Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th February 1830.
Reference Number: 18300218
Reference Number: f18300218-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN CROWDER, MAYOR.

THIRD SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 18TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1830, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY HENRY STOKES; NO. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1830.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN CROWDER , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Honourable Sir John Bailey , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Bolland , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bernard Bosanquet , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; William Heygate , Esq., and Anthony Brown , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Charles Farebrother , Esq., Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

John Anderson Wilt ,

Estith S. Davis ,

Joseph Porch ,

Samuel Jordan ,

George Everingham ,

James Jackson ,

Robert Noble ,

Samuel Briggs ,

Thomas Ellis ,

George Boyer ,

Thomas Kidstone ,

Thomas Roberts .

Second

John Blelock ,

George Wood ,

Gillet Johns ,

Thomas Ward ,

John Cousins ,

Wm. Hodgkins ,

Richard Hawkins ,

William Carpenter

Wm. Clark Brand ,

Clement Pool ,

Frederick Horn ,

Charles Roberts .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

James Bond ,

Charles Bailey ,

John Bell ,

John Bower ,

John Baxter ,

Richard Bridges ,

James Bailey ,

William Bird ,

William Bullock ,

John Blunt ,

John Buckel ,

George Bugg .

Second

Wm. Tyler Burrows ,

Thomas Bennett ,

George Bagnal ,

Charles Bull ,

John Bridges ,

William Bailey ,

Benjamin Bright ,

William Bunting ,

Charles Beckett ,

John Bennet ,

Robert Baker ,

William Bailey .

Third

Richard Aldridge ,

James Ashfield ,

Samuel Aldridge ,

F. Briant Adams ,

Archibald Alladice ,

Thomas Amos ,

John Alexander ,

Richard Ayliff ,

Jonas Atridge ,

William Alder ,

George Abell ,

Thomas Appleby .

Fourth

John Angel ,

William Ashcraft ,

Thomas Andrews ,

James Averd ,

Thos. J. T. Ashley ,

Thomas Alland ,

Michael T. Atkins ,

Abraham Abrahams ,

William Ashby ,

James Aslam ,

William Atkins ,

Benjamin Best .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 18, 1830.

CROWDER, MAYOR. - THIRD SESSION.

Reference Number: t18300218-1

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

498. THOMAS SAGGERS and JEREMIAH CRANE were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , at St. Alban, Wood-street , 7 pieces of flannel, value 23l., the goods of John Leach and others, the masters and employers of the said Thomas Saggers , in their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, like the first, only stating it to be the dwelling-house of Jacob Tweedale .

JACOB TWEEDALE . I live at No. 3, Love-lane, Aldermanbury , in the parish of St. Alban, Wood-street - I rent the house, and live there; I am a manufacturer of flannels and baizes , in partnership with John Leach and another. Saggers was in our service - Crane was a stranger to us, but I believe Saggers has employed him as an occasional porter ; I have seen him in our house, employed as an occasional porter. On the 22nd of January, a little after nine o'clock in the morning, I received information from an officer, and missed this flannel; I went to Guildhall directly, and saw the two prisoners in custody - I saw seven pieces of flannel there, which I am certain are ours; they are worth about 23l. - they were kept in different parts of the warehouse - I had put part of them by myself the night before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you know that at the time Crane was in your warehouse, that Saggers was not there, being ill? A. I do not know that; Saggers has been occasionally ill - I will not swear Crane was not employed part of the time of his being ill; I did not employ him - I believe Saggers has been ill for a fortnight or three weeks at a time. Crane could not be in our employ as extra porter while Saggers was ill, because he could not be there without Saggers employing him - our warehouseman is here; we have a clerk, who is not here.

Q. Might he not be employed part of the time that Saggers was ill? A. He might, but it would be extraordinary - I should think it impossible; I will not swear it- he could not be in our employ unless Saggers employed him, because he always employed the extra porters; he generally does - if he is on the premises he does it: Crane never was employed by any body else, I am certain - I will swear that; nobody but myself, Saggers, and the warehouseman employ extra porters, as far as regards Crane I think I am right - Crane was never employed by any body except by Saggers; if Saggers was away we must, of course, employ an extra porter - nobody but myself and the warehouseman employed them; I will not swear Crane was never employed there when Saggers was ill, I do not think he was - the warehouseman is here to tell you; we have not two warehouses in London - we have an upper and lower room in the same house, but not two establishments; we serve customers in Cheapside, both wholesale and retail, but never send goods there to be sold retail on our account, I swear that - they could not be sent without my knowledge, unless they went the same way as these.

Q. Did you not ask Saggers to go to Guildhall, without taking him into custody? A. I did, and he went - I do not know whether it was willingly; he did not manifest any unwillingness, but I cannot tell what passes in a man's mind - I told him to go for the purpose of identifying Crane, who was in custody; he went without making any objection - the Magistrate was not sitting, and he was at liberty; he had not been taken into custody: he went again willingly, at my request, in about half an hour - he knew I had charged somebody with stealing the goods; he was examined and detained - he denied all knowledge of Crane: he has been in our employ three years - he lived in Philip-lane; I went to his lodgings, but found nothing there of ours.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you or the warehouseman attend to the business? A. We both attend; I do not know which of us is most employed - I cannot state any time at which Crane was employed; it must be within two years or two years and a half - I will not be confined to two years and a half; I have seen him on the premises, but cannot say when; I will swear I have seen him on the premises, my present warehouseman was then in my employ - we have been in business in London nearly three years; I will not swear to any time; I will swear it is within the last three years, but I recollect seeing Crane there, coming with a knot, and putting it aside - I know him well, and Saggers must have paid him - he always paid the extra porters; if he was ill we must have paid them; I never paid Crane.

COURT. Q. Can you say about how long it is since you employed him? A. I cannot tell - I have seen him on the premises.

JOHN SALTER . I am a constable. On Friday, the 22nd

of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I met Crane in Whitecross-street, nearly opposite the prison wall - he had a load on his back, tied up in a sheet; I asked him where he was going with that load - he had it very loose on his head; he said he was going to Islington with it - I asked if he had got an invoice of the goods; he said No: I told him to bring them over the way to Harris' public-house, where I deposited the goods, and took him to the Compter; he did not say how he came by them, or whose they were, nor ask why I took him, but went with me directly - the sheet contained seven pieces of flannel; I inquired at different houses - I saw the prosecutors the same morning, about half-past ten o'clock; they saw the goods at Guildhall, and claimed them - I saw nothing of Saggers till I went to the warehouse.

HENRY WESTON. I am warehouseman to the prosecutors. About half-past nine o'clock on Friday morning, the 22nd of January, Salter came to the door, and produced a wrapper, which I could not swear to; I afterwards saw the goods at Guildhall, and can swear to their being the prosecutors' property - I cannot say when I had seen them last.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you swear these goods have not been sold? A. I can swear I never sold them; Mr. Tweedale sells goods, and occasionally Saggers and the clerk; the clerk is not here - I cannot swear he had not sold them; he is in our service now - his name is John Brenan; we have had another clerk within the last three years - our manufactured goods are never sold with a private-mark on them; other goods have been sold with the private-marks - I know of no place in Cheapside, or any where else, where goods are sold on my masters' account; we have a manufactory at Rochdale; four persons were engaged in the warehouse at this time, Saggers, Mr. Tweedale, the clerk, and myself; no other porter was employed at the time - I did not miss the goods till the officer showed me them; I could see the goods were taken from the holes - we missed them after the officer came; unless the officer had brought them we might never have missed them, our stock is so extensive; I might have supposed them sold.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you been warehouseman to the prosecutors? A. About three years, since they have been in London; I have some slight recollection of Crane, but cannot swear I have seen him on our premises.

Q. If he was employed as extra porter must you not have known it? A. No, I am out of town a good deal.

BETTY SHORE . I am servant to Mr. Tweedale, at No. 3, Love-lane. I do not know that I ever saw Crane - I know Saggers, but know nothing about these flannels being taken.

WILLIAM HILL . I live at a wine-vaults, No. 110, Fore-street, Cripplegate. On the morning of the 22nd of January, Crane came into the shop with a load on his back - he put it down on the stool, and called for a glass of gin and spruce; he asked me to help the load on his back - I did so, and asked him if it was cloth; he said it was, and he was going to Shoreditch with it; I lifted it on his back, and he went out - I have known both the prisoners for the last two years, coming for spirits; Crane was quite alone in our shop; an officer came and made inquiry - I saw Crane in custody at Guildhall on the following Monday.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far is Fore-street from the White Swan, Bunhill-row? A. About half a mile - it was about half-past eight o'clock.

MR. TWEEDALE. I am certain this is our flannel; I put this piece by myself the night before, in the upper warehouse, which is part of the dwelling-house where I live - that piece is worth 8l. 15s.; the whole is worth 23l. - I believe the wrapper to be ours; Saggers said himself that it was.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate that you thought it was not your's? A. Never - it has Leach on it.

Crane's Defence. I met a man who employed me; he looked like a porter, and wore a long frock coat - I met him in Cripplegate-buildings; he asked me to carry the load to the top of Goswell-road - he gave me 6d., and said he would overtake me at the top of Goswell-road, and give me the other 6d.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I live at No. 99, Britannia-street, City-road, and am a commercial traveller; I am acquainted with Crane's person - I have been in the habit of meeting him at the White Swan, Bunhill-row. On the 22nd of January I had occasion to meet a person at the Bird-cage, Wood-street; I breakfasted at McLellan's, at the end of Wood-street, and saw Crane in Cripplegate-buildings - it was just after eight o'clock, for while I was at breakfast some hot rolls were brought in; Crane was at that time selling goods in the silk trade, and haberdashery, and I believe travelled with them - he was talking to a person in Cripplegate-buildings, and standing leaning on a post by Deacon's warehosue; only one person was with him - a short man in a fustian jacket had the parcel; Crane had not got it - the other person had it leaning on the post; I could not hear what passed because I was not near enough - they appeared in conversation, and had I not seen him in company with another person I should have spoken to him - after they had conversed together for some time, Crane took up the parcel, which had been carried by the other person, and went towards Whitecross-street, towards Fore-street - had he been going the other way it would most likely have been the same way as myself, which was up Wood-street; the person talking to him had the parcel before.

COURT. Q. You did not see where that person got the parcel? A. Certainly not - it was a large bundle, packed in a coarse cloth; I was the length of this Court off - I was coming out of the coffee-shop, and saw him standing by Deacon's warehouse.

Q. Who first had possession of the parcel you do not know? A. No - I cannot say whether any name was on the wrapper.

JOHN SALTER . The seven pieces were all in the wrapper; the mark on the wrapper was inside, and could not be seen.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . (in continuation) It was much about the size of that wrapper - Crane went towards Whitecross-street; the other man turned up towards Monkwell-street - I did not go and speak to Crane, for my time was up to be at the Bird-cage.

WILLIAM HILL . Our wine-vaults are opposite Cripplegate-buildings, not fifty yards from Whitecross-street.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I know Hill's wine-vaults; I did not go there.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you known Crane long? A. Two or three years, and considered him an honest man from what I knew of him - I am intimately acquainted with the landlord, with whom he dealt, and visited him frequently.

COURT. Q. When did you hear Crane was taken up? A. Either on the Tuesday or Wednesday following - this happened on the Friday; I mentioned this to the landlord of the house I use, the week after he was taken; I did not attend the examination; I did not know he was committed till I saw it in the newspaper - his wife having heard what I stated, asked me to come forward on the trial.

JOHN SALTER re-examined. The parcel weighed about 1 cwt.; I stopped him at the gateway of the King's Arms, Whitecross-street, nearly opposite the prison - there is no post about the spot Taylor describes, where a load could be rested on - they are all high gas-lamps; I am not quite certain of that.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner Crane a good character.

CRANE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 41.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of his character.[Thursday, Feb. 18th.] SAGGERS - NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18300218-2

499. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Matthews , on the 2nd of February , at St. John, the Baptist, and stealing therein 4 quires, and half of another quire of writing paper, value 18d., the goods of Joseph Douglass .

HENRY MATTHEWS . I am an upholsterer , and live at No. 16, Budge-row, in the parish of St. John, the Baptist . On the 2nd of February, about seven o'clock in the evening I was in a parlour behind the shop - my shop door was on the latch; it was closed - the windows were all safe and unbroken at five o'clock - about seven some young men were thumping at the door; I went out, and they gave me information - I had seen Douglass' paper shortly before; a person breaking the window could get at it; on receiving the information, I went to the window, and found it was broken; a small pile of paper, and a small pile of books were knocked down, and part of the paper was gone - I could not speak to the precise number of quires, but about the same quantity has been found.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any other Christian name? A. No - I am in the habit of selling in Douglass' shop; I am his son-in-law, and act as his assistant - there is no private mark on the paper - the dwelling-house is mine.

JOSEPH DOUGLASS . I am a stationer - I have a shop in Mr. Matthews' house, but do not live there. I was not there when this happened; I occupy part of the shop -I only identify the paper.

JAMES ABEL . I am an officer of Walbrook. About seven o'clock on the evening in question, I received information that a window was broken in Budge-row - I was on duty; I pursued, and apprehended the prisoner in Size-lane, about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's house - I took him to the house, and then to the watch-house; I searched him, and in his hat found this writing paper, and a crooked wire, this is note paper - the wire would draw any thing out of a shop, or perhaps a gentleman's pocket, or go through a bolt hole; he gave no account how he got the paper - it was claimed by Mr. Douglass.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear him claim it? A. Yes; I have been twisting this wire since I found it - I did not hear Douglass say any thing about a private mark on the paper; he claimed it as his, and said he had lost it from the window - it was loose, and not in any wrapper.

COURT. Q. When you found the wire in the prisoner's hat, was it fixed to this bit of stick, as it is now? A. Yes, and the hook was at the end of it - I have only bent it in the middle.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This would hook out a quire of paper, would it? A. I do not suppose it would; the wire has been nealed in the fire - it would not make a mark unless it was dirty.

JOSEPH DOUGLASS. I saw this paper next day at the Mansion-house - it is small note paper, and is mine, there are four quires and a half.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe there is no water-mark on it? A. There is on some of it - here is, "Simmons, 1827;" he is an extensive maker - it is the same make, and the same stamp as mine; I always have mine stamped"Superfine Bath."

Q. You would not have claimed it if you had seen it on the table of an inn ten miles off? A. No, certainly - I might have bought it six months before; I have taken stock since, and have not sold four quires and a half of this altogether; I value it at 1s.

JAMES NEALE . I live at No. 20, Tooley-street - I am now out of place; I lived with an optician. I was in Budge-row on the 2nd of February, and saw two men at Mr. Matthews' window, and as I walked past I heard the glass crack: that was while the two men were at the window - I walked back, and saw one man put his hand in and take out some paper; the other man said to me,"How do you do?" I saw the man who took it at the Mansion-house two days after, and knew him again - it was the same man as put his hand into the window; the prisoner is that man; I gave information to an officer who I saw in the street, and was present when he laid hold of him - I am sure he laid hold of the same man as put his hand into the window; I did not lose sight of him before the officer took him - the other man ran away.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to say, the next time you saw him was two days after at the Mansion-house? A. Because they did not come for me to go there the next day; I saw him taken, and had never lost sight of him.

Q. I suppose you went away to get an officer? A. I was going home, and told the officer; I left him by the window; I found the officer about two hundred yards off; I turned my back on them to go to find the officer - I lost sight of them during that time; I mean I never lost sight of him while we were running after him - I had never seen either of them before they were at the window; I did not stop at the window - I walked on; I did not walk very quick; I was about five minutes going to the officer- both the men wore hats; the other had a red neckhandkerchief, and had got it round his mouth.

Q. You paid more attention to him than to the pri

soner? A. He came up and spoke to me; I observed him the most - I do not think I could swear to him if I saw him, but I saw the prisoner at the watch-house, and saw him running away; he could have got away if he liked while I was going for the officer - I am turned thirteen years old.

HENRY MATTHEWS . I saw the paper at the Mansion-house; it appears to make up the quantity missing, as near as I can judge - I am sure about that quantity of paper was there about five o'clock, after that I cannot state; it was not in any wrapper - there was an outside quire, which is very much soiled.

Cross-examined. Q. Does nobody but yourself sell in the shop - does not your wife? A. Occasionally - she is not here; I had been at home from five o'clock - whatever is sold is entered in a book, which is not here - it is possible for a trifle not to be entered, but I do not call a quire of paper a trifle - it is 1s. a quire; it would come to 4s. to sell retail - I have no mark on it; no doubt there are thousands of quires of the same sort.

COURT. Q. Had any of this paper ever been sold? A. No - that portion of paper had never been disturbed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Budge-row towards home, and saw the paper laying in the kennel -I picked it up, and put it into my hat, not knowing the value of it; in two or three minutes I heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned down the street by the side of an elderly lady - two officers walked by with the boy; the boy looked about, and seeing none but me, said "That is the man."

HENRY MATTHEWS . At the watch-house he denied having any thing about him.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[Friday, Feb. 19.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his youth and former good character.

Reference Number: t18300218-3

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

500. ROBERT FARTHING was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , at St. Ethelburga, 16 sovereigns, 30 half-sovereigns, 4 crowns. 8 half-crowns, 16 shillings, 5 sixpences, and one 5l. Bank note, the property of Charles Slinn , his master, in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES SLINN . I am a shoemaker , and live at No. 82, Bishopsgate-street Without , in the parish of St. Ethelburga; I rent the house - the prisoner was in my employ as porter . I left town as near as I can tell on the 16th of October, and returned on the 23rd; this robbery was committed the morning before I came home - I left William Hull in charge of my business; when I returned the prisoner was gone - he had not intimated to me any intention of going before I left town; he had live with me about six weeks - he had lived with his uncle, a respectable person, and I took him without a character, supposing him honest; I have no partner.

WILLIAM HULL. I am foreman to Mr. Slinn - he left town about five days before this happened; while he was absent I received the money from the different customers, and there was some money left in the drawer when he left town - I kept the money in the iron safe; I did not keep the key, but I had it the night previous. On the night of the 21st of October I put into the drawer, in the iron safe, 38l. 18s. 9 1/2d. - there were more than ten sovereigns among it; the prisoner slept in the house that night - I balanced the cash, and took the key of the iron safe up with me; the money was all safe: in the morning, about half-past seven o'clock, before I was up, the prisoner came up to me and asked for change for a sovereign, as he said he had a customer waiting for change; he did not say how much he wanted - he said the customer had bought a pair of shoes; I could not give him the difference - I told him the key of the chest was in my pocket, that he might take it, and I should be down shortly; as nobody else was up I knew he could not go out to get change - I went down myself in about an hour; he was not there - I never saw him again till he was taken up, which was thirteen weeks after; when I got down I found the chest open, the key in the lock, and all the money except 3 1/2d. gone; Mr. Slinn came home next day, and I told him what had happened - I had a great coat and hat taken at the same time; there was a pair of gloves in my great coat pocket - I saw the gloves at the Compter; I saw Sapwell take them from the prisoner, either from his coat pocket or his hat; they were on the table - I have not found the coat or hat; I am quite sure the gloves are mine.

JURY. Q. Who was in the shop when you came down? A. Nobody but the servant - an alarm had been given.

MARY BAILEY . I was Mr. Slinn's servant of all work at this time - the prisoner slept in the house; I recollect his coming down on the morning in question, about six o'clock - I did not see him go to the safe; he had given me no intimation that he was going to leave - he went away about eight, as near as I can guess: I had not seen the iron chest before he went - he never returned; Hull told me what had happened to the chest about half-past eight o'clock - Hull's hat and coat were kept in the same closet as the chest.

THOMAS SAPWELL . On the 29th of January I was sent for, and found the prisoner at the Compter; I searched him, and found two pairs of gloves in his pockets - Hull claimed one pair - I told the prisoner Mr. Slinn had been robbed. and on the following morning, going to the Mansion-house, (I did not hold him out either threat or promise.) I asked where he had been; he said at the Malt and Shovel, at Chatham, and from there he went to Brighton, and was robbed of part of the property - he did not say what property; I asked what he had done with the coat and hat - he said he had sold the coat; I do not think he said any thing about the hat.

Prisoner. My Lord and Gentlemen. I am fully sensible of the situation I am now placed in - I have nothing to say.[Monday, Feb. 22.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18300218-4

501. HENRY RICHARDS and THOMAS BURDETT were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Susannah Houson , on the 23rd of January , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and stealing therein 2 coats, value 3l.; 3 waistcoats, value 30s.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 10s.; 1 shirt, value 4s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 1 ring, value 7s.; 22 bobbins of cotton, value 10s. and 10 bobbins of silk, value 10s., the goods of James Lamey ; 2 coats, value 3l.; 2 waistcoats, value 1l.; 2

pairs of trousers, value 1l., and 1 shirt, value 3s., the goods of James Lamey , the younger .

JAMES LAMEY , JUN. I am the son of James Lamey ; I and my father lodge together in a room on the third floor at No. 8, New Nichol-street, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green - the house belongs to Susannah Houson ; she lives there - it is a public-house; we have only one room. On the 23rd of January I left the room about five minutes to nine o'clock, leaving nobody in the room - my father went out at eight o'clock; the door on the stairs was fastened with a bolt - the street door was shut, and fastened with a spring lock; our room door was only on the latch - the door on the stairs opens by undoing the bolt with a wire; I went to meet a society at the Fox and Hounds, Hare-street, and returned at a quarter to twelve o'clock; I came home first - the street door was fast, as I had left it: I went into the public-house, part of the house, and asked them to unlock the street door for me, which they did; the street door leads up to our room, without going through the public part of the house - there is a private door to the house; they opened the door, and I went in - I went up to the door on the stairs, tried to undo it, and found the bolt was not there; I went down stairs for a light, went up again, and found the bolt and staple laying on the stairs inside the door - the staple and bolt had been forced off; I found no instrument there which could have done it: I went into our room, and the first thing I saw was my box wrenched open, and all my things taken out.

Q. How could any body get to that room if the street door was fast? A. They must have come through the public-house - there was no other way, except through the street door, which was on the spring lock; that might be opened with a key: I missed all my clothes out of my box - my father's box and drawer were opened; I missed two coats, worth 3l. - one of them was nearly new - two pairs of trousers, worth 2l.; I had only worn one pair twice - they cost me 36s. - two waistcoats, worth 1l. and a shirt, worth 3s.; my box had been locked - I found it broken open - the further part of the room was covered with handkerchiefs and things taken out of the drawer and boxes and strewed about; I missed a suit of black clothes and other things of my father's - I had not seen them myself; the box was open, and every thing taken out - that box was not locked before: I sent for my father, who came in a few minutes - I have seen a pair of trousers, a shirt, and a handkerchief since.

JAMES LAMEY , SEN. I am the last witness' father, and live at No. 8, New Nichol-street, Bethnal-green. I went out about eight o'clock on the 23rd of January, and left my son at home; I came home in consequence of being sent for, and found all the boxes and drawers strewed about the place. I lost two coats, a black and blue one, from my box, which was not locked; I had seen them that morning- I value them about 3l. - two waistcoats, worth about 1l. two pairs of breeches, 1l.; a gold ring, two silk handkerchiefs, worth 8s. or 9s.; a shirt, twenty bobbins of cotton, and ten or twelve bobbins of amber silk, worth 1l. together - I had seen every thing safe that day except the ring.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am a constable of Worship-street office. In consequence of information I went with Waters after the prisoners to No. 1, Scott-street, Bethnalgreen, and in the back parlour I found, hanging on a line, these trousers, which I produce, and laying on the table was a great quantity of housebreaking implements, and among them a small crow-bar - we brought them away, and went to Mrs. Honson's house; I examined the door which had been forced - it appeared to have been done by a small crow-bar; I fitted the crow-bar which I found in the room to the marks, and to the edge of the door, and it fitted exactly - it also fitted the marks on the box up stairs - Lamey, Jun. identified the trousers; after that we received further information, in the evening, from nine to ten o'clock (this was Monday, the 25th), went to the White Hart and Fountain, Rosemary-lane, and found Richards in company with about one hundred persons, and from the description we had received we took him down to the bar parlour, and told him he was charged on suspicion of breaking open the house of Mr. Lamey, No. 8, Nichol-street, Bethnal-green; I did not say it would be better or worse for him to confess - he said he was very sorry, it was nothing but distress caused him to do it, and being over persuaded by other persons; I told him we had found a pair of trousers at his lodging, No. 1, Scott-street, Bethnalgreen (I am sure I said his lodging.) which had been identified by young Lamey; he said nothing to that; I asked how long he had lived there, and he said nearly five years; we took him in a coach to the office - the landlord of the house gave us every assistance, and behaved very well. On the Monday following, the 1st of February, Burdett was brought to the office by a constable of Spitalfields parish, and having received information, I detained him.

JAMES LAMEY, JUN. These trousers are mine - I know them by being torn, and a black lining inside; I wore them a good deal, and have no doubt of them.

THOMAS WATERS . I am a Police-officer, and went with Attfield to No. 1, Scott-street; the street door was fastened - we knocked, and a person named Riches, who lived up stairs, let us in; she pointed out a room to us, which we went into - I found on the table these skeletonkeys and these picklock-keys (producing two large bunches) - I also found this crow-bar, which I fitted to the door myself, and Attfield fitted it to the boxes; the marks exactly corresponded - I do not swear it was done with that crow; I also found this lantern, covered with a piece of leather, a centre-bit, and a great quantity of other tools - I was searching in the room when Attfield took the trousers off the line; I afterwards went to the White Hart public-house, and found the prisoner Richards, in company with about a hundred persons; I am certain nothing was said to induce him to say any thing; Attfield told him he was charged with robbing the house of Mr. Lamey, No. 8, Nichol-street - he said it was distress, and he had been led into it by others; I told him we had been to his house, No. 1, Scott-street, and found a quantity of housebreaking implements on the table; he made no answer - Attfield asked him if he lived there, and in my presence he said he had lived there five years.

Richards. Most of the tools are my working tools - I cannot do without them; what he calls a crow-bar is what I had made to rub out the caps when I am at work.

THOMAS WATERS . I understand he is a stone-mason, and this is an instrument used in his trade; that is not a

crow-bar, but a thick iron instrument - I find it is an instrument stone-mason's use; there were three or four large crow-bars at the house, which he uses in business, but not this small one, hor the centre-bit.

ANN RICHES . I am the wife of Isaac Riches , and live at No. 1, Scott-street, Hare-street-fields, Bethnal-green. I am the prisoner Richards' sister-in-law; I let the officers in - he rented the back room on the ground floor: I showed the officers into that room, and saw them find a pair of black trousers and the things produced - he had lived there about five years.

ZACHARIAH LONG . I am a headborough. I apprehended Burdett on Saturday, the 30th of January, at the Frying-pan, Brick-lane - Cox was with me; we took him to Spitalfields watch-house, and searched him - he pulled 4s. and a duplicate of a shirt out of his pocket, with the name of Bradley, Brown's-lane, on it; I went there, and found a shirt pawned for 3s. - Lamey's son claimed it; I went to Bullock's, and found a silk handkerchief, which I have here; I took him to the office on the Monday following.

WILLIAM BULLOCK . I am a horn-presser, and live at No. 6, Osborne-place. I know the prisoners - I bought a handkerchief of Burdett on the 30th of January, at the Frying-pan, Brick-lane, Spitalfields; he asked 4s. for it, said it was his own property, and his own manufacture - I gave him 4s. for it; I delivered it to the officer: before that I had pawned it at Williamson's, for 2s. 6d. - I went with the officer, and got it back; (looking at it) this is it- I know it by a bit of white thread in the corner.

MARTIN SUTTON . I am shopman to Mr. Bradley, a pawnbroker, of Brown's-lane, Spitalfields. I know the prisoner Burdett - he brought this shirt to pawn on the morning of the 30th of January; I lent him 3s. on it - I have known him for years; I have had it in my possession ever since.

JAMES LAMEY , JUN. This is one of my shirts which I lost that night.

Burdett. Q. What do you know it by? A. It was bought ready made, with only one button-hole, and one has been made since; I had it made after I bought it, and another button put on.

JAMES LAMEY , SEN. This handkerchief is mine.

THOMAS COX . I am an officer. I was present when Burdett was apprehended, and went with him to the pawnbroker's, and saw the silk handkerchief.

THOMAS WATERS re-examined. I was present when Burdett was brought to the office, and heard Attfield ask him if he had sold the handkerchief - he said he had sold it to this man, and that he bought it in Petticoat-lane about three weeks ago.

SARAH BROOKE . I am servant to Lamey. I know this shirt - the button-hole on it is my work.

Richards' Defence. The chief of the tools called housebreaking implements are my working tools; the stock called a centre-bit I use to make cramp holes for chimney-pieces - I also use the crow-bar as he calls it; I cannot do without it.

Brudett's Defence. That shirt I bought myself, and have had it in my possession for full four months; I have pledged it several times at the same shop with that young man - I bought the handkerchief of a Jew in Petticoat-lane; when I showed it for sale in the public-house, persons disputed its being worth what I asked; my reply was "I don't part with it for less, I have manufactured many of them."

RICHARDS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 38.

BURDETT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.[Thursday, Feb. 18.]

Reference Number: t18300218-5

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

502. WILLIAM JONES , alias GRAY , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , at Harefield, 1 mare, price 10l. , the property of John Piper Pearson .

JOHN PIPER PEARSON . I am a farmer , and live at Harefield, in Middlesex . On Sunday night last, the 14th of February, I lost a mare out of my stable - I left her there at nine o'clock, after giving her some hay and water; the stable was not locked: I had seen the prisoner before, but did not know him - he did not live near me, to my know ledge; I saw my mare again on Tuesday morning, at Stoke-common, Buckinghamshire, seven or eight miles from Harefield, in possession of Archer, a constable; I am quite sure it is mine - I had had her three months, and bought her at Maidenhead fair; I took her home next day.

THOMAS ARCHER. I am constable of Stoke-green. -Edgson and Mason, two watchmen, brought the prisoner to me with the mare; Pearson saw the same mare, and took her away.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am a watchman of Stoke-green. I and Mason were together between three and four o'clock last Monday morning; the prisoner passed through our parish, riding on this mare - we pursued and stopped him, after consulting together; we did not make use of any threat or promise to him - I told him I considered it our duty to know who he was, and where he was going - he said he was a native of Uxbridge; he was riding towards Maidenhead, and said he was going to Maidenhead on business - he was on the high road, near Farnham-royal - he said he was going there on business, but the nature of his business he would not mention; we detained him and the mare, and took him to Stoke-green, to the constable - we kept him in custody till Pearson came on the Tuesday; Archer searched him, in my presence, and found a knife, a coarse cloth apron, and 4 1/2d. on him.

SAMUEL MASON . I have heard Edgson's statement - it is quite true; I have nothing to add to it.

Prisoner. I have not a friend in the world.[Thursday, Feb. 18.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, the stable being within twenty yards of the public road, and neither the door nor yard gate locked; and by the Jury, on account of the door being unlocked.

Reference Number: t18300218-6

503. THOMAS SALES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Carington Bowles the elder , on the 19th of October , at Enfield, and stealing therein 1 clock, value 5l.; 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 mat, value 1s.; 1 miniature, value 1l., and 9 paintings, value 4l., his property; 1 writing-desk, value 3l.; 2 coats, value 2l., and 3 hats, value 15s., the goods of Henry Carington Bowles the younger .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MR. HENRY CARINGTON BOWLES , JUN. I am the

son of Henry Carington Bowles , of Middleton house, in the parish of Enfield . On the night of the 19th of October, I was at home, living with my father; I went to rest about half-past eleven o'clock - the house was perfectly safe; the bolts and fastenings to the hall door were quite secure - I arose next morning about a quarter before six: I was called up, and went down to the hall -I examined the door, and found one of the pannels cut out - one door was left open and the shutter against it; it is a double glass door - the house is out of the high road, and is approached from the road by a drive; there is a gate at the high road, and a private lane, with a field on one side of it - I examined the other parts of the premises, and found nearly all the parlour doors open; I went into the different rooms, and missed these articles - there were two black and two white hats in the hall the night before; all four were gone - I missed a clock from the landing-place on the staircase, which is approached from the hall, and a miniature painting, which had hung up in the library - I had seen it the evening before; I have since ascertained that nine or ten paintings were taken from my writing-desk - the clock was my father's; the paintings had been in the house about sixty years - one of the hats was my father's; the other three were mine; the writing desk was taken - that belonged to me; two coats were taken - a white mat was taken from the bottom of the stairs, and I believe a water bottle; the property taken was worth 10l. - I have since seen one of the hats in possession of Walmsley, the pawnbroker; it belongs to my father.

JOHN LEE . I know the prisoner Sales - I also know Pelser; I remember the night of Mr. Bowles' robbery - before that I saw Pelser at the Crown, New-cut, Lambeth; we had some conversation, and I agreed to meet him at the White Lion, Wych-street, and did so; I went there by myself, and the next day I went to a house in Shire-lane, by Temple-bar - that was the day after I was at the White Lion, and the Crown in the New-cut; I met Henry Wood and Pelser at Shire-lane - Sales did not go with me then; I took him afterwards - I went to Sales' house in a day or two after I had seen Pelser; I went in consequence of what had passed between me and Pelser - I saw Sales, and he went with me to Shire-lane - that was two or three days after I had met Pelser at the Crown; when Sales and I went to Shire-lane, we met Henry Wood and Pelser there; two women came in and then went out -Pelser, Sales, Wood and I were in the room together; we shut the door - Wood said he knew of a thing as good as a gift, that he could get a great deal of wedge meaning silver; the conversation went on as to how they were to go down to the place to get it.

Q. Was a proposition made to go down? A. Yes - it was made by Wood, Sales, Pelser and myself; Wood and Sales said they thought it would be the best way to go down in a gig - we had no money to pay for a gig; Pelser said he would pawn his watch to raise the money - we separated that night, to meet next afternoon at three o'clock, in Shire-lane; I went out with Pelser next morning, and he pawned his watch for 1l., at Higginbottom's, New-cut; we then went to a livery-stable in Wellington-street, Blackfriars-road, where Pelser deposited 6s., as he told me, but I did not see it; he came out and said it was all right, we had got the gig - he said so; I went from there with Pelser, to Sales' house, in Brandon-street, near the Kent-road - it is about a quarter of a mile from the Elephant and Castle- we saw Sales; Pelser and myself said we had left the money for the gig, that it was all right, and we were to meet altogether at Shire-lane, at three o'clock next day, to appoint the time to go at night.

Q. Did you know at this time where you were going? A. No I did not; Pelser, Wood, and I met there at three o'clock next afternoon, but Sales was not there - Pelser and Wood lived in Shire-lane; I and Pelser went from there to get the money for the gigs back again, in consequence of what passed, and I believe at one place in the Waterloo-road, part of the money was returned.

Q. Then there were two gigs? A. Yes, at two different stables; we went to Sales' house, and he was not at home - we went back from there to Shire-lane, and met Sales at the door and a person with him who I had never seen before, named George Williams; Sales was in a passion, and we said it was put off because he did not come to his time - he was in a great passion at that, and swore very much; he said he would be d-d if he would be played with by any b-r; Wood and Pelser came down stairs, and were alarmed at his being there, and we all five went away; Pelser and Wood said they would go and try to get the gig to convince him we had paid for them - we all five went to the livery stable in Blackfriars-road; Sales. Williams and I stopped at the corner of Wellington-street - Wood and Pelser went to the stable and got the gig - when we saw the gig coming we said it was all right; Wood and Pelser drove to the corner of Rowland Hill's chapel - Sales got into the gig there: Wood and Pelser were in - I and Williams were to walk to the Flower Pot, Bishopsgate-street, where they said they would wait for us; Wood gave me a shilling, and told me to give it to a coachman that would be there and in a little time a coach came up with Edmonton and Tottenham written on it.

Q. Did you get to the Flower Pot? A. Yes, and met them there; I and Williams stood there waiting for the stage - the others waited at the corner, and said they wanted to get something which they were short of; I think it was poison; a stage came up with Tottenham and Edmonton written on it - we got on it, and stopped on the left-hand side, by a public-house on the road; I do not know whether it was Edmonton or Tottenham - the gig was at the door at the time; it was sometimes before, and sometimes behind the stage; I do not know the sign of the public-house - I pointed it out to the officers, and went in with them; I described the bar to be a round bar, and a very handsome machine in it - we got down there, and saw Wood, Pelser and Sales drinking something there in a glass; I think it was brandy and water - they got there before us; I and Williams had a pint of porter, a biscuit and some cheese - they took no notice of us at the bar - we all went outside together, and had some gin; the stage was waiting all this time - I and Williams got on it, the other three got in the gig, and we went to a house on the left-hand side of the way, with some pillars before it, where the stage stops - I have pointed out that house to Myers and Goff; we got down there - it is by a lane leading to Enfield; I think it was about ten o'clock

when we arrived at that public-house; the gig had not arrived - it came about five minutes after; Pelser came into the room, and said they were all ready - Sales and Wood remained in the gig; there was some joking in the tap-room while Pelser and Williams were there - after that Pelser took his seat in the gig; Sales and Wood were in it - Williams got on the step, and I ran behind; I sometimes laid hold of the gig - I should think the gig drove along three miles from the public-house; I should know the place where it stopped at - I saw it, and have not seen it since; it was a wooden gate - Wood got out of the gig, went in, and led the horse down the lane; there is a hedge on the right-hand side of the lane, and a wooden paling on the left; when the gig stopped there I had two phials given to me by either Wood or Sales, I cannot say which - I was to go down the town to a public-house Wood was to shew me, and where Mr. Bowles' servants were, I was to sing a song, ask them to drink, and to pour the contents of the phials into what liquor they (the servants) were drinking.

Q. Did you know before that it was Mr. Bowles' servants? A. No - I have been told that since; I do not know whether Wood or Sales gave me the phials - they were both present; Wood told me he would describe the livery the servants wore - I refused to go, as I did not like it; I said the servants would be at home and in bed - I poured the contents of one phial out on the ground, and I believe I let the other fall on the ground; Wood said he would go and get some hay for the horse; he went, and I think Pelser with him - he returned with the hay.

Q. At that time had you heard the chimes of a clock? A. Yes - at this time it was as near as possible half-past eleven o'clock; after the horse had the hay Sales said it was time to go and put away the type, which means the dog - I had not heard any dog there; Sales got a piece of liver out of some part of the gig - whether it was the pocket or not I do not know; he cut it into four pieces, cut a small piece out of each piece, and put something in mixed up about the thickness of mustard - the liver was tied up by Sales; I got a piece of string out of my shoe, as they had not string enough to tie the whole; Wood and another went to give the liver to the dog - I think Sales was the other; the dog barked very much first of all, but it was soon quiet - I could not see the house, but could see lights from the window; the house appeared about one hundred yards from the gate - they soon returned, and said the dog was quiet enough; Sales said it was quiet, and said if the dog could get any water he would go off, or burst, like a cannon - he made that observation directly, it was about half-past eleven o'clock; Sales said it was time to get the things out - he said it was time to go to work, and he began to trim a dark-lantern, which I think he had in his pocket.

Q. What things do you mean it was time to get out? A. There was a centre-bit, a crow-bar, a chisel, and this dark-lantern.

Q. Who brought these things? A. Williams had some in his pocket, and some Sales had in his pocket; they were all taken out - I saw them in the hands of Sales and Williams; they bid me stand by the horse, and not move - Sales, Pelser, Williams and Wood went away together, desiring me to stand by the horse and not leave till they returned; they were absent about two hours and a half, I think - I know it had not gone three o'clock; each came back loaded; as they came along I heard the tingle of something as it came along the fields, and I afterwards found it was a dial - it had two handles to it, and two of them carried it between them; they all returned together- there was a desk, four hats, two great coats, a white rug which might stand at a drawing-room door, and a decanter or water caraft; they were all packed up - I went into the gig first to help to pack them but they did not like the manner I did it; I was bundled out, and they packed the goods in the chaise; Wood and Williams got into the gig, and drove off - Sales, I, and Pelser were left to walk; the gig drove off - we kept up with it as long as we could, till it at last drove out of sight, and we stopped at a public-house on the right-hand side, as if it was in the main road - we had beer, bread, cheese, and onions there; I do not know any part of the road - I should know the house again; I have not pointed it out - I think it is about two miles from the gate where the gig had stopped; we remained at the public-house about twenty minutes, and met the gig a little below the public-house - it seemed as if it had come out of a lane below the house.

Q. Did you not overtake it? A. It was stopping about and seemed as if it had come out of a lane; Wood got out of the gig - Sales and Pelser got in; it drove off rather fast, and left Wood and me to walk - Sales was driving the gig; I walked with Wood about a quarter of a mile till we got to a bridge - I had occasion to stop behind, and Wood went as very fast; I did not see him again -I walked home as fast as I could; it was six o'clock when I arrived at Shoreditch church - I was very tired, and went from there to Brandon-street, where Sales lived; I got there about eight o'clock, and when I got into the room I found Sales, Wood, Pelser and Williams there -I was very much fatigued, and could scarcely walk; I threw myself down on the bed, and had a cup of tea brought to me - the place was all in confusion; the desk was broken open - there were papers and books, several purses and papers, and sealing-wax; there was a silver card case, which was engraved, but had no letters on it- I saw the dial, the great coats and hats, but I did not see a painting which was wrapped up in the rug.

Q. How do you know it was wrapped in the rug? A. I was to hand this rug up to them in the gig, and I could feel the glass in it; I saw the rug at the house - I saw some paintings at Sales' house, and have seen them since(looking at some) - there are no marks on these, but they were exactly like these; I have seen this bird before, and I have seen this one before - they are the very things I saw at Sales'.

Q. Did Sales do any thing with all, or any part of them? A. These paintings were left alone - they were thought of little or no value; there was a box silver mounted, with a crest on it, and compasses and things in it: Sales and Williams rubbed out part of the crest -Sales and Williams took these with some other silver things away, and returned with 3l. odd shillings; Pelser went out with a great coat, and brought 1l. back - Sales gave me 1s. to go to buy two hat boxes; I brought them to Brandon-street, and took out two hats in them, one white and the other black, and was told to get what I could for

them; to pledge or sell them, but not to bring them back; I took one to a pawnbroker's, Mr. Walmsley, London-road, where I had pawned on my own account before - that was a large white hat; I pledged it for 4s. - I pawned the other hat, a black one, for 5s. or 6s., and the woman I bought the hat boxes of had the tickets; I have since seen the same white hat - I should know it again.

Q. You say the woman had the tickets, then you went back to her? A. I went back to her, and had two more boxes - I sold one of the other hats to the woman for 3s., the other was an old white one; I could scarcely get any thing for it, and left it with the woman.

COURT. Q. Had you taken four hats? A. Yes, but not altogether; I took out two first, and then returned to Brandon-street to fetch the other two - I bought two more boxes, and then got the other hats; one I sold for 3s., and left the other with the woman - I went back to Sales with the money; it was put together, and divided into five parts - each had 19s. 6d.; I do not think one divided it more than another - it was thrown on the table, and reckoned at 19s. 6d. each; each took up his money - the dial, desk and other things were left with Sales at the house; Sales said he had broken up the desk.

Q. What do you mean by leaving every thing else at Sales' - do you mean the contents of the desk? A. Yes, every thing but what I have named; Sales told me Williams had taken the dial out, but it was stopped - I went to Sales two or three times afterwards; there was a book with an immense sum of money entered in it of annuities, and money, as much as 10,000l. at a time - I wanted that book to be sent back to Mr. Bowles.

Q. How came you to hear of Mr. Bowles? A. The name was on several papers - Sales said that was the gentleman, and that he lived in St. Paul's Church-yard; I think it was Carington Bowles; Sales said he would take care of the book and papers, he would not let any thing be taken out of the place - Sales was dressed that night in a large drab great coat, trousers, and a sort of engineer's coat; I should know the great coat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Drab is not an unusual colour for a great coat? A. No, but I think I should know it if I was to see it - I should know it, for I have seen it when he has got it out of pledge: I follow the paper-hanging and painting business, and did so at the time of the robbery: I was not in employ then - I have not worked for a master, except Mr. Greenwood; I worked for myself - I have worked for Higginbottom, the pawnbroker, within three months: I hung paper for him- it may be within a month of the robbery; I had to paint and paper a room - that was not the last job I had before the robbery; the last was at the Crown, in the New-cut - I was employed there a few days before the robbery; I cleaned a house down for Mr. Webb - I owed him money, and received nothing for it; I had my dinner, breakfast and supper, which was set down against the little work I had done; I was a publican before I was a paper-hanger, and have had four houses - I failed as a publican in 1822; before that I was a gentleman's servant, and ceased to be so when I took the Castle tap in 1821 - I failed, to the best of my knowledge, the latter end of 1822, or it might be 1823; I had been in four different public-houses in that time - I went from school to be a servant; I was first with a cabinet-maker, and had 13l. a year - I left there to go to a gentleman's service.

Q. Of course you have been an honest man up to this time? A. I never had a stain in my character in my life; I knew I was going to do what was wrong, to rob a house.

Q. Did you go against your will? A. I went down actually from want; I never intended to go into the house, but to look after the horse and gig - I would not have gone into the house, nor would I go to the servants; I went down with a view of holding the horse and gig - I knew I was doing wrong.

Q. Did you give information of it till you were taken up? A. Yes, I told a person named Tucker that I had done it - I do not know whether he is here, for I did not know whether the trial would come on to-day; I mentioned that I was concerned, but never told an officer till I was taken up myself - I did not think I should be found out.

Q. Did you not expect to be tried and convicted, when you were taken up? A. Yes, I certainly thought I should be convicted; it was not to save myself that I impeached other persons - I knew I was guilty; I had heard Wood was taken and hung, and I knew I was guilty.

Q. Did you not do it to save yourself? A. No - I told voluntarily - I did not exactly expect to save myself; I thought it might go easier with me; I never had an idea that it would save me, but thought it might be lighter for me; I do not know exactly what situation I am in now - I am here to speak the truth; I do expect that perhaps giving my evidence may save me, but I should have told it if it would not.

Q. Why not tell it before it was found out? A. I thought of course it would not be found out; if I had not been taken I do not think I should have said any thing about it.

Q. Is not your sole motive in telling of it to save yourself? A. No, it is not; every thing I have said is as true as that; I do not give evidence to save myself - I confessed openly and voluntarily - by giving evidence I hope for mercy, but do not know that it will save me - I do not expect it will save me, because I do not know what dangerous situation I am placed in; every man has a wish to save himself - I wish to save myself if possible, but I tell the truth: I am not swearing to save myself - I am speaking the truth: I know the meaning of wedge, by hearing several characters who came to my public-house mention it- I never knew type meant a dog before; I heard it from Sales' mouth - I did not ask him what it meant; I do not know that I ever heard it before; I might, but to the best of my knowledge I never did; I did not know where I was going, but knew it was about a robbery; I went to hold the gig - I would not assist in it; it was said I was to mind the gig - I certainly knew there was to be a robbery; they did not say they would give me part of the plunder, but I was to be satisfied for going down.

Q. With part of the plunder? A. I was to be satisfied - I firmly believed I was to be paid out of the money they would get for the things which were taken; I never saw Wood before - I had seen Pelser several times; I was not intimate with him, but have drank with him - he used the

Crown, in the New-cut; I had seen him there for the last five or six months - I had never seen Williams before.

