Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th April 1830.
Reference Number: 18300415
Reference Number: f18300415-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN CROWDER , MAYOR.

FOURTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 15th DAY OF APRIL, 1830, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY HENRY STOKES, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1830.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN CROWDER , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Honourable Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one other of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq., and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys . Esq., Recorder of the said City; Henry Winchester , Esq., and William Taylor Copeland , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

John Golding ,

Thomas White ,

Daniel Squier ,

George McKenzie ,

B. Hickinbottom ,

Joseph Ingham ,

James Dixon ,

Mark A. Orm ,

Thomas Hurley ,

Benjamin Cook ,

Thomas Raine ,

John Oliver .

Second

George S. Acred ,

Samuel W. Batt ,

John Biggs ,

William Hopkins ,

D. Hickinbotham ,

John Taylor ,

Thomas Johnson ,

Charles Newman ,

Joseph Meek ,

John Taylor ,

Richard Lake ,

Joseph Brooks .

Third

Edwin Bull ,

Samuel Orton ,

Joseph Daniels ,

William Alfrey ,

William Boyle ,

Thomas W. Sadler ,

William Pocock ,

William Bailey ,

Joseph Molineaux ,

James Cross ,

John Hoard ,

Thos. B. Percival .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

John Cantis ,

Thos. Chadwicke ,

James Cooper ,

Rich. Coventry ,

John Chapman ,

Thomas Cooper ,

Daniel Cullimore ,

George Chappel ,

Thomas Cox ,

Jno. Wm. Cooper ,

Thomas Course ,

Robert Cutter .

Second

Thomas Dismore ,

Joseph Daw ,

Joseph Dillon ,

Robert Dobinson ,

John Dower ,

Charles Deer ,

Daniel Dunn ,

Sam. Davenport ,

George Door ,

Thomas Durley ,

James Dow ,

Arch. Douglas .

Third

Joseph Deacon ,

Jno. F. Dove ,

Stephen Davies ,

Robert Dick ,

George Dead ,

Wm. B. Dowset ,

Wm. Dixon ,

Richard Dawson ,

Samuel Dalow ,

Wm. Clark ,

Henry Davis ,

Henry Cross .

Fourth

Robert Birch ,

Edward Bennet ,

Richard Brown ,

David Bell ,

John Bird ,

Wm. Blofield ,

John Bentley ,

Joseph Bowers ,

Robert Boucher ,

Benj. Bradford ,

Robert Benson ,

Joseph Beckwith .

Fifth

John H. Caney ,

Jos. Catherwood ,

John Cobb ,

Francis Collins ,

Joseph Cable ,

Henry Carliss ,

Sam. Cambridge ,

Edward Carter ,

John Chidley ,

Wm. Chater ,

James Crerar ,

Wm. Crump .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 15, 1830.

CROWDER, MAYOR. - FOURTH SESSION.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

Reference Number: t18300415-1

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

669. GEORGE EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Moody , on the 2nd of February , at the Inner Temple, and stealing 1 cloak, value 7l.; 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 2s.; 1 umbrella, value 23s., and 1 carpet bag, value 3s., his property; 1 coat, value 2s., and 1 pair of boots, value 10s., the goods of Charles Strachan .

MR. LANSDOWN conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES STRACHAN . I am clerk to Mr. William Moody, whose chambers are at No. 6, King's Benchwalk, Inner Temple , in the city. On the 2nd of March I had occasion to leave the chambers for a short time - I shut the inner door, and left the outer door open; I was not absent more than a quarter of an hour - I do not think it was more than ten minutes; I left nobody in the chambers - on my return I found a latch-key in the key-hole of the inner door; one key opens both doors - it is a Bramah's lock; the door was shut - I shortly after saw the prisoner about half way up on the second pair of stairs, with a bag and umbrella; our chambers are on the first floor: the bag and umbrella were Mr. Moody's - I asked the prisoner what he wanted there - he said he wanted Mr. Farrant; there is a Mr. Farrant living on that staircase - I asked what he did with Mr. Moody's bag; he said it was not Mr. Moody's - I said it was of no use to deny it, for the name was on it, on a brass plate, which was the case; I laid hold of his collar, and he dropped the bag and umbrella on the stairs - a scuffle ensued; he succeeded in getting out of my hands, and ran down stairs; I immediately followed him, and did not lose sight of him - he was secured, and brought back to the chambers - the bag and umbrella were found on the stairs, where he dropped them, and on his person was found some keys; and a pair of sugar-tongs belonging to Mr. Moody; most of the keys were for Bramah's locks, and of different sizes, the same kind as that in the door - the bag was opened, and contained a cloth cloak, worth eight guineas, and a great coat of master's, a black coat and a pair of boots of mine - I had seen the bag, umbrella, and sugar-tongs in the chambers ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, just before I left the chambers; Mr. Moody sleeps there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you left a notice on the door that you should return immediately? A. No - it was so short a time I did not think it necessary - nobody ran down stairs as I came in; the prisoner's way out if he had been in our chambers would be down stairs, but I suppose he heard me coming up; he was half way up the second floor stairs - Mr. Farrant lives on the third floor; I never saw the prisoner before - I had not double locked the door, but left it on the latch; the key in the lock was one of Bramah's - a common key would not open it I should think; I have one key, Mr. Moody and the laundress another - persons are constantly going up and down stairs; Mr. Moody has no other Christian name - it was not his key.

Re-examined. Q. Could you get the key out of the lock again? A. We were obliged to get a blacksmith to get it out.

COURT. Q. As you went up stairs, would your footsteps be likely to be heard by a person close to the door? A. Yes, for I ran along the passage; if I had met him on the stairs I must have seen him with the bag. I have lived with Mr. Moody nearly four years - he has lived there all the time; I never saw the prisoner there before - if he had been employed there I should have known him.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge - I have the property; here is the umbrella - there is a name outside the bag, on a brass plate, visible to any body; I found on the prisoner's person these sugar-tongs, and in different pockets these eleven keys, which I tried to several chamber doors - the cloak has the prosecutor's name inside; I found the cloak and great coat in the bag - the black coat and boots were not in it when I saw it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not a small brass plate? A. Yes; the prosecutor's servant claimed the things, and the prosecutor himself afterwards.

CHARLES STRACHAN . I am certain this cloak and great coat are master's; I brush his clothes - his name is on the cloak, which is worth eight guineas, and the great coat 1l.; the black coat is mine, and worth 2s., and the boots 10s. - I am certain of these sugar-tongs; they were safe when I left the chambers; they are not silver - I have no mark on them; they were there when I left, and gone when I returned.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired by a gentleman to take a letter to Mr. Farrant; a young lad passed me very hastily, and looked about - I went up, and found these

things on the stairs; I was going up with them, to inquire about them, suspecting something was wrong - I was seized, and as it was a false accusation I made my escape.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.[Friday, April 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18300415-2

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

670. SARAH NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on 6th of March , at St. Gregory by St. Paul, 270 yards of silk, value 41l., the goods of John Pallister and others, in their dwelling-house ; and JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of William Pearce .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM PEARCE . I am one of the firm of John Pallister and Co., of St. Paul's church-yard , silk manufacturer s; there are three partners; I live in the house, which is in the parish St. Gregory by St. Paul; the rent of the premises is paid altogether out of the funds of the firm, and I pay the firm for my dwelling-house; I have lived in the house nearly two years. The prisoner Norris was in my service for about twenty months, at fourteen guineas a year; she was the house servant, and lived in the house; I never saw Jones till he was apprehended; we have about ten servants in our business; I generally lock up the warehouse myself at night, and am certain I did so on the 5th of March; I generally take the key in my pocket, and at night take it with me into my bed-room; I am sure I did so on the 5th of March; my practice was to send it down in the morning by Norris when the porters and two apprentices came, which is usually about the same time; they rang the bell, which I generally heard; Norris used then to come into my room for the key; she had nothing to do with the warehouse, and had no business there at any time - subsequent to the 20th of January, circumstances excited my suspicion, but I never intimated them to Norris. On the 5th of March I know that a piece of black silk was cut for Mr. Pallister, sufficient to cover a stock; it was a particular fabric, very rich and stout, and cost us more than 6s. 3d. a yard; eleven yards were also cut from a piece of slate coloured silk to make a cloak or something for one of his family, on the same day. On the morning of the 6th, Mr. Lane made a communication to me; I then examined, and missed those two pieces of silk, which had been cut the day before, and at a subsequent examination of our stock book I missed ten or twelve more pieces; this was on the 6th of March; we examined the stock-book as far back as January; they had been purchased at different times in the course of this year; I went to the Mansion-house for White, and officer, who came with me to the house; I took him up stairs with me to question Norris, and questioned her myself; she answered with every appearance of fairness and candour, and told me I might search her bed-room; I had not the slightest suspicion of her at that time, and sent White away; in consequence of information respecting a woman having been seen about our premises, I afterwards fetched Martin, the officer - he examined the different young men in the warehouse, and afterwards went up stairs with me to the kitchen to examine Norris; we both went up to her bed-room with her - nothing was said to induce her to say any thing; we found nothing there at that time - I think Martin observed to her that she had a remarkable stock of clothes for a person in her situation; she said she had been in better circumstances, and had taken great care of her clothes - this was on Monday, the 8th of March; she had been out on Sunday the 7th, with my permission to see her friends - she had asked leave the beginning of the week to go to Highgate to see her friends; I knew she had a mother and sister living in Hornsey-lane - she went on the Sunday; Martin said nothing to her about that to my recollection. On Tuesday or Wednesday, the 9th or 10th, I saw Martin again, and saw Norris - he asked her several questions with regard to her acquaintance and connexions, who they were; she said they were very respectable - we asked if there had been any body about her at any time, that she herself had any reason to suspect - she still pleaded the respectability of her connexions, and said it was impossible for any of her connexions to know any thing about it; when questioning about her connexions she said a woman named Jones, had occasionally assisted her as charwoman - we asked her where that woman lived; she persisted in saying she did not know - she said so more than once, and that she had not seen her since the last week in December; I saw Martin again on Thursday, the 11th, and he went with Norris into her bed-room - I did not go with them that day - they afterwards came down - neither I nor Mr. Pallister had held out any promise or threat to induce her to say any thing.

MR. JOHN PALLISTER . I am in partnership with Mr. Pearce. I saw Mrs. Norris on the morning in question -I never held out threat or promise to her, for I had no idea of her knowing any thing; I have two partners, and no other Christian name.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I did not at any time say any thing to Norris to induce her to make a disclosure - I do not consider that any thing I said amounted to that.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you recollect in the bed-room saying there was no use in concealment, for more had come out than she was aware of? A. I said nothing about concealment - I said, "More has come out than you are aware of;" that was not for the purpose of making her tell any thing - on the contrary, when she felt disposed to say any thing, I said, "I will not hear what you have to say, you must state it to your employers."

MR. PEARCE re-examined. When Martin returned with her down stairs into the kitchen, I asked how it was she could have been guilty of such a delinquency, and she said, "The poverty of my own relations has driven me into this situation;" I asked her what quantity of property she had taken at different times - she stated that she had taken four pieces on the Saturday morning previous, which was the 6th - she acknowledge that Mrs. Jones was her sister, but in consequence of her poverty she was ashamed to own her; she had given Martin, Jones' address before.

Q. Did she state where she took the four pieces from on Saturday? A. Out of one of the presses in the warehouse; I asked how she got possession of them - she said she obtained the key of the warehouse from my bed-room about five minutes before the porters came in in the morning, by causing the bell to ring, which signified to me that they had arrived, and then applied to me for the key,

which I had no hesitation in giving her, having heard it ring; I inquired about other silks taken - she at first stoutly denied having taken more than these four pieces, but afterwards admitted that she had; she acknowledged that whatever we had lost she had taken.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer of the Mansion-house. In consequence of what happened on the Monday I went to Hornsey on Wednesday afternoon, and in consequence of what I heard there, I saw Norris' mother, and brought the prisoner's sister, Harwood, to her at Mr. Pallister's house - they had some conversation together which I did not hear, and then Norris agreed to go with me to Jones'; she took me to No. 19, Baldwin's-gardens - before this I had asked her a great many questions about Jones several times, and she always denied knowing where Mrs. Jones lived; when Harwood came Norris said she would go with me, and show me where Mrs. Jones lived - she went with me on the Wednesday night; she went up stairs, before me, and called out Mrs. Jones! the door was opened and I went into the room - the male prisoner was there; I asked Mrs. Jones, (who was there) when it was she had last seen Norris - she said the last week in December, and that was exactly what Norris had said; I pretended to be satisfied with that account, and came away - on the following morning, Thursday, I received some information respecting Jones' wife, and went again to Jones'; I took two persons, showed Mrs. Jones to them, and asked them in the presence of Jones if that was the person they had seen so frequently opposite to Mr. Pallister's door - they stated that it was; I then returned to Mr. Pallister's, and went up to the kitchen with Messrs. Pearce and Pallister; Norris was then there alone - I told her what she had stated was untrue respecting her not having seen Mrs. Jones since December, and said I had two witnesses to prove to the contrary, and had taken them there to see Mrs. Jones; she said, "Then I will tell you the whole truth, that person is my own sister, but on account of her poverty I have denied her" - I told her I had sufficient evidence to justify me in taking her into custody, which I should do; she was the only female servant in the house - I then searched the kitchen more minutely, and found in a drawer, of which she had the key, something less than 3l. in money; I then desired her to accompany me up stairs to her bed-room - when I got her into the room I told her more had come out than she was aware of; she said, "Can any thing be done?" those were her very words; she said, "I have saved 10l., and I will give it you if you can assist me - what I have done was to assist my relations in their distress;" I said, "Can the silks be got back?" she said she thought the last two pieces might - I asked what she had done with them; she said she had given them to Jones, her brother-in-law - he was not present then; she again said, "I will give you the 10l. if you can assist me," and seemed very agitated; I told her I had no power to assist her, if she had any application to make it must be to her employers - they were the only persons who could shew her any lenity; I then brought her down stairs - she had some conversation with Messrs. Pallister and Pearce, which I did not hear; I left her in the house, desiring the prosecutors to see she did not go away, and went to the Mansion-house for Roe, and officer - I then went and apprehended the prisoner Jones, in Baldwin's-gardens; I told him as we came along that I had information that he had had a portion of the silk which came from Mr. Pallister's - he denied it; nothing more passed till I brought him to Mr. Pallister's - I took him into the kitchen; Norris was up stairs; I sent for her down, and on coming into the kitchen, she said to Jones, "Oh, John! what have you done with the last silks I gave you, for you know I have had no money for the last four pieces?" Jones made no reply - I then said to him, "What have you done with the light coloured piece?" he said he had left it with his sister - I asked what his sister's name was; he said Elizabeth Edmonds, No.27, Swan-place, Bermondsey - I went there, and got it at No. 26 instead of 27; I got it from Edmonds, who is now here - I said to Jones, "What have you done with the other three pieces?" he said, "I have burnt them" - I said, "Is it possible that people's property can be so wickedly destroyed?" he then said he had not burnt them, that he had sold them to a Jew, named Benjamin, who lived in Golden-lane, for 5l. - I understood Benjamin's house was out of the City; I sent Roe to Worship-street to endeavour to get a search-warrant, but believe nothing was found - I sent Jones to the Compter by Roe, and brought Norris to the Compter myself; I then went in search of the silks.

Q. You told Norris she had seen Jones since she had stated - did she say when she had seen her last? A. No; the prisoner Jones said Norris had been there on the Sunday. On the following morning (Friday) I searched Norris' bed-room, and found three silk dresses, which appeared not much worn; they were shown to the prosecutors - there were not more than six silk dresses in all, but these were selected; there was a great many other dresses, calico and others, eighteen or nineteen; I also found jewellery, which I gave up, by desire of the Magistrate; Mr. Pearce, in a small paper box in another of her boxes, in her bed-room, found ten sovereigns - I found in an old night cap, in another box in the bed-room, twenty-five sovereigns. On Friday morning I took her to Guildhall, from the compter, and on our way I said "I thought I understood you to say you had only 10l. - I have found twenty-five sovereigns in a night cap, in addition to the 10l." and said, "Is that 25l. part of the produce of the silk?" I did not name any particular silk - she said the 25l. was, but the 10l. was not; I also took Jones from the Compter, and said to him, "I understand there has been some money found in your place; he said Yes - I said as much as 33l.; he said Yes: I said"I understand you have said part of that money is the produce of the silk;" he said 28l. of it was the produce of the silk, and the other 5l. he had saved to get his wife through her lying-in - she was delivered two days after I believe.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. In your conversation with them did you tell them whether you had evidence against them, except what you could get from their answers? A. I told Norris I had more evidence than she was aware of, and from that this conversation arose - I had no conversation with Jones till we were coming along; I then said what I have stated - I did not examine or cross-examine him; I did not say I should make use of any answers they gave me - I understood Jones had made a previous statement to another officer; I asked

these questions with a view to discover the robbery, and if it was requisite to make use of what they said - if I had told them I should give what they said in evidence, I should not have discovered the robbery; Mr. Pallister and Mr. Pearce, were present when Norris stated about her sister - I believe neither of them were present at the conversation with Jones; I intended at the time to give their answers in evidence, if it was requisite - my object was to discover the robbery, and give what they said in evidence certainly; if I had said I should make use of their answers I should not have discovered the robbery; Jones and I were walking alone in the street when we had the conversation.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you in any manner invited the conversation in the kitchen, when Norris said to Jones,"I have had nothing for the last silks?" A. Nothing at all - it was quite a conversation between themselves; the prosecutors were not present - I pursued my further inquiries in consequence of that conversation; I did not tell them they were obliged to say any thing.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure you neither held out threat nor promise to Jones, to induce him to say what he did? A. I am quite sure I did not.

JOHN ROE . I am an officer of the Mansion-house. I went with Martin to Jones', and searched the premises, on Thursday, the 11th of March; he was not at home the first time, but the second time he was - I found thirty-three sovereigns in a bag, under a heap of rubbish, up in the cock-loft at the top of the house; I afterwards counted them out before Jones - there were twenty-eight loose in the bag, and five wrapped in a piece of paper, and in the bag; Walters, a Worship-street officer, was with me, and he asked him how much of that money was the produce of the stolen property - neither threat nor promise were used to him; he said, twenty-eight were the produce of the stolen property, and the 5l. was his own money; I told this to Martin.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not Martin present when he said this to you? A. Certainly not - he said nothing to me about saying it to bring his wife through her lying-in- I was not with him when he went to the office nextday.

JOHN WALTERS . I went with Roe to Baldwin's-gardens, to search - I have heard his evidence, and it is correct, as far as passed in my presence.

ANN ELLERY . I am a mantua-maker, and live in Old'Change. I was employed by Norris to make up a muslin dress and other things; she brought me some black silk to make into a petticoat and aprons - this is the silk I was employed to make up (looking at it) - she brought it to me on the 6th of March, and said it was for a friend; I am sure this is the same silk.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your work on it? A. Yes - I had no other of the same kind.

COURT. Q. What quantity was there? A. Better than five yards; hearing what had happened I took it to Mr. Pallister, and showed it to him.

JOHN EDWARDS LANE . I am a warehouseman in the prosecutors' employ. I remember a piece of black silk being cut off to cover a stock for Mr. Pallister; I have got the piece which was cut off here; the silk produced is of the same sort and quality - I never saw two so closely correspond, and the selvidge is the same; between forty and fifty yards of this piece were left when the stockcover was cut from it - it is worth between 6s. and 7s. a yard to us, to buy.

Q. Look at the slate coloured silk - do you remember a piece like that being cut for Mr. Pallister's family? A. Yes, I have the pattern of it, and the cloak that was made from it; the pattern corresponds precisely with the piece produced - I have no private mark on it. On the morning of the 6th of March, about eleven o'clock, I missed the two pieces of silk which the stock and cloak had been cut from, and on going over the books we found two other pieces were missing; the value of the black and slate coloured pieces is about 22l. the lowest value; I have no doubt of these being the same two pieces.

Cross-examined. Q. It is rather hard to say you are certain of it? A. No, it is not - I never saw one before with the sort of selvidge the slate coloured one has; there may be hundreds of them by this time - they were introduced this season; there are some figures at the end of the black silk which I cut - there is no private mark on the petticoat - it is by no means a common silk; there may be a hundred of the kind - I should not say there were hundreds; I judge them to be the same by comparison, and by missing them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you any doubt that this silk is the same texture and every thing the same as that which is made into a cloak? A. Not the least - our marks are in pencil, and would rub off in making up: I never sold Norris any silk - she had no business in the warehouse.

The prisoners made no Defence.

Two witnesses gave Norris a good character.

NORRIS - GUILTY - DEATH .

JONES - GUILTY .[Monday, April 19.] Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-3

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

671. JOHN STOCKINGS was indicted for that he, on the 10th of February , at St. Sepulchre, in the dwelling-house of William Stockings , did steal 1 knife, value 1s.; 1 snuff-box, value 6d.; 5 sovereigns, 1 guinea, 10 shillings, 2 sixpences, six 5l. Bank notes, and 1 promissory note, value 10l., the property of Benjamin Stockings ; and that he, being in the said dwelling-house, having committed the said felony aforesaid, afterwards, to wit, on the same day, at the parish aforesaid, did feloniously break to get out of the same, and did break and get out of the same ; against the Statute.

MR. HEATON conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN STOCINGS . I am a harness-maker , and live at Ipswich; the prisoner is my nephew; I came to town to see my brother William Stockings, on the 10th of February - the prisoner is his son, and lived with his father, who is a harness-maker; I do not know what parish his house is in- I slept with my brother William that night; we went to bed about eleven o'clock - it was dark; I am certain my money was safe when I went to bed - I had six 5l. and a 10l. note; my money and cash together amounted to 47l or 48l; it was in my small clothes pocket when I went to bed- I put them on the back of a chair; my brother slept in the same bed with me; the prisoner was sitting up in the same room in which I slept - the window was down and closed when I went to bed; I awoke about six o'clock

in the morning - it was nearly getting day-light; it was not quite day-light - when I awoke I found the sash of the window thrown up; the room is on the first floor - it appeared somebody had got out of the window; the clock line was cut, and fastened to a hook at the side of the window, as if the person had dropped down from the window to the ground - the window looks into a court; I found all my money gone from my pockets.

Q. Who was in the house when you went to bed, besides the prisoner and your brother? A. A little boy about twelve years old, who is his brother; the prisoner was not in the house when I awoke - my brother was still in the room; we got up and made inquiry about the house - every body remained in the house except the prisoner; I have recovered none of my money - I saw him in custody in a month or six weeks after; I had been making inquiries for him before, but could not find him till I saw him in custody at Worship-street - I did not promise him any thing or threaten him; he acknowledged that he had robbed me, and said he had sold the 40l. for 20l. - the Magistrate asked what he had done with the 20l.; he said he had spent it.

Prisoner. Q. Were you sober went you went to bed? A. I had had a glass, but was not tipsy - I was tired and fatigued with my journey; I believe you were sober - I had been with your father that night, and left him at home.

Q. Did you not leave him at Sam's, in Long-alley? A. You went home with my sister Thompson.

COURT. Q. Was he in the room when you went to bed? A. Yes - the bed-room door was locked inside: the prisoner should have slept in the same room that night,

Prisoner. You need not call any more witnesses; I shall plead guilty - they will call false witnesses, and swear my life away.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer of Worship-street. The prisoner was brought to the office - I did not apprehend him; when his uncle came before the Magistrate, the prisoner told him he did commit the robbery, and said he could tell him where the notes were if he pleased.

ISAAC ARMSTRONG . I am a saddler and ironmonger. I know William Stockings' house; it is in a court in Cow-lane, in the parish of St. Sepulchre ; the prisoner sent two messengers for me one evening about a fortnight after the robbery, saying he wished to meet me at a public-house -I said I would not go to that house, but if he would come to the Golden Lion, I would come; I went there and saw him outside the house - he beckoned to me, and then said he wanted to speak to me about his uncle's notes; I did not threaten or promise him any thing - I asked him how he came to do such a wicked thing as to take the notes, when his uncle had behaved so kind to him on a former occasion; he said the devil must have tempted him to do it, and that he let himself down by the clock lines.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

The indictment further stated, that at the delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, for the County of Middlesex, at Justice-hall, in the Old Bailey, on the 6th of December, in the 8th year of the Reign of his present Majesty he was convicted of felony.

JAMES TAYLOR . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, from Mr. Clark's office (read) - I gave evidence against the prisoner on that trial; he is the person who was convicted, and received sentence of one year's imprisonment.[Thursday, 22nd April.] GUILTY.(See 3rd Day, New Court.)

Reference Number: t18300415-4

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

672. HENRY WRIGHT SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , at St. Pancras, 1 hair trunk, vlaue 2s.; 1 trinket-box, value 5s.; 8 rings, value 10l.; 2 brooches, value 10s.; 1 watch, value 8l.; 1 metal watch, value 2l.; 6 pairs of ear-rings, value 3l.; 6 scent bottles, value 10s.; 2 gold pins, value 10s.; 1 gold locket, value 5l.; 2 purses. value 10s.; 2 fans, value 5s.; 1 gold watch-chain, value 9l.; 2 seals, value 2s.; 2 rings, value 2s.; 4 thimbles, value 5s.; 1 band and buckle, value 2s.; 1 clasp, value 2s.; 4 pairs of bracelets, value 30s.; 6 necklaces, value 2l.; 5 shawls, value 7l.; 2 veils, value 2l.; 15 handkerchiefs, value 1l., and 1 gown skirt, value 10s., the goods of Charles Caron , in the dwelling-house of George Duckett .

ELIZABETH CARON . I am the wife of Charles Caron , and live with my brother George Duckett , in Upper Seymour-street, in the parish of St. Pancras ; he is the house-keeper; my husband does not live with me. On Friday, the 29th of January, about the middle of the day, the prisoner came to my brother's house to take a lodging - we had a bill in the window to let one; I showed him the second floor back room - he agreed to take it, and was to come the next day towards evening; he referred us to No. 3, Judd-place; I sent somebody there, but got no account of him - he came on the Saturday; I told him we could get no account of him there: he said I had made a mistake, for he told me three times No. 28; he came to the lodging so soon after that: did not inquire there - he slept in the house that night, Saturday, and on Sunday he went out in the morning, and came back about five or six o'clock, and said his brother was taken suddenly ill, and if he was not back by ten that evening he should not come home till next morning - he came again on Monday, three times in the course of the day; I told him his luggage was not come, which I expected - he said instead of it going to No. 108, Seymour-street, it went to No. 111 - he went out again in about half an hour, returned, and went out again, I think about six or seven o'clock; he said he should return in about two hours, but did not - I went up stairs about twelve, and discovered the robbery; I missed from my own room a trinket-box, I had not seen him go out the last time - I heard his voice; he came into the kitchen before he went out, and returned three brushes which he had borrowed - the trinket-box contained a gold watch and chain, two seals, and two gold rings; the seals were not gold - a metal watch, and a metal chain, which was not attached to the watch, a pair of ear-rings, and a great many other things - I think them worth more than 50l.; there was also a trunk gone, containing shawls, scarfs, veils, India handkerchiefs, and various things - I had seen all the things perfectly safe in the course of that day; I was present on the Tuesday week, when he was taken in the fields behind Union-street, Somers'-town, where he lodged, he had robbed me on the Monday - I saw all my things when he was apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Your husband does not live with you? A. No. we have separated- he left me last May; he went away once before and returned - I have not seen him since; I do not know where to find him, but have no doubt of his being alive - most

of the property was my trinkets, the rest wearing-apparel - very little of it was bought by my husband; I had most of it before I was married - there was no marriage settlement; the property belonged to me entirely - a Mrs. Aldridge lodged at the house at the time; she is not here - I was present when my property was found at the prisoner's lodging - Limbrick asked him if it was mine; he said Yes, and that it was all safe - my brother's Christian name is George; he rents the house by himself, and has no partner - he is a tin plate worker.

JOSEPH BURGESS . I keep a pawnbroker's shop, in Chichester-place, Gray's Inn-road. I produce a pair of ear-rings, pawned on the 2nd of February, and two scent-bottles, a gold pin, and a metal watch, on the 3rd and 6th, by the prisoner; I recollect him perfectly - I knew him before: he said he had purchased the watch for his sister, and the other articles were his own.

ELIZABETH CARON . I know these things - I had them when single, fifteen years ago.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What part of the property was in the trinket-box? A. All, except my wearing-apparel; the trinket-box was locked, but the trunk was not - the trinket-box had a common sort of key - he went out two or three times on the day of the robbery.

EDWARD DAVIES . I am journeyman to Mr. Beecham, a pawnbroker, of Holborn-bars. I know the prisoner, and remember his coming to the shop on the 3rd of February, to pawn a gold watch for 5l., in the name of Burgess; we sometimes give more than the value of articles - I should not think the intrinsic value of this was 5l.

Q. What do you mean by the intrinsic value? A. To melt down; if it had been hung in our window for sale we should not have charged it above 7l. - there was no chain to it.

Cross-examined. Q. Though you sometimes advance more than the value, you do not sell but for more than the value? A. Sometimes - we often give more than the value.

MRS. CARON. This is my watch - the trinket-box was taken away.

JOSEPH AVANT . I am shopman to Mr. Gray, of Fleet-street, a pawnbroker. I have a gold chain, pawned by the prisoner, on the 6th of February, for 7s., and he left this locket, to see what the expense of a glass to it would be - he did not call for it; I knew him before, and am positive of him.

MRS. CARON. These are mine.

RICHARD FRY . I am a locksmith, and live at No. 36, Skinner-street, Somers'-town. The prisoner brought this cash-box to me, and said he had lost the key of it on the ice - he wished me to open it for him, which I did- there was nothing but papers in it; he was taken up before I fitted the key to it.

MRS. CARON. This is my box - it contained receipts and papers, but no money.

JOSEPH MILLER . The prisoner lodged at my house four or five months before this transaction, with his mother and her two daughters, and occasionally her son-in-law lived with them; the prisoner I understood to be a draper's shopman - he had not been at my house for five or six months, in consequence of something; I kept a look out upon him in February, and made a communication to Limbrick the night before he was taken. On the Tuesday on which he was taken, Limbrick left me alone, and while he was gone I saw the prisoner in the field at the top of Union-street, Somers'-town; I told him there was a letter from his mother at my house, and he had better go there with me - he went, and when I got to the house Limbrick was passing; I called him in, and he took him - his mother is not in any business.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know that his mother is a very respectable person? A. I have heard she is independent; I cannot say I ever understood the prisoner was at all out of his mind, or wrong in his head; I have heard since he has been taken, something about his having been supposed to be wrong in his head - I never heard of his sleeping with a dagger under his bed.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Miller's house on the Tuesday after this robbery, and saw the prisoner there - I searched him, and found this handkerchief round his neck, and this little box, with nine rings and two brooches; I also found on him six duplicates, one for a watch pawned at Burgess', a gold watch at Beecham's, two smelling-bottles and a ring at Burgess', a shawl at Smellie's, and a pin at Gray's - I told him he must be a very bad man to rob a poor woman like that, with a family of children; he said he was very sorry for it - that he was a great deal in debt, but now he was not; he said all the things were safe at his lodgings but a bit of merino - Hall went to his lodging, and I followed him.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable. I have a trunk which we found at the prisoner's lodging - it contains a quantity of articles.

MRS. CARON. All these things, and the trunk, are mine.

MARY BRETT . My mother keeps a lodging-house in that neighbourhood. The prisoner came to lodge there about Christmas, and brought this trunk there on the 1st of February; he said he had received it from a cousin of his at Kingsland.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he lived with you some time? A. No, he lodged with my mother - I have not passed as his wife; I have read the story of " George Barnwell " - I never passed as his wife at my mother's lodging, nor any where; he knew me at my lodging, but I did not pass as his wife - I am an unfortunate woman; I do not know of his sleeping with a knife or dagger under his pillow; I heard some talk about his poisoning himself - I know he once took laudanum.

COURT. Q. How do you know it? A. The phial was found under the sofa pillow - I did not see it; the landlady went to the doctor's where he bought it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was that while you were acquainted with him? A. Yes; he was very unhappy for several days before.

COURT. Q. You never saw him take any? A. No; I saw the phial, and smelt it - it was landanum; he was very ill after it, and very stupid in his head; this was previous to Christmas, I believe.

The prisoner made no Defence, but his Counsel called -

ANN WATKINS . I live in Cromer-street, Gray's Inn-lane. In November last the prisoner came to lodge with

me - the witness. Brett, accompanied him as his wife; he left a week before Christmas - about a week before he left he was taken dangerously ill; I went up, and saw him very ill in bed, and a few minutes afterwards he put on his things, and went out into the street without his hat in a pouring rain - I remonstrated with him about it; his mother and sister came shortly after that - I went up to his room to let him know they were come; he was then very ill laying on the sofa, and the next time I went up he was vomiting: I found a phial on the sofa, it was empty - I took it over to a medical gentleman - it smelt of laudanum; he recovered by means of the vomiting - his conduct at my house was very wild at times, and seemed very strange.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I am the prisoner's mother. While he lived at Mrs. Watkins' I received a communication from him, and went to see him; I found him laying on the sofa very ill - a phial laid there, which I could tell had had laudanum in it by the smell; he vomited after that, and I thought appeared to have taken laudanum - I have seen a person under the influence of laudanum before; some months before this I found a dagger under his pillow - I have also found a carving knife under his pillow; he has been affected in his head from a child -I do not mean that his mind has been gone, but his head is diseased whenever he gets a cold; there is a sure inside his head - it was ulcerated within; it was never opened.

Q. In consequence of communications you have had from medical persons as to his state, have you been obliged to watch him? A. Yes, I have watched him at times; I had an elder son, who is now dead - he was afflicted in his head just as the prisoner.

COURT. Q. How long is it since the dagger and carying knife were found under his pillow? was it several months before Christmas? A. I should think not more than a month before; I went into the country last May, and returned - he then lived with me again; I never knew Watkins - the prisoner lived with me for about a fortnight after I returned from the country.[Thursday, April 15.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18300415-5

673. HENRY WRIGHT SMITH was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 2 yards of Irish linen, value 5s.; 229 yards of silk, value 34l. 7s.; 6 coral necklaces, value 3l. 12s.; 9 yards of silk fringe, value 30s.; 8 yards of cambric, value 4l.; 60 yards of ribbon, value 2l. 5s.; 8 pairs of silk stockings, value 2l. 8s., and 5 yards of lace, value 10s., the goods of George Drake Sewell and another, in their dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM EVANS . I am in the employ of George Drake Sewell and Robert Cross, of Old Compton-street, Soho . The prisoner was in their employ from September, 1828, till February, 1829 - he then left, and returned in September, 1829, and left the same month; I saw him at Hatton-garden, in February, when a quantity of duplicates were produced, and the goods relating to them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe you have a particular shop mark? A. Yes - it is "Djlmbusar," which means,

"Do justice, love mercy, be upright and sincerely righteous;" Messrs. Meeking have the same shop-mark, I believe.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I was in company with Limbrick, who apprehended the prisoner; I took him to No. 32, Union-street, Somers'-town, where he said he lodged - he showed me his room, and pointed out a small hair trunk under the table, which I produced on the last trial; I found at the bottom of it a purse, containing seventy-four duplicates - he wished particularly to have the duplicates, saying they were his own, and did not belong to Mrs. Caron - I said I would take care of them; I found a small memorandum-book, he wished to have that, and said it was his own - I produce it.

JOHN CORDY CROUCH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Grafton-street East, Tottenham-court-road. I produce one hundred yards of silk, a coral necklace, a great coat, and several other articles, some of which were pawned by the prisoner - I can swear he pawned the great coat and twenty-two yards of the silk with me, but not on the same day; part of them were pawned with a young man who has left me - I lent him 28s. on the great coat, it may be worth 35s.; the silk is worth 2s. 6d. a yard - here are twenty-nine yards of silk, worth about 2s. 6d. a yard - that was not pawned at the same time as the others; the duplicates of these goods are among those produced.

Cross-examined. Q. There is no article worth 5l.? A. No.

JOSEPH AVANT . I am a shopman to Mr. Gray, of Fleet-street. I produce five lengths of silk, three of which were pawned by the prisoner in the name of John Smith , No. 28, Judd-street - they are remnants of twelve and twenty yards; there are eighty yards in five lengths - one was pawned on the 21st of November last, and another in October.

FRANCIS PARKER . I am servant to Mr. Blackburn, a pawnbroker. I have a parcel of silk, which I am certain was pawned by the prisoner for 2l, it is worth 2s. 6d. or 3s. a yard; I did not measure it - he told me the quantity, and asked for 2l.; I thought it a fair advance - I do not know how much there is.

WILLIAM EVANS . I believe the twenty-nine yards produced by Crouch to be my employers' by the general texture and selvidge - I have no doubt of it; we have missed various pieces of silk of this description - all the silks bear a resemblance to our's, and part of them have our private mark; this fringe has - it is m j.

FRANCIS PARKER . The prisoner pawned that fringe with me; I am certain this is the duplicate I gave him.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 99s. only.)

Reference Number: t18300415-6

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

674. SARAH WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , at St. Anne, Westminster, 1 box, value 2d., and 15 sovereigns, the property of Simon Hobley , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLOTTE CUSDEN . I am housekeeper to Mr. Simon Hobley, a brush-maker , who lives at No. 40, Lisle-street, Leicester-square - he keeps the shop; he rents the bottom part of the house, and sleeps there; Mr. Dushay, who keeps the Prince of Wales next door, is the landlord - there is no internal communication from his house to Mr. Hobley's; our part of the house does not communicate with the upper part;

the communication is stopped up with boards at the top of the staircase - the hotel runs over our part of the house, but does not communicate with it at all. The prisoner was in Mr. Hobley's service for one month, and left on the 26th of March, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, when I sent her out with some things to be mangled, and she did not return - Mr. Hobley was then out; finding she did not return, we missed a box, containing fifteen sovereigns, from between two mattresses under the bed - I had put it there; it was not always there, but the desk was very old, and rather unsafe - Mr. Hobley gave it to me to take care of, and I put it there two or three days before; the prisoner often made the bed - she could not hear the money rattle, because it was wrapped in a piece of paper; she made the bed after I put the box there - I gave notice to the Police next day, and she was taken on the 31st of March; I saw her that day in the watch-house in the Waterloo-road - I did not promise her favour, nor threaten her with punishment; she told me she took the money and spent it, and that a young woman, a companion of her's, had thrown the box away.

BENJAMIN BATES . I am an inspector of the Police-division, No. 3. Cusden gave me information on the 27th of March; I found the prisoner at the watch-house on the night of the 31st, and asked what she had done with the money she had taken from Mr. Hobley; she said it was all gone - that she took it from between the bed and mattress, and spent it all in different articles of wearing apparel; I found 5s. 8d. on her.

EDWARD TYRRELL SMITH . I am a constable of the night. I was in the watch-house when the prisoner was brought there; I was going to discharge her - she gave the address of her parents at Brompton; information came about this robbery, and I detained her - she then said she had robbed her master of fifteen sovereigns, and that his name was Hobley, residing near Leicester-square; she fell down on her knees, said she was very sorry for what she had done, and was very much affected indeed - she said she and another girl had been buying some clothes, and had spent very nearly all the money; I fetched her master to the watch-house - she said she had taken the money and box from under the mattress, and thrown the box away; the housekeeper came - she stated the same to her.

Prisoner's Defence. A girl came to me a week beofre I did it, and told me she had robbed her master and mistress of two rings and a brooch - she said my mistress had so much money laying about, I might often take some - I said I would not; she came to me again, and I would not do it - she came again the morning I went to the mangle; I told her I had taken the box, and went to her mother's in a coach - I gave her a sovereign, and she gave her father 4s. 6d.; she went and bought something in Holborn.

BENJAMIN BATES . I never heard this before.

EDWARD TYRRELL SMITH . I never heard this before.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Strongly recommended to Mercy on account of her youth, considering her the dupe of another, her apparent contrition, and the careless manner the money was deposited .[Thursday, April 15.]

Reference Number: t18300415-7

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

675. HENRY TYLER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Bradish , widow , on the 25th of February , at St. James, Westminster, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 5l., her property .

MARY BRADISH . I am single, and live at No. 44, Great Windmill-street, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . On the 25th of February, a little after ten o'clock at night, I was sitting in my parlour - my mother was there asleep; I thought I heard something - I turned my head to look, and saw the prisoner standing by my side in the parlour, putting his hand into his trousers pocket; I asked what he wanted - he said to purchase a comb; I told him we did not sell them, and that he did not want one - I said he was a thief, and collared him; he seemed rather confused at first, but afterwards struck me to get away - I held him fast; he dragged me along to the shop door, and into the street, and struck me again in the street - I called Stop thief! the Police-constable came up, took him, and found this watch on him, which hung on the mantle-piece; I saw it two minutes before he came in - it is worth 5l.; my father had had it seventeen years - I do not know what he gave for it; a gentlemen valued it at 5l. - as I sat in my parlour I fancied I heard a noise; I had not been in the parlour three minutes, and had come out of the shop - I hasped the shop door when I left it; I am quite certain it was shut and hasped - the parlour door was open.

MANWARING PITTS . I am a Police-officer. I heard the prosecutrix call out - I crossed the street, took the prisoner, and found this watch in his trousers pocket; it has been in my possession ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)[Thursday, April 15.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18300415-8

Before Mr. Justice Park.

676. PHILIP RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , at St. James, Westminster, 38 yards of carpenting, value 6l. 19s., the goods of Thomas Simcox Lea , in the dwelling-house of William Butcher .

JAMES HUDSON SPARKS . I am a hackney-coachman, and live at Bell-yard livery-stables, Strand. On the 31st of March, about half-past one o'clock in the day, I was on the stand at St. Giles' - the prisoner came and asked what was the fare to Gun-street, Union-street, Spitalfields - I said 4s.; he said he would only give me 3s. - I agreed to take it; he then put a roll of carpet into my coach, and got in - as I drove down Holborn-hill he pulled down the near side glass, and asked if I had any side blinds; that excited my suspicion - I told him Yes; he then told me to drive on at a sharp rate - when I got to Gun-street he gave me a 5s. piece; I said I had no silver, and went to a cheesemonger's shop and got change - I wished to detain him as long as I could; I saw a Police-officer, and spoke to him - he took him into custody, and the carpet.

Prisoner. What he swears about the blinds is false?

Witness. It is true.

BENJAMIN BARNETT . I am an officer, and took the prisoner into custody in consequence of what Sparks said to me; I have had the carpet ever since.

WILLIAM BUTCHER. I am agent to Thomas Simcox Lea, carpet-manufacturer , of Kidderminster - my house is in the parish of St. James, Westminster , and is my dwelling-house; I know this carpet from the pattern and colour - the pattern is remarkable; we have no others of this pattern and length - I have no private mark to it, but am certain it is mine; I cannot be certain whether I had seen it on the Monday before - this was Wednesday; I am certain I had not sold it - it was in the hall; there are about thirty-eight yards and half - I have no shop; it is a wholesale house - the warehouse is part of the dwelling-house; I missed the carpet on Thursday or Friday, before I received information - I had not seen the prisoner about the premises; I have no partner - I value it at 3s. 7 1/2d. a yard, the lowest cost price, which would be 6l. 19s. odd.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along by St. Giles' church, and met a man, who asked me to carry it; he gave me a crown piece, and said, "Make haste, you had better take a coach, for if I am not there by half-past two o'clock I shan't get the money for it - you will meet me in Gun-street, Spitalfields."

JAMES HUDSON SPARKS . He stopped at the corner of Gun-street - not at any particular house.

WILLIAM ADDIS . I have retired from business, and live at No. 31, Gun-street, Spitalfields. The prisoner was in my employ two years ago, when I was a retail brewer at Shadwell; I am on half-pay, and have been a lientenant in the army - he lived with me till Christmas, 1828, and then went to Mrs. Storey, my next door neighbour, at Shadwell: he remained with her till eight or ten weeks ago, and could not get employ - after that he went to Sheerness to enter the navy; he bore a good character - he did not live with me in Gun-street; I ordered her to bring no carpet.

Thursday, April 15.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18300415-9

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

677. JAMES PARISH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Pitham , on the 10th of February , at South Mimms, and stealing therein 56lbs. of pork, value 1l. 15s.; 8lbs. of beef, value 4s. 8d.; 6 knives, value 3s.; 6 forks, value 3s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 1l.; 1 coat value 8s.; 3 live tame pigeons, value 6s.; 1 hat, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 bag, value 1s., his property .

HENRY PITHAM . I am a farmer , and live at Bentley-heath, Middlesex, in the parish of South Mimms , it is my dwelling-house. On Thursday night, the 10th of February, I went to bed about nine o'clock; I heard the clock strike three, and heard a noise in the house - I got up and found a window broken open, which was secure when I went to bed; the wooden part of the cellar was forced open, and the bar taken down - a pane of glass was taken out, and the window opened; I did not get up till half-past five o'clock, and found it so then - I missed the articles stated in the indictment from two or three rooms- I saw the blood of the pigeons at the bottom of the stairs; I had heard a rustling noise in the night, and got up - I looked out of window; I thought it was the cats, and went to bed again - I heard it again, opened the window, and then heard no more noise; I found a red cap, which was not mine, left in the house - they had struck a light in the house, on the copper, for the matches were there; I never saw the prisoner before he was apprehended.

ANN LAWFORD . I have known the prisoner's friends thirty years. He was coming by my door one day - I cannot say how long ago it was; I was before the Magistrate in March, it was about a month before that, I think - it might be a fortnight; I bought an old coat of him for 6d., he offered to sell it to me - I knew he lived in North Mimms, which joins South Mimms; I gave the same coat to Langley, the constable of Barnet.

SAMUEL LANGLEY . I received a coat from Lawford, which I produce; another constable apprehended the prisoner on the 28th of February, and I took a pair of shoes off his feet - I have not got the red cap, whether it was left at the Magistrate's I do not know.

FRANCIS HOY . I am a labourer. I have known the prisoner two or three years; he asked me to swap hats with him, with I did, and gave him 1s. to boot, and was to give him 1s. 3d. more; this hat is what I had from him.

JOHN STEPHEN RACINE . I keep a public-house. I had the cap, but left it in the Magistrate's room. I have not seen it since - I knew it was the same cap as the prisoner had on his head when he was at my house; he lodged at my house for some time - I live in South Mimms about two miles from the prosecutor's; he was in the habit of wearing a red cap.

HENRY PITHAM . This is my coat, which I lost out of my house that night - the shoes taken off the prisoner's feet are mine, and the hat is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought these things of a young chap.

[Friday, April 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18300415-10

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

678. CHRISTOPHER O'HARA was indicted for feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously assaulting John Trapp , a subject of our Lord the King, on the 16th of February , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously stabbing and cutting him, in and upon the left cheek, with intent feloniously, wilfully, and of malice aforethought, to kill and murder him ; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grevious bodily harm.

JOHN TRAPP . I am a printer , and live at No. 76, in the Minories. I have known the prisoner about five months - he is a chair-maker , and lives in North-street, Bethnal-green , in a house which is the joint property of myself and Mr. Wood - he has had it since last October, as a weekly tenant, at 5s. a week; he was considerably in arrears - I do not think he had paid one third; on a previous occasion I and Mr. Wood called on several tenants who were in arrears, and the prisoner among others - we stated the rent should be paid regularly, as they were let low, and if he was unable to pay he should quit the pre

mises; I went to him again on Tuesday, the 16th of February, in company with Mr. Wood and Fergusson, to ask for the rent; when we got to the house there were a number of persons surrounding the door principally females and children - they were standing there in a state of alarm; the street door was wide open - we paused for a moment at the door, and the cry of Murder! was repeated several times from inside the house - I went up stairs about half way, with Wood: Fergusson I believe did not go up - when we got half way up we saw the front room open, and a woman struggling, with one man at her head, and another at her feet - the prisoner was the one at her head; she was on the floor, and calling out Murder! the prisoner was swearing violently - he seemed labouring under the effect of dreadful passion; I exclaimed, "Good God, what are you doing?" the prisoner in a moment left the woman, and rushed down stairs; the other man followed him - Wood retreated first, and I followed him down stairs into the shop - I was before the prisoner, as I was on the stairs when he was on the top of them - when I faced about the prisoner was in front of me, with a large chisel in his hand as broad as three inches, I suppose, threatening to destroy us, lifting it up over his head; I did not observe it in his hand when he was with the woman - I do not know where he got it; I said, "You know we are your landlords;" I thought that would pacify him - and in a moment I grasped the hand in which he had the chisel, to get it from him; I pressed his wrist as tight as I possibly could, turned the instrument round, and it dropped from his hand - the blade appeared loose from the handle, for I thought they dropped separately; I then let go of him, and retired towards the door - in retiring I just took a glance round, and observed the prisoner again armed with an edge tool; it did not appear to me to be the same as before; I do not know where he got it, and at the same moment the other man exclaimed, "The first man that enters I will knock down," or words to that effect; he was armed with a bludgeon - almost immediately afterwards the shop door was pushed from within, and I found my umbrella confined between the door and the door jam; shortly afterwards my eye was a little inclined towards the street, thinking assistance was coming up, and I received a violent blow in my eye - it created a burning sensation, and bled very copiously; I thought my eye must be destroyed - I applied my handkerchief to it, to stop the effusion of blood, and somebody took me away from the door by the arm; I did not see any tools near where I got the chisel from his hand - I could not see what struck me; I called out, "My God, my eye is destroyed," or an exclamatien to that effect - the prisoner appeared to me to be sober; I had given him no provocation in the least - I had not spoken to him, except asking what he was about; I was confined about three weeks with my eye - it is bruised now.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had no quarrel whatever? A. No - I cannot say whether the woman was tipsy, the time was so short - I believe she was his wife; she was laying on the floor.

Q. I believe the young man who was with the prisoner is now in Clerkenwell prison, for an alledged assault upon you? A. I do not know - I left it to the Magistrate's discretion to do what he chose with him; I stated the case before Mr. Broughton, the Magistrate, as I have now, and how far the young man participated in the act; I do not know what was done with him - I said he took up this weapon, and I certainly felt an increased apprehension from him.

Q. Had either of them touched you till you seized the prisoner by the wrist, and grasped him as you have described? A. Certainly not; I grasped as tight as I could, for my own preservation - he had threatened to strike me, and was over me in this way; I was afraid to turn, or I should have had the instrument in my neck - he was in a dreadful passion, and did not seem to know what he was doing; the prisoner and the man were in the front room, which they call the shop - I was not trying to get in; I was in the room when the man was there.

Q. At the time the instrument struck your eye was not the door half closed between you and the prisoner? A. I stated that my umbrella was between the door and the jam - I was not pushing to get in at the door, nor did I make a push at the men inside - it never entered my mind; my umbrella caught between the door as I was retiring - the pointed end of it caught in at the door; I was carrying it as I usually do - I did not push with it at the people inside; I could not move it - it was fast between the door and jam; I did not attempt to withdraw it - I never thought of entering the room, and did not push to get in.

Q. Was there any thing to prevent his rushing out at the door at you if he thought proper? A. I should think not; he did not attempt to do so - I was taken by the arm, and walked away from the place; I should think it all passed in less than five minutes from the time I entered the house till all was over.

SAMUEL BODFORD WOOD . I was with Mr. Trapp on Tuesday afternoon, the 16th of February, between three and four o'clock - when I got half way up stairs I saw a female laying on the ground, and two men standing over her - directly they caught sight of us they turned; we retreated down stairs - they followed us into the shop, and I saw the prisoner with the chisel; I did not see it in his hand before he followed us down stairs - after we had retired down into the shop, he held the chisel up as if going to strike Trapp, and threatened him; he threatened every one in fact; the other man was in the act of trying to get hold of something in the cupboard, and I caught hold of him, to prevent his doing mischief - I found Trapp had disarmed the prisoner of the weapon he had, and had let him go; he immediately seized hold of another weapon - it was a chisel; they are tools he uses in his business - I did not see the blow struck, as I got out immediately; I did not see Trapp do any thing with his umbrella, either striking or attempting to strike: when I retreated from the house into the street I heard somebody say Trapp was stabbed - I went and found him with his handkerchief up to his face; I took him to a surgeon, and got the prisoner apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. You went down stairs immediately after seeing the prisoner and his companion with a woman? A. Yes; I went down very quickly - I will not swear he might not have had the chisel in his hand at first.

ROBERT FERGUSSON . I was at this house, but did not go up stairs; I saw them come down - Trapp and Woo came down first; I was just at the foot of the staircase - it is a small house; I did not see any thing in the prisoner's hand when he came down - I heard them scuffling on the stairs, and withdrew immediately to the front door; I saw Wood and Trapp come down, and the prisoner immediately turned to the left, towards a sort of cupboard without a door, where he keeps his tools, and immediately after I saw him with a long handled chisel in his hand, struggling with Trapp, who was behind him, and holding his wrist; before that he was holding the chisel up towards Trapp in a menacing way; Trapp did not give him time to turn round, but seized his wrist, grasped it, and the chisel fell - I did not hear him say any thing, it was so momentary - Wood came out of the shop; Trapp followed: I saw his umbrella entangled between the door and frame or cill, as if somebody had shut it in, he being outside the door -I never saw his umbrella pointed to any body; very shortly after I saw the prisoner pass the window, and take a large sharp turner's gonge, which is a circular tool. and very sharp - he seemed to take it from a work bench; I saw him put his hand through the aperture of the door, with this gouge in his hand, and strike Trapp on the face; Trapp immediately turned round, and said, "Oh, dear, he has cut my eye out," or words to that effect; the prisoner opened the door soon afterwards, with a kind of laughing grin apparently; Wood led Trapp away to a surgeon's - a Police-officer came; they would not open the door, and the officer broke it open - the prisoner did not appear to be drunk: shortly after a tall gentleman, who said he belonged to the Excise, was remonstrating with the prisoner - he immediately knocked him down, and cut his mouth; the prisoner appeared to me to be sober - I went to the Police-station with him, and when he and his companion were put to the bar, the prisoner said to his companion,"Mind, they don't know which of us did it;" I am quite sure he is the man who struck the blow, for he was in his shirt sleeves, and the other had his jacket on - I did not see Trapp give him any provocation.

Cross-examined. Q. Does the shop door open in or out? A. Inwards - in his hurry of coming out, I suppose, his umbrella got entangled, for they thrust the door too immediately.

Q. Did they not try to shut the door too to keep the persons outside from coming in? A. I do not think they did, for they could have done it if they liked - it appeared to me that the umbrella was caught in the door by accident; if it had not been there the door would have shut - if they had relaxed the door the umbrella would have been loose; Trapp had held his umbrella by the handle, and was trying to get it out, which caused his face to be towards the door - I cannot say whether the prisoner had any thing in his hand when he came down, but after he get to the cupboard he had the chisel - whether he had it before I will not positively swear; he appeared in a violent passion - I suppose the whole affair lasted four or five minutes.

EDWARD SHAW . I am a Police-constable. I went to the prisoner's house with Wheedon, my serjeant, in consequence of an alarm; we asked him two or three times to open the door - he smiled, and would not open it; we broke it open, and took him to the station - Powell, a constable, afterwards went with me to the place; Powell went to a cupboard in the corner of the room, and produced three gouges, one of which I produce - it has marks of blood on it, near the edge; we also found this chisel.

JOHN TRIPE . I am a surgeon, and live in the Commercial-road. On the 16th of February I saw Mr. Trapp at his own house, and examined his wound; it was a wound which might have been inflicted by such an instrument as this gouge - I found a circular cut extending from the left angle of the left eye towards the nose, about an inch in length; I cannot state the depth - there was a great flowing of blood; the gouge edge is fluted - the eye was in danger.

CHARLES WALTER WHEEDON . I am serjeant of the district. I went with Shaw to the house; when the prisoner was going with me from the station to Worship-street, in the evening, he wished to relate to me the whole particulars how the affair happened; I did not either threaten or make him any promise - he asked me how I thought he would be punished; I told him it would be a very serious charge if proved - he said he would tell me the whole affair how it happened; I told him to be silent, for I should have to relate all he said - he then shed tears, and began complaining of his wife, saying she was a very drunken woman; he spoke very affectionately of his children, and said they were starving from her misconduct, and that this affair was all caused through her - I said,"You see the consequence of giving way to passion;" he said, "But still you had no right to break open my door;" I told him I had - he then said he was very sorry that he had not marked or maimed one or two others; I conveyed him to Worship-street.

