Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th January 1830.
Reference Number: 18300114
Reference Number: f18300114-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN CROWDER , MAYOR.

SECOND SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 14th DAY OF JANUARY, 1830, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER BY HENRY STOKES No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1830.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN CROWDER , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Honourable Sir William Alexander , Knt., Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Stephen Gaselee , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir James Parke , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Richard Carr Glyn, Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart,; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; John Thomas Thorpe , Esq.; and William Venables , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Sir Peter Laurie, Knt., and Henry Winchester, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Deoman, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

H. Austvick ,

George Simons ,

John Smallwood ,

Thomas Richards ,

Henry Sharp ,

John Gitten Laws

Ed. W. Whittler ,

Henry Marshal ,

Wm. Thompson ,

Jo. Jas. Vegnens ,

Alexander Low ,

James Kent .

Second

Charles Sully ,

Charles Robins ,

Richard Hall ,

Edward Trickett ,

Thomas Bolton ,

John Perkins ,

Wm. Rowbottom ,

John Hobden ,

Charles Plumb ,

John Phillips ,

Burney Wood .

W. Law Ogleby .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Julius Anderson ,

William Ausel ,

William Allen ,

J. G. Andrews ,

Henry Austin ,

Philip Briggs ,

John Arnold ,

William Arton ,

Wm. Armstrong ,

William Arthur ,

John Austin ,

George Arnold .

Second

John Broach ,

George Burlow ,

James Barton ,

John Balls ,

Robert Benniel ,

William Berrill ,

William Berry ,

Thomas Bentham ,

Charles F. Best ,

Francis Bevil ,

William Ailcock ,

J. P. Bannister .

Third

J. H. Bates ,

James Barnes ,

Ruben Bull ,

William Boyles ,

James Bennet ,

John Buckley ,

James Bradford ,

William Best ,

Thos. W. Bennett ,

James Berrith ,

Joshua Butler ,

John Barrett .

Fourth

William Abbot ,

William Adams ,

F. W. Andrews ,

R. W. Anderson ,

John Amphlett ,

John Andrews ,

William Addlson ,

Samuel Andrews ,

James Arnett ,

James Avery ,

John Atwood ,

Thomas Burls .

Fifth

William Baden ,

James Baget ,

William Bray ,

Francis Barrs ,

Henry Baxter ,

George Barlow ,

Thos. Brownley ,

William Bradley ,

W. C. Alvey ,

Henry Andrews ,

Thomas Amor ,

Thomas Addis .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 14, 1830.

CROWDER, MAYOR. - SECOND SESSION.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18300114-1

234. EDWARD KENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , at St. Ethelburga, 60 yards of silk, value 6l., the goods of James Nicholson , in his dwelling-house .

ALEXANDER PAUL . I am in the employ of James Nicholson , a linen-draper , who lives at No. 60, Bishopsgate-street Within, in the parish of St. Ethelburga . On the 4th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the shop; two persons were with him - one about two years older than himself; they came in together- the prisoner asked for a pair of stockings: I took down some to show him; I was the only person serving in the shop - there is a staircase leading from the shop to the upper part of the house; I cannot exactly recollect which of them asked for the stockings - they said they only had 6d., and we had none so low; they left the shop - a little boy who was in the shop at the time gave information; I immediately went out, and laid hold of the prisoner and another man - I charged the prisoner with stealing some silk, and found it under his apron - there were sixty yards of it; he had not asked to look at it - it was on the counter, within his reach, when he came into the shop; I was obliged to turn my back to them to get the stockings - they could take it in that time without my seeing them; it is worth upwards of 6l. at the manufacturer's price - I have a good knowledge of the value of silk; I sent for an officer, and had him secured - I took him sixty or seventy yards from the shop door.

Prisoner. He said at the Mansion-house the silk was sixty-five yards. Witness. I said it measured sixty-six yards, but I would call it sixty.

SAMUEL DODSWORTH NICHOLSON. I am the prosecutor's son. On the 4th of January, I was on the staircase, looking through a window at the top of the door leading into the shop; I could see into the shop, and saw the prisoner there, and three others, I think - I saw the prisoner go to the opposite counter, take this roll of silk, and put it under his apron; I told Paul, who went after him, and brought him back - be let it fall when he was caught; I saw it fall from him when he was caught, and picked it up; my father has no partner - he lives at this house.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am an officer, and took him in charge with the silk - he said nothing; I have had it ever since.

ALEXANDER PAUL . This is the silk, I am certain - it has our private mark on it; there are sixty-six yards - I have measured it.

[Friday, Jan. 15.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

Recommended to mercy, on account of his youth.

Reference Number: t18300114-2

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

235. THOMAS TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously assaulting David Grant , on the 1st of January , at St. Magnus, the Martyr, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 diamond pin, value 2l. , his property.

DAVID GRANT . I am a merchant , and live at No. 2, Philpot-lane. On the 1st of January, a little after two o'clock, I left my counting-house, and went down Fish-street-hill ; at the bottom of the hill the prisoner came up with another person - they were strangers to me; the prisoner accused me of running against him, and laid hold of me by the collar; I had not run against him at all - he seized me with both his hands, and kept down my hands, having his hands about my breast, taking out my diamond pin, which was in my shirt; I tried to get from him one way and another, and at last when he got the pin he left me: I had spectacles on, having a slight inflammation in my eye -I took them off, turned round, and felt myself about, to see what I had lost - he looked round, and looked me full in the face; I went about three steps, then being collected, I turned round, and ran after him; he had got to Eastcheap, and was standing with another person, and was blowing on something, which I conceived to be my pin; I accused him of it, and laid hold of him - he gave me a knock; I was obliged to let go; he ran: I called Stop thief! he was followed by several people - his companion attempted to stop the one who was nearest to him; I endeavoured to get somebody to seize that man - he got through Monumentyard into Botolph-lane, and was secured about twenty yards from Botolph-lane; I am quite certain my pin was safe in my shirt when he laid hold of me.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you put it into your breast in the morning when you dressed? A. I had about half-past nine o'clock in the morning - it could not have slipped out; I am confident it was in my shirt at the time he stopped me; about half an hour before this

happened I took off my ruff, which was round my neck, and then felt the pin; the pin was not in the ruff - I had put it on about ten o'clock in the morning; I did not put it on or take it off by a glass - I distinctly felt the pin when I took my ruff off; I did not remove the pin, but felt it safe- I could not well untie the ruff without touching it; that is the reason why I say I touched it - Fish-street-hill was a good deal crowded; it happened just before the crossing, at the bottom of Fish-street-hill, at the corner of Lower Thames-street - he came bolt up against me, seized me, and charged me with running against him.

Q. Then you must have come against each other? A.Certainly. When he laid hold of me he came against me; I attempted to pass him first on one side and then on another, but he kept before me, pushed down my hands, and extracted the pin - I did not see him with the pin, he kept me so fast; I was not aware where I was robbed - I asked if he intended to rob me while he was taking out the pin; I was sure I was robbed, and felt my pocket - I felt my watch safe, then missed my pin, and followed him; I turned round, and pursued him up Eastcheap; I went about three steps before I knew where I was robbed, but was confident I had been robbed - he kept my hands down, and I first felt for my money and watch, then felt my handkerchief, and missed my pin, which accounted for his holding me so fast by the throat; I had green spectacles - my sight was as perfect as it is now: I had a little inflammation in the side of my eye, not in the pupil - I asked him if he intended to throttle me; he held me fast by the neck, and kept my hands down - he was working as hard as he could in my throat; I thought I should be choked - my pin was fastened in as a pin, not as a brooch; I went about three steps before I ascertained where I had been robbed, and during that time my back was towards him - I had lost sight of him; I think I went three steps before I determined to follow him; I did not see him till I laid hold of him in Eastcheap; I went as fast as I could - he crossed over - I went up, and he was standing blowing at something, as if to ascertain the value of it: I laid hold of him instantly: I could not be mistaken in him - this might be three minutes after I was robbed; there was not a crowd, but the usual number of people - when I laid hold of him be knocked me off, and I called Stop thief! I had a little boy with me - the prisoner was immediately pursued; nothing was found on him.

LEWIS LEE . I am eleven years old. (The witness appeared to be sensible of the obligation of an oath.) I was in company with Mr. Grant; I saw Taylor come up to Mr. Grant - he caught hold of him by the collar, and said Mr. Grant had run up against him, which was not true, for I must have seen it if he had; Mr. Grant asked if he was going to throttle him - he was holding Mr. Grant by the collar for some seconds; in about two minutes Mr. Grant said his pin was lost - he went after the man; I followed, but could not overtake him - I was left behind a good way; I saw the prisoner after he was taken, and was quite sure he was the man who had attacked Mr. Grant; when he laid hold of Mr. Grant there was another man in his company who ran after Mr. Grant when he ran after the prisoner; I had not observed Mr. Grant's pin in his shirt.

Cross-examined. Q. You have frequently seen the pin in the prosecutor's shirt, have not you? A. Yes - I had been with him from ten o'clock till half-past one; I did not know the prisoner before - I should not know the other man: I saw the prisoner more than him - he was behind; I only saw him run: I was behind Mr. Grant when I saw him run.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBITTER . I am a marshalsman. I apprehended the prisoner in Botolph-lane; I had been up a gateway, and seeing several people together when I came out, I went up, and found him in among them, charged with robbing Mr. Grant of his pin; Mr. Grant and the boy went with me to the Mansion-house - he was examined next day; I could not search him till I got him to the Mansion-house - I found nothing on him but 1s. and a pocket handkerchief.

MR. GRANT. The pin was worth 2l.

Prisoner's Defence. How was it possible for me to abstract a pin from the prosecutor without his perceiving it? he stated in his deposition that he never missed his pin till he was out of the crowd, which stood across the road, and when he missed it he came up Fish-street-hill, met me and accused me of it; I told him I knew nothing of it, and asked him to let me go; he would not - I threw myself out of his hands, and fell down - he likewise slipped down- he accused me because he said he saw me looking at something in my hand. Is it feasible that I should stop a man in a public thoroughfare, in the middle of the day, and take property, without being detected? Gentlemen, either of you being on the spot might be as well accused as myself.

[Saturday, Jan. 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing he did not intend any personal injury.

Reference Number: t18300114-3

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder

236. MICHAEL SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , at St. Mary Cole, 1 copper bowl, value 6d., and 4 1/2 ozs. of grain gold, value 18l., the property of James Bult and James Philip Bult , in the dwelling-house of the said James Philip Bult .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said James Bult and James Philip Bult.

MR. JAMES BULT . I am in partnership with my son, James Philip Bult ; we are goldsmiths , and live at No. 86, Cheapside, in the parish of St. Mary Cole - the prisoner was quite a stranger. On the 12th of January, between half-past nine and ten o'clock in the morning, a lad and a boy came into the shop; one of them drew my attention to look at a knife in the window, and the other boy, who was hardly as high as the counter, snatched up this bowl of grain gold, and ran away - I have no knowledge of the prisoner; the bowl was on the counter - I had served a person out of it; there was from 4ozs. to 5ozs. of fine grain gold in it - I saw the prisoner in a very few minutes in custody of the officer, who had the bowl, and a very small portion of the gold; I am sure it was our bowl - I have had it a great many years; my son lives in the house with the servants - he is the resident partner; I do not live there now - the shop is part of the dwelling-house.

GEORGE WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a constable. A little before ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner and two others, one a little boy, thirteen or fourteen years old, and the

other about nineteen - he was a head taller than the prisoner: in consequence of suspicion I watched them - they went from Cornhill towards Cheapside; I missed them for a minute, and then saw the prisoner looking into Mr. Bult's window - at the same time I saw the boy come out of Mr. Bult's shop; I did not see the third one then - the boy put his hand to the prisoner, and as I suppose gave him something; he appeared handing something to him - I crossed the road as quick as I could, being on the opposite side - the prisoner ran away from the window, down Ironmonger-lane, which is eight or nine doors off: I passed the boy, pursued the prisoner, and twenty or thirty yards down the lane, as I was going to put my hand upon him, he turned round, saw me, and threw something across the road - I picked it up; it was a copper bowl - it had snowed the night before, and I could see no gold; I secured him, and then picked up the bowl - I looked about, but could see no gold; I took him to the shop, went back to where he threw it down, and found some gold - I did not pick it up myself; it was produced at the Mansion-house, and returned to Mr. Bult.

MR. BULT. I have it here; I saw several grains picked up - the gold in the bowl when I left it on the counter was worth 18l. or 20l. or more - I had left that quantity of gold in it four or five minutes before; nobody had been into the shop after the customer I served from it - the gold now in it is worth 24s. or 25s.

Prisoner's Defence. I went round the City to look for a situation, having been out of work three days, and passing this shop it drew my attention to look in; I stood there half a minute - two young gentlemen came by; one said to me, "I will give you 3d. to take this to Ironmonger-lane;" it was in two bits of whitey brown paper - I had hardly got round the corner before the gentleman seized me by the collar, and knocked it out of my hand.

GEORGE WILLIAM MORGAN . There was nobody near him but me when he threw it away.

Prisoner. When he took me another young man ran by - he said, "You are one of them."

[Monday, Jan. 18] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his youth.

Reference Number: t18300114-4

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

237. GEORGE JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Heath , on the 20th of December , at St. Sepulchre, and stealing therein, 20 spoons, value 7l. 6s.; 2 pairs of sugar-tongs, value 16s., and 1 milk-pot, value 1s. , his property.

JAMES HEATH . I live at No. 66, Snow-hill, in the parish of St. Sepulchre , and rent the house. On Sunday evening, the 20th of December, at half-past six o'clock all my family, consisting of eight persons, went out to church, leaving me alone in the house; it was not quite dark - I believe the house was safe; I had not seen the fastenings in the course of the day, for I had been very unwell the whole day - in about ten minutes after my family were gone out, the front door bell rang twice, very faintly: I did not get up to answer it - about ten minutes after that(there was no noise whatever, every thing was perfectly silent;) I was sitting in the dining-room, up stairs - my face was directed towards the dining-room door, and the door of the room was pushed very slowly open, and part of the head of a person appeared; I immediately rose from my seat, went towards the door, and the head was instantly withdrawn, and the person ran very precipitately down stairs, and made a great noise in going down - I thought it unwise to follow, so I proceeded to the dining-room window, threw it up, gave an alarm, and in rather more than an hour I saw the prisoner in custody - I examined the house, but was not aware that any thing was gone; the street-door was closed in the usual way when I went down - I had not heard it shut when he ran down, if it had I think I must have heard it; I saw two small crow-bars in the back part of the house - I could not discover how the party had got in; I found the street-door bolted on the inside - they could have entered that way, and bolted it afterwards- my family returned about half-past eight o'clock; a hat was found at the bottom of the stairs - I did not see it there myself; the spoons, sugar-tongs, and milk-pot were in the kitchen.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any second Christian name? A. No; I saw no appearance of breaking into the house - I cannot say a person might not have been concealed in the house.

HENRY CHANDLER. I live at No. 32, Cock-lane, and am a silver spoon maker, in Mr. Chawner's employ. On Sunday, the 20th of December, about a quarter-past seven o'clock, I was sitting in doors, and heard a cry of Murder! and Thieves! my house is a very little distance from the prosecutor's - I ran out to the spot; the cry came from the first floor of Mr. Heath's house - he was giving the alarm, and said, "Go to the front door;" I ran to the front door - it was fast; I had been there about two minutes, and heard a cracking up Cock-lane - I ran there, and saw the shutters fall out; they were pushed out from inside, and I saw the prisoner come out without a hat, and run up the lane - I pursued close at his heels, and never lost sight of him - just as he turned the corner I caught him, about twelve yards down the turning; I could not possibly be mistaken - I could not swear to his face, but I never lost sight of his person; he had no hat on - he ran against Kemp, and had a tussle with him, which enabled me to collar him, and he said, "It is not me - what have I done?" I am sure he is the person that came out of the window; when I could see his face he had a black mark under his nose - I do not know whether it was dirt or a plaister; Hanley came up, and kept the mob off as we took him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. An alarm had been given by Mr. Heath before you went? A. I should think about a minute before; I went to the door, and in two minutes went to the window - several neighbours had come out of their houses in consequence of the alarm; I suppose fifteen or sixteen, but not out of the prosecutor's house; the place where the window is is very dark; he came out of the window without his hat - his being taken without a hat did not increase my belief of his being the man, for I never lost sight of him; he turned one slight corner by Munn and Co.'s - the gateway projects, and it is but a slight turn; three or four came up when he was stopped: I had run out without my hat, and there was one person by the window without a hat or coat - he is a man who keeps a coal-shed opposite.

CHARLES KEMP . I am warehouseman at a printing-

office. On Sunday evening, about a quarter-past seven o'clock, I was coming across Smithfield, and heard a cry of Stop thief! at the end of Cock-lane; I saw a man come up Cock-lane without a hat, and about fifty persons pursuing him - he was running from the cry; I caught hold of him - it was the prisoner: Chandler came up instantly after, and laid hold of him - the prisoner said directly I took hold of him, once or twice, that it was not him; the people behind came up - Chandler and I took him to the watch-house, and he was detained.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not see a good many other persons running? A. Behind him there was - there was nobody without a hat, except the prisoner.

COURT. Q. You saw nobody else without a hat? A. No; he was the only person running from the cry.

