him in the shop, as I was not certain what he had - he was at the door before I saw him, and when I came round the counter to go to the door he was walking away very quickly; when he said he had nothing in the boots he attempted to shake me off, and then I said, "You must come back, you are my prisoner:" when he came back I told my master I thought he had something in the boots, but I could not see what it was while I had hold of him, he struggled so violently it was with difficulty I held him; I saw my master take a pack of cards from his boots - he gave his address at No. 21, Westmoreland-place; this was about ten o'clock in the evening, the time he would be going home - I believe the officer has the pack of cards, but I did not examine them at that time; my master took them out of the boots, and put them on the counter by the side of the boots - the prisoner was taken to the station-house; he said, "They are a set of scoundrels, and the scoundrels put them into the boots."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe he was in a very great passion? A. No, he was not, nor was he quite cool; he appeared agitated; a person might have said what he did without being angry - I had not seen him cleaning his shoes in the course of the day, but I saw a pair of boots behind the counter, where we keep blacking-brushes, and other things; I judged they were the prisoner's - they were not mine, nor my master's, but my master's brother had died some time before; they were cleaned - I did not see any boots there after he was taken: I have no doubt that they were the same I took from the prisoner; the prisoner was before me at the door when I saw something in the boots; the counter was between us- I do not know why I did not call to him; he was near enough to hear me - I hesitated whether I should call my master or not; I did not call him back and say he had forgotten his shoes, but I had told him not to forget to take them - I had seen them in the middle of the day, and I asked him, "Are these your boots?" he said Yes - I said, "We are going to clean the place up to-morrow - if they are yours don't forget to take them home," and he said, "If I do you remind me of it;" I did not send him out to see what time it was - upon my oath I do not remember sending him out; I might have sent him, but I do not believe I did - I was in the habit of sending him to know the time, that I might know when to send him home- I did send him out that night, and he brought me word that it was half-past seven o'clock - we have no clock in the house; it was a custom to send him out to know the time - we do so always; my master's watch very seldom goes right - he sets it right but it will not do - the prisoner took up the boots in such a way that I could not fail to see the cards; I told all this story to the Magistrates - they let the prisoner go on bail; I have heard so since the prisoner was taken up - he and I had not had any altercation about my watching him, or pretending to watch him for two or three days; I did watch him, but he did not complain of it, and for what I know he did not know it; the prisoner signed a book before he went away, and he asked for his wages - I do not remember sending him out after he signed the book; Mrs. Carvalho was in the shop when he signed the book - I did not see him take the boots up at night; I was about two yards from him - he carried them openly in his hand; I think he could not have concealed this pack of cards. because my mistress was behind him, and I think she would have seen them - he could have put one boot on the other; my master was in the parlour with Dr. Ramsbottom - I did tell my mistress of it when I went out; he had crossed the street in a slanting direction when I took him - he was twenty or thirty yards off, near Mr. Caslon's letter-foundry; I swear he said he had nothing in the boots - he did not say "Nothing but my boots."

COURT. Q. How was he carrying the boots and cards? A. Openly in his hand - I did not see him take them up; he took them from under some paper, I judge, by the direction he took them in - his mistress was close behind him- the place he took them from then was at some distance from the ledge, where I had seen them in the middle of the day; he had taken his wages, and signed the book, as he did every Saturday night - there were no cards kept near the place where the boots were; I do not know who put the boots where I saw him take them from - I am sure I did not: when he was signing the book I said, "James, don't forget your boots," and he then took them - he could not have put them at that time in the place where I saw him take them from - I do not know who put them there; I did not know where they were when I said.

"Don't forget them;" the back of the counter had been cleared in the middle of the day, and I believe he did it; I went out directly Sabbath was up, and did not return till half-past nine o'clock - Yes, I forgot, I returned at seven to get some things I had ordered before - I did not send the prisoner to any particular place to know the time.

DAVID CARVALHO . I saw the prisoner about nine o'clock in the evening on Saturday, the 22nd of January; our Sabbath ceased at dusk, about six o'clock or half-past six, when we open shop - I think Cohen went out about six; I think he had not returned before nine - I do not recollect his returning; we have no clock in our shop- I do not recollect seeing the prisoner's boots that day -I had seen them a few days before; I was not aware, but by chance, that he had any boots in the house, and I asked Cohen if they were his - he said No, and I told him to ask the prisoner if they were his; I really forget whether my wife went out that evening, but she was at home about nine, because I was in the parlour when Dr. Ramsbottom came - I saw the prisoner about nine o'clock that night, stooping behind the counter - when I spoke to him he raised himself up, and put a pack of cards on the counter; I thought they had fallen down, and he had taken them up to put on the shelf - I saw the prisoner brought back, I think, after ten o'clock that evening; I had not sent him out to know what time it was that evening - I have a watch, and it goes, but it might not go right; I have sent him out repeatedly to see what time it was in the evening, to know if it was time to shut up; I do not know whether my watch went that evening - I was without a key for some time, but I think I had one at that time; my watch not going was probably owing to its not being wound up - when the prisoner was brought back he had a pair of half-boots in his hand, and a pack of cards in one of them; I presume he has pockets to his coat - it was stated at the Police-office that the officers had the greatest difficulty to get their hands into his pocket; there was a pack of cards in one of the boots, but I have no idea how they got there- one boot was not over the other - I saw something white in the boot, put my hand in, and found this pack of cards; I looked at them, and found my private-mark on them - my wife is not here; the prisoner had only been with me a fortnight - I had a good character with him, but when I applied again, for them to put it to writing, they refused; I should judge his friends are not respectable.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you keep the whole of the house? A. I do, Sir - it wants now twenty-five minutes to two o'clock, by my watch, which is a quarter of an hour too slow.

COURT. Q. What did the prisoner say? A. He said,"I did not put the cards into the boots," and he said he would tell me all about it, alluding to some other things.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Cohen present then? A. No, I had sent him for an officer - I told the Magistrate that, and, to the best of my belief, I told about the prisoner's placing a pack of cards on the counter; the Magistrate did say, when I was telling that to the clerk, "I did not understand your saying any thing about that," and I said,"Sir, you interrupted me;" I had not sent the prisoner out that night to see what time it was, nor did any one else to my knowledge - I did not see Cohen return; I had sent him out after my Sabbath, which ended about six o'clock, on business - he had not told me the business he had done, because I was engaged: I had asked Cohen about a pair of boots, and told him to ask the prisoner if they were his - there is no other man living in the house; the last one who lived there was a Mr. Emmings, which is about six months ago; no other man has lived there but a Mr. Evans for two years, and no other man but those two have lived there for three years - my brother might have lived there two years ago, but he is dead now; he did not die in my house - his wearing apparel was not in my house; I did not take his old boots and shoes into my house - Cohen did not tell me he thought these might be my brother's old boots; he said they were not his, and I desired him to ask the prisoner if they were his - I had sent Cohen out to take home an order; Cohen slept under the counter, near where I saw the boots - Cohen told me the prisoner's boots were left in front of the shop, and that he took them up in his presence; he pointed out the spot, about a yard and a half from the door, on the floor in the passage, through which the prisoner would go, rather on one side - any one going into the shop would of course have passed them; I do not recollect that he showed me the place at the moment, but he did afterwards - there were some reams of paper, and books on the floor near the place; I heard that the prisoner said the scoundrels themselves had put the cards there, but I was not there then -I cannot say that the prisoner ever threatened me with an action for a conspiracy, but he said, "Well, as this is the case, I will see if one swears different to the other, and if they do, I will have them taken;" the prisoner did not say to me he would have me indicted for a conspiracy, nor did he in my presence - I did not say that if it were not for his insolence I would not prosecute him; I said if any respectable person would come forward, and say he was respectable, I would not prosecute - I heard from Cohen, that he had sent the prisoner out that night after the shop was shut, to see what time it was.

HENRY BERESFORD . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner with these cards and shoes - he said he knew nothing about it; they were a set of scoundrels - that the cards had been put into his boots, and he did not know how they came there; I found some difficulty in getting at his pockets that night, but the next day I found they were the same as usual.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent - I did not put the cards into the boots.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-38

463. GEORGE PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 3 pecks of wheat, value 5s., the goods of William Mellish , Esq ., his master .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD WATKINS . I am a horse-patrol on the Enfield-station. In consequence of information I waited for the prisoner's coming from his work at Mr. Mellish's, at Bush-hill park, on the 17th of January, between five and six o'clock in the evening; when he had got three hundred yards from the barn, I stopped him - I took off his hat, and found in it a bag of wheat undreased; Mead was with me- we took him to the watch-house, and then went to search his house, where we found about three pecks more of

wheat, some wheat ground, and a small mill with some wheat in it.

JOHN MEAD . I was with the patrol, and saw what he has stated.

CHARLES ROBERT BRADY . I am bailiff to William Mellish , Esq., of Bush-hill park - the prisoner was one of his thresher s, and there had been another thresher, named Dearman, there. The prisoner had been threshing wheat on the 17th of January - we never permit the servants to take any corn when they are working for us; this wheat is in the state it is immediately after threshing - I have brought a sample of the wheat the prisoner had been threshing that day, and, I believe, this found on him, and at his house to be the same as this - here is about the same quantity of seed and soil with one as with the other; I have no doubt they are part of the same bulk.

Prisoner's Defence. I never carried a bag - this little bag was laid as a trap to catch me; there was a man caught with some wheat before, and then they suspected me - I have often gone up the lane with these officers before, and they did not stop me; I have threshed near three years for Mr. Brady, and this is done merely out of spite because I would not send Dearman money - this was a trap, and if the officers did not do it they have let somebody else do it, that is the real truth; if I was to be transported for fourteen years to-morrow - I have put up hundreds of quarters of corn for Mr. Brady, and it has been measured out to half a bushel.

CHARLES ROBERT BRADY . I know nothing of this bag - it is such an one as labouring men are in the habit of carrying their victuals in - I know of no small parcel of corn being put into any bag; the prisoner had been three years in the employ, and I never heard any thing against him.

COURT to RICHARD WATKINS . Q. Had you previously seen any portion of corn in a bag? A. No, I had not -I was on my horse.

GUILTY . Aged 50. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18310217-39

464. MARY HARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 muff, value 27s.; 1 tippet, value 27s.; 1 pocket-book, value 3d., and 1 frock, value 1s., the goods of Evan Thomas , her master .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

EVAN THOMAS . I am a linen-draper , and live in Ratcliff-highway ; the prisoner had been in my service about a month, as nursery-maid , and left me a little before Christmas. In consequence of missing something, I went to No. 8, Buross-street; I saw the prisoner and her mother in the room - I said I wanted to search the room, and the mother said there was no objection; I told the prisoner we had missed several things since she left, and we wished to have the thing cleared up - I said, "First of all I want Mrs. Thomas' muff and tippet;" she said, "Mrs. Thomas made me a present of it;" the officer began to search, and we found them in a cupboard in a corner of the room - he took them out; I said, "They are my property, I give you the prisoner in charge;" we looked further and found a pocket-book, which had been given to my little boy, who is now at school - I then said, "Now, Mary, I want three long frocks, and some table-cloths;" she said she knew nothing about them - I afterwards saw one of the frocks at Mr. Latter's, a pawnbroker, in the Commercial-road; I was before the Magistrate, and heard the prisoner say they were given her - I did not go to the Portugal hotel.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How long have you known this girl? A. She first came to us between seven and eight years ago, and was then with us a short time - she was first employed as a needle-woman, and then for a month as nursery-maid; she had not been a servant more than a fortnight; I cannot say when these articles were taken, but I should think while she was in the nursery - she was at work before at 6d. a day, but I should think these things were not taken then, as she had not access to the room - I saw a lady, named Von Bibra , at the Police-office; the prisoner was taken on Friday, the 7th of January - she had not been at my house on the Tuesday previous; she had quitted me in the Christmas week.

COURT. Q. When you went into the room, were the parties sitting there? A. No, they met us on the top of the stairs - the cupboard was open; there were hats and other articles of wearing apparel there.

MR. LEE. Q. Did you charge her with stealing a pair of shoes? A. Yes - I had a short time before discharged a shopwoman for burning a piece of lace.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am a Police-serjeant - I went to the house in Buross-street; the prisoner said Mrs. Thomas gave her the muff and tippet - these are them; I found them in the cupboard; I found this pocket-book, and the prisoner's mother gave me two duplicates - I heard Mr. Thomas ask about frocks, and she said she knew nothing about them.

SEARLE WHITTON . I am a shopman to Mr. Latter, a pawnbroker; I have a child's long frock, pawned by the prisoner, with other things, on the 1st of January - I have no doubt of her person - I had seen her before.

CATHERINE THOMAS . This is my muff and tippet; I believe I gave nine guineas for the two - I never gave them to the prisoner; this frock is my own work - I never gave that to the prisoner; I was never in the Portugal hotel, and never heard it named till the prisoner named it - I had an infant about three years and a half old at Christmas last.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hire the prisoner? A. Yes, at her own solicitation, as a needle-woman, at 6d. a day; I then engaged her as nursery-maid, at the same wages my former nursery maid had - I did not give her any clothes then, but when she was first recommended to me, seven or eight years ago, I gave her some of the child's clothes - I had not given her any thing the last time, nor did she ask for any - there was nothing given her by me.

COURT. Q. You gave her some child's clothes seven years ago? A. Yes, and some for herself, but this frock was not then made - I made this either two or four years ago, and I had given nothing to the prisoner in the interval.

MR. LEE. Q. On the Tuesday, before she was taken, did she not come to your house? A. She never came to my house to my knowledge - I never saw her with a muff and tippet similar to this; I know them by them hooks and eyes, which I sewed on, and by a little piece which had been torn out, and I mended.

Witness for the Defence.

ELIZABETH VON BIBRA . I am the widow of an officer in the army - I do not recollect the day on which the prisoner was taken up, but I recollect going with her on a Tuesday to the prosecutor's house, at the corner of Cannon-street, in the Commercial-road; I saw her go into the house with a muff and tippet on - I cannot say what colour they were, as it was night - I know she had a tippet of mine, which I brought from Van Dieman 's Land; I have known her about seven months - her conduct has been every thing that was correct.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. In the first place, does the prisoner's brother live in your house? A. No, Sir, and never did - several of her brothers have visited there; I never swore to the colour of the muff and tippet the prisoner had on that Tuesday - I said I saw her with a muff and tippet; perhaps I did swear I saw her go into the house with this muff and tippet, when it was put to me.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 24,

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-40

465. WILLIAM DAVISON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 6 lbs. weight of pork, value 2s. , the goods of James Butler and Richard Butler .

CHARLES WALTER . I am a Police-serjeant. On Saturday evening, the 15th of January, I was at Shadwell, between ten and eleven o'clock at night; I saw the prisoner walking to and for opposite the prosecutor's shop, and seeing he had the House of Correction dress on, I crossed over, and stood at the end of Union-street to watch him - I saw him go to a board in front of the prosecutor's window, who keeps a pork-shop, and take something from the board - he ran off, and I pursued; I saw him throw half a leg of pork away - I laid hold of him at the same moment with one hand, and took the pork with the other - he had flung it in the mud; he said. in going to the watch-house, that he was very sorry he was grabbed for such a trifling thing, but he was in want - in fact he was starving; he appeared so, and the Magistrate ordered him some refreshment directly after the examination.

RICHARD BUTLER . I am in partner ship with James Butler - the prisoner was brought to our shop, and the pork was produced; I believe it was our property.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 1 Day .

Reference Number: t18310217-41

466. SARAH HEIFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 tea-spoon, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Gurney , her master .

THOMAS GURNEY . I live in Harrow-road - the prisoner was my servant of all work . On the 12th of January I went into the country; I returned the day following, and found her in custody - I have seen this spoon produced by Mr. Swaine; it is my property - I had never given her authority to pawn any articles; she would not have to provide for the house while I was gone, as my wife and another servant were at home - she had been thirteen days in my house; I had a character with her - her last mistress was dead.

HENRY SWAINE . I am shopman to Mr. Martin, a pawnbroker, in St. Alban's-place, Edgware-road. I have a silver tea-spoon, pawned at his shop on the 13th of January, by the prisoner, for 1s. - I had not seen her before, but I am positive she is the person; the officer came and brought the duplicate.

The prisoner delivered in a written statement, representing that she intended to redeem the spoon on the following day.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-42

467. JOHN HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 12 handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the goods of Henry Simpson .

CHARLES WINSTEAD . I am shopman to Mr. Henry Simpson , hosier and glover , of New-street, Covent-garden . On the 6th of February I saw the prisoner at his shop - he had asked for something, but I was not then in the shop; he had a hat on, and my mistress desired him to take it off, which he did, and there were several pieces of handkerchiefs in it; I do not know how many - the hat and handkerchiefs were put into a room behind the shop, and he was detained; my master returned in about half an hour, and I was sent for an officer - the officer took the handkerchiefs; they were silk - there were some handkerchiefs exposed in the window which he was near.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. When he was asked to take off his hat, he took it off immediately? A. Yes; he was going away, but I stopped him - the handkerchiefs had my master's mark on them.

SARAH ANN SIMPSON . I am the wife of Henry Simpson . On the 5th of February I saw the prisoner at his shop, about half-past eleven o'clock; he asked for stout white cotton stockings - he stood about half a yard from the window; there were two or three silk handkerchiefs hanging before the window - he took off his hat two or three times, under the pretence of blowing his nose; he kept me in conversation some time, and then said he would have some black worsted stockings - I turned to get them; I showed them to him, and said they were 1s. 4d. a pair - he then said he would have ribbed ones; the boy then came in, and picked up a silk handkerchief from the other side of the counter, close behind where he stood - I then walked round and told him to take off his hat; he said "Oh yes," and took it off - there were some silk handkerchiefs in it; I showed them to him, and afterwards took them and the hat into a little back room till Mr. Simpson came home - he was given in charge; there were twelve handkerchiefs, which Mr. Simpson valued at 20s.; he asked the prisoner whose hat it was, and he said it was his.

Cross-examined. Q. You were with the prisoner during the whole time? A. Yes; I had to ascend some steps, and to turn to get the stockings - the handkerchief that was found was not in front of him; it was behind him - I did not observe that he had a cold.

COURT. Q. Was your back turned to him while you got the stockings down? A. Yes; and then I suspected him, and would not get him any more.

PATRICK RONAYNE . I took the prisoner, and have the twelve handkerchiefs, which Mr. Simpson gave me; I found only 2d. on the prisoner.

SARAH ANN SIMPSON . These are ours; one of them has our mark on it, and the others are similar to what we have at home.

Cross-examined. Q. You had a great many other

handkerchiefs about the shop? A. Not at that spot; we did not take stock - we take off the marks of handkerchiefs when we sell them; we might have omitted it - but it is our practice; we had no other handkerchiefs at that spot but cotton ones - he took the silk ones, and left the cotton.

COURT. Q. When you looked at the window did you miss a quantity which had been there? A. Yes; I did not sell any handkerchiefs to the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-43

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

468. WILLIAM MUCKLESTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 1 dead pig, value 4s. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

SAMUEL ABORN SOMERS . I am the son of Samuel Somers , a butcher , in Skinner-street, Somer's-town . On the 22nd of January, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, we had two roasting pigs on a basket near the door - I heard a shout that a man had stolen a pig; I ran, and saw my father's servant and a Policeman in pursuit of the prisoner - he was stopped; I came up and gave him into custody - I had not seen him near the house, but I saw him at a distance; I would not swear to him.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Where did you see the pig afterwards? A. In the shop, covered with mud - it had been ready for sale.

EDWARD HAWKINS . I am in the service of Mr. Somers. I was in the shop, and saw a man taking a pig off the pavement which had been on some baskets - he walked away; I asked a person in the shop if it was sold, who said No; I pursued the man - it was the prisoner; when I came up to him he had dropped it, but I did not see him - the pig was taken up, and carried back to the shop; I asked the prisoner what he had - he said he had no pig, and had stolen none.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him take it off the pavement? A. No; he took it as if from the pavement - it is a pretty good thoroughfare, and the pig was outside the shop on a basket - I did not see it on the pavement.

JAMES POSFORD . I was standing opposite the shop, and heard a cry of stop thief! I saw the prisoner running from the shop - I ran after him, and as I was pursing him I ran over a pig; I followed the prisoner from three to five minutes, but he was never out of my sight - I never saw him with the pig; a young man came up, who offered me 5s. to say he did not run.

Cross-examined. Q. What had be upon him? A. A piece of beef, tied up in a handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-44

469. MARY McKENSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 shirt, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Burgess .

HAYLER NATHANIEL SCRIVENER . I live with Mr. Joseph Burgess , a pawnbroker , in Gray's Inn-lane-road . On the 8th of February, about half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the shop with two children - I had not known her before; she took down a shirt hanging by the side of the shop, and gave it to her eldest daughter, who was outside the door, and gave it to the other girl - I ran after them, and took the youngest, and gave her to a boy; I then ran after the prisoner, who had gone in a different direction, and got about two hundred yards - I brought her back; she said she had never seen the shirt, and never took it down - I can swear she took it down, and it was inside the shop.

Prisoner. Q. Was I ever in the shop, (say it upon your conscience,) till I went to inquire what the child had done? A. Yes, you were.

Prisoner. Q. No; I never was; there was a woman in the shop pawning something, and she said she would declare she saw the child pick something up outside the door, and you said you did not know how the child got it, but you supposed my eldest daughter gave it her. Witness. No, I did not - the little girl had got about twelve yards from the shop when I took her.

COURT. Q. Have you always said you saw her take it? A. Yes; I could see her through the glass door - she did not ask me the price, but took it down, and instantly gave it to her eldest daughter, who gave it to the other; I was attending to other customers - the prisoner just came in; the girls did not - when I came back with the little girl, the mother and the other girl had run off in different directions; I passed them at the door when I went after the little girl.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written.) On Tuesday, the 8th of this month, I was walking towards home, and met with my eldest daughter; she, pointing, said, "Mother, there goes the man that made my sister's shoes." I accosted him, and spoke to him about them; my daughter (the youngest) walked in; at this moment a mob was gathered round the child, as we stood looking towards the pawnbroker's; my eldest daughter said,"Mother, a man is taking my sister into the pawnbrokers;" when I attempted to go in, the prosecutor turned round, and asked me if the little girl belonged to me; I answered Yes, and enquired what she had done; he said, "You know what she has done;" I replied that I did not; the prosecutor said she had stolen a shirt, and had said that either her mother or sister had given it to her. Prisoner declares that she never saw the shirt until it was upon the pawnbroker's counter.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18310217-45

470. WILLIAM FARRANT TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 6 pieces of paper, with pictures of birds thereon, value 30s. , the goods of Moss Haim Botibol .

Mr. CLARKBOX declined the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-46

471. JOHN McCARTEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 coats, value 40s. , the goods of Thomas Lane .

THOMAS LANE . I am a milkman . Two coats hung on two different nails in my shop on the 16th of January - I missed them a little after six o'clock; I went out, and saw a man walking fast - I told my boy to follow him, which he did, towards Lincoln's Inn - the prisoner was taken to the station, where I found my coats.

THOMAS LANE , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son. My father told me of these coats being gone - I went and saw the prisoner.

MICHAEL KELLY . I was on duty, and heard an alarm of Stop thief! in Chancery-lane; I saw the prisoner running from another man - a gentleman here had the coats in his arms.

PETER WHITE . I was in the street, and saw the pri

soner pass; this boy gave the alarm - I pursued the prisoner, and came up with him near the Registry-office; he had the coats on his arm - I took hold of him; he dropped the coats, swung me round, and got away - he ran on; he had made a resistance, and I told the Policeman to take him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310217-47

472. ALEXANDER MILLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Robert Jeffery , from his person .

ROBERT JEFFERY . Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of January, I was in Regent-street , and distinctly felt a pull at my pocket, by which my handkerchief was extracted - I turned, and saw it in the possession of the prisoner; he dropped it - I took it up, and gave him to an officer; there was another boy near me, who I think was an accomplice, but I cannot be positive.

THOMAS HOBBS . I watched the prisoner and another following a gentleman all the way up Regent-street - they then left him, and followed this gentleman down Regent-street - I followed them, and saw them give a tug at his pocket; he took no notice of that, but went into a shop - they waited till he came out, and followed him again till a cart passed by on that side, and then they made the draw so that I could not see the handkerchief come from the pocket, but I had seen them make two different attempts at the pocket - I took the prisoner, and the other ran away, but I knew him, and where he lived; I went and took him about three quarters of an hour afterwards, but the bill against him was thrown out.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-48

473. MICHAEL QUINLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 watch, value 15s.; 1 seal, value 3d., and 1 key, value 1d. , the goods of Louis Le Plastrier .

MARY ANN MARSHALL . I am servant to Mr. Louis Le Plastrier, a watchmaker , who lives in High-street, Shadwell . On the 11th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I was in the kitchen, and heard a noise in the shop - I knew my master was not there, so I went up, and saw the prisoner behind the counter, in the act of taking a watch from the window; I screamed out - he jumped over the counter, and ran out into the street; I am certain he was the person - he was brought back almost immediately.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you certain of his being the person? A. Yes - a very few moments elapsed before he was brought back; I should not think it was five minutes - I think I can swear it was not; I was much alarmed - that caused me to scream out, and threw me off my guard, but I am certain he is the man; I noticed his person and dress.

LOUIS LE PLASTRIER. I was dressing, up stairs, and heard the witness scream out - I ran down, and saw the sash of the window had been opened; I ran out into the street, and passed eight or nine houses, where I saw one of the witnesses struggling with the prisoner; I went up, collared him, and brought him back - the watch had been thrown away in the cart road; I saw it brought back all over mud - it was mine, and had been in my window.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see it in the cart road? A. Yes.

THOMAS BARTON . I am a lighterman. I was near the shop, and heard a scream; I was going to a public-house with a young man, and the prisoner ran against me and knocked me backwards into the road; I got up, and ran after him - he threw the watch away before I seized him; I struggled with him - an apprentice-boy belonging to a collier took up the watch; the prisoner gave me two or three blows on the side of my mouth, and said, "Why don't you let me go? we shall not catch the man who has got the watch."

Cross-examined. Q. There was a loud scream from the house? A. Yes, and when the prosecutor came up I was struggling with the prisoner - I am quite sure he threw away the watch; I saw the watch in his right hand - it had a black ribbon: I think it was silver - my friend who was with me belonged to a sailing-brig, and he went down to Rochester two days ago.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-49

474. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 cloak, value 15s. , the goods of John Dent .

RICHARD WILDING . I am shopman to Mr. John Dent, a linen-draper . On the 26th of January, about half-past eight o'clock. I saw the prisoner going out of the shop with this cloak, which had been about two yards within the door - I did not see him come in; I followed him about two hundred yards, and stopped him with it; I said he must come back with me - he said he could not; I took him back to the shop - this is the cloak; it is my master's.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-50

475. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of Robert McCallan .

ROBERT McCALLAN. I am a tailor , and live in King-street, Covent-garden . This coat was not taken out of my house, but I heard my sister cry out Thief! I ran out of my back parlour, and the passage door being open, I went into the street, and turned to the right - I saw the prisoner running down New-street; I cried Stop thief! and the Policeman brought him back - the coat was one I use for the gig; it was never out of the passage.

ANN McCALLAN . I am the prosecutor's sister. About one o'clock on the day in question I was coming down stairs, and saw the prisoner in the passage - he took the coat from the peg, put it on his arm, and was walking out- I took hold of his arm; he said, "I beg your pardon;" and gave me the coat - he was quite a stranger.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you seen it in the passage? A. Yes, about ten minutes before; I had not heard any knocking - the door was open; a cart was at the door, and some persons were taking goods from the house - the prisoner did not ask me for a person named Bennett; the carter was standing by the cart, which was directly before the door - there were two chairs in the passage - there was no clothes on either of them; he did not take the coat up and place it on the chair - I saw him take it from the peg, and said, "What are you doing?"

he said, "I beg your pardon;" he did not make any resistance; I cried Stop thief!

PATRICK RONAYNE . I am a Police-constable. I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running; I pursued, took him, and brought him back - he had got three or four hundred yards from the house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the 11th of February I returned from Bristol - a journeyman tailor had lodged with my mother, and she said she was directed to go to the White Horse, Carnaby-market, to find him; I went there and was informed that the likeliest place to find him was at the prosecutor's - I went there, and saw two chairs near the passage door, with a coat or a cloak on them; I did not touch them, but I saw something at the end of the passage; I took it up, thinking it fell from a chair, and replaced it - this lady came down, and screamed out; I was alarmed, and ran out.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-51

476. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for that she, on the 13th of January , feloniously and maliciously by force, did take away Caroline Lewis , a child under the age of ten years, to wit, about the age of five years , with intent to steal 1 bonnet, value 1s., and 1 pair of boots, value 3s., the goods of James Lewis , upon and about the person of the said child ; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be by fraud, instead of force.

JAMES LEWIS . I am a warehouseman , and live in Glass-house-street , I have a child named Caroline - she is five years old; she had been at school, but not through this winter - on the 13th of January, when this happened, I was out.

MARY LEWIS . I am the mother of the child. On the 13th of January I was at home, and she and her sister went down stairs, between five and six o'clock - they then had bonnets on, which were nearly new; they were playing for some time in the passage, when I missed them by not hearing them talk - I thought they were gone into the shop, but soon after the eldest, who is about eight years old, came up crying, and saying the woman had taken Caroline away; I missed her for about two hours, and was very much distressed - I then received a message, and went to Lancaster-court, New Bond-street, where I found the child, but she had neither bonnet nor boots on; I know nothing of the prisoner - I never saw her till she was apprehended on suspicion of taking the child; I have found the bonnet, at Mrs. Lomax's shop, in Monmouth-street.

JOHN JAMES GANNELL . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty on the 17th of January, and saw the prisoner for a long time loitering about my beat - I watched her, and saw her go into a marine-store shop and offer a jacket for sale; the woman said to her, "You are the woman who offered me a bonnet for sale;" she said, "Yes, and I sold it for 4d." - I then went into the shop, and asked the woman about it; I then pursued the prisoner - she ran, dropped a small mug, and broke it; I took her, and got this bonnet from Mrs. Lomax.

ANN LOMAX . The prisoner came to my shop. I believe, on the 13th of January, and asked if I would buy two bonnets - I asked what she wanted, she said 6d. for one, and 4d. for the other; I said I would give her 6d. for one, but I could only give her 3d. for this one - she left them, and afterwards she came with another, which she sold me for 4d.; the Policeman came, and asked if I had bought such a bonnet - I said I had, and took it down from the nail; the prisoner is the woman I bought it of - she had a very black eye when she came to me, and so she had at the office.

MYRA GARRETT . The prisoner came to my shop, at No. 12, Lancaster-court, on the 17th of January, between six and seven o'clock, and bought a farthing's worth of cakes - I was called to the office soon afterwards, and saw a little girl stripped of her bonnet and boots; my house is not more than five yards from where the bonnet was sold - I saw a child in about twenty minutes afterwards.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - (See 4th Day, New Court.)

Reference Number: t18310217-52

477. JOSEPH WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 watch, value 10s. , the goods of Richard Hawkins .

RICHARD HAWKINS . I am a farmer , and live at Hillingdon . I lost a watch from a bed-room in my house, on the 15th of January - I sent to a watchmaker at Uxbridge, and he described the prisoner, as having sold the watch to him, but he is not here; the prisoner had worked for me for four months.

HENRY WEBB . I am in the service of the prosecutor. On the 14th of January, he gave me his watch, that I might know the time to get up in the morning - I got up, and went out at a quarter-past five o'clock, leaving the watch in the room; the prisoner did not sleep in that house - he slept in Uxbridge.

RICHARD HAWKINS re-examined. On the 15th of January I saw him, and took him to Mr. Attwell's, the watchmaker's - I did not make him any promise, or threaten him, but he said he had sold the watch there for 10s., and he would come and work it out; he had worked for me four months this last time, but he had been with me before - he has two children; his wife is dead.

Prisoner's Defence. I never went near the house - a man gave me the watch to sell, and said he would give me 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-53

478. ROBERT ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 4 trusses of hay, value 8s.; 3 trusses of straw, value 2s. 6d.; 8 bushels of corn, value 3s.; 3 bushels of chaff, value 1s., and 1 pad bridle, and 2 hames, value 15s., the goods of Isaac Jerrom , his master ; and GEORGE HALL and THOMAS NORMAN were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen ,

JAMES MITCHELL . I am foreman to Mr. Isaac Jerrom ; he is a stable-keeper , and lives in Upper Montague-street - Andrews was in his employ to take out provisions to different gentlemen's horses ; he had been employed on and off for about two years; he went out very often with the cart - I was induced to watch him, and on the 14th of January I saw him go out of the yard with a load of four trusses of hay, a quarter of corn, two trusses of straw; and about three bushels of chaff; he should have taken about the quantity of hay which he had, but only one sack of corn - I watched him, and he

went to the Green Man, at Paddington ; he drove the cart into the yard - I followed him, and he began to unload the hay and give it to Norman; he had only taken off one truss, when I went up to him, and asked him who authorized him to bring hay and straw there - Norman was by at the time, and heard what I said; Andrews answered, "It is mine" - I asked him what he meant by"mine;" he made no answer - I then asked Norman who was master of the yard, and he pointed to Hall, who was cleaning a horse at the time; I went up to Hall, and asked him how long he had been in the habit of receiving hay and straw, and he said he did not know any thing about it - I then ordered Norman to put the hay on the cart again, which he did, and I ordered Andrews to take it back; he took it part of the way back, and then got out of the cart and said he owned he had done wrong, and begged me to forgive him - I said he and his master must settle that, and I told him to get into the cart and go home, which he did; when his master came home he gave him in charge; we went up to the same stables again at night, and found this gig harness in the stable - Hall was not there at the time; he and Norman had been given in charge - I do not know whose stable it was, but the harness, pad-bridle, and hames were hanging up; it is called Hall's-yard, but different persons have stables there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many persons have stables there? A. I should think six or seven - the truss of hay did not fall off.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Norman was merely in the yard? A. Yes.

CHARLES WADE . I am a boot and shoemaker. I bought the harness of Norman about the beginning of December, and it was in the stable in which my horse stands at Mr. Hall's, at the Green Man; I pay him for my horse standing there.

WILLIAM EDWARD WRIGHT . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in Crawford-street - I was called by Mr. Jerrom; I went to Upper Montague-street, and took Andrews - he said to his master, "I hope you will not press the charge against me?" and as he was going to the office he said to him, "O G-d, don't have me locked up, for the sake of my wife and child;" I then went to the stable and found the harness.

ISAAC JERROM . This harness is mine - what the officer has stated is correct; I only know that Andrews begged forgiveness, and said he was very sorry for what he had done - I said, "I did not expect this of you;" he said, "I hope you will forgive me for the sake of my wife and family;" I paid him from 20s. to 25s. a week, and was very sorry to prosecute him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you not prosecuted him? A. Yes, but I think I have done what I ought to have done.

Andrews put in a written Defence, stating the cart had given a sudden jerk on going over a kenuel, and the hay had fallen off, but that he had no dishonest intention in calling at the yard.

ANDREWS - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

HALL - NOT GUILTY .

NORMAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-54

479. SUSAN CRONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 cloak, value 5s. , the goods of Joshua Rigby Mortimer .

JOSHUA RIGBY MORTIMER . I am a pawnbroker , and live in St. Alban's-place, Edgware-road . On the 4th of January I lost a cloak, which had been hanging three or four feet inside my shop, and the door was closed - the prisoner had been a customer of mine, but I did not see her at the time I lost the cloak - I mentioned it to the Police.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I apprehended the prisoner in consequence of hearing of a watch being lost - I found fourteen duplicates on her, and one was for a Bath cloak, which she said she had bought in Cranbourn-alley three years and a half ago - this is the cloak; the prosecutor identified it as his.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had she not a cloak on her back when you took her? A. I cannot tell whether it was a cloak or a shawl - she did not refer to a cloak on her back; she referred to a cloak I had the duplicate of, and which she had on her back at the time she was here to give her son a character - I do not know that there is any one here who saw her then.

ROBERT SWEETING . I live with Mr. Tomlinson, a pawnbroker. I have a cloak, pawned by the prisoner on the 5th of January.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you not known her exceedingly well for some time? A. No; I never saw her in the shop before - I had not been there above a month; it is in the name of Susan Croney - she pawned this with me, and gave me this name and direction, which I believe is all right - I lent her 4s. on it; I do not think it is worth more as a pledge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of pawning at that shop, and they have known me for many years; I have six children, and endeavour, with my own industry and my husband's, to bring them up in an honest manner.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-55

480. SUSAN CRONEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 watch, value 2l. , the goods of John Robinson .

JOHN ROBINSON . I live with Mr. Phillips, a baker, in Chapel-street, Edgware-road . I lost my watch from his bakehouse on the 21st of January - I afterwards found it at the pawnbroker's; the prisoner might have been at our shop, but I had not seen her; I was out serving my customers, and on my return the watch was gone.