JOHN POWELL . I confirm Shaw's statement.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I got up at three o'clock to finish some work I had in hand; I returned about nine - my wife was not at home: I asked my child where her mother was - she did not return till near four o'clock in the afternoon, and then came through the streets, roaring, singing, and crying; I was ashamed of her - she came in doors, and went up stairs crying and singing; she was going about the place, puking and crying Murder! I went up stairs, as I could not work for the noise - I said, "If you don't leave off that noise you must leave the place;" I helped her up, and persuaded her to go to bed - she resisted me, and I went away certainly in a great passion, having been at work very hard, and really I could not tell in my passion whether I stood on my head or my feet - I have stated to you the real facts of the case; this is not the first time she has been guilty in this way - I am a hard working man; not a neighbour can say I ever used a bad word, or said harm of them. I acknowledge I was in a most violent passion, and being with an hungry belly, from waiting for my dinner, to have at four o'clock a drunken wife come home; I never struck her all the time she has been my wife - no person can say a word against me; when she has come home in that way I have gone out of doors, as I could not stand it.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character for humanity, kindness of disposition, and as an affectionate father.

GUILTY on the 3rd Count - DEATH . Aged 28.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his good character and large family .[Friday, April 16.]

Reference Number: t18300415-11

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

679. THOMAS STUTCHFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March, at St. Marylebone, 1 mare, price 20l. , the property of William Gilbert .

MR. HEATON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GILBERT . I am a farmer , and live at Watford-lodge, Northamptonshire . On Wednesday evening, the 17th of February, I had occasion to go to my stables - my mare was then safe; I went again on the following morning, about five o'clock, and she was gone - I went to Northampton, gave information at the Police-office, and circulated hand-bills. I saw the Times newspaper on the 22nd of March, and in consequence of an advertisement I came to London that night; I went to Queen-square office next morning, and found my mare in Hutchinson's stables, Princes-street, Westminster, and knew it to be mine - it is worth 25l. or 30l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far do you live from town? A. About seventy-five miles.

JOSEPH DREW . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 20th of February I went to Hutchinson's stables, on business - he showed me a mare, and after waiting two hours Lamb came there; I took him into custody, and went with him after the prisoner to the Nightingale stables, Catherine-street, Paddington, but did not find him there - I left Lamb there with a brother officer, and took Taylor, the ostler of that stable with me to look for the prisoner; we went to Adam-street, Marylebone, and saw the prisoner there - the ostler pointed him out to me; I went and asked if he had authorised a man to sell a mare for him, and for how much - he said he had authorised him to sell the mare for 30l.; I asked if he had authorised him to sell it for more or less than 30l. - he said he desired him to sell it for what he could get; I asked where he got the mare from - he said he brought it from a village on this side Birmingham - I said I must take him into custody on suspicion of stealing it - he came very quietly with me till we got to the gate of the Nightingale stables, and by some means he gave me a trip, threw me down, and started away; two or three other men there endeavoured to keep me down while the prisoner made his escape - I had my hand dreadfully cut, and also my knee; I hallooed Stop thief! as loud as I could, and got up, with my pistol in one hand and staff in the other - I endeavoured to clear my way as well as I could; he was stopped by some man, and taken into a public-house - I went in, and secured him; I had two hundred and fifty bills printed, and advertised the mare.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am ostler at the Nightingale stables. On the 18th of February, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, this mare came to our stables; the prisoner brought her - nobody was with him; she appeared as if she had been rode, but had stopped, and been rubbed down - she was not very dirty, but sweated; she remained there till Saturday, the 20th, when Lamb came with the prisoner; about seven o'clock in the morning Lamb rode her out for about twenty minutes, brought her back, and said she seemed rather shy; the prisoner said that might be, she was not used to town - they went away, came again about one o'clock, and Lamb took the mare away - Lamb was to be back at three o'clock: the prisoner came at three, but Lamb had not returned; he stopped about there for two or three hours, and laid down in the stable; about half-past six he got up, and said,"I shall go on to Adam-street, and if Lamb comes he knows where;" Lamb came with two officers about eight o'clock at night; I went with Drew to the Royal Oak, Princes-street - the prisoner was not there - we found him in Adam-street, and Drew took him into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. On what day did you first see the prisoner? A. Thursday, the 18th, at half-past six o'clock in the evening, in Catherine-street, Paddington.

JAMES LAMB . I am a coachman. I have known the prisoner two years; I saw him on a Friday in February, just by the Stingo, between that and Baker-street - he said he had got a mare which would very likely suit some of my customers, as I sell horses at times; I said I could not go to see it then - I went next morning at seven o'clock, and met him at the Nightingale stables; I took the mare out a few yards, and told him she was a little lame, rather shy, and would not suit my customers - I told him in the afternoon if he liked I would ride her to Westminster, and show her to a man; I took her in the afternoon to Hutchinson's stables, and showed her to him.

JOHN HUTCHINSON . I am a livery-stable keeper and hackneyman. On the 20th of February Lamb brought a mare to my stable; she appeared to have been rode hard, and rather distressed - it was claimed by Gilbert.

JOHN TILLEY . I live at Long Buckley-walk, Northamptonshire, about two miles from the prosecutor's. On the 15th or 16th of February I saw the prisoner at my house.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not certain of the day of the month? A. No; it was on Monday or Tuesday - I never saw him before.

WILLIAM GILBERT . I have had the mare three years on the 25th of April; I knew her by a white blaze down the face, and on the off hip - I recovered her in about five weeks, and have had her ever since - I am sure it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Drew said I told him I bought her at Birmingham; I never did - I told him the gentleman I bought it of told me he brought it from the side of Birmingham - I bought the mare at Uxbridge-market.

[Friday, April 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18300415-12

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Justice Park.

680. JOHN GAEELTIG was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Newgart , on the 18th of February , at St. Mary, Malfellon, alias Whitechapel, and stealing therein 1 drawer, value 6d.: 20 pence, and 20 halfpence, his property .

PETER NEWGART . I keep the Catherine Wheel public-house, Essex-street, in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel . The prisoner came to lodge at my house about five months ago - he lodged there twice, and altogether about four months; he slept in the top front room, which is up two pairs of stairs; I slept in the back room on the first floor. On the 18th of February my servant told me something - I went up stairs to my bed-room, found the door locked, and the key in the lock; I went in and found the prisoner behind the door without coat, hat, or handkerchief on; I asked what he was doing there

- he made no answer; I collared him, brought him down stairs, and sent for the officers - he went into the yard before they came; I did not go with him, as he could not get away - he came back; I went to the watch-house with him, and saw ten duplicates found on him - I went up to my own room when I returned, with Robinson, the officer, and found 11s. in copper on the floor, in a little drawer belonging to a looking-glass, which stood on the table - it was wrapped in his handkerchief; I had seen that handkerchief on his neck all that day - I and the officer then went into the yard and into the privy; we found three keys, a small chisel, and a little piece of a gown.

HANNAH MOLONY . I am a servant to the prosecutor; the prisoner has slept in the front room ever since I have been there. Between nine and ten o'clock on the night in question, I went up to master's room with a candle; I was in the room several minutes, and then heard the window smash - I am sure it was not broken before; I drew the curtain aside, and saw the prisoner hanging down by the bed-rug outside the window - he had come from the backroom down to master's bed-room window; the windows are about two yards apart - I locked master's door, took the key out, and went down stairs; the window was down when I left - he must have broken it with his feet; I brought master up, and unlocked the door - master went in and took hold of the prisoner; I afterwards saw the handkerchief found with the money in it - I knew it to be the prisoner's; he wore it on his neck that day - he had none on when he was taken, and neither coat nor hat; a flower-pot which had been outside the window was on the floor inside the room - I went up to the second-floor room, and found that open, and two rugs tied together, fastened to the bedstead, and hanging out of window; they reached down to master's window - the bedstead was close by the window; I found a piece of iron under the prisoner's bed in the front room; I saw the coat in the back room second floor - it was given him to go to the watch-house.

HANNAH NEWGART . I remember the prisoner being brought down stairs without his coat or hat; he said would I let him go up and get his coat and hat - I would not let him; he said he was a done man - he had lodged with us about four months, and only paid 2s. 4d.; I had seen the halfpence safe in the drawer on the Monday evening - this drawer belonged to a looking-glass in our room; I had put about 12s. worth of copper into it, put it into a large box, and locked it up - when the prisoner was taken I found that box on the table empty, and the lock forced; I had not seen it there before he was taken.

PETER NEWGART . I had not seen the halfpence in the drawer.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a Police-constable. On Thursday last I examined the prosecutor's house - I went into the privy, and found this chisel; the marks on the box correspond with it - the box was locked, as it has a spring lock, which fastens on being shut down; I found four common keys in the privy, one of which unlocks the servant's room, and one a bureau in the bar - I opened the box with the chisel; I found a piece of iron between the sacking and the prisoner's bed - I produce the handkerchief and money.

ZACHARIAH BAKER . I am a Police-constable. I searched the prisoner at the station-house, and found on him ten duplicates, a pocket-book and knife.

HANNAH MOLONY . I am sure this is the handkerchief the prisoner wore on that day.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

[Friday, April 16] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 46.

Reference Number: t18300415-13

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

681. THOMAS JUXX and JAMES PLUMMER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Carpenter , on the 8th of February , at Ealing alias Zealing, and stealing therein, 3 coats, value 2l.; 50 pairs of trousers, value 16l.; 27 waistcoats, value 8l.; 18 pairs of breeches value 8l.; 3 boys' dresses, value 3l.; 4 pairs of shoes, value 27s., and 3 silver spoons, value 12s., her property .

MARY CARPENTER. I keep a slop-shop at Barnet, in the parish of Ealing, Middlesex - it is my dwelling-house. On the 8th of February, at ten o'clock, I went to bed - I left all my doors and every place fast; I got up at seven o'clock in the morning - I was the first person up; I found my cellar-window wrenched open, and a pannel cut by the side of the cellar-door, by which means they had got into the shop; the brick-work of the cellar was taken away - I missed all the articles stated in the indictment out of the shop; they were worth upwards of 30l., and were all safe when I went to bed - I have known Juxx since last summer; he lived in the neighbourhood, and knew my shop- I never recollect his dealing with me.

GEORGE GOFF . I am a constable. I went to the prosecutrix's house on Wednesday morning, the 10th of February - I found the cellar broken, and the pannel cut out; in consequence of information I went to town for assistance - I apprehended Plummer on Saturday night, the 13th of March, at the Crown, at Brentford; I had been looking for him several times - I did not know him before.

RICHARD MYERS . I am a tobacconist, and live in Newington-causeway; I have been a parish-constable. I had information from Goff, and on Thursday, the 11th of February; I was going to meet Goff at Brentford, and in Hammersmith, between five and six o'clock in the morning (it was very frosty,) I saw three men coming along the footpath; I stood up by the side of a wall, and concealed myself immediately under a gas-light; the three men came by - Juxx was the first, Plummer the next, and the third, who is not yet taken, the last; each had a great basket on his head - I am quite sure they are the men; I did not know them before - Plummer, seeing me look so hard at him, said, "Good morning, master;" I said, "Good morning" - they passed me, and I went on towards Brentford; I had not gone far before something struck me that all was not right - I turned back, and ran towards them again; there is a night-house at Hammersmith, called the Chaise and Horses, and joining that a pent-house, and the there I saw three baskets under the pent-house, and the three men had got a pot of beer; I immediately crossed the road, walked by them on the opposite side of the way, and seeing nobody to assist me I crossed over and came upon the same side as they were standing - when I came up to them Plummer, and the one not in custody, stood with their faces towards me; Juxx's face was towards them - I laid hold of Juxx by the shoulder, faced the

others, and said, "What have you here, old chops?" Plummer said, "Water-cresses, master" - I then laid hold of Juxx by the shoulder, and said, "Let us look at them then," and at that moment Plummer, or the other, threw the pot down and ran away - Juxx tried to get away, but I told him it was of no use; I looked into his basket, and found a quantity of pairs of breeches - I called the landlord to take the baskets, and took Juxx into the public-house; he said, "What are you going to do with me?" I said to take him to Bow-street - I said, "What are you going to do with these?" he said, "I don't know, some man gave them to me, and asked me to give him some bread and cheese;" I locked him up - he behaved very ill, and we had a great deal of trouble with him; I described Plummer; I am quite certain he is one of the men; I saw him pass by the gas-light and noticed him; I afterwards spoke to him and he said they were water-cresses - on my oath he is the man - I produce the property and baskets; the shop tickets are on the things.

Juxx. Q. At Bow-street, Sir Richard Birnie asked if I made any scuffle, and you said, No, not any. A. He did try to get away, and said he would not walk; I said, "Then I will roll you there, for you shall not get from me."

ELIZABETH FENNY . I live close to Mrs. Carpenter. Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon before the robbery, I saw Juxx passing her place, and looking in as he went by.

JOSEPH FENNY . I am the last witness' husband. On the morning of the robbery I saw three men carrying three bundles from the house across the street; it was very dark, and rained very fast - I could not see their faces; one had a large bundle under his arm, another a pack on his shoulder, and the other a good sack full.

MRS. CARPENTER. I have examined all the property; my shop mark is on them - here is not all that I lost - it is part of it; I am single.

Juxx's Defence. On the 11th of February, I got up about five o'clock in the morning, to go to Limehouse to get a job, and in Gunnersbury-lane I overtook two men - Plummer was not either of them; they were each carrying a basket on their heads, and had the other between them - I bade them good morning; they asked how far I was going - I said to London; they said if I would carry the basket to Covent-garden they would give me somebeer, bread and cheese, and told me they were water-cresses I proceeded on, and met Myers; he said to me, "Good morning;" at the Chaise and Horses public-house they asked if I would have something to drink - I set the basket down; they fetched a pot of beer - I was drinking - Myers came up, and asked what I had got; I said water-cresses - the two men said, "We are going in to get a pipe;" Myers immediately collared me, and the other two ran away.

Plummers' Defence (written.) Between the hours of eight and nine o'clock, in the evening of the 13th of March, I was at the sign of the Crown public-house (Mr. Jeffry's) drinking a pint of porter, when Myers, the officer, entered, and told me I was wanted; I asked him what for - he took me into a parlour, and searched me, and found only 2 1/2d. and a handkerchief, which was returned to me; Myers then said, "You know what I want you for - you are acquainted with a chap called Long Tom; I said No - he makes answer, "Yes, you know Tom Juxx ;" he then says, "I want you on suspicion of having been concerned in the robbery at Mrs. Carpenter's;" I declared I knew nothing of the transaction - I positively declare I am innocent of the charge altogether; I never was in company with the prisoner Juxx, or any other man on the morning named in the indictment: I was at home in bed at the time the robbery is said to have been committed, which I could prove, but the distance from town prevents my witnesses from attending, they being people in business, and I am unable to pay their expences; I have always borne an undeniable character throughout my whole life, and got my bread by honest and industrious means.

JUXX - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

PLUMMER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.[Saturday, April 17.]

Reference Number: t18300415-14

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Justice Park.

682. JOHN Mc.DONALD was indicted for that he on the 9th of March , at St. Paul, Covent-garden , feloniously did falsely make, forge and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in false making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain order for payment of money , as follows: -

London, March 8, 1830.

To Messrs. GOSLING'S and SHARPE, Fleet-street, Pay Messrs. Powell or bearer, seventy-five pounds 10s. 75l. 10s. JOHN CHETWODE . with intent to defraud William Gosling and others, against the Statute.

2nd COUNT, that he on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain false and counterfeit order for payment of money, well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeit,(selling it out as before), with intent to defraud the said William Gosling and others; against the Statute.

3rd COUNT, that he on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did offer, dispose of, and put away, a certain false, forged, and counterfeited order, for payment of money, well knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeited, as follows (setting it forth as before), with intent to defraud William Gosling and others; against the Statute.

4th and 5th COUNTS, like the second and third, only substituting the word warrant instead of order.

6th COUNT, like the third, only stating the intent to be to defaud Sir John Chetwode , Bart .

7th COUNT, like the second, only stating the intent to be to defraud John Newdigate Ludford Chetwode , Esq .

MESSRS. BRODRICK and BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM EWINGS . I am cashier to Messrs. William Gosling and Sharp; there are other partner s - their place of business is in Fleet-street. In March last Sir John Chetwode was a customer at our house, and in the habit of drawing cheques on us - he has been so for many years. On the 9th of March, about the middle of the day, this cheque was presented at our house by a porter named Shaw; Sir John Chetwode generally draws on blank slips of paper, and so is this - it is the mode in which he usually draws cheques: I am acquainted with his handwriting - it is not his writing; I discovered that when it was presented - it is a resemblance of his writing; I made

a communication to the principals of the house, and gave the cheque to one of the firm.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Does Sir John Chetwode 's son keep cash at your house? A. Yes - his name is John, but he has other names; I believe the name is entered in our book as John Chetwode ; we supply engraved cheques if asked for, but Sir John Chetwode always draws on blank paper - it was my impression the moment I saw it that it was a forgery; the letters are formed in something the same manner as his - his cheques vary in the size of the papers; I am not aware of ever having seen him write; Shaw had a knot on his shoulder - he did not appear a ticket-porter.

JOHN SHAW . I am a porter, and have been so about seven years; I live at No. 16, Boot-street, Hoxton. On the 9th of March I was in Chandos-street, Covent-garden- there had been a sale of China there the day before; while I was there the prisoner came and spoke to me in the street, and asked if I was engaged - I told him I was waiting for a gentleman; he said, "Never mind then;" I asked him how long his job would take - he said,"Half an hour;" I told him I would serve him first - he asked if I knew Doubleday's, in Bedford-street; I told him no - he said, "Come with me and I will show you;" we walked together into the passage of the house - he then said it was strange to stop a stranger in the street, to do what he wanted me for, and said, "Where do you live?" I lent him a pencil, and he wrote my address down on a card, which he had in his pocket - I told him, John Shaw , No. 16, Boot-street, Pitfield-street, Hoxton; he told me he wanted me to go to receive a cheque for 75l. 10s., at Gosling and Sharp's, Fleet-street - I was to bring a 50l. note, and the rest in gold; I asked him what I should say if they asked me any questions - he said,"They won't ask you any questions; they will pay the money immediately" - I said I was certain they would; he said "Say it is for Sir John Chetterworth 's eldest son," and gave me the cheque - I believe the one produced to be the same (looking at it) - I cannot say that he read it to me, but he told me where it was, and he wrote on a slip of paper, No. 19, Fleet-street, and said Powells mentioned in it, were coachmakers in Bond-street - he was to remain at Doubleday's till I returned with the money; I went to Gosling and Sharp's, presented the cheque and was called backwards, and asked how I came by it - I gave an account how I came by it, and one of the firm came with me to Doubleday's, and got a Police-man on the road; I had the cheque given to me - we all three went to Doubleday's, but did not find the prisoner; I waited there alone for him about two hours and a half, but did not see him - the officer was handy, but out of sight; I then returned to the banking-house, and gave up the cheque - I saw nobody with the prisoner when he first spoke to me in Chandos-street; he crossed the road to me - I heard no more of him till the 18th, when I received a letter, post paid, this is it (looking at it;) in consequence of that letter I went to the banking-house, and then to the two-penny post office, in Brewer-street, Golden-square - I left part of an old catalogue there, with my name and address on it, for a gentleman named Thomas, who had sent the letter; this is the piece of catalogue, with my address on it (looking at it;) I left word that there was a parcel at that address, and if the gentleman came according to that direction, he must come personally and receive it. On Saturday, the 20th, at half-past nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my house; I went down to him - I had gone to bed; he said he hoped the money was safe - I had received directions to apprehend him when I could meet him; I told him the money was safe, that I had left it at a friend's house for safety, and if he would go with me, he could receive it - I and he proceeded towards the watch-house; my intention was to look for a Policeman - I saw a man standing, who I thought was a Policeman; I collared the prisoner, and expected that man to assist me - I told the prisoner he had sent me with a forged cheque, and had like to have got me into trouble, therefore I should detain him; he said he would give me a sovereign if I would let him go - I told him I should take no money, I should do my duty; the man did not assist me - a scuffle ensued, and he got away; I pursued, calling Stop him!- I kept him in sight, and a man named George Grafham came to my assistance - the prisoner told Grafham he was not aware of the danger he (the prisoner) was in, he said, "Let me go for God's sake; you are not aware of the danger I am in" - we took him to the watch-house- he struggled a little - he was not willing to go; I left him in the watch-house, in charge of Bedford.

Cross-examined. Q. You are a ticket porter? A. No, I attend sales - I am not employed by any auctioneer; I never saw the prisoner before - I still work as a porter.

Q. Were your suspicious a little raised at the time you asked the prisoner what you should say, if they asked any questions? A. I thought myself it was not all right, but he was so particular in getting my address in case I should not bring the money; Doubleday's is a public-house; I was to take the money to him; I told him it was strange to stop a stranger in the street.

Q. Why not tell him to take back his cheque, if you thought all was not right? A. He was so particular in taking my address; I went back to Doubleday's with the officer - I went to the coffee-room and the bar; I was not accompanied by any person between the 9th and 20th.

Q. When the cheque was given to you did he point to the name and say, "That is Sir John Chetwode 's son?" A. No, he did not point to it - he did not say "That is Sir John Chetwode 's eldest son," but that he was Sir John Chetwode 's eldest son; he was a stranger to me.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. The 9th and 20th were the only times you saw the prisoner? A. That is all.

COURT. Q. You say you were not accompanied by any body between the 9th and 20th; that is nobody had you in custody? A. No, I might have gone away if I liked; I do not recollect hearing the name of Thomas mentioned by the prisoner when he was apprehended.

WILLIAM ELLIS GOSLING , ESQ. I am a partner in the house of Gosling and Sharpe. On the 9th of March Ewings made a communication to me on the subject of this cheque, which he gave me (looking at it) it was in my possession till given to the solicitor for the prosecution; in consequence of a communication from Ewings, I accompanied Shaw down the Strand to Doubleday's eating-house, in Bedford Street - I took an officer with me, who

I met in the Strand - we could find no person there; I directed Shaw to look out, and came away; this cheque is not Sir John Chetwode's hand-writing, nor the hand writing of John Newdigate Chetwode , his son, who keeps a separate account with us.

Cross-examined. Q. You accompanied Shaw? A. Yes, I walked with him to meet the person.

JAMES TAYLOR . I live at the two-penny post-office, in Brewer-street. I do not know the prisoner; a person called in March and left a piece of paper to be delivered to any person who might call in the name of Thomas; I cannot say whether this is the paper, a person called in the evening, and it was given to him by my boy - I was sitting in my parlour at the time, and cannot say who it was; the same paper that was left was put into the rack -I do not remember what day it was.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you with him? A. I was not with him; I did not take the paper in.

THOMAS HOLLIS . I live at the two-penny post-office, Brewer-street. I remember a man, calling himself Thomas, calling for a paper, which I took out of the rack and gave him; this is the paper (looking at it) - I do not know the man to whom I gave it - it was about eight o'clock in the evening and quite dark; it was in March, but I do not exactly remember the day.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it was March? A. I recollect it was March; I should think it was three or four weeks ago; I found the paper in the letter rack; I do not know who put it there; I did not write on the paper, but I read all through the printing part, and all the day before; I do not think I should know the man again.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you know who brought the paper? A. I did not see it brought, but saw it in the rack the day before, and read it.

GEORGE GRAFHAM . I am a painter. On the 20th of March, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was near the Ivy-house at Hoxton. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running; I laid hold of him and detained him till Shaw came up - he begged me very much to let him go, saying, I did not know the consequence of his being detained; I and Shaw took him to the watch-house and gave him in charge.

JOHN BEDFORD . I am a Police-serjeant, at the station-house, Hoxton Old Town. On the 20th of March the prisoner was brought to the watch-house by Shaw and Grafham, charged with forging on Gosling's - he appeared in great agitation, and said he was not the man who had forged; I searched him, and found on him a letter and part of a catalogue, which I produce; he gave me the name of William Thomas , 47 or 27, New Bond-street - the letter I found on him was wafered up and directed to Shaw; I gave it to Shaw in his presence - he opened and read it in the prisoner's presence, and returned it to me - he was kept in custody, and about two o'clock in the morning, he came to me at the desk, and asked if I would be kind enough to show him what charge I had got against him; I said I would, and showed it to him - he said that was not right, that his name was not Thomas but Mc-Donald, that he wished to say something to me, as he had told an untruth, and truth went the furthest; I cautioned him not to say any thing to me, but he said he had been lodging at a public-house in King-street, Golden-square, and the person who he had received the cheque from he had seen there two or three times; that he was in company with him at that house the night before the cheque was presented; he described the person, and said that person was in liquor the night before when he was in his company, and that the person told him if he would meet him there next morning he would give him a job; he said he knew him by the name of Thomas, that they met next morning at this house, and this person gave him the cheque, and asked him to go and get cash for it - he said, Yes, he would if it was all right - that he at first said it was all right, and afterwards said it was not right, but that Thomas had told him he would get the money, as it had been done before - he did not say in what respect Thomas had told him it was not right; he said he and Thomas then went out of the public-house together, and proceeded towards the City or Strand - that they were together two hours previous to meeting the porter - that they met a porter in Chandos-street and he went up to the porter and asked him if he would go and get cash for that cheque, but that Thomas kept back at this time; he said he told the porter that he would meet him at a house in Bedford-street, that he went to the house in Bedford-street, to wait for the porter coming back with the money, and that Thomas followed the porter to the City to see if any person came out with him; Thomas saw some person come out with Shaw, and came running to him to the house in Bedford-street, telling him some person had come out as if they thought that it was not right; that he (the prisoner) then ran out of the house, and did not see Thomas again for a day or two, and then he said he met him the next day in Oxford-street, and Thomas wished him to write to Shaw, thinking perhaps he had got the money - he did not write then, but two or three days after Thomas came and beckoned him out of the shop, or as he stood at the door beckoned him from the door, and asked him to go and take a walk with him - that they went away from the shop together towards Holborn, where Thomas and him went into a coffee-shop, and he wrote a letter to Shaw - that he asked Thomas at first to write himself, but he declined on account of having something the matter with his thumb, and then he wrote - that they parted that evening, and Thomas came on the Saturday on which evening he was apprehended, and again beckoned him out of the shop, and they went away that night together from the shop of Mr. Richards, in Oxford-street where he said he lived - that they went on talking together towards Holborn, till they got towards Hoxton, and came together to the corner of Pitfield-street, Hoxton, and Thomas requested him to go to Shaw for the money - he asked Thomas to go himself, but Thomas made some excuse and he went himself; I said, "Why not state when you were brought to the watch-house that such a person was waiting for you, I might have apprehended him then" - he said he was in such a flurry he did not think of it - he said he had seen Thomas at King-street, Golden-square; I went next morning at seven o'clock to King-street, Golden-square, and found a person named Thomas, and took him into custody; the prisoner afterwards saw him, and said immediately that was not the man; I took a person named Grant, in consequence of a description given me by the prisoner - he did not see that person - he is here.

Cross-examined. Q. This must have been a very long interview between you? A. Yes he was not out of my

presence all night; I did not think it safe for him to be out of my sight; he was not locked up in the watch-house; he could not get away; I did not tell him it would be better for him to make a statement to me; I put him on his guard; I asked him no questions, except the description of Thomas.

Q. Did you not state before the Magistrate that you could not tell but he might have said he had seen Thomas a week after? A. Not to my knowledge - my evidence was so long, I will not swear I did not say so.

Q. Did he not tell you he had been the dupe of a man named Thomas? A. Yes something to that effect - he told me as we came down Pitfield-street that night, that he had heard from Thomas that the cheque was not right after it had been presented.

COURT. Q. But he told you at the watch-house, Thomas had informed him before the cheque was presented that it was right, and then afterwards that it was not? A. He did.

SIR JOHN CHETWODE, BART. I keep an account at Messrs Gosling and Sharpe's. (Looking at the cheque) this is not written by me, nor by any body by my authority; I always draw on blank slips; it bears some resemblance to my hand-writing; I have made frequent purchases of Mr. Graham, a linen-drapper in Holborn, last year; I remember making a purchase last year, for which I have a receipt, which I produce; I do not recollect the person whom I had the receipt from; I imagine I received it at my own house; I have paid Mr. Graham by a cheque on Gosling's in more instances than one - that payment was by a cheque.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you sign your cheques " John Chetwode ?" A. Yes, in full - I think I generally draw on larger slips than this; I will not say I always do - it is written in the form of words I usually draw; I think I usually put the shillings in figures.

JOHN NEWDIGATE LUDFORD CHETWODE , ESQ. I keep an account at Gosling's. This cheque is not drawn by me, nor by any body by my authority; I have no knowledge of the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you sign " John Chetwode ?" A. I do not draw any cheques.

JOHN HEALEY . Last year I was apprentice to Mr. Graham, linen-draper, of Holborn. The prisoner came to live there as shopman, about the middle of April, and staid about two months; I know Sir John Chetwode as a customer - I could not swear to the prisoner's hand-writing; (looking at the receipt) I believe this signature to be the prisoner's hand-writing - it is signed John McDonald . and dated 20th of May, 1829, when he was in Mr. Graham's employ; (the receipt for 36l. 3s. 7d. was here put in and read.)

Cross-examined. Q. Was he shopman or cashier? A. Shopman; the cashier does not usually give receipts.

JOHN CRAWLEY . I am a linen-draper, and live in Oxford-street; the prisoner was in my service for a month or five weeks - I have frequently seen him write; this cheque is very much like his writing; I believe it to be his, but cannot swear to it - it is very much like it - this letter I believe to be his writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you speak by comparing it with the other? A. No; I saw him write last in my shop - I have seen him make bills for customers and examined them after him.

ALEXANDER THOMPSON . I was clerk to Mr. Crawley, when the prisoner lived there, which was last January; I frequently saw him write, and believe the figures in this cheque to be his hand-writing; I have seen him make figures every day - I believe the writing also to be his, and the signature " John Chetwode ;" it appears to be the same.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you believe it to be his hand-writing? A. I do.

HENRY POWELL . I am a coach-maker, and live at Nos. 38, and 43, Bond-street - this cheque never passed through my hands; I know nothing of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any other coach-maker, in Bond-street, of your name? A. No, except my brother, which is one establishment.

JAMES THOMAS . I am a manufacturer of cloth, in the West of England. I lodged in King-street, Golden-square; the prisoner lodged there while I did - I know nothing about this cheque in the least; I never went with the prisoner about any cheque in my life.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you a brother or son? A. A son Charles, and a brother Joshua, he lives at Gloucester and has not been in town for two or three years, to my knowledge.

COURT. Q. Are you on good terms with him? A. I never fell out with him, but we do not visit each other.

CHARLES THOMAS . I lodge with my father, in King-street; but did not at the time the prisoner was there - I know nothing about this cheque, and never went with him about one.

JOHN GRANT . I live at No. 6, Buckingham-street, Strand. I was taken up about this; I know nothing of the cheque.

Cross-examined. Q. You know the prisoner? A. I have known him ten or twelve years; he bore the highest character for honesty, and was respected by every one who knew him - he is a native of Scotland; I was clerk to Messrs. Foreman and Hadow, but am not at present; the prisoner and I are friends.

The cheque was here read; the direction " John Shaw , No. 16, Boot-street, Pitfield-street," written on part of a catalogue, and the following letters, which had been produced.

10th March, 1830.

I was very much surprised at your not returning with the money I sent you for yestraday, and went down the Strand after you, but could see nothing of you; but having got your address I did not quite despair of seeing you again - if you will write me a note, or send the money enclosed, addressed to Mr. Thomas, 2d. post, Brewer-street, Golden-square, to be left till called for, as I have had a terrible row with my employers; I do not like to trouble them with it, as they have made me responsible for the money. If you send the money enclosed you may take a half-sovereign for your trouble. I am yours, &c.,

WM. THOMAS.

- Shaw, 16, Boot-street, Hoxton. Post-mark, 18th March.

The letter found on the prisoner was as follows: -

20th March, 1830.

I have been three or four times at Hoxton, but could never find such a place as Boot-street. After being so long of answering my letter, you might have left me the money in place of your address. Make up the money into a small parcel, and

give it to the bearer, but you need not tell him that it is money you give him, as I do not know much of him; you may keep half a sovereign for your trouble - I think that will be sufficient, after giving me so much trouble about it - I would have gone for it myself, but it is so great a distance, and very inconvenient for me to go. I am, yours, &c., WM. THOMAS.

John Shaw , 16, Boot-street, Pitfield-street, Hoxton.

The prisoner made no Defence, but three witnesses gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY of uttering only - DEATH . Aged 36.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his excellent character .[Saturday, April 17.]

Reference Number: t18300415-15

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

683. HANNAH (THE WIFE OF THEOPHILUS) COTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, one 50l., one 40l., and two 5l. Bank notes, the property of James Silverthorn , in his dwelling-house .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SILVERTHORN . I keep the Bald Faced Stag public-house, Worship-street . The prisoner was my servant of all work - it is my dwelling-house, and is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. In October last I had a 50l., a 40l., and two 5l. Bank notes - I deposited them in my cash-box, which was kept in a small room behind the bar; it had no lock to it, but the drawer in which it was was always kept locked - I never found it open; the same key unlocked the drawer and till - the key was always in the till, except when wanted to open the drawer. On the 1st of January I went to my cash-box to take the notes out, and they were gone; the prisoner was in my service at this time - I suspected my pot-boy, and had him apprehended; he was discharged - and in consequence of information afterwards received I had inquiry made about the prisoner, who had left my service on the 10th of January; she knew where the cash-box was kept - I had seen the notes safe ten days before I missed them: in consequence of further suspicion I went to Chatham, with Brown, the officer; we got information there from Captain Lloyd, and found Mr. Osborn, a linen-draper, at Chatham, and ascertained something about the notes - I returned to London with the officer, and proceeded to Ireland, about four miles beyond Tuam, to a village called Woodcay, and apprehended the prisoner there on the 28th of January; when we were on board the steam-packet, coming home, I handed her some refreshment - she said she had been a very bad woman, and I had been a very good master; she was at that time in custody for robbing me - I had charged her with it.

GEORGE OSBORN . I am a linen-draper, and live at Chatham. On the 14th of January I was at home - Whitehead, my shopman, brought me a 40l. note, and from what he said to me I went up stairs into my shop, and saw the prisoner; she had no bonnet on - I changed the 40l. note for her, and after writing her name on it I put it into my cash-box - I had some conversation with her about it, and am certain she is the person; I wrote on the note the address she gave me, and gave her the change; between the 14th and 18th of January I found a 50l. note in my cash-box - I did not change that myself; I sent that same note to Leaf, Son, and Coles, with the 40l. note - the prisoner made several purchases at my house after I changed the 40l. note, but not before.

ELIZA OSBORN . I am the daughter of the last witness. The prisoner came to the shop in January last, purchased something, and handed me a 50l. note; I gave her change for it - I put the note into my father's cash-box: she bought a cloak, ribbons, a handkerchief, and other articles, which I have since seen.

REBECCA OSBORN . I am Mr. Osborn's daughter. On the 14th of January the prisoner came to the shop, and asked for change for a 40l. note - that was before she purchased any thing; I received the note from her, and gave it to Whitehead, the shopman - my father afterwards came up, and had some conversation with the prisoner.

LEWIS WHITEHEAD . I am shopman to Mr. Osborn. -On the 14th of January I saw the prisoner in the shop - she wanted change for a 40l. note; I received the note, and took it to Mr. Osborn; master asked her name, which she gave - he wrote that name in her presence on the note; I recollect Mrs. Cotton was the name she gave - she made some purchases after she got change, and I saw before the Magistrate goods which she had bought; there was a shawl - when she bought the shawl she told us her husband had lately had 300l. left him by his uncle, that he was then on the water, and she expected him home shortly - that they intended to hire a house, and live in the town, and they should have plenty of goods; this was on the 14th - I saw her again next day; she bought some articles, and on the 16th she came again twice, and the second time bought a cloak, some lace caps, ribbons, silk handkerchiefs, Valentia, and other articles, amounting to between 4l. and 5l., and tendered the 50l. note; Miss Eliza Osborn gave her change for it - the goods produced at the Magistrate's I believe are the same I sold her; on that occasion she said she was going to town, and did not like such large notes about her, as she was coming back shortly, and asked if she could put any money into the Savings Bank - she did not leave any notes with me.

WILLIAM GLASBROOK DRESSER. I am in the employ of Messrs. Leaf, Son, and Coles, wholesale warehousemen, Old 'Change. On the 21st of January I received a 40l. and 50l. note from our cashier, Mr. Smith - I presented them for payment at the Bank on the 21st of January; here are the letters which contained the two halves - the 50l. note is No. 13,722, dated the 15th of July, 1829; and the 40l., 16,803, the 21st of August, 1829; I have written that on the back of the letter, and wrote on both notes the name and address of our firm - I have since seen the same notes in the hands of the Bank clerk.

MR. OSBORN. These are the letters which enclosed the two halves of the 40l. and 50l. notes; I am certain they contained the same notes.

ROBERT CRESSWELL . I live in King-street, Islington. In August last I received a large sum of money from Jones and Lloyd, and among the rest a 50l. note; on the 18th of October I took the same 50l. note to Silverthorne, who gave me change for it.

GEORGE KERBY . I am clerk at Jones, Lloyd and Co. On the 13th of August I had a cheque drawn by Davis and Taylor, and among other notes, I paid a 50l. note, No. 13,722, 15th July, 1829, for it.

WILLIAM THACKERAY . I am clerk to Messrs. Fuller

and Co., bankers, Cornhill. On the 17th of October I paid a 40l. note, No. 16,803 in part payment of a cheque of 45l. 4s. 6d. - I have not got the date of the note; I have since seen it in the hands of Freeman, a Bank clerk.

JOSEPH PARR . I am second mate of the Dolphin convict bulk, at Chatham. A man named Cotton was on board the bulk; I believe the prisoner to be his wife - she came there in January, as his wife: on the 17th of January I was the officer on duty - the prisoner came to the bulk, and had some conversation with Cotton as his wife; after that I took from Cotton three 5l. notes and three sovereigns; according to the rules of the bulks a person confined there cannot come to visit a friend with money, and I took this 18l. from him when he came on board from his wife - he had been allowed to go out to see her, and had no money when he went out.

JAMES BROWN . I am a Police-constable of Worship-street. In consequence of information, on the 21st of January, I went with the prosecutor to Mr. Osborn's, and received from Whitehead some patterns of ribbon; I returned to town, went to Ireland, and apprehended the prisoner - I asked if she knew who I was: she turned round, and said, "Yes, I do - it's all up with me now;" I found a shilling and a few halfpence on her - I asked what she had done with the rest of the money she had received in change for the notes at Chatham; she said she had spent it all.

Prisoner. I did not say it was all up with me. Witness. Yes, you did.

JOSHUA FREEMAN . I am a clerk of the Bank of England. I produce a 50l. and a 40l. note, paid into the Bank on the 21st January, by Leaf, Son and Coles.

MR. OSBORN. This 40l. note I am certain is what I received from the prisoner - my own hand-writing is on it; the 50l. note agrees with the number of the note I took when I sent it to Leaf and Co.'s - I found it in my cash-box the name of Cotton which she gave me is on the 40l.

MISS OSBORN. I am sure of this being the 50l. note; I put it into the cash-box.

MR. OSBORN. It is the 50l. note I found in the cashbox - there was another 50l. note there, but this was the only one I sent to Leaf and Co.

JAMES SILVERTHORNE . I received the 40l. note from Thackeray, and the 50l. from Cresswell; I do not know the identical notes, but I am sure I put the same notes as I received from them into the cash-box, on the 18th and 20th of October, and never had any others of those amounts during the whole time; when I lost them I took every measure to discover the thief; the prisoner lived with me at the time, and was well acquainted with my loss.

JAMES BROWN . The prisoner was examined before Mr. Broughton, and what she said was taken down - the signature to this examination is Mr. Broughton's writing. -(read)

"The prisoner says she found the two notes in the prosecutor's passage; she did not know that they were part of the money he had lost - she did not know the amounts; hearing her mistress say she had lost four notes and some receipts, she did not know these were part of the notes she had lost."

Prisoner's Defence. I was sweeping the rooms one morning, and picked them up in the passage, and nine or ten days after I heard mistress and master saying something about missing something in a parcel, I said to myself these papers I found must be some money, and somebody must have dropped it who has come to the house; I kept it nine or ten days, then heard a great noise about four notes being lost out of a parcel; master said at first there were six notes in it, and then four, but there were only two papers in the parcel I found; mistress said she had them in her hand on the Monday before the Friday she lost them, and I had had these a long time before that; I went to Chatham and gave them to a woman to read, she said it was a 5l. and a 10l. and wanted to go out and get them changed - I said I would go myself; I went to a grocer's and bought a few articles, and asked them to change a 5l. note; he said, "Good woman, this is a 50l. note;" I showed him the other, he said it was 40l., and said, "Never mind paying for the things now, take them to the public-house where you lodge, they will take care of them for you." I went and began to tell the publican's wife how I got them - she said, "Never mind, go over to that shop, and you will get change for it - never mind who you are." I went; I did not know it was master's money; I never took the money out of the drawer; mistress said there was 40l. in sovereigns and 40l. in silver, if I took any thing I should take that.

MR. SILVERTHORNE. The prisoner left me without notice.

[Monday, April 19.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18300415-16

Third Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

684. JAMES CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , at All Saints, Poplar, 4 silver salt-spoons, value 16s.; 4 silver salt-cellars, value 3l. 10s.; 6 silver tea-spoons, value 1l. 15s.; 2 pair of sugar-tongs, value 1l. 10s.; 1 gold brooch, value 2l. 10s.; 2 seals, value 2l. 10s.; 1 necklace, value 1l.; 2 ear-rings, value 1l.; 8 crowns, 32 half-crowns, 100 shillings, and 40 sixpences, the property of John Amsdell , in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN AMSDELL. I am a baker , and live in Well-street, in the parish of All Saints, Poplar - it is my dwelling-house. On Sunday, the 7th of March, I and my wife went out; we returned in a gig, at five minutes past eight o'clock in the evening, and when within thirty or forty yards of my own door. I saw a person jump from the paling adjoining my premises; I was thirty or forty yards from him, and cannot swear to him; I had no idea who he was; the prisoner lived servant with me for three or four years, and left on the Saturday night week before this; when I got to my own door, I knocked for more than ten minutes; the prisoner's wife and my servant were up stairs - his wife did not live in the house, and had no business there; I had left the servant in charge of the house; they did not open the door to me - I knocked for ten minutes, and then broke the door open; the servant came to me and said something; I went up stairs, and found my drawers broken open, and missed all the property stated in the indictment, which was secure when I went out; I had left nobody but the servant in the house; the prisoner was apprehended, and when he was in Newgate, I received this letter, which I believe to be his hand-writing; I have seen his hand-writing in several of my customers' bills; I received the letter on the 5th of April, though it is dated the 3rd.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. It was dark, was not it? A. Yes, I indicted the prisoner's wife, and Kent, my servant, as well as the prisoner, but the bill against them has been thrown out. (Letter read)

March 3, From James clark, at Newgate. Mr. Amsdel - sir, it is very ard that I should be here suffering for what I am innocent of; if you go to No. 21, old Nicol-street, leading out of Cock-lane, up stairs, in the one pair frunt room, there you will find peter povo - there you will find the man that done the deed; go on Sunday morning, you will be sure to find him at home: a young man about my own height, dark hair, frequently at the red lion - From your obedient humble servant, James clark. Sir, when you see that man there is no dought but you will know him again.

ELIZABETH HART . I live at Poplar, and know the prisoner. On Sunday the 7th of March, I saw him about half-past six o'clock, at Poplar, coming past the Harrow public-house, which is about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's.

Cross-examined. Q. He was a stranger to you? A. No. I knew him by sight - he had a blue coat, light trousers, and a white hat.

JOHN KIFFE . I know the prisoner quite well. I was playing near the prosecutor's house on Sunday, the 7th of March, and saw him return home in his chaise, and saw the prisoner Clark jump from a gateway by his house; I am quite certain of him; he had a small bundle under his arm, and I heard something jingle - as he jumped from the gateway his clothes caught in the spikes on the top of the gateway.

Cross-examined. Q. Who told you to say it was the 7th of March? A. My mother - I cannot tell how long ago it was; I have often seen him - I live in the same court as him; I do not know his wife; he did not live at the prosecutor's at the time I saw him jump from the gateway.

COURT. Q. Was this on the Sunday evening that Mr. Amsdell came home in his chaise? A. Yes, and I heard the house had been robbed that evening.

JURY. Q. Can you recollect how he was dressed? A. A black hat, a black coat, and light trousers - I am sure he had a black hat on.

COURT. Q. Could you see whether it was a black or blue coat? A. No, it was dark; I was within a yard of him.

JOHN BENNETT . I heard of this robbery - on the Sunday night previous I observed a person jump from a gateway by Amsdell's house; he had a light pair of trousers on - I do not know the prisoner; I was about as far from him as I am from Newgate now, and could not distinguish part of his dress.

THOMAS GRAY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of March, about half-past nine o'clock, at the Red Lion, Whitechapel-road - I told him I wanted him for a robbery at Mr. Amsdell's, at Poplar; he said he knew nothing about it - I asked where his residence was; he said no where - I then asked where he slept on Sunday, the 7th of March; he said at the Unicorn, Shoreditch - I made inquiry there; I took him to the watch-house, and took his shoes off and on the 10th I went to Mr. Amsdell's; there were some footmarks on a waste piece of ground adjoining his premises - I compared his shoes with those marks, in Amsdell's presence - they corresponded right and left, and the nails in the heels exactly corresponded, the toes being towards the gateway; it was a clayey soil; there are nails on the gateway adjoining the premises - I examined his trousers, and found a tear about an inch long; they were lightish trousers.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you mean by lightish - were they the colour of this book (brown)? A. About it, not quite so dark as that - the waste piece of ground joins Amsdell's premises; it is enclosed, and not a thoroughfare.

JOHN AMSDELL . I was present when the shoes were compared with the ground - they tallied with the marks in every respect; the marks and the nails corresponded; I have no doubt the impressions were the footmarks of those identical shoes - I value all my property at 25l.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner did visit your house? A. Not with my consent - his wife was there without my knowledge.

Prisoner's Defence. I tore my trousers in the skittleground.

[Tuesday, April 20.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18300415-17

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

685. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for that, at the General Quarter session of the peace, holden for the County of Middlesex, at the Session-house for the said County, on the 12th of January, in the 9th year of his present Majesty's reign, he, by the name and description of William Wilson, late of the parish of St. Martin in the Fields, in the County of Middlesex, labourer , was tried and convicted upon a certain indictment against him, for that he, on the 11th of December, in the 9th year aforesaid, with force and arms, at the parish aforesaid, in the County aforesaid, one piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a piece of good, lawful, and current money, and silver coin of this realm, called a crown, as and for a good crown, unlawfully did utter to one Thomas Dicken, he well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit; and that he afterwards, within ten days next following, to wit, on the 20th of December, in the 9th year aforesaid , at the parish aforesaid, in the County aforesaid, one other piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good crown, unlawfully&c. did utter to Thomas Dicken , knowing that also to be counterfeit .

2nd COUNT, charging the single uttering on the 20th of December, and that the said William Wilson was thereupon ordered to be imprisoned in the House of Correction at Clerkenwell, to hard labour, for one year, and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for his good behaviour for two years more; and that he, having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards, to wit, on the 15th of February last , at St. Andrew, Holborn , unlawfully and feloniously did utter to one Sarah Winfield , spinster , a piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good crown, knowing it to be counterfeit; against the Statute.

3rd COUNT, the same as the first, only omitting the words in italics, and substituting the words as aforesaid.

MESSRS. SCARLETT and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD JOSEPH POWELL . I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of William Wilson , at Clerkenwell

Session, in January, 1829; I examined it with the original in the office of the clerk of the peace.

GEORGE BRAND . I was chief turnkey of the House of Correction, Clerkenwell, in January, 1829, and know the prisoner; I was present at his conviction at Clerkenwell January Session, as a common utterer of counterfeit coin; I received him into my custody - he was imprisoned one year, and was to find sureties for two years then to come; he went by the name of William Wilson.

The copy of the record was here read, as in the indictment.

SARAH WINFIELD. I live at Mr. William Martin's, the Ship public-house, Chichester-rents, which is in Middlesex. The prisoner came there on the 15th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and asked for a glass of gin, which I drew him - he put down a 5s. piece; I saw it was bad, and told him it was a bad one - he then began to use very bad language, and I called Mitchelson, a porter of Lincoln's Inn, who was standing by at the time; he saw it was bad as well as myself, and detained the prisoner till Sullivan, a constable, came - the prisoner took the crown up; Mitchelson took it from him, and marked it, and I marked it after him; Mitchelson took it again - this is it (looking at it) - the gin came to 2d.

ALEXANDER MITCHELSON . I am a porter of Lincoln's Inn. I was present, and saw the crown - I took it from the prisoner, marked it, and gave it to the last witness to mark; I then put it into my pocket, kept it there till we got to Bow-street, and then delivered it to the officer; it was not mixed with any other money - I saw the prisoner come in, and put the crown down; I am sure it is the same he put down.

JOHN SULLIVAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody at Martin's, and took him to Bow-street; I searched him first at the public-house; I found no money on him, but a paper of tobacco, which I produce - it has the name of "Toury, tobacconist, &c., 84, Drury-lane," on it- as he went along to Bow-street I shook him in the street, and a half-crown and two shillings fell from him; they were good money - I went to Mr. Toury, and got a 5s. piece from him, which I have had ever since - I produce the two crown-pieces; one I got from Toury, and the other from Mitchelson - I have kept them separate.

GEORGE TOURY . I am a tobacconist, and live at No. 84, Drury-lane. On Monday morning, the 15th of February, as near eleven o'clock as possible, the prisoner came into my shop for an ounce of tobacco, which came to 3 1/2d. - I served him: he tendered me a 5s. piece - I gave him half a crown, two shillings, and 2 1/2d. in change; he appeared to me very much intoxicated, which took up my attention, and made me not suspect him; he did not remain in the shop - I put the crown into my purse; I had no other I am confident, for I took the change out of my purse - I gave the crown to Sullivan about an hour afterwards, or an hour and a half; I put my initials on it, and marked it before I gave it to him - I am confident I gave him the same, for I had no other; I never saw the prisoner before - he was about five minutes in my shop: I am satisfied he is the same person.

JASPER ATKINSON , ESQ. I am a moneyor of the Mint. These crown-pieces are both counterfeit, and seem to have been cast in the same mould, for there is a flaw in the mould, which is visible on them both - they are not silver.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know it was bad; the money taken from me was given to me after the officer first searched me.

[Tuesday, April 20] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18300415-18

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

686. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , 1 tea-caddy, value 5s.; 2 ozs. of tea, value 6d.; 21 sovereigns, and 40 shillings, the property of Stephen Collins , in his dwelling-house .

MR. HEATON conducted the prosecution.

SARAH COLLINS . I am the wife of Stephen Collins; the prisoner lived in the upper part of our house - we keep a green-grocer's shop . On the 4th of July, about nine o'clock in the evening, he came into the parlour, said he was very tired and wished to sit down for a few minutes - he sat down in the parlour behind the shop - while he was there two customers came in, and I went into the shop to serve them - I left him in the parlour, and while serving them, I saw the prisoner go out at the side door with the tea-caddy, which contained twenty-one sovereigns, and 2l. in silver; it was locked, I saw it in his hand, and saw him take it out at the door - I was so confused I had not power to follow him; on the 10th or 11th of August, which was five or six weeks after, Shaw came up to me and told me something, and I saw the prisoner the next day and took him to Worship-street - after he came out from the Magistrate, (I made him no threat or promise;) he begged for mercy, and said he would make it all up to me if I would forgive him - I told him I would have the same mercy on him as he had on me when he took the caddy with the money; he was dismissed by the Magistrate, as the witnesses were not in attendance - the Magistrate told me I could bring him up at any time; I indicted him at the October Session, but did not see him again till I saw him here; there was a warrant out against him; he is the man I saw with my tea-caddy.

STEPHEN COLLINS . I live in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. I rent the shop and parlour; the house is let out to different tenants; the landlord does not live in the house, his name is Saunders there are two other lodgers.

ALEXANDER LISAGE . I am the officer who took the prisoner, at Hackney, on the 11th of August; I asked him how he came to rob a poor person of such a sum of money - he made no answer; I afterwards said, "I understand by Shaw that there were two more with you, Martin and Mason, you shared it among you, I suppose?" he said Martin was innocent of it, but Mason had part, and, to the best of my knowledge, he said, "as well as myself" - I was present at the examination at Worship-street, and as we came down stairs he said, "Mrs. Collins, I hope you will have mercy, I will make it amends to you;" she said, "The same mercy as you shewed to me when you took my money, I will show to you;" I received this caddy from Mrs. Collins.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not deny the robbery directly you took me into custody? A. No, you did not say a single word - I meant to take him to Collins; he said,"Don't take me to Mr. Collins, as I am well known in the neighbourhood, take me to the watch-house."

MRS. COLLINS. This is the caddy he took out of my parlour - it was brought to me by Bartram.

ANN BARTRAM. I live in Pleasant-row, Ball's-pond. On the 5th of July I sent my child, who is eight years old, on an errand, and, in consequence of what he said, I went with him to a ditch near the Rosemary Branch lead-mills, and found this caddy in a ditch; I returned it to Collins on the 12th of July.

MRS. COLLINS. It is our caddy.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come home to your house directly I was discharged from Worship-street? A. Yes - I said I hoped he would be a better boy, I did not say I was glad he was come home.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate you could not see what I had, for my jacket was over it? A. No, I said he had the caddy - he was apprehended again just after the last Session.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - In last June I was apprehended, with one other man, on suspicion of the robbery, and, on our examination, the Magistrate thought proper to discharge the other man - I was remanded for five examinations; the Magistrates, finding nothing tending a committal, discharged me also - I returned home to my father, and kept to my work, during which time I was frequently accused of the robbery by the parties stating this to my father; he threatened them with prosecution for their unjust assertions, which is the only cause of the parties for the prosecution acting so unjustly, and bringing me to trial after so long an elapse of time - conscious of my innocence as to any part of the felony of which I now stand charged with at this bar, with fortitude and resignation I await the issue of a grand Jury of my country.

[Tuesday, April 20.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

See the Fourth Day, New Court, where the prisoner was convicted of larceny, by the name of William Marney .

Reference Number: t18300415-19

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

687. MARY COLLINS and ANN ROWLAND were indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Joseph Burchell , on the 26th of March , at St. Luke, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 half-crown , his property.

EDWARD JOSEPH BURCHELL . I am an appraiser , and live at No. 14, Lower Fountain-place, City-road. On the 26th of March I was passing through New-court, Goswell-street , on my way home; it had turned half-past eleven o'clock at night, and just as I got abreast of the Prince Regent public-house I saw four women, and I verily believe there were five, and a man - the door of the Prince Regent is at the corner of the house; when you get to the corner there are two ways - I was laid hold of, and pinioned on each side by two women; the other two, and I believe three women and a man were in front of me - the prisoner Collins was on my left side, and her left hand in my trousers pocket; she was one of those who pinioned me - her right hand held my left arm, and her left hand was in my trousers pocket; I knew I had half a crown there, and that it was all the money I had about me - I seized her hand while in my pocket with my left hand, and pulled her hand out of my pocket, and as well as I could reach with my right hand forced open her little finger and the next, and there I saw my half crown in her hand; she gave her arm a sort of spring, and the half-crown fell on the ground where the rest of the party were standing - I then left her with intent to pick up the half-crown, when Rowland met me, and dodged we as I endeavoured to go forward, saying, "This is the halfpenny you have dropped, Sir," presenting a halfpenny to me; in the mean time I saw the other party who were in her company stoop - whether they picked up the half-crown I cannot say; by this time Collins had ran away - I ran after her; she had not got out of my sight - there is a little angle in the court; she had the length of the court to run - I ran and called "Stop her Police, stop her;" she had turned out of New-court into Goswell-street, and ran till she came close to the Horse Shoe, in Goswell-street, which is about twenty or thirty yards - I came up with her there and secured her; Afterwell, the officer, came up, and took her into custody - he took her back to the Prince Regent, and searched her; I told him he need not search for my half-crown, for I was quite positive she had not got it - she heard all this; Rowland was present, and insisted that it was only a halfpenny I had dropped - I did not then give her in charge, but on the road to the Police establishment in Bunhill-row, having told Atterwell she was the girl who presented the halfpenny to me, he considered it his duty to lock her up also; it was a very fine night, and where it happened was as light as it is here now, for the Prince Regent had a particularly glaring light over the door, and light came through the windows also - I do not know who was the other person who pinioned me, but can speak positively to both the prisoners; I afterwards looked into my pocket, and the half-crown was gone - I had been drinking that night, but was as collected as I am now; I had received the half-crown from Mr. Nyman, of Fetter-lane about seven o'clock; it was all I had about me.