THOMAS STALION . I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre. I heard Mr. Heath give an alarm, and saw him on the window leads of the first floor; I went to the front door, found it was fast, and came round to Cock-lane, to what had been a side door, but has been blocked up - I waited there about a minute; the shutters opened, and the prisoner came out first, and another one with him: the prisoner ran up Cock-lane, towards Smithfield; I attempted to lay hold of the other, but stumbled over the shutter, and lost him; I pursued after the prisoner, but lost sight of him as I stumbled over the shutter - I went up Cock-lane, found him in the hands of Kemp, Chandler, and Carter, and laid hold of him; Hanley came up, and took him to the watch-house - I saw Hanley search him; a small pocket-book and I believe three halfpence were found on him: he was the first who came out of the house, and was without a hat- I returned to Mr. Heath's, and on examining the back window which he had come out of in the warehouse, I found a small basket, with two small jemmies in it; I saw a hat found at the bottom of the staircase - it was not claimed by any body; when I came up to the prisoner in Cock-lane he said he had lost his hat.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw two men come out of the window? A. Yes; I tried to take the second man - my attention was particularly directed to him; there was a number of persons running in the street - I saw nobody without a hat while I was running; there were people without hats at the top of the lane when the prisoner was detained - I cannot tell where they came from; there might be three without hats or more - I did not take an account of them; it was impossible for me to look at every body when my attention was directed to the prisoner - there might be fifty people altogether; I did not hear the prisoner say he had been knocked down, and lost his hat.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street. I was in Giltspur-street about seven o'clock on Sunday evening, the 20th of December, and heard a great noise and bustle, and near the corner of Giltspur-street there was a great crowd, some crying, "Hold him fast," and others said, "Let him go;" I rushed into the crowd, and saw the prisoner struggling violently with Chandler and Kemp; I laid hold of him, and he then said, "I will go quietly;" after leaving him in the watch-house I went to Mr. Heath's house, and found this hat at the bottom of the stairs, within a yard of the stairs; I searched the house well, and found two jemmies near the window which had been burst open - they laid on a work-board; I tried the largest crow-bar to a desk in the counting-house next day, and it fitted the marks on that desk, which had been broken open; I went to the Compter, tried the hat on the prisoner, and it fitted him exactly, but he denied its being his; Hooker, the officer, had this key in his possession - I saw him fit it next day to the prosecutor's door, and it opened it; I did not see that found.

Cross-examined. Q. Who did you get that key from? A. Hooker - he brought it here to-day; he and I both fitted it to the door; the hat would fit other people besides the prisoner no doubt - I found no marks of their having broken into the house; there were marks where they broke out.

WILLIAM HENRY HOOKER . I am a constable of the City, and live about one hundred yards from Mr. Heath's. I heard a great noise, went out immediately, and about halfway between my house and Mr. Heath's, I heard a great crash of something falling; I went to the corner of Cock-lane, and saw two shutters had fallen outside the house - in consequence of information I saw the crowd going up Cock-lane; I followed, and within a few yards of the lane, near Giltspur-street, I found the prisoner had been stopped - Hanley was there, and they gave him in charge; I then went to Mr. Heath's, but found nothing particular. Next morning, when I went, this key was given to me by Mr. Heath's son; I tried it to the lock of the front door, one end of it opened the door very easily; I saw two jemmies, but did not see them found - the hat was given to me: I saw it tried on the prisoner - it fitted him well; twenty spoons, two pairs of sugar-tongs, and a milk-pot were delivered to me next morning - I have had them ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. Some of them are very small spoons? A. Yes; I did not try the hat on any body else a person could not get in; I did not see a single person without a hat, except the prisoner - I saw Chandler, but cannot say whether he had a hat; I noticed the prisoner more than other people - I think Chandler had his hat on.

HENRY CHANDLER. There were three persons without hats, I, the prisoner, and a person who came from the opposite house.

FANNY MIDDLE . I am servant to Mr. Heath; I left the house at six o'clock on this evening - I went out at the front door, and shut it; nobody went out with me - I left all the family in the house: I found the door shut, and shut it after me - I saw part of the tea-spoons about ten minutes before I left - nothing was missing then; I returned five minutes before nine - I then found the plate removed from the drawer and closet, and put on the dresser; I am sure they were not there when I went out - they were all put together carelessly on the dresser; I had cleaned them, and put them away before I went out.

Cross-examined. Q. How many are there in the family? A. Seven, including myself - there is only one young lady grown up; mistress is alive - I cannot say she had not moved the plate in my absence; nothing was taken out of the house - some of the things were moved from one end of the kitchen to the other, and left on the dresser; I found them all laying together, not tied up.

COURT. Q. Were any of them on the dresser when you left the house? A. No - the closet was merely closed - they were clean.

HENRY HEATH . I am Mr. Heath's son. On this Sunday evening, about half-past six o'clock, I went out with the rest of the family; we went out at the street door, which I found fast - I cannot say whether I opened it, or any of the rest of the family; I left my brother behind - he came out with us, but was the last out; he went to church with me - we left nobody in the house but my father; I am sure the door was closed; the key was not in the lock, but was in the house - the prisoner is a perfect stranger; my mother went out with us to church - we all went out at the same time.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you undertake to swear which of the family was last at the door? A. Yes, my brother; I had not searched the house - the servant is not in the habit of taking the key out; it hung up inside the passage; my father keeps a warehouse, which is pretty large - I cannot say whether any body was concealed there- I am sure the key was not in the lock, for it is never kept in it; I did not look at the lock, but the key always hangs up.

MR. HEATH. I can positively swear there was no key in the lock; I particularly examined it before I opened it.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you tell whether any body inside might not have taken it out after the persons came in? A. I found the lock without a key in it; I cannot say whether it was in or out when the family went out.

COURT. Q. After your family left did you bolt the street door? A. No, it could not be bolted from the outside.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Whether persons in the house, going to rob, might have bolted it, you cannot say? A. No- my premises are very large; it is possible somebody might be concealed.

COURT. Q. What is the value of the spoons? A. There are twenty spoons, and two pairs of sugar-tongs, worth about 7l.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The milk-pot is not silver? A. No, it is worth very little - some of the spoons are very old and some very small; I have not weighed them - my opinion is they are worth 7l. in their present state.

EDWARD CHARLES HEATH . I am Mr. Heath's son, and attend to the business. I went out at half-past six o'clock with my two brothers, my mother, and sister, leaving nobody at home but my father - I was the last person that went out, and shut the door; I do not know where the key was - it is usually left at home; I do not know where it is kept - I returned about eight o'clock; this matter had happened then - I saw this skeleton-key in the house next morning; it did not belong to the house, nor does the hat produced belong to any of the family; I never saw the crow-bars in the house before - we all came home from church together.

Cross-examined. Q.Whether the jemmies were dropped in the house by a person concealed there you cannot tell? A. No; there were no marks of violence of persons breaking into the house.

COURT. Q. Could any body have got into the house except at the street door? A. No - there were no marks of violence on the door; nobody could have got into the house from the warehouse without violence - neither of us went into the kitchen when we went out.

MR. PHILLIPS Q. I suppose you were dressing for church in your own room? A. Yes - the kitchen is behind the dining-room; I cannot say my mother or sister did not go in while I was in my room.

HENRY HEATH. I was not in the kitchen before I went to church; my mother and sister went out before me - they did not go into the kitchen as we went out.

Cross-examined. Q.Might they not have gone in before they went out? A. They might.

FANNY MIDDLE . The tea-spoons were used at tea, the salt, table, and gravy spoons at dinner; the dessert-spoons were not used that day - I put the table and gravy-spoons into the drawer about two o'clock, after dinner, and the tea-spoons in the closet about ten minutes before I went out; I am quite sure of that - there could be no occasion for them to be used after I left; I found them clean, as I had left them.

JURY. Q. Is it customary for your mistress to take the plate up stairs in the evening? A. No, never - they were not locked up.

JURY to MR. HEATH. Q. Have you any recollection of the person who looked into the dining-room? A. No- there could be no spoons wanted after the servant went out, that I know of; I wanted none, and saw none used - my wife occasionally goes into the kitchen: I think the bell rang about ten minutes after the family went out - the ring was repeated in about two minutes, and in about ten minutes the man appeared at my room door; there is a small room, about six feet five inches, between the room I was in and the kitchen; the cupboard might have opened without my hearing it.

Prisoner's Defence. Passing the prosecutor's house on the night named in the indictment, there was a quantity of persons at the corner of Cock-lane; I passed through the crowd, and at that moment a shutter fell from the prosecutor's window, which knocked me down, and knocked my hat off - I got up, and followed the persons who I suspected; I was secured, and accused of the robbery: what I state is a fact, I assure you - it was evident to the persons who took me, that I had been knocked down; they saw my hands and side all over mud - my witnesses have been here four days, but were not aware of my being tried this morning.

MR. HEATH. The prisoner told me he had been knocked down; I went to the Compter to see if there was any mark or cut in his hand, as I found a lamp had been knocked down - he shewed me his hand, which had a mark of dry dirt on it; it did not appear to be street dirt - my opinion was that it was not street dirt; his hand was not cut.

JURY. Q. What communication is there between the warehouse and dwelling-house? A.There is a door between two rooms, in the further room is the window from which the person escaped; that door was fastened on Saturday night, after the men left, I am certain; it is a ground floor window - the shutters were fastened inside by a screw not: I had two candles burning in my dining-room - the light could be seen outside from three windows, as the shutters were not shut; there is a key-hole to the parlour door; after the robbery the warehouse door between the back and front rooms was found open - no violence had been done to it; it had only been bolted: the warehouse and house are all under one roof - I went down stairs my

self after returning to the dining-room, before I went to the window to give an alarm, and before the men had got out of the window.

ROBERT CARTER. I am a pavior, and live at No. 23, Cock-lane, about one hundred yards from the back of Mr. Heath's premises. On the Sunday night in question I had occasion to come down to the back yard, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran down the street, and the moment I got there the shutter was forced out - it very nearly fell on my shoulder; the prisoner then jumped out of the window, and ran up the street as fast as possible - he was without his hat; I am certain he is the man; I ran after him quite close, and saw him secured - I went back to Mr. Heath's house in about a quarter of an hour, and saw the hat picked up at the bottom of the stairs; on searching a little further I found two small crow-bars on the desk near the window he had jumped out of.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you very good sight? A. Yes, pretty fair with one eye - I cannot see with the other eye; the shutter falling did not alarm me - I got out of the way of it; it might distract my attention a little - I only saw one man jump out of the window; I took notice of nobody else, but went after him - whether he had been concealed in the house before I cannot say; the prosecutor's front door is on Snow-bill - it is a public street, and much frequented.

JURY. Q.Do you know what time it was? A. I will not positively say, but we took him to the watch-house, and got back by half-past seven o'clock; there is a gaslight in the lane - I was close to him, and saw him come out of the window; I ran close after him, and never lost sight of him for a moment; he was not ten yards from me when he jumped out; Hanley, the officer, ran round with me - I do not know who else was in pursuit.

[Wednesday Jan. 20.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, having offered no personal violence.

Reference Number: t18300114-5

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

238. WILLIAM ADAMS and WILLIAM MEALING were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , at St. George, Hanover-square, 29 silver spoons, value 20l.; 4 silver sauce-ladles, value 4l.; 31 forks, value 20l.; 1 silver ink-stand, value 2l.; 2 silver salt holders, value 2l.; I silver stand, value 1l.; 2 pairs of spectacles, value 1l.; 1 silver cup, value 2l.; 19 knives, value 3l.; I silver sugar-sifter, value 5s.; 2 pairs of nut-crackers, value 5s.; 2 silver skewers, value 15s.; 3 pencil-cases, value 10s.; I silver cork-screw, value 10s.; 1 silver nutmeg-grater, value 5s.; 1 silver thimble, value 1s.; 5 pairs of ear-rings, value 3l.; 1 ivory box, value 1s.; 2 penknives, value 1s.; I silver extinguisher, value 10s.; I musical-box, value 2l.; I gilt chain, value 5s.; 1 pocket-book, value 1s,; I case of instruments, value 5s.; 1 reticule, value 2s.; 1 silk case and purse, value 1s.; 5 gold rings, value 2l.; 8 brooches, value 3l.; 1 necklace, value 1l.; 2 bracelets, value 1l.; I silk watch-guard, value 1s., and 2 cornelian crosses, and chains, value 1l., the goods of Elizabeth Musgrave , in her dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MISS ELIZABETH MUSGRAVE. I live at No. 27, Green-street, Park-lane, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . The prisoner Adams lived in my service fo about seventeen months, but was not in my service on Christmas-eve; he left on the 12th of August - I knew he was in the habit of visiting at the house after that. I spent Christmas-eve out - my plate was kept in a chest, in my bed-room closet, and was there when I left home on Christmas-eve; I returned a little after twelve o'clock, and found the house in a state of alarm - part of my plate was gone; this was Thursday, and on the Sunday following I saw the plate, now produced (looking at it) it is all mine, and has my crest upon it; I know nothing of Mealing - the plate produced is worth about 50l.; the house is my dwelling-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. What character did Adams bear in your service? A. I thought he bore a good character or I should not have kept him; I allowed him to visit the house afterwards.

AGNES SMITH . I lived with Miss Musgrave on Christmas-eve, and have been twenty-two months in her service; I know Adams and Mealing - I have seen Mealing at the house twice. On Christmas-eve I let in Adams, and Mary Mealing was with him; Adams staid in the kitchen about an hour and a half, or three quarters - we drank some liquor, and played at cards together; Adams did not leave the kitchen after we began to play at cards, but before that,(after he came in) he went out alone for some gin and cloves, and when he returned he rang the bell; I went up and let him in - he had let himself out; about half an hour after we began to play at cards, I heard a noise outside the house, and a whistle; I went into the area to look, but could see nothing - I heard the front door slam too about an hour after that: Adams was with me at that time - I said, "What door is that? it sounds like our street-door;" and told him to come up stairs with me to see - he came up, and after searching some other rooms, I went to mistress' bed-room, found the cupboard door open, and several things laying about the floor; the parlours and drawing-room were not disturbed - I ran down stairs, and called the Police; Adams was with me, and assisted in calling them - Bond and Bates came; I know this plate.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known Adams before he was in the service? A. No; I lived there all the time with him - he bore an honest character; he assisted me to call the Police when I discovered the robbery.

COURT. Q. Who were playing at cards? A. Adams, Mary Mealing, and I - Mary Mealing came with Adams, and remained down stairs all the time: she never went up.

WILLIAM BOND. I was a serjeant of the Police, but have since been promoted. On Christmas-eve, about quarter-past ten o'clock, I was called to Miss Musgrave's house, and saw Agnes Smith - I was joined by two Police-men; I saw Adams and Mary Mealing - I searched the house from top to bottom; the bed-room cupboard was open, and things disturbed as the witness has stated - I found a chisel in the bed-room, under the drawers; I examined the house outside - no violence whatever had been used outside: I took Adams, Mary Mealing , and Mary Evans, who is the cook, into custody; Evans and Mealing have been discharged - when I found Adams did not belong to the house, I questioned him; he denied all knowledge of the robbery - I took every body found in the house into custody, except Smith and the footman, who came in after

wards; Evans had been out, and returned while I was in the house.

BENJAMIN BATES . I am an inspector of the Police. I joined Bond on Christmas-eve, and took Adams, Evans, and Mary Mealing to the watch-house; next morning I saw Adams, and in consequence of something I heard I went to No. 12, Rochester-row, Vauxhall-road - Clements was there, and the prisoner Mealing; we took him into custody. On the Saturday following I was at the Police-office, when the prisoners were examined - I accompanied Adams and Mary Mealing from the office to Tothillfields prison; I said nothing to induce them to say any thing about the robbery; as we went along Adams said he wished to state the whole affair of the robbery.

MR. CRESSWELL. Q. Was Miss Musgrave at the house on the night of the robbery? A. She came before I left - she stated that if they would confess, it would better for them; Adams, and all the servants were present - the prosecutrix said to Adams, would he confess, it would be better for him - that she should be likely to look over it.

Q. Did she say if her property was found, she would freely pardon the party? A. I believe that was said, but he denied all knowledge of it - Adams did not see her after that, except at the office.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you pretend that you recollect the prosecutrix's exact words? A. Yes, as near as possible.

Q. Was not what she said, "If you will tell me on the instant, and not give me further trouble, but tell me all you know about it, I will look over it? A. Yes, that is as near as possible.

MISS MUSGRAVE. I came home and found my house in disorder; I said to all the servants present, and in Adams' presence, "If you will now, at this moment, confess the truth, and tell me where my property is, I will tell you, 'Go, and sin no more,' and will forgive you;" I am certain I confined my promise to that moment.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. Were you not some what alarmed? A. Very much, and my feelings excited, but am positive those are the words I used.

BENJAMIN BATES re-examined. On our road from the office to Tothill-fields, Adams stated he wished to state the whole affair of the robbery, and that the girls were innocent; nothing more passed till we got to a public-house - I said, "We will go into a private room," and on getting into the private room, Adams wrote this paper,(see No. 1) - I have had it ever since; I am quite certain I said nothing to induce him to do this - I did not tell him it would be given in evidence against him; he said he wished to write all the affair to save the girls - after reading this paper, I went with Clements and Bond to Appleyard's, Princes-row, near the work-house, at Lambeth; I saw a chest there, and in it found the property now produced - I did not see Mealing there myself, and do not know who the chest belonged to; I saw Harriet Appleyard there - (paper read) -

No. 1. I do hereby certify that William Mealing and myself are the only persons concerned in this robbery, to my knowledge; if the property is not sold, it is my opinion it could be found at Mr. Appleyard's, carpenter, Lambeth, a little distance from the work-house, in a chest belonging to William Mealing - he is the person who entered the house on Thursday night last by my means, and was planned by us two, and no one else.