JOHN NEEDES . I am shopman to Mr. Tomlinson, a pawnbroker. I have a watch, pawned, towards the close of the day, on the 21st of January, by a woman in the name of Susan Coney - I believe the prisoner to be the woman, but cannot be positive.

Cross-examined by HEATON. Q. It was dusk? A. Yes, and I do not know that I had seen her before - I might have mistaken the name for Croney; she had a child in her arms.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I am the Policeman. I took the prisoner on the 22nd of January - I found some duplicates on her, but none of this watch; I told her I

wanted her for a watch, and she wanted me to let her go - she said she had received the watch from a person; she lives at No. 10, Stingo-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal it, nor know any thing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-56

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

481. HANNAH LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , at St. Luke, Chelsea, 1 table-cloth, value 5s.; 1 sheet, value 3s.; 2 caps, value 4s.; 2 pieces of lace, value 7s.; 2 knives, value 1s., and 2 forks, value 1s., the goods of Sarah Horn , widow ; and 1 gown, value 10s.; 1 cap, value 5s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 1 piece of lace, value 3s.; 2 books, value 3s. 6d.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 6s., and 1 piece of ribbon, value 6d., the goods of Mary Horn , spinster ; and 1 piece of lace, value 5s., the goods of Sarah Horn , spinster ; and 1 pair of scissors, value 1s.; 1 pen-knife, value 18d., and 1 piece of lace, value 3s., the goods of Catherine Throsby , spinster ; 1 piece of lace, value 3s., the goods of Eliza Porter , spinster ; 2 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 2 caps, value 5s., and 1 shawl, value 7s., the goods of Mary Ann Downes ; 1 piece of net, value 18d., and 1 pair of scissors, value 1s., the goods of Elizabeth Mash ; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 brush, value 2s. 6d., and 1 purse, value 1s., the goods of Jane Mash ; 2 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; and 1 pair of scissors, value 18d., the goods of Emily Massey ; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Chistiana Goldie ; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s., the goods of Emma Mortimer ; 1 book, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Martha Mattleton ; 1 work-box, value 2s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Mary McNicoll , in the dwelling-house of the said Sarah Horn , widow, and others .

MARY HORN . I live at No. 41, Cadogan-place, Chelsea , and have three partners - we pay the rent and taxes jointly; the prisoner was three or four months in our service. On Sunday, the 16th of January, she was about to leave - we had given her warning; before she went I insisted on searching her person - my servant s were present; I searched her person first, and took off her person, myself, a green silk dress of my own - I also found on her person a calico sheet and a table-cloth, fastened round her waist, and hanging by a string; she was dressed to go away - the sheet and table-cloth hung down under her gown, suspended by a string; I found some lace pinned into the sleeve of her gown - there was also a stocking of mine in her sleeve; I found some more lace on her person, and some handkerchiefs dropped from her on unpinning her gown - I then searched her trunk, and found all the things specified in the indictment; we have not found the table-spoons, which we lost the first day she came into the house - we have lost property of every description; blankets, and a variety of other things - a quantity of household linen, in value altogether about 20l.; it was chiefly linen - we keep a school for young ladies.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What was her wages when she first came to you? A. Twelve guineas; she once said the place was too hard for her, but at the same time agreed to stay, on her wages being advanced to fourteen guineas - one trunk was opened in her presence; the other was opened in her absence, but that was not locked, and had nothing of ours in it - all our things were found in her presence.

Q. After the officer was with you and her trunk had been searched, was she not permitted to go away? A. Yes; she came afterwards, on Monday, to demand her wages, and was given into custody on the Tuesday morning - she had slept out on the Sunday night; we examined the house in the meantime, and found we had lost every description of property - I did not have her taken on Monday; she might have gone where she chose on Sunday night and Monday - she came back on Tuesday morning, of her own accord.

Q. Did you not, after finding these things, give her back some of her clothes, and tender her 1l. as wages? A. We gave her her clothes, detaining our own property, and she would not go, trusting to our mercy, as she said; we called in the officer, and he took her - she confessed herself guilty over and over again; she demanded her wages both days; I offered her 1l. to send her down to her friends; we said we would pay her fare down, and I offered to see her off - she said her father and mother lived at Chester, and afterwards confessed that she had none, and said she was from Ireland immediately after.

Q. Did she not refuse her fare to go to Chester? A. No, we never gave her the opportunity of refusing - she was taking back property which was ours, and putting it into her trunk; she claimed property which it will be proved was not hers - she claimed property which had our own name on it, and I showed it to her; she had property in her trunk belonging to a lady present, amounting to 13l., "Mercy! mercy!" was all she cried out all the time.

Q. As you found property which you claimed, why did you not give her into custody on Sunday? A. The property consists of numerous articles, but is not valuable - we intended to extend mercy to her, but afterwards we found we had lost property from every part of the house; the articles in the indictment were found in her trunk and on her person - I suppose they are worth upwards of 5l.; we know none of her connexions, and have not found all the property - she claimed all the property at first, thought it was marked with our names; we did not take the trouble to state all the case fully to the officer when we gave her into custody.

Q. Have you not said she confessed stealing the property? A. Yes; she begged for mercy - Williams was present; she claimed the property in the presence of the officer, those in the trunk; she could not claim those found on her person.

MARY WILLIAMS . I am in the prosecutrix's service - I was present on Sunday when mistress found on the prisoner's person a sheet, a table-cloth, several yards of lace, several pocket-handkerchiefs, a stocking, and several yards of ribbon - nothing else to my knowledge; I remember mistress searching the trunk - the prisoner was present; I cannot state the articles found - there were a great many which mistress claimed - the prisoner did not claim those articles in my hearing, nor those found on her person.

JURY. Q. Have you enumerated all the articles found on her person? A. All that I can remember - some small articles dropped from her, which I cannot relate; a silk dress was found on her person.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she wearing the silk dress? A. It was next to her petticoat - she had it on; this was on Sunday afternoon; the officer was called in at the time her trunks were searched, but after the things were found on her person - I did not see her trunks opened - I have related all that passed between the prisoner and mistress, as near as I can state; she did not say any thing more in my presence at any time - she never asked for mercy or forgiveness in my presence; I am quite sure of that - the officer was called in on the Sunday; she came again of her own accord on Monday and Tuesday - I have been twelve months in the prosecutrix's service; the prisoner did not ask for her wages in my presence, nor did mistress offer to pay her fare to Chester in my presence - I was at our house when she was given in charge, but not present; she did not claim her wages in my hearing - I have heard from mistress that she did; I was present when one box was opened - she did not claim the things found in it in my presence; she was in the room with mistress for about an hour before she was given in charge.

JOHN BENTON . I am an officer. I was fetched to Mrs. Horn's house on the Sunday; I found the prisoner, Miss Horn, and the servant girl - they informed me they had taken a silk gown, a sheet, and a table-cloth from her person - Miss Horn asked her to unlock her box, which she did, and I saw some books, a cap, some stockings, and a variety of articles taken out - the prisoner did not claim them in my presence; she said she had done wrong in taking them, and said, "Miss Horn, what property belongs to you, take;" and when she went out of doors she said she had taken the property Miss Horn found on her, but never took the spoons - Miss Horn had complained of losing two spoons.

Q. Why did not Miss Horn give her in charge? A. She said she should consider more about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you called in on Sunday by Miss Horn? A. By the servant girl, at Miss Horn's desire, at seven o'clock at night - I saw the box opened; the prisoner claimed part of the things, and Miss Horn claimed some; I thought I had no business to take her unless Miss Horn gave her in charge - she did not ask for her wages while I was there; it was not me who took her on the Tuesday - only one box was opened in my presence; she said some of the property belonged to them, and what belonged to them to take - Williams was present, but I cannot say whether she left the room during the transaction or not - the prisoner went away; Miss Horn said she should consider whether she should give her in charge or not.

MARY HORN . This is my sheet - there is no mark on it; we missed it the night before from a basket of clean linen, and it corresponds with the fellow; I missed a table-cloth of this description from the basket, but have no mark on it - this silk dress is mine; I know it by its make, and the colour; I have worn it frequently - I know this lace by the pattern, breadth, and length; it tallies exactly with the quantity missed - this stocking is marked with my name; I showed that to her - this ribbon and this lace cap were found on her person, and are mine; I am sure the articles found in the trunk are mine- several of them are marked at full length; the names are picked out of many of them, but the traces are left; here is a child's work-box, which was full of playthings belonging to Mary McNichol - this book was in the trunk; here is the name of Nettleton, one of my scholars, on it, in my own hand-writing - I am quite sure all the articles stated in the indictment are the property of ourselves and the scholars.

Cross-examined. Q. Which trunk were the two pairs of stockings found in? A. The locked trunk - none of the property was found in the open trunk; the locked trunk was opened within ten minutes after the other -I have heard my servant's evidence; I persist in saying the prisoner said, "Guilty! guilty! Mercy! mercy!" Williams left the room at times - I am not aware that I said she was present when the prisoner asked for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked Miss Horn for my wages in the presence of Miss Horn; she said she could not give them to me unless I acknowledged the robbery - if I acknowledged the robbery she would give me them; the Policeman said, "You cannot keep back her wages."

JOHN BENTON . I never heard keep Miss Horn say she would give her her wages if she acknowledged the robbery; I told Miss Horn the girl could demand her wages- she did not demand them in my presence.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then how came you to mention the wages? A. Miss Horn called me into another room to ask about the wages.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-57

Before Mr. Baron Bailey.

482. CHARLES HAYNES was indicted for >stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 horses, price 20l., and 1 mare, price 10l. , the property of William Elson .

The same evidence was given on this charge as against the prisoner on an indictment for receiving the said horses, knowing them to have been stolen, of which he was convicted; but upon this indictment proved an alibi.

NOT GUILTY .(See Fifth Day New Court.)

Reference Number: t18310217-58

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Bolland.

483. WILLIAM KING and MATTHEW FRAYNE were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Edgcomb , on the 6th of February , and stealing 1 watch, value 10s.; 10 spoons, value 24s.; 2 rows of beads, value 2s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 1 toothpick, value 1s.; 1 sovereign-balance, value 1s.; 1 pair of sugartongs, value 2s.; 1 pencil-case, value 2s.; 2 seals, value 4d.; 1 key, value 1d.; 3 coats, value 27s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 hat, value 3s.; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 2 waistcoats, value 8s., his property .

HENRY EDGCOMB . I live at No. 2, Conduit-place, Paddington . On the 6th of February I left my house at a quarter-past six o'clock at night - I left the doors locked, and went next door, where some of my family live, and about a quarter-past seven I sent my youngest sister into the house, at the back door, for some linen - I did not see her go in, but in about four minutes she came back with

out the linen, and alarmed me; I immediately went to the house - I entered at the back door, which was shut, but not fastened; I had not locked it, but only shut it with a latch - I am not sure it was latched - I found it ajar when I came back; on entering I saw three men coming down stairs - I was alone, and had no light; they had a lighted candle - I immediately collared the first who came down stairs, which was Frayne; I was immediately struck on the left arm with some instrument by the prisoner King, who was the other man - the blow fell rather heavy; I cannot say what instrument it was - it appeared in the shape of a hammer; King had the light, and threw it down - I have no knowledge of the other man - on receiving the blow I let go of Frayne; I took hold of him again, and then received another blow from King with the same instrument, on the right arm - I let go of Frayne again, but finding myself getting weak I called for help - they had then come down to the passage; this all happened in the passage - the front door was shut; I was between the back door and them - they could not get to it without passing me; my mother came, and she was immediately pushed against the side of the wall, and by the push and her fright she fell - Frayne then laid hold of me, pressed me against the front door, and the other man laid hold of my mother; King immediately unbolted and unlocked the front door, and they all three ran away - I examined the ground floor room, found the drawers had been taken out, and missed all the articles stated in the indictment (enumerating them) - nothing was taken from the other rooms; the clothes were taken off the bed, and the things pulled about - the bed-room is on the ground floor; I saw my property at the office, in possession of Thompson.

Frayne. Q. Did you see me come down stairs? A. Yes, you were the first who came down.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I am a Policeman. The prisoner King passed me on Sunday night, the 6th of February, near half-past six o'clock - I was standing at the corner of Earl-street and Salisbury-street, Lissongrove, about half a mile from Edgcomb's - he passed me two or three yards; I called him back knowing him, and asked what he had got about him (his appearance did not indicate that he had any thing) - he said it was all right; I put my hand into his trousers pocket, and felt a small crow-bar, called a jemmy, which I have here - I took him to the station; he unbuttoned his clothes as he went along- I suspected it was to slip out of his coat, and told him to button them up; he said, "I am not going to run away;" at the station-house I searched him further, and in the same pocket as the crow-bar I found six tea-spoons, two table-spoons, a silver watch, two salt-spoons, a pencilcase, two rows of beads, a sovereign-balance, two seals, and a watch-key: these were all in that pocket, and on his back I found this black coat, a black waistcoat, and the front of an under waistcoat - he had them on over his own clothes; he had two coats and two waistcoats, besides his own - I found a black and a yellow silk handkerchief in his hat; the black one had a pad in it - I also found a toothpick, and a shirt pin; I asked how he came in possession of the property; he said he had picked it up - I took a hat from him, which belonged to Edgcomb - on the following morning I took him some tea down to his cell; he asked if I had found an owner - I told him I had, and I was sorry to find it was so bad against him; when he got to Marylebone-office, a constable was there with two hats, which had been left behind in Edgcomb's house - he is not here; I received a hat from that constable, and knowing King wore such a hat I presented it to him, and said,"King, take your hat, and give me that you have on," which he did - he gave me Edgcomb's hat, and took the one I presented to him; I do not know whether he heard the conversation between me and the constable about the hat - after I took King I went to different stations to find out where the robbery had been committed; I was directed to the prosecutor's, and in consequence of information I went to the Sun, in Lisson-street, about half-past ten o'clock on the night of the robbery, and saw Frayne with two others sitting in one of the boxes; I did not then suspect him, and did not take him - he was afterwards taken by Webster.

King. The hat he gave me did not belong to me - he took the other off my head, and said it belonged to another man. Witness. I gave him his hat, and he gave me the other in return.

HENRY EDGCOMB re-examined. When I came to examine the house I found they had entered it at the front, for I locked the front door myself when I went away, but did not bolt it, the bolts being inside; I went out at the back door - I am positive I did not bolt the front door, but when I came into the house I found it was bolted; I saw King make towards the door, but whether he unbolted it I cannot say; I had gone to it, and found it bolted - then they seized me, and I saw them remove the bolts top and bottom; I heard the bolts drawn back - all these things are mine, and what I lost that night; the scuffle continued about ten minutes - I am positive the prisoners are two of the men; my mother did not bring a light when she came- it was on Sunday.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I apprehended Frayne at the Sun, Lisson-street.

Frayne. He said he had a charge against me for house-breaking on Sunday evening; I said, I knew nothing about it; that I was in bed - I got up and washed myself at eight o'clock, and came out. Witness. He said he was not well, and that he went to bed at eight, not that he got up at eight - he denied the robbery.

JANE PRATT . I am the wife of William Pratt , and live next door to Edgcomb. On the Sunday night on which the house was robbed, I was standing at my door, at four o'clock in the afternoon, and saw King pass with two others, who I do not know.

King's Defence. All I have to say is, this young man at my side is innocent - he is taken for the wrong man. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

JURY to MR. EDGCOMB. Q. In what part of the passage did you first see Frayne? A. He had one foot on the stairs, and the other on the floor; King threw the candle down, but it did not go out.

PRUDENCE FRAYNE . I live at No. 19, Queen-street, Edgware-road - I am Frayne's mother - he lives with me, I understood at the office that this robbery was committed last Sunday night week, the 6th; my son dined with me and my husband that Sunday, between one and two o'clock- he went out after dinner, returned again a little after

three, and complained of a pain in his back - he went to lay down on the bed, in the same room as we were sitting in and had dined in; I was not out that afternoon - I called him about seven o'clock, to have some tea; he said he would not get up then - he got up about eight o'clock, had his tea, washed himself, put on his shirt and handkerchief, and went out.

Q. How do you know the time of night? A. I have a clock in the room; I said, "Don't go out to-night, for it rains very fast;" he was not out of my sight from three o'clock till after eight - I have no witnesses, for nobody came into the room while he was laying down; my husband does not live at home - he is a servant; he was at home that day - the bed is in the same room; I was reading, and did not go to sleep myself.

PHILIP WEBSTER . This woman lives rather better than a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's - it is nearer half a mile; she gave evidence at the office.

KING - GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

FRAYNE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-59

484. JOHN PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 74lbs. of pork, value 33s. , the goods of George Bowles ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-60

485. SAMUEL CALVERT was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 28th of January , of a certain evil-disposed person, 4 crape handkerchiefs, value 28s.; 2 other handkerchiefs, value 7s., and 8 shawls, value 8l., the goods of Jeremiah Greatorex and another, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS HALL . I am a linen-draper, and live at No. 103, Bishopsgate-street-without. On the 29th of January the prisoner called at my house, and offered me six China crape and imitation handkerchiefs, six Thibet shawls, and two silk shawls - I purchased four China crape handkerchiefs, all the shawls, but not the two imitation crape handkerchiefs; I first purchased the china crape handkerchiefs, for which he asked 3s. 6d. each, observing that he had never sold any of that description under 4s. before -I offered 3s. for them, which he took; he offered me the eight shawls for 4l. 16s. - I offered 4l. 10s., and he agreed to take 4l. 13s., which I gave him; after offering him 4l. 10s. for them, I said one description of the shawls were to be bought at Bradley and Greatorex's, the prosecutors, for 14s. - I named that to ascertain the price, as they were of various values; they were the lowest in value - when I made that observation, he put the shawls into a brown paper parcel, which he had taken them from, put them into a blue bag, and put them under his arm; I said I would take them, and called to my cash-keeper to hand over 4l. 13s. to him for them - he did so, and they were given up to me; I had observed a mark on one of the handkerchiefs, but said nothing to him about that - I went to the prosecutor's within half an hour of the transaction, and he saw the goods at my house that day (Saturday); on the Monday, I accompanied the prosecutor to the prisoner's house, in Fore-street, Cripplegate - I went in first; I went into the shop, and spoke to him about some cord, which he had mentioned to me on the Saturday: I then asked if he had any more job goods - I do not know whether I said goods or job goods; he said No, but he should have some on Friday or Saturday - I then went to the door, called the prosecutor, and desired Calvert to walk into the front parlour, for we wanted an explanation about the goods I had bought of him; that I had brought the prosecutor, whose goods they proved to be, and I expected I e would tell him who he had them from, as they had been stolen from the prosecutors' warehouse - he said it was impossible for him to tell, but if we would allow him to go to my house to look at the goods, he might be able to say something about them; the prosecutor then produced from his pocket part of the goods he had sold me - he then said it was impossible for him to tell; I said the lapse of time from Saturday to Monday was so short, I thought his memory could not be so bad as to forget about the goods - the prosecutor again asked him if he would satisfy him where he got them from, as he did not wish to give him any trouble - his only desire was to come at the thief, as he had a number of persons in his employ, and wished to discover who it was - the prisoner said it was impossible for him to tell any thing about them; the prosecutor then went to the door, and called in Hawkins, the officer, who asked him if he had any other goods - he said Yes, he might have, or something to that effect: Hawkins then began to search - I was in the parlour when Calvert took down a bag similar to the one which he had brought the goods to me in, (previous to this he had objected to Hawkins searching without producing some authority - he showed him something, and he objected no further); Hawkins laid hold of a bag in the room, and then the prisoner took down this blue bag, and the two imitation crape handkerchiefs, which I had not purchased, were in it - the prosecutor claimed them; Hawkins then went up stairs with the prosecutor, and after they came down, the prosecutor said, "Mr. Calvert, I don't want to trouble you, will you explain who you had them from?" he said it was impossible for him to tell, he could not tell any thing about it, and the prosecutor gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you know him before that Saturday? A. Yes - I think since August or September last; he is a housekeeper, and was represented to me as a respectable man, by the person who introduced him - I am a haberdasher, and live about three quarters of a mile from him; I had made two purchases of haberdashery of him - he has several times offered me goods; I have been thirteen years in business - it is very common for manufacturers to go about to sell goods.

Q. If a man had bought goods, and had to meet an acceptance, he would sell them for what he could get? A. Yes, and very frequently at a very low price, but from the condition these were in, they appeared to have come fresh from a parcel, not exposed at all - the only thing I suspected was seeing four shawls of one pattern, which few retail dealers would purchase, as they like a variety, and there were two of each of the other pattern; a man might dispose of any thing to raise money - I had purchased each of the patterns of the prosecutor, and two of them certainly within a month; they were in the daily practice of selling such things - I bought them at their warehouse; I knew where the prisoner came from - dur

ing our conversation about the shawls, he said he could do twine for me better than hawkers, and begged me to come and deal with him; job goods are goods under the regular price - it is not uncommon to find such goods; the prosecutor had a shawl and all the crape handkerchiefs in his pocket - one crape handkerchief was all he could swear to; the ticket with his private-mark was left on that - the prisoner could have had the goods in his hand if he chose, and I think he did; there is a glass-door between the parlour and shop, and a curtain to it - it was after Hawkins insisted on searching, that the prisoner took down the bag: the two handkerchiefs I had refused to buy were in it - I believe the other bag was empty; I do not know what was found up stairs.

JURY. Q. You say the lowest value of the shawls was 14s.? A. The Thibet shawls were 14s. - there were two silk ones, which I value at the lowest at 12s. 6d. each.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You are now describing the warehouse price? A. Yes; people sometimes sell 12 1/2 per cent. lower, and sometimes more - part of them were summer stock.

JURY. Q. Were any of the Thibet shawls worth more than 12s. 6d.? A. Yes - the eight shawls were worth about 8l.; I paid 4l. 13s. for them - the handkerchiefs 29s., I paid 12s. - the warehouse price is 29s.

JEREMIAH GREATOREX . I have one partner - we are warehousemen . On the Saturday Mr. Hall showed me some shawls and handkerchiefs, which are here; I went to the prisoner's house on Monday, showed him the property, and asked where he got it; he said he could not tell, he did not know - I told him it was very strange, (as he dealt in cord and twine,) these goods being so different to his general business, that he could not tell me where he bought them: he said he could not - I said, "Don't you know whether it was of man, woman, or child - have you no idea;" he said he knew nothing about it - he would not tell me; when the officer came in he asked if he had any more such property - he said he did not know, but when the officer was going to search, he produced two handkerchiefs from a blue bag, saying they were all he had of that description; I said, "Let me know where you have purchased these goods, and I shall be satisfied - I keep a large quantity of young men, among whom I must suspect some as thieves, till we find out the individual, and it is of great consequence for me to know who the persons are who have been robbing me:" he said he did not know, he could not tell who he bought them of, and I called in the officer; there is one crape handkerchief has my privatemark on it, and which I can identify - the others I have not the least doubt of, but will not swear to them, because my marks have been taken off.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were the patterns very uncommon? A. Some of them - I have them here; I do not mean to say these are the only patterns of this description in the trade - other houses may have them - I do not recollect who I bought the uncommon pattern of; I now recollect it was Buchanan - the clerk who manages that department has just reminded me of it, and I recollect it now perfectly, and can swear it from my own recollection; it is a particular style of shawl, not made by any other individual - here it is; I have no private-mark on it; we have not had many of that description - we have fifteen or sixteen shopmen, who sell, but only four in the shawl department; one of them is here, who manages that whole concern - his name is Martin; the others have liberty to sell, but he superintends - he marks the goods, and sees all that comes in and goes out; in times of difficulty persons go about to sell to dealers - we never buy in that way; there was twine, cord, and mats in the prisoner's shop.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Martin has the control of the shawl department? A. He has: we never send any goods about to be sold - no respectable house would; Buchanan lives at Glasgow.

JURY. Q. Do you know whether any of your people ever sold a shawl of that pattern exactly? A. Yes, many,

EDWARD MARTIN . I am in the prosecutors' employ, and have the control of the shawl department. I may have sold these shawls - I cannot undertake to say they have not been sold, but one of the handkerchiefs certainly has not been sold by me - we took stock in December; it was there then - we leave the mark on when we sell them; it is not entered in the book as sold.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-61

486. JOSEPH CRITCHETT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 4 sovereigns, four 5l. Bank notes, and I order, for payment of and value 26l., the property of James Deacon and others, his masters .

JOHN GRIFFIN . I live in Lyon-street, New Kent-road , and am clerk to James Deacon and another, tarpauling-manufacturer s - the prisoner has been in their employ about three years and a half. On Thursday morning, the 30th of December, about ten minutes to ten o'clock, I put into his hands to take to the bankers', Messrs. Glyn and Co., Lombard-street, a cheque for 26l., four 5l. notes, and four sovereigns, to pay in on masters' account - he never returned, but absconded; I did not see him again til the 20th of January, when he was in custody.

CHRISTOPHER HUTCHINS . I am a constable of Gosport. I apprehended the prisoner at Gosport, in consequence of information, and told him the charge - he said he had spent the money, and left the cheque at his lodgings, in South-street, Gosport; I went there by his direction, and found this 26l. cheque - I knew he lodged there.

JOHN GRIFFIN . This is the cheque I gave the prisoner - I had written Glyn's name across it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you count the money over to him? A. No.

MR. JAMES DEACON . I live at Cripplegate. The prisoner has been some time in my service - I never gave him authority to apply the money to his own use; I was not present when it was delivered to him - my clerk had authority to send him to the bankers.'

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any other Christain name? A. No - I have two partners; he has lived with us at two different periods.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310217-62

487. THOMAS FLEMING was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 13 handkerchiefs, value 2l. , the goods of George Rumble .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be 12 yards of silk.

GEORGE RUMBLE . I live in Fleet-street , and am a mercer and tailor . I was not present when this happened - on being informed of it I missed twenty handkerchiefs, which I had seen a few hours before.

JOSEPH SLACK . I am shopman to Mr. Rumble. On the 7th of February, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, alone, and asked for a box of cotton, which came to 3d.; these handkerchiefs were on the counter, close to him - he tendered me a shilling; I had no halfpence in the till, and sent my brother out to get change; while he was gone a man came in to look at a cravat which was in the window - I turned my head to get it, and on turning again saw the prisoner running out of the shop door, without waiting for his change; I looked on the counter, and missed the twenty silk handkerchiefs - they were in four pieces; my brother came in immediately, and I sent him after him - he brought him back within five minutes; I took off his hat. and found thirteen of the handkerchiefs in it - the other man paid 1s. for the cravat, and went out; seven handkerchiefs are missing, and have not been found.

WILLIAM SLACK . I am the last witness' brother. I saw the prisoner in the shop, and the handkerchiefs on the counter; I was gone about two minutes for the change - on returning my brother was at the door, and told me to run after the prisoner, without saying what he had done - our shop is opposite Fetter-lane; he ran up Chancery-lane - I followed, and missed him for some time; I ran further than him, and as I turned back I saw him coming up on the other side of the way, with another person - he saw me, and started across the road; I ran, caught him, and brought him back - I found thirteen handkerchiefs in his hat; he called out to the person who was with him, but he ran away - he was a young man, about nineteen or twenty years of age.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am an officer, and received him in charge, with three pieces, containing nineteen handkerchiefs.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-63

488. WILLIAM HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 30 yards of matting, value 25s., and 2 1/2 yards of carpet, value 5s. , the goods of William Hare .

ADAM CHALK . I am in the employ of William Hare , a carpet-manufacturer , in Bishopsgate-street . On the 14th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, a gentleman came and informed me two young men were lurking about the door, and had cut the rope which secured this carpet - I went and saw the rope was cut; I placed myself behind a carpet, and in less than five minutes the prisoner came and shouldered a piece of carpet; he looked down the warehouse to see if any body was coming - he saw me behind two pieces of carpet, and threw it down - he ran off, and I after him; I secured him, and am certain he is the man - I never lost sight of him: a constable came up.

JURY. Q. Had he got the carpet and matting both in his possession? A. He took both on his shoulder - they stood three yards within the door, tied together.

ALFRED PRATT . I am a carpenter. I was going by Hare's between six and seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner go up, stoop down, and take the carpet on his shoulder - he lifted it about nine inches from the stool where it was; he ran out of the shop - I followed, and never lost sight of him.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer, and live in Farrier's-rents, Bishopsgate-street, about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's. I heard a cry of Stop thief! between six and seven o'clock - I ran out, and Chalk had got hold of the prisoner; I did not know him before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Sun-street - I turned to go to Half Moon-alley; I heard a cry of Stop thief! but took no notice - I walked on, and the young man took me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310217-64

489. JOHN MIZON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 300 sheets of printed paper, value 2l. , the goods of Henry Colburn .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Henry Baylis .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM MOSS . I am warehouseman to Mr. Henry Baylis , printer , of Johnson's-court, Fleet-street - the prisoner was in his employ for about twelve months, and left about May or June last; I saw him in the warehouse once after he left - that was about August, as near as I can guess; we printed a work called Highways and Byeways - on the the 4th of December I found some bundles of paper at Mr. Paget's, a tobacconist, in Fetter-lane, out of which I made up seven complete sets of Highways and Byeways, the third series - each set consists of three volumes; I made up the whole twenty-one volumes quite perfect for sale, with title-pages, out of what I found there; it was not at all misprinted - I looked for the prisoner afterwards, found him in Fleet-street, and in consequence of what Paget told me, I secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When did you see the work last? A. On the 9th of July - I put it by; I believe it was after he left - it was tied up regularly for delivery, in sheets; not bound - not one copy had been sent home to Mr. Colburn, the publisher, for two years, when exactly two thousand were sent to him in sheets, in the same state as those stolen - I discovered the loss on the 23rd of December; Mr. Baylis discharged a boy that day - I took that boy into custody on the 6th - he is not in custody now; I have not taken means to apprehend any body but the prisoner for this property - I have attempted to find people for other losses.

WILLIAM STEVENS PAGET . I am a tobacconist, and live in Fetter-lane, in the City - the prisoner came to my shop about September last, and offered paper for sale, which he described as misprinted; I asked if it came from a printer's; he said, Yes; I said, "Is it your property?" he said No, it belonged to the men, and was their perquisite for beer - I did not open it; I bought it as waste-paper, at 3d. a lb., which is a fair price - I bought the quantity now produced at twice; about half each time - he brought the other half about two or three days after - the first weighed about 10 lbs.; when he brought the second parcel, I asked if there was any more

of it - he said, "No, not at present;" he had offered waste-paper for sale about a month before, but I did not buy it - I told him it was too good for my business; he showed meens sheet; it was a thick good paper, and printed on - I showed Moss the same paper as I bought of the prisoner; I had opened it, but used none of it - it weighed 19lbs., and I have not a doubt of its being the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Which end of Fetter - lane do you live in? A. The middle - it is in the City; I occasionally sell a little writing-paper; I buy waste-paper, and sell it if I have more than I want - I opened this for a person to look at after I had bought it; he looked at it as waste-paper - it did not suit him; I did not know it was books with the title; it was all clean perfect sheets, in quires - I have dealt in waste-paper about twelve months; I do not recollect buying of any other boys - Moss clamined it early in January.

WILLIAM MOSS . This is the paper I saw at Paget's - it was given to Hall the officer; the 19lbs. make twenty-one perfect volumes of the Highways and Byeways - it is perfect, and cannot be mistaken for waste; the prisoner must know it was perfect from his experience in the business; Mr. Colburn's name is Henry.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you swear this is not part of the two thousand copies sent from the printing-office? A. I should think not, but cannot swear it positively.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Suppose they are part of the two thousand, would they be Mr. Colburn's property? A. There is no doubt of it - the two thousand copies were sent off above two years ago.

JURY. Q. Are misprinted copies the workmen's perquisites? A. Not a sheet; if a journeyman spils paper he has to pay for it, and has it for his own use.

MR. BARRY. Q. Mr. Colburn has a partner? A. He has now, but had not when this was printed; he lives in Burlington-street.

WILLIAM HALL . I received this bundle of paper from Moss.

WILLIAM MOSS . I gave him the same paper I received from Paget.

WILLIAM STEVENS PAGET . I gave him the paper the prisoner sold me.

Prisoner's Defence. I left the employ the 9th of May, and in July the property was all right; since that I have been on the premises but once - that was with a letter to Moss; it is impossible to bring waste-paper out of the warehouse without being detected; I was not in the employ at the time the work was printed.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-65

490. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 coat, value 2l. 10s.; 2 waistcoats, value 1l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 25s.; 2 sheets, value 10s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 2s.; 1 key, value 6d., and 1 brooch, value 7s., the goods of John Brann , in the dwelling-house of Jane Sophia Stoker .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of Jane Sophia Stoker and another.

JOHN BRANN . I am a coal-porter , and lodge at Jane Sophia Stoker's, at No. 1, Canterbury-court, Blackfriars , on the third floor - another man lodged in the same room with me for three years; the prisoner was quite a stranger. On the 3rd of February, at seven o'clock in the morning, I left my apartment - I did not look the door; my fellow, lodger left before me - there are other lodgers in the house; I left my box locked, and the articles stated in the indictment in it - I had the key with me; I returned at three o'clock in the afternoon, and found the lid of my box burst up, and this property gone - I have found none of it; my fellow-lodger is a plasterer - he came from his work, and still lodges there; I saw the prisoner next day in the Acorn public-house, at the corner of Addle-hill and Thames-street; Mr. Golding, who keeps the White Lion, was sent for, and he was taken into custody.

ELIZABETH PYBAN . I live at No. 1, Canterbury-court, with Mrs. Stoker, who is my mother; Brann lodged in the second floor for about four years, with another man. On Thursday, the 3rd of February, the prisoner came and agreed for a lodging in the same room; there were two beds in it - he was to have part of a bed, with another lodger, at 2s. a week; I left him in the room - I am quite sure he is the man; I saw him go out of the house afterwards - he had no bundle or any thing with him; when he went away he asked me for a bottle to fetch some liquor, saying he had been travelling all night, and was very ill - I gave him a bottle; he never returned - I went up stairs in a quarter of an hour; there are two boxes in the room - I saw one had been pulled up, but nothing taken from it; that was corded, and contained boots - Brann's box was broken open; I sent for him, and informed him what had happened - I saw the prisoner in custody next day, in the afternoon, and I was quite certain he was the man who took the lodging; he had asked me to let him lay down a few hours to rest - it was between eleven and twelve o'clock when he came; I gave him leave - he was not above half an hour in the room; I met him coming down, and asked what was the matter - he said he was very ill; I said he had better come and sit by the fire - he had the bottle, and never returned.

Prisoner. Q. What did I ask for when I undressed and went to bed? A. You did not undress - you came and sat by the fire; you had nothing about you that was visible.

COURT. Q. He did not open his coat to convince you he had nothing? A. No; his coat was buttoned up close to his throat.

Prisoner. There was a tall thin man in the house, dressed in a flannel jacket. Witness. There was nobody in the house but me and my mother. who is disabled - the box was perfectly safe before he went into the room; he was there alone about half an hour - he had asked me to let him lay till three o'clock in the afternoon, and agreed for the bed as a lodger - he brought nothing with him; my mother and I pay the rent between us - her name is Jane Sophia Stoker.

MARY ANN THOMPSON . I live in Ireland-yard, near Canterbury-court, and work at my needle. On Thursday, the 3rd of February, about half-past eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to my mother's, and asked for a furnished lodging for a single man - we directed him to Mrs. Stoker's, as a place to get one.

NATHANIEL SMITH . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 4th of February, at the Acron public-house, for robbing this lodging - I found none of the

property on him; he denied the charge - I do not know where he slept on the Thursday night.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly laid down there - I was tired when I took the lodging, and was going to return there the next day; I was just by there - I had no more property about me than I have now; I sat by the kitchen fire with her before I went out - she gave me the bottle, and opened the door to me; it was impossible for me to have the things without her seeing them.

JURY to ELIZABETH PYBAN . Q. Do you leave your street door open, or is it always shut? A. It was shut all that day, as it was very cold - we have a bell to the door, which rings when it opens; there was not a creature came into the house besides him - I and my mother live in the room close to the door, and can see any body going up and down - the door was shut when the prisoner was with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-66

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

491. WILLIAM DEELEY was indicted for feloniously marrying Elizabeth Chant , widow , Elizabeth Rowe , his wife , being then living .

JOSEPH SMITH . I am a saw-maker, and live at No. 26, Crown-street, St. Giles'. I was at the parish church of St. Martin's in the Fields, on the 1st of June, 1824 - I have known the prisoner many years; I saw him there, on that occasion, married to Elizabeth Drew , I think her name was - no, it was Rowe; I heard her called by that name - I have seen her since then; I see her every week - I saw her last week; I have no doubt she is the person - I do not know the clergyman's name who married them; I believe she is not in attendance here - I gave her away; my wife was present - the second wife has directed this prosecution.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Now, do not you believe her name was Drew? A. No - I have a certificate which the second wife got; I did not know her name before she was married - I had seen her several times with the prisoner, who had worked for me several years - I did not recollect her name when I said Drew; I have heard her husband say her name was Rowe - I should be able to say, independent of this paper, that the name of the person I saw was Rowe, for she told me so herself, two or three weeks ago; I know it was mentioned in discourse when she brought work to my house - I cannot swear when I heard the prisoner state her name was Rowe, the time is so long ago; she said "It is my house."