Q. Had you not agreed before you went down that you was to have a share? A. No - we never said a word about it; Wood said there were four chests of plate - no agreement at all was made for me to have a share; I did not bargain to have any thing at all - the name of the person to be robbed was not mentioned; I did not know what part of the country we were to go to - I should have stopped at the house they went to, be it whose it might; I was not a housekeeper at this time - I lived at No. 11, Hollis-street, Clare-market; I have been there about a year and nine months - I was apprehended at the Crown, New-cut, where I have done a good deal of work, and often used the house - I have known Sales three or four years or more; I frequently met him; our first acquaintance was at the young woman's he lived with - I have pawned on my own account six or seven times at the place I pawned the hat; I was in distress at the time; the coat I now have on was lent me by Drinkwater, the wardsman - he afterwards sold it me for 8s., which my brother-in-law sent me; he sent me 2l., and I bought a waistcoat - I borrowed the coat yesterday, to go to Hick's-hall, and when I came back he said I might have it for 8s.

Q. Have you been conversing with the officers? A. As I came from the watch-house they said, "You know there has one suffered for it;" I said I did not know it before - he has not suffered for this robbery; I never heard he had suffered - I have been living in London.

Q. Have you not conversed since you were taken up, over and over again, with the officers, as to the evidence you were to give? A. When I confessed to the officer, as we walked by Bethlehem, he said Wood had suffered; I said I thought Wood never would have told of me - that I was very sorry for it, that it was an unforeseen thing altogether, and I went, being in distress.

Q. Was it not to save yourself from suffering that you confessed? A. I thought it would tend to a little mercy for me - I do not fear it will go harder with me if I am not believed to-day; I fear for the situation I am in - I have told the truth; I had 19s. 6d. - I do not consider that an equal share, when the other things were left there; I had as much as either of the others had then: I would not have gone the distance for 19s. 6d. - I should not have gone to rob nearer or farther off at any other time but that night; I really should have gone with them wherever they went -I would not have gone to injure any man with any foul weapon or any thing; I did not know I was going to Mr. Bowles' - I did not rob any body; I was aware I was going to do what I ought not; I had been at work for Mr. Webb a few days before the robbery - I had finished Higginbottom's work in a day and a half, then worked for Webb - he gave me my victuals; I worked for him till two or three days before the robbery.

Q. Did you ask for work any where else? A. When I go about I always ask for work; I think the robbery might be planning three or four days.

Q. Then instead of going to work you were three or four days planning this robbery? A. I went to Shire-lane - all the plan was, it was said it would be the best way to go down in the gig; I was not there two hours; I have given a direct account of it - I have never heard of any reward being offered concerning this robbery; I have seen the bills since I have been in custody - I never had one - I read a little of it; Myers, the officer, had it - I did not read it all- I saw something about burglary and about 50l.; I judged it was the robbery I had been concerned in, but did not read sufficient to know, I had not an opportunity - I knew it was about that robbery, by their saying at the house that it was the robbery.

Q. The hand-bill offers a reward, or a pardon to any body who will turn evidence? A. No, I never saw any thing of that kind, nor heard of it; to the best of my knowledge I saw nothing of it but "burglary, 50l." - I did not see any thing about offering a reward to any person who would give evidence so as to convict the thief, nor hear of it; I thought certainly the officers would have the 50l. if they apprehended any of the persons; I did not expect any body else would have any of it - I cannot say whether it happened on the 18th or 19th; I think it was on a Monday.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am a Police-constable. On the 21st of October, in consequence of information, I went down to Mr. Bowles' house, at Enfield, and examined the premises; I found the pannel of the hall door completely out - I examined the lane leading to the premises; I found a quantity of hay laying there, and an appearance as if a gig had come up there - I think the 21st was Tuesday; Pye was with me - I saw him pick up a bottle, which I have; I examined it - I cannot state what it contains - it is in the state I found it, and the liquid is in the same state; on farther search another phial was found - I produce that in the same state; they were both close to where I supposed the horse had stood - they were five or six yards from each other; I am not a judge of laudanum - I produce a paper which I saw Mr. Bowles find in a ditch; it was marked as it is now, "Nux vomica, poison;" the ditch is in a very narrow lane - on one side a hedge, and the other a paling; it was about a hundred yards from the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any of the bills offering a reward? A. I have not.

ISAAC PYE. I am a parish constable, of Cheshunt. I went with Edwards on Wednesday, the 21st of October, and examined the premises; I have not got a bill offering a reward - I picked up the bottle; I did not go into the prosecutor's house - I saw in the lane, an impression of a cart or gig having been there, as the tire-mark was small, and from the appearance of the foot-marks, the horse had been standing there a considerable time; there was hay about.

SARAH BELLINGER . I live at the Ship, at Tottenham, which is on the left-hand side of the road, going from London. On the 19th of October, about half-past nine o'clock, I remember a chaise coming there - I do not know how many persons were in it, but three came into the house- I saw the chaise myself from the window; the persons who came in had brandy and water or gin and water - I did not particularly notice their dress, but believe there was one in a drab coat; I cannot say whether the prisoner was one of them - I have a slight recollection, but am not positive.

Q. Did you see a stage at the door? A. There was, just after it came, the gig came - the stage was at the door

while the three men were at the bar; two more men came in, and I believe they had biscuits, cheese, and a pint of porter - I cannot swear to Lee, but have a slight recollection of him; I believe the gig and coach went away together - they had a quartern and a half of gin; they took it to the door, and it was drank - I do not know Mr. Bowles' house at Enfield; our house is about four miles and a half from Shoreditch church.

JOHN CHAPPEL . I am ostler at the Rose and Crown. On Monday evening, the 19th of October, two men came into the Rose and Crown tap-room, about a quarter past ten o'clock, and called for a pint of porter; our house is about two miles and a half from the Ship, at Tottenham - two men came in first, and called for a pint of porter; another one came in directly after - I did not notice their dress; I cannot swear to either of them - I cannot swear to the prisoner or to Lee; I was sitting having a pint of beer - there was a joke passed, and I said to the three men, "Oh you are only three tailors from London."

JOHN WILSON. I am a constable of Enfield. I was on duty near the White Lion at Enfield, on the night of the 19th of October. On Tuesday morning, the 20th, about three o'clock, I stood against the White Lion door - three men came up and went into the house; the White Lion is on the right hand side, coming from Mr. Bowles' to London - I saw three men come up and go into Turner's, who keeps the White Lion; I went in, and saw them - I then went and met two men in a gig - the horse seemed jaded; I then went back to the White Lion to see if the three men were there, and they were gone - Turner's is a night house; the chaise was going towards London - I saw all three of the men that were in the house - the prisoner was one of them, I am positive; he was dressed in a drab coat, and a pair of corded trousers - Lee was another of them I am sure, for I took particular notice of them.

Cross-exmined. Q. Did you speak to the men? A. No; I had never seen them before - I cannot tell what kind of a neck-handkerchief Lee had on, whether it was white or black; nor what coloured handkerchief the prisoner had - I know he had a drab coat and corded trousers; he had a hat on I am positive - I was in the house four or five minutes while they were there, and from the time I went out till I came in again was twenty minutes; I had nothing to drink - there was nobody in the room they were in; the prisoner's was an outside coat, and buttoned up - it was not a great coat - his corded trousers came lower than his coat; he had shoes on - I cannot tell the colour of his stockings; I was there four or five minutes - it was not less; I looked at the clock - directly after I saw the chaise I went into the public-house, and said I thought there was something amiss; I did not look into the gig - we have not power to stop a gig; it was going on when I met it - I never saw it standing still.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. The three men were in the bar, not in the gig? A. No: the White Lion is about a mile and a half from Mr. Bowles'.

JOSEPH TURNER . I keep the White Lion, at Enfield. I remember the night Mr. Bowles' house was robbed; I was at home that night - mine is a night house; two men came to the bar that night, and another stood outside the door; Wilson was there at the time - he was in the bar with me; he said nothing to me till after he came back again - the three men were then gone; there is a partition between the bar and the lobby where they stood - Wilson looked through that at these men; I saw him doing it - I took very little notice of them myself, and cannot tell the dress of any of them; I did not observe them, so as to know them - I was very busy at the time; I cannot positively say the prisoner was one - Lee resembles one, but I cannot positively say he was one.

Cross-examined. Q. There were but two men in the house? A. Two men in, and one stood at the door - the third man was not inside.

WILLIAM WALMSLEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in the London-road. This hat (looking at one) was pawned at my house on the 20th of October, for 4s., in the name of Totteridge; I cannot say who by - I took it in myself; it was put with other pledge - I have brought it here to-day.

Cross-examined. Q. Of course you gave the same evidence before the Magistrate? A. Yes - Lee was present; he heard me say I gave 4s. for it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you hear Lee examined? A. Yes - he was examined before me, I am certain.

RICHARD WATKIN . I am a Bow-street patrol, stationed at Enfield. I apprehended Sales on Tuesday night, the 27th of October - he was in company with Henry Wood, in the bar of the Three Jolly Butchers, at Tottenham; I was at the last Hertford Assizes - I have heard Wood has been executed; I took the prisoner into custody- they had come up in a gig: they told me themselves they had come together, and they owned the gig and horse- I had not received any information about the prisoner; I took him into custody in consequence of searching him and finding house breaking tools on him, which I have not got here; I left them at Hertford, where I produced them on Wood's trial - I found on the prisoner five skeleton - keys, a fire-box, a very small bull's eye lantern, a gimblet and a paper with powder in it, marked "Poison;" Sales was dressed in a corded jacket and corded trousers when I apprehended him, and he had a drab great coat on; I cannot swear to the coat, because Mead, the beadle of Enfield, took it from him when he was put into the watch-house - I saw him take it from him; I held the candle while he searched them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go to the prisoner's lodging to search? A. I did - I searched for Mr. Bowles' property there, but found none; that was on the 28th of October.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. That was a week after Mr. Bowles' robbery? A. Yes.

JOHN MEAD . I am beadle of Enfield, and have the care of the watch-house. I remember Sales being brought there by Watkin - I was not at home when he was first brought; I went and searched him in the watch-house, and in his trousers pocket was this crow-bar, placed up in this manner - he said I had no business to search him, as he had been searched by an officer, but I said I should; he had a drab great coat on, and was dressed like an engineer or millwright, with a corded jacket and trousers; I searched his hat, and under the lining of it found a toll-bar ticket, and in his pocket a duplicate for a saw; I have had the coat ever since - I think I have lost the toll-bar ticket; I have searched, but cannot find it.

Cross-examined. Q. The saw was his own? A. Yes- I do not know that he was apprenticed to a millwright.

Prisoner. Q. The two hats were on the seat, you do not

know whether that was mine or Wood's? A. I took it off your head.

RICHARD WATKIN . Sales was sent to the House of Correction for two months.

GEORGE GOFF . I am a constable of Lambeth. I apprehended Lee on the 24th of December, at the Crown public-house, New-cut, Lambeth; Myers was with me -Sales was given into my charge the following day; he was discharged from the House of Correction, and Myers gave him into my hands from that place.

RICHARD MYERS . I accompanied Goff, and took Sales- I delivered him to Goff.

MR. HENRY CARINGTON BOWLES. I live at Middleton-house, Enfield parish. This white hat is one I lost on the night of the robbery.

JOHN LEE . This is the hat I pawned at Walmsley's - this is exactly like the great coat the prisoner wore that night; in fact, I am sure it is the coat - he took it out of pledge on a Saturday night, and it is the coat he wore on the night of the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. What pawnbroker's shop was it taken out of? A. Cannon and Dickers': there is nobody here from them - I went with Sales myself to get it out of pawn; I have been in trouble on family affairs - my wife put me in gaol: I have been in Horsemonger-lane gaol twice - my wife put me there once, and I went there for this robbery; I was locked up there twice before I went for this robbery - I was locked up for bail; I only stopped in one night, my bail came in the morning - that was the first time; it was three or four years ago: I was there again two or three years after, and was there seven days, for being intoxicated - Mr. Swabey was the Magistrate; I had done nothing - I was taken up intoxicated, put into the watch-house, and sent there for being drunk; I do not know whether they called me a vagrant or not - I had done nothing but got intoxicated; I was not put there for any crime.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you ever charged with felony before? A. Never with any felony; I was once taken into custody for a little while - there were some friends I went with to take a cup of tea; it was at John Harrison 's- there were three or four more at the house, and while I was in the yard with him (he is a sausage-maker) he said he had lost 19s., and each of the persons there were taken up; I was put into the watch-house, sent to Union-hall, and discharged in the morning.

MR. BOWLES, JUN. I was not aware that these paintings were in my desk till I found them in the officer's hands; they are mine - there were memorandum books, a cash-book of my private account, and I believe some purses in the desk.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, more than that I am quite innocent of the charge - I know nothing of the robbery whatever; I have no witnesses, only my indentures to prove I served seven years to an engineer or millwright - I have been in the habit of working in the country, not in town.[Friday, Feb. 19.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, as no personal violence was used.

Reference Number: t18300218-7

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

504. WILLIAM LEWIN WATKINS was indicted for that he, on the 14th of March , at St. Martin in the Fields, having in his custody and possession a certain bill of exchange , which is as follows: (i.e.)

£53: 9: 6 London, 4th of February, 1829.

Two months after date pay to my order the sum of Fifty-three Pounds, Nine Shillings, and Sixpence, value received of

W.L. WATKINS.

To Messrs. Long's, coachmakers, St. Martin's-lane.

he, the said William Lewin Watkins, on the said 14th of March, at the parish aforesaid, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, upon the said bill of exchange a certain false, forged, and counterfeit acceptance of the said bill of exchange, as follows: (i. e.) Accepd Wm. Long, with intent to defraud Henry William Miles , against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, that he, on the same day, at the same parish, having in his custody and possession a certain bill of exchange - (setting it out as before), and upon which said last mentioned bill of exchange was and in a certain false, forged, and counterfeit acceptance of the said last mentioned bill of exchange, as follows: Acceptd Wm. Long - he, on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did utter and publish as true the said last mentioned bill of exchange, well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeit, with intent to defraud the said Henry William Miles , against the Statute.

HENRY WILLIAM MILES. I keep the Volunteer public-house, Upper Baker-street - I have kept that house more than seven years; I have known the prisoner from the time of this transaction, which was in the middle of March last - I had never seen him but once before; he came to my house in the morning - the first time he came he handed me a card: I have not the same card now - I did not take particular care of it; I have looked for it, and cannot find it - I have one in my hand, which I know to be from the same plate; it is "W. L. Watkins, coach-founder and plater, No. 90, Long-acre, London;" he gave me a card similar to this, as an introduction, wishing me to give him money for the bill I now hold in my hand; I then told him I would not - it had an acceptance on it at that time; he had been waiting for me in my house an hour before he gave me the card - I was down in the cellar; I told him I would not give him the money for it - he then mentioned my brother's name; my brother is inspector of pavements to St. Martin's board - he said he knew him, and had seen him several times; I told him if my brother wished for the bill to be answered by my giving money for it, he would get a note from him to testify that the bill was a legal and honourable transaction; he went away, came again next day, and brought a note from my brother; I have not got that here - I have searched for it, but did not preserve it; I have every reason to think it is lost or destroyed; the bill is the only document I have preserved; my brother knew the inhabitants of the parish so well, I was aware if the transaction was honourable he would be able to ascertain whether it was so; the note, as near as I can recollect, said, "Dear brother, I have made diligent inquiry as to the respectability of the house of Messrs. Long and Son, and saving lived so many years where they now do, I consider the bill perfectly safe, and if you wish to serve the young man I think you may do it with safety;" after seeing that document, the prisoner sat down in the parlour some time, called for something to eat, and asked me to have it cooked for him; he sat there some time - I called him to the bar, and

inquired of him the nature of the bill; he said it was as safe as the Bank - that he knew it was usual on such occasions to allow more than legal interest; I observed to him that I should not do so, I should take 5 per cent. interest, and no more - I then made a calcuation, and took the bill from him - I gave him a 30l. and a 20l. note, also from 8s. to 10s. in silver, and his lunch was not paid for; among the silver there happened to be a bad 5s. piece - he immediately said, "This will not do for me - this is a bad one;" I did not know it myself - I changed it for him: he then said he would take the remaining part in wine and spirits; he said it was of no consequence to him, as when a gentleman called on him on business it looked very respectable to ring the bell and call the servant, requesting her to bring a bottle of wine out of No. 5 bin, and two or three other names he mentioned, for a person that was looking forward in the world; thinking him a respectable tradesman I sat down about ten minutes with him in the parlour after he received the money, and he had a glass of brandy and water; I had one with him, and in ten minutes he went away.

Q. Did he leave the bill in your possession from the first day he came to the second? A. To the best of my recollection he did; I had no idea at the time that it was not proper - the bill has never been out of my possession, except when I gave it to James Miles, my brother, to present when due - it was out of my possession then, but at no other time; he brought it back to me, and I have had it ever since: having received information on the afternoon of the day he gave me the bill, I showed it next morning to a neighbour, and while I was doing so his father-in-law, John Rogers, came into the bar - in consequence of what he said I made application at Bow-street for a warrant, which I placed in Herring's hands; that was two days after I gave him the money for the bill; I attempted myself to find out where the prisoner was, but did not succeed - he was not apprehended on this charge; to the best of my recollection he was taken last Monday fortnight - I did not see him from the time I gave him the money for the bill till he was at the office; I have had no conversation with him since.

JAMES MILES . I am the prosecutor's brother. I received a bill from him to present - this is it; I presented it, and it was not paid - I returned the same bill to my brother; it was never out of my possession or sight.

WILLIAM HENRY ATTFIELD . I am a carpenter. Mr. Miles showed me the bill in the evening, and asked me if it was Watkins' writing - I said Yes; he asked if I knew his hand-writing - that is all I have to say.

RICHARD RICE. I am a coachmaker, and live with Messrs. Long's, No. 36, St. Martin's-lane - I have lived with them forty years; neither of them are here; one of them is William Charles Long , and the other partner Stephen Oliver Long - I know the hand-writing of both of them; the acceptance to this bill is not the hand-writing of either of them, nor is it the signature of the firm, which is S. Long and Son; there is another coachmaker in the lane, but not of the name of Long, nor do I know any body in the neighbourhood of that name- I speak to its not being William Charles Long's handwriting, from the character of the writing, and he has not been in town since June, 1828; I am quite satisfied of it from the character of the hand-writing - Stephen Oliver Long is in a bad state of health now, and has not been able to attend to business these eight weeks; William has a nervous affection. which prevents his attending to business at all - he is fifty miles off, and I am afraid could not attend here.

JOHN ROGERS . I am a bricklayer. I have known Watkins twelve years, and am acquainted with his handwriting - (looking at the bill) the whole of this bill is his hand-writing; I have a small paper in my hand which was written by him.

Q. You are not at liberty to judge of it by comparison - have you such a recollection of the character of his hand-writing, as to tell us whether you believe the whole, or part of it, to be his writing? A. All the writing part- there is no doubt of the name at the bottom being his: I believe the acceptance to be his hand-writing, from the character of it, I have known his writing so well - I saw the bill in Miles' hands the day after he took it; here is an indorsement on it in the same hand-writing - he lived at No. 90 Long-acre, till the 10th of March, and then absconded; he left his wife and family.

HENRY WILLIAM MILES. He came to me about the 10th of March. (Bill read, see indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. The time has been so short, not being before a Magistrate, I was not aware of this indictment till the night before last, and yesterday I was down here nearly all day - I have not had an opportunity of defending myself, and on these considerations throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY (of uttering only) - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of the bill having been left with the prosecutor, which allowed him time to make inquiry, and his want of caution in not doing so; and also by the prosecutor.[Saturday, Feb. 20]

Reference Number: t18300218-8

505. JAMES WEBBER was indicted for feloniously and sacrialigiously breaking and entering a certain chapel, at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington, on the 1st of February , and feloniously stealing therein, 1 scarf, value 2l.; 2 bottles, value 2d.; 3 pints of wine, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 3 drinking glasses, value 3s.; 2 linen cloths, value 1s., and 1 corkscrew, value 6d., the goods of Frances Harrison and others .

2nd COUNT, calling them the goods of William Taylor .

3rd COUNT, calling them the goods of Ann Warner .

ANN WARNER. I am pew-opener of Brompton chapel, which stands in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington - it is an Episcopal Chapel. On Sunday, the 31st of January, I left the chapel about twenty minutes before nine o'clock at night; I was the last person there - we made all the doors safe; the windows were all shut - I went there on Monday, between three and four o'clock, and discovered that the wax candles were taken out of the pulpit - the vestry door, which opens into the chapel, had the key taken out of it, and a door leading out of the vestry into a passage by the side of the chapel was open; it had been unbolted and unlocked - I think the persons must have been secreted in the chapel; the outer vestry door was unbolted and unlocked - there was no appearance of a breaking outside of the chapel; I first missed the candles out of the pulpit - I went into the vestry, and missed all the glasses and things; the clergyman's robe-box was broken open - the lock was forced off; two handkerchiefs

were gone out of that box, and two glass cloths - nothing else was lost out of the box: I had seen them there on the Sunday evening; a scarf was gone from the wine-cupboard - the wine and a cork-screw were taken from the same cupboard; a piece had been cut out of the side of the lock of that cupboard - I cannot say how many bottles were in that cupboard; they were not in my charge - the door leads out of the chapel altogether; there is another door from the vestry into the chapel - that door was locked on the chapel side, on the Sunday night; a person in the chapel could open it, as the key was left in the lock - I found it taken out; the two cloths belong to the chapel -Frances Harrison has a share in the chapel; I receive the pew rents, and pay them to Mr. Taylor, the agent.

REV. WEEDEN BUTLER. I do duty at Brompton chapel. On Sunday evening, the 31st of January, as I came out of the vestry to go to the pulpit, to preach, I saw the prisoner close behind the stairs; it was about twenty minutes or a quarter to eight o'clock - we begin service at seven; I ordered the pew-opener to put him into a pew. On the following Sunday I found the lock of my box forced off - it was fastened by the hasp, remaining as I had locked it; when I opened it I found a silk handkerchief, in which I wrap my cassock, gone - when I searched the pocket of my cassock, I missed a white cambric handkerchief, but am not certain I might not have taken it away on some former occasion, but I thought it was in the cascock - I saw the silk handkerchief again to the best of my belief, in Woodberry's hands, but should not like to swear to it; Frances Harrison is the widow of the Rev. Richard Harrison - she is one of the proprietors of the chapel; Mr. Taylor receives the rent of the pews - the scarf belonged to the Rev. Mr. Miles; I know nothing of that.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many proprietors are there? A. I never inquired; I know there are several - Taylor pays my salary.

WILLIAM WOODBERRY. I am a constable of Queen-square. I went to the prisoner's lodging, No. 4, New-street, Brompton, on the 1st of February, about two or three o'clock - he was at home; I saw him - I was making a search there, not for this property - I saw in a box, in a paper, some pieces of wax and mould candles; I asked him where he got them - he said they were given to him; I found nothing else - I went to him again on the 8th of February, hearing of the robbery at the chapel; he was not at home then - his wife was; I found some pieces of wax and mould candles, two wine-glasses, a tumbler, a cork-crew a silk handkerchief, a glass cloth, a wine-bottle, with a little sherry left in it, and an ink-bottle; I took his wife into custody, and brought her to the office - I saw the prisoner the same evening, about half-past seven o'clock, at the corner of York-street, Westminster - his mother fetched me to him there; he said he was come to tell the truth - I had not spoken to him, and neither made him any threat nor promise; I said I would take him before the Magistrate, and as we were going towards the office, he said he was guilty of going to the chapel with a young man named Chitty - I had not said any thing to him about the chapel.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not told his wife, and told her to tell him it would be better the whole truth should be told? A. No such thing; he said he was sorry for what he had done - I then took him before the Magistrate, as he said he wished to tell the Magistrate; no examination was gone into that night - I told the Magistrate he wished to confess something; the Magistrate told him he would advise him not to state any thing - he was not examined, as there was no clerk there, and what he told the Magistrate that night was not taken down in writing, but it was next day, when he made a similar statement - he told the Magistrate that night, that he did go with Chitty; that Chitty came and called him two or three times that night, and he went out with Chitty, went into the chapel with him, and went into the vestry, drank some wine, and Chitty had told him if he would go in with him, he should have a good fire and a glass of wine - that he was so frightened when he was there that he spilled the wine over him, and that these glasses and things were given to him by Chitty; they were were not produced that night - he knew I had them; that is all he said that night, except that he was very sorry for what had happened - he was examined on the Thursday following, and the witnesses also; he made a statement that day to the Magistrate, which was taken down in writing - (looking at it) this is Mr. Gregorie's (the Magistrate) writing; I heard him examined - (read).

The prisoner says, "I am innocent of the robbery; the things were given to me by George Chitty - he came to me on Sunday fortnight last, and I went out with him for a walk with another man named Aldin; Chitty left us - we went into the Crown and Seeutre; on coming out Chitty ran after me, and said, 'Come, I want you,' and he took me to Brompton chapel into the vestry room, where I found a fire, and wine on the table - he told me to drink, which I did; I came out, and next day Chitty brought me the things found at my house."

WILLIAM WOODBERRY (in continuation.) I found a knife at his lodging; I went and examined the vestry on Tuesday, the 9th, and seeing the lock of Mr. Butler's box had been forced open, I put the knife against the impression left inside the box, and it answered the size of the knife exactly - the mark agreed with the width of the knife.

Cross-examined. Q. This is a very common kind of knife? A. It is; he said Chitty had given him the things - I went to his lodging first on the 1st of February, saw the wax candles, and inquired about them; he said they were given to him; I saw the glasses there that day, but did not ask about them, because I knew nothing of the robbery of the chapel; I did not mention to him about the glasses: he might know I had seen them - they were in a cupboard which I opened, in his presence; he could have made away with them between the 1st and 8th of February if he had chosen; he was at large those seven days - I only found a few pieces of wax candle on the 8th; he said Chitty gave him all the things - I have been looking for Chitty ever since, but cannot find him.

ANN WARNER . I know these things - these glasses were left in the chapel; they have been there for years - I have had the care of them about eight months, and have no doubt they are the glasses, and this cloth has the B. picked out - the C. is left; here is the mark where the B. has been - this tumbler is a remarkable one, more so than the glasses; I believe them to belong to the chapel, but the cloth certainly belongs to the chapel - it is inked with the gentlemen wiping pens on it - I have seen Mr. Butler with a handkerchief of this kind.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. That is an extraordinary tumbler? A. It is a thick common glass, very clumsily made; the wine-glasses are not an uncom

mon pattern - we had only two glass-cloths; I do not mean that there has been no more since the chapel was built - the old ones were allowed to the vestry-woman; these were new last October - there is no date on them: the chapel was repaired thirteen years ago, and they had new vestry linen; I have belonged to the chapel thirty-six years, and been vestry-woman eight years - the woman who was in the vestry before had the place fifteen years before she died; she was ill sometimes - she used to attend off and on; what she disposed of I cannot tell - I do not swear to the candles.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am representative of the proprietors of the chapel - I receive and pay all monies for them; there are six shares - I have always paid the money to three parties; Mrs. Frances Harrison employs me to receive the monies - she has two shares: I also pay the other persons - I receive the pew rents and every thing; they employ me - I make the account out, and take off 5 per cent. every half year; I stop it out of the money I should otherwise pay them; I have a key of the chapel, and Mrs. Warner another - I am not answerable for the things in the vestry if they are lost; I think, when I come to re-consider, they are under my care, because I have been regularly appointed by the proprietors - I should consider every brick is under my care.

Cross-examined. Q. You have a key, and walk in and out whenever you choose? A. Certainly - I consider I have the care of every thing; I account to two persons besides Mrs. Harrison, but one of those gentlemen is dead - three shares have been on sale for three months, and I think are sold.

COURT. Q. Mrs. Harrison is alive, and to her you have paid money? A. Yes - the gentleman has been dead several months; I know Miss Thompson, of Kensington-square, has one share - I pay money to her uncle on her account every half-year; I divide the money into shares, and pay each their portion - I paid Elisha Bischoffs , of Oxford, for three shares; he is dead, and I have paid it to his executors since his death.

MRS. WARNER. I cannot swear to the cork-screw.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-9

506. JAMES WEBBER was again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Frederick Scott , on the 1st of February , at St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington , and stealing therein 49 silver spoons, value 20l.; 1 watch, value 15s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 20s., and 1 razor, value 2s., his property .

SAMUEL FREDERICK SCOTT . I reside in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts, Kensington. The prisoner lived in my service for about twelve months - I discharged him three weeks before the 1st of February; he was my groom , and occasionally waited at table, and assisted in the house. On Monday, the 1st of February, I came down stairs about nine o'clock in the morning, and discovered that two sideboard drawers, one containing plate, and the other which money is at times kept in, had been forced open - all the spoons were stolen; I had used one of them at half-past twelve o'clock the night before, and the sugar-tongs; Mrs. Scott kept the key of the drawers, and put them away - I stood at her side, and saw her put the spoon into the drawer, and saw there were others in it; I saw her lock the drawer - I cannot speak to the state of the house that night; I usually examine the doors but on this night omitted to do so - there are four doors' a person must have come through to get at this parlour; I missed ten table, sixteen dessert, seventeen tea, two mustard, and four saltspoons, and the sugar-tongs I had used; there was other plate on the sideboard - one of the spoons was left on the parlour table; I lost a silver watch out of a stand; it was a very common one, worth about 15s. - I lost a razor, and have since discovered that I lost a musical snuff-box- the value of all the things is about 22l. or 23l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you or Mrs. Scott go to bed first that night? A. We both went up together - I have only one maid-servant; I do not rightly know Chitty - he acted for the prisoner when he was ill; there was a degree of shyness about him that made me suspect him; he never came up stairs - I do not know him by the name of Chitty; I do not recollect describing his person to the officer - the maid-servant knew him; I knew the prisoner lived with a gentleman named Vale, but did not trouble to go for his character; he was known down the mews - he was ill when in my service: I rent the dwelling-house.

CAROLINE DOMINICO. I was in Mr. Scott's service till the 3rd of February - I was in the house on the 31st of January; the two middle doors were merely shut too, but the outer door was bolted and locked, and one middle door also; the house was made safe that night - I was up first in the morning, about half-past six o'clock, and in coming down stairs I did not discover that any body had come in, till the boy belonging to the stable came in and told me - that was about seven; I then found somebody had broken the middle door open - that leads into the long room; I know that door was shut and locked the night before - it was broken open; there were marks on the door, and the lock was loose - I had locked that door myself the night before; I know the door leading to the mews - that was both bolted and locked on the 31st of January - that is the street door, and was found forced open; it is an outer door - the stable boy found it open; it is an outer door - I let the stable boy in by unfastening the kitchen door.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the young man who came while the prisoner was ill? A. Yes, by sight - he was three days at the house; he went by the name of Chitty - he only came into the house for the knives and boots; I suppose he is about eighteen years old - the prisoner was ill, and obliged to go away.

JOHN DOMINICO. I live with my mother, at No. 5, Exeter-place, Chelsea. I was servant to Mr. Scott, but did not sleep in the house - I went to the house about seven o'clock on Monday morning after the robbery; I went through the stable door, which I had the key of, and let myself in; it is an outer door into the mews - I found that locked; I then went through another door into the garden - that is never locked; the stable is detached from the house - my sister, Dominico, let me into the house, through the kitchen door; when I got into the house I got a candle, went up stairs, and found the door leading to the long room broken open - I had found the door leading to

the mews unlocked and unbolted; the bolts are inside - that door had not been broken at all; it was shut too.

Cross-examined. Q. There are two outer doors, by which you may get into the house? A. Yes; one of them I found locked, as it had been left, and the other open - a person must have been inside to open that; the door that was broken is inside the house - it is the second door from the mews, and not an outer door.

JOHN STRACEY . I live with Mr. Slater. I heard of Mr. Scott's robbery - I have known the prisoner about three months; I saw him on the 31st of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, at the back of Mr. Scott's stable door, in the mews; a young man was with him who I knew by sight - he went by the name of George Chitty; I saw the prisoner go to Mr. Scott's door which enters into the shop, I believe; it is one of the doors of the house - he put his hand to the latch of the door; I heard the latch rattle - he found it bolted; he did not open it - he came from the door to my stable, and stood talking to me for about two minutes; that is all I know.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe what became of Chitty? A. He went with him out into the street; he was just by while the prisoner was talking to me - I do not remember that Chitty spoke to me; he is about eighteen years old; I have not seen him since.

WILLIAM WOODBERRY . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 1st of February I went to the prisoner's lodgings with Mr. Scott, with a warrant to search the place; I found the prisoner there - I told him there was a suspicion that Mr. Scott had been robbed, and I had come to search his place, to see whether he had any plate or any thing; I searched, and found neither plate nor money, but a few shillings - I found nothing belonging to Mr. Scott; the prisoner said he knew nothing of the robbery, and I went away; I went again on the 8th - he was not there then, I only saw his wife; I was searching for other things, and during that time I saw his wife go and hide something under the head of the bed; I then went and searched there, and found a purse with eight sovereigns in it - I did not see the prisoner then; I saw him about half-past seven o'clock the same night, at the corner of York-street; I took him before a Magistrate, according to his own wish - Mr. Gregorie was the Magistrate; he told me he had come to tell the whole truth, and it was his mother's wish he should go and speak the truth.

Q. Did he say any thing to you when he was not before the Magistrate? A. Yes, after he came from before the Magistrate he told me the same as he had told the Magistrate - I had not told him it would be better or worse for him; he said he had been to Mr. Scott's house with Chitty, and that he stood in the coach-house - that he went out from his own house at a quarter past eleven o'clock, and stopped in the coach-house while Chitty went into the house; he said he did not see the things Chitty had taken - that he returned to his own house at two, and the next day Chitty brought him ten sovereigns as his share; I asked where he got this canvas bag which the sovereigns were in - he said it was made by a young woman. I went to Mr. Scott's house on the 1st of February, and found the middle door had been broken open, either by a chisel or crow-bar; that is the door which leads into the long room - I examined the sideboard, and found the top of it had been lifted up, and the drawer drawn out; the bolt had pulled away the veneering.

Cross-examined. Q. He had told his story before the Magistrate in your presence? A. Yes - there was a good many people about when he told the story to me; I do not know whether they heard it - we did not talk out loud.

Q. How did he happen to tell it over to you again, when you had heard him tell it before the Magistrate? A. Because I was putting questions to him about where he sold the plate; he begged me not to lock him up, and he would tell me the whole truth - I have told you word for word what he said; he said he waited in the coach-house and had not been inside the house - I mentioned this robbery to him on the 1st of February; he could have absconded between that and the 8th - Chitty has absconded; I know that now - I have been an officer twenty-eight or twenty-nine years; I have done all I could to find Chitty - I did not look for him till he said he was with him; I found none of Mr. Scott's property at the prisoner's lodging.

COURT. Q. Were you present when he was examined before the Magistrate? A. Yes; he told the Magistrate the same as he told me, as near as could be, within a few words, but not at the time of the examination; when the witnesses were examined he denied it, and said he was innocent - what he said was the evening before, when he first gave himself up; that was not taken in writing - he was examined on the Thursday, and said he was innocent.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not state to me that he told you the same story as he told before the Magistrate? A. Yes, that evening, when he desired to be taken before the Magistrate; our chief constable heard every word that passed, he is not here.

Prisoner's Defence. When the officer came to my mother's, he said I had better tell the truth how I came by the money, as my wife was in custody, or else it would be worse for me, and I told him Chitty came to me, gave it to me, and said if any thing happened I was to say I knew nothing about it.

WILLIAM WOODBERRY . I never made him any promise, nor did I say his wife was in custody at all.

Prisoner. He said he wondered how I came by the money, as I had but 2s. 5d. before.

WILLIAM WOODBERRY . I did not.

MR. SCOTT. I have been accustomed to send him to my banker's every week, and trusted him with considerable sums; I never found him dishonest - I have trusted him with as much as I lost.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.[Saturday, Feb. 20.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, considering him to have been entirely led into the commission of the offence by Chitty.

Reference Number: t18300218-10

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

507. WILLIAM MECHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 30s.; 2 waistcoats, value 15s.; 1 coat, value 30s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 18d., and 1 seal, value 1s., the goods of John Fife , in the dwelling-house of William Naser .

JOHN FIFE. I lodge with William Naser, in Mile-end New-town - he rents the house, and lives in it; I do not know what parish it is in. On the 18th of January I saw all this property safe in my box, about seven o'clock in the morning; my box was locked - I went out at a quarter to eight o'clock, and remained out till five, when I returned, and found my box broken open - it was in the first floor room; the street door is kept fast in the day time - the prisoner slept in the same bed with me; I left him in bed - the watch was worth 2l., the trousers 30s., the waistcoat 14s., the coat 25s., the handkerchief 4s., the stockings 18d., and seal 1s. 6d., I found my watch pawned at Mr. Law's, Church-lane, Commercial-road; I said nothing to the prisoner about it.

GEORGE GILES , I am shopman to Mr. Law. I took this watch in pawn from the prisoner, in the name of John Mecham , for 16s., on the 18th of January, about twelve or one o'clock - I did not know him before, but am certain he is the man; we live very near Mile-end - being so common a watch I considered it his own; it is not worth 1l. - no person in the trade would give more than 17s. for it; I could buy it new for 23s. - I did not ask how he got it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH CATLING . I am a watchman. About eleven o'clock on a Monday night the prisoner delivered himself up to me; Mile-end is in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up to Catling, hearing of this robbery, and understanding it was said William Mecham had done it I asked Catling if it was so, and he immediately put me in the watch-house.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-11

508. LOUISA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 watch, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 22s.; 1 key, value 8s.; 1 ring, value 10s., and 1 ribbon, value 2d., the goods of William Cooke , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Webb .

WILLIAM COOKE . I live at No. 149, Old-street. On the 8th of February I met the prisoner - she asked me to go with her; she took me to a house belonging to a person named Webb, as I understand; I do not know the name of the street - I went to bed with her; I had a silver watch, with two gold seals and a ribbon, which I took from my pocket, and laid on the table - I went into the room about half-past nine o'clock, and fell asleep; I awoke in about half an hour, and missed it - she was gone then; I went to the landlord, and gave information to an officer that I was robbed: I went the distance of a street with Turner: he got another officer, and went with me to a night-constable - the prisoner had given me her address, No. 61. Ossulton-street ; I was just entering that house with an officer, when another officer brought her out of the house with the watch; that was not the house I had been to with her.

JOHN SKERRATT TURNER . I live at No. 63, Ossulton-street, and was a watchman. On the 8th of February I saw the prisoner go into No. 61, Ossulton-street - I knew her before; I had received information of this robbery - I followed her into her own room, and took her, as she answered the prosecutor's description; I told her she was the person I wanted, as I had information she had stolen a watch from a gentleman - she came down stairs with me, and gave me the watch, begged me to hand it to the gentleman, and request him to say nothing further about it.

ROBERT TEASDALE. I was constable of the night. I produce a watch, which I received from Turner; I took the prisoner to the watch-house, but found nothing on her - I only know from information who the house belongs to.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-12

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

509. JAMES CURRIE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1000 scores of straw plait, value 50l., the goods of John Austin , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN AUSTIN. I keep the Ship public-house, Chandos-street, Covent-garden , and deal in straw plait ; I bought a quantity in August last, which I deposited in two large chests on the landing-place, close to my chamber door; the prisoner came to lodge at my house about six months ago - I think it was the beginning of September, or the latter end of August; he continued there till the 28th of January, when he was apprehended; I was present when he was apprehended in St. James'-park - he is a soldier ; the officer, in my presence, told him he was apprehended for robbing his quarters - he did not say what of; I missed nearly all my straw plait - there was upwards of a thousand scores in the chests; I found only forty left - that was two parcels of twenty each; I went, among other persons, to Stroud, and found some plait - he gave me up two bundles, which I have kept ever since; it is here - I find my private ticket inside both the bundles now; it was so when Stroud showed it to me - it is the letter G.: I sold none of the plait which I bought in August - I went to a great many other shops, and found some at several places besides - here are two bundles I got from Miss Tucker, of York-street, Westminster; I have no private-mark on that, as it is partly used, but by the colour, quality, tie, and size of the string, I believe it to be part of what I lost. In consequence of something I heard, I and Thomas, the officer, searched the prisoner's room at my house; the officer found 4l. 18s. 6d. in the fire-place - I never knew of the prisoner dealing in straw, or being any thing but a soldier.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you any other soldier lodging in your house? A. His comrade, Carter, lodged in the same room; he is still in the regiment, I believe - he left me directly this turned out against Currie; the serjeant took them both away - the prisoner had the key to lock the room whenever he chose; the chests were not locked - he had no business in the part of the

house they were in; he would pass that landing to go to bed - I have also a female lodger who would pass the place. I am not a manufacturer of plait; I have lately lost my wife - she had nothing to do with the business - the letter G. is my own mark; it denotes the price I bought it at; I have bought thousands of bundles at that price in my life - I put it away for the Spring trade, and did not miss it till I found it was all gone; it was all safe the beginning of October - some was marked G. and the rest E.; three bundles here have not my mark on them -I had two of them from York-street, and the other I brought from home; I believe them to be the quality I had from the manufacturer, but these two have been untied, and then the private mark would drop out; the prisoner was billetted on me till he was apprehended - he was very troublesome in the house, and went to the next house, because my wife would not let him have salt and things three or four times a day - he did not take me before a Magistrate, it was my servant.

GEORGE STROUD. I keep a straw bonnet shop, in Milner-place, Lambeth. The prisoner called on me about three weeks previous to his apprehension, and offered some plait - I bought a small quantity of him for 8s.; it is here - I gave it to Mr. Austin about a week after; I am sure it was the same - I was about ten minutes making the bargain with him the first time; he came again next day, but I did not buy of him - he had some more plait; I do not know what quantity - what he brought the first time was in a red handkerchief; he had some in a handkerchief the next time, but I do not know whether it was red - it was tied in a handkerchief and put into a knapsack; he told me he had got more plait to sell me, and asked 10s. for it - I then asked where he got it: he said his sister and mother who made it sent it up to him from the country - I said, being a stranger to him, I should like to have some further account of it, as he asked me considerably below its value; I asked where he lived - he said in Oxford-street; he was in soldier's clothes - I asked where in Oxford-street; he said that was a matter of no consequence, if I had any doubt of him I had no occasion to purchase it - I then told him I had no reason to doubt him, but he asked me so much below the value, if he could prove to me how he came by it, I would give him 2l. for it - he had asked 10s.; I thought it worth full 2l. - he made some answer; I asked if his serjeant knew he dealt in straw - he said he did; I said if he would take me to where he lived, or to his serjeant I would purchase it, but that he also declined - I would not purchase, and he left; this interview lasted full twenty minutes - I have not the slightest doubt of his being the man; I did not see the private mark.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you keep an open shop? A. I do; my wife was present on the first occasion, and my brother on the second - they are not here; they were not required at Bow-street - I have not been long in the trade: I stated to him on the second occasion that I was a large dealer, and knew every one in the trade; that was not the case - I do not consider myself a very good judge of plait; I gave him 8s. for two bundles - he was in his undress with a cap on, and was a stranger to me before.

MARY BROWN. I live with my father, a bonnet cleaner, in Litchfield-street. The prisoner came to our shop to offer plait to my father for sale about three weeks ago; I was present - he bought none; the prisoner was in the shop five or ten minutes - I had never seen him before, but he is the man; he was dressed in regimentals, and had the plait in a red handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you not seen other soldiers at your shop? A. No; he did not speak to me - I am positive he is the man; he was in his undress.

ELIZA TUCKER . I live at No. 47, York-street, Westminster, and keep a straw bonnet shop. I have bought plait of the prisoner; I am certain he is the man - he came several times; the last time was about a month ago- I have seen him four or five times, but did not purchase every time; the quantity altogether came to less than 1l. I have not the slightest doubt of his person - he was alone; he had it once in a white wrapper; I do not know what it was in at other times - I asked where he got it; he said he was a native of Dunstable, that his friends sent it to him, and he could serve me as cheap as the dealers as that was the case; that satisfied me.

Cross-examined. Q. Was that at the first or a subsequent time? A. I cannot be certain whether I bought any of him first - I always buy of dealers; they call at the shop - his being in soldier's clothes was the reason I asked him about it; I gave Austin what I had left - the rest was manufactured; I gave him 4s. for each bundle - I delivered up two bundles.

JAMES SADLER THOMAS. I am superintendant of the Police. I apprehended the prisoner - he was not searched; I searched his clothes which were at his lodgings; I have a handkerchief which I found inside one of his jackets, and inside the handkerchief are some small particles of straw not large enough for plait; I took him on the 28th of January, in St. James'-park, at the military station.

MR. BARRY to JOHN AUSTIN. Q. Besides the person you have named was there a boy and a man lodging in your house? A. There was a little boy eight or nine years old and his mother, but no man.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more of it than a child unborn - I never committed any misdemeanor whatever.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 99s .) Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-13

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

510. JOHN SMITH was indicted for bestiality .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-14

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

511. WILLIAM BLOOMFIELD and WILLIAM BENJAMIN JEFFERSON were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Edghill , on the 5th of February , and stealing 1 pelisse, value 5l., his property .

EDWARD HUGGLESTONE. I am a serjeant of the Police. On the 5th of February, a little after six o'clock, I saw both the prisoners in Oxford-street, against the prosecutor's window, about a yard from each other - I did not see them converse together; they were standing at the window for about a minute - I saw Bloomfield take something out of the window, and go off down the street; I did not know what he took - he folded it round, and put it into his apron; I immediately pursued up the road

about two hundred yards before I overtook him - the other prisoner was walking after him; he did not join his company, but went past him - Bloomfield darted through a rank of coaches, and threw something down; I seized him, dragged him back to it, and found it was this pelisse, which I took up - Jefferson was coming in a stooping position towards the coach, and I took him; he had not done any thing - when I was picking up the pelisse he did not interfere; I took them back to the prosecutor's, who claimed the pelisse - I found they had pushed in these pattern boards, which were nailed up instead of a square of glass.

WILLIAM EDGHILL. I am a tailor , and live in Oxford-street . On the 5th of February Hugglestone brought the prisoners to my house with this pelisse, which is mine- I had seen it on the bar that day, but saw nothing of the transaction; the cost price is 5l.

Bloomfield's Defence. I was not with any body that night - my mother sent me to get some work for her; I did not steal any pelisse, and was not near the shop - I was walking along when a man came and caught hold of me just by the shop my mother works for, which is a staymaker's, at No. 14, I think.

BLOOMFIELD - GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 99s. only, and not of breaking and entering) Aged 8.

Transported for Seven Years .

JEFFERSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-15

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

512. JOHN BURLEY was indicted for that he, on the 9th of February , being in the dwelling-house of Joseph Lester , did steal therein 1 basket, value 6d.; 1 knife, value 4d.; 1/2lb. of pork, value 4d.; 3 biscuits, value 1d.; 2 sixpences, and 7s. 6 1/2d. in copper monies, his property; and that having committed the said felony, about five o'clock in the night of the same day, burglariously did break the said dwelling-house to get out of the same .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a watchman of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On the 9th of February, about five o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise like the bolt of a door being drawn - I saw a door open, and a head look out; the door then closed - I went over to the door, tried it, and found it fastened; I got in, and found the prisoner in the passage with a little basket in his hand - I asked how he came there; he said he had slept there that night, and called to see the gentleman who kept the house - I asked where the gentleman was; he said he was in bed - I asked where he himself slept, and to show me the room; he saw a door a few steps up, and said that was his room -I told him to open the door; he tried, but could not - I knocked, and Lester, the landlord, got up; the house is in the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch.