26th December, 1829. (Signed.) ADAMS,

JOHN FREDERICK CLEMENTS. I was a serjeant of the Police, but have since been promoted. I saw Adams in the watch-house - he told me he wished to have pen, ink, and paper; I neither threatened, nor promised him any thing - I saw him write this paper; I told him to be careful of what he wrote, as it might come against him -I have the paper he wrote; when I cautioned him to be careful, he said it was his intention to write to Mealing, the girl who was up stairs, because she was innocent - he wrote this paper; I saw Mary Mealing afterwards, and in consequence of what passed between me and her, I went in a coach to Rochester-row, and apprehended the prisoner Mealing - while I was handcuffing him, Bates and Bond came in; I told Mealing his sister was in trouble: when I first went in, he stood and looked at me - I said, "It is concerning some plate of Miss Musgrave's," and that I apprehended him on suspicion of being concerned in the robbery; he positively denied knowing any thing about it - I took him to the watch-house, and in the watch-house he asked me to allow him pencil and paper to write to Adams, which I allowed him; I held out neither threat nor promise to him - I saw him write a paper, which I produce; I did not tell him to be cautious what he wrote - in consequence of something, I went to Appleyard's, No. 6, Princes-row, broke open a chest, and found this basket, containing the plate produced - it was afterwards shown to the prosecutrix, who identified it; (papers read) -

Mary, I am sorry to inform you that I am guilty, but you and Mary are quite innocent; I hope you will be liberated by this - my partner is one that is a near relation to you.

I remain, WILLIAM ADAMS .

Old friend, you had better say no more of me than you see, if you do you will say more than is true - I am not the one; I wish you to look to what you say - I think you have said more than you ought; if you wish to be transported, I had rather not - there is some mistake; be careful for my sake.

WILLIAM MEALING .

HARRIET APPLEYARD . I am the wife of William Appleyard - we live at No. 16, Princes-row, Lambeth. I know the prisoner Mealing - he went by the name of Warren; he did not lodge at my house - my husband worked with him this time twelve months; I had seen him at our house: the chest the officer broke open belonged to him - he asked my husband to let it stand at our house; I was not present then, but have seen him go to the chest - his tools were in it; he was not very often at our house; he used to come to bring his tools - I did not see him on Christmas-day, when he came in, as I was very ill, but I heard his voice, and was perfectly certain it was him; I asked him to breakfast - he said, "No thank you, there is a man waiting for me in the road;" I desired him to call at the new chapel to ask my husband to come home to breakfast; he just stepped into the back parlour - his chest was in the kitchen; I was in the front parlour - he might have gone to the kitchen without my knowledge - he could have gone through the passage: the Policeman came to my house next day - I saw him break open the chest, and find these articles.

WILLIAM APPLEYARD . I am the son of the last witness, and am going on for thirteen years old. I knew Mealing by the name of Warren, and have seen him at my father's house - I saw him there on Christmas-day, about nine

o'clock in the morning; I let him in, and observed that he had a basket under the skirts of his coat - he went into the kitchen to his tool-chest, and I went into the parlour to my mother; I did not see him come out of the kitchen he stepped into the back parlour, and had a large handscrew in his hand - that was not in his hand when he went into the kitchen; my mother asked him to stop to breakfast - he said he could not, because he had a young man waiting for him; I could not identify the basket again - I only saw the bottom of it.

COURT. Q. You saw him go into the kitchen with the basket - when he came into the parlour had he the basket? A. No - I could not see whether any thing was in the basket.

WILLIAM CHURCH. I am a Police-constable. On Christmas-eve I was on duty in Green-street, where Miss Musgrave lives, and saw the prisoner Mealing directly opposite her house, between nine and half-past nine o'clock - it was after nine; I saw him twice within the half-hour in the same street - when I first saw him he was standing there with his hands in his pockets; I walked by him - he turned his back, and walked away deliberately; on seeing him the second time he was in the same street - I saw him all along the street; he came deliberately up the street, and passed Miss Musgrave's house: on observing me he mended his pace, and walked very quick towards Park-lane - I never saw him before, but have not the least doubt of him; I cannot be mistaken.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. What kind of a night was it? A. The street is very light with gas; I only saw him twice to notice him - it was merely in passing by that I noticed him; I saw him again at the first examination at Marlborough-street, on the Saturday - I took particular notice of him, having suspicion, as I saw him walk down the street, and then return: I swear to his person.

JOHN FREDERICK CLEMENTS re-examined. I found this basket in the chest, with an apron covered over the plate - it was all thrown into the basket, with the jewellery and different things in a bag.

MISS MUSGRAVE. The basket does not belong to me- I had seen the property some days before, it was locked in a chest; I am certain it was in my room when I went out, according to my idea - another key was taken out of a drawer to open the closet, and also keys to open the chest.

Q.When can you take upon yourself to say the chest was actually locked? A. Some days previous - I did not use the plate in that box every day; this chisel does not belong to me - I never saw it till that night.

WILLIAM APPLEYARD. It appeared to be a basket of this sort.

Adam's Defence. I doubt whether it will be of any use, but the prosecutrix has denied what she promised on the night of the robbery - Clements has denied what he told me when I wrote what I have, and Bates the same; Mr. Monteith and Captain Monteith came home with the prosecutrix on the night of the robbery - and Mr. Monteith said, "William, do you hear what Miss Musgrave says? if the property is restored she will forgive all." and Bates told me the more I said the better it would be for me - I told him the young women were innocent, and it was wrong for the innocent to suffer for the guilty - he said it was; I told him the promise the prosecutrix had made, and he said, "She may consider of it."

Mealing's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery - I was at another place that evening, and expect I have witnesses to say where I was; the property might be put into my chest, but not by me, nor had I the key of the chest at the time.

MRS. APPLEYARD. The chest had been at my house since August or September - he had the key himself.

Prisoner Mealing. The person I stated was outside the door, when she asked me to stop breakfast, is the person who had the key of my chest, and brought in what was found there, the basket and plate; that basket was never in my possession - he asked me to take care of them; I would not have them - I said, "You may put them into my chest if you like, here is the key;" while I was talking to Mrs. Appleyard I suppose he came in, and put them into my chest privately - I was at Mr. Francis', Spread Eagle, Lambeth-road; I slept there on the night of the robbery - I got there at twenty minutes or a quarter before ten o'clock; it was my handscrew that I got from the chest.

WILLIAM APPLEYARD re-examined. Q. You say he said there was a man waiting for him at the door, did you see whether there was any man at the door? A. No - I am sure nobody came into the house but Mealing; nobody but him went into the kitchen.

Prisoner Mealing. Q.When you let me in you went into the parlour to your mother? A. Yes - I shut the door; I do not know whether I shut it close.

Prisoner Mealing. While I was speaking to his mother in the parlour, a person came in; I believe the boy was in the parlour at the time.

Five witnesses deposed to Adams' good character, and two to that of Mealing.

ADAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

MEALING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Both Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of their character; the Prosecutrix joined in recommending Adams to Mercy. Adams was too ill at the end of the Session to receive judgment.[Thursday, Jan. 14.]

Reference Number: t18300114-6

First Middlesex Jury,

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

239. JAMES WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , at St. John, Hampstead, 1 gelding, price 30l. , the property of John Froggatt .

JOHN FROGGATT . I am a farmer , and live in the parish of Hampstead . The prisoner worked for me for the last four months - he came to me some time in September, and was working with me at the time in question; this gelding was taken on the 20th of December, or early in the morning of the 21st; I had not seen it myself for two or three days - my servant attended to it; I found it on the Monday in a stable at Edgware, in the custody of George Wilson - it was mine.

GEORGE WILSON . On Monday, the 21st of December, I saw the prisoner on the road from Pinner to Rickmansworth, on this horse; he asked me the way to Amersham, and how far it was - I said fourteen miles; I told him he had a shoe off, and the horse would be crippled

unless he had one put on - he said he would get one at the next blacksmith's; I said it would be crippled, and left him - I afterwards heard he had been offering the horse for sale; I then saddled my horse, and overtook him on the road from Rickmansworth to Amersham - when I came up to him he asked if I could write; I said I could not - he said he wanted a direction wrote where he was going to take the horse, for he had lost his direction; I asked whose horse it was, and where he was going to take it - he said it was his uncle's, and he was taking it to Stoke; I said, "You have got a stont useful horse" - he said, "Yes, and I will sell him to you if you will buy him; I was to sell him if I could" - I asked what wanted for it; he said he was to make thirty guineas of him if he could, but I should have him for 7l. - I said I would give him 5l.; he said that was too little, but if I would give him the money there I should have it - I said I had no money with me, as I did not think of buying a horse, but if he would turn back with me I would pay him for it, and, as it was very cold, I would give him a little of my elder wine; he turned back, and went to my house, which is about a mile and a half - I gave him some wine, and sent for an officer; I did not give him the money - I gave him into the custody of Leach, who is not here; I took the horse before the Magistrate, who gave me orders to take care of it, which I did from Monday to Wednesday, when Froggatt saw and claimed it - it was the same horse.

WILLIAM STEWARD. I am in Mr. Froggatt's service. I locked the horse up about a quarter past four o'clock on Sunday afternoon, in the barn at the farm, with two more - I missed it on Monday morning, at a quarter to seven o'clock; the door was locked - I saw it again at Edgware on Wednesday, in Wilson's possession; I have known it about nine months - it is the same, and belongs to my master; he was there, and claimed it - it had been taken out at the back door, which was bolted inside at night: I found it unbolted in the morning, but latched - the prisoner was in master's service; he was discharged on that Sunday morning.

GEORGE JORDAN . On Monday morning, the 21st of December, about half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner and this horse at the Red Lion, at Pinner; he was standing there on the horse, and a great many people round him - a man, named William Oldfield, asked what he wanted for the horse; he said thirty guineas - the man said he had not got thirty guineas, but he had a 5l. note in his pocket if he would take that; he said, "I will, and will call on you in about a month - if the horse suits you can pay the 25l.," and if it did not suit him he would take the horse and return the 5l.: I went up to him after that, and said, "You have stolen this horse" - he said, "No, I have not, it belongs to my uncle;" I said,"Where did you bring it from?" he said it had been at Westminster three months to a gentleman on trial - the gentleman had wrote to his uncle to send for it, and his uncle sent him for it, and told him to be sure and sell it for what he could get before he got home; I took hold of the horse - he struck me with a stick, and rode off - I met Wilson, and told him the circumstance.

JOHN FROGGATT. I saw the horse in Wilson's custody; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor friendless chap, and hope you will be as easy as you can with me.

[Thursday, Jan. 14.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18300114-7

First Middlesex Jury, Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

240. WILLIAM JOBBINS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Briant , on the 23rd of December , at St. Mary Abbotts , Kensington, and stealing therein 1 whip, value 4s. , his property.

WILLIAM BRIANT. I live at No. 8, Strong's-place, Fulham-road, in the parish of Kensington , and am a saddler . I have known the prisoner about nine months - he is a private watchman of Chelsea parish; he shut up my shop once or twice - the last time was about three months ago, and I missed the key of the door at that time; it usually hung on the door inside - I missed it the day after he shut up; it is the key of the shop door, which opens into the street. On Wednesday, the 23rd of December, about twenty minutes past seven o'clock, Burgess, my lodger, went out, and in three or four minutes I heard the shop door unlocked, and saw the reflection of a light through the bottom of the door of my bed-room, which is next the shop - I immediately got up, opened the bedroom window, and saw the prisoner running away from the door with a whip in his hand; he was just shutting the shop door too at the time - I did not call to him; as soon as I found out where he lived I went, and found the whip on his premises - that was on the same day; as soon as my lodger came home I went and inquired after him, and went with one McKenzie to his lodgings, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning; he was in bed there -I did not see him, but an old lady gave up the whip; I knew it to be the one I had seen in his hand by a particular mark - I had very few of them at that time; it was not my make - it was delivered to McKenzie, who gave it to Hughes; I did not see the prisoner in the house at that time - I inquired of the neighbours for his house; the whip is worth 4s. 6d.; I got a warrant, and searched his house - there was another charge against him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to swear you have any other charge against him? A. No- I never had any quarrel with him.

Q. On your oath, did you never ask him not to take notice if you moved any goods out in the night? A. Never - that I swear; I did not call after him, as I did not know but my lodger might have let him have a whip from the shop, as he has done so to other people, and told me afterwards; I have been threatened with an execution for rent - the prisoner came to me tipsy in the evening; I had been to his house then, and got the whip.

Q. If he was in bed, why not take him? A. I had never been in such a case before, and did not know any thing about it; his wife called at my house in the evening when I was out - when he came he said, "This is a strange thing your accusing me with the whip;" I told him the Watch Committee wished me to prosecute him - they had been to me about it; I did not then give him in charge, as I knew nothing about it - he was taken very soon after; a constable was sent for - I did not send for one; he was allowed to go from my house - I went to

the office with him and the officer; he went willingly - the office was shut, and he returned home; I believe he was on duty next night - I went to the office next day, and saw him and Hughes together on the road going to the office; I swear I found the same whip as I saw him with - I saw the top of it; any one seeing it would know it again - there is a button on the bottom of it; I could not see that as he carried it - I swear it is mine; I cannot say I could identify it when I saw it out of window, but he brought it out of my shop.

COURT. Q. Had you seen that whip the night before? A. Yes, and missed it directly I came down stairs; I swear it is the one I lost.

CHARLES HAYWARD HUGHES I am a constable of St. Luke, Chelsea. I went by desire of the Watch Committee with the prosecutor to the house of McKenzie, who gave me this whip; we then went to the prisoner's house, in Frances-street, Chelsea, with the whip - his wife called him in out of the yard; I told him I had come to inquire about this whip - that there were strong suspicions about it; he replied, "I found it near the saddler's door" - I said it was necessary we should go before a Magistrate to inquire into it; he said he was very willing to do so, and said it was necessary the ostler of the public-house should be with him, to whom he had made a communication respecting two whips and some reins standing up on the mail-coach as it passed in the morning - I sent for the ostler, and we proceeded for an officer to Queen-square, Westminster; we were too late, and next morning we went to Marlborough-street - I told the prisoner to bring the ostler there with the reins, but he said it was of no consequence; he was examined and remanded for a week.

Cross-examined. Q.Finding the office shut, you let him go for the night? A. Yes; he went on his duty as usual, and next day came to my house by appointment, about ten o'clock; I was not ready - he went away, and came again; he knew he was charged with stealing a whip - I went to the prosecutor's, and found the prisoner waiting for me to go to the office.

JOHN BURGESS. I am a labourer, and lodge at Briant's. On Wednesday, the 23rd of December, I went out at twenty minutes past seven o'clock; I shut the door - I opened it with a key, and left it on the spring lock; I drew it after me - I always try it, and am sure it was fast.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any thing to do with the whip trade? A. No; I never sold whips out of the prosecutor's shop - I have given out harness which has been repaired; I never gave out whips - I have been there when his child has given out an old whip which has been repaired.

JURY to WILLIAM BRIANT. Q. How could you see him to know him; could you see his face? A. Yes, and he had his lantern.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[Thursday Jan. 14. GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 49.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy, on account of his character.

Reference Number: t18300114-8

Second Middlesex Jury.

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

241. JAMES BUTLER and JOHN PICHOTT were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Timewell , on the 22nd of November , at Paddington, and stealing therein 1 tippet, value 3l.; 2 shirts, value 4s.; 1 gown, value 10s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 10s.; 1 clasp, value 2s.; 1 eye-glass and chain, value 1l.; 1 brooch, value 1s.; 1 ear-ring, value 1s.; 2 ear-ring drops, value 6d.; 1 cravat, value 9d., and 6 keys, value 1s., the goods of James Timewell; and 1 shawl, value 5s., the goods of Zilpah Sharp ; and 10 pieces of linen, value 14s. , the goods of Elizabeth Sharp .

JAMES TIMEWELL . I live at No. 96, Junction-terrace, Edgware-road, Paddington, in the parish of St. Mary - it is my dwelling-house. On Sunday evening, the 22nd of November, I went out at half-past six o'clock, with my wife; I left all the doors locked - the drawing-room, the kitchen, and shop were locked, and I had the keys; the outer door was on the spring lock - that is the private street door; there was nobody in the house, but I did not know that when I left, for an elderly lady resides in the upper part, who seldom goes out, but I found she had gone that afternoon to see her daughter; we returned at half-past eight o'clock, and found the private door wide open, and also the door leading to the shop, which faces the private door - I left my wife at the door to see that nobody came out, while I called a watchman, who returned with me to the house - he came inside, and fastened the street-door, while I got a light, and went with him through the house to see if any body was there, but found nobody - we went into the kitchen, which had been broken open by a crow-bar, which was found, and fitted the marks; the drawers and closets were entirely turned out, and what they chose was taken - every thing was taken out of the closet and drawers in the kitchen, and thrown on the floor; we then went into the front shop, the door of of which was broken open by the crow-bar, and every thing, that was in a desk, which stood on my counter, was taken out, and thrown on the floor; I missed nothing from the desk - the whole of the doors throughout, from the kitchen to the attic, were broken open; every drawer, and closet, the wardrobe, and every place was ransacked, and what was not taken away, was left on the floors - the beds, bedding, mattress, and every thing was thrown about; I lost two shirts, a pair of bracelets, two pairs of ear-rings, two pairs of ear-drops, a gold ring, a gilt chain, an eye-glass, a brooch, with my initials upon it, and a variety of other things, some of which have not been found - twelve shirts, one silk gown, a black silk dress, a chain, an eye-glass, and other things have been found, also a chinchilla fur tippet, and a pair of pearl-drops, in a little paper box; all the keys which were left in the house were taken away - I had seen most of the things in the house the same day; the silk gown, the bracelets, chain, and tippet - I saw some of them again, on the 6th of December, at No. 18, Drummond-street, and some at the watch-house, in Albany-street, Regent's-park.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Had you any servant living in the house? A. No - our servant had left us, and the other had not come; the old lady is not here - she came home at ten o'clock, and I let her in myself; I cannot swear she was not in the house when I left, nor that she had not gone out, and left some of the doors open.