JOHN ATTERWELL . I am headborough of St. Luke's. I was in Goswell-street about a quarter to twelve o'clock, returning home, and saw Collins running very fast, and the prosecutor after her; just as he got to the end of the court, I heard him cry, "Stop her, stop her, Police, police" - I immediately pursued her, and the prosecutor secured her; he said he wanted a Policeman - I said I was an officer; he said, "I give this woman in charge, she has robbed me of a half-crown" - I took her and him to the Prince Regent, searched Collins there, and found 8 1/2d. about her, but no half-crown; as I was taking her to the station, Rowland came along with us, and she said,"No, Sir, it was not a half-crown he dropped, it was only a halfpenny - I saw the halfpenny in her hand;" the prosecutor said he had lost a half-crown, and shewed me the spot where they were standing - I did not look for the half-crown; Rowland said two or three times as we went along that it was only a halfpenny, and I took her into custody - it was a very fine night, and very light up that court by the Prince Regent; there is a large gas light, and the house was not shut up - the prosecutor appeared to me to have been drinking, but knew perfectly well what he was doing.

BENJAMIN NYMAN . I live at No. 42, Fetter-lane. Burchell was in my house on this Friday evening from two o'clock till seven; I owed him some money, and saw my wife, by my desire, give him a half-crown - when he left my house he was very sober; mine is a private house.

EDWARD JOSEPH BURCHELL re-examined. I went from Nyman's to Wych-street, where I had a man in possession; I did not change the half crown - when I asked Mrs. Nyman for money I had about 10d. in my pocket; I treated the man I had in possession in Wych-street and the man on whom I had distrained - we had a quartern and a half of gin between myself, my man, and the man and his wife; I stopped there till that time, hoping he would be able to settle the amount I had seized for - that was all I drank.

Collins' Defence. I met him in Goswell-road; he asked me to take a walk with him - I said I could not; he caught hold of my arm, and was very much intoxicated; he asked where I lived - I said in New-court; he asked me to take him home, and in New-court he said he did not know whether he had any money, but he would feel - he put his hand into his pocket, and let a halfpenny fall; I took it up and gave it to him - it went out of his hand; he called a Policeman, and I ran away.

COLLINS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

ROWLAND - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of their youth .[Tuesday, April 20.]

Reference Number: t18300415-20

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

688. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alfred Carter , on the 4th of April , at St. Martin in the Fields , and stealing therein 1 sheet, value 5s.; 100 pairs of boots, value 25l.: 250 pairs of shoes, value 50l., and 7 pairs of clogs, value 2l., his property ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18300415-21

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

689. JAMES COOKE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Bonsall , on the 26th of February , at St. George, Hanover-square, and stealing therein 1 plum-cake, value 2s., and 1 watch, value 3l., her property .

WILLIAM COCHRANE . I am a Police-constable. On the 26th of February, a little after nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of a confectioner's shop, kept by the prosecutrix , in Duke-street, Grosvenor-square ; I secured him just as he got out of the door, in consequence of suspicion, and found a cake under his jacket -I asked what he had got there; he said Nothing - I did not suspect he had any thing else, and did not search him further till he got to the watch-house, which is a long distance from the house; the watch has not been found - he night have dropped it on the road without my knowledge.

MARY BONSALL . I am single, and keep a confectioner's shop. It is my dwelling-house, and in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square; the prisoner was apprehended at ten minutes past nine o'clock - this cake was in my shop, and the door shut I am sure, but not locked; I shut it myself - it fastens with a spring lock inside, but can be opened outside by lifting the latch; I am sure it was latched - when the officer took the prisoner, I immediately missed the cake, and when he took the prisoner away, I went to my parlour, which is behind the shop, and missed my watch from the mantel-piece; the door between the shop and parlour was open - I had occasion to go down into the kitchen, and was not absent above three or five minutes; the watch was safe when I went down, for I saw it - I did not miss it till the officer took the prisoner off to the watch-house; I ran after him on missing it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.[Wednesday, April 21.]

Reference Number: t18300415-22

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

690. EDWARD CULLAMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel, 1 gelding, price 3l. , the property of Robert Rake .

ROBERT RAKE. I am a farmer , and live at Plaistow. The prisoner was in my service, and left me about three week before Easter; I understood he was taken ill, which was the reason he left; I did not see him after - I had a pony gelding; it was turned out on the Manor-way, Marsh-lane, in the parish of West Ham, Essex - I had a not seen it for a week; I did not miss or know any thing of it till the Police-officer came to me about eight o'clock on Good Friday morning - (the prisoner had left me three weeks before that, I had seen the pony after he left) I attended the Police-office next morning, and saw my pony at the stables belonging to the station- I had not authorised any one to sell it for me; it was not worth more than 3l. - I had had it eight or nine months; it was a singular looking pony - I am certain it was mine.

HENRY YEO . I know Mr. Rake's poney; I saw it the night before Good Friday, at five o'clock, feeding, down the Marsh-lane - I afterwards saw it at the Police-station, Lambeth-street, and am sure it is the same.

THOMAS HILL . I am constable of the Bethnal-green Police-division. I was on duty in North-street, Whitechapel, about two o'clock in the morning of Good Friday- I know the prisoner; I saw him on horsbeack standing still, and asking a private watchman where Mr. Downes lived - the watchman told him there was no such person there, and asked what he wanted with Downes; he said he had brought a pony to be killed by Downes, and he must have him killed before he went away, for it was his master's order; the watchman asked him if anybody besides Downes would do, as there was no such person there, and he could call a person up who would buy it - the prisoner said he dare not let any body else have it but Downes, he must take it back sooner than let any body else have it; I stepped up and asked him who his master was; he said Mr. Rake, of Plaistow - I said I was not satisfied with his story, and should take him into custody and keep him till day light - he then jumped off the horse, but I took hold of him; he did not resist or attempt to run away - I took him to the Police-station, and went to Rake next morning.

ROBERT RAKE . I did not authorise him to take the gelding to Downes; he was taken between four and five miles from Marsh-lane - he lived eight or nine months with me, and was a good working man.

Prisoner's Defence. I left home about twelve o'clock in the morning of the 9th of April - I was going to load a barge of sand, and by the East India Dock warehouse, I saw a man beating the pony with a stick; I asked where

he was going, he said to London - I said I knew the pony, that it belonged to Mr. Rake; he said he did not know but he had bought it - I said I knew three persons it had belonged to before; he asked how long I had been with Rake - I said I had left him three weeks; he said he would give me a turn, to take the pony to Downes; he took my shovel out of my hand, and told me if I was asked about the pony, to say I was going to take it to Downes to be killed - he went away; I went on, saw a watchman, and inquired for Downes; he said there had not been such a person there for years - I told him my employer had authorised me to take it there, and he was to meet me there; he wanted me to take it to another person - I said No, I knew the person it formerly belonged to, and should take it back there; the Policeman came up; I told him it belonged to Rake, and I should take it back - he said he thought I had not got it honestly; I said I would go with him any where; I got off the pony - he found a small trowel in my pocket, and a piece of paper which I had from the workhouse; I told him if he would go to Plaistow, and shew master that paper, he would know who had the pony.

[Wednesday, April 21.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 45.

Reference Number: t18300415-23

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

691. WILLIAM BARNADIER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Stripling , on the 17th of March , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , and stealing therein, 1 coat, value 6d., and 2 pairs of trousers, value 3s., his property .

SOPHIA STRIPLING . I am the wife of Benjamin Stripling - we live in the parish of Bethnal-green; we only have one room, which we lodge in - it is the first floor front room; the landlord does not live in the house - it is let out to different people; I have three children - I had known the prisoner for six weeks before the robbery; he sells matches and bearth-stones. On the 17th of March, in the morning, he came to my room - my children were with me; he came, and said, "Mrs. Stripling, my father wants to speak to you to tell you where they are giving away beef and bread in St. John-street;" his father lived in the next street to me - he told me to go to his father's house directly, as he wanted to tell me where to go; as he went down stairs, he said, "Don't take the children with you;" he did not say why: I washed my two children, and then went - it was half-past ten o'clock in the morning when I came out; I shut and latched my door, leaving the children in the room - nobody could go in from outside without opening the door; I left the key inside the door, and did not lock it - nobody could open it from without, unless they forced it; I went to try to get some bread and beef - I went to his father's house, but could not find him; I came back immediately - I was absent about five minutes, I ran all the way; when I came back I was coming up stairs, and saw my room door open - the door had been forced, and the staple of the lock laid in the room; I saw my bed very much pulled about, and missed two pairs of trousers and a coat of my husband's from under the bolster, which had been disturbed - the trousers were worth 3s.; I had left the bed rolled up in one corner of the room.

ELIZABETH STRIPLING . I am ten years old - (the witness being questioned appeared perfectly aware of the obligation of an oath) - I saw the prisoner come to my mother's; before she went out he went away - my mother washed me and my brother and sister's faces, and brushed our hair, and then went out; she latched the door, and left my sister with me - I am quite sure neither of us unlatched the door after she was gone; she had been gone out about a minute when William Barnadier, the prisoner, came up, and forced the door open; he forced the staple into the room, went up to the bed, and pulled it down - it was rolled up; he took a coat and two pairs of trousers - he told me he would take the two pairs of trousers and coat, and sell them, and bring my mother the money; he took them away with him.

WILLIAM CLARKE . I am a Policeman. On the 6th of April I apprehended the prisoner at his father's house, No. 26, Thomas-street - Lawson was with me; I went to his father's about half-past seven o'clock in the morning - he was up; as soon as I saw him I told him I wanted him for a robbery, and collared him - he made a great resistance, laid hold of the latch of the door, and held by it; his father caught hold of me by the collar, and tried to pull me away from his son - he found he could not do it, and called to his daughter to bring him the poker; she brought it, and he began to lay upon me most unmercifully - the prisoner succeeded in getting into the back room; I was obliged to let go of him - I left Lawson there, holding him, and went for more assistance; I got Read, and as I came back I saw the prisoner running down Hare-street as hard as he could; I secured him, and took him to the watch-house.

CHRISTIAN LAWSON . I went with Clarke, to apprehend the prisoner; while Clarke was gone for assistance, the father locked the door; I kept hold of the prisoner; his father went to open the back door into the yard; the prisoner said he must go into the yard; I said I must go with him; he said I should not go; his father took the poker, and said if I did not let him go he would knock me down - he did not strike me with it - I had my staff in my hand and kept him off; he said if I would let him go, he would be bound he should come back again; the prisoner then gave a wrench from me and got away; the father prevented my following him - he stood at the door with the poker in his hand; I endeavoured to follow him; he would not let me; the father opened the front door, and insisted upon my going out; I went out, and when I got to the Police-station, I found the prisoner there.

ELIZABETH RICHARDSON . I live on the ground floor of the same house as the prosecutor. On the 17th of March about half-past ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming down stairs; I had seen him before and knew him; I had heard him go up - I heard him say to the prosecutrix,"Don't bring the children;" and that there was meat and bread giving away; I saw him come down stairs as I was going out; I did not see him again till he was at Worship-street.

MRS. STRIPLING. I have never got the clothes back.

Prisoner's Defence. She had known my father a short time; she wanted to move her things away, because she owed a little rent, and said to my father, "Will you be kind enough to help me away with these things;" my father took some things and brought them to our place at

six o'clock in the morning - they remained there till five or six o'clock in the afternoon, and I want to know if she missed any thing then; if I wanted to rob her I should have taken things when they were at my father's.

MRS. STRIPLING. I was placed in a baker's shop in Air-street, to attend to it for a lady who kept another shop; his father came one morning, about a fortnight before the robbery, and took away two chairs, a table, and my bed tied up; they remained there about seven hours, and were brought back - the father removed them, not the prisoner; they were only put there till my own room was ready; I did not move them to cheat my landlord; I had been in this lodgings about a fortnight; the coat and trousers were at his father's, tied up in the bed.

ELIZABETH RICHARDSON . I have lived at the house nine weeks - the prosecutrix had been there about a fortnight when this happened.

[Wednesday, April 21.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18300415-24

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Justice Park.

692. THOMAS THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Isaac Lonon , on the 30th of March , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, and stealing therein 1 shawl, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s., and 2 spectacle-glasses, value 6d., his property .

MARY ANN LONON . I am the wife of Isaac Lonon , we live at Notting-hill, in the parish of Kensington - we live in a cottage by ourselves. On the 30th of March, I and my husband went out, between six and seven o'clock in the morning; I left nobody in the house; I locked the door, and took the key myself; I am sure the windows were fast; I returned between ten and eleven the same morning, unlocked the door, and went into the bed-room, which is on the ground floor, and found the window-curtain pulled down, and half the window gone - a person could get in then; they must have put a hand in and drawn the fastening back; the nails were drawn out of my box, which was open; I missed a black silk handkerchief and shawl, my glasses were taken out of my spectacles, and the frame, which is tortoise-shell, left; a pair of shoes were gone from under the bed, and one old shoe left behind instead of them; I missed a pair of breeches; I went out and met Skinner, who gave me a black silk handkerchief which I had missed; I saw my shawl at Flint's, a pawnbroker's, in Edgware-road; my shoes were found on the prisoner's feet; I saw them on his feet, and my spectacle glasses were found in his pocket.

BENJAMIN SKINNER . I live at Notting-hill, and have known the prisoner from his infancy; his mother used to rent a cottage of the prosecutor. I met the prisoner in the Bayswater-road, about ten o'clock on the morning of the robbery - I saw a black silk handkerchief round his neck, and asked how he came by it; he said his cousin Polly had given it to him - I saw he had a pair of trousers on, and asked how he came by them; he said Mrs. Jordan gave them to him - he went to wash his face in a ditch by the road side; he took the handkerchief off and gave it to me to hold - I told him that was dirty water; he then went to the horse trough - I went on with my cart; I saw him in the road afterwards, and called after him to give him the handkerchief, but he ran away - I afterwards met the prosecutrix, and gave it to her.

JAMES HILLYER . I am shopman to Mr. Flint, of Edgware-road. On Tuesday, the 30th of March, in the evening, this shawl was pawned for 2s. 6d., in the name of Thomas Thomas - to the best of my recollection it was by the prisoner; I believe it to be him - I did not know him before; the prosecutrix claimed the shawl a day or two afterwards.

ISAAC LONON. I rent this cottage. I do not know what parish it is in. On Saturday, the 3rd of April, about twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner at Kilburn, and said,"How came you to rob me, Tom;" I knew him before - he made no answer; he had got my wife's shoes on his feet - I challenged them as her's; he had trousers on, but not mine - I said, "Tom, how came you to break into my house? how did you get in?" he said, "Why I took a pane of glass out at the back window, and got in;" I did not threaten him or make him any promise.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am a constable and watch-house-keeper. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington. I found the prisoner at the watch-house, searched him, and found on him a pair of glasses, nothing else.

MRS. LONON. This is my shawl; it had never been worn - I am sure it is mine; I have no mark on it - it is just the same as I folded it up; this silk handkerchief I know to be mine, and the one I lost - the two glasses fit the frames.

Prisoner's Defence. Their son used to pick the fat off the wash-tub, and tell me to go and sell it, but I would not; that was the first indication of my going thieving.

MRS. LONON. I keep pigs, and suppose he means the hog-wash-tub.

Wednesday, April 21.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

Reference Number: t18300415-25

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

693. FRANCES MATTHEWS and ANN MATTHEWS were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Williams , on the 12th of January , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, five 10l. Bank notes, his property .

JOHN WILLIAMS . On the 12th of January, I was in Kingsland-road, between seven and eight o'clock at night, coming from Kingsland to town; I had been to Kingsland - I had not dined there; I was sober - I had five 10l. notes rolled up together in my fob, and one 10l. note, six sovereigns, five half-sovereings, and one King William and Queen Mary guinea, in a purse separate from the other money; as I went along the road I met the two prisoners - they said they were in great distress, and asked me to relieve them; I passed on endeavouring to get from them - they followed me, and held me by the arm, one on each side, not holding me forcibly; they were very meanly attired - I told them I was not accustomed to stand and talk to people in the street; they pressed on me to go and see their situation, for they were certain I would take it into consideration, and recommend them to some society - I objected to go to their place of abode, and was about to give them some money, when they refused it, and still pressed me to go and see their situation - I then went to Hoxton-town, which is where they said they lived, and when I came to the corner of Davis-place I objected going further; I had not gone

into a public-house, but about one hundred yards before, I got to that place (as it was very cold) I stood at the door, and gave them some English gin, which I paid for, and drank with them - I did not go into the house; I am sure it did not intoxicate me - when we came to Davis-place I objected to go down; the prisoner Ann caught me by the arm and pressed me down the passage, down Davis-place, and I went into the house; I had not the slightest reason to believe them women of the town - they told me they were tradesmen's daughters, out of work, and in the greatest distress; I went down with them to their house - they opened the door with a key; it was a very mean hovel, with no fire in it, nor any light; I then turned round to go away, and Frances held me while the other got a light - when the light was got they were about to light the fire, but could not scrape up coal to light it with; there were a few sticks and ashes - they said it being very cold they would light a fire, and if I would sit down they would relate their case to me; they began to state that they were hair feeders - I asked what that was; they said they supplied the stuffers of sofa covers, as they could not go on with their work without a feeder - I saw a little bag hanging over the fire-place; they said it was full of duplicates of goods they had pawned for support - I did not look at it; I gave them money to fetch victuals and drink - Ann went for it, and brought some boiled pork, bread, and a pint of beer; they brought some gin - that was not drank for a considerable time; I think they called it a quartern and a half - I partook of what they brought, and might be there nearly two hours, but after the first hour I stopped because I could not get away, for they had locked me in; when I left some of the gin was left; (the bottle was on the table the following morning) immediately that I came out of the house Frances came out after me - I left Ann in the house.

Q. While you were in the house, had you observed any thing done to your pockets? A. I found Ann several times making an attempt at my pockets - first on one side, and then the other; in consequence of that I stated to them that I had property about me, and I immediately put my hand to my fob, lifted the notes out, and saw that they were all right - before I left the house I had put them safely back again, and buttoned my coat over my pockets; Frances followed me out of the house - she said she would go a little way down Hoxton with me; I told her there was no need for that, for I wished to get from them, finding what they were - she still persisted in going with me, and about two hundred yards from the house the sister came up, tapped me on the shoulder, and said,"Is he going to give us any thing to drink before he leaves us?" I consented to give them something to drink to get rid of them - I know my property was all safe at that time; I crossed the way into the Red Lion, in Hoxton - they went in, and called for a quartern of gin; they poured out a glass of gin for me to drink, but I objected to have any - I asked the landlord's son for a little water, and put about half a glass of gin into it, which I drank; they drank the rest - I paid for it, and immediately came out; they came out immediately, and at the corner of the house is Red Lion-passage, which is a thoronghfare into the Kingsland-road - they endeavoured to force me down there, but I objected; they said it was my nearest way, as I was going Hackney way - I had not got more than twenty paces down the passage before Frances took hold of me, and struck my head violently against the wall; Ann tore open my coat, and forced her hand into my fob- I said, "Don't attempt to rob me;" she got hold of the notes - I held my watch in one hand, and my hand on my purse, which I thought would keep all the money in, but I was affected with the blow; in less than a minute she said, "Come along, Fan, I have got it all"- she put a few words at the end of that, and said, "All is right."

Q. Did you stand or fall from the blow? A. I fell on the ground; I laid there scarcely five minutes before I heard the voice of a female, but I had not power to articulate - I heard her saying, "Get up," and immediately some watchmen came and helped me up; they took me to Hoxton watch-house - I staid there all night, and next morning, a little after seven o'clock, went to the place I had seen them at the night before, in Davis-place; I found the house open, but nobody there - the window was thrown up, and the shutters put too; I called out - nobody answered - I went in at the window, and went up stairs; nobody was there: every thing appeared in the place as I had left it, except the little bag over the mantle-piece, and that was gone - I gave notice to stop the Bank notes next morning: as I had the numbers of them - they were all paid into the Bank three weeks after; they have not been stopped.

Q. Were you at all in liquor, or unable to take care of yourself? A. I was not; I had not the slightest improper intention in going with them.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. You say you were not in liquor at all? A. Not at all; I dined at home, at No. 21, Dean-street, Commercial-road - I went to Kingsland to tea; I drank nothing at dinner but a little porter - there was a pot among four of us; I drank about half a pint - I am certain I did not drink a pint; I set off to Kingsland about two o'clock - I drank nothing in the way; I went to a friend's there, not to a public-house - I am not addicted to go to public-houses: I never get tipsy- I do not know when I was in a state of intoxication; it being cold weather I took a glass or two of gin that night, as I stated - I might be at Kingsland an hour and a half; I took nothing but tea, and about half a wine-glass of gin- I called no where on the road; I was stopped by them on Kingsland-bridge - I stopped at so house on the road; I do not know the sign of the first house I went to with them; I had one glass of gin there, but did not go into the house - Ann went in and fetched it out to the door; I did not remain there three minutes - when I was at their house they fetched two pints of beer; I drank very little of the first pint, but more of the last, and that stupified me - they drank very little of the last pint; there was some stuff in it, for I observed it - I had only part of one glass of gin there; nearly all the last gin was left - I drank none of that; what I drank was before I had the beer - I smoked a pipe there; I sent for a bushel of coals for them, and paid for them.

Q. Were you not all on perfectly good terms at their house? A. Not all the time I was there - when I found them hustling about my pockets I was afraid of my mo

ney; I felt for them from the state of the weather, and was interested to hear their tale - I did go up stairs with one of them, but I was not there two minutes; I came down immediately.

COURT. Q. Did you go up stairs for any improper purpose? A. I did not.

MR. HEATON. Q. Will you swear you were not up stairs half an hour? A. I was not up stairs five minutes, I am certain; the stupefaction did not remain on me long- it was only when I drank the beer: I am a married man - I do not think I could be up stairs more than three minutes; I went up, because one of them asked me to go up and see their habitation up stairs, to see their furniture - the bed lay down on a low bedstead; one of them said it was a very mean one - I do not recollect making any reply.

Q. On your oath, did you not reply, "It is good enough for you and me?" A. No, on my oath, I did not; only one of them went up stairs with me; after I came down some gin was fetched, which I paid for - they fetched a quartern and a half twice, and two pints of beer; I think I gave them 3s. - that is 1s. 6d. each time for the liquor, 2s. to fetch meat and bread, and 1s. 6d. for coals; 1s. 6d. will buy a pint of gin, but they did not buy that quantity - it was in a small bottle.

Q. Now, will you swear you were perfectly sober when you left that house? A. Yes, I was so far sober; I do not think what I had drank had hurt me, not to make me incapable of knowing what I was about, and taking care of myself - I afterwards drank about half a glass of gin in water; I am positive I drank nothing more.

Q. Will you swear you did not fall from drunkenness, instead of being struck? A. No - the cause of my falling was Frances striking my head against the wall; the watchman carried me to the watch-house; I was incapable from the stun I had received, of walking - they robbed me in Red Lion-passage; it is a public thoroughfare - I was not well after I got to the watch-house, from the blow I had received, and the stuff they put into the beer; I did not see them put any thing into the beer, but from the taste it had I thought so - I remained at the watch-house a considerable time, for the blow I had received, and what little I had drunk, not being used to drink, it took an effect on me, and having laboured long under paralytic, as I do on one side, it made me feel unwell and unpleasant for nearly two hours; I have not said the liquor alone made me insensible.

Q. When you came to yourself in the watch-house was it then you first discovered you had lost your money? A. I knew I was at the watch-house - they let me be by the fire, and they rummaged my pockets; I was well aware I was robbed when they knocked me down, for I felt her put her hand into my pocket; I did not charge any other person.

Q. Will you swear you did not charge any other person at the watch-house? A. I did not - they said I did, but they misunderstood my statement; they said I had charged them, but I will state how it was - at four o'clock in the morning they brought a handkerchief to me, and said, "There is your property - you are capable now of finding your way home;" I said, "Never mind the property, let it lay till morning, but when I undid the handkerchief I found all the property I had had about me, except the five 10l. notes and a silk handkerchief; they said"Is that all your property?" I said, "No, there are five 10l. notes I have not got;" the night officer then said,"Then you charge us with felony," but I had not charged them with it - I said No, I did not, but I would not leave till morning, when I would go before a Magistrate, and have it settled - I went to Worship-street.

Q. You did not state at the watch-house that these women had robbed you? A. I did not tell them there that the women had robbed me - I said I had been robbed; I told the night officer I had been robbed, and went with him next morning to the place where I had been, and showed it to him.

Q. At what time in the morning was it that you said you had been robbed? A. Past seven o'clock; I became sensible about half-past two - I left the prisoners' house about a quarter or half-past ten o'clock, I think; I have had notice from the Bank of the notes having come in - I showed the officer the place I was robbed at- it is about twenty paces down the passage leading from Hoxton to Kingsland.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 26th of February, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was passing down Thames-street with Prendergass (I had received information of this robbery about three weeks before from the Hue and Cry) - I saw Ann Matthews there; I knew her person before, and in consequence of my suspicion, I did not take her, but left Prendergass to watch her, and went to the Anchor, at St. Mary-at-hill - I saw Frances there, and told her I apprehended her on suspicion of robbing a gentleman of five 10l. notes at Hoxton; she said, "Oh, if it is for that I don't care - I thought it had been for something else."

Cross-examined. Q. She denied it, did she not? A. She did.

COURT. Q. You have not said so? A. She said if it was for that she did not care; I do not call that a flat denial.

Q. Do you mean to say she denied it, or said she had not done it? A. No.

SAMUEL PRENDERGASS . I am an officer. I waited in the street while Shelswell went into the public-house -the prisoner Ann went into the same house; I then told her I took her for robbing a person of five 10l. notes - she said it was not her, as she had left off going on the streets at night; she denied all knowledge of the robbery- I took her to the office - I was present when the prosecutor first saw the prisoners; he identified both of them immediately, without any hesitation whatever.

JOHN AXE . I was serving at the Red Lion, when the prosecutor came in with two young women; I cannot swear that the prisoners are the women - I cannot recollect sufficiently to say whether they are or are not; they had a glass of gin, and a small glass to drink it with - a quartern is a quarter of a pint; Williams had water, and put a small portion of gin into it - they were in the house about three minutes; he drank nothing but the gin and water - in about five minutes after they left, a young woman came and told me a gentleman had fallen down in Red Lion-passage; it was not either of the women who had been in the house with the prosecutor - I was alone in the bar, and did not go out; I told the young woman if there was no watch

man there to get one, but she had been for one before who was with him at the time - I heard nothing more of him that night; he would not pass our door to go to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. They all three came into the house to drink the gin? A. Yes, they appeared on friendly terms; they all drank together and laughed; the passage is by the side of our house - if there had been a disturbance there I should not have heard it; the tap-room is next to the passage; there was company there- we have no door opening into the passage; the wall of the house separates it from the tap-room - our bar and door are in front of the house in the road; the doors are always kept shut - our shutters were up; I was not out of the house.

Q. Can you tell whether any person left the house after these persons before the young woman came? A. No, I do not think there was; I cannot recollect - I do not know whether any body was in the tap-room; my father was in the tap-room, with the door closed - the passage is about twenty-five feet from where I was.

Frances Matthews ' Defence. I leave it to my Counsel. I wish witnesses to be called in.

PETER DREW . I was a watchman. I remember finding Mr. Williams in Red Lion-passage on the night in question; he might be a dozen yards from the Red Lion door - he was laying on his face in the snow, and his head right up against the wall; we carried him to the watch-house.

Q. Was he intoxicated or not? A. He was quite, entirely senseless.

COURT. Q. When a man is senseless are you able to discover whether it arises from drunkenness or disorder? A. No; I found him at half-past eleven o'clock - he was searched in the watch-house, and a silver watch with a chain and seals, a 10l. note, a guinea, three half-sovereigns, and I cannot exactly tell what else, were found on him.

JOSEPH JOHNSON . I was the watch-house-keeper. The Police have now taken possession; I was at the watch-house when the prosecutor was brought there - he was brought in about a quarter before twelve, in a state of insensibility, by three watchmen and two inhabitants; they were carrying him.

Q. Are you able to say what was the cause of his insensibility? A. I presume it was drinking a quantity of liquor - a state of intoxication; I sat him up against a chair, undid his neckcloth, and gave him air - in about an hour afterwards he was sick, and emptied his stomach; he had a bruise on his forehead - it appeared as if he had fallen against the wall, and grazed his skin; at two o'clock I got him on a chair - he was not then sensible, but about four o'clock I thought he was sensible, and asked him some questions; when I returned him the money I had taken from him, he said he missed five 10l. notes - I had entered in a book what I found on him(reads); "A pair of spectacles and case, a pin, a watch-key, two silk handkerchiefs, one ditto, a knife, a watch and chain, another pair of spectacles in a morocco case, a bunch of keys, a half-crown, 2s. 6d., one gold ring, four sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, one King William and Queen Mary guinea, which I took for a foreign coin, one 10l. note, an umbrella, and a snuff-box" - his watch was hanging out when he came in, and his money in his pockets; when I gave him this money, he said, "I shall not take them, for I miss five 10l. notes, and I must have lost them in the watch-house - I must have been robbed here."

JOSEPH DAVIS . I was the night officer. The prosecutor was brought to the watch-house by three watchmen and three others; he was drunk, very drunk, not capable of knowing what he did; he remained there till seven o'clock in the morning - he became sensible partly about two, and about four he got sufficiently so to answer questions; when his money was returned to him, he said,"Whoever took one must have taken the other, and I am determined to take the thing before the Magistrate" - he said he had lost five 10l. Bank notes; I asked if he had been in company with any body - he said No, only with his father at Newington; I said, "Did you leave them with your father?" he said, No.

COURT. Q. What time was this? A. About six o'clock in the morning; he said he had been to pay some bills.

MR. HEATON. Q. Did he say any thing more? A. I asked if he was positively sure he had not been in company with any body; he said he had not, only he lost the money - I said, "Why do you accuse me or my brother officer of taking these things?" he said, whoever would take one had taken the other - I went to Worship-street to clear myself from having taken his property; he made no charge against the officers at Worship-street.

COURT. Q. Did you go with him to Davis'-court? A. I did about half-past seven o'clock; he had not told me he had been there with some women - he took me to the house, and when he got there he said, "I suppose this is the place where the girls live who have robbed me;" I said, "Why you accused us of it."

Q. He appeared to you quite drunk - have you ever seen a man under the influence of a blow on the head by being knocked against a wall, and having a paralytic affection as well? A. No.

F. MATTHEWS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

A. MATTHEWS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.[Wednesday, April 21.]

Reference Number: t18300415-26

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

694. GEORGE COSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , at St. James, Clerkenwell, 2 ozs. 16 dwts. and 6 grs. of gold, value 12l., the goods of Godfrey Wohlman , in his dwelling-house .

GODFREY WOHLMAN . I live at No. 18, Compton-street, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell ; I am a gold and silver refiner ; I have no other Christian name, nor any partners now, they are both dead. On the 27th of February, about twenty minutes after one o'clock, I saw the prisoner in my shop; I never saw him before - he came for 2 1/2 dwts. of fine gold - as I had not sufficient in the box I usually keep it in, I took some in a paper out of the desk; there were 2 ozs. 16 dwts. 6 grs.; gold was 4l. 6s. an ounce at that time; it would come to above 12l. altogether - I had put a little into the scale, I fetched the paper from the desk, and placed it on the counter to weigh the quantity he wanted; he instantly snatched it from the counter and ran out - I immediately followed him, calling

Stop thief! I did not see him taken; I lost sight of him for a moment at the corner of Compton-passage, I then found him in charge of McGhee - I took him back to my shop, and sent for a constable; I found nothing on him - the pavement was searched afterwards by some boys, who are not here; some gold was afterwards given to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is any body here who found any gold? A. Not to my knowledge, neither of my partners were living at the time of the transaction; the prisoner was searched in my presence, and nothing found on him.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure you had gold in a paper on the counter, and that the prisoner ran out with it? A. Yes.

JOHN WEST . I am a Policeman. On the 27th of February, I saw the prisoner in the prosecutor's shop; the prosecutor gave him in charge for stealing a paper of gold - the knees of his trowsers were dirty as if he had fallen down; I went to Compton-passage with the prosecutor about ten minutes after two o'clock - I found a small portion of gold which I have here; as I took the prisoner to the watch-house, he said he was not the man who was in the shop.

ANNETTE McGHEE . I am a cabinet-maker. On the 27th of February, about ten minutes or a quarter past one o'clock, I was going up Compton-passage; I heard a cry of Stop thief! I instantly saw the prisoner turn the corner, and come towards me running very fast; I said, Halloo! and instantly stopped him, and as I stopped him he fell down; the street was dirty, I let him get up, he then said "It was not me" - I took him to the top of the passage, and met the prosecutor at the end of the passage in about half a minute; he said to the prisoner,"Where is my gold you have robbed me of?" the prisoner said, he had not got any gold.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the passage in which you took the prisoner short or long? A. I suppose about two hundred yards long; I was ten or twelve yards from the end of the passage; I did not go back to the prosecutors.

Prisoner. I am quite innocent of the robbery.

Nine witnesses gave the prisoner an unusually good character for honesty and steady conduct.

[Wednesday, April 27.] GUILTY. Aged 20.

Very strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his excellent character.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300415-27

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, APRIL 15.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

695. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Carington Bowles , the elder, on the 19th of October , and stealing 1 clock, value 5l.; 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 mat, value 1s.; 1 miniature, value 1l., and 9 paintings, value 4l., his goods; 1 writing-desk, value 3l.; 2 coats, value 2l., and 3 bats, value 11s., the goods of Henry Carington Bowles , the younger .

The facts of this case are precisely the same as detailed in evidence against Thomas Sales last Session, page 218. Mr. Clarkson (for the prosecution,) not being able to confirm the evidence of the accomplice, John Lee , withdrew from the prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-28

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

696. JOHN MUNDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 2 diamond rings, value 100l., the goods of Robert Clavering Savage , in his dwelling house .

ROBERT CLAVERING SAVAGE. I live in Percival-street, Clerkenwell - I am not in business. On Monday night. the 10th of April, at half-past twelve o'clock, when I came home, I missed these rings - I had seen them in the drawer I usually keep them in, the day before, but cannot be positive whether I saw them on the Monday morning; there was no key to the drawer - the prisoner was a helper in my stables; he had access to my room -I made immediate inquiry about them, and next morning sent for one of the Police; the prisoner was apprehended - three or four persons were apprehended; I told the Policeman what had happened.

SARAH VEASEY . My husband is coachman to Mr. Savage; we live on the premises over the stable. On the 5th of April, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw two rings in Mr. Savage's bed-room drawer- I suppose them to be diamond rings; I left them there - I had gone into the room to make the bed, as Mrs. Savage was without a servant; in the course of the afternoon I heard the kitchen door open, locked out of window, and saw the prisoner come out of the kitchen with hot water in a pail - I did not see where he went - the door was not locked.

FRANCIS BIGNALL . I am an officer. Mr. Savage's coachman called me in; I took two of the strappers in the stable and the coachman's wife into custody; I took the prisoner - he was examined and discharged.

JOHN WOOD . I live at No. 22, Compton-street, Clerkenwell. I was in Clerkenwell-prison last Thursday, on suspicion of felony, and have been discharged - the prisoner came into the same yard as I was in, and sat down by me; I was at tea - it might be between three and four o'clock; he asked me how I thought he should get on -I said he knew his case better than me; I had not talked to him before, and did not know what he was there for - he told me he was charged with stealing two diamond rings, one a plain one, and the other a white one, with two rubies in it - I asked what made them accuse him more than the other servants; he said, because he went in for some hot water that afternoon - I asked whether he had them; he said Yes, he had them, but no blame was to be attached to him, for the coachman's wife had had a young woman to see her, and they had examined the rings, and also the other servants were held in 50l. bail - he said the rings were not missed that day, but he went out with the carriage, and his master told him he might go home about eight o'clock in the evening; that his master returned between twelve and one, missed them, called some of the servants up, and told them he missed them - that he went to bed, and tied them up in his shirt that evening; the next morning he was cleaning his harness in the stable, and his master sent for an officer

and while the officer was gone for he concealed the rings in one of three empty stalls, between the bricks; that he pulled up the dirt, covered them over again, and threw some loose hay-seeds over them; I went with Duke, the officer, to the stables, on Saturday, and was with him when he found the rings in one of the stalls, as described by the prisoner; he said, when he went for the hot water he opened the looking-glass drawer, and took them out - that there was a gold watch and gold snuff-box there; I asked what made him take them in particular - he said because they were the most portable, and that he intended to have pawned them.

Q. What was the occasion of his telling you all this? A. He said if I could sell them for him he would give me half the money; I told him I did not know what to do with such things - I was liberated the same day (Saturday) and told Reid, the officer, at Hatton-garden, of this directly I went there; he was the first officer I saw.

ROBERT DUKE . I am a constable of Hatton-garden. I first heard of this robbery on Saturday morning last, when Wood was before the Magistrate - I made a search between eleven and twelve o'clock, and found nothing; I made another search in about half an hour - I searched for some time, and in the third stall from the door, between the bricks, about two inches down, I dug up with a knife a piece of paper with these two rings; after finding them I understood the prisoner wanted to speak to Mr. Savage - I went to the lock-up room with Mr. Savage; he began to cry, and said, "Oh, Mr. Savage, do forgive me! I am guilty, it is my first offence;" nothing had been said to induce him to say this.

MR. SAVAGE. These are my rings - I gave sixty guineas for one, and fifty for the other; I was on horseback on Monday afternoon, from four to seven o'clock, and then went to a friend's in the coach at eight, but discharged it at half-past ten, with the two servants, the prisoner and another - I went to the prison two days after he had been there; he then began crying, and pretended to know nothing about it - I said, "I wish you would confess, because suspicion is greatly on you, and I think you are the person; if you will confess to me I will give you something;" he said he was as innocent as a lamb and cried - this was on Tuesday or Wednesday.

ROBERT DUKE re-examined. The prisoner had been re-examined on the Saturday, and expressed a wish to see Mr. Savage - the Magistrate desired me to go with Mr. Savage to him; he then made the statement I have given - he did not at that time know I had found the rings.

Prisoner. When Mr. Savage came to me I had had my hearing, and the rings were found; the Magistrate asked if I had put them there - I said, "No, I know nothing about them."

ROBERT DUKE . I was present at the examination(looking at the deposition) - after all the depositions were taken, the Magistrate asked what he had to say to the charge; he said I am guilty - the Magistrate used no threat or promise to him, nor did he tell him if he said any thing it would be used as evidence against him.

MR. SAVAGE. I did not mention to the Magistrate that I had made the prisoner any promise.

ROBERT DUKE . He was brought up the first time, and said he knew nothing about it; I went to the office again in an hour, having found the rings, and then the Magistrate had him brought up and committed; I think Wood had been in custody about a week.

JOHN WOOD . I was in custody on the Thursday, and had been in custody ever since the Saturday before that.

Prisoner's Defence. This day fortnight I went to Clerkenwell prison. Wood was in the yard; he came up and said, "What are you here for?" I said, "On suspicion of two diamond rings;" he said, "Do you know where they are?" I said, No; he said, "Then I can tell you - they are in the stable, you know they are;" I said I did not; he said, "I know you do, and when I go up on Saturday, I will tell the Magistrate you put them there, and I shall get acquitted of stealing shoes, which I am here for;" he has been at this bar three times.

JOHN WOOD . I was discharged because there was no evidence against me; I was tried here in September for picking a pocket, and acquitted; but I was never in custody before; I am a carver and gilder.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-29

Before Mr. Justice Park.

697. ROBERT BEECH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 19 yards of cloth, value 12l., the goods of John Hopkins , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM COX . I am a constable. On the 8th of March I saw the prisoner in Shoreditch, carrying this piece of cloth on his arm; he looked round, and then ran into Swan-yard, and threw it down; I heard a cry of Stop thief! I immediately crossed and picked up the cloth; he was pursued and brought back in two minutes; I am certain he is the man.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . On the 8th of March, I saw the prisoner running down Swan-yard, and two persons running a little distance from him; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw Davy secure him.

THOMAS SPARROW . I am shopman to John Hopkins, a linen-draper , in Shoreditch . I know this cloth to be his, by the mark, No. 504; I bought it for master on the 4th of March; it came to 10l. 12s. 3d.; it was placed in the lobby, before you come into the shop-door; it was within the threshold, but if the door was shut it would be outside, but there is a shutter at night which incloses the lobby; the shutter is put up at night for greater security; we leave no property between the shutter and the door at night; the lobby is open all day, but at night we put up a bottom fence, and on that a shutter.

RICHARD DAVY . I live at the Canterbury Arms, and am a saddler. I was in Shoreditch, and saw the prisoner take the cloth from a quantity more which was placed against the prosecutor's inner door; it was outside the door; I saw no other door there; I followed the prisoner and caught him; I am certain he is the man - I never lost sight of him after he parted with the cloth.

GUILTY of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-30

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

698. WILLIAM HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 4 handkerchiefs, value 9s.; 1 swan stock, value 1s. 6d.; 2 pair of gloves, value 5s.; 12 yards of silk cord, value 6d., and 2 yards of ribbon, value 1s. ,

the goods of Thomas Leigh , his master; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300415-31

699. CHARLES HART was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , at Saint Botolph without, Bishopsgate, 9 glazed window sashes, value 11l. 9s.; 4 wooden shutters, value 2l. 14s.; 20 iron sash weights, value 2l. 10s.; 19 wooden doors, value 19l.; 10 iron locks, value 2l. 10s.; 1 glazed and pannelled partition, value 2l.; 8 wooden shelves, value 24s.; 1 wooden dresser and shelves, value 3l.; 54lbs. of leaden pipe, value 2l. 10s., and 1 brass cock, value 4s., the goods of James Collins , and fixed to a building of his; and 1 butt, value 15s., his property .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES COLLINS , ESQ . I am a solicitor , and live in Spital-square, and am owner of some premises in Sun-street. St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate ; No. 77 is one of those houses. In November last, the prisoner applied to become a tenant of that house; he said he was a blacking-maker , and having a tenant of that trade, I objected, but he said he wanted to carry on the wholesale blacking trade, and possession was given to him on the 5th of November; from November till April I received no rent; I did not send for the half quarter; in consequence of information, (and having passed the house repeatedly, and noticing there were no goods in the shop, nor any business carrying on) immediately after Lady-day I gave Mr. Joel authority to distrain; I sent Bostock and Millist to the house last Saturday night; they sent for an officer and took the prisoner in charge; when he took possession of the house, I believe it was in every respect quite perfect; I had not been into it, but every thing that could be seen externally was perfect.

THOMAS MILLIST . On the 5th of November I was in Mr. Collins' employ as messenger. I gave the prisoner possession of the house, No. 77, Sun-street; the glazed window sashes, sliding shutters, lead weights, doors, locks, keys, the glazed and pannelled partition, cupboard doors, shelves, and every thing named in the indictment was safe; there were about twenty-four feet of service pipe fixed to the premises; in consequence of information, I went to the house last Saturday evening with Joel, and found the prisoner there; the articles enumerated were all gone; the partition appeared entirely torn down; I caused the prisoner to be taken into custody; he said if we would wait till Monday, he would replace the things he had taken away, mentioning the sashes particularly; there was nothing left inside the house, or outside, but the bare walls; I had been in the shop once while he was in possession - there was no appearance of business.

Prisoner. I never said I would bring the things back on Monday. Witness. I am confident he said so; I am quite sure I heard him say so.

JOEL COLEMAN JOEL . I am a broker, and live in Long-alley. I made frequent application for admission to distrain for rent since the 2nd of April; on Saturday, Millist came, and said the door was open, as they were shutting up shop - I went there; the prisoner was there, and another person, shutting up - I found no property to distrain on; some of the windows were left, but nine had been removed - the articles stated in the indictment were deficient; I called Bostock's attention to the circumstance, and sent for Sapwell, the officer - I said to the prisoner"Do you know what you have been doing? you know you can be indicted for felony;" he said, "If you will let it stand over till Monday I will have them replaced, or brought back;" every door in the house, except one, was taken away - I gave him in charge.

Prisoner. He asked if I would replace the doors; I said of course, when I left I should leave the house in the same situation as I found it. Witness. The expression was if I would let the case stand over till Monday he would have them replaced, or brought back on Monday morning: the value of all the articles removed is 52l. 13s. 6d. as fixtures - it would cost 80l. to replace them.

JAMES BOSTOCK . I am clerk to Mr. Collins, and accompanied Millist to the house - his statement is correct; the prisoner told me if I would not give him in charge but let it stand over till Monday, he would have the fixtures brought back; there was nothing but an old chair in the shop - the house did not appear to have been occupied for months.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. I was sent for on Saturday, and took the prisoner to the Compter; I asked if he could account for any thing - he then said a person named Bell had been living with him, as porter; I asked if he thought he had done it - he said he could not say; he afterwards said he had not had 5s. worth of property there himself while he had been there; I found a quantity of bottles and boxes in the shop, labelled, but nothing in them, and there was a kind of rug under the counter, where he had apparently laid; I found this direction in his pocket, "Hart's Paragon Blacking, No. 6, Devonport-buildings, Dover-road," with directions for use - I went there, and found he had lived there before he went to this house; there was no appearance of business at the house in Sun-street - he said he expected a large order, but had not got it yet; I saw Bell - he promissed to come forward, but did not.

ELIZA LINFORD . My husband is a watchman. I lodged opposite to the prisoner in Sun-street; I remember his taking possession of Mr. Collin's house - I bardly ever saw him go up stairs, till the Thursday before Good Friday - I then saw him go up, and take the beading off the staircase window, and fear the window out, but the shutter was put too, and I could see no more.

Prisoner. Q. Was it me you saw, or any body else? A. You: you had a light coloured hat on - I told my husband of it; we looked, and saw the lower window was out too.

WILLIAM PEGINGTON . I am a broker, and live in Long-alley. I know Bell, but never saw the prisoner till he was in custody; I bought some partition wainscoting, with glass at the top of it, of Bell, at No. 77, Sun-street; I gave him 10s. for it - I suppose it was three months ago; I have his receipt for it, but it is not dated - I have the partition at home now; I cannot say it belonged to the house - some of it was down, and some up, when I bought it; I saw it in the bottom parlour - it was certainly fixed to the house before I bought it.

GEORGE WYNN . I am an undertaker. I was working for Mr. Tagg, in Sun-street, nearly opposite No. 77, on Thursday last, and saw the prisoner at the house, with a person in black, who has always been there, with Hart -

they were in the shop; I was going out to tea - the man came out with something under his arm - Hart seemed to tell him to go back a little, and as I returned from tea I met the same person with the things under his arm; they were sash weights, in a bag - Hart was in the house at the time; I saw the man return afterwards with the bag empty - I saw some wainscoting taken out once, and several times saw things go out in baskets; the prisoner has been on the premises several times, when things have gone out - I never saw any furniture there, or business going on.

Prisoner's Defence. I took this house at the halfquarter for the purpose of opening it in the blacking line, having been promised several orders; I did not succeed in doing any thing - I was in daily expectation of doing something, till within a month of Lady-day, when Mr. Collins' clerk called for the rent; I said I dare say in about six weeks I should be able to settle it - he called about a week after Lady-day; I said if he would draw a bill I should be able to honor it. and next day he served me with a copy of a writ: last Saturday the broker and Mr. Collins' clerks came to seize - I said I was not aware these things were gone, but as I had taken the house I should leave it as I had found it; he said if the things were not returned by Monday Mr. Collins would give me in charge for felony - I said I would return them, but did not say by Monday; I did not sleep in the house, but at my sister's - a man used to open and shut the shop, whether he took the things. I cannot say, but he told the officer he would appear on Monday, but did not.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-32

700. JAMES MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 18 brass castors, value 18s.; 6 brass ornaments, value 20s.; 6 pieces of brass, called fork-fastenings, value 15s.; 6 brass handles, value 2s., and 6 brass knobs, value 1s. , the goods of William Wilkinson and others, his masters.

MR. WILLIAM AYSCOUGH WILKINSON . I am the son of William Wilkinson , of Ludgate-hill , upholder ; I and my brother are his partners - the prisoner was apprentice d to us about three years ago, for seven years. On Friday, the 19th of March, I suspected him, and when he was going home, about half-past six or seven o'clock. I challenged him with having taken away some brass work, and asked where he had sold the brass work which he took on the Friday before - it was merely by accident I mentioned Friday; I had no particular knowledge of Friday; he appeared at first a little confused - I said, "I desire to know to whom you sold them;" I repeated the question two or three times very rapidly, and he said to Mr. Everard, or some such name, in the New-cut: I then asked where he had sold the brass work on the Tuesday before - he said he did not take anyon the Tuesday before; I said, "I mean the Tuesday before that" - he replied, "I sold them in Whitecross-street;" he named the shop, but I do not think he named the person - I then took him up stairs to the warehouse, to a chair which had the castors taken off, and said, "Where did you sell the castors off this chair?" he said, "I sold them to Lambert, (and somebody) in the New-cut" - I then took him to another chair, a sofa, and a set of dining-tables, which had had castors fixed to them; we lost a variety of articles of the description in the indictment, worth more than 4l. or 5l.; he had a private examination before Sir John Perring next day, at Guildhall - I found some castors and brass fork-fastenings at a house in the New-cut, by means of a search-warrant, and brought them away: I fitted them on the legs of a table - they corresponded with the screws, which were left on the table.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARRSON. Q. Did it not strike you that the people who bought them were the worst of the two? A. No, it did not - our foreman, Richardson, was present at the conversation; I certainly said to the prisoner, "I know all about it - tell me where you sold them;" I did not say it was of no use to deny it - I put down what I meant to say to him before I went in; he is an orphan, and was brought to our house by his uncle; who had served us with great propriety.

JOHN CLARK . I am shopman to Messrs. Everet and Lambert, of the New-cut and Charles-street, Long-acre. -The prisoner brought some old brass to sell two or three times; he used to bring about 3lbs. at a time - we allowed 4d. a lb.; it was old brass.

Q. That had been injured by wear? A. Yes, injured by wear, and broken likewise; I did not ask how he came by it, as persons frequently bring in brass. and have articles in exchange - we paid him for this; I do not think I have dealt with him more than three or four times - I never asked what he was, or were he came from - Mr. Wilkinson and an officer went into our foundry, with a search-warrant, and brought out some fork-fastenings and old castors: I told him a lad brought them - he asked if I knew the lad; I said Yes, by his coming to the shop - the brass could not be used till re-melted; I swear that - the castors were broken.

Q. They did not appear as if they had been just taken off good furniture? A. No - some of the table - fork fastenings were correct, two or three of them, but those were not brought altogether.

Q. You observed at the time that they were correct? A. No; when they were put on the desk I went to them, and was surprised to see it; they must be lacquered again before they are fit for use - I have not been in the business more than three months, not with Everet and Lambert -I have been with brass-founders; some of the castors were not broken, they were not fresh - they must be lacquered again.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I think I heard you drop that your master keeps a foundry? A. Yes; we melt the brass over again - we do not keep a marine-store shop, but are brass-founders; we do not buy for lacquering, but for melting.

Q. From boys like the prisoner? A. Yes; I do not suppose more than three castors would go to 1 lb. - they were broken: they might be compared with the tables, by the screw holes.

Q. Suppose Mr. Wilkinson was to tell us they were bran new, and of the best character, would that be true? A. No, they were broken - none of the articles delivered to Mr. Wilkinson were new; they were dirty - I own two or three were new, but they were brought with other old brass; the castors appear to have been worn - they are broken at the screw-hole; it did not strike me that they

had been torn from a chair - I thought they had been worn off; they could have new ones for the price it would take to do them up - we sell some new ones at 11d. a set of four, but I do not know what these claw castors are worth; I did not hear Mr. Wilkinson threaten to take me or my masters into custody as receivers.

SAMUEL JEAFFRESON . I am an officer of Union-hall I went with Mr. Wilkinson to Lambert and Co.'s, Newcut, and found some articles which he claimed; I saw Clark - he said be bought them of the prisoner, who was then in custody; I found about 3lbs. - there was a great deal of old brass, which Mr. Wilkinson could not swear to, but Clark said he bought them of the prisoner; Mr. Wilkinson claimed more, but only desired me to bring these away.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you left the best behind? A. No; they are bent, just as if prepared for the forge, but are quite new brass - there is no doubt some are quite new, and not bent at all; nobody could doubt about their being new brass, if he saw it by itself.

MR. WILKINSON. I have no doubt of this being our brass work; we should not send fastenings of this description to be melted as old brass, but these which are bent we should; I dare say we had some bent in our possession, but that is always locked up; these have been taken off furniture in our ware-room - we lost all the fastenings from every table we have in the house; I must say that Everet and Co., as soon as I went there, said there was no need for a search-warrant, I might search every where I liked.

Cross-examined. Q. Were all the castors on your chairs quite new? A. Some chairs had been made three or four years - they had never been worn, except moving about the warehouse; the brass forks could not he bent, or they would not go into the tables - when these were bent I cannot tell: we lost some castors worth 15s. or 16s. a set, and some at about 2s. 6d. or 2s. - none of them would be worth only 4d. a pound as new, but very few except three or four sets would be of use till new lacquered.

JURY. Q. Must not the prisoner have been many hours taking these castors off the furniture? A. He must have been several; we have a variety of rooms, where he rubbed the furniture - all the castors were taken from a room where we keep furniture which we lend for parties.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his character.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300415-33

701. WILLIAM COLLISON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Day , from his person .

JOHN DAY. I am a merchant , and live in Water-lane, Tower-street. On the 10th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up Mincing-lane with my handkerchief in my outside coat pocket; I am sure it was there - near the top of Mincing-lane I was told my pocket was picked; the prisoner was pointed out to me - I ran after him; he got to the middle of Billiter-street before he was stopped - I lost sight of him in turning two corners - the handkerchief was given to me in his presence, and he was charged with stealing it; I do not know that he said any thing - he appeared the same person as was pointed out to me; I saw nobody in his company - several persons pursued him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me running away from you? A. Yes, the moment I heard I had lost my handkerchief; I did not see you with it.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I am a dealer in fish, and live in Lower Thames-street. I was in Mincing lane, and saw the prisoner close behind Mr. Day and another person in his company; I saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief out of Mr. Day's pocket, and told Mr. Day immediately - the prisoner ran away; his companion came behind after the prisoner was taken, and was outside the watch-house door - he had run part of the way with the prisoner; I kept my attention on the prisoner - I never lost sight of him till he was stopped; he dropped the handkerchief in the middle of Billiter-lune; I did not see him drop it - it was found near him.

WILLIAM ARTHUR . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge at the watch-house, with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it; I did not know what I was stopped for.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-34

702. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 butter-firkin, value 6d., and 67 lbs. of butter, value 2l. 9s., the goods of James Randall and others .

MR. JOHN HOWELL . I am a malt-factor, coal merchant, and wharfinger , in partnership with James Randall and another, at Queenhithe - I was not present when this happened.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a constable of Vintry-ward. I know nothing about the prisoner; I was bound over against two men, against whom the bill has been thrown out - I observed the prisoner opposite my house, No. 22, Queen-street, Cheapside, on the 17th of March, about half-past two o'clock, alone; I afterwards saw him with two others in Queen-street - they had nothing with them; the prisoner crossed over to Maiden-lane, and attempted a restcule - I never saw him in possession of a firkin; I assisted Smith in taking him the same day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. For what you know the two others might have employed him to carry something? A. No they did not, for I was following them, and know they were connected together.

JOHN BENSON . I am a constable of Vintry-ward.I was called by Harris - we followed the prisoner and two others; I followed the prisoner, and saw him go alone into Mr. Howell's warehouse, Queenhithe - the other two were standing outside; I went into the counting-house, and gave information - I came out, and directly after the prisoner ran by me at a quick step; he had got nothing then - I had not seen him come out of the warehouse; it was a few minutes after he had gone in - I saw a firkin of butter in the possession of Evans, the constable, in about ten minutes; I am positive I saw the prisoner go into the warehouse.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the firkin in the prisoner's possession? A. I did not - I believe I gave the same evidence before the Alderman.

Q. Did you tell the Alderman you saw the prisoner enter the warehouse? A. My deposition was not taken before the Alderman; it was taken by Mr. Payne, and read over in the Alderman's presence - I was bound over to prosecute; after I saw the prisoner enter the warehouse, he ran past me - he had nothing then; Evans is not here.