JOHN LESTER . I rent this house. I never saw the prisoner till I was alarmed that morning - I did not know of his being in the house; I was the last person up the night before, and fastened the door safe; it was bolted with three bolts, but there was no lock - an iron bar goes across, and a bolt through the bar; any body within could open it - the prisoner had got on a beer stand to reach the top bolt; it stood just inside the door - the basket he had is mine, and contained a quantity of farthings, a piece of bread, and a knuckle of pork - I missed out of the till two sixpences, a shilling, about 16d. in copper, and a knife from near the till; I found the knife in his pocket - the basket had come from the country, and has my direction on it; there were two halfpence among the copper which I am certain were in my till the night before; they are marked particularly - it was quite dark when the watchman called me.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-16

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

513. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Gordon , from his person .

MR. JOHN GORDON . I live at No. 77, Gower-street, Bedford-square. On Monday, the 8th of February, about noon, I was in Skinner-street , walking towards the City, and felt a twitch at my right-hand pocket; I turned suddenly round, and laid hold of the prisoner behind me - two persons appeared to be in his company; I said,"You have taken my handkerchief;" he denied it - I observed the corner of it sticking out of his breeches pocket; I immediately pulled it out, and said that was it - he replied,

"So it is;" a constable happened to be in the way - he got away from me; the constable followed - I lost sight of him, but saw him again in five minutes, and am quite certain of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM TURNBULL. I am a constable. I was walking up Skinner-street, and saw Mr. Gordon laying hold of the prisoner's collar; I cannot say whether he had any companions - Mr. Gordon accused him of taking his handkerchief; he denied it - I saw Mr. Gordon take it from his pocket; he twisted himself out of his hands -I followed, and secured him without losing sight of him; the handkerchief was delivered to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Skinner-street; the handkerchief was taken out of the gentleman's pocket, and thrown at my feet - I took it up, and put it into my pocket - he turned round, and charged me with it; I gave it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-17

514. THOMAS AMOR was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 2 cotton cravats, value 3s., and 1 worsted cravat, value 18d. , the goods of William Griffin and another.

WILLIAM GRIFFIN. I keep a ready-made linen warehouse , in Cornhill , and have one partner. On the 25th of January, about six o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in the back parlour, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went out - the prisoner had turned down 'Change-alley, which is one door from my house; I called Stop thief! and he was stopped - I lost two cotton cravats and a worsted one- he had not got them about him; they have never been found,

JANE GRIFFIN. I am the wife of William Griffin . I was in the parlour behind the shop, sitting opposite the door; I saw the prisoner come in, and take something off a small table - I had shortly before that told the young man to take these cravats from the door; I saw the prisoner take them from the table, and go off with them; I could see

what he had got-he was brought back by Mr. Griffin and a ticket-porter; the property is worth 4s. 6d.

Prisoner. Q. You said at the Mansion-house that the person had a detriment in his eye? A. I said he had a very curious look in his eye, which I think you have.

WILLIAM HUGHES. I am shopman to Mr. Griffin. I saw the prisoner come into the shop, take three cravats, and instantly gave an alarm; Mr. Griffin went out - I followed him, but before I overtook him the prisoner was in custody; I recollected his features, and am quite certain of his person - he had run half-way up 'Change-alley; the things have not been found.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am a ticket-porter. I heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was coming towards me, running fast. and I stopped him; I did not observe any thing with him - I took him into the shop; Hughes and Mrs. Griffin immediately said he was the person - he said he was no thief.

Prisoner. Q. I could have got away, could not I? A. Not from me - you made no resistance.

SARAH TOWNESEND. I live in Coppice-row. I was at tea at Griffin's; I saw the prisoner stoop down, come in, and take the property off the table - previous to that three boys came in, one with a petition, another to ask for tape, and a third to sell pens: while the one was offering pens the prisoner came in - I am confident he is the man: as he took the bundle his eye caught mine.

Prisoner. Q. How far was you from the person? A. About six yards.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the west-end of the town, looking for work; in my way home I ran up this court, being cold, and that caused a crowd.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-18

515. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 1 leather howsing, with 2 brass plates, value 4s. , the goods of George Simmons .

GEORGE SIMMONS. I am a sack-collector , and live at No. 203, Upper Thames-street . On Tuesday evening, the 2nd of February, having lost several articles while my carts have been at the door, I was on the look out - I opened my door very carefully, and saw the prisoner by my horse's head; I immediately ran up the court, and said, "Halloo, my lad, what now?" he dropped this howsing, and ran off; I immediately followed him - he was stopped at the corner of Fish-street-hill; I never lost sight of him - on the spot where he was stopped I picked up a common knife; the howsing was cut off the horse's back; I suppose I was five minutes in pursuit of him - there are two brass plates in the howsing; it is worth 4s.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you had lost a pair of reins? A. I said I thought it was a pair of reins, but attached to the howsing was a long thong.

THOMAS KIRWAN. I am a patrol of Bread-street. I was on duty, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner run against a post, and stop - I ran up, and took him- Simmons came up directly, and charged him with stealing some harness from his horse; he said nothing to it.

JAMES HAMOND. I am a beadle of the ward. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and found the prisoner in custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman did not know what he had lost; being cold I was running - he called Stop thief! and I was stopped; he charged me with stealing a pair of reins off his horse; I was taken to the watch-house, and kept there a quarter of an hour - I said I had stolen nothing. The constable of the night told the prosecutor to go and see what he had lost; when he came back he brought this with him to the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-19

516. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Ralph Charles Price , from his person .

MR. RALPH CHARLES PRICE . I live in William-street, Blackfriars, and am the son of Mr. Ralph Price . On the 21st of January, about three o'clock, I was on Ludgate-hill - my handkerchief was safe half an hour before, when I left home; I felt a pull at my pocket, turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand; I immediately collared and secured him - there appeared to be another man with him; he followed us to the Compter, and on returning I saw him outside the gates - I delivered the handkerchief to the officer, and am quite sure it was mine; the officer is not here.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to look for a situation, and met a person in Gracechurch-street; she asked me to go and see the funeral of Sir Thomas Lawrence - I was standing at the corner of Ludgate-hill; she called out.

"William, there is a man picking a gentleman's pocket;" the man threw the handkerchief down, and ran away; I took it up, and ran after the man with it - I tapped the gentleman on the shoulder, and told him that was the man that was running, but he collared me.

MR. PRICE. He told me after I had collared him that another person took it, but not till I had collared him; he did not tap me on the shoulder - it was at the time of the funeral.

ELEANOR FITCH. I live in Harcourt-street, Skinner-street. Somer's-town, and am an ostrich feather maker. I was going to the Minories to purchase some feathers, and saw the prisoner there; I have known him three or four years - he was alone; I saw a handkerchief taken from this gentleman's pocket, but by whom I cannot say, except that it was not by the prisoner, for I had hold of his arm - I had asked him to assist me as far as he was going, for I was taken ill, and was confined at five o'clock that very day, with the baby I now hold in my arms; if he had taken the handkerchief I must have seen it - I swear he did not take it; it was thrown alongside, on my basket, which I had in my hand. but by whom I cannot say - I saw the gentleman lay hold of the prisoner, and heard him say,"If you will let me go I will point out the man who took the handkerchief;" I did not tell Mr. Price what I had seen, for I was taken bad at the time, and was confined in three hours - a gentleman standing by saw that I was taken ill.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-20

517. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of George Smith , from his person .

GEORGE SMITH. I am a surgical-instrument maker , and live in Hertford-row, Old Kent-road. On the 15th of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I had my handkerchief taken from me, as I was crossing

Smithfield ; I had used it three minutes before; I felt it taken, and saw the prisoner put it into his left-hand breeches pocket; there were four or five boys in his company- I took the handkerchief from him; he begged my pardon, and said if I would let him go he would never do the like again - I took him into a shop, and sent for an officer- he begged my pardon again before the officer came, and said if I would let him go he would never do it again.

JOSEPH BATTEN. I am a Police-officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I found 8s. on him - Mr. Smith gave me the handkerchief: he begged pardon, and said he would never do the like again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking through Smithfield; several boys were behind me - one ran by me, and threw the handkerchief on the sheep pens; I picked it up, and was putting it into my pocket when the gentleman collared me.

JOSEPH BATTEN. He never gave this account before.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18300218-21

Third Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

518. JOHN MAYDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 2 jackets, value 10s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 10s.; 2 waistcoats, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 pair of mittens, value 6d.; 1 cap, value 1s.; 1 hat, value 3s., and 1 handkerchief, value 9d. , the goods of David Irvine ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 37. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-22

519. RICHARD ENGLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 12 lbs. weight of bacon, value 8s. , the goods of James Smith ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 32. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-23

520. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of David Farrow ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-24

521. GEORGE MORTLAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 pair of bellows, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Francis Lamb ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300218-25

522. JOHN MILDENHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 horse-cloth, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Scrivener : to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-26

523. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 bed, value 2l.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 1 sheet, value 2s., and 1 counterpane, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Stock ; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-27

524. WILLIAM ABERCROMBIE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 2 handkerchiefs, value 12s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 1 apron, value 1s. 6d.; 11 yards of cotton, value 15s.; 7 yards of linen, value 14s.; 2 table-cloths, value 10s.; 2 towels, value 3s.; 1 ring, value 20s.; 1 brooch, value 30s.; 1 pencil-case, value 2s.; 1 brooch, value 10s.; 3 yards of silk, value 10s., and 1 promissory note, value 37l. 10s. , the goods of Ann Petrie .

ANN PETRIE. I live in Parsons-street, Ratcliff, and am single . The prisoner keeps a green-grocer's shop - I lodged with him till the 21st of June, when I left to go to Cornwall; I left a trunk at his house, containing all the articles stated and several others - I returned on the 21st of November, went to his house, and asked if I could get a bed; Mrs. Abercrombie refused me - I asked where my bed was; she said it was safe: I wished to see my trunk, which they refused; I had the key with me, and had left all these articles locked in it - Mr. Gordon's young man gave me the duplicate of a quilt, which was pawned for 10s., and that duplicate, with several others were in the box when I left it; I went to Mrs. Abercrombie, and said,"Mr. Gordon's young man has given me a duplicate which was in my trunk;" she said,

"Your trunk is safe enough for what I know;" in a few days I went again, with a friend, and saw the prisoner - I said,

"Can I get my things?" he said,

"No, pay me what you owe me;" he said there was 12s. 6d. due - I said,

"You shall get your money before I remove my goods; but I wish to see if my things are all safe;" he said he would not let me see my things till I paid the money; I went again with a porter, and paid the prisoner's wife the money - she then took a key, and opened the door: I saw my trunk broken open, standing on two chests, and the articles stated were gone from it; the pocket-book, which had contained the duplicates and a promissory note, was laying on the trunk - the prisoner came in while I was there, and I said to him,

"I have been robbed - what a cruel thing it is;" he and his boy then bundled out my things on the pavement; I then taxed Mrs. Abercromble with stealing my property - she said, in the prisoner's presence, that she had not stolen it, but she knew who had; I have never found my property; I have searched respecting the property to which the duplicates had belonged, and some of them had been taken out of pledge.

GEORGE STEVENS. I am a messenger at the King's Bench. I was employed by one Gonnell to go and put the prosecutrix on board of a steam-packet, on the 21st of June; when I went to the prisoner's house I saw a person, who I believe was Mrs. Abercrombie - she refused to let her take any thing away, because the rent was not paid; after some conversation they agreed that I should take a trunk away provided I lent her 5s.; after they had settled, and parted friends, the prosecutrix opened a trunk full of woman's apparel, and said there were papers in it of value, and wished them to take care of it, which they promised they would do.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not they tell her they had no more room? A. No - I heard her say they were welcome to make use of any of her clothes, if they would take care of her trunk; I did not hear them say they must put it into the kitchen.

THOMAS LUCK . I work with a coal-waggon. On the 9th of December Mrs. Petrie asked me, between three and four o'clock, to help her move some goods from Mr. Abercrombie's; we went there, and saw Mrs. Abercrombie; I

moved a tub and some other things, and the prisoner came in - I saw Mrs. Petrie pay some money; the door of the room was then opened - I saw a trunk and some chests; the trunk had been forced open and the hasp broken off; there was a few clothes in the trunk; the underneath chest was wet with the potatoes.

MARIA PETRIE. I am the prosecutrix's niece - I lived with her at the prisoner's house; I know she had these things.

BOYD SILVESTER. I took the prisoner on a warrant - he said he had stolen none of the things; there were some things there, but she had them when she came for them - he said there had been 17s. 6d. owing, and he had received 5s. before she went; he said he could not be accountable for these things.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say he did not know what she had left? A. Yes, but believed what she left she got.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-28

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

525. ANN ELLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 9 yards of ribbon, value 13s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

ROBERT RAMSAY. I am in the employ of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , of Nos. 44 and 45, Old Compton-street, Soho . On the 8th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the shop - the prisoner came in and asked to look at some ribbon; I showed her the drawer - she desired me to cut three quarters of a yard off one of them; while I was doing that I saw her take a piece from the drawer, and put it under her shawl, then under her handkerchief, and then under her shawl again; I went and told Mr. Sewell - he sent the next witness to conduct her to a passage; this ribbon was dropped in the shop, eight or nine yards from where I had been serving her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many persons were in the shop? A. I should think fifty or sixty - I did not take her at first, as I waited to see if she took it away; Mr. Sewell was at the bottom of the shop -I put away the drawer, and left her with the ribbon while I went to him; it is possible she might have gone off, but there was a young man in the shop; she was five or six yards from the door when I served her - I should not have seized her without telling my employer; if he had not been there I should have told the young man.

WILLIAM GUYTHER. I attend in the shop, but do not serve; it is my business to attend the customers when they come in; after Mr. Sewell told me of this I went to the prisoner, and begged her to come to another part of the shop; when she had got six or seven yards I saw her shifting something, and this ribbon fell from her person.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there many persons about? A. Yes, the shop was full; the place where she dropped the ribbon was further from the door than where she had been served; she came further into the shop when I begged it as a favour - I do not know what part of the shop Mr. Sewell was in; he came to me in the middle of the shop - I do not think it possible for this ribbon to have hung to the prisoner's person - I never knew such a thing.

ROBERT RAMSAY . This is the ribbon - there are nine yards and a half of it - she had bought some other ribbons, but none of this sort; she laid out about 3s.

Cross-examined. Q. Had she not paid you? A. Yes, after I had told Mr. Sewell; I had not made out the bill when I told him.

COURT. Q. Did she pay for it before she dropped this other ribbon? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I followed this gentleman a considerable distance up the shop; they said they suspected I had taken something - I said I had not, and opened my shawl; they left me two or three minutes, and then said they had picked up a piece of ribbon which I had dropped; the gentleman first said he saw me put the ribbon under my shawl, then into my pocket, and then take it out again, and yet he did not take me; I have been married twenty years, and was never accused of any thing of this kind in my life.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18300218-29

526. JOHN BOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 1 watch value 3l.; 1 ribbon, value 1d.; 1 seal, value 1d.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 10 sovereigns, and 4 shillings , the property of Caroline Skill .

CAROLINE SKILL. I am single , and live in Holborn. I lived in Grand Junction-terrace for eleven months; the prisoner became acquainted with me the beginning of July - he had been butler in a gentleman's family, but was out of place; we were asked in New Marylebone church, and were to be married on the 25th of August -I gave warning to leave my situation, and left it on the 24th of August, which was Monday - a fortnight before that I had gone to his lodgings and drank tea with him and his landlady, at No. 10, Adam-street - I had my watch in my hand, and laid it down on the table; he said, what a dirty ribbon I had - he put another ribbon to it, which he had ready in the room; he said,

"Why do you always carry it in your hand?" I asked him to have the goodness to put it into his pocket till I went home - he went home with me that evening, and I forgot to ask him for it; on the Sunday before I left my place, we were at a tea-garden together, and I asked him for my watch - he said he had left it at home, because he had worn it till the ribbon was very dirty; I said, "Never mind, I am going to leave to-morrow evening;" I have never had the watch since nor seen it. On the Monday evening I left my place, and went to his lodgings between eight and nine o'clock; we went, took a walk together, and I expected to be married the next morning - we returned home about half-past ten, and he asked me to lend him nine sovereigns to go and fetch his clothes from the tailor's; I lent them to him, and 1l. 4s. besides to buy some other things for the next day - he had all the nine sovereigns at the same time, and they were to get his clothes; he went to bed about eleven o'clock; I slept with his landlady - I got up at half-past eight the next morning, and he was gone; I never saw him again till yesterday week, when he was at the office for a spoon - I never intended he should keep the watch or the money; I cannot tell whether he slept there that night, but he was gone when I got up - I waited till eleven o'clock, and then went to Harley-street where he had lived; he had

been there, and taken away his box - I have never got my watch nor my money again.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me the watch to get a new ribbon? A. No; I counted the nine sovereigns into his hand to get the clothes - I asked if the tailor could not wait until the next day; he said I should be tired, and he should like to take it that night.

COURT. Q. Had he inquired if you had any money? A. Yes; I told him I had saved a little while I had been in service.

EDWARD BERRIDGE. The prosecutrix lodged a complaint some months ago against the prisoner; he was afterwards brought to our office on another charge, and she came forward and identified him.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the money and the watch - I had carried the watch about a fortnight, and the night before we were to be married, she counted the nine sovereigns into my hand, and asked if I would have any more - I went out in the morning to get my clothes, and got drinking from one house to another; I got intoxicated, fell asleep, and lost the watch and great part of the money - I had lived with Admiral Digby and Mr. Dodswell.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-30

527. ELEANOR BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 2 glass salt-holders, value 5s. , the goods of John Larard .

WILLIAM HENRY FISH . I am in the service of John Larard , of Chichester-place, Gray's Inn-road . On the 19th of January the prisoner came and brought a trifle-dish to match - I said we had not one like it; she then asked the price of a pair of salts - I went to ask Mrs. Larard, and while I was gone I saw the prisoner put something into her lap; Mrs. Larard went, and spoke to her - she was then going away; I went, and asked what she had in her apron - she said what she had was her own; I had seen her before.

ELIZA LARARD. I am the wife of John Larard . Fish called me, and I spoke to the prisoner when she was going away; he asked what she had in her apron - she said what she had was her own; I took these articles from her, which are my husband's.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to match a trifle-dish, and what he showed me was too large - I then looked at a pair of salts, and he did not know the price; his mistress came out, and asked 5s. for them - I bade her 4s., and she would not take it; I was then going out.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-31

528. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 1 sausage-machine, value 50s. , the goods of James Anderson .

JAMES ANDERSON . I am a furnishing ironmonger , and live in Wardour-street . This machine is mine - a woman told me, on the 22nd of January, that it had been taken; I went to the door, and saw the machine on the prisoner's shoulder - I went after him down the street, and brought him back - he had got about a hundred yards from my house - he said a person gave him 2s. 6d. to carry it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is the person here who told you it had been taken? A. No; I did not see him take it from my door - I think he said he was to take it to Queen-square.

JACOB MILLER. I am a Police-constable. I have the machine, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the street; a man, who looked like a porter, asked me to assist him to carry this down to Queen-square - I did not know it was stolen.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-32

529. FRANCIS BLACKBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 2 saws, value 5s.; 2 planes, value 3s.; 2 squares, value 3s.; 1 oil-stone, value 6d.; 1 rule, value 6d., and 3 castors, value 6d., the goods of George Dales ; and 3 planes, value 3s.; 1 saw, value 1s., and 2 pairs of compasses, value 1s. , the goods of Robert Charoneau .

GEORGE DALES . I am a carpenter . I have known the prisoner twelve or fourteen years - he has occasionally worked for me. I left the articles stated in a work-shop, at No. 23, Duck-lane - the prisoner had been out of work a long time; he came to me, and asked for a job - as soon as he was gone I missed the rules; I went and accused him of it, and he gave me up the duplicates - I knew he was in great distress, or I do not think he would have been guilty of it.

JAMES ADAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Berwick-street. I have three tools pawned by the prisoner.

ROBERT CHARONEAU. I lost some tools - two of these articles are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to replace them as soon as I got work.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-33

530. THOMAS BARNES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 memorandum-book, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 4d., 3 pence, and 2 halfpence , the property of William Chaplin .

SAMUEL PHILLIPS . Mr. William Chaplin keeps a hotel at the bottom of Adam-street, Adelphi . Last Saturday morning, at twenty minutes before eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner jump out of his parlour window - the witness followed him, and cried Stop thief! I caught him at the corner of Robert-street; nothing was found on him.

HENRY KIDNER . I am a waiter at the hotel - Mr. William Chaplin keeps it. I was going into one of the parlours, and saw the prisoner getting out of the window with my master's coat - I ran, and snatched it from him - I then pursued him round the terrace, and he was taken; I am sure he is the man - this is the coat; this handkerchief and book were in the pocket of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been out of work a great part of the winter - I have a wife and two children, and had not a morsel of bread.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-34

531. JANE EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 5 lbs. weight of pork, value 1s. 8d. , the goods of William Hindley .

JAMES EDMONDS. I am in the employ of William Hindley , a cheesemonger ; he sells pork. On the 30th of January, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and a man came into his shop - the man

asked the price of several pieces of pork; I said 5d. a lb. - he seemed to think it too much; two females then came in - I went to serve them; I then went to the window, and missed a particular piece of pork - I said to the prisoner and the man,

"Where the deuce is that piece of pork gone?" I saw the prisoner was then standing behind the man - I went towards her; she went to go out of the door, and fell down - I went, and found two pieces of pork in her apron; I took her to the back of the shop, and found another piece of pork on her - she had not bought any thing; she had been there two or three Saturday nights with that man.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I ask you the price of the pork? A. No, she did not ask the price of any thing; I was going round to her, as I had some suspicion of her - one of the pieces I took from her apron was the particular one I had missed, and when I got her up the shop she dropped another piece; I did not push her against the counter - she had not bought any thing nor the man either; I saw no money.

RICHARD KERSWELL . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner, and have the pork.

Prisoner's Defence. - I went into the shop, and asked the price of the pork - my husband was with me; I was very much intoxicated - the pork laid on the bench; he asked 5d. per lb., and I offered him 4d. - he served me with two pieces, and took 1s. 6d.; he then came, took hold of my apron, and said,

"What have you here?" I said," What I have paid for;" he said, "You have paid for nothing" - he threw me up against the counter, and this other piece fell off.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300218-35

532. CHARLES CRACE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 4 brushes, value 8s. , the goods of Leonard Dell .

LEONARD DELL. I keep a shop in St. Martin's-street . On the 9th of February the prisoner was brought back to my shop by the Police-officer; he asked if I had lost any brushes - I said I did not know; but I looked, and missed these brushes from my shop.

DENNIS HERON. I was in St. Martin's-street, between six and seven o'clock that evening, and saw the prisoner and another pass the shop - the prisoner stepped in, took a bundle of brushes, and gave them to the other man - I went to follow the other man, and the prisoner ran after me, to prevent my following him; he ran after Pimro, struck him, and the other man got away.

Prisoner. Q. What part of the shop did I take them from? A. From the left-hand side of the shop - I was about half way between Mr. Dell's shop and Leicester-square.

WILLIAM MATTHEW PIMRO . I was in St. Martin's-street, saw the prisoner step in, take the brushes, and give them to another - I was going after the other, and the prisoner came and hit me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home from Mr. Laing's, where I had been for work - I saw nothing of this till the officer came with these two boys, and took me; they said they lost the brushes on the Thursday, and it was Tuesday I was taken; they said they were taken from the door - I was walking quietly along; it is a very crowded neighbourhood.

WILLIAM MATTHEW PIMRO . I will swear that is the man who struck me - he was dressed as he is now.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-36

533. AGNES CONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 5 lbs. weight of ham, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Shepherd Simpson .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-37

534. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 1 earthenware pot, value 6d., and 10 lbs. weight of honey, value 20s. , the goods of John Kirkland .

HENRY DAY . I know the shop of Mr. Kirkland - he is a grocer . On the 23rd of January I was opposite his door, and saw a lad bring a pot of honey out, and give it to the prisoner; I suspected it was stolen, and pursued the prisoner - he put down the pot about twenty yards from the shop, and then ran; I pursued, and took him back to the shop - the boy with the honey got away; the prisoner said he was not the person, I was mistaken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What hour was this? A. About half-past eight o'clock in the evening; I had not known him before - he was searched, but I believe nothing was found on him; I have not inquired about his friends - I believe they are respectable.

JAMES HUNT . I am shopman to John Kirkland. This is his honey - it was two or three yards within his shop, on a canister; I was at the sugar-block at the back of the shop - it was covered over.

Prisoner's Defence. I had taken a pair of shoes home to Mrs. Manclark - her husband had not received his wages, and I took a walk just to kill the time; I was going down Marchmont-street, and heard Stop thief! called; I ran, like most other people, and the young man took me.

CATHERINE MANCLARK . My husband is an upholsterer. I have known the prisoner seven or eight years - he came to me at eight o'clock that evening to bring a pair of shoes; he had worked for me as a shoemaker for four years - he has been a very honest man.

Five other witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-38

535. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 drinking-glass, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Lewis Jones .

LEWIS JONES. I am a publican . On the 26th of January the prisoner came into my house, and called for a glass of ale; he went into the tap-room, and sat about a quarter of an hour - he watched his opportunity, then took the glass, and went out; my wife suspected him, and I followed him into a court, which had no thoroughfare - I took him with my glass and another one on him.

FRANCIS DIAGRE. On the 26th of January the witness gave the prisoner to me, with these two glasses.

LEWIS JONES . One glass is mine; this other glass belongs to a publican who lives about one hundred yards from me - he is on the Jury at Guildhall, and cannot attend.

Prisoner. I was in great distress, and had been out of work a long time.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-39

536. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 hat-box, value 2d.; 1 hat, value 27s.; 5 half-crowns, and 1 sixpence , the property of James Fisher .

JOHN STENNARD. I am errand-boy to Mr. Fisher, a hatter , of Regent-street. On the evening in question, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner came and ordered a hat to be sent to No. 3, York-buildings, New-road , in the name of Mr. Booth - it came to 27s.; in about a quarter of an hour my master sent me with it; it was to be paid for in ready money - I took five half-crowns and a sixpence to give change; when I got to No. 3, York-buildings the prisoner was at the door, and asked if I came from Mr. Fisher - I said Yes; he asked if I had change -I said Yes; he told me to give him the hat and the change which I did; he asked if I had a receipt - I said Yes, and I gave him that - he then told me to go and order a pint of ale; I went, and when I got back he was gone - I went to the house, and asked if they knew a Mr. Booth; they said they knew no such person - I went down to the Paddington coach-stand, and asked the people there, and a man told me he had seen a person get into a coach with a box; we opened the door, and the prisoner jumped out at the other door and ran away, but he was pursued and taken.

THOMAS LAWSON. This boy came up to me, and said he wanted a man with a hat-box; the coachman tapped me on the shoulder, and said, "Why, I have a person in my coach with a box;" I opened the door - the prisoner ran out, and was stopped at the corner of Baker-street.

JOHN DAVIS. I am a watchman., and was at Clarencegate; I received charge of the prisoner from a soldier, who had stopped him; he said he had done nothing, and begged me to let go of his collar, as I should spoil the collar of his coat; this lad came up, I went with him to the coach, and saw the box taken out of the coach; I found five half-crowns, a sixpence, and a cigar-tube on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I got into the coach at the Yorkshire Stingo, and the box was in it.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-40

537. WILLIAM READING was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 8 ivory balls, value 4s. , the goods of Richard Barnett .

MARGARET BARNETT . I am the wife of Richard Barnett - he keeps a public-house at Ratcliff . The prisoner came in on the day in question, and called for a pint of porter, which the servant took to him in the parlour; he stopped there till the rest of the people were gone from the parlour; there was a bagatelle-board in the parlour, which was shut up, and I had seen the balls safe about half an hour before he went into the room, when the board had been moved - the prisoner left about six o'clock in the evening; I had heard the board moved, and as soon as he was gone I sent my servant to look for the balls - I missed eight balls, and I believe these to be them; he was found in another public-house, and these balls were found up the chimney - other people had been in the room after I saw the balls safe.

JOHN DAVIS. I am a headborough. I was sent for to take the prisoner that same evening, a little after seven o'clock; he was in the parlour at the Phoenix tavern - I found nothing on him, but in the fire-place, up the chimney, I found these balls concealed.

Prisoner's Defence. Other persons played with the balls after the prosecutrix saw them; what she said was my opening the board, was a pint pot which I sat down - I was an hour and a half there; there were six gentlemen there when I went in.

MARGARET BARNETT. No one had played with the balls after I saw them, till I sent my servant, who said they were gone.

JOHN DAVIS. I was in the house that afternoon, but no one played with the board; he confessed at the watch-house that he took them.

GUILTY . Aged 27. Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-41

538. CHARLES GATES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 coat, value 1s., and 1 spoon, value 8s. , the goods of George Goodluck Richardson .

GEORGE GOODLUCK RICHARDSON. I live in Middlesex-place, New-road . The prisoner lived with me as a servant three weeks, but did not sleep in the house; I missed an old coat and a silver table-spoon, and spoke to him about it - he denied it; he was recommended to me by his uncle, who is a respectable man.

GEORGE MERICK. I am a Police-constable. I had information, and took the prisoner; I had a great deal of conversation with him - he at first denied knowing any thing about the things, but at last told his mother, in my presence, that his uncle had given him the coat, and the spoon was in the cock-loft - I went to his mother's house, and found the spoon on a beam, as he described; the coat was in a box.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300218-42

539. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 ham, value 9s. , the goods of Thomas Brigham .

THOMAS BRIGHAM. I keep a small ham and beef-shop in Baker's-row, Whitechapel . About a quarter-past twelve o'clock on the night of Wednesday, the 10th of February, the prisoner came in behind a woman; the woman asked me to cut her some ham and beef - the prisoner said, "If you cut it so fat I can't eat it;" the woman said,

"It is not too fat for me;" the prisoner then said, "I can eat all that;" the woman said,

"Well, I will have two ounces more" - the prisoner then took up a ham from my window, and ran away; I pursued him, but he turned down a dark turning, and I gave it up - I returned, and found my ham by the pavement; the woman was still there - she said she knew nothing of the man; I said, "That won't do for me"- the prisoner was taken in Whitechapel-road, the following evening; I had seen him about there before.

CHARLES EVANS. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have had the ham.

Prisoner's Defence. About nine o'clock at night on the 10th of February, I returned home with a young man, and bade him good night at the door; I was standing at the Red Lion public-house the following evening - the prosecutor and officer came there and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18300218-43

540. JOSEPH FURNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 jacket, value 20s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 2 half-crowns , the property of Thomas White .

THOMAS WHITE. I am a rope-maker's labourer , and live at Limehouse . On the 26th of January I let the prisoner sleep with me, as I had known him some time before; I got up first the next morning, went to my labour, and left the articles safe in my trunk in my room, it was locked - I came home at three o'clock, found the trunk broken open, and the handkerchief, coat, trousers, and two half-crowns were gone; I took the prisoner on the 28th - he said, "Come along with me, and I will tell you all about it;" I was certain he was the man, and had him taken.

JAMES LAMB . I live with Mr. Walker, a pawnbroker. I have a jacket and a handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Thomas White .(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23. Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-44

541. THOMAS FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 6lbs. of bacon, value 2s. 3d. , the goods of John Nicholson .

JAMES FENWICK. I live with Mr. John Nicholson, a cheesemonger , at Hackney . On the 8th of February I went up stairs, and heard a noise in the shop - I came down, and saw the prisoner running from the door, with the bacon in his hand; I ran out, called Stop thief! and saw the prisoner throw the bacon over a wall, about a quarter of a mile from my master's shop; the Police-man took him.

ANN NICHOLSON. I am the wife of John Nicholson . I followed our lad down stairs, and saw the back of the prisoner as he was pursuing him; he was brought back to my house by the officer. This bacon is mine.

THOMAS BROADBRIDGE. The Police-man took the prisoner, and gave him to me; this is the bacon - the prisoner said he was a coal-whipper, and had really done this from want.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 7 Days .

Reference Number: t18300218-45

542. WILLIAM FIELD and NATHANIEL HAGGER were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 20lbs. weight of nails, value 7s.; 7 gimblets, value 1s.; 1 saw, value 6s.; 1 sack, value 1s.; 1 wanty, value 7s., and 1 auger, value 1s., the goods of Robert Wragg ; 1 auger, value 1s.; 1 bill, value 1s.; 1 axe, value 2s.; 3 hammers, value 1s.; 1 pair of shears, value 2d.; 1 drawing-knife, value 6d.; 3 chisels, value 6d.; 1 pair of pincers, value 6d.; 1 pair of compasses, value 6d.; 1 file, value 2d.; 1 basket, value 1s., and 1 leather belt, value 1s. , the goods of William Tomkins .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT BROWN. I am constable of Hackney. On the morning of the 20th of January I was coming out of a gravel-pit, where I had been employing some men to clear the snow away; I saw Field with a flag basket on his shoulder - I went and asked what he had got; he said what was that to me; I took the basket down, and took him to the watch-house - I found in the basket two parcels of nails and some gimblets, and this saw was in his left-hand pocket; while we were in the watch-house Hensey came in with a sack; this bag was round Field, fastened with a gimblet. I took Hagger, I think, in about a fortnight afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Who is Hensey? A. A man who was at work with me that morning; he is on the parish - this was about nine o'clock - when I saw Field he was alone; I had been after Hagger every night for about a fortnight - I might have seen him in the course of that time fifty times, or I might not see him at all; I will not swear that I did not see him a dozen times, but not to my knowledge; I at last found him in Charles-street, Dalston - I cannot recollect exactly the day; it was the latter end of January, or the beginning of February - it was about two o'clock; there are six little white houses, and the one I found him in was the last but one; I do not think it has any number; no one was with me at the moment I took him - Hensey was not the person who gave me the information: I had been in company with several officers during the fortnight.

COURT. Q. Was any person with you when you took Field? A. All the men were coming out of the gate at the time - I knew Field.

JOHN HENSEY. I am a ground-workman. On the 12th or 13th of January. I think it was, I saw both the prisoners - Brown took Field into custody; I was a distance off, and saw Hagger come round a corner, and as he turned he saw Field in custody - he dropped this bag near Mr. Burgiss' ground, and ran away towards Walthamstow - I took the bag to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Who do you work for now? A. Mr. Gardiner, opposite the Peacock, at Hackney; I have seen both the prisoners four or five times before - Field was by himself when Brown took him; if Hagger had kept the bag on his shoulder he might have passed me without my noticing him - I never spoke to him before in my life, to my knowledge; I have spoken with him since- he said before the Magistrate that I asked him to give me 5s., but I can take an oath against it, for I had two witnesses with me when I was talking with him, three nights after the robbery; the reason I did not take him was, because I have children of my own, and did not like to have any thing to do with it; I told him he had better get out of the way, for if any thing happened I should have to come against him - this conversation took place at the White Hart, Horusey: I knew him when he was ostler at Stoke Newington - I had seen him as I passed, feeding the horses; I might have seen him twenty times, but I never drank with him - I had seen him at the White Hart, and thought that a likely place to find him, but I did not appoint to meet him there; a man named Mills was there - he lives in Union-street, Stoke Newington, and was formerly a bricklayer's labourer; I do not know what he is now - he had been at work with me the day I saw Hagger drop the bag; upon my oath I did not go with a view to get money out of him, but to tell him to keep out of the way.

WILLIAM TOMKINS. I live at Walthamstow , in the employ of Mr. Robert Wragg . I do not know the day of the month, but one Tuesday night, when it snowed very fast, my master's premises were all safe, and on the follow

ing morning I missed these articles from the tool-house; these are my master's, and these tools are mine - I had seen them safe that afternoon, and locked the tool-house up in the evening; between six and seven o'clock the next morning I found the lock broken open - the tool-house is about ten yards from the house door; we lost a spade besides - there were more articles taken than one man could carry; Field had worked for us some time before - I know nothing of the other.

Field's Defence. I was going along the Lea-bridge-road, and met a man, who asked me to carry the things for him; I went on with them to Water-lane - Brown stopped me, and asked what I had got; I told him I had the things to carry for the man - I turned, and the man was gone; I know nothing of Hagger.

FIELD - GUILTY . Aged 23.

HAGGER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-46

542. ALEXANDER MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 piece of India-rubber, value 3s. , the goods of William Richards .

JOHN REID. I live opposite to Mr. William Richards, in the Hampstead-road . On the evening of the 26th of January I saw the prisoner and four or five others; I watched them for about twenty minutes - I saw one of the others push a piece of board from the prosecutor's window, the prisoner put in his hand, and took out this piece of rubber - I pursued him; he threw it down in the dirt, and I took him.

WILLIAM RICHARDS. I keep the shop: this rubber is mine; I was not at home at the time it was taken.

JOHN WILLIAM REID . I saw the prisoner take the rubber, and when he threw it down I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18300218-47

543. FRANCIS METCALF was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 ham, value 12s. , the goods of Walker Marshall .

WALKER MARSHALL. I am a cheesemonger . About nine o'clock at night on the 12th of February, I saw the prisoner come across the street, up to the door, take a ham which was hanging at my door-post, and run away with it- I pursued him; he fell, and I came up with him; I gave him a slap or two on the head, and intended to let him go, but the officer came up, and took him - this is the ham.

Prisoner's Defence. He was desired to return and fetch the ham, but he said it was impossible to fetch that one, as he had mixed it with several others which were more or less dirty - he was told the constable would be bound to prosecute, he went back and fetched the ham.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18300218-48

544. WILLIAM MELVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 silver table-spoon, value 10s. , the goods of William St. Quintin .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN EATON . I am footman to Mr. William St. Quintin . The prisoner was in his employ on the 21st of February - our plate is kept in the pantry; I had seen it all right on Wednesday, the 19th, and on Friday, the day after the prisoner left, I missed a table-spoon - I have seen it since at the office, I examined it, and compared it with my master's spoons; this is it - I believe it to be my master's; it appears as if the crest has been rubbed out- here has been a rubbing where the crest has been.

COURT. Q. What was the prisoner? A. Merely a workman there, to put up a blind in the parlour.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Is he not a master-workman? A. Yes - there were seven or eight servants in the house; I missed the spoon on Friday, in consequence of what was told me - they were right on the Wednesday evening, about seven o'clock, after dinner; I did say before the Magistrate that I would swear to the spoon.

ARTHUR JONES . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Princes-street, Leicester-square. I have a spoon which the prisoner brought to our shop, about seven o'clock in the evening, on the 21st of January - he asked 6s. for it; I asked his name, and was going to make a duplicate out- he asked if I could not give more, and I said Yes, 10s.; he said I might as well make it 10s. 6d., and I did so - he then wanted to sell it; I said we could not purchase things that were in pawn - I then asked where he got it; he gave several different accounts; at first he said he bought it at Mr. Neat's, the pawnbroker, and he was borrowing money to pay Mr. Neat 6s.; he then stated that he had some more of them, and took us to his workshop to show them to us, but he could not show them - we then gave him into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he took you to his workshop? A. Yes.

JOHN BENTON . I am a Police-constable, and was desired to take the prisoner. I got this spoon at the pawnbroker's.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-49

545. CAROLINE LUCY , alias JOHNSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 half-crown, 1 shilling, and 2 sixpences, the monies of Michael Devereaux , from his person .

MICHAEL DEVEREAUX. I am a ballast-heaver . On the 12th of February I was at Shadwell , at past twelve o'clock at night, and fell in with the prisoner and another young woman; they crossed the street, and came to me the other took me by the arm, and the prisoner put her hand into my waistcoat-pocket - she took out half a crown, a shilling, and two sixpences; I took hold of her, and held her fast - the Police-constable came up, and took her; I saw her searched, and 2s. 1d. were found on her, but at the time I gave her in charge, she hove part of the money away - there were near a dozen girls came round her at the time; I could not have held her if the officer had not come up - I was sober.

FRANCIS FELTHAM. I heard the girl cry out Murder! and ran over - the man had hold of her hand in his right hand, and his arm was round her waist; I saw her throw out her hand, and something flew out of it - I could not see what it was; the girls were scuffling about - I found one shilling and sixpence in silver on the prisoner, and 7d. in copper; the man was sober.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met him he had a young

woman with him, and he accused me of robbing him of 5s.; he took hold of me, called the officer, and said if I would give him 4s. he would let me go, and have no piece of work - when he was down at the Thames Police he said he had found 6d. in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-50

546. JOHN JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 2 coats, value 10s., and 1 pair of gloves, value 3d. , the goods of John Ayley .

JOHN AYLEY. I live at Little Adam, in Hertfordshire. I was coming to town on the night of the 25th of January with a load of straw - I stopped on the morning of the 26th, at the White Lion, Enfield-highway , and took my coat into the house; I saw the prisoner at the White Lion - when I came out I put the coats on the straw, and when I got about ten or twenty yards from the house I missed them; I went back to the ostler, and told him of it - I then sent a constable to the prisoner's house, as I had seen him behind my cart.

JOHN WILSON . In consequence of suspicion I went to the prisoner's house, and knocked him up; I said I wanted the two great coats he had stolen - he hesitated for some minutes, and then said he had found two; I went up stairs, and he delivered me these two coats from the head of the bed - he is single.

Prisoner. He said he was not sure whether he put them on the cart before he put his horses in, or not. Witness. No, but I put them on the straw.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in the road, and went along with them a quarter of a mile, and then took them down to the house - he came in the morning, knocked me up, and said he wanted the coats; I said I had two, but I had not stolen them.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-51

547. THOMAS WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 3lbs. weight of beef, value 2s., and 7lbs. weight of mutton, value 3s. , the goods of Isaac Solomons .

ISAAC SOLOMONS . I am a butcher . On Saturday, the 23rd of January, I went out, and left some meat in my shop - I pulled the door too, but did not shut it; the watchman took the prisoner into custody - I heard of the robbery, went to the watch-house, and saw the meat, which I knew to be mine.

THOMAS WELLS. I am a watchman. I met the prisoner in a court, about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's; he had a bundle under his arm - as soon as he saw me he knocked at the first door he came to, and asked if one Sam lived there - they said No; I then asked what he had got - he said some meat; I looked into the bag, and saw two breasts of mutton, neither of which were chopped, and a piece of beef, which had this book in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the top of Petticoat-lane, and a man came and asked me to take this meat to Sam Shagger in Love-court; I inquired at about twenty houses, and could not find him - the watchman then saw me, he asked what I had got, and found the breasts of mutton and the piece of beef.

THOMAS WELLS . From the description he gave of Sam Shagger I went and took him; I saw him knock at one door, and ask for Sam only - when I took Sam Shagger the prisoner denied all knowledge of him.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18300218-52

548. JOHN WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of John Penniston Topper .

JOHN PENNISTON TOPPER. I am clerk to Mr. Willcotton. I usually dine at a coffee-shop in Hand-court, Holborn - I went there about four o'clock on the 30th of January, and called for my dinner; I put down my hat, and two bags in it - there were ninety sovereigns in one bag, and silver in the other; I saw the prisoner there - I instantly missed my hat; the prisoner was gone, and I pursued him down the court, across Holborn, up Turustile and up another court; I took up my hat from the ground, and all the money in it - I cannot say I saw him throw it down; I think I saw my hat on his head - I saw him again at Bow-street, and am certain he is the person who ran away.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you think it was possible for me to make a mistake in the hats? A. I cannot say - they were on one table.

MARY COURCELL. I keep the coffee-house, and remember the prosecutor coming in to dine; I saw the prisoner take a hat, but I did not know but it was his own; there was one hat left behind.

THOMAS YOUNG. I am a Police-constable. I was on duty, and saw the prisoner running - the bags were given to me.

Prisoner. My friends are out of town; I have not let them know, as I am afraid it would injure their feelings, and perhaps be the death of them.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-53

549. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 2 sets of gig harness, value 8l.; 1 saddle, value 15s.; 2 bridles, value 5s.; 1 pair of traces, value 5s.; 3 horse-cloths, value 1l.; 2 horse-collars, value 5s.; 6 martingales, value 10s.; 1 pair of driving-reins, value 5s., and 2 live tame fowls, price 5s. , the property of David Soame Hewson .

MATTHEW CHAMPKEN. I am servant to David Soame Hewson - he lives at Bromley, near Bow . This property was taken from his stable on the 19th of January; I had locked the stable the night before, and all was secure; I went at seven o'clock the next morning, and found the door broken open - the lock laid inside, and the property was all gone; I suppose the amount of the loss was 20l. -I know nothing of the prisoner; the harness was all taken at once, and it would require two men to take it.

LEWIS BEACHEM. My father is a saddler, in Whitechapel-road. The prisoner brought some harness to his shop on Thursday morning, the 21st of January; he offered it for sale - he said he had brought some odds and ends, and wanted 1l. for it; I saw the crest on the blinkers and sent for the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What did he bring? A. A pair of hames and some other parts of two harnesses; my father asked where he got it, and he said he received it of a man named Wells.

RICHARD BURGESS. I am an officer. I took him into custody - this is the harness.

HENRY PARNELL. I was in a public-house, and saw Wells and Taylor come in with some harness - they were talking about it; Taylor brought the bag into the tap-room and threw it into the first box.

Witnesses for the Defence.

MRS. JOHNSON. The prisoner lodged at my house, and he was not out one night, I can safely say.

COURT. Q. What night do you speak of? A. He slept at my house on the Wednesday night before he was taken - I have only two persons in the house; I see them to bed every night, and shut the door - the prisoner was not one night out; ten o'clock is about my latest hour for going to bed.

JOHN DELANT . I am a wine-cooper, and lodged in the house in which the prisoner did for the last four months; the prisoner slept with me every night, in the same bed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-54

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

550. MARGARET WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 bottle, value 3d.; 1 tumbler glass, value 6d., and half a pint of rum, value 1s. , the goods of James Beddoes .

JAMES BEDDOES. I keep the King's Head tavern, in Russell-street . On Friday last I was at work in my spirit-room the whole of the day, and had occasion to go into the cellar - I did not lock my spirit-room door after me, but left it open; the prisoner was my servant , and was doing her household work up stairs - about five o'clock a gentleman came to dinner, and she was called down to prepare for him - I found she was not capable of doing it, for instead of preparing the dinner she put the fire out; my mother-in-law came in, and said, "What have you been giving to the servant, she is quite tipsy;" the prisoner was then missing for some time; we went up stairs, found her tipsy on the bed, and a candle burning by her side - I got the Police-officer; we told the prisoner to get up and go about her business - the officer found in a band-box in her bed-room, a bottle, and some rum in it, a glass, and a handkerchief; he took her to the inspector, and she was committed by the Magistrate: on the Saturday I had a charwoman to work, and she found a wash-hand basin full of rum, which she had taken and placed up stairs.

GEORGE TWOART. I was sent for to the prosecutor's, and found the prisoner just raised up in bed, quite in a state of intoxication; Mr. Beddoes wished me to look if there was! my spirits - I looked into a box, and found this glass nearly full, and this bottle full of rum; the wash-hand basin was not in that room, it was at the door, in a box.

Prisoner's Defence. I took none in the wash-hand basin - I took that in the glass; I took not more than two table-spoonsful, and it made my head swim; it is the greatest falsehood to say I was drunk; I have been an honest hard-working servant for upwards of thirty years - trace me all round, and you will find me an honest character; they have a spite against me.

JAMES BEDDOES . This glass is mine, and was in my bed-room - the bottle I cannot speak to; the rum was above proof, just as it came in from the distiller's - she had left the tap running, which was a great loss to me.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-55

551. JOHN SNAPE was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 1 sovereign , the money of Thomas Preist .

THOMAS PREIST . I was at Mr. Hemery's, the Mason's Arms , and asked the landlady to give me change for a sovereign, which I put down, and she gave me the change; I was going to leave the bar, and she said, "I beg your pardon, but you did not give me the sovereign;" I gave her another sovereign, and said I thought I put it down -Mr. Hemery came up, and said he saw me put it down; the prisoner had been at the bar and taken a pint of beer into the tap-room - he had left a sixpence laying on the counter; the landlady said she supposed he had taken up the sovereign instead of the sixpence; the sovereign was found, but I was not in the room then.