COURT. Q. I suppose you were told what her name was when you were about to give her away? A. Yes, at the church; and I saw the name entered in the book.

ELIZABETH CHANT . I lodge at No. 21, New Compton-street, St. Giles'. I first became acquainted with the prisoner in November, 1829, and was married to him on the 5th of January, 1830 - he always said his wife was dead; he was living at No. 12, Mortimer-market, Tottenham-court-road - he was living there as single; he had no wife there with him - he did not say when his wife died; he said she was dead, and he had buried her in the Borough - I did not know any of his friends to inquire of them; we were married in All-soul's church - I was a single woman, but he put it down widow - I had not been married before, and did not go with him to have the banns put up; nor did I observe it till I had the marriage lines.

Cross-examined. Q. You are described as widow in the indictment; had you not been married? A. No; I am quite sure of that - Mr. Clark was never my husband; I have known a person of that name, but I do not know what he is - I have known a soldier of that name; he was in the 17th regiment, but that has nothing to do with this - he lived at Chatham, I believe, but he is nothing to me; I was at Chatham one day - I do not know whether I saw him; I never was inside the barracks there - Mr. Clark is across the water, I suppose; the regiment is gone abroad - I cannot tell how long.

COURT. Q. You say you had never been married before? A. No; a young person, with whom the prisoner was acquainted, introduced him at my apartment - her name was Mary Strachan ; I did not ask her any thing about his wife - I did not care about him at that time; I am about twenty-eight years old.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. What age is the prisoner? A. Sixty-three - my name is not on this paper (looking at one) - here is the name of E. Deeley; it is my hand-writing - I know a gentleman of the name of Lynch; it is hard for me to say whether I have lived with him as his wife - I never lived with Clark as his wife.

COURT. Q. Were you ever married to Lynch? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I assure you, Gentlemen, if I had known what had become of my first wife I should not have done it - I was three months walking about to look for her; I searched every where, and examined all the papers - I have been extremely ill-used by this woman and by the first also.

ELIZABETH CHANT re-examined. Q. You used the expression "it would be hard to say whether you had lived with Lynch as his wife?" A. I lived in the same house with him, and worked for him.

Q. I do not ask if you were married, but were you ever supposed to be married or represented as Lynch's wife? A. No - I did go by the name of Lynch, because I did not want the prisoner to find me out; he was continually annoying me day and night - that was since I married him; I did go by the name of Lynch before I was married, but I was by myself; I knew Lynch by working for the same shop - I did not go by his name as his wife; I went by that name in the lodging, and by his getting me into the same shop he worked for - I went by that name, because I did not wish to go by my own name; I never went by the name of Mrs. Lynch - I lived ten or twelve weeks in the same house with him.

Q. I ask you this question, and take care how you answer it; did you never go by the name of any man before you married the prisoner? A. By the name of Lynch I did for two or three years, but I was not reputed to be his wife - he was not long in London; I went by the name of Elizabeth Lynch in the lodging, but not Mrs. Lynch - I did not, upon my oath, pass to the people in the lodgings

as Lynch's wife - he did not pay for my lodging; I paid myself - I never went by my own name in London; I went by the name of Lynch, because he was answerable for my work - I never went by the name of Clark, or any other man - I never went by any other name but Lynch in London, before I married the prisoner - I have been in London three or four years; I never represented, nor heard it represented, that I was the widow of any man.

Q. Then, do you mean to say that the prisoner had no authority from you to describe you as a widow, and that you never were treated as a widow in any company? A. No, my Lord, he had not, neither did I know he did so when he put the banns up.

GUILTY. Aged 55. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310217-67

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

492. MARGARET CRAWFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 5 pairs of stays, value 10s. , the goods of Samuel Emsley .

EDWARD EMSLEY . I live with my brother Samuel Emsley ; he is a stay-maker ; the prisoner had been in his service about three months. On the 13th of January I missed a loaf - I searched her box in her bed-room; it was not locked - I did not find the loaf, but I found five pairs of new stays, which were my brother's, and she had no right to have them there.

SAMUEL EMSLEY . These are my stays; they are not finished, but they are stays.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-68

493. JOHN DREW was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 saw, value 3s. , the goods of Emanuel Barley Heath .

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a carpenter - Heath is a shopmate of mine. We were working at Castle-court ; on the 11th of February, this saw was left safe when wegenerally went to dinner, but in consequence of having lost tools before. I stood about two hundred yards off to watch the premises - I saw the prisoner go in; I went nearer the door, and saw him come out - I said I must search him; I felt down him, but did not feel any thing - he said he had come from the Coach and Horses to look for a job; I said I would go there with him - in going along I felt this saw by his side.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know it had been there? A. I saw my partner using it just before he went to dinner - there was no one left in the house - about four persons had been employed there.

EMANuEL BARLEY HEATH. This is my saw. I had been using it at that house, which is undergoing a thorough repair - I left it there when I went to dinner, and to the best of my belief, I left it on the bench.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you know whether you did or not? A. To the best of my recollection it was on the bench.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness asked me what business I had at the work - I said I was a painter, and had not been at that house, but to a house in the Strand to ask for work, and in coming back I had seen the saw lay and took it up - he took me to the Coach and Horses, in going along I gave him the saw - when the prosecutor appeared at the office he said he would not prosecute, but the Magistrate said he must.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-69

494. JOHN DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 1 live tame fowl, price 2s. , the property of William Thomas Roper .

JAMES LINCOLN . I am in the service of Mr. Charles Friend ; William Thomas Roper is his son-in-law, and lives at his farm, at Finchley - all the fowls on the farm belong to him. He had lost some fowls, and on the 22nd of January, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I went out to watch the fowl-house in the yard - I saw the prisoner go into the fowl-house, and I heard a fowl, after he was in, make a small noise - he was alone, and had a light in his hand; the door was not locked - he opened it, and walked in; he came out, and walked three or four yards towards the potatoe-house - I then took him, and took this fowl from him, which was alive, and I can swear to it- I also found three dead fowls in a bag of chaff, which he was going to take to town, but I cannot swear to them; he was a carter on the premises at the time, and had been so for a year and a quarter - he had 14s. a week: he was going to take the chaff to town with a load of plants that morning.

WILLIAM THOMAS ROPER . I have no doubt of this being my fowl - I did not miss the other three, but the servant brought them from the chaff-bag.

RICHARD WILSON . I had to take his load to town - I took the bag of chaff, and I found three dead fowls at the bottom of it.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had merely taken the fowl up in his hand, but not with a felonious intent.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-70

495. MARTHA FOSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 1 pillowcase, value 1s.; 3 napkins, value 3s.; 2 aprons, value 2s.; 3 caps, value 2l.; 1 spoon, value 3s.; 1 collar, value 5s.; 1 comb, value 5s.; 1 thimble, value 6d., and 1 ring, value 3s., the goods of Benjamin Perry , her master .

CHARLOTTE PERRY . I am the wife of Benjamin Perry , who keeps the Independant public-house, in Brewer-street, Somers'-town - the prisoner had been our servant for four weeks and six days; we have three other female servants. I had missed various articles, and on the 17th of January I searched the prisoner's box - I found in it a child's cap, a lace collar, a thimble, a comb, two other caps belonging to her fellow-servants, a remnant of stuff, and two remnants of lace, and there were some other things found at her lodging - I missed a coral ring from a cotton-box; I mentioned that to her, and she said she had taken them - the officer went to her lodging, and found some napkins and other things - the whole of this property is mine, with the exception of the caps, which were her fellow-servants.

JOSEPH PARROTT . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner - I went to some lodgings in Edgware-road, but I do not know that they were the prisoner's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written). On the 16th of January the nursery-maid came up to mistress' bed-room, and asked me for my master's brooch; I gave her one which I supposed to be my

master's - she said it was my mistress', but I never saw it more; I must occupy your time a few moments longer, in stating the circumstances connected with a parcel, which had been left by me at Mrs. Richardson's house - she was quite ignorant of its contents; I knew her by having lodged with her when out of a situation - I therefore called upon her, and said as I was not going directly home, I should esteem it a favour it she would allow me to leave it there. (See 3rd Day. New Court.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-71

496. THOMAS BROWN FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , 1 pair of boots, value 6s. , the goods of William Hollingsworth .

JOHN BREWER . On the 11th of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was at my own door, and saw the prisoner come from the prosecutor's door with a pair of boots in his hand, which he put under his coat - he went on the the corner of the New North-road, turned up there, and another boy then joined him; I ran to the prosecutor, and asked if he had sold a pair of boots - he said he had lost a pair; I took him, and showed him the prisoner - he ran faster than I could, and just before he got up to the prisoner, I saw him drop the boots; the prosecutor took them up - he took the prisoner, and brought him back to me; I collared him - he put his hand into his pocket, took out a large goblet, and before I could get hold of his hand, he threw it down and broke it.

Prisoner. It was a strange boy who threw them down. Witness. No, the strange boy was ahead of you.

WILLIAM HOLLINGSWORTH . I am a shoemaker , and live in Batchelor-row, Battle-bridge . I was in my shop serving a gentlemen with a pair of Wellington's - I ran out and pursued the prisoner, who was carrying these boots; I saw him throw them down - I took them up, and took him; they had been hanging inside my door - I saw him throw down a very handsome goblet and break it; I did not see him take the boots, but I missed them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A strange boy came by and threw the boots down - I turned round, and the gentleman caught hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-72

497. MICHAEL HILL and HENRY ERLE were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 shawl, value 5s. , the goods of Isaac Humphreys .

HENRIETTA HUMPHREYS . I am the wife of Isaac Humphreys - we live in Hornsey-lane . On the 29th of January, at one o'clock, I was in one of our parlours on the ground floor, and saw Erle walk away from the other parlour window; I followed him down to the gate across our little garden - he crossed the road, and gave something to the other prisoner against a wall; they went on, and I called my husband - we both went in pursuit; I saw them drop the shawl between them about forty yards from the house - my husband took Erle, but Hill was not caught till they got into Holloway - this is the shawl; it had been safe in my parlour, and the window had been shut five minutes before, when I was there, but I found it open.

ISAAC HUMPHREYS . I heard the alarm, and pursued the prisoners - they had dropped the shawl before I saw them; they were both in company - I pursued, and took Erle.

Hill's Defence. I am a plasterer, but being out of work, I get my living by selling things in the street ; as I was coming by that place I saw this lady, who asked me if I had been with this lad - I said No; I then went away, and her husband came afterwards and took me.

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

ERLE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-73

498. THOMAS HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 4 silver ornaments, value 4s., and 3 rings, value 4s., the goods of Charles Reily and another .

CHARLES REILY . I am in partnership with George Storer - we are silver smith s, and live in Carey-lane ; the prisoner was in our employ form April till about the 2nd of December last - we parted with him then, being slack of business. On the 31st of December we took stock, and discovered some deficiences; we heard something of the prisoner, and I went with the officer to his lodging -I think it is in White Horse-court; I there found these silver ornaments in a drawer - they are worth 8s.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. There was plenty of time for him to have got rid of them? A. Yes - we had no difficulty in finding the lodging; the ornaments are silver shells in an unfinished state; they are articles on which he might have been employed; the men are not allowed to take work home - these are struck from a private die; there is no die like it in the trade - we may have sold one hundred, but these are not finished; he never sold small articles for us - he arrived at his lodgings while I was there.

GEORGE STORER . I am in partnership with Mr. Reily, and superintend the manufactory - I am confident these are our property; the prisoner had left our service - I went with the officer to his place, and found these things; I had received information that he lodged there. and we found his wife there - he had not told me he lodged there.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I went to search his lodgings - I knew he lived in White Horse-alley, but I did not know his room; I found his wife there - I have known them both from children; we found these articles there; the prisoner came in in about ten minutes, and I took him to the office.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he know you were there? A. He told me that Forbes, the officer, told him I was in his room, and he came there - I have known him upwards of twenty years, and he always had a very good character.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310217-74

499. JAMES HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

JOHN LEACH . I am a Police-constable. On the 13th of February I was in Drury-court , about three o'clock in the afternoon; I saw the prisoner, and watched him - a

gentleman walked along, the prisoner went close behind him, and took this handkerchief from his pocket; he put it into his bosom, turned back, and came towards me - I do not think he saw me; when he came near me, I attempted to seize him, but he ran off - I pursued him nearly two hundred yards, and caught him - the gentleman was then gone; this is the handkerchief.

MICHAEL KERNEY . I was on duty in Clare-market last Sunday afternoon, about three o'clock; I saw the prisoner run very fast by me - I heard Stop thief! called, and I pursued him; he threw down this handkerchief - I took it up, and still pursued him; he was stopped some distance further, and I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. He did not see me take it - a boy ran by me, and threw down the handkerchief; I took it up, and the Policeman came after me.

JURY to JOHN LEACH . Q. Where did this happen? A. In Drury-court - it is about 100 yards long; I was at one end, and this happened pretty near the other; the court is nine or ten feet wide - I was on the opposite side of the way to the prisoner, and could therefore see the better - I did not see any other boy in the court.

JURY to MICHAEL KERNEY . Q. When you first heard Stop thief! called, how near were you to the prisoner? A. He ran within two feet of me - I saw him throw the handkerchief down; I was not more than five or six yards from him.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-75

500. CHRISTIANA HARDISTEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 pillows, value 4s., 2 flat-irons, value 1s.; 1 blanket, value 2s., and 1 set of bed-furniture, value 10s ., the goods of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL . I live in Marshall-street . The prisoner took a lodging at my house in August last; she had the back attic furnished - a man lived with her; she continued till the beginning of January - she was then about two months in arrear with her rent; she went away without notice, and left the door of her room locked - I cannot say that she quitted the lodging, but she was not seen for a week or ten days; we broke open the door, and the property stated was gone - she came to the house on the 16th of January, and I took her - this is my property.

WILLIAM GAUL . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker, in Wardour-street - I produce the bed - furniture and flatiron; I cannot say who pawned them.

MATTHEW HARDING . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner - I found this duplicate on her, and these other five in the room; one of them relates to this iron and furniture.

WILLIAM GAUL . This is the duplicate I gave the person.

JAMES STOKES . I am shopman to a pawnbroker; I have a blanket and two pillows pawned, I believe, by the prisoner, but I am not sure of her person - I gave this duplicate for them.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that she had left her lodging for eight days to attend a sick mother, and on her return was given in charge; that the duplicates were found in her room, but the pawnbrokers could not identify the person who pledged them; she received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 29. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310217-76

501. MARY ANN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 tea-caddy, value 4s.; 2 curtains, value 4s.; 1 piece of patchwork, value 3s.; 2 pillows, value 1s.; 2 sheets, value 2s.; 1 bolster, value 4s., and 2 blankets, value 1s. , the goods of William Cockran .

SOPHIA COCKRAN . I am the wife of William Cockran - we live in John-street, Tottenham-court-road ; the prisoner took the front attic furnished, on the 18th of December, at 6s. a week. On the 24th of December I missed her, and did not see her again; I waited till the Wednesday after Christmas-day; I then had the room broken open, and missed the property stated.

BENJAMIN BIRDSEYE REEVE . I am a shopman to Mr. Lowther, a pawnbroker - I have all this property which was pawned by the prisoner, at different times, before Christmas.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 27. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310217-77

502. LEVY JACOB was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 2 reams of paper, value 2l. 2s.; 1 gross of Vandyke borders, value 2l.; 14 bundles of violin strings, value 2l. 13s.; 24 rings of violin strings, value 5s. 6d., and 4 dozen of pencils, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Shepherd and Frederick Wilson Sutton .

FREDERICK WILSON SUTTON. I am in partnership with Mr. William Shepherd , of Foster-lane, Cheapside - we are stationer s. On the 8th of January I saw the articles stated in the indictment, packed in a box to go to Scotland, by a vessel from St. Katharine-dock - our porter was entrusted to take it there in a truck, and another porter was to go behind; they returned about half-past six o'clock, and gae us some information - I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM TREVISS . I was employed to take the box to the docks in a truck - when we passed the front gate of the dock it was all secure; we then were both in front, as we were going down hill, and it was very slippery - I saw some man coming down by the side of the dock; I turned round, missed one of the boxes, and very soon after I saw the Policeman with the prisoner, and a gentleman with the box.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me? A. Yes, you are the person I saw come by the side of the wall - I did not see you take any thing.

JURY. Q. Were they fastened in the truck? A. Yes, with a cord, which was cut - this box was at the back.

JOHN BORRODELL . I am an officer. I was on duty at the docks - I saw the two men with the truck; the prisoner went behind the truck, and took the box off - I followed him, took him by the collar, and said, "What have you got here?" he was setting the box down - he said,"Let me go, and I will catch the boy;" I said, "That is not the question I asked you;" he wrenched from me, and ran off - I pursued and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. That gentleman is saying false - I

could not lift the box; I had but just come out of the hospital, where I had undergone an operation.

GUILTY . Aged 67. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-78

503. HENRY KING and GEORGE BAILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 12 yards of calico, value 4s. , the goods of William Hopley .

BENJAMIN GOODWIN . I am a Police-constable. On the 28th of January, I was near the house of Mr. Hopley, in Church-street, Bethnal-green - I saw the two prisoners near his window, and was going to drive them away; I then saw King go into the shop, and soon afterwards come out with this calico in his possession - Bailey was close to the door; King put the calico into his apron, and they both joined and ran away - I pursued, and took them both back; King still had the calico.

WILLIAM HOPLEY . This is my property, and was taken off my counter, but I was not at home at the time.

Bailey's Defence. I was not with this boy - I was going to my sister's.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

BAILEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-79

504. MICHAEL KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 1 coat, value 8s. , the goods of Samuel Atkins .

MARY ATKINS . I live with my uncle, in New Gravel-lane - he keeps an eating-house . On the 2nd of February, the prisoner came and had his supper there; he was alone in a room for about half an hour - there was a great coat in that room; he paid for what he had, and was going away - when he got into the passage, I saw the collar of my uncle's great coat under the prisoner's great coat on his back; I told him he had my uncle's coat on - he said No, it was his own; I called my uncle, and I went for an officer, who took him - I looked into the room for my uncle's coat, and it was gone.

SAMUEL ATKINS . My niece called me, and I saw my great coat on the prisoner's back, his own great coat was over it, and another coat on his arm - I told him it was my coat; he denied it, and said it was his - I have no doubt at all of its being mine; his own is a light colour, and mine is a green.

HENRY BROWN . I am a headborough. I was near the house, and took the prisoner - he had a body coat on, this great coat, and another coat over it; I have known him these ten years - he is a coal-whipper, and had a good character; I do not think he was sober.

GUILTY. - Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18310217-80

505. JOSEPH KINSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 10 scrubbing-brushes, value 9s. , the goods of William Jefferys .

DANIEL MOBBS . I am a Policeman. On the 26th of January I was near the prosecutor's shop, in Upper Marylebone-street ; he is an oilman - there was another lad, who passed this bundle to the prisoner; they were in company together - I stopped the prisoner, and asked what he had got; he said brushes; I asked where he got them; he said, "From the top of that street;" I said there was no shop there - he then said I might go to the house in the Seven-dials, where he was going to take them; I said I wanted to know where he got them from - he got from me, ran about two hundred yards, and I took him again.

WILLIAM JEFFERYS . These are my property - one bundle was about six inches within my house, and the other about two feet; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Titchfield-street; a young man asked me to carrythese brushes -I asked who they belonged to; he said to him, and they had come from the top of the street - the Policeman stopped me; I said, "The young lad said from the top of the street."

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-81

506. JOSEPH MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the monies of Thomas Dovey .

THOMAS DOVEY . I am coachman to Sir Henry Halford . I lodge in White Horse-street , at Mr. Brooks' - the prisoner lodged in the same house, but not in the same room. Having missed some money out of my breeches pocket, I marked two shillings, and one sixpence, on the 21st of January, and put them in my breeches pocket -I then went out, and returned about half-past nine o'clock the same morning; my money was then gone - I had not suspected the prisoner, or any one in particular; I was present when this money was found, in a hat, in his room; I believe he is a servant out of place.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. How many persons occupied this room? A. Three in all - I did not suspect any one in particular; I was absent from half-past six till half-past nine o'clock - I had not fastened my room door; the prisoner and the others, I believe, were all in the habit of borrowing my brushes, which were on the table.

LYDIA BROOKS . I keep the house - the prosecutor told me he had lost money, and wished me to witness his marking twoshillings and a sixpence; he put them into his breeches pocket - when the other young man, who sleeps with the prisoner, had gone out, I concealed myself under the stairs, and in ten minutes I saw the prisoner come out of his room, without his shoes, and go into Dovey's room, which is on the same floor; he remained there a few minutes, and I heard some money chink - he then went into his own room, and shut the door; I went down and told my husband - we then went up to his room, and saw him brushing his clothes with some brushes, which he had taken from Devey's room; we asked what he had taken - he said nothing, and we might search him; he turned out his pockets and there was nothing there, but there was some silver in his hat - we sent for the officer, and the money was taken which had the marks on it; I believe the prisoner was in distress - he had a good character, and this was his first offence.

Cross-examined. Q. Could not the other man have gone into the room? A. The other came down at nine, and went out to breakfast, and then I stood under the stairs - Dovey returned at half-past nine o'clock, and then the money had been found.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the two shillings, and sixpence.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I got up at half-past nine o'clock, and went into that room to borrow the brushes -I then sat on the side of my bed to brush my clothes; they came up, and asked if I had been in the room - I said Yes, for the brushes; they asked if I had any thing else; I said No, and they searched my waistcoat pockets, then looked in my hat, and said, "Here it is."

The prisoner received an excellent character from his late master, who stated that he would take him again into his service.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310217-82

507. RACHAEL MANDENO was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of James Gilen .

SARAH GILES . I am the wife of James Giles - he lives in St. John-street , and is a stove-grate manufacturer - the prisoner lived with me for three weeks. On the 16th of January I missed my shoes, from the floor at the foot of the bedstead - I had put them there when I went to bed; I thought the prisoner was gone, as I had discharged her on the Saturday, between two and three o'clock, and put my shoes at the foot of the bed at twelve, when I went to bed; she must have got in and concealed herself in one of the rooms.

JAMES GILES . I am the prosecutrix's husband. I took the prisoner in Cross-street on the Sunday evening; I asked her to show me her shoes - she put them up, and I knew them to be my wife's; I gave 4s. 6d, for them about a week before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-83

508. JOHN McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Walter Carter , from his person .

WALTER CARTER . I am a footman . On the 8th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Bond-street , and felt a twitch at my pocket - I turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I seized him - he threw the handkerchief behind him; I took it up, and gave him to an officer - there was another boy rather taller than him in his company.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-84

509. WILLIAM PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 2 umbrellas, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Cooper .

SAMUEL ROCKET . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Cooper , an umbrella-maker , who lives in New Bond-street . On the 19th of January I saw the prisoner, between four and five o'clock, take two umbrellas from the door - he put them under his cloak; I pursued, and took him about half a dozen doors from the house.

SAMUEL GODDARD . I took the prisoner, and have the umbrellas.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of employ for two months - I was walking by, and saw these umbrellas at the door; something came over me to take them, merely to satisfy the cravings of nature, having had no food for two days.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310217-85

510. JOSEPH PAYNE was indicted for embezzlement .

SAMUEL CHARLESWORTH . I am a grocer , and live in Shoreditch . The prisoner was my porter between two and three months - it was his duty to receive money on my account when he took out goods; the bills of parcels were sent out with the goods, and he was to bring me the money as soon as he returned.

HARRIET JEANES . I live in South-place, Islington. I dealt with the prosecutor for grocery - I paid the prisoner a bill of 4l. on the 23rd of December, for his master; he gave me this memerandum; (read) "Received 4l., Joseph Payne ."

GEORGE COLLIER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

CHARLES POWELL . I deal with the prosecutor. I paid the prisoner 1l. 8s. 4d. on account of his master, on the 23rd of December - he gave me this receipt; (read) "Received 1l. 8s. 4d., Joseph Payne ."

JOHN HOLLIS . I paid the prisoner 7l. 5s. 10d., on the 23rd of December, on account of his master - he gave me these receipts - (read).

Prisoner. I did not sign those bills - my master did, and I took them. Witness. Yes, it was so.

SAMUEL CHARLESWORTH . On the 23rd of December the prisoner went out with these goods - I expected him to return, but I never saw him again till the 25th of January - he had given me no notice to leave; he never accounted to me for these sums of money.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost 6l. 10s. out of a hole in my fob; the prosecutor told my father if I would return he would not give charge of me - I returned, and said I would work the money out if he would employ me.

SAMUEL CHARLESWORTH . I had employed an officer to look for him, who could not find him any where; I have known his father many years, and he brought the prisoner to me, giving me a reference to a lady in Doughty-street.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-86

511. HANNAH PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 mat, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Wise .

JACOB MILLER . I am a Police-officer. On the 21st of January I was on duty in Oxford-street, about five o'clock in the evening, and met the prisoner near Tottenham-court-road, carrying this mat rolled up; I asked what she had; she said a mat: I asked where she got it - she said her husband was a mat-maker, and she had been to take one home to Mr. Turnbull's, No. 16, Upper Rathbone-place, and had got this old one in exchange; I saw it was nearly new, and took her - I then went and found there was no such place as she had described; I went back, and she burst into tears, and said she took it from Mr. Wise's door in Regent-street - I have inquired into her circumstances, and find she was really famishing for want.

SAMUEL WISE . My servant missed this mat from my hall about an hour before the officer brought the prisoner back with it.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310217-87

512. JAMES RADLEY and WILLIAM BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Ridpath .

HENRY BRITTAIN . I am a journeyman pawnbroker - Mr. Thomas Ridpath is a shoemaker . About half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, on the 14th of January, I saw Radley take this pair of shoes from a board at his shop - he and Baker ran off; I took them both, and took the shoes from Radley - they had been in company before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Radley's Defence. This boy knocked them down with his cap - I took them up, and was going to give them to the man.

Both the prisoners received a good character.

RADLEY - GUILTY . Aged 8.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 10.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310217-88

513. SOPHIA ROBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 cloak, value 3s. 6d.; 1 gown, value 1s. 6d., and 6 towels, value 5s. , the goods of George Mayes .

GEORGE MAYES. I am a tailor , and live in Edgware-road . I have known the prisoner six or seven weeks - she was in distress, and I took her in till she got a situation; when she had been a month or five weeks in my house, she went away, without giving me notice; we missed this property, gave information, and she was taken - the gown and cloak were on her back.

BARNABY AYLEY . I was looking for the prisoner, and found her on the 10th of February, under the Quadrant, in Regent-street; she said she had the gown and cloak on - I asked what she had done with the towels; she said she knew nothing about them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl - the prosecutor's wife gets her living by taking in such as I am - the cloak and gown were lent to me, and I intended to return them.

GEORGE MAYES re-examined. Q. Did your wife lend her these things? A. She had, but not at that time; the prisoner had to go to the dispensary twice a week, as they said there was something the matter with her - I did not know the prisoner was in the habit of going out; there is a young person who lives in my house and has one child; she is kept by a gentleman - her sister also lives there; a man and his wife, named Bunnings, live in the kitchen - he belongs to the parish; my wife keeps good hours.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-89

514. WILLIAM TOMPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 2 decanters, value 50s. , the goods of Francis Walmslay .

ELIZABETH KEMPSELL . I am servant to Mr. Francis Walmslay , who lives in Parliament-street - he is clerk to the House of Lords . On the 26th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of our parlour, and go out at the street door, which was open, with two decanters; I followed him, and saw him throw them into a waggon in Parliament-street -I did not follow him any further, but he was soon taken and brought back - I know him to be the same man.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had lost sight of him? A. Yes - I had not seen him before.

CHARLES DAWSON . I was in Crown-street on the morning of the 26th of January, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running; I followed, and took him back to Parliament-street, where I was informed he had stolen two decanters.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure you did not lose sight of him? A. Yes - I have been in the Police myself, but was discharged.

JOSEPH FRYER . I heard a cry of Stop thief! and went back with the prisoner and Dawson; I received these two broken decanters, which some person had picked up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310217-90

515. THOMAS AMEY, alias JOHN CRANE , & JOHN NEWMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 3 bushels of coals, value 3s. 9d. , the goods of Thomas Hannam .

JOSEPH HAINSWORTH. I know the house of Mr. Thomas Hannam , in the New-road - there is a garden in front. On the 12th of February, at six o'clock in the morning, I found the gate open - I walked in with my light; on looking round I saw the two prisoners laying, one on the other, under the garden wall, and two bags of coals near them, containing about three bushels - I called up the family, and Birch came down; I asked the prisoners what brought them there - they made no answer; I know one of them well.

WILLIAM BIRCH . I live with Mr. Thomas Hannam. I went to bed about eleven o'clock at night, on the 11th of February; our coal-cellar is in front of the house, but the door was not locked; the coals in the bags were all large ones, and appeared to have been taken off my master's heap - the gate had been broken open.

JURY. Q. Whose property are the bags? A. I do not know.

AMEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-91

516. RICHARD AYRES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 12 shillings, the monies of John Flack , from his person ,

JOHN FLACK . I keep a beer-shop , in Ashford-street . On the 24th of January I had, I believe, eight or nine persons in my shop; my usual time to shut up is ten o'clock- all the other persons had left at that time, but the prisoner, and a man named Stevens staid - they began to sing and make a noise; I said, "I will thank you to leave, or I shall be obliged to put you out;" I took hold of Stevens and put him out - he kept fighting me all the way, and ripped open my waistcoat; the prisoner then came, and put his arm round me, but I did not feel his hands in my pockets - I believe he and Stevens had come together; they had drank together, and appeared to be friends - I cannot say which of them paid: there were not above two pints of beer had, for which my servant took the money - at the time I put Stevens out I had about 12s. in my breeches pocket, as near as could be - I found my pocket turned out, and the money all gone - some person took up one shilling at the door, at the spot where the prisoner

had hold of me - I had my money safe about a quarter of an hour before; I had then taken it out, looked at it, and put it into my pocket - all the others had gone out; my servant found 1s. 6d. behind the door, the next morning - the prisoner was taken into custody at the very moment, by the Policeman; I think 5s. 7 1/2d. was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had the prisoner his hand in your pockets? A. I did not feel his hand in either of my pockets - there was no disturbance in the house, but with Stevens and the prisoner; Stevens' wife had been there drinking - we had not had a row together, but when they were at the door she put her hand on my shoulder - there had been a row between Stevens and one Taylor half an hour before, and I went to interfere, but I had not put my money into my pocket then; I took it out of the till - I took hold of Stevens in the first row to part them; they had him down, and I took the man off him - there were eight or nine persons in my house at the time of the last squabble, there were from ten to twenty persons about - I knew both Stevens and the prisoner well- they were neighbours; the prisoner was not searched on the spot.

COURT. Q. These parties were in your house, and you found it your duty to turn them out? A. Yes, and after they were gone I felt my money - I held Stevens at a distance; he could not reach me.

JURY. Q. Were you knocked down? A. No, I never was knocked down - Stevens' wife, or a woman, put her hand on my shoulder; my waistcoat was torn, and my breeches pocket torn down and turned out.

JOHN FENWICK . I live with the prosecutor. I remember the prisoner and Stevens being there, after the others had gone - my master went to them and said, "Now, gentlemen, I will thank you to go, for my time is up;" they both began to sing - Stevens said, "No, d-n my eyes if I will go;" the prisoner made the same answer - my master said, "Then I will put you out," and he took Stevens and pushed him out, holding him at arms length - the prisoner then came behind him, put his arms round him, and said,"Pray don't, Mr. Flack;" he had his arm round him when the Policeman came up, and my master gave him in charge for the noise first; then he put his hands down, felt his left-hand pocket inside out, and said, "He has picked my pocket, take him in charge;" a person then said,"There is a shilling down," - he picked it up inside the door; and the next morning I found, behind the door 1s. 6d.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the principal waiter? A. Yes; it is the sign of William the Fourth - I suppose there might be fifteen persons outside the house; I never saw the prisoner's hand in master's pocket - I suppose master's waistcoat was torn by Stevens' other hand.

THOMAS JACKSON . I was called into this beer-shop to take the prisoner for picking the landlord's pocket - I took him to the watch-house, and found 5s. 6d. and 1 1/2d in his right-hand pocket, which he claimed.

Cross-examined. Q. What did the landlord say he had lost? A. He told me 11s., 12s., or 13s. - I suppose there were from fifteen to twenty people about - I might have been in another street when there was a row before.

Prisoner's Defence. I merely put my hand to him, and said, "Mr. Flack, don't put yourself in a passion."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-92

517. JOHN BEAZEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 cheese, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas House .

JOHN BAINBOROUH. I know the prosecutor's shop; he is a cheesemonger , and lives at No. 163, Shoreditch . I found the prisoner about a quarter of a mile from his shop, and having heard the cheese had been stolen, I collared him, and said, "You are the man I have been looking for: you have a cheese here;" I put my hand under his coat, and took this cheese out.

FRANCIS UNITT . I live with Mr. Thomas House - he is a cheesemonger; this is his cheese - we lost it on the 3rd of February, about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the evening from the shop door.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me the cheese, and said he would give me 6d. to carry it.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-93

518. THOMAS BONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 3 pairs of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of John Ferry .

JOHN FERRY. I keep a shoemaker's-shop , in St. Martin's-court . On the 29th of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw a hand put inside my door, and in a moment the hand and the shoes disappeared - I went to the door, and saw no one between me and the prisoner; I went up to him - he threw the shoes under a window; the officer came up, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. This was at dark? A. Yes; it is a place of great thoroughfare; I was at the back of my shop - I saw no one passing but the prisoner, when I got to the door - I distinctly saw the shoes fall from his hands; there were three pairs, and a bill attached to them, of my own making - they were caught off a hook, and the remainder of the string was hanging to the hook - I sent out a little girl to see who took the shoes; she stood at the door; she said the prisoner was the person, and I ran up to him.

JURY. Q. Did you see the shoes in his possession? A. I saw him throw them under a window, three shops off - I was in my shop, and saw a hand come in.

GUILTY Aged 19. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310217-94

519. MARY CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 2 seals, value 3s.; 2 watch-keys, value 1s., and 1 ring, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Drake , from his person .

JOSEPH DRAKE. I am a carpenter , and live in West-street. On Saturday night, the 12th of February, I met the prisoner in the street; she came up, and asked Catherine Mills , who I was in conversation with, to give her something to drink - I said if she would go a certain distance I would, and she went up to a gin-shop in Tottenham-court-road ; I went up there with Mills to give her a glass - while I stood at the bar, some person asked me what time it was; I took out my watch, looked at it, and put it in again - the prisoner took hold of the seals, shook them, and said, "I wish I had them, they would get me half a hundred of oranges to-morrow;" I took hold of her hand, and something fell on the floor -I scuffled with her for some time, and a woman said she had put something in her bosom - my witness took some of them out of her bosom, and some were on the floor.

CATHERINE MILLS. I have known the prosecutor for twelve months - I met him that evening; I was out of a situation; the prisoner came up while we were talking, and asked for some gin; we went to the house - he took out his watch, and put it in again - I saw the prisoner take hold of his seals and keys, and pull them off the chain; the chain broke, and some fell on the floor - a woman who was in the bar said she saw her put something in her bosom; I put my hand in, and found one ring and one key - I found the others on the floor.

MAURICE NICHOLAS . I am a Police-officer - I was sent for, and the prisoner was threatening to beat the prosecutor; the landlord put these things into my possession - the prisoner had been drinking.

The prisoner put in a written defence, denying that she had touched the property, and stating that the witness, Mills, had quarrelled with her on a former occasion.

CATHERINE MILLS . I have known her twelve months, but had no quarrel with her, nor spite against her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-95

520. WILLIAM COOKSLEY was indicted for stealing, 4 table-cloths, value 3l.; 29 napkins, value 7l.; 6 shirts, value 3l.; 8 shifts, value 30s.; 7 caps, value 8s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 12s.; 3 waistcoats, value 30s.; 10 pairs of stockings, value 17s.; 30 handkerchiefs, value 6l.; 7 cravats, value 10s.; 7 collars, value 14s.; 2 pairs of gloves, value 4s.; 9 bed-gowns, value 30s.; 12 petticoats, value 2l.; 16 pinafores, value 2l.; 4 pairs of stays, value 6s., and 2 toilette-covers, value 6s. , the goods of Jacob Connop .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of William Farmer .

3rd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of John Jull .