ELIZABETH SHARP. I live at Mr. Timewell's house.

I am the old lady's daughter - I went out with her that day, before six o'clock; I know we went out before Mr. Timewell - we came back together about nine; Timewell had then come home - I found the house all in confusion: I had left our door locked - it was broken open, and a burean in our door had the top broken off; my mother's name is Zilpah - there was a silk gown, and two shawls of here taken; one of which I have since seen, first at the watch-house, and then at High-street - two shirts have been found.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. What time did you leave the house? A. Some time before six o'clock, and returned a little before or after nine; the house is about a mile from Regent's-park.

HENRY WILLIAM MORRISON. I am a serjeant of the Police. I saw Butler in the watch-house on the 6th of December, and asked him where he lived - he said in the Edgware-road; I asked where there - he said near the turnpike; I asked how many doors from the turnpike - he said he did not know; I asked the number - he said he did not know, and that it was a private house, he believed; I said I thought he did not live in the Edgware-road - I took him down, locked him up, and went to his house immediately, with Weatherly, who took me to Drummond-street (he is not here) we made inquiries at a public-house, and in consequence of information, went to No. 80, Drummond-street, Paddington, and on coming to the door, a little girl came - I went into the house; a female stook in the passage, who said her name was Butler- I only know it to be his house from information; I found in that house, among other property, a fur tippet, two shirts, a silk gown, a buff handkerchief, six keys, and several articles of jewellery; I have had no communication with Butler about these articles. On the Tuesday following, I went to Pichott's, No. 25, Chester-terrace, Regent's-park - I knew he lived there; I found him and his wife there - they were removing; a van stood at the door, loaded with boxes - I told Pichott I was an officer, and asked him if Butler was there last Thursday; he said No, he was there last Sunday week - I then said I had come to search the house; I did so, but found nothing suspicious in the house - I then told him he must go to the watch-house, and I should take the van and goods there also, which I did; he said the whole of them were his boxes - after taking them out of the van I told him I wished him to be present, as I intended to search them; he, his wife, Watkins, and a female were present - I found this shawl, claimed by Sharp, in one of the boxes, and a pair of drops, claimed by Mr. Timewell, in one of them; this was on the 8th of December - I found a skeleton-key in a box, at Pichott's; a pocket tinder-box, and an instantaneous light-box in one of the boxes.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You call this a skeleton-key? A. I believe it to be one; it was newly field when I found it - I have been in the Police from the first commencement of the new system; I call a key which has been altered as this is, a skeleton - the wards have certainly been field down; the drop ear-rings were in Pichott's box on the 8th - the owner was not present at the time; I produced them at the office - they were not recognized there; Miss Sharp was present - there were three hearings; they were not recognized till after the prisoner was committed - they have been recognized only to day, by Mr. Timewell; he described them to me particularly before he saw them, and the moment he saw them in my hand he said they were his; he saw what I produced at the office, but I only produced what had been recognized at the watch-house - all the property was at the office, but not produced to him; it lay on the table, but his attention was not directed to them - he had not a full view of every thing on the table; he could not see it, unless he looked down direct upon it, for there were forty or fifty articles produced, and these might be covered over with some others - I believe they were; the witness' attention was only directed to what was recognized at the watch-house, and which I produced as theirs - they were told to look at the property on the table.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD. I know the house, No. 80, Drummond-street, to be Butler's; I have been employed by him himself; he let part of it out - I did not see the things found, and have had no conversation with him about them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Were you before the Grand Jury on this case? A. Not on this case; I was employed by Butler last about two years ago, but have seen him there since - I was there on the 18th of last September; he had one lodger on the first floor, and I believe there has been no other lodger, for I have had occasion to watch the house; I certainly cannot from my own knowledge say who has lodged there since September.

COURT. Q. You say he had a lodger? A. Yes, a female, who I have executed some warrants for; she had the first-floor, which is two rooms - I believe she had both; she seemed to have access to both.

WILLIAM HENRY MORRISON. I found the things in the back parlour, which is occupied as a bed-room; they were not on the first floor - here are some skeleton-keys which I found in Butler's back kitchen.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether that room might not have been let to a lodger? A. No, only from what Mrs. Butler said - I do not know Butler to be a carpenter.

EDWARD BURRIDGE. I am a constable of Marylebone Office. On Saturday, the 12th of December, I was hailed by a person in Marylebone-street, and saw a woman in company with a person I knew; she came up and said her name was Pichott - I received from her a bundle, containing two shirts, which Mrs. Sharp claimed at the office.

JAMES TIMEWELL. I can identify the whole of these articles; some I found myself at Butler's, and some at the office - the bracelets I found in a drawer in the back parlour, the chain, glass, silk dress, and two shirts; they were all in the house at the time of the robbery - I know the drops; I did not see them at the office, or I should have known them - I did not identify any of my property at the office; the drops were in the same drawer as the bracelets, and taken from the same place - the silk dress and tippet were in the front drawing-room; the property found in Pichott's boxes is mine.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q.You did not identify the property at the office? A. I mean I did not identify any fresh property there - I had examined it before; I was told to look at the property on the table, but I had examined it, and thought I had seen all that was mine before, but to-day is the first time I saw these drops - if I had seen them I

should have known them; I could point them out from among a thousand - the officer was opening a bundle to day, and I saw them, took them out, handed them to another officer, and told him a mark which was on them before I examined them.

MISS SHARP. This is my mother's shawl, and was in the room at the time.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q.Had you had it some time? A. Yes, four years, but never wore it; I took it out of the paper a week before the robbery, and looked at it; I know the pattern - there is no particular mark on it, but I am sure of it by the appearance, colour and pattern; I should know it among others, having had it so long.

Butler's Defence. Respecting the property, it was brought into my house by John Jennings - I did not know it was stolen; respecting the two shirts, I had took two to Mrs. Pichott, and asked her to mark them for me.

Picholt's Defence. Butler was known to my wife's first husband several years ago, and was at that time foreman at a lime-yard - I knew nothing of him then; it was five or six years ago - when I married my wife I went to live by the New-road; she met Butler, and told him what business I was in, and that I should be glad to serve him - I accordingly worked for him; he called and paid me ready money for every article I made for him, and took them away; I never went to his house - he was always represented to me as possessed of hundreds of pounds, and having a kiln of his own; at one time I heard he was independent.

HENRY TORIAS HAWKINS. I am a carpenter and joiner, and live at No. 9, Chester-terrace, Regent's-park; I am minding three houses there. On the 22nd of November I left my house at a quarter to six o'clock, and went to a place of worship in Charles-street, Hampstead-road; I got into the chapel about five minutes to six o'clock, and remained there till nine o'clock, I believe - I do not think I had got there more than three or four minutes before I saw Pichott sitting across a form near my pew door; I beckoned him into the pew which I have part of - he came in, and remained there till the service was over, which is generally at eight o'clock, a minute or two before or after; this was a mile and three quarters from some parts of the Edgware-road.

COURT. Q.Is Pichott an acquaintance of your's? A. I never exchanged more than ten words with him before; Mr. Wild preached at the chapel that night.

MARTHA WAGGETT. I live with my father in Henry-street, Hampstead-road. On the 22nd of November I went to the chapel in Charles-street, at six o'clock; Pichott was there when I went in - I sat near the pew in which he and Mr. Hawkins were; he remained there till the end of the service, and I spoke to him.

COURT. Q. Is he an old acquaintance of yours? A. He subscribes to the Missionary Society, for which I collect, and here is my book - that is the way I knew him; the service ended near eight o'clock.

JOSEPH WAGGETT . I am the last witnesses' brother - we live with our father. I went to chapel with her on the 22nd of November, and saw Pichott in Mr. Stevens' pew- Mr. Hawkins and his wife also sit there; his wife was not there that evening, she was ill - Pichott was there when the service began, and till it was over, which is generally about a quarter to eight o'clock.

COURT. Q. How do you happen to recollect the 22nd of November? A. I remember my sister speaking to him at the door, and a person at the same time asked my sister what Mr. Jackson was to preach the following Sunday morning, which was our Sunday School anniversary sermon - that was on the 29th; Mr. Wild preached that night.

THOMAS BLESSLEY. I live at No. 10, William-street, Regent's-park, about a mile and a quarter from Edgware-road. On the 22nd of November I saw Pichott at my house from a few minutes before eight o'clock till half-past ten; I had a sister insane, who had an inclination to have somebody to read to her, and I got him to come for that purpose, but he did not read, for she was not in a fit state; I am certain he came about a quarter before eight o'clock - I saw him out at my door at half-past ten o'clock, with his wife, who had come after him.

MARY ANN BLESSLEY. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 22nd of November, from ten minutes or a quarter before eight o'clock, I saw Pichott at our house - he came to read to a lunatic sister, but did not; he remained there till half-past ten - my husband and a lodger were with him; his wife came about nine.

JAMES McKENNER . I am a tailor, and live at No. 10, William-street, at Blessley's. On Sunday evening, the 22nd of November, about five o'clock, I called at Pichott's house, and remained with him till six, when he went to chapel, and I saw him again about a quarter-past eight - he was in my compay till a quarter after ten o'clock that evening, at Blessley's - his wife was with him when I called at his house; I went to Portland-road, returned about a quarter to seven, and remained in company with Mrs. Pichott till eight o'clock - she was sitting in the room with me, reading; I afterwards went to my lodging, as he had promised to come there to see a woman who was ill in the house; I went there at five or ten minutes past eight, and found him there - he said he had been there ten minutes - his wife came in about ten minutes; she had merely waited for a lodger to come from chapel - she left William-street with him.

LOUISA TURNER . I live at Blessley's. I saw Pichutt there on the 22nd of November; he came to read to a lunatic - she was not in a fit state, and he came into the room I was sitting in - I left the room a quarter before nine o'clock; he was there then - I saw him first about five minutes past eight; he was then in the lunatic's room - I had never seen him before, and remarked what a sedate, good sort of a man he appeared.

JOSEPH CARPENTER. I am in the employ of Mr. Robins, an auctioneer - he bought the house No. 25, Chester-terrace. I gave Pichott notice to quit, and on the day he left I went and ordered him to quit.

COURT. Q. When did the notice expire? A. He was merely there on sufferance; he quitted the day he was apprehended - I went there to see that he left; while the cart was at the door they came and seized the things.

BUTLER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

PICHOTT - NOT GUILTY .[Friday, Jun. 15.]

Reference Number: t18300114-9

First Middlesex Jury.

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

242. JAMES BUTLER was again indicted for fe

loniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Baylis , on the 6th of December , at St. Marylebone, and stealing therein 2 brooches, value 12s.; 1 earring, value 2s., and 3 pins, value 7s. , the goods of Alice Baylis .

CHARLES FREDERICK JAMES. I am a brewer, and live in Portland-town, directly opposite Mr. Baylis' private door. On Sunday, the 6th of December, I was in my brew-house, and saw two men standing before Mr. Baylis' private door, with their faces towards me - I took no particular notice of them, till I saw the prisoner Butler, who I knew before, by seeing him two or three times before; I saw him go to the private door, put his hand to the keyhole, and as I thought put a key in - he opened the door, went in, and shut it after him; I first saw him try as if the key did not answer the purpose, and then make a second attempt - I saw his hand at the key-hole, but saw nothing in his hand; the door was apparently shut before- I then ran into my parlour, told my wife, then went out, crossed over, looked up and down the street, and saw only a little boy, except the two men, who had shifted to the corner of the house; I went up to them, seeing nobody in the street, and said, "The sooner that man is out of the house the better;" I then went, and brought Webb, the officer - he went into the adjoining house to Baylis, and brought the prisoner out by the collar; I had observed him loitering about the house two or three Sundays previous, but never in the week-day - I went into the house in about two hours, and it was all in confusion; the bed-clothes, bed, and mattress were all turned over.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You saw the hand towards the door? A. Yes - I was across the street, which is narrow; from his position I suppose he was opening the door with a key - he might have been tapping at the door.

ALICE BAYLIS. I am the daughter of William Baylis, and live at No. 53, High-street, Portland-town , with him; he keeps a shop , and has a private door. On Sunday, the 6th of December, my father and mother went out at five minutes past eleven o'clock in the morning, leaving me alone in the house - I staid there till twenty minutes or half-past eleven, and then locked up the house; there are four rooms - I locked them all but the back room up stairs: I am sure I left nobody in the house - I locked the outer private door, and put the key into my pocket; I came back a little before twelve - my father and mother were not with me; I found the private door open, and the front bed-room door, which I had left locked was broken open - the bed turned off the bedstead, all the things turned over in a chest of drawers which was not locked; two brooches, three gold pins, and an ear-ring of mine were taken from one drawer, and were afterwards found on the stairs - I had left them in a drawer in the front bed-room; I had not seen them that morning, but am sure they were left there - I found them in Jackson's possession; I had put them in the drawer myself - I cannot exactly say when; I always keep them in one particular place in the drawer; these are them (examining them.)

SUSANNAH JAMES. My husband gave me information of this - I did not see the man go in; I saw a man at the first floor window, and alarmed the neighbours - the prisoner was brought out.

SAMUEL WEBB . I am an officer. About half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by my wife -I was asleep in the first floor room; I heard there was a thief in Baylis' house - I dressed, and got to the house in four minutes; I went round to the front door, examined it and found it closed - I then went through the shop of Mr. Pratt, a butcher, next door, and got over the wall into Baylis' yard, as the people surrounding the house said the thief was in the yard; I searched the wash-house and privy - he was not there, but on turning round I saw him through the staircase window, coming down the prosecutor's stairs - it was the prisoner; I went round, and posted two housekeepers at the front door - then returned over the wall into Baylis' yard; I found the back door fastened - I stepped five or six yards from the door, heard it open, and the prisoner came out; I collared him, and brought him through the house into High-street - I then got Jackson to mind the house, took the prisoner down the street, and met Soper, an officer - I then put my hand into the prisoner's coat pocket, and took out this crowbar; Soper took out this picklock-key - a small box-key, and a comb were found on him, and a large blue bag in his hat, with his handkerchief: I handcuffed him, and took him to the watch-house in Regent's-park - he was searched by the serjeant, but nothing more was found, except his handkerchief, which I gave him to wipe his hand which was bleeding very severely when I took him; I returned to the house, and found the front bed-room on the first floor broken open - here is the screw of the case the lock goes into, it appeared to have been forced off by this crow-bar; three bureau drawers were opened, every article taken on, and thrown on the floor - the drawers were open, they stood in the front bed-room; I then saw three boxes open, every article taken out, and strewed about the room - he made no resistance.

ISAAC NEWTON JACKSON . I live directly opposite Baylis' house. On the 6th of December, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I went out, seeing a few people collected in the street; I saw Webb, and went through the next house over the wall with him - while I was on the wall I saw the prisoner coming down stairs, by the staircase window; he came out at the door - I jumped off the wall, and Webb took him; I went into the house to mind it - I found there three pins, two brooches, and an ear-ring in pasteboard boxes, at the foot of the staircase - I showed them to Alice Baylis, who claimed them; I gave them to the officer - those produced are the same; I found two skeleton-keys under the mat of the door, and gave them to Manning.

JOHN MANNING. I am an officer. These keys were given to me; I produce them - I had charge of the prisoner during the night of the 6th of December and on the 7th; I held out no threat or promise to him - he asked me if James was in custody; I asked him what James - he said John James, or if Charley Box was in custody; I asked why he inquired - he said, "Because they were with me in it yesterday;" we had been talking about breaking into Baylis' house - he asked me what Baylis had lost; I told him I believed nothing was taken away, but some things were found on the stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search to see if any one might have been secreted in the house to let him in? A.

I searched the house, and found nobody in it - I did not search every room.

[Saturday, Jan. 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.(See Sixth Day, New Court.)

Reference Number: t18300114-10

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

243. JAMES SILVESTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Baker , on the 10th of December , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing therein 2 coats, value 50s. , the goods of John Baker .

JAMES BAKER . I am a surgeon , and live in New North-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch - my outer street door is kept open all day; there is an inner door across the passage, which is fastened by a latch lock, and cannot be opened outside without a key: a stranger cannot get in without ringing the bell. On the 10th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the front kitchen, and heard some person trying a key or keys to the middle door in the passage; I sent Evans, the servant, to see who was there - I heard him call Stop thief! I ran up stairs, followed him along the road, and the prisoner was secured by a gentleman; he appeared dreadfully agitated, and begged I would not be hard with him - he seemed greatly penitent, and said he was in great distress; I had neither promised him any thing nor threatened him: two coats hung in my passage five minutes before - they belonged to my brother John - they were gone, and dropped near the outer door; he was brought back to my house, and in my presence three keys were found on him, two of which opened my door, also a strap and dog-collar, and a bit of scented liver, which is used to attract dogs.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you have made inquiry about him? A. I have seen his parents and cousin; I believe they are highly respectable - he appeared very much distressed.

SAMUEL EVANS. I am Mr. Baker's servant. I was in the kitchen - my master sent me up; I heard a noise in the passage, and when I got up I saw the prisoner run down the steps, and the two coats laying in the passage - he dropped them on hearing me come up stairs; I saw him about a yard from the door - he ran away: I gave an alarm, and pursued him; I had not seen him with the coats - he was never out of my sight; I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw him with the coats? A. No - I saw them down in the middle of the passage, on the ground in the inner passage: they had been hanging up on pegs before.

Q. A tall man rushing by in a hurry might brush them down? A. If he was inside the door he might. I had been in the passage half an hour before.

SARAH BARTON . I am Mr. Baker's servant. On the Thursday in question I was in the kitchen, and went up to let a lady out five minutes before this happened; the coats then hung up perfectly safe - when I opened the middle door I saw the prisoner trying the surgery door, and asked what he wanted; he asked if we wanted any leeches - I asked if master ever dealt with him; he said he had bought some of him before - I told him to wait, and called to master to know if he wanted any: I went to the door, and told him master wanted none - he turned away from the door, and I shut it; in five minutes I heard the door open, and there was a cry of Stop thief! I had latched the door - I saw the coats in the outer passage, after the alarm.