JOHN HEMERY. I keep the public-house. I saw the witness place a sovereign on the counter, and ask my wife for change; the prisoner was standing on his right-hand; he gave my wife a shilling - she put down a sixpence and 3d.; she then said to the witness, "You have not given me the sovereign;" he said he thought he had, be searched his pockets, and found he was a sovereign short; I had suspicion of Snape, from the sixpence being left on the counter - I called him, and said I wanted to speak with him; I accused him of it, and he denied it - I sent for the Police-man; as soon as he saw him he stooped down, and I heard a sovereign fall near him - the Police-man said,"Here's a sovereign;" I had known the prisoner for seven years - he has been a very honest industrious man, and I believe bore a good character.

JOHN BURKE . I was called - the sovereign was found near the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I used that house almost every day; I am not the man who took the sovereign from that place - I had just come into the house to have a pint of beer, I took my change, and put it into my pocket; I might have gone out of the house at once if I had chosen.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18300218-56

552. CATHERINE RAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 23 yards of jean, value 30s. , the goods of Jonathan Orme .

JONATHAN ORME. I am a haberdasher , in Little Russell-street, St. Martin's in the Fields . Near nine o'clock in the evening of the 8th of February, the prisoner came in for half an ounce of thread; I had occasion to go to the other end of the shop for change, and when I came back she was very busy adjusting her dress - I served her with the thread, and followed her about twenty or thirty yards from the shop, where she joined some of her associates; I looked at the prisoner, and saw the end of the jean - I called the watchman, took her back, and delivered her to the watchman; there are twenty-three yards of the jean.

JAMES PLACE. I was called, and took the prisoner.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, denying having been in the shop, and stating that Orme described her as wearing a bonnet, but she was without one.

JONATHAN ORME. I am quite sure she is the person - I never lost sight of her till I took the jean from her; she lost her bonnet from falling down - she had no opportunity of giving it away - it has my shop-mark on it; the thread she purchased fell from her. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-57

553. JOHN COFFEE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 3 planes, value 7s. 6d., and 1 saw, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Walter Riddle .

WALTER RIDDLE . I am a carpenter . I lost my tools on the 1st of February from a new building in Woburn-square ; I left them safe on the Saturday night at half-past five o'clock, and on the Monday morning I went into the front parlour of the house; I heard a noise in the back parlour - I went, and met the prisoner coming into the front parlour; I looked into the back parlour, and saw a plough which I knew should not be there - I followed the prisoner, and called Stop thief! he was stopped by a soldier in Keppel-street; he dropped two planes, and when he was stopped a plane and a saw dropped from him - I saw them drop; the other two planes were my property.

Prisoner. Q. Where did these tools lay? A. In a cistern in the back office. I saw two of them fall from you.

JACOB BROWN. I saw him come out with something under his jacket - Riddle ran after him; I saw the soldier stop him - he dropped two planes from under his jacket. and a man, named Wright, picked them up - this plane and little saw were found on his person when he was taken.

WILLIAM BURTON. I had these planes and saw given into my possession in Keppel-street, by one of the witnesses - I took the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Were they given to you? A. They were brought down by another officer.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. They swore at the office that they were taken from a basket, and now they say from a cistern - he swore at the office that part of them did not belong to him.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-58

554. WILLIAM CREW and JAMES ADAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 2 live tame turkies, price 10s., and two live tame fowls, price 5s. , the property of John Perkenhead .

JOHN PERKENHEAD. I keep turkies and fowls , and live at Hornsey-wood house . On the morning of the 25th of January they were all right - I did not miss them till the officer came, and asked me if I had lost any; I have a great many fowls and turkies - I have ten turkies which were going about loose; I can speak to two of the turkies, from having their feathers cut - I cannot speak to the fowls.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had a great many fowls? A. Yes, fifty or sixty; they had no particular mark on them.

JAMES JONES. I am a brass-founder, and live at Islington. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, on the 26th of January, I looked out of my window, and saw the two prisoners near a brick-kiln - I watched them, and when they were gone I went to see what they had put there; I found two fowls - I called the watchman, and told him of it; he and I watched, and in the afternoon we saw the prisoners coming across the fields - Adams had a bag over his shoulder; Crew went up to the brick-kiln, and took the fowls - the watchman took him with them; I followed Adams - he was taken to the watch-house, and the turkies were found in the bag; I do not know who they belong to.

THOMAS BOLTON . On the 26th of January the witness informed me he had taken two fowls from the brickkiln, one was half dead and the other quite dead - I said I would take them back again, and did so; we patroled the road till four o'clock in the afternoon, when these two lads came across from Highbury - Crew went down to a clump of bricks, and Adams went on; I saw Crew take the live fowl, kill it, and put it into his apron with the other dead one - he jumped over the ditch, I jumped over it too, and took him with the two fowls; I gave him to the witness, and I took Adams with the two turkies, which were both alive - I found this barley in the prisoners' pockets to entice the fowls; these are the turkies.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You are sure it was "to entice" - do you expect to belong to the new Police? A. No, I would not belong to it; I do not know the prosecutor - Adams told me he stole them from there; if I had had the fowls under my care I should have known them - one of them was blind with one eye.

Adams. I told him I had to carry the turkies for a gentleman to Islington. Witness. He told me, when coming across the fields, that some gentleman in a white rough great coat had given him 9d., and part of a pot of beer to take them to Islington, but afterwards he said he brought them from Hornsey-wood house.

JOHN PERKENHEAD. I can swear to these turkies, but I did not know these fowls.

JOHN PERKENHEAD , JUN. I am the prosecutor's son. One of the fowls that was found has but one eye, but we have several that are so - I know we lost some fowls on the 25th, but I could not swear to them.

Crew. This young gentleman said at the office that he could swear to one of the fowls. Witness. No I did not.

Adams' Defence. These are not the turkies that were taken from the bag - a gentleman gave them to me to carry.

Crew received a good character.

CREW - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

ADAMS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-59

555. RICHARD BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 1 leg of pork, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Iveson .

THOMAS IVESON. I am a publican , and live at Staines . On the evening of the 23rd of January my man came, and told me that a person had taken a large leg of pork from a table at the back part of the house - I got the pork again; the man found it with him.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Was it cooked? A. No, it was preparing to be made into a ham.

THOMAS READ. On Saturday evening, the 23rd of January, I saw the prisoner go from the tap-room into the yard - he was gone a considerable time, and I waited to see if he would return; I then heard a noise, and went and saw him taking the leg of pork, as it appeared to me,

between his teeth as he was creeping out - I took it from him, and he begged me to say nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know how long he had been there? A. From the morning, and this was about half-past six o'clock in the evening - I think he was sober; the pork was in front of him - it weighed 23 lbs.; he could get out that way - the door was not fast; after I took the pork he went into the tap, but did not remain there two minutes - he then went away; he did not call for any porter after that; I saw him go - I did not take him at that time, because my master was busy: as soon as he was at leisure I told him of it - it might be two hours after.

GEORGE LAYTON. I went with the officer, and found the prisoner in bed at his lodgings, in Church-street, Staines - he came down in his shirt, and I said he must go with us; he said, "What for?" I said he knew what for - he then said he supposed it was about the leg of pork; he said he was sorry for it, and hoped I would forgive him.

THOMAS KING. I am a constable, and took him.

MR. IVESON. He has frequented my house for some time, and I knew him as coming there frequently - I imagine he was sober; I had seen him two or three times in the day, and knowing him I sufferred him to lay on the settle.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18300218-60

556. JANE ALLUM was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 2 sheets, value 3s.; 1 blanket, value 3s.: 1 quilt, value 1s. 6d.; 1 flat-iron, value 1s.; 2 chairs, value 3s.; 1 pail, value 1s.; 1 iron poker, value 6d.; 1 pair of tongs. value 6d.; 2 pattens, value 6d., and 1 knife and fork. value 3d. , the goods of Matthew Hall .

CHARLOTTE HALL. I am the wife of Matthew Hall: the prisoner lodged with us one week - she came on a Saturday. On Sunday. the 24th, I missed the articles stated. and some others - I opened her room door, went in. and said, "How could you be so cruel as to rob me?" she said, "Don't be angry;" I then turned down the hed, and missed the bed clothes - I said, "You have stripped the bed:" she said, "I have, but don't transport me:" she told me what she had done with the things, and I found them.

THOMAS DELAVALLY. I bought two or three little articles of the prisoner.

JAMES MOODY . I am a pawnbroker. I took in two or three articles of the prisoner, which the prosecutor saw and claimed.

WILLIAM JONES . I am the officer. I took the prisoner, and bring the things from Mr. Delavally - the prisoner acknowledged that she took them from the room.

Prisoner. I did it from distress and want; from my husband's being out of employ, and having four young children.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18300218-61

557. ELIZABETH HALLICK was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 1 cap, value 3s. 6d.; 1 shawl, value 9s., and 4 yards of lace, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Howard .

MARIA HOWARD. I am the wife of Samuel Howard . On the 23rd of January I lost a shawl, a cap, and two pieces of lace - I am out at work from half-past six o'clock in the morning till eight at night; I leave my mother-in-law in care of my place and children - I had seen these things on the Monday. and missed them on the Sunday afterwards - I have known the prisoner ever since August last.

ELIZABETH FREEMAN. The prisoner sent my mother out on an errand from the prosecutor's house on that Saturday - she then told me to take up the baby, light a candle, and play with him - she then went down to the yard, as I thought; I heard somebody at my sister's door - I went into the passage, and inquired who was there; no one answered - I then opened my mother's door, saw my sister's door open. and the prisoner near her bed-side; she said, "Lork, Betsey I thought your mother was here;" I said, "You know very well she is not, you sent her out on an errand;" we then both came into the room together, and she told me to go and lock my sister's door - I went to lock it; the key was not in it - I took the key from the nail, locked the door, and came in again.

ELIZABETH FREEMAN, SEN. I am the mother of this witness, and mother-in-law of the prosecutrix. The prisoner asked me to go into Brick-lane for her - I was washing a gown at the time; I might be gone about half an hour - I delivered my message, and she was to go in the evening to the place for an answer; when I returned she said, "Your daughter's door was open;" I said, "It was not when I went down stairs."

Prisoner. I do own to taking the things. but not with an intent to steal - this witness has pawned many of my things. Witness. Yes, but I always fetched them out again.

THOMAS MILLAR. I am an officer of St. Luke's. I took the prisoner - she said she knew nothing at all about the robbery; she afterwards gave up the duplicates out of her bosom.

Prisoner. Q. Did she not say she would take 6d. per week if I would give it her? A. Not in my hearing.

JOHN SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a piece of lace, shawl, and cap, pawned on the 22nd of January, by the prisoner.

GEORGE LANCASTER. I am a pawnbroker. I have a piece of lace, pawned by the prisoner on the 22nd.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-62

558. JOHN HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 2 sheets, value 10s., and 1 table-cloth, value 10s. , the goods of John Lowdham Brett .

JOHN LOWDHAM BRETT . I live at Hornsey - I know nothing of the prisoner. On the 21st of January I lost two sheets and a table-cloth from a garden behind my house - they were hanging on a line to dry; they have my marks on them - the prisoner was brought back with them, and several persons charged him with taking them.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What marks are on them? A. I. L, B. I only know them by the marks; I

have been told they are mine - the witness, who could have identified them more particularly, is dangerously ill.

WILLIAM CULLUM. I am a carpenter, and live within a short distance of Mr. Brett. On Thursday, the 21st of January, I was going home about twenty minutes before six o'clock in the evening, and going down the hill two young men passed me; one of them had a bundle - I said to a person who was with me, "I think they have some linen, let's go after them;" we did so, and I saw one of them throw a bundle into a garden - they then ran off, and I pursued - I told the man with me to take care of the things; I called Stop thief! a gentleman's servant ran out and another person - I was out of breath, and I said to them, "There go the thieves! you go after them," and I stopped to get wind - they pursued; when I got wind I went on, and met a young man bringing the prisoner back.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not dark? A. It was dark - the prisoner is one of the two who ran off - I cannot say which had the bundle; the person I saw with it was about ten yards from me, and the other was about five yards behind - when I lost my breath I think they were twenty yards from me; it is a straight road - when the other persons came out I lost sight of them; I suppose I lost sight of them for about ten minutes - it is a public road; it was at Crouch-hill, Horusey - I did not see any other persons on the road.

BENJAMIN WRIGHT. I was with the witness, and saw two men, one following the other - one had a bundle, which he flung over a hedge; I went after it - it contained the articles produced; I cannot tell how far that was from Mr. Brett's.

Cross-examined. Q. Who those persons were you cannot say? A. No; I gave the things to Applegate, and he gave them to the constable.

THOMAS PASSEY . I am a servant to Mr. St. John. I saw Cullum running up the hill after two men - I only saw Mr. Rogers' coachman on before me; I ran after the two men - I overtook the coachman at first, and then saw the two men; I overtook them, and took the prisoner, who was one of them - the other struck me on the head, and got away; the prisoner said to him, "Don't go without me."

Cross-examined. Q. What happened previous to the cry of Stop thief! you do not know? A. No; when I first heard it I did not see the persons I intended to stop, but I saw the prisoner and another run, and followed - it is not a very populous neighbourhood; I saw no persons running before them - I might meet three or four.

JOHN APPLEGATE. I heard Stop thief! called as I was at work in the stable - I did not go after any body, but saw Wright looking for the things; I said, "What are you looking for?" he said, "There are some things thrown over, and the thieves have run up here;" I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody - I took the things of Wright, and took them to Mr. Brett's.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were the things till you took them to Mr. Brett's? A. I was at work at my horses - I locked them up in my master's saddle-room till I took them to Mr. Brett's.

JOSEPH BRETT. I am a headborough of Hornsey. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - I had not possession of the bundle till the 23rd, when they were given to me by Chambers, the beadle of Hornsey.

JACOB BIRCH . I am coachman to Mr. Rogers. I heard Stop thief! called, and ran out - I saw two men. whom I pursued; Mr. St. John's man overtook me, and ran after them - he took the prisoner, who was one of them; the other got away.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know who they were? A. The prisoner was one, for he turned round and looked at me - I only saw those two men running, and the man who pursued them; it was light, and the snow made it lighter - I mean it was not dark.

JOHN LOWDHAM BRETT re-examined. Q. What was done with the bundle? A. It was left in my house, and delivered to the constable by a servant - I believe there was washing at my house on the 23rd; I believe I saw some articles hanging out.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you take notice of every washing day? A. I took notice of that day - I only know these things by the mark; some things were stolen- if another table-cloth had been brought in with the same initials, I should not have sworn to that: I know these were set apart as those which had been stolen - I sent a servant to see if there were any missing from the garden, and there was.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-63

559. ELIZABETH FITKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 5 lbs. weight of pork, value 2s. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

JOHN SCOTT. I am in the employ of Samuel Somers , a butcher , of Somers'-town . I saw the prisoner take a piece of pork from his shop, on the 16th of January; she came and asked the price of it, and took it in, as if to be weighed, but instead of that she put it under her cloak, and went out at the other door; I took her with it, and she let it drop.

GEORGE HAVILL. I am an officer. I received the prisoner at the watch-house; she said she had not taken the meat - it was found under the block.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no cloak on; I had a shawl and a basket in my hand - I bought a bunch of lights for three halfpence, and paid for it; when I was taking it out this man said, "Where is the piece of meat?" I laughed at him, and asked what he meant - Mr. Somers then told his man to go and fetch another; they pushed me about;. and the piece of meat was found in the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-64

560. GEORGE DAVIS and WILLIAM BLOUNT were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of February , 1 hydraulic-press, value 2l. , the goods of Henrietta Wilmot .

WILLIAM CLAPPERTON . I am a machinist. On the 28th of January I was at Mr. Cole's, in Cow-cross, and saw some steel, which I thought I knew as coming from Mrs. Wilmot's; I went out with Mr. Cole to Peter-street, and met Davis, who asked him for the money for the steel- he said he had no change, but if he would go to the sale he would get change and pay him; we went on, and I said to Davis, "That steel came from Mrs. Wilmot's, and she will not sell things to me; if you can purchase any thing at a reasonable rate, I will have it of you;" he said,

"I can get you any thing you want," and used some phrase - he used the word prigged, or something to that effect, meaning that he had got it clandestinely; I could not swear that he used the word prigged - I saw Mr. Wilmot the day after this - I saw Davis on the 2nd or 3rd of February when he came to my house with Blount, and told me to go to Blount's premises: I went first, and told Mr. Wilmot of it - I then went to Blount's; I saw part of a press, and made part of a bargain - Blount produced a key out of his pocket, and said, "We can get what you want." or something of that sort, and he asked me if I should like to have a range; the two prisoners brought the press down to my place - Mr. Wilmot was there, and they were both taken that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. When did you see Davis first? A. On the 27th of January; I did not see Blount till about the 2nd of February; I am a machinemaker, but I deal in all kinds of mechanical tools - I am not a friend of Davis'; I never spoke twenty words to him before this - I said Mrs. Wilmot would not let me have things, because there has been a dispute in the family, and the shop was shut up; I cannot tell why she would not deal with me; when Davis uttered the word it gave me a suspicion that he got them wrong; I did use the word prigged before the Magistrate, but I was not quite certain that he used it - I should think every one understood the word, but whether he made use of that word, or words to that effect, I cannot say; I would have told you before if I could have recollected the word - the word prigged is not an invention of my own; he gave me to understand that the thing were got dishonestly - it was Davis that said."I can got you any thing you want," or something of that kind; Blount showed me the key, and said, "This is the thing that will do it - at any time we can get you what you want." or something of that kind, and turned round a little bit of a corner; he showed me a lantern; that was the first thing Blount said - I had known Blount previously to that morning; when they came to my house, and said I was to go and see the press no other conversation passed, but that I was to go and see it; when I went there he showed me the key, then the lantern, and then the press; I understood by the key and the lantern that they were for bad purposes; I had been to Mr. Wilmot's before, to let him know - I do not know what you mean by any person's hand being held up, and a mark being made in it - I never saw any thing of the kind; I did not hold up my hand to Davis, and say "Is there not something else belonging to it;" I did say the press was not perfect - I did not say when the piece of steel was produced, "This is a piece of steel belonging to a press - where's the press, and I will buy it of you;" there was some conversation relating to a press on the 27th of January; and I mentioned to Mr. Charles Wilmot on the 28th of January, that the shed was robbed.

Q. Was it the press that you knew had been stolen on the 27th of January, or the steel? A. The steel: there was not a word mentioned about the press on the 27th - I did not know the press was stolen till the 2nd of February, when they came to me about buying it; the answers I have been giving you were about the steel, not the machine- I knew on the 2nd of February they were going to take the press; I do not know whether they took it that morning - I never saw Blount in my life till the 2nd.

Q. Had you seen either Davis or Blount before that day about purchasing the machine? A. I saw Davis on the 28th of January, and he told me he could get the press to sell, but he had not got it - I understood that he meant he was going to steal it, and I told him he might come down to my place, but that was to detect it; I told Mr. Wilmot on the 29th that these things had been taken out of the shed, and that the press would be taken out - I live in Fetter-lane, and am quite sure I never dealt in these kind of things, and no person can say I have.

JAMES ISAAC. I am a Police-man. I took up the prisoners on the 2nd of February; the witness had given me the information that afternoon - I found this lantern in a dust-hole, but no key; Blount said he had never been to Mr. Wilmot's.

JOHN WILMOT. I am the son of Heurietta Wilmot; I have assisted in her business since my father's death- the press was on her premises about a fortnight before Christmas. On the 2nd of February I knew it was gone - Clapperton told me that the shed had been broken open, and the press was for sale; I went to his house, and saw the prisoners bring the press - I have a brother named Charles; he told me on the Friday that Clapperton had mentioned such a thing to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Then no information was given to you till the 2nd of February by Clapperton? A. No - my mother manages the business; she has administered to my father's effects - the shed is shut up now.

RICHARD PEARSON . On Tuesday, the 2nd of February, we had information of this robbery, from Clapperton; we went to the shed, and waited there to see if we could see the prisoners come - we waited till about six or seven o'clock in the evening; we then saw Davis go up Backhill - he went on towards Clapperton's house; Clapperton met him, and we followed them down to Blount's, and took them - we went to Clapperton's, and got the press.

Cross-examined. Q. Where does Mrs. Wilmot live? A. The shed is in Onslow-street , opposite to Blount's house - we followed them to Blount's house, and took them; Clapperton was to give us information who the men were.

CHARLES WILMOT. Clapperton told me on Friday, the 29th, that he had an idea that the shed had been opened, and some things were taken from it that were very near the door; I made a guess that it was the steel, and he said Yes.

Cross-examined. Q. Then all you knew was what Clapperton told you? A. Yes. I live with my mother; I told her when I went home - I did not go to the shed till the 2nd of February, and then these persons were planted there to take the prisoners.

COURT. Q. Do you know this press? A. Yes: it is my mother's - it was in the shed.

Blonnt's Defence. The press was brought there by Davis, when I was out, and he agreed to satisfy me if I would assist in carrying it, which I did.

Davis' Defence. I did say I would pay him for carrying it, as I could not carry it myself.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

BLOUNT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-65

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

561. WILLIAM WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying William Raley .

CHARLES BAKER . I am a serjeant of the Police. On the 4th of January I received charge of the prisoner at St. James' watch-house , for being drunk and disorderly in Oxford-street; I put him down in the cell about eleven o'clock - he was intoxicated, but could walk; the deceased was brought in about half an hour after, and put into the same place; there was no other person in the cell: I went down again a little after twelve o'clock, with another prisoner, and found a great quantity of blood about the cell; the deceased was sitting on a bench, and the blood running fast from his head - the prisoner was standing up; I got a coach, and moved the deceased to the hospital - I asked him, in the prisoner's presence, how it happened, but he gave me no answer; I did not ask the prisoner how it happened - he said nothing; the deceased was wounded in the head - he had no wound when he was put down there; I found no instrument of any kind on the prisoner, nor in the cell - he was taken before a Magistrate next morning, and afterwards bailed.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is there a kind of stone step in the cell? A. No - the cell is not very dark; there is no window, but a grating in the door - they appeared strangers to each other.

GEORGE BLACKMAN. I am inspector of the Police, and was on duty. All drunken persons are searched when brought to the cell; there was no instrument on the prisoner - there is a projection in the cell, where two iron bars are put to throw light in; it is a kind of cill, about three feet from the floor - it is stone; I found blood on that, as if the man's head had fallen against it, and the blood was traced from that stone, to where the deceased was sitting - I have no doubt but his head had fallen against that.

JAMES DANDO. I am a tailor, and have known the deceased for the last twenty years. This accident was on a Monday; I saw the deceased at the hospital on the Monday after - he was in bed, and very ill; he was very low in spirits, but said nothing as to whether he expected to recover - he died about three weeks after.

JOHN SMITH . I am house-surgeon of St. George's-hospital. I saw the deceased between one and two o'clock on the morning of the 5th; he had received a severe lacerated wound on the head, immediately above the left brow; the bone was exposed to a considerable extent - I could discover no other injury; I attended him till he died, which was on the evening of the 30th - the wound in the head was entirely the cause of his death; I should think the most probable cause of the wound was falling on the stone cill described by the witness - the blow was a severe one, but I cannot form an opinion whether he himself might not have caused it, by stumbling against the cill, or by being pushed.

Q. Were you with him at any period when he considered himself in extreme danger, and conscious of approaching death? A. He repeatedly asked me if he was in danger; I continually told him he was in danger, from the time of his first coming in - he was a very well disposed man, and seemed to conduct himself very well, and to believe what I told him; his danger had been fully explained to him, not only by myself, but by Mr. Keith, the surgeon of the hospital, in my presence; I do not recollect that he communicated to me how the accident happened after he was aware of his danger - it was immediately after he came in.

JAMES DANDO. I saw him on the Sunday after the accident. and again that day fortnight - he told me how it had happened at my first visit, but not afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-66

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

562. ELIZA JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 table-cloth, value 5s.; 1 pillowcase, value 1s. 6d., and 1 night-jacket, value 2s., the goods of Eliza Curnick ; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pillow case, value 18d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s., and 1 pocket, value 6d. , the goods of Sophia Cook .

ELIZA CURNICK . I am servant to Sophia Cook, of Wellington-street, Camden-town . The prisoner was employed by my mistress' washerwoman for about a week, and left on the 28th of January. In consequence of information I examined my box last Thursday evening, and missed a white silk scarf, a petticoat, a table-cloth, a pillow-case, and a night jacket - I saw the prisoner at Marylebone Office on Friday morning, and found on her my petticoat, and a pocket of my mistress'; she had them on: she was employed to work at the house because I was ill, and was not to take any thing home.

EDWARD HOWARD. I am a constable. In consequence of information I went to the prisoner's lodging, in James-street, Hampstead-road, and found her in bed - she got up- I told her her landlady bad reason to believe she had robbed several places where she washed; the landlady produced to me a pillow-case belonging to Miss Cook - the prisoner said it was Miss Cook's, and she had brought it home to wash; I found a dirty table-cloth laying on the bed, and a night-gown, claimed by Curnick; I took her to the office, and in the evening I returned to her lodging, and found a night-jacket put between the bed and sacking, and under the bed, on the boards, a pair of stockings of Miss Cook's.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner when she was in custody; this petticoat, shift, and pocket were found on her - she was wearing them.

Prisoner. He did not take them from me. Witness. I received them from the person who took them from her; I did not go into the room while she was being stripped.

ELIZA CURNICK . I took these things from the prisoner, and delivered them to Dutch; I do not know the shift - the pocket and petticoat are Miss Cook's.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them home to wash.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-67

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

563. SARAH RINGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 tumbler-glass, value 1s.; 2 towels, value 1s., and 3 wine-glasses, value 1s. , the goods of Henry Harben .

SARAH HARBEN. I am the wife of Henry Harben . -The prisoner has charred and washed for me every Monday for a long time; I have lost a great number of things during the time she worked for me; I have matched these

glasses and towels with my own, and they are exactly the same - I found two towels, one tumbler, and three wineglasses pawned at Mr. How's, next door to me; one towel has the mark picked out - they are both different qualities, and agree with the qualities I have brought; the mark has only been taken out of one, and it is taken out at the place mine was marked in; I have missed two towels and three glasses of this description, and a great many more.

WILLIAM HOWS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 8th of January the prisoner pawned two wine-glasses; I asked how she came by them, knowing her to be a charwoman - she said she had been in better circumstances, and had kept a better house than Mrs. Harben, and that they belonged to her - the other articles were pawned at my shop, but I did not take them in.

MAURICE NICHOLAS. I searched the prisoner on the 16th of February, and found three duplicates on her, which correspond with this property - one is for two glasses, pawned on the 8th of January; the others are for two towels on the 7th of October, and a tumbler on the 26th of September.

WILLIAM HOWS. These tickets belong to the articles I have produced; I have the counterparts on the goods - we put the duplicate inside the glasses; the towels are not pawned in her own name, but the glasses are; it is a name she formerly pawned by; we knew her by both names.

Prisoner's Defence. These things do not belong to Mrs. Harben - I bought the two wine-glasses in Oxford-street.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-68

Before Mr. Baron Bolland .

564. ELIZABETH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 2 pillows, value 4s.; 1 blanket, value 2s., and 1 sheet, value 1s. , the goods of Lewis Franklin .

LEWIS FRANKLIN . The prisoner lodged with me for a week, about three months ago. On the 15th of January one of my tenants gave me information - I went to one of my houses in Mill-yard, Mill-alley, Whitechapel, where she lodged, and found the prisoner before the street door, with a bundle in her apron; I sent for an officer, and found in her bundle two pillows. a sheet, and a blanket - she had no business in the room, for I had the key: I asked what she had to do in the house - she said somebody told her to go and take the property out of the room.

Prisoner. Q. While I lodged with you did you find any thing wrong in me? A I received no rent, and told you to leave the room; that is the only fault I have to find.

ALEXANDER ANDERSON. I am a patrol, and received the prisoner in charge with the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent. I was robbed of 15s. in the house a few hours before, by a person who owed me 15s.; I went to ask her for it - I had some drink, fell asleep, and was robbed; they took me down stairs, left me at the door, and got me into this trouble.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-69

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

565. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 3 silver spoons, value 2l. 8s., the goods of Joseph Henry Streetfield , his master .

JOSEPH HENRY STREETFIELD . I live in Stebon-terrace, Stepney , and am a malster . The prisoner was occasionally employed by me to go on errands and clean boots . On Monday, the 8th of January, he was sent to clean my knives, forks, and boots; I employed his father by the week - he asked me to give the boy a job, and I was to pay him 1s. a week; he lived with his father in a house of mine, next to the malt-factory. On Friday, the 6th of February, I missed two table-spoons, worth 2l., and on Tuesday another was missing - I went on the Tuesday following. and asked him where my spoons were, and said he had better tell me; I have not found them.

JOHN STEWART. I am a serjeant of the Police, and took the prisoner into custody by Spitalfields church, on the 9th of February; the prosecutor was with me - the conversation I had with him was in the prosecutor's presence - I know nothing about the property except what he told me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-70

566. ROBERT FINCH was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of February , 1 purse, value 2d.; 5 sovereigns, and 2 half-sovereigns, the property of John Thompson , from the person of Sophia Ann Thompson .

SOPHIA ANN THOMPSON . I am the wife of John Thompson . On the 3rd of February, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, I took a coach in Tottenham-court-road, being very ill and unable to walk - the prisoner was the coachman , and between Battle-bridge and the Angel, at Islington , as we were going along, he stopped the coach and opened the door; I asked why he intruded, saying it was not a stage - he shut the door, came round on the other side, got into the coach, and picked my pocket.

Q. What did he do when he first got into the coach? A. He was impudent, and said he should like to kiss the old lady, or something; the door was shut, and the coach drove on - it went slow, as it was up hill; he took my purse two minutes after he got into the coach, and got out directly - I do not know whether he stopped the coach, for I was terrified; if it did stop it drove on directly- when the toll was demanded at the turnpike, I told the toll-man I was robbed, and refused to pay; the prisoner drove on - I wanted to get home: I never saw him before- the robbery made me know him, for I trembled liked a leaf: he was dressed in a light coat and buttons as a hackney-coachman; a man whom he called his brother was on the box with him, driving; I was going to Lower Islington - when I asked the fare at the stand, which is near Oxford-street, they said 3s.; I saw this chariot, and he refused to take me under 3s.; I told him to take me as far as he could for 1s. - he took me to Battle-bridge; I gave him 1s., got out, and told him if he would take me home I would give another one - he said he would; I went into a public-house, changed half a sovereign, and had half a pint of porter - the prisoner and his brother had a glass of gin each; I pulled out my purse to change the halfsovereign, and he took the change under pretence of looking at it, and put it into his pocket; I was ill, and too timid to say any thing.

Q. Did you get into the coach again? A. Most assuredly - he said, "Old lady, I will take you;" I got in- he drove half way up the hill, and then stopped; he came first on the left side, then on the other, and said he wanted something out of the chariot - I said, "This is not a stage; what do you want?" he felt about me - he knew my money was on my right-hand side; he went round to the other door, got in, and sat by my side - I felt him take my purse; he jumped out immediately - I did not know what to do; I had been laid up for five weeks with the rheumatic gout, and could not walk - the coach went on, and I came to the turnpike - the prisoner came, and asked me for the toll: I told him I should not give any thing, I had given enough; but I did pay it - the prisoner took the sixpence; I told Mr. Bury, who kept the gate that I had been robbed, but said no more, for I thought I was in very bad hands, and the sooner I got home the better - he drove me to Norfolk-street instead of New Norfolk-street, where I live, and sat me down in the middle of the street, in the middle of the snow, and left me there - that is two or three streets from New Norfolk-street; the person, he called his brother, was still with him - I saw the watchman coming up; the chariot drove down to the end of the street, which is no thoroughfare - the watchman said, "You are left in a distressing situation;" I said, "Never mind me, stop that chariot," and he tried. but said he could not - the watchman took me home; I did not see the prisoner again till Saturday.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you in any business? A. I have a husband who supports me - he is in the surveying line , and was formerly an officer in the army - I do not assist in his business; I have had the rheumatic gout about two years - I have taken a small quantity of brandy, when I have been sick; I had some that day - I begged of the coachman to give me brandy, for I thought I should die from the inclemency of the weather - when I had the beer I gave him a glass of gin- the weather was cold; the beer did not agree with me- I threw it off my stomach immediately, and said I should like brandy; this was after I had rode some distance in the coach, he got me the brandy.

Q. How had you been employed that day? A. I had been very busy with my daughter, who had been laid up; I do not know why I am to say where she lives to bring her into trouble; she is young and blooming - I had been on business with her.

COURT. Q. How far does she live from where you took the coach? A. I took a cabriolet for her in Rathbone-place, and walked to where I took the coach, which was at the stand near the New-road - I had gone out to receive the money; I was not in a public-house before I went into one with the coachman; I had fetched a trunk from Seymour-street, and had half a pint of beer between me and my daughter - I do not know the name of the public-house - I bought some boots in Seymour-street -I dined at home that day, and had no more than I usually have, a pint of porter - I am frequently very ill; it is always attended with sickness - the prisoner never tried to kiss me; he said, "Old lady, I should like to kiss you;" I turned a deaf ear to that; that was after I had been to the public-house, at the time he took the purse -I distinctly felt his hand in my pocket when he took it, and I tried to binder him with my band, but was too feeble - I was too weak to cry out - I was unfit to be out of doors; my daughter wished me not to go, but I was anxious for her sake - I was afraid she would not be treated well on the road; I placed her in a cabriolet, paid the man, and told him to take care of her - I took the number; she was going to her destination - she dined with me that day; she is not here - I should have gone home in the Omnibus, but there were none at half-past ten o'clock; I left home abont six, and took my daughter to Rathbone-place.

Q. How were you engaged for four hours and a half? A. We had to walk; it is a long distance, and my daughter had a trunk.

Q. When you told the man at the turnpike you had been robbed, did you not say who had robbed you? A. I spoke of it, but I thought the gate-keeper might be as bad - I knew I had a husband at home; and when I got home he said, "Good God! what an hour to be out;" he had advised me not to go out - he was not pleased at this.

Q. When you arrived in Norfolk-street were you not in such a state of intoxication you could not walk the rest of the way? A. No, the watchman will tell you the same; I was stupified with fear - I have no power with my right hand, having the gout in it; I received the money at No. 71, Lombard-street.

Q. Now, after all this, is it true you paid the coachman 3s.? A. He paid himself - I gave him no money, except 6d. to pay the toll - I was a helpless woman, and thought it much better to go to my husband; I did not take the number of the coach - it was my daughter that took the number of the cabriolet.

Q. After the man left you alone in the coach. why not put down the glass and say you were robbed? A. Islington is not a very thronged place; I thought he should drive me to my own door - I did all I could to have him detained when I got out; two watchmen came up - I was placed in the snow; I told them to follow the chariot, and it very nearly turned over.

COURT. Q. You set out about six o'clock to walk with your daughter? A. Yes; I walked all down the road to Seymour-street, Euston-square, where I bought my daughter a pair of boots - I then went to Rathbone-place, and put her into a cabrioet at half-past eight o'clock - we had staid a little time in Rathbone-place; I called there to pay a sovereign.

JAMES BURY. I keep the turnpike at Islington. On the 3rd of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I remember seeing a yellow chariot driven by the prisoner - I knew him before, having taken toll of him many times; his chariot is No. 226 - when he got to the gate I knocked at the door, and asked for 6d. for the toll two or three times - nobody answered; I then opened the door, and saw the old lady Thompson sitting on the left hand corner of the chariot - I asked for the toll; she said she would not pay it, that she had been robbed - she did not say who by; the coachman got off his box, and came to the gate - there was nobody with him at the gate; I asked for the toll again - Thompson said she would not pay it; the coachman said she must, and in about half a

minute he paid it himself - I cannot say where he got it from; he gave it to me, shut the door, and drove away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prosecutrix appear to have been asleep? A. No, I could not see what state she was in - she sat up in the corner; she did not name the prisoner as having robbed her; if she had I could have called the watchman - there is one near the Angel, and another near the toll-house; it was between eleven and twelve o'clock at night - there was nothing to prewent her giving information; the chariot door was open- she came to me on the Friday evening, at the Highgate gate - she was alone; she said nothing about her busband's insisting on her prosecuting.

JOHN WILLSHER . I am a constable of St. Pancras. I received information of this robbery from the prosecutrix on Friday, the 5th of February - she wished to find out Bury, the toll-gatherer; I told her where to find him, and to apply to him for the number of the chariot - he afterwards told me the number, and I apprehended the prisoner - Bury pointed him out to me on the Friday night; I had no difficulty in finding him - he was at the house he frequents.

Cross-examined. Q. Is that a watering-house? A. Yes, in Tottenham-court-road.

WILLIAM CHAPPEL . I am a watchman. On the morning of Thursday, the 3rd of February, I was on duty, and saw Mrs. Thompson sitting in the snow in Old Norfolk-street - a chariot brought her there; I did not see the coachman, but heard his voice - I saw the chariot come down nearly to the bottom of the street; I told him it was no thoroughfare - he instantly said, "Then I must turn round;" I came up to Mrs. Thompson again - I had not seen the coachman set her down; she then said,"Stop the chariot, I am robbed;" I went out into the main road, and the chariot got away - it drove very fast; I went about two hundred yards, but could not overtake it.

Cross-examined. Q. How long is Old Norfolk-street? A. I should think about one hundred and twenty yards; I saw Mrs. Thompson sitting in the snow before I saw the chariot - I led her home; she walked.

Q. Could you account for her sitting in the snow? A. No; I went very close to her, but smelt no brandy - she seemed much agitated; she spoke to me first, and said"Stop the chariot, I am robbed;" I had come in at the bottom of the street - the chariot came down to the bottom, and then I saw her sitting on the snow; it was after the chariot turned that she spoke to me - I saw the chariot coming down the street before I spoke to her - there was a watchman with me, named Element; he was not before the Magistrate.

Q. Have you had any money for coming here? A. No - I have drawn 1s. from the constable last night.

Q. Do you mean to say that is all - be cautious how you answer - how much have you had? A. Two shillings, no more - I had them from the constable Willsher- one last night, and one the day before; I asked him for it, because I wanted it - I had one on Monday, and the other yesterday; that was at Clerkenwell - I did not refuse to go in at Clerkenwell until I had it; I cannot tell whether it was before or after I gave my evidence -I think it was about two o'clock.

Q. Will you swear you did not make it a condition on which you went before the Grand Jury, that you were tohave 1s.? A. No; the officer desired me to attend - I brought Mrs. Thompson with me part of the way; I went to her house once before that, and had a glass of rum, but no money - she gave me the rum; I did not ask her for it - I have received no money from any body, except the 2s.; I have eat and drank - the prosecutrix was sober; she seemed very much agitated, and trembled - I cannot say she had been drinking; I swear she appeared sober - she was much agitated at losing her money.

Q. If you followed the coach two hundred yards, why not call out? A. It drove away, and got out of my sight- when I came to the top of the street it was gone; I did not say I saw it for two hundred yards, but that I followed it.

COURT. Q. When you got to the main road, did you see the chariot? A. No, it was gone away.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How do you know it went fast? A. It went from the top of the street to the bottom; that leads in to the Lower-road, which is lighted with gas; I could see two hundred yards, and more I should think; I was not with the prosecutrix a minute before I went to look after the coach - I did not see it turn the corner, and do not know which way it went.

Q. How do you know it went fast? A. I went from the the top of the street to the bottom; the next turning is King-street, which is about thirty yards - I cannot say it did not turn down there; I did not tell the Grand Jury I saw the coach for a considerable distance.

MRS. THOMHSON re-examined. When the chariot came up the street again it was almost turned over by the furious driving - when he drove through the turnpike he used an expression to the man; he said, "The old b-r had like to have taken me into -" some term, meaning the prison.

WILLIAM CHAPPEL . The chariot did not drive very fast when it went up the street.

Prisoner's Defence. When I sat the lady down at the corner of Norfolk-street, she paid me 3s. for my fare - she was very tipsy, and fell down on the snow; I picked her up once and put her against the railing, where I left her - I got on the box, turned round, and came away; I did not drive fast.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-71

567. ELIZABETH COWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , one 10l. Bank note, the property of John Gordon , from his person .

JOHN GORDON . I live in Devonshire-square, Bishopsgate - I am a clerk out of employ. On the 16th of February, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I had dined with some friends, and was walking home; I was rather intoxicated, but not so much so but what I could walk - I was sensible enough, but had drank wine rather freely; the prisoner and another girl met me - they came up to me in the neighbourhood of Great St. Helens; I was induced to walk with the prisoner - I did not go into any house with her; we went into a passage - I do not know whether it was a thoroughfare; it was in Great St. Helens, I think - I do not think I could find the place,

for it was very dark; I was never in that spot before - soon after I had been with her there she left me, and I discovered that I had lost a 10l. note; she left me abruptly; I had given her 1s. 6d., all the change I had; it was in my trouser's pocket - the Bank note was in a different pocket, I am quite sure; I also gave her a silk pocket-handkerchief, and a pair of gloves - if I had had more change I would have given it to her; I discovered that the note was gone in less than five minutes after parting with her -I think I was in the passage leading to Devonshire-square when I discovered the loss; I had not lived in the neighbourhood above a week - I went to the watch-house, and described the woman I had been with; two watchmen went and found the prisoner - I had received the note the previous day from a friend, who lived at St. Paul's coffee-house; I got the number from my friend, told it to the officer, and it tallied with it - my friend has left town; I was sober when I got the number and date from him; I had dined in Leadenhall-street - I do not think I spoke to any other woman unless it might be in passing.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What employment have you usually filled? A. I am here on commercial business - I am a stranger in London; I have not been in town a month at a time - I received the note that day between four and five o'clock; I dined at six and lost the note between eleven and twelve; it was loose in my pocket; I left my friend's house about eleven, and met the woman between eleven and twelve; I cannot give the time nearer- I am positive I did not go into any house with her, or any other woman; I am certain my silver was loose in my pocket - I knew before I went out that I had that change in my pocket, and had no occasion to touch it afterwards.

THOMAS PETCH. I am an officer of Bishopsgate. I saw Mr. Gordon at the watch-house last Tuesday night, about half-past twelve o'clock - he had been drinking, but still spoke very rational; he stated that he had been robbed of a 10l. Bank note, and had been in company with two females, whom he described - I went and apprehended the prisoner by his description, in Webbsquare, in a lower room on the ground floor, with another female; I searched under her pillow, and found her pocket and a silk handkerchief - my brother officer found a pair of gloves; I likewise found a 10l. note, a sixpence, and some halfpence - she said the gentleman had given her the 10l. note, and that she had seen him to the door.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she say he had given her the silver wrapped in a paper, which she discovered, on coming to the light, to be a 10l. note? A. She did not say so to me - she told the Lord Mayor so, and said he had promised to meet her the next day, and she meant to return it.

ROBERT DICK. I am an inspector of Bishopsgate ward. Petch's statement is correct - I have a pair of gentleman's gloves found at the prisoner's: the prosecutor said she was not satisfied with 1s. 6d., and he was induced to give her the gloves and handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a respectable servant , and lived with the Rev. Alexander Fletcher, of Homerton. On this night, at half-past eleven o'clock, I met this gentleman very tipsy - he parted the young woman and me, and said, "I will have you, can you go home with me;" I said I never took any body home - he said he had very little money, but would give me his handkerchief; he took it off, and tied it round my neck - I walked with him for near an hour; he said if I would see him to No. 8, Devonshire-square, he would give me 1s. 6d. - I saw him to the door; he pulled off his great coat and hat, and offered them to me to go home with me - I refused; he said could I meet him next day - I promised him, and when I got to the gas-light, the young woman said, "Look in your hand, and see what you have got;" I found it was a piece of paper, and was going to throw it away - she said, "Don't throw it away;" on looking at it I found it was a 10l. note: I should have returned it to him when I met him the next day.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-72

568. JOHN NORRIS and SAMUEL HAYNES were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 watch, value 4l.: 1 chain, value 3d., and 1 key, value 2d. , the goods of John Sharp and another.

JOHN CAMFIELD . I am in the employ of John Sharp , who is a clock and watch-maker , and has one partner. On Friday, the 5th of February, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was alone in the shop; both the prisoners came in - Haynes asked to see a ring; I said I would call my master down, but he pointed to a ring - I turned, and while I was looking at it Norris got behind the counter, and got a watch; I saw the chain banging from his hand - I said, "You have got something belonging to the shop;" he made no reply - I called the servant, and put the chain to the door. so that they could not get out; the servant did not come - I called again, and Norris tried to undo the chain of the door; I ran, and put my back against the door - the servant came down, and they were both secured; the servant went and called master, and while he was coming I heard Haynes say to Norris, "Give it to me, give it to me!" - he got it from him, put it behind a box, and it was found there; I saw the chain in his hand - master came down, and a constable was sent for; the watch is silver, and worth 4l.

HADAREZAR SHARP. I am the son of John Sharp . I was in my bed-room, dressing - the servant came up; I went down, found the prisoners standing in the shop. and the watch behind a scale-box, immediately behind Haynes - the boy said he had seen it pass from one to the other; I sent for a constable, and they were secured - the chain was fastened to the watch; the watch is worth 4l.

JOSEPH MANNING. I am an officer. I received the prisoners in charge - they said nothing to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Haynes Defence. I know no more about it than a child unborn - the watch laid on the counter as I went in.

JOHN CAMFIELD. The watch hung on a book behind the counter.

HAYNES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

NORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-73

569. WILLIAM LOWE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 11 lbs. of cake, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Notley .

HENRY NOTLEY. I am a pastry-cook , and live in Newgate-street . On the 18th of January, between ten and half-past ten o'clock at night, I was sitting in a room be

hind my shop - the window was open, and my attention was fixed on it; I saw the prisoner put the whole of his body in - he reached over, took this large piece of twelfth cake, and instantly ran off with it; I saw him, ran after him immediately, calling out Stop thief! and never lost sight of him - I had a pair of slippers on; when he came to Giltspur-street he threw the cake into the road, and by the Compter I took him without losing sight of him - the cake was worth 10s.; I gave him to the watchman -I asked why he stole the cake, for if he was hungry there were buns and smaller things; he said he did not want buns, he wanted something more than that, for he would only have four months at the tread-mill, and that would not suit him - he used other taunting language in the street.

JOHN SMITH. I am a watchman. I heard an alarm, and ran up - Notley gave the prisoner in charge; he went back, and picked up the cake.

Prisoner's Defence. When the prosecutor stopped me he said he should have me whipped up and down the street at the cart's tail - I told him I woul! rather he would do any thing than that.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-74

570. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 2 copper measures, value 25s. , the goods of Thomas Chambers .

THOMAS HUTCHINSON. I am porter to Thomas Chambers , a wine-merchant . On the 25th of January I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, about five yards within the warehouse, with two copper measures in his hand - he was going out with them, and got out before I stepped him; I laid hold of him in the street - he said he had picked them up, and was going next door to see if they belonged to them; I had seen them on the premises not a minute before.

Prisoner. I had rang the bell before he took hold of me. Witness. He had not rang master's bell - I am positive I saw him take them out of the warehouse; they had been about five yards from the door.

THOMAS CHAMBERS. I am a wine-merchant - I have no partner. I know the measures to be mine - they were kept in the warehouse, on the ground-floor, and are worth 35s.

JAMES WEBB. I received the prisoner in charge - he said he had picked the measures up. and was going next door to inquire if they belonged to them.