RICHARD GRANGE . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Randall and Co. On the 17th of March, between two and three o'clock, we received ten firkins of butter, which were lodged in the warehouse, and between three and four I missed one; I saw it about four in Thames-street, about a hundred yards from the warehouse, in possession of the officers - I had not seen the prisoner near the warehouse; inquiry was made if we had missed a firkin, I looked and missed one - I know that to be the same; it has the same brand mark, and is worth 2l. 9s. - I had been engaged in the warehouse on the same floor as the butter lay; but had seen no stranger there.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you many persons employed in the warehouse? A. We have four, and at times, five regular hands - many people come on business; people are not allowed to come unless they bring goods; I saw every body that came with goods - I receive the notes for them - I do not see every body who comes unless they bring notes for goods, as I sign the notes - the warehouse door is open at the square, and people might come in to make inquiry; I suppose I was about twenty feet from the firkin - I am not always in one place - I was not more than twenty or thirty yards from it, I suppose.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am beadle of Queenhithe. On the 17th of March, I was going down Bread-street-hill, and saw Lawrence stop the prisoner, with a tub of butter on his shoulder, forty or fifty yards from Messrs. Randall's warehouse - he asked him where he was going with it; he said a man had given it to him to carry for him; and he would go back and show him the person - he immediately put the tub of butter on the pavement - Lawrence went with him; I minded the tub till I saw him run away; I then followed him to Garlick-hill, calling Stop thief! and stopped him; he had been out of my sight for about a minute, as he turned into a small passage - I have no doubt of his being the man; I saw nobody with him - the butter weighed 29lbs., and was claimed by Grange, as his masters.

MR. PHILLIPS to JOHN BENSON. Q. You saw him after he came from the warehouse without any thing? A. Yes, he was then about ten yards from the warehouse; he was running very fast then.

NATHANIEL LAWRENCE . I am the street-keeper, and live in Trinity-lane, On the 17th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner coming up a passage opposite to Bread-street-hill, in a direction from Messrs. Randall's wharf, with a tub on his back; I hit it with my stick, and said, "Mate, what have you got here?" he said it was all right; I asked him to show me the bill of parcels - he then put the tub off his shoulder, and said if I would go with him he would show me the person who sent him with it; I crossed the street with him, went down the same passage, and the moment he got to the archway he took to his heels and ran away - I saw plenty of officers about, and called, Stop thief! they followed him, and I went back to mind the butter - he was secured in five minutes; I have no doubt of his being the person - the tub and butter are here.

RICHARD GRANGE . This is the firkin; it has the ink marks W. A. the same as the others.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you received many tubs from the same person? A. A great quantity at different times, but not on that day, or perhaps for a week before; we do not send them out at all - we are in the habit of shipping a number with the same mark, at different times; we received these ten from Lilwall and Co., of Lime-street - we received no others from them that day; we have at other times - I cannot swear we had received none within four days; we always ship them to Kent and Sussex - we send none by land carriage; I know this to be one of the ten sent that day.

Q. Suppose you met that cask by itself, would you have known it from any others of the same firm? A. No.

COURT. Q. Had you any other from that firm except the ten on that day? A. No, I think not; the mark was put on it before it came to us.

MR PHILLIPS. Q. Will you swear positively you bad no others of the same mark in your warehouse that day? A. I know we had none of the same mark, nor any of a former stock.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 17th of March the porter of Mr. Randall, who works in the warehouse, said he had seen me come into the warehouse to ask for work, and saw me go out without any thing; is it feasible for a moment that I should have taken the butter? if so the warehouseman or porter must have seen me; Benson says that in about ten minutes after I was taken with the butter; it being so short a time my friends are not here, and I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

JURY TO RICHARD GRANGE . Q. What description of butter is it? A. Limerick; the cask is No. 20, letter A., but we never take notice of the numbers.

MR. HOWELL. The casks were marked W. A. in ink; we do not notice the brand marks.

The prisoner then handed in a written defence as follows:"I went to Queenhithe to obtain work; a man came up and asked if I wanted a job, and said he would give me one, to take a tub of butter to the Angel, St. Martin's-le-Grand, and he would give me 1s. 6d.; I took it up, and got about one hundred yards when two men met me and asked if I had a bill of parcels; I said No, that a young man at the wharf gave me the goods to carry, and said he would follow me; I put down the tub and told him I would show him the young man; we went to the wharf, and could not find him; then the officer took me; there are two ways leading to the wharf; the officer went one way and I the other."

THOMAS KELLY. I am a wine-cooper, and live at No. 46, Golden-lane, St. Luke's. I do not know the prisoner; I was coming up Thames-street on the 17th of last month- I had occasion to stop in the street for a friend who was coming after me, and saw a man ask the prisoner to carry a tub of butter; I both heard him ask him and saw him employ him - they had some altercation about the price of his wages for carrying it, but as far as I could understand they agreed for 1s. 6d.; I have not heard the prisoner's defence read - I stopped there and saw the man get the cask of butter and carry it up the street; my friend

joined me, and I walked on - my friend's name was Casey, not Crawley; we had occasion to return in a very short time to the Custom-house, and I saw a crowd of people in the street, and found this man in custody near Queenhithe - a person there seemed to know him; I naturally inquired the cause of the crowd - a person there told me what it was, and I left my address with this man, who seemed to know him, that if any thing should occur they would know where to find me; I did not know the man I left my address with - he knew the prisoner very well; I said, "I saw that man employed not many minutes back to carry a tub of butter, and if any testimony I can give will be of use to him I will give it" - I left my address, and through that I have been led into be brought here; he was in custody of the beadle of the parish - the man I left my address with told me that he knew the prisoner very well.

Q. Why not go to the beadle and tell him? A. I could not get near him; I was a good distance from him- I suppose twenty or thirty yards; it was in Thames-street he had hold of the prisoner - I could not make my way up to him; there were a great many people round -I did not like to interfere; I gave my card to tell where I was to be found - I knew he was taken up for this tub of butter; I did not go and tell the beadle what I had seen - I have no motive in coming here.

Q. On your oath, where did you see the tub delivered to him? A. I saw him coming up the corner of Queenhithe with it; I do not know where the man delivered it to him - I did not see him deliver it to him; I saw the man agree with him about the price; if I have said I saw it given to him it is wrong.

Q. Did you see any tub in the custody of the man who was talking to him about carrying it? A. No, I was not present when it was given to him, but I afterwards saw him carrying it.

Q. Then for what you know it might have come out of this warehouse? A. It might. I lodge in Golden-lane now, and am a journeyman wine-cooper; I do not work for any body now, nor did I at the time this happened - I only work occasionally where I can get jobs; I have not been in regular employment for four years.

Q. How many days have you been employed for the last four months? A. About ten days, but worked for no one in particular - I buy bottles, and sell them; I have not bottled any wine for the last four months - I buy bottles, and sell them again; I call myself a wine-cooper, because I was bred to it - I still profess to be one, but have not worked at it lately; I have not bottled wine for the last year; I sell bottles to the shops in Golden-lane.

Q. Who applied to you to come here to give evidence? A. This man's mother - an elderly woman called on me; she found me through the address I had given the man- she could not know me through any other channel; I was not subpoenaed - I did not see his mother till to-day; she did not then see my card - I do not know where my friend Casey is - he saw this; I did not think it necessany to bring him here - I am not interested; Casey does not live in town - he is a gentleman who bottles wine and porter, and sends it to the East Indies; I do not think his name is in the Directory - he is not a resident here; I do not know where he lives - I have known him a long time; I found him in Thames-street that day - he only comes to town occasionally; I am not on terms of intimacy with him - I have often been employed by him as a porter to see wines and porter shipped, and things of that kind; I never asked where he lived - he pays me the moment I do a job; I have done nothing for him lately - I think it is more than a year or two since; I met him in the street on this day - he said if he had any thing for me to do he would employ me; I was out of employ - he had nothing for me to do; he told me to stop while he went into a gentleman's office, and I stopped - I got a few shillings from him; I believe it was 3s. 6d. - that is what he gave me, neither more nor less; he saw part of this transaction, and was with me when I saw this man in custody - he did not go up to tell the beadle; I told him I had seen a man bargaining with him to take the tub - I did not interfere more than I have stated - I never heard where Casey lives.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-35

Fourth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

703. ENOCH LOMAS was indicted for stealing, 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of James Cahair Smith ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-36

704. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 4 1/2 lbs. of sugar, value 3s. 8d. , the goods of Thomas How and James Way ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-37

705. CHRISTOPHER VINCENT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 book, value 1s., and 1 neck-stock , the goods of James Thomas Spice ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-38

706. GEORGE HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 ass, price 30s. , the property of William Rogers ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18300415-39

707. THOMAS DUNSFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of James Dibell ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 50. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300415-40

708. GEORGE DOWNIE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 silver tea-spoon, value 4s. , the goods of Margaret Bartram ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300415-41

709. JOHN LITTLEHALES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Shotter Boys , from his person .

THOMAS SHOTTER BOYS. I was in Waterloo-place about two o'clock on the 4th of February - I turned, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's pocket; I did not feel it taken from me, but I had used it a few seconds before - it fell from his pocket; he dropped it, and began to run - I seized him.

Prisoner. He did not see it on me. Witness. I saw it on him, and there was no other person near.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a Police-officer. I was going along - the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner, and gave him to me; a friend of the prosecutor's gave me this handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing to do with it; I was not near it, and did not see it at all.

JURY to MR. BOYS. Q. Are you quite sure you did not drop it? A. Yes, quite - he was about three feet from me; he declared he did not steal it, and said he had a mother.

JOHN MARTIN . There were two gentlemen's servants, who said they saw the prisoner take it from the gentleman; the prisoner made no answer to that.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-42

710. EDWARD ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 coat, value 6l. , the goods of George Richard Phillips , Esq .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Thomas Higgins .

THOMAS HIGGINS. I am coachman to George Richard Phillips - he lives at No. 12, Hill-street, Berkeley-square . I left this coat on the carriage-box, in the coach-house, and the door locked, at half past eleven o'clock, on the night of the 23rd of March - I returned about half-past six in the morning; the coat was gone, and a whip - the prisoner had assisted me, and, as he did not call that morning as usual, I had some suspicion, and went to a house where I saw him intoxicated; I went out, and spoke to a Policeman; the prisoner came out of the house- he looked agitated, and went in again; he then came out, walked off for some distance, and then began to run - the Policeman went and took him; he could not be examined that day, being intoxicated, but was the next day - he said he knew nothing of it; he spoke to me, and asked to give him something to eat and drink, but I said I could not, as he had robbed me.

Prisoner. Q. Did any person sleep in the stable that night? A. Not to my knowledge - when I have gone home late, a man who regularly helps me has slept there, as he could not get into his lodging, but he was not there that night; he has a key of the door as well as myself.

Prisoner. He generally lets people sleep there, and the officer knows that I was knocking to get in; I had slept there the night before.

HENRY HART . I was near my shop on the 24th of March - a neighbour of mine recommended the prisoner to me, who wanted to exchange a box-coat for some clothes; I looked at it, and found it had no buttons on it, but was nearly a new one - I had some suspicion, and said, "Is this your coat?" he said Yes; I said, "What has become of the buttons?" he said, "My master told me if I gave them to him I might have the coat" - I saw something in his mouth; I asked him if he had a button - he said Yes, and gave me the button out of his mouth; it had a lion on it and a fleur-de-lis in his paw - I said if he would bring me a note from his master, saying it was his own, I would buy it; he went away, and I saw him no more - he said he had worn it three years; I was certain it could not have been worn six months.

ROBERT CURRIE . I was on duty on the 23rd of March, and saw the prisoner lurking about my beat; I tried the doors and found all right; I went round, returned, and found the prisoner there still. I said, "Is it not time for you to go home, and go to bed?" he said, "I can't go to bed;" he kicked at the stable-door; I took out my truncheon and knocked at the door; I said, "Your friend must be dead or drunk" - this was past twelve, and about half-past two o'clock I lost him altogether.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I tell you to put your finger into the hole, and see if the key was in? A. The prisoner put his finger in, I did not - he told me he lived at No. 10.

THOMAS HIGGINS . He does not live at No. 10, and never did; the carriage got in that night about ten o'clock; I had some young horses, which took some time to unharness, and I did not leave till half-past eleven - my master's crest is a rampant lion with a fleur-de-lis in his paw.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took the coat - the Magistrate acquitted me the first day, but I was detained and brought up again - the coachman had let me sleep there for helping him, but locked me out that night, and let other persons in.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-43

711. HARRIET CONSTABLE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 3 blankets, value 18s.; 2 pillows, value 10s.; 2 candlesticks, value 1s. 6d.; 1 tea pot, value 1s. 6d.; 1 bed-tick, value 4s.; 1 quilt, value 6s., and 1 curtain, value 2s. , the goods of John Hutchings .

SARAH HUTCHINGS . I am wife of John Hutchings. The prisoner lodged with us in West-street, St. James's . On the 29th of September, a chest of drawers were left at our house, and they were put into the prisoner's room - in a few days the person to whom they belonged came for them - they had all been opened, and the property was gone - but this property was not in the drawers - it was lent to her as part of the furniture, and I did not miss them till the 22nd of March - she had lived there from June.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You do not know when this was committed? A. No - she is married, I believe, and her husband lived with her - she took the lodging; she was not in arrears of rent - her husband paid it; there was something said about selling the things in their room, and they were asked if they would purchase them; they said they could not afford it - that was about a month ago; we wanted to sell them, as we were going to quit the house, and it is all sold now; when the prisoner was taken there were some few articles of their's left in the room.

THOMAS DONDERS PERRY . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a bed-tick, tea-pot, and other articles, pawned at eight different times, between the 22nd of June and the 29th of September, all by the prisoner.

GEORGE FARMER . I have two pillows and a blanket, pawned with me on the 13th of June, by the prisoner.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE. I took the prisoner - she gave me nine duplicates in a pocket-book.

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to replace them - she gave me warning - I was to go in a fortnight into a back room, and pay for the things as I could, and pay the rent; I offered to get them out again, but they would not let me - she has received a week's rent since I was in custody. Witness. Yes, on the Saturday night when there was a week due, and the husband then went away.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

There was a second charge against the prisoner which was not tried.

Reference Number: t18300415-44

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

712. PETER HANRATTY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 boy's dress, value 4s. , the goods of George Barber .

GEORGE BARBER. I live in Great Chapel-street, Westminster , and keep a clothes shop . The prisoner came there on Saturday night the 20th of March, with two men and a woman - one of the men bought a pair of cord trousers; as they were turning from the door, I heard the pieces of a boy's dress give way - I followed the prisoner, who had got about three doors off, and found the dress in his possession; he offered to pay me for it rather than go to the watch-house - I think I have seen him at my shop before.

JOHNSON ABERCROMBIE . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner and have the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated - the two men and the woman went into the shop and I went with them; I do not know that they bought any thing - the woman gave me this dress.

GEORGE BARBER . The other had paid for the trousers, but they had not left the door; the prisoner appeared rather drunk - he was in work at the time at a lime wharf; his master has called on me, and given him a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300415-45

713. JAMES MAHONY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of William West .

WILLIAM WEST. I am a tailor , and live in Carnaby-street, St. James' . On the evening of the 31st of March, between six and seven o'clock, I was going home, and saw the prisoner coming out of my shop with a coat; he was doubling it up - I pursued him, he ran on to Golden-square, and the Policeman took him with this coat; it is my property - I had seen it at the farther end of my shop about an hour before.

JOHN KENT . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Golden-square; the Policeman stopped me, and charged me with stealing this coat.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18300415-46

714. ELIZABETH MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 1 pair of trousers, value 6s. , the goods of William Goften .

JAMES PICKETT . I am servant to Mr. William Gofton , of Gilbert-street . On the 6th of 'April the prisoner came to his shop and asked the price of a gown; as she went away from the door I saw her take a pair of trousers and put them under her arm - I went and took her with them; I had seen her the day before.

MICHAEL HOLDEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - she had no money about her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at a gown at the door; a woman said, "Hold up your lap" - she put these trousers into it; I hardly knew what I was doing; when young man took me I had some money.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-47

715. MARY MAREN and MARTHA BAYFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 15 yards of ribbon, value 12s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

NOBLE HALL . I am in the employ of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , silk-mercers and haberdashers . of Compton-street . On the 1st of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came in together; one of the superior young men came to me, and spoke to me - I watched them, and saw them leave the shop, without purchasing any thing; I pursued them, and took Maren myself - I took this piece of ribbon from under her shawl; the person who showed them some ribbon is not here.

ROBERT GOLDING . I saw the two prisoners in the shop - they asked one of the young men to show them some ribbons; I saw them pulling them about, and suspected them - I spoke to the young man, and said, "Take care they don't rob you;" I then went to the witness, and told him to watch them - they were taken into the dining-room to be searched; Bayford was very violent; she took up a knife, and threatened to stab the officer, and said she would rip his bl - y gots out; he was forced to use great violence to defend himself - this is the ribbon, and was one that was shown to them; there are fifteen yards of it.

THOMAS WILSON . I am an officer, and took the prisoners; there was 9s. 6d. found on them.

Maren's Defence. I went to purchase some ribbons - the gentleman fetched me a basket, and I took up one piece, which he asked 1s. 2d. for; I agreed to have it, and while he was wrapping it up he said, "I made a mistake, it is 1s. 4d.;" I said, "I shall not give it," and put it down - I went out; they fetched me back, then brought up two pieces of ribbon and a roll of cotton, and said they were found on me; I said I had had no such thing - they said a woman saw me drop them - the officer took out a staff, and knocked me down; this young woman took up something, and said she would strike him.

ROBERT GOLDING . I rushed in and took the knife from her, and got my hands cut. The prisoners had been both together, and had gone out.

MAREN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BAYFORD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-48

716. JAMES PENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 8lbs. weight of bacon, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of John Tapley .

HENRY LAWRENCE . I am servant to Mr. John Tapley, who keeps a chandler's-shop . On the evening of the 5th of April the prisoner came in, and took up this bacon in his right hand - he said he wanted a piece of bacon, and put it under his coat; he ran off, and got into the next street; I am sure he is the man - he threw down the bacon.

HENRY PETERS . I was playing at the end of Richmond-street , which is eight or nine yards from the shop, and saw the prisoner run by with the bacon - he threw it down under a chandler's-shop window, pointed with his finger, and called out Stop thief! himself.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard Stop thief! cried, and

saw a man pass me; I followed, and called Stop thief! a man came and took me to the shop - I have a wife and four children.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18300415-49

717. MICHAEL QUINLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of January , 4 flutes, value 4l., and 1 violin, value 20s., the goods of Thomas Welch , his master .

THOMAS WELCH . I live in Steward's-grove, Chelsea. I had this property for sale at the late Argyll-rooms ; the prisoner had been in my employ as porter about a year and a half - I missed some property, and sent for the officer; I charged the prisoner with stealing some articles, and had a confession from him; the duplicates were found by the officer, in his breeches pocket.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer, and was sent for by the prosecutor on the 5th of February; he accused the prisoner of taking twenty-four music-plates and a flute - the prisoner gave up a great many duplicates; some of the articles are here produced - the others were given up before the Magistrate; he denied the charge at first.

PETER TURNBULL TATE . I am in the service of Mr. Bartram, a pawnbroker, of Princes-street, Soho. I have four flutes, pawned at different times, I believe by the prisoner, but the two last I am positive he pawned - these are the duplicates which were given for them, in the name of John Quinlan.

JOHN WILCOX . I am a pawnbroker, in Long-acre. I have a violin, which I believe was pawned by the prisoner - this is the duplicate given for it, on the 16th of January - I lent 12s. on it.

MR. WELCH. This violin is mine; I should think it worth 4l. - it is not of great repute: the prisoner had access to these instruments, as my servant - these flutes are mine; they are worth from six to eight guineas each - here are four of them; his salary was 12s. a week, from eight o'clock in the morning till six in the evening. I never promised him any thing to confess; I did say he might be a respectable old man, and advised him for his good.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-50

718. JAMES JONES and CORNELIUS HAYES were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 tin dish, value 3d., and 1 tart, value 2d. , the goods of George Beard .

JOSEPH OSTELL . I am a street-keeper of St. Martin in the Fields. On the 19th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners near Mr. Beard's shop in Sydney's-alley - he is a pastry-cook ; they were loitering about, in company together - they then went up to the shop, and Hayes took a tart and the tin dish from the window - Jones was in company with him; I went up, and took Hayes - Jones went away, but I sent a person to take him; I had warned him away before that - this is the dish and tart.

ROBERT BROOM . I am journeyman to Mr. George Beard . I have made tarts in this dish, and know it; I had sent it into the shop, and was called up immediately afterwards to go to the office.

HAYES - GUILTY of stealing a tart, value 1d. Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

JONES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-51

719. CHARLES MARELL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 2nd of February , 42 copper patty-pans, value 20s., and 2 copper boxes, value 3s., the goods of the Duke of Wellington , which said goods had lately before been stolen, by some evil disposed person ; against the Statute.

JOSEPH BONEY . I am cook to the Duke of Wellington. These articles were stolen from the pantry at the bottom of Apsley-house - there are forty-two copper patty-pans and two boxes, which were taken; I did not know the prisoner till I saw him with the officer in Maddox-street - the brazier came and told me he had seen the prisoner with them, and they were marked with the Duke of Wellington's coronet - I had inquired for the prisoner at his house, and they said he was not at home, but he was at home, and we took him; he denied having them.

GEORGE BAKER . I am a brazier, and live at No. 8, Davies-street, Berkeley-square; I saw the prisoner at my shop, about the middle or the latter end of January - he was quite a stranger; he brought two copper boxes, containing patties - he took off the covers, and asked if I made such things; I told him I did - they appeared to me to be full, and to have twenty-four in each, as we usually make them; I took one from each box as he held them in his hand, and saw the Duke of Wellington's crest on them, and D. W. - he asked what I would make them for per dozen; I told him the price, and he said he would call and give orders for some - I did not see him again for about nine days; I had in the mean time been to the witness and told him what had occurred - the prisoner called at my house again, and said he wanted to give me an order for some fire-irons and baking sheets, but said nothing about the patties; I asked him his address, and he said, "No. 8, Woodstock-street;" he wrote his name and address on a piece of paper, which I gave to Plank, who is not here, but I remember that was the direction - I made inquiries, and found the prisoner and three others had taken apartments at the house, as wholesale pastry-cooks; I saw the prisoner there, and he pointed to an oven, for which he said he wanted some baking-sheets- I looked about, but could not find any of the articles he had brought to my shop; the prisoner said he had them, and would lend me a few of those he had shown me, but he had lent them to a friend to use; I did not see them again till I saw them in the officer's possession - he spoke English to me, and seemed to understand me.

ROBERT SMITH . I am a fruiterer and confectioner. I have known the prisoner since June last; he came to me the latter end of January, or early in February, with a case of these patty-pans - he came to my counter, opened the case, and said he had a case of patty-pans, which would suit me very well; I asked how he came by them - he said they were given him; I said they were things I never use - he pressed me very much to keep them, but I refused; he called about a fortnight afterwards, about eight o'clock in the evening, and said, "You had better buy them - they are very good; I have been to the gentleman who makes them, and he says they are worth 7s. 6d. a dozen;" he said, "Let me have 2s. 6d., I have had no meat to-day, and I want 1s. for my lodging;" I said, "If you are distressed for 2s. 6d., you shall have it, but I

don't want these things;" he thanked me, and went away for about a month, when he came and said he had gone into business with two men, and wanted some oranges and lemons - he had two dozen of oranges, which were sent to his house, and taken in by the prisoner; these cases were left at my house as security for the 2s. 6d. - he did not mention the Duke of Wellington, but said he knew Mr. Boney very well; I do not recollect his saying he had been to see him - he spoke in English.

WILLIAM BALLARD . This property was given to me by Mr. Smith; I searched the prisoner's lodgings in New Quebec-street - I found some copper-filing on the table and this file; the patty-pans have all the crests filed out; the file is full of copper now, and a small crucible was in his box.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made a long Defence in broken English, stating, that a man brought the articles to him to sell for him, and he took them to Mr. Smith; he had never seen the crest on them.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-52

720. WILLIAM WOOLFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , one coat, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Gadsdon .

HENRY GADSDON. I live in Union-street, Bishopsgate . The prisoner was apprentice to a gentleman next door; I went out on the Wednesday, returned on the Thursday, and missed the coat, which I had to scour for a gentleman, off a shelf behind my counter - I was going out on the Friday and saw the prisoner, who said, "Have you found your coat?" I said No - he said, "I am afraid you never will," but on the Saturday I received information and found it.

ROBERT GODFREY . I have known the prisoner these twelve months; on the Friday night he left me a bundle to take care of - it was given to the prosecutor by my servant.

LOUISA NEW . I gave the bundle to the prosecutor; this is it - it contains the coat.

WILLIAM WHEATLEY . I have had this coat ever since; the prisoner said he took it and thought it no harm.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300415-53

721. JOHN WISE was indicted for stealing on the 21st of February , 1 sack, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Capper and another.

WILLIAM HANDS . I am a private watchman in Savoy-street. On the 21st of February, about one o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another person; the prisoner had this sack under his arm - I said, "Wise, who does that belong to?" he said a person who sells coals - I said "He has no such sack;" he then said he found it at a public-house - I took him to the watch-house, and on the Monday morning I saw the name of Mr. Capper on it.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Where did this take place? A. At the Savoy-palace public-house. I saw him go out; I did not see the sack lying at the bar- it was under his arm; it is a house much frequented by carmen - I cannot tell whether they are in the habit of leaving sacks there; I have seen small ones, but not large ones there - he did not make any resistance, but he threatened that he would punch my head; he went quietly to the watch-house - I never swore I would do for him; I have known him three or four years - we might have had words, but no quarrel; he was a coal-porter , I believe- I believe these men wait there for jobs; this is a large coal sack.

THOMAS CAPPER . I have a partner , and this sack is ours. It has our mark upon it; we have a great many, and lose a great many - the prisoner was formerly in our employ, and knew our premises well.

Prisoner's Defence. We had had a few words the night before, and he said he would do for me - I picked up this sack under the bar, and he said, "Whose is it?" I said, "I don't know;" he said there was no name on it, and the landlady told him to look inside.

GEORGE STACY . I was in the Savoy public-house. I saw the prisoner come in about nine o'clock in the evening; he had a two-bushel bag - he stopped till about twelve - the witness and he were having a few words together - when they came to the bar, I asked him if he was going home; he said Yes; he went to look for his bag, found this sack, and held it up; the watchman said, "Now I will do for you, I owe you a grudge;" there was no mark on the sack - he took it home from the office, and said he would have an Old Bailey job of that.

COURT. Q. Did he say this openly? A. Yes - I am a coal-porter; I know a two-bushel bag from a sack; this is the bag he brought in - this was taken away about ten o'clock by a man who had been working with him, and who is here; the prisoner did not see the bag taken at ten o'clock - he was in the tap-room and this was under a seat; I cannot tell why the other man took it out - the prisoner looked under the seat at twelve o'clock and found this one.

JOHN BURCH . I am a coal-porter. I took away the bag belonging to the prisoner a little before ten - I took it to take care of, because he was a little in liquor.

COURT. Q. So you took the bag? A. Yes, for fear it should be lost; I did not take him home to his wife, I had no business to do so; I took the bag back the next morning; I should not mistake these two bags if I had time to look at them; I did not see the sack there when I took up the bag - I can not tell how it got there.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. What hour was this? A. Nearly one o'clock on Sunday morning - it was not my duty to see whether that house was shut.

COURT to WILLIAM HANDS . Q. Did you ever tell him you would take him to the Old Bailey? A. No - they are very bad characters - every thing they have said is false; the prisoner did not appear much in liquor, but as if he had been drinking.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-54

722. WILLIAM WHEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 3/4 of a yard of Valentia waistcoating, value 4s. , the goods of John Dent .

ROBERT HARDING . I am shopman to Mr. John Dent ; he lives in Crawford-street . On the 16th of March, the prisoner came into the shop, and took this piece of Valentia off the counter, put it under his coat, and walked off with it; I followed and took him - on seeing me he

dropped it and ran away; I lost sight of him for about five minutes, but I am sure he is the same person.

HENRY GARNETT . I was on duty on the 16th of March, in Bryanstone-square, the prisoner ran towards me; I thought it was not all right, and I went to the corner the street and held up my finger; the people did the same, and I followed and took him - the witness gave me this piece of stuff; I asked the prisoner where he got it - he said he took it from the door, but saw the young man coming and threw it down in the street.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor did not see me go into the shop; what he says is false.

GUILTY. Aged 21. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300415-55

723. ANN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 8 pieces of leather, value 4s. , the goods of John Gibbett .

The leather being the joint property of John and James Gibbett , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18300415-56

724. THOMAS TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 6 lbs. of beef, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

FRANCES SOMERS. I am the wife of Samuel Somers, a butcher in Skinner-street, Somers'-town . On the 6th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner with a piece of beef in his hand; he was looking at it, and kept looking round at me, to see if I was looking at him - he then wrapped it in a handkerchief and went out of the shop with it; I sent my man who brought him back.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many persons were in your shop? A. There might be from twenty to thirty; my son was the only person who was taking money at the other scale - I am sure the beef was not weighed; I was on the opposite side of the shop taking money with my second son - I could not hear what the prisoner said; I heard him afterwards say it weighed 6lbs. 9ozs., which was within an ounce of its real weight; he was brought back to the door, but I did not hear him say any thing.

ABRAHAM JENKINS . I was serving in the shop; I saw the prisoner standing by the scale looking at the beef; I asked him if I should weigh it, he said he did not know yet - I did not weigh it; I did not see him leave the shop; I saw him brought back - he said he had paid 1s. 3d. for it; I suppose it was worth 2s. 6d. - it was part of a buttock, there were 6lbs. or 7lbs. of it; we should sell it at 5d. or 6d. a pound.

Cross-examined. Q. How far had he got from the shop? A. I do not know; he was brought back in four or five minutes - I did not weigh any beef for him; there were ten or twelve people in the shop, he was brought into the shop and up to the scale, which is two or three yards within the shop; I suppose Mrs. Somers must have made a mistake, when she said he came to the door - she was at the other scale two or three yards off; I do not know whether she heard what was said - he took the beef to the watch o se with him; the beef was not weighed by me, or by my orders; he did mention some weight before the Magistrae.

COURT to MRS. SOMERS. Q. Was the beef weighed afterwards? A. It was by the Magistrate's orders; the prisoner had before said it weighed 6lbs. 9 ozs. - and it weighed 6 1/2lbs.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am an officer. I was called in and took the prisoner; he said "I did not steal it, I paid 1s. 3d. for it" - on going to the watch-house, he said he paid 1s. 9d. for it, and he had the 3d. in his hand - that is the handkerchief it was in.

SAMUEL ABORN SOMERS . I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner at the time my mother called out "A man has gone off with a piece of beef;" I went to the door and saw him with one of our men - he said, he had paid me 1s. 3d. for it; I said it was a falsehood - as I had never seen him before; I gave him in charge by my father's orders - when he was at the watch-house, he said he paid 1s. 9d. for it; I asked him the weight - he could not tell me; he did not know what he was to give a pound for it.

Cross-examined. Q. You were before the Magistrate? A. I was on the Wednesday; I asked him at the watch-house the weight of the beef in the presence of all who were there - I asked him because he had said he had paid me 1s. 3d. for it; there might be twenty or thirty people in our shop - we had about a dozen of our people there.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was asked the weight of the beef; I had paid 1s. 9d. for it - I said 1s. 3d., and then corrected myself, and said 1s. 9d.; I paid the prosecutor's son for it.

HARRIET COOPER . I was in the prosecutor's shop on the night in question, and gave my address; I saw the prisoner take up the bit of beef, and saw it weighed to him; he took the money out of his pocket, and put it down - my husband is a porter; I was going to buy a bit of pork.

COURT. Q. Did you see the person who weighed the beef? A. No, I should not know him; I did not buy any thing - I was interrupted; I spoke to the master of the shop, and asked him the price of it - and then this happened; Mrs. Somers was not at that side of the shop -I did not hear what it weighed; I went before the Magistrate on Monday, and told him what I saw - I said I saw the man weigh it, and throw it down by the side of the scale.

COURT to SAMUEL ABORN SOMERS . Q. How many persons were weighing? A. Only two, Jenkins and my mother; we should have charged about 4 1/2d. a pound for it - it was not fit for a gentleman's table.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-57

725. SUSANNAH TELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 3lbs. of pork, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of William Bell .

WILLIAM BELL . I am a pork-butcher , and live in Oxford-street . On the evening of the 9th of March the prisoner came into my shop, with another person; my wife was serving - I watched the prisoner; she took a piece of pork, about 3lbs., from a tray, and put it into her apron - I detained her.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no right to contradict what he says; I had had a child stolen away from me, and wandered as far as there; I do not know what I did- my memory is much impaired; how I came to do this I do not know - my husband has been thirteen weeks in Guy's Hospital.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300415-58

726. MARY TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 2 pairs of stockings, value 10s. , the goods of James Savage .

It being the property of John and James Savage, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18300415-59

727. THOMAS RICKARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s., and 3 shoes, value 1s. , the goods of Benjamin Degrott .

BENJAMIN DEGROTT . I live in Bethnal-green . On the 6th of April the prisoner's father came and asked if I would take the prisoner as a lodger, which I did - he slept in my room; I went out between two and three o'clock in the afternoon - I came back a quarter before seven, and he was gone; my drawer was unlocked, and the coat and waistcoat were gone, also three shoes; I met him, and took him, but the property has not been found.

HENRY LENNON . I took the prisoner, and found this shoe on him, which the prosecutor claims.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the coat and waistcoat.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300415-60

728. JOHN ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February . 3 pairs of shoes, value 15s. , the goods of Charles Hird .

WILLIAM HIRD . I am the son of Charles Hird . On the 19th of February I found one pair of shoes in the prisoner's great coat pocket, which was hanging in our passage; he put his coat on - he had been in our employ since the 17th of May.

JAMES BACON . On the 19th of February I went with the witness to the prisoner's lodging - this pair of shoes were found there; this pair was in his coat pocket, and this duplicate was given to me by his wife.

SAMUEL HERDSMAN . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this pair of shoes with me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300415-61

729. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 1 coat, value 20s.; 1 pair of pantaloons, value 7s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 silk purse. value 2s.; 1 pencil-case, value 2s.; 1 knife, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 3 half-crowns , the property of Charles Stuart .

CHARLES STUART. I am captain of a vessel . On the morning of the 25th of March I thought I heard some one in my cabin; I looked up, and saw no one - I then heard the table move: I said, "Who is in my cabin?" I called my mate, who was feeling about, and put his hand on the prisoner's shoulder, he was behind my cabin stove - the property stated had been taken from my cabin into the after-cabin; this purse had been in my waistcoat pocket, and I found it at his feet - he was secured.

ROBERT FAIRLESS . I am mate of the vessel. I heard the captain call out, and found the prisoner, who was a stranger, and had no right there.

Prisoner's Defence. I belong to a ship - I was rather groggy, and do not know how I got on board.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-62

730. CATHERINE McKENZIE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 sovereign , the money of William Hurst .

WILLIAM HURST . I am a seaman . On the 9th of March I went with a woman to a public-house; she told me to go and see for the prisoner, as she was destitute of a home; I found her at the White Hart - we all went together to the Ship and Shears ; we had some beer - I took out my purse, and paid for it: I was sober - my purse was falling, and I caught it by the wrong end; three sovereigns and nine shillings in silver fell on the floor - I saw the prisoner take up the sovereigns and the shillings; the other woman took up two half-crowns - the prisoner returned me the 9s. in silver, and two sovereigns; I charged her with stealing the sovereign - she swore at me; I said, "You had better give me my sovereign, or I will endeavour to give you seven penny-worth;" the other woman was my witness, but she has not appeared - she said, "You have the sovereign - give it up;" the prisoner said, "No, I will not give it up; I will stick to it like bricks and mortar;" the sovereign has not been found.

GEORGE BLAKE . I was called on the 9th of March to take the prisoner for stealing a sovereign; her husband was there, and thrust his finger into her month - he said she should give it up; he made her month bleed, but no sovereign was found.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the White Hart, and the prosecutor came and asked for me; I said, "I am the person - have you come from Scotland?" he said, "There is a friend of your's wants you at the Ship and Shears;" I went - the other woman was there, and some liquor was on the table - the woman asked for a room; I took them to see one: they left 1s. on it, but said they did not like it - we then hadsome more liquor, and on coming out of the dancing-room this woman, who was dressed in black, fell on her back - she then said, "Go and fetch a pot of ale, and we will stop till we have a room;" the prosecutor gave me 1s. to pay for the ale, and when I returned I saw two sovereigns under a table - he and the woman were stooping; I took up the two sovereigns and the silver, and gave it into his hand; but I am innocent of stealing any.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-63

731. CHARLES MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of Edward Lander .

EDWARD LANDER. I am a shoemaker , and live in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . The prisoner came to my shop alone, about ten o'clock on the morning of the 18th of March; he asked for a light pair of shoes I showed him a pair; he said they were not wide enough- I turned to give him a pair from the shelf, and while I was turning he took this pair, which were cleaned, on the counter, ready to go home; when I turned back he said his brother was at the door, and he would call in againjust then the person these shoes were for, came for them; I sent my boy for the prisoner, who brought him back.

JOHN HUNT . I went after the prisoner, who had got about nine doors from the house; I said he had a pair of my master's shoes - I cannot tell what he said, but I saw

the shoes under his coat; I called my master, who came, and the prisoner threw the shoes up in a corner.

GUILTY . Aged 42. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300415-64

732. THOMAS MULLINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , 4 lbs. of pork, value 2.s , the goods of James Knight .

MARTHA KNIGHT . I am the wife of James Knight ; he keeps a shop in the general line, and sells pork . The prisoner was on duty at nine o'clock in the evening, as parish watchman ; I saw him come round the door-post and take the pork from a stall, two yards within the shop door - he put one foot into the shop, and walked off with it; I was watching him at my parlour door, as I had lost two cheeses one night before - he took the pork to the other corner of the street, and put it down; he is one of the early watchmen.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has he not been in the army? A. I do not know, but I heard he was whipped for stealing in the army - he is a pensioner; I did not say I saw him come in on all fours - he came in a crouching position; I have seen him crawl on his hands and knees by my door, but not that night - Mr. Maybank took the prisoner, but he is not here, nor the pork.

Prisoner's Defence. She told the watch-house-keeper that I crawled in on my hands and knees, and the next morning she said I went in and took it off the stall - my character is too good to be a thief; I am too much of an upright character in heart for it; she said the next morning that I slid round the corner, and I never darkened the door.

MARTHA KNIGHT. I gave Mr. Maybank the same account as I did to the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not tell him the prisoner crept in on his hands and knees? A. No - I told the watchman I had seen him before on his hands and knees; no other person is here.

COURT. Q. How often had you seen him crouch? A. On the Tuesday before the night I lost my cheese - the prisoner was given to another watchman.

Prisoner. It is a malicious thing altogether; she has done it to blast my character - in going to Queen-square she and her husband asked what pension I had - had 1 1s. a day? I said Yes; they then asked if I had 1s. 0 1/2d.? I said Yes - then 1s. 1d.; I said Yes - but my pension is 1s. 5d.; if they had said 2s. 6d. I should have said Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 47. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-65

733. WILLIAM LUMN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 table, value 16s. , the goods of Richard Dunn .

PETER MUNGO KNIGHT . I know the house of Richard Dunn , a broker and auctioneer , in Arabella-row, Pimlico . About two o'clock, on the 20th of March, I saw the prisoner take this table from just outside his door, and carry it two or three hundred yards, before I secured him - he said nothing; I had seen him lurking about some time.

RICHARD DUNN. The table is mine, and was close by my door - I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman came out of the shop and asked me to carry it to No. 14, Sloane-street - I said the man was on before me, but they would not call him; there was a gentleman in the shop talking to a lady.

Mr. KNIGHT. I passed the door, and saw Mrs. Dunn and a gentleman in conversation - I then took the prisoner; I had watched him for a quarter of an hour - I saw him take up the table; there was no person near him.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found this bottle-jack on him.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-66

734. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 1 lock, value 1s., 1 pair of hinges, value 1s., and 4 brass ball feet, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Harris .

THOMAS HARRIS. I am a carpenter , and so is the prisoner. I had my tools in a basket, at my lodging, in Little Chester-street - the prisoner was there at work at the time I lost them; I missed the lock, the hinges, and the feet, on the 24th of March - I told him I had lost the lock; he seemed very unconcerned about it - he afterwards came and asked if I suspected he took the things; I said I should be better pleased to go to his lodging - I went, and saw this lock; but I should not like to swear it is mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-67

735. FREDERICK JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 4s. , the goods of Francis Cotton .

CHARLES PADDON . On the 19th of March I received information that a handkerchief had been stolen from Mr. Francis Cotton, my employer, a pawnbroker , who lives in Shoreditch ; I ran out, and took the prisoner - I charged him with the theft, and took it from his pocket; I saw part of the fringe hanging out; he was one hundred yards from the shop - he merely denied having stolen it; I had not seen him in the shop - it was fastened up by a string, which was broken.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have had the handkerchief ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not deny having it; I was taking it out of my pocket, when he came and accused me of it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300415-68

736. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 1 sovereign, 7 half-crowns, and 2 shillings , the monies of John Fox .

MARIA FOX . I am the daughter of John Fox , a perfumer , who lives in the Strand . On the 6th of April, about ten minutes past four o'clock in the afternoon. I was sitting in the parlour, and heard the lock of our till strike - I went out, saw the prisoner on his knees behind the counter, with both his hands in the till; I seized him - he struggled very much, and struck me in the face - I called loudly for assistance, and a person came in and secured him; the officer came in and found seven half-crowns, and two shillings on his person, but I missed a sovereign, which was not found - I missed several half-crowns from the till; the prisoner never got from me - I closed the door, and he broke a square of glass, but never got out.

JOHN UNDERHILL . I heard the alarm, went in and secured the prisoner. The officer found the money on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy a pocket-comb, the lady seized me, and almost choked me; when the officer first came, she said she had lost half a sovereign, and then a whole sovereign; 1l. 5s. 7d. was taken from me, which was my own.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-69

Fifth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

737. SARAH HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , 11 lbs. weight of beef, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I am a butcher , and live in Kingsland-road . About two o'clock on the 2nd of March I was told by a neighbour that I had lost a piece of beef - I went to my window, and missed a piece which I had seen not five minutes before; I went out, but could not find any person; in half an hour the Policeman brought the beef, which I knew to be mine.

FRANCIS FEATHERSTONE . I saw the prisoner about half-past two o'clock with a parcel under her apron, about fifty or sixty yards from the prosecutor's; I asked what she had got - she said, a piece of beef, which she took from the prosecutor's shop; I took her and the beef.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300415-70

738. ROBERT FRENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 4 half-crowns, 18 shillings, and 4 sixpences , the monies of Samuel Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am the sun of Samuel Smith , a publican , and live in the Colonade, Russel-square . On the 15th of February, the prisoner came and asked if he could have a supper cooked for twenty-four or twenty-five men- I showed him our club-room, which he said would do very well; my father asked if he had provided meat for the occasion - he said No; my father said, "I will recommend you to my butcher's;" he went there and wanted two legs of mutton and some ribs of beef; they had not got the ribs of beef; he came to our house, again, went back to the butcher's, and ordered some other beef - he asked me for change for a sovereign; I said,"I will let you have it;" I laid the change on the table - he took it up, and said, "I will give you the sovereign in a minute;" I was called to the bar, and he went away with a labourer, who was with him; he returned, and said he wanted change for a half-sovereign - I gave him that; he went away, and I did not see him again till he was in custody.

JAMES HARDY . I am a butcher. The prisoner and this witness came to my house about one o'clock; I sold him two legs of mutton, and after that, he came and had part of a round of beef - I am positive he is the man; he said he had married a wife with 1700l., and he was going to have a supper; I sent the meat to Mr. Smith's; the prisoner cut a rump-steak off, and I had some of it - he came again at two o'clock, and ordered a leg of pork, and said he would come at four o'clock and pay for the whole; he came at six o'clock, and said, "I forgot, I shall want a leg of veal for Sunday, I wish to give some friends a treat, as I have married a wife with a large fortune; if you will come to Mr. Smith's, I will pay you" - I said my mother was out, and I could not leave the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the man - he never gave me any money at all.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-71

739. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 4 loaves of bread, value 2s. , the goods of William Trew .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of James Ireland .

JAMES IRELAND. I am in the employ of William Trew. On the 20th of March I was out serving my customers in the New-road , and left my basket inside Mr. Dyer's premises; I went across the way to serve a customer, and returned in about eight minutes - I found the prisoner inside the gate with four 2lb. loaves tied in his apron; I asked him what he did there - he said he was taking a bit of bread, as he was very hungry.

Prisoner's Defence. I was only taking a few crumbs of bread out of the basket.

JURY TO IRELAND. Q. Are you positive you took them from him? A. Yes, they were in his apron. I cannot swear to the loaves, but I lost four from the basket.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 15 Days .

Reference Number: t18300415-72

740. WILLIAM DRAPER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 12 boots, value 35s., and 4 shoes, value 6s. , the goods of George Haydon .

GEORGE HAYDON. I am a boot and shoemaker . On the 30th of March, about five o'clock in the morning, my shop shutters were wrenched on one side, a pane of glass broken, and six pairs of boots and four odd shoes were taken out; I have brought those they left in the window to match them - I was in bed and asleep at the time.

JOHN PERRIN . I was going to my work that morning, and had occasion to go behind a fence; I heard a pane of glass break - I looked through the fence and saw the prisoner draw these articles out at the window; as soon as the clock struck five he went off - I went after him and met the watchman; he went after him, and said he could not find him - I said, "He cannot be far off, if you go on quick you will see him;" he went and I met him coming back with the prisoner - these articles were found on him.

JOHN BOTTRAL . Perrin gave me information; I went twice after the prisoner, and found him just before he got out of Limehouse, in the Horseferry-road, about six hundred yards from the prosecutor's shop; I asked him if he saw two men going along - he said Yes, along that way, and pointed to a way where the bridge was up; I then asked if he had any thing about him - he said No; I took him to the watch-house, and my officer found these boots and shoes upon him.

JOSEPH ORGAN . I took these boots and shoes from the prisoner; he had pockets all round his jacket, and the property in them.

JOHN PERRIN . There were three men together; I did not see them do any thing but keep watch at the corners- the prisoner broke the window and took out the shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Lambeth Oldstairs, saw this property lying against the wall, and took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-73

741. DENNIS CAVANNAH and GEORGE SADLER were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 4 cheeses, value 2l. , the goods of Thomas Brown .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

MATTHEW WARD . I am shopman to Thomas Brown , a cheesemonger , of Grafton-street, Soho . The prisoner Cavannah came on the Friday before the 1st of March, and purchased some firkins; on the 1st of March he came for them - Sadler was in Mr. Brown's employ as porter ; he was bringing up the firkins from the cellar, and in that cellar were some cheeses - Cavannah brought up the first four firkins empty, and put them on the pavement; the second time he brought up three, and Sadler brought up two close after him, and as Cavannah came through the shop I observed something in the firkins which he had - they were placed in a truck to be carried away; when they went into the cellar, I went to the truck and saw two cheeses, one in the load Sadler brought up, and one in the loud Cavannah brought - they then went into the cellar and Sadler brought up the hoops and heads of the firkins; he then went down, and they both came up with two firkins each - I did not go to look till they were ready to start home, and then I saw two more cheeses, one in each of the last loads they brought up; there were four cheeses in all - Cavannah was tying up the firkins; I went and said to him, "What have you got here?" he said, "I hope you won't do any thing" - I said, "No, I will take you into the shop;" Sadler then came up; I said to him,"George, what is all this about" - he said, "I do not know; I did not put them in" - I said, "Go and serve that lady;" these are the cheeses, and are of the same description as those in the cellar - the Magistrate asked Cavannah his address, and he said in Cornwall-road, I think No. 3 - I went with the Policeman, and no such person was known there, only by selling empty firkins; the officer found his lodging the next day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had Sadler been in the service? A. I do not know - I have only been there four months; I sent John Coates , the apprentice, for the officer - he was in the shop at the time; Cavannah was in the shop, and Sadler was coming up - he might be in the shop before the boy got out; I spoke loud; the boy might have heard me; I told the boy to go and get an officer directly, to take up these men; I said it was a pretty thing for George to carry on business like that, to take out goods from the shop, and give no account of it; I might point to the cheese, I do not know that I did - the cheeses were all in the shop at that time, and the firkins were out in the street, all over the place; I had thrown them into the street to get the cheese, I might make a fuss, being a little flurried; there was a mob - they must have heard me throwing the barrels about; I was quite cool - I did collar Cavannah, but did not touch Sadler at all; I did not tell the Magistrate that I found any of the cheeses in the tubs Sadler brought up - I told him the number of tubs that were brought up, and the cheeses; the Magistrate asked if I saw these two men bring up cheese, and I said, Yes, but I did not mention Sadler's name; I said, "The two prisoners," and Sadler was one of them - Cavannah was out in the street when I collared him, but I let him go before the officer came; Sadler did not make any attempt to go away; I saw the tubs with cheese in them brought up by the two prisoners - I saw those that came up the first time were empty; I saw the cheese in them as they passed through the shop - the first tubs that came up had hoops on, so that no cheese could be in them.

JURY. Q. Is it possible to put a cheese into the tub with hoops on? A. No.

Prisoner Cavannah. I have bought firkins there repeatedly; they were put one in another in the cellar - they take the hoops off to get the butter out. Witness. But we put them on again, because we get money for them - it is the porter's work to put them on.

MR. LEE. Q. You brought Cavannah into the shop, and Sadler was coming out of the cellar? A. Yes - the firkins were in the street, and the cheese in the shop.

THOMAS WILSON . I am a constable. I took Cavannah into custody, and at the office he said he lived at No. 3, Cornwall-road; I made inquiry the next day, and found he lived at No. 7 or 8, Prospect-place; I found his wife, searched the house, and found two cheeses, and two Bath chops.

Prisoner Cavannah. I gave the address to where I was best known, and where I had lived - I had sold firkins there.

WILLIAM WEBSTER . I took Sadler in custody to Marlborough-street; I went to the address Cavannah gave, and found three or four No. 3's, and no such person was known; I heard from a boy that he had seen such a person, and I went to Pear's cooperage, and got information there; I went to Prospect-place and found his wife, who showed me their residence - he was then in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You took Sadler? A. Yes, on the 1st of March; he went quietly.

COURT. Q. Did you see Mr. Brown there? A. Yes -Mr. Ward stated what he had done.

Sadler's Defence. On the 1st of March Cavannah came for the casks; I took him into the cellar and showed them to him - I went into the next cellar, and got the heads; I carried up six tubs, and when we had put them into the truck, I went to get the heads and hoops - I heard a noise of throwing the tubs about; the shopman called me - I went up; he pointed to the cheese, and asked what I meant by the cheese being in the tubs; I said I knew nothing of it.

CAVANNAH GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

SADLER GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, thinking Cavannah had le him astray .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18300415-74

742. EDWARD CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 stove, value 18d., the goods of William Kirby ; and 1 iron bar, value 2s., the goods of William Oxley .

WILLIAM KIRBY. I bought a stove of William Oxley ; it was in the Refuge for the Houseless Poor, in St. Martin's;

this bar belonged to Mr. Oxley; I found the prisoner and the stove at the watch-house - he did not say any thing.

WILLIAM OXLEY. This bar is mine; it was at No. 10, St. Martin's-court , next door to the Refuge, of which Kirby is superintendent .

JOHN HAYES. I saw the prisoner take the bar from Mr. Oxley's, and the stove from Kirby's.

JOHN MILES . I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. The place was all in ruins, and no fence - I saw these things laying about, and took them, being in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Fifteen Days .

Reference Number: t18300415-75

743. SARAH CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 watch, value 12s. , the goods of John Morris .

JOHN MORRIS . I was returning home on the 1st of March, after nine o'clock in the evening; I was in liquor, and met the prisoner in the Commercial-road , with a child in her arms - she said she was begging for herself and her child; I said, "If you will go home, I will give you a shilling;" I do not know whether I did or not, but I believe I did; I then went to the Mariners, and she came in; I ordered her some bread and cheese, and a pint of porter, which she took - the landlord desired her to go home; I stopped some time, and the landlord desired me to leave my property there - I said No, I could take care of it; I pulled out my watch to see the time, then went to another house, took a glass of gin and water, and fell asleep; the prisoner came in, and when I awoke I missed my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You were very charitable to this woman? A. Yes - I believe it was a shilling I gave her; I do not think it was a sovereign - it was not my watch, for I had it at the Mariners; I was in liquor - I never saw her in my life; the other public-house was the Robart Arms; I do not remember playing at billiards, or throwing my purse on the table, and challenging them to bet a sovereign - I was only in the bar at the Mariners with the landlord; I do not recollect throwing my money down - I swear the prisoner followed me to the Robart Arms; she took part of my gin and water I believe, but I do not recollect - I know I had my watch there in my pocket; I believe I took it out there, but I do not know.

JOHN BERRY . I keep the Mariners, I saw the prosecutor; he looked at his watch, and left me soon after nine - he treated this woman with bread, cheese, and porter; I saw he was intoxicated, and sent the woman away - I wished him to leave his watch and money with me.

JAMES HOLCHONE . I am a pawnbroker; I have a watch pawned on the 2nd of March, by a woman - I do not know who.

JOHN CLARKE . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; she said she never saw the watch - but I found the duplicate at No. 57, Three Colt-street, Limehouse, which her sister told me was her lodging, and that was the direction on the duplicate.

CATHERINE HARRIS . I keep the Robart Arms, Ratcliff. I saw the prosecutor, and a woman with a child come in shortly after him; he went to sleep, but I did not see any watch - I do not know who the woman was. Cross-examined. Q. What part of the house did the prosecutor go to? A. To the tap-room and into a side box; the bar is opposite to it - he was very much in liquor; and did not seem to know what he was doing - he went to sleep on the table; I think he was awake when she went away - he had paid for the liquor before she went; she went in about ten minutes afterwards - no other persons were in the tap-room.

JOHN MORRIS re-examined. Q. I had a 10l. note and a 5l. note; they were safe - she had as good an opportunity of taking them as my watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-76

744. GEORGE ROBINSON and GEORGE BROWN alias WILLIAM BURRELL were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 2 coats, value 5l.; 6 waistcoats, value 3l.; 1 jacket, value 1l., and 1 pair of trousers, value 1l., the goods of Archibald Morris , then being in a certain ship in a port of entry and discharge .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the property of Richard Musgrove .

3rd COUNT, stating them to be the property of John Wilson .

BROWN pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

JOHN WILSON. I am a tailor , and live in Old Bond-street. I packed up some clothes for the Hon. Robert Musgrove , the Attorney-General of Antigua , and delivered them to Wallis, who took them - these are the articles; I had been paid for them.

JOHN SEALE . I am foreman at the West India Docks ; I received these goods on the 24th of March, and delivered them on the 25th, to the mate of the Regulus; they were directed to the Hon. Robert Musgrove .

HENRY SHIPP . On the 31st of March I was informed a case had been broken open; I went and found it so - I went on board the John Atkins , and inquired for another person; I found part of these things there.

FRANCIS FAIRBAIRNS . I am a Thames Police-officer; I took Brown, and found this duplicate, with the name of George Robinson on it - I asked Robinson, who was present, how he came to pawn this waistcoat; he said Brown gave it him to pawn.

SOMERVILLE TELFER . I am a pawnbroker. Robinson pawned this waistcoat, and said it was for a person outside.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-77

745. DAVID WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 4 sovereigns, and 19 shillings, the monies of Robert Mountjoy , from his person .

ROBERT MOUNTJOY. I am a ship-carpenter . On the 17th of March I put down a 5l. note to pay for two glasses of grog, and this was the change of it; it was lying on a table in a public-house - the prisoner took it up; he was quite a stranger - he walked out at the door, I did not stop him; I met his wife at the door - she asked me where I was going - I said after Walker who has gone off with change for a 5l. note; she said she would take me home - I found him there, he said he had not had it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What house was this? A. The George - I was not quite sober; I left my

vessel between two and three o'clock - I went to a house as soon as I got my money and had some grog; I do not think I took any spirits neat - I had seen the prisoner on board the ship, looking after lodgers and boarders; he had gone with me to the captain for company - there was only ourselves in the room; I had no money at all when I left the ship in the morning - I had received 6l.; I do not think I could have spent the other pound in the time; but I gave the note to be changed - the change was laid on the table - the prisoner counted it, put it into his pocket, and walked off - I went home with his wife and the other lady, who said, "Do not alarm yourself; no doubt you will find him in the house, and it will all be made right" - I had no other reason for going home with them; I know Mary Long - I have never been to them and said, "One of your girls have taken my money from me; if you will give me 2l. I will say no more about it" - I have received one sovereign, but not two; I have not been to the woman who keeps the house, and said if she would give me another sovereign, or do another thing, I would say no more about it.