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a City officer. On Saturday, the 8th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I was in the City-road; I observed several persons following a cart - I followed them across Finsbury-square on to Union-street, and down Bethnal-green-road ; when we got near the Salmon and Ball public-house, I observed a white bundle laying in the road, and the cart was just going from it to go on - it laid there for the space of half a minute, and a man took it up, and carried it to the corner of Paradise-place, out of the road - he pitched it up against the rails; I went on, and as I passed I lost sight of the bundle; I then turned round again, and when I turned, the prisoner had, this bundle on his shoulder - I followed him for thirty or forty yards on to Camden-walk; he was in the act of turning down, when I said to him."What have you got there?" he said,"Dirty linen;" I asked where he was going with it; he said, "To Mr. Hand, the broker, in Mile-end-road, or Mile-end-gate" - I took him into a new beer shop, and asked from whom he had received it; he said he had just received it from his mother - I then took him into custody; I think I had watched the cart for three miles; I believe there were five persons who went to the tail of the cart several times - I cannot say that I saw the prisoner.

MARY ANN KING . I am in the service of Mr. Jacob Connop - he was sending this dirty linen to our laundress, Mrs. Farmer; I packed up the bundle on the 8th of January, and gave it to Sarah Kemp; it contained the articles stated - they were my master's property; Kemp took away the bundle in a cart.

SARAH KEMP . I work for Mrs. Farmer - she washes for Mr. Connop; I received the bundle, and gave it to the young man, who put it into the back part of the cart, and he drove; I sat in the front of the cart - I had seen the parcel put in safe and secure; I missed it when we got by the Jew's chapel in Cambridge-heath-road -I saw it afterwards in possession of the officer.

HARRIET FARMER . I am the wife of William Farmer - I wash for Mr. Connop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Dog-row, and saw something in the road; I took it up - the officer came and asked what I had there; I told him dirty linen, and I was going to take it to my mother to hear if there was any advertisement for it.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-96

521. FREDERICK HORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 mat, value 5s., the goods of John Diston Powles and another ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-97

522. DENNIS WELSH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 iron grating, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of William Oliver .

HUGH GRIFFITHS . I live in Adam-and-Eve-court, Whitecross-street . On the morning of the 10th of January I missed an iron grating from an area in front of the house - it had not been fastened; I saw the prisoner that same morning in Lower Whitecross-street, going into a broker's shop - I do not know the name; I am sure it was the prisoner; I saw him in custody afterwards.

JAMES LANE . I keep a broker's shop in Lower Whitecross-street. On the morning of the 10th of January the prisoner came to my house before I was up, and brought a grate - it was by nine, or before nine o'clock; he told me he had brought a fine grating, and put it into the passage - he said he wanted the same for that as he had for one he brought before; I told him I had not the money then, but if he would call in a few minutes I would pay him - he went away; I got an officer, and when he came again he was taken - I took the grating to the watch-house - this is it.

JOHN PEACOCK . I live at No. 46, Milton-street, and am a constable; I received this grating at the watch-house, and received the prisoner at the Compter - I made inquiries, and found where it had been taken from - I am not the person who first took the prisoner.

WILLIAM OLIVER . I live at No. 9, Hamilton-place, New-road; the house No. 11, Adam-and-Eve-court, belongs to me - this grating belonged to that house; I had seen it two or three days before, and as one had been lost from an adjoining house, I told the tenant to take care of this, and nail it down - he went to nail it, and broke a part of it, by which I know it.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-98

523. AMELIA ISAACS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 watch-ribbon, value 1d.; and 1 watch-key, value 6d., the goods of Henry Foster , from his person .

HENRY FOSTER. I am groom to Mr. Shepherd, of Kensington-square. On Monday, the 14th of February, I was in St. Paul's Church-yard , between three and four o'clock - I saw the prisoner, who offered to sell me two sponges; she asked two shillings for them - I said I did not want them; she said I should have them for one shilling - I looked at them, and thought they were good for nothing, but I gave one shilling for them; she then came up again, with two more, and said, "You shall have these for sixpence;" I said, "Indeed I do not want any;" she said, "Do buy them of me;" I put my hand into my pocket, took out some silver in a purse, and gave her a shilling - she put that in her mouth, and caught two more shillings out of my hand; I put my hand up quickly, and caught them away from her - she said,"Now, you have not paid me for my sponges;" I said."You have a shilling in your mouth, and you have to give me sixpence;" she said, "No, you have not paid me;" she stuck close to my collar with her left hand - a great crowd collected, and an officer came up; I told him I had paid her honourably; but if she would let me go, she should have her sponges and her money - he said to her, "Take your sponges, and let the man go;" she said, "I won't, I will have my money;" as soon as we got out of St. Paul's Church-yard the officer let me go -I understood it was out of his bounds; I then saw a cornchandler, whom I knew - he said to her, "What are you doing with that man?" I said, "Mr, Johnson, come and relieve me," but he went on - he said he had money in his pocket; I then went on to Mr. Townes, a saddler, but he was not at home - I then went on, and was still surrounded by a mob; and, being faint, I slipped off the pavement under a cart, in Newgate-street - when I got up my watch was gone; I should not have known it, but a boy picked up the case of it - the prisoner was then gone; I did not see any one I knew there.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. So, then, this woman ran away? A. Yes, Sir; but she was taken in a moment afterwards - I do not rightly know where; I was so pushed about that I cannot tell whether she was taken on the very spot, or was demanding the money, which she said I had defranding her of - she had never ceased to accuse me of defrauding her of the 1s. 6d.; I believe the officer who took hold of me, in the church-yard, is not here - I do not know where she put the first shilling; the sponges were forced upon me - I had no wish to buy them; it was more like charity - the second shilling she put into her mouth; I do not know whether she might have swallowed it - I did not see her searched; there were two men supporting me; I believe it was the street-keeper who took her at last - I cannot say whether any money was found on her; she kept hold of my collar all the way, and a mob of people were about, who seemed to be taking my part, but they might be some of her friends; my watch-ribbon was what she saw - there is not the least doubt of it; I was very poorly, and was tossed about by the crowd - I have had people to inquire about her, who say she is a notorious character; I have not heard that her father is in the employ of Mr. Myers - she had hold of my collar when the officer came up, in the church-yard, and said I had not paid her; but there were persons who had seen me pay her - a man said so, but I have no business to call him - the prisoner had hold of my collar when I slipped down, and that was the time my watch was taken; she nearly fell down.

COURT. Q. Have you ever got your watch again? A. No; I paid eight guineas for it a good many years ago - it was capped and jewelled.

CHARLES WILLIAM BREWER . I live in Great Alie-street - I saw a mob in Newgate-street; I ran up, and saw the prisoner holding the prosecutor's collar, and her other hand had hold of his watch-ribbon - almost directly I got up they both fell; I saw a boy bring the watch-case to the prosecutor, and then he said his watch was gone - the prisoner was then gone too; I ran in the direction she went to see if she was stopped - I came up to her in St. Martin's-le-grand, opposite the Post-office; she was there given to the officer by some men who had stopped her.

Cross-examined. Q. You were not in St. Paul's-churchyard? A. No; I had lost sight of her when the prosecutor said his watch was gone - he was not far up Newgate-street, going to the Old Bailey, on the right-hand side; upon my oath, the prisoner had got more than three yards from him before she was taken; I looked to see where she was, and I ran into St. Martin's-le-grand - I did not hear what was said between her and the prosecutor; they fell down nearly together - I did not see whether they got up together, as there was a mob got round them; a very few second selapsed from the time I lost sight of her till she was brought back; I was at the Compter when she was searched; I believe the prosecutor did not come in till afterwards - I did not see any silver, or watch, found on her, or any ribbon.

JOHN LAYCOCK. I live at No. 3, Hanover-court, Milton-street, Cripplegate. I saw the prosecutor and prisoner together - I saw him pay her a shilling for some sponge, and as he was turning round to walk about his business, she caught hold of him, and said he had not paid her - as they were going along Newgate-street I parted them, and he went on; she then turned round behind me, and caught hold of him again - they both fell down in the kennel, and I pulled them both up; as soon as I had pulled them up a little boy picked up the watch-case, and gave it to the prosecutor - be directly said his watch was gone; the prisoner was then gone - I believe she ran away; I did not see any more of her till the officer was bringing her back - it was between Butcherhall-lane and Bagnio-court that they fell down, and about the second lamp down St. Martin's-legrand I saw the officer bringing her back.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A labouring man, but I am out of employ, and have been for a fortnight- I was at that time going to inquire about a situation; I last lived with Mrs. Bailey, in Chapel-street, Grub-street - she is a town carwoman; I have not seen the little boy here who picked up the watch-case - he was at Guildhall the first day; the officer did not ask his name there - I believe he gave his name at the Compter, I do not know to whom - I have had no money, nor any thing else for coming here - I swear I have not talked to the officer about it; I was present at the beginning of the transaction - I did not see

any constable before this one; I believe it was the same man who removed them from the church-yard - I did not see the woman in the saddler's shop; I had only seen one shilling paid to her - I saw one sponge, and I saw him pay her a shilling for it; I do not know whether he had any more than one sponge; upon my oath, I have not been promised money for my evidence to-night; I was by them all the time, but when I pulled them out of the kennel she was gone - I cannot say how long she was gone; I went into the Compter, but I believe I was not there when she was searched.

COURT. Q. She did not repeat her charge of not being paid for the sponge, after she got up out of the kennel? A. No - I lost sight of her.

THOMAS DAVIES . I am a constable. I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner together in Cheapside; I saw a great crowd cross from St. Paul's-church-yard to Cheapside - they went a little way down, and I followed them; I took the prisoner about ten yards down St. Martin's-le-grand, hearing that she had run away with the prosecutor's watch - I did not see them when they fell down; there was a general cry of the watch being lost, and people were running after the prisoner, which induced me to follow her.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the officer who interfered in St. Paul's-church-yard? A. No, that is a mistake of the witness' - I saw them in Cheapside; I saw them going from the saddler's-shop to Newgate-street - the prisoner said the man had not paid her; she had hold of him, and refused to quit him - I separated them, and desired her to go about her business - the prosecutor said he had paid her; I did not take charge of him, because I have such trifling things every day, and I do all I can to get them out of my district - when I took them out of Cheapside and down Newgate-street, I got a good many of the crowd away, and I left them - I saw no part of the first transaction; I took her in about three minutes after he said he had lost his watch - she was running down St. Martin's-le-grand, and was stopped; plenty of people saw her run - I took her from some other person's custody, about ten yards down St. Martin's-le-grand; I searched her in the Compter - I found some halfpence and some sponge on her, but no watch, nor a shilling; I took down the name and address of the boy who found the case - he lives in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's; I have his name on a piece of paper at home, but I do not recollect it - Sir Peter Laurie did not bind him over; Laycock was there, but I did not stand at his elbow - Mr. Beresford was attending to the boy's evidence; I do not know whether he took down what he said.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had not touched the prosecutor's property, and was only following him to obtain payment for her sponge, which she had never received.

JURY to C. W. BREWER. Q. Why did you not call out when you saw her lay hold of the watch-ribbon? A. They fell almost instantly, before I had time to speak - I did not see the watch taken from the prosecutor's pocket; I did not mention about the watch till the case was given - I told some person I had seen her hand upon the watchribbon.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-99

524. JOHN COTTERELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Gooch , from his person .

THOMAS GOOCH. I live in London-wall, and am a warehouseman . On the 19th of January, about a quarter or half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Redcross-street , and felt something at my pocket - I turned, and saw the prisoner close at my back, and at the same time missed my handkerchief; the prisoner was close to me, and I saw another individual bigger than him - I had a friend walking with me; I accused the prisoner of this, and he said, "Me, Sir!" I saw he had his hand behind him, and my handkerchief fell behind him - I took hold of him, and took up my handkerchief; there was a person behind him, but not near enough to drop the handkerchief - I have no doubt the other was an accomplice, as he ran off; this is my handkerchief, and it has my initials on it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see it in my hand? A. I could not, as your hand was behind you.

WILLIAM BECK . I live in King's Arms-yard, Cripple-gate, and am a constable. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the street; a young man before me took the gentleman's handkerchief, threw it behind me, and decamped.

COURT to THOMAS GOOCH . Q. How near to the prisoner's hand did it appear to you to fall? A. Close to his heels, and he was close to my heels - no one was near enough to have dropped it but him.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310217-100

525. RICHARD BREDE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Westwood , about ten o'clock in the night of the 7th of January , at St. Giles without, Cripplegate , and stealing therein 23 lbs. weight of cheese, value 10s., her property .

CHARLOTTE TALLIS . I live with Elizabeth Westwood , at No. 21, Jewin-street - she is the housekeeper. On the 7th of January, in the evening, I was in the back room - there is a shop bell affixed to the door, and I heard it ring a little after ten o'clock; I went into the front shop, and saw the prisoner under the counter - I saw a handkerchief on the floor, and this half-cheese was on it; the door had been shut and latched, and the bell rings in opening it - it would have rung if the door had been ajar; I had seen the door shut five or ten minutes before - I gave an alarm, and Mr. Simmons, at the next house, saw the prisoner go out, and brought him back; I had lost sight of him when he went out of the shop door - that was after I had seen him under the counter; I had cut some cheese from this piece about a quarter of an hour before, and had placed it in the window; there was a light in the shop - the cheese had been removed from the place I put it in to the floor, where the handkerchief was - it was Elizabeth Westwood's property.

HENRY SIMMONS . I live at No. 22, Jewin-street, and am a carpenter. I heard a cry of Murder! I ran out of my shop, and saw the prisoner run out of Westwood's; I ran after him, and saw him stopped in Redcross-square, about one hundred and fifty yards off.

ROBERT HOWARD. I took the prisoner, and produce the piece of cheese, which was brought in by Simmons.

HENRY SIMMONS. The cheese was laying on the handkerchief on the floor of the shop.

ROBERT HOWARD re-examined. Q. What parish is the house in? A. I understand it is called St. Giles without, Cripplegate, but we always call it Cripplegate without.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-101

526. EDWARD LUCK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 bag, value 1d.; 1 half-sovereign, and 6 shillings, the property of John Shea , from the person of Ellen Shea .

RICHARD APPLETON . I live at No. 1, Hartford-place, New Haggerstone - I am a pig-jobber. Between one and two o'clock, on the 14th of February, I was in the pig-market, at Smithfield ; I saw the prisoner close alongside of Ellen Shea - I saw he had a dark article in his hand, a kind of blue thing, and I said to him, "What have you taken from that poor woman?" he said, "I have not taken any thing;" I said, "You have, and have it in your pocket;" he took it out, and said, "This is all I have;" I took the bag, and kept it till the officer examined it - it contained a half-sovereign, and five single shillings.

ELLEN SHEA. I live in Well-street, Salisbury-street, Bermondsey - I am the wife of John Shea. I was in the pig-market, at Smithfield, on the 14th of February; I saw the prisoner, but did not see him do any thing - there are some palings, and the prisoner attempted to get between me and the palings; he pushed me - this bag and money are mine; I missed it when I got to the corner of Newgate-street - I do not know how long this was after the prisoner had tried to get between me and the palings; I did not see Appleton there - I had pulled out my money to pay for a pig; I left half a sovereign, and six shillings in silver in the bag - I am quite sure my bag was in my pocket, and I had not taken it out after paying for the pig.

RICHARD APPLETON re-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner do any thing to the woman? A. No, only come away from her with this article in his hand.

JOHN VINN . I took the prisoner, and have the bag and money - there is a half-sovereign and five shillings in it; I found 1s. 1 1/2d. in the prisoner's pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-102

527. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Edward Simeon Stephenson , from his person .

EDWARD SIMEON STEPHENSON . On the 18th of January I was passing over Blackfriars-bridge - I had got about two-thirds over it, towards the City, and on the east or right-hand side; I felt my handkerchief, as I supposed, drawn from my pocket - I put my hand down, and my handkerchief was gone; I turned, and saw the prisoner close at my heels, concealing a handkerchief on his person or his clothes - I saw the handkerchief in his hand, and from its colour and appearance, I believe it was mine; I told him he had my handkerchief - he denied it; I said I would give him in charge to the first officer I met - he ran off, after a few seconds, into Bridge-street, crossed the road, and ran down the first turning on the left-hand, and then along the street which runs parallel with Bridge-street; he then made a turn back at the end of Tudor-street passage - I came up with him then; he dropped the handkerchief at his feet, and I took it up - it turned out to be mine; I am told the spot where I missed my handkerchief is in the City of London - the entire of that side, I am told, is in the parish of St. Ann, Blackfriars, but the precinct of Bridewell is on the other side.

JOHN FORRESTER . I know Blackfriars-bridge, and have always understood the whole of it is in the City of London, but in different parishes - there is a stone on the further side, which divides the parishes, but the whole is in the City of London.

Prisoner's Defence. I left home to look for work - on returning it was rather late; I was running to get an answer from a gentleman - two young fellows passed, and dropped this handkerchief; I took it up, the gentleman tapped me on the arm, and accused me of robbing him - I denied it, and ran off.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310217-103

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

528. SARAH CLARK was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Beal , on the 21st of January , and stealing, 1 waistcoat-piece, value 2s. 9d.; 3 shirts, value 15s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 1 pair of sheets, value 5s.; 2 curtains, value 4s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 1 gold ring, value 7s., and 1 pair of earrings, value 7s., his property .

JOHN BEAL. I lodge in Whitecross-place, Wilson-street, Finsbury , on the first floor. The prisoner is landlady of the house , and lived there - on the 22nd of January, at seven o'clock in the morning, I went out, leaving this property in my room; I locked the door - I returned about half-past eight in the evening, and found the door open - my son had got the key, and my daughter was in the room; I missed a great many articles which I had left safe - the prisoner's husband lived in the house with her.

MARTHA BEAL . I am the prosecutor's daughter, but do not live at this house. On Saturday, the 22nd of January, about ten o'clock, or a little after, I asked my father for a waistcoat-piece from the drawer, and it was missing - when I went to the room that evening, I found my brother at home; I missed nothing else myself - I do not know whether the prisoner was at home; I found some property pawned at Attenborough's, on Monday morning, and when the prisoner was at Worship-street after I had found the property, I asked her what she had done with the duplicates; she said if I went home to the back kitchen, in the dust-hole I should see an old garden-pot, and under the pot should find the duplicates - I went and found ten duplicates, with a key which fitted the room door; I gave them to the officer.

JAMES BEAL. I live with my father. I was at home all day on the 22nd of January - I went out the day before, about half-past three o'clock, leaving the prisoner at home, and when I came in at half-past five I found the staple of the padlock drawn; I went into the room, but missed nothing - I told my father when he came home,

but he did not take much notice; this was on Friday -I met the prisoner in the court as I came home.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 25th of January, I was sent for, and went with Martha Beal to Attenborough's; I went to the house, and received the prisoner in charge - she said something at the office to Martha Beal , who went and got the duplicates and key, which I found opened the door.

GEORGE JOHN MOULTON. I am shopman to Mr. Attenborough, of Crown-street, Finsbury. I produce two curtains, one sheet, three shirts, and two pairs of stockings; I received the stockings in pawn myself from the prisoner - the other things were pawned in the same name; I did not take them in - the duplicates correspond with those on the articles, and are the counterparts.

JOHN BEAL. These are my property, and were in my drawers; I missed them on Saturday, but some were taken before the others, for what I know - I never allowed her to pawn my property.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had been in the habit of borrowing articles of the prosecutor to pledge, and intended to redeem them - that the prosecutor's son was an abandoned character, and must have taken the padlock off himself to screen his own delinquencies.

GUILTY of larceny . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-104

Before Mr. Baron Bailey.

529. JOHN SAINT JOHN LONG was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Colin Campbell Loyd .

THE ATTORNEY GENERAL, with MESSRS. WHEATLEY and TALFOURD, conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD LOYD , ESQ. I am a post-captain in the Royal Navy - my late wife 's name was Colin Campbell Loyd . In the course of last autumn I came to London from Cheltenham, where I reside; Mrs. Loyd and my children accompanied me - I came to town in September; the first time I saw the prisoner was when I paid an evening visit to a gentleman in Ulster-place, in the early part of the year.

Q. Do you remember attending an inquest held upon Miss Cashin, in the Hampstead-road, at any time when the prisoner was there? A. Yes, I saw the prisoner there four or five days - it was as long as the inquest lasted; Mrs. Loyd was not with me the two first days - she was not acquainted with him previously; we became well acquainted with him in consequence of seeing him at that inquest; Mrs. Loyd afterwards consulted him professionally on account of her child, but occasionally mentioned to him a complaint she herself was subject to, which was an occasional choking in her throat when she caught cold, or any thing excited her - I have accompanied her to Mr. Long's house to consult him about it; the first time I went there was about a fortnight before she put herself under his care - she became his patient on the 5th of October, but did not inhale till the 6th; she was then in very good health, otherwise than this occasional choking - she had caught a slight cold a few months before that, and a little before the 6th of October she applied a small blister to her throat, about the size of half a dollar; this was on the Sunday night or Monday morning before the 6th - I have a memorandum here in her own hand writing.

MR. ALLEY (the prisoner's Counsel.) I make no objection to that being used with respect to the dates.

Q. Then tell us the date that a blister was applied? A. Sunday, the 3rd, she found herself unwell, and put the blister on during the night; it was nearly well on the 6th - she had frequently applied that blister when this affection was coming on; she became Mr. Long's patient on the 6th, and went again on the 7th, 8th, and 9th; I was not with her on the 9th - she was rubbed that day across the chest; I did not see it done - I did not see her breast till Sunday evening, the 10th; she had been to Mr. Long's on the 10th, and in the evening complained of a violent burning across her chest, and I examined her chest and breast - there was a great redness across the breast or bosom, and it was darker in the middle than in other parts; she complained that evening of great chilliness, shivering with cold, but a burning heat across the breast - she passed a very restless uncomfortable night; she was very unwell all the next day, and complained of great thirst - she was up for some time, and then laid on the bed again; she did not go down stairs - she complained of sickness at the stomach, and being very thirsty continually; she was feverish all day - I saw her breast and chest on Monday; the redness got more vivid - it got stronger, and the spot in the centre darker; it was white round the edges, and much puffed up - it discharged from the centre a dirty whitish thick kind of substance, and the cabbage-leaves which were taken off appeared slimy; I understood the cabbage-leaves were applied by Mr. Long - they were kept on by his direction; I believe they were first applied on the Saturday, but not seeing the breast I cannot say; I first knew of a cabbage-leaf being there on Sunday, the 10th - on Monday Mrs. Loyd felt an odd sensation, as she had felt the evening before, a sickness, and was very uncomfortable every way; Mr. Long did not call to see her on Monday - I am not aware that he knew where we lived; she passed a very uncomfortable night, indeed, on Monday - I saw her breast and chest again on Tuesday morning; the redness was, if any thing, greater - the spot in the centre of the breast more puffed up, and darker; the redness spread considerably more, and round the edges where it stopped there were blisters, the same as when a common blister is applied - they were in the skin, from the discharge which had gone over the bosom, and appeared to me only to have stopped where the bed-clothes might have touched and absorbed it; the inner part of the arms were very red, from the discharge which had gone down on each side; wherever the discharge had gone, the skin was very much irritated, and red; and in the end, wherever that discharge had gone, the flesh mortified, and was taken off afterwards - I mean many days after during her illness; but the smell began to be very bad in about a week or ten days; she felt very unwell on Tuesday the 12th, very hot, feverish, restless, and had no appetite, in consequence of which I went to Mr. Long about the middle of that day - I saw him; he expressed his surprise - he asked me why Mrs. Loyd had not come to inhale, and go on with her rubbing; I told him it was impossible, she was so very ill - that she had been constantly unwell from the Sunday night, and was suffering a great deal of pain - he said he dare say

that would soon go off; that it was generally the case - I told him of the chilliness and shivering she had on the Sunday night, and that we had given her some hot wine and water to relieve her when she was going to bed - he said hot brandy and water would have been a better thing, and to have put her head under the bed-clothes -I said her breast and chest looked very red and very bad, but did not describe it perhaps so minutely as I have to-day; he said that generally was the case in the first instance, but it would go off in a very short time; there was no fear or danger, and I need not be uneasy about it - I requested him to come in the evening, and described where we lived - he came that evening; I do not know at what time; I was in the room - (while I had been with him in the day, Mrs. Loyd, from excessive pain, had thrown aside the cabbage-leaves, and put on a little blister-dressing to allay the heat; and when he came into the room,) he said he was sorry to see her so unwell; she was in bed - he said she ought rather to have got up, and endeavoured to have come to him, and he would have endeavoured to relieve her; she said it was impossible, she was in such pain and suffering, and with her breast open in that way it might be dangerous - he then asked to look at it, and did; he said those greasy plaisters had no business there (they were what she had put on herself), and that she ought to have continued the cabbage-leaf - she said she could not bear the pain of keeping it on; he then took off his great coat, and said he would rub it out, which would give her relief - he turned up the cuff of his coat, apparently preparing to rub it; she exclaimed very much at the idea of such a thing, and said she wondered at his thinking of rubbing, in the state her breast was in, and asked if there was no way he could give her relief without touching her breast, for she could not bear to be touched - he asked what she wished; she said, "To be healed;" he said it would never heal with those greasy plaisters; that was not the way he healed sores or wounds; (I do not know which he called it) - he called for a towel, which I gave him; he began dabbing it on the breast and across the bosom, but particularly in the centre where the discharge was oozing from; the discharge proceeded only from the centre; whenever that discharge came, it took off the skin ultimately; the skin was all discoloured and red wherever it reached, and ultimately brought it off.

Q. Having dabbed it with a towel, what did he do? A. He said old linen was the best thing to heal a thing of that kind with; but she said she had always been in the habit of healing any thing of that kind with the simple dressing she had used - that her skin and flesh were very healthy, and healed immediately; she had been in the habit of using that simple dressing when she put a small blister on her throat - he said old linen was preferable, but she might use that if she liked, he saw no objection to it, and when it skinned over he would rub it again - she said No, she thought she never could submit to rubbing again, from what she was then suffering; I assisted him on with his coat, and he took his leave.

Q. Do you remember any observation he made when you first stated the appearance of the breast and chest? A. He spoke in his usual manner, "Oh, that is nothing; it is the case generally in the first instance" - he called again next evening, Wednesday, the 13th; Mrs. Loyd was then suffering a deal from pain, and was in a very low state from low spirits, pain, agitation, and fever, and dreaded any thing touching her breast - we made a little kind of cradle to keep the clothes from touching her- the prisoner did not see her that evening; she was alarmed on hearing of his arrival, and begged I would not allow him to come up, and he never saw her again - Mr. W. A. Campbell had seen her on the Tuesday evening, the 12th, and saw her several times a day after that - I do not recollect whether he saw her more than once on the Tuesday, but after that he saw her several times a day; he lives close by, and was very attentive - Mr. Vance was called in some days after, and Mr. Brodie came as a friend of Mr. Vance's; she died on the 8th of November; I believe it was exactly a mouth and a day after she had been to Mr. Long's.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Mrs. Loyd was on a visit at Kensington, at Mr. Campbell's mother's house? A. Yes; we intended to take her apartments, but wished to remove her nearer to Mr. Long's - Mr. Campbell is a medical man; we were at Mrs. Campbell's when Mrs. Loyd began to attend Mr. Long, and continued there till her death - Mr. Campbell saw her on the Tuesday evening before the prisoner saw her; he is a young man, but has been several years in practice, I believe - I believe she had applied the plaister herself, which Mr. Long complained of.

Q. Did not Mr. Long say it was the most likely thing in the world to counteract the proper application of his treatment? A. Not that I recollect - he said it was not what he was in the habit of using; it was a common blister-dressing, a common healing plaister after a blister - he said it would not heal it; it was not the grease he talked of rubbing out; none of that had come off the plaister; it had been merely put on lint, and put on the breast - I considered he meant to rub out the application which had been formerly rubbed in; he had not found fault with the effect of the greasy plaister, but with the application of it; he said the cabbage-leaves ought to have been kept on - I think Mr. Vance was called in on the Thursday after Mr. Campbell began to attend her; he at that time was her only medical attendant.

Q. After the prisoner was refused permission to attend her, did not he send a medical gentleman, named Rawlings, requesting he might be allowed to see her? A. There was some extraordinary character called to see her; I do not know when it was - he said he came from the prisoner; I referred him to Mr. Vance and Mr. Campbell, and did not allow him to see her - Mrs. Loyd had been occasionally afflicted with this complaint in her throat for some years; Mr. Vance attended her for it two years ago - my son had attended the prisoner for some time before Mrs. Loyd; he had been about a fortnight inhaling before she went - her going with him led to the conversation about her throat - he attended some days after his mother's illness; I had told Mr. Long if he allowed my boy to attend him (it did not then suit my convenience, but) after Christmas I would pay him - this was before my boy went to him; this was in consequence of an unexpected curtailment of my income - he said I could send him, and he would attend to him; my son was desired to tell the

prisoner he need not come any longer to see his mamma, as she was better.

MR. WHATELEY. Q. Was it after Mrs. Loyd had declined to see the prisoner that this message was sent? A. Yes; Mrs. Loyd paid the prisoner's fees - I have it here in her own hand-writing, and I gave her the money to pay it - she states here, "6th, Began inhaling at Mr. Long's, paid him 1l.," and on the 9th here is 1l. paid him - she was with him on the 10th; I do not know whether he fixed for her to come on the 11th; the plaister she had on when he came on the 12th, was a preparation of lard, spread on lint - it might have been on two hours, but I was not there when it was put on.

MRS. ELIZABETH CAMPBELL . I am a widow, and live in St. George's-place, Knightsbridge. I was well acquainted with the late Mrs. Loyd from her marriage, about fourteen years, and have known Captain Loyd from a boy - they generally lived at Cheltenham; I always considered Mrs. Loyd a very healthy woman - she and Captain Loyd came to visit me on the 28th of September; Mrs. Loyd appeared in very good health, but her throat was sometimes troublesome, a sort of stoppage in it when swallowing - I never accompanied her to Mr. Long. On Sunday evening, the 10th of October, she was sitting with me on the sofa, and was taken with a shivering fit; that was the first symptom of her illness that I perceived, except the irritation in her throat - her bed was immediately warmed; she was carried up to bed, and warm water bottles applied, but the shivering continued, and was very violent - I left her about two o'clock in the morning, to go to bed, and saw her next morning about nine or half-past nine; she complained very much of a soreness in her bosom, and I saw it then for the first time - it was very much inflamed all over the chest, from shoulder to shoulder, very red, and extended from the throat down about six inches - the skin did not appear to be broken then; she did not leave her bed that day, to my knowledge - I saw her frequently, but did not stay with her all day; she changed her bed room once, but never came down stairs again, and never left her bed, except to go from one room to the other; I remember Mr. Long coming one Tuesday evening - I went into the room and he was using a cloth, wiping the discharge from her chest; I saw her breast - it was very much inflamed, and the wound in the centre more marked than when I first saw it; the inflammation was more extensive - the wound in the centre was about the size of the top of a large tea-cup; not quite so large as a breakfast-cup - it was larger than a dollar; she was in very great pain in the forenoon, before Mr. Long came - Mr. Campbell, my son, had applied a simple dressing of spermaceti-ointment, and removed the cabbage-leaf; it was the same plaister as Mrs. Loyd had used before to a blister on her throat - my son is a surgeon, and has been in practice about seven years; I was not in the room when Mr. Long first came - I heard Mrs. Loyd complain of the pain in her chest; Mr. Long asked if she wished him to rub it out - I think that was the expression; she said she would not have it rubbed any more; she would not endure it again - he then asked what she wished to have done; she said she wished it to be dried up and healed - he objected to the ointment which had been applied, and said she should apply nothing but dry linen; she said she had often had blisters, and healed them with that ointment without any trouble: he said, if that was the case, he saw no objection to her using it again - he, after that, went away; he gave her no direction as to diet, nor prescribed any medicine that I heard - he called next day. and was not admitted; I saw Mrs. Loyd frequently - she remained at my house till she died; she at one time appeared a little better - we had once a hope of her recovery; she was in a dreadful state - in a perfect torture.

COURT. Q. Do you mean that she was in perfect torture during the whole time after Mr. Long left her? A. She was, till the mortification took place - her sufferings were most acute; my son attended her till her death, and Mr. Vance and Mr. Brodie saw her.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you ever in company with the deceased when she went to the inquest held on Miss Cashin? A. No; they were not at our house then - I know it was after that inquest that she went to Mr. Long.

Q. On the Sunday she had the shivering fit, had she been out any where? A. She had been to Mr. Long's, and been rubbed a second time, as she told me - he lives in Harley-street, which may be two miles from my house; I cannot say whether she walked there and back - she was a good walker; I have no reason to suppose she did not walk - she went no where else to my knowledge: she went out about twelve o'clock, and returned some time before dinner, which was about five o'clock; she had complained of her throat several times - it could scarcely be called an illness; I never knew her under any body's care for it but Mr. Vance's - when I saw Mr. Long in her room Captain Loyd had fetched him; the wound had then broken, and water was oozing from it - Mr. Long disapproved of the greasy plaister; my son has had seven years' practice - I have not another son a chemist; he died, but the shop is kept on under the same name - my son first attended Mrs. Loyd on Tuesday, the 12th; nobody attended her on Monday, but the cabbage-leaf was applied according to Mr. Long's order - she was not out of bed at all.

COURT. Q. You did not know till she was taken with the shivering fit that she had been to Mr. Long? A. She told me that day at dinner time that she had been; I knew she had been and inhaled, but did not know she had been that day - I saw her breast on the Monday.

MR. WILLIAM ARCHIRALD CAMPBELL . I am a surgeon, and live in Wilton-place, which is a little more than one hundred yards from my mother's. I knew Mrs. Loyd shortly after she was married - she appeared quite a healthy person; I saw her first about her breast on Tuesday, the 12th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, at my mother's request; she was suffering very great pain, and told me she was in perfect agony - the appearances of her breast were such as to make it probable she was suffering great pain; I found a very extensive wound, covering the whole interior part of the chest - I think any strong acid would produce such a wound; the skin was destroyed and laying in folds on the chest, completely suppurated and the cellular membrane, which is under the skin, was partly destroyed - there was a considerable discharge from the whole of the wound, which extended nearly from one arm-pit to the other, and from the throat down to the stomach; the skin was off both breasts - the centre of the wound was in

a higher state of inflammation, darker in colour; I think I removed the cabbage-leaves - it would take several cabbage-leaves to cover the wound; I applied a simple dressing of spermaceti-ointment - I only saw her once that day; I saw her on the Wednesday. and daily, till her death, generally two or three times a day.

Q. Did you consider the wound dangerous to life when you first saw it? A. Very much so; I continued to apply that ointment - it was the only dressing I applied till I saw Mr. Vance; he continued to apply the same dressing, with some addition of calamine powder, and the second or third day he applied a bread and water poultice; nothing that we applied could possibly increase the danger - Mr. Vance was called in on the 21st; I described accurately to him the treatment I had adopted - there was once some slight hopes of her recovery; I was always very fearful it would terminate fatally - I gave her at first some saline aperient medicine, and after that she had bark, mineral acids, and quinine, to prevent mortification as much as we could, to support nature - as soon as mortification took place, she took the bark and mineral acids; the spot became gangrenous about a week after I attended her - she died of that wound decidedly.

Q. In your judgment, would it be necessary or proper to produce such a wound for the purpose of correcting any difficulty in swallowing? A. No; I know of no disease whatever in which it would be necessary or proper.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long have you been a surgeon? A. I have been in practice six or seven years; it has been a fair practice - a common blister will often produce effects which the person who prescribed it never contemplated; it has assumed an unhealthy appearance sometimes, and had an injurious effect; it was after Mr. Vance was called in that there were slight hopes of her recovery, and before I thought there might be hope -Mr. Long had no opportunity of applying any thing after I was called in.

Q. You have said that for a pain in the throat such a wound ought not to be produced - must not the remedy applied depend not on the external appearance alone, but very often on the symptoms the patient relates? A. Upon that he must guide his treatment, of course - I was not present when Mrs. Loyd stated her symptoms to Mr. Long -I thought the wound dangerous from the first, but it was not desired by Mrs. Loyd that any body else should be called in; I do not recollect that I proposed it to her, and I did not think it necessary - I thought as long as her friends were satisfied it was enough; the general practice is to state our opinion, and leave to the friends to act - immediately after mortification took place another medical practitioner was called in; I had no wish for additional assistance before - I think gangrene came on seven or eight days after she was under my care; I cannot tell the day of the week - I thought it not unlikely from the beginning that she might sink under the effects of the wounds; I feared gangrene from the beginning - I stated the danger I apprehended to Mrs. Higgins, Mrs. Loyd's sister - I also stated it in the house; this was previous to Mr. Vance attending - I should think it was three or four days after my attending her, that I stated I was afraid it would be dangerous - I attended her nearly a month; Mr. Long had no opportunity of prescribing for her during that time.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. Though you apprehended danger from the first, did you consider it a case of difficulty in the treatment? A. No, I did not - I considered that I understood it perfectly; I saw the body after death, and have no reason to think I was mistaken - I never saw a blister of that size applied; in cases where unexpected results have followed the application of a blister there has generally been afterwards appearances to account for those results.