Prisoner's Defence. I can only say I picked them up. and took them up the passage - I saw a person take them out of the warehouse, and turn down Walbrook with them- he put them down; I went and rang the bell to take them into the house.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined 1s., and delivered to his former employer .

Reference Number: t18300218-170

Fourth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

571. JOSEPH SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 watch, value 6s.; 3 pencil-cases, value 3s.; 9 pieces of silver, value 5s.; 1 tooth-pick, value 6d., and 1 crown , the property of John Spencer ; to which the prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-75

572. WILLIAM DISMOR was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 umbrella, value 6s. , the, goods of Susannah Jupp .

JAMES CONSTABLE . I am shopman to Susannah Jupp , a widow , who keeps a sale shop . On the 28th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner ran from the door - I followed him about two hundred yards, and he was taken by the officer; he had nothing then - I had not seen him part with any thing, but as he was running I saw the umbrella in front of him; there was one missing from the door - I had put four there in the morning.

Prisoner. Q. You said there was none missing? A. Yes - Mrs. Jupp said to me."Are you sure there is one gone," and I said perhaps not, but I went to the door and took down the loop to which it had hung; it had been pulled down, and the loop was left - I did not say it would not do to detain him, as there was no umbrella missing.

EDMUND DAVIS . I am a Police-man, and heard Stop thief! called. I saw the prisoner run across the street in front of a waggon, and stopped him - he had nothing with him; he said he ran because he heard Stop thief! called.

HENRY REDMAN. I was on duty on the 28th, and heard Stop thief! called, in George-street; I went, and saw the prisoner crossing under the head of a waggon horse - the witness came up, and said he had stolen an umbrella; nothing was found on him but some duplicates of different property.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and ran - no umbrella was found on me; the duplicates were of my own property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-76

573. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 2 shirts, value 5s.; 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 shirt front, value 1s.: 4 linen towels, value 1s., and 1 pair of flannel drawers, value 1s. , the goods of Pablo de Mendibil .

HANNAH CARTER. I am in the service of Pablo de Mendibil , of Burton-street, Burton-crescent . On the 1st of February the prisoner came to the door, about ten o'clock in the morning, rang the bell, and asked me for the dirty clothes: I did not know her before, but I thought she came from the laundress - I gave her the articles stated, which were my master's; I said my master was out, and I could not give any without orders; she said "I just met your master, who said if I asked you for the things you would give them to me;" I left her in the passage, and went and got the things - I said I had to darn the table-cloth, which my master had cut in the morning, and she said she would do it for me.

THOMAS PEWTNER . I am a pawnbroker. On Monday, the 8th of February, the prisoner pawned some articles with me; she came again on the Wednesday, and I detained her.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I took the prisoner, but found nothing on her; she said she got the things of a woman to

pawn - I took her to Hannah Carter, who said she was the woman who had the things of her; the prisoner said a woman sent her to the house for them, and then sent her to pawn them, and gave her sixpence - she was to meet the same woman again that day; I went with her to find her, but we could not - she did not say she knew the woman, or had been in any house with her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of Mapleton-street; a woman came and told me to fetch the things, and she gave me 6d. - I met her again, and she sent me to pawn them; she gave me 6d. - I met her on the Wednesday again, and she sent me to the pawnbroker's, where I was detained; I was to meet her again, but she did not come - I know nothing of them; I have no father, but I have a mother and nine brothers and sisters.

GUILTY. Aged 16. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300218-77

574. JOHN COOK and MARIA COOK were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 20 pounds weight of feathers, value 2l., and 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Edwards .

AGNES EDWARDS . I am the wife of Joseph Edwards ; he is a labourer in the East India Company's service. On the 22nd of January, the male prisoner came for a furnished room in my house, and said his wife was coming from Brighton that evening; he said he was a carpenter belonging to the West India docks - I said

"Are you sure you are;" he said Yes - they came in that evening; there was a feather bed in the room, which they cut to pieces to make three pillows of, which they pawned on the 25th - I had them taken into custody, as a girl who lived on the first floor told me she thought all was not right, as she saw them going out with bundles; when they were taken the man said he had taken them, and he could make them good if he chose, but he would not.

WILLIAM HAYES . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pillow pawned by the female prisoner for 1s., on the 25th of January.

JAMES HARRIS. I have a pillow and sheet pawned on the 23rd of January by the man - he said they were his own.

JOHN HAMFORTH. The two prisoners were brought to me at the watch-house; the woman told me where the duplicates were, and I found them behind the stove.

John Cook 's Defence. I am very sorry I did it; I went out for work, and on my return I found my wife in the greatest distress, without a bit of fire.

JOHN COOK - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor. - Confined Seven Days .

MARIA COOK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-78

575. THOMAS CONNOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Benjamin Timbrell .

JOHN JAMES SPEED . I live with my grandfather, Benjamin Timbrell - he is a constable ; his wife keeps a shop, and sells shoes - I saw the prisoner come and take the shoes, and give them to another one behind him, who ran away; my grandmother seized the prisoner, and said "Your companion is gone, but I will take good care you shall not go" - he said, "If you don't let me go I will murder you;" he got out of her hands, went up a barber's passage, and got over the wall into the next yard - the Police-officer came and found him in the privy; I did not see him found, but I am quite sure he is the person.

CHARLES BURWOOD. I am a Police-officer. On the 16th of January I was on duty in St. Ann's-street, Westminster, a few minutes before nine o'clock, and heard Stop thief! called; I ran, and Speed told me his grandmother had been robbed of a pair of shoes, that one of the men had gone into the barber's passage, and if I went through the George and Blue Boar, I should find him - I went, and found him in the privy; his hand and wrist were cut, as I suppose, with the glass bottles on the wall.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-79

576. THOMAS JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 silk shawl, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Thimbleby .

HENRY RICHARDSON . I am in the service of Joseph Thimbleby , a pawnbroker , in Old-street-road . On the 29th of January the prisoner came to the shop, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and looked out 5l. or 6l. worth of goods, which were shown him by our young man - the last articles he looked at were some silk shawls; I did not see him take one - a bundle was made up of the things which he had bought, and he said, "if you will wait a moment I will fetch a person to pay for them;" he was suspected, and I was sent to watch him - he went on to Mr. Board's, a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch; he went in the front shop, and they sent him round to the boxes - I went and asked what he came for; they said to pawn this shawl, which is my master's, and has our shop mark on it - he was detained.

JOHN BOARDS . The prisoner came to my front door; I did not like the way in which be came, and I sent him to the side - this had then came in, and we detained the prisoner.

RICHARD REEVES. I am a constable. I took the prisoner; this is the shawl.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in the Borough.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-80

577. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 9lbs. weight of cheese, value 6s. , the goods of Robert Free .

MARTHA FREE. I am the wife of Robert Free - he is a chandler , and lives in James-street, Old-street . I had my child in my lap by the parlour fire on the evening of the 1st of February, and heard a footstep in the shop - I turned my head, and saw the prisoner reaching his arm to the end of the counter, where part of a cheese stood on a jar of pickled onions - I followed him to the door, and called Stop thief! Woodgate, the officer, pursued, and took him about fifteen yards from my shop - I did not lose sight of him after he turned from the door.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was there any cheese on the counter besides this? A. No, that was all we had; I had seen the cheese not five minutes before; there is a glass door to the parlour - it has no curtain, I had had the prisoner pointed out to me several times before, as a very suspicious person - I knew him again; he is a remarkable man - it was a double Gloucester cheese. I believe, and has a taster at one end; I did not tell the Magistrate, I did not know what cheese it was.

WILLIAM TYAS WATSON . I saw the prisoner go into the shop and come out in about two minutes - I saw the witness looking after him; he walked out, and the officer stopped him - I did not see any cheese.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see any other person come out? A. No - I was on the opposite side.

GEORGE WOODGATE. I saw the prisoner in James-street, Old-street; Mrs. Free said, "That man has got the cheese;" I collared him, and the cheese dropped from under his coat - I took it up; this is it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any one else about? A. Only a patrol - it was a quarter-past eight o'clock in the evening.

JOHN NEEDLES . I heard Stop thief! called, and ran to the spot; I took the prisoner to the watch-house - he made no resistance.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 1st of February I had been to Islington, to take a parcel and a great coat for a young man who was going by the Boston coach - I then went down James-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I stood against the wall for two or three minutes - the officer came and took hold of my collar; they did not see me drop any cheese - I said, "Go to the stand and ask the wateringman if I did not leave him within five minutes;" they would not go, but said he was as bad as me; I said,"Look at my coat - if I had had the cheese under it there would be marks of it;" I never had it in my possession, nor saw it - I had not time to get to the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-81

578. WILLIAM HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 watch. value 7s.; 2 half-crowns, and 1 shilling , the property of Thomas Cooper .

THOMAS COOPER. I lost 6s. 6d. and a watch on the 9th of February - I missed the money in about half an hour, but I did not miss the watch for near twelve hours; I was in bed, asleep, and the prisoner was sleeping in another bed in the same room; I have seen my watch at the pawnbroker's - this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. I believe the prisoner was taken in by you from charity? A. Yes - he came from Leamington; his money was gone, and I took him in: I did not then know where his relations lived, but I have ascertained since, and have seen them - they gave him a good character.

JOHN BENZY. I am a baker. The prisoner came to me on Monday week, in the evening, and asked me to buy a watch; he said he came from Leamington, and wanted to part with the watch to get a lodging - I said I had not money to buy it, but I would let him have a shilling or two on it - I kept it till the next day, and then pawned it for 3s.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. No; I told him I should pawn it, because it was too late for him to pawn it that night.

CHARLES HOUGHTON. I am a pawnbroker, and took the watch in pawn.

THOMAS COOPER re-examined. I went to the prisoner's friends, and said if he would discover where the watch was I would not do any thing against him, and they sent me word about it; it was on Sunday evening I missed it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300218-82

579. JONATHAN NOAD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 12lbs. weight of pork, value 6s.; 8lbs. weight of mutton, value 4s., and 17lbs. of beef, value 7s. , the goods of John Wilton .

JOHN WILTON. I am a butcher , but do not keep a shop I employed the prisoner to porter for me three or four times a week, to go to an eating-house. On the 30th of January I sent him with a side of pork, a leg and a shoulder of mutton, and a piece of flank of beef; the whole weighed 71 lbs. - he was to take it to the eating-house in Warwick-street; I saw him in the afternoon, and asked him if the weight was right - he said Yes: I went to the house on the Monday, and heard something about it; I saw part of the meat at the White Bear, at Lambeth.

RACHAEL LUSTED . We keep this eating-house. On the 30th of January the prisoner came and brought a piece of roasting beef, a fore-quarter of pork, and a shoulder of mutton, but no leg - the weight of what he brought was 33lbs.

JAMES SAMUEL GORE . I am a constable of Southwark. On the 1st of February I was on duty at the watch-house, and was applied to to take the prisoner in Union-street, Lambeth-road - I found on him a bag, with 38s. in it, which he said he had sold meat for - that was all that passed: I did not go to the eating-house.

MR. LEE to JOHN WILTON . Has not the prisoner been a master butcher himself? A. Yes, but he never bought meat of me - he portered for me, and I paid him; he was not to receive money for me - he was only employed to carry this meat.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 38. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300218-83

580. ARTHUR McHUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 3lbs. weight of ham, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Pulston .

GEORGE HARRIS . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Pulston . a cheesemonger , at Nos. 54 and 69, Leather-lane . On the 26th of January I saw the prisoner pass No. 69, and take a piece of ham with his right hand - he passed it to his left hand, and dropped it; he stooped to pick it up- the officer crossed, and took him back to the shop.

WILLIAM WINDECOTT . I was standing in Leather-lane - I saw the prisoner pass the window, turn, and take the ham; he dropped it, and the officer took him.

WILLIAM WILSON . I saw the prisoner take the ham -I crossed, and took him.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not intoxicated? A. He might be rather so, but well knew what he was about - he had 5s.; it was about six o'clock in the evening - he offered to pay for the ham; he walked very well.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18300218-84

581. JAMES MURRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 2 1/2 lbs. of soap, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Jeffs .

THOMAS EDMONDS . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Jeffs ,

of Leather-lane . On the evening of the 27th of January I went into the parlour behind the shop, and left three cakes of soap in the box - in about three minutes the Police-officer brought in the prisoner with one of the cakes; I had seen him in the shop before.

JOHN LONDON . I am a Police-officer. I saw the prisoner take the cake of soap from the box inside the shop, and I took him with it about twenty yards from the shop; he had 1s. 2 1/2d. on him - he had been drinking, but was able to try to get off his coat, and get away; this is the soap.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a flat-iron, which was my own property, and a piece of bacon, which I came honestly by. and some other articles, to take home to my poor wife- I was rather in liquor; I have been unfortunate in business, but never was guilty of a rascally thing in my life.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18300218-85

582. GEORGE WILKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of Margaret Goff .

MARGARET GOFF. I am single . On the 17th of January I lost a handkerchief from No. 2, William's-buildings, Chelsea - I took it off my neck, and put it on a chair-back- the prisoner was there, and he drew the chair to the fire- I went out for a few minutes, and when I came back he was gone, and the handkerchief; he had lodged that night with the landlord; I lodge in the same house - this is the handkerchief - I know it, but it has no mark on it.

GEORGE CURTIS. The prisoner sold me this handkerchief on the 17th of January, about half-past one o'clock.

HENRY WILLIAMS . I was sent for to the house, and took the prisoner when he came in in the evening.

Prisoner. Starvation and hunger drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-86

583. WILLIAM WILDMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 cloak, value 14s. , the goods of William Thomas .

WILLIAM THOMAS. I keep a sale-shop , in Holborn -This cloak is mine, and was taken from my shop on the 30th of January; I did not see it taken, but the Policeman brought the prisoner and the cloak in - it has no mark on it, but I know it, and I have brought another similar to it.

JOHN TILLEY. I am a Police-officer. I was on duty, and saw the prisoner walking very fast; I followed him; he ran, and I ran after him - I took him with the cloak - he was about fifty yards from the prosecutor's when I first saw him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Holborn, and just as I passed the George and Blue Boar a gentleman alighted with this cloak and a trunk - he asked me to carry the cloak for him: he turned down Turnstile, and said he would leave the trunk and follow me - I was going on, and the officer came and took me; when I was taken to the shop they were not certain whether they had lost one or not; it was eleven o'clock, and the shop was closed.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-87

584. JOHN THORPE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 seal, value 5s., and 1 watch-key, value 6d. , the goods of Mary Till .

MARY TILL . I am a widow , and live in Turk's Headgardens, Clerkenwell - the prisoner did not sleep there, but he had his meals with me, in a back room on the ground floor; my watch, seal, and key were in a drawer in that room; I missed them on the 10th of February, and had seen them safe on the day before, when I put them in - this is the property.

EDWARD BULWORTHY. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a watch, pawned by the prisoner, on Wednesday, the 10th of February.

THOMAS FAREY WALL. I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-88

585. JOHN SWADNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 saw, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph West .

JOSEPH WEST . I deal in building-materials . On the 29th of January I lost a saw out of my shed - a witness came to my house, and said the boy had ran away with it; prisoner told the officer where it was.

AMEY PHILPOT. I saw the prisoner from my window, where I was standing ironing, take the saw in his left hand, and ran away with it - he was pursued, but was not taken till the next morning.

Prisoner. I did not take it. Witness. There was no one but him, and he took it.

THOMAS BRIDGES . I received the prisoner in charge on the 30th of January - he told me he sold the saw to Richard Garrett, for 1s. 3d.; I went to Garrett's, No. 9, York-street, Bethnal-green, and found it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was playing, and a boy went and took it - he asked me to sell it for him, and I did; he took my hat and put on when he took it.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18300218-89

586. RICHARD SPENDELOW was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 5 live tame fowls, price 10s. , the property of Patrick Lawrie .

WILLIAM MASON . I am servant to Patrick Lawrie , Esq. , of West-end, Hampstead . On Sunday morning, the 24th of January, I missed five fowls out of a hen-house which I had put on the roost at five o'clock on Saturday night; I saw them dead afterwards, and knew them to be my master's - their feet and wings are here; I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty on Sunday morning, the 24th of January, and saw the prisoner with a parcel under his arm, just by the Hero of Maida - I asked what he had got; he said fowls, which he had brought from Mr. Meek's, and was going to take them to Mr. Bull - I said, "I must look at them;" I found five fowls dead, but quite warm - I took him to the section-house, and then before Mr. Rawlinson; I inquired, and got information that Mr. Lawrie had lost some, and the description he gave of them exactly answered those I found on the prisoner.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had bought the fowls of a man on his road from Watford, for 4s.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-90

587. GEORGE KIRBY , GEORGE ABBOTT , HENRY ABBOTT , and WILLIAM PENDRED were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 30 bushels of onions, value 6l. , the goods of Thomas Deadman .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS DEADMAN . I am a market-gardener . During the last year I cultivated a particular sort of onion, called the Globe onion - they are a very particular sort; I have not seen any of them in any London market - I had a number of them in a barn adjoining my house; and on the morning of the 14th of January I missed a great many; they were secured by boards, one of which had a particular mark on it; it has a notch in the middle of it - it was afterwards found in a cart; I can swear it was on my premises; I know it by its general appearance as well as the notch.

JAMES HATTON. I am labourer to the prosecutor. On the 13th of January I removed a number of onions from the barn to an empty house; I put boards round them, and one of them had a notch in it - this is the board I will swear. I saw Henry Abbott go up the lane while I was doing it, and he looked over the place where I was putting the onions.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you know these men? A. Yes, I know them all - they buy articles and carry them about in a donkey-cart for sale; I put this board and some others round the fire-place of the house where I put the onions - the boards had been brought from Bagnigge-wells, in a waggon, about a week before.

MR. LEE. Q. Do not the prisoners go about collecting Bones? A. Yes, and selling other things.

DAVID REEVES. I am watchman to Mr. Green. On Thursday, the 14th of January, I was on duty, and saw George Abbott and George Kirby come out of a gate, at ten minutes before four o'clock in the morning; they were about a field and a half from the house where the onions were, coming from the prosecutor's house; they had a donkey and cart, loaded with some sacks - they went into the Fulham-road; I can swear it was William Pendred 's cart - in about a quarter of an hour I saw Henry Abbott and Pendred at the bottom of the lane, just outside where the cart had been when I first saw it; they went the other way, towards North-end.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you knew them all before? A. I had seen them as I went to my work; they live in the neighbourhood - I was watching in the lane and the high-road, but was in the road when the cart passed me; I had been down the lane before - this was a field and a half from the prosecutor's; it is not a cart-way to the empty house - you cannot get to it without going on another person's premises - I was perhaps a hundred yards from them; it was moon-light and snowy together - it did not snow then; their side was towards me - I knew the cart was Pendred's, by seeing it the day before and the day after.

COURT. Q. Do you know of any work they could have so early in the morning? A. No; the last two went in an opposite direction to the first, but they came from the same gate.

JOHN SENDALL. I am a market-gardener. On the 14th of January I was at Wandsworth, about three o'clock, I saw a cart loaded with onions, drawn by a donkey; the name of William Pendred was on it - Pendred and Henry Abbott were with it; they were a particular sort of onion, called the Globe onion - Abbott was filling some of them into a measure, as if for sale, and as I knew the prosecutor had lost some the morning before, I went and said, "Abbott, You have got a goodish sample of onions here;" he said,"Yes, we have been to Croydon boneing, and I have bought some;" I said, "I shall take a few," and I put some into my pocket - I then went into the Queen's Head, and there I saw Kirby; I staid some time till they went away -Kirby drove the cart to Mr. Metier's; they stopped there, and I had the cart detained - Kirby said the cart belonged to Pendred, his master; Pendred and Henry Abbott had gone away before that - I had seen Pendred take the money for a perk of onions; I saw some boards in the cart on the day after - this is one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to say you saw this board in the cart that morning? A. I saw it the following day, when I went with Mr. Deadman; I did not notice any boards the first day, but I took the name of the cart - I took particular notice of the onions; they seemed to me to be all of that sort, but I did not turn them over from the bottom - I considered they were all alike; this was two miles and a half or three miles from the prosecutor's - I knew the prisoners, and they knew me; they did not object to my taking a sample.

COURT. Q. Do you know the empty house? A. I was born in it; it is at the bottom of Red Cow-lane, Hammersmith.

JOHN DOVE. I am ostler at the Queen's Head public-house. On the morning of the 14th of January, George Kirby came between six and seven o'clock with a donkeycart - he was alone; about nine o'clock two others came, but I did not notice them, and cannot say who they were - the cart was loaded with onions - Kirby said he had been up all night, and had come over Fulham-fields, and was going to Croydon; he went in, sat down, and fell asleep - my master bought a peck of the onions, and Mr. Young bought a peck; I did not see them sold.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew Kirby before? A. No, I never saw him before; he stopped there till near four o'clock in the afternoon, while the other two walked about.

JOSEPH COCKERTON . I live at Fulham. I was standing at Mr. Metier's gate, on the 14th of January, and saw the cart of onions drawn by a donkey - the constable had charge of it; it was between four and five o'clock - there were four sacks of onions in it, and some loose; they left it in our place till the next day - it was put in our cart-house, and a waggon was put against the gate that no one could get to it; Kirby drove the cart - the next day they were taken away; I noticed two or three pieces of board in the cart on the 14th.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you know the prisoners? A. Yes - it is part of their employ to go about the country, and buy bones, onions, and other things.

MR. DEADMAN. I cannot swear to these other two boards, but I can to this one with the notice in it; here are some of the onions from the cart, and some from my stock- there is not a question, but they are the same sort; I do not know any man who grew such.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you grown that

kind of onion? A. Two years; I bought the seed at a seed shop in London - I bought all they had.

JAMES SMITH. I took the prisoners, and have had the onions ever since; these are part that were in the cart - these were taken from the bulk: and these are the boards.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you take the prisoners? A. Kirby I took at home, and George Abbott on the 16th- the other two I took at the Cock and Magpie, about three weeks after.

EDWARD EDGSON. I assisted in taking the prisoners.

JOHN SENDALL re-examined. Q. Why did you not have them taken when you saw them? A. They took the cart, and allowed Kirby to go, as he said he would send his master for the cart.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know whose cart it was? A. Kirby said his master was Pendred - that he and Abbott bought them at Croydon, and he saw them; I said, "Your donkey could not draw them from there;" "Yes he could" he said.

Kirby's Defence. I asked them to take me if they thought I had any thing to do with the robbery.

George Abbott's Defence. I can prove I was in bed and asleep that night - next morning I was in my father's garden, and saw a mob; they came and took me.

Pendred's Defence. There is a board to be produced, which came from the same place.

KIRBY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

G. ABBOTT - GUILTY . Aged 19.

H. ABBOTT - GUILTY . Aged 24.

PENDRED - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-91

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

588. JAMES BALLS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 4 shillings, and 3 sixpences, the monies of Charles Charlton , his master .

CHARLES CHARLTON . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Castle-street, Soho - the prisoner came to me as an apprentice , but was not bound; he had been with me about two years. On the 27th of January, a little after six o'clock in the evening, I came down stairs from having my tea, and as I passed the counter I saw his hand in the till - he looked frightened, and I did not take my eyes from him for a minute or two - I then went up before the counter, and he laid down four shillings and three sixpences on the counter; I caught hold of him, and sent him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How many shopmen have you? A. Two; they put money into the till, and take change out - I am not in a large way of business; he had served the last customer, and given change for sixpence - there was about 2l. in the till.

JOSHUA CLEMENTS. I am an inspector of the Police. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and said he was very sorry for what he had done - this money was delivered to me by his master; I went and searched the prisoner's box - I found some other things, and some money.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to say he said he was sorry for what he had done? A. Yes; his master did not say if he would tell he would forgive him.

Prisoner. I am very sorry for it - if my master will forgive me this time I will not do it again.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300218-92

589. JANE COX was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 4 silver spoons, value 2l., the goods of Richard Clark Sewell , her master .

RICHARD CLARK SEWELL . I live in Gray's Inn-square - the prisoner had been in my service about two months; I missed some plate, and applied to the Police - the next morning I received a letter from the prisoner, enclosing same duplicates.

SAMUEL HAMPSTEAD . I am a pawnbroker. I have four silver forks, and one pillow-case - this fork and pillow-case were pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My master left me in want, and I did it to procure subsistence.

MR. SEWELL. I had been out of town, but before I went I left her money.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-93

590. WILLIAM WILLIS and ALEXANDER HIGDEN were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 5 bottles, value 1s.; 3 quarts of wine, value 1l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 brush, value 6d.; 1lb. of candles, value 6d., and 1 bottle of blacking, value 3d. , the goods of Joseph Somes .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN PEARCEY. I am a watchman, of Anderson's-gardens, Bethnal-green-road. On Sunday night, the 24th of January. I stopped Higden with a basket and a bundle, a little before twelve o'clock; I asked what he had - he said it was his own, and he was going to Haggerstone; I took him to the watch-house, and asked what he had in the basket - he said wine, but what was in the bundle he did not know; I opened it, and found these other articles in it - I asked where he got them from; he said from his brother-in-law, who lived with Mr. Somes in Mile-end-road - I went there, found Willis, and asked if he had seen his brother-in-law the night before; he denied it, but after some time he said he had, and had parted with him at half-past nine o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Was there any other conversation with Willis? A. Not at that time; Higden told me where he got them - I could not have found it, but for him.

JOSEPH SOMES. I live in New-grove, Mile-end ; Willis had been in my service six months - I know nothing of Higden. On Monday, the 25th of January, the witness came to me, and I called up Willis - I said he had robbed me of some wine, which he denied; these two bottles I can positively identify, but not the other three, though I think they are mine - I know these two by the marks on the corks; these trousers, found in the bundle, are mine -I cannot swear to this shirt; Willis slept next the stable, and the wine was kept in a locker in the servant's room -I never gave Willis liberty to take it.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you take upon yourself to

swear you have lost a single bottle of wine? A. I will swear to these bottles, on account of the marks of K. & Co. which I suppose is the wine merchants - it was made a present to me; I mixed five bottles of this sort; it is Madeira - it is impossible I can swear this is Madeira without tasting it; Willis was my footman - I give my clothes away, but not to my servants; I know these trousers are mine - I cannot swear to this soap.

COURT. Q. Do you know whether his brother-in-law had been there? A. I do not; he denied it at first, and then said he had been there.

GEORGE GRAVES . I am a Police-constable. I took Willis into the yard at the office - I made him no promise or threat; he was crying very much, and I said "What are you crying about?" he said,

"I am crying about the wine;" I said, "What wine?" he said, "The five bottles I took from my master, a bottle at a time" - I said, "Who is your master?" he said Mr. Somes.

The prisoner received a good character.

WILLIS - GUILTY. Aged 18. - Judgment Respited .

HIGDEN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-94

591. CHARLES OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 hamper, value 6s.; 8 bottles, value 1s.; 6 quarts of wine, value 24s.; 2 puddings, value 5s.; 1 sausage, value 2s., and 1 box of water colours, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Winstanley .

THOMAS JAMES. I am a coachmaker. On the 11th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Mecklenburgh-square - I saw a carrier's cart with a tilt over it; the prisoner and another person were there - I saw the prisoner jump into the cart twice; his companion was on the side of him - the cart then went on, and stopped in Gray's Inn-lane; the prisoner looked in again, but did not take any thing - he followed it on to Holborn, then got up, and took a hamper; he carried it up Holborn, called a coach, and got in - I ran, and took hold of him; he dropped the hamper and said, "Take this;" I took it - he got into the coach, and drove away - I met a Policeman, and told him; but he would not take him, because he said he was not on duty - I met another, who ran after the coach and took him.

THOMAS MOORE . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner - I asked him if it was his property; he said Yes, and I took him to the watch-house - I produce the hamper, which contains the articles stated.

WILLIAM HARVEY. I am messenger and porter to Richard Winstanley . I packed up this hamper, which contained the articles stated - I did not send it by the carrier, but it was sent.

JOHN WILLIAMSON. This cart was mine - I took up the hamper in Mecklenburgh-square, at Mr. Winstanley's- I stopped in Gray's Inn-lane to take up a parcel; I stopped again in Holborn, and soon after the hamper was taken - I did not hear of it, nor miss it till the next morning, when I looked over my things.

Prisoner's Defence. James has been placed as I am now for some linen; if I had allowed him to go halves in the property this would not have happened.

THOMAS JAMES. It is a great untruth - I was in Clerkenwell for an assault once; I should know the person who was with him if I saw him.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-95

592. JOHN LUDWIG was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 coat, value 4l., the goods of Frederick George John Burghart , his master .

The prisoner, being a foreigner, had the evidence interpreted to him.

ALEXANDER JOHN BURGHART. I am the son of Frederick George John Burghart - he is a tailor , and lives in Clifford-street . The prisoner was a journeyman in his shop for three or four months, but did not live in the house; we missed a coat of a customers on the 9th of February - we did not know where the prisoner lodged till he told us in the evening; we went there with an officer, and found five gilt buttons, but the coat we found in pawn.

FRANCIS BYAR . I am a pawnbroker. I believe this to be the coat I took in pledge from Anna Kessner .

ANNA KESSNER. I know the prisoner - he asked me to pawn the coat, which I did for 30s., and I gave him the money; he is a Dutchman - I have known him three years, and speak his language.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was not my intention to steal it- I expected money from Holland, and I would have brought it to my master's; I was starving, with my wife and children - I asked my master and the foreman to advance me 1l.; I had no bread and no work for a fortnight -I could have sent for friends if I had known it had been necessary.

ALEXANDER JOHN BURGHART . My father paid him for what he did; he had only been there one hour that week - he could have as much work as he chose to do.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18300218-96

593. WILLIAM HERBERT REYNOLD BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 12lbs. weight of soap, value 8s. , the goods of Samuel Jackson .

JOSEPH CHICK. I am shopman to Mr. Samuel Jackson , who keeps an oil-shop in Edgware-road . The prisoner came there on the 10th of February, and said he wanted some soap and oil for Mr. Wilberforce; I gave him the soap, but said I could not get the oil, as it was so cold - I said I would send it; he said they would send for it - a woman afterwards came for the oil; I gave it her, and followed her - I saw her talking to the prisoner; I went up, and he said, "You have not sent the oil" - I said No; he then ran away - I gave an alarm, and he was taken; I did not see the oil in his possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-97

594. JOHN KNEEBONE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 crease-iron, value 6s.; 2 soldering-irons, value 2s.' 1 pair of snips, value 5s.; 1 mallet, value 3d.; 2 bread-graters, value 16d.; 1 lock and key, value 1s. 6d.; 2 powder-boxes, value 4d.; 2 small pots, value 8d.; 1 nutmeg-grater, value 1d.; 3 tart-pans, value 2s.; 1 ventilator, value 2s.; 1 chisel, value 3d.; 1 piece of solder, value 2d.; 1 kettle-spout, value 4d.; 1 tea-pot, value 2s. 2d.; 2 saucepans, value 3s.; 2 wine pots, value 18d.; 1 egg-boiler, value 3s. 6d.; 1 steamer, value 3s. 6d.; 1 slice, value 1s.; 1 sandwich-box, value 1s. 9d.; 1 soup

ladle, value 1s. 4d., and 2 gentle-boxes, value 6d., the goods of William Robert Wall King , his master .

MR. J. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ROBERT WALL KING. I am a tin-plate worker , and carry on business at Islington, and at Hosier-lane. I missed a variety of articles after the 18th of January - we had been continually losing things; I sent the officer, and found some articles at the prisoner's lodging.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You used the word we - have you a partner? A. I had till October, 1828 - I know the property found was mine, but I cannot tell when I lost it.

DUKE WILLIAM STONE . I am foreman to Mr. King. I went to the prisoner's father with the officer, and found a great many tin goods, particularly in the parlour; I found some tools up stairs.

COURT. Q. This was at the father's - did the prisoner lodge there? A. I suppose so - I do not know; the father did not come to visit him, to my knowledge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. For aught you know his father might have come to see him? A. I am sometimes out - I never sold the prisoner any thing, nor gave him any thing to my knowledge - I gave him a dripping-pan and stand to take to my house, which Mr. King gave me; I did not tell him not to say where he had been - when I was in business I had a boy from the parish as an apprentice; he was a very bad boy - he had nothing to complain of from me; I am married.

THOMAS PIKE. I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's father's. and found a great number of tin articles, which I produce.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The father might have brought them to the place? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Did you have any conversation with the prisoner? A. As we were going along he said, "The prosecutor has two other apprentices, and there will be something found on them as well as me."

MR. KING. I have looked at these articles, and know they are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not miss them? A. No - I missed a great many things; these might have been taken when I had a partner- the prisoner has a brother an apprentice to me; I do not think but what he took some of the things.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-98

595. MARY HILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 1 silver spoon, value 20s., and 1 jelly-mould, value 6d., the goods of William John Albert , her master .

ISABELLA ANN ALBERT . I am daughter of William John Albert - he is a abroad; my mother lives at Chelsea . The prisoner was our servant for one week - we gave her four silver spoons for the dinner, as we had soup; we missed one of them, and have not found it - we found this jelly-mould,(which is ours,) at her lodgings on the 22nd of January; she asked permission to go out that afternoon - my mother desired her not, but to go and get her wash up, instead of which she brought up the tea and ran out of the house; there was no other person in the house who could have taken the articles but a work-woman, and at her request we searched her.

Prisoner. Her mamma gave me the jelly-mould to keep my sugar in? Witness. No, she did not, and the prisoner did not say so at the time.

MATILDA MANN. I laid the four silver spoons on the table, and when the prisoner was gone I went down and missed one.

DAVID PHILLIPS . I was sent to search the prisoner's lodging, and found this mould concealed in a cupboard.

Prisoner's Defence. I left the place because I was ill-treated - my young mistress asked me one day to pawn my gown to get some money to go out, and I would not; she then asked me to pawn one of her dresses - I refused, and she said she would tell her mamma, and get me turned away; she wanted me to go and do it unknown to her mamma, because she was blind; and at the office she offered to take me back, if I would do it as the other servants had done.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-99

596. MARY ANN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 seal value 5s., and 1 key, value 1d., the goods of William Watts , from his person .

WILLIAM WATTS . At a quarter before one o'clock in the morning of the 14th of February, I met the prisoner in Shire-lane, with another girl - I had seen them before in Fleet-street; I agreed to go home with the other girl - we went to No. 4, Shire-lane : we went into a room alone - I had my watch in my fob, and while I was talking to the other girl, the prisoner came in, and told me not to make such a noise in the house; I did not perceive the prisoner do any thing, but when I was going to part with the other girl I missed my watch - the other girl could not take it; she was sitting a yard and a half from me; I was standing up - I was not quite sober, but I knew what I was about; a Police-man told me next morning that he had found my watch - I had had the other girl taken up, as I did not know but she might have taken it, as we were entering the room together; we all three went out of the room together, and in going down the lane I went to look at my watch, and it was gone - I took it out in the room to see the time, and I believe I put it into my trouser's pocket.

THOMAS HILL . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner at half-past one o'clock the same morning - the prosecutor had described what had occurred; he described her person, and I found her in Fleet-street - I charged the prisoner with stealing the watch; she denied it, but I found it in her hand.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you seen the prosecutor that night? A. Yes - he said he had been with the two women; he gave the other in charge for stealing the watch - she was discharged on the Monday; he accused the other woman of stealing 3s. 6d., but when he got half-way he said he gave the money into her hand- he was not sober.

WILLIAM WATTS. This is my watch.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean that you was not nearer to the woman than a yard and a half? A. No - we walked up the lane together with the other woman; I had agreed to give that woman 3s. - I had not 3s., and laid half a crown and one shilling on the table; she

put it into her bosom; I made a noise, and the landlord came up - we all went down together, and we settled it; she might have given the prisoner the watch - I did charge that girl with stealing it.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the girl, and she gave me the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-100

597. SARAH BEAZELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 watch, value 20s., and 1 watch-chain, value 2s., the goods of Jeremiah Connor , from his person .

JEREMIAH CONNOR . On the 24th of January, after eight o'clock in the evening, I was in the Commercial-road - I was going home, and slipped down; the prisoner and four or five more came up - they all went off but the prisoner; she wiped me, and asked if I was hurt - I said No; she said I must be hurt, and I had better go in and rest myself - I was going into a house to treat her, when she took my watch, and ran off; I followed her, but some men and women got before me and prevented me - I saw the prisoner take the watch from my pocket with her left hand; I have never seen it since - I described her, and the officer took her.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not in company with three or four different girls before you met me? A. No - I was going home, and was sober.

JAMES SYMONDS . I am a patrol. The witness gave me information - I knew the prisoner, and went to look for her; she absconded that night, but I found her at two o'clock on Tuesday morning - I knocked at the door, and some girl said, "What do you want?" I said, "I want to speak to the mistress of the house" - I heard two persons come down stairs and whisper together; I then heard a back door unbolted and bolted again; another girl opened the street door, and I accused her of letting a girl out at the back-door - she said she had not; I went into the yard, and there was no one there - I got over the fence, and found the prisoner in another house; I took her, and put her with three or four other girls - the prosecutor pointed her out.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to fill the kettle.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-101

598. MARY WEEKS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 watch, value 7l., the goods of John Beaty , from his person .

JOHN BEATY . I am a carpenter . On the 1st of February, between twelve and half-past twelve o'clock in the morning, I fell in with the prisoner at the end of Tothill-street - I went home with her to the Almonry , and went to a room on the second-floor; I know I had my watch when I went into the room, as the chain was hanging out, and I had looked at my watch when the Abbey clock struck twelve - I am sure I had put it safe in my pocket again; I did not see any person in the room but the prisoner; I went to bed with her, but did not take off my trousers - she got out of bed, and went to the end of the room; she came back between me and the candle, took my watch, and gave it to a person that came past, and who went off with it; I suppose that person came from a cupboard - the prisoner staid in the room; I called out, and gave charge of her.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not take a light up stairs with me? A. No, you struck a light in the room.

JOHN DANGERFIELD . I am a Police-officer. I was on duty - the prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner; they were scuffling together - he appeared sober, and charged her with stealing his watch.

Prisoner. Q. Was I in the street? A. Yes, as much as twelve yards from the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this man talking to two others; he crossed, and asked where I was going - I said to No. 26, Almonry; he said, "Can I go with you?" I said there was a young woman lived with me, but she was not at home - I got a light, and took it up; we went into the room - he shut the door, and bolted it; he said, "Put out the light, and come to bed" - I said, "I beg your pardon, what are you going to give me?" he said, "I have only a few halfpence, but you need not be afraid to trust me till to-morrow" - I said, "That won't pay my rent;" I sat down on the bed, but would not go to bed.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-102

599. JANE COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 sovereign, 2 shillings, and 1 1/2d., the monies of Alexander White , from his person .

ALEXANDER WHITE . I am a journeyman carpenter . I met the prisoner in Tothill-street, between twelve and one o'clock, on the night of the 24th of February; she asked the way to Pimlico - I said straight on, and asked what part she was going to - she said near the bun-house; I said, "I am going that way" - she said, "Allow me to take hold of your arm;" I said, "Do, mother"- we turned down James-street , and I found her hand in my pocket; she went down a court - the Police-officer was coming by; he took her, and found the money in her mouth; one halfpenny I can swear to - it is an old one, and has been in my possession for several years.

EDWIN ALEWOOD. The witness called me. I took the prisoner, and found in her mouth a sovereign, two shillings, and 1 1/2d.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him in the middle of York-street; he said, "Mistress, this is a dark night for you"- I said, "Yes, and it is very slippery;" he said, "Take hold of my arm" - in going up William-street he gave me two pieces of coin; I said could not he give me some halfpence - when we got to a lamp he said I had taken some money from him; he put his hand into my pocket, and took some money out - I said, "Don't rob me."

GUILTY . Aged 48. - Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-103

600. SUSAN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 6 half-crowns, and 3 shillings, the monies of George Wright , from his person .

GEORGE WRIGHT. I am a journeyman carpenter . On the 23rd of January I was in Kingsland-road , about half-past eleven o'clock at night, with a man named Chapman; the prisoner and two others came up to us; the prisoner spoke to me, and one of the others spoke to Chapman - the prisoner wanted me to go with her, and I refused; when she could not prevail on me to go down a turning, she pulled up her clothes, put my hand against her person, and put her other arm round me - I had 30s. in my breeches pocket; I put my hand into my pocket, missed the money, and took hold of her - she shrieked out Murder!

I put her down, and three more came about me - she was taken, but no money was found on her; I saw her put her hand to a young woman behind.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you told the whole of this story? A. I believe I have - I did not go out of the road at all; I live at Hoxton - I do not work so late as that; I had no halfpence about me, and gave her none - I cannot say why she cried Murder! I had my hand on her, trying to keep her down, and more were fighting me; I do not know that there were any halfpence found on her - there were three penny-pieces; they had not been in my pocket - we were not walking arm-in-arm- I felt her hand in my pocket, drawing out the money, at the corner of the turning, when she introduced my hand to her person; I did not give her the three penny-pieces to do that - I do not know whether I was at the sign of the Hare on the 8th of February. I deny, on my oath, calling on the prisoner's father - he came to my house on the Monday night, and asked if a carpenter lived there, and said he had a job for him; I did not ask 30s. to let her go - I had money offered me; and at the office a young man pulled out money and offered me; I do not know one Mautz by name- I went to the Hare on the Monday; no money was offered me there, but I have had it offered by him - Chapman and another person were with me at the Hare; I did not say "It was not the prisoner took it, but I believe her name is not Susan Jones" - Chapman and I did meet at the Green Dragon on Tuesday; I will swear I did not ask a man there to pay 30s. into the hands of my principal witness, and then I would have the bill thrown out.

JOHN CHAPMAN. I am a carpenter, and was with the witness - three girls came up: one of them kept me behind, and the other two walked on; the prisoner was one: she was detained by my mate - I did not see what was done, but he called out that he was robbed, and I ran up - the prisoner wanted to get away, and he held her down.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it a light night? A. Yes - there were a good many people round; the witness cried out for the watch, and she cried Murder! I do not know which cried out first; he had had 25s. paid him by his master at the King's Arms - I do not know any thing about money being offered him but what he told me; I saw no money offered him at the Hare or the Green Dragon - he said they had been trying to make it up, and he would have nothing at all to do with it.

JONATHAN WOOD. I am a watchman. I heard the call and went up; I found the prisoner, the two carpenters, and some women - the prosecutor had the prisoner down; I collared him, and asked what he was doing with her - he said, "I give you charge of her - she has robbed me of part of my wages;" I said, "Let her get up, and we will overhaul her" - he said,

"It is of no use - she has given it to another girl;" she got up, gave me three penny-pieces, and said that was what he had given her for a certain purpose; in going to the watch-house she ran up a passage, and the patrol took her.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she appear to have been illused? A. I thought so at first. I think the cry I first heard was of a female; she gave up the 3d., and said that was all she had.

THOMAS LITTLE . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner when she had escaped - what has been stated is true.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of his money; he gave me 3d., and because I would not do as he wished he beat and kicked me, and knocked me down - I called out Murder! and several persons came up.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-104

601. ELIZABETH NORTH was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 20th of December , 20 scores of straw plait, value 6s., the goods of John Austin , which had been lately before stolen, she well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute , &c.

JOHN AUSTIN. I keep a public-house in Chandos-street, and likewise deal in plait . I lost a great quantity of plait within the last three months; I found out one of the thieves, who was tried and convicted yesterday - the prisoner did live in Little Wild-street.

JANE BAKER. I am in the straw bonnet line. I bought about twenty scores of plait of the prisoner, at three different times, just before Christmas; she said she was selling it for a person in the business, who had lost the use of her limbs by sitting in a draught, that she was going to the hospital, and was obliged to sell it for tea and sugar; this is a part of what she brought - I gave her a shilling for this bit.

JOHN AUSTIN. To the best of my knowledge this is part of my property, but I should not like to swear to it; I took other witnesses to Bow-street, but they did not think it necessary to examine them. The prisoner said she had it of the soldier, who was convicted in the other Court yesterday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-105

602. FREDERICK BUCKOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 1 wooden bowl, value 6d., and 5s. in copper monies, numbered, the property of Mary Ann Threader ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

MARY ANN THREADER . On the 23rd of January the prisoner came into my shop, (which is a pastry-cook's,) for some cakes - I was serving him; he came round the counter, and took a bowl of copper - he was pursued and taken- the bowl was thrown into the road; I am sure he is the boy.

WILLIAM PITMAN. I took the prisoner with the bowl in his hand; I fell down, it being frosty, and the bowl was thrown into the road - I got up, and the prisoner was taken without my losing sight of him.

HENRY PALMER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the bowl, with 2s. 9d. in it.

JOSEPH CLEMENTS. I am an officer. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, on Thursday, the 14th of January, in the 10th year of His present Majesty's reign; I took him, and know he is the lad.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-106

603. DANIEL HAMMETT was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 3 brushes, value 10s., the goods of Thomas Green ; and that he had before been convicted of felony .

THOMAS GREEN. I was coming out of my shop, No. 90, Leather-lane , on the 25th of January; Ann Norris came and said, "That man has just unhung three brushes

and given them to a woman;" I gave the prisoner in charge of an officer, and went to see for the woman, but we could not find her - this was between five and six o'clock in the evening; they were three large white-wash brushes.

ANN NORRIS . I saw the prisoner on the 25th of January, unhang three brushes, and give them to a woman, who walked off with them - I told the prosecutor, who took him.

Prisoner. Q. Where was the woman? A. At the other door, waiting and you gave them to her.

GEORGE TILTMAN . I am in Mr. Green's employ. I did not see any thing done at the shop, but there were three brushes missing, which I had seen two hours before- I had not sold them; I had been in the shop all the time.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out selling fish - I met a young man, and we were going to have a pint of beer; he went into the shop to get 1d. worth of tobacco, and this young woman said I took the brushes - I had not been near the door; if the woman had them it was unknown to me.

EDWARD SHEPPERD . I have a copy of the record of the prisoner's former conviction, on the 4th of December, 1828, in the name of Gotier - I attended the trial, and know he is the man; he was committed to Newgate for four months.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-107

604. WILLIAM HOWLETT was indicted for embezzlement .

GODFREY THURGOOD . I am a baker . The prisoner was in my employ - he came last October twelve months, and remained till I took him into custody, on the 10th of January; he was in the habit of receiving money, which he should have paid me directly.

MARY FARRER. I am a servant. I paid the prisoner two half-crowns on the 1st of January , about the middle of the day - he did not give me any receipt.

GODFREY THURGOOD , JUN. The prisoner paid me me half a crown on the 11th of January, which I put into the till - I was eleven years old last Christmas-day.

MR. THURGOOD. I discovered that he had only paid half a crown, and I took him up directly - he said he was very sorry, but he had spent half a crown with Thomas Perry .

THOMAS PERRY. I was with the prisoner on the 11th of January; I saw him receive the two half-crowns - he put one into his pocket, and took the other home to my master; I am on liking to the prosecutor - the prisoner gave me 1s. to keep for him, and spent 6d.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18300218-108

605. HENRY JAMES HITCHERSON was indicted for embezzlement .

JOSEPH JUPP . I am a hatter , and live in Regent-street; the prisoner has been employed by me since Christmas, to carry out bills ; I did not particularly give him orders to receive any money, but if he did, he was to bring it to me.

JAMES WHITE . On the 22nd of January I paid the prisoner a sovereign, a half-sovereign, and three shillings for his master - I cannot exactly say the time of day, but it was dusk - I had no receipt; my master lives in Lamb's Conduit-street.