MARY LONG . I met the prisoner's wife, who was looking for her husband; we went to the house and met the prosecutor coming out - he said her husband had taken his change; she said she dare say he was gone home, and she would get him his change - we went home, and he asked him for his change; he said he had no change - he was sitting on a chair, and was in liquor; this was about five minutes after - the prosecutor said he would fetch an officer; Walker said he would give him a sovereign, and he gave him one - he said he had not the change; when the officer came the prisoner ran into the yard - they had bolted the door, and I opened it to let the officer in.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner drunk? A. Yes, more so than the prosecutor - I saw the prosecutor come to Mr. Walker afterwards; I did not hear him say,"Some man has taken my money, but who I cannot say;" he made no offer in my presence to Mr. Walker - I had not known the prosecutor before; I did not volunteer to come against the prisoner, nor say any thing about having a quarrel, or I would serve him out; he never did me any harm - I was in a little bit of trouble once about poisoning a sailor, but it was cleared up; I was before a Magistrate once before that - I will not swear I have not been five times at a bar; I never said I would serve Walker out the first opportunity.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am a Police-constable. On the 13th of March the prosecutor called on me, and took me to the prisoner's house - when I knocked at the door it was locked, but Long let me in; Walker ran into the privy - I came back for a light, and took him out; I found a Mexican dollar, and some silver and copper on him; I went to the watch-house the next day, and the prisoner had a pen in his hand - he asked me to write a promissory note to pay the prosecutor; I said "It is a thing not allowed, and I will not do it" - I took the prosecutor, and had him bound over; Walker's wife kept him away, and the prisoner was remanded; the prosecutor was sober, but had been drinking.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you go? A. To Walker's, within three or four minutes after the prosecutor told me of it - I had known him before; I found no sovereign on him.

ROBERT MOUNTJOY . I had a Mexican dollar, but I cannot say this is it.

Prisoner's Defence. This young woman and the other were in company all the evening, and she swore she would serve me out, by her G-d.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-78

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

746. WILLIAM PARKER and DANIEL THEOBALD were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 fire-grate, value 10l., and 1 marble mantel-piece, value 10s., the goods of George Worrall , and affixed to his dwelling-house .

SEVEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the description of the building.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

HENRY POPE . I live at Chalk-hill farm. I was left in care of an empty house, in the parish of Kingsbury , belonging to George Worrall - at eight o'clock in the morning, on the 24th of March, I saw the drawing-room grate and slabs safe; the chimney-piece was fixed - it was a steel grate, with a bronze front; the house has been robbed at different times, and the windows stolen; a person could easily get in.

WILLIAM ELLIS . I am servant to Mr. Pope. On the 24th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was near this house, and saw the prisoners - I came up the road and watched them; I saw them get in at the window of the house - I went and told Mrs. Pope; she came to the house - I fetched Morgan; I then heard a lumbering in the house, as if they had let something down on the floor - there was nobody in the house but them; they were there nearly an hour and a quarter.

MARY POPE . Ellis fetched me; I went to the house with Letty Edwards; we heard something fall, and went in; Ellis waited outside - we found nobody in the house, but Ellis talked about firing guns up the chimney, and then the prisoners were brought down the drawing-room stairs - they had come out of the chimney; their backs were all over smut and soot - one of them said he had come out of the chimney for fear he should be shot; they did not say what business they had in the house - I had never seen them before; the grate had been moved from its place and laid down, and the slabs also.

THEOBALD, GUILTY . Aged 24, PARKER, GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-79

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

747. JAMES WILSON , JOHN WILLIAMS , CHARLES DYER , and SARAH ANN HARPER , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Boddington , on the 7th of March , and stealing 2 spoons, value 5s.; 1 gold pin, value 5s.; 1 silver castor-top, value 6d.; 1 silver thimble, value 6d.; 1 bottle top, value 3s.; 1 set of brass weights, value 5s.; 1 sack, value 6d.; 1 shilling, 2 sixpences, and 7s. 2d. in copper monies, his property .

GEORGE BODDINGTON. I live in Blackmoor-street, Clare-market , and am a baker ; the business belongs to Robert Clues - I am his confidential servant; only I and my wife live in the house - Clues lives on the Continent, and when in England he lives at Acton; he pays the rent and taxes of this house - I have 2l. a week for me and my wife, and the house to live in; I let one room, the rent of which I receive on account of my employer. On Sunday morning, the 7th of March, we went to bed about two o'clock; Williams and Rhodes called me up a little after three o'clock; I came down with them, and missed about 10s. worth of copper, and 4s. off the parlour shelf; I found the back window had been opened by a square of glass being broken, and the back door was open - there were footsteps on the cill of a little window which was open, and where they must have got in; I missed the articles stated in the indictment, all of which were my own except the money, which was my employers - I found the things in possession of Byford.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you any right to the possession of the dwelling-house except as a servant, and subject to your master's control? A. None - I am placed there to carry on the business.

COURT. Q. If you did not live in the house, would you have more wages? A. I dare say I should be allowed apartments out; nothing was said about my living there when the agreement was made for my wages - I occupy the parlour, and one bed-room; the furniture is master's; if he chose to let any part of the house I can not object to it.

GEORGE BISHOP . I live at No, 14, Clare-court - the back of my house is nine or ten feet from Boddington's; I am a muffin-baker. On the morning of the 7th of March, I was called up by a person who comes to work for me - I heard a rustling noise in the yard; I pulled my curtain aside; I saw a man get off the water-cistern, in the yard, and come in at my back door into my passage - my yard joins the prosecutor's; there is a wall between them - I told the person, who called me, and he alarmed the Police; two Policemen came almost directly, and went out of my back door to Boddington's, but could find nobody - I did not go with them, as I was not dressed; I went to the back door; a bag and several weights were found in Boddington's yard - I went to the top of my house, thinking they might have got out at my roof; I knocked at the prisoner Harper's, door, which is the top room in my house, and said,"Mrs. Harper, don't be frightened, have you any one there?" - she said, "Oh, dear, no;" she and her husband lodge with me - I went down again; we hunted in the cellar, but could find nobody, and the Police went away; a little after six o'clock, Mrs. Wood, who lodges on the same floor as Harper, came down and told me something- in five or six minutes I went up with Rose and another Policeman, and found the three male prisoner in Mrs. Harper's room; they were taken to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Harper is married? A. Yes - she had lived in my house about five months; her husband was in the hospital at the time - I cannot tell how the men came in her room; I saw nobody with the man that came from the cistern.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There are houses on each side of Clare-court? A. Yes; and at each end; they are inhabited.

BENJAMIN BYFORD . I am a portmanteau-maker, and lived next door to the prosecutor. in Blackmoor-street. On the morning in question, on looking out of window, about nine o'clock, I saw something like a handkerchief laying on the part which projects over the opposite shop front - I went and fetched it; it contained a silver tea-spoon, the top of a bottle, a brooch, and things - I delivered them to Priest; this was across the road, and about ten or twelve yards from the prosecutor's in front.

JANE WOOD , I am the wife of Charles Wood , and lodge on the same floor as Harper. On the morning of the 7th of March, about half-past two o'clock, I heard voices of persons in her room; there appeared to be several voices - I heard the door open, and persons go down stairs - it appeared to be the footsteps of two persons, but I cannot possibly say; and when the alarm was given, I heard footsteps come up stairs again - they went into her room, and the door was locked immediately; I afterwards heard two persons come up stairs, and ask if any body was in the room - a woman's voice answered that there was no one; I afterwards went down to Bishop.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You heard the voices about half-past two o'clock, and then heard two persons go down? A. Yes - it appeared to be women's footsteps; they appeared very light - I saw nobody - the two persons came up directly after each other; I immediately heard the door shut and locked - I still heard voices when they went down; it appeared men's voices, but whether it was in the house I cannot tell; I went down to Bishop a little before six o'clock - when the person asked if there was any body in the room, he said something about a robbery; I heard a noise as if the door was opening, about six o'clock, before I went to Bishop - the prosecutor's premises are separated from ours by, I think, a wooden partition; it is higher than my head - no person could see over it; they must climb over there to get from our premises to his; I do not know whether Mrs. Harper is in the family-way - I heard the voices about half-past two o'clock; the persons returned about a quarter-past three o'clock - directly the alarm was given I bolted my door.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are there not a number of lodging-houses in the court? A. There are.

WILLIAM WILLIAMSON . I am a serjeant of the Police. I was called up about ten minutes past three o'clock - I heard a rattle spring, and went to Bishop's house; he gave me information - I placed one man at each door, and searched the rooms below, and then went up stairs to the third floor back room; the door was locked - we knocked, and asked if any one was there, and were answered by a female voice, that there was nobody but herself; I went down into the back yard, got on the top of the wall, and the privy, and found a sack with these weights - I found the prosecutor's back window and door open - I searched the house below, then went up, and awoke him; the partition between his yard and Bishop's is a brick wall, nine or ten feet high - there is a cistern on Bishop's side, which enables a person to get on the wall; I saw no wooden fence.

HUGH ROSE . I am a Police-constable. I went with Williamson, and searched both the houses. About half-past seven o'clock one of our men fetched me to Bishop's again, and in the third floor back room I found the four prisoners - Dyer was in bed; I told them there was suspicion of a robbery having been committed at No. 22, Blackmoor-street, from that house; and on the person of Wilson, who gave his address at Lambeth, I found a half-crown, a file, a breast-pin, a piece of sealing-wax, and a piece of lead; on Williams 6 1/2d.; on Dyer 1s. in silver, and 8 1/2d. in copper, a penny of which was very remarkable, having two letters on it, and under the pillow on which Dyer slept, in a pocket, was twenty-eight farthings, 6 1/2d. in copper, two sixpences, and a shilling, and tied up in a blue handkerchief inside the pocket, was more silver- the money and every thing found on them was ordered to be given up by Sir Richard Birnie .

JOSEPH PRIEST . I am an inspector of the Police. On the 7th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I received a handkerchief from Byford, which I produce - it contains a gold pin, a silver tea-spoon, the top of a bottle, a tea-caddy spoon, the top of a peppercastor, and a silver thimble.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure this was not after nine o'clock? A. Yes.

GEORGE BISHOP re-examined. I could not form any judgment who it was it at I saw come ozer the cistern - there is a water-closet at the side of the cistern; that is close up to the wall, and there is a water-cistern on the other side of the wall, so that it is easy to get down, and on my side it is like a ladder; I never examined the other side to see if it was easy to get up from there - there is no wooden partition; it is a brick wall, eight or nine feet high.

- HALL. I am a fishmonger, and live in Clare-court, which is right at the back of Boddington's house. On Sunday morning, the 7th of March, about half-past one o'clock, I was closing my shop, and observed the prisoner Harper coming up the court with a man; they stopped at Bishop's private door, stood talking for two or three minutes, then passed each other, and parted - she went up stairs, and the other one went down to the end of the court, to two more men who stood there, and in two or three minutes I saw three men come up the court together - they went to the same door as Harper went in at - I heard one say, "Is the fire a light?" they all three went in, and closed the door - I saw no more; I did not notice their faces.

GEORGE BODDINGTON. I know these weights - the things found in the handkerchief are mine, but not the handkerchief; I do not know any of the copper - I lost as near as I can calculate, 8s. or 10s. in halfpence, farthings, and pence, but how many of each I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18300415-80

748. JAMES STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , at St. George, Hanover-square, 8 shirts, value 4l.; 15 cravats, value 1l.; 18 handkerchiefs, value 2l.; 1l cloths, value 8s.; 1 dresing-gown, value 10s.; I flannel gown, value 5s.; 2 waistcoats, value 10s.; I pair of drawers, value 3s.; 3 stockings, value 1s., and 1 jacket, value 5s., the goods of the Earl of Cardigan , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD HUGGLESTON . I am a Policeman. On the 22nd of February, between ten and twelve o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner in the Edgware-road, with a basket on his shoulder, containing this linen - I told him he had been very fortunate that morning, and he must go with me; he immediately threw the basket right upon me - it knocked me into the road; I pursued - I dragged the basket along as well as I was able; he was knocked down by some people in Oxford-street, and secured, without my losing sight of him - I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How long had you known him? A. Some months; he lives within two hundred yards of me - he was in Somerset-street, coming from Portman-square.

MARTHA YATES . I am housekeeper to the Earl of Cardigan, who lives in Portman-square, in the parish of St. Marylebone . On the 22nd of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning, this basket of linen was put into the passage of the area, ready for the laundress; there are steps and a gate to the area - I did not miss it till an inventory that was in the basket was brought by the Policeman - Somerset-street is about two hundred yards from our house.

HENRY CAMPION . I received the property from Huggleston, and took out the inventory - we took them back to the Earl's house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I work for Mr. Thacker, a shoemaker; I did not go to work on this morning - in Orchard-street I met a female with a man; she asked me to carry this basket to Oxford-street, and she would reward me; the Policeman said I had stolen them, and if I did not bring them back he would take me to the watch-house; I said I would not take them further, and threw them down.

GUILTY, of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-81

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

749. ELIZA STALLY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 76 books, value 24l.; 1 portfolio, value 2s.; 7 reams of paper, value 3l.; 6 mats, value 2s.; 1 caddy, value 10s.; 1 opera-glass, value 2s.; 1 tea-pot, value 2s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; 1 spoon, value 2s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 3s.; 2 rings, value 2l.; 1 locket, value 1s.; 1 knife, value 2s.; 4 pairs of sheets, value 2l.; 5 table-cloths, value 1l.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 rug, value 10s.; 1 table cover, value 3s.; 13 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 10 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign. and 24 shillings, the property of Charles Alexander Crickett Hodges , in his dwelling-house .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

C. A. C. HODGES. I am a bookseller , and live at No. 27, Portman-street, Portman-square . The prisoner came into my service on the 26th of January; on Sunday, the 21st of March, I went out, leaving her at home - I had seen all the property stated in the indictment safe the day before, and some that morning; I returned at eight o'clock in the evening, and knocked at the door; I received no answer, and was going for a Policeman, when

a neighbour gave me information - I got a constable and got into the house; the prisoner was gone, and I missed all these articles and money - I got information and afterwards went to No. 20, Little James-street, Manchester-square; the property had then been found - I saw it before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you hire the prisoner? A. I hired her first about the end of November. I met her accidentally; I walked with her and made an appointment with her, as is usual in such cases - it was not for her to come into my service then.

Q. Will you swear she did not live with you as a mistress? A. Certainly not - I have receipts to prove she was my servant. When I first met her I went with her to a house in the neighbourhood of Soho-square, and there found her to be a girl of the town, as I believed she was; but from the knowledge I obtained of her character afterwards, I thought she might be trusted, which induced me to take her; I never slept with her while she was in my service - I certainly did in Greek-street, Soho; I had frequent interviews with her at her lodgings, which she took me to in Meards-court; I gave her money - I gave her nothing but her wages while she was my servant.

Q. Did you keep her as your mistress before she came into your service? A. I never considered her so. I supported her in every way; the wages I gave her was 5s. a week, or 12l. a year, which was the agreement - I took lodgings for her before she came into my service; she lived at those lodgings about two months or longer, till the 26th of January, when she came into my service - I first saw her on a Sunday, the latter end of November or beginning of December; I walked by her side - I appointed to meet her on the Tuesday evening; I did so - I took an apartment for her at No. 21, Norton-street, Marylebone, but did not pass her off there as my wife; she was there about a month - it is not a house of ill same; the landlord is a chair-maker - she walked with me to the house; no inquiry was made whether I was married - there was a little objection made at first as to a reference; I said if there was any objection I would not take the apartment - I refused to go in doors; no question was asked as to whether we were married - I I did not go there with her as my wife; when she had been there a month I might have said the expences were too great for me - I certainly thought so, and proposed to take another lodging; she solicited me to apprentice her to learn shoe-binding - as I intended to leave my business and go abroad, I did not wish she should he unsupported; she said if I would apprentice her to the shoe-binding she should do well, but she never would return home - she is seventeen years old; I am twenty-seven - we had two other lodgings; one in Nassau-street. Middlesex Hospital, the other in Cirencester-place, Fitzroy-square, and staid a fortnight or three weeks in one, and three weeks or a month in the other - I then, in consequence of being about to dispose of my business, and my servant having burnt a sheet, I sent her out of the house, and stated to the prisoner that she should come for a short time, which would be about a month; I charge her with taking 21l. - I gave her no part of that to buy dress; I believe there is at home in my watch-case a broken brooch which she begged I would never part with for her sake.

THOMAS NEATE . I am a hackney-coach proprietor. On Sunday evening, the 21st of March, a young woman fetched me from the stand in Oxford-street, to No. 27, Portman-street; a good many parcels were put into the coach - I put must of them in myself by her direction; I believe the prisoner to be the young woman - she ordered me to drive to No. 20, Little James-street, Oxford-street; I left the things there with her.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not sure of her? A. No, she being dressed different, and it being dark in the evening - she had a veil on.

ANN FROST . I am a married woman, and live at No. 20, James-street, Manchester-square. The prisoner came on Sunday night, the 21st of March, and took my back kitchen furnished; she then came in a coach with some parcels, which were taken down into the kitchen - she continued to remain there until Thursday, when she was apprehended.

BENJAMIN STRIDE . I am an officer. In consequence of information I went to No. 20, James-street, with Hornsby, and found the prisoner there; we found the articles stated in the indictment at her lodging - she acknowledged to me that the whole of the things belonged to Mr. Hodges; there was a quantity of linen, other goods, and some clothes of her own, which she acknowledged she had bought out of the money she took from Mr. Hodges - I found ten sovereigns and a half, and asked if the money belonged to Mr. Hodges; she said it did - I asked where the remainder was; she said she had bought clothes with it.

JOSEPH HORNSBY . I am a Police-serjeant. I went with a warrant to No. 20, James-street, and saw the prisoner; I told her I had a warrant to search for goods brought there on Sunday evening - she said, "I am the person that brought them;" I told her she had no occasion to tell me any thing to implicate herself, for I must give in evidence what she said - she went on to say, "I am the person; I am guilty, but I hope Mr. Hodges will be merciful to me, but I am too wicked to expect it" - Stride came in about twenty minutes after me; I suppose the value of the property is 70l. or 80l.

JOHN FERGUSSON . I am a Police-constable. I went with the prosecutor to his residence and found the door fast; I got in at the window, and found the house in a very disordered state.

C. A. C. HODGES. She lived in my house five or six weeks; the amount of property found at her lodging is above 60l. or 70l - I had seen the tea-caddy at breakfast, and some of the things that morning; I found nothing on my bed which I slept in the night before - I did not see the money that day.

Prisoner's Defence. The reason I left him was, he told me about a fortnight before that he had a wife living, and was going abroad, and should leave me; I became very uneasy, and determined to quit the house - the money found upon me was my own; it was given to me to buy dresses, and as I was not very extravagant I did not spend it all; not a farthing of it is his.

C. A. C. HODGES. I am married, and told her so a short time before she left; it was by mere accident that

my being married was found out - I cannot exactly tell whether I told her of it.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 17.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Transported for Seven Years .

(See 4th Day, Old Court.)

Reference Number: t18300415-82

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

750. JOSEPH CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , I handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Charles Green , from his person .

CHARLES GREEN . I live at Camberwell. On the 10th of April, between twelve and one o'clock, I was near Great Eastcheap , nearly opposite Miles'-lane, and had a silk handkerchief in my pocket - I did not feel it taken; my friend Gill, who was with me, gave me information, and I collared the prisoner, who was about two yards from me; I did not observe any person with him - I did not find my handkerchief; he denied all knowledge of it - I saw nobody near enough to do it but him; I had used it an instant before.

WILLIAM HEATHORN GILL . I was with Mr. Green going out of Eastcheap towards Fish-street-hill - a great many coaches and carts were passing, and some were drawn up by the pathway; I let my friend go rather before me, and saw something passing from his pocket - it struck me it was his handkerchief; I immediately asked if he had lost it - he felt and said he had; at the time I saw it occur I turned round, and saw the prisoner - I knew him by his dress, and finding my friend had lost his handkerchief, I pointed him out; I am sure he took hold of the same person who I thought was drawing his handkerchief out - he denied all knowledge of it, but the action was very quick, and there were others behind him; he could not escape, because there were carts on one side, and houses on the other - I never lost sight of him till he was secured.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-83

751. JAMES PRIOR was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , I handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas John Culliford , from his person .

THOMAS JOHN CULLIFORD . I am a merchant , and live in Furnival's Inn. On the 30th of March, about two o'clock, I was on Holborn-bridge, at the corner of Field-lane ; I felt a tug at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, which I had used about half an hour before; I had not seen the prisoner near me; it was in my inside pocket, but my coat was unbuttoned - having lost many handkerchiefs on the same spot, I turned round quickly, and saw the prisoner drop it; he had one man and three women of the lowest description in his company; they endeavoured to rescue him when I had hold of him - they got between me and him, and shoved about; when I saw him drop the handkerchief I rushed on him and collared him- he clung to a post; I got him from there, and then he clung to a lamp-post; these people then got between us, but did not succeed in getting him from me - I took the handkerchief, and kept it till the officer came.

ABRAHAM COLEY . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge, with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking after a situation -I had not left a gentleman long who asked me to carry a parcel to Holborn-hill, and gave me 4 1/2d.; I walked on - the handkerchief laid at my feet; I picked it up - the gentleman seized me; I did not know what for.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-84

752. JOSEPH PRESTON was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS COOPER . I am in partnership with Richard Cooper - we are tea-dealer s in Monument-yard ; the prisoner was in our employ as collecting clerk ; his duty was to account every day when he returned, for what he had received; he should enter it in a book, and pay the money over to Stringer. On the 28th of August Botten owed us 35l. 11s.; the prisoner has never brought that to account; there is no entry of it in his book - we have never received it; on the 25th of February 10l. was due from Middleton; he never brought that to account - his salary was 90l. last year, and 100l. this; he had received money on account of his wages about ten days before - he did not state that he had received this money; we knew nothing of it till the 26th of February, when I suspected something was wrong, and sent to Botten - I then called the prisoner in, and asked if he had received money from other people and not accounted for it; he said he had a great deal, and produced this account, which is in his own hand-writing - the amount is more than 500l.; I gave him in charge - he had never before intimated that he had received these amounts.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long has he lived with you? A. Above two years - he told me he came from the north; he has not tendered me any sum of money - his friends attempted a negociation, but I always rejected it; they were troublesome to me, and I referred them to Mr. Harmer - his mother and sister wanted me to take something, but proposed no specific sum; I do not know what they said to Mr. Harmer.

GEORGE BOTTEN . I am an oilman, and deal with the prosecutors. On the 28th of August, I paid the prisoner 35l. 1 1s. on their account, in Bank notes and cash - he collected orders and money.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take a receipt? A. I have a receipt, which he wrote in my presence - it is a memorandum on the account; the prosecutors applied for the money in February, and this was discovered.

COURT. Q. Did you make any other payment to him? A. On the 10th of December, I paid him 3l. 7s. 7d., on their account, and took an acknowledgment, which I saw him write.

EDWARD MIDDLETON . I am a tea-dealer, and live in Crawford-street. The prisoner was in the habit of calling on me weekly for orders and money; on the 25th of February, he called for 12l. 7s. on account of Messrs. Cooper, which I paid him in money, and he wrote an acknowledgment in my book, which is here.

JOHN STRINGER . I am the prosecutors' clerk. The prisoner did not pay me any of these sums, which he ought to do in the regular course of business - he never told me he had received them.

Cross-examined. Q. How often did he account to you? A. In the evening he wrote in the cash-book what he had received, and brought it to me, with the money; if I was

at home; I was at home on the 28th of August, for here is my writing in the book on that day.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had not the most distant idea of defrauding his employers, and that he had a wife and four children to support.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-85

753. THOMAS HAND was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of the Rev. William Johnson , from his person .

THE REV. WILLIAM JOHNSON I live in Baldwin's-gardens. On Sunday, the 11th of April, a little before six o'clock in the evening, I was in the Poultry , near the Mansion-house, and received information that my handkerchief was taken; it was safe a few minutes before - I attempted to pursue the prisoner, who was pointed out to me; I fell down, and in rising saw a person had stopped him - I am certain he is the person who was pointed out; I took him to the Mansion-house, and in his right hand breeches pocket the officer found my handkerchief - I had a great coat on, and it was in my under coat pocket; the flap must have been lifted up to get it - I saw another person, about his own age, running away; they both passed me, one calling to the other, "Come on Tom."

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I live at Mr. Debatt's, the pastrycook, near the Mansion-house. I was looking out of the door - I saw the prosecutor go by; the prisoner and another were behind him, in the act of taking the handkerchief out of his pocket - the prisoner held up the tail of his great coat, while the other took the handkerchief from the other coat pocket; I ran out and told the prosecutor - I pursued the prisoner; - he was stopped by another person; I am certain of him.

JOSEPH ROME . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in custody, and found the handkerchief in his right hand breeches pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Cheapside; a lady slipped down - I turned round, and a boy gave me this handkerchief; I put it into my pocket - I did not know it was stolen.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-86

754. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 59 yards of silk, value 9l. 5s., and 1 wooden roller, value 1d., the goods of John Remington Mills and another, his masters, in their dwelling-house .

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am an officer of Cripplegate. On Monday evening, the 22nd of March, about ten minutes to eight o'clock, I was standing in Milk-street, near the prosecutors' house - I heard a door shut, and the prisoner immediately ran by me very fast, with a bundle under his arm - it excited my suspicion; I followed him to Maidenlane, and there stopped him - he had this bundle under his arm; I asked him what was in it - he answered, Nothing; I said, "Yes, you have something there - where are you going with it?" - he said to his mother's; I asked where he brought it from; he said from Remington Mills , in Milk-street - I told him I knew Messrs. Mills' house very well, and asked if it was silk; he said it was, that he was going to take it home to his mother's to show his sister, that she might choose a new gown from it, and when she had done so he meant to return it again - I then took him to the watch-house, and found it was a roll of silk measuring fifty-nine yards; he then said the gown was not for his sister, but for a young person named Mary Cole, who lived in the same house as his mother - I asked where his mother lived; he said in Pear Tree-court, Clerkenwell - I went to Mr. Mills, but found none of the firm; I took one of the gentlemen of the house to the prisoner's mother, where he had described - I found nothing of the prosecutor's there; a young woman there answered to the name of Cole - I asked if her name was Mary; she said No, her sister's name was Mary; I went to Exmouth-street, and found Mary Cole at a friend's house, but she lived at the same house as the prisoner's mother.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. The information as to where Cole lived turned out correct? A. Certainly; I first saw him six or seven houses from his master's - he made no resistance, and did not attempt to conceal the silk.

WILLIAM LAW . I am in partnership with John Remington Mills , of Milk-street. The prisoner was never allowed to take silk out to dispose of and afterwards account for it; no such practice is allowed - he had been with us between a month and five weeks; we had his character from Mr. Bew, of Newgate-street - he had lived with him about two years; I am quite sure this silk is ours - the lowest value is 9l. 5s. 6d., according to the present price, which is a depression; we both occupy the house - Mr. Mills does not sleep there, but occupies it, and has a right to sleep there; we pay the rent out of the profits of the trade - he has occasionally slept there.

Cross-examined. Q. How recently? A. Within the last six months - he has a room at his service whenever he likes to sleep there: we had a very satisfactory character with the prisoner - we never allow servants to take out silk to show their friends unless by permission; if he had taken this out and brought it back, we should have objected to cut it for him, if it was taken out without permission - our private mark, in our clerk's hand-writing, is on it.

COURT. Q. Had he ever given you any intimation of his intention to take it out to show? A. Not the least; his wages were from 8l. to twelve guineas a year - silk is never taken out to show to friends by persons in our employ.

JURY to WILLIAM HENMAN. Q. Did you know what circumstances Mary Cole was in? A. No - she had a silk gown on, but she said she knew nothing of this transaction, and never asked him to purchase a silk gown for her; I understand her to work in the brush trade - the prisoner's parents bear a good character, but appeared in indifferent circumstances.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-87

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

755. ELIZABETH SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 1 purse, value 6d., 4 sovereigns, and 17 shillings, the property of Thomas William Glover , from his person .

THOMAS WILLIAM GLOVER . On the 19th of March I went to the Cock and Hoop public-house, in Church-street , Stepney, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, to get a lodging; when I had been there about half an hour the prisoner came in - I drank there, but had not been drinking before; I was not quite sober - I was drinking with the prisoner in the tap-room; I had four sovereigns in a purse, and about 1l. worth of silver in my left-hand breeches pocket - we then went up into the clubroom; there was no one there but the boy of the house - we drank part of a pint of beer there, and she asked for some gin; I went down, and got three half-quarterns in a bottle; I left her and the boy in the room, and when I came up again they were sitting on the second pair of stairs - I went into the bed-room with the prisoner and the boy; the prisoner pulled me about - I tumbled on the bed, and the prisoner called to the boy to put out the candle, which he did, and then he came on the bed; I said, "I will get up," and I told the boy to go and get a pint of beer and a light, which he did, and I gave him a penny for bringing it; they then went down - I got up, and missed the beer; I found they had robbed me of my money - I went down, and saw the prisoner and five or six others, who all ran out; I said to the young man, "I think some of you have robbed me;" he said, "It must be the woman who was up stairs with you;" he went and got the Policeman - we followed, and took the prisoner; we found a sovereign and 10s. 7d. on her, but I had lost all I had; it was in a dark canvas purse - she said I had given it her, but I had not thought of giving her any thing.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not come in with two women and sit drinking there? A. I went in with one woman, but she never sat down at all - I did call for a pint and a half of gin; I do not think I asked the landlady if I might go up stairs - I did not give the landlady some money, and say the change would do in the morning; I did not give her money out of my pocket to go to bed with me - I had no money but a sixpence, and which was in the purse; I never asked her to go to bed with me - I never saw Adams in the bed-room.

Prisoner. After Jane Adams had gone down stairs he gave me the money, but what it was I did not know.

JACOB SULAN . My mother keeps the house. I saw the prosecutor come in with two women, who passed as his sisters - they said they would call and see him in the morning; he was not out of the way in liquor when he came in - the prisoner was there before he came in, and he formed an acquaintance with her; my mother told me to show the prosecutor up to bed - I did so; there was no one there at that time - he sent me down for a pot of beer, and when I went up with it, he was gone from the bedroom into the club-room; the prisoner and Adams were there with him - I received the money for the beer, and said that was not a proper place to be in; I blew out the light, and went down - my mother went and turned the two women into the street, and the prosecutor went in the bed-room with me; I do not recollect the prisoner or the other woman being in the bed-room with him, but there is a bed in the club-room, and they had been sitting on it - when the women had been gone a quarter of an hour the prosecutor said he had lost his money; I had not seen any purse in his hand.

DANIEL BRETT . On the 19th of March I was on duty - the prosecutor came and said he had been robbed of 4l. 17s., or thereabouts; I took the prisoner from his description: she was knocking at a door - I took her under a lamp, and found 1l. 10s. 7d. in her hands - she said the prosecutor gave it her, and she said so before the Magistrate; I took Adams, but found nothing on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave him the same money the prosecutor gave me out of his right hand pocket - whether it was gold, silver, or copper I did not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-88

756. ELIZABETH EVERY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 6 spoons, value 50s., the goods of George Mohon , her master .

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE MOHON. I am a solicitor , and live at No. 1, Verulam-buildings . The prisoner came into my service as housekeeper , on the 6th of March last; and on the 23rd I had occasion to part with her, she had the key of a cupboard in which the plate was usually kept; I saw some spoons - I took them up to look at them, and found them in a very neglected state; on examining them, I missed six of them - I think there should have been about thirty pieces of plate: I sent for an officer, who searched her box, and we found a leather purse, with ten or thirteen duplicates, one of them relating to spoons - I said, "Whose are these?" she said, "Your's, sir."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not ordered something for dinner, and she had been longer than you thought necessary, and you ordered her out of your house, and said she should not sleep another night there? A. I inquired the cause of her absence, and she became very violent - I desired her to produce her key, which she did; I told her to pack up her things and leave the house - I did not settle her wages, as I was not certain of the extent of her misconduct; she did not say she had made use of part of the plate, and begged me, as I had money due to her, to take it out; I think I have paid her 35s. since she has been in custody; I had engaged her at eighteen guineas a year - when she came I told her to keep a book, and put down what she bought; I paid the butcher's bills myself; I believe, for the first ten days she was there I dined at home but once, and on that day I had company; I did not hear her say she had pawned part of my plate to pay for the meat - I missed the plate before she said she had pawned it; I think a porter belonging to Gray's Inn was present before the plate was missed; this altercation took place in the kitchen, which I presume was the place where the plate was kept - I gave it into her care, and had confidence that she would keep it in a proper place.

GEORGE PALMER . I am a Police-constable. I was sent for, and found a leather purse, containing many duplicates, three of which relate to this property; I took her into custody - she resisted very much.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she appear sober? A. She was not; she first denied having taken any thing, and when I found the purse she was very violent, and endeavoured to get it from me - she did not know what she was about.

JOHN JONES . I live with a pawnbroker in Theobald's-

road. The prisoner pawned this spoon with me on the 9th of March.

WILLIAM WEIBLE . I am assistant to a pawnbroker in Holborn. I have a spoon, pawned by the prisoner, on the 13th of March.

PHILIP EATON . I am a pawnbroker. I have two desert-spoons, pawned by the prisoner, I believe, on the 13th of March; it was a woman giving her name Elizabeth Morgan - I gave her this duplicate.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have two tea-spoons, pawned by the prisoner, on the 23rd of March.

(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 43. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300415-89

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

757. ELIZABETH THATCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 watch chain, value 4s., and 1 seal, value 6s., the goods of George Prentice Ward , from his person .

GEORGE PRENTICE WARD. I am a journeyman baker . Last Saturday evening I was going down Gray's Inn-lane with a basket of bread - I met the prisoner, who made a snatch at my watch - the chain broke off, I put down my basket and caught her with it in her hand; I kept her till the officer came and took her - I had never seen her before.

RICHARD ROWE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner from the prosecutor - she had this chain and seal in her hand; the baker's basket stood close by him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not touch it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-90

758. WILLIAM SAVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 1 watch, value 3l.; 3 seals, value 1l.; 2 watch-keys, value 10s., and 1 watch-chain, value 1s., the goods of William Carter , from his person .

WILLIAM CARTER. I am a master mariner . On the 15th of March I was going down Ratcliff-highway, and was attacked by three young men in Narrow-street ; I had been drinking, but I can remember what passed: I had a watch, three seals, and two keys, which I had tucked inside the flap of my trousers - they hustled me and threw me down; I received a blow on the back of my head which I did not lose the effect of for three weeks: I perfectly remember there were three of them, and they got my watch, seals, and keys from me, and tore the pocket; a Policeman came up and took the prisoner - I cannot say whether he was one of the men.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS . I am a sailor. I was going down the highway about eight o'clock in the evening, and saw them attack the prosecutor; the prisoner had him by the arm, and I said to him, "what are you going to do with that gentleman?" he said, "What business is that of yours? I know him and am going to take him home" - I crossed the way; they walked on to a street and pushed him down - I ran over and they all ran away; I jumped over the prosecutor, pursued the prisoner, and laid hold of him - he said, "For the love of God let me go, the other one has got the watch, not me;" he struggled very much - but I held him till the officer came; another one came back, and said, "Let him go, you will catch the other yet" - but I held him tight.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am a Police-officer. The prisoner was given into my custody - I found nothing on him; he said, one of the other boys had the watch not him.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked if I had the watch; said "No, I know nothing of it, and never saw the man.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-91

759. ELIZA MONTAGUE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Johnson , from his person .

JOHN JOHNSON . On the 1st of April, at eleven o'clock in the evening I was in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles' . I was not quite sober; three women came out of a court, and wished me to go with them; I refused - I had the lease of a house in my coat pocket; and some silver in my breeches pocket - they took a handkerchief off my neck, and ran away with it; I cannot swear to either of their persons.

JOHN GLUE . I am a Police-constable. The prosecutor said he had been robbed of his handkerchief - I got a candle, and found the prisoner with this handkerchief in her pocket; she said she did not know any thing about it - here is a greasy place in the corner of it, which he had described.

JOHN JOHNSON . I have no doubt this is my handkerchief; it is a new one - and mine was a new one, and has some grease at one corner.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it, and put it into my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-92

760. EDWARD LOWRY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Westoby , from his person .

JOHN WESTOBY. I am a harness-maker . I was in New Compton-street on the 4th of April, at six o'clock in the evening; I had a handkerchief in my coat pocket -I felt some one drawing it; I turned, and found the prisoner with it in his hand - he dropped it; I pursued, took him, and gave him in charge, without losing sight of him.

JOHN SHEEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-93

761. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Augustus Wolston , from his person .

AUGUSTUS WOLSTON . On the 18th of March, a little before seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Bedford-row ; I felt a tug at my pocket, but took no notice of it; I soon afterwards felt it again, turned, and saw the prisoner with my hankerchief in his hand, in a stooping position - I seized him, and found the handkerchief in the road; but I did not see him drop it - this is it; he had it in his hand at first.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along; the gentleman seized me, and asked me to give him his handkerchief, but I had not had it; I am a gentleman's servant, but was out of employ.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-94

762. MARY TOLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 2 silver tea-spoons, value 10s.; 11 copper moulds, value 11s.; 1 tin canister, value 1s.;

2 iron spoons, value 6d., and 2 trowels, value 6d., the goods of Charlotte Latouch , her mistress .

HUGH BEARS. I was butler to Mrs. Charlotte Latouch, of Sussex-place, Regent's-park - the prisoner had been cook in the family for three days, and was discharged on the 17th of March, for being disorderly and in liquor.

WILLIAM LUXFORD . I am a Policeman. On the night of the 17th of March I found the prisoner at a quarter-past ten o'clock, leaning against some rails; I found a silver spoon in her pocket with a crest on it - she was drunk; I took her next morning to High-street, and the Magistrate ordered me to go and search her box; she gave me a wrong direction, but I found her place at No. 2, Little Park-street; she did not tell me it was her lodgings - and no person is here from the place: this is the spoon I found on her person.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Did you take 1l. 7s. from her? A. No.

HUGH BEARS . This is my mistress' spoon.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Is your mistress' married? A. She is a widow; her title is the Hon. Mrs. Latouch - it is her title in her own right, not derived from her husband; there was a person employed under the prisoner as charwoman - this was St. Patrick's day; she was in liquor, but able to walk about - she was not to say drunk; I did not perceive her to be in liquor till she came down from Mrs. Latouch - I did not understand that she gave notice to leave, in consequence of the service being too hard, till Mrs. Latouch told me to discharge her, and I went to ask for some money to discharge her, then Mrs. Latouch said, "I don't think I shall give her any thing, she gave me warning;" the plate is generally kept in the sideboard drawer - the tea-spoons were in the pantry; I do not know that this tea-spoon was left in some wash - it was my duty to take care of the plate; I do not know when I had seen this spoon before; I know it to be Mrs. Latouch's by the crest, which is a star, and I know the pattern.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-95

763. GEORGE RITCHIE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 11 drinking-glasses, value 15s., the goods of the Earl of Aberdeen , and others, his masters .

ROBERT WILSON. I am steward of the Travellers' club-house, 49, Pall-Mall - I am answerable for the plate and property there; the Earl of Aberdeen is one of the trustee s, and there are five others - the prisoner was waiter there for twelve months; I had frequently missed glasses. On the 17th of March I called in an officer, and asked the prisoner to let the officer search his house, in Stafford-place, Pimlico; I went with them, and found these glasses there.

THOMAS PROSSER . I am inspector of the Police I went with the prisoner and witness, and found there two glasses, in a cupboard on the left-hand side - I insisted on searching the bed, and found nine more glasses between the sacking and the bed.

ROBERT WILSON . I had missed glasses of this description, and believe these to belong to the club.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Are you steward? A. Yes; it is my duty to employ servants, but I was not steward when the prisoner was engaged - he has a wife and two children; here is T. C. marked on these two glasses, and they are all the make of the club - there is a housekeeper, but it is my duty to take care of the glass; I have acted as steward for six months - they might have been taken twelve months ago, but I have lost such since I have been steward.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-96

764. THOMAS HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 2 sovereigns, 11 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of William Taylor , his master .

WILLIAM TAYLOR. The prisoner was my errand-boy for four or five months - I was not present when this property was delivered to him.

JAMES BENTLEY . I am in the prosecutor's employ. On the 31st of October, I sent the prisoner with a bill of exchange for 9l., and two sovereigns, and 11s. 6 1/2d., in cash, to take it to Mr. William Taylor, in Wimpole-street - he did not return.

FRANCIS SHEARGOLD . I live with Mr. William Taylor, in Wimpole-street . On the 1st of November, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and brought some books in a bag, and a bill of exchange for 9l., but he gave me no cash.

JOHN MAGNER . I took the prisoner on the 8th of March, in Wigmore-street - he was pointed out to me by a boy; I asked him about this money - he said he had spent 2l. 11s. 3d., and returned the cheque.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-97

765. MARY GEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 watch, value 4l., the goods of Samuel Fisher , her master .

MARGARET FISHER . I am wife of Samuel Fisher . The prisoner was in my service - one of my children found some liquor in a cupboard, and I spoke to the prisoner about it; she insisted on leaving my service -I had, before this, missed a gold watch from a room next the kitchen, to which no one had access but the prisoner and myself; I mentioned it at the time I missed it - she said she did not think it could be lost, nor do I; but when she was going, I said it looked very bad having liquor in the cupboard, and it was very likely she took the watch - she said she would go to her clergy, take an oath, and bring me a letter from her clergy; I got an officer, who took her, and found the watch in her bosom.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer. On the 15th of March, I took the prisoner, and said, I had a warrant to search the house for a gold watch - I asked what part of the house she lived in; she said in the kitchen; I began to search up stairs, and I saw her secrete something in her bosom; I said, "What have you got?" she said, nothing that I should see; she pulled out a small pin-cushion, and said that was it; I still had my suspicions, and forced her down into the street, and into a coach, which I had waiting - she made great resistance, and bit me; I got the watch from her bosom in the coach, and the prosecutor claimed it; she said at the examination that she had taken it a fortnight before, and it was lying on her master's drawers.

MRS. FISHER. This is our watch.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When had you seen it? A. A few weeks before; she found a sovereign one day and brought it to me - I am not in the habit of leaving my watch and money about, nor do I think I did leave the sovereign about; I think it was taken from my bag; the prisoner says she is a widow and has a son - when she first came I heard she was not married; I have since heard she is a widow.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-98

766. JOHN GROOM was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 11 bars of iron, value 12s., the goods of William Hutchons , his master .

WILLIAM HUTCHONS. The prisoner is a fire-wood cutter , and was in my employ. I suspected that a man employed with him had robbed me, and instead of going to breakfast I watched and saw the prisoner take these eleven bars under his arm in this sack, which I know are mine; he had been but a few weeks in my service - when I took him he said he never took any before, and he would take them back again.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that one Penton, who employed him, had desired him to take the iron to the New-road, where he would meet him.

WILLIAM HUTCHONS. Penton is a man I employ to cut wood; he had brought the prisoner to help him; I took the prisoner in Dorset-place, not in the way to the New-road.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300415-99

767. ANN DOUGLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 4 silver spoons, value 20s., the goods of William Hewes , her master .

CATHERINE HEWES . I am the wife of William Hewes - he lives in Boswell-court, Devoushire-street, Queen-square ; the prisoner was an occasional servant - on the 26th of March I went out and left her with a little girl; I had put four spoons in a drawer in her presence, before I went out - I returned at nine o'clock in the evening, and she went away immediately; I missed the spoons on the Saturday at dinner time - I went and asked if she had them; she denied it - as I was coming out she called me back and said she had taken them, and gave me the duplicate.

THOMAS HEDGES . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Drury-lane. I have four spoons pawned by the prisoner on the 26th of March.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-100

768. MATILDA CROOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 12 yards of linen, value 26s.; 1 hearth rug, value 5s.; 2 pieces of carpet, value 12s.; 2 yards of flannel, value 2s.; 2 pieces of calico, value 1s.; and 1 piece of lawn, value 18d.; the goods of Richard Alderson , her master .

RICHARD ALDERSON . I live in Crawford-street, St. Marylebone , and keep a linen-warehouse . On the 9th of February the prisoner came to me as servant of all work ; on the 11th she went out - we had some suspicion and searched her box, where we found this piece of Irish; there was no lock on the box - I sent for an officer, and in the mean time she came home; the officer searched her other boxes which were in the same room, and found this hearth rug, some pieces of carpet, and flannel - we took them down stairs, and asked how she came by them; she gave no answer - I cannot speak to this piece of calico, but the other property is mine, and has my mark on it; I can speak positively to the piece of Irish.

PHILLIP WEBSTER . I am an officer, and found what the prosecutor has stated. I asked the prisoner how she came by the property, and she said it ought not to be hers.

GUILTY. Aged 17. Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300415-101

769. JAMES CASTLE was indicted for that, he on the 6th of March , at Wilsden, a certain building there, feloniously did break and enter, being within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of John Clark , and did steal 9 live same fowls, price 20s.; 2 saws, value 2s., 1 knife, value 3d., and 1 coat, value 1s., his property .

JOHN CLARK. I live at Kilburn, in Wilsden parish ; this building is within thirty yards of my farm house - it is within the fence, and the door is within the yard; I locked it up at eight o'clock on the Friday evening, and at six in the morning of the 6th of March I found it had been broken open, and this property all gone; I lost nine fowls, two saws, a knife, and a coat - the staple of the padlock had been drawn, and put in again.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I met the prisoner at half-past six o'clock in the morning of the 6th of March, in Devoushire-street, a mile and a half, or two miles from the prosecutor's; I purshed him down a narrow passage into Charles-street, and asked what he had in the sack that he had with him - he said, "Some salt beef;" I opened it, and found four fowls, a piece of beef, a knife, and mortice chisel; I asked how he got them- he said he found them on the canal bridge on the Harrow-road, just by the watch-box; this cloth was in the sack, which has a name on it, but it is not in this indictment - this coat was on his back; the chisel exactly fits the marks on the door of the building.

JOHN CLARK . This knife is mine, and the four fowls were part of my nine - this coat is also mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the sack lying in the road with the beef and fowls - I took it up, and the officer took me in William-street.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-102

770. WILLIAM BREMIRE , was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 2 trusses of hay, value 5s., the goods of William Rigden , his master ; and WILLIAM CHERRY and JOSEPH ANSTEAD were indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM RIGDEN . I have a stable in Westminster -Bremire was in my employ as carter for twelve months; I have a small farm at Kingsbury to which 1 sent him on the 6th of April, for twenty-six trusses of hay, which he brought me - Cherry was ostler at the Cock some time ago.

THOMAS SOPER . I am a Police-constable. On the 6th of April I saw the prisoners together opposite the stable of the Bell, at Kilburn - there was a load of hay in the prosecutor's cart, which had his name on it; I saw Cherry come from the hind part of the cart to the side of it, and ask a man who was going by with an empty cart

if he wanted to buy a truss of hay - he said No; the prisoners were then in conversation for ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour - I had known Cherry and Anstead as ostler s at the Bell before this; Cherry then walked ten or fifteen yards from the cart - Bremire got on it, pulled a truss from under the cloth and put it down on the ground; Anstead took it up, and took it into the stable of the Bell - Cherry was within ten yards of the cart, looking sometimes at them, and sometimes at me; I was within three or four yards of the cart - I was dressed as I am now, but had my great coat on; we go on evening duty at seven o'clock; this was just after seven - Bremire then got on the cart, and pulled out a second truss, which Anstead took into the stable; Bremire then put the fore horse to the cart and drove off - the other two remained; I asked Austead to let me look at the two trusses of hay he had taken into the stable; he unlocked the door; I went and looked at them; I pulled a piece out and put it under the bands, that I might know them again - I asked Anstead what he gave for these two trusses; he said he did not know. William had settled for them, by which I understood he meant Cherry, who goes by the name of William - I told him I did not think that he came by them in a right way; he said he did not know, but he did not think it was right himself - I told him not to say any thing to William at that time respecting it; I came out and the door was locked - I overtook the cart, and asked Bremire if he were going to take the hay to the Hay-market; he said "No. to his master's stables in Westminster, opposite the Abbey" - I then returned, and asked Cherry what he had given for those two trusses, and who he bought them of; he said of a person named Ballard, who was in the tap-room of the Bell, and had given three shillings a truss for it - I asked if Mr. Ballard would come and satisfy me of that; he brought Ballard to me - I asked him if Cherry had bought two trusses of hay of him; he said "No, not of him, but he might of his brother' - I asked which way his brother's cart went; he said towards Edgware - I then took Cherry and Anstead, and went and took Bremire at the Boar's-head yard, Westminster; I do not know how many trusses were on the cart - I went to the stable and showed the same trusses to the prosecutor, who said he believed them to be his.

MR. RIGDEN. I received thirty-six trusses, a regular load.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you missed any hay? A. It is impossible for me to miss hay; there is a great quantity of hay like this - I would not swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-103

771. WILLIAM WEAVER was indicted for embezzlement .

RICHARD MANNING . I keep a coal-shed in Goodge-street . The prisoner was in my employ for three months, and was to receive money when he went out with coals, which it was his duty to bring to me immediately.

SARAH CALEY . My mistress buys coals of the prosecutor. I paid the prisoner this bill of 2l. 10s. in the course of last month, by 10s. at one time, and two sovereigns at two other payments.

CHARLOTTE POWELL . I have coals of the prosecutor. I paid the prisoner 1s. 5d. on the 9th of March, for his master, and had no receipt.

EUGENE MURRAY . I took the prisoner - he said nothing till we were going to the office, when he owned he had received 6s. of Mr. Harrison, which he had not paid his master; I told him not to say any thing that might convict himself.

RICHARD MANNING. He brought me 16s. on the 3rd of March, and it appears by this bill that he received 1l. that day - he never paid me this 1s. 5d.; he said the coals were not paid for.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300415-104

772. MATTHEW POOLE was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM SPRATT . I keep the Royal Hospital, at Chelsea . The prisoner was my pot-boy for eighteen months, and occasionally received money.

JOHN PHILLIPS SCARR . I am a Police-officer. On the morning of the 11th of April I apprehended the prisoner in George-street, Chelsea; I told him he was my prisoner for robbing his master - he said he was very sorry, but part of the money he had spent, and part he had lent.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not state what money he was accused of stealing? A. No.

WILLIAM SPRATT. I sent him to serve the clerks at the Hospital with ale and sandwiches; I meant to call him to account the next day, but he left me - none of the clerks are here; I had entrusted him to dispose of these things, and to take the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-105

773. JOHN JENKINS was indicted for embezzlement .

SAMUEL LAHEE . I am an auctioneer . The prisoner was my porter - it was his duty to receive money, and account to me for it.

JACOB CUFF . I know the prisoner: I paid him 4l. 2s. for his master on the 14th or 15th of February , I think: he gave me no receipt - it was merely for a glass, which I took away.

SAMUEL LAHEE. He never paid me that 4l. 2s.; but on the 18th of February, in his way to Marlborough-street after he was in custody, he paid at my office 24l. 8s., which was from a sale at Montague-street, Portman-square.

Prisoner's Defence. I laid out some of the money I received, and paid the balance - what is deficient is my wages, and the men who were employed with me.

MR. LAHEE. The men came to me for their wages, and I refused to pay them till some articles were accounted for - the goods sold amounted to 28l. 2s. 6d., and I received 24l. 8s.; the prisoner and three others were employed there - I think they were there four or five days, at 4s. a day; I desired him not to pay the men, but I think it very likely he did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-106

774. HENRY CLARK was indicted for embezzlement .

CHARLES HENRY GODFREY . I am a shoemaker , and live in North-street, Finsbury-market - the prisoner was my apprentice , and was employed to receive money for

me. On the 1st of April I sent him early to the west-end of the town, to receive a bill at the King's-road ; he absconded, and I did not see him till the next day; I asked why he did not return - he said he had been to the play, and had spent the money; he came to me in January last.

SARAH BUCKLER . I paid the prisoner 7s. 3d. for his master - he gave me this receipt for it.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-107

775. JOSEPH PETTIT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 44 yards of carpet, value 35s. , the goods of Richard Cooper and James Phillips .

JAMES PHILLIPS. I am in partnership with Richard Cooper - we are linen and woollen-draper s, at Charing-cross . On the 26th of February, about twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner go out at the door, with a carpet on his shoulder - I followed, and brought him back with it; he said distress drove him to it - this is it; there are forty-four yards of it.

BENJAMIN BATES . I was standing near the door, and saw the prisoner taken.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-108

776. ELEANOR MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 9 drinking-glasses, value 7s.; 4 ounces weight of tobacco, value 1s., and 23 cigars, value 2s., the goods of Charles Thomas Bigleston , her master ; and JOHN ARCHER was indicted for feloniously receiving the said glasses and cigars, well knowing them to have been stolen ; and CATHERINE SWEARINGEM was indicted for feloniously receiving the said 4 ounces weight of tobacco, value 1s., well knowing it to have been stolen .

CHARLES THOMAS BIGLESTONE . I keep a tobacco shop in Regent-street . Miller was in my service for about three months; I missed cigars, tobacco, and various other things on the 5th of March - I went for an officer; Avis came - we brought down Miller's box; we found some tobacco - in the bottom of it - I then accused her of it, but she strongly denied of it - I asked her if she had not that morning taken a lot of cigars out of the till, and some tobacco; she then acknowledged without any promise or threat, that she had had the cigars and tobacco in her box that morning -I had missed out of one till about four dozen of the best cigars, and various kinds of tobacco; Miller then said she had given them to Swearingem - I had seen a woman about the place, but could not exactly say that she was the person; I had seen Archer at the window, but not in the shop - Miller then said the cigars had been taken to Archer's house at Lambeth; Avis and another officer went there with me - Archer was out, but his wife and Swearingem were there; the women said they had never received any thing from Miller, and Swearingem went to run up stairs. but Avis caught her and pulled her down on the stairs - I found these tumblers and wine-glasses on the mantel-piece, and said I would swear they were mine; Archer came in while we were there - he said Miller had bought the glasses in Regent-street for 7s., and brought them there as a present; about two dozen cigars and a quarter of a pound of tobacco was found up stairs - I would not swear to them.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What did Miller say she had taken the tobacco and cigars for? A. For Archer to smoke - that he had been out of employ for some time; Archer and Swearingem admitted they had received cigars from her; Archer said so as soon as he came in - I pay for Miller's sleeping with Mr. Hancock's servant next door; she told me it was her box; I think it was unlocked - the shop I occupy is under the same roof, but it is partitioned off; there is no private way from my house to the public-house - there is a door which leads to the bottom of their staircase; these glasses are my own- I have a great many cigars sometimes; I had a young lad, my wife's brother, in my shop - it was not very easy to miss a few cigars, but when I went to bed I put them away, and the next morning I went to my till, and about four dozen of the best cigars, which we sell at 4d. a piece, were missing; this was before my brother-in-law was up.

GEORGE AVIS . I went to the prosecutor's; Miller brought her box down - I asked if it was her box; she said Yes - I said I had information that something had been in her box; she denied it - I found the tobaccodust in the bottom of it, and in the evening she admitted she took the cigars; I went to Archer's next day and found his wife and Swearingem - I read my warrant; they denied it, but I found the tobacco there - Swearingem then said that Miller gave it her that morning, and she gave it to Archer who was waiting outside the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Was tobacco. cigars, and other articles expressed in the warrant? A. Yes. Archer said the moment he came in that he had received the cigars a fortnight before.

Miller's Defence. I took my mistress's straw-bonnet to Cranbourn-street, and I asked her to let me go to Lambeth; I took the glasses, cigars, and tobacco then - I said I bought the glasses for 7s., and the tobacco and cigars I had given me.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

ARCHER and SWEARINGEM - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-109

777. WILLIAM MATTHEW PINEREAU was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 1 tea-spoon, value 5s., the goods of Manuel Costa , his master ; and JOHN PRING was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

MANUEL COSTA . I live in Jermyn-street . Pinereau was my errand-boy ; I missed two tea-spoons from the kitchen, and spoke to him about it - he said he knew nothing about it; he had been with me about a week - his mother came and asked how he got on; I said,"I have lost two tea-spoons" - she said, "Call the boy," and I did; she said to him, "Well, Sir, in this house they have lost two tea-spoons" - he said, "I know nothing about them;" she said, "Don't tell stories, I can tell by your eyes you have taken them" - she smacked his face, and he ran away: she went and took him to her own house; and there he said he took them and gave them to another boy to sell.