Cross-examined. Q. The boy says they were in the inside passage? A. It is his mistake - they laid towards the street door; he pulled the middle door after him when he heard us coming up stairs, and dropped the coats in the outer passage - I had let Mrs. Derbyshire out; I tried the door, and it was latched.

SAMUEL EVANS . It was my mistake; the coats hung in the inner passage - they were picked up between the two doors; I made a mistake before.

JAMES PINKERTON. I am an officer, and produce the coats - I searched the prisoner, and found three keys, two of which open this passage door.

MR. BAKER. These are my brother's coats.

MR. PHILLIPS to SARAH BARTON . Q.When the prisoner was brought back did not Mr. Baker ask if you had shut the door? A. He did; I did not say I did not know- I said I was most positive I shut it; I said that in the shop - master did not scold me, and say he was always telling me of it.

MR. BAKER. I asked if she shut the door; she said, "I am most positive that I did;" I believe I said, "I am often talking to you about shutting the door, and hope you did shut it:" this was before the keys were found on the prisoner - I said something about its being a temptation, as she had at times left it open - it has been left open.

Prisoner's Defence. I had both leeches and senna leaves to sell.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

[Saturday, Jan. 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, not having offered any violence.

Reference Number: t18300114-11

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

244. ROBERT WINTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Law , on the 10th of October , at Enfield, and stealing therein 4 coats, value 3l. 10s.; 2 waistcoats, value 10s.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 16s.; 1 hat, value 6s.; 1 smock-frock, value 3s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 5s. , his property.

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

MARY LAW . I am the wife of John Law - we live at Clay-hill, in the parish of Enfield . On the 10th of October, at one o'clock in the day, I and my husband went out to work, leaving the house safely fastened, and took the key with us; the articles stated in the indictment were in the house; on our return, between five and six o'clock, I saw a pane of glass was broken, and the front window open - any body could get in - I missed all our clothes; I have since seen a pair of breeches, a waistcoat, and a smock-frock.

COURT. Q. When you went out was the window fast? A. Yes - the pane of glass being broken they could put a hand in and unfasten it; there was a little place broken in the glass in the morning, but not large enough for a hand to be put through - the window was hasped; it is on the ground floor - I found my bed-room window open, which was shut before; they had got out there, I

suppose - the property was in the bed-room; all my rooms are on the ground floor.

ISAAC PYE. I am constable of Cheshunt. On the evening of the 10th of October, in consequence of information, I went in pursuit of some persons, and apprehended the prisoner about two o'clock on Sunday morning, the 11th; I did not take any thing from him - he had a smock-frock on, which I directed to be taken off; I afterwards saw it in the possession of Hanken - he was examined before the Magistrate with Joseph Winter , and made a statement - I searched the prisoner's premises, which he showed me himself: it was a shed - he said he and his brother had been sleeping there; I there found a pair of braces, a hat, a stick, and a coloured handkerchief, which Hanken has got - I took him to Hertford gaol.

COURT. Q. On what occasion did he tell you he had slept in the shed? A. When I took him into custody I said, "Where have you been sleeping?" as his house was empty, and he took me to the shed - it was near twenty miles from Law's; it was in a lane in the parish of Seacome, near Hertford - he informed me that he and his brother lived together; I took him at the back of the house where it was said they lived, at two o'clock in the morning - I desired him to show me where they slept, and he took me to the shed; this was before the brother was taken.

JOHN BOWEN . I am assistant to Pye, and went with him in pursuit of the prisoner. I was present at a conversation between him and his brother Thomas - Thomas said to him that if he had taken his advice and stopped at home, he would not have fallen into this dilemma; he made no answer, but merely told his brother to hold his tongue - I had him in custody in the public-house for two hours and more: I did not threaten or promise him any thing - he said he would tell me where to find all the things; I was talking about the prosecutor's things at that time - while we were talking Pye and Hanken found the things in the shed.

WILLIAM HANKEN. I was with Pye when the prisoner was apprehended, and two or three days after I took from him in Hertford gaol, a smock-frock, a pair of breeches, and a waistcoat; I was with Pye when he found the braces and handkerchief in the shed - I produce them all.

JOHN LAW. These things are mine; I know them all by having worn them, and by marks on them, and swear to them - I know the smock-frock and handkerchief by some stains.

MARY LAW . These things were safe on the 10th of October - I know them; I left nobody in the house.

ANN NEWMAN. I saw the prisoner at Enfield on the 10th of October, about two o'clock in the afternoon, in Flask-lane, next door to the prosecutor's - he was coming down the lane with his brother Joseph; I did not know him before - he had a few clothes wrapped up in a white smock-frock, as it appeared.

Prisoner's Defence. My brother asked me to go with him to Enfield, to a house he lodged at, as he had some things there when he worked at Theobald-park; when I got there the woman was not at home - I went to a public-house, had a pint of beer, and then came down the lane again; my brother was there with a bundle of things, and when we got home he gave me the frock, trousers, and breeches to put on, and the constable took me with them.

[Saturday, Jan. 16.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18300114-12

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

245. PATRICK McNAMARA and ELIZABETH(HIS WIFE ) were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah de Macedoe Silva , on the 23rd of December , at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, and stealing therein 3 watches, value 30l.; 1 gold chain, value 8l.; 6 silver spoons, value 30s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 12s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 4l.; 2 pencil-cases, value 8s.; 3 brooches, value 4l.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 2l.; 4 pairs of sheets, value 4l.; 3 sovereigns, 1 sixpence, and 1 piece of silver coin of this realm, called a 4d. piece, her property; one 20l., and three 5l. Bank notes , the property of Peter Warburton .

SARAH DE MACEDO E SILVA. I live at No. 14, New Rutland-street, in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney , at the back of the London Hospital. The prisoners came to lodge with me on the 12th of November by the name of James Green and his wife; Peter Warburton also lodged at my house. On the 23rd of November, at twelve o'clock in the morning prceisely, I went out with the prisoner's wife; I have no servant - I locked the doors, and left the keys in the room doors; I locked the doors of every room occupied by us, and Warburton's room, the kitchen, dining, and bed-room; I did not know of any body being in the house when I left it - I locked the outer door, which has two keys: I put one into my pocket, took out the other, which was inside the door, out of the lock, and put it into a hole in the passage, inside the house - I took the other with me, as the prisoner's wife said I had better take it to let myself in; she went with me about as far as the New-road, and looked very hard down there; I said, "Mrs. Green, what are you looking at?" she said, "I thought I saw my husband" - I said it was impossible, for he said he was going to the west-end of the town, and should not be back till half-past three o'clock; we were out together for half an hour, and then she left me - she said, "I dare say they will keep me to tea, and I shan't be back till six"- she got about two yards from me, then put out her hand, shook hands with me, and said, "God bless you;" her hand seemed to tremble - I never saw her again till she was at Bow-street: I got home a few minutes after half-past one o'clock - I found the outer door on the catch, not locked; I went straight down stairs to the kitchen, and saw two trunks, which stood under the dresser, all turned out, and every thing taken out except a few papers and rags; they were safe when I left the house - I had locked the kitchen door, and am sure nobody was in there; I sleep in the kitchen - I missed out of the kitchen drawer my gold watch, a pair of ear-rings (which were yellow topaz double drops, pearl and gold) - the watch cost 25l. when it was bought new; the watch and ear-rings were worth more than 20l., I should imagine - I lost a silver 4d. piece of the reign of William and Mary, with a hole through it, and a small crack on the head side; I sent for a neighbour, a lady, and went with her to Warburton's room - I cannot say whether his door was open or shut, for the lady went in before me; I saw Warburton's clothes were taken out of his drawers, which were unlocked - I saw a bundle

in the prisoner's room, containing all my wearing-apparel and linen; Warburton's linen, and all his clothes, except what he had on - they were all tied up in three bundles, and put behind the door, in a wrapper belonging to the prisoners - neither of the prisoners returned to the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you since seen any of the property that was taken away? A. None at all, except the 4d. piece - I said I could swear to that at the office, and that it was marked; I told Priece particularly before I saw it, that it had a hole in it, and a scar down the face; I did not say I could not identify the one produced, as it was not marked. I married a Portugues, but am now a widow.

PETER WARBURTON . I lodged in the prosecutrix's house. On the 23rd of November I left the house about half-past nine o'clock in the morning; I knew the prisoners by their having lodged there some time by the name of Green - I returned home about twenty minutes past four, went into my room, and found all my property gone; I kept my clothes in a chest of drawers, and saw them there just before I went out that morning; when I came home the two bottom drawers were empty - I had left a pocket-book in my drawer with my linen, and in it was a 20l. and three 5l. Bank notes - the drawer was locked; I had received two of the 5l. notes from my brother George, on the 30th of October, and kept them in that pocket-book; I had seen them there the night before, when I went to bed: I received the other two from Esdaile's bank on the same day, the 30th of October - I found my clothes down stairs, some of them in the kitchen; the bundles had then been opened - I lost three razors.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any servant? A. No.

GEORGE WARBURTON. On the 30th of October I gave my brother two 5l. notes - I had received them from Richard Fuller , of the Stamp-office; I received four from him two days before, and am sure I paid my brother two of those four - I paid the other two to Mr. Hunneman, of the same office.

Cross-examined. Q.Had you marked the notes? A. Not all of them, but they never left my possession till I paid them to him, because I had no others in my possession- they were the first two; I do not say I should know them again, not being certain whether I marked them - I know I gave him two of the four I received.

RICHARD SALTER. I belong to the Stamp-office. I gave George Warburton four 5l. notes on the 28th of October, and have the numbers and dates entered in my book- (reads) "10,150, 4th of May - 75, 11th of August -19,566, 7th of August - 28,620, 6th of May, all in 1829;" I made this entry at the time I gave them to him.

BLADON HUNNEMAN. I changed two 5l. notes for George Warburton on the 31st of October, and entered them in my book at the time - (reads) "10,150, 4th of May, and 19,566, 7th ditto, 5l.;" my entry is 7th ditto, which would mean 7th of May - I belong to the Stamp-office; the notes I received from him were paid into the Bank from the Stamp-office, on the 2nd of November - I have no entry but this; by reference, I have reason to believe the date, 7th of May, is incorrect, by comparing the entry in Salter's book, and in another book in the office, not made by me, but in which the notes sent to the Bank are entered - the person who made the entry is not here - I am certain I sent the two notes I received from George Warburton to the Bank.

Cross-examined. Q. May there not also be some error in that - how are you sure you sent the same notes to the Bank? A. I have compared the entry with Mr. Salter's and another book, which is here; when I made the entry I thought I was doing it right.

JAMES REYNOLDS . I am shopman to Mr. Harlam, of Bishopsgate-street. On Monday, the 23rd of November, about half-past three or four o'clock, the male prisoner came to the shop, and bought a clock for his wife, who was with him; I positively swear to both their persons - he also bought two India silk handkerchiefs; he at first offered me a 20l. Bank of England note, which I objected to change - he then produced a 5l. note; he took it out of an old red leather pocket-book, with one or two more - he gave me the name of James Green, which I wrote on the back of the note; this is the note I received from him, (No. 75, dated the 11th of August, 1829;) it has my writing on it.

Cross-examined. Q.What are you? A.Furriers, and deal in woollen goods - I never saw either of them before; there may have been fifty customers in the course of the day, or there might have been two hundred.

JOHN KING . I am pot-boy at the White Hart, Turner-street, near the prosecutrix's. On the 23rd of November, at one o'clock, I saw the male prisoner by the side of the prosecutrix's door; I took the newspaper to the house, and gave it to him - he was standing outside the door, which was open; I knew him before, and am sure it was him - I always served him with beer.

ANN EDWARDS. I have known the prisoners these three years and a half, but was only acquainted with the woman. To the best of my recollection, it was on the night of the 23rd of November, between twelve and one o'clock, the female prisoner knocked at my door, called me by name, and said she wished to leave a bundle with me, which she did - in the morning, between eight and nine o'clock, as I was going to work, I saw the male prisoner at the top of the court where I live; the bundle remained in my place till the Friday following, when the woman took it away herself - Lea, the officer, came the same night in search of it; I never saw it opened.

Cross-examined. Q. You were intimate with this woman? A. No, she lodged three or four months with me; I found her honest.

JOSEPH PRIECE . On Saturday morning, the 28th of November, I received the female prisoner in custody from one of our inspectors; she had a 4d. piece, which she gave up to me when I asked her for it - I gave it to Lea; it was first produced to the prosecutrix, who indentified it - the female prisoner said her husband gave it to her with some other silver, 3s. 6d.; I asked her if she was the woman McNamara - she said it was of no use to deny it, she was the woman.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer. I was at Bow-street, where the female prisoner was under examination, on the 5th of December; she had this cloak on, which I afterwards took from her in Clerkenwell prison - she was asked where she got it; she said she bought it in Oxford-road, and gave 1l. for it - I produce a 4d. piece, which I received from Priece on the 5th of December; I traced the male prisoner from the George and Blue Boar on Wednesday

morning, to Limerick, and took him there - he asked the charge; I told him it was for robbing Mrs. Silva, where he lodged - he said it was true he lodged there, and he had a right to leave her if he thought proper, as he did not owe her a fraction; on the road to Dublin he asked me if there was any other lodger in the house - I said there was another gentleman, but he had left; he asked how long he had left - I said about a fortnight: he then said Mrs. Silva had committed the robbery, and wanted to lay it on him - he said he had slept with his wife at the George and Blue Boar on Tuesday night, and a man named McCormack; I have a letter which I intercepted - I never showed it to him; he said he had sent a letter to his wife: I understand he cannot write - I have the strap and cloth which the bundles were tied in the parlour.

JAMES REYNOLDS. This is the cloak I sold to the prisoner - it is a particular make.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose there are a great many of the same make? A. Very likely - I have not sold many like it; it was a cloak of this pattern and make - it is made in rather an uncommon way, being trimmed round the cape and down the front with silk; it is a Scotch plaid, but not a common one - I am sure it is the cloak I sold them.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. On the 2nd of November these two 5l. notes, No. 19,566, dated the 7th of August, 1829, and 10,150, 4th of May, 1829, were paid in from the Stamp-office.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you receive them yourself? A. No - I produce them from the Accountant's-office, where they are always brought; they are entered in our books as coming from the Stamp-office - my knowledge is all derived from the book; we never produce the books in these cases.

COURT. Q. You found those two notes in the Bank? A. Yes, my Lord; I have copied the entry in the book on the back of the notes, in my own hand-writing.

JOHN STEWART . On the 23rd of November I was going to see a friend, at No. 13, New Rutland-street, next door to the prosecutrix, and as I drew up to the door, about twenty minutes past one o'clock, I saw the male prisoner coming out of the prosecutrix's door, and shutting it after him; nobody was with him - he had nothing in his possession - as I drew near the door he turned and looked upon me; I thought he was going to speak - he advanced six or seven yards from me, then turned again, looked upon me again, which caused me to take notice of him; I discovered that he was of a light complexion, a long thin visage, and about five feet six inches high; I am certain the prisoner is the man - he had grey trousers, fitting close to his legs, and low shoes; the prosecutrix came home in about a quarter of an hour, and discovered the robbery - I described the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you call the prisoner's a light complexion? A. Yes; I could not tell his height to an inch - I never said he had a drab coat and ancle boots on.

MRS. E SILVA. This is my 4d. piece, and what I lost on the 23rd - I had seen it about a week before; it was taken out of a pertmanteau in the dining-room closet- there is a hole in it, and a crack near the head.

Cross-examined. Q. It is not uncommon for trinkets of that kind to have a hole? A. It may not be - I never wore it about my neck.

Q. I am desired to ask if you did not go with the prisoner and his wife to Whitechapel, lock the door, bid them good bye, and ask them if they came to London again to be so good as to call on you? A. I never did, nor did I know but what they were coming back; this cloth and strap were put round the three bundles - I had seen the cloth before on their table; they used it for a table-cloth: it has a blue stripe on it, and is greasy now.

PETER WARBURTON . My pocket-book was rather old, and Russia leather.

Peter McNumara's Defence. Does it stand to reason if I committed the robbery I should give my name on the note as Green.

P. McNAMARA - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

E. McNAMARA - NOT GUILTY .[Monday, Jan. 18.]

Reference Number: t18300114-13

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

246. SHADRACK MUSTO was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell, 108 yards of silk, value 16l., the goods of James Jones , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH OKE. I am shopman to James Jones , a linendraper and silk-mercer , of High-street, Clerkenwell . On the 31st of December I saw the prisoner in my master's shop, just before the gas was lighted - I do not exactly know the time; I was serving a customer at the door; the prisoner was three or four yards from me - I saw him putting something into his bag, but what it was I did not know; I went to him, and asked what he wanted - he replied some black ribbon; I then asked what he had in his bag - he replied, "Nothing but my work;" I then told him if he would step on the other side he would get served with the ribbon - I returned to my customer at the door, to receive the money for what I sold to him, and then kept my eyes on the prisoner - I saw him on the other side, and in a few minutes saw him go to the door; he attempted to open it: I called him, and asked if he had been served with the ribbon - he said he could get no one to serve him; I then said I would serve him if he would return, but seeing a young man disengaged I referred the prisoner to him, and while he was in the act of showing him the ribbon I called him to the further end of the shop, and asked him again what he had in his bag; he again said nothing but his work; I said, "I should like to look," and when I opened the bag I found this piece of silk, containing one hundred and eight yards, value 16l. - I detained him, and gave him in charge; he begged for pardon. (Looking at the silk) I swear this is my master's - I do not recollect having seen it during that day; our people were busily engaged with customers - two other young men came into the shop about the same time, which particularly drew my attention to the door; one of them tried to draw my attention to the door.