MR. JUPP. On the 22nd of January the prisoner did not return - he had left me on the Saturday before that, and said he had a bad heel; I saw him on the Tuesday, and he said he was not able to return, but he would when he was better.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-109

606. JOHN FORDHAM was indicted for embezzlement .

TURPIN CARTER . I am a baker , and live at No. 2, Goswell-road . The prisoner was in my employ, and received money every day - he was to give an account every afternoon, when he had done serving the customers.

JOHN RIDLEY . I paid the prisoner a shilling on the 16th of January , for his master - on the Friday before I paid him 8d.

TURPIN CARTER. The prisoner came home that day, and booked the bread as not paid - I have not got the book here.

THOMAS JAMES CARTER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner - he said he was very sorry, but he had been ill, and had robbed his master to pay the doctor.

TURPIN CARTER. He had been ill, but he had had money of me before.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-110

607. WILLIAM BENNETT was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 3rd of December , 2 trusses of hay, value 4s., the goods of Lord Ellenborough , which had been lately before stolen, he well knowing them to have been stolen , &c.

RICHARD KENNEDY . I am an odd-boy to Lord Ellenborough. On the 3rd of December I was coming from Roehampton to town, with a cart, and some hay in it; I left four trusses of hay with the prisoner, at the Old George, in the Brompton-road - he gave me some liquor to drink, and said at any time if I left hay with him he would give me something for it - I received 1s. a truss for the first two trusses, but nothing for the last.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you steal the hay? A. I brought it from Roehampton; I saw the man taking the hay off the cart - I did not try to prevent it, nor ask for it back; I knew I was doing wrong - he gave me nothing for the last trusses; I had 1s. for the first - I thought it was not right; he is ostler to the inn-keeper - I did not pull the hay off the cart; I took the shilling for the hay - I dare say I expected to get 1s. for the last hay; they were tied up as trusses, but had not been weighed; I do not know how much there is in a truss.

SAMUEL GREGORIE . I am under-gardener to Lord Ellenborough. I sent ten trusses of hay to town by the witness, on the 2nd of December; I did not see him go with them - I believe he went the next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure there were ten trusses? A. Yes; I pitched them up one at a time - a truss of hay has two hands, and a bundle has only one.

MARK WATKINSON . I am servant to Lord Ellenborough. On the 3rd of December I received eight trusses of hay at the stable in town.

JOSEPH WIGGINS. I am servant to the prisoner, at the George - he ordered me to take two trusses of hay off the cart on the 3rd of December; I do not know what was done with them; I believe they were put into the yard - I did not see them any where else afterwards; Mr. Ball keeps the yard, but the prisoner has the stable - I do not know whether he rents it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not customary for gentleman who send their horses along a road, to leave a bundle or truss of hay to feed them? A. Yes, Lord Durham does it for one; this was taken openly - I have seen Lord Ellenborough's horses fed with hay that has been left; I have given it to them - that carter was in the habit of borrowing hay to feed Lord Ellenborough's horses, and I believe they have taken it to pay themselves - I never saw any horses eat the hay that was left belonging to Lord Ellenborough but his own.

COURT. Q. What man in Lord Ellenborough's service did you know to borrow hay of the prisoner? A. Kennedy has several times - I cannot tell whether a truss of hay is worth 2s.; I do not mean that they were put in any place for Lord Ellenborough's horses - they were only put into the yard: Kennedy said, "Here are two bundles of hay - I will leave them till I come back."

MR. PHILLIPS to MARK WATKINSON . Q. Do not you know that Lord Ellenborough said he would have nothing to do with this? A. No - the butler gave me orders to come here to-day; I generally get my orders from the servants.

JAMES HUMPHRYS . I am a constable. I took Kennedy and Wiggins into custody; I did not take the prisoner - he was taken on the 23rd.

JOSEPH SMITHERS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was told about the prisoner, and looked for him, but could not find him - he was brought to Queen-square Office on the 23rd of January, by Hughes, but he said he had surrendered himself; Hughes said he brought him there to be discharged, as Lord Ellenborough would not do any thing against him - I went to inquire by the Magistrate's order, and they said they had not said so.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-111

608. JARVIS ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 live tame fowl, price 2s. , the property of William Pyle .

WILLIAM ASHFORD . I am a constable, and live at Harley-bush cottage. On the 15th of February I was on duty, and saw the prisoner and some other boys between four and five o'clock, in the High street; the prisoner had a fowl rolled in this cloth, under his arm, and was running- I pursued and took him; he threw the fowl over a garden wall; I secured him, and gave him to another constable - I went and got the fowl from the place where I saw him throw it - he said a boy named Harding gave it him; I took Harding - he said a boy had stolen the fowl from Hampstead-heath; he was discharged by the Magistrate.

WILLIAM PYLE . I keep fowls . This was mine, and was the only one which happened to be out on that occasion; I keep them on the common.

GUILTY . Aged 11. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-112

609. WILLIAM SHUTTER was indicted for that he, on the 8th of January , at St. Paul, Covent-garden , feloniously and knowingly did deliver to Morgan Oram a certain letter, accusing the said Morgan Oram of a certain infamous crime; that is to say, of an attempt to commit b-y with the said William Shutter , with intent to extort money from the said Morgan Oram ; which said letter is to the effect following: - (i.e.)

SIR, - I am extremely sorry to be under the disagreeable necessity of waiting on you, but under the circumstance I cannot help it; the serjeant that was with me at Drury-lane Theatre, on Wednesday night, has threatened to report me to the officer of my detachment, for taking such a compensation from you, for the insult I received; and does further declare, that I must return you your money, and lodge a complaint against you directly; so what to do I know not; I am sorry from the heart, that a man like you (of seeming respectability) should be guilty of the like. I have said all that I could to him, but am afraid to no purpose. I have taken this plan to mention it to prevent any person from hearing the conversation; a few moments conversation with you would be advisable, away from the house. - I am Sir, your most obedient.

WM. SHUTTER, Corporal.

To Mr. Haurum.

against the Staute, &c.

2nd COUNT, like the first, only calling it a threatening letter, &c.

3rd COUNT, like the second, only stating that he did deliver a certain letter demanding, with menaces and without any reasonable or probable cause, certain money, with intent, &c.

MORGAN ORAM. On the 6th of January I went to the 2s. gallery at Drury-lane theatre with two little boys - there was a very great crowd at the door: the prisoner was there - he called out to another soldier, "Houston, this person has assaulted me;" I said, "It is false if you say so; any more than being pushed against you, which you know was the effect of accident, the crowd being so great"- I was then holding the youngest boy with my two hands to prevent his being hurt in the crowd; the other boy was further on - the other soldier turned round and said,"Never mind now, stop till bye and bye:" after a little while, he turned round again, winked at the prisoner, and said "Keep your eye upon him;" this was before the doors opened, and just as the doors opened he said, "Take off his excommunication;" the doors opened, there was a great rush, and the little boy cried out - I said to the prisoner, "Do take care, and don't hurt him;" he immediately took him up in his arms, and said he would take him into the theatre - I took some money out of my pocket to give the prisoner to pay for the boy's admission and in my confusion I gave him the 6s. 6d., which was all I had in my pocket - when I got to the pay-place I told the eldest boy he must wait there while I went back for some more money, as I had given it all to the soldier, or had dropped it - the prisoner took the little boy into the theatre, and I went back for more money; in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes I went back, and took the elder boy into the theatre - I looked for the prisoner, on account of his having the child, and saw him about half way down the gallery, sitting by the side of the little boy - the gallery was so full I could not get near him at all, but I called to him, and told him to take care of the boy till the play was over; which he did, and when it was over, he brought him to me - I gave the prisoner

something, but I am not certain what it was, "I was so agitated from the threats he had made use of in the first place - he did not make use of any then; I took the two boys home to the City - nothing else passed between the prisoner and I on that occasion; I have no idea what I gave him - it was a little change; on the Friday following the prisoner brought me a letter to No. 6, Tavistock-street, where I live - he had not known before where I lived; the little boy will state how he came to find me out - when the prisoner brought the letter he said, "Take it, and read it, and come away from the house; I want to speak to you"- I read it, and the officer has it; this is the letter - I went up Charles-street with him, and he said the serjeant obliged him to come to me for some more money, as the paltry sum I had given was not enough - I said it was a shameful and a scandalous thing to come to me for money when he knew he had no charge against me, but being pushed against him - he said he knew that, but he was obliged to come, as his serjeant would not be satisfied without my sending him a couple of sovereigns - I said it was a very hard case indeed, as I had not so much money by me - I had not above a sovereign and 1s. 6d. - he said he could not help it, if I did not send more he should he obliged to come again; and under the threats be made use of, I took out the sovereign and three sixpences, and gave him - I said that was all I had; he said he would try if that would satisfy the serjeant, and walked away with the money. On the Friday following a little boy brought two letters, one inclosed in the other, nearly to the same purport as the other was - I went out, and found the prisoner in Charles-street waiting for me; he said he was sorry, from his heart, to have to come to me, but his serjeant obliged him to come to get some more money - I said it was a very great shame that he should come in that way for money, when he had acknowledged, the last time he saw me, that he had no charge against me; he said he knew that, but his serjeant obliged him to come, or else he would report him, and he should get flogged - I said he had extorted money from me, and he wanted to extort more - he said he should be sory to do that, but he had had a long walk, he had just come off duty, and he hoped I would give him something - I offered him 2s. 6d. which had been marked; as I had in the mean time told my landlord, who had told a gentleman of it, and this plan had been arranged - the prisoner refused to take the 2s. 6d.; Mr. Tate came up, and took him into custody - he was very much confused, and begged to be let go; Mr. Tate gave him to an officer.

Prisoner. Q. What was the cause of our first interview? A. It was quite accidental - I was pushed against you by the crowd, as any other person might; and that would not have happened if you had not turned almost facing me.

Q. What money did you give me? A. Six shillings and sixpence, to pay for the boy, because you took him in your arms - I did not know I gave you the whole 6s. 6d.; I told you to pay for him, nothing else; I certainly said I would see you after the performance, to take the boy home, or words to that effect - when you brought the boy I gave you something, I do not know what.

Q. Did you not, on your examination, deny giving me any thing but the 6s. 6d. at the theatre, and the 1l. 1s. 6d. in the street? A. I could not recollect every circumstance.

COURT. Q. Did you say you had not given him any other money? A. I believe I said I could not recollect the circumstance.

Prisoner. When the play was over he gave me 10s. in a paper. Witness. I cannot say what it was - I do not recollect putting it in paper; I believe it was in paper.

COURT. Q. What did you mean by saying you would see him when the play was over? A. To take the little boy of him - I do not know what I gave him, it might be a few shillings - I cannot swear whether it was less or more than 10s.

Prisoner. When he gave me the 6s. 6d. he said, "Take this, I will give you more after the performance is over, but do not expose me. Witness. I did not say such a word; I said I would see him when it was over, when he was at the pay door.

COURT. Q. Did you say you would bring more money? A. No, I do not know what I got when I went home - but whatever I gave him was in consequence of the threats he made use of.

Prisoner. On the examination I asked him what money he gave me when the performance was over, and he said none. Witness. I believe I said I could not recollect.

COURT. Q. Did you deny giving him money at the end of the play? A. I believe I said I could not recollect; the push was quite accidental, and not in any indecent manner.

CHARLES JAMES ORTON . My father is a deputy seacoal meter. I went with the witness to Drury-lane theatre on the night of the 6th of January; I saw the prisoner in the street, standing near the door - I heard him say Mr. Oram had assaulted him; Mr. Oram said it was false, it was the crowd pushed him - the prisoner said he had assaulted his person, to the best of my recollection - Mr. Oram was rather behind him; the prisoner said to another soldier, "Come out;" the other said, "Never mind;" the prisoner then said, "Houston keep your eye upon him" - we went into the theatre when the door was opened, which was in about half an hour; I went up stairs rather before Mr. Oram - when he came up, he said he was afraid he had lost his money; I said, "Have you had your pocket picked?" he said he must go back, and get some money; I waited for him - the other little boy is my brother; Mr. Oram came back in about ten minutes, and paid for me and himself - the prisoner took my brother in; I did not take notice how he got money to pay for him - after the play was over the prisoner brought my brother to Mr. Oram, who had waited for them, and Mr. Oram told me to go down and wait for him - he came down with my brother, and joined me; I know of nothing else.

Prisoner. Q. How long have you known him? A. About twelve months - he took me to the play because my father had not time to go.

Q. Have you ever been alone with him? A. Yes, out walking - he never took any liberties with me.

COURT. Q. Attend to that, did he ever take any liberties with you? A. No - I never had an idea that he was a person likely to commit any indecency.

WILLIAM ORTON . I was at the theatre on the 6th of

January; there was a squeeze in the crowd before we got in - I saw the prisoner, and heard him say Mr. Oram had assulted him; I understood he had pushed against him- Mr. Oram said it was a story, he had been pushed against him - the prisoner said to the other soldier, "This fellow has assaulted me," and the prisoner said he would fetch some one to take Mr. Oram away - the prisoner took me to the third or fourth seat in the gallery; I did not see how he got any money - I did not see Mr. Oram give him any - the prisoner paid for me; I did not ask how he came to have the money for me - Mr. Oram said to him, "Good night," when it was over; I did not see him give him any money.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see him shake hands with me? A. Yes.

Prisoner. That was the time the 10s. was put into my hand.

ROBERT TATE . On the 15th of January, about half-past three o'clock, Mr. Farrow, of Tavistock-street, who is Mr. Oram's landlord, told me of this circumstance - I stood with him some time, and a boy came into the shop; Mr. Farrow said, "Here is a note on the business I spokeabout"- I said I knew what soldiers were, and I advised Mr. Oram to go and tender the prisoner some marked money, and I should follow, to hear what he said - I followed him, and saw the prisoner join him near the end of Bow-street, they walked up Bow-street, and turned down a passage into Long-acre - I was as close behind them as I could be, without treading on their heels, and could hear their conversation from time to time - I heard Mr. Oram say it was a most false accusation; there was no ground for it, and it was very unjust that he should take the steps he did - the prisoner said he was sorry from his heart or soul, but he was obliged to do it - he did not believe him guilty of the charge, but was compelled to it by the serjeant, (I think;) I followed them into Longacre, and being fearful they might turn down a court, I took the prisoner, as I knew Oram was a timid man - I had seen Oram before this - I should observe, I had seen Oram offer him 2s. 6d., and the prisoner said it would not he worth his while to take so small a sum, as he had come a considerable distance - I took the prisoner, and brought him to Tavistock-street - I was very much excited at the time - a Police-man was sent for, and took him.

Prisoner. Q. How long have you known Oram? A. I should think eighteen months, or nearly, from seeing him at Mr. Farrow's.

Prisoner. This gentleman, when on his oath at his examination, said he had known him eight or nine years.

JOSEPH ROBINSON. I am a Police-man - I took the prisoner at Mr. Farrow's from Oram; he said that he had taken improper liberties with his person at the entrance of the 2s. gallery.

COURT. Q. What did Oram say? A. He said he had come to the house under a pretence of accusing him of taking improper liberties with his person, to get money, and he desired me to take him to the watch-house - the prisoner said, on our way to the watch-house, that the prosecutor had taken improper liberties with his person at the entrance of the theatre, and he confessed he had received some money - I believe he said 6s. at the entrance of the door, then 10s., and then a sovereign, and three sixpences.

Prisoner. Q. Where you present at the examination? A. Yes - Mr. Oram certainly did deny that he gave you the 10s.

JOHN EALES ROGERS . I am an inspector of the Police, and was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in; this letter was delivered to me by Oram -I went up the same night to the riding establishment in St. John's-wood, where I understood the serjeant was, and I took him before the Magistrate the following morning, but it was Corporal Houston ; he corroborated the statement of the prisoner, as to what he said took place at the entrance of the theatre - I heard the prisoner say Oram gave him 6s. 6d. before he went in, and when he came out 10s., wrapped in paper; but Oram denied giving him the 10s.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night in question, I was at the theatre door, and was insulted by Oram; he gave me this money not to expose him; there was 6s. 6d., which was just sufficient for him and the two boys; he told me when the performance was over he would see me again; I brought the boy out, and he handed me the paper with 10s. in it; he put out his hand, and shook hands with me, and in a low tone of voice he said, "Here is 10s., don't expose me;" I saw no more of him till the day he gave me the 1l. 1s. 6d.; on his examination he denied giving me the 10s., and therefore must be allowed to be a perjured man, which I hope your Lordship will allow me to have the benefit of.

ALEXANDER HOUSTON. I am a corporal in the Light Dragoons, and was at the theatre - I heard the prisoner say Oram had insulted him, and he had his hand on Oram's shoulder; I was about a yard in advance of them; the prisoner said, "Come out;" I could not get out, but I saw Oram tremble like an aspin-leaf - I said, "Keep your eyes on him;" in a few minutes the doors were opened - I saved a place for the prisoner - I said, "Where is Oram?" he said, "He is safe enough, he gave me this boy as a pledge, and he gave me 6s. to pay for the boy and me, and 2s. 6d. to drink;" after it was over, he said, "He has given me a cartridge;" we went to a public-house, and opened it, and found 10s. in it - in going down the street he said, "I was obliged to borrow money for my admission, and I have no more money on my person than this;" I never desired him to go to Mr. Oram, and get more money of him, nor ever had a moment's conversation on the subject, till I was brought a prisoner to Bow-street - I did not know Oram's name till I heard it before the Magistrate - I did not say, "Take off his excommunication."

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-113

610. JAMES VINE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Saunders .

ROBERT SAUNDERS . I am a shoe-maker , and live in Old-street-road . A person told me a boy in a bottle-green jacket had taken a pair of shoes - I went and took the prisoner, who was putting them on his feet, about a hundred yards from my house.

JOHN LIGHT . I took the prisoner, and have the shoes.

WILLIAM STALMAN. I saw the prisoner take the shoes from Mr. Saunders' shop.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18300218-114

611. THOMAS TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 24 yards of gingham, value 10s. , the goods of James Brown .

JAMES BROWN . I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 9th of February, I saw the prisoner take the gingham from within my door - he tucked it under his arm, and I took him with it, twenty or thirty yards from my house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading poverty

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-115

612. MARY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 pair of boots, value 7s. , the goods of James Pickford .

JAMES PICKFORD . I am a boot-maker , and live in Whitecross-street . On the 25th of January, I lost a pair of boots from my window bench; I did not see them taken, but received information from a customer - I cannot say when I had seen them; there were many on the bench - I missed one pair when I took the prisoner back; I took hold of her by the shoulder - she had crossed the way, and was on the pavement; I said, "I want you," and she dropped the boots from under her cloak - she stood there till I had served a customer, and then the officer took her - she said it was her first offence, and she hoped I would forgive her.

JOHN DAVIS . I took the prisoner, and found ten shillings and a duplicate on her; she begged I would give her leave to go, and she would pay for them.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18300218-116

613. EDWARD SYRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 2 pint pots, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Sharpe .

ROBERT SHARPE . I keep the Woodman, at Dalston . I am continually losing pots; I missed two last Saturday, when I came to look my stock over, and the officer brought these two in a handkerchief, which I knew to be mine - they have the name of Moore, the man I took the house of, upon them.

JOHN WILLIAM WINTLE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner with these two pots in Kingsland-road, coming out of a shop, nearly two miles from the prosecutor's - he said he had bought them.

ELIZABETH CAPEROE . The prisoner came into my shop, and asked me to buy this pewter; I would not - he went out, and the officer took him - he was in liquor.

THOMAS BRANCH . I saw the prisoner at the Woodman on Friday, about four o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I got a little intoxicated, and was returning from Dalston. A poor man asked me to give him some halfpence; I gave him 6d., and he gave me these pots.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18300218-117

614. GEORGE POLOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 pair of trousers, value 4s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 1 shirt, value 3s., and 1 towel, value 3d. , the goods of Simon Maryon .

SIMON MARYON . I am a carpenter . These things are mine, and were taken from my boy.

JOHN WILLIAM MARYON . I am eight years and a half old. On the 18th of January, I was by the New Church, Hoxton , about half-past six o'clock in the evening; I had these clothes in a bundle - I was taking them home from Mr. Smith's, a pawnbroker; the prisoner asked me if I could slide - I went to slide, and fell down; he caught my bundle, and ran away - I cried out, and somebody stopped him; he was not much out of sight - they took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you slide much? A. No, I fell down; it was night - I did not see the man above a minute.

THOMAS SMITH. I am a pawnbroker. I gave the bundle to the witness; I cannot swear these are the clothes, but they were of the same sort.

JOHN BUNN . I am a white-smith. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I waited, and the prisoner came up running - he stopped the moment I told him; I did not see any one else running; he came in a direction from the cry.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not very cold? A. Yes- perhaps I should have been glad to have ran to keep myself warm.

CHARLES CONSTABLE. I was at the watch-house, and heard the cry - I went out, and saw a mob; I took the prisoner, and told the watch-house keeper to look out for the bundle - he brought it to the watch-house.

WILLIAM MORTON . I am a watch-house keeper. I heard the cry, and went out after this witness; I brought the little boy, and the bundle, which he gave me, to the watch-house - I did not see the prisoner till I got there.

RICHARD WATERS . About half-past six o'clock that night I was going down Pitfield-street, and heard this child cry Stop, stop! I saw the prisoner running with a bundle - he dropped it, and I took it up; I pursued him, and never lost sight of him till he was stopped; I did not see his person when he dropped the bundle, but I saw the same person stopped.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you say before the Magistrate, that you gave the bundle to the night-officer? A. No - I did not lose sight of the man while I picked it up; I never took my eyes off him till I came up to him - he ran about fifty yards; I am a gentleman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WILLIAM MARYON . I did not have the bundle again - it was left at the watch-house.

WILLIAM MORTON . I got the bundle from him - he is mistaken in saying he did not give it me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Highgate to see a gentleman, and was returning home; I was running, I heard Stop thief! called, and the gentleman caught me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-118

615. JOHN JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 watch, value 1l.; 3 sheets, value 14s.; 3 shirts, value 12s.; 1 blanket, value 6s.; 1 pillow, value 2s., and 1 pillow-case, value 1s. , the goods of John Wallis .

ANN WALLIS . I am the wife of John Wallis. On the

15th of January I went out on business, and a girl told me a man had gone into my house; I looked, and saw the prisoner come out with a bundle - I ran, and cried Stop thief! he walked on, and was stopped at the corner of the street; the bundle was thrown down; I have not sworn the prisoner is the man that came out of my house, nor should I like to do it - I never knew him before; the watch has not been found - these are the other articles.

ANN TAYLOR . I saw the prisoner go into the house. and told the witness; he came out with the bundle in ten minutes.

JAMES JOHNSON . I was standing at the corner of William-street, and heard a call of Stop thief! I ran, and saw the prisoner running with a bundle under his arm -I ran towards him; he said, "Don't stop me," and dropped this bundle - I gave it to the prosecutor.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner three weeks afterwards, from the witnesses description.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS. I saw him go into five houses, and come out, which brought to my mind what I had heard; I said I took him on suspicion of robbing Mr. Wallis, of York-street, Commercial-road - he denied all knowledge of it.

GUILTY . Aged 45. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-119

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

616. SARAH BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 3 collars. value 14s.; 2 caps, value 7s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 1 necklace, value 6s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 10s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 3s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 1s.; 1 pin-cushion, value 3d.; 6 tortoiseshell combs, value 3s., and 1 bed-gown, value 1s., the goods of Christopher Battcher , her master .

CAROLINE BATTCHER . I am the wife of Christopher Battcher - we keep a shop in the jewellery line , in Hanway-street . The prisoner was about four weeks in my service - we gave her warning, and she left on the 18th of February; I missed some articles, and went the next day with an officer to her father's; she was present - I charged her with stealing jewellery - she said she had nothing belonging to me; I found part of this property in her box, and the rest in a clothes bag which hung on the wall - she said she certainly had taken them, and was very sorry.

JOHN ANDERSON . I am an officer. I was sent for, and went to the prisoner's; she at first denied having any thing, and afterwards said she was very sorry - I produce the articles.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me three handkerchiefs out of her drawers by mistake for my own, when I was coming away; the handkerchiefs she owns are not hers; I had none of hers.

MRS. BATTECHER. These are not pocket-handkerchiefs - there were three pocket-handkerchiefs also, which are mine; I did not give them to her; I received a good character with her.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-120

617. HENRY CHARLES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Middleton .

CHARLES LOWE . I am a Police-constable. On the 18th of February, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was on duty in the Strand , near the house of Mr. Middleton; I saw the prisoner and two others watching about for twenty minutes or half an hour, looking into different shops - the prisoner opened Mr. Middleton's shop door, put his hand in, and took a handkerchief; I went and took him into custody as he was running across the road.

Prisoner. He says he saw me take it. I saw a person come from the shop and drop it - I picked it up; he said,"What have you there?" I said a handkerchief; he said,"What shop have you been robbing?" I said None - he took me to two or three shops, and asked if they had lost the property. Witness. A gentleman stood at his door, next door but one to Mr. Middleton, and as I went by I asked him if he had lost any thing, as I had seen him go to several shops; the other two had separated from him, when I disturbed them from another shop.

JOHN SMITH . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Middleton. We have handkerchiefs of this pattern, and missed one, two or three minutes before the prisoner was brought in.

Prisoner's Defence. He did not know which shop it came from, and at the office he brought a man who had been convicted of perjury to swear the same thing.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-121

618. THOMAS BAYNHAM and WILLIAM ELLIOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 7 lbs. of mutton, value 6s. , the goods of Richard Adams .

WILLIAM COBB . I live with Mr. Adams, a butcher , of Charing-cross . Baynham was in master's employ: Elliott came into the shop - I saw Baynham reach this mutton off the book, and give it to Elliott, who crossed the road, and went into a court with it - they said nothing to me: Baynham had a right to sell meat - it was never weighed nor paid for; I could see all they did - it hung on the hook, with other meat - it weighed about 7 lbs.; I told master, who was up stairs - Baynham was taken up last Sunday morning; it was then I told master of it.

Q. Why not tell him before? A. I did not know whether he was going to pay for it or not - it was last Wednesday or Thursday fortnight; I have only lived there three weeks.

JAMES ELEMENT . Elliott lived waiter with me. One morning, when I came down, I saw a leg of mutton hanging up, and asked how he came by it; he said his brother-in-law gave it to him - his brother-in-law is a butcher.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-122

619. The said THOMAS BAYNHAM and JOHN STEVENSON were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 6lbs. of beef, value 3s., and 2lbs. of pork, value 14d. , the goods of Richard Adams .

WILLIAM COBB . Last Sunday morning, just after eight o'clock, Stevenson came outside the shop; Baynham went out to him - they both came into the shop; Stevenson put his apron on the block, and Baynham put a bit of beef into it - they had been whispering outside the door - Stevenson took down a piece of pork, and put it by the

side of his apron; I pushed it aside, and said he should not have one of them - he took and put it into his apron, and went out; the officer brought the same meat back to the shop, and then I told master.

JOSEPH TISDALE . I am an officer. On Sunday morning I stopped Stevenson in Northumberland-street, with a bundle; I asked what he had got there - he said meat: I asked how he came by it - he said the shopman gave it to him at Charing-cross , where he used to live; I took him back, saw Baynham, and asked him if he gave him that meat - he said Yes, he did, but he had allowed his master 3s. 6d. for it; I asked if he weighed it - he gave me no answer; I asked if his master was at home, for I must see him - he said I could not, for he was out, I might see him in an hour; I took Stevenson to the Police-ship, returned, and showed Mr. Adams the meat.

RICHARD ADAMS. Baynham was in my service. I never sell meat without weighing it; he gave me no account of this meat - Stevenson had lived with me for six weeks, three weeks before this; Baynham lived with me at that time - Stevenson knew the custom of my trade very well, and knew the other had no right to give him meat, or to take any away without paying for it - I cannot swear to the meat, but believe it to be mine.

Baynham's Defence. I allowed master 3s. 6d. for it, which I thought the full price - I did not weight it, as he was a poor fellow out of place; the boy saw me put the money on the desk for it.

Stevenson's Defence. He let me have the meat, and said he would pay master for it.

MR. ADAMS. No money was put down for it.

BAYNHAM - GUILTY . Aged 21.

STEVENSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Before Mr. Justice Bosanquet.

Reference Number: t18300218-123

620. GEORGE HUNT and JOHN HULBOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 20 lbs. of hay, value 18d. , the goods of John Boddy .

JOHN TRINDER. I live at the Plough, at New Brentford , kept by Mr. Smith. On Thursday evening, the 27th of January, at nine o'clock, I saw the prisoners; Hulbock was up in the hay-loft, over the shed, and Hunt down in the stable - the loft belongs to John Boddy; Hulbock was lifting some hay down out of the loft - Hunt had got a candle, lighting him to do it; Hulbock was throwing the hay down into the shed where he was - I was at master's stable door, watching them; I went and looked into the place - they heard me, and put the light out - I went and told Boddy, and went to the premises with him; we went to Hunt's premises, which are opposite Boddy's - he has a shed there, and we found the hay in his shed which had been taken from the loft; it was clover and bets hay, and that in Boddy's stabe was the same sort.

JOHN BODDY . This loft belongs to me - I had some clover and bets hay there; I bought it that day - Trinder gave me information; I went and missed some: I had but one truss - I saw some in Hunt's shed of the same kind; it agreed with that in my loft, in quality and quantity -Hunt said he had brought it from somewhere else; Hulbock was in the shed, and said he brought it out of the market place.

Hunt's Defence. I was gathering my tools up ready for the morning; this lad came down with a bit of hay, and told me he had found it in the street - he asked me to let him lay in my shed for the night; I said he could not, as it was full of soot.

Hulbock's Defence. I brought the hay down to him, and asked him to let me lay there, as I had a quarrel with my father.

HUNT - GUILTY . Aged 25.

HULBOCK - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-124

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

621. FREDERICK BRITTON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 silk umbrella, value 18s. , the goods of Thomas Briggs .

JOHN GROOM . I am beadle of St. Martin's in the Fields. Last Saturday evening, about seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Long-acre, with an umbrella - I was carrying a bedstead, and told Dowding, who was with me, to stop him- he struggled with him very much; I put down the bedstead, and helped to secure him - I took the umbrella from him, and asked where he got it - he said he should not tell me; he was taken to the office, and told the Magistrate that he had given 6s. for it in Waterloo-road - that was not taken down; he was coming towards Newport-market, from Drury-lane.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How long was it before he was taken? A. Not a minute; I was about fifty yards from him - I did not hear him at the time he was taken, say he had bought it; I asked him to let me look at it - he said he should not.

GEORGE DOWDING. I stopped the prisoner last Saturday, at seven o'clock, and asked where he got the umbrella from; he would not tell me - I endeavoured to get it from him: he struggled very much - he did not say he had bought it; I took him to Bow-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean by struggling, his refusal to give up the umbrella? A. Yes - he did not tell me he had bought it in Waterlon-road: he would not satisfy us how he came by it - he did not try to get away.

THOMAS BRIGGS . I am an umbrella-maker , and live in St. James'-street . This umbrella is mine - it is my own make; I saw it safe on Saturday evening, the 13th of February, between four and five o'clock - it stood in my back shop; mine is a corner shop - it was within a yard of the side door in Ryder-street: it is my own make - it is a particular kind of umbrella; I had sold it, and it was brought back to be altered.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you have a great many? A. No, my business is mostly in sticks; I had three or four dozens of this particular sort - I only know it by its being my own make; I have not sold many of this description, not one within the last month - I only know it by its make and general appearance; it was brought back by a gentleman on the 13th, between four and five o'clock, and left on our counter; I was not out of the shop that night: I have not another to match it in the shop; my sister acts as my shopwoman.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from work about half-past six o'clock; a man over in the Waterloo-road, dressed in a blue coat and white apron, had three umbrel

las under his arm - I wanted to buy one, and asked him the price; he showed me this, and asked 9s. - I bid him 5s.; he said he could not take it - I walked on, and he called me back; I gave him 6s. for it, and in half an hour, as I came down Long-acre, the officer stopped me, and asked how I got it - I told him I gave 6s. for it, and he took me.

GEORGE DOWDING. I stopped him close to Rose-street, at the St. Martin's-lane end of Long-acre; I found half a crown on him - he was going towards St. Martin's-lane.

SUSAN BRITTON. The prisoner is my son, and is a sofa-bedstead maker - he was never here before; I never knew him do wrong: he was at work last Saturday over in the Waterloo-road, with a young man named Smith, in Elizabeth-place.

THOMAS BRIGGS . I only lost one umbrella.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-125

Before Mr. Baron Bolland.

622. MARY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 watch, value 4l., the goods of Antonio Matteri , from his person .

ANTONIO MATTERI. I am a looking-glass maker , and live in Beauchamp-street. On the 19th of February, about one o'clock at night, I was with another man - we met the prisoner and another woman in Holborn, and went to a house in Field-lane with them - all four of us went to bed; I had a silver watch in my fob, with a guard to it -I went to bed with my clothes on; I went to sleep, and about four o'clock (we were all locked in) the women wanted to go out; the servant girl came up, and came into the room - she asked me if I had my watch safe; I got up, and found it was gone - the prisoner had it in her bosom; she pulled it out of her bosom, and put it under the mattress - she was in the room, but out of bed, standing near the bed; the servant took possession of it, and took it down stairs to the Police-man; the prisoner was in the room at the time - my guard was made of copper; it was broken: it was nearly worn out before; there were two beds in the room.

SARAH LENORE . I am servant to Mrs. Webb, of West-street. The prisoner and prosecutor came to my house with another man and woman; I showed them into a room with two beds, and bolted all four in - I was called in about two hours, to let them out; the prosecutor had gone to bed in his clothes - I saw his watch when he went into the room; they were in the parlour - I opened the door when the women wanted to go, and asked the prosecutor if his clothes were all safe - he said they were; I asked if he had got his watch - he said, "Stop, don't let them go till I see if it is safe;" on my mentioning the watch the prisoner pulled it from her bosom, and put it between the bed and mattress - she said nothing; I sent for the Policeman, and delivered it up to him - he took the prisoner.

Prisoner. The prosecutor delivered his watch to the other woman to take care of. Witness. She was several yards from the bed.

JOHN SHACKLOCK. I am a Police-constable. I was called to the house in West-street about four o'clock, and took the prisoner and watch.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in his company, but with the other man; the other woman got up, and came out with me; the witness asked if his things were right - he said Yes, but he had left his watch with his companion; he was very tipsy.

ANTONIO MATTERI. I gave my watch to nobody, I had it in my pocket - I was rather in liquor; I am sure I did not give her the watch - she did not undress.

SARAH LENORE . She had her clothes on, ready to go out.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-126

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

623. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 21st of January , 2 sets of gig-harness, value 8l.; 1 saddle, value 5s.; 1 bridle, value 5s.; 1 pair of traces, value 5s.; 3 horse-cloths, value 1l., and 1 spare harness, value 10s., the goods of David Soames Hewson , well knowing them to have been stolen . (See page 240.)

MATTHEW CHAMPKEN. I live with Mr. David Soames Hewson, at Bromley, near Bow . On the 18th of January, about nine o'clock in the evening, when I did my horse up, I saw this harness safe - I missed it next morning when I went to the stable - I could see no foot-marks about - I had double locked the stable, and found the lock broken off - I afterwards saw two pairs of traces, two bridles, one with a bit, and one without, a collar, martingale, and a pair of driving reins - I have not recovered above a quarter of what was taken.

LEWIS BEACHEM. I am a saddler, and live at No. 56, Whitechapel-road. - On the 21st of January, about half-past four o'clock in the evening, the prisoner brought this harness for sale in a bag; I asked him several questions about who he lived with; he said a person named Alder - we asked where he got it - he said his master was like other people, poor - we had seen a bill describing the property, and sent for an officer - he afterwards said he had it from a person named Wells - that was before the officer came - he also said in the officer's presence that he received it from Wells - he said Wells trusted him to sell it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is yours a public-shop? A. Yes - there was a bill in my shop, offering a reward for the property, but not in my window - I had seen one posted near Whitechapel-church, offering twenty guineas reward, and describing the harness - I am positive he said he had it from another person, besides Wells; my brother was in the shop, and can corroborate what I say: he did not mention any name - he said his master was poor like other people, and he had brought it for sale, being the property of his master, and said his master's name was Alder; I was examined on his trial on Thursday; but was not asked whether he said he brought it from anybody but Wells - I did not mention about his saying he was sent by his master, who was poor, like other people; the Judge asked who he said he had it from - I told him Wells; you would not let me say any thing more; when I was going to mention it, you said I might go down.

Q. Where you not asked several questions after that, both by me and the Judge? A. I do not recollect any.

RICHARD BURGESS . I am an officer. I was sent for,

and took charge of the prisoner, in Beachem's shop - he told me he had come from a person, named Wells, in Mile-end-road, and that Wells was waiting for him in Mutton-lane.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he in your presence give an account how he obtained the harness? A. No - he said this when he came out of the shop - I believe he said the same in the shop - Beachem and his brother were there, within hearing; they made no observation in answer to him - I was not in the shop two minutes; I have searched for a person named Wells, but cannot find him - a man answering his description has absconded.

HENRY PARNELL. I am stable-keeper at a public-house in Mile-end-road. On the the 21st of January, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the tap-room alone: he threw a bag into the first box, in the tap-room, and soon after Wells came in - I have seen Wells once or twice before; they spoke together, what about, I do not know - I could not form an opinion what was in the bag - it seemed as if there was a good sized bundle in it - I left them in the house, opposite the bar.

MATTHEW CHAMPKEN. This is the harness, this is master's crest on it; the same as is on my button; and here is the roller which I cut off, before it was lost.

Cross-examined. Q. Your master circulated a bill, offering a reward for the property? A. Yes - it was found three days after the robbery - the bills were about the neighbourhood the prisoner took it to - the crest could have been taken off in a minute, if he chose; the appearance has not been altered in the least - this is rather the worst part of it.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me, by a man named Wells, who asked if I could sell it for him - I told him I would try - I went along Whitechapel, into Beachem's shop; I told him I had it from a man named Wells, who asked me to sell it for him - I never saw the harness till I turned it out of the bag in his shop - Beachem showed me a bill, which he had in his window, and said "This is the very harness I have been looking for" - he called the street-keeper, and gave me in charge.

MARY JOHNSON . The prisoner lodged with me for ten nights he was never out late one night - he was in very early on the 18th of January - he was often home at six o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-127

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

624. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Alexander Strathern , from his person .

ALEXANDER STRATHERN . I am a baker , and live in Charles-street, New Kent-road. On the 15th of February, about a quarter to two o'clock, I was at the Old White Horse Cellar, Piccadilly - my handkerchief was safe a quarter of an hour before: I did not feel it taken, or see the prisoner till I was told my pocket was picked - I then turned round, and saw the prisoner in a gentleman's hands - he pointed to the pavement; I saw my handkerchief laying there, close to me - it has my initials on it; the gentleman is not here.

JAMES TALLY. I am nearly eleven years old; I go to church, and believe persons who tell lies will be punished in the next world. I was standing by the Old White Horse Cellar, against the lamp-post - the prosecutor was two yards from me; two boys were together - I saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take the handkerchief out - he delivered it to the other boy; I sweep a crossing close by the place - I told a gentleman what I had seen, and he informed Mr. Strathern; two men laid hold of the two boys, one got away, and dropped the handkerchief on the ground - the prisoner was detained; I am sure he is the person who took it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me near the gentleman's pocket? A. I saw you put your hand into the gentleman's pocket, and take out a handkerchief; you delivered it to the other, who dropped it.

JAMES FISHER. I am a Police-constable. I was called from the opposite side of the way; a gentleman had Smith in custody, and gave him in charge for stealing the handkerchief; he said nothing to it - I asked if any body had seen him do it, and Tally said he had - I have had the handkerchief ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been on an errand for my master to Knightsbridge; I came Piccadilly way home - there was a crowd assembled at the coach office; I was passing through, a gentleman laid hold of me, and said I had stolen his handkerchief - I said I had not seen one; he gave me in charge - the gentleman then said, "I cannot swear I saw him near my pocket, nor did I feel any thing, but I have lost my handkerchief;" he had it then in his hand - the gentleman who took me laid hold of another lad, and let him go; as we went to the watch-house the Police-man told the lad he would get more by prosecuting me than if he was sweeping the crossing - I ask the prosecutor if he did not say so.

JAMES FISHER. On my oath I did not make use of those words, or any thing to that effect.

MR. STRATHERN. I did not hear the officer say any thing of the kind to the boy.

JAMES TALLY . I heard nothing of the sort said by any body.

Prisoner. If the Magistrate was brought forward, he could prove the same; you may be assured it is true - the Magistrate asked the lad the meaning of an oath; he said he did not know - then he said, "You would not take a false oath?" "No, (said he,) unless I could get any thing by it" - the Magistrate said, "Oh then, you would, would you, if you could get any thing by it?" the lad said,"No, I would not."

JAMES TALLY . I did not say so; I believe it would have been a wicked thing if I had said so.

Prisoner. The Magistrate heard it, and said I could put forth any thing of the kind here.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-128

625. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 5 lbs. of beef, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Cromer .

SAMUEL COOK. I am fourteen years old, and am servant to Richard Cromer , a butcher , near Islington turnpike . On the 18th of February, about eight o'clock in the even

ing, I was in the shop; this beef was on a board outside -I saw the prisoner take it, and put it under his coat; I ran after him, and stopped him, without losing sight of him - he threw the beef down, hit me very hard indeed, shoved me away, and ran off, but was secured without my losing sight of him - the beef weighed 5 lbs.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. I heard a cry of Stop thief! Cook and a watchman were pursuing the prisoner; I took him - he had a bag under his arm, with 6 lbs. of potatoes, and a pound of beef steaks in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I belong to Mr. Perry's farm-house - I had leave to go to see my mother; I came by the shop, and the lad laid hold of me - I denied the charge; several people stood by; he asked them to lay hold of me, but they would not - I had no beef; he laid hold of me, and I shoved him away, but did not strike him.

GUILTY . Aged 21. Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-129

626. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of January , 1 shirt, value 10s. , the goods of William Sadler .

HANNAH SADLER . I am the wife of William Sadler. This shirt belonged to a gentleman I washed for - I employed the prisoner to take it home to Wigmore-street this day three weeks, and on the Monday following I found it had not been delivered; I had not known him long - it was worth 10s.

JOHN BALLAM . I am a shopman to Hall and Burgess, pawnbrokers, of High-street, Marylebone. I have a shirt which I took in pawn from the prisoner on Saturday, the 23rd of January, for 4s.; I knew him before - he has redeemed things his mother has pawned; I am certain of his person - Sadler claimed it on the Monday following at the office.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner delivered in a paper, expressing his contrition for the offence, and soliciting for Mercy - he received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18300218-130

627. PETER STOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , 1 clock, value 5l. , the goods of John Carter .

JOHN CARTER . I am a watchmaker , and live in Tooley-street . On the 25th of January, about noon. I gave the prisoner, who was in my service, a clock to take to Mr. Allingham, Bermondsey New-road - he returned much later than I expected; I said he had been a long time - he said he had a little business of his own, which had detained him; about a week after the person called to know why the clock was not sent - the prisoner was still in my service; I called him, and he said he had taken it to his own home - he lives in Clerkenwell; I disputed that - I called at his house next morning, and could not find it; he did not abscond - I found it in pawn.

Prisoner. The clock never was fit to go home till I repaired it at home. Witness. It had gone well for a fortnight - he was only my journeyman , and earned 15s. or 20s; a week with me, but I understood he worked for other people.

LEONARD CLARE MATTHEWS . I have a clock, which was pawned at my house on the 25th of January, for 25s. - I did not take it in; the person who did has left me - it was pawned in the name of John Burkit, No. 6, St. John's-square - I have known the prisoner some years, going by the name of Burkit - he lived at No. 6, St. John-square.

THOMAS LALLY . I am a Police-constable. I apprehended the prisoner yesterday fortnight in Old-street, and told him it was for pawning two clocks of the prosecutor's; he gave no answer.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS. I am an officer. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in - I found a parcel of duplicates on him, and one for this clock among them.

MR. MATTHEWS. This is the counterpart of the duplicate for this clock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Carter did not request me to take the clock home that day - it was not in a proper state to take to the owner till properly repaired; I took it home for that purpose - Mr. Carter was holding my wages in his hands, and only paid me yesterday; as to my earning 15s. a week, I was in his employ from August, and all I have received from him was 5l. - I received the principal part of that yesterday at the Police-office; I desired his man to ask him for a sovereign, and he would not give it to me.

JOHN CARTER. He asked me for 10s. on Saturday night, and I gave him a sovereign - I did not know what I was indebted to him; I repeatedly requested his account, and never could get it from him; whatever he asked me for, he always had.

GUILTY . Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-131

628. RICHARD PROUDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 13 live tame fowls, price 5s., and 2 geese, value 12s. , the property of Samuel Greenhill .

SAMUEL GREENHILL . I live at West-end Northall , and am a farmer . My fowls were kept in a hen-house - I saw them at four o'clock in the afternoon of the 22d of January, in the farm-yard - I did not see them locked up - on Friday morning I found the hen-house had been broken open with a pick-axe apparently; I found my fowls dead at Paddington watch-house three or four days after; there were thirteen fowls, two geese, and a gander, which were all I had lost - the prisoner is a stranger to me - a pick-axe was produced with the poultry at the office, and some shoes - I am sure the poultry is mine - I have not compared the axe with the door.

SAMUEL GREENHILL , JUN. I am fourteen years old, and am the prosecutor's son. I locked the poultry up between five and six o'clock at night - there were thirteen fowls and three geese; I found the place broken open between six and seven next morning; the prisoner is a stranger; I saw the poultry at the watch-house three days after, all dead - I used to feed them, and knew them - the pick-axe did not belong to us; the door appeared to have been broken open with it.

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I am a constable of Paddington. About seven o'clock on Friday morning I was called up by the night-patrol, who said he had discovered a quantity of fowls under the hay-stack in a meadow close to my garden; he asked if he might stand in my stable to watch who came for them, and pointed to the prisoner, who, he said, was waiting about, and had passed him two or three

times near the spot - I gave him leave, and asked him to give me a description of the prisoner - I went out to look for him, and directly I got outside my garden-gate, the prisoner stood about a hundred yards off; he made off to the back of some buildings; I lost him, and found him concealed behind a wash-house; I went and asked him what he did there; he said he came to case himself; I said that would not do, he was my prisoner - he said, "I know you, and you know me" - I said, "That don't matter, you must go with me" - he said he would not - I collared him; he got from me two or three times, and made across to some new buildings, and then back to the meadows; we had several struggles; he wrestled my staff out of my hand; at last White came up and secured him - he said, "What do you want of me?" I said, "You know better than I do" - after he was in custody I and Chapman went and fetched the fowls to the watch-house, and counted them in his presence; there were thirteen fowls and three geese; we took his shoes off, brought them to the hay-stack, and the print of the shoes in the snow, both going to and coming from the stack, corresponded with his shoes; it was very severe weather; the shoes are nailed, and correspond with the nail-holes in every respect - we took him about half-past seven o'clock - I first saw him soon after seven - there is a path across the meadow - I took him into the meadow, which he had run into; I found the impression of every nail in the snow.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the office, that I was only twenty yards from the hay-stack when you took me? A. I said a hundred yards: you were behind the washhouse, not in front - when I first saw you, you were about a hundred yards from the stack.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a watchman. On the 22nd of January the serjeant came to me, and asked if all was right - I said I had not been to the hay-stack yet; I went there and found two geese and two fowls under some loose hay - I called the serjeant, and we found the whole quantity - I did not see the prisoner till he was taken.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see two men stand talking at the watch-house, about half-past seven o'clock, as you went out? A. No; I went over the wooden bridge to Black Lion-lane, across the field to the footpath - I did not see you behind me.