JOHN MACKINLEY . I sell things about the streets. I met Pinerean, who brought me a spoon on the Tuesday or Wednesday before I was taken; he said, "Will you sell this" - I said, "I do not know, I will see;" he said,"You may as well sell it for us" - I took it to Pring's, and asked his son to buy it; he said, "What do you want?" - I said 1s. 6d.; he asked Pring what he would

give - he said 1s.; I said I would go and ask if the boy would take it - he said Yes; I went in, and Pring gave the 1s. to his son, who gave it to me - Pring said it was the full value of it.

JOHN WEST. I am a Police-officer. I went to Pring's; I said, "You must go with me to the watch-house" - he put on his coat and went; I asked if he had had a spoon of a boy - he said Yes, and given 1s. for it; I took him to the watch-house, went back, and found this spoon.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Then he offered you every facility? A. Yes.

MR. LEE to JOHN MACKINLEY . Q. How many persons were in the shop? A. Pring, two of his sons, and another person. They were all at work; I asked one of his sons to buy it, and Pring said, "Let me look at it" - he said,"I will give you 1s. for it;" I had no share of the 1s. - not one farthing.

COURT. Q. What is Pring? A. He mends shoes. I knew him by living opposite to him.

Pinereau's Defence. Mackinley used to knock at the railing for me, and ask if I had any silver spoons or forks to bring up to him to sell.

Pring's Defence. I never bought any thing stolen in my life; I was busy and my son bought it - I said I did not know whether it was silver, and he went to my son and got the 1s. of him; he had the 1s. of me, but I did not know it.

COURT to JOHN MACKINLEY . Q. Did Pring take the spoon? A. Yes; he looked at it, and gave me the 1s.

Q. How came you to say the son gave it you? A. I gave the spoon to the son, who asked what I wanted - he showed it to the father, who laid it on the place, and gave me the 1s.

MR. LEE. Q. Have you ever been placed in a dock yourself for any offence? A. I was before a Magistrate, but never was here - that was for receiving a handkerchief which another boy had stolen; once I was walking along Berkeley-square, and was taken up for nothing at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-110

778. REUBEN PINFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 5 pairs of shoes, value 15s., and 1 pair of boots, value 5s., the goods of Isaac Brook , his master .

ISAAC BROOK. I am a shoemaker , and live in Cranbourn-passage . The prisoner was my apprentice - I had another apprentice, named Cauntley; the prisoner had been with me about two years - I have missed a great many shoes, but I cannot say when I missed them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many apprentices had you? A. Six, and I have now four - the prisoner lived with me till he was taken into custody; he had not been applying for his discharge; I had a foreman there, and some journeymen who worked out of doors.

PETER TURNBULL TATE . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. On the 27th of August I received two pairs of women's shoes, and on the 19th of October, two pairs more - I do not know by whom they were pawned, but"Reuben Pinfield" is on the duplicate.

FRANCIS SHIRLEY . I live with a pawnbroker in Compton-street. I have a pair of boots, and a pair of shoes, pawned on the 12th of June, and the 3rd of September -I do not know by whom.

JOSEPH OSTELL . I am a constable. I received charge of the prisoner, on the 29th of March, at his master's - I found some duplicates on him, all of which related to his own property, except one for a pair of women's boots; Cauntley went with me to the pawnbrokers.

JOSEPH CAUNTLEY . I am apprentice to the prosecutor. I know Mr. Bertrand's shop in Crown-court; I have been there with Pinfield, to pawn a pair of shoes of my master's; I went in with him, and he gave me part of the money, which we spent - I went to Mr. Perryman's with a pair of boots of my master's; we pawned them, and I had part of the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-111

779. JAMES KEATING and THOMAS BAMFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 13 pairs of shoes, value 30s., and 6 pairs of boots, value 20s., the goods of Isaac Brook , their master .

ISAAC BROOK . I am a shoemaker . The prisoners were my apprentice s - they left more than half a year ago; while they were with me, I lost a great many boots and shoes.

MICHAEL COMERFORD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. I have two pairs of boots and three pairs of shoes, pawned between the 1st of July and the 19th of September, by a man in the name of Jenkins - I do not know whether it was either of the prisoners.

SAMUEL HASLOCK . I am a pawnbroker. I have five pairs of shoes, pawned at different times, I think by a much taller person than either of the prisoners.

EDMUND GOODFELLOW . I am apprentice to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker, in Long-acre. I have three pairs of shoes - I cannot say who pawned them.

JULIUS HOCKLEY . I live at Mr. Newby's, a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of women's shoes, and two pairs of boots - I cannot tell by whom they were pawned; they are in the name of John Jenkins.

JOSEPH OSTELL . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to take the prisoners at Somers-town - Bamford said, "I suppose you will want Jem;" he said, Yes - he said he lives in Chapel-street, and showed as the house he lived in.

JOSEPH CAUNTLEY. I know the two prisoners - I have heard them talk of pawning shoes in the name of Jenkins; I did not tell my master - he was in the country at the time; I did not tell him when he came home - they gave me money not to tell, and threatened me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-112

780. WILLIAM ARMITAGE and JOSEPH ARMITAGE were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 2 fishing-nets, value 2l., the goods of Moses Gibson , being in a certain boat upon the navigable river Thames .

MOSES GIBSON . I am a fisherman , and fish in the river Thames. I left my nets under the stern of my boat, facing the Ship public-house, at Hammersmith , on Sunday-night, the 4th of April, and missed them on Monday morning; I know the prisoners - they are fishermen, but seldom work on the river Thames; I saw my nets on the Wednesday - I heard the prisoners were about the river.

WILLIAM PEARCE . I am a fisherman. The officer set me to watch one house, while they searched another - I saw William Armitage come out of his own house with two nets, and before I came up to him he put them down;

he went back, put on his hat, and went out; the officer took him - I said they were my brother's nets.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Then he came out and went in again? A. Yes.

JOSEPH DICKENSON . I am a constable. On the 7th of April I went and took Joseph Armitage , and searched him: I then went to take William Armitage , and placed Pearce to watch, who said he saw him come out of his house, and put down the nets; I said to William Armitage, "I want you" - he said, "For what?" I said,"For some nets;" he said, "There are some I have put down, and you may look at them;" I said to Pearce,"Are these your brother's?" he said, "No, but I believe they belong to Gibson, of the Godspeed;" Joseph Armitage came down, and I asked who they belonged to- Joseph Armitage said they belonged to him and his mate, and that they bought them of a donkey-man that morning.

Cross-examined. Q. You found nothing on Joseph? A. No - I went into the room where he was in bed; I told him what I came for, and he afterwards came to his cousin's house (the other prisoner) - William Armitage said he had some nets there, and they stated how they got them before the Magistrate; they said they paid 12s. for them.

MOSES GIRSON . This is a flounder-net, and this a smelt one - they are worth about 2l.; I am licensed by the Lord Mayor.

Joseph Armitage 's Defence. We all work nets alike up and down the river - we have been brought up to fishing as he has.

MARIA ARMITAGE . I am sister of Joseph Armitage. I was at the top of the alley with him on Wednesday week, when he bought a net like one of these of a man who had a donkey and two hampers - I lent him 12s.; I do not know what he gave for them.

COURT. Q. How much did they pay a piece? A. They were to pay 6s. a piece - I did not know the donkey-man; they bought them not half a dozen yards from my brother's door; the officer came about twelve o'clock I went before the Magistrate, but I did not speak - I had never seen the man before; it was about half-past eight in the morning when they bought them - I am usually in service, but left my place last Saturday fortnight; I lived with Mr. Avis; the donkey had two baskets - one had the nets, and the other something-else; they came to search for Pearce's nets - they were taken out to dry, I believe; I do not know whether they were opened when they were bought - the donkey-man said they belonged to some one who was dead, and he could sell them cheap.

William Armitage 's Defence. The man said he had them to sell for Martin's people, who were dead - we leave our nets out, and lose none.

WILLIAM ARMITAGE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

JOSEPH ARMITAGE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-113

781. HENRY ROSE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 6 live tame rabbits, value 10s. , the goods of James Stephens Bullock .

JAMES STEPHENS BULLOCK . I live at Millfield-lane, Highgate . On the night of the 5th of February I had seven tame rabbits - on the morning of the 6th I was informed some were gone; I went and missed a buck, a doe, and four young ones - I have seen the buck and doe, and they are here now; one is red, and the other is black- I have no doubt they are mine; the young ones I understand were killed.

WILLIAM MACKEGG . I had the care of these seven rabbits. On the 5th of February I left them safe, at seven o'clock in the evening, in the shed where they were kept; it had been fastened, so that they could not get out themselves - in the morning, about seven o'clock, the doors were open, and the rabbits gone; they had only to turn the button and take them out - they had taken a doe, a buck, and three young ones, and one laid dead at a little distance; I have seen the buck and doe since - I believe them to he the prosecutor's; the doe has a bad eye, which she had not before.

WILLIAM HENRY PALMER . I am a turner. The prisoner brought the young rabbits dead to my place, and the other two alive; I said they should not be at my place, and he took them away - I believe this back and doe to be the two; he said he had been to Highgate for them.

Prisoner. I went to his house several times. and on the Saturday morning these rabbits were there - he told me to go and sell them for him. Witness. No, it is not true; I took him home to lodge about a fortnight before, as he was out of work, but he had not slept there that night.

JAMES BLACKEBY . On the 6th of February the prisoner came to my house, about eight o'clock in the morning, at Middlesex-mews, Stafford-street; he asked my wife to buy two rabbits - I was not at home; he came again when I was - he said he wanted 6s. for them; I said I could buy them cheaper at the market - he came again, and I said I would give him 1s. 6d. a piece for them; he took it, and I asked him what he was going to do with the butches - he said they took him a great deal of time to make, and they were worth 15s.; I said I could not give that.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I found these rabbits at the witness' house; I apprehended the prisoner at Unionball, when he was about to be discharged for the Duke of St. Alhan's robbery - I said I took him up on suspicion of the robbery; he said Yes - I shewed the rabbits to the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. The man employed me to sell them; I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-114

782. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 1 truss of hay, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Cunnington , his master ; and JOHN BATES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

THOMAS CUNNINGTON . I am a butcher , and live at Hampstead . Brown was my carter - I have a little farm at Child's-hill; I ordered Brown to come to my house on Monday morning, the 23rd of March, at five o'clock, for a load of dung, to take to the farm, which he did; the Policeman afterwards came and asked me if I had sold any hay to Bates - I said No, I have not seen the hay since; Bates had seven cows, and they have eaten it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then you saw

no hay at all? A. No - I should not know my hay from any body else's; I grew it.

PHINEAS BUTTLER . On the 23rd of March I was on duty at Frogwell, between the prosecutor's shop and his farm - I heard a cart stop early in the morning, and saw Brown pass me with a truss of hay on his back; I said to him, "Good morning;" he said he was going to Bates', and some more was coming - I went to see that he took it to Bates', who is a cow-keeper; he did so, and came away without it - I then went to the cart, and saw it was Mr. Cunnington's - I took the name of it, and then went to the prosecutor's; he was gone to Smithfield-market - I did not see Bates.

Cross-examined. Q. Where Brown got this hay you cannot tell? A. No - I did not see him take it from the cart; Brown was at liberty till one o'clock that day, when I took him.

COURT. Q. How far was he from the cart when you saw him? A. One hundred yards; I did not say any thing to him then, but at one o'clock I said, "You are my prisoner" - he said, "What, about that little bit of hay?" I said Yes.

JOSEPH MORRS . I saw Buttler, and went and took Bates; I said I apprehended him on suspicion of having received some hay belonging to the prosecutor - he said had I got the old man; I said, "You will see him in a few minutes;" he said he did not care, he gave the full value for it.

Brown's Defence. I never received a farthing for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-115

783. EDMUND COLLISS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 coat, value 6s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 half-sovereign, 2 half-crowns, and 1 shilling , the property of Sergeant Bold .

SERGEANT BOLD. I keep a smith's-shop in Little Wild-street . On the 30th of March the prisoner, who is my son-in-law, took away a suit of clothes and 16s. of mine; I found them at Bow-street - I had seen them three or four days before; I missed the money from a small box in the cupboard.

ANN BOLD . I am the prisoner's mother. I left the place in his care on the 30th of March, and was out from morning till evening - when I came home he was gone, with the clothes and money.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I produce the coat, waistcoat, and trousers, which were pawned with me on the 30th of March, by the prisoner, for 12s.; he had brought the same things before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 10.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300415-116

784. HENRY WALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 4 carriage-glasses, value 2l., and 1 carpet, value 2s. , the goods of John Spinks .

JOHN SPINKS . I am a coach-master , and keep my coaches at the Bull, at Kingsland . On the 12th of March I lost five glasses out of different carriages; the Policeofficer came and asked me if I had lost any - I went to look, and missed five; they had been right at two o'clock in the morning, when one of the carriages came in - I know nothing of the prisoner; I fitted the glasses which were found into the frames, and they fitted exactly, and appear to be the same kind of glass, but I cannot swear to them -I can swear to the carpet and the check-string; there were four glasses brought in - this carpet has a loop to button on the carriage, and this string has a knot in it, which I tied myself.

WILLIAM WEBB . I am a coachman, and had the care of one of these carriage; I drove in one of them at two o'clock in the morning - all the glasses were quite safe then - I put up the blinds the last thing, and all was right.

WILLIAM CHURCHILL . I am the Police-officer. I was on duty on the 12th of March, and saw the prisoner with these glasses, down a court, about ten minutes before six o'clock in the morning; this handkerchief and carpet were tied round them - there was nobody else in sight: he was taken to the watch-house, and he then asked for the handkerchief that was round the glasses - that was before we knew what was in the handkerchief.

WILLIAM WIRE . I am a private watchman. I went down the court, and saw the prisoner; as I came up again I saw these glasses up against a door - I told the witness to stop him as he came up the court.

Prisoner's Defence. The Policeman stopped me, and the watchman went down the court to see if there was any thing there; the Policeman said, "Is all right?" he said Yes - I went on, and they came again and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-117

785. THOMAS TOMKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 2 umbrellas, value 20s. , the goods of William Storer .

WILLIAM STORER . I am an umbrella-maker , and live in Ratcliff-highway . I lost two silk umbrellas on the 24th of March, between three and five o'clock in the afternoon; I was from home at the time they were taken.

Cross-examined. Q. When had you seen them before they were taken? A. Within a week - I had not attended to my shop that day.

MARY ANN STODDART . I am the prosecutor's niece. I was in the parlour, and saw a man in the shop - I looked up, thinking it was a customer, and he ran out with two umbrellas in his hand; I ran after him - he was running as fast as be could; they cried Stop thief! and he dropped the umbrellas; a person took them up, and gave them to me - the person who dropped them ran away, and I did not see him stopped; there were several pursuing him - I took the umbrellas and went in: I think the prisoner is the man who was in the shop, but I cannot be certain - I saw him in custody five or ten minutes afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. You were in the back parlour? A. Yes; the shop is not very large - the door from the shop to the parlour was open; I was sitting with my face to the shop, and was working.

MARY ELIZABETH MAY . I live opposite the shop. On the 24th of March I saw the prisoner go into the shop - I am sure he is the man; I saw him come out with two umbrellas on his arm, and run away with them - I was running over, and saw Stoddart when I got on the curb.

Cross-examined. Q. How wide is the street? A. I think about twelve yards; our house is directly opposite: I swear the prisoner is the man - I do not know that I had seen him before.

JOHN RIGG. I am a Police-officer. I was in Back-lane, near Ratcliff-highway, and saw a great number of persons mustering; I went up, and found the prisoner, who had dropped down, surrounded by the people - I took him on the place, and brought these umbrellas; I found nothing material on him.

Cross-examined. Q. He had not the umbrella in his possession? A. No; I understood he had dropped them, but I did not see that.

MARY ANN STODDART . I gave Rigg these umbrellas.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-118

786. THOMAS RAPLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 saddle, value 3l., and 4 bridles, value 2l. , the goods of William Anderson .

DONALD ANDERSON. I am the son of William Anderson - he is a job-master and horse-dealer . On the 21st of February our premises were broken into, and these bridles and saddles were taken from the counting-house, where they were safe on the 20th, between five and seven o'clock in the evening, and at half-past nine the next morning I knew the place was broken, and the articles were gone - the bridles have not been found; I know this saddle by the maker's name.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have no other mark on it? A. No - the maker is Mr. Hall; he is an extensive maker.

WILLIAM KAY . I am in the prosecutor's service. I fastened his premises up about twelve o'clock at night, on the 20th of February; there were four saddles there then, to my knowledge; a man called me up between five and six o'clock next morning, and told me the premises were open - I came down, and found it was so; the door had been unlocked, and thrown open - I went into the counting-house, and missed the bridles; I did not miss the saddle: there were three saddles on the horse - I cannot swear to this saddle.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you not thrown down the keys to the farrier? A. Yes, between five and six o'clock in the morning, and then I went down and found the doors open - whether he opened them or not I do not know.

COURT. Q. How soon after you threw down the keys did you go down? A. Not three minutes; he called to me for the keys, and then said the door was open.

JOHN MUNDELL . I am a Police-officer. On the 21st of February I stopped the prisoner in Holborn, carrying this saddle, concealed under his great coat, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; I asked what he had there- he said a saddle, his own property, which he got from Mr. Biggs, at Brixton - I said I knew Mr. Biggs; he then said, "I brought it from my own place, at Brick-street;" I was going there, but a man met me, and I went with him to the prosecutor's - I found a pane of glass had been cut out of the window, and some one had got in; the door opens with a spring lock; a person not so stout as the prisoner could have got in where the pane was out - I took the saddle to Mr. Anderson.

Cross-examined. Q. Then it is clear the prisoner could not have got in the window? A. I do not think he could- I cannot tell whether he got it from any one else.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had met a man in Piccaditly, who employed him to carry the saddle to Holborn, where he would meet him.

JURY to MR. ANDERSON. Q. Do you swear positively to the saddle? A. Yes; I do not believe any one has blue girths but us - I swear positively this is the saddle we lost.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-119

787. JAMES WITHERS and EDWARD LAYTON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 pair of cart-springs, value 20s., and 1 pair of coach-springs, value 30s. , the goods of Edward White .

EDWARD WHITE . I had a cart taken from my premises in Half Moon-alley, Bishopsgate , and some coach and cart-springs stolen on the 6th of March - I had seen the cart in the yard on the Saturday evening; and the springs were in a cupboard - I know the springs are mine; but the cart I can say nothing to - it was there for hire.

RICHARD RUCK . I am a coach-maker in the prosecutor's employ - I left the shop on Saturday evening, the 27th of February; the cart was then on the premises -I had not seen the coach-springs for some months; on the Sunday morning, I went there about ten o'clock, and missed the cart and springs, which were fixed to it; on the 6th of March, I was in Willow-walk: and saw the cart-springs for sale - I went into the shop, and saw the coach-springs there: I thought. perhaps the cart-springs were the prosecutor's, but I was not certain, till I saw the coach-springs, which I know, though I had not seen them for three or four months - they had been in a cupboard; Layton worked for the prosecutor as a wheeler - he used to come with his work.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. On the 27th of February you saw the cart safe? A. Yes, the coach-springs were not missed, till I saw them in Willow-walk; the cart springs were fixed to the cart - there was one end of them broken off; I know the coach-springs by having them in my hands, not by any mark; I cannot tell exactly when I saw them - it might be a month before Christmas; I did not say at the office that I knew them by the colour.

COURT. Q. Was the cart taken, as well as the springs? A. Yes.

JOSEPH BARTHOLOMEW . I am a coach-wheelwright, and worked for the prosecutor - I know nothing of the springs; but I know Layton the wheelwright, and I believe the other is a smith. On Saturday night, the 27th, the cart was there safe - we locked it up, and carried the key to Mr. White; about a quarter-past ten o'clock the next morning, I heard the cart was gone - I went up Willow-walk and saw the cart-springs, which I knew by being broken at the end, and having a hole in them -I had seen them in the same state before, and I believe these are the springs.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not that a common place for a cart-spring to break? A. They break in various places; it certainly is a common place for them to break.

MARY SHUTTER . I keep a shop in Willow-walk. James Withers came to sell these springs to me on the 6th of March; he was then alone, but when he brought them, the other prisoner was with him; when he first came, he had a coach-spring in his hand, and asked what I would give him for them; I said 14s. a cwt. was all I could

give - he said he had a pair of cart-springs with the scroll irons on; I said I would not give more than 15s., if they were ever so good - I bought them of him; he said they were his own, and that I had bought of him once before; I supposed he carried on business on his own account.

Cross-examined. Q. And he left them there openly? A. Yes, there was no concealment about them; it is common for smith's to have iron to sell - he gave me his right address; and left part of it against the gate - he said, "I will get a truck and bring the remainder;" it is old metal, and would be worth nothing without being re-forged.

JOHN EDWARUS . I am a carman and work for Shutter - I was at the gates when Withers came and offered some old steel for sale.

WILLIAM CURTIS . I am a turner, and live in Willowwalk; I let out trucks. On the 1st of March I was out, and when I came home one of my trucks was let out - it was brought home afterwards, but I do not think by Withers; on the 2nd of March I bought these coach-springs, which I gave the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Are not these common old springs? A. Yes, they are commonly sold as old steel.

CHARLES HAGLEY . I am a Police-serjeant. On the 8th of March, I went to Rodney-court, Chapel-street, Curtain-road, found Withers, and asked him if he knew about the springs sold to Mr. Shutter; he said he did, and he did not care, as he knew where he got them - I followed him into the room, as he came undressed to the door, and then I found the other prisoner; they both dressed, and went with me without hesitation.

JAMES BROWN. I am an officer. I went with Atfield on the 6th of March, and found all this property, except these coach-springs - I went on the Tuesday to Rodney-court; I searched the back room on the ground floor - I took out the stove, and found this skeleton-key behind it.

WILLIAM ATFIELD. I have nothing to add, but going and finding the other springs at Curtis.'

MR. WHITE. I know these are mine - they had been put away with some other old things in a closet; I cannot tell how long they had been there.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear to within six months? A. No - I have been a coach-master many years; these articles were put by till we wanted them - I will swear I have seen them within three years, because the carriage they belonged to has been broken up within that time; I may have seen them within three months.

COURT. Q. When was the carriage broken up? A. I cannot tell, as I have not my books here.

Withers' Defence. I merely sold them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-120

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

788. JOSEPH SANDERS was indicted for feloniously forging a certain receipt for the sum of 42s. 1d., in the name of John Winterborn , with intent to defraud George Offor and others .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud different persons.

FIVE OTHER COUNTS, charging him with uttering the same with the like intentions.

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH ORTON . I am the wife of John Orton - in 1828 we lived in Whitecross-place, Finsbury; I know my husband was indebted to John Winterborn - I first saw the prisoner about June or July, 1828; he came to our house, and said he called for a debt due to Mr. Winterborn; he had a book once when he called - he came several times; in March 1829, in consequence of receiving a paper, I went before the Commissioners of the Court of Requests, in Osborne-street, Whitechapel, and saw the prisoner there - he demanded the utmost the Court had jurisdiction to order, which was 1l. 19s. 6d., for Winter-born; I told the Commissioners I wanted to know where Winterborn was, and that Mr. Sanders would not tell me - he did not tell me then; the Commissioners asked if I acknowledged the debt; I said I did - they said no one could take it out of Court but Winterborn, and directed me to pay it; I paid two half-crowns by instalments, and paid the rest to Wellan afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How came the Commissioners to say nobody could take it out of Court but Winterborn? A. Because I wished to see him - the prisoner had demanded it for eight or nine months before I was summoned; I attended the Court for my husband.

HENRY WELLAN . I am a beadle of the Court of Requests. I went to Orton's house with a process, and received from her 34s. 6d. and 2s. 7d. costs.

THOMAS BILTON . I am a clerk of the Court of Requests, Osborne-street, for the Tower Hamlet. On the 2nd of January the prisoner applied at the office to take out some money; I asked for his ticket; he gave me a reference to a book in which the entry was made - he said the money had been paid in for John Winterborn ; I asked if the plaintiff was in the office - he said he was waiting; on referring to the book, according to his direction, I told him the whole debt and costs were paid, and amounted to 2l. 2s. 1d., together - I wrote a receipt, and told him it was ready; he called out, "John Winterborn, come forward and sign the receipt" - a man came forward from a number of people up to the counter; I said, in the prisoner's hearing, "Is your name John Winterborn?" - he said Yes; I handed him the receipt on a two-penny stamp, and said to him, "Is this your debt" - he said Yes, and signed the receipt, and then drew back among the crowd; I took up the receipt, and placed on the counter 2l. 1s. 7d., deducting 6d. the Court fee - the prisoner took up the money.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known the prisoner as being concerned in that Court before? A. He calls himself an agent or collector of debts - I cannot say whether it was, or was not, Winterborn who signed the receipt; I have known the prisoner in the habit of receiving debts for persons before - they are frequently received by collectors or agents.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Is it the custom of the Court to pay money to any body but the plaintiff? A. No; unless the plaintiff comes to sign the book it is not customary, except by order of the Commissioners, then it may be paid to any body.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is it usual for collectors or agents that are known, to receive debts? A. Never, unless by

direction of the Court while they are sitting. The consent of the Court would appear on the books; my book is not here - when we take a stamp receipt, the book is not signed; I should pay on production of a power of attorney, but not without a legal instrument - we have no jurisdiction out of the Tower-hamlet.

Q. The words "Tower-hamlet" are scratched out of this receipt - who was that done by? A. I do not know - I believe they were not struck out when it was signed; I wrote it - it is customary sometimes to write it on receipts; it denotes the jurisdiction of the Court - those words were not on the receipt at the time it was signed; it was an cmission - it is not always written; it must have been put in, I think, after the receipt was signed, because it was supposed not to be so correct - I think I put the words in after it was signed; I know I did on re-consideration - I do not know exactly when I put it in; I first observed it struck out two or three days ago - it has been in the custody of Mr. Laing, the attorney; I do not know when it was delivered to him - before he had it, it was in a drawer in the office, which the clerks had access to in office hours; I keep the key - I wrote in the words "Tower-hamlet" since the prisoner has been in custody, as I conceived it was an omission on my part before; I did not do it to injure the prisoner - sometimes it is omitted and sometimes put in; I do not know who struck it out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-121

Before Mr. Justice Park.

788 JONATHAN OAKES and JONATHAN PLUMMER were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 clock, value 20l., and 2 vases, value 5l., the goods of the Duke of St. Alban's , in his dwelling-house .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, varying the description of the dwelling-house.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS & CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

ANN SNOW . I was housemaid to the Duke of St. Alban's. On the 13th of February I was at his Grace's seat, at Holly-lodge, in the parish of St. Pancras ; the yellow drawing-room is on the ground floor, even with the conservatory, which is entirely of glass, and opens into the garden - I cleaned out the yellow drawing-room between eleven and twelve o'clock that day; there was then a cutglass clock, and two cut-glass vases on the marble-slab, facing the glass-door which leads to the conservatory - any person in the garden could see through the conservatory into the room, but could not see the property; after cleaning the room I fastened that glass-door and put the key in its proper place - I also locked the door leading from the conservatory into the garden; I locked that door from without - the yellow drawing-room communicates with another drawing-room, and that door I also secured; his Grace was not residing there at the time, and I had not occasion to go to the yellow drawing-room again till the following Monday, when I accompanied Bostick to the room - the door leading to the drawing-room was then closed, but not locked; the door leading to the yellow drawing-room was closed, and the window shut and fastened - the vases and clock were gone, and the glass shades which covered them were moved from their places; I found one window of the conservatory open - that is on the ground, and could be entered by a person without; it appeared to have been pushed open - it slides sideways; those windows were all shut on the Saturday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not a man belonging to the establishment taken up? A. Yes, a gardener named Henry Hockley; he was dismissed before this circumstance; I do not know of his having been tried this Session.

JOHN CARPENTER . I am head gardener to his Grace, at Holly-lodge. On Sunday, the 14th of February, I was in the conversatory for about a quarter of an hour; the doors, window, and every thing were closed and safe then.

JOSEPH BOSTICK . I am under gardener at Holly-lodge. On Monday, the 15th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I discovered that the conservatory window had been slided back, and the door communicating with the yellow drawing-room was forced open by cutting the wood away from the lock - I observed footsteps outside the conservatory just under the window which was drawn back, and just within the conservatory on the border was another footstep; that was about two yards from the yellow drawing-room door - I went to the kitchen and told Snow, who accompanied me to the spot.

WILLIAM KILSBY . I am a broker and appraiser, and live at Brentford; I have known Plummer several years. On Monday, the 15th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the parlour of the Halfway-house between Knightsbridge and Kensington - my horse was at the door; Mrs. Brain and lvemey were also there - while I was there the prisoner Plummer came in; he said he had taken the liberty, seeing my horse at the door, to come in and inform me of some articles he knew of for sale - he said they were the property of a gentleman who had been speculation in the funds and was ruined; that an acquaintance of his, who worked for the family, had the selling of them, and they were to be sold a great bargain, and if I would give him two guineas be would take me to where they were to be sold - he did not mention what the things were; he said they asked 10l. for them - I then left my horse at the door, and went with him to the Lamb and Flag, James-street, Oxford-street; he left me in there while he went to see if the person was at home, as he told me - he returned in three or four minutes with the prisoner Oakes; I had never seen him before - he introduced him as the person who had the selling of the things; Oakes said he had the selling of the articles - that they were the property of a gentleman who had been speculating in the funds and was ruined; that he lived in a square close by - he took me to his house, in Gee's-court, and showed me two vases and a clock; the clock had been taken to pieces; two of the glass pillars were broken, and it was in such a state I could not ascertain whether it was all there - I asked where the glass shade of the clock was; Oakes said it was kept by the gentleman, to prevent his disposing of his property being noticed, and he had put a figure of Hercules under it; he said there would be a set of mahogany chairs, and two feather beds to he disposed of by the same gentleman - we returned to the public-house, and he then asked me 10l. for the two vases and clock; I told him they were not worth it, and declined buying at that price - I hid him 5l. and went away - I returned to Knightsbridge, and had got within one hundred yards of my horse when Plummer overtook me, and

said they had been to the gentleman, who was very much in want of money, and if I would give him the two guineas I was to have the articles for the 5l. - I told him I had been considering of it, but as I was not satisfied the whole of the clock was there, I would give him 10s. then and 1l. if it turned out to be all there; we then returned to the public-house in James-street - Oakes was there; he agreed to take the money, and we went to Gee's-court; Plummer stopped behind to mind my horse, which I had taken with me to the public-house; I and Oakes went into his house, in Gee's-court - he lent me a basket and some wrappers; Plummer then came and I packed them up - I told him I must have a receipt for the money - they got a stamp and Plummer wrote the receipt for Oakes, as he said he could not write; Plummer asked him if his name was not Langston; he said Yes, and Plummer wrote that name; here is the receipt - (read) "February 15, 1830. Received of Mr. Kilsby 5l. for a time-piece and two vases. Jonathan Langston ". Oakes made the cross to it; I paid the money, and took away the articles; I put the money on the table, Oakes' wife took it up, and said he had better leave it at home, as he was going to return to the public-house - Plummer went with me to Oxford-street; I changed a sovereign, gave him 10s, and went home - I applied to Trail, a watch and clockmaker, at Brentford, to repair the clock for me, and on the Saturday I pawned the clock and vases for 6l. with Mr. Butcher; I heard nothing more till a Police-officer applied to me on Wednesday, the 24th, while I was out; I went to the Castle, at Brentford, by Butcher's direction, and met the Duke of St. Alban's steward - a gentleman who had repaired the clock, and Curtis, the officer, came in; they were the persons I expected to meet - Curtis took me into custody, and made inquiry of me; I went with him to Oxford-street - I rode my horse and Curtis drove a gig; we went to Oakes' house, in Gee's-court, and the first person we met was Plummer, at the door, just going out - that was before we had got into the house - I said,"Oh, you are the man I want," he then endeavoured to escape - I seized him, and called for the officer to come up, and gave him to the officer; we then went into the house, and found Oakes laying on the floor in a blanket - there was a female there; they were playing together, and I think he was rather in liquor - I told him I wanted him; he asked what for; I said "The clock you have sold me is stolen;" he denied having sold me a clock - Curtis came up. and I gave him in charge; Plummer was in hearing at the time - Oakes said he had never sold me a clock; we took them into custody - I went before Mr. Swabey, at Union-hall; Curtis said I was still to consider myself in custody, and the Magistrate remanded the case; I was kept in custody till the Wednesday following, when the case was proceeded in - Mr. Chambers set me at liberty, and bound me over to give evidence.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it true that you took Oakes to the Police-office? A. I took Plummer; I seized him first; I might have gone away myself if I had liked, for I was in my cart, and took Plummer in it - I considered myself with the officer, and in custody certainly; he said, I must consider myself in custody - I remained in custody a week all but a day; I have been a broker all my life - I have been in business thirteen years; there were some persons in the room at the Lamb and Flag, but not that I knew - I should think they were near enough to hear our conversation; the young man at the bar saw us together - I am not aware whether he could hear our conversation; his name is Greg - he is here.

Q. How came you in the conversation not to ask what the things were you were to buy? A. I deal in every kind of articles; he described them as articles which he took me to see - I did not ask what they were; I bought them to sell again, and I considered I was giving the fair value for them in their then state - the clock was repaired before I pawned it; Plummer said he had not the money, or he would purchase them himself - I have not got the account from the clock-maker for the repairs; I did not tell him where I got them - he asked me no questions on the subject; Oakes was rather tipsy when he was taken, but not to be stupified; I do not know where the Duke of St. Alban's lives.

THOMAS IVEMEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Brain, a carrier, at Brentford. On the 15th of February I saw Plummer at the Halfway-house - Mrs. Brain was there; Kilsby was there before Plummer - when Plummer came in he called for a glass of porter, and said to Kilsby, he was the very man he wished to see; that he had something to buy, but had not enough money himself - it could be bought for 10l., and if Kilsby would go with him, he would show him where it was to be bought; I heard nothing further - I was dining on one side of the room; I got up, and left them there - I went to Kilsby's house afterwards; he called me in to show me the bargain he had purchased of Plummer - he showed me a clock with a cut-glass face; I saw the stand and the vases.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you waiter at the house? A. No; a carter - I have known Kilsby nearly fifteen years; I spoke to him at the house, we dined together -I think it was on the Wednesday that he showed me the things; it was two days after I saw them together; the glass work of the clock stood there; nothing was broken to my knowledge, not to my recollection - it was standing upright.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the clock there, or only the glass work? A. I saw no clock.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am in the employ of Mr. Butcher, a pawnbroker, at Brentford. On the 20th of February Kilsby pawned this glass, clock and vases for 6l. - I do not know the intrinsic value; I considered they might he worth 10l., or considerably more, for what I knew - I afterwards saw the Police-officers, and went with them to Kilby's; he was not at home - I left a message at his house; he came down to me the same day,(Wednesday, the 24th) I had some conversation with him, and he went with me to the Castle, where these gentlemen were.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you made no inquiry of him about the clock? A. No, he wanted 15l. on it; I have known him two years, ever since he has been in that house.

ALEXANDER SMART . I am a watch-maker, and live in Chapel-street, Grosvenor-square. I know this clock and vases to be the property of the Duke of St. Alban's; I had to clean the clock for the Duke, and marked my own

name on the dial-plate - I consider the clock worth 30l.; there is a glass top goes on it.

MR. PHILLIPS to WILLIAM KILSBY. Q. Were the glass pillars, the chrystal underwork, perfect when you bought them? A. No - two of the pillars are broken, and the clock was all to pieces; the vases were complete - I consider the value of the vases four guineas the pair new; I have seen a pair close by, much handsomer for four guineas.

EDWIN TRAIL . I am a clock-maker, and live at Brentford. The works of this clock have been in my care - it was then all to pieces; in the state it was I should not think any body could ascertain whether it was perfect or not - I had it on the 15th of February to put the stand together, and set the works in a going state.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you the chrystal work? A. No - I afterwards fastened it on the chrystal work; I have no idea of the value, never having seen one of the description - I never asked Kilsby where he got it.

JOHN CARTER . I was in the service of Kilsby, and accompanied him to London when the prisoners were taken - I was present when Plummer was being conveyed to Union-hall, and on the road he said he did not know what he was taken for, or what he was going upon; Kilsby told him it was about the clock - he said he did not know what clock, he had had nothing to do with any clock; and afterwards, as we were going down Regent-street, he said, "I had nothing to do with it, you know, I only recommended you - I did not know it was stolen, any more than you did; you gave me 10s., and the other one gave me a crown;" I asked him if he meant the man in the other gig - he said, "No, don't swear any man's life away, I did not say he was the man;" I said, "No, you did not say so - I only asked you if he was the man" -Kilsby, Plummer, and myself were in one cart, Curtis, his man, and Oakes in the other; there was no officer in our cart - Plummer said if it was perfect when it was put together, Kilsby was to give him 1l. more.Cross-examined. Q. He said this openly before you? A. Yes.

JAMES GREG . I am servant at the Lamb and Flag, Oxford-street. I saw Kilsby at Martin's house - there were two others with him; I know Plummer to be one, but cannot say whether Oakes is the other - I did not hear their conversation; there were other people in the tap-room, but whether in their company I cannot tell.

ROBERT CURTIS. I am an officer. In consequence of information of this robbery I went to Brentford, on the 24th of February, with Mr. Harrison, the Duke's secretary, and Mr. Smart - we went to a glass-shop, and from there to Butcher's, and found the clock and vases; I went to Kilsby - he was not at home; we went to the Castle, and Kilsby came there - I told him he must consider himself in custody; he accompanied us to Gee's-court, Oxford-street - we there found the prisoners, and took them- Oakes asked what he was apprehended for; I told him for selling a stolen clock - he said he never had a clock and never sold one, and that he was not worth 18d. in the world.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he sober? A. He was the worse for liquor, he was tipsy; there is a marine-store shop at the house in Gee's-court.

Plummer's Defence. I am totally innocent; I never saw the things till they were in Oakes' shop, and never had them in my possession - I met Kilsby and told him I had seen such articles for sale, and 20l. was asked for them; Oakes told me it was left at his shop for sale by some people - I was not present when it was sold, nor when Kilsby bargained for it.

RICHARD HUMPHRIES . I am a carpenter, and lodge in Gee's-court, in the same house as Oakes. I saw him on Saturday, the 13th of February last - I think it was about a week before he was taken up; I saw him on Sunday, the 14th, about half-past twelve o'clock, when he left the house to go to dine, as he generally dines out on Sunday at his mother's - he slept at his own house on the Saturday night, for I saw him at half-past eleven and twelve o'clock that night, and again about eight in the morning, at his own door; he came in on Sunday night, about half-past eleven o'clock - I let him in; he had nothing with him, I am certain - I saw him go into his own room; I saw him again about half-past seven in the morning, but I spoke to him about seven o'clock, and he answered me from his bed.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When did you first see the clock and vases? A. I never saw them at all.

MARIA TURNER . I am married, and live at No. 9, Waterloo-road. I lived in New-cut, Lambeth, on the 13th of February. I was in company with Oakes on Sunday, the 14th of February, from four o'clock in the afternoon, till half-past ten a might - I was at his wife's mother's, No. 9, Prospect-place, St. George's-fields, and took tea with her; he was there the whole time.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you been acquainted with him? A. Twelve years - he was in my husband's employ eight years out of that time; it was not the last eight years - he was our ostler: since that I believe he has been in the bird-fancying and brokering trade; we lived at Bath, and let out carts to fetch coals and things; he carried on the bird-fancying and brokering in Westminster-road some part of the time, and I believe he was in the same capacity in Oxford-street - I have been at his shop in Gee's-court: there is no shop of his there now; he sold birds there - I have seen birds and cages; he dealt in ironmongery, I believe, there - my husband has been dead fourteen years; since that I have lived with my father in the New-cut; he was living in Waterloo-road, and is a broker - I always understood Oakes to be married.

Q. Who was at his wife's mother's? A. The wife, her mother, myself, and Oakes, those were the only persons there in the course of the evening - I believe he had dined there; he usually dines there on Sundays - I was told he had dined there; his wife's mother is not here - I have not seen her this fortnight; I believe she was well when I saw her.

COURT. Q. How many years is it since he went by the name of Langston? A. I never knew him answer to any other name but Oakes.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am a tinman, and live at No. 8, Gee's-court, and have known Oakes three or four years - he bore an honest character.

COURT. Q. What was his trade in Gee's-court? A. He kept an open shop, sold ironmongery and brokery - there were birds in his place when he was apprehended;

I never knew him go by the name of Langston. I saw these things on his counter on Monday, about the middle of the day.

ANN PLUMMER . I am the prisoner's sister-in-law. On the 13th of February he resided with us at Old Brompton, No. 4, Prospect-place - he spent Sunday, the 14th of February, at our house after dinner; from two o'clock on Sunday afternoon, till nine o'clock on Monday morning, he did not leave our house.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You dined at two o'clock? A. He did not leave our house after two o'clock - I cannot say we dined exactly at two - we had a roast loin of pork for dinner; we did not dine together; he occupied a different apartment - his wife prepared his dinner; it was a roast leg of pork; he was out of business at the time - he came to our house in December, and during that time has been out of business; he has been a green-grocer - he was in the habit of going to town every day to attend to business as a broker, when he had business to do; I never saw Oakes - I did not see Plummer at all on this Sunday; I heard him conversing with his wife and family - we were in bed about ten o'clock; my room joins his - I did not see him go to bed; I heard him go up stairs with his wife, and heard him fasten their door - we were all in bed before ten o'clock; we took nothing together - we lived distinctly separate; a friend called to see him about eleven o'clock in the morning - he left before dinner; nobody called in the evening to my knowledge - I did not hear any body; he has four children; I did not see him from Sunday morning till Monday night.

WILLIAM FRANCIS PLUMMER . I am the last witness' husband, and Plummer's brother. On Sunday, the 14th of February, he was at my house, and on Monday morning I left him in the house, about nine o'clock, when I went out.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had he lived in your house any time? A. From about the middle of December; he occupied part of my house till he could get a convenient shop - he was looking out for a shop; he had quitted business, except going to different sales - I am a broker and appraiser; he carried on the business of a green-grocer and coal-dealer, at Chelsea - my name is not over my door at present, as the house has been repaired; the name never has been there - I only went there the beginning of December; I have the lease of the house - I could not begin business there till I got my premises repaired; I do no business at home, but attend sales - I opened a shop about a fortnight back; there has been a calamitous fire opposite my house, and four people burnt to death - the children lay at my house, and my time has been taken up with them, and the gentlemen of the parish, who are making a collection for the sufferers, and I have not been able to attend to business; I have sold a few articles in my shop - I expose goods outside and inside; the house has only had one coat of paint - if I had not been waiting for the decision of the fire-office, about the paint being damaged, the name would have been over the door; the fire was last Monday fortnight - my brother and I were very good friends till five or six days previous to his leaving my house, which was on the Friday after the 15th; he had then suited himself if with a house in Thomas-street, Oxford-street - I did not know of his having an acquaintance named Oakes or Langston; I never knew my brother live in Gee's-court - I know Gee's-court; it is full of old iron and broker's shops - I do not know one in particular; I did not go before the Magistrate - I heard my brother was in custody two or three days after it happened, and went to Union-hall, to state that he was at my house, but was prevented by an officer from going in - I told him I came as a witness, and Mr. Malham, a broker, at Chelsea, was there; he is an acquaintance of both of us; he went with me to prove he knew him, and Mr. Butt, a broker, was there, merely to prove he knew him - my wife did not go; we dined by ourselves on Sunday, and my brother, his wife, and children by themselves; I dined about half-past one or two o'clock, and had a loin of roast pork, and my brother had a roast or baked leg of pork; he supported himself by disposing of some of his property till he could get a shop; he had carts and two horses, and sold one horse while with me, to a butcher at Chelsea, I believe - we had quarrelled on the Friday evening, and did not dine together.

COURT. Q. Whose hand-writing is that (the body of the receipt)? A. I cannot say; I have seen my brother write; I will not swear it is not his hand-writing - it is something similar to his writing; he writes very bad - if I could see the name signed I could tell whether it was his;(looking at the signature) - I cannot say whether this is his writing; it is very much blotted; the J. appearslike his, but as for any other letter I cannot say; the most I have seen of his writing was signing his name - I do not believe the body of the receipt to be his writing; the name Jouathan seems like his writing, and I believe it to be his - I never heard him mention the name of Langston.

Prisoner Plummer. When I was asked to write the receipt there was another person in Oakes' shop, who I considered I was writing the receipt for.

NOT GUILTY .

The prisoners were detained, to be indicted as receivers.

Reference Number: t18300415-122

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

789. WILLIAM GARDNER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Isaac Denning , from his person .

ISAAC DENNING . I live at Bishop's Stortford, and am a perfumer . On Tuesday morning last, about a quarter to one o'clock, I was on Fish-street-hill , and felt a pressure behind me, and somebody treading on my heels - I looked round, and the prisoner rushed from behind me; he crossed the road, and under his coat I saw a small part of a handkerchief, which was the colour of mine; I followed and caught him; I think he had a companion, but he must have run a contrary way - I laid hold of him immediately, and found my handkerchief on him; I know it was safe not two minutes before - he said he did not take it; he had passed it from his coat into his trousers while he was running - I found it there, and took him to the watch-house.

THOMAS KILBY . I am the street-keeper, and received the prisoner in charge - he said nothing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up just by the Monument.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-123

790. JAMES TUCK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 3 coats, value 5l. 10s.; 1 pair of gaiters, value 4s. 6d., and 1 pair of trousers, value 1l. , the goods of George Randall Whittingham .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE RANDALL WHITTINGHAM . I keep a tailor's shop , at No. 52, Cheapside , and live at Islington. I missed this property on the 8th of February; I had a boy named Lancashire in my employ - he is about sixteen years of age; I discharged him on the 9th, as I had repeatedly missed property; in consequence of a communication from Mr. Bugg, the prisoner was taken into custody on the 19th of February - I had Lancashire apprehended the same evening; Mr. Bugg produced to me a surtout coat, a black coat, an olive frock coat, and a pair of trousers, which were my property - I had seen them safe on the 6th, and missed them on the 8th.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You missed goods on the 8th, and dismissed Lancashire in consequence of that? A. Yes - he was discharged on his examination; he was not examined as a witness before the Alderman.

JOHN BUGG . I am in the employ of Messrs. Spinks, pawnbrokers, Gracechurch-street. I produced three coats, a pair of gaiters and trousers, which were pawned on the 8th of February, by the prisoner for 35s. in the name of John Thompson; I am certain of him - on the 10th he brought some more things which I detained.

RICHARD STATHAM . I am a constable. On the 19th of February I accompanied the prosecutor to Mr. Stokes, a batter's shop next door to his own; I found the prisoner and took him into custody - I asked where he got the clothes he went to pawn: he said he had pawned nothing - that he had been to pawn them, but they were stopped: I took him up stairs, and found in his box five duplicates, and on his person 12s.; I have no duplicate dated the 8th of February - he told me the clothes were given to him by John, the boy next door, that alluded to the clothes the duplicates were for - he said he had them from John; that the first money he had from John was 5s., and afterwards he had 2s. - I asked if he did not know they were stolen; he said after the first time he did think so, but at first he did not.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he had received them from John and pawned them? A. Yes, he had received them of a morning before his master came to the shop; that he received them at Whittingham's shop from the boy, and went from there and pawned them; I understood him that when the two were cleaning their windows, John gave them to him; he said he received them at the door.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Lancashire gave me the property to pawn; he said they were given to him instead of wages - I did not know they were stolen, or I should not have pawned them in my own name.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-124

791. JAMES TUCK was again indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 19th of February , 1 waistcoat, value 12s., and 2 pairs of gaiters, value 8s., the goods of George Randall Whittingham , well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. WHITTINGHAM. The prisoner lived with Mr. Stokes, next door to me; I missed property, and on the 19th of February I went with the officer, and was present when the prisoner's room was searched; under his pillow was a pistol loaded with bullets, and in his box two pairs of gaiters and a black velvet waistcoat, which are mine, and in the pocket a set of buttons, which I am quite positive are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it was his bed-room? A. He was there, and his master said in his presence that it was; he did not contradict it - Lancashire slept at my place; how the property got away I cannot tell.

RICHARD STATHAM . I accompanied the prosecutor, and saw the prisoner in the shop - I went up to his bedroom with him; his master pointed it out - I found these things in his box; I asked whose they were - he said they were his own; that he had the gaiters from his mother.

Mr. WHITTINGHAM. I am positive these articles are mine, but cannot state when they were safe; they were never sold.

Cross-examined. Q. How can you tell that? A. By my books. My foreman and the boy occasionally serve; if they sold them they ought to account for them - I have no private mark on this waistcoat; I missed one - I had had three or four like it, and I know these buttons which are in the pocket.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How can you undertake to identify the buttons? A. Only from having some similar. I will not swear the waistcoat has not been sold; we sometimes sell buttons - I know the gaiters, and they are wanting in the stock; they have not been worn - I can swear to my workman's work; I believe he works for no other people.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-125

792. GEORGE HERBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 28lbs. of butter, value 2l. 2s.; 1 butter-cloth, value 1s., and 1 basket, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Hill .

JOSEPH HILL. I am a salesman at Newgate-market . On the 17th of March this flat of butter stood in my window; I saw it safe ten minutes before it was taken - I do not recollect seeing the prisoner near the shop; I saw the flat again in ten minutes and knew it.

THOMAS LITTON . I am shopman to Mr. Jennings, of Newgate-market, about forty yards from Hill's. On the 17th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I went to a customer's cart with a flat of poultry, and on returning saw the prisoner coming along, carrying this flat of butter before him, which is an unusual way; I watched and saw him turn up a court into the market - I followed him, and when I got to the corner of the court he was in the act of having it lifted on his head; I asked what house or where he got that flat from - he said, what business was that of mine; I pulled it off his head, opened it, found it contained butter, and saw the dairyman's note in it, which is not usual when it is sold - I saw by that who it belonged to; I said to the boy,"Keep this man till I return" - I made haste to Hill's, and on coming back the prisoner was gone: a boy directed me down St. Martin's-le-Grand; I found him up a court

there with the flat of butter in his possession, and gave him in charge.

GEORGE WEBB . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge with the butter; he asked what I thought would be done to him - whether he should be transported or not; I said it was impossible for me to tell.(Flat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of selling sponge about; I came to Newgate-market to sell some, and met a man who said "Old man, will you earn 6d. to carry this flat as far as the New Post-office?" - I said Yes; I met this young man, who asked me what I had there - I said it was nothing to him; the man who was rather before me then went on - this young man left me for ten minutes; I went to the Post-office - the man was not there; I staid there till the young man came up- I could have run away and left it, if I had got it dishonestly - I described the man to the officer; he said he thought he had got his companion in custody.

GUILTY . Aged 53. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-126

793. CAROLINE WALTERS was indicted for stealing on the 13th of March , 1 sovereign, 5 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the monies of William Pearce , from his person .

WILLIAM PEARCE. I am an agent for the sale of woollen goods , and live in Church-row, Bethnal-green. On the 13th of March, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I lost my money; I had spent the evening with some friends, at the Grapes, in Smithfield, and drank some wine, but was quite sober - I was in Steers'-court, Barbican ; I saw the prisoner just before I reached the end of the court - she was alone; she caught hold of my arm, and asked where I was going - I said home, and endeavoured to get from her, but could not; I found her hand in my right-hand waistcoat pocket - I am certain I had two sovereigns, and 16s. in that pocket when I left my friend: I never consented to go with her -I felt her hand in my pocket, and endeavoured to get the money from her, but could not; I called the watch, and gave her in charge - the money was not then in her hand; the officer searched her at the watch-house, but could not find it - a stricter search was made; I saw a sovereign and 6s. taken from her month - I found 10s. left in my pocket, which made up the 36s.

JURY. Q. At what time did you leave the Grapes? A. About ten minutes before I met her; it was a company of private friends - no strangers were in the house.

SAMUEL SEAGER . I am a superintendent of the watch. The prisoner was given into my charge by Pearce, who said he had 36s. in his pocket before he met her; I found he had 10s. left in his pocket - I asked the prisoner particularly what money she had about her; she said a sixpence and 2d. - I searched her very minutely as I thought, but found nothing; he was positive about it - I touched her cheek, and heard the money jink in her mouth; I took hold of her throat, and immediately she discharged from her mouth a sovereign and 6s; she endeavoured to swallow it as I thought - Pearce had been drinking, but was perfectly sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I can safely say he gave me the money going along, and said he would go with me - we went up a court, and he afterwards wanted to take it from me; I would not let him have it, and put it into my mouth to take care of it - he thought it was in my hand, and bit my finger.

SAMUEL SEAGER . She had received an injury on her hand; she said nothing at the watch-house about the money being given to her.

WILLIAM PEARCE. I never consented to go with her I scratched her hand, but did not bite her.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-127

794. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 12 pamphlets, value 9s. , the goods of Frederick Waller .

JEREMIAH CLARKE . I am shopman to Mr. Frederick Waller , a stationer in Fleet-street . On the 26th of March, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came in (he has come there for the last six weeks for sheets of paper;) he was about five minutes in the shop, and asked for a sheet of brown and a sheet of writing paper - they are kept on separate sides of the shop; I did not wait on him, but observed him secreting some pamphlets under the sheet of paper; he was leaving the shop - I stopped him at the door, and twelve small pamphlets were found on him; I told him he had been there the last night and took some - he said, "If you let me go, I will pay you for those I took last night;" I saw him shifting them under the paper.

THOMAS SMALES . I am apprentice to Mr. Waller. I stopped the prisoner at the door, as he was going out; he had these twelve pamphlets under the brown paper he had bought - he gave no account of them.

Prisoner. Q. Was I leaving the shop or standing at the counter? A. He was at the door, in the act of going out.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went for two sheets of paper, which are kept at different sides of the shop - I had to cross the shop to fetch the writing paper, and folded the brown paper to make a sort of portfolio to put the writing paper in, and laid it on these books while I got the money out of my purse to pay; a person came in to look at some cards, which laid by the books - I drew the paper towards me, and these pampblets with it; I was in the act of putting them back when this young man seized me.

THOMAS SMALES. He was not putting them back - he had gone from the counter with the books, in the brown paper in his hand; he was a yard and a half from the counter, full - he did not intimate that this was the case then.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300415-128

795. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 canvas wrapper, value 2s., and 93 yards of carpeting, value 11l. , the goods of Ebenezer Harvey .

ARCHIBALD HARVEY. My brother, Ebenezer Harvey , lives in Bow-church-yard . On the 1st of April I missed this carpet from the warehouse; I went out, and saw the prisoner with it on his shoulder, in Bucklersbury - I collared him, and charged him with the robbery; he said some person had given him a job, and he did not refuse

it - he did not describe the person; I placed the carpet in a warehouse, and told him he must go to the Mansion-house; he said if I would let him go he would go quietly, and as I crossed towards the Mansion-house he closed in with me, and broke my umbrella in two - I would not let him go; he bit my fingers, and gave my arm a twist - I was obliged to let go, and he ran off; I kept within a yard of him, and gave him a blow on the head, which rather stunned him - a person came before him, stopped him, and lodged him in the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of White Lion-street, Whitechapel - a man came up, and asked if I wanted a job, and said he had a large parcel to carry out of the City; I went with him to near the church - he told me to stop while he went and brought this carpet; he gave it to me, and took my hat in his hand - he gave me the bat again immediately, before this gentleman came up.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-129

Fourth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

796. CHARLES ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 watch, value 30s. , the goods of John Fox .

MARY ANN FOX . I am the wife of John Fox. On the 24th of March I took his watch to pawn in Gilbert-street ; a young man looked at it, and gave it to another, who laid it on the counter - the prisoner and another young man were in the box; the prisoner snatched it up, and ran away with it - I had never seen him before; I saw him about ten minutes at that time - I am quite sure he is the man; the watch was brought to me the next morning.

ROBERT MUNKITRICK . I am a Police-officer. On the 25th of March, at night, I was on duty, and found the prisoner in Parker-row, Deptford-road, in bed - I found the watch there; he told me he took it from a lark, and meant to take it back the next morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he intended to return the watch to the prosecutrix, who had previously sold him a duplicate and knew him.

MARY ANN FOX . I had not sold any duplicate to him- I did not know where he lived.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18300415-130

797. ELIZABETH PETERS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 1 tea-kettle, value 5s. , the goods of William Mickey .

ANN LEARY . I am servant to Mr. William Mickey, a publican . On the 12th of April the prisoner was in the kitchen, and I turned her out; I then missed the teakettle, which I had seen ten minutes before - I followed the prisoner, and found her with it in the street, under her cloak, and the lid of it in her black reticule.

EDMUND ROACH . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner - she begged me to take her before the owner of the kettle, which I did.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Eight Days .