BENJAMIN CATMULL . I am a constable of St. James, Clerkenwell - the prosecutor's house is in that parish. I took the prisoner in charge; this is the silk which was given to me with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at one counter, and the silk

by the chair at the other. My father died, and I got acquainted with boys who led me into bad company; I leave it to the mercy of the Court - I live with my mother; my friends did not know when I was going to be tried.

[Monday, Jan. 18.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth, and having no protector.

Reference Number: t18300114-14

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

247. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , at St. Martin in the Fields, 1 watch, value 7l.; 1 seal, value 2l.; 2 rings, value 10s.; 1 key, value 10s.; 18 sovereigns, and two half-sovereigns, the property of Thomas Payling , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS PAYLING. I live in Oxenden-street, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields ; I am a tailor - the prisoner is my apprentice , and has served me between four and five years. On the evening of the 12th of March he absconded, without any notice; after he was gone I missed a watch from a drawer in the bureau - it was worth 7l.; a seal was attached to it worth 2l., and two gold rings, worth 10s. - I also lost eighteen sovereigns, and two half-sovereigns, out of a different drawer, in the same bureau, which stood in my room, on the first floor, and was not locked; I had seen all the property safe that morning - he was apprehended about a fortnight ago; my son brought him to my house - I did not hold out either threat or promise to him; I asked how he came to serve me as he had - he said he did not know what possessed him to do it, but he had done it; I asked what he had done with my watch - he said he had lost some of the money, and that he had sold my watch to a sailor for 30s. - I have found none of my property.

HENRY PAYLING . I am the prosecutor's son. On the 4th of January I followed the prisoner's father to No. 40, Berwick-street; I saw the prisoner came out of the house, followed him till a Police-officer come by, and then gave him in charge - we had been looking for him ever since he left, but could not find him; he made the statement to my father in my presence - no threat or promise was used; he said he had sold the watch to a sailor for 30s.

JOHN TREVY. I am a Police-officer. The prisoner was given into my charge, in Well-street, on the 4th of January; he said, "I am done for - I have robbed the best of master's; he has been a father and a master to me."

[Tuesday Jan. 19.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18300114-15

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

248. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Butler Pain , on the 18th of December , at St. Paul, Shadwell, and stealing therein, 2 table-cloths, value 3s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s., and 1 towel, value 3d., his property; and 1 shawl, value 1s. , the goods of Ann Osten .

WILLIAM BUTLER PAIN . I am master of the British Union School . Shakespeare-walk, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell - I occupy it as my dwelling-house. On Friday, the 18th of December, I was the last person up; I searched the house, and saw that every thing was properly secured, about eleven o'clock, and retired to rest - I sleep in the first floor front room; I heard a noise between two and three o'clock, got up, and went down stairs - on opening the stair-foot door, I observed two inner doors ajar, which I had left shut; I then went into the kitchen - the window shutter was down, and the window wide open; it is an inside shutter - I had left the window down when I went to bed, I am certain, and put the shutter up; it was evident the party had got in that way - I immediately gave an alarm of Watch! and commenced searching about the house; I went into the front room, and into the Committee room, but observed nobody - I then heard the watchman at the gate, let him in, and searched with him; I went twice into the front room without observing any body, but the third time I went into the front room, I found the prisoner concealed, standing up behind the door; I said, "Here is one of the rascals;" he raised his arm up as if to strike me -I had a poker, and hit him across the head with it; the watchman took him to the watch-house - he was a stranger- I found the trousers, which I had put on a chair by the fire, thrown across the cill of the window; the table-cloths were taken from the table-drawer, and put upon the table, also a towel - the shawl I laid across the window-cill.

JOHN ANDERSON . I am a watchman. I was called in, and examined the different rooms; I found the prisoner standing behind the door.

THOMAS AMES . I am an officer. I produce the property.

MR. PAIN. This is the property which was removed.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been tried in the other Court, and acquitted; I said all I had to say then - I know myself innocent of any attempt to rob; I have no friends, but my shipmates, who are at sea - I have been in the Navy.

[Tuesday, Jan. 18.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.(See 1st day, New Court.)

Reference Number: t18300114-16

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice James Parke.

249. HENRY TURNER HARRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , at St. Marylebone, 1 gold chain, value 5l.; 1 eye-glass, value 3l.; 7 rings, value 9l.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 15s.; 1 purse, value 2s.; 2 keys, value 1s., and 5 sovereigns. the property of Sophia Requie , in the dwelling-house of Mark Polack .

SOPHIA REQUIE. (a native of France, gave her evidence through an interpreter.) In November last I lodged at Mr. Polack's, in Charlotte-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone ; I do not know his Christian name - I have lived there five months; I know the prisoner - he staid at my lodgings three days, and slept there three nights - he left on the 26th of November between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning; I missed these articles about a minute after he left - I accompanied him to the door, and he made me a compliment of some notes, which I suppose to be false ones; he said there were 25l. - I said I should not receive them, as I was not a person to receive a compliment; he took them, and put them into my bosom - the articles I lost were all in my bed-room, when I got up in the morning; he had desired me to go out of the bed-room, because he wanted to dress himself - he then locked the door of the bed-room; I did not stop two minutes after he left the house before I went into the bed-room - the articles lost were all in a little box, in the commode; I found he had cut the commode in order to open it - I found the little box in which they were kept, placed upon the mantel-piece,

but all the articles gone; I had seen the box in the commode at nine o'clock that morning, when I opened the commode to give him a towel - I had seen the articles in the box at ten o'clock in the morning; I had put them into the box the evening before, when I went to bed - we both slept in the same room; I lost a gold chain, which I cannot state the value of, as a friend made me a present of it - I lost five sovereigns in a little purse, out of the same box, also a gold eye-glass, which cost 3l. - I had only had that in my possession three days; also seven rings, one with six brilliants in it, I do not know the value of them, and a pair of pearl ear-rings, of which I cannot state the value - I saw something in the newspaper, about his being taken, and saw two of my rings at the pawnbroker's last week; I have found nothing else - I had put the purse and five sovereigns into the same box, the morning he went away.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q.When did you become acquainted with me? A.Eight months ago; I saw him at different theatres and places: the commode is three or four feet from the bed - I had left the key of the commode in the bottom drawer, but apparently he did not know that, for it was broken open; the door between the drawing-room and chamber was closed while he was alone in the bed-room - he stopped in the chamber alone for about two hours and a half; he fastened the door, so that I could not get in.

Q. How do you know the room door was locked? A. He shut the door himself: one door leading to the staircase is always closed - the door between the two rooms is generally closed, but on this occasion he shut it himself: I remained in the drawing-room - I heard some kind of noise in the bed-room, but thinking I had an honest man in the room I took no notice of it; it was like the wash-hand-stand being moved, no other person was in the house but the master, mistress, and servant; there are no children - no person entered that room during the three days he was there.

THOMAS BYRNE . I am a Police-constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 26th of December, on another charge - I took him to the watch-house and found a duplicate of two rings, pawned at Norman's, Princes-street, Leicester-square, on him, which the prosecutrix claims: I produce the duplicate.

ARTHUR JONES. I am shopman to Mr. Norman, of Princes-street, Leicester-square. On the 19th of December I took two rings in pawn for 5s., from a person like the prisoner: I cannot swear he is the man - it was a person very much like him; he asked for 6s. - I took them to the foreman who valued them; here they are - this is the duplicate I gave him.

Prisoner. Q. You say I am the individual? A. I think you are; I do not swear it - it was between eight and nine o'clock in the evening: many persons come to our shop - the person came into the boxes, kept at the end, and hid half his face with his hand; he stood quite to the left of the boxes - that is the very reason I do not swear to you - I took you to be a gentleman, and would not bother you with any questions; I should have asked you where you lived, but did not - I did not take notice of you particularly; I judge by your height more than any thing.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer of Marylebone. The prosecutrix gave me information of her robbery on Friday evening, the 23rd of December - I went next morning to her apartment, and examined her drawers: I found the right hand top drawer had been attempted to be broken open - I then received from her the handle of a knife, and compared that with the marks; it appeared as if it had been used to force the drawers, and also that something like a pair of scissars had been used -I noticed that the lock had not been forced, and remarked that to her; she said she had left the key in the bottom drawer, and supposed he must have found it there at last, for the lock had not been forced - she delivered me these five notes; I endeavoured to apprehend the prisoner, and found him in custody.

Prisoner. Q. You say the lock was not forced? A. No, it had been attempted; it was a small pen-knife - the prosecutrix said she found that knife in the room; the marks matched exactly with the broken part of the blade in several places, and there are other marks, as if a pair of scissars had been used - I have been in the habit of examining places which have been broken open for the last thirteen years; there had not been force enough to get the drawer quite open - she shewed me the drawer the things had been taken from; it was the top drawer on the right-hand, close by the wash-hand stand - I never saw you about, though I looked for you a great many times; the prosecutrix said she had seen you several times on horse-back, and in a yellow-bodied cabriolet, in the Parks, Regent-street, and Pall-mall.

MARK POLACK. In November last the prosecutrix lodged in my house, which is in the parish of St. Mary-lebone: I saw the prisoner coming down stairs one morning as I was putting a nail in the carpet - it was towards the latter end of the week, and five minutes after that the prosecutrix told me of the robbery.

Prisoner. Q.You can swear to me? A. Yes; I saw you twice - you were dressed in a brown frock-coat.

Q. Could you point me out from half a dozen others? A. Yes.

SOPHIA REQUIE . These are the papers he gave me for Bank notes; he put them into my bosom.

Prisoner. Q. You say I handed you these pieces of paper? A.He pulled them from his pocket and put them down my bosom at last; these rings are my property.

The papers being read were headed, "Bank of Elegance," engaging to cut hair in a superior style, or forfeit, one 10,000l., and the other four, 50l. each, signed, M'Alpine.

Prisoner's Defence. (Partly inaudible.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - Not having pecuniary resources to command the aid of counsel, I hope you will make every allowance for me. Fully aware of the perilous and awful situation in which I stand, I shall use the best ability I possess to erase from your minds suspicion of my guilt. In a land of strangers, removed far from friends, being some thousand miles from a single relative, I have not the means of procuring counsel or witnesses; I no doubt appear before you in the semblance of guilt, but hope to satisfy you I am not the individual I am represented to be - I hope you will ponder well before you give your decision, and will be perfectly satisfied; I have but little doubt but you are endeared to your homes by the endeared members of your affectionate family, and will not consign me to an ignominious death; at all events to the degrada

tion of banishment from country, home and friends; to be stigmatised for ever as a felon, and doomed to companionship with the myriads of vice and infamy that colonize that unhappy country, and will give due allowance for my situation and feelings. I will endeavour to make such few comments on the evidence, as my feeble abilities will allow, - first, it is sworn by the prosecutrix, that I called on her, and remained three successive nights and days, and on leaving her I abstracted from her drawers or bureau, jewellery, money, and cash, to the amount of what constitutes a capital charge: that on the morning previous to my leaving her she had examined the jewellery-box, and on being questioned, she says she did not examine it, but went to the drawer to take a towel out - It is not likely an individual going to take out a towel, which would require no looking for, would see every thing in a jewellery-box; I feel satisfied the whole affair has been brought against me with the most vindictive feelings - I have not been spared in any way. With regard to the pieces of paper, I certainly confess I did give them to her; but not accompanied by any observation; I did not say it was money - I did not hand them to her, but placed them in her bosom on leaving the house. The evidence of the pawnbroker must be preposterous; he says he knows me by my size; that I hid my face with my hand, and he did not get a glimpse of my face; then he says, "I think I know the individual" - that of course you will not receive as evidence. A pawnbroker's shop is a receptacle for every individual; many hundreds may call there every day, and unless he knew a person it is scarcely possible he should recognize him. As to Mr. Polack, I have no reason to doubt he observed me on the stairs. I admit having been there, and stopping with the lady three nights; but deny having in any way or shape taken her articles. I have not been in London six months, and am certain I have not been eight months in England. A conversation occurred during the short time I was waiting in this Court where the prosecutrix and her friends stood, which showed a great deal of the callousness of their feelings. I heard them observe, "D-n him! we will finish him this time;" or something of that sort; it shows they did not care whether they swore false or not. The officer says, no lock was broken, but there appeared an attempt to force it - if you will examine the knife, you will find a man must be a very great novice to attempt to force a drawer with such a knife, and it is not my property.

[Tuesday, Jan. 19.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18300114-17

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

250. JOHN PUDDIFOOT and EDWARD GRATTON , were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , at Enfield, 1 sheep, price 20s. , the property of Elizabeth Lewis .

SECOND COUNT, for killing the said sheep with intent to steal the carcase; against the Statute.

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

ALEXANDER SAVILL . I am servant to Elizabeth Lewis , and take care of her sheep - she is a widow , and lives at Enfield . On the 1st of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I counted her sheep - there were thirty-six altogether; I went to the field next day after my son came to me - I found a skin in the possession of my son: I found in the field a sheep's entrails and some blood - I am sure the skin was the skin of the sheep I missed; here is the mark on it, W L, on the off side - I afterwards saw the head and feet of a sheep; I looked over the pales, and saw footmarks of two different people - they were near the spot where the entrails and blood were found; I received the skin into my possession, and put it into the tool-house in the garden, and produce it here; Mead had it from me, and I have got it now from him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When did you get the skin from your son? A. On the 2nd of January - it was snowy weather: I do not know whether it had snowed in the night or not - the fields are frequented by sportsmen at times, but it is paled in, and we prevent them when we can.

JAMES SAVILL. I am the son of the last witness, and in the employ of Mrs. Lewis. On Saturday morning, the 2nd of January, I went into the field, and counted the sheep; there were thirty-five - I found a skin in the field, and the entrails and some blood; it was under some trees by the side of the pales - there were some dried leaves in the field near to where I found the skin; it was an ewe sheep - I gave the skin to my father.

Cross-examined. Q. There are plenty of leaves about every field where there are trees? A. Yes.

JOHN MEAD. I am beadle of Enfield. On the morning of the 2nd of January, about ten o'clock, in consequence of information, I went to Mrs. Lewis' premises; I went into the park - Savill showed me the entrails of a sheep, and blood; the skin was shown to me in the tool-house - I saw footmarks in the park, close on the spot where the entrails were; the footmarks were not bloody - I looked over the pales, and saw footmarks where they had got over, and traced them nearly three quarters of a mile on the snow, leading towards Enfield, in a direction to Puddifoot's house: I traced them within two hundred yards of his house - he does not live in the high road, but on the Chase green; I went to Puddifoot's house - he was not at home; I searched the house - I had some slight knowledge of him before, and knew he lived there; I went up stairs, and in a butter-firkin, in the bed-room, I found nearly the whole carcase of a sheep, cut up in a very slovenly manner, and put into the firkin covered with a sack, and in the window, in the bed-room, lay a bill and a knife all over blood; I produce them - there was also some fat and small pieces of meat on them; the blood was very fresh - it had not dried; in the sack which covered the tub was a sheep's head with part of the skin on it, and by the side of the tub lay part of the inside of a sheep, and in it what turned out to be a young lamb; I searched the lower part of the house, and under the stairs I found a sheep's pluck, and three sheep's feet concealed - they were not covered, but were on a shelf high up; I found a parcel of ropes, two very large sticks in the bed-room loaded with lead and nails - they are not here; I afterwards apprehended Puddifoot in the barn -I said, "You are the man I want; you must go with me;" he said, "For what?" I said "For Mrs. Lewis' mutton;" he said, "Oh, I will go with you" - he did not resist; I locked him up and went in pursuit of Gratton - Watkins took him that morning, and about twelve o'clock I took his(Grattons) shoes off; there were nails in them, and marks of blood and fat, and small pieces of meat on the shoes - I

produce them; I looked into the snow, and there were nine nails in the shoes, in a crossway, and so there was in the snow - I did not put them into the snow, because there had been a little thaw; I did not take the shoes to the field when I looked at the footmarks: I compared the sheep's head and feet with the skin produced - they exactly fitted; there were some leaves on the head, and by my laying the head down the leaves dropped off on the skin - I saw some of the dry leaves in the field, by the blood and entrails, and the leaves on the head were the same.

Cross-examined. Q. What sort of trees are there? A. Oak and ash; the sun had come out about twelve or one o'clock, which was the reason I did not take the shoes to fit them- I know it was Puddifoot's house I went to; his wife and family live there, and were there when I went - I never saw him there myself; I was told it was his house - I was before the Justice.

Q.Were not several butchers sent for to try to fit the legs and head in the skin? A. One, named Taylor, was sent for; nobody else - I heard no butcher declare it was impossible to say a sheep cut up in that way would fit the skin; I was there nearly all the time - there were two butchers there, but only one was sent for; the other came in by chance, (Mr. Gocher, who is here) - Taylor did not like to interfere in it; he was spoken to by the Magistrate, and said he had rather decline having any thing to do with it, he did not like to be called out of his business; there was no other butcher there to my knowledge - none were examined, for I was not out of sight of the office; I only went out to wash my hands.

Q. Do you know how many children live in Puddifoot's house? A.There was a little boy at home, and two work for Mr. Ellis; he told me himself, at the Nag's-head public-house, where I took him, and gave him a pint of beer, that it was his house - he said he knew nothing at all about what was in the house; he had got his dinner - I said,"Come, old man, you sha'n't go in dry," and gave him a pint of beer - I said I had been to his house, and he said,"I live on the green;" he said it was his house - I said I had been to search his house on the green; he said, "What did you find there?" this was in the farm-yard - I told him I found some mutton: there are two houses standing by themselves on the green, one of which is his, and there are some more houses about fifty yards off: there are six or seven cottages on the green in all - the high road passes by the green; the snow was batted down on the road.