COURT. Q. You did not use any application to reduce the inflammation? A. I think the simple dressing would reduce it - I never tried a poppy poultice, and do not think that would reduce it; in the state it was in on Tuesday, I should have thought that rubbing would have increased the inflammation - it could not have been in the least beneficial; I think I told Captain Loyd immediately on my seeing the wound, that I thought it was dangerous - I do not recollect the expression I used; I have not a doubt that I told him it was dangerous; and I told my mother the first day I saw her, that I was afraid Mrs. Loyd would never recover.

MR. GEORGE VANCE . I am a surgeon, and live in Sackville-street. I first saw Mrs. Loyd on the 21st of October - she was in bed; Mr. Campbell was present - she complained of extreme soreness at her mouth and throat, and ascribed the complaint to having inhaled through a tube at Mr. Long's, in Harley-street; on examining her chest, I found a sloughing ulcer of great extent, where, by her own account, she had been rubbed by a liniment, which might produce mortification - if she had been rubbed by a corrosive liniment, or a violent application, it might have that effect; it extended from one arm to the other, and from the upper part of the breast-bone, to, I suppose, a little below the nipples - it was stated to me, by a person who measured it, to be seventeen inches long, and ten or eleven broad, and in my judgment that was about the size; the centre of the wound was dark and in a state of mortification, and towards the circumference there was a little appearance of health - the dead parts were separating from the living; in a day or two a more unfavourable change took place, the parts assumed a flabby condition, mortification became extensive, and I imparted to her friends the certainty of her death - nothing that I applied materially arrested the progress of the disease; she gradually grew weaker, and died on the 8th of November; a few days after I first visited her Mr. Campbell and I, and both distinctly, at different times removed dead flesh from the breast, and found the breast-bone bare; Mr. Campbell stated to me, when I was first called in, the treatment he had adopted, and he conformed to my suggestions subsequently - I certainly approved of the mode of treatment he had adopted; I had attended Mrs. Loyd about three years before for an affection of the throat - I was at first under an impression that she might have a narrow orifice into the stomach, but having passed a pretty long sponge several times, I was satisfied that was not the disease; and that it was a complaint called globus hystericus, which is a nervous affection, an inverted motion of the cesophagus; it is a very common complaint, particularly with women in early life - I never knew a woman die of it; I have seen some thousands in it - in my opinion, a wound on

the chest would not relieve such a disease; I afterwards attended the opening of the body, by desire of the Coroner - the whole body, both internal and external, was in a very healthy state; it was externally very fat, but all in a healthy state, with two exceptions - one was the disease of the gland, and the inflammatory effect of the lining of the windpipe, occasioned by their contiguity to the upper part of the ulcer; I am certain of that- it is my opinion, that before the ulcer was occasioned those two parts were free from disease; there was a little narrowness at the entrance of the oesophagus, which I believe to be congenital, as there was no thickening of the part; I believe the mortification to be the cause of her death, and that to be caused by high inflammation, which was produced by some powerful application.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was there any period at which you gave the deceased's friend's hopes of her recovery? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Suppose a liniment, or liquid, to have been applied on Sunday, the 10th, to have been rubbed in then, and spread so as to produce the appearance of inflammation on Tuesday evening from arm to arm, was that such a case as might have produced the effect you observed? A. Certainly; I should suppose the body was pre-disposed to inflammation, as it was a very fat and healthy body, indeed, it would be evident to any man of common judgment.

Q. Would a man of common prodence, or skill, have applied what would have produced such an inflammation as has been described to have taken place two days after the application? A. I think not - all irritating external applications sometimes exceed our expectations; I would add, that they are generally kept within control - it certainly would be an act of great rashness to use an application that could have produced such an inflammation, and would certainly be ignorance.

JURY. Q. If you had been called in, say on the 12th, could you have prevented her death? A. That is a very difficult question to reply to - I should like to be excused giving an opinion beyond my own knowledge of facts; I should think it was not likely that I could - I think it was a case of great peril from the commencement; I have admitted, from Mr. Campbell's account, the propriety of his treatment, and therefore I do not conceive I could have improved it.

Q. You approved of Mr. Campbell's treatment? A. The account he gave me satisfied me of the propriety of his management - his account to day corresponds with the account he gave me; "simple" applied to ointment, means it is not of an irritating quality.

BENJAMIN COLINS BRODIE , ESQ. I was requested by Mr. Vance to see the deceased, on Friday, the 29th of October - I found her in a very dangerous state; a large sloughing ulcer in her breast and chest, the appearance of which led me to believe that in all probability it would be the cause of her death - I believe that ulcer might be produced by rubbing a corrosive liniment on the part on the 10th.

Q. Do you know of any state of disease which would render it necessary to apply a liniment capable of producing such an ulcer? A. No, I do not know of any disease which could induce a person to use a liniment with the intention of producing such an effect; I have heard Mr. Campbell examined - I was present at the examination after death, and from the evidence given, I should not think that other medical assistance would have been likely to produce any other result - it does not appear to me that any different treatment would produce a different effect.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. I believe it is quite a common practice now to use counter-irritation? A. Yes, it always has been.

Q. Has not the same application that on one subject will produce beneficial effect, often produced an injurious one, going beyond what was intended? A. Certainly; it of course depends on the habit and constitution; the effects of application of external liniments certainly sometime go beyond what was intended.

Q. Therefore the most scientific practitioner may be deceived in his application? A. Certainly; he cannot always calculate to a nicety - I do not recollect an instance of death having been produced by a blister, but I suppose such a thing may have been - I should suppose a patient, walking five or six miles with a blister on her breast, would add to the irritation - I should not treat all wounds alike; I should inquire the cause of the wound, and the state of the patient.

Q. Suppose an ulcer from a blister to be caused by an application unknown to the medical adviser, would not the application of any substance, not congenial, tend to increase the wound? A. I think it would be desirable to know the nature of the application, but do not think it would lead to a different treatment - we do not always apply the same antidore in cases of poison, especially in poisons taken into the stomach.

Q. Would not an incompatible substance, applied to a wound in the breast, be likely to produce mischief instead of good? A. I suppose that some substances might be better than others; with respect to the external treatment, I do not know that the surgeon would judge much from the nature of the application that produced it - he would not certainly judge so much from that as from the appearances.

Q. A medical man, I presume, when he sets about a cure, pretty well arranges, in his own mind, the course he intends to adopt; now if a stranger, without consulting with the person who originally made the application, applies something which the person who originally made the application did not, do not you think it would be attended with destructive effects? A. I should like to know the application, certainly.

COURT. Q. What is your answer? A. That certainly it would be so sometimes.

MR. ALLEY. Q. When a particular line is intended to be pursued, a stranger coming in, not knowing the course intended, and adopting a different one, would not that be likely to produce mischief? A. Of course such a circumstance might occur.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. Supposing you had seen a wound in the state Mr. Campbell has described it to be on the 12th of October, should you have thought it necessary to resort to the person whose treatment had produced the wound? A. I should not have thought it necessary absolutely; and indeed, in the case I have

heard described, I doubt whether it could have led to any useful consequence; still I should have got the information if I could, in case it might throw light on the patient's condition - when I say it might be dangerous to deviate from the original plan, I mean the plan of a man of science - I should certainly not think spermacetiointment could have increased the danger; I never saw such an effect produced by any ordinary medical application.

COURT. Q. Could you impute such an effect to the constitution of the patient, unless a dangerous remedy had been used? A. There are some constitutions in which very slight remedies will produce very serious consequences; I have known one person die from the bite of a leach - another from the sting of a bee - that must refer to the state of the constitution; I had no means of knowing any thing of the state of this lady's constitution; from the evidence I have heard in Court I should believe, from the way the inflammation made progress, that it depended more on the nature of the application, than the patient's constitution - it may have depended partly on each.

Q. When a thing in some instances may be beneficial, and in others injurious, is it not usual to judge of the constitution before you make the application? A. It is; we cannot always form an accurate judgment; but in using a violent potent remedy, we proceed with great caution - I can form no positive opinion whether from the effect produced, the person acted with undue caution, rashness, or ignorance - a liniment of this nature ought to have been used with great caution; the impression on my mind is, that it was not used with sufficient caution, though I do not form a positive opinion; it was used with rashness I should think.

Q. Did you ever, in the course of your whole practice,(which I believe is very extensive) know an instance of such inflammation being produced by an external application? A. No, I cannot say I ever did - I have known blisters and other liniments produce mischief greater than was intended, but have not seen such extensive mischief as was produced in this instance; I should think the effect of such an irritating application would be rapid.

MR. RICHARD FRANKUM . I am a surgeon. I saw the deceased once, about a week before her death, and was present at the examination after death; I observed nothing to lead me to suppose there was any peculiarity of constitution to to account for the violent effect produced - she was apparently very healthy indeed, except where the injury was done.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I think I can prove if there was any thing poisonous at the time I saw Mrs. Loyd, that effect must have produced death in two or three days - eight days elapsed according to the evidence of Mr. Campbell, before any injury took place; he says there was a discharge of matter, and that the part appeared red - that proved the parts were healthy; if it was not so bright and red, it must be inflamed, and poison must have been applied, but the parts were red and healthy, and that lasted eight days, which goes to prove no injury was done on Tuesday - when I called on Mrs. Loyd, I inquired who did the injury which produced the blisters; I produced no blisters - I know nothing of it; when Captain Loyd called on me; I inquired why she had not come to inhale - he said she was ill; I went to see her, and said, "This is bad practice, who has produced these blisters?" Mrs. Loyd said herself, and Mrs. Campbell confirmed it, and afterwards acknowledged that her son did it, and that she desired her son to attend Mrs. Loyd - it is in evidence before the Coroner, that Mrs. Loyd - consulted Mr. Campbell without consulting me; Mr. Campbell said she should not do so, and Captain Loyd and Mrs. Campbell say nothing about the blisters on Monday, but on Tuesday, after Mr. Campbell commenced his practice, I saw it, and condemned it; these are the words of Mrs. Campbell at the inquest, as to what I said, "You are using a wrong dressing, it should be only old linen to absorb it;" I offered to wipe it, but was prevented - Mrs. Campbell seemed exceedingly angry because I condemned the practice of her son; I called next day, and Miss Loyd told me her mother was so much better and asleep - her son called next day, and said his mamma was so much better, I need not trouble to go to Kensington; we kept up that sort of conversation for a week, and I concluded she was well - when on my trial here before I expected her as a witness; I knew nothing of her illness till Mr. Wontner told me I should soon be in Newgate again - I did not know what for, but it seems it was mentioned among medical gentlemen here, and an inquest was held; about a week after I left here, I sent Mr. Rawlings to see Mrs. Loyd - Captain Loyd would not admit him to the post mortem examination; when the lady was opened, the head was not examined, nor the spine, yet it is in evidence that Mrs. Loyd had head-aches - it will also be proved she had copious expectorations - Mr. Vance says the mouth was corroded by inhaling, if so the whole body must be affected, and the lungs appeared perfectly sound, this is inconsistent - I had nothing to do with it; I knew nothing of the circumstances till Captain Loyd told me; and Mr. Campbell admitted here to-day, that eight days had elapsed before mortification took place; he made no change in the application, which was wrong - a greasy plaister, if discharge was produced, must produce mischief; he should have applied exciting plasters - no medical man will say they ever cured mortification yet with a spermaceti-plaister; there is nothing in it to excite - the evidence will prove as far as my practice goes, that inhaling never produced any injury; it will be proved, by my extensive practice, that a blister was never known to be produced by my applications, or that my means ever produced any injury - some of my patients had my application home with them, and used it. Gentlemen, on these grounds you cannot find fault with me; if you had commenced business yourselves, or any kind of work, and it was taken from you, and got into other hands, and it was afterwards injured or spoiled, do you think you would be answerable? is there any man alive who can say if she had continued under my care, I should not have cured her? my conviction is she would have been alive to-day; and if Mr. Vance could have encouraging hopes of her doing well after mortification, and if he had been called in four days before, when no mortification took place, he must have saved her; it was given in evidence that the skin was not broken, and no evidence can show it was broken for

eight days after - if there was any corrosive substance applied on the Tuesday, or at any other time, it must not only have destroyed the skin, but the parts under it, and if a corrosive substance was applied, no discharge could have taken place. It is evident the vitality was not injured - if it was, it must have become as if dead, and mortified at once; if there was corrosive substance applied on the Tuesday, that must have destroyed the parts immediately - the application I make use, of my patients even gargle with, and wash their face and teeth, and no injury occurs; at the last trial Dr. Brodie said there was mortification - Dr. Thompson said, in direct contradiction to him, there was no mortification, "For by mortification," said he, "we mean the coming away of the parts" - now the charge against me is for doing what no man alive can do; if my patient was under my care I would have saved her - she died under the hands of others. Why was I singled out to be prosecuted? why was not I put into the witness-box as well as Mr. Campbell? why is not Mr. Campbell put here instead of me, for allowing mortification to come on? - and Mr. Vance approved of his practice when he did not know what he did; yet he approved of what brought on mortification - I took medical gentlemen to see the case; they were not admitted; why should I be responsible for what was done by Mr. Campbell, who is young and inexperienced? his mother desired him to attend Mrs. Loyd, and if there was any thing wrong in me, why did Mrs. Loyd send for me? Mrs. Campbell forced her son to attend - he says, in evidence, "My mother desired me to attend her;" and he desired I should not attend her; and was it not very natural for him to try to get a patient entirely under his care? When I sent to the house Mrs. Campbell told Mr. Sayer that Mrs. Loyd would be well enough in four days to undertake a journey to Cheltenham - Mrs. McDougal, when she went to enquire, heard Dr. Frankum say that I was making 12,000l. a year, and he could scarcely make any thing; they then told her Mrs. Loyd was likely to die from suffocation, yet the lungs were perfectly sound. Where did it come from? I wish to know these points? I merely point out to you that I had nothing to do with Mrs. Loyd - she came to me and inhaled - she left me, and went under other persons' care; if she died under my hands I should be accountable, but I condemned the practice the moment I saw it - is there a medical man will say mortification can be cured by spermaceti-plaisters? - they have not accounted satisfactorily for what they have done. Now, gentlemen, the argument against me is that I am ignorant and unacquainted with medicine - I am willing to stand any examination; one gentleman is here who conversed with me last night on the nervous system and the human frame - he says, "Well, I am willing to state on oath that you are acquainted with the human frame;" Dr. E - will prove I have dissected; before I began on serious cases, I practised on small cases - the witnesses coming here are the incurables of these very gentlemen; Mr. Vance had a patient who will be here - I have placed into the hip-bone a socket, which Mr. Vance and Mr. Brodie said could not be done; again, I have evidence that I cured mortification, since this prosecution against me - if this verdict is against me there is not a medical gentleman who is not liable; I am not aware that I am doing wrong; but, Mr. Brodie attended Mr. Buller, of Gloucester-place, four or five weeks ago, for a cancer on the lip - the gentleman had had it ten or twelve years; he was in no kind of danger - he consulted, I believe, Mr. Brodie and Mr. Vance; they cut it off, and he died in three days - there was no prosecution there; medical men are not going to be thier own witnesses, though they condemn me to-day - if Captain Loyd was the only witness against me who would condemn me? you might as well condemn Mr. Campbell - he brought on the mortification; but my patients are here, the incurables of the faculty; I have cured consumption, which they acknowledge they never cured - I must understand anatomy; it may be said I only cure particular diseases, which quacks do - I have cured every disease, even derangement - cancers - diseases of the lungs, and the patients consulting me are those who do not get relief from the faculty; you will hear that medicine could do them no good, but they are cured - I say Mr. Campbell's treatment was unskilful, and if Mr. Vance had had the case at the begining, he would have restored her; there was a discharge, which proves health - why should he have checked it? - he should have put a poultice on - in a case like the small-pox, humours are driven to the surface; well then, a bile comes on the wound, that should be drawn off - would any medical man try to heal up an abcess, and drive it in? the spermaceti-plaister checked the discharge, filled the vessels, and the parts mortified, because the matter was not drawn off, and death followed - but here I do not know whether death should have followed, as they say Mrs. Loyd was a healthy subject; but I say she had disease when she consulted me - why did she trouble to come all the way to Harley-street if she was not ill? she knew some of my patients - they were connexions of hers; she had ample opportunities of knowing my practice - I never lost one patient that was not first a failure of the faculty; I challenge the world to produce a single patient, who died under my hands, who was not decided to be incurable by medical men before - I have cured many who I gave no hopes to; I have spent more money in my education than any ten physicians - look at the expences I have been at in Harley-street - and see the machinery there; I have cured by it, and that is all I want - I am charged with not curing a patient who was not under my care; they took her away from me - they prosecute me; and my sentence, as far as I have heard, is, that I should be here again, because I got off the last time - I leave my case in the hands of a British Judge and Jury; how many medical men might be brought here if answerable in this way? who would attend you, gentlemen, if ill to-morrow? I am told I stand here on the same footing as a member of the College of Physicians - I have as much liberty to practice as they have, provided I have done no harm; this is nothing but a persecution against me, because I have discovered a remedy for the cure of consumptions - the prevention of the small pox - the removal of the gout - and of insanity - the prosecution is by the medical gentlemen; and the last prosecution against me was paid by the medical gentlemen - I have practised among you, and do all the good I can; I had no interested motives with Mrs. Loyd - I only received 1l. 10s. from her, and I took her son for nothing; I have many patients that never pay me a farthing - that will do away with my being influenced by mercenary motives; I havespent a fortune in the search of medicine - I dissected fourteen years ago, and made a discovery, or I did not intead to follow medicine.

MR. PHILLIPS to MRS. CAMPBELL? Q. Did you ever say to any body, while your son had the care of Mrs. Loyd, that you had the best means of knowing how she was, as your son attended her, and she would be well enough to be removed to Cheltenham in four days? A. I said to Captain Sayer , who was in our house, that Mrs. Loyd was better, and we were in hopes she would be able to be removed in four days - I did not say where to; I had no idea of her going; I will not swear I did not say I had the best means of knowing, as my son attended her - I cannot tell when I said this; Captain Sayer was in our house, and asked me the question - it very likely might be on Wednesday, the 13th, I cannot say.

MR. ATTORNEY-GRNERAL. Q. Had Captain and Mrs. Loyd come on a visit to you? A. Yes, on the 28th of September - they had only come on a visit for a week.

COURT. Q. Did your son tell you at any time that he thought Mrs. Loyd would not get over it? A. He told me so very early, perhaps the second day - it was before I spoke to Captain Sayer ; I did not feel myself justified in giving my son's opinion for any thing - he did not desire me to keep it a secret; I mentioned it to Captain Loyd as soon as my son stated it - that was on the Thursday; I told him my son was fearful she would not get over it.

CAPTAIN LOYD re-examined. When Mr. Campbell first saw the wound he said it was an extraordinary wound, and a very dangerous one, and that he had rarely seen so large a wound - Mrs. Campbell said she thought it looked very dangerous on the Sunday night, after Mrs. Loyd complained of chilliness, and that it was very alarming, because it was generally the forerunner of mortification.

Q. How happened it that you did not call in additional assistance earlier? A. Mrs. Loyd's general good health led me to hope she would get over it without additional assistance; and I judged, from the very large practice Mr. Campbell had, he must be clever, and I continued satisfied till the wound remained open so much longer than I expected - what confirmed me in that was the spot, where she originally applied the blister, was getting much smaller.

WILLIAM ABINGDON . I have held a situation in the East India-house for forty-four years, and have been under Mr. Long's care several times since 1828, and had reason to be satisfied with his skill, care, and attention - I resorted to him for different disorders.

MRS. ASHWORTH. I am the wife of General Ashworth . I have had occasion to require the professional attendance of Mr. Long for many members of my family, adults and infants, for a variety of disorders since, I think, last March to the present time; his attention cannot be exceeded -I found more skill and benefit from him than from all the doctors I ever attended: I have derived more benefit from him.

MISS ROOKE. I am Mrs. Ashworth's sister, and daughter of the late Judge Rooke. I have been under Mr. Long's care since March last - I have the greatest opinion of his skill and attention; I have derived the highest benefit from him - I am still under his care, and have seen his conduct to Mrs. and General Ashworth , and give the same testimony as to his conduct to them.

MRS. PRENDERGAST. I have known the prisoner more than a year - all my family have been under his care for different disorders, and were perfectly satisfied with his care, skill, kindness, and attention - when I require medical attendance I continue to resort to him.

MRS. McDONALD. I have known Mr. Long since Christmas twelve months, and attended him for more than one disorder, and he once attended my infant - he was extremely kind and attentive; I derived great benefit from his skill.

MRS. WEBB. I have known Mr. Long nearly three years - he attended me nearly three years ago for four months, and restored me to health, after being given over by three medical gentlemen - he attended my boy, who it six months old, for a cold about four months ago; I was perfectly satisfied with his skill - I have been at his house when a great number of patients have been attending; they had a high opinion of his skill and attention - they all considered him very clever.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. Are those persons dead or alive? A. They are here now - Miss Saunders and Miss Page are two of them.

M. G. PRENDERGAST, M. P. I have known Mr. Long since the middle of January last year. I consulted him as a medical attendant, and derived the greatest possible benefit from him - I observed his treatment to other patients, and have the most satisfactory opinion of his judgment, skill, and kindness.

HARRIET PAGE . I live at Ramsgate, and have been acquainted with Mr. Long about two years - I consulted him for one disorder, and observed his attention to other people; I was so satisfied of his skill that if I was again ill I would immediately place myself under his care.

COLONEL CAMPBELL, R. A. I am stationed at Woolwich, I have known Mr. Long twelve months, and resorted to him for advise for my daughter - my sister was also under his care; I had every reason to be satisfied with his care, skill, and attention.

- OUGHTON. I live at Roehampton - I lived at Manchester till within two months. Mr. Long did not attend me, but my nephew - I have every reason to be satisfied with his care, skill, and attention; I have to express myself in the highest degree satisfied of the talent and ability of Mr. Long.

MISS SWINDEN. I live in Sloane-street. I have known Mr. Long since 1828, and been under his care seven weeks, during that year, but not more - I was perfectly satisfied with his skill, and all the patients who were with me expressed the greatest satisfaction with him.

MRS. McDOUGAL. I am the widow of an officer in the army, and live in Great Castle-street, Regent-street. I have known Mr. Long since December, 1829, and been frequently under his care: I was perfectly satisfied with his treatment as a medical man - he bears a very good character for care and ability, among those who knew him.

MR. ATTORNEY-GENERAL. Q. How long have you had the misfortune to be a widow? A. Ten years - I became acquainted with Mr. Long in Harley-street; I came to town with a relation who was placed under his care; I

lived in his house for about a month, with my cousin, who is a sister of Colonel Campbell's.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You said there with this young lady? A. She is not young - she is the mother of eight children.

MISS GREENAWAY. I live in North-bank, Regent's-park. I have known Mr. Long about two years and a half- I was under his care for three months, and have the highest opinion of his skill and humanity, not only from his conduct to me, but to others.

MISS ELLEN GREGORY . I am single, and live at Shacklewell, with my parents; my father is living on his property. I have known Mr. Long nearly three years, and consulted him twice - I think him the kindest - the most attentive - and the most skilful person I ever met with, from his conduct to others as well as myself.

MR. LINGS. I am a cheesemonger, and live in the Borough. I consulted Mr. Long about ten months since, and was seven weeks under his care; I observed his treatment to others as well as myself - his skill and attention was such as to give me the greatest satisfaction.

SAMUEL WILDINGS . I live in Shrepshire. I become acquainted with Mr. Long rather better than three years ago; I was eleven weeks under his care - I have so high an opinion of his skill and humanity, that if ill I would immediately put myself under his care again.

FOREMAN TAYLOR. I live at Enfield, and have been acquainted with Mr. Long about a year and three quarters, when Dr. Miller, my medical man, took me there - he is an apothecary at Enfield; I only saw Mr. Long once - I went by his prescription, and got better very rapidly.

GEORGE MANLEY . I live at Westminster, and am a wine-merchant. I have known Mr. Long three years - I put a child of mine under his care; he attended it about two months; from my observation of his care to him and other patients, I have reason to form the greatest opinion of his skill; he cured my child of consumption, and from his kindness only received half fees from me.

LEWIS G -. I live at North-bank, Regent's-park, and am a professor of music. I have been Mr. Long's patient twice, and observed his skill and kindness, also to his patients - they were always very well satisfied with him; I had a good opinion of his skill, and should be his patient to-morrow if I was in the same pain again.

GEORGE MORRIS . I am a clerk, and live in Tower-street. I was about five weeks under Mr. Long's care, and observed his care and skill to his patients - I am perfectly satisfied with it, and consider him perfectly humane.

MRS. BELL. I live in Russell-square - my husband is a merchant. I was under Mr. Long's care better than four months, and have the greatest confidence in him.

SAMUEL SUTTABY . I am an auctioneer, and live in Wellington-street. I was under Mr. Long's care three months, and have the highest opinion possible of him - he relieved me in a manner no medical man ever did or could do; I had tried many for years.

JOHN MORGAN . I am a solicitor, and live in Great James-street. I was nearly three weeks under Mr. Long's care, and consider him a very skilful man, and very kind; every body who was there at the time I was, were of the same opinion - a great many persons were attending there.

JOHN PEMBERTON . I am a surveyor and builder, and live at Hertford. I have known Mr. Long about two years and a half - I consulted him about a child of mine who was under his care for about six months, in his house; I sent her from Hertford - I had consulted other medical men about her; I have great reason to say, I have a great opinion of Mr. Long - my child is quite well now; it is two years since she left him - she was never well before she went to him, from ten months old, at intervals; she is now about seven years and a half old - I had consulted other medical gentlemen for my other children as well, and two physicians from London.

ALFRED BRADFORD . I live in Mary-street, Fitzroy-square. I have not consulted Mr. Long for myself - my brother was under his care, and I believe him to be decidedly a skilful man, very attentive and kind - I have been present when he attended my brother, who had been under the faculty a long time, without effect.

ALEXANDER BURNE . I am a merchant, and live in Montague-place. I have consulted Mr. Long, and have the highest possible opinion of him - I have seen him perform cures where others have failed.

COURT. Q. Do you know that other people had been consulted before? A. I was told so by the persons.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-105

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

530. ELIZABETH RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 18th of January , of a certain evil-disposed person, I silver spoon, value 3s.; 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 3 napkins, value 3s.; 2 aprons, value 2s.; 2 caps, value 7s.; 2 remnants of lace, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 2 breast-pins, value 5s., the goods of Benjamin Perry , well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

WILLIAM PERRY . I live with my brother, Benjamin Perry - he keeps the Independant public-house, in Brewer-street, Somer's-town ; I lost a shirt-pin and silk handkerchief about the 3rd of January, and spoke to my brother's wife - Martha Foster , the servant, was taken into custody on Monday, the 17th of January - I do not, of my own knowledge, know where Foster had lodged -I had seen the prisoner before - she lived in Princes-street, Edgware-road; I went to her house with a Police-officer, on the 18th of January; the prisoner opened the door to me - I asked if she knew Martha Foster ; she said she did - I asked when she had seen her; she said,"Not for five weeks;" I said I heard she was there on the Sunday previous, which was the 16th of January - she denied that; I told her I was positive she had been, and brought a bundle - she then said she had, and left two dirty aprons to wash, and a cap to bleach; the prisoner brought them to me, and a tea-spoon wrapped up in the cap - she said that was all she had belonging to Martha Foster in the house; I told her it was useless for her to deny the other articles, for I was aware there were many other things - she then said there were one or two articles of Foster's, she believed, in a box of her own up stairs; I went up with her, and she opened a box in the front-room, which is a laundry; I took out of that box

a table-cloth, three napkins, a pillow-case, a cap, and the articles here produced - here is an apron, some lace, and a breast-pin, which she brought down with the caps at first - that is mine; the breast-pin and handkerchief are mine; the rest belong to my brother's wife, and are my brother's property ( Benjamin Perry ) - the box was not locked; there was no bed in the room; there were some petticoats and other articles of her own wearing-apparel, as she said.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. She said she did know Foster? A. Yes, but she had not seen her for some time - I do not know whether Foster had lodged there previous to going into my brother's service; Foster had then been taken into custody in my brother's house; the prisoner stated that a man, who came in after the house was searched, was her husband - she did not offer the least resistance to my searching the house; she was admitted to bail by the Magistrate.

COURT. Q. Had you seen any of these articles shortly before the 18th of January? A. I think I had seen my handkerchief within a fortnight - I do not recollect any thing else.

CHARLOTTE PERRY . I am the wife of Benjamin Perry- this table-cloth is mine; it has my mark on it, and so has this pillow-case; these caps are mine, and the other articles; these other caps belong to another servant in my house, and this spoon, I believe, is ours, but I cannot swear to it; it is the same as mine in shape and make, but there is no mark on it - it is like one I lost, and that was the only article I missed till these things were produced - these napkins I believe are mine, but I will not swear to them - there is part of a mark on two of them, which has been picked out.

JOSEPH PARROTT . I am a Police-constable. On the 18th of January I accompanied William Perry to the prisoner's house - I knocked at the door; she let me in, and I asked if she knew a young woman named Foster; she said, "Yes," but she had not seen her for five weeks - I said I was certain she had; and when she came to recollect herself, she said she was at her house on Sunday night; I asked if she did not bring a bundle - she said she did not; I said, "I am certain she did;" she recollected herself, and then said she brought two dirty aprons to wash, which hung up behind the door; she took them down, and I saw Mr. Perry's name on them in full - I asked if there were any other articles there; she said she believed there were some up stairs, which Martha Foster told her Mr. Perry's brother, who was an auctioneer, had knocked down to her at a sale - I went up; she opened a box, and Mr. Perry cast his eyes on one of the articles, took hold of it, and said, "This is my brother's;" he then took out these other articles - the prisoner made no resistance; there were other articles in the box - I asked whose they were; she said, "My own wearing apparel;" I asked if there were any more belonging to Mr. Perry - she said No, I was welcome to search, but I found no thing; she did not say when Foster had left them - some of those articles were clean, as if they had come from the mangle, and the things which the prisoner said were hers appeared to me to be clean; the caps, and one or two trifling articles, appeared dirty - they were in a little blue bag, which had the pin and the spoon in.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner before this? A. No - she at first hesitated in giving an answer; I had plain clothes on - when I said I was an officer she gave me every facility of finding the things; she showed me the dirty aprons behind the door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-106

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

531. JOHN WILCOX was indicted for putting off three counterfeit half-crowns to Edward Birt , for the sum of 3s. ; against the Statute, &c.

MR. SCARLETT conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD BIRT . I am a carpenter , and live at No, 1, Old Kent-road. In consequence of an application from Myers, to assist him in detecting persons dealing in counterfeit coin, I went with him, on the 8th of January, to the Green Man, in Little George-street, Westminster - I there met Mr. Gollocker, the officer, and he furnished me with three shillings; (I had been introduced to the prisoner on the 10th of December , at No, 4, Almonry, and had arranged to meet him on the 8th of January) - when I had got the three shillings from the officer on that day, I went and met the prisoner opposite the Sessions'-house; Charles Smith was with him - the officers were at that time in the Green Man parlour, about sixty yards off, and they could see me; the prisoner said he had brought me three half-crowns - he had before asked what I should want, and I said three half-crowns; I gave him the same three shillings I had received of Gollocker - I had no other counterfeit money, or any money whatever, about me at the time; I returned to the officer in a very few minutes - I marked the half-crowns which I got from the prisoner, and gave them to Gollocker.

COURT. Q. When you first met the officer, on the 8th of January, had you any money about you? A. No, not any - I had only the three shillings which the officer gave me when I purchased, and when I returned I had only the three half-crowns; I did not see any other person on that day, till after I had bought the three half-crowns of the prisoner - I did afterwards, but I bought of this prisoner first; I had bought money of the prisoner before that day.

Prisoner. Q. Had you any more bad half-crowns in your pocket? A. No - I bought three of you, and three of Smith, but I did not have the whole six in my possession when I went back.

RICHARD MYERS . I am a tobacconist, and was a constable for about ten years in Surrey, but I am not in office now; I have known Birt about two years and a half - he is a carpenter and joiner; I applied to him to assist me in detecting persons selling counterfeit coin - he agreed to act under my direction; he is a respectable man, as far as I know - I met him on the 8th of January; Gollocker was with me - I had heard there was to be a meeting with him and the prisoner; I searched Birt before he went to the prisoner, and gave Gollocker three shillings to give him, which he did in my presence - they were not marked, because it was not our intention to take him at that time; soon afterwards I saw the prisoner come with another man, and lean against a post by the burial-ground, opposite the Sessions'-house - Birt went out, and I saw the prisoner give him something in his hand I

kept my eye on him all the time - I then saw Birt return something to him; Birt then returned to us at the Green Man, and produced three half-crowns, which he marked, and gave to Gollocker, who gave them to me - I produce them; I then went out of the house - Birt followed me; he joined the prisoner, and as I went by I heard the prisoner say to him, "They are the same as the last, they are very good ones;" we did not take the prisoner then, as we had others to take, and we should have lost them if we had taken him.

COURT. Q. When you searched Birt, he had no money, good nor bad? A. No, and when he came back he brought these three half-crowns, which he marked, and gave to Gollocker, who gave them to me; we had appointed Saturday, the 15th of January, to apprehend the prisoner, and I went with Hall and Gollocker to a house in the Almonry, at Westminster - the prisoner and another man were standing before the fire, and there was a woman on each side of them; the prisoner and the other man leaned forward over the fire - Hall seized the other man; the prisoner put his left hand over the fire, and put something in; I put in my hand, and took out eight base half-crowns - the prisoner made a little resistance, but I told him it was of no use, for if he did I would take his arm off.

Prisoner. Q. Was any thing found on Birt? A. No, nothing but these three half-crowns - he dealt with Smith after he dealt with you, and then he came to us.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. I have the eight half-crowns, which Myers took out of the fire at the Almonry, when we took the prisoner and Charles Smith.

JAMES GOLLOCKER . I was with Myers on the 8th and 15th of January; what has been stated is true.

JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin for the Mint. These three half-crowns are all counterfeit, and so are these eight; these are all of the same description, and cast from white metal, but from different dies.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-107

532. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for a like offence .

MR. SCARLETT conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD BIRT . I was introduced to the prisoner by Barness, on the 13th of December, to purchase counterfeit coin of him - I met him on the 8th of January, at the time I met Wilcox; I had received three shillings from the officer before I met the prisoner, and I had no other money, good or bad; the prisoner sold me three half-crowns for the three shillings which I had received of the officer - I took the half-crowns back to the officer; I marked them, and gave them to Gollocker - I kept the three half-crowns I bought of this prisoner in my left hand, and the three I bought of Wilcox in my right hand; I had no conversation with the prisoner on that occasion, only he said those I had of him were quite as good as those I had of Wilcox.

Prisoner. He never went back with three half-crowns - he had six altogether.

COURT. Q. Did you purchase three half-crowns from one, and three from the other? A. Yes - I had received six shillings, and bought six half-crowns.

RICHARD MYERS . I went to the Green Man, on the 8th of January - we there furnished Birt with two three shillings; he was to put three in his left-hand pocket, and three in his right - shortly afterwards the prisoner and Wilcox came up opposite the Sessions'-house, and Birt went out, he dealt with Wilcox first, and then with this prisoner; we saw the money pass, and then Birt returned and told us which he had received from each of them - he marked them, and delivered them to us; he then went out -I went another way, and passed this prisoner and Birt together - the prisoner chinked up a shilling, and said, "They are quite as good as the others;" on the 15th of January, when we went to take Wilcox, this prisoner was standing on the right-hand side of the fire - Gollocker seized him, and took him to the other end of the room; I said, "There is some money gone, be particular in looking," but we could not find any - there was a square of glass broken, and we afterwards found the money had gone out of the window; there were eight half-crowns found in the fire.

JAMES GOLLOCKER . I was with Myers on the 8th, and on the 15th January - what has been stated is correct.

JOHN FIELD . These are all counterfeits, and prepared in the same way as the others.