Reference Number: t18300415-131

798. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 20 yards of silk, value 3l.; 1 muslin collar, value 10s.; 4 yards of satin, value 8s.; 6 yards of ribbon, value 2s., and 3 pairs of socks, value 1s., the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , his masters .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT BEMAND . I am superintendent of the establishment of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross, at Knightsbridge - the prisoner was in their employ as confidential shopman . On the 26th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come from the warehouse with a parcel under his arm; I followed him on to Piccadilly, and then desired to know what he had in the parcel - he observed, his coat only; I said I was not satisfied with that, and wished to see what was in it; he then said some linen as well - I said I was not satisfied, and desired him to walk back with me to the warehouse; on reaching the warehouse I found the articles here produced, and some linen, in the parcel - the piece of silk was in his pocket; the articles are worth at least 4l. 10s. - he said he could not account for them; they have my private mark on them, and are the property of my employers.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What is a confidential shopman? A. He was a man who had been in the employ some time, and we had confidence in him - I have no part in the concern; the warehouse is connected with the house - he came out at the private door; I followed him I think about a mile - I am quite sure he said he had a coat in the parcel; he did not say the goods had been purchased by a customer.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He said he could not account for their being there? A. He did, sir.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was there a band found in the parcel? A. There was a black silk band - I do not know whether it is here.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a Police-man. The prisoner was given into my custody - I received these articles in a bag from off the table at Mr. Sewell's; I have not seen the band.

MR. CLARKSON to MR. BEMAND. Q. Did you hear the prisoner's defence before the Magistrate? A. He made no defence; he has not stated from whom he received the band, nor mentioned it to account for the possession of them - I have produced all the property belonging to Sewell and Cross; I will swear it has never been paid for, and I swear it has not been sold - if it had it must have been paid for, and it is not down as paid in our books, which are here; all our people are not here -I have not heard that they had been paid for with a 5l. note, which has been traced to the Bank; if these goods had been sold and paid for, it certainly would have been down in the books, but I had observed the goods concealed nine days before they were carried from the house- I did not tell the Magistrate this; I know Miss Priestly- the Magistrate would not allow me to state any more; he said I had stated sufficient - I said I had suspected the prisoner for some time; he said, "There is no occasion to go further" - that was my way of attempting to tell him the goods were concealed; I do not know where

the band is - I have done nothing with it; it was not in the bag, it was in his pocket - he took it out, and I laid it on a chair; I believe the officer took it - I saw him take the goods; I have not heard the prisoner state that his means of defence were the production of that band.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it the custom of your shop to enter immediately any articles that may be sold? A. Yes, and if the prisoner had sold these goods, it would have been his duty to have entered them; I have brought the books to show there is no such entry - I told the Magistrate what I have stated to day, about finding the goods, and he said there was no occasion to state more; I saw the prisoner given to the officer - he gave no account of the goods.

MR. PHILLIPS to JOHN JOHNSON. Q. Did you hear him give any account of the property? A. No.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What did you do with the band? A. I did not have it.

Prisoner's Defence, (written). On the subject of the charge on which I now appear before you, I declare most solemnly that the goods had been purchased by Mr. Root's, between one and two o'clock on the day before, who begged that I would take them home for him, as he was going to Hammersmith, and did not expect to return till late - I took the goods into my bed-room, where they remained until the Friday evening; I should have gone home on the Thursday evening, as I promised Mr. Roots, but felt myself very unwell, and, therefore, remained at Knightsbridge - had those goods been taken dishonestly, it is not very probable that I should have allowed them to have remained so many hours in a place to which nearly forty persons had as free access as myself; and had Bemand suspected me, as he says he did, there is no reason on earth why he should not have searched the room, and found the goods, many hours before, in preference to waiting until I went out in the evening. Again, when he accosted me in Piccadilly, did I not voluntarily return back with him? Is it probable that I would have done so, or that I would not have made some attempt to have got away, if I had come dishonestly by the goods? Certainly not - I knew the goods had been paid for, and therefore, I had no hesitation in returning. The reason why I did not make this statement before the Magistrate, and detail to him the way in which I became possessed of the goods, and by whom, and when they had been purchased, was by the advice of my attorney, Mr. Hart; because, he found that Bemand and Chillicombe were endeavouring to get up other charges against me; and that considerable property had been taken from my wife's residence, which these persons swore to, and that, therefore, my committal for trial was a matter of certainty. I took his advice, and made no defence.

ROBERT ROOTS . I am a broker, and deal in silks. I went to Sewell and Cross' ten days or a fortnight before this - I saw the prisoner, and asked for a pattern of this silk; he said there were twelve or thirteen yards of it -I said, "Put it by for a day or two, I think I know a customer for it;" I called in about ten days, bought it, and also this black silk to match a band - I left the band and all these goods which I had bought for the prisoner to bring home; I took an order from a lady in Cannon-row, Westminster; I bought this satin for trimming a bonnet- these socks are for my own children; I have the bill here, which the prisoner made - it is 4l. 17s. 5d.; I paid him a 5l. Bank note; I took the number and date at the time - it is 4,220, September 17, 1829; I paid it on the 25th of March - I said I was going to the Camden Arms, and from there to the Hand and Flower; I asked him to take them home, and he said he would if he could - we do not live far off.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Of course you told him not to involve it in any secrecy? A. I said nothing about it; I did not take them, because I was going further - this article is for Mrs. Davis, and the other for Mrs. Perkins; they very commonly give me orders to buy silks for them- I have dealt in silks twenty years; they live in our house - I do not think they are here; they are both married - this is a collar for Mrs. Davis: a number of the shopmen were present when I bought these goods, and I believe Mr. Bemand was there; I do not know whether he was behind the counter or not - the prisoner took the note, and brought me the change; he was to bring them to No. 9, Sutton-street, Soho; I am not a housekeeper now - my house is pulled down; I am lodging at No. 21, High-street, Bloomsbury - I do not keep any stock of silks; ladies employ me on commission to buy silks, and I get a profit on them - I generally call on them; Mrs. Davis had seen the pattern of this silk before - this ribbon was my own choice; I had a stock of some thousands of pounds, but I have been a bankrupt unfortunately - I did not tell the prisoner to say he could not account for having the things.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You told him to take them to your house? A. It is a common every day occurrence for me to call on ladies, to ask if they want any thing, and I give them a little accommodation; this is the pattern the lady had seen - it has been in my possession; coals, wine, and silks are often sold by persons who never have a stock of them; I did not say any thing about what the prisoner was to say - the band was Mr Perkins', and I left it with the prisoner - it has not been returned to me; I went out of town on the Friday, and did not know the prisoner was in custody.

JOHN BEETON . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I have a 5l. note which came into the Bank on the 10th of April - it is No. 4,220, dated the 17th of September, 1829; it has a name on the front of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who paid it in? A. I do not know; I did not take it in.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It might have been in a hundred hands? A. It might.

ROBERT ROOTS . This is the note.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for 14 Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-132

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

799. THOMAS RYDER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 3 pints of brandy, value 10s. , the goods of the St. Katharine Dock Company .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD BAXTER . I am superintendent of the Police at the St. Katharine's Docks - the prisoner was employed there as a watchman . On the 1st of March, about tea minutes past two o'clock, he was about to leave the premises; when they were ordered to take their hats off, he put both his hands to his hat, and took it off in a very careful manner - I suspected all was not right, and went to him; I asked what he had in his bat - he held up a corner of a handkerchief, with white spots on it; I at

tempted to put my hand into his hat - he instantly put it on his head; I asked what he had there - he answered,"A mere nothing;" I said, "Show it to me:" he said,"I will after the others are gone;" the others went, and then I asked him what he had - he begged of me for God's sake not to look at it, as if I did it would rum him for ever- he was brought into the room, and I found a bladder, containing eleven gills and a half of brandy; he said he had it given to him by a person on board a ship, whose name he did not know, and he begged very hard to be set at liberty; he told me I was too strict, and why should I be so severe upon him; I took him to the Magistrate - there were a great number of hogshead of brandy on the quay; it was foreign brandy - I cannot say whether it was the same sort as that in the bladder: the bungs of the brandy-casks were open that day.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I suppose brandy is of different qualities? A. Yes - I believe the whole of it is white till it is coloured; I believe the casks were afterwards guaged - I cannot tell whether there was any short; there were ships in the dock which brought brandy - I do not know that it is common for persons to go on board the ships to have liquor; I have never seen it done there, but have in other docks.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there not a rule to prevent persons taking things from ships as presents? A. Yes; he said it was given him by a person on board ship, but he did not know his name.

FREDERICK TASHMAKER . I am a clerk in the superintendent's office. I was present at part of this transaction; this is the bladder - I put the brandy into a bottle.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it offered me on the quay by a sailor; I refused it, and he said, "I will put it in such a place for you" - I took it from there, and put it into my hat to carry it out of the docks.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

There was another indictment against the prisoner, which was not tried.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-133

800. THOMAS MYLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 coat, value 18s., and 1 knife, value 6d. , the goods of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH . I am ostler to Mr. Harrison, of Blackfriars'-road . On the 24th of February I went to bed, the prisoner came home in the dead of the night, and went out again very early in the morning - he sleeps in the same room with me, but has nothing to do with my master's yard; when I awoke in the morning I went down stairs, and when I came up I saw my waistcoat pocket turned inside out, and missed my coat - I called the person who sleeps with me, and we went in search of the prisoner; I never lent him my coat, and have never found it since - I found my knife on him.

BENJAMIN MARSDEN . I am an officer. I was called to take the prisoner; we took him to the watch-house - he sat down in a chair - I told him to get up to search him, and this knife was in the chair.

JAMES SMITH . This knife is mine, and was in my waistcoat pocket, with 2 1/2d.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300415-134

801. JAMES MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 umbrella, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Moore and Francis Moore .

EDWARD WILSON . I am shopman to Thomas and Francis Moore, umbrella-maker s, of St. Martin's-court . -On the 8th of March this umbrella was lost, but I did not see it taken; I went out, and took the prisoner with it a door or two from out shop - it had been inside our door.

CHARLES DEWING . I am a Police-officer. I saw the prisoner with Wilson, and took him into custody; this is the umbrella - it has the ticket on it now; he said he took it on purpose to get a home, for he had had no food for a day and a half.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-135

802. CHARLES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Farrind .

THOMAS DIXON. I am servant to Robert Farrind - his stable is in Little Park-street-mews . On the 6th of March I was returning to the stable - I saw the prisoner with his back to the door, about four yards from the stable; I had left my coat in the stable - he asked me for some name; I said no such person lived there - he turned away, and I saw he had my coat on his back; I thought it was mine, turned to the stable, and missed it - I overtook him in St. James'-park; I told him I wanted my coat; he said, "What coat?" I said the one he had on; I took him - this is my coat; he had nothing to do with my stables - I had not been away four minutes, and left the door latched.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-136

803. RICHARD LAW and JOHN SHEARMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 4 brushes, value 5s., the goods of George Furby and another .

ROBERT BARNES . I was in Whitechapel-road on the evening of the 9th of March; I saw the two prisoners in company - Law took the brushes, which hung about half a yard from the prosecutor's door-post; Shearman was next door at the time - another lad had been with them; Law gave the brushes to Shearman, and I took him with them - I gave him to two young men, and ran after Law- I called to two constables, who took him.

GEORGE FURBY . I am in partnership with William Wilson . These brushes are ours, and were hanging on a book on the door-post - I had never seen the prisoners.

Law's Defence. I never took them.

Shearman's Defence. I was running along, and some person passed me - he threw something down, which I took up; it was these brooms.

The prisoners received a good character.

LAW - GUILTY . Aged 16.

SHEARMAN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300415-137

804. CHARLES HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 3 candlesticks, value 5s. , the goods of John Gosney .

JOHN GOSNEY . I live at Lisson-grove . On the 28th of March the Police-officer brought the prisoner to my house and searched him; I saw one of these candlesticks taken from his hat - the officer had two in his hand: I had seen

them safe about six o'clock that evening - this was about half-past one.

WILLIAM ELLIOTT . On the morning of Sunday, the 28th of February, I was going up Princes-street, and saw the prisoner and twenty or thirty young men with him; I went up and saw one of these candlesticks sticking out of his coat; I asked what he had got; he said a candlestick, and he was going to get a light - I felt, and found it hard- I found this candlestick under his coat; I said, "This won't do;" he struck me, and tried to get away - I seized him, and knocked at the door; another officer came to my assistance, and we got him in - he was very violent, and struck me again; I was forced to hold him down on the ground while the other officer searched him.

RICHARD KNIGHT . I was with Elliott - what he says is correct.

Prisoner. This is the first time, and I hope you will look over it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-138

805. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 6 reams of paper, value 22s. , the goods of Lucinda Vidler .

JOSEPH SMITH . On the 5th of April, at twenty minutes before eight o'clock in the evening, I was walking with my wife in Marchmont-street , and saw the prisoner and another person walking before me; there was a chair at a stationer's door, with a large bundle of paper, and a small one on it - the other person took the small bundle, and the prisoner took the large one; I followed him, and saw an officer - we went after him to Guildford-street - he saw we were following him, and threw the paper at our feet; I never lost sight of him till we took him.

HENRY BITT . I went with Smith, and took the prisoner.

MARY VIDLER . I am the daughter of Lucinda Vidler . This is my mother's paper, and was just outside our door; there were two smaller parcels, which are lost.

Prisoner's Defence. A person ran by and dropped this parcel; I was running along, and some persons took him, but they let him go and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-139

806. THOMAS GOODALL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 4 loaves of bread, value 1s. 4d. , the goods of William Fountain .

JANE WILLIAMS . Mr. William Fountain keeps a chandler's-shop in St. John-street, Westminster . I was in his parlour, and saw the prisoner come into the shop on the 27th of February - he took the loaves, and went off; I told my husband, who took him with them.

WILLIAM PATMORE . I received the prisoner in charge about forty yards from the shop, with the bread - he said he was very hungry, and intended to take but two of the loaves, and that the other two stuck on them - I went to his master, a butcher, who gave him a very good character.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very hungry, and had no food for two or three days.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-140

807. SARAH GRIFFITHS and RICHARD PERRARA were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 2 drinking-glasses, value 2s. , the goods of Edwin Young Bantley .

CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS. I am porter at the Horse Bazaar. On the 12th of March I saw the two prisoners there - I had seen Perrara before; I had some conversation with another porter, and we went after the prisoners, who were then gone; we met Griffiths, who had this basket, and these glasses in it - they are the property of Edwin Young Bantley , and were sent there for sale; I had seen them while the prisoners were there, and missed them in less than five minutes - they are cut glass.

Prisoner Griffiths. Q. You did not see me take them? A. No, but I missed them as soon as you left the room.

GEORGE GRIFFIN . I am a porter at the Bazaar. I saw the two prisoners there together; Griffiths had a basket, and when they left we missed the glasses - I went out, and came up with them about two hundred yards from the place; I saw Perrara put his hand into his coat pocket, take out one glass, and put it into the basket; I brought them back, and found these two glasses in the basket - I had seen them safe five minutes before.

Griffiths' Defence. He said to this young man, "You must go back to the Bazaar;" I said, "What for?" he said, "You have something in your basket;" I said, Yes, and this young man said, "They are for patterns," but I never touched them.

Perrara's Defence. I asked Griffiths where she was going - she said to Carburton-street; I left to go with her, but she got three streets off before I came to her.

Perrara received an excellent character.

GRIFFITHS - GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

PERRARA - GUILTY, Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character, and believing him to have been seduced by Griffiths .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300415-141

808. THOMAS FRANKCORN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 120 yards of silk, value 18l., the goods of George Hitchcock and another .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN GREEN . I am a Police-officer. On the 8th of April I saw the prisoner in Union-street, Spitalfields - he came out of a coach near the Grapes, and had a bag with him; I asked him what he had got - he said, "If you will come with me you shall see;" I said "Where did you bring it from?" he said "From Turnstile, Holborn" - I went into the Grapes with him; he asked the lady if she would take it in - she refused; he said,"You know Thomas Lackey, don't you?" she said "No, I know Thomas Blackey " - she then took it in; I let the prisoner go then, for it was the first case I ever had - in consequence of what I afterwards heard I sent William Dyke to look for him; I am certain he is the man I saw -I described him to Dyke.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How do you know it was the 8th of April? A. Because I was on duty and took particular notice of it - I was not on duty on the 9th or 10th; it was half-past three o'clock in the afternoon - it is a great thoroughfare; only one person got out of the coach, and that was the prisoner - I did not notice the wheels of the coach; he did not say he was employed to take it to the Grapes - he went in there and I followed him; he did not say he was directed to leave it there for Mr. Lackey - the lady said she thought it was all right; and I let

him him go, as he appeared to have done all that he said he had to do, to leave the parcel there - I said to the landlady, "I don't think it is all right;" - he was taken up about two hours afterwards; I had never seen him before, but I took particular notice of him.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How was he dressed? A. He had a red night-cap on that day; I saw the bag opened by the inspector, and it had these two pieces of silk in it - a man might carry them without a coach.

SARAH BOWEN . I am landlady of the Grapes - I have seen the prisoner once or twice; I do not recollect whether it was the 8th of April, but I was in my house with the witness when a bag like this was left by the prisoner - Mr. Heron came and took it; it contained two pieces of silk like these.

Cross-examined. Q. What was done with the bag? A. It remained there about two hours, and then the superintendent and two officers took it.

COURT. Q. Are you sure the prisoner brought it in? A. Yes, and he said it was to be left for a gentleman of the name of Blackey.

WILLIAM DYKE . I am a Police-officer. On the 8th of April I went to the Grapes with an inspector - I got this bag and have had it ever since; I afterwards took the prisoner, at the Prince of Wales, in Wentworth-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go with the superintendent? A. Yes, the bag was taken from the bar to the section-house; the superintendent kept it there till last Tuesday when I went and got it - it is the place appointed to put such things in; I can swear to the pattern of the silk and to the bag.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you take patterns of the silk? A. Green did in my presence.

THOMAS SLOPE . I am in the prosecutor's employ - I know these two pieces of silk; I saw them in the morning of the 8th of April, the day before Good Friday, about nine o'clock - I looked for them afterwards and they were gone; the patterns of them were shown to me on the Saturday morning - I have no doubt they are my master's.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any thing particular about the pattern? A. Yes, it is rather singular - we never had such a pattern in our house before; it is French silk - more of it may be imported, but I never saw either of the patterns before - we have between twenty and thirty persons in the shop.

GEORGE HITCHCOCK. I am one of the firm - I have only one partner ; this is our silk - it has our private mark on it, put by my partner; this other is not marked - we lost two pieces like these exactly in quality and quantity.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your Christian name? A. George - these had been in the silk-warehouse, the upper shop; they were missed about five o'clock in the evening - they are brought into the shop by day, and were very near the door about three in the day, and a young man was showing them; I think it very possible the prisoner might have come in without being observed by our men, we have so many people.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You cannot tell whether the prisoner might not have been outside to receive it, or whether he kept that night cap on all day? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Holborn - a gentleman stopped me, and said, "Don't I know you? did you not work for Mr. Tate?" I said Yes; he said he had a parcel to deliver if I would take it in a coach to Union-street; I took it there, and the officer stopped me - I said I did not know what I had, but if he would walk a few yards he would find; I went and asked the lady if she knew Thomas Lackey - she said, "I know Thomas Blackey," she said, "Is he a tall dark man?" I said Yes - she said "I dare say it is all right" - I left it there; the officer came to me, and said he was not altogether satisfied - I said, "You will see the person presently."

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-142

809. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 1 sovereign, 2 shillings, and 5 pence the monies of Charles Price , from his person .

CHARLES PRICE. I am a tailor . I have known the prisoner two years. I met him on the 8th of April, and went and treated him at a public-house in Bruton-street ; I took out my money to pay - I had a sovereign in my right hand waistcoat pocket, and about 1l. worth of silver - when we came out of the house, he caught hold of my arm, and felt him putting his hand into my waistcoat pocket - I fell and missed my money; I said, "Give me my money, and I will say no more about it;" he said, "If you say robbed you, I will knock your bl-y head off," and he ran against me and knocked me down - I am sure I had the sovereign when I was in the house, as I had pulled out instead of 1s.; I gave an alarm, and the Policeman caught the prisoner running away - the sovereign was found upon him.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You knew the prisoner very well? A. Yes - I treated him because he said he had no money, and he asked me to treat him; I did not know where he lived; I had been at my brother's, where I had a glass of rum and peppermint - that was about four o'clock; I had not drank any porter - I had been at Westminster that morning, but I do not believe I met any female there; I never told a man named Jones that I had been robbed of 1l. 5s. by two women at Westminster, on at any other place - I do not know a man of the name of Smith; I never said that two girls had attempted to take my money, and I thought they had robbed me of 1l. 5s.

JOSEPH STANNARD . I was on duty, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - I ran after the prisoner, caught him, and held him till the prosecutor came up, who said he had picked his pocket of a sovereign and some silver - the prisoner denied it; I asked the prosecutor if he was sure of it - he said Yes; I asked the prisoner what he had in his pocket - he said some halfpence; I searched him, and found a sovereign, 2s., and some halfpence - he ran the length of a street, and I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. What street was it in? A. Marylebone-street, a great thorougfare - it was half-past seven o'clock in the evening; it was getting dark - I was about twenty yards from the first person I saw running the prisoner is the man I took back to the prosecutor, and he said he was the man who robbed him; the prosecutor certainly was not sober, but he could give his evidence very well before the Magistrate, and we went before him in about a quarter of an hour - he did not at first say he had lost 1l. 5s.; he said a sovereign - I said, "Search your pockets, and see if you have it," and he did; he was satis

fied of it himself, but I made him feel for fear he should be wrong.

Prisoner's Defence. My witness was here yesterday, and the officer said he would take him.

JOSEPH STANNARD . There was a young man wished to give evidence before the Magistrate, but his conduct was so had he was turned out - he laid hold of the prosecutor, and said if he attempted to say any thing against the prisoner, he would knock his bl-y head off.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-143

810. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 15s., and 2 waistcoats, value 8s. , the goods of John Bishop .

SOPHIA BISHOP . I am the wife of John Bishop, and live in John-street, Curtain-road . On the 8th of March I was down stairs and had occasion to go out - as I returned I heard a noise in my front bed-room over head; I knew the street door was open - I went and shut it; I sat down again in my chair, and heard some person going out - I went and saw the prisoner with these clothes under his arm, which had been in a wardrobe up stairs; I took hold of him, and called a neighbour who took him from me.

RICHARD SPURGEON . I live opposite Bishop - I heard her call, and ran and took the prisoner; the things were then on the step of the door.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-144

811. THOMAS DAILY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 1 watch, value 1l. , the goods of James Wild .

JAMES WILD . I am pot-boy at a public-house at Knightsbridge . A fisherman sent the prisoner on the 25th of March to repair my watch; I gave it him to repair - he could not finish it that night, as it got dark; he came again the next day to finish it - I said I had no money that day; he said I must give him something to drink, and I gave him three-parts of my beer for lunch - my master called me, and when I came back he was gone; I saw him in bed tipsy that night, and he threatened to knock me out of the room - he gave the duplicate of my watch to the fisherman to bring to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-145

812. ELIZABETH DUGGIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 18 yards of ribbon, value 10s. , the goods of Jonathan Orme .

JAMES VALLATON. I am shopman to Mr. Jonathan Orme, haberdasher , of Little Russel-street . On the 19th of March the prisoner came with another young woman to look at some bonnet ribbons - the young woman who was serving them left the drawer of ribbons before them, and went to the window to get some others; I saw the prisoner take one piece out of the drawer - I went to the door and stood till they were coming out; I then said I wanted to speak to them - they said for what; I said if they would come back I would tell them; they walked backwards towards the counter, and the prisoner tried to drop the ribbon on the counter, but it fell on the floor.

Prisoner. He knocked it out of my hand when the lady asked 8d. a yard for it. Witness. I never touched it - she took it, put it under her shawl, and was going out with it; this is the ribbon - there are eighteen yards of it; it is worth 10s.

RICHARD TRIPP . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The young girl asked if I would go with her to buy a ribbon - she bought one, and left 9d. on it; I then took up this one, and said it was pretty - the witness knocked it out of my hand, and the young wo - took up the 9d. again.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-146

813 THOMAS CREED was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 5 1/2 lbs. weight of copper, value 2s. , the goods of John Clark .

THOMAS MILLS . On the 11th of April, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was near the premises of Mr. John Clark, in York-street, Portland-town - I saw the prisoner come out with this copper under his arm, concealed; he said he went in there and found it.

THOMAS YOUNG . I am a tenant of Mr. Clark. This copper is his, and was under the eaves of the stable; I saw it safe about three o'clock in the afternoon, in an enclosed yard. I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I merely went in there, and saw this wrapped up; the Policeman said, "What do you do there?" I said, "Here is something wrapped up," and he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-147

814 WILLIAM CORDERY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 rat-trap, value 1s.; 1 iron chain, value 1s., and 2 live tame rabbits, value 3s. , the goods of William Collett .

WILLIAM COLLETT . I live at the Post-office, at Acton , and keep rabbits. On the 24th of December I missed them; they were in a warehouse, and I had fed them the day before; when I went that day I found the latch-door and the window open - the warehouse is across a little yard; there is a gateway belonging to three houses - I missed a rat-trap also: they had taken the key, gone down, and got out, and had broken five large squares of glass to get in.

WILLIAM PRATLEY . On the 24th of December the prisoner came and asked me to buy two rabbits, as I was standing at the turnpike-gate - I knew him before, and went to school with him; he said he had bought them at Brentford-market - I gave 2s. 10d. for them; one I gave away, and the other is here.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I have had this rabbit ever since; Pratley delivered it to me.

WILLIAM COLLET. I know the rabbit by many ways he has; if you were to put out a glass of beer, he would run round like a cat after milk.

COURT. Q. Was this done in the night? A. Yes; I had fed them the night before, and we suspected this boy, who lived with me.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-148

315 AGNES CONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 1 pelisse, value 5s., and 1 cloak, value 5s. , the goods of William Daniels .

GEORGE LAW . I am shopman to William Daniels, a pawnbroker . On the 5th of March the prisoner came to the shop; I had received information, and suspected

her - I saw her take down a blue pelisse; she waited about the shop a few minutes, then came to the counter, and offered it me to pawn; I asked where she got it - she said she bought it at a neighbouring pawnbrokers; I asked what she wanted for it; she said 2s. - I said if that was the case, I would lend it her; I went down to that pawnbroker to ask if she had bought any thing that day, and she had not; I took her back to our shop, and lent her the 2s. - she stood about till the shop was pretty full of people, then walked round, and snatched down a cloak; I followed, and gave charge of her.

Prisoner. I did no such thing.

WILLIAM DEARING . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had gone to the shop to purchase a pelisse, and thought she had paid for it.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-149

816 EDWARD BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , 1 watch, value 3l.; 2 seals, value 7s.; 3 watch-keys, value 3s.; 2 razors, value 9d.; 1 pair of shirt-buttons, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 purse, value 6d., and 1 breast-pin, value 6d. , the goods of Joseph Taylor .

JOSEPH TAYLOR. I live with Mr. Sanders, a fishmonger, in Oxford-street. I have known the prisoner from his infancy - I met him on the 9th of April, in Oxford-street; he said he was in great distress, and had no lodgings - I took him to my lodgings, in Marylebone ; he got up the next morning at half-past four o'clock, but I did not hear him - I got up at five o'clock, and missed my watch, seals, and handkerchief; I came home at four o'clock in the afternoon, and missed the other articles; the watch had hung on a chair by the side of the bed, and my clothes were on the bed - he was taken on the Monday afterwards; he has been living with his father, a respectable man, at Cheltenham, who keeps a riding-school, but his father neglected him, and he came to try to get work.

LEONARD GEORGE NEEDES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a watch two seals, and two keys, pawned by the prisoner in his own name, on the 10th of April, at our shop in Bridge-road, Lambeth.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I went with the prosecutor to Greenwich, and found the prisoner on the road; we took him to his sister's, in Bridge-road, who gave us the other property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300415-150

817. JOSEPH BENTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 pint pot, value 1s., the goods of Richard Sirell , and 1 pint pot, value 1s., the goods of James Partridge .

HARRIET PICKETT . I saw the prisoner take two pint pots off the window-ledge, at Mr. Cowie's, in Clifton-street, Finsbury ; I told my mistress, who was in the parlour - Mr. Cowie went after him, and cried Stop thief! I saw the pots taken out of his hat by the potboy.

MARY COWIE . Pickett came to my house to work - I saw the prisoner take the pots; I ran and called to a milk-man to take him; I went and told Mr. Sirell of it - I saw the pots taken from his hat.

WILLIAM WAMPLE . I am pot-boy. I took these two pots from the prisoner's hat; one is my master's, Mr. Sirell.

RICHARD SIRELL. I keep the Fox, in Park-street, Finsbury . This pot is mine, and the other is Mr. Partridge's.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18300415-151

818. SARAH ASBRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 box, value 14s.; 2 coats, value 3l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 1l.; 2 waistcoats, value 15s.; 6 shirts, value 20s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 2 aprons, value 2s.; 2 candlesticks, value 4s.; 1 hat, value 8s., and 1 Prayer-book, value 1s. , the goods of John Mortimer .

JOHN MORTIMER. I am a stone mason . I came from Peterborough to town in the waggon with my wife, on the 15th of February - the prisoner travelled with us from the same place; I had not known her before - we arrived at the Rose-inn, Smithfield , between ten and eleven o'clock, on the 15th of February - I had four boxes, which I left in care of the proprietor of the waggon - they were not taken out in my presence; the prisoner, my wife, and I left the inn, and went to Oxford-street, and when we got to Bond-street, the prisoner took leave of us - we went to see about a place to live in, and went back to the inn about five o'clock in the evening; two of our boxes were then gone, they contained all the articles stated in the indictment; some of them we have found, but some are lost -I wrote a letter to Peterborough, and received an answer, which enabled me to find the prisoner at some lodging, in the Edgware-road, on the 9th of March; she denied all knowledge of the boxes, but afterwards she said she met a strange man in the street, and asked him what he would give her upon the box - that he took it, and brought her back a 1l. note; I said there are no notes passing now - she then said a pound's worth of silver; I had her lodgings searched, and found some of my property, which had been in the box; I found some articles at the pawnbroker's.

CHARLES JAMES JOYCE. I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have a suit of clothes, pawned by Valentine.

WILLIAM GEORGE POCOCK. I have a flannel shirt, coat, and waistcoat, pawned by Valentine.

CHARLES VALENTINE . I am a butcher. I have known the prisoner better than two years; she had been in town before, and my mother knew her; on the 15th of February, between one and two o'clock she came and took me to Smithfield with her - she asked for two boxes; one was standing against the door, and the other on the rails; she did not pay for them - she said she would pay when she came for the others; she said they belonged to her - I took them to my mother's house in Carlisle-place; the prisoner had got a situation at No. 23, Portland-place, and I thought it was her property - she sent me to pawn the articles produced, and I gave her the money and duplicates.

JOHN CHAMBERLAIN . I am an officer. I went to the

lodging, and found part of this property, which the prosecutor owns.

MARY MORTIMER . I came with my husband from Peterborough; I know the prisoner, but was not acquainted with her; she was in service, I believe - this is the property that was in the boxes.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-152

819. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 2 coats, value 2l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 9s., and 1 shirt, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Paton .

CHARLES PATON. I am a bookbinder , and live in Noel-street . I lost these articles from a room in that house - the prisoner is a stronger; he had slept there the night before, the 5th of February - I got up first that morning, and left my box locked: I was sent for about half-past nine o'clock, found the box broken open, and my property gone - I have not found any of it - I cannot tell how many persons lodged in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. About how many? A. Three single men, the master, mistress, and one servant; I tried my box that morning and it was locked; when I came back it was broken and a candle cut to pieces to fill up the cracks.

JAMES CRISK . The prisoner took a lodging that night in the same bed with Paton; I went up stairs in the morning to see who was gone out, and found the door locked; the prisoner answered from within that the witness was out; I had suspicion that it was wrong for him to be there at that time, as he stated he was a mechanic - I came down and watched in my parlour; when he came down I did not see any bundle, but he looked rather bulky - the moment he had shut the door I ran up stairs and found the door locked; I ran out, and gave notice at Bow-street, and brought Paton from his employ; he missed the articles -I was present when the door was opened; the box was cut, and the lid and staple left in the lock - it was after nine o'clock when the prisoner went out; the property has not been found - the prisoner gave me an address a long way off, and said would I let him sleep there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not meet him in the passage? A. Yes; I attributed his appearance to his slovenly mode of dressing - I think it is possible he might have the articles stated without my seeing them; his belt I apprehend was a very useful thing to brace himself with- it would brace the great coat; I have a wife, two children, a servant, and three single-men lodgers - there is only one door; the lodgers have separate apartments, and leave to go in and out; I was within half a yard of the prisoner when he went out.

BENJAMIN HARWOOD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; he said at the office he did it from distress, and burst into tears.

Cross-examined. Q. What was said to him? A. Mr. Crisk said he was perfectly aware he had done it, but he held out no promise or threat, and the prisoner voluntarily said he had taken them, and he hoped Mr. Crisk would forgive him.

Prisoner. It was not stated that I confessed till the fourth examination. Witness. The confession took place the first day - he was remanded three times for want of evidence; I was not called on to tell it; Mr. Crisp told it first - I was unacquainted with it; I never had any such case before - the Magistrate asked me on the fourth examination.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-153

820. JOHN ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , 1 hive, value 15s., and 10 lbs. of honey, value 15s. , the goods of Henry Catling .

THOMAS SOPER. I am a Police-constable. I was on duty at Kilburn at half-past two o'clock in the morning, on the 6th of April; I saw a travelling waggon - the people belonging to it said they saw a man on the road with a sack: I went on towards Windmill-hill, and met the prisoner coming down the bill, towards London; he had a bag tied across his shoulders, but no sack - I asked him if he had seen two men with a waggon; he said he had - I asked if he had seen a man with a sack; he said No: I asked if he came to the top of the hill with them - he said Yes; I said a man with a sack had left them there - I thought he was the man, and I should keep him; he then said he had a sack, and he was going to take it to his brother - I said if he would show me where it was, and go to his brother, he might; he took me to the top of Windmillhill, and showed me a sack under a hedge - I was going to untie it; he said, "Don't, I will tell you the truth - it is a hive of bees I bought of a man in the country; I am going to sell them:" I asked where his brother lived - he said in the country; I said it was very strange he should bring them from the country to London, to send to his brother in the country - I detained him, and the next day I found the prosecutor; he was about thirteen miles from the prosecutor's.

HENRY CATLING . I live at Latchmore-heath, Herts , and keep bees . I lost one hive on the 6th of April, which I had seen safe about the middle of the day before; I could not swear to the hive, but I believe it was mine, and it was delivered up to me; I had no doubt they were mine - I had seen the prisoner pass my garden; he was a stranger to me - he said it was a fine morning, and I said it was - I was busy, going to load some dung.

Prisoner. I was out of work, and had nothing to eat - my friends live near a hundred miles off.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-154

821. HARRIET WALTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 watch, value 30s., the goods of John Dunage , from his person .

JOHN DUNAGE. I am a shoemaker , and live in Little Pulteney-street - I am single. I fell in with the prisoner on the 29th of March, about half-past eleven o'clock at night; I went to the Black Horse in the Haymarket - the prisoner came in by herself: she got into conversation with me, and invited me home with her - I at last went with her to a house in Whitcomb-street ; on entering the room on the first floor, she shut the door, and began to use very bad language, and swore, which frightened me very much indeed; I gave her 6d. to let me come away - she asked for my watch; she seized my collar, and said if I did not give her my watch she would have my life - she tried to throw me down, and tore my trousers nearly all to pieces on the stairs - she got my watch by force from me,

and broke the guard; I got down, and waited outside, and when she came out in a few minutes I gave an alarm, and she was taken - I saw her put her hand to her bosom, take out the watch, and throw it down; she had before that denied having it I suppose twenty times; this is the watch, and this is the part broken from the chain - it is the first time I ever got in any disgrace, and I will take care it shall be the last.

Prisoner. I never saw this young man in my life, nor drank with him. Witness. Yes, that once, I will take my oath.

JESSE MASTERS . I was called to assist the prosecutor in Whitcomb-street, at half-past two o'clock in the morning; he gave the prisoner in charge for robbing him of a watch at a house about four doors off - she denied it over and over again; I took hold of her and this watch fell on the ground - I believe it fell from her, but I did not see it fall; the glass is broken - I have seen the prisoner every night I have been on duty in the Police; that is a street which gives us a great deal of trouble - the prosecutor was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Leicester-square, and saw this young man standing against the wall with his trousers down and in liquor - he said, "My dear, where are you going?" I said, "I am going home" - he then called me back, and said I was the girl who had been in a house with him and robbed him of 6 1/2d.; I said I had not - he made use of very bad expressions, and said I had robbed him of his watch; he called the Police.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300415-155

822. ALEXANDER SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , 1 shirt, value 8s. , the goods of George Cushion .

WILLIAM HEDGER . I am errand-boy to Mr. George Cushion - he lives in Ivy-lane, Hoxton. On the 31st of March I was sent to the Strand to take some clean linen, and brought the dirty linen away in a basket; when I came near the mews I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger - he hit the basket; I said, "You have no occasion to bit my basket" - I did not talk to him, but he followed me to Charles-street, City-road ; he asked me to let him carry my bundle, and he took the shirt out of it -I saw him take his hand from the bundle and put on his hat; the bundle then felt not so large - I said, "Be so good as to let me look into your hat;" he would not, but said he was going to the saw-mills - I said, "You shall not go without my looking into your hat;" he said he would go and let my master see what was in his hat - he then said he was going to a cheesemonger's shop opposite, and ran down a street; a lady stopped him; he got from her, and two gentlemen caught him - his hat was taken off and this shirt was in it.

SAMUEL HAMER . I took the prisoner into custody - his hat was given to me with this shirt in it.

MARY WHITE . On the 31st of March the witness came for the dirty linen, and I tied up this shirt with some other things and gave it him - it is the property of Mr. George Cushion .

MARY ELIZABETH CUSHION . I sent the boy for the dirty linen - this is my husband's shirt; when the bundle came home it was wanting.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-156

823. JOHN STOCKINGS and THOMAS DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 4d., the goods of James Merritt , from his person .

JAMES MERRITT . I am a cordwainer . I was at the Eagle tavern, City-road , on the 8th of March, between four and five o'clock - I had been there a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, at a meeting of Mr. O'Connell's friends, in the open air; I had a handkerchief and pair of gloves in my left-hand pocket - I did not feel any thing done, but two officers came and asked if I had lost any thing; I said I did not know, but I felt and missed my handkerchief and gloves - I went with them immediately and took hold of Stockings; I was going through the crowd with him, and he pulled out the handkerchief from his left-hand pocket, and threw it down - I said, "That is of no use," and I took him to the watch-house; I did not see Davis do any thing - they were taken together.

SAMUEL MAYNE POWELL . I am a constable of Bethnal-green. I went promiscuously to the meeting - I saw the two prisoners and two others with them, all in the same company - I have been a constable six years, and know such characters pretty well; Stockings went on the ground with another person, and met Davis and shook hands with him - they all hustled the prosecutor; Davis held up his coat, and Stockings took out his handkerchief with two fingers; I had seen them attempting several persons pockets before - I told the prosecutor of it.

Prisoner Stockings. Q. Does it stand feasible that he could see this man hold up the pocket in such a crowd? A. Yes, I did.

HENRY ARNAND . I am a boot and shoemaker, and a constable of Bethnal-green. I was at the meeting - I saw the prisoners meet and shake hands there; there were four in the gang - two backed up by two; I saw Davis lift up the pocket, but did not see Stockings draw the handkerchief - at that instant the mob began to separate; my brother officer went to the prosecutor, who felt and missed his handkerchief - I followed the prisoners, and heard Stockings say to Davis, "What have you got?" he said, "Only a snotter;" I seized one of them, and my brother officer the other.

Stockings' Defence. I never saw this prisoner before in my life; the officer knows the man I shook hands with was not the prisoner - the gentleman at first said the handkerchief was worth 4d., and then he said 1s. 4d.

Davis' Defence. I had no hand in it at all - I had never seen this prisoner.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

STOCKINGS - GUILTY . Aged 19.(See page 298.)

Reference Number: t18300415-157

824. ELEANOR REARDON , was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 1 gold ring, value 9s., the goods of Henry Strapman , from the person of Jane Strapman .

JANE STRAPMAN . I am the wife of Henry Strapman; he is a sugar-baker . On the 28th of March I had the tooth-ache, went to the doctor, and had it out, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning - I then went to a public-house, under an archway in Union-street, to get something

to drink; a woman who had been to the doctor with me was in my company - we there met the prisoner, who was a stranger; I said my husband was a German, and the prisoner said her husband was a German, and worked at Roach's; we had some gin there, then went to another house, and had some more, and to another house and had another quartern of gin - I had my tooth in my pocket; the prisoner went with me to the door of my house, and then took me to another house next door but one; I went up stairs and was sick - the prisoner was very kind to me; I was very ill - I had not drank more than two glasses of gin and peppermint - I was sitting on the stairs, and the prisoner was telling me I should be better directly; she laid hold of my hand, took my ring off as far as the knuckle, and then put her teeth to it and pulled it off - I was perfectly sensible; she did not bite my finger - I said, "Do not," and I thought she put the ring back again; but she put another ring on and took mine away - when I got to my own room I thought it was very strange for her to meddle with my ring, - I looked at my finger and found it was quite a black ring that I had on - my ring has not been found, but I believe my tooth was found in her pocket.

Prisoner. She was so tipsy she did not know her own door - she had six glasses of liquor. Witness. I had only two - I was sober.

HENRY BOLTON . I had information from another officer, and took the prisoner about half an hour afterwards - I found this tooth on her, and a little brass ring, but no gold ring; she said she was not afraid.

HENRY STRAPMAN . I came home between twelve and one o'clock in the day; I do not know whether my wife was ill or in liquor - I took her up stairs, but before that the prisoner had come, and said "Your wife has been to the doctor, and had a tooth drawn, and has been taken ill, come with me" - I went with her, and she took me to the market; I said, "If you are going to play tricks with me, I am off;" I went home to see for my wife, and found her at the next door.

MARY CURTIS . About half-past eleven o'clock that day a knock came at my door; the prosecutrix and the prisoner came in - she said, "Excuse me, we have made a mistake in the house;" the prosecutrix sat down some time, and when she got better I forbid them the house - they got up to go, and put their arms round each other, and said,"We will sit down on the stairs" - I noticed that the prosecutrix had a bright gold ring on her finger, and the prisoner had a thin black ring; the prosecutrix said, "I can't bear it, it is all filth, I can't bear it" - I said to the prisoner "Take off her handkerchief and wipe her mouth;" she did not, and I took it off and wiped her mouth myself - the prisoner then said she would send for some brandy; I said "You had better send for a halfpenny-worth of vinegar," and she sent a little girl who came up with two oranges.

Prisoner. She knows I had no ring on - she has been tried herself, and knows the consequences of it. Witness. She had this ring on her finger and it was very tight - I never was at a bar.

HENRY BOLTON . She had no ring on her finger when I took her, but there was the mark of one.

HANNAH WEBB . I live in Red Lion-street, Spitalfields I sell cloths in Spitalfield's-market, and I have seen the prisoner come to look at things, but she never bought any- I always noticed that she had a brass ring on, which was very black, and I made an observation that if I was forced to wear a brass ring I would keep it bright.

Prisoner's Defence. I called at the public-house - the prosecutrix and another woman came in; my little girl had the tooth-ache, and the prosecutrix said she had just had a tooth out - she called for some liquor, and offered me some; I did not like to take it, having a fracture in my head - she made me take some, and took the skirt of my gown, took me to another house, and called for more gin; we then went to another house, and she well knows that she asked me to escort her home - we went and knocked at Mrs. Curtis' door, and I said, "Does this woman live here?" she said No - I said, "Will you allow her to sit down?" she said Yes, and she was very ill; I then took her and sat her on the stairs - I went to look for her husband, and hearing his character, I did not like to tell him at once what situation she was in; he then went and took her up to bed.

GUILTY . Aged 42. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300415-158

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

825. MARY PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 gown, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Manicom .

SUSAN MANICOM . I am the wife of Charles Manicom. On the 27th of March, I lost a gown from behind the bedroom door - I missed it on the Sunday morning, when I went to put it on; I had hung it there on the Saturday - the prisoner chared for a person on the first floor; this is my gown.

JAMES SARMAN . I took the prisoner, and got the gown from the pawnbroker; the prosecutor gave me the duplicate.

THOMAS PERRY . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this gown on the Saturday evening from the prisoner, I am almost certain; I gave this duplicate for it.

SUSAN MANICOM. When the prisoner was taken she said she had pawned it in Berwick-street, and the duplicate was in her drawer - my husband went and got it.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-159

826. MARY MACK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 16 shillings and 2 sixpences, the monies of Thomas Harrison , from his person .

THOMAS HARRISON . I am warehouseman at Morrison and Co.'s, Fore-street. I met the prisoner in the street at ten o'clock on the night of the 7th of March; I did not go with her to any public-house I am sure - I was not sober; I do not know whether she did any thing to me, but I felt my pocket lightened a little - I had changed a sovereign at Temple-bar, and had walked from there till I met her; I believe she put her hand into my waistcoat pocket, and I dare say she might into other pockets - she scuffled me about a good deal; I do not recollect her putting her hand into my trousers pocket - I do into my waistcoat pocket, where part of my change was, and part in my trousers; I missed some money from my waistcoat and some from my trousers - she was taken to the watch-house by a person; it was not by my desire; I said I was robbed; I did not drink any gin with her - I had none after I left Temple-bar.

COURT. Q. You said at the office that you did not know whether you spoke to her or she to you? A. No, I do not know.

COURT. Q. You said, "I felt her put her hand into my trousers pocket and take out my money," is that true? A. I recollect her putting her hand into my waistcoat pocket, and I missed some silver from my trousers pocket.

AUGUSTUS FAIRCHILD . I was in Whitecross-street , and saw the prisoner take the prosecutor by the arm; she went up the street, and when she saw the Police she took him across the road - she went in front of him, put her two arms on his shoulders, and pressed him to cross the road, which he did; she took him across the road again, placed him against a door, put her two hands into his waistcoat pockets, and then her right hand into his trousers pocket; she then put her hand into his waistcoat pocket again - I saw the Policeman coming up, and gave charge of her; I saw her searched, and 17s. was found on her - the prosecutor was very much intoxicated; not at all sensible.

ROBERT RANSON . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner together, as I passed down Golden-lane; they crossed over before I got to them - I went to disperse some girls, saw them again, and the prisoner had her hand in the prosecutor's pocket; I asked her if he was her husband - she said No; I asked if she knew where he lived - she said near Old-street; I said "You had better see him home;" the prosecutor then said he had been robbed of nearly 1l. - the prisoner said, "He has been robbed of all he has but this 6d., which I am going to get some gin with, and you may have some if you like;" I took the 6d. from her, and took her to the station - I asked what money she had; she said 15s. or 16s. - I took 15s. in silver and 5 3/4d. in copper, from her, and the 6d. which I had before; this was at a quarter before twelve o'clock.

JANE ENDALL . My father keeps the Green Man, Shipyard, Temple-bar. The prosecutor received change for a sovereign of me that Sunday evening; I gave him the full change - he said he wanted to give 2s. 6d. to a subscription; this was between nine and ten o'clock - he was drunk.

Prisoner's Defence. I left the prosecutor standing against a window-shutter; he called after me, and said,"Will you see me part of the way home?" I said, "Where do you live?" he said in Old-street - I said I would; we then went to a public-house, and had some gin - we then went to the Cat, and he treated me again to another quartern of gin; he then said he had lost a sovereign, and then 1l. worth of silver - on the Saturday morning I had changed a sovereign, and had 15s. 6d. and some halfpence in my pocket.

ROBERT RANSON. I inquired at the Cat, and she had not been there - she had been at Mr. Wingfield's.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-160

828. ELIZA HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 pin, value 3s.; 1 watch-key, value 4s.; 1 ring, value 2s.; 10 sovereigns, and 16 shillings , the property of George Casebourne .

GEORGE CASEBOURNE. I am a clerk . On the 11th of March, I met the prisoner about one o'clock in the morning, and went with her to her lodging in Martha-street, St. George's in the East ; I was the worse for what I had taken - I went up stairs to her room, and soon after felt inclined to go to sleep; I asked her to assist in taking off my boots, which she did; she then withdrew - I undressed, went to bed and to sleep - in the morning I awoke a little after six o'clock; I got up, and missed all this property - the money had been in my left hand trousers pocket, which I had put on a chair, and my watch and pin on the table - when I awoke the prisoner was gone, and my hat and boots were secreted to prevent my going after her; my landlady found them under the bed; this is my watch.

JOSEPH ALDRIDGE . I am a Police-officer. On the 11th of March, at a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Fox-lane, Shadwell; two women fetched me to No. 43, Spring-street, at the back of Fox-lane, to a back-room on the ground floor; the prisoner was in bed - I told her I was informed she had robbed a gentleman of his watch and some sovereigns; she said she knew nothing of it - I asked for her pocket, which she gave me, and I found in it this pouch, which contained 14s. 9 1/2d., and five duplicates; I told her she must go with me - she hesitated; the landlord came up, removed the bed clothes, and I saw the watch in the bed; she said if I would stand on one side, she would get up, and take me to a house where I could put my hand on nine sovereigns and a gold pin; I went with her to No. 22, Martha-street - she took me to a room, and said, nine sovereigns and the pin were near the looking-glass, but there were none there; I had not then mentioned about the pin - I had not known it was lost.

SOPHIA REED . I am servant at No. 22, Martha-street - the prisoner lodged there. On the 11th of March she came home with the prosecutor; I went to bed - she afterwards came and asked me to get her something to drink; I said it was too late - she came down again, and asked a young man to get her something; he said he could at the night-house - she gave him 1s.; he said that was not enough, as he meant to have a glass himself; she went up again, brought down something, and put into his hand - I do not know what it was; he then went out, and I went to sleep - she came down again, shook me, and said, "Is Mark come back?" I said, "I don't know;" she said, "He is a long while gone, I will go and look for him, and leave the door open, as he has taken the key;" I said, "Don't some one may come in."

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor, who went home with me - he gave me his watch to take care of till morning; he then put his hand into his pocket, and gave me a sovereign, and 2s to send for some liquor - I gave the 2s. to a man to get some liquor, he did not return, and I went to him - I sat drinking most part of the night; I changed the sovereign, and spent part of it - when he saw I was drunk, he went away and left me; I could not find my way home - I went to a sailor's wife, and went to bed there; I took the watch out of my pocket, and laid it by my side, where the officer found it - the pin and neck handkerchief were on the table when I left the room.

JOSEPH ALDRIDGE re-examined. Q. Did she say she had the watch to take care of? A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-161

829. JOSEPH GRAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 pocket-book, value 1s., and 1

pencil-case, value 5s., the goods of Percival Edward Leslie , from his person .

PERCIVAL EDWARD LESLIE . I missed my pocketbook on Saturday evening, the 27th of March; I cannot swear to having seen it since the evening of the previous Wednesday, when I returned it to my pocket - I think if it had not been in my pocket I should have missed it; the officer brought it to me about nine o'clock, and it contained this silver pencil-case, some papers, and writings of mine; this is it - I reside with my father, in East India-buildings, Houndsditch.

GEORGE JUDGE . About five o'clock on the Saturday evening, I saw the prisoner and two others following the prosecutor - I followed them, and saw the prisoner take the book from the prosecutor's pocket, and try to conceal it in his trousers; I seized him, and forced him into a shop - I found the prosecutor's residence by a bill that was in book.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a bill up for a light porter - I went to the place, and in coming out I saw the book; I took it up, and the constable took me into a shop.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-162

830. RICHARD FORRESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Montrion , from his person .

WILLIAM MONTRION. I was walking near St. Giles' church on the 6th of April, and felt a snatch at my pocket - I turned, and saw the prisoner walking from me; I followed, and charged him with taking my handkerchief - I seized him, threw his coat open, and saw my handkerchief in his inside pocket; he said he found it, but I had had it just before.

Prisoner. Q. How far was I from you? A. Five or six yards, walking the contrary way; my pocket was turned out, and he was walking on.

JOHN BALDWIN . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the property.

Prisoner's Defence. He touched me on the shoulder, and asked if I had found a handkerchief; I pulled out this, and asked if it was his. Mr. Raffle, of Long-alley, is my master.

WILLIAM MONTRION . This is my handkerchief; I did not ask if he had found one - I saw it in his inside pocket - he did not give it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-163

831. ANN ANDERSON , ELIZABETH JACKSON , and ELIZABETH POWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 4 crowns, 8 half-crowns, and 30 shillings, the monies of Frederick Strom , from his person .

FREDERICK STROM . I was robbed of 3l. 15s., all in silver, from my pocket, at the sign of the Bell, in Ratcliff-highway , on the 21st of March, about ten o'clock at night - I am a Sweed; we had come into dock that day, and my shipmate and I went to that house, where my brother used to live twenty-seven months ago; I asked for him, but the same landlord did not keep the house, and the present landlord said my brother was dead; I had something to drink - Anderson sat at a table in the same house; she saw me take the money to pay for the beer out of a callipash, which I bought in Ceylon; I was then walking out, and she came into the passage, put her hand into my pocket, and took out all my money; I stopped her, and said, "Return my money;" she said, "I have not your money," and passed it to some of the other girls; I sang out for the Policeman, who came, and was going to search her - I said she had passed it away - he however searched and found 1s. or 1s. 6d. on her.

Prisoner Anderson. When he came in he was very much in liquor. Witness. I was not; I had been drinking, but had my senses about me - I do not remember having conversation with any girls at the tap-room, or calling for rum and water; the persons at the same table might have it, but I did not drink any to my recollection. I did not dance with any body - I do not know whether I asked them to dance or not; I did not say Johnson had robbed me; I said Anderson was the woman, and so she is; I did not give charge of her that night, because I was not acquainted with the law in England - the Police-officer said, "Give her in charge;" I said I would next night, and the next night I dressed myself in other clothes; I found her, and said, "I hope you made good use of the money you took last night;" she said, "What money? I am not the person who robbed you."

JAMES HALL . I am the Policeman. I went to the Bell - the prosecutor said Anderson had robbed him - he was not drunk, but had been drinking a little; I searched her, and found only a sixpence and a few halfpence on her - he wished me to search her; he did not say she had parted with the property - I did not take charge of her till the following night; she said she did not pick his pocket, but she knew the person who did - she went with me to Limehouse, and pointed out the other two prisoners, who, she said, were concerned in the robbery; she then said she took 10s. out of his pocket, which was all he had, and divided it; that Jackson said she had 2s., and so did the other, and two others, who are not apprehended; and Anderson said she had paid 2s. for rent that night.

Anderson's Defence. I was standing outside the door - he came and asked me if I knew Jackson and Powell; I said I did - he did not tell me what he took me for; he asked if I would give him any gin - I said I had no ginmoney; Jackson had a silk handkerchief round her neck, and he asked her to leave that for half a pint of gin; I asked him for it again at the office, and he said, it was taken out of his pocket, and a muslin one put in its place.

JAMES HALL . I took the handkerchief, and let her have 9d. on it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-164

332. JOHN SLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , at Fulham , 1 truss of straw, value 18d., the goods of Thomas Cubitt and another .

WILLIAM PARNEY . I am foreman to Messrs. Thomas Cubitt and Lewis Cubitt - they had some straw on a stack of bricks on their premises at Hammersmith; at six o'clock in the evening of the 24th of March, when I left work, I looked to see that all was correct; the prisoner was about the premises, but did not work there. On the morning of the 25th, I missed a truss of straw -I tracked it by pieces in the hedge and on the ground, to the prisoner's residence, where I found it; he was standing by it - I said it was my straw; he said, if it

was, he would take it back: he took it back to the stack of bricks, and I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How much of the straw had you? A. Six loads; it was rye-straw - I had counted the trusses out of the waggon, on the bricks; I saw the straw and the prisoner at the back of the premises - I went round to the front door, and he was coming out; he said, "William, if it is yours, I will take it back" - I do not know whether he remained in the officer's custody all night; I had not sold any of the straw, nor had Mr. Cubitt - he never sells any; he wants to buy one hundred loads now - it is a very scarce article; the prisoner told me at first that he did know how it came there - when I said I was led to believe it was my master's property, he took it back, and then he said, "I will tell you how I came by it; I saw a man in the lane with a truss on his shoulder - I called to him, and he laid it down" - I had been searching in other places, but had no suspicion of him; I had not been talking about it; it was six o'clock in the morning - it was in his back premises, which are railed round, and was near the pig-stye; I had tracked it by the ears of the straw being about the hedges, but there was a little opening in the hedge, and I suspected another person, and went there - I then returned, and traced it to the prisoner; I did lose the tracing for about ten yards.