COURT. Q.Were they footmarks of one or two persons? A. Two; I traced footmarks on the green after they crossed the bridge, across the green again - there was still two footsteps, and blood was traced within two or three hundred yards of the house; Puddifoot's sons are not grown up - there are two children under fourteen years of age; the footmarks were of grown up men.

RICHARD WATKIN . I am a horse patrol of Bow-street, stationed at Enfield. In consequence of information I went to apprehend Gratton, and took him in Pudidfoot's bed-room; on my going into the house I saw him before me - he turned his head, and when he saw me he ran; I did not know him at the time, but suspected it might be him - I afterwards ascertained that it was him; I took him to the watch-house, assisted Mead in taking his shoes off, and then locked him up.

Cross-examined. Q.Was this after Puddifoot was taken? A. Yes.

JACOB GOCHER. I am a butcher. I examined the carcase found in Puddifoot's house before the Magistrate: it was produced in a tub by Mead - it was cut up all to pieces, hammocked and spoiled; I examined the head, feet, and skin - I tried the head to the skin; it fitted - we should term it a Welch breed, but it was a little cross; the head matches the skin - the skin on the head is not as a butcher would cut it; I did not compare the feet with the skin.

ALEXANDER SAVILL . I compared the feet found in Puddifoot's house, with the skin; they matched - I also compared the head, that matched - I produce the feet; it was not a thorough Welch bred sheep, but a little cross.

Cross-examined. Q.If you saw those legs and skins in Yorkshire would you say they were the same? A. I swear the head and skin match, and the feet also; if I had never seen the skin and legs before, I would swear they matched.

COURT. Q. If you saw them now for the first time, should you think they belonged to the same skin? A. I should.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Suppose you never saw the head and feet before, and met them down in Yorkshire, and did not know that Mrs. Lewis had lost a sheep, would you swear they belonged to the skin? A. Yes, I would; I should not think there is another skin in the kingdom that would match them - about thirty of Mrs. Lewis' sheep are alike.

Q. Suppose two sheep had been taken, and two skins were produced, could you tell which of the two they had belonged to? A. I am sure of it.

MR. DOWLING. Q. What makes you so certain no other skin would match the head? A.Because it is cut in such a way - different to what sheeps' heads are usually cut; it was an ewe sheep, and I expected it was with lamb - I expected all her ewes were with lamb.

COURT. Q.Looking at the head of the sheep, can you tell it belonged to a Welch cross breed? A. Yes.

JOHN MEAD re-examined. Q. You say Puddifoot told you it was his house - state what passed? A. When I gave him the beer I said, "I have been to your house; you know that;" he said, "I know nothing about the mutton;" I said I had been on the green to his house - I think that is all that passed about the house; I saw his wife, and a little boy there; I know she passes as his wife - I had seen her frequently before; she went by his name, and she attended before the Magistrate when the prisoner was there; she was there in consequence of what she had said respecting the mutton - she was called Mrs. Puddifoot, in Puddifoot's presence.

Cross-examined. Q. Who called her Mrs. Puddifoot? A. The Magistrate; and when I was going to Newgate, Puddifoot said "I was a lucky man with my old wife, but now have got a d-d fool."

COURT. Q.Who was he speaking of? A. Of his wife; he said he had as nice a little woman as ever man had in his life - that he had lost her, and got a d-d had one, and a fool; I was talking at that time of what she had said, but I am sure I do not recollect what - she was not examined before the Magistrate; he said she was a lazy, dirty, and dilatory woman.

Prisoner Puddifoot. I leave my case to my counsel.

JAMES PETER . I have been an officer in the Navy, and live at Enfield, on my pension, and an income from my friends. I have know Puddifoot thirteen or fourteen months; he is the last man I should have suspected of any thing.

MR. DOWLING. Q. Do you know his house in Chasegreen? A. Yes - there are two houses together; one of which is his - his is the first from the corner; Mr. Mundy lives in the other.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many houses are there together? A.Those two, and there may be two others together - the rest are single; the next house to his, is a farm, about thirty yards from his.

Eleven witnesses gave Puddifoot a good character.

PUDDIFOOT - GUILTY. Aged 60.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of his former good character.

Judgment Respited .

[Saturday, Jan. 16.] GRATTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-18

First Middlesex Jury,

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

251. ANN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 4 pairs of stockings, value 5s.; 30 sovereigns, and 20 half-sovereigns, the property of John Phillips , in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ANN PHILLIPS . I am the wife of John Phillips - we keep the King's Arms, Orchard-street, Westminster . The prisoner was our servant ; I had four pairs of stockings in a closet in my bed-room, with 10l. in sovereigns and half-sovereigns in each pair, making 40l. On the 10th of December I went up stairs, helped the prisoner to make the bed, and left her alone to sweep and dust the room; after she had done she brought me down the key, and sat down to dinner with the family - about four o'clock I sent her out with two half-crowns, to buy some soap, and desired her to make haste back; she said she would, but I never saw her again till the Monday, at Queen-square; in consequence of her leaving I went up stairs next morning, to examine if my money was safe - I unlocked the cupboard door, opened the box lid, found every thing turned upside down in the box, and missed all the money; I am certain it was all safe the day before, when I took a sheet out of the box; the prisoner came up directly after, but was not there when I took it out - I had let one pair of the stockings drop a few days before, and she said, "Well, mistress, there is some private blunt there - I suppose master don't know you have got it;" my husband knew I had money there, but did not know the amount. On the 7th of December she asked me to lend her 4s. to buy a duplicate of some silk handkerchiefs, but I did not lend it to her.

CHARLES BANGS . On the 14th of December I was walking near the Marsh-gate, and met the prisoner; I told her she was the person I was looking for, and asked her to walk quietly with me to Westminster - she said she would not; I said she had been robbing her master - she said I had no business with her; I saw an officer, and gave her in charge.

RICHARD DOBSON . I am an officer of Lambeth -Bangs gave the prisoner into my charge; I took her to Waterloo-bridge watch-house, about ten o'clock in the morning; I returned, and found on her eleven half-sovereigns, half a crown, sixpence, and some halfpence; I searched her again at the Catherine Wheel, and found two gold rings, two silk handkerchiefs, a new bonnet, and a cloak; Furlong, who was with me, asked what she had done with the rest of the money - she said, "Oh, what a bother about the money - I have only taken twelve sovereigns;" we had said nothing to induce her to confess.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she left the room open several times while scouring it, during which time the lodgers had access to it - that when her mistress sent her out she met some friends, who detained her, and she was afraid to return - and that the money found on her she had saved in service.

MRS. PHILLIPS. The cupboard door and the box were locked, but the keys were in both: the key of the bedroom hung in the bar - nobody could open the door without a spring bell ringing.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 99s.) Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-19

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

252. JAMES LIDYARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 gelding, price 55l.; 1 mare, price 50l.; 1 sieve, value 1s.; 1 saddle, value 1l.; 2 brushes, value 1s.; 1 bridle, value 10s.; 2 suits of horse-cloths, value 5s.; 2 pairs of girts, value 7s.; 6 pairs of reins, value 30s.; 1 pair of stirrup leathers, value 3s.; 2 collars, value 1l.; 1 halter, value 1s.; 1 bucket, value 1s., and 1 lantern, value 1s. , the goods of Andrew Meagher O'Brien .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

MARGARET ANN MEAGHER O 'BRIEN. I am the wife of Andrew Meagher O'Brien, a merchant , who is now at Madrid. I lived in the Alpha-road, and had two of the prisoner's daughters in my employ - one as a servant, and the other as a needle woman; she slept at home - I had a horse and mare, which I intended to send to the strawyard, about the 20th of November: I had sent them as far as the half-way house at Harrow, on their way to Arlesden, but in consequence of what the prisoner's daughter said, I was induced to allow him to have them to forage for me, instead of their going there - he was to fetch them, and to charge me with their keep, and to bring me in a bill for the forage; I did not see him for a fortnight after - he was then in my kitchen, and gave me this bill, charging 36s.; I asked him how my horses were - he said they looked quite well, and were quite well, and asked if I would settle that little bill; I said certainly; he then said, "Ma'am, if you can advance me a little money, I can buy the things much cheaper and better; "I asked what he thought their keep would come to per week - he said, "Why, this is what Mr. Coates has charged me, but I think I could keep them much cheaper"- I asked how much cheaper; he said he did not know, but whatever it came to he would charge me, and no more, and he should leave it to me to pay him for his own trouble; I never sold the horses to him - I gave my servant

2l. to take to him, to pay the bill; he had the horses at his own stable: a few days after he had them, in consequence of what his daughter said, I told my servant to give the key of the stable to her - I did not miss the property from the stable till the Monday before Christmas-day, when I found he had absconded - the key of the stable was also gone; I knew he had the horses - the other articles in the indictment were taken from the stable; he lived in Portland-town, near Primrose-hill - I gave information to the Police, and saw my horse, mare, and other things at High-street; the daughter who worked for me left the house on the Saturday before the Monday on which I missed the property, and his other daughter pretended to be ill with spasms in her stomach - she might have been ill; they both left on Saturday - I have not seen them since, except at the door of this Court; I never consented to his parting with the horses in any way - he had them to forage, and nothing else.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.If the girl might have been ill, why do you say it was pretence? A. I think it was pretence, as she was seen running about at play in the street; I sent the horses to be foraged - that was my only intention in sending them.

Q. Had you sent any thing else out? A. The people I wash for had my linen, I believe, and I may have sent things from my wardrobe to be repaired, but nothing else; I sent nothing out but my wearing-apparel - I may have let a few of my things go, but it was nothing but wearing-apparel; I sent the prisoner's daughter some silk gowns to repair - there was an execution in the house about, or at the time, at the suit of Mr. Wilson, I believe; the prisoner made the bill for the horses up to the 3rd of December - he had had them a fortnight then; my husband had bought the horses of Mr. Osborne, and given one hundred guineas for them - I have said they did not belong to me, because I had sold them to my cousin; he had given me 50l. in part payment - Mr. O'Brien was in difficulties, and I said so; it was a fact, but my cousin had left them with me for my use and pleasure - I said so to several persons; I was to place them at the cheapest place I could, when I could not ride them - I never offered them to the prisoner for 30l., nor tell his daughters I had called them in to witness their being his in case of an execution - I never said any such thing; the clothes I sent out I should think at the utmost were not worth more than 15l. - I sent them out to be protected; I did not know the prisoner at the time he first had the horses.

Q.Where did you send the clothes to? A. The prisoner's daughter said, "Oh, let me take the things home to my father, and he will take care of them; we have often had executions in our house, and I know they will take every thing;" I think it was his youngest daughter - Watkins, my servant, took some, and his daughters the rest; the execution was subsequently withdrawn; the landlord was paid - there was not enough for the Sheriff.

MR. BARRY. Q. Your servants knew of your misfortune - did you authorize the prisoner or his daughters to clear your stable out? A.Never; I never saw the prisoner but when he produced the bill of 36s.

JANE WATKINS . I am the prosecutrix's servant; she desired me to give the key of the stable to Eliza Lidyard; I did so - I do not recollect the day; it was before the property was missed.

Cross-examined. Q. You took some things out of the house? A. Yes - it was while the execution was in the house; there was some baby linen, and I do not know what else.

JOHN CHAMBERLAIN . I live in Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove - I am a parish constable, and a furniture broker; the prisoner lived in High-street, Portland-town, about three quarters of a mile from me. On the 19th of December he asked me to come to his place to buy some furniture, as he was about to remove to Prague-street, Paddington - I bought some furniture of him, and on the Monday some fixtures; he told me to bring my cart and take them away - he afterwards said, "Bring a van and take my goods at the same time," as my house is in the direction he was going; I noticed a press-bedstead among other things, being heavy - I went after the prisoner on the 24th of December, and in a barge at Windsor, belonging to Clark and Robinson, I found the same press-bedstead which I had helped to put into the van; it laid on its back, with the two folding doors upwards, and two plates screwed down into the doors - I unscrewed it, and found the saddles and horse-cloths in it; the prosecutrix identified them in the prisoner's presence, at the office.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you known him? A. Not till he came about the furniture.

WILLIAM DICKENSON. I am a serjeant of the Police. On the 21st of December I was going my rounds, and the prosecutrix called me in, and gave me information, in consequence of which I went in search of the prisoner and horses to Cheltenham, then to Chippenham, and went with Denman to Shenstone, in Wills, and at the Rattlebone public-house Denman brought the prisoner in; Conway, the prosecutrix's gardener, was with me, to identify him - he shook hands with him; I asked if that was Lidyard -Conway said Yes; I told him I had come from London, and that he was my prisoner - that he had escaped with some horses; he was very obstreperous, and wanted to know the particulars - after handcuffing him I told him he was charged with stealing a quantity of bridles, saddles, horse-cloths, and two horses; he said he had never stolen them, that he bought them, and gave 30l. for them; I said if that was the case, if he would go before some country Magistrate, no doubt they would discharge him; the place was quite in a disturbance, for all the inhabitants were on his side - he said he would not go: I said he had better go to the nearest Magistrate we could find, and he should chose one himself, but he said he would not go out of the village; as we went along he said he would give the horses up if Mrs. O'Brien would pay the expences; I had before that asked him where they were, and he would not tell me - he repeatedly said he had bought them for 30l.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you state to the Magistrate one word about his not telling you where they were? A. I believe so, I am sure of it in fact; what I said was taken down and read over to me; he said he would go before Mr. Oldfield, the Magistrate at Shenstone, and I took him; he would not interfere, and I brought him to town.

WILLIAM DENMAN . I am constable of Chippenham. On the 24th of December I accompanied Dickenson to Shenstone; I found the prisoner at his father-in-law's, in

the village, and took him to the Rattlebone, by stratagem; he had come down the evening before with his wife, by Tanner's waggon - the waggoner authorized me to make a demand on him about the carriage, and by that means I got him there; he resisted being taken - I returned to Shenstone after bringing him to London, and found the horse and mare at the house of one Butler, and brought them to London.

JAMES POWELL . I sell greens and potatoes, and live in Portland-town; the prisoner rented a stable of me nearly three weeks ago. I recollect Timothy Young coming into the yard - I think it was on a Wednesday; the prisoner was there, and I heard him offer the horses for sale for 35l. each - Young said they were not worth the money.

Cross-examined. Q.How long have you known the prisoner? A.Nearly a year and a half; there was no disguise in the transaction.

JANE WATKINS . When I delivered his daughter the key, I told her to tell her father to go to the stable and clean the saddles; I do not think this was above a week or ten days before Christmas.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-20

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

253. JOHN SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 tea chest, value 1s., and 80 lbs. of tea, value 20l. , the goods of John Forster .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating them to belong to Thomas Watkins and another, and to the East India Company .

THOMAS WATKINS . I am a tea-broker . On the morning of the 3rd of October I bought for John Forster a chest of Congou tea, which weighed about eighty pounds, at the East India Company's warehouse; it was No. 492, by the Castle Huntley - the chests are delivered on presenting a permit; a paper, requesting the permit, is put into a box at the permit office, at the Excise-office - any individual can go and take the permit from the box; I do not know the prisoner, and never authorised him to get possession of it- Forster's porter should have got it from the warehouse.

JOHN FORSTER . I am a grocer . I gave Mr. Walker an order to buy a chest of tea; I sent my porter for it, but it was not to be found - I live in Tooley-street; I knew the prisoner, but never authorised him to get it - the permit is a copy of request paper lodged in the office.

THOMAS ROBERTS. I am a labourer to the East India Company. I take an account of what goes out of the yard - I have known the prisoner some years; I saw him in the yard on the 3rd of October with a permit in his hand, which he presented for a chest of tea, No. 492, by the Castle Huntley - I took the permit, entered it in the book, and helped the chest on his knot; it is always delivered on the permit being presented - I did not see him again till the 28th of November, when he was in custody; he used to work for different carmen - permits are generally put into a box at the permit-office; a stranger could easily get one at that time, but I believe an alteration has been made.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not book my own name to it? A. I booked your name as the person taking it away; I was in the habit of seeing you before the 3rd of October, off and on, but not for a week or a month - I have not known you to have many chests as a porter.

SAMUEL PRICE. I am a labourer to the East India Company, and superintend the teas as they go out; the time of delivery is from nine o'clock till four - I saw the prisoner going out with a chest about five minutes after three, which is an improper time, as the men are then going out, and being searched as they go out; it is a time he ought not to leave the yard - I stopped him, and told him it was an improper time; he pleaded ignorance - I detained him till all the men were searched; then called to Roberts, to know if he had booked the chest - he said he had, and I let him go; I have known him coming to the yard for fifteen or sixteen years; I did not see him again till he was taken.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect whether the call had commenced when I entered the yard? A. I am not certain of that.

CHARLES RICHARD CALDWELL . I am an Excise-locker at Crutched-friars yard. I saw the prisoner take a locker's paper, and go away with it; that is a copy of the request note - by taking that to the Excise-office and putting it through a hole, the permit would be handed out without his being seen by the person - I am certain of him; I knew him before.

THOMAS DEVY. I am a constable of Aldgate-ward. I apprehended the prisoner in Thames-street, on the 28th of November, and told him I wanted him to go with me to Crutched-friars warehouse - he went, and the witnesses indentified him as the man who had the chest; he said that on the 3rd of October he had been employed by a gentleman to get a chest of tea out of the warehouse, and take it over the water, and he left it at the foot of London-bridge- I asked at what house he delivered it; he said he delivered it in the street at the foot of the bridge, that the gentleman paid him, and he came away - he did not say what the gentleman did with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the Ship in Hart-street, when a gentlemanly dressed man asked for a porter; I went out with him - he gave me this paper from his pocket-book, containing the particulars of the chest, and a description of the party; I went to the yard, selected the paper, and got the permit, went to Jones' in Crutchedfriars and borrowed a knot, and when I went to the yard the call had not commenced - when I got to London-bridge I pitched the chest on the block; the same gentleman came, and said, "I will not trouble you further, I have just met my own porter coming" - he gave me 1s., and I delivered the chest to him; here are the instructions I received - there were two persons in the Ship, one was the Imperial Vintner's porter. I thought that the gentleman was Mr. Forster, whose name was on the paper.