Prisoner. There was a towel up against the window.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-108

533. CHARLES PERKINS and JOHN CARTWRIGHT were indicted for a like offence .

MR. SCARLETT conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD BIRT . I am a carpenter. On the 17th of November I went to the Golden Cans, public-house, at the corner of Laystall-street and Tothill-street, Westminster , about a quarter before nine o'clock - I saw the two prisoners there; Perkins went by the name of Charles Green - I was introduced to them then; I had never seen them before - I went out with Cartwright to purchase some counterfeit coin of him; when I went in, Barnes spoke to Perkins, and he nodded to me to stop there - Perkins then came up to me, and said he did not serve himself, but as he had a knowledge of the person who had introduced me, his partner Cartwright should serve me; Perkins, who called himself Green, then produced a bag, which he gave to Cartwright when I was in the passage - Cartwright and I then went on to the corner of the street, under the bar-window; he there asked me what coin I wanted - I said six half-crowns, and he gave them to me out of the bag which had been given him by Perkins, and I gave him 6s. for them, which I had received from Gollocker; the bag contained more money - I saw more half-crowns in it; when I had given Cartwright the 6s., Perkins came up, and said he ran quite risk enough by making them, without selling them to a person he had no knowledge of; Cartwright gave him the 6s. - after this transaction was finished, I went to Gollocker at the Red Lion, in Fleet-street; Myers went with me - he had been standing in Laystall-street, and I believe saw me deal; I could see him at the time - I marked the counterfeit half-crowns at the Red Lion, and gave them to Myers; Cartwright said that if neither he nor Perkins were at the Golden Cans, I might ask the waiter, who would find them - I did not know where they lived.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever

go to the waiter at the Golden Cans? A. No - I am very seldom without business; I have two or three notes in my pocket now - I did not bring them for any purpose; I have known Myers two years or better - he was an officer when I first knew him; he first employed me in jobs of this kind last summer, in the case of McCarthy - I was then in business as a carpenter, and had not much time to spare, but I considered it my public duty to undertake such a job; it was from principle and duty, but I expected to be paid for my loss of time - I do not consider I was paid enough; I believe I got between 4l. and 5l. in McCarthy's case - I was very well satisfied; these cases are the next I have had - I have not looked for any other; I do not know whether I expect as much for each of these cases as I had in McCarthy's - I do not know that it depends on their conviction, or acquittal; I value my time at 4s. 6d. a day - I have got 5s. 6d.; I think the Mint paid me 4s. 6d. a day in McCarthy's case, but I do not recollect.

JURY. Q. Did Myers see you in the passage? A. Yes, he was standing in the street.

RICHARD MYERS . I am a tobacconist, and was for ten years a constable. I know Birt, and employed him to assist me in this business - he receives no remuneration but for his loss of time; no bargain is made with him that I know of - on the 17th of November, an appointment was made to meet him and Barnes at the Red Lion, in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street; we met soon after eight o'clock in the evening - I searched Birt, and found nothing on him; he was then furnished with six good shillings - I then went with him and Barnes to the Three Golden Cans, in Laystall-street; we got there a little before nine o'clock - Barnes went into the house first, then Birt, and I took my station at a house opposite; in a short time I saw Birt come out, and stand with his back against the bar-window - he had not been there more than two or three minutes, I should think, when Cartwright came out, and stood immediately opposite him, with one foot on the curb and one off; Perkins then came out, and stood on the right of Cartwright - directly upon that Cartwright took something from his pocket, and put it into Birt's hands; Birt opened his hand and counted it, to give me, I suppose, an opportunity of seeing what it was, and I saw some large pieces of money, as there was a strong gas-lamp over them - the clock was striking nine at the time; the street is narrow, and I was opposite them, at a private house, elevated on a step - Birt then gave Cartwright something, and Perkins held his hand out and took it; he held his hand open, and turned it over, as if looking at it - he then turned round, went into the Golden Cans, and Cartwright followed him; Birt then came across to me, and gave me six half-crowns - that was directly after Cartwright had left him, and gone round the corner into the public-house; Birt gave them to me from the same hand that I saw him receive them in - I never lost sight of him; he had no money about him before, except what I gave him - these are the six half-crowns; I did not take the prisoners then, because we had others to take - the prisoner Cartwright was taken on the 15th of January, and then we went back again; Perkins came in, and was taken - I did not take either of them; I was waiting in Tothill-street, in case they should get away backwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you marked the six shillings? A. No, Sir; Birt was a respectable man; but I searched him, to satisfy the Jury that he had nothing; I can now swear more correctly that he had nothing - I do not know whether it is a licensed public-house or not; I am not in the habit of going to that end of the town- I have known Birt between two and three years; I have been employed by the Mint eight or nine years - I am not paid by the year or the month; I am paid for my loss of time - I sometimes get a crown a day, and sometimes less; I am paid according to the number of days I am employed -I employed Birt on McCarthy's case, but I did not pay him - he is paid by the Mint; I was an officer of Surrey for ten years- I did not belong to Union-hall; I was a parish constable, from year to year - I never was accused of letting a prisoner escape for the sum of 5l.; I am a tobacconist, and live on Newington-causeway - the house is my own, and six or seven others; I work for the Mint because I think it is my duty - I would not lose my time for government without being paid for it; I do not know how much I have received of the Mint in the last twelve months - perhaps 20l. or 30l., and I have been out for weeks and weeks about it; I will swear I have not received 200l. or 300l.; if I had my books here I could tell - I always make a minute of what takes place.

JAMES GOLLOCKER . I am a constable of Lambeth. I went on the 15th of January to the three Golden Cans, in Tothill-street, to take the prisoners; Myers, Hall, Lee, and Dunn, were with me - I stopped in Laystall-street till I thought the transaction was over; I then went to the Golden Cans, brushed into the house, and caught Cartwright's hand - he had twenty-four half-crowns in it; I caught hold of his wrist, and turned the half-crowns over into my own hand; Birt was then in the passage, just by the bar door - I marked the half-crowns, and gave them to Lee; I did not see Perkins at that time.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Barnes? A. Yes; we wished him to be here, in case there should be any thing particular asked us - he did not come with us; this was in the passage of the public-house - the landlady was in the bar.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable of Hatton-garden. I assisted in taking Cartwright, at the Golden Cans; I saw him standing at the door, talking to Birt - we rushed over, and Gollocker took twenty-four half-crowns out of his hand, which he marked in my presence, and handed over to me - I did not see them in Cartwright's hand, but I saw them taken from his hand.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Barnes? A. I saw him for the first time on the 15th of January - I do not know that he has been convicted of robbing the East India-house.

THOMAS DUNN . I am a constable of Lambeth. Myers asked me to go with them on the 15th of January - I went, and saw Cartwright drop a parcel of base coin into one of the officer's hands, one of them dropped down; one of the party said Perkins (calling him by the name of Green) was in the tap-room - I went in, and asked him if his name was Green; he said I was mistaken, he was not the party- I ran into the passage to get one of the officers, and when I returned he had fled away; I returned, and we took Cartwright - soon afterwards Perkins came in, and was taken; I think he had changed his waistcoat - I know

nothing of that public-house; it was the first time I had been there - there were a parcel of bad women and bad characters there.

Cross-examined. Q. You would know a bad character if you saw one? A. I am in the habit of seeing a great many - I am not acquainted with Barnes; I believe he was there on the 15th of January, but I do not know that I should know him; I think the waistcoat Perkins had on at first was a light colour - there seemed an alteration; he came back to the same spot, when he thought we were gone; I found thirteen penny-pieces and an old rag on him - I should imagine the public-house is licensed; there was a man playing a violin, and some low characters seemed to be dancing - the landlady was in the bar; I do not know whether she saw the transaction.

JOHN FIELD . These are all counterfeit, and the same metal as the others.

JURY to RICHARD MYERS . Q. From what part of his person did Cartwright get the half-crowns? A. Apparently from his middle; I stood on the step of a door directly opposite.

Perkins put in a written defence, declaring that he had nothing whatever to do with the transaction, that he had merely gone into the Golden Cans for some beer, and was apprehended.

PERKINS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

CARTWRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

534. CHARLES PERKINS and JOHN CARTWRIGHT were again indicted for a like offence .

MR. SCARLETT conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD BIRT . I met the two prisoners on the 1st of January, at the Three Golden Cans; I went into the taproom, and they pointed for me to go to the street door -Perkins there asked me how I got on; I said, "Very well;" he said I did not do many of them, meaning the counterfeit coin, which I had purchased of him - I got eight more half-crowns of Cartwright, who stood in the doorway; Perkins stood between the bar door and the street door - he handed them to Cartwright to give me, and I gave him 8s. for them, which I had got from Gollocker, at the Red Lion, in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street, about twenty minutes before - I had no other money, good or bad; I did not stay above three or four minutes with the prisoners - I then went to the Red Lion, marked the bad money, and gave it to Gollocker; at the time I bought these half-crowns of the prisoners, Gollocker stood opposite, in Laystall-street - Cartwright saw him, and asked if he was any one belonging to me; I said Yes, he was a friend of mine.

Perkins. Q. What time did you come there? A. At a quarter after seven o'clock - I saw you inside the door with Cartwright - you gave him the eight half-crowns as he was on the cill of the door; I then crossed to Gollocker, and we went to the Red Lion - you went towards the taproom; I do not know whether you went in - when Cartwright gave me the money I went into the street.

JAMES GOLLOCKER . I accompanied Birt, and stood opposite, under a gas-lamp - I had searched Birt before, to throw every doubt aside, and he had no money, bad or good, but what we gave him - he was not out of my sight, but just when he went within the door; he then came to the door, and I saw Cartwright give eight large pieces of money into his hand, and he gave Cartwright some money in return; Birt then came over to me with the half-crowns, and we took them to Poppin's-court.

RICHARD MYERS . I was in a court opposite the public-house - I saw Birt and Cartwright standing inside the door, on the threshold, and I saw another man behind, but I could not distinguish Perkins' face; I saw their hands going together, and directly the dealing was over, Birt came over, and gave the eight half-crowns to Gollocker - we went away: we took the prisoners on the 15th of January.

Perkins. Q. How was the door? A. It was shut when you were inside with him - when you dealt you were between the street door and the swing door - I was in a court which has a baker's-shop at one corner of it; I stated on a former occasion that they were half-crowns - you were under a gas-lamp, and I could see you distinctly.

JOHN FIELD . These eight half-crowns are all counterfeit, and the same as the rest.

PERKINS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

CARTWRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

Reference Number: t18310217-109

535. JOHN SWIFT was indicted for a like offence .

WILLIAM ROSE . I am a pork-butcher, and live in China-walk, Westminster-road. I was applied to by Myers to assist in taking the prisoner - I was introduced to the prisoner for the purpose of purchasing base coin of him, on the 31st of January ; I met him again by appointment on the 1st of February, in Eagle-court, St. John's-lane , opposite the White Swan - Myers and Gollocker went with me; they had previously searched me, and given me seven shillings, all in shillings, to purchase of the prisoner - I had no other money; I got the seven shillings in the White Swan - I met the prisoner opposite there, and went with him into Eagle-court, when he gave me a paper parcel, and I gave him the seven shillings; I was going to open the paper - he said, "Don't do that - you will have somebody see you;" I said, "There is no one here;" I held them out for Myers to see them, and said, "The edges are very bad;" the prisoner said, "Get a good half-crown, and rub them, and they will do very well;" I gave the same money to the officers in about five minutes - they had not been out of my hand till I gave them to the officers; the prisoner behaved very well - he called for a quartern of gin at the Blue Posts, and paid for it - he said he should see me another day.

JAMES GOLLOCKER . I am a constable of Lambeth. I went with Myers and Rose; I gave Rose seven shillings to purchase twelve counterfeit half-crowns of the prisoner- he went out while we sat in a box in the tap-room; I had before searched Rose, and he had no money but what we gave him - I saw him meet the prisoner at the corner of Eagle-court; they went down, and stood about two minutes together - I saw the prisoner give Rose a paper, and Rose gave him something; Rose held the parcel in his hand, and it appeared to contain something - Myers has the money.

RICHARD MYERS . I went with these two witnesses, whose evidence is correct - I searched Rose when he came back, and he had nothing but these twelve half-crowns, which I produce.

GEORGE DEWER . I took up the prisoner in Playhouseyard, on the 4th of February - he was in bed with a woman, whom he called his wife; I found this metal at the bottom of the fire-place, and this pipkin was on the hob, with a little metal in it; I found these moulds on the grate, and here is a bit of sand-paper, which has a little of the metal on it.

JOHN FIELD . These half-crowns are all bad, and of the same description as the others; this appears like metal, which, in a state of fusion, had fallen through the grate - it is the same metal as the coin is made of - these appear parts of a mould, in which such coin is cast - I can discover on them, with a glass, the faint remains of one or two letters which the coins bear.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met Rose there was another man in company with him, and I ought to have been detected at the time if I had offered them - I never had them, nor ever sold them.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-110

536. GEORGE HILL was indicted for unlawfully entering a certain enclosed land, at Stanwell , about twelve o'clock, in the night of the 5th of January, 1830 , belonging to Sir John Gibbons , Bart., for the purpose of taking and destroying game; he and others being armed with guns and other offensive weapons ; against the Statute, &c.

THREE OTHEN COUNTS, varying the charge.

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

SIR JOHN GIBBONS . I am a Baronet . On the night of the 5th of January, 1830, I was disturbed from my bed after twelve o'clock, and in consequence of some communication from the persons who came to me, I went to an enclosed preserve in a particular part of my ground, where I saw seven or eight men armed with guns and bludgeons - my men were ten or twenty yards in front of them; I seized the gun of one of the men I saw, and struggled with him - I was thrown down, and my hat was knocked off; a great deal of violence was offered to me while I was on the ground - I was struck several times, and one very severe blow was aimed at the side of my head with a bludgeon; it just grazed my head, and, I believe, I have the bludgeon by me now - if it had struck me it must have killed me; it was a very thick bludgeon - there was then a general battle - several guns were levelled at me, but I cannot swear to one being fired; I was before the Magistrate when the prisoner was taken - he said he was in a state of gross intoxication, did not know what he did, and he had been seduced by the others - we identified eight of the men, and they were tried.

COURT. Q. Was this in your own park? A. Yes, in Stanwell-park.

GEORGE WHITE . I am footman to Sir John Gibbons . On the night of the 5th of January, 1830, I went to the preserves; we met eight persons armed with guns and bludgeons - the prisoner was one of them; I had my arm broken in the affray by a man named Hooper, who was in company with the prisoner and the others - I was struck several times, and had several bruises - the prisoner had a gun with him.

COURT. Q. Did you see any gun pointed at Sir John Gibbons? A. Yes, and I saw the fire from the flint and steel - it was only about two or three yards from Sir John: ashed in the pan - this was in the park, just outside the preserve; I did not hear from the party what they came for - the preserve is in Stanwell parish.

SIR JOHN GIBBONS re-examined. Some of them said they had only taken two or three pheasants that night - they were just then beginning.

Prisoner. If I am found guilty I hope Sir John Gibbons will recommend me to mercy.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-111

537. MARY CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 3 loaves of bread, value 1s. 6d., and 1 quart of groats, value 6d., the goods of Thomas McLachlan , her master ; and MARY LEARY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

MATTHEW HARDING . I am Police-constable. Mr. McLachlan is a baker , and lives in Windmill-street - I received information, and waited some time, on the 12th of February, and met Leary with a basket - I asked what she had; she said bread, which she got from a baker by Piccadilly, that she had bought, and paid for it - I let her go, but she went on so fast that I stopped her again, and asked her to come back to see if it was right; she said she would not tell me where she got it, but if I wanted any thing with her I might take her to the watch-house, which I did - Cunningham then went to the place where he had seen her, and he came back with Crawley; Leary immediately said, "I don't know any thing of that young woman;" Crawley said, "Don't deny it, you know I gave you the bread;" she then turned to me and said, "For God's sake, don't say any thing to my master" - there was one quartern, one half-quartern, and this 2d. loaf, in the basket.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. She told you at once that it contained bread? A. Yes - she did not say she had bought it in Windmill-street.

THOMAS McLACHLAN . Crawley lived servant with me for three months - I do not know Leary; the property is mine- there was no mark on it, but I was positive of it when I saw it - I never permit my servants to take and sell my bread.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that you could not swear to the bread? A. No, I have always said it was mine - the moment I saw it I could swear to it; I could positively swear to the two large loaves, and this small one was with them; there was no mark on any of them - I had only one man servant, and this girl; she has sold bread in my shop if my wife has been engaged, but she could not have sold it that morning - it was before I was up.

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM . On the 12th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I saw Leary in the street with an empty basket - I asked what she had got; she said Nothing, but her sister was in service at a baker's-shop, and she had some wet clothes from her the day before, she was going to take the basket home - I went round my beat, saw her knocking at the prosecutor's door, and a young woman, but I could not see who, opened the door, took the basket of her

- in three-quarters of an hour I saw her again my brother officer called her, and took her.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen Leary before? A. Yes, once or twice passing there.

Leary's Defence. I never was there in my life before- when I met the Policeman, he said, "That is the young woman I should wish for my wife," and he said if I would give him a few shillings he would let me go.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-112

538. THOMAS CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. 5d. , the goods of Thomas Banyon .

DANIEL PHILLIPS . I am a shopman to Mr. Thomas Banyon - he is a baker . On the 21st of January I was in the back room; I heard a noise, jumped up, and caught the prisoner with these two loaves about eighteen yards off - I knew them to be my master's, and I had put them in the window - I had seen the prisoner in the shop about ten minutes before; he has dealt with me - we knew where he lived, but we had never given him credit for bread, though he wanted it.

RICHARD CALLIS . Daniel Phillips met me, and asked me to stop the prisoner with the two loaves - I said, "Are you positive they are your's?" he said "Yes, they are two outside and upset loaves;" we went and took the prisoner - he said he bought them, but I do not think he said where.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the bread down in Old Brentdord, and picked off one corner - I gave 8 1/2d. a loaf for them.

RICHARD CALLIS . He was going towards Old Brentford.

JURY to DANIEL PHILLIPS . Q. Was there any specific mark by which you could swear to the loaves? A. No, they were outside loaves, and there was a bit out of the corner of one of them.

COURT. Q. Did you miss them from where they had been? A. Yes; I heard the noise, and saw the back of the prisoner going out; I then followed, and took him.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-113

539. THOMAS CONSTABLE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 5 yards of cambric, value 40s., and 8 yards of muslin, value 20s., the goods of Andrew Caird Churton and another, his masters .

ANDREW CAIRD CHURTON . I am a linen-draper , and live in Regent-street - I have one partner; the prisoner was our porter, but he frequently assisted as a shopman ; he came to us about the beginning of March, and left us the end of August last - he had been with us about three years before; while he was there, we missed some goods, but certainly did not suspect him; a Police-officer came to us in January, and produced some articles, which I knew were ours.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am a pawnbroker - I have two remnants of cambric, pawned on the 19th and 25th of March, by a man, but I cannot say who.

JOSHUA FREDERICK CLEMENTS . I am an officer - I took the prisoner on the 19th of January, on a charge from Swan and Edgar; I found on him the duplicate of this cambric and muslin.

WILLIAM MARTIN . These are the duplicates I gave.

JOSHUA FREDERICK CLEMENTS . I then went to Smith's lodging, and found this duplicate of a dress.

JOHN PENSON . I am a pawnbroker - I have a muslin dress pawned by a woman, to whom I gave this duplicate, on the 6th of July, 1830.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I have known the prisoner two years; he had lived with me - the officer came and searched my lodging; the prisoner gave me this dress; he said he had purchased it, and I pawned it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Is this the only thing you can speak to? A. Yes, he said he had bought it - it is made up into a dress.

ANDREW CAIRD CHURTON. I believe this dress is my property, though I cannot swear to it - we had such a quality and such a pattern while the prisoner lived there- here are our private-marks on the cambrics.

Cross-examined. Q. This dress has no private-mark? A. No, we have sold many of them - here is a mark on the cambrics of the length, and my own private-mark of the price - we might have sold cambries without obliterating the marks; we have generally three persons in our shop- I do not know that I ever obliterated a mark; I would not swear these pieces were in our possession between March and August.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-114

540. DANIEL DURHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 6lbs. weight of tripe, value 3s. , the goods of Benjamin King .

BENJAMIN KING . I keep a tripe-shop in Regent-street . On the 19th of January I was in the back-parlour, and saw the prisoner come and take a piece of tripe out of a broken pane of glass; I ran out, I got up to him, and he dropped it - he told me if I would let him go, he would leave me his hat, and give me five shillings the next day- there was about 6lbs. of tripe; the officer had it.

WILLIAM MILLER . I received the tripe - it had been thrown in the dirt, and I gave it to the dog.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310217-115

541. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 61 brass hooks , the goods of Saint John Avery ; and JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen.

SAINT JOHN AVERY. I am an ironmonger , and live in Prospect-place, Chelsea . I do not know either of the prisoners; but on the 8th of January I was at home in my parlour, and saw Evans going out of the shop - he had not asked for any thing, and I thought he had brought a bill, or something; but I looked about, and did not see any thing; I then went out, and was told which way he was gone - I went in a contrary direction, and met him and Thomas together; I passed them, to see what they were doing - I saw Evans giving Thomas some brass hooks, and he put them into his hat; I seized Thomas and the hat - Evans got away, but he was seized, and brought back by an officer.

JOHN FORBOCK . I am a Police-constable. I received Thomas in charge, and a Police-constable brought Evans - these are the hooks that were in Thomas' hat - I found 4 1/2d.

and a pair of shoes on Thomas, and a few halfpence on Evans.

SAINT JOHN AVERY. These are my hooks, and were on the counter two or three yards from the door - here is my mark on the paper.

The prisoners put in a written statement, pleading distress,

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 35.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-116

542. ANN DELAY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 3 sovereigns, and 1 shilling, the monies of Thomas Upjohn , her master .

THOMAS UPJOHN . I am a salesman , at Leadenhall-market, and live at No. 10, Upper John-street, Commercial-road, St. George's in the East . The prisoner had been in my service for upwards of two months - I put eight sovereigns into my drawer in my bed-room last Sunday morning, at half-past nine o'clock; one of them was particularly bright - there was an old shilling in the same drawer, but not with the sovereigns - I have had that shilling for years, and should know it again; the drawer was locked - I missed three of the sovereigns when I got up and dressed myself, at half-past five o'clock on the Monday morning - I did not miss the shilling then, but it was afterwards found in the prisoner's box, with the sovereign and a twopenny piece, which I firmly believe to be mine, as I had missed one - I suspected the prisoner, and sent for an officer.

JOHN SYMCOCK . I am a Police-constable. I was sent for on the Monday morning, and saw the prisoner; the prosecutor charged her with stealing three sovereigns, and told me he had searched her boxes, and every thing, with the exception of this work-box - I immediately asked her for the key of it; she said she had lost it on the Wednesday evening previous in going to her sister's - I forced it open, and in a division in the work-box I found these nine sovereigns and a half, which I took out, and counted in the presence of Mr. Upjohn, his wife, and the prisoner- I also found this old shilling, this twopenny piece, and these two old silver coins; I said, "You must have had a legacy left you;" she smiled, and said it was money she had saved while in the service of her half sister, at the Horse and Trumpeter public-house, in Jewry-street - the prosecutor's wife found the key of the work-box afterwards; the prosecutor recognized the shilling as his, and there is one very bright sovereign.

ELIZABETH UPJOHN . My husband awoke me at half-past five o'clock, and asked me about his money; I said I knew nothing about it - I was present when her box was searched, and nothing was found; I afterwards saw the work-box broken open, and this property found in it; one of the sovereigns is very bright - this is the old shilling; it has a name on it - the prisoner said she had lost the key of the work-box, but I afterwards found it by the side of her box in her room - I had before asked her what was in this box; she said nothing but an oil bottle.

THOMAS UPJOHN. I can swear to this shilling - I had had it nine years.

Prisoner's Defence. I had saved the money while I lived with Mr. Johnson.

MARY ANN JOHNSON . My husband is a publican - the prisoner lived seven years with me, and had a very good character; I know she had saved some money, but I did not know how much.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY of stealing the shilling only. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-117

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

543. MARGARET FLANAGAN and ELIZABETH FLANAGAN were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 shirt, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Monks .

SOPHIA MONKS . I am the wife of Thomas Monks - I live in Park-street, Somers'-town , and am a laundress; Elizabeth Flanagan worked for me for six months, by the name of Mrs. Mansfield; the other has been in the habit of coming to my gate to see her. I missed a shirt on the 27th of January, which I had seen safe on the Tuesday - this is it; I have an ironing-room, but that was in the sorting-room, where Elizabeth Flanagan worked. On Friday, the 28th of January, the officer brought Margaret Flanagan; her mother came to her, and asked what she had said; she said, "Sure, what could I say but that you gave it me."

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure Margaret said so? A. Yes; she said at the office that she picked it off the ground - there was no dirt on it; it did not appear to have been on the ground - it was wrong side outwards, as it came from the drying-room into the ironing-room; I did not express any doubt about the identity of this shirt - it had not been ironed; Elizabeth Flanagan was a shirt ironer; I had about forty women in my employ - she had been six months in my employ.

HENRY BRITAIN . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Ridpath , a pawnbroker. On Friday, the 28th of January, Margaret Flanagan came and offered to pawn this shirt - finding it was rough dry I suspected it was stolen; I asked where she brought it from - she said from a person named Flanagan, in Gee-street; I went there, and then she said the person lived in St. Giles' - I went with her as far as Seymour-street, and then I gave her in charge.

WILLIAM MALONEY . I am a Policeman. Margaret Flanagan was given into my custody on Friday, the 28th of January - they told me she had offered to pawn a shirt; she said a woman had given it to her; I asked where the woman lived - she said she did not know, she was a stranger in London; that she herself lived in Chiswell-street, Barbican, and then she said in Malcolm-street - she wanted to get away, but I took her to the station; they there asked her how she came by this shirt, and she said she had it from her mother - she took me to the prosecutor's on the following day, and her mother came out; they talked together - I took them both to the office.

Cross-examined. Q. Then you received such information as induced you to take Margaret Flanagan ? A. Yes - I asked her to give an account of herself; my memory is rather treacherous.

MRS. MONKS re-examined. This shirt was safe on the Tuesday; Margaret had been there between the Tuesday and the Friday, but I did not see her - the room in which this shirt was, joins the room in which Elizabeth

Flanagan was at work, but they must go out of doors to go from one to the other; this shirt was dried in the drying-room - it belongs to Mr. Woodward; it has no mark of mine on it - it has D. W., No. 2, on it, I believe; I heard Margaret Flanagan say, what else could she say when the mother gave it her; and at the office she said she found it outside the gate.

Cross-examined. Q. This happens to be No. 3 - have you any other of Mr. Woodward's shirts here to compare with it? A. No - I have washed for him about two years.

Elizabeth Flanagan 's Defence. I never took the shirt, and know nothing at all of the robbery - my daughter told me she picked up the shirt at the gate; I never gave her the shirt - there was money stopped from the women for some things that were lost the week before.

MRS. MONKS. I believe I did stop money twice; 4d. at one time, and 6d. at another.

MARGARET FLANAGAN 'S Defence. I did not say my mother gave it - I picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-118

544. JAMES GODDARD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 70 lbs. weight of lead, value 5s., the goods of Richard Smith , and fixed to a building of his ; against the Statute, &c.

BENJAMIN COLLINS . I am a Police-constable. On the Saturday before the 17th of January, I was on duty in Bunhill-row, at nine o'clock - I saw the prisoner about a quarter-past nine, carrying a quantity of lead in a bag, on his shoulder; I stopped him, and asked what he had there - he said backs of stoves, he was going to Mr. Hunt, at Blackfriars, with them, and he had them from George-street, Spitalfields; I said it was out of his way to be in Bunhill-row - he then said he had been to his mother, who lived in Whitecross-street; I took him to the station - I found the bag contained this sheet lead; on the Monday following I spoke to him again about it, and he said he got it from Mr. Smith's, his landlord, in Whitecross-street - I went there and fitted the lead to the roof of the garret window; it fitted in every part - the edges were quite bright; it appeared to have been recently cut with a sharp knife - I compared the nail marks and the crevices of the lead; it corresponded in every part - there was about half an inch of lead left on, and it seemed to agree with it; altogether there were about 70lbs. of lead.

RICHARD SMITH . I live at No. 124. Whitecross-street , and am a potatoe-dealer ; I am answerable for the rent of No. 125, which my son occupies - the prisoner was in the habit of visiting at that house, but I do not know who; there is a person named Williams, who occupies the second floor, but I do not know whether he visited her - the garret was occupied; in consequence of information, I examined the top of the garret window - this lead was missing from there; my landlord's name is Phillips - he said that I was answerable for the lead.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress when I took it - I have had no employ these nine months.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-119

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

545. WILLIAM MORTIMER JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 3 corkscrews, value 7s.; 5 thimbles, value 5s., and 6 pencil-cases, value 24s. , the goods of Thomas Emmett ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310217-120

546. JOHN SMITH, alias MATTHEWS , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 54 yards of flannel, value 3l. , the goods of William Ravenhill .

BENJAMIN JONES . I am shopman to Mr. William Ravenhill - he lives in Beech-street, Barbican , and is a linen-draper . On the 7th of February, about eight o'clock, I was in his shop - the prisoner and this piece of flannel were brought in by two young men; the flannel has our mark on it, and the mark of the person we bought it of - I had seen it safe half an hour before, laying on three other pieces in the shop; we sent for an officer.

JAMES MITCHENER . I live in Golden-lane, and am a wire-worker. On the night of the 7th of February I was near the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner just pass the window with this piece of flannel in his arms; he seemed to me to have come from the door - I took him back into the shop.

WILLIAM HENRY ROYER . I was with Mitchener - I saw the prisoner coming from the shop, with the flannel in his arms - I assisted in taking him back.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and have the flannel.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the Mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-121

547. EDWARD LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Henry Sage , from his person .

HENRY SAGE . On the 28th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the corner of Leadenhall-street - I was crossing over to Gracechurch-street, and felt a slight pull at my coat; I missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner walking very fast across the way - I followed, stopped him, and accused him of the theft; he denied it - I sent for an officer, and he gave me my handkerchief, in about twenty minutes; he drew it from his back, through his waistcoat hole.

Prisoner. It is my first offence.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310217-122

548. JAMES BOTTOMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Jacob Israel Brandon , from his person .

GABRIEL ISRAEL BRANDON . I live in New-street, Bishopsgate. On the 10th of February I was in Cutler-street, Houndsditch , with my father and uncle - I saw the prisoner put his hand into my father's pocket, and take out his handkerchief; I seized him - he dropped it, and broke from me - he ran, but was stopped before I lost sight of him.

Prisoner. Q. Were you and your father walking together? A. I was walking in the middle of the road, behind my father, who was on the pavement - there was no one else between you and my father.

JACOB ISRAEL BRANDON . This is my handkerchief;

I knew nothing of it till it was taken - my uncle gave me the handkerchief; he is not here.

JAMES BRADLEY . I am an officer. I received the handkerchief from the elder Mr. Brandon.

GABRIEL ISRAEL BRANDON . It was a green handkerchief which he took, and I believe it was this.

Prisoner's Defence. I was selling clothes there - I saw this handkerchief on the ground, and took it up; this gentleman came to me, and said he would give me in charge - I said I had not stolen it, but my word was nothing against a man like that, and I got away.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence .

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310217-123

549. MARY NEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 dead goose, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of James Herbert Cook .

ELIZABETH ANN COOK. I am the wife of James Herbert Cook . On the 16th of February, at half-past one o'clock, I was in his shop, and saw two women near the board of the shop, which projects from the window, where we place poultry - I saw the prisoner, who was one of the women, take something, and put it under her apron; she went round a corner, and the other woman went away - I desired my servant to go after her; I went out, and missed a goose from the board, worth 4s. 6d.

REBECCA WALLER . I am servant to Mr. Cook. On the 16th of February my mistress called my attention to two women; I went out, and came up with the prisoner and another in Farringdon-street; I took the goose from under her apron - she said she took it in a lark - I asked a man to hold her, but he would not, and I was forced to let her go; but I saw her again in half an hour, pass on the other side of the way; I followed her to the Anchor public-house - I knew her by her features, and I had seen her before; she passed the shop almost every evening - I gave her into custody.

JAMES WHITE . I am a constable. On the 16th of February I was sent for, and took the prisoner at the Anchor public-house, about two o'clock in the day - she did not appear in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and have no knowledge of it.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310217-124

550. JOSEPH DENISON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 brush, value 2s., the goods of William Brown , from his person; and that he had before been convicted of felony .

WILLIAM BROWN . I live at Guildford, and am driver to Mr. Charles Shelley , a carrier. On the 11th of February, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Warwick-lane ; my master was before me, and I had just spoken to him, when I missed a parcel out of my pocket - I believe it contained a hair brush - I turned, and saw the prisoner about three yards off, running; I got up to him after he was stopped, and he gave me my parcel - I do not know whose property it was; I had received it to take to my master.

THOMAS GODFREY . I live at No. 55, Regent-street - I saw the prisoner running in Warwick-lane; I stopped him - Brown came up, and said, "You have got my parcel;" he at first denied it, but produced it directly afterwards, saying, "Here is your parcel, bl-t you;" the officer took him.

JOSEPH BATES . I took the prisoner - I saw him run, and he was stopped by Godfrey; the brush was delivered to me, and was directed to a person in the Borough.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the brush under the inn, and put it under my coat; I deny using the expression which has been stated.

WILLIAM MARCH . I am an officer. I have a certificate of the conviction of a person named Shean at the April Session, in the tenth year of His late Majesty's reign, for stealing a handkerchief from a person unknown, for which he was ordered to be confined twelve months, and to be twice whipped; I took him on that occasion, and, to the best of my belief, the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310217-125

551. HENRY THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of James Hopkins , from his person .

JAMES HOPKINS . I am a carrier , and live in Great Dover-street. On the 17th of February I was in Longlane, near the pig-market at Smithfield , and felt a twitch at my coat pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner about a yard from me - he was the nearest person to me: I seized him instantly, and observed him shifting his coat -I suspected he had my handkerchief; I put my hand into his breast pocket, and pulled it out - this is it.

THOMAS BARKER . I am an officer, and produce the handkerchief, which I received from the witness, with the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not do it - there were two lads who threw it down; I picked it up, and put it into my pocket - the other two ran away.

MR. HOPKINS. There were no lads near me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18310217-126

552. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 sheet, value 6s., and 1 table-cloth, value 7s., the goods of William Robert Poole Golding ; and 1 shawl, value 5s., the goods of Elizabeth Hughes .

WILLIAM ROBERT POOLE GOLDING . I keep the White Lion, in Upper Thames-street . On the 27th of January the prisoner came in the evening, and asked for a lodging - I refused him; he went away, and in half an hour returned, and begged very hard to have a lodging, saying he had been travelling, and just coming off a journey and it was a hard case a man could not get a lodging - I turned to my wife, and asked if she could make a bed in the club-room; she said she could - I then said, "We will make you as comfortable as we can;" he said, "I shall take up my residence here," and he walked into our little bar-parlour, called for a glass of rum-and-water, smoked his pipe, and made very free - he said he had just come from Staffordshire, that he travelled for government, and had 4l. 10s. a week - he then made use of an oath; I said we did not allow that, we expected he would act as a gentleman - he then threw down some half-and-half, and called for another pint; he dashed that down, and called for another - he then said he would go to bed; I took a candle, and

showed him into the club-room - I told him I would come and fetch his candle; I went again after a while, he was then in bed, and the sheets were on the bed; I believe it was then between eight and nine o'clock - he said he wanted to lay till nine in the morning, and then to be called - on my daughter's going up stairs to bed she saw a great wet in the passage - she came down; I went up, and saw the water under the door, and I fastened his door by tying it to the balustrades, so that he could not get out - about nine o'clock in the morning, while I was in bed, my door was opened; it closed again, and I heard some one say, "D-n it, I have made a mistake;" in a few minutes the door opened again -I opened one side of the curtain; I saw the prisoner again - he begged pardon, said he had been down stairs, and had made a mistake; he then went down stairs, and said, "Good morning, Mr. Golding, I shall be here again to-night;" he went down, and presently I heard some one come up again; I thought it was the servant coming to see that all was right - I got up, put my trousers and stockings on, went out of my room, which faces the room he slept in, and to my surprise there was the prisoner brushing his coat - I thought he seemed buttoned up very tight; he said he had been down stairs, and had a glass of gin, which had made him all right - I said, "How came you to make such a mess here last night?" he said, "Oh, I have been down, seen the servant, and made all right;" he then bolted out of the house as hard as he could run - my mistress went to the door, and could not see him; she then called up to know if all was right - I looked on his bed, and missed one sheet; they ran out, but he was gone - I got on my things and went out, but I could not find him; I returned, and to my surprise I found the girl had lost her shawl, and a table-cloth was also missing - I got an advertisement put it into the paper, as a cantion to publicans; and in consequence of that I was sent for on the following Friday by Mr. Smith, at the Acorn, the corner of Addle-hill, and found the prisoner had come there - I said, "That is the fellow;" the prisoner said, "Fellow! I will make you prove your words; I am no fellow, and no thief;" I sent for the officer, and he was given in charge - I have never found any of my things.

Prisoner. He told you he saw me on the stairs; I was in my room, I took up my hat and gloves, and came out with him. Witness. No, I did not go into the room - I stood at the door, and he bolted down stairs as hard as he could.

Prisoner. The Magistrate would not commit me on his charge - when we came out of the room the sheets were safe. Witness. I did not go into the room at all - I opened the door, and he was standing there; he then ran off.