JAMES COOK. I am a constable. I was sent for to take the prisoner on the 25th of March, for stealing a truss of rye-straw.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not set at large? A. Yes, from Thursday till the Monday, through a respectable market-gardener, saying he would be answerable for his appearance; I have known him four or five years - he has an honest character.

Prisoner's Defence. I was set at large till the Monday morning. and then I appeared again at the Bell and Anchor; and if I had stolen it I should not have thought of appearing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-165

833. JEREMIAH TIERNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 7 hats, value 14s.; 6 bonnets, value 12s., and 1 basket, value 4s. , the goods of Patrick Curran .

PATRICK CURRAN. I am a hatter and live at Bermondsey . The prisoner was my apprentice , I told my son to put seven hats and six bonnets into a basket, to give the prisoner to go and sell them - and told Roberts the errand-boy to go with him to watch the hats, and see that the money came home safe; I told the prisoner to sell them, and bring the money to his mistress, or to give it to Roberts.

Prisoner. I am tried for stealing six hats and seven bonnets; I received eleven bonnets and two hats - I was to send him home a fish for dinner, and sell them retail as well as I could; he told me to get 1s. 6d. a piece for them. Witness. I never told him any such thing; he bought a fish and gave it to Roberts to take home to his mistress - it was not fit for eating; it was thrown out.

Prisoner. It was a salt fish, and the boy went home with it; I was holding the hats in my hand trying to dispose of them if I could. Witness. I did not tell him to sell them in the market; but to go to any of the shops - I did not appoint any place: I sent the boy back to tell him to sell them as fast as he could, and for what he could; when the boy got back he was gone, and the basket and bonnets.

JOHN CURRAN . I am the prosecutor's son; I packed up seven hats and six bonnets, and told the prisoner to sell them in a shop or two in Rosemary-lane - and if he could not sell them there, to take them to Petticoat-lane; he went away with them, and did not return.

SAMUEL CURTIS . I am a Police-constable, I took the prisoner on the 18th of March, a little before one o'clock, in coming off duty; I asked what he was doing; he said he had no place to go to - I would not allow him to sit in the street, and was taking him to the watchhouse - he said he might as well be taken first as last, for he had robbed his master of a number of hats and bonnets - I think he said thirteen, and he sold one and sent a fish home; he said he had only been out of confinement five weeks for stealing a side of bacon - he told me Mr. Curran, lived at No. 5, Rupert-street, Bermondsey.

Prisoner's Defence. The basket being about five feet long, and I being a small person, could not see both ends; I had two hats taken out, while a person was offering me 3s. 6d. for these two hats and a bonnet; I then missed them, and absconded with the rest.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven years .

Reference Number: t18300415-166

834. EDMUND TOWNSEND was indicted for embezzlement .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD INGARFIELD . I have two partners; we are fish-monger s, and live in Paddington-street . The prisoner has been in our employ upwards of two years, as clerk ; he was to receive money, give receipts, and enter it in the cash book; which is here - he was to settle with me every night; he received 20s. a week: he left us of his own accord on the 20th of February - I serve a customer, who has a servant named Lavington.

JANE LAVINGTON . I am cook at No. 62, Gloucester-place. I occasionally bought fish of the prosecutor; I paid these bills to the prisoner - these receipts at the bottom of them I saw him write; I paid them at separate times in December.

The bills were here read. Dated December 7th, for 14s. 11d. - December 11th, for 3s. 1d. - and December 21st, for 4s. 5d.

EDWARD BURRAGE . I took the prisoner; but found nothing on him.

EDWARD INGARFIELD . The prisoner, never accounted for these monies - they are not entered in the cash-book; and he did not pay them to me.

Cross-examined. Q. When did he leave you? A. On the 20th of 21st of February, and this charge was preferred on the week following, when the bills were returned that were outstanding; he was taken on the following Monday I think - he had been sent for to our house; we took him; he had set up a fishmonger's-shop himself - it was about the 1st of March, we sent for him: I did not ask him how he was going on in business - I have not made any bet about his conviction; nor offered any; there was a bet offered me, whether the crime was a

transportable one or not - I really forget who the person was I made it with; I think it was a person of the name of Butler, but I had forgotten it altogether.

COURT. Q. What was the wager? A. A bottle of wine, that if he were convicted he would be transported; several other persons have offered to lay wagers with me, which I declined, because I thought it was wrong.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you any book in which you will venture to swear that these sums have not been entered? A. Yes; this is it, it is the daily cash-book, and there is no entry made of these sums - I do not keep my own books; the sums are entered in the ledger, but not in the cash-book - they are in the prisoner's writing; I do not recollect that they were pointed out to me by the prisoner at the meeting he was sent for to attend, and explained to be a mistake; my partner, Mr. Rowland Riley , and William Ingarfield were at that meeting - Mr. Riley and I have had misunderstandings on the subject of these accounts, but not on my mode of keeping them; I did not keep them, the prisoner did - he has asked me from time to time if there has been overplusses in the account, which there sometimes has, but more frequently not; I was not accustomed to go through the items of bills received by the prisoner every night, or I should have detected many other robberies - I did not state to the Magistrate, that I went through the accounts with him every night; I saw the nominal amount and took it of him - if he had given me but 49l. and put down 50l. I should have known it; he has paid more money than he has accounted for, but more frequently less - it has appeared that there has been a larger sum in the till, than has been put in the books; it may have been so twenty times; there has been trifles over; I have consulted the prisoner about them, but I put them into my pocket; he said to me, "It is not worth while to put them down, I consider you are a loser by the surplusses whatever they are;" I never had any misunderstanding with Riley on this subject.

COURT. Q. What do you mean by stating you had no difference about the accounts, when you stated you had had misunderstanding about them? A. He suggested that if there were any surplusses or minutes they should be put down, but there was more frequently a minus than surplusses - I did not suspect the prisoner at all.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Now turn to your ledger, and see if you can find the entries of these payments? A. They are entered as goods sold, but not made paid, he ought to enter all monies that are received in the cash-book - there is one book wanting; I did not hear the prisoner complain of the want of that book before the Magistrate - I do not recollect his solicitor asking for it.

Q. Did not the prisoner call for that book by his solicitor before the Magistrate, and was not your answer that it was lost? A. Really I have no recollection of it, and I do not see how it could favour his case at all; I have no doubt he took it away - if I did state it was lost, I stated the fact, but I have no recollection of it.

COURT. Q. Was it an earlier book? A. Yes - it had nothing to do with these accounts.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you any thing to do with the keeping of the ledger? A. No, the prisoner has entered these accounts in the ledger, but we never take any cash accounts from there - it is put down in the ledger in red ink, "Paid, E. Townsend," which makes the robbery the greater and the more flagrant; his entering it there is no proof of his honesty - all money received ought to be accounted for in the cash-book; this does not afford a means of conviction - he did not state to me on the evening in question, that I should find them in going through this book, and explain to me the mistake.

Q. Did he not explain to you that when you were in the shop, if a customer came in you would receive the money, and give him the bill to receipt? A. No, not at that time - I always handed to him every farthing I had received in the day, before we closed our accounts at night.

Q. Was this one of the circumstances of the misunderstanding between Mr. Riley and you? A. No, it was never mentioned - I have not paid money out of my pocket without considering where it came from; I have told the prisoner to put it down, and have accounted to him for every farthing - there has been as much as 1l. surplus of a night, but we have accounted for it next day satisfactorily; it has been some bill omitted by the prisoner - that has not often happened; there have been frequent dificiencies, but I never considered he would be so base as to rob me, they were treated as mistakes.

Q. Have you ever given him a moment to enter into explanation on the subject of these three bills? A. Yes, about three weeks or a month previous to his leaving my employ, my partners were dissatisfied and particularly Mr. Riley; I spoke to the prisoner, and there were a great many bills came in; I believed him honest, and I paid 6l. 10s. out of my own pocket.

COURT. Q. Was he questioned about there particular bills? A. Yes, he was.

Mr. CLARKSON. Q. Will you swear he was questioned about any one of them, except on the night he came to your house? A. Yes, Mr. Riley and my brother were present. I am clear I spoke to him about these three accounts before the night he came to my house; there can be no mistake about that - these accounts were included with many others; that was not because Mr. Riley laid the whole blame of keeping the accounts to me - he never blamed me; Mr. Riley and I had no misunderstanding before the Magistrate about them; Mr. Rawlinson did not remenstrate with me on the subject of my misunderstanding with Mr. Riley - he blamed me for my neglect, in trusting too much to the prisoner; he was held to bail, but did not get bail.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Does that other book relate to this case? A. No; when the prisoner received money it was his duty to enter it in the cash book.

JANE LAVINGTON re-examined. Q. Where did you pay these bills? A. In the prosecutor's shop. I cannot tell whether the prosecutor was there; I paid the money to the prisoner.

ROWLAND RILEY . I am in partnership with Mr. Ingarfield. I have blamed him in some measure for putting so much confidence in the prisoner; I had no other dispute with him.

Prisoner's Defence. In making my defence it will be necessary for me to state the way and manner of our keeping our accounts; he commenced by giving me a certain sum of money to which at night was added all accounts of money and bills received - it has frequently

happened there was a surplus over, and he would say he did not recollect, but he supposed he must have gone to the place where he kept his money and mixed it; in the course of a week or a fortnight the bill has come back receipted, and he would say that must be the bill that made the surplus on such or such a night; as it respects the dates of the bills in question that was the time the fish was had, not when the money was paid; these bills were among those surplusses - he has received money, and I have receipted the bills; he has frequently told me not to mind putting down a bill or two, as it would be found on paying the next bill - the night I was taken he asked whether I would have the kindness to come down to trim his accounts; I said certainly, and on the Monday he asked if he should see me that evening - I went; I explained many things to them - they then brought many other things against me, and I rose to go home, when they told me I was in custody; Mr. Riley had a final settlement every Monday night, and if there had been an error one night he must have discovered it on the Monday following.

MR. RILEY. I did compare the ledger and cash-book on Monday evening, and that was the way this was detected.

COURT. Q. Was there often a surplus? A. No, my Lord. We have ascertained that he has called over a name from the cash-book which was not down; he called the bills, and I compared it with the ledger.

Q. Can you swear the sums here charged were omitted in the cash-book? A. I cannot say that; I well remember one instance in which he did.

JURY. Q. Have you not two shops? A. We have a shop in Orange-street. The prisoner set up in business between that and our other shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-167

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

835. WILLIAM WARREN , GEORGE MILES , and ISAAC SMITH were separately indicted for rapes, and jointly as accessories .

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

Reference Number: t18300415-168

836. WILLIAM MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Thomas Pain .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am footman to the Earl of Chichester. On Friday, the 26th of March, I was attending the carriage in the Park, about half-past three o'clock; Lord and Lady Chichester were in the carriage - there was a gig with a gentleman in it; I did not observe any thing till we came up to the gig; the prisoner was driving master's carriage - I cannot say he was exactly drunk, but he had had something to drink; the accident happened between Grosvenor and Stanhope-gate - I did not observe the gig till his Lordship's carriage caught foul of it; I saw the gentleman chucked out - he fell just against the wheel; I think it was the fore wheel - the gig was going before us, not coming towards us; the road may be about twenty yards wide - the gentleman was picked up, put into his gig, and conveyed to the hospital - I think the hind wheel went over him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know how long his Lordship had had these horses? A. Only one day; they were not very spirited; I never saw the prisoner or the horses till the day before; the gig was not going very fast, nor were our horses; about seven miles an hour I should think - I was on the box with the prisoner, and do not think he saw the gig; it appeared to me a pure accident; he did not attempt to urge the horses- there was a carriage passing on the other side, which he appeared looking at - he appeared to drive with as much care as he could; if I had thought him not capable of taking care of the horses, I should have told his Lordship.

COURT. Q. You say he was not looking at the gig, but appeared to have his eyes on the carriage passing on the other side; the gig was before him, was it not? A. The gig was on his left, and the carriage on the right - the gig was on the left, but we had not passed it.

THE HONOURABLE EARL CHICHESTER . I was in the carriage with my lady - I saw the gig about half the length of the carriage before me; the road is about twenty yards wide - it happened immediately opposite Stafford-gate; the impression on my mind was that the coachman was drunk - it ought not to have happened if he had been sober and attending to his duty; as a good coachman, as I supposed him to be, he might have pulled up - I attended the unfortunate gentleman at the hospital for about an hour, then left, returned again and staid about two hours with him; during that time he was perfectly sensible, and made his will - I attested it; he was perfectly sensible of his approaching dissolution at the last interview; the chaplain and myself talked to him, and told him he was dying, and the medical man was there all the time; the only expression I heard him make use of was, "How could that man have done such a thing?" he said that repeatedly.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe the prisoner came from Lord Cardigan's service, recommended to your Lordship? A. He was a job coachman - he had driven Lord Cardigan and Lady Chichester last summer, when Lord Cardigan was in a feeble state of health; these horses had only been out two days.

THOMAS BRETTON . I am a serjeant in the Guards. I was about thirty yards from the gig; I saw the carriage coming along regularly towards me - the gig was eight or ten yards from his Lordship's carriage when I first saw it, and it was nearly in the centre of the road; I did not perceive any irregularity in the coachman, till I heard some person give a Halloo - I suppose it was the deceased; I immediately turned my eyes, and saw the carriage and gig in contact - the gentleman fell forward towards the hind-wheel of the carriage, which went over him; I assisted in taking him up and taking him to the hospital - the prisoner remained on his box, and in lifting the gentleman up I asked where he felt most hurt - he said his ribs were broken, and he felt great pain in the body; he did not speak loud enough for the coachman to hear.

JOHN SMITH . I am house-surgeon at the hospital. The deceased was brought there between three and four o'clock, and expired about eleven o'clock that night; I

saw he had received a severe injury, and asked if I should send for any one - he gave me the address of two gentlemen, whom I sent for; and shortly after I apprized him of his danger; he seemed conscious of it and made his will; I and his Lordship attested it - he said the coachman had behaved most rascally; he was perfectly sensible at the time - after his death I examined his body; I found five ribs fractured, and a very severe lacerated wound of the liver; I have no doubt the accident described was the cause of his death.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you his own gig was in the centre of the road? A. I do not recollect that he told me any of the circumstances of the accident.

GEORGE CULLEN . I attended at the hospital when the will was made - I am one of the executors; somebody said the coachman was drunk, he believed - Mr. Pain took up those words, and said he was either drunk or mad - his name was Thomas Pain .

GEORGE PICKERING . I am an attorney. I heard the deceased say the coachman had behaved rascally, and must have been either mad or drunk to have driven over him in the manner he did.

LORD CHICHESTER. I saw the carriage on the other side of the road - it was as close as possible it could be to my carriage, without touching it, within two feet - and meeting mine, not passing it, the gig was on the other side within three yards of the carriage, and before it - I saw my near-horse touch the wheel of the gig, and the near trace got over the wheel; the coachman's duty was to have pulled up - he might have gone a little nearer to the carriage, but very little; he ought to have seen the gig - it was very nearly in front of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you hear any shout? A. I do not remember it - there was a considerable noise; as the carriage was meeting mine, it was necessary for the coachman to be on his guard.

Prisoner's Defence. It was entirely accidental - I could not pull the horses up in time.

HENRY PORTER . I am a groom. I was about fifty yards off when the accident happened - I saw the gentleman thrown out; it appeared purely accidental - I saw the gig for five minutes before the gentleman was thrown out - there was a carriage on the right side about two yards from Lord Chichester's.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-169

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

837. ELIZA STALLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 silk dress, value 3l.; 1 muff, value 3l.; 1 pair of stays, value 1l.; 1 gold chain and cross, value 3l.; 4 gold rings, value 15s.; 10 spoons, value 3l.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 10s.; 2 gold seals, value 1l.; 1 gold key, value 15s., and 2 shifts, value 5s., the goods of John Phillips , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH ANN PHILLIPS . I am the wife of John Phillips; we live in Southampton-buildings, Holborn - the prisoner lived seven weeks in my service. On the morning of the 5th of November, about half-past six o'clock (she slept in the next room) I knocked, she did not answer; I went into her room, and found she had not been in bed, for it was not unmade - I found she had absconded, and missed the property stated in the indictment; her boxes were not taken away - I found them open; I did not see her again till she was in custody - the property might be worth about 20l.; no single article was worth 5l. - I saw my chain and ear-rings on the Monday evening; she left on Thursday.

JAMES HOWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Bartram, pawnbroker, Princes-street, Soho. I have two rings pawned on the 28th of November for 10s. in the name of Mary Argent , by the prisoner, 1 believe; she came on the 20th of March, said she had lost the duplicate, and wanted to take them out - I told her she must make an affidavit before they could be delivered; she said she would not expose herself by going to a public office, and went away.

THOMAS PRATT . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, of Charing-cross. I have five tea-spoons, pawned on the 6th of November for 12s., in the name of Mrs. Phillips - a pair of ear-rings, two seals, a watch-key, pawned for 16s. in the same name, at the same time, but in different pledges; they were pawned by a respectable dressed female, but I have not the slightest recollection of her - I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not.

WILLIAM PACKER . I am shopman to Mr. Cotterell, of Oxford-street. I have two table cloths, and two salt spoons, pawned on the 5th of November for 25s.; also a pair of ear-rings and two gold rings, the same day, for 8s., all in the name of E. Phillips, No. 6, Gilbert-street; I do not know who by.

WILLIAM ADAMSON . I am a Police-constable. On Thursday, the 25th of March, I received some duplicates from Mr. Hodges, which have been in my possession ever since - here are two of Cotterell's, two of Dobree's, and one of Bartram's; I have also a silk dress which I received from Hodges - he sent his servant up stairs for it.

JAMES HOWELL . This is the duplicate of the two rings.

WILLIAM PARKER . Here are the two duplicates I gave the person.

THOMAS PRATT . Here is our duplicate.

C. A. C. HODGES. I delivered these five duplicates to Adamson - they were found in my house, in Portman-street, by an officer; I saw him find them in a small trunk which the prisoner had packed up, containing silver spoons and other property of mine, but which she did not take away - the trunk belonged to the prisoner; she brought it when she came into my service; she was my only servant, and left me on the 21st of March - these duplicates were found that day; the box was left with me, and remained with me, I believe, till I gave the duplicate to Adamson - I generally carried them in my pockets; I cannot swear they are the same duplicates -I am certain I delivered him the same duplicates as I found in the box; this silk dress I believe to be the same as I have seen the prisoner wear.

JOSEPH HORNSBY . I am a Police-officer. On the 25th of March I took the prisoner at No. 20, James-street, and among other property. I found a squirrel muff in the back kitchen - the prisoner was there; she said nothing about it.

MRS. PHILLIPS. This is my muff - there is a place or two where the moth had got into it; I bought it the winter before last - I am certain it is mine; I had seen that on the Wednesday - I know this ring; the other is a plain one - the spoons, key, and other things are mine;

I had seen them a few days before she left - I gave nobody authority to pawn any of the articles.

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 99s. only .) Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years, to commence from the expiration of her former sentence , (see page 343.)

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18300415-170

838. CHARLES BIDMEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , 1 piece of paper, value 1d.; 3 patterns of ribbon, value 1d.; 1 half-sovereign, 11s., two 20l., one 10l., and one 5l. Bank note, and a bill of exchange for 54l. 6s. , the property of John Burton .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating them to be the property of other persons.

MESSRS. PHILLIPS and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GILES . I am a warehouseman, and live in Wood-street, Cheapside; I attend to the town business of Mr. Burton, a ribbon-manufacturer of Coventry. On the 21st of August I addressed a letter to him, and enclosed in it a 20l., a 10l., and a 5l. Bank note; a bill for 56l. 4s., a half-sovereign, and 4s., with a few patterns of ribbons; I wafered it, and delivered it to Pearson, my clerk, to take to Mr. Taylor, a silk-broker, in Lothbury - I had received the notes from Pearson that day; on Sunday morning, the 23rd, I saw Mr. Burton in town, and in consequence of a communication from him, I went to the Cross Keys, Wood-street, about a parcel.

ROBERT PEARSON . I am clerk to Mr. Giles. I received the letter from him on Friday, the 21st of August -I took it to Mr. Taylor, and received a letter from him, which I saw him enclose a 20l. note in; he gave me 7s. - I enclosed both letters in a packet, tied them in paper, and directed it to " John Burton , manufacturer, Coventry, per Emerald coach;" I took it to the Cross Keys, Wood-street - I delivered it to a porter in the office, and saw him put it through the bars of the desk which the prisoner was writing at - I had seen him several times before in the office, and knew he was employed there; I paid the porter 2d. for booking, and told him to take care of the parcel - this was about a quarter-past six o'clock; I had received the 20l. note that day at the Bank, and the 10l. and 5l. at Rogers and Co. - I did not see them enclosed in the letter myself.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You are clear that is the person you delivered the parcel to? A. I am clear it was passed to him; I pointed out a man named Zachary in the Court of Common Pleas, as the man I delivered it to, and saw him pass it through the bars to the prisoner; I understood that man's name afterwards to be Alexander - I thought his name was Zachary.

JAMES PRICE . I am guard of the Emerald Birmingham coach. I remember leaving the Cross Keys on the 21st of August; I received as many of the parcels as I could, and placed them in the coach - I have assistance; I cannot exactly recollect whether the prisoner was there when the coach was loaded; we sometimes receive the parcels from one porter , and sometimes from another - they are generally put on the counter altogether for us; I cannot say what was done that night.

WILLIAM DICAS . I am clerk to the solicitor for this prosecution. I never heard the prisoner say any thing relative to this, except on the trial of an action in the Common Pleas.

JAMES PRICE re-examined. I do not exactly know how many parcels I received that evening: those loaded from Wood-street were put into the boot - Moss and Hewitt assisted me in loading; I locked up the boot at Wood-street; the parcels the carriage of which are not paid are generally tied together, but whether they were on that night I cannot say; it was Moss' duty to bring the Coventry parcels to me - I kept the key of the boot, and did not leave the coach between London and Coventry, except at supper time; I kept the key of the boot - we arrived about half-past six o'clock in the morning; I saw the way-bill before I set out, but we do not take much notice of the parcels - the book-keeper at Coventry compares the way-bill with the parcels; I am not aware of any Coventry parcel leaving the coach, from the time I had the key till I got to Coventry - I do not recollect opening the boot after I left the Peacock. I believe this to be the waybill by the date of it (looking at it) - here is a parcel directed to Mr. Burton; it was the duty of Astel, the bookkeeper at Coventry, to compare the parcels with the way-bill - a porter examines it with him.

Q. Does the guard do it? A. Sometimes - I cannot tell whether I did it that night; I read it very seldom - I do not recollect whether this parcel was missing that night - sometimes they do not call them over; it was missing afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you hear of it being missed? A. On the Saturday night, as I came up again, Astel said a free parcel was missing, and inquiry was made about it some days after; the boot would be opened at the Three Cups, Aldersgate-street, if they had parcels - I see by the way-bill there was one; I generally stand by the boot, and take all the care I can of it; it was not opened at the Peacock that night.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to say that nobody but yourself opened the boot at the Three Cups, and when you received the parcel you locked it? A. Yes, my Lord.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce from the library of the Bank, a 20l. note, No. 13,673, dated the 22nd of July; a 10l., 16,850, 22nd of July; a 10l., 10,378, 21st of July; a 10l., 8,048, 21st of July; a 5l., 11,147, 23rd of June; on the front of the 20l. note is written, "Mr. Jones, Canterbury-place;" there is the same name and address on the three 10l. notes.

JONAS SMITH . I am a Bank-clerk. On Saturday, the 22nd of August, I gave sovereigns for the notes produced - it must have been before three o'clock, as I left at that hour; I judge it was between twelve and one o'clock;"Mr. Jones, Canterbury-place," was written on them at that time, for we always expect the public to do so; I do not know the person who brought them - I cannot say whether it was a man or woman; the word Lambeth is under Canterbury-place, in my writing; I asked the person where Canterbury-place was - he told me Lambeth, and I wrote it; after notes are exchanged they go to the library.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a special constable of the City, and know the prisoner; I have seen him write since the 21st of August, but not before - I believe "Mr. Jones, Canterbury-place," on this 20l. note to be his

writing; I also believe the name and address on the three 10l. to be his hand-writing - I have been employed to search through Lambeth for Canterbury-place, but have not been able to find any body named Jones there; I have made diligent inquiry of a person who has lived sixteen years there, and served parish offices.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you seen the prisoner write? A. Once - he wrote but one word full to the best of my recollection; he wrote other letters, but only one word - I do not give my opinion from that alone, but from other writing which has been put into my hands; I form my opinion from having seen him write alone - I got him to write to know where his residence was, after he was in custody; he wrote his sirname at full length -I was as clear of his writing before Sir Peter Laurie as I am now.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON . I am beadle of Aldersgate. I have seen the prisoner write; (looking at the notes) I believe this writing to be his.

Cross-examined. Q. What opportunities have you had of seeing him write? A. By passing him to his parish some time in February, when he applied to our parish for relief; I saw him sign a deposition - he wrote" Charles Bidmead " at full length; I only saw him write once.

JOHN BOSWELL . I am head book-keeper at the Cross Keys, Wood-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you had many opportunities of seeing the prisoner write? A. Yes, for nearly five years, he has been with me, and I have seen him write occasionally. (Looking at the 20l. note) I can see nothing like his writing here - I do not believe it to be his.

COURT. Q. Do you think it resembles it? A. I can only see the top of one letter like his writing; it is an open hand - I do not believe the writing on any of the notes to be his.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Look at this paper with the words "Jones, Finsbury?" A. This I believe to be the prisoner's.

JOHN TAYLOR . I live at Coventry. On the 21st of August I had a counting-house in town, and enclosed a 20l. note in a letter to Mr. Burton; I wafered it, and delivered it to Pearson.

JOHN BURTON . I live at Coventry. I did not receive a parcel containing these notes last August.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-171

Fifth Middlesex Jury, - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

839. EDWARD JOHN MIDDLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 yard of velvet, value 14s; 3 shirt-collars, value 3s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Busher ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Fifteen Days .

Reference Number: t18300415-172

840. HENRY LITTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 1 coat, value 3s. , the goods of William Ling ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-173

841. MARY ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 1 silver mug, value 50s.; 1 glass decanter, value 7s., and 1 glass tumbler, value 18d. , the goods of Alexander Smyth ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-174

842. JAMES LOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 piece of timber, called shoring, value 12s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

2nd COUNT, stating it to be the property of the Right Hon. William Lowther , commonly called Viscount Lowther, William Dacres Adams , Esq . and Henry Dawking , Esq .

3rd COUNT, stating it to be the property of William Oxley .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WALLER . On the 11th of March I saw the prisoner go into the ruins at the bottom of Southampton-street , between twelve and one o'clock, and take a piece of timber used to shore up the house; he took it as far as Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields - the officer stopped him with it; we questioned him, and he said Mr. Oxley, the foreman, gave it to him - then he said a woman bought some timber, and gave him this to sell for beer, and then he said a man named Charles gave it to her.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I stopped the prisoner near one o'clock; I asked where he was going - he said to Mr. Cubitt's; on our way to the watch-house he said Mr. Oxley gave it to him, and then he said a lady had bought some timber, and was to give him some beer, but did not, and he was going to sell it for her.

WILLIAM OXLEY. I am employed in taking care of the property. This piece of wood belonged to the Commissioners of Woods and Forests; it was in my care - the prisoner was working there.

SAMUEL STANILAND . Lord Lowther is one of the Commissioners of Woods and Forests .

Prisoner's Defence. This man was selling some of the wood; he gave several pieces of timber away, and he said"This is the only piece without an owner, you may have it if you like," and it is my opinion that as soon as I was gone Charles sent the person to take me - if I am to die this minute, this is the truth; Oxley knows the person to whom he sold the last two lots of fire-wood.

WILLIAM OXLEY . This is a new piece kept on purpose to shore up the adjoining house; it is thirteen feet long - it was put there by Mr. Baker six months ago.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-175

843. JOHN LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , three decanters, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Dawson and Henry Smith Cafe .

JOSEPH MIDDLETON . I am porter to Mr. Thomas Dawson and Henry Smith Cafe, auctioneer s, Marlborough-street . On the 10th of April three decanters were lost from their place, while the goods were on show; I was writing at a table - the prisoner entered, and went to the place where the decanters were in a stand; in a few minutes I heard a sound of glass, and the prisoner was gone - I went to the top of the stairs and saw him with the neck of one of the decanters out of his pocket; I called a fellow

servant to go with me, and we overtook him at the corner of Blenheim-street - I took him back; I got an officer who took him - he was quite a stranger; he took out one decanter while I went for the officer - when the officer came he found the third decanter in his umbrella.

CHARLES LAMMING . I went with Middleton and took the prisoner at the end of Blenheim-street; when he came back, and Middleton was gone, he gave me one decanter out of his pocket; the witness had taken the other before he went.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he say any thing in your hearing? A. No.

HENRY GODDARD . I received these two decanters from the witnesses, and found the other in the prisoner's umbrella.

Cross-examined. Q. What did he say? A. He said he had a wife and two children, and it was from distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and two small children; I was actually in a state of starvation.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300415-176

843. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , 1 pair of trousers, value 12s. , the goods of Thomas Nichols .

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Nichols , pawnbroker , Gray's Inn-lane . A pair of trousers were taken from the shop door on the 12th of April, but I did not miss them till the prisoner was brought in with them; I had seen them about an hour before.

EDWARD BROWN . I was passing along Gray's Inn-lane, and heard something like the breaking of a string; I looked across the way, and saw the prisoner with something blue under his arm - I called Stop thief! and he was stopped about a dozen doors off, by a person passing; he dropped the trousers - I took them up and gave them to the officer in the shop; the prisoner begged for mercy.

FRANCIS FAGAN. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a hair-dresser, and have a wife and two children; I am in the greatest distress, and my wife has only been put to bed one week - I have no friends.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300415-177

844. JAMES SHELDON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 1 basket, value 6d., and 1 leg of pork, value 3s. , the goods of William Johnson .

JOSEPH JOHNSON . My brother William keeps a butcher's-shop . On the 5th of March his boy was sent out with some meat in a basket; a lad came and told me it was taken away - I went out and found the basket; I know nothing of the prisoner, but took him from Brown's description.

TIMOTHY ALLINGHAM . I was sent out with the basket and a leg of pork in it, between eight and nine o'clock at night - I put my basket down and went into a passage; and the basket was gone in a minute - I did not see any body with it, but I found the basket thrown over some garden rails, about three minutes walk from where I put it down - the pork was gone.

DANIEL BROWN . I was in the street; I saw Allingham put down his basket with a leg of pork in it, against the palings, while he went up an entry - I saw the prisoner, whom I knew, come and take it; I looked well at him - he went down White Lion-passage; I thought he was only playing a trick, but I found he did not come back - I am thirteen years of age; I did not speak to him - I knew where he lived; the gas was lighted in our shop, which is at the corner of the entry.

JOHN JOHNSON . This lad told me the prisoner was the man who took the basket - he swore at me a little, but the boy said he was the person, and I took him to the watch-house; I considered him a little in liquor.

JURY. Q. How long was it before you took him? A. About an hour and a half after the boy went out.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300415-178

845. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , 6 printed bound books, value 20s., the goods of John George Trentell and another .

There being a third partner the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18300415-179

846. THOMAS SPRIGG was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 pair of boots, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Leverton .

ELIZABETH LEVERTON . I am the wife of Thomas Leverton, we live in White's-yard, White-cross-street ; my father is blind. The prisoner was his servant - he came to us on the Saturday before the 25th of February; I was entrusted with my father's property - I was sitting by the fire, dressing my child, and saw the prisoner take these boots from my father's bed side, to clean them.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am a chimney-sweeper. On the 25th of February the prisoner came to our place and brought this pair of boots, which he offered to a young man at our door, who called me down and asked if I would buy them - I said, "No, I am going to have my own soled and heeled, and these won't fit me;" but I tried them on and they did - I bought them for 1s. 6d.

EDWARD PENSTONE . I am an officer. I was going out of the morning of the 25th, and saw Brown going down the street with the prisoner; Brown had brought me the boots before - I kept them and let Brown go; he brought the prisoner and said he had sold them - the prisoner said he knew his way to Worship-street, for he had been there.

Prisoner's Defence. The sweep told me to get shoes or boots, or any thing, and he would buy them of me.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300415-180

847. MARY RIORDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 shawl, value 9s.; 2 shirts, value 7s.; 1 shift, value 4s.; 1 pair of stays, value 8s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 8s.; 2 gowns, value 13s.; 1 gown piece, value 7s.; 1 bonnet, value 4s.; 2 caps, value 3s.; 1 collar, value 5s.; 1 coat, value 3l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of John Galton .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN GALTON. I live at Barnsbury-row, Islington . The prisoner was in my service in February last, and had been so for two months. On the 19th of February she was sent out on an errand by my wife - she was brought back

by two watchmen in a quarter of an hour, with some articles of clothing, the whole of which belong to us; she was crying, and I thought some accident had happened - she said nothing relating to these things to me.

JAMES ESSEX . I am a watchman of Islington. I met the prisoner at half-past six that evening, with a bundle over her shoulder; I asked what she had got; she said clothing; I said I had some suspicion it was not right, that she must go to the watch-house, and if it was right she should be let go - in going along she said, "Let me go home;" I said, "You shall if it is not too far;" she said, "I live up here," and took me to her master's, who owned the property; while we were examining the bundle she got out backwards - another watchman pursued and took her.

AUGUSTUS FREEMAN . I am a watchman. I was on duty - when we came up to the prisoner she said she had some blankets going to be washed, I looked and saw it was wearing-apparel, and we took her to her master's - she made her way to the kitchen, and got out the back way; I missed her crying, and took her about two hundred yards from the house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-181

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

848. WILLIAM PIPER , WILLIAM WALLIS and THOMAS WALLIS , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering a building, within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Edwin Hill and others, and stealing 1 saw, value 1s.; 2 gimblets, value 2d., and 1 hammer, value 6d., the goods of the said Edwin Hill and others; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s., and one round frock, value 1s., the goods of George Cox ; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 razor, value 9d., and 4 ounces weight of tobacco, value 9d., the goods of Thomas Walker .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

EDWIN HILL . I live at Bruce Castle, Tottenham . I have more than one partner ; Cox and Walker were employed in our garden - there is a garden-house, used for keeping tools, within the ring-fence of our premises; it is about one hundred yards from our house, but within the wall.

GEORGE COX. I was in the employ of Messrs. Hill and others at Tottenham; I worked there three years, and know the garden-house very well - I remember finding it open one morning, but I cannot tell the day; I had fastened it the night before, as I did every night; it was broken open - when I fastened it at six o'clock in the evening, there was a saw, two gimblets, and a hammer, belonging to Mr. Hill, a round frock and a pair of shoes belonging to me, and a waistcoat belonging to Walker - at a quarter-past six o'clock in the morning I found it open, and these things were gone; the window was shut and fastened the night before, but there was a hole - the glass was broken; I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you paid for your work there? A. Yes - I am a pauper; the officers pay me - I am not paid by Mr. Hill; I believe this was after Christmas; I think I can swear it was - I had not seen the prisoners there; I did not see this property again till last week.

THOMAS WALKER . I was employed with Cox at this place; I went to the shed between six and seven o'clock in the morning, just after him - there was snow on the ground, and I saw the foot marks of two men; the heel of one looked a good deal larger than the other; I traced them to the bottom of the garden, and then they got over the wall - I did not try to trace them any farther.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were the marks? A. Down one side; we traced them about twenty rods from the window - the snow was all over the place; Cox locked up the garden-house in my presence - we took the key to Mr. Hill, and we did so every night; I am sure the marks were of men's feet.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were the foot marks close up to the building? A. Yes.

JOHN FOWLER . I am constable of Tottenham. On the 27th of February I searched Piper's house, behind the Roebuck, at Tottenham - I found this saw and two gimblets there; he was then in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see his wife? A. Yes, she did not show them to me - I took several duplicates from her, but did not take her into custody.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you take any notice of the feet of either of them? A. Thomas Wallis wears a very thicksoled shoe, having had his thigh broken - I have seen him wear such a shoe; the sole is high as well as the heel - it would make the same impression as a thin one.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am constable of Tottenham. I searched the house of the Wallis' - they live together at Tottenham; I found this waistcoat there - Thomas Wallis had left before I went; I took him near Buntingford, in Hertfordshire, on the 4th of March - in coming home he said he was very sorry that he ran away, but he was in hope he should not be taken; I found him in bed - he called me up and said he knew my voice, and knew what I wanted him for; I have not noticed his foot.

MR. HILL re-examined. Q. Did you ever notice the elder Wallis' feet? A. Yes, he was digging on my ground about a year ago, and he wore a thin shoe to make equality - that would make a different impression on snow; I know this saw to be mine - I do not know the gimblets.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know when they were last safe? A. No; I cannot say whether I have lost saws before, it is very likely I may.

GEORGE COX . I know this saw well and this small gimblet - they were in the shed.

Cross-examined. Q. How many tools were there? A. I suppose half a dozen spades, shovels, and pick-axes.

THOMAS WALKER . This is my waistcoat, and was in the shed on the night in question - here is where I had cut three buttons off it.

JURY. Q. How long had you had it? A. Three-quarters of a year - it is such as the parish officers furnish to paupers; it is darned in the sleeve.

William Wallis 's Defence. My mother can swear she darned it herself.

ESTHER WALLIS . I am the daughter of Thomas Wallis; I know this waistcoat; my mother bought it twelve months ago last Friday, in Petticoat-lane, for 2s. 6d. - I know it again; I remember the officer taking it away.

COURT. Q. Do you remember the day of the month? A. Yes, it was twelve months ago last Friday - it was too small for my father, and my mother darned it; I do not

know that it was worn out at one of the pockets - I know Petticoat-lane very well; I then lived with a person named Thorn, in the Dog-row, a broom-maker - I took a walk with my mother to buy it; I do not know whether this is the colour they wear at Tottenham.

ELEANOR LAWRENCE . My husband is a carpenter, and lives at No. 9, Queen-street. This saw was broken by William Piper , at St. Katharine's Docks, and he had to pay for it; it belonged to a carpenter, who came for 2s. 6d. for it, and I saw Piper's wife pay it - I was sitting in her house at the time; this was three years ago, when the Docks began.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What is your husband? A. A carpenter, and he works for Mr. Slater, in Hackney-road - he was discharged some time ago when they were slack, but he is gone back again; I am sister-in-law to Piper - I did not look at the saw myself, but I heard them say there was the name of Hill on it. I do not know Mr. Hill, of Tottenham.

COURT. Q. Were you before the Magistrate? A. No; I did not hear that an out-house had been broken open; I heard my brother was taken up - I now live at No. 9, Queen-street, Clerkenwell; it was three years ago he broke this saw.

THOMAS WALKER re-examined. Q. Did you have the accident to break this saw? A. Yes, sawing an appletree two years ago, and I kept it back some time that Mr. Hill might not see it - it is called a lock-saw.

T. WALLIS - GUILTY . Aged 50.

PIPER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

W. WALLIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-182

849. WILLIAM WALLIS and WILLIAM PIPER were again indicted for that they, on the 26th of February , at Tottenham , the shop of Thomas Newsom , there situate, feloniously did break and enter, and steal therein 3 bushels of apples, value 15s.; 40 oranges, value 3s.; 3 pecks of onions, value 5s.; 25lbs. weight of pork, value 20s.; 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 jacket, value 20s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 10s.; 10 knives, value 2s.; 4 forks, value 1s.; 1 bag, value 1s.; 1 pair of mittens, value 6d.; 2 razors, value 2s.; 13 boot-laces, value 1s.; 1 bed-wrench, value 1s.; 1 sack, value 1s.; 8s. in copper monies, and 1 piece of foreign coin, value 1d., the property of the said Thomas Newson ; and THOMAS WALLIS and JANE WALLIS were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS NEWSOM. I am a gardener , and live at Tottenham - I had a shop there in February last, but neither I nor any of my family slept there. On the night of the 26th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I left the articles stated all safe in the shop; there is a door leads from the shop to the stairs of the dwelling-house - I fastened the shop; I went next morning between five and six o'clock - I unlocked the door of the shop, but could not get in; a man going by with a light came and assisted me: we pushed the door open and found the obstruction was occasioned by a sack being hung over the fan-light over the door - I missed all the articles stated, and the copper money and foreign coin from a desk; I went to the back door and found it on the latch - I had bolted it the night before; I looked up and saw a back room window open, and marks on the tiles as if men had got in there; I am not sure whether it had been shut the night before - the door leading to the stairs was open; which I had shut and latched - I saw several footsteps, and traced one across the gate-way, and across the field to a stile leading to Scotland-green, and on to the pavement, where I lost them; this was between six and seven o'clock; there were two or three persons footsteps at the back of my house, but it was only one I traced so far.

WILLIAM TALBOT . I am a farmer, and live at Tottenham. On the morning of the 27th of February I was out early in my field, which is between the prosecutor's and the house in which Wallis lives - I went up a private lane, and found the fence broken down; I then found some person had been crossing there - as I was returning I saw Griffiths and the other constable tracing some footsteps across my field; I came down to where the fence was broken, and found some footsteps, which I traced over another fence into Mr. Newsom's garden; I saw Thomas Wallis , who was between Mr. Newsom's and his own house - he appeared to be raking.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you see the rake? A. I cannot say I did; I did not speak to him - I was thirty or forty yards from him; I did not ask what business he had there - this was about seven o'clock; I told the officer.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am constable of Tottenham. On the morning after this robbery, I went with Fowler to the prosecutor's about seven o'clock - I found footsteps of two persons as it appeared to me; they went from there to within thirty or forty yards of Wallis' house - I got a warrant and went to Wallis'; I saw Martha Wallis first, and then Jane Wallis, the mother - I said I had a warrant to search for stolen property; she said "For God's sake, Mr. Griffiths, do'nt make any uproar in the parish - I will let you know where they all are;" the daughter then said to her, "I will tell you what mother, the first time I knew my brother kept company with Bill Piper , I knew there never would be any good come of it" - the mother then went up stairs; I and the daughter followed; I saw something which appeared to be a bed, but it was not - she took off the top clothes, and under them was the whole of the property; the prosecutor was with me and claimed it - I took William Wallis and Piper the same day; I found on Wallis, 2s. 1 1/2d. in copper, and among it this coin: there was only a knife on Piper - I took them past the prosecutor's house- Mrs. Newsom stood at the door, and said, "You good for nothing rogues, how could you rob such poor people as us?" Piper said, "D - n your eyes, why did not you take your pig home with you;" I knew old Wallis had left home, and I took him in Herts - I know Mr. Robinson's hand-writing; this examination is signed by him.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Mrs. Newsom here? A. No. I went over the ground and saw the marks of two persons who had gone in different tracks the same way; I heard Mr. Newsom state that the marks were traced to within one hundred yards of Wallis, but I traced them in a different way and nearer the house - Jane Wallis told me she would give up all, and if she had known they had been Mr. Newsom's she would have taken them back.

JOHN FOWLER . I am a constable. I searched Piper's

house, and found a pair of gaiters and stockings very wet, as if they had been lately used, and this chisel, which I applied to the marks on the desk at the prosecutor's, and they corresponded exactly.

THOMAS NEWSOM . This coin was in the desk at my house, and the property found at Wallis' was mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was this coin? A. By itself in the desk, where the copper monies were; I saw it safe the night before.

The examinations were here put in and read.

William Piper, being asked by me if he had any thing to say, cautioning him, that what he said would be put down in writing, and used in evidence; neither promise nor threat was made or held out to him, but he voluntarily saith, "I went with Wallis last night to Islington, and we returned together about twelve o'clock at night; we went to my father-in-law's, in Benson's-yard, Tottenham - we staid there about ten minutes; we parted at my father-in-law's - I went directly home to my lodgings, and went to bed about one o'clock; I know nothing about the articles now produced." The mark of X WM. PIPER.

(Signed) W. ROBINSON.

William Wallis , the son, being asked by me if he had any thing to say, cautioning him, that what he said would be put down in writing, and used in evidence (neither threat nor promise was made or held out to him), but he voluntarily says -"Yesterday evening, after work, I went to Islington with William Piper; we returned to Tottenham about half-past twelve o'clock at night - we went together to Piper's mother-in-law's house, in Benson's-yard; Piper went home to his lodgings, and I went home to my father - about a quarter to one o'clock I had occasion to go into the yard; I found all the articles now produced, tied up in two sacks behind the privy - I took them into the house, and put them in the room below stairs; I opened the sacks, and I saw in one of them a dead pig, "which I took out and laid it on the table - I then went to bed; in the morning, when I got up, I told my father what I had found behind the privy." The mark X of W. WALLIS.

Before me, W. ROBINSON, 27th February, 1830.

William Wallis ' Defence. My father knew nothing of the robbery, and my mother was asleep.

Piper's Defence. I left Wallis and went home; this chisel belonged to me when I worked at East Barnet.

PIPER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

W. WALLIS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

JANE WALLIS - GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

T. WALLIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-183

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

850. JOHN RISTON and THOMAS FLETCHER were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 teakettle, value 10s. , the goods of William Parker .

It being the property of George Parker , the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18300415-184

851. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , 2 live tame rabbits, price 5s. , the property of James Reed .

LOT FLETCHER . The prisoner brought these two rabbits to sell at my house in Slater-street, Bethnal-green, on Wednesday evening, about seven or eight o'clock; he said they were his own - I gave 2s. for them; I went to the office next day - two persons came together, but the prisoner had the money.

ELLEN REED . I am the wife of James Reed - he is at sea . I bought these two rabbits for my little boy twelve months ago - I lost them early last month; I had fed them about six or half-past six o'clock in the evening, and fastened them in the hutch - I went to fill the kettle, and when I returned I missed them; I am certain there are them, by the marks on them - the prisoner came to my premises and wished my little boy to join with him in a pigeon, the week before I lost the rabbits; I live in Chapman-street, St. George's in the East .

JAMES MORGAN . I got these rabbits at Fletcher's; one of my men told me they were there, and I took the son and this witness - they both knew them.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my mother at five o'clock on Wednesday morning, as I meant to turn steady and mind my work; this gentleman came and took me - a boy talking with me ran away, but I did not run.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-185

852. JOHN ADAMS and WILLIAM BARRATT were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , 18 handkerchiefs, value 3l. 10s. , the goods of Jane Puzey and Martha Newbery .

JANE PUZEY . I am in partnership with Martha Newbery - we keep a shop in Holborn . On the 3d of April we lost some handkerchiefs from the shop, but did not miss them till they were brought back; these are them - they have our shop mark on them; I had seen them about two hours before.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a Police-officer. I was going up Holborn, and saw Barratt standing at the corner of a court; Adams went into the prosecutor's shop - I turned back and passed the shop on the opposite side of the way; I stood some time till Adams brought out these handkerchiefs; he put on his hat and put them in it; he walked on- I followed him, and Barratt and another followed me; I stopped looking at a picture shop till they all came together - I followed them; they saw me - all threw off their hats and ran off; the two prisoners were taken - I took up one hat, with these six handkerchiefs in it; I am quite sure Adams is the boy who went into the shop, but they had changed hats before I came up to them - Barratt was near the shop when Adams went in; and he passed the shop to see if he was coming; I kept my eyes upon them from the time they pulled off their hats and ran - I took Barratt.

Barratt. The witness said he saw me have a cap on all the while, and when a witness was speaking at the office, he said, "Hush! hush!" - Witness. He had a cap on at first, and then the one who got away had the cap, and got off with it.

JOSEPH ROBINSON . I was a Police-constable. On the 3rd of April I was passing Lincoln's Inn-fields about six o'clock in the evening - I heard Stop thief! called, and saw Barratt running across the fields; he threw off his hat, and I saw some handkerchiefs fall out of it - I caught him, and the hat was brought to me by a young man; I saw the same hat taken up, and these handkerchiefs were in it.

Barratt. Q. How long did you see me run? A. About three minutes, as near as possible; the hat he threw off was, no doubt, for fear I should see him.

THOMAS HOBBS . These six handkerchiefs were given to me in the crowd; I do not know by whom.

Adams' Defence. I was taken; I asked for my hat, and one was brought with some handkerchiefs in it - I said it did not belong to me, and mine was brought; the man who took me could prove whether I had any handkerchiefs in my hat, but they would not let him speak at the office.

THOMAS HOBBS . I went into the clerk's office at the Magistrate's, and heard Robinson tell a person he would not be wanted.

JOSEPH ROBINSON . There was a young man came to the office, but the Magistrate had heard our depositions, and did not make any inquiry about any further witness; to the best of my knowledge he was the person who took up the handkerchief - when I came out he said, "Shall I be wanted any more;" I said, "I suppose not, the Magistrate seems satisfied."

ADAMS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

BARRATT - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18300415-186

853. MARTHA BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 20 yards of gingham, value 10s. , the goods of James Veitch .

JAMES VEITCH . On the 20th of February I lost my gingham from my shop door in Ratcliff-highway ; it was partly out, and could be taken without going into the shop; I did not miss it till the Policeman brought the prisoner in with it - this is it.

DAVID LOVICK . I was a Police-officer. I saw the prisoner take this from the door - it was partly out; she crossed into the middle of the road, and I took her back to the shop - it had been pinned on a rail in the shop; I saw her working at it as I passed - I returned, and saw her again; she tried four times before she got it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and did not see where it came from - I was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-187

854. THOMAS READ was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , 1 bridle, value 5s., the goods of John Abrahams ; 2 tugs, value 2s.; part of a pair of reins, value 1s., and 2 back bands, value 2s., the goods of John Cuttell .

JOHN ABRAHAMS. I am a green-grocer ; I rent a stall at the Nag's Head . On the morning of the 11th of March, at a quarter past four o'clock, I went there and found the gates open; a fishmonger had gone out before I got there, and left the gates open - I saw a man with his face to the wall, on the left-hand side, about twenty yards from Mr. Cuttell's door; I knocked at his door, and told him some person was in the stable - he went and got an officer; I went back with the officer, and missed my bridle, which I had left there over night - I found it about thirty yards from the stable, laying in the yard; the prisoner was found in the yard.

JOHN CUTTELL. I am landlord of the yard . I found some harness in different parts of the yard - the prisoner was in the yard, and no one else; nothing was found on him - he was behind a rubbish-cart; five of us were nearly two hours looking for him.

Prisoner. Q. Were not your gates open at all hours of the night? A. No; there is a fisherman goes out every morning, at half-past three o'clock, and he leaves the gates open - the premises are extensive, and persons might get into the yard; there is a hole in the back of the premises, which leads to the barracks - two of these stables were locked; they got a ladder and got up in the rack.

GEORGE HORNSBY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found a dessert-knife and latch-key on him - the stables were not fastened.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the yard, and laid down in one of the carts; I knew no more till the officer came - the stable door was off the hinges.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-188

855. CHARLES RUMSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of April , 3lbs. weight of cheese, value 18d. , the goods of Jacob Holmes and Thomas Russell .

JACOB HOLMES . I am in partner ship with Thomas Russell - we live in Chiswell-street . On the 2nd of April we lost a piece of cheese; I did not see it taken, but a young man told me of it - I had seen it not above a minute before, on a board within the sash, which was open.

RICHARD BOHLEN . I was passing on the 2nd of April, and saw the prisoner take the cheese from the shop; he put his hand over the board - it was six or eight inches within the shop; I pursued, and took him in Type-street- there was another with him; the prisoner dropped the cheese as I collared him, and Mr. Holmes took it up.

EDWARD PIMSTONE . I am an officer, and took him - he said he stole it because he was hungry.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me that took it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300415-189

856. HENRY READ was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Ralph Wilcoxon .

SAMUEL WELLS . I am foreman to Ralph Wilcoxon , a shoemaker , of Oxford-street . On the 25th of February the prisoner came and asked for a pair of shoes; he tried on several, and fixed on one pair, which were to be 7s. 6d. - he then said he was going next door, to have something to eat, and would get change; I said we could give him change - he hesitated, then felt his pocket, and said he had lost a sovereign; I said he did not look like a man who had a sovereign to lose - he said he had: I said I had my doubts, and he could have no objection to my feeling his pockets, which I did, and found these shoes, which are my master's.

PETER KAIN . I took the prisoner, and have the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I lost the sovereign just before I went into the shop, from a hole in my pocket.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300415-190

857. AGNES PURTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 6 yards of ribbon, value 4s. , the goods of James Hawkins .

SUSANNAH WALTERS . I serve in the shop of Mr.

James Hawkins , in Sidney's-alley - he keeps a bonnetshop ; I saw this ribbon safe on Saturday night, and was told on Sunday morning it was gone - the prisoner was my servant; I searched the house, and found the ribbon under the mattress of her bed - I charged her with it; she denied it - I said it was of no use denying it, for I had found it; she then begged of me to forgive her - she had been three months with me, and had behaved very well; I had a good character with her.

ELIZA SUSANNAH OWEN. I got up that morning to take a walk, and saw the prisoner placing some amber coloured ribbon up to her cap, to see how it looked - I asked Mrs. Walters if she had given her the ribbon; she said No - the ribbon was then found under the mattress of her bed.

JOHN FIRNS . I was called in to take the prisoner - I asked her if she took the ribbon; she said Yes, out of the drawer.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300415-191

858. THOMAS PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , 1 watch, value 15s.; 1 watchchain, value 6d., and 1 watch-key, value 6d. , the goods of Arthur Edward Meggs .

THOMAS AMES . I am a constable of Shadwell. I went to the shop of Lawson, a pawnbroker, on the 17th of March; I saw the prisoner, who Mr. Lawson said had come to redeem a watch which had been stopped that morning - I asked how he came to get a watch out without a duplicate; he said a young man outside sent him in, and said he could get it - I asked him to point out the young man; he said he could not see him, and did not know his name, nor where he lived.

SAMUEL WILLIAMS . On the 16th of March I received the watch in pawn, I believe from the prisoner, but I cannot positively swear it - I live with Mr. Lawson.

EDWARD MEGGS . I am the son of Arthur Edward Meggs. This is his watch - we missed it out of the back room below stairs, on the 16th of March; the prisoner was at our house sometimes, but I cannot be positive whether he was there on the 16th of March.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is that your watch? A. Yes, my father gave it me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300415-192

859. MATTHEW NOWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 coat, value 6s., and 1 snuff-box, value 2s. , the goods of William John Holt .

WILLIAM JOHN HOLT . I missed my coat and snuffbox on the 18th of February from the lobby of No. 6, Finsbury-square , where I reside as clerk - I missed a great coat in about a week, and have not found it since; but I have this snuff-box, which was in the pocket of it- I had had it so long that I knew it immediately from some chips on it; it had some snuff in it when I lost it, and some of the same snuff was in it when it was found - the prisoner used to come to the house, but I never saw him.

ESTHER ADLINGTON . I am servant to Mr. Ewington. On the 18th of February the prisoner brought some coals to the house, and on the 25th he brought two sacks more - he took some up stairs, and some down; he passed the passage or hall, where the coats hang in general.

JOHN GRAVES. I live in the same house with Medcraft in Hart-street. I received a coat from a little girl, who lives with my landlady, about the 18th of February; it was a black coat, but I never opened it - it was a close body coat; the prisoner came to my room a little before one o'clock, and asked for a black coat - I said, "There is one hangs over the chair;" he said, "I left it when you were out;" Mrs. Loveday had come in, called me Johnny, asked if it would fit me, and then I saw it was a close body coat, and too small for me - I saw that it had a bit of red tape at the top, and said "Where did it come from? it must have been hung up at some shop;" the prisoner laughed, and took it away - he gave me a bit of snuff from a box, the colour of this, and it had some drawing on it. On the 25th of February he came again in a great flurry, and asked if his boots were done; he had a great coat on then.

SARAH MEDCRAFT . The prisoner came into my passage, and went into the yard - I ran down, and he said,"Will you be so kind as to give Mr. Graves this coat," and he took it out of a coal-sack - I took it from him, hung it across a chair; and when my little girl came from school, I sent it to Mr. Graves; it was a close body coat.

MARY ANN LOVEDAY . I saw the prisoner in Mr. Graves' room, with a coat under his arm - I said, "What have you got?" he said, "A coat" - I said, "Will it fit our Johnny?" he said No; I took it, and saw a piece of red tape to hang it up by - the prisoner took it, and went away; he said, "I know where this shall fetch me eight pegs;" I saw a little yellow snuff-box, with a picture drawn on the top of it - I think it was this one.

JOHN GARDNER . The prisoner came, and asked me to lend him 11/2d. towards a pot of beer, and left this box with me; it had snuff in it - this is the box; I marked it, and then I lent him 1d. to buy some tobacco.