Prisoner. I walked behind you all the way. Witness. Then you were watching me.

JOHN WHITE . I am the night-patrol. On Friday morning, a few minutes before seven o'clock, I saw the patrol - I went to the stack and found the poultry, a basket, and a pickaxe in the basket; some of them were in a basket, and some loose; I watched to see who would come for them, and in a quarter of an hour the prisoner passed me, while I stood by the watch-box, about forty yards from the haystack - I looked after him, saw him return, and described him to Freeman; he would have liberated him. if it had not been for me; he was scuffling with him - we took him to the watch-house, and took off his shoes - I went to the haystack, and compared them with the foot-marks; the snow had rather drifted near the stack, and we could not match them there, but as far as the snow remained in the way to the stack, I found marks of the shoes, and the prints of the nails corresponded exactly - I saw nobody else lurking about; he was detained till we found the prosecutor, who swore to the poultry.

GOULD KNIGHT. I am a Police-constable. I had the prisoner in my custody for stealing a fowl on the 1st of January, and know this pick-axe was in his possession then, for I took it from him about two o'clock in the morning; it was in my possession for a week, and then returned to his wife at the door of my house in East-street, Manchester-square; she lived in Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove with the prisoner - I am quite sure it is the same axe; it is a peculiar kind of one; I know it by letters on it, and the basket very much corresponds with one he had, but has been fresh bound since.

Prisoner's Defence. My wife sold the axe; it was not in my possession; it is not likely I should go by the witness, when I saw him turn up the road, and go right to where the property was concealed - I went right up Black Lion-lane; it was eight o'clock.

JOHN WHITE . I got him to the watch-house about eight o'clock: I saw him first about seven.

THOMAS CHAPMAN. It was seven o'clock, the watch was going off duty at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-132

629. SAMUEL LUCAS and JAMES BEADLE were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 400 lbs. of twine, value 10l. , the goods of Edward Newman .

EDWARD NEWMAN. I am a rope-maker , and live at Deptford-creek . On the 16th of December my premises were broken open, and I lost more than 4 cwt of twine, worth 10l.; I saw some of it at the Thames Police-office on the 24th of December; neither of the prisoners were in custody then - one was taken the latter end of January; they were strangers to me - I had seen one of them once before.

JOHN EDWARD GURNEY . I am waiter at the Bee Hive public-house, which is about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's premises. On the 15th of December, in the evening, I saw the prisoners at my master's house; I afterwards saw them in custody; I never saw them in possession of any twine.

SUSAN DAVISON. I keep the Bull's Head, at Rotherhithe. Hook (who has been convicted) was at my house with Lucas about a fortnight before Christmas-day, to breakfast - it could not be got ready, and they went a few doors off, and got breakfast; it was on a Monday or Tuesday - they returned, and Beadle sat in the tap-room; Lucas asked Beadle if he wanted a job - he went with them; I do not know what the job was; I saw the twine at the office about six weeks ago.

MARY HOOK . I live at Orchard-house, Blackwall. I know the prosecutor's house, on the other side of the water - I am the wife of Hook, who was tried for this offence last Session. Beadle came to my door on the 16th of December, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and asked if Master Hook lived there - I asked what he wanted - he told me he had brought his boat home, and that he was home before him; my husband kept a boat - I went out and saw it was my husband's boat, and told him he had better haul it in alongside the other boats, which he did, and came ashore - I saw twine in the boat in the course of the day; there was a large quantity - my hus

band was not at home; Lucas came to my house a short time after - he and Beadle then staid at my house, and spoke about the twine; I asked where they had left my husband - they said at Rotherhithe; they said they were glad the twine had come home safe - Lucas said so to Beadle; my husband did not deal in twine - he is a fisherman - when my husband came home they were in conversation together, and had a little money to divide among themselves; the twine was brought ashore, and put into our house; it was not removed from there before they divided the money; they went away, and returned next morning, the 17th, fetched a horse and cart, and took away the twine - they all three assisted in loading it. and my husband took it away in the cart; he has been transported for this offence; Beadle came down next day (Friday), and said Lucas had sent him to see if there was any money - I met him, and told him my husband was not at home; on the Monday he came down again, alone, to see if there was any money - he said he had come from Lucas; my husband was not at home: on Tuesday the officers searched our house - the twine had been all removed.

Q. Do you know where it had gone to? A. Yes, to Limehouse-cut - it was sunk under the water; I saw it there; after the officers were gone Lucas came down, and asked my husband, in my hearing, if it had been got rid of- my husband told him he had chucked it away, and would not have any thing more to do with it, and would not tell him where he had put it; Lucas was quite in a rage, and was very much dissatisfied; next day Beadle came, he said Lucas had sent him, and told him not to be afraid of speaking, for he would not be ranked in such a manner; my husband was taken about nine o'clock the same evening; the twine was found two or three days after - I went to Lucas, and told him my husband was taken; I found him at his lodgings at Rotherhithe - he told me not to fret, he would do his endeavours.

Lucas. I was never down at Orchard-house with Hook.

Witness. He was - what I have said of him is true; he has been taken up, and discharged since my husband was convicted.

Lucas. Since that she has said if she could transport me as well as her husband, she would do it, as well as laid in her power. Witness. Never, on my oath.

Beadle. She offered to sell some of the twine. Witness. I never did in my life.

AMELIA FITCH . I am single, and live with my father, in High-street, Poplar - he is a warehouseman. Hook came to hire a cart of my mother, and asked my mother if I might go down to Orchard-house, to tell his wife he wanted her; I went, and saw Lucas and Beadle there, at dinner - I saw no twine there: Mrs. Hook asked me to go and get a pot of beer, and when I brought it she asked me to stop dinner; I said I had dined; Lucas said I had better have some - I know nothing more; this was the same day as Hook had the cart, but before he had got it.

HANNAH JEFFREYS . I live by the Orchard-house, which is by the water-side, at Poplar, near the iron-bridge - I saw the prisoners at Hook's house on the 16th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, and about two in the afternoon I went there again, and they were sitting by the fire, with Hook, drinking porter - Hook asked me to drink, which I did - I went there again the following week, and saw Mrs. Hook and Beadle, in conversation; he said he had come from Lucas, who had told him not to be afraid to speak out, he would be rent in no such manner - Beadle said he had had no victuals for two or three days - she gave him some bread and meat, and asked if I had any money; I said, only 2d., which I lent her - she put a halfpenny to it, and told him to get a pint of beer with it as he went along - I never heard any thing about the twine from the prisoners - on Christmas-eve, when Hook was in custody, I went to the Thames-police, with Mrs. Hook, and saw a great quantity of twine - Mrs. Hook asked me to go over to Rotherhithe with her; I went to Mrs. Knight's, where Lucas lodged - he came in; Mrs. Hook told him her husband was taken - he told her to never mind, and not fret, for he would work his hands to stumps to support her and her family; he then said, "Never mind, if he don't say any thing, he will be cleared; and I will work to get him a counsel to defend him." - Mrs. Hook asked me again, to go to the office with her, at the last examination but one; I went, Lucas was then in custody, he sent one of the officers to say he wanted to speak to Mrs. Hook; she did not like to go, and I went to him, and told him Mrs. Hook could not come, and if he had a message I would deliver it to Mr. Hook; he told me to ask Mr. Hook if he had said any thing - I went to Hook, returned, and told Lucas that Hook said he had said nothing - he said, if he had not, they would get clear; and he would suffer the rope to go round his neck, rather than say any thing himself.

Lucas. I never told her any such thing. Witness. I am quite sure he did - my husband is a waterman; we live right opposite Hook.

THOMAS GRAY . I am a Thames-Police-officer. On the 23rd of December, at ten o'clock at night, I was at Bow-creek, Poplar, and took Hook on suspicion of this robbery - I took a quantity of twine that day out of Limehouse-cut, it was sunk under the water; I dragged up 2cwt. - it was afterwards claimed by Mr. Newman, and I took two coils from Lee-bridge; I found that in the house of Wicks.

WILLIAM JUDGE. I am a Thames-Police-officer. I was in company with my brother officers, and saw the twine found; here is a sample of it - I do not know whether the prisoners or Hook were acquainted with Wicks.

Mr. NEWMAN. I saw the twine at the office - this is part of it; I am sure it is the twine stolen - it was sworn to on the last trial; I know it to be my manufacture - it was kept locked up in my warehouse which was broken open.

Lucas' Defence. I know no more of it than a child unborn.

Beadle. I am innocent.

LUCAS - GUILTY . Aged 30.

BEADLE - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-133

630. LAWRENCE MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 coat, value 4l., the goods of George Blundell ; and that he had been previously convicted of felony ,

Mr. GEORGE BLUNDELL . I live in the Crescent, New

Bridge-street . On the 29th of January this coat was in the back part of my house; I desired my servant to brush it at ten o'clock that morning - it was missed on the 30th - I saw it at Bow-street on the 11th of February, and knew it to be mine; the prisoner is a stranger.

JOHN EBSWORTH . I am errand-boy to Mr. Blundell. I brushed this coat on the morning of the 29th of January, and saw it safe at half-past nine o'clock - I missed it about four in the afternoon; who took it I do not know.

ISAAC SIMMONS . I am a clothes-salesman, and live at No. 9, Monmouth-street. On the 29th of January, about half-past one o'clock, the prisoner and another man came to my shop, to sell this coat - they asked 2l. for it, and both spoke about it; the prisoner spoke broken English: I could understand him - he had got the coat on, wearing it; when he came into the shop he pulled it off, and asked 2l. for it; I asked if it was their own, as it appeared too good- I kept them in conversation, and sent privately for an officer, but the man was gone so long, they went away, leaving the coat in the shop; I went to Marlborough-street, and in the evening a neighbour, who had seen them, saw the prisoner, and gave him into custody. I am certain of his person.

JOHN DUNCAN . I am a salesman, and live next door to Simmons. On the 29th of January I saw the prisoner go into Simmons' shop, in company with another person; I saw him again about six o'clock in the evening - I followed him till I found a Police-constable, and gave him in charge.

JOHN DREW . I am an officer, and received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner, being a foreigner, had the evidence interpreted to him; and made the following

Defence. I went to the shop to buy a pair of pantaloons; another Spaniard came in with this coat on, he said he had had it given to him, and asked if the man would buy it - I said he did not understand him, and he had better speak to him by signs; I afterwards went out, leaving the man there - the Spaniard called me back, saying they would not give him the coat back - I said, "Why, that coat has been given you out of charity, and I think they should give it you;" then he said a gentleman made him a present of it - I said the man could not stop it; Simmons told me to come nearer, for he wanted to speak to me- I went, and he asked if I or the other wanted to sell the coat; I said I had nothing to do with it - I never had it on - it was the other man; I do not know where Mr. Blundell lives; I went away to tell the gentleman who had made him a present of it.

ISAAC SIMMONS . Both the men were foreigners; the prisoner wore the coat - he did not ask to buy a pair of pantaloons.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I was present on the prisoner's former trial, and have a certificate of his former conviction - (read) - he was tried by the name of Lorrenzo Parado.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-134

Third Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

631. THOMAS FLETCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 3 lbs. weight of soap value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Henry Stead .

BENJAMIN HOSEMAN. I live two or three hundred yards from Mr. Stead. On the 20th of January a person ran through my passage, and some soap was dropped, which I took up - I went to look after the person, and found the prisoner, who had got over two sheds into another garden - he was coming out of the privy.

JOHN HENRY STEAD . I live in Cumberland-row, Battle-bridge - I deal in soap . On the 20th of January I lost two cakes of soap; I found one of them in Hoseman's passage - I saw the prisoner in the passage; he was accused of stealing the soap - he directly made his escape backwards; there were two other boys with him when I pursued him - they got away; this was between twelve and one o'clock in the day - it was taken from a box standing in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-135

632. MARY ANN MALHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 pillow, value 2s., and 1 blanket, value 3s. , the goods of Zaccheus Bannister .

ZACCHEUS BANNISTER. I live in High-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner lodged at my house between three and four months - I missed a pillow and a blanket from her room; I believe these are them, but cannot swear to them - I never allowed her to pawn any thing.

DAVID TRAIL . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pillow and blanket, pawned by the prisoner on the 4th of December.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

633. MARY ANN MALHAM was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 3 books, value 3s. , the goods of John Johnson .

THOMAS SHIELDS . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have three books, which I got from the prosecutor.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a jeweller , and live in Dean-street. These books are mine - I lent them to Joseph Bannister three months ago.

JOSEPH BANNISTER. Johnson lent me these books - they were taken from my room; the prisoner lived in the next room to me, at No.29, High-street, Bloomsbury .

MARY ANN WALKER . I have known the prisoner eight months - she brought these books to me, and I bought them of her, about ten weeks or two months ago; she wanted 1s. 6d. for them, and I gave her 1s. - she said she had them to sell for a poor woman in distress.

Prisoner. You asked me to lend them to you - I never sold them. Witness. No, you sold them; I gave them up as soon as I heard they were stolen.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge pawning the blanket and pillow, but I never stole the books - the prosecutor's son wanted to swear I stole a pin, but I had not seen it.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-136

634. WILLIAM BURKET was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 adze, value 8d.; 1lb. weight of nails, value 2d., and 5 lbs. weight of iron rivets, value 10d. , the goods of the London Dock Company .

GEORGE BOWDEN . I am a Custom-house officer. On

the 5th of February I was at the London-dock gates - I saw the prisoner go out, and thought he had something in his pocket; he had been at work there some time before, but was not then; I stopped him - he made some resistance, but was secured by a man whom I called; these nails, rivets, and this adze were found on him - he at first said they were his own, and then said he picked them up in going round the dock; the adze has the mark of the Dock Company.

EBENEZER JENKINS. This property belongs to the London Dock Company; I know the prisoner - he has had a good character.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been with a friend in the London Docks - he was a mate of a ship; we drank freely together - these things laid there, and he told me to take them if I liked, but had I been in my senses, I should not have done it.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 7 Days .

Reference Number: t18300218-137

635. CHARLES BEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of John Zanotta .

JAMES ARNOLD . I am a mat-maker. I have known the prisoner five years - I bought these shoes of him on the 27th of January; they had been pawned for 1s., 6d., and I gave him 1s. 2d. for the duplicate - the prisoner was digging, wheeling, and carting .

JOHN ZANOTTA . I am a shopkeeper , and deal in shoes . I lost seven pairs at once - I have seen the prisoner near the shop; he lives down a court by me, and passes by the corner of my shop to go out - this is one of the pairs I lost; I never sold them.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor knows I work hard for my living; I went to Petticoat-lane, and saw a man with these on his arm; I asked the price of them - he said 2s.; I offered him 1s. 6d. - he would not take it; I was coming out of the fair, and he said I should have them - I returned home; my wife was dying, and I was obliged to send them to pawn for 1s. 6d. to buy doctor's stuff.

GUILTY . Aged 55. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300218-138

636. ANTHONY ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 2 deal boards, value 13s. , the goods of Thomas King and William King .

PETER KING . I am a labourer On the 26th of January I saw the prisoner in Mr. King's yard, with two deal planks on his shoulder - I told my master of it; I had known the prisoner before, but he had not worked there.

THOMAS KING . JUN. My father, Thomas King , and my brother William are in partnership - these boards were taken from a piece of waste ground we have enclosed for building on; no stranger had any right there.

The prisoner delivered in a paper, pleading poverty, and expressing his contrition for the offence.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18300218-139

37. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Robert Keate ., Esq.

2ND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Samuel Lumbers .

SAMUEL LUMBERS . I live with Mr. Robert Keate as coachman - his stable is in Market-street . On the 18th of February I came down from my own room over the stable, and went for some butter - I returned in about five minutes, and met the prisoner about fifteen yards from the stable door, with the box-coat on his shoulder; I asked where he was going with it - he said the servant sent him for it; I collared him, and took him back - it is my master's coat, but he said if I lost it I must make it good.

WILLIAM HACK . This is the coat - I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a coachman, who told me to take the coach to the stand.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-140

638. WILLIAM WARD & THOMAS CLAYTON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 pair of trousers, value 14s.6d. , the goods of Benjamin Blankley and another.

JAMES KENNERLEY . I am a music-copyer. About five o'clock in the evening of the 13th of February, I saw the two prisoners in Piccadilly - they attempted several shops; I watched them to the prosecutor's, at the corner of Francis-street - I saw Ward take the trousers, and run towards Golden-square; I pursued, but lost sight of him - I returned, and saw Clayton endeavouring to take another pair; I told the person in the shop of it, and we went to the watch-house, and gave notice - I afterwards saw the prisoners together, I told the officer, and they were taken.

Clayton. Q. How did you know us again? A. I had noticed you in Piccadilly.

ROBERT SAMPSON . I am in partnership with Benjamin Bankley. I had hung up a pair of trousers, which were lost - I have never seen them since.

Clayton's Defence. I was not near the shop.

WARD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

CLAYTON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-141

Before Mr. Recorder.

639. JOHN WISE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 50 live tame pigeons, price 2l. 10s. , the property of Daniel Jeffcoat .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

DANIEL JEFFCOAT . I am the father of John Jeffcoat, and live at Greenford . I left home on the 18th of December, and left our pigeons about I believe - I returned on the 21st, in consequence of what my son said; I looked into the dove-cot, and missed the pigeons - there was a hole forced through, quite large enough for a man to get through; after missing the pigeons I went to Mr. Calis' house, and asked if he had bought any pigeons - he said Yes; I said, "Of whom?" he said, "What is that to you?" on the 5th of February I went there, on the day the shooting was, and saw about a score of pigeons, which were shot, and were dead - while the shooting was going on I had three pigeons come home, one of which I knew;

it had a feather broken in its tail, as if it had been shot - in consequence of what I afterwards heard from Calis I had him and the prisoner taken; Calis was discharged -I had pigeons like those I saw dead in the hamper at Calis', and one I particularly knew.

COURT. Q. How many pigeons did you lose? A. About fifty - I have the live pigeons here which came home, and which I particularly speak to.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How many pigeons had you? A. About fifty; I believe I had seen them a day or two before the 18th of December - about the 16th; there was about the usual number; I returned on the 21st, and missed them the same day - I did not ask Mr. Calis to let me see them till the 5th of February; I had seen him two or three times in the time, and said to him, "Mr. Calis, you have bought a lot of pigeons?" he said, Yes -I said, "Of whom did you buy them?" he said, "What is that to you?" the three pigeons came home on the 5th of February, in a direction from Mr. Calis' - they do sometimes wander; this pigeon, whose tail is shot, came in that direction - I can swear it is mine; I never caught it till last night - I can swear this is the one; I do not know any thing particular about it - it is a common sort of pigeon.

MR. BODKIN. Q. When did you hear there was to be a shooting-match? A. On the 4th of February - I staid at home on the day of the shooting, to see if any of the pigeons came home; I heard firing in the direction of Calis,' at the time the pigeons returned - I have no doubt of this pigeon being mine; I have occasionally fed them - the one I noticed in the hamper was a very remarkable one; as soon as I saw it I said, "This is mine, and I will swear to it" six or eight persons then got up, and forced it from me - they would not let me go out of the room with it.

COURT. Q. Is the one that is alive, like one of those you had in your dove-cot? A. Yes.

THOMAS CALIS. I keep the Black Horse, but I never had a shooting match there before in my life. I bought four dozen pigeons of the prisoner at the bar, but only two dozen were shot at - I gave 6s. a dozen for them; on the 21st of December he came to me, and asked if I was going to have a shooting party - I said Yes; he said, "I can get you some pigeons cheap from the country;" I might have seen him at my house, and have drawn him beer - I was in the house before on the day of the shooting; the pigeons which were killed were put into a hamper - I had no other pigeons but those I bought of the prisoner; two dozen of them had got out, or had died; Jeffcoat saw the hamper in which the dead pigeons were, and they were part of what I bought of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You said two dozens of them died? A. Yes, or got away; I should think a dozen got away - Mr. Jeffcoat had been at my house, he drank tea, and supped; had he asked to see the pigeons I should have said, "There is the key, you may go and look at them."

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did not he ask if you had bought any pigeons? A. I do not know that he did; he might say so, and I might say "What is that to you?"

JOHN JEFFCOAT . I am thirteen years of age - I know the nature of an oath; it is a sin to swear falsely. I remember my father going out in December last - he had fifty pigeons - I used to feed them sometimes; about two days after my father was gone, I saw the dove-cot; it had a hole poked through the tiles, and the pigeons were all gone - I had seen them safe two or three days before - they were not fed every day; I believe this one to be my father's.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How many of this description had your father? A. No more like this; they had more white about them - there was one of them very particular.

JAMES HITCHCOCK. I live just by the prosecutor. On the 5th of February I was in his yard; I heard firing in the direction of Mr. Calis' - I saw two pigeons come in a direction from there; they alighted on the dove-cot, and went in at the holes - there was a brown one feeding there, which he said had come home before.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. If you had heard nothing of the prosecutor losing pigeons, should you have thought it unusual for pigeons to come there? A. Yes, unless they had been born and bred there; I have kept pigeons, but do not now.

WILLIAM WEBSTER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Witnesses for the Defence.

JOHN JONES. I am a sawyer, and live at Harrow, about two miles from Greenford. I have known the prisoner three years, and never knew him act dishonestly.

COURT. Q. What is he? A. He did labouring work - I saw him dealing with a man for pigeons on the Saturday before Christmas-day - I saw him give the man a sovereign and 10s.; he said, "That makes 30s." -I said,"Well, I wish you good luck," and went about the distance of this Court; he called Stop! that was the only time I ever saw him deal in pigeons - I am sure I saw him give a sovereign into the man's hand, and some silver - I did not ask who the man was; I did not go above one hundred and fifty yards with the prisoner before we parted; I did not ask how he came to buy pigeons or what he meant to do with them - I thought it was not my business; I walked on with my tools at my back; he asked where I had been working - I said I had been sawing; I then turned off to the right, and he went straight on - I never heard from him what he did with them.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-142

640. JOHN THOMAS and EDWIN VINCENT were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 live pig, price 15s. , the property of Henry Brumbridge .

THOMAS pleaded GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE BOWLEY . I am a labourer, and live near New Brentford. On Tuesday, the 16th of February, I was at the door of the Magpie and Stump, at New Brentford-Vincent came and asked me if I wanted to buy a bargain; I asked what it was - he said he did not rightly know, but he thought it was a swine - I asked where it was; he said a man belonged to it up the market; I asked if I could see the man - he said he did not think I could then, but

at nine o'clock in the evening, if I would meet him there, he would take me to the man - I went at that time, and Vincent came and said the man was over at the market place - I went with him to the Butts public-house, close behind the market, and saw Thomas whom I knew before; I asked Thomas what he had in the sack - he said a pig; I asked what he wanted for it - he said 12s. - I said,"Let me put my hand into the sack, and feel if it is a pig;" he said, "Weight it first, and then you may put your hand and feel;" I did so, and then I said, "Now tell me the truth where you got this pig;" he said, "The whole truth of it is, I got it from a farm close against Feltham church-yard;" I did not know the farm at that time, but I have been there since - I said to him, "Bring the pig along then down to my house," and they both brought it; I locked them both in my room and bolted the door, but as there was only my wife in the house, I did not like to leave them there, so I said "I have not the money in the house, but if you will leave the pig, and go and get a pot of beer, I will come and pay you for it; but mind, I shall only give you 10s. for it;" they went - I told my wife to lock and bolt the door, and keep the pig inside; I went, and got the officer - we went, and took the prisoners at the public-house; the next morning I went to Feltham, and at last found Mr. Brumbridge - he came, and owned the pig.

COURT. Q. When you were bargaining about the pig, did Vincent say any thing? A. No; he only stood by.

GEORGE BARTHOLOMEW BRUMBRIDGE . I am the son of Henry Brumbridge - he has a farm adjoining the church-yard, at Feltham ; he keeps pigs. On the 15th of February we had about forty of them of different sorts - there were eight, which were very rough; in consequence of what the witness said, I looked, and missed one of the eight rough ones - I went to Brentford, saw it there, and knew it to be my father's.

JOHN BURNHAM . I know the pig to be one of the eight rough ones belonging to Mr. Brumbridge, my master.

Vincent's Defence. All I have to say is I saw Thomas with the pig in the market - he asked me if I knew any one who wanted to buy a pig; I said I did not; but I went, saw Bowley, and asked if he knew any one who wanted to buy a bargain - he said what was it; I said I did not exactly know, but I would bring the man at nine o'clock - I brought Thomas, then went and told Bowley, the man was come with the pig - we went to the Butts; Bowley said, "Let me put my hand into the sack, and feel the pig;" he then said, "Bring it to my house;" we took it there, and turned it out - he then said, "Go, and get a pot of beer, and I will give you 10s. for it;" we went, had one pot, and called for another, when we were taken.

VINCENT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-143

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder

641. JOHN DAVIDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 1 ham, value 7s. , the goods of John Edwards .

JOSEPH DAY . I live in Leadenhall-street , and am in the employ of John Edwards , a ham and tongue dealer . On the 22nd of January, about eight o'clock in the evening, the ward beadle came to know if we had lost a ham; I went to the watch-house, and saw one which I knew was my master's, and had been in our shop in the afternoon - our window was shut, and this ham was on the counter inside; there are folding doors to open to get in - the ham is worth about 9s.; I had not seen the prisoner near the shop.

WILLIAM PLAISTOWE . I am ward beadle of Aldgate. I was at the watch-house door, on the same side as the prosecutor's shop - I saw the prisoner on the other side of the way, walking fast, with a ham in his hand; it was about a quarter before eight o'clock - an officer said,"That looks like one of the party, who has been in the street;" we went to him, and asked where he got it - he threw it down, ran into the road, and was taken directly; the witness went to the watch-house, and claimed it.

WALTER PLAISTOWE, JUN. I took the ham up in the road - I saw the prisoner throw it down.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down the street; two young men came behind me, and threw the ham down in the street - the two officers came up, and one said I was not the man; the other said I was.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-144

642. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 38 1/2 yards of woollen cloth, value 27l. , the goods of William Westall and others.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WESTALL . I am a member of the firm of Spence, Bagley and Westall - we are warehousemen , and live in King-street, Cheapside. On the 24th of November we received, by post, this letter (See No.1.) - in consequence of which, we sent thirty-eight yards and a half of woollen cloth by our porter to the Kent and Essex tavern, in Whitechapel - it was directed for Jesup and Son, Halstead, who appeared to be the writers of the letter; we had not known them before, but we ascertained, from inquiry, that they were respectable people - the value of the cloth was 27l. 2s. 1d.; we have not seen it since.

WILLIAM BLUNDEN. I am porter to the prosecutors, On the 24th of November I took some goods from their house to the Kent and Essex tavern, Whitechapel - they were directed, "Jesup and Son, Halstead;" I delivered them to Mr. Denton.

BENJAMIN DENTON . I am book-keeper at the Kent and Essex tavern. I saw the prisoner three times before I received the goods; one time was about a week before I received them - he gave himself the name of Smith, of Halstead, and said he had taken a house at Bockingchurch-street, and had set up a new van to go from and to London; that Mr. Jesup, and Mr. Brockway had promised him the charge of their goods, and he should have a great deal of goods to come to our yard, if I would take them in for him and book them - I saw him shortly before these goods came; he said he expected some goods for Mr. Jesup and Mr. Brockway in a few days, and no doubt there would be plenty sent to go by him; on the 24th of November I received the goods from Blunden, for Mr. Jesup, of Halstead, to go by Smith.

COURT. Q. Had you seen any van of his before? A. No; he said it was not finished.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you receive any more goods? A. Two parcels for Mr. Jesup, and one for Mr Brockway - that was all. On the 27th of November I received this letter from Garret Scollard (See No. 2) - in consequence of which I delivered the goods to Scollard, and sent my nephew and my porter to see that they were delivered to the prisoner, as I did not know Scollard.

GARRET SCOLLARD . I was a porter in November last. The prisoner came to me and asked if I wanted a job; he gave me this note to go and get two parcels from the Kent and Essex yard - I was to take them to the Royal Oak, in Whitechapel-road, on the right-hand side, below the church; the Kent and Essex tavern is opposite Red Lion-street - I delivered the note to the clerk; he would not trust me, as he did not know me, and he sent a boy and a porter with me and the goods - we went to the Royal Oak, and found the prisoner outside the door; he said his van had not come - we delivered him the goods; he gave me 1s., and said it was all right.

THOMAS WILKINSON . I am nephew of the book-keeper at the Kent and Essex tavern. Scollard took one parcel, and I the other, to the Royal Oak; we saw the prisoner, who said his van would be up next week, and he hoped for a load - he should have a hogshead of sugar for one thing; I am sure he is the man to whom the parcels were delivered - he gave the porter 1s.

ABRAHAM COE . I am porter to the book-keeper at the Kent and Essex tavern. I took one parcel to the Royal Oak, and Scollard took the other; I delivered my parcel to the prisoner - he said he was waiting for his friend, who was to take them.

JAMES JESUP . I am a member of the Society of Friends. I live with my father, Samuel Jesup, at Halstead; I was not acquainted with the firm of Spence, Bagley and Westall - this letter is not my writing, or my father's; I know nothing of the transaction at all - the first I heard of it was about the middle of last month, when we received a letter from Spence and Co. enclosing a bill for acceptance; I could not recognize the prisoner, but I have discovered since he has been in custody, that he is a person I once knew, as living at Bocking - there is a carrier named Smith, but the prisoner is not the man; he never had authority from us to receive any goods. (letters read.)

[No. 1] Halstead, 23rd November, 1829.

RESPECTED FRIENDS, - Please forward per Smith, form the Kent and Essex tavern, Whitechapel, to-morrow by four o'clock without fail, as under, and you will oblige your friends.

Here followed an order for the goods.] S.JESUP and SONS.

To Messrs. Spence, Bagley and Westall.

[No. 2.] 27th November, 1829.

SIR, - My van will not be up this week, but next Tuesday I intend coming into your yard, so I shall feel thankful for any thing you can book for me; Mr. Jesup, of Halstead, has promised me some this week - if there is any for him or Mr. Brockway, let the man have them, as a friend of mine is going to carry them for me this week, and his man will not be able to call for them. Yours, &c., J. SMITH.

Addressed to the book-keeper, at the Kent and Essex tavern.

Prisoner's Defence. I was only committed last Wednesday, and had not time to get friends.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-145

643. WILLIAM THOMAS was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 40 yards of brown Holland, value 2l.; 60 yards of lrish linen, value 6s., and 30 yards of linen cloth, value 3l. , the goods of Thomas Darke Allin and Thomas Shepperson .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS SHEPPERSON . I am one of the firm of Thomas Darke Allin and Thomas Shepperson - we are warehousemen . On the 24th of November we received this letter, and in consequence of the contents of it we sent the goods stated in it by Rooke, to the Kent and Essex tavern, Whitechapel , for Samuel Jesup and Son; the letter came by post, and purports to come from them - we had known them before for some years.

WILLIAM ROOKE . I am a porter, in the employ of Messrs. Allin and Shepperson. On the 24th of November I took a parcel to the Kent and Essex tavern - I left it at the bar for Jesup and Son; Mr. Denton was present.

BENJAMIN DENTON . The prisoner came to me on the subject of receiving goods - he said he expected some for Jesup and Brockway, and desired me to take care of them - he said he was the son of a carrier at Halstead, and he was going to set up a van - that his name was Smith; he said he had taken a house at Bocking-church-street - on the 27th of November I received this letter from Scollard; I had before that received a parcel from Rooke, directed for Jesup and Son - I delivered these goods and the other parcel.

THOMAS WILKINSON . I remember Scollard coming and having two parcels for Mr. Jesup; I went with him and the porter to the Royal Oak, and saw the prisoner at the door; both the parcels were delivered to him, and he gave Scollard 1s., I believe.

ABRAHAM COE . I went with this witness and Scollard, and saw the goods delivered to the prisoner, which were received from Mr. Denton.

GARRETT SCOLLARD . I saw the prisoner in November last, and received this letter from him, to go to the Kent and Essex tavern, and get two parcels, which I was to take to the Royal Oak - I delivered it to Mr. Denton; he sent two persons with me and the parcels, which I delivered to the prisoner - he gave me 1s., and said it was all right.

The letter being read was to the same purport as that produced on the former case.

JAMES JESUP . I am a member of the firm of Jesup and Son, at Halstead. We never gave this order, nor is this my writing or my father's - we never authorized the prisoner to receive any goods for us.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years, to commence from the expiration of his former sentence .

Reference Number: t18300218-146

644. MARY STEIN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 2 half-sovereigns, 4 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the monies of Joel Coleman Joel , from his person .

JOEL COLEMAN JOEL . I live in Long-alley, Finsbury. On the 17th of February, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was going home perfectly sober; I saw the prisoner in Bartholomew-lane - I passed her about twenty yards, when I heard some person running after me; I turned, and it was the prisoner - she asked me to treat her, and walk with her - she addressed me in very obscene lan

guage; I said I was going home, and would have nothing to do with her - she followed me till we came to Crown-court, Broad-street ; she solicited me to go up there - I had at that time 14l. 13s. 6d. in my right-hand pocket, and six half-crowns in my left-hand pocket; I am quite sure I had more than two sovereigns in my pocket, and two half-sovereigns - I refused to go up the court, and at once repulsed her; she clung round me, and I said, "I will thank you to leave me - I will have nothing to say or do with you;" she then left me - I did not perceive any thing go from me, but as soon as she left me I found my trousers-pocket was unbuttoned; I went to the opposite lamp, and found I was minus some money - I am quite sure two sovereigns were gone, which had been loose in my pocket; I saw her walking away fast - I went and took hold of her hand: I said I had been robbed - she fell on her knees, and asked for mercy; I called the watchman, who took her to the watch-house - she wished to sit down, but he said, "You must stand and hear the charge;" she stood, and a sovereign fell - she said, "That did not fall from me;" she had a sixpence in her left-hand, and it must have been with her left hand that she took my money; a purse was found in her bosom, containing some money, which she begged to have back; she begged for mercy at first, but as soon as the charge was booked she seemed careless - I accused her of robbing me of 3l. 6s., but when I returned home I reflected on what I might have spent, and can solenmly charge her with stealing 3l. 5s.

Prisoner. Q. Upon your oath did you not say you lost four sovereigns? A. Certainly not; there was no gold found on you.

JOHN PRICE . I am a constable of Broad-street ward. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in; the witness charged her with taking his money from his pocket - I began to search her, and a sovereign fell, I suppose from her person; I removed her, and found a sovereign under her feet, which I believe must have fallen from her - I found a purse, with some halfpence and silver in her bosom, and 6d. in her hand; she said she had not robbed the man - I did not hear her ask for pardon.

JOHN THOMAS NASH . I am a watchman. I received the prisoner in charge from the prosecutor in Broad-street - she said she had not robbed him, and she hoped he would not send her to the watch-house: she went on her knees, and begged for mercy - I took her to the watch-house; she produced 6d., and said that was all she had - I did not quit her hand till I placed her before the table in the watch-house; she tried to get to the fire-place, and at last I heard a sovereign drop - there were three or four men on a bench, but they declared it did not fall from them, and I believe it could not - she was a yard or two from them; the prosecutor was quite sober.

Prisoner. There were a great many men there - the prosecutor walked up from the fire with the gold and silver in his hand.

MR. JOEL. I did not take the money out to count before the sovereign dropped; I then took it out to see what I had lost.

JURY. Q. How long before you counted your money under the lamp had you ascertained what money you had about you? A. I knew I had 14l. or 15l. about me before I met her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-147

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

645. BENJAMIN NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 tea-pot stand, value 1l.; 1 soup-ladle, value 2l.; 1 punch-ladle, value 5s.; 3 other ladles, value 35s.; 1 skewer, value 1l.; 34 spoons, value 16l. 10s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 1 cream-ewer, value 5s.; 1 bottle-lable, value 1s.; 1 muffineer, value 2s.; 2 sovereigns, and two 5l. Bank notes, the property of Jephthah Huntley and another .

JEPTHAH HUNTLEY. I am a hatter , in partnership with my brother, in Sweeting's-alley, Royal-Exchange . I lost the plate, cash, and notes mentioned in the indictment, on the 24th of January, out of an iron safe; I have a list of them - they were in a wooden box in the safe or book-case, which was locked; I had it safe on Saturday, the 23rd, and missed them on Sunday, between six and seven o'clock- I saw the plate at the Mansion-house, but not the notes or money; I have a glass belonging to the silver creamewer.

WILLIAM STEPHEN HUNTLEY . I am brother of the last witness, and can confirm his evidence, as to the things being in the book-case - we each had a key; the lock had been forced open.

EDWARD ELLICOTT . I live next door to Messrs. Huntley; they broke into my premises, and so got to theirs.

GEORGE WILLIAM MORGAN . About three o'clock on Sunday, the 24th of January, I was in Sweeting's-alley, and saw the prosecutors' shop door open - I went to ring a bell, and heard a step; I turned, and saw the prisoner - I ran and seized him; he unbuttoned his coat, and this bundle, containing the articles, fell down - I took them up; I knew him before - I found this skeleton-key on him, and these other things on the premises.

JAMES MORGAN . I was in the kitchen of a coffee-house, and heard a cry; I went out, and assisted in taking the prisoner; I saw the officer and the prisoner struggling together, and this bundle of plate on the ground.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through Sweeting's-alley, and the officer accosted me by name; I turned - he seized me, and said, "You shall not escape if the rest have;" this bundle was laying at his feet; I did resist, knowing I was innocent.

GEORGE WILLIAM MORGAN . He opened his coat himself, and the parcel fell down.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

646. BENJAMIN NICHOLLS was again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the shop of Edward Ellicott , on the 14th of January , and stealing 4 spoons, value 24s.; 3 seals, value 30s., and 6 watch-movements, value 30l., the goods of Edward Ellicott ; 2 seals, value 30s., and 2 watch-chains, value 10s. , the goods of James Fleet .

EDWARD ELLICOTT . My shop is at No. 17, Sweeting's-alley - it was all safe on Saturday evening, the 23rd of January, at eight o'clock; on Sunday, between five and six a message was sent to me - I came, and found a hole had been made in No. 18, the contrary side to Messrs. Huntley, and all the drawers and cupboards had been broken open- I went to the Mansion-house, and saw some watch-movements, spoons, and gold seals, which I knew had been safe on Saturday evening; I had had the gold seals in my

hand - there were several watch-movements which had come from the workmen, and were not put into cases, but were in drawers on the counter; they all appeared to have been swept into a handkerchief, without any degree of care- I can swear these are my property; they had broken into a room up stairs, come down into the shop, and then went into the cellar; the shop had not been broken, but the room up stairs is a workshop, and persons work there; clocks are cleaned there in general; I can swear the whole was safe on Saturday evening.

JEPHTHAH HUNTLEY . I only know that I saw the hole through which it is supposed they entered.

GEORGE WILLIAM MORGAN . I took the prisoner in Sweeting's-alley, and these spoons and watch-movements fell from him - the seals were in his waistcoat pocket.

JAMES MORGAN . I assisted in taking the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-148

647 GEORGE WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 18 pairs of gloves, value 2l., the goods of Winwood Thodey ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

WINWOOD THODEY. I am a glover , and live in the Poultry . On the 8th of February the prisoner took eighteen pairs of gloves from my counter, and walked out rather rapidly; I went after him, and overtook him a few feet from my shop window - I asked what he meant by it, and he said nothing particular.(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner. I did it through distress.

WILLIAM SMITH . I produce a certificate of the former conviction of the prisoner - I was present at the trial, and know he is the man; he was imprisoned fourteen days in Newgate.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300218-149

648. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 watch, value 10l.; 1 watch-chain, value 4l.; 1 seal, value 2l.; and 1 watch-key, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Webb , from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

THOMAS WEBB. On the 8th of February I was coming off the steps of the London tavern , and four or five persons rushed against me; I lost my watch in an instant; a person on my right saw the act, and seized the prisoner - I secured him with a good deal of difficulty; he made considerable resistance; he threw down the watch in the street, and it was taken up, but I did not see that.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Did you see your watch go? A. No; it was about ten o'clock at night; there was a good light - I had been at a dinner; we sat down about four o'clock - I was sober - it was the licensed victualler's dinner - there were a great many persons; there were four or five turning off the steps, and the moment I turned, these persons rushed round me, and the watch was taken; I know I had it; as I came along I had my hand on the seals - when the rush was made I recoiled, supposing I was the intruder - the prisoner was secured struggling across the street, and I was then sensible the watch was gone; I followed and secured him; the watch was taken up and lodged in the hands of Mr. Bleadon.

STEPHEN PEARSON . I was coming out of the London tavern with the witness - we turned to go to Cornhill; there was a tremendous rush, and the prisoner seized the watch, and took it out; I saw him do it, and seized him; he struggled across the road, but I still held him, and never left him till we got to the Mansion-house.

Cross-examined. Q. You say there was a rush, and you seized the prisoner? A. Yes; he darted between the carriages; I was upon him all the time, and seized him in a moment; I swear he is the person.

ROBERT CEELEY . I was coming out of the tavern at ten o'clock in the evening, and was talking to my friend; I saw the prisoner come up to him, and saw his hand, but did not see any thing in it; he ran - I ran, and seized him by the handkerchief; he got his hand up, and said I should throttle him; but I got hold of his handkerchief and his thumb, and he could not get from me - he danced about like an eel, and was most resolute; I am quite positive he is the person - he never escaped.

THOMAS WHITE . I was on duty; Mr. Bleadon sent for me, and gave me this watch.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring that he was mercly passing, and had not touched the prosecutor.

JOHN YARRON . I have a certificate of the former conviction of the prisoner; I was then an officer, and attended his trial and conviction.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Had you seen him before that time? A. Yes, repeatedly.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18300218-150

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

649. JOHN BAILEY , WILLIAM SMITH , and JOHN LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Jones , from his person .

THOMAS JONES . On the 15th of February I lost a handkerchief from my coat pocket, about five o'clock - I do not know the street I was in; the officer told me, and I missed it; it was in the officer's hand; I cannot say exactly when I had had it; I saw the prisoners at the time, but I had not seen them before.

CHARLES HERD FIELD. I was in Abchurch-yard , and saw the three prisoners following the prosecutor; I had watched them from the Poultry - Lawrence and Smith were close behind the prosecutor, and Bailey behind them - I saw the handkerchief pass between Lawrence and Smith, and Bailey took it, and put it into his coat; he turned round into my arms, and I took him - here is the handkerchief, it is marked with the prosecutor's initials - my brother took the other two.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD. I had followed the prisoners with my brother from the Poultry; I did not see the handkerchief taken.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Bailey's Defence. I was going to see my brother, and met these two lads, who asked the way to Cannon-street; I said I would show them; as we were going through the church-yard I parted with them, and picked up this handkerchief.

Smith's Defence. I was going to East Smithfield with some work, and was taken by the side of this gentleman.

BAILEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

LAWRENCE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-151

650. SAMUEL GREENFIELD and EDWARD SAMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Taylor , from his person .

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I was in Eastcheap on the 29th of January - I used my handkerchief, put it into my pocket again, and soon after missed it - a lad told me that the prisoner Greenfield had taken it - I ran and took him; he said he had not got it: the lad then said the other must have it; I then ran and took Sampson, and brought him to a house; he denied having it for a long time, but when the officer was coming, he took it from his own pocket, and gave it me; it is my handkerchief.

GEORGE PALMER , I was in Eastcheap, and saw Greenfield take the handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket; Sampson was by his side at the time - they then went up a gateway together - the gentleman turned round, and said he had taken his handkerchief; I told him of it; it was all done in a very short time; he went and took Greenfield; he had not the handkerchief - Sampson was walking away; I said he must have it; the gentleman took him, and a man took Greenfield - they denied knowing one another for a great while - Sampson at last took the handkerchief from his pocket.

THOMAS KILBY . I am the officer. I came up and received the handkerchief from the prosecutor; I did not see it given to him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GREENFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor. - Confined Six Months .

SAMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-152

651. CATHERINE BAINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of January , 2 pairs of stockings, value 6s. , the goods of Mary Blundell .

MARY BLUNDELL . I am single . I lost two pairs of stockings between the 18th and 22nd of January; they had been in my possession on the 18th, and the prisoner left my father's service on the 22nd - I have seen them at Guildhall, they had the letter B. which the laundress had put on them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The laundress put it in? A. Yes - I had bought them on the 5th of January; the prisoner had been two or three months in my father's employ: she had given notice to quit; she had not left her address with me - I had paid her her wages - we had a character with her; the initial of her name is the same as mine; I have two sisters.

COURT. Q. Had you an opportunity of searching her box? A. Yes.

GEORGE BLUNDELL. The prisoner was in my service from the beginning of November till the 22nd of February - I received information that she was gone to live in Fetter-lane, and I went there with an officer; I found two pairs of cotton stockings in her box, which was enclosed in a trunk - she gave up the key of it; I had a pair of stockings with me, and those I found corresponded with them; she said they were her own, but did not say where she got them; she said at Guildhall that she bought them and marked them, and her name being Baines, she had marked them with the letter B. - here are the stockings, and this is the pair I took with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean there were no other things in the trunk marked with B.? A. There were other things marked, but not in the same way; this is done by a laundress - I did not see her do it; it is just run with a needle and cotton, and the other articles were marked in the way a sampler is - these are marked with red; I do not know what colour her other things were marked with; there might be stockings marked with B. for what I know - I saw a great many stockings marked with B.

COURT. Q. You said you found these stockings marked with a B. - that she said she always marked with a B., and you say they were not marked in the same way? A. They are marked in a more temporary way.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there a B. on the prisoner's stockings? A. There might be; no doubt there was, but I did not take particular notice; there was a difference between these and hers.

Q. How do you know there was a difference, if you paid no attention? A. They might be marked with a B. but I did not take particular notice; all that I looked at were marked B. - I cannot swear they were not marked with red; they were of a different texture - the prisoner had given notice to quit - I had not quarrelled with her.

Q. Did you make a charge against her, and she said she would not stay in the house? A. No. My cook afterwards gave me warning to quit; I did not ask the prisoner to take the cook's place; the cook's name was Simmonds - I had no quarrel with her, I do not know whether my wife had - I have not been speaking to any of the witnesses who are to give the prisoner a character, to my knowledge; I have not, to my recollection - two or three persons have come to me to request me to be as lenient as possible - I have spoken to a man named Hilditch; I have not endeavoured to prevent his coming forward - I told him she had been guilty of a theft, because Mrs. Hilditch had recommended her into my family; - it was a fortnight after she left before I went to search her trunk, but I did not know of it before.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Blundell to the prisoner's room, in Fetter-lane - she presented the keys of her box; I said, "You had better open it yourself;" and she did - we found two pairs of stockings in the box; Mr. Blundell looked at them, and mentioned the slight way in which they were marked; there is only one pair marked - he made an observation on the marks of the others in the trunk; on the size of the letter - the other stockings were marked with a small B. - I considered some of them were marked with red, and some with ink.

Cross-examined. Q. She gave up her keys the moment you asked her? A. Yes - it would not take half a minute to take out this mark.

ANN VALENTINE . My mother is the laundress, and I have the care of the linen; Miss Blundell wore these stockings, and sent them without a mark; I marked three pairs, and sent them home with the mark on them -

this is a mark I put in for Miss Blundell - these other pairs have had the mark, but it has been drawn out.

Cross-examined. Q. How long would it take to remove this mark? A. I cannot say, certainly it could be removed.

EDWARD DUNSBY. I am a hosier. I sold some stockings of this sort to Miss Blundell.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-153

652. FREDERICK THOMAS ALLEN . SAMUEL RELF , RICHARD ROGERS , MOSES MAGNUS , SAMUEL FLEMARE , and CHARLOTTE LEWIS , were indicted for stealing, on the 23th of January , 1 canvas bag, value 1d.; 1 leather case. value 2d.; 20 pieces of paper, value 1d.; 24 shillings, 1 sixpence, two 20l., and two 10l. Bank-notes; one 10l., and two 5l. promissory-notes, the property of William Edwards , from his person .