ELIZABETH HUGHES . I am servant to the prosecutor. I remember the prisoner being at my master's house; he went out just after nine o'clock in the morning - he had no breakfast; he took a glass of gin at the bar - I made the bed over night; it then had a pair of sheets on it - I missed one sheet just after he left the house, and my shawl, which I had left over night in a drawer in the kitchen, which is up stairs - he would have to pass that to get down to the tap-room; he stood at the bar to have his gin - he did not pay for his bed; it was a large size sheet, but he might conceal it about his dress - when he went away his dress seemed very tight indeed; I did not observe his dress over night - I gave 5s. for my shawl; it was a cotton one and a smallsize - the sheet was worth about 6s.; the table-cloth, which was missed, had been in the same drawer with my shawl; that was worth 7s. - I had seen them both safe over night, just before I went to bed; no one had been in the kitchen, to my knowledge, that morning.

Prisoner. The prosecutor said this witness saw me come out of the kitchen.

MR. GOLDING. No, my youngest daughter saw him.

COURT. Q. What did he pay? A. He paid 1s. 10d. for what he had over night; he paid nothing in the morning, but the 2d. for the glass of gin.

NATHANIEL SMITH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the Acorn public-house - Mr. Golding was present; there were three or four persons there giving charge of him.

The prisoner, in a long Defence, declared that he had not taken the property.

JURY to MR. GOLDING. Q. Had you any other lodgers in the house that night? A. No, not one; no one but him used the bed-room.

GUILTY of stealing the sheet only . Aged 32.

553. WILLIAM SMITH was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 sheet, value 4s., and 1 counterpane, value 1l., the goods of John Turner ; and 1 pair of shoes, value 6s., the goods of William Robinson .

JOHN TURNER . I live at No. 5, Pitcher's-cout, Bellalley, Coleman-street . The prisoner came there this day three weeks, and said he wanted a single man's lodging -I said I had one; he went up stairs, just walked into the room, and said, "This is a comfortable bed, and that is the chief thing;" he said he had just come from the country, and wanted somewhere near hand to his work - I asked him what trade he was; he said he was an engineer - he asked what was the rent; I told him half a crown a week - he said that would hurt no one; he went down stairs, asked me to show him into the back yard, and then he went away for about three hours - he came again about half-past two o'clock, and said he had been drinking with some of his countrymen, and was very much fatigued, for he could not stand our London drink; I said if he wanted to lay down in the room in which I was at work, he could - he said, "I am afraid your hammer will disturb me;" he then walked into his room, and laid there about half an hour - he then knocked against the wainscot; I went in, and he said his box would be there about four o'clock - he asked me to take it in, to call him about six, and he would have a cup of tea; I left him there, and a young man, who was going to sleep in the same room, came up and took some money out of his box - the prisoner asked if he could spend the evening with him; he said Yes, it would be very agreeable - the young man then came out, and the door was shut; in about twenty minutes afterwards I heard the prisoner walking about the room without his shoes - he rattled the wash-hand jug and basin; I thought he might be washing himself - I presently heard the room of his door open, he came out, and knocked at my room door; he opened the door, came half-way in, and said, "D-n

that fellow, he made such a noise I could not sleep; what will you have to drink?" I said Nothing - he said, "You must have something;" he stood with the door open, and his body leaning forward - a young man, who was at work with me, said, "If we must have something, we will have a drop of gin;" he said, "I will go and fetch a drop, can the landlady lend me a bottle?" I said Yes - he said,"Very likely the publican can lend me a pot:" he then went down stairs, and I thought he was rather long before he went out at the street door - I got up, looked out at the window, and saw him going down the court; the young man who worked with me looked out likewise, and remarked how he waddled - I sat down, worked for about five minutes, and I thought he was gone a long while; he never returned - I went into the room he had been in, and missed my quilt, sheet, and a pair of shoes of William Robinson 's, which had been in the cupboard in that room.

Prisoner. I know nothing of this gentleman whatever - he said the other day, when I was ordered into the yard to walk, that I was not the man. Witness. No, I did not; that is the man, and that is the dress he had on when he came to my house.

CELIA TURNER . I let the prisoner in when he knocked at the door, and called my husband - I am certain he is the man.

THOMAS SCATES . I work with the prosecutor - I saw the prisoner; I am certain he is the man that came - he came into the workshop, and was there about eight minutes; I heard him talk, his voice was very gruff - I am certain he is the person.

ABBOTT KING . I was at the house, and saw him; I am certain he is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of these persons; I walked in the yard for twenty minutes - they said I was not the man; he states I took a counterpane and a sheet, and I was dressed as I am now - is it possible I could, and he not seen them when I went down the court?

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven years for each Offence .

Reference Number: t18310217-127

OLD COURT. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

554. GEORGE GARTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hutton , on the 20th of January , and stealing, 1 silk stock, value 3s., his property .

EDWARD SPARROW . I am a stone-mason. The prosecutor lives at the corner of Cross-street, Finsbury - on the 20th of January, I was across the road, forty or fifty feet from the house; I heard some glass fall - I looked across, and saw the prisoner and another boy at the prosecutor's window; they ran away, and about five doors from the house, I stopped the prisoner, brought him to the shop, and found the window broken, and the stock lay there - the other escaped.

WILLIAM HUTTON . I keep the shop, and am a haberdasher . I went out about four o'clock, returned about half-past seven, and found my window broken - this stock is very much like one which I missed, but I cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-128

Before Mr. Baron Bailey.

555. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for that he with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, feloniously did shoot at Elizabeth Gulliver , with intent to murder her .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable, or do her some grevious bodily harm.

ELIZABETH GULLIVER. I live at No. 4, New Tothill-street . I know the prisoner by sight - I had seen him pass my door about two years before this at different times; about seven o'clock on the Wednesday evening, before this transaction, he knocked at my door - I went to the door; he told me he wanted to see a woman in my back kitchen - I told him he made a mistake, that I had nobody there, front or back; he said I certainly had, for they annoyed him, he could neither rest night or day - I told him my kitchens were so wet I could not let them; he asked if I would let him see the kitchen - I lighted him down; he saw no one there, and that there was nothing but lumber, wood, and coals; he said he would knock the place down, but he would have his revenge - I said he was welcome to do that as soon as he liked; my daughter called me up stairs, and said I had no business to go down with any body - he went away directly; he had lived next door to me, at No. 5, for about six weeks - I did not notice any thing particularly strange in his manner; there had never been any noise in either of the kitchens to annoy him - they were not used at all; he knocked at my door again on Saturday, the 8th of January - I went to the door, and the instant I opened it he fired a pistol - he had had time to see who came to the door; I saw him, and of course he saw me - he certainly aimed at me, but struck the door; he never spoke a word - he stopped there till I threw the door wide open; I said, "Lord have mercy on me!" he then made off - he made a kind of run down into Old Tothill-street; I had never disagreed with him - I never spoke to him only on the Wednesday night; there was a leaden bullet in the pistol - it went into the door.

ALEXANDER SHAW . I am a broker, and live at No. 1, New Tothill-street. On Saturday evening, a little before six o'clock, I was sitting on a table in front of my shop, and saw the prisoner run by me, towards Mrs. Gulliver's, and in a few minutes after I heard a noise with some boys playing, and saw the prisoner standing by Mrs. Gulliver's door - I saw him present his arm, saw the pistol flash, and heard the report; it was pointed towards Mrs. Gulliver's door - he then ran down the street by me, putting the pistol into his side pocket - I thought it was not worth while to stop him, and that he had merely fired to frighten the boys; I heard no more till eight o'clock, when Mrs. Gulliver's daughter stated the case to my wife - I went, and described the prisoner to Mrs. Gulliver, as she did not know who he was at the time; she said, "Well then, that is the man who lives next door;" I went next door with her - the prisoner was not at home; I went to the Police-station, informed Lowry, the inspector, and next morning I went with a Policeman to the prisoner's house - the Policeman knocked at the door, somebody asked who was there; the officer spoke in a sort of woman's voice, and the prisoner opened the door - the Policeman asked where he was last evening; he said his landlord had told him somebody had been after him, and said he was irritated in

his mind and did not know where he was; the officer asked where his pistol was - he said it was on the chair; he made towards the chair; the officer put him aside, away from the chair, and under a waistcoat on the chair were two pistols, which were both loaded, and both cocked - he directly demanded the officer's warrant to take him into custody; the officer told him he did not want a warrant to take him on a charge of that kind - he said, "I suppose I must go with you then;" after that I went and took the ball out of the door, and we found at his lodgings a bullet mould, some copper caps, gunpowder, and a leaden inkstand, which had been cut up for making the bullets - I compared the bullet in the door with the mould; it answers to it, and fits the pistol - I have seen the prisoner pass my door at times.

DANIEL REARDON . I am an officer. I went with Shaw- his evidence is correct; I found in all three bullets, besides those in the pistols - he asked for my warrant; I said I had no occasion for one - he said, "Well, if you must take me, you must; the fact is, the people have troubled me very much next door, and I did not know what I was doing;" I did not know him before - I have made enquiry, and cannot find that he has been doing any thing lately; but, by a letter found on him, I understand he belongs to a respectable family.

MRS. GULLIVER re-examined. Nobody was in my house to give him any annoyance; there was nobody in my house but my daughter, (who is thirty years old,) myself, and an old lady; my house was kept very quiet.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. I do not know whether he talked to you about witches in your kitchen? -A. No; but I heard him say, before the Magistrate, that he had been troubled very much for four years by witches, noises, and sorcery.

Prisoner's Defence. I have had great noises in my head for the last four years, and my brains used to go round, and heat like streams of fire; and as I passed by the houses in the street, flashes used to come by my head; and, moreover, I think I am allied to the Royal Family - I have received great homage, when I was young, from people in carriages, and I suppose they took me to be an illegitimate son of the Duke of York; but my mother was not the celebrated Mrs. Clarke - when I went to Paris I was under the necessity of changing my name; I received similar homage at Paris, and military homage from the soldiers - I have been given to understand I was a descendant of George Rex, who lived at Combe and Delafield's brewing manufactory; I consider myself entitled to the dukedom of Lancaster - when I was at Hicklow, a lady came, very much like my grandfather; I think she was a child of Queen Caroline, the wife of George the Third - she came into the court-yard, and questioned the ostler about letting me have a horse, which he promised, and when I went into the yard, spurred, &c. he said I must not have it; whether it was in consequence of the saddle I do not know, for my grandfather was a saddler - she went up the stairs of the next house, and from that night I heard the noise; but, the night after that, I saw a great flame, which scorched my body; and ever since that lady talked to me I have had a heat over my head; she was talking to me with others through the wall some time - she said my equipage would be ready soon, and I should go to town, and these Royal personages should be looked after; after that I went to shave myself, and as most people make faces when they save - I had the door open - a gentleman and lady came in, and hurt me tremendously; when I went down to dine there was a chair vacant - I understand it was for Prince Leopold; I dined, but no lady came, nor any equipage - I returned to my chamber, after stopping some time, and they left; I concluded that lady was the cause of the heat in my head, and I have had it ever since.

ELIZABETH CLARK . I am the prisoner's sister. This letter (looking at it) is his hand-writing - I received it from him from Paris; my father and mother are dead -I have received other letters of the same description from him; he has laboured under a delusion about witches and wizards ever since I have corresponded with him.

The letter being read gave a long and incoherent account of the prisoner's connexion with wizards, and the influence they had over him, and a long history of gipseys, &c.; it bore the Paris post-mark of May, 1829.

MR. McMURDO. I am surgeon of Newgate. I have endeavoured to ascertain the state of the prisoner's mind since he has been in Newgate, and consider him insane during the whole period he has been here - I have conversed with him on a great many subjects, and on every subject he left that impression on my mind.

Prisoner. He knows nothing about it.

JOHN HASWELL . I was the prisoner's landlord at this time - I have heard him speak about witches; he repeatedly said he was tormented with witches - he told me he fired this shot; that he did it, intending to be taken, that the public might know his troubles concerning these witches.

Prisoner. I think it is a complete imposition - the injury I have received is unimaginable; for example, how would a man like to have his head opened.

NOT GUILTY, on the ground of insanity .

Reference Number: t18310217-129

556. MICHAEL CAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 plane, value, 4s. , the goods of Thomas Thomas .

THOMAS THOMAS . I am a carpenter , and live in Chichester-place, Gray's Inn-road - this plane was in the parlour of No. 1, Crane-court, Fleet-street , where I was at work. On the 17th of February, about eight o'clock in the morning, this plane was on the work-bench; I was at breakfast in the kitchen of the house, and having lost tools twice before, I set Dugin, the labourer, to watch - I came up in about twenty minutes; the plane was then gone, and the prisoner taken to the watch-house - he had been there on the Tuesday previous, inquiring for a person who was not there; I afterwards saw the plane, and knew it; it has a brand mark on it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. When had you seen it last? A. At eight o'clock that morning.

DANIEL DUGIN . I am a labourer. I was desired to watch, and about ten minutes past eight o'clock I was in a room, which commands the view of the room the plane was in; the prisoner was not employed at the house - I saw him come in, take the plane off the bench, and put it under his jacket; he went out, I followed, and saw him

drop it at the corner of the court - I never lost sight of him, but did not stop him till he got to Clifford's Inn; he was secured - I gave him to Lightfoot; then went and told Thomas - a young man, who was in the court, took up the plane; it was shown to Thomas, who claimed it -I saw it given to Lightfoot.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What means had you of seeing into the room? A. There are windows to the room - I was in the opposite room, and could see him perfectly well; it is an open room - there was neither door nor window between us; I have seen him before, coming to ask for a job - I cannot say how far Cranecourt is from Clifford's Inn, nor how far I was behind him - I never lost sight of him.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am a constable. I was fetched from my own door, and received the prisoner in charge from Dugin, for stealing tools - the plane was brought to the watch-house - Thomas claimed it, also a scraper.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for employ, and met a plasterer, who told me of a job in Crane-court; I went, saw the door wide open, and seeing nobody there, I did not wish to enter; I staid at the end of the court, and saw a boy run out with a plane under his jacket; that man followed him, he dropped it, and I dropped my tool; this man followed, and accused me of stealing the plane; at Guildhall Thomas said the tool belonged to another man.

THOMAS THOMAS . I never said so; I said it was mine as soon as I saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310217-130

557. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 2 3/4 yards of silk, value 10s., and 12 yards of cotton cloth, value 6s., the goods of George Rumble , his master .

GEORGE RUMBLE . I am a linen-draper and haberdasher , and live at No. 44, Fleet-street - the prisoner was in my employ for about a month - I only know the property.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Had you not a good character for three years with him? A. Yes; I occasionally leave my business to the foreman - I have one shopman, who has been with me fifteen years, and two of my sons assist; it was usual, if my servant s wanted an article, to cut it off, and put it down in the book.

GEORGE COLLIER . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner's brother on a charge of housebreaking, and found these articles in possession of another person, who appeared as the prisoner's brother, on Sunday morning, the 30th of January, at No. 20, Great Chart-street, Hoxton, about ten o'clock - the prisoner was not present; I found in the brother's possession nearly three yards of silk, and this cotton cloth - I took the articles to Mr. Rumble's private house in the New-road, and he claimed them; the prisoner was at the house in Fleet-street, and I sent him with a note to Mr. Rumble's private house -I afterwards went to Mr. Rumble myself, returned to Fleet-street, and the prisoner had absconded; I saw him on the Monday morning at Guildhall.

ROBERT MASON . I lodge at No. 20, Chart-street, Hoxton, and am the prisoner's brother. Collier took this silk and cotton from my house on Sunday - the silk was brought to me by the prisoner on the Saturday night before; I am a tailor - my brother used to sleep at his master's - I received the cotton cloth from him on the Friday night; I was to use part of the silk for a coat I was making for the prosecutor - the prisoner told me he wished the other to line a coat for himself; I had told him the week before I wanted some shirts, and he told me he had some cotton which would do for them, and gave me the cotton for that purpose - I told Collier what they were brought for.

Cross-examined. Q. How old are you? A. Twenty-one; I work for the prosecutor, and was in the constant habit of going to his shop - I said in the first instance that my brother gave them to me; the officer said he should take me into custody for having things found on me - I told him immediately he came that my brother gave them to me - I was going to use part of the silk on Mr. Rumble's coat, which he had given me to make - the prosecutor does not swear to the cotton.

COURT. Q. Did Mr. Rumble furnish the cloth to make the coat? A. Mr. Rumble did; he sent no silk - I was to find the lining, and charge him with it.

WILLIAM JACOBS . I am a Policeman. I was present when Collier searched the prisoner's premises, and found the silk and cotton; it was claimed by Mr. Rumble - I produce the cotton.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not several articles found at this man's house, claimed as the prosecutor's, and not included in this indictment? A. I think there were several- they are not included, because they could not swear to them - here is some cotton which was afterwards found in the prisoner's box. at Mr. Rumble's.

COURT. Q. Where did you find the cotton now produced? A. Collier found it - when he gave it to me it was on the brother's shop-board; the cotton I have was found in the prisoner's box, at Mr. Rumble's.

MR. RUMBLE. I can speak to this silk most positively - it is not silk for coat-linings; it is gros de Naples for ladies' bonnets - I never intended it to line a coat; while the prisoner was in my service it was put into a box, after taking stock some time back, and was not for sale - I am certain it never has been sold; I have the remaining part here, which matches it; the prisoner slept in my house, but unknown to me - I did not know he had a box there; I can almost say to a certainty that the cotton produced by Collier is mine - the selvidge corresponds exactly with other cotton which I have; I have not the least hesitation in speaking to that produced by Jacobs - it corresponds with the rest in my shop; it strongly resembles what I have in my stock - it corresponds exactly in width and quality; I am positive of the silk - it is worth 10s.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the box kept in the shop, tumbled about on the shop-board, and open to every body? A. Certainly not; I never knew the prisoner's box was there, and whether that was open to every body I cannot say - my answer applied to the box I had put the property into; the box said to be his was in the kitchen - my foreman lives at the house; I have no servants there - his box was brought up stairs when the officer came, and broken open; the silk is not used for coats - it is an uncommon good one, and what I can swear to; I only had this piece - there were fifty-two yards of it; the rest was all made

into bonnets, on my account - I have not sold a yard of it: when I took stock there were eighteen yards left; I have no mark on it, but know it by the quality, and comparing it; there is no mark on the cotton - I do not swear to that, because it is a common article; I have looked over my books - the prisoner is certainly not debited to me in them for three yards and a half of silk; there is no cotton claimed by me and omitted in the indictment - it is all included together; it makes twelve yards together - I have no doubt of its being mine - I took stock about a month ago; other persons could have gone to the box.

JURY. Q. You suppose the silk was cut off that piece? A. I think it corresponds in the cutting.

MR. LEE called.

JOSEPH SLACK . I am the prosecutor's foreman. On the Saturday preceding the Sunday on which the prisoner was taken, we had an order to execute rather rapidly; we had a black coat to make, among other articles - it was not to be lined with silk; the prisoner cut the coat out, and it is usual for the person cutting it out to fit it up - I ordered no silk to be used; the servants of the house have been allowed articles at cost price, to complete a garment, but then it must be booked; this order was given out on the Saturday night, to be ready on the Monday following- the prisoner was taken on the Sunday night.

Q. Supposing he had taken the article on Saturday night, could he, without unusual care and diligence, have placed it to account before Monday morning? A. He had no permission to take any thing without entering it; his brother had the coat away about the afternoon - the box the silk was in was placed on the counter, at the back part of the stop; the prisoner's box was in the kitchen - every body in the concern might go there.

COURT. Q. Was there not time on Saturday afternoon before the brother had the coat away, to enter any thing which he took honestly? A. Of course - this silk was not fit to line a coat; it is a very different kind of article; master allows servants articles at cost price, for their own use, but not to dispose of.

JOSEPH SLACK , JUN. I recollect this garment having been given to the prisoner to make up; I remember the prisoner saying he wanted silk to line it - I do not know what silk was taken; he did not tell me he had taken this silk for Mr. Rumble, and to charge it to the account - he inquired for the silk which is generally used for the handfacings; there being none in the house, I told the brother to get some and charge it to Mr. Rumble's account, which I suppose he was going to do - the coat might be given to the prisoner about ten or eleven o'clock on Saturday night - he was sent on Sunday with a note to master, and returned to the shop; I told him I had a charge against him, and was ordered to detain him.

Q. Was not a memorandum found on the prisoner of two yards and a half of silk to be charged to Mr. Rumble? A. One was given to me when the prisoner was going to the office; it had been found on the prisoner when he was taken.

COURT. Q. Would it require more time to write that in his master's book than on the paper? A. It might not take more time - the prisoner told me on the Saturday before that he was going to have a frock coat for himself, and it would require silk for the facing - that would take the quantity stated here; he had access to the book to make the entry - no cloth was delivered to the prisoner's brother to make a coat for him.

JURY. Q. Was Mr. Rumble's a frock coat or a dress one? A. A dress coat - one-eighth of a yard of silk would be sufficient for it; silk for coat-linings is about 4s. a yard.

MR. RUMBLE. The coat was only to be faced with silk, not lined; this gros de Naples is worth about 10s. - the prisoner's brother had no access to the premises; Slack, Jun. slept in my house - the order for the coat was given to the prisoner's brother, who came to us in the name of Parker.

ROBERT MASON . I went by the name of Parker, because I was not out of my time, and had left my master.

NOT GUILTY . (See page 229.)

Reference Number: t18310217-131

558. ROBERT LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 basket, value 3s., and 20lbs. of butter, value 30s. , the goods of Edward Gainsford .

ROBERT EVANS . I am servant to Edward Gainsford , a cheesemonger , of Ludgate-hill. On the 12th of February I bought three flats of butter of Hill, a salesman, in Newgate-market - I sent two home, telling Hill the same man would be back for the third shortly; I saw the prisoner a few yards off, and have no doubt he heard this - I had occasionally employed the prisoner; I never received the butter.

JOSEPH HILL . Evans bought three flats of butter of me, and sent two away by his porter - he said he would send for the third - the prisoner stood at Evans' elbow when he bought them, and must have heard what he said- in about five minutes the prisoner came and asked for the flat of butter; I delivered it to him, and did not see him again till next day, when he was in custody - I believed he was authorized to call for it; I am certain of his person - he had carried goods twice before for Mr. Gainsford.

JOSEPH BATES . I am a patrol of Farringdon ward. I apprehended the prisoner on the 13th of February, and told him it was for the butter which he had from Hill's - he said he had sold it for 10d. a pound in Whitechapel-market, and threw the basket and cloths away.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

JOSEPH BATES . He has a very comfortable home - his children looked well: there was no appearance of want.

GUILTY . Aged 57. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-132

559. ANN BURFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 4 1/2 lbs. of pork, value 2s. 7d. , the goods of Robert Pocklington .

ROBERT POCKLINGTON . I am a butcher , and live in Old' Change . On the 8th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to the shop, and cheapened some joints of meat outside - I had three ladies in the shop: this pork was inside the shop, salting in a tub - she then came in; I was very busy - she went to the tub, and put her cloak over it; I saw her take a piece of pork out -I let her go out, and then went after her; she cheapened more joints outside - I let her go to Carter-lane, there stopped her, and found this pork wrapped up in a cloth, which she had before her, under her apron - she had been to my shop before.

MATTHEW CARTER . I am a constable. I received her in charge with the pork; she said she was very sorry for what she had done - I only found 2 1/2d. on her.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 53. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310217-133

560. THOMAS POTTS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , two tubs, value 6d., and 136 lbs. of butter, value 6l., the goods of John Titterton , in his dwelling-house ; and JOHN SKINNER, alias GARSON , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

ROBERT HOARE . I am servant to Mr. Dean, a cheesemonger, of Fore-street. On Saturday morning, the 8th of January, about eight o'clock, I saw five men, with two firkins of butter, in Milton-street - the prisoner Potts was one of them; I thought it was not all right, and gave information to the officer, at the watch-house, which is within one hundred yards of where I saw them - I went with him to point them out, and when I returned I saw the five men in Milton-street, without the butter; I am quite certain Potts is one of those I saw on both occasions - they were still in the street, but the butter was gone; I left the officer, and saw nothing more - I saw Potts at Guildhall, on the Monday following, and am quite sure of his person; he was a stranger to me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you on the look-out that morning? A. No; I was merely coming along with two pails of water, for my master - I took great notice of the five men, and am certain Potts was one of them; I left it to the officer to take them - I might know the other four, if I saw them; I cannot say I could swear to them - I am positive of Potts; I never said the wrong person was taken, nor any thing like it, or that any body was a d-d fool - I might have said they might have taken the man who was carrying the firkin, and who I could swear to; Potts was not carrying it - they were all going on together; I was on the other side of the way - I knew the officer by seeing him in the ward; I went away of my own accord - he did not send me.

JAMES NOYES . I am constable of Cripplegate-without. I was at my own house; I did not receive information from Hoare - Howard called me down, as the clock was striking eight - I went down and saw Potts in custody, in Honeysuckle-court, Milton-street; Howard said, in his presence, that he was charged with being with four other men, who were carrying two firkins of butter - he said nothing to it; I went, from Howard's information, into Milton-street, and saw four men standing at a distance from the court, by a public-house - I went towards them, and they all four ran off as hard as they could; I ran, and it being a very foggy morning, they turned down different alleys, and I lost them - I immediately came back, and from information, I went to Skinner's lodging, No. 3, Honeysuckle-court; it is a house let out in lodgings - I went up to Skinner's room, on the second floor, knocked at the door, and after some time got admission -I found him there, and told him I wanted some butter, which I understood he had got there; I immediately walked into the room - he said some men had been there who he knew, and had asked him to take care of some butter for them; he did not mention their names - I found the butter, without any tubs, concealed under a great coat, which Skinner himself took off; it was against the wall, within a yard or two of the window - I searched the room, and all I could find of the tubs was two heads, and a few hoops; I could tell they had formed part of a butter tub- the heads were quite wet, as if recently taken off the butter; I took Skinner into custody - the butter was sent to Howard's house, and in the course of the morning, by the ink marks on the heads, I traced the butter to have come from Mr. Titterton's, and gave information there; the butter was in the shape of tubs; as if it had come out of two separate tubs.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. They could have been carried by two men? A. Yes - I could walk from the prosecutor's house, which is in Newgate-street, to Honeysuckle-court, in five minutes; nothing was said about the wrong man being taken in my hearing, nor that Potts was not the person who was intended to be taken -Howard accompanied me to Skinner's; he had called me down to assist in securing some of the others - my house is near Skinner's; Howard had got Potts when he called me - the others knew me unfortunately.

JURY. Q. Skinner is only a lodger? A. No, the house is let out in furnished tenements - the landlord does not live in it.

Cross-examined by MR. STURGEON. Q. Skinner directly took off the coat, and said there was the butter? A. Yes.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am a constable. On Saturday, the 8th of February, just at eight o'clock, I received information from Heare, and went into Milton-street - I got to the end of Honeysuckle-court, which is in the City, and saw five men; Potts was one of them - having the five men pointed out to me, I passed in right between them; Potts was counting some silver, and said, "D-n it, he has made a mistake, I will go back again." and when I found he meant to go back, I went through Honeysuckle-court, about half-way - he followed after me; I saw him go to a door, and he made a jump up two steps - I retreated back, and called for Noyes' assistance; Potts went into the door of the house where Skinner was afterwards found- I let him go in, and when he came out he made a jump out at the door, and as he came out I collared him (he had had time to go up stairs); the other four men made their escape up Milton-street - I sent Potts to the watchhouse, by another person, (I searched him at the Compter, and found 1l. 5s. on him, which he at first refused to give up); directly after I gave him in charge I went up stairs with Noyes, and found these two firkins of butter at Skinner's - they were not in tubs then; I saw the two heads, and some of the hoops - when we mentioned the butter Skinner uncovered it, and said it was left by four men, whom he knew; they had asked him to let them leave it a few minutes, and they would call again - I borrowed two tubs of Dean's man, and took it to my own place; Skinner said he knew the men, and he was to tell us their names, but he did not - the butter was afterwards claimed by Mr. Titterton, of Newgate-street; the heads of the casks were shown to Salmon.

Cross-examined by MR. CALRKSON. Q. You have no knowledge of who took the butter to Skinner's? A. No

- Hoare went away, saying he could not stop, after pointing them out; I found 25s. on Potts - I left 3s. with him; the rest was given up to him before the Alderman, as he asked for it for his wife and family - I did not pay attention to Hoare's evidence here; I never heard any thing said about the wrong man being taken, or about a d-d fool - I did not hear him; I might have taken the whole of them - I said I should have liked to take the whole five, if I could.

CHARLES JAMES SALMON . I am warehouseman to Mr. John Titterton , of Newgate-street , a dealer in butter and cheese - I had seen these firkins of butter between seven and eight o'clock on Saturday morning, the 8th of February, about a yard within the door-way; the shop was then open for business - five firkins stood there; I did not miss them till I received information from the constable between twelve and one o'clock the same day - I immediately observed that two firkins were gone; these were servants in the shop between seven and eight o'clock - the officer brought the butter back on the following Saturday; when our cart went that way we sent for it - he had brought the two heads of the firkins the same day as they were stolen - I knew them to be master's by the marks and numbers; they were two of five regular numbers, from 59 to 63 - I missed 59 and 61, and these numbers were on the heads, marked with chalk by one of our men; I had not a doubt of their being the heads of our two firkins, and the butter was the same bulk as if it had been contained in firkins - the two would be worth from 6l. to 7l.; they would sell for more - Mr. Titterton lives in the house; it is in the parish of Christ church, Newgate-street; I have seen the hoops in the officer's hands this evening, not before.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How do you know the parish the house is in? A. Because I asked one of the officers this evening - my master brought the butter of a broker; they would cost at that time about 6l.; I swear they cost more than 5l.; I saw the butter safe when the servants were in the shop, and also when they were not; that was between seven and eight o'clock also - there is generally one man in the shop, but I know he was below; I cannot say whether the butter was taken at one time or twice.

COURT. Q. What was the weight of the butter found? A. 136 lbs.

Pott's Defence. I had not been out of my house above half an hour; I was going to buy spirtis of wine; when the officer took me they were all four standing at the door talking, and I was walking through the court; that man said in the watch-house, "An old fool, he has taken the wrong man;" I did not know what it was for till I was committed - I have a wife and children.

Skinner's Defence. On Saturday morning, about eight o'clock, two men brought into my room two firkins of butter, and asked me to let them remain there - they took the tubs away, and left the heads; I was dressing when Noyes came and asked if there were not two tubs of butter there; I said Yes, and asked if he had the men in custody - I gave him the names and description, and said he was likely to find them in Golden-lane; he said he would go after them, and on Monday he said he had been, but supposed they had heard of it, and were out of the way.

JAMES NOVES . He said that the four persons were to he found at a public-house in Golden-lane; he did not give me their names, but said they were in the habit of using that house - here are the heads and hoops.

CHARLES JAMES SALMON . I have no hesitation in speaking to the heads; they have 59 and 61 chalked on them, and an A in a diamond, which is the sellers' mark- I have not a doubt of them.

POTTS - GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

SKINNER - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-134

NEW COURT. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

561. JOHN TUBBS , ELIZABETH TUBBS , and WILLIAM SCATE were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December, 1828 , 1 blanket, value 15s.; 1 set of bed-furniture, value 1l.; 1 sofa-cover, value 10s.; 1 washing-tub, value 5s.; 1 broom, value 6d., and 1 shovel, value 6d. , the goods of William Fiddes .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JANE FIDDES . I am the wife of William Fiddes , I resided two years before last Christmas, at No. 1, John-street, Frederick-street, Portland-town - Tubbs was my landlord . Shortly before Christmas, 1828, he called on me, and said he would seize our goods - I offered, a little before Christmas, to give up the house on condition that I should have a quarter's rent, in consequence of having new roofed the house - he would not listen to any proposal, but said he would follow me up close when the rent became due; I had my father-in-law and two other lodgers in my house; I carried on business in the general line, but Tubbs opened against me, because I turned my hand to other things; he lived next door but one - I did not propose to give up my house till he abused me, and broke the locks; after he refused to enter into any terms about the house, my father-in-law's goods, and what I could spare, were removed to Greek-street, to his master's, for the purpose of raising money to pay the rent - previous to Christmas-day I took a lodging on the opposite side of the street, because my life was in danger; I shut up the shop occasionally after I took my lodging, and put up two bills to let it for nineteen years - on the 25th of December the quarter's rent was paid on my father's goods; I did not pay any myself - I had not time; he took care to seize the goods; on Monday morning, the 26th of December, the rent was paid, and I came out with the receipt in my pocket, which was written by Mr. Scates' young man - this is it; I received it from Mr. Flint, who paid the money to save our goods - the name of Mr. Scates' young man is down on the receipt, but I did not see him; I got the receipt about eleven o'clock - Tubbs and his wife came to my house, and broke the door open while I was in town; we had left to go to town between eight and nine o'clock in the morning - we had left plenty of goods to pay the rent; we returned in the evening, and our goods had then been all taken away, to the amount of 8l. or 9l. - I am now speaking of the lodging opposite the shop; I missed a blanket from there, but that was not at that time; there were more robberies after that; on the

23rd of December I employed Scate to get a lodger out of the house, and he entered another room with a false-key and stole these things; he stole the large blanket, bed-furniture and sofa-cover; it was near a fortnight after that, that Tubbs and his wife broke in and got over the wall - I cannot say whether Scate was in every respect connected with them on the 26th of December; no article in this indictment was taken from me on the day after Christmas-day; Tubbs and his wife were on the premises on the day I employed Scate to get my lodger out - Tubbs' wife was at the door on the 23rd, abusing me and raising a mob about the house, and Tubbs was up and down stairs; Scates took the blanket, bed-furniture, and sofa-cover - a man was brought to seize my goods for the water-rate, and they brought a cart to the private door and took them; I did not see Scate take my goods.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How often, since this transaction, have you been drinking and carousing with Tubbs, and his wife? A. Never, to my knowledge - they did, unfortunately, coax my husband out of his house; the only day I drank with him was on the day we took him, and then he offered me some money not to come against him - I have never drank with his wife, to my knowledge.

COURT. Q. Have Tubbs and his wife been living in the same street ever since? A. I cannot tell whether Mrs. Tubbs has, but he was found there.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not Tubbs summon you to the Court, and make you pay 9s.? A. Yes; there were some little items, and my husband paid 9s. into Court, I believe; that was a very short time after we left Portland-town - it did not suit us to take them into custody then; we had not got all our witnesses - we got an assault warrant; it was not dismissed, but we got leave to quit the Court, in order for him to offer us a sum of money - I had them before Mr. Rawlinson, and I have the officer here; I did make a charge of robbery against them then, but, while I was talking to the Magistrate, Scate and my father both tried to get me down; the Magistrate said,"What is the reason she is not allowed to speak;" he said he liked to hear female complaints, but they took me away, and said it was finished; no money was ever given to my father - when I went again his Worship said he would not listen to the complaint; I should have staid before - at that time Tubbs lived in Portland new-town - he is a Policeman of Westminster; I do not know where Mrs. Tubbs lived - they say he lodges down in Westminster.

COURT. Q. Did they continue, for a year and more, in the same house after this transaction? A. I cannot account for that - I took steps to have them apprehended, shortly after they broke in and took the things, which was shortly after quarter-day; I took them before Mr. Rawlinson.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you mean to tell my Lord, that, when these persons were before the Magistrate, you charged them with the robbery? A. I certainly did.

WILLIAM KING . I am nephew to the prisoner Scate. On the 23rd of December, 1828, I was on Mr. Fiddes' premises, in Portland new-town - Scate gave me orders to remove three chairs, a deal table, and sundry old furniture - I cannot exactly remember the goods; I do not remember that there was any bedding, sofa-cover, or shovel.

MRS. FIDDES. Those things were taken about a fortnight after, when Tubbs and his wife broke into the house over the wall.

COURT. Q. On what day did you lose your blanket? A. On the 23rd, and the bed-furniture and sofa-cover on the same day; and the washing-tub, broom, and other things, about a fortnight afterwards.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is this your hand-writing (handing a paper to the witness)? A. I think it is - I shall not say any thing more than that.

WILLIAM KING . I removed some goods from the second floor back room - I think there was a fender, a tea-kettle, and three or four chairs; I am not certain whether there was a bedstead - I think not; they were very poor, and had not been able to keep any thing - Mr. Fiddes signed the warrant, and I took the goods for Mr. Scate.

COURT. Q. Were these things taken from the place? A. Yes; to Mr. Scate's.

GEORGE HEARNE . I am father-in-law to the prosecutor; I do not know of any goods being taken - they were all there when I went away, and I never saw them after; they were taken away.

MARY LOW . I know some of the prosecutor's goods were taken away the day after Christmas - that was after they removed from Mr. Tubbs' house; I saw goods in a cart, but did not notice what they were - I did not notice any bed-furniture, sofa-cover, washing-tub, broom, or shovel; I never saw them in the prisoners' possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-135

562. WILLIAM GREENLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 bridle, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Sheward .