MR. WATKINS. This paper is not my hand-writing - it is customary for the porter to have the particulars to apply for the request paper by.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Years , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18300114-21

254. JAMES PAUL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Frances Patten , on the 1st of December , and stealing 1 clock, value 10s.; 2 petticoats, value 5s.; 2 gowns, value 6s.; 1 shawl, value 4s.; 3 aprons, value 3s.; 2 shifts, value 3s.; 2 cloaks, value 5s.; 4 curtains, value 10s., and 2 pictures, value 3s. , her property.

MARY WALKER. I live opposite Frances Patten, in Bishopsgate-street within ; her house is let out in lodgings - the landlord does not live in it; Patten is a widow and has the middle room on the second floor - about half-past three o'clock on a Monday I saw the prisoner at the door of Patten's house; I do not exactly know the day of the month - I have known him about six years; he lived in Skinner-street - he had a clock wrapped up in a black silk cloak, trimmed with lace; I saw which way he went, then went for an officer, who took him on the Wednesday morning - I know the things belonged to Patten; she is now confined to her bed, ill - I am sure the things he had were hers; it was a small clock - I cannot be mistaken in his person, having known him so long; I am married, and am a weaveress - I was close to the prisoner's shoulder, with my baby in my arms; there was another person with him - I was afraid to speak to him, or say any thing for fear they should knock me down with my child; Mrs. Patten desired me to get an officer.

REBECCA SLADE . I live at No. 3, New-court, Angel-alley - my father is a weaver; I know Mrs. Patten - I was coming out of Long-alley, and saw a young man coming down the steps with a bundle under his arm; I do not know who he was and have not seen him since - I was coming along and met the prisoner; I am certain of him - the first young man was about twenty yards from him, going down the same way; the prisoner also had a bundle under his arm - it seemed like a clock wrapped up in a cloak with lace; I could see by the shape that it was a clock, and he had the pendulum in his hand: it was about half-past three o'clock - he was a long way from Patten's; I went up stairs and told my father - I then went and told Patten, who asked my father to go with her for an officer; I knew the prisoner by seeing him standing by his mother's stall in Bishopsgate-street, and am quite certain of his person - I saw him in custody three days after, at the Mansion-house; I never saw the clock again.

EDWARD PRATT. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday morning, the 3rd of December, at his mother's in Skinner-street, a very short way from Mrs. Patten's - I had been to her house and seen her lock broken; he said he was innocent.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time of the robbery I was at work in Pelham-street, and was to have witnesses here, but do not think they are come.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-22

255. GEORGE WILMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 ream of paper, value 14s. , the goods of Charles Bird and another.

WILLIAM WEBB. I live with Mr. Charles Bird , a stationer , of Ave Maria-lane - he is in partnership with his brother. On the 6th of January, about a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning, I had a customer in the shop, and went into the cellar for something he wanted - this ream of paper was behind the door; as I went into the cellar I saw the prisoner entering the shop, through a glass door in the passage, and having lost paper before, I stepped back into the shop, and caught him with a ream of paper in his hand; he stood behind the door, with the door open - the instant he saw me he dropped it on the floor; I collared him, and sent for an officer - he told me he wanted some marble paper; this was coloured paper - marble paper is not made up into reams.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know what he is? A. I am informed he is a book-binder: marble paper is not called coloured - I was four yards from him when I saw it in his hand; he had not moved out of the shop - after I collared him he asked for marble paper.

THOMAS WAGSTAFF . I am an officer, and took the prisoner for stealing this paper off a shelf in the shop - he did not contradict it.

Cross-examined. Q. Without taking off the cover could you tell whether that was marble paper or not? A. I should think not.

Prisoner's Defence. I went for marble paper - when I opened the door there was something against it, and a man rose up from there - the shopman laid hold of me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-23

256. JOHN NAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 dead goose, value 6s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Dyson Brooke and another.

CHARLES BROOKE . I am servant to Henry Dyson Brooke and another - they are poultry-salesmen . On Saturday, the 19th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, several flats were pitched opposite their door in Leadenhall-market ; the one in question contained twenty geese - I saw the prisoner in the market two or three times - I was walking in the market, and saw him lift up the lid of the flat and take a goose out; I caught hold of him about two yards off, with it in his hand; he said he was going to show it to a gentleman, but did not point him out.

JOHN GRIMES . I am a constable, and took him in charge; he said he was going to show the goose to a person; I knew him before - he has lost the use of one arm, and does nothing to support himself; I found on him a line, with a hook to it.

Prisoner's Defence. That line is what I dry my mother's pails with. This goose hung out by the legs; a gentleman said, "Does that belong to you?" I took it up, and was going into the prosecutor's shop with it - I did not say I was going to show it to a gentleman; it is false.

CHARLES BROOKE . He was going from the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-24

257. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 scarf, value 20s.; 1 spencer, value 10s., and 1 shift, value 2s. , the goods of Susan Douglas .

SUSAN DOUGLAS . I am a widow , and live in Bury-court, Aldermanbury ; the prisoner lodged with me for a month. These articles were in a box by his bed-side; there were two other lodgers and two beds in the room - the box was always locked. On the 5th of December, in consequence of information from my son, I went into the room, and found the prisoner doing something to his dress- he sat down on the bed; I said,"I found the box open and a false key in it;" the other lodgers had gone out hours before; I said, "Mr. Taylor, this is too bad;" he said, "I am innocent," and got up - I turned down the bed, and my scarf, spencer, and shift, were in the bed - they had been taken from the box; he was a civil quiet man, out of employ - I found eleven false keys between the bed and mattress where he slept.

WILLIAM DOUGLAS. I am the prosecutrix's son. I went into the room about ten o'clock in the morning, and found the prisoner there, alone - as I went into the room I heard the box shut down, and saw him raising himself from it; I went to the window, stood, there till the clock struck ten, and then went down and told my mother - one of the lodgers slept with him, and still lives there; the other has left.

HENRY STANTON . I am a constable, and received him in charge with the eleven keys.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner delivered in a paper, requesting to be sent to some asylum where he might be separate from the bad connexions he had formed.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-25

258. WILLIAM POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 7 seals, value 6l., the goods of Edward Taylor . in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS ASKEY. I am shopman to Edward Taylor, a jeweller , of Leadenhall-street . On Saturday night, the 5th of December, the prisoner came and looked at some seals, but bought none - on Monday, the 7th, at seven o'clock in the evening, he called, and asked to see those seals again - I showed him a tray, with those in it he had seen before; he said be thought what I pointed out to him were not those he had chosen - I said they were: he considered them dear - he then moved rather from the counter, and snatched a handful from the tray, took seven seals, and got out; I went out into the road, gave an alarm, and he was taken in five minutes - three seals had dropped in the shop, and three were found in Brown's-buildings, about one hundred yards off - the other has not been found; there were ninety-nine in the tray: I am sure the six found are master's - they are gold plated on copper, and worth 6l. or 7l.; they would cost 6l. from the manufacturer's - I think two or three are solid gold, but cannot tell without taking them to pieces.

JOHN GASKIN. I am a Thames Police-surveyer. I was near Mr. Taylor's, and saw the prisoner run out of the shop - Askey came out, and gave an alarm; I pursued him down St. Mary-axe, and he turned up a sort of court; I was nearly up to him, but met with an obstruction, and lost sight of him for a moment; I then saw him in custody - I brought him back to the shop - I did not see the seals found: I asked him what he was - he said he was a tailor, and if he was to be hung out of the way it would be of no consequence, for he was in distress. I saw two seals on the shop floor, and one on the edge of the counter.

WILLIAM ARTHUR. I am inspector of the ward. I was in Bury-street, and heard an alarm - I pursued to Grey-alley, leading to Brown's-buildings, and saw the prisoner running; I secured him - I have the three seals found in the shop.

ESTHER COHEN. I live in Bell-court, near Brown's-buildings. I found three seals on the ground in Brown's-building, about five minutes past seven o'clock in the evening - I had not heard the alarm of Stop thief! I produced them before the Magistrate, and Askey swore to them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-26

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

259. JOHN RIDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 1 spoon, value 20s. , the goods of William Rhodes ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 42. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300114-27

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

260. THOMAS GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , 16lbs. weight of beef, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Collins .

THOMAS COLLINS. I am a butcher , and live in Piccadilly . About twelve o'clock on the 23rd of December, I lost a piece of beef from my shop - I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN DUNN. I was opposite the prosecutor's shop on the 23rd of December; I saw the prisoner with two others - the prisoner went to the shop, and took a piece of beef, which he gave to one of the others, who put it into his apron, and ran off; I went and told the prosecutor, who sent his man out, and took the prisoner - the beef has not been found; I knew nothing of the prisoner before.

GUILTY. Aged 12. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300114-28

261. WILLIAM BELCHER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 29th of November , 14 yards of silk, value 9l., the goods of John Bedward , which had lately before (to wit) on the same day, been feloniously stolen by a certain evil-disposed person, he well knowing it to have been stolen .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS EVANS . I am shopman to Mr. John Bedward , a man's mercer , of Vigo-street - he purchased sixteen yards of silk, of Mr. Candy, which was delivered to him on the 11th of November; it cost 13s. per yard, for ready money - we generally sold it for 16s.; fourteen yards and a half of it were placed in the window - I saw it last about the 26th or 27th of November; I missed it on Monday, the 30th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning; this is part of the silk - it is not of a common description or pattern; it is of Lyons manufacture - I swear this is what was placed in the window; I have a pattern which I cut off it myself, and it matches exactly with the pattern and the place it was cut from; the silk had been round a roller, and had a selvidge with a mark on it.

COURT. Q. How much is now produced? A.Eight yards and a quarter - part of it has been cut off; that taken from the window was fourteen yards and a half.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Were you before the Magistrate? A. Yes - I did not swear that it corresponded with the quantity, which was eight yards and a quarter; it was a mistake of Mr. Roe's or of mine, I do not which; I had measured it the day before, and there were eight yards and a quarter of it - I went and rectified the mistake within an hour: as soon as I got home I heard that the prisoner proved he had had more than fourteen yards of it - I do not think the number of yards was mentioned in the first instance; I had seen it on Wednesday, and we missed it on Thursday or Friday, but decidedly on the Monday, when it was wanted for a customer; there are four or five shopmen, but we keep

our books very regularly, and if they had sold it it would have been put down - our books are not here.

COURT. Q. You can tell what you sold, but cannot speak for others? A. No - this piece was cut off after we had sold a part of it; this is a piece that had been in my master's window.

SOLOMON JOSEPHS. I live at No. 26, Wincot-street - I attend sales. I have known the prisoner several years; he came to my house on the 1st of December, and brought these eight yards and a quarter of silk, which I was to sell for him at the west-end of the town, as it was too high a price for his shop - I was to sell it at 8s. or 8s. 6d. a yard; I do not know the value of it; I went to Michael Jonas with it, and we took it to Mr. Pool's to sell it - we were both taken the same afternoon.

COURT. Q. What is the prisoner? A. He now keeps a sale shop, and sells clothes, shoes and boots; his shop is in Portland-town - he has been there two or three years; he had lived at a pawnbroker's - I have dealt with him for second-hand clothes.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Did Mr. Pool take the silk of you? A. I did not go into the shop: I first became acquainted with the prisoner in consequence of his wanting a cloak for a gentleman - I had the means of procuring that cloak; I have dealt with him in different ways- he keeps a shop; I have seen piece-goods there - Portland-town is not a very fashionable place; Pool's house is in Burlington-passage - Jonas left the silk there; I have been out on bail.

COURT. Q. I thought you were to sell it? A. Yes, but I met Jonas in the morning, and had this silk in my hand - I had a piece of tabaret to sell, and Jonas took this piece of silk.

MICHAEL JONAS. I am a general dealer - I buy silks, and ladies' and gentlemen's wardrobes. On the 2nd of December I saw Josephs in Cutler-street, with this piece of silk: I said I had a customer for it, and took it to Mr. Pool's for sale - he was not at home, but I left it there; Josephs staid at the door - I was taken into custody; I do not know the value of the silk, being new - I had never dealt in such a thing before: I was not instructed to take 6s. - I was to ask 8s. for it; I thought it was a moderate price - I had not dealt in silks before.

Cross-examined. Q.But you had dealt in second-hand silks? A. Yes - I could not venture to swear to this silk; there may be more like it - it has no mark on it; I took a piece of this pattern, and there was eight yards and a quarter of it - I believe this is it.

JAMES POOL . I am a mercer, and live at No. 4, Old Burlington-street. Jonas came on the 2nd of December, and left this silk at my shop for sale at 8s. a yard; I told my son to look to the invoices, as I was sure it was below the mark - these silks have not been in the market more than six weeks; I gave the witness into custody - it is Lyons silk; I had paid 17s. a yard to the same man for some similar to this - the pattern I think you cannot match.

Cross-examined. Q.But you bought it of a person who sells it? A. Yes - not of the manufacturer; it had not been in the market more than six weeks before this happened - from my knowledge of the business I know it has not; I know it is Lyons silk, and of a new pattern - I have bought second-hand silk of Jonas, but I never saw him with any thing new before; I have sold him second-hand clothes.

JOHN BEDWARD . I received information, and went to Mr. Pool's - I saw Jonas there; the other witness was brought in; I believe this is my property - it is a scarce article, and foreign silk; it has not been manufactured in Spitalfields.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know all the Spitalfields weavers? A. No, I know many of them - I do not know that it has not been imitated; the person I bought it of is in Court - he is the importer; it had been in my stock in the shop - I have several shopmen; I had seen it about three days before there was an alarm that it was missed - my shopmen are not here, but I have made every inquiry among them; I believe it had not been sold.

COURT. Q.Whether this silk could or could not be imitated, what you bought was of Lyons manufacture, and this is of Lyons manufacture? A. Yes, it is different to British manufacture and in width; I should have sold it at 16s. or 17s. a yard - I do not think if I were to order it in Spitalfields, and give them a month to make it in, that they would be able to make it to match as this pattern does; I believe the pattern and piece to be the same - the ground, flowers, and every thing seem to me to coincide exactly; in trying to imitate it exactly in Spitalfields they would fail to do it nineteen times out of twenty - indeed, if I was to write abroad to the manufacturer, and say,"Make one like this," I think neither the ground nor the flower would correspond exactly as this piece does.

- GRAHAM. I live with Mr. Charles Candy - he is abroad; this piece of silk is foreign manufacture - we only imported one of this pattern; I firmly believe this is part of it - I would not swear it; I think we could have a piece like this made at Lyons, but decidedly not in this country - they may have another piece by them at Lyons.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You think it possible there may be another piece? A. Yes, but very improbable; I do not know how many pieces they might make: two pieces might be so manufactured that a person could not distinguish one from the other, but not to correspond as this pattern does - we imported but one piece, and sold that to the prosecutor.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD. I am an officer. In consequence of information I took the prisoner on Wednesday, the 7th of December, in High-street, Portland-town; this piece of silk was produced at the time - he said he knew the silk; he was very much flurried, and I told him to be cautions, as it was stolen - he said he bought it at an auction-room about a fortnight or three weeks before, but he did not know where; I said that was before it was stolen - he then said, "Let me consider, it was about Friday or Saturday last," and concluded by saying, "It was on Friday;" he afterwards said he bought it in a street in Petticoat-lane, and afterwards that it was in a house in Petticoat-lane, and he could produce the man he bought it of: I then gave him in charge of Avis - this is the silk; I have had it ever since - I likewise produce a yard and a quarter more, which I got from Mr. Burnett, who said he got it of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What time did

you go to the prisoner's? A.About seven o'clock in the evening; I saw his wife, but did not make myself known - I gave her a fictitious name: there is a shop window, but very few goods in it - the prisoner came home about ten o'clock, and I asked if he knew this silk; he said directly that he knew it, and named the quantity, but he was flurried; I told him, before he made this statement, that it was stolen, and he looked in that kind of way as I should have expected a person would who was guilty - here is a yard and a half in this other piece of silk, according to my measurement.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I was with Schofield outside the door with Josephs; I took the prisoner to the watch-house - I made him no promise or threat, but he told me that he bought the silk in Petticoat-lane, and gave it to Josephs to sell, knowing him to be a better judge of silk than himself.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Josephs', as I had an order for a gentleman's cloak, and I knew he was acquained with master tailors at the west-end of the town - he got me four cloaks, and I sold one; then there were tassels wanting, and Josephs told me if I would call in the course of a week he would get them - I called, and I happened to have this silk with me; he said if I had not a customer for it he thought he could get me one - I had sold some of the silk, as I can prove; I told Josephs it cost me 8s. per yard, and if he could get any thing more as a profit well and good - I left it with him on commission.

JOHN BURNETT. I am a master tailor, and live in Upper North-place, Gray's Inn-road. I bought three yards and a quarter of this silk, of the prisoner, the latter end of November, about the last day; it was sealed up in this paper at Marlborough-street office, where I attended with it, and has my signature upon it.

MR. LEE. Q. You are a very good judge of these articles? A. I have made up a great many - I was to give 8s. or 8s. 6d. a yard for this - there is an account between us; I supposed 8s. about the value of it; I have been a tailor all my life - I have worked for the prisoner, and if he has any thing to suit me, he says, "Will that do for you?" I saw