WILLIAM EDWARDS. I am a patten-maker , and live at Winchester. I was in London on the 25th of January; I left the Bell and Crown, about eight o'clock in the evening, to go to Union-street, Bishopsgate; I called in Rose-alley, to see a friend, who was not in the way - I told the woman I would go over to the public-house, and wait for him; I went to the sign of the Rose , and asked the landlord if he knew the person I wanted; he said he believed he did - it was then a quarter before nine o'clock; I had a pint of beer, and then asked for a Welsh-rarebit - I had been at business all day, and was not to say very sober; being very tired I went to sleep - the landlord awoke me, and said, "Come, you must get up. we are going to shut up;" I got up, and in going out of the door, I said."My money is gone - I have lost my money and purse" - the landlord said, "You have not been robbed here" - I said Yes, I had; I had 24s. 6d. in my purse, and 1 1/2d in my waist coat-pocket; I had lost my pocket-book, which contained three 10l. and four 5l. notes, which I had put in at the Bell and Crown. and several papers and letters - I saw the book the next day: the officer showed it me, but not the notes - there were fourteen or sixteen people there - I cannot swear the prisoners were there.

THOMAS PETCH . I am superintendent of the watch in Bishopsgate. About two o'clock on Tuesday morning, the 26th of January, the prosecutor said he had been robbed of a pocket-book, containing 50l. in Winchester and Bank of England notes; and his purse, and that he had been at that public house; I told him to come to me at eight o'clock in the morning, and I would accompany him to the house to ascertain who had been there - as he did not come at eight o'clock I went by myself to the house - I asked the landlord who had been there, and he could not give me any account - he said he had no doubt he should know the persons if they were brought before him; I went with my brother officer to Rose-lane, Spitalfields, and went into a room on the ground floor, in a house near the top - I found Allen, Relf, Magnus, and Flemare and Lewis who was in bed with another woman; I told Allen I wanted to speak to him - he came out and asked what I wanted; I asked if he had been at the Rose - he said he had been at a public-house; I said I supposed he knew what I wanted him for - he said, "What, for the man that was robbed last night;" I said Yes - he asked if I was an officer, and desired to see my authority; I showed it him, and then told my brother officer to go in and search the room - he called me in; there was nothing but a bed in the room - he placed his back against the door; I searched and found this pocket-book in the bed - it contains every thing but the money - I asked how they came by it, and they all said they knew nothing about it: I took Allen and Relf into custody, because I heard they had been at the place over night - I took them to the Bell and Crown, where the prosecutor was, and he owned the pocket-book; I then went back to the house to get Magnus and Flemare, but they were gone - I brought up Lewis, and two other women, whom I found there, and before the Magistrate, Lewis said she rented the room; we then took them to Worship-street- I went to the Rose, and took Rogers; Lewis said Allen had given her the pocket-book.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. And you found Allen in the room with her? A. Yes.

Allen. he came and said he wanted me, and said,"Were you at the Rose?" I said I was - he said, "There was a robbery committed there;" I said, "I am innocent"- I had no objection to go with him. Witness. He mentioned the robbery first, I am quite sure.

ROBERT DICK. I went to the house, and we found all the prisoners there but Rogers - I heard my brother officer tell Allen he wanted him; Allen said, "What, for the robbery at the Rose?" - he said Yes; I said,

"I have known you from a boy, if you act well I will not ill-use you" - I had agreed to meet Relf in Bishopsgate-street; I went there, saw him meet the pot-boy, and speak to him, and as soon as he saw me he set off - I could not follow him, but I met my brother officer, went to Rose-lane, and took them there; I afterwards went to the Rose, and saw Rogers- I called him out, and asked if he knew any thing about a purse - he said Yes, it was a skin purse that Allen gave it to him, and they burnt it.

COURT. Q. Were you in the room at Rose-lane before the officer was? A. We went together - I knocked; the door was not opened, and I pushed it open - I went in; the room was very dark, but I looked round, and saw Allen.

Allen. Q. You say you was with the other officer when he asked me if I knew any thing about the robbery? A. No; he said, "I want you; I suppose you know what for?" and you said, "What, for the robbery at the Rose?"

Allen. When the knock was at the door it was opened - Relf was brushing his shoes; he had not been there five minutes - he asked him where Allen was; he said, "There, by the fire;" I said, "Do you want me?" when they got me outside they said there was a robbery last night, and they wanted me - I said I had no objection to go with him. Witness. I am quite sure he first mentioned the robbery.

Relf. Q. Did not I tell you, if you thought there was any thing, to go in and search? A. Yes, you did.

WILLIAM TURNER. I am landlord of the Rose. I believe all the prisoners were there that night, in company with twenty more, except Lewis; they were there the greater part of the evening, but I did not know any of them by name - I saw the prosecutor come in tipsy, about half-past nine o'clock; I had only been in the house six days - the prosecutor sat at the end of the tap-room; I saw no one near him - he went to sleep after taking a pint of beer.

Allen. Q. Was he not tipsy? A. Yes, very tipsy - he

could hardly get the money to pay for the beer; I stood I suppose, ten minutes before he gave me the shilling, and I gave him the change - they all went out together; they all knew of the robbery before they went - the prosecutor first said he had lost 14s., and then 25s.; he then clapped his hand to his side pocket, and said he had lost his pocketbook and all his property; it was then ten minutes before eleven o'clock - I said, "Upon my word I think you have not lost any thing, as you give such different accounts, but you can go to an officer, and come to me in the morning."

Allen. Q. Did not I go away at a quarter before ten o'clock? A. I do not know.

Magnus. Q. Did you not get me to assist in moving your goods up and down? A. Yes, for two or three days.

COURT. Q. Then he did not come in with the others? A. I do not know that he did, but he was there - I thought he seemed to be industrious, and I asked him to assist me - I let him have 5s. to start him in business to sell oranges, lemons, and clothes.

JOHN GARDNER. I am pot-boy at the Rose. I saw the prosecutor there asleep - Allen was by him at one time, and Rogers was near him at the same time; I do not know that they sat there all the time - I was in and out of the room; I saw them once or twice - they might be near him five or ten minutes; Flemare was sitting opposite him, singing all the evening - the others were a good way off; Relf was near the door - I saw Flemare go out once, that was all; Magnus was just by Flemare -Lewis was there in the evening while the prosecutor was asleep - I suppose she was two or three yards from him, and not at the same table; I heard him say he had been robbed of 14s., and then of 25s. - he then put his hand to his side pocket, and said he had lost his pocket-book.

Allen. Q. Did you see me touch, or take any notice of him? A. No, you were sitting by him - I did not see any of them touch him.

Relf. Q. Did you see me near him? A. No, you sat at the further end of the room,

Magnus. Q. Was not I there with a few oranges? A. Yes.

JURY. Q. Did you see one of them the next morning? A. Yes, I saw Relf, as I was going for some sugar, and he asked what time the soup would be ready - I told him at twelve o'clock - I left him and two or three more talking.

Flemare. Q. Was I sitting near the prosecutor? A. No, you were sitting opposite, and went out about two minutes before the rest; Allenwent out at a quarter-past ten o'clock, and came back just as all the rest were gone - he said he had been to get some money to have something more to drink.

JAMES SHUTTLEWORTH. I am a bricklayer. I went to the Rose about eight o'clock, and sat there till half-past nine; I saw the prosecutor come in, and have some beer, and bread and cheese - I went out, and came back five minutes after ten; I saw Allen sitting by the side of the prosecutor, and Rogers near him, but a girl sat between him and the prosecutor - Lewis was there when I went about eight o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see Lewis do any thing with the prosecutor? A. No, nor near him - there was another female with her.

GEORGE HALL . I am an inspector of the watch. On the night of the 7th of February I took Flemare from information - I put my hand on his shoulder, and said, "I want you;" he said, "What for?" I said,

"If you will come with me, I will tell you" - he walked about one hundred yards, and then ran from me; he was stopped and I took him to the watch-house - he admitted that he was at the Rose on the evening of the robbery; I could not find him before.

Flemare. Q. Was I not in liquor? A. I did not perceive it if he was - it was at half-past eleven o'clock at night.

WILLIAM EDWARDS. This is my pocket-book - I had two purses. one a canvas one, and one was the dried skin of a bullock's heart.

Allen's Defence. I saw the prosecutor come into the tap-room at the Rose - he looked about, and went into the bar; I went to get my pipe filled, and saw him there - he had some bread and cheese in a plate; he came into the tap-room, and sat down at the further end - Relf sat five or six yards from him, and Rogers by the side of him for about a minute; Magnus was sitting there, and Flemare was singing songs - I saw two or three women there, but not Lewis; one of the women shook the prosecutor- I took no notice; she had a plaid cloak, and a white Leghorn bonnet on - in a few minutes I saw her take his arm, and then lay it down - she then went out; I went to light my pipe at the gas, and saw a kind of skin lying - I said to Rogers, "Put it on the fire, it will make a blaze;" I was not half a minute by the prosecutor, and know nothing of the transation.

Relf's Defence. I came out of the Rose with the prosecutor - he said he had been robbed, and would go for an officer; I went home to bed, and went to Rose-lane in the morning - I suppose the officer watched me; I went to get a brush to brush my clothes, to go after a situation.

Rogers' Defence. I was in the house most of the evening - the prosecutor came in at half-past nine o'clock; I was by the fire - there were a great many people, and we sat down to make room; I sat near the prosecutor - there was, I believe, one person between us; Allen picked up a purse, and said to me, "Put that on the fire to make a blaze;" I did so.

Magnus' Defence. I know nothing of it; I went the next morning to get my bag and basket, and was taken.

Flemare's Defence. I went and had a pint of beer, and on coming out I saw a journeyman baker, named Green- he asked if I knew where to find Relf; I said I might find him, and the next morning I went towards the Rose- the man came out and said Relf was not there; I went to Rose-lane, and saw Relf go into the house - I went and told him Green wanted him; I was there smoking my pipe when the officer came.

Lewis' Defence. Allen gave me the book that morning - had I known to whom the book belonged, I had plenty of time to have got away; it was ten minutes before the officer returned and took us.

Allen. If you will allow me to be evidence on the Crown side, I will disclose it all - I know all about it, but

I am not guilty of the transaction myself, nor do I believe any one at the bar is.

JURY to WILLIAM TURNER . Q. Your boy says he saw Rogers near the prosecutor, but somebody was between them? A. Yes, but I do not know who it was - I did not know any one in the room.

Allen. At the time the woman was touching the prosecutor Rogers was not near him.

ALLEN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

RELF, ROGERS, MAGNUS, FLEMARE, and LEWIS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-154

653. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 2 bags, value 2d.; 4 sovereigns, 5 half-crowns, 12 shillings, and 7 sixpences, the property of Trimont Ward , from his person .

TRIMONT WARD. I was at Billingsgate on the 7th of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning -I bought some fish, and took some money out of my purse to pay for it; I returned into my purse four sovereigns, about five half-crowns, and some sixpences - in about two minutes I felt for it, and it was gone; it had been in my side pocket, or my breeches pocket - I had not moved above five or six feet from the place; I have never seen it since.

BENJAMIN JOHN RANGECROFT . I was at the market- I saw the prisoner near Mr. Crook's form, and saw him put his hand into Ward's left-hand coat pocket, and take the purse out; he went four or five yards from the form, and put it into his own breeches pocket - I went in a few minutes, told my father, and he told me to go and tell Mr. Ward he wanted to speak to him; I went to look for the prisoner, but could not see him - he was taken in about a fortnight; I had known him by sight before, and can swear he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you thought it was a perfectly honest thing? A. No. I never saw such a thing before; my father has been an officer two years - I never heard of expences being given here; my father has been here once - I have known the market four years; I am sixteen years of age - I sell fish in the market; I did not know what to do when I saw this - the market was full of people; I did not run after the prosecutor - I did not know what to do; I know it was the 7th of January, because my uncle lent Mr. Ward's brother some money that morning - I knew Mr. Ward before, but I did not know what to do; he was not above a yard from me when I saw this, but I did not tell him of it.

JOHN RANGECROFT. On the 7th of January my son told me of this, and I sent him to tell Mr. Ward - I understood the thief walked up the market,

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the country at the time.

HENRY JONES . I get my living by selling things in the street - I have known the prisoner ever since I was horn - the prisoner and another were with me at Maidstone on the 7th of January, setting Flanders-bricks, and hearth-stones.

COURT. Q. How do you know it was the 7th of January? A. We reckoned it up - we started away on Wednesday, the 6th, and returned on Friday: it was three weeke or a month ago - his father told us so; he reckoned it up, and Brocket, who nailed the prisoner's shoes, is here.

JOHN PRIESTLY . I know the prisoner - we took him down to Maidstone in a cart and donkey: we were there on the 7th, selling Flanders-bricks and hearth-stones - I have known him seven years.

COURT. Q. Do you know it was the 7th of January? A. His father reckoned it - I know it was the 6th when we started; about three weeks ago I heard the prisoner was taken up.

WILLIAM BROCKET. I am a shoemaker, and live at No. 22, Granby-place. I know the prisoner - I nailed a pair of shoes, and tipped them for him on the 6th of January; it was on a Wednesday evening - he said he was going with Flander-bricks and hearth-stones to Maidstone - Priestly came with him; I have known him nine years.

COURT. Q. What is the prisoner's father? A. He travels with laces and other things in the country - he has a hawker's licence.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18300218-155

654. MICHAEL DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 bottle, value 3d., and 1 pint and a half of wine, value 3s., the goods of James Coster and another .

ANDREW BEATER . I am in partnership with Mr. James Coster - we are silk mercers . On the 28th of January we lost a bottle of wine from our cellar; I have seen the prisoner there - he was sent by Mr. Brass, the builder.

GEORGE BURBURY. I am in the employ of the prosecutors. I saw the prisoner between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, on the 28th of January, he came into the cellar, and took a bottle of wine - I was placed there, as we had missed several bottles of wine; there were two or three casks there, and the wine had been drawn from them - no one could see me; the prisoner took up one bottle - I followed him, and took him up stairs into the warehouse, with it in his hand; Mr. Brass had some work doing at the back of the premises - the prisoner was in his employ.

WILLIAM HERMAN. I took the prisoner, and have the bottle.

MR. BEATER. This is the bottle; it is Madeira - I have tasted it; the prisoner has been employed by Mr. Brass six or eight months.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-156

655. EDWARD DREADY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 pepper-castor and top, value 1s.; 3 salt-holders, value 2s. 6d.; 6 wine-glasses, value 3s.; 2 jelly-glasses, value 6d.; 2 ale-glasses, value 6d.; 5 pin-cushions, value 2s. 6d., and 1 toy-basket, value 1s. , the goods of George Owen .

ELIZABETH OWEN. I am the wife of George Owen - we live in Redcross-square . I was attending a person who was ill last Saturday week - I returned home on the 13th, and missed my property, which I had left safe - I knew the prisoner well; I have seen some of the things since.

JAMES TURNER. I keep a shop in the general way.

I have some things that were brought to me last Saturday night by a woman - she first came to sell some glasses- I bought them; she then brought some other things -I suspected her, and went to her house in Playhouseyard; I saw the prisoner at the door - he said it was all right; I said, "Is Mr. Simmoas, your landlord?" he said Yes; I went, and saw Mrs. Simmons - she said she dare say it was all right, and she should have bought them; on the Monday the woman came, and said the person wished to have them back - I went out, and found the officer; I produced the things.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON. I went to Mr. Simmons' house - I found these glass salts and pin-cushions - I asked the prisoner what he had done with the other things; he took me to Turner's house - he said his brother gave them to him; Mrs. Owen's son gave the prisoner to me.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday evening I was forced to go for relief, and while I was there a person brought the officer to take me; I said the things were at my place, and my brother had left them to take to a person in St. John's-square - I took the officer to the place.

MRS. OWEN. The prisoner came to lodge in my house the week I was out; his father keeps the house I lodge in - I lost many more articles.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-157

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

656. JAMES HARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 gelding, price 13l. , the property of Charles Wynn .

CHARLES WYNN . I live in the Hackney-road. On the 5th of February I went to Smithfield , to sell my grey gelding; Jackson had it to show about the market - I waited in the parlour of the Greyhound; I came out soon after, an offer having been made for it - the prisoner was present, and showed it to a person there; he said it was in better condition than it was a few weeks before, and said his cousin would buy it: I said if he could get me a customer I would give him 10s. - he said he ought to have 1s. in the pound; I said the lowest price would be 13l. - after showing it to several persons I returned to the Greyhound, and went out three times to persons who had looked at it; the prisoner came into the house to me once, saying he thought he should be able to get a customer for it - the last time I saw him was about half-past five o'clock: shortly after that I went into the fair - he and the horse were gone; I could see neither him nor Jackson - I went to the stable in London-wall, where it was put up, but it was not there; I have never seen it since - I had the prisoner apprehended, in consequence of a letter sent me on the 6th; he was to have 13s. if he could get a customer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How often had he it from you to try to dispose of on commission? A. I have been to sell it three times, and my son several times; he never had from me - I received the letter on the 6th, but he was not apprehended till Monday, the 8th.

Q. Did he not come to you on Monday, the 8th, in person, tell you he had been robbed, and put down four sovereigns, which he had borrowed to pay you? A. He did not put down any money; he said he had four sovereigns, if I would take it, compromise it, and make a debt of it - I refused; he had appointed to meet me by letter at the White Hart, and offered to pay four sovereigns - he said he had been robbed; he did not show me his pocket - I had an officer, and he was apprehended; I understand four sovereigns were found in his pocket.

COURT. Q. The horse was in a stable? A. Yes, at Newman's, in London-wall; I should never have trusted him to sell it for me - he had said he would come directly, after drinking some rum and water with me, and he never came; I never authorized him to sell it, only to find a customer - he attends the market for that purpose.

JOHN JACKSON. On the 5th of September I was showing the horse for sale in Smithfield; the prisoner came and informed me the horse was sold, that he had made it all right, and settled with the governor - this was between six and seven o'clock; I was in the market - he said he had settled, and would make it all right with the governor; the horse was in the market - he took off the saddle and bridle, gave them to me, and told me I was to take them home; I have never seen the horse since - I did not see Mr. Wynn till next morning - I then told him of this; I saw the prisoner at Guildhall on the Tuesday following.

Cross-examined. Q. At the time he told you the horse was sold, was it not in your possession? A. Yes, and the purchaser was present as far as I know; there was a man who said he was the purchaser - the prisoner took it away with a halter; there was nothing to prevent his taking the saddle and bridle - he had the horse out of my hands eight or nine times to try to sell it, on three different days; I always led the horse about, and he brought gentlemen to look at it - he sometimes rode upon it; I did not lead it then - he has rode it about three or four times

COURT. Q. Did you know where your master was, when he took the horse away? A. There were two persons with the prisoner; he did not say which was the purchaser - neither of them said they had bought it: they went away together - I was not to sell the saddle; he said he had settled with the governor - my master was at the Greyhound

JOHN FORRESTER. I am a constable. I apprchended the prisoner at the White Hart, Giltspur-street; Mr. Wynn was with me - he said he had four sovereigns to pay; Wynn gave him in charge; I found four sovereigns and a duplicate on him - he said he had been robbed.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not go to the White Hart expecting to meet him there by his appointment? A. Certainly, from what Wynn said.

CHARLES WYNN re-examined. I had seen the prisoner once before; I am well known at Hackney - the letter was directed to Hackney; I live in the Hackney-road - the bridle and saddle did not belong to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not direct the letter right; I did not know Mr. Wynn's address - I leave my case entirely to your consideration.

WILLIAM CHURCH. I lodge with the prisoner, at Mrs. Coker's, Brackley-street, Golden-lane. On the 5th of February, about one o'clock in the night, I saw him in Beech-street, Barbican, about three hundred yards from

our lodgings; I found him laying on the pavement, and said, "Halloo old chap, what do you here?" I looked at him, not knowing him, and saw it was him - I lifted him up: he was very much intoxicated; his breeches pockets were torn down - he said he had been robbed, and in the morning his landlady lent him another pair of trousers while his own were mended; there was nothing to prevent his running away - he came home regularly to bed at night.

HANNAH COKER . My husband is a town-carman. -The prisoner has lodged with us above twelve months, and conducted himself remarkably well - I saw him on Saturday morning, the 6th; his trousers pocket was ripped down to the thigh - I asked how it came to be done; he said he did not know - I lent him four sovereigns on Monday morning; he said he had been robbed of some money not his own, and he wanted to make up all he could for the gentleman, and had pawned a coat to try to make up some more.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-158

657. MARY EAST was indicted for uttering a counterfeit half-crown ; to which she pleaded GUILTY .

Confined 6 Months , and to find sureties .

Reference Number: t18300218-159

658. GEORGE HENRY WRIGHT and JOHN DUGGAN were indicted for fraud and conspiracy .

MR. MIREHOUSE conducted the prosecution.

CHRISTOPHER WALTON . I live at Manchester, but am at present residing at Nos. 3 and 4, Friday-street. On Saturday, the 26th of December, I went into an auction-room, No. 96, Cheapside - Wright was acting as auctioneer , and Duggan was showing the goods round ; several things were put up, and then a dressing-case - it was handed round by Duggan; but before that a smaller one was put up, in which the shaving-box was apparently lead- on the second one being put up Duggan said, "The top of this box is silver;" Duggan managed the putting the things up; Wright was in the pulpit, as auctioneer - he was at some distance, but near enough to hear that; after hearing two or three persons bid I bid 35s. - it was a dressing-case, containing several articles; the top being silver I had a commission to buy one, and thought this an opportunity of getting it cheap; Wright had run it up to 38s., but Duggan said to him, "This gentleman has bid 35s.," and he came down to 35s. - I recollected that afterwards; he knocked it down to me at 35s. - I put down 10s., and said, "I will send my man in the afternoon with the rest of the money:" I waited some time, and then saw some circumstances which made me have some suspicion, and I said to Duggan, "You said that was silver;" he said; "No, I said no such thing - I said it was German silver;" I said."You told me it was silver, and I will have my money back;" a crowd got round the counter -I made an attempt to get my money back, and at last some of the crowd called out, "You are all a pack of thieves;" I went up to Wright, and demanded to have my 10s. back- he said, I am auctioneer, and am answerable for the acts of my servant;" he said he would not give me the money back - I said I would kick up a row in the shop; I afterwards went before the Lord Mayor; I did not know where the Mansion-house was, but I went there the same day - the Magistrate was not sitting, and I could not be heard till Monday; a prosecution was directed - I afterwards saw Wright three or four times; he called at my place, and said, "I have called to know if you intend to continue the prosecution;" I said I knew nothing of it, I was only a witness for the King, as I had been told so - he said he had a wife and two or three children, had only been out of prison a few weeks, and had paid 1000l. to the King, on an Excheqner writ; I said I would consult a friend - he called again; I said I had seen my friend - that my friend told me the only thing that could possibly do him any good, would be for him to return the money unsolicited, and as he was not the person so guilty as the other it might have some weight with the Jury, but as to Duggan I had nothing to do with him, and the money was left at my lodging.

COURT. Q. Did you speak to Wright, and desire to know whether the things were silver? A. Not to the auctioncer.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I think you are a Lancashire person? A. Yes; on my first entrance there were about ten persons in the room, I suppose.

Q. Will you venture to swear when you asked whether the tops of the glasses were silver, that he did not say they were German silver? A. It was the top of the large one - he said it was silver: he did not mention German silver till afterwards. (The dressing-case was here produced.) I am not twenty-one years old; I believe this is the box, but do not know it to be the same - I am not able to say whether it is worth 35s.; this is the top which he alluded to; I bought it after he represented it as silver -I swear positively that he did not say it was German silver; my friend said his handing over the 10s. would make no alteration whatever, but it might have some influence with the Jury - I was told the prosecution should not cost me a farthing, it should be done at the City expence. I did not hear any thing said about the other two boxes.

Q. Have you wit enough to know if that top was silver, it would be worth all the money offered? A. I should think not - I should have tried the weight of it before I could judge the value; I will not swear I have not said I did not wish to prosecute, but do not think I used that expression - I do not think I said a word to Wright about the dressing-case before I purchased it; I suppose he was two or three yards from Duggan when I had the conversation about its being silver - the shop is very dark; Wright could not see Duggan, nor Duggan see Wright, at least I think so; I mean to say Wright could not see the transactions of Duggan, so as to be able to see the articles which were showing round.

MR. MIREHOUSE. Q. Wright was in the pulpit? A. Yes, acting as auctioneer, and Duggan as servant; Wright was near enough to hear what Duggan said, and then he enlarged about it - I bought it in consequence of what Duggan said.

COURT. Q. Did you speak to Wright respecting it, and tell him it was not silver? A. After I bought it I did; he said he was answerable for the acts of his servant - I never heard him say it was silver.

JOHN CURTIS . I was present in the shop on the afternoon in question, when the dispute took place between Mr. Walton and the auctioneer, but not when the box was put

up - I had been in the shop a minute or two, when the prosecutor said to Wright, "Now mind you have stated, all the tops of the glass-stands in the box are solid silver;" he said that to Wright, and Wright said, "Oh, no" -Walton replied, "Why. you represented them to be so, and that induced me to purchase the lot" - Wright then said,"I only represented them as German silver" - I do not know what German silver is; I believe there is a distinction between German and common silver - Walton said, "If they are not as you have represented them to be, solid silver, I am taken in, and you must therefore refund my deposit"- Wright refused to return any money, saying the goods, were in fact what they were represented to be, German silver - finding he could get no redress from Wright, he turned to Duggan, and said, "Why, you represented that the articles were solid silver;" Duggan began to laugh, and said, "Oh, no, Sir, they are silver mounted" - Walton told Duggan immediately after, that he had not only stated them to be silver, but had guaranteed it - I understand the conversation to refer to all the tops distinctly.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your way of life? A. I am not at present in any regular business, and have not been so for several months - my mother was a laundress and mangler; her business came into my hands at her death; but I have since disposed of it - I held the concern about four months, and mangled - I have done nothing since - I have money to live on - my mother died about ten months ago, and I came into a little property - about seven years ago. I lived with Richard Walters , a dealer in fancy trimmings, and was seven years with him; I have followed the same business ever since I was fourteen years old; I never kept a shop - nobody employed me to go to this auction; I went to give evidence on this case, and was bound over by the Magistrate - I had looked into the auction-room, as other people do, to kill time, seeing respectable people there; for the last seven years I have lived with my mother, and conducted her mangling business - I am sure Walton charged Wright with representing the articles as silver, and Duggan also, both of them; I have been at the extreme end of the Court, and did not hear Walton's evidence.

Q. Did you state before the Alderman that you heard nothing that Wright said? A. I do not remember answering such a question - I am sure I never stated to the Magistrate that I did not hear Wright say any thing; I did not distinctly understand the question before - I did not hear Wright represent any of the articles as silver.

WILLIAM SMITH. I am street-keeper of Cheap ward. I know the house, No. 96, and have been in the habit of seeing the prisoners there. Wright as auctioneer, and Duggan handing the things about, repeatedly; I have seen that gentleman (Mr. Genesse) with them.

Cross-examined. Q. How long will you swear you have seen either of them at that shop? A. A long time back, but not long at this time, because the place has been shut up once; it has been a trunk-maker's since, and then it was re-opened - it has not been re-opened as an auction-room above two or three months, but had not been an auction-room for twelve months before.

MR. MIREHOUSE. Q. Has it been going on ever since this transaction? A. Yes - I am obliged to drive the people away.

ROBERT HARRISON. I am a ward-beadle. This place was opened for a long time as an auction-room, and then shut up - I think I have seen Wright there.

MR. CLARKSON addressed the Court and Jury on behalf of the prisoner, and called -

JAMES HALL . I know the auction-room in Cheapside, I believe it is No. 19. I live in Howland-street, Fitzroy-square; I was at the auction-room on the 26th of December, and saw the prosecutor there; I do not recollect seeing Curtis there; there was a dressing-case put up for sale - this is such a case; I cannot swear it is the same - I heard Mr. Walton bid for it; I did not hear any thing pass on the subject of the tops - I was there half an hour before the case was sold; I do not know at what time the prosecutor came in; I did not see him pay any thing, as there were persons standing between us; I heard Walton say to Wright, "Are the tops silver?" or to that effect - I cannot be positive to the words; he replied, "I don't represent them as solid silver at all;" that was the first I heard; Walton and him seemed to have a dispute about it - I do not know what was said; I had bought six goblets, and had a very fair bargain.

MR. MIREHOUSE. Q. Then there was a dispute? A. yes, but I did not hear what was said; I heard that he did not sell the case representing the tops to be silver - what had passed before I do not know; I heard nothing about German silver.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. If Duggan had said before it was sold, that the tops were silver, must you have heard it? A. Yes; I was close to the place.

SAMPSON GENESSE. I know the auction-room in Cheapside; Mr. Martin is the proprietor of it - I am clerk there: Wright is an auctioner, and has a commission for what he sells - Duggan is the same; I was there the whole of the morning in question - I saw Mr. Walton come in; no observation had been made by Duggan on the subject of the tops being silver; if it had I must have heard it - Mr. Walton paid a deposit to me of half a sovereign; he came to me in about five minutes after, and asked if the tops were silver - I said they were not; he said he understood they were, and wished for his 10s. back; I said they were not mentioned as silver, and I should not return the 10s. - if I had he would have been glad to go away; he went out, and came back with a respectable person, whom I do not see here - he then wished for his 10s., and I said we would not give it him; I suppose the regular shop price of an article of this description would he about 50s.; it is rose-wood - it is cheap at 35s.

MR. MIREHOUSE. Q. Had you heard 38s. bid for it? No; I am paid so much a week by Mr. Martin - he is not here - I did not interfere till the article was knocked down; the room was full.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you sure you heard all that the other persons heard? A. Yes; if such an observation had been made I must have heard it - Mr. Martin lives in the Haymarket, and has two auction-rooms; he has broken the bone of his thigh.

COURT. Q. How far is your desk from the pulpit where Wright was? A. Close by the side of it; Wright could not have made any declaration from the pulpit that the tops were silver, without my hearing it - he never made a word of such a representation.

WILLIAM RORERTS. I am a journeyman to Mr. Thomas Hassel, a cahinet-maker. I am a judge of such articles as this - the lowest price for putting together the materials would be 10s. - it is made of rose-wood, and the inside is cedar; the value of the materials wood be 6s. or 7s. - the veneering. lock, and brass, would be 7s. or 8s. more; the French polish, about 2s.; the lining, about 1s. 6d. or 2s.; it would be about 20s. altogether - I think the maker would sell it for 35s.; I am sure there could not then he more than 6s. profit to the master maker - I never made such a thing for less than 10s., and I have had 15s.

THOMAS HASSELL. I am a cabinet-maker. This witness was my apprentice, and is a good workman - the lowest I should sell such an article as this (and that is a sacrifice) is 28s. or 30s.; I had 30s. from Mr. Jupp, and that is a sacrifice.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you in the habit of making them? A. I have ever since 1790; I served my time to it - we call the tops of these Birmingham metal; they are plated - there is nothing but the standard silver, and these; these are like other plated articles.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is there a shop in Holborn for the sale of German silver? A. Yes, Mr. Edwards' - I do not know whether that is Birmingham metal washed with silver.

RONALD CAMPBELL . I am an Excise-officer for the district, in which this auction-room is. I was there on the 26th of December, but not at the time this article was sold - it is regularly entered as a place of sale.

JURY. Q. In whose name is the license taken? A. The auctioneer is licensed, not the proprietor; it is in the name of George Henry Wright .

MR. MIREHOUSE replied.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 27.

DUGGAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of the conspiracy. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300218-160

659. JAMES THORPE was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JAMES MARTIN . I am servant to Messrs. R. Dawson and T. Williams , woollen-drapers , of Cloth-fair ; I know the prisoner. On the 23rd of October he came to the shop, and said he came from Brown and Sams for a length of cloth - they were customers of ours, to whom we give credit; they are tailors - he said he wanted two yards and a half of cloth; I cut it off, and he had an invoice with it to take to Brown and Sams; it was superfine, and worth 2l. 5s. - I let him have it, believing he came from Brown and Sams. On the following day he came again for four lengths more for the same persons; they measured about nine yards; I let him have them - that was worth 8l. 2s.; he was not taken up till the middle of January - I saw him at the examination at Guildhall; I saw Brown and Sams about a day after, and told them what had passed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have the kindness to state the exact words he said the first time he came? A. He said he had come from Brown and Sams for a cut or length of cloth, two yards and a half - that it was to be the very best, and according to a pattern which he had - it was a dark olive; that is all he said then, I believe - I cut a cloth to match his pattern; he had been in the service of Brown and Sams some months before - they were in the habit of sending him to our shop for cloth.

Q. Did not they direct that no cloth was ever to be given for them without a written order? A. We often gave this man cloth on their account without a written order; there was no order not to deliver cloth without - he did produce a written order sometimes, but not for one article in twenty; Messrs. Dawson and Williams have no other partners.

WILLIAM BROWN SAMS. I am in partnership with Mr. Brown - we are tailors, and deal with Messrs. Dawson and Williams. The prisoner was in our service, but had not been employed by us for six months previous to the 23rd of October - he had left us for more than six months; I had no knowledge whatever of his going to get these goods on our account - we should not have employed him in our business after the time we discharged him; he brought some goods to me on the 24th of October, and asked me the favour to cut out from one of the lengths a coat for himself - he did not tell me where he had got it, nor did I know - it was to be applied to his own use.

Cross-examined. Q. For what you know it might be the cloth mentioned in the indictment? A. For what I know.

COURT. Q. On the 24th of October he appears to have had two yards and a quarter of blue cloth from the same persons - did you authorise him to go for that for yourself, or did your partner? A. I did not.

JAMES MARTIN re-examined. He came on the 24th for four lengths of two yards and a quarter each; they were blue Oxford mixed and brown - he brought a pattern-card, and pointed out the patterns for all of them.

MR. SAMS. I did not know of his getting these articles, and never authorized him to get them; when he came to my house he asked me to cut a coat from the Oxford mixture - he took the whole away, and never intimated that he had got them on our account.

Cross-examined. Q. For aught you know they may or may not be the property included in this indictment? A. I cannot say - I am convinced Mr. Brown did not send him- I am sure he did not; Mr. Brown was at that time an invalid - he was not confined to his bed; he was in the house, but not doing business - I was not with him all the day, but am convinced he did not send him; I know it, as far as it is possible for any one to know the actions of another - I did not ask him if he had sent him: I can swear positively, of my own knowledge, that he did not - he is unable to walk now; I act as foreman - nobody besides myself takes orders except Mr. Brown, and he has been unable to attend to business; I do not mean to swear he was unable to go into the shop that day.

COURT. Q. Did you see the prisoner at your house before he was in possession of the cloth? A. No - I saw him with the cloth on the morning of the 24th, not the 23rd- I was at home part of the day on the 23rd, but not all day.

MR. PHILLIPS addressed the Court and Jury on behalf of the prisoner, and called two witnesses, who deposed to his good character.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutors.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-161

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

660. DANIEL MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 pocket-book, value 1d.; 1 half-crown, 1 shilling, and 2 sixpences , the property of Mary Ann Pound .

JAMES TARR. I am a watchman, and was on duty on the 26th of January by the side of Fleet-market, between one and two o'clock in the morning - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running along Snow-hill - I stopped him, and presently a woman came up, and said he had robbed her of a pocket-book and 4s. 6d.; I said,"What is the money?" she said a half-crown, a shilling, and two sixpences, and the pocket-book contained duplicates, many of them in the name of Smith - she gave her name as Mary Ann Pound, and swore to the property before Mr. Alderman Copeland, but she is not here; I found a half-crown and a shilling on the prisoner - he said at the watch-house that he would leave his hat to make up the two sixpences.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutrix had accosted him and must have slipped the property into his pocket, in order to extort money from him.

COURT to JAMES TARR. Q. Did he deny he had taken it? A. Yes, and said it had been put into his pocket, but after that said he would leave his hat to settle it - he said they had been walking together.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-162

661. JOHN KNEEBONE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , 1 tin can, value 1s.; 1 coffee pot, value 1s., and 1 horn, value 8d., the goods of William Robert Wall King , his master . (See page 237.)

MR. J. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES TOTTERDALL. I am errand-boy to Mr. William Robert Wall King , a tin-plate worker , of Hosier-lane and Snow-hill. I remember seeing the prisoner on the 16th of January, in the warehouse in Hosier-lane - he said he should like a tea-pot for his mother; he went up stairs, and pointed out one that he should like - he said he should put it among the wood in the yard; on the following Monday I saw him in the front yard in Hosier-lane - he did not say any thing at that time, but Mr. King called him. and asked if he had taken any thing - he denied it; I did not hear any thing then about a mail-horn - Mr. King sent for an officer, who came in about five minutes; Mr. King had before searched him, and found nothing; the officer went to Phillip-street, Kingsland-road, and brought away these articles.

DUKE WILLIAM STONE . I am in Mr. King's employ, in Hosier-lane. I know the prisoner's father by sight -I went with the officer and the prisoner to Phillip-street, Kingsland-road, on the 18th of January - I understood it to be where the prisoner lodged with his father; I saw the officer find several articles which I knew were Mr. King's - here is a tin mail-horn, a coffee-pot, and other things; we left the prisoner outside with a boy, while the officer and I went in - the prisoner told us where his father lived; we knocked at the door, and asked if a person named Kneebone lived there - we went in, and saw the prisoner's mother; I did not hear him say any thing respecting these things.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Were any of these produced on Friday? A. Not to my knowledge; the articles were all found on the same day, but some were taken in London and some in the County - I never sold him any thing; I cannot say when these were missed - we have so many we cannot miss any thing exactly; I know Kirk - I have seen him here; this coffee-pot was standing on my desk a few days before it was missed - we have a great many in the warehouse, but do not keep goods where this stood; I know this by the top - it is made in a particular way; I do not suppose we have sold above two dozen like it - we have a stamp for this top; it is strack up by one blow, almost all others are worked up by hand - this mail-horn has a mouth-piece stamped with a die; I did it myself - I have not sold them, nor do I know whether they have been sold; I did not say on Friday, after I left this Court, "I will nick him now- he beat us on Friday, but I will nick him on Monday;" the prisoner's father is not accustomed to come to the shop - I never saw him there; the prisoner has a brother who works for the prosecutor, and lives with his father.

MR. ALLEY to JAMES TOTTERDALL. Q. Did you see a horn in the prisoner's pocket? A. Yes, one of this description.

JURY. Q. When did you see this? A. On the 13th of January - I did not tell my master of it till the 16th.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How had he the horn in his pocket? A. If was standing upright in his pocket; I saw a little bit of the top of it - I did not know he had stolen it; I did not know but he had bought it of the warehouseman, as they were about on the Saturday - when my master mentioned about the tea-pot I told him this.

THOMAS PIKE. I am an officer. I went with the prisoner to his father's house - I did not know he lived there before; I found these articles, and a great many others - the prisoner said nothing at the time; he was very willing to show us the place.

MR. KING. I make such articles as these in my business: the prisoner was in my employ - I indicted him last Friday for some things taken from Islington; these were taken from London - he has a brother in my employ; I sell nothing at Islington - the goods are made there, and brought to Hosier-lane.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You may have sold these articles? A. I cannot say - I have two or three shopmen, and seven apprentices; the shopmen are not here.

JOHN JORDAN. I am in the prosecutor's employ. I know this horn by the mouth-piece - it is the way he makes all his; it is the general rule in his business to mark the goods - I made this coffee-pot myself, and can swear to it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How many dozen of that description have you made? A. Perhaps one hundred dozen; this horn is made in the same way as all the horns he sells.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-163

662. ROBERT SCOTHRUP was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM ROWLAND GLADWIN . I am a smith . The prisoner was in my service from May last, as a clerk - if he received money he was to bring it to me; we had a rough cash-book, in which he was to put down all he received, and it was settled every Saturday evening - he was not to pay any money without my order.

CHARLES SHARPE. I am a clerk to Mr. John Hodgson - he is a tobacconist in Budge-row. On the 19th of December the prisoner called for 2s. 8d., which was due to Mr. Gladwin - I paid him, and he gave a receipt for it; I am pretty positive he is the person - on the 16th of January he came again for 4s. 8d., which I paid him.

JAMES AGAR. I paid two bills on the 6th of January to the prisoner, I believe, for his master, amounting to 1l. 0s. 7d. - he gave me these receipts.

MR. GLADWIN. These receipts are the prisoner's writing - he never accounted for any of these monies: here is the 19th of December, but no entry to the name of Agar or Sharpe; in the week ending on the 9th of January, here is no entry from Agar, nor on the 16th of January from Sharpe - we missed some goods, and spoke to the prisoner; he made out a list of some money which he had embezzled - he did not deny the fact at all.

Prisoner. It is the first time.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-164

663. RICHARD HELSTON and JOSEPH THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a person unknown, from his person .

DANIEL FORRESTER. I am a City officer. On the 8th of February I saw the two prisoners in the Poultry , about twelve o'clock - they crossed and followed a gentleman towards St. Paul's; they then returned, and followed another gentleman. who had a handkerchief partly out of his pocket - when they came near Mr. Debatt's shop they closed upon him; I seized them, and found this handkerchief on Helston - I took the gentleman to the Mansion-house; he gave the name of Mayer, No. 13, Birchin-lane -I asked him to come, but he did not; I went to that address, but the gentleman had gone away - the prisoners were close together; one must have seen what the other did - Helston had it in his apron.

Thomas put in a written defence, stating that he met Helston in a crowd, caused by a coach having broken down - that they walked together, when two men passed them and threw the handkerchief at their feet.

DANIEL FORRESTER. No one could have done it but them - there was no broken down coach there.

HELSTON- GUILTY . Aged 17.

THOMAS- GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-165

664. GEORGE CLARKE and EDWARD PATTEN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Joseph Edwards , from his person .

JOSEPH EDWARDS. On the evening of the 9th of February I was in Angel-court, Throgmorton-street , and lost a pocket-handkerchief from my right-hand coat pocket - I had had it about ten minutes before; the officer called me, and I missed it - this is it; it has my initials on it.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Did not you say it had no mark? A. I told the officer so, but I understood from my mother that it was marked J. C.

CHARLES THOROGOOD. I am an officer. On the 9th of February I was on duty near the back of the Royal Exchange - I saw the two prisoners come down Sweeting's-alley; Clarke was close behind the prosecutor, and Patten behind him - I followed them down Angel-court, and met Patten turning back: I seized him with this handkerchief in his hand - I called the prosecutor, and asked if he had lost a handkerchief - he said Yes; Clarke was going on, and I said, "Take hold of that one" - he did not; I pulled Patten up, and took Clarke myself.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Was it dark? A. Yes - I had followed them about three hundred yards; they were out of my sight when they turned into the court - as I turned, Patten had just turned from the gentleman.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Where did you first see them? A. In Sweeting's-alley - there were two or three persons passing; Clarke was about five yards from the gentleman - I should not have taken another person who had been passing; Patten did not attempt to go away.

Clarke's Defence. I was returning from Rosemary-lane, where I deal in wearing-apparel; this prisoner asked me the way to Bell-alley - I told him I was going nearly the same way; I got as far as Copthall-court, and aceidentally came in contact with him again - he asked if he was right; I said Yes, and went on - when I was called back by the officer I declared my innocence, but he said he was positive of me - I am a cripple, and it is not likely I should be guilty of such a thing.

Patten's Defence. I cannot say what I wish; but had my trial come on on Saturday, I could have produced friends to give me a character.

Patten received a good character.

PATTEN- GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 4 Months .

CLARK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300218-166

665. WILLIAM SELWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a person unknown, from his person .

JOHN LAWS. I am a constable. On the 17th of February I saw the prisoner in Long-lane with a companion- he took this handkerchief from a person's pocket, and gave it to his companion - I took them both, but was not able to get to the gentleman; I took the handkerchief from his companion's hat - they were both together at the time it was taken - it was by a board in the street; the other was discharged.

JURY. Q. How far were they from you? A. On the opposite side.

Prisoner's Defence. The lad said he bought the handkerchief for 2s.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-167

666. JAMES WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a person unknown, from his person .

BENJAMIN CHARLES MURRAY . I am a Police-man. -On the 21st of January I saw the prisoner with another person - there was a crowd; the prisoner put his hand into a gentleman's pocket, and I caught him by the collar- his companion had then gone away; the prisoner threw this handkerchief on the ground - I touched the gentleman on the back; he went on, and said he would meet me, but he did not come.

ROBERT CREEBER. I was at the corner of Ludgate-hill - the witness said to a gentleman, "You have been robbed of your handkerchief," and the prisoner ran into my arms; I caught his hands, and said, "Where is the handkerchief?" he shrugged up his shoulders, and a gentleman said, "There it is on the ground;" I found this handkerchief close to him - I found another silk handkerchief in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. The other handkerchief my mother will swear I have had three years; and this was two yards from me; there was a great crowd of people, and I was trying to get through to go home, when I was seized and accused of this.

GUILTY . Aged 19. Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300218-168

667. SAMUEL WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 1 brooch, value 3d., the goods of Charles Webb, the elder : and 1 brooch, value 18d., the goods of Charles Webb, the younger .

ANN WEBB. I am the wife of Charles Webb, and mother of the prisoner. About the end of October we missed two brooches from a cash-box - one was his father's, and one was his brother Charles'; these are them.

WILLIAM BEZANT. I am a pawnbroker in the Borough, I have one brooch, pawned on the 23rd of October, (I do not know by whom) in the name of John Bourne, for Hannah Bourne.

LAWRENCE NOTLEY . I have a brooch pawned by a female.

ELIZABETH BOOTH. I lodged at the prosecutors'. Samuel Webb gave me the duplicates of these things; I have not got them in my possession; I gave them up to his mother - I do not know what he gave me them for, except to take care of.

CHARLES WEBB. I own one of these brooches; I know it to be mine - I did not give it to my brother, or order him to pledge it.

ELIZABETH WEBB. I received the duplicates from Elizabeth Booth; she said at first that she had sold them for half a crown.

JOHN BEZANT . I am a pawnbroker. I gave this duplicate to the prisoner.

LAWRENCE NOTLEY. I am a pawnbroker; this other duplicate is mine.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300218-169

668. RICHARD SETTLE was indicted for embezzlement .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: o18300218-1

GILBERT WITT , convicted of stealing in a dwelling-house at the last September Session, received sentence of Death , the Twelve Judges, for whose consideration his case was reserved, having confirmed the conviction. [See Mr. Alderman Thompson's Mayoralty, page 828.]

Reference Number: o18300218-2

SAMUEL PRATT , who was convicted of felony at the January Session, see page 186, has been sentenced to Seven Years' Transportation ; the Learned Judges having confinned his conviction.

Reference Number: s18300218-1

ADJOURNED TO THURSDAY, THE 15th OF APRIL.

Reference Number: s18300218-1

SAMUEL PRATT , who was convicted of felony at the January Session, see page 186, has been sentenced to Seven Years' Transportation ; the Learned Judges having confinned his conviction.

The Number of Prisoners committed for Trial at the present Session, was 211. Of whom were Acquitted or Discharged by Proclamation..... 59.

Convicted..... 158

Of whom 9 have Received Sentence of Death.

19..... Transportation for Life.

11..... 14 Years.

56..... 7 Years.

89 carried up.

89 brought up.

59 have been Imprisoned for various terms, Whipped or Fined.

4 Judgments Respited.

152


View as XML