JAMES PUTT . I am foreman to Mr. Samuel Sheward, a horse-dealer , of Green-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 12th of January I was in a loft over the stable, in the yard behind my master's house - I saw the prisoner coming out of the stable, about five minutes before four o'clock in the afternoon - I asked him what he wanted there; he said could I give him a job, or did I want a hand in the stable - I told him No, and asked what business he had to go into the stable; he said he saw no person in the yard, and he went to see if there was any one in the stable; I told him he had done wrong in going in - he said he knew he had, and he would not do it again; he walked out, and in about two minutes I went into the stable, and missed a bridle out of three which had been hanging there; I ran out, and saw the prisoner running down Green-street, on the opposite side of the way - I overtook him, took his hat off, and found this bridle in it, which is my master's.

THOMAS MARCHANT . I am the constable. I was in Green-street, and saw the prisoner go into the stable-yard, and come out - he was walking when I saw him stopped- Putt had then called to him; I saw his hat knocked off, Putt took this bridle out, and gave it to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the stable, and called out, "Is any one here?" I came out, and shut the door - as I was going out I saw this bridle lay tied up on the pavement.

GUILTY Aged 35. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-136

563. THOMAS HILLMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 glazed window-sash, value 4s., the goods of Edward Holgate , his master ; and WILLIAM SIMMONDS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

WILLIAM STOTHARD . I am foreman to Mr. Edward Holgate, who lives at No. 18, Great Mitchell-street , and is a builder - Hillmore was his carman . In consequence of something that occured, about two months before January last, I went to Simmonds' house with Hillmore; I cautioned Simmonds, in Hillmore's presence, against buying any thing of Hillmore, as I told him he had no property of his own, and he was in my master's employ; there is an apothecary's shop in Whitecross-street, and I went there on Friday, the 14th of January, about nine o'clock in the evening - I saw Hillmore go by there with this sash; he went on to Simmonds', in Playhouse-yard - he looked at the house, and a private door on the side was opened to him - he went in; I saw Simmonds in the shop - Hillmore passed the shop door and window to get to the private door - he came out again at the shop door, without the sash, in about five minutes, or hardly so much; I went home, and told my employer, Mr. Holgate, of it - I got a warrant, and went the next morning to Simmonds' house, with an officer; we found the same sash, which I saw Hillmore take the night before, in the back parlour - I knew of my master's having such a sash, as I had seen it on his premises about three hours before it was taken, and had it in my hand; Simmonds said he had bought it of a tall man named Hillmore, living in George-yard - it had been in a room over the stable on Mr. Holgate's premises.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was Hillmore present when you cautioned Simmonds? A. Yes; I took him with me from our own premises - we were both sober- I had suspicion of a sash that I cautioned him about before, but I could not swear to that; I have sent Hillmore to Mr. Gough on several occasions - Simmonds buys and sells sashes; the sash Hillmore then had he said he bought of Simmonds - that was three weeks before this; nothing more passed at that time; my master is not here - I prosecute for him, and know this property; it came from Mr. Panton's, in Smithfield; I never remember purchasing a pine plank from Mr. Gough, in the Curtain-road - I have bought some hundreds of other things there; I did not accompany Hillmore there about six months ago, and purchase a pine plank to make a frieze of - I do not remember unloading it; I never gave Hillmore money to fetch away goods which I had purchased there - I have often sent him to fetch away goods from there, but never to fetch a pine plank; he never brought me any money back; I never sent him with a farthing - he never brought me any money from Mr. Gough; I remember a great many truck loads of fire-wood coming from a yard in Goswell-street - I sent some of them to my house - undoubtedly Mr. Holgate knew it; I had the selling of it myself - I am only a lodger there; Mr. Holgate knew that I received a truck load -I told him of it, that I swear; I did tell Hillmore at the time not to tell his master, but it was not because I was taking it in an unfair way, but that he was other ways employed - the lady where I lodge may have wood at any time.

COURT. Q. Was that your reason? A. Yes; I was always authorized to send her any quantity, but he was very busy at that time, and I said, "You have no occasion to mention to Mr. Holgate that you took this truck."

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is Mr. Holgate so good as to let your landlady have any wood? A. Yes - she holds the lease, I believe, of his premises; the wood was for her - I never made a fire in the house; the only reason I told Hillmore not to tell his master was because we were very busy, and he wanted the man - the man wished to go with it, as she generally gave him a pint of beer; it was merely that Mr. Holgate should not know that the time of his servant was wasted, that I told him not to mention it - I remember sending Hillmore to Holloway with a load of timber; I did not see what he brought back - I did not tell him to tell his master he had brought nothing back; I did not see him on that day, that I know of; I did not, on any occasion, tell him not to tell his master what he had brought back - it is the first I have heard of it. I know nothing of five paving-stones being left in Rahere-street, Goswell-street-road - I never heard of it. I live in President-street - I know half a dozen people who live in Rahere-street, but I know nothing of that transaction; I was not doing any private job there for myself - I was doing a job for Mr. Holgate at Mr. Anderson's, in Rahere-street - that is two or three months ago; of course Mr. Holgate knew of it - I never told Hillmore, when he went to Mr. Gough's, to tell Gough to charge an extra shilling; he never brought me back a shilling in his life.

COURT. Q. Upon what occasion did Mr. Holgate tell you to take wood to your landlady? A. He has given me orders many times to take wood there.

JURY. Q. Did your employer purchase the business of your landlady? A. Yes, and I believe she holds the lease of the premises.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you been acquainted with Simmonds before this? A. Never before I went to caution him - he was not under my control; he said he was in the habit of buying and selling, and he was not in the habit of noticing every person who came into his shop - he gave me such a dissatisfactory answer, that I went and fetched Hillmore, and said, "Is this the man you sold a sash to?" he said, "I believe it is;" he gave me the right direction of the man he bought this sash of, I believe - he keeps a general shop; I have seen his name up at the shop about nine months; I am not acquainted with him, and he is not in any way acquainted with the prosecutor - there is nothing on the sash by which a stranger could know it was Mr. Holgate's, but I knew it, having had it in my hand two hours before it was stolen.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I took Hillmore into custody on the 15th of January; Mr. Holgate gave me charge of him on his premises - I then went with Mr. Stothard to Simmonds' shop, where I found him at work; I told him I came about a sash that he had bought last night; he hesitated a little, but I told him I had a warrant; he said, "You have no occasion to read it, you may search my premises any where" - I then went into a back parlour; Simmonds led the way - it appeared to be used as a living room; he went to the left-hand corner of the room, produced this sash, and brought it into the

shop - I asked what he gave for it; he said 1s. 6d., and he bought it of a tall man, who lived in George-yard, Golden-lane - he mentioned some name, but I did not catch it; I then took him and the sash to the station-house; when he and Hillmore were together, I asked Hillmore if he knew any thing of that sash; he said No, he knew nothing at all about it - I then took them to the office.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He never denied the sash all through? A. No, he told me at once what he paid for it - Mr. Stothard was with me; I know Simmonds has lived there some time, and he has a wife and some children - I am sure he said he bought it.

JURY to WILLIAM STOTHARD . Q. Was Simmonds' shop shut up that night? A. No, it was lighted with gas, and Simmonds was at work in the shop - I did not see through the shop into the parlour; he came out at the shop door without the sash.

JURY to THOMAS VANN . Q. Did you see any other sash in that room? A. No, it is a room to live in - I think I went there about twelve o'clock in the day.

Simmonds put in a written Defence, stating that he had lent Hillmore 1s. 6d. on the sash for three days, and did not know it was stolen.

The prisoners received a good character.

HILLMORE - GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Six Months .

SIMMONDS - GUILTY. Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character, and believing he paid the value of it .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310217-137

564. JOHN HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 spoon, value 10s. , the goods of John Henshaw .

JOHN HENSHAW. I am an auctioneer , and live in Duke-street, Smithfield - the prisoner was in my employ for about a fortnight, to clean boots and shoes; he could have access to my spoons - I found him in custody; a spoon was produced to me at Worship-street office; I had him from the charity-school; his master gave him a very excellent character - this is my spoon; it is worth 15s. or 16s.

CHARLES BATH . I live at No. 10, Goswell-street, and am a pawnbroker. On Tuesday, the 8th of February, the prisoner came to my shop about eight o'clock in the evening; he offered this spoon to pawn, and I detained him.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310217-138

565. JAMES SIDEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 cloak, value 4l. , the goods of Henry Bromley , Esq .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LOWE . I am a servant to Colonel Henry Bromley. The prisoner brought this cloak to my master's house on the 4th of February: and on Tuesday the 8th he came again, with Miss McCutcheon's compliments, and she would be obliged if Miss Bromley would let her see the cloak again, as there was a gentleman waiting at her house who wished to have one altered by it - I delivered it to him by my master's orders.

SARAH McCUTCHEON . I am a milliner, and live in Regent-street. The prisoner had been three months in my employ, and was so on the 8th of February; I received this cloak from Colonel Bromley to repair; I returned it by the prisoner - I never desired him to fetch it again - he left my service on the day he took it home; I had no cloak to be made for any other gentleman; the prisoner behaved well in my service.

-. I am a pawnbroker. This cloak was pawned with me by a woman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner handed in a written paper, expressing his contrition for the offence.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310217-139

566. JOSEPH HEWETT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 2 brooches, value 4s.; 2 rings, value 4s., and 2 seals, value 12s., the goods of George Rossiter , his master .

JAMES MOTT . I am an apprentice to Mr. Bulworthy, a pawnbroker, in Aylesbury-street. On the 20th of January the prisoner came, and pawned two rings, two brooches, and one seal, for 5s.; he said his father sent him.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What time was this? A. About eleven o'clock - he came round to a box; he could get his head up to the counter - I did not know him before, but I am confident he is the boy.

FREDERICK GIBBS . I am a Police-constable. On the 20th of January I saw the prisoner in Woodbridge-street, in company with two other boys; in consequence of something I had heard, I watched them, and saw them go behind a dead wall; they appeared to be sharing some money - I took the prisoner, and found on him this gold seal and the duplicates of the other articles.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he tell you he had been instructed by them to take these things? A. No - I took the other boys, but they were not detained; I believe the prisoner's father is a broker.

GEORGE ROSSITER. I am a watchmaker , and live at No. 5, Blackman-street, Surrey - the prisoner was my errand-boy . On the 20th of January I sent him on an errand to Clerkenwell; I believe all these articles to be mine - I have a mark on these two rings, and I had such brooches and seals in my possession about this time; I did not miss them till the constable came to me - I had a glass-case, in which I kept them; I looked into that, and missed one or two of the articles.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you state before the Magistrate that you could swear to the rings? A. Yes - if I had marked them the marks would remain on them; I have not a large stock - I cannot say when I had seen these seals; I had had the tray of seals out, and cleaned them a few days before, but I cannot say whether they were among them then - I do not think they were missing at that time.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18310217-140

567. SUSAN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 8 half-crowns, the monies of Zachariah Hill , from his person .

ZACHARIAH HILL . I live in Ratcliff-row, St. Lukes, and make nails . On the night of the 16th of January I was in the City-road , about eleven o'clock - I had been to conduct two females part of the way home; I saw two or three women standing with a man - the prisoner, who was one of them, came up and asked me to give her something to drink; I said No, but she followed me across the road, and asked me to go home with her - I told her No, and at the same time I felt her hand in my left trousers pocket; I had no money there - I did not feel her hand any where else; I said, "What right have you to put your hand into my pocket?" she smiled, and left me that moment; I had had eight half-crowns in my right-hand waistcoat pocket, and half a minute before she came up I had ascertained that they were safe - she stood in front of me; I had not spoken to any one else, and as soon as she was gone I missed them - after she left me she went across the road very quickly, to the party she had left; I followed her across, and saw her go up to them, but when she saw me she left them, and met me on the footpath - I caught hold of her hand, and asked her to deliver up the money she had taken from me; she said she had no money - I told her she had taken eight half-crowns out of my pocket; the constable came up, and I gave her into custody - I am quite sure I had eight half-crowns about my person when she came up to me; I was perfectly sober.

THOMAS DOOLEY . I am a Police-constable. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prosecutor and prisoner standing together opposite each other, near the Cumberland's Head, public-house - I saw them separate; the prisoner crossed the road, and joined a party consisting of three women and a man; I waited, saw the prosecutor come by some rails, cross, and take the prisoner - he came about six or seven yards before he crossed; I had seen her join the party, and separate from them - I heard him ask her for his money, and she said, "What money?" I crossed the road, and asked what was the matter; the prosecutor said, "She has robbed me of eight half-crowns," and I took her to the station-house - there was only a pocket-piece found on her; she had not staid with the party more than two or three minutes, when she left them and crossed to meet the prosecutor - she had stood close to the party, and had opportunity of passing the money to those persons if she had been so minded; both she and the prosecutor were sober.

HENRY BERESFORD . I am a Police-serjeant. I took the charge - they appeared sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor, and asked him to give me something to drink - he refused; I saw the officer coming, and I crossed to go home - the prosecutor then came, and asked me for money; I said I had had none that night.

JURY to ZACHARIAH HILL. Q. Had you any other money besides the half-crowns? A. Not any - I am quite sure they were safe within less than half a minute of her joining me; I do not know what had induced me to feel it, but I did feel it.

COURT. Q. Was you in the same street when you felt it? A. Yes, not ten yards before - I had put the eight half-crowns into my pocket about two o'clock that day, and had not spent any part of it; I am quite sure it was all in my pocket- my coat was not buttoned.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18310217-141

568. JOHN JONES and JOSEPH THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 coat, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Woolf Pragar .

THOMAS BICKNELL . I am an inspector of the Police. On the evening of the 25th of January I was coming through Spital-square, about a quarter before seven o'clock- I saw the two prisoners and another lad walking together; I went up to Jones, and found this coat under his own coat - I detained him; they were all talking together, and had just turned out of Shoreditch.

PETER KELLY . I am a weaver, and live in Fleur-delis-court, Wheeler-street . On the 25th of January I came to the door of my house, about seven o'clock - I saw two boys against a window opposite; I saw a boy come out of the prosecutor's passage, go across, and give something to the other two boys - they then all three went away, one at one end of the court, and two at the other; the one who received the article went away alone, and the other two went away together - there were other boys standing in the court; I told the prosecutor what I had seen.

WOOLFE PRAGAR . I live at No. 3, Fleur-de-lis-court, and am a tailor . This coat is my property, and was on the counter in my shop on the 25th of January - I missed it when Kelly gave me information.

Thomas' Defence. I was going home, and this lad said he had picked the coat up.

Jones' Defence. This lad came up to me, and the other ran away.

THOMAS BICKNELL . I took the prisoners four or five hundred yards from the prosecutor's.

JONES - GUILTY Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

THOMAS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-142

569. THOMAS JONES , JOHN FERGUSON , EDWARD BOND , and CHARLES BERRY , were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January ; 9 pairs of shoes, value 29s.; 2 pairs of boots, value 10s.; and 1 boot, value 3s. , the goods of Mary White .

MARY WHITE. I live at No. 109, Rosemary-lane , and am a widow ; I and my son sell a few second-hand shoes . On the 27th of January I was very ill, and was up stairs between twelve and one o'clock - I heard a huzzaing, and some person crying out, "Shoes and boots." I looked out at the window, and saw nearly two hundred persons round the house - they kept on crying out, and looking up to me; the prisoners said, "Halloo, mistress, for your shoes and boots;" my shop-window is glazed, and is a plain window - I saw the persons carrying the boots and shoes from my window; I then went down, and the people ran away - there was a great deal of noise and hallooing - one of the party had a flag, and I followed it; I had seen my son go out to try to save a few of the goods - he was struck several times, and had a black eye; I cannot speak to the persons of the prisoners - I lost nine pairs of shoes, two pairs of boots, and an odd boot; I have since seen one of the pairs of shoes, and the odd boot - they were part of the property stolen by the mob.

JOHN COX . I am a Police-constable. On the 27th of January I went to Ratcliff-cross, between twelve and one o'clock; I saw Ferguson there, with the colours in his right hand - there were from a hundred to a hundred

and fifty persons round them, within half a dozen yards; I saw a fresh pair of shoes on Ferguson's feet, and another pair under his jacket - these are the pair he had on his feet; they appeared clean, and have been claimed by the prosecutrix - the pair in his bosom were very dirty; I should think he was then a mile from the prosecutrix's house - I took him to the watch-house.

COURT to MARY WHITE. Q. What was the man doing who had the flag? A. I did not take notice of any thing he did in particular, but he was among them, and near enough to see my shop and what was done.

JOHN CRAWLEY . I am a Police-constable. I took Jones at Ratcliff-cross, where Cox took Ferguson; Jones was going round a corner - there was a mob of from a hundred to a hundred and fifty persons; they had been stopped by the officer before I got up to them - a pair of shoes, a boot, and an odd shoe, fell from under Jones' arm; the prosecutrix claims the boots as her property- he said he had picked them up.

JOHN ROBERTS . I live next door to the prosecutrix, in Rosemary-lane. On the 27th of January I was at home when the mob passed; I saw Bond take a pair of shoes off the rail, at the prosecutrix's shop, outside her window - he went away with the rest of the crowd; they ran, and I followed them to Ratcliff-cross - I pointed Bond out to a Policeman; he had the shoes in his possession at the time I pointed him out, but I did not see them afterwards.

ROBERT BUSSELL . I am a Police-constable. Bond was pointed out to me by Roberts; I found on him a list of a number of names, a pocket-book, and 2 1/d. in copper.

JOHN ASHER . I am a Police-constable. I was in Rosemary-lane; I saw the mob at the prosecutrix's door- I saw Berry take a pair of shoes from her window; he put them under his jacket, and went among the mob - they went on to Ratcliff-cross, and he went with them; I attempted to get among the mob to get him out, but I was beat back twice - I followed them till I got further assistance; I came up and took Berry at Ratcliff-cross, but nothing was found on him.

MARY WHITE. I know this odd boot to be one of those taken from my shop, on the 27th of January, and those shoes are mine which were taken from Ferguson - they had been in my shop that day.

Jones' Defence. I had the shoes in my hand, which I had picked up in the crowd; I made no resistance - I know the prosecutrix's son was not touched by me, nor any of the mob, that I know of; the officer heard the people say that I picked them up - the word had been mentioned in the Asylum that we would all go to the Admiralty to try to get a ship, and as we came back there was a great loud hallooing; I saw the shoes, and picked them up.

Ferguson's Defence. I picked up the shoes in the middle of the highway; I was out carrying the flag at the time they were taken - I had not had it five minutes when I was taken; I had a very bad pair of shoes on, and when I took these up I put them on my feet and my old pair in my breast.

Bond's Defence. On the day before, while I was at the Asylum, a person asked me if I could write; I said Yes - I put down the names of about a dozen who were going to the Admiralty, in the morning, to see if we could get a ship - we went in the morning; they said they could do nothing for us, but told us to go down to Portsmouth or Plymouth; we then came back, and I was taken at Ratcliff-cross.

Berry's Defence. I was in a public-house close by the docks - a man came, and asked me if I would go to the Admiralty; as they came back there were several persons pulling down things in Ratcliff-highway - when I got to the cross a person said, "Were you not in the mob?" I said, Yes - he said, "If you go to Denmark-street, the Magistrate will do something for you;" I went there, and then Asher said, "I think I can swear to you;" I had not followed them to the Admiralty - my name is not down.

JOHN ASHER. I followed him from the highway to Ratcliff-cross - I should have taken him in the highway, but I was driven back by the mob; I am quite clear he is the man I saw take the shoes - I followed him till I got assistance, and took him.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

FERGUSON - GUILTY . Aged 26.

BOND - GUILTY . Aged 26.

BERRY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-143

570. SARAH KEMP , MARY ANN SMITH , and ELIZABETH SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 5 scrubbing-brushes, value 4s. , the goods of James Bott .

JAMES BOTT . I keep a broker's-shop , in Tottenham-street, St. Pancras . On the 1st of February I saw the prisoners at my shop - Kemp and Elizabeth Smith came into the shop; Mary Ann Smith staid outside - Kemp produced a jacket, and asked my wife if she would buy it; she said No - I stepped out of the parlour, and said I did not deal in such things; they then went out - I afterwards received information, and missed five scrubbing-brushes off a nail on my door post - I went, and overtook the prisoners three or four doors off; I felt them round, but found nothing on them - I should think they had then got two hundred yards from the house; I then saw Mary Ann Smith alone, with these brushes in her lap - she ran a good distance with them, but I overtook her; I afterwards took Elizabeth with the same jacket under her arm, which Kemp had offered for sale at my shop - when I first went out after them I could not find Mary Ann Smith; the brushes had hung within her reach.

ELLEN PLOWMAN . I live with my father, in Tottenham-street. I was looking out of our shop window, and saw the three prisoners go to the prosecutor's shop - Kemp went in, and the other two stood partly outside the door -I saw them come away from the shop, and Elizabeth Smith took off the brushes and gave them to Mary Ann Smith ; I then saw them walk away, and Elizabeth Smith tried to cover something over which Mary Ann Smith was carrying, but I could not see what it was - I went, and told the prosecutor.

WILLIAM MAYS . I am a Police-constable. I took Elizabeth Smith; she told me the name of Kemp, and I took Kemp at her father's.

Kemp put in a written Defence, stating that the prisoner Eli

zabeth Smith had sent her to sell a coat, and during her absence had taken the brushes.

E. SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

KEMP - NOT GUILTY .

M. A. SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18310217-144

571. WILLIAM YEOWELL and JOSEPH CANT were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 cheese, value 5s , the goods of Charles James Webb .

ANGELIOUS BETRAUN . I am a special-constable. In the forenoon of the 19th of January I was in Oxford-street - I saw the two prisoners in company with a third person, and watched them on to the Haymarket, and then back again to Oxford-street - they went up to Mr. Webb's, a cheesemonger's-shop, and staid there ten minutes - I then saw the two prisoners come away; Cant had something under his smock-frock, under his arm; I went up to them with Kennerley - I took Yeowell, and Kennerley took Cant; I took this cheese from under Cant's arm, and took it to Mr. Webb's shop, where it was claimed.

JAMES KENNERLEY . I am a music-copier. About noon, on the 19th of January, I was in Oxford-street, and saw the two prisoners - I had just met Betraun, who directed my attention to them, and a third person, who was in their company; I saw Yeowell take the cheese from the show-board, at Mr. Webb's, and give it to Cant - Betraun took it from under his frock.

WILLIAM BROWN. I am shopman to Mr. Charles James Webb, a cheesemonger , who lives in Oxford-street . This cheese is his property - I know it by the dairy from whence it came; we missed it from the board when the officer brought it - it is worth 5s.

Cant. This person is not guilty of the charge - I can say nothing for myself.

Yeowell handed in a paper, expressing his contrition for the offence. He received a good character, and his father engaged to employ him.

YEOWELL - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

CANT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-145

572. MARY McCARTHY was indicted for stealing on the 4th of February , 1 pillow-case, value 6d., 2 napkins, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 6d., and 1 pair of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of Nathan Mandleson .

PHOEBE MANDLESON . I am the wife of Nathan Mandleson, who lives in Petticoat-lane , and is a pastry-cook . The prisoner had been in our service a week and three days - I had given her warning, and she was about to leave us. On the 4th of February she came to the counter, out of doors, for me to pay her her wages - I thought she appeared much stouter than usual; I told her to go into the kitchen - I went, and asked her what she had in her pocket; she said a couple of dirty caps - I desired to look at them, but instead of dirty caps it turned out to be a bundle of coffee tied up in a piece of rag which she had found about the house - I then made her pull off her pockets, and found in them some more coffee, fancy biscuits, sugar and bread - I told her I would search her, and she ran up stairs into the back bed-room - I called my husband to mind the place, and in a few minutes I followed her up stairs - she was then in the act of throwing some dirty clothes from her, but I cannot say what they were, as there were a great many dirty things about; I found upon her a pillow-case, two napkins, and a flannel - I sent for an officer, and gave her in charge; these are the articles I found on her - this pair of stockings was pulled off her in the room when she was committed: they are all my husband's property - there were other articles on the floor in the room where she was undressing, but I cannot say that she pulled them all off.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Was not the room quite covered with dirty things? A. No, not quite- it was not our washing-day; we had washed three days before; there were a great many rough dry things about, which had been dried the day before - she had the flannel waistcoat on, with her arms through the sleeves, and the stockings were on her feet; she had a small bundle, but none of my property was there - I found some of her things in the house afterwards, which I gave to her cousin; there was a pair of stockings, and a bundle of things - I saw the officer with her bundle in his hand, but I did not exactly look at it - I was too much confused; I cannot say it was not as large as this bundle.

JAMES SMART . I took the prisoner, but did not see any thing produced from her person.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not she say she had put them on by mistake? A. Yes, and that she was going out washing.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my own stockings she brought against me; her stockings were not worth 3d.; I had been out, and got mine wet in the snow - I put that old pair on, left mine there, and when she came against me, she said she could not bring any thing against me but my own stockings - I was not going to leave her; I got up at three o'clock in the morning to wash, and I put that old jacket on to keep me warm - the napkin I had no business with; the pillow-case and napkin were in the room, and she said I had them on me, which I had not - the coffee and other things were under the bed.

PHOEBE MANDLESON. I carried the coffee and sugar up in my hand which I had taken from her in the kitchen -I spilt some on the bed; she had got biscuits and fancy bread; I had had no quarrel with her; I was going to send her to another place - she did not suit me; it had not snowed that morning; she had been out some days before- she had not been washing that day; I am positive I took the pillow-case from her - I unpinned it from round her person.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18310217-146

573. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 2 planes, value 7s.; 2 saws, value 12s.; 9 chisels, value 3s.; 2 screw-drivers, value 2s.; 3 guages, value 1s.; 1 square, value 2s.; 1 hammer, value 3s.; 1 pair of pincers, value 2s.; 1 spoke-shave, value 9s.; 1 divider, value 2s.; 2 gimblets, value 3d.; 3 punches, value 3d.; 1 scraper, value 4d.; 3 brad-awls, value 3d.; 1 brush, value 3d., and 1 basket, value 1s. , the goods of John Whitaker .

JOHN WHITAKER. I live in Stafford-place, Pimlico.

On the 17th of August I was at work at the Board of Work's office, Whitehall - I left my basket of tools within the hall door; I missed them at half-past eleven o'clock that morning.

THOMAS CRANE . I lodge at the Black Bull public-house, Chapel-street, Westminster. On the morning of the 17th of January I was at Whitehall; the prisoner passed me with a basket of carpenter's tools - he crossed the street right opposite the Horse Guards; a person I met said something to me - I went and looked behind a place at the Horse Guards, where I found the basket and the articles stated; it appeared to me to be the same as I saw the prisoner carrying; I pointed him out to the officer, who took him.

WILLIAM MOORE . I am a private in the Life Guards. On the 17th of January I was sentinel, and saw the prisoner between eleven and twelve o'clock place a basket behind the door which leads to the stable; I told Mr. Crane where it was - I am certain the prisoner placed it there.

JOHN WHITAKER . This is my basket and my tools - I saw the prisoner pass two or three times while I was at work that morning, and I missed them about three minutes after I had seen him the last time.

NATHANIEL NICHOLLS . I am a Police-constable. I took the basket from behind the stable-door, and I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-147

574. JAMES NEIL and JOSEPH PARROCK were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 cwt. of potatoes, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of John Daly .

JOHN DALY . I live at No. 13, Saffron-hill , in the back and front lower rooms. On the 12th of January I had 1 cwt. of potatoes there - a person must go through the passage from the street to get to the room they were in; I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock on the 12th of January, in the front room, and the next morning, when I awoke I missed my potatoes from the back room - the staple of that door had been drawn; I applied to an officer, and Neil, who lodged in the same house, was taken - Parrock and Neil's sister were in the room with him; there were about - cwt. of potatoes in their room - some were in a sack, and some in a pail; Neil said it was done through distress, for he had had nothing to eat for three days - Parrock said they were Neil's mother's; I lost some washed potatoes, but I did not find any of them - those I found were red Scotch potatoes; I do not know whether they were what I lost - they were worth 3s. 6d.; I had locked the back room at eight o'clock, and did not go to it again before I went to bed; Neil's sister had lodged there, but she left the day that he was taken.

WILLIAM MASON . I am a Police-constable, and live in Greville-street. I went into the room with the prosecutor, and found the two prisoners - Neil said he took the potatoes through distress, and he hoped he would forgive him - Parrock said the same; they appeared to be in great poverty.

The prisoners handed in a petition for mercy, pleading extreme poverty. They received a good character.

NEIL - GUILTY. Aged 17.

PARROCK - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18310217-148

575. BENJAMIN SPICER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 tea-pot, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Winfield .

ELEANOR LARNER . I am servant to Mr. Robert Winfield , who keeps the Bricklayers' Arms, in Whitecross-street . On the Tuesday before the 4th of February I was in the parlour of his house - there is a window, through which I could see a bottle-rack; I saw the prisoner come out of the public-room, and down some stairs, take the tea-pot off the bottle-rack, empty the water out of it, and give it to his wife, who put it into her apron; she went through the yard, then through a shop, and out into the street- the prisoner went up stairs again; I saw the Policeman at the door, and he brought back the woman, with the tea-pot - this is it; I know it by having burnt the lip of it off.

GEORGE GLADWELL . I am a Police-constable. I stopped the prisoner's wife with the tea-pot - I then went back, and took the prisoner.

ELIZABETH WINFIELD . I am the wife of Robert Winfield. This is my tea-pot - I have had no quarrel with the prisoner.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that a man named Pascall, who he saw at a public-house, had sent him to fetch the tea-pot to dispose of for him. He received a good character.

ELIZABETH WINFIELD. I know nothing of a person named Pascall - I do not know whether he was in the house; I believe the prisoner did say a man named Pascall had sent him for it.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18310217-149

576. EDWARD STRANGE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 3 shovels, value 6s. , the goods of James Hayward .

JAMES HAYWARD. I am an ironmonger , and live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell . A little after five o'clock on the 9th of February, in consequence of some information, I went out of my house, and met John Pett - I went, by his direction, to some ruins on the Woodbridge Estate, where I found three shovels of mine; I took them to my house.

JOHN PETT . I live in Garrett's-buildings, and am a carpenter. I was in Aylesbury-street on the evening of the 9th of February - I met the prisoner and another very near the prosecutor's shop; the prisoner had three shovels - I went in the direction of the Woodbridge Estate, and saw him throw the shovels down; he was taken in my presence - he was not more than twelve yards from the prosecutor's shop.

EVAN DAVIES . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner on the night of the 9th of February - I took him into custody- I went back to the prosecutor's shop, and took these shovels.

JAMES HAYWARD . These are my shovels - they had been in the street; they are generally chained, but were not then.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the witness was mistaken in his person. He received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18310217-150

Fourth Middlesex Jury before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

577. JOHN WISE was indicted for stealing, on the

31st of January , 1 coal-sack, value 7s., the goods of Henry Papps and another, his masters .

HENRY TRAWARTHERS . I met the prisoner in the Strand, at one o'clock in the morning of the 31st of January - he had this coal-sack under his frock; knowing him, I followed him, and took him to the station-house - the sack had nothing in it; I suppose he was half a mile from the Adelphi-wharf.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Where was this? A. Near the corner of Adam-street; he appeared as if he had been drinking, but on the way to the station-house he tried to run away, and I was forced to knock him down to take him again.

THOMAS BOTTOMLEY . I am in partnership with Mr. Henry Papps - we are coal-merchant s, at the Adelphi-wharf . The prisoner was in our service five months - this sack is ours; he had no right to have it - it did not belong to the waggon he went with.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he in your service at this time? A. Yes - we very seldom send out single sacks of coals, when we do it is in the day time; if a man had got tipsy, it would not have been an offence for him to have brought the sack back on Monday.

COURT. Q. When you send out a sack you send it with coals in it? A. Yes, and they go in two sacks in general.

WILLIAM HAMBLY . I am a carman to the prosecutors. I know this is one of their sacks.

Cross-examined. Q. Has it any mark on it? A. No, but I have used it, and know it was one of the set of sacks which was brought out on the Monday, and this was on the Saturday night - this has W. H. on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to trounce the waggon - the sack was used to carry some other sacks in, and I supposed it was left at the Cock and Bottle; I took it to take it home the next morning - I could not get any money of Hambly, and Mr. Bottomley would not pay me.

JURY to MR. BOTTOMLEY. Q. In whose employ was the prisoner? A. In mine - I pay Hambly, and he pays him; I direct the carmen in the trouncers they employ -- they take them from the wharf, but they are approved of by me; there had been no coals sent to the Cock and Bottle - one or two persons on the wharf give their men the sweepings, but I do not; I give them 1l. 2s. 6d. a week instead of the sweepings.

COURT to HENRY TRAWARTHEN. Q. Where did you meet the prisoner? A. Near the bottom of the Shades, walking from the Adelphi towards Temple-bar.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he going from the Cock and Bottle? A. Yes, certainly.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-151

578. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 2 salt-cellars, value 1s. 4d. , the goods of Henry Chandler .

JOHN HINCKLIFF . I saw the prisoner on the 12th of February, take a pair of salts off Mr. Chandler's board, just by Mile-end turnpike - he put them into his pocket; he did not come into the house at all - there were one or two more with him; I called my master, Mr. Chandler, and we caught the prisoner in Bellevoe-place, Red Cow-lane - the salts were found upon him.

HENRY CHANDLER. I heard the alarm - I caught the prisoner with these salts, which are mine; they had been opposite my window.

The prisoner delivered in a petition for a lenient sentence. He received a good character, and a witness engaged to employ him.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18310217-152

579. ANN McDONALD, alias JOHANNA BUCKLEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 cap, value 2s., and 3 brushes, value 3s. , the goods of David Cohen .

DAVID COHEN . I live in Cannon-street East . The prisoner was in the habit of coming to work as an apprentice to a woman in my house - on the 21st of January I had nobody there but her and the woman; on the following morning I went into the wash-house to clean my shoes, and I missed the brushes - no one but her could have taken them; I have seen them since - I had not missed the cap till I found it.

WILLIAM McDONALD . The prisoner brought these things to my house at Bermondsey - her name is not McDonald, but Buckeridge; she told me she bought the cap, and the brushes were her own.

WILLIAM DICKINSON . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and found this property at McDonald's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. These are my own brushes, and I bought the cap.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310217-153

580. HENRY SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 2 drinking-glasses, value 2s. , the goods of Moses Crafter .

ANNA MARIA CRAFTER . I am the wife of Moses Crafter - he keeps a public-house in Ratcliff-highway . On the 22nd of January the prisoner came with another person for a shilling for two sixpences; while they were there I missed a glass - they had been there the day before for change, and then I missed a glass: I took them on the 22nd, and found this glass under the prisoner's coat - both the glasses had been taken from the counter; I called the Police-constable, and the prisoner was taken - the other boy ran away.

THOMAS GAMMAGE . I took the prisoner - I found one sixpence, and one shilling on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the glass.

GUILTY . Aged 14 - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18310217-154

581. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 11 pieces of foreign silver coin, called dollars, value 2l. 4s. , the monies of Edward Norton .

EDWARD NORTON . I am a seaman , employed on board the London packet. I had a trunk containing some property, and about twenty dollars, as near as I can guess- I left it in the chamber adjoining where I slept, at Elizabeth Young 's; the prisoner at first lodged in the same room; he was sent to that lodging by the American Consul - he was there three or four weeks; I lost the key of my trunk, and got a new one - on the 5th of February I missed from eight to twelve dollars from my trunk; I know one of them was particularly marked with black

spots on the face - I had an old key filed to fit my lock; I do not know what became of the first key - I had it in my pocket one afternoon, and the next morning it was gone - the prisoner then slept in the same room.

ELIZABETH DAVIES . I have known the prisoner about five weeks; he has been in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to me - we had lived together; he gave me eight dollars to get changed, and two he had given me before; I changed them at Mr. Cushway's, at the Royal Sovereign, and took two and 2s. to the Angel, to get half a sovereign for them, and two I took to a pawnbroker's in Ratcliff-highway, but I do not know the name - the prisoner told me he wanted the half-sovereign; I got it, and gave it him on last Friday fortnight.

WILLIAM CUSHWAY . I keep the Royal Sovereign. I received five dollars from Davies, I think, on the 5th of February - I gave her 4s. for each dollar; I gave them to Mitchell.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I received these five dollars from Cushway: I had taken the prisoner on the day before; I asked if he had any money about him; he said none whatever - I asked if he had any dollars; I searched and found on him half a sovereign and a duplicate for a pair of trousers.

MARY WATERS . My husband keeps the Angel public-house, Back-road, Shadwell. I received two dollars and 2s. from Davies for a half-sovereign - we take a good many; we value them at 4s. each; we had twenty-two dollars in the till - I cannot say how many I received that day; we have a drawer in which we put all the foreign silver - we have a good deal of foreign silver.

THOMAS WOOD . I am waiter at the Ship and Shears. The prisoner gave me a dollar to change one Friday morning, more than a fortnight ago; I took it to a pawnbroker, and got him 4s. for it.

EDWARD NORTON. Here is one dollar I can swear to by the black marks on it.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18310217-155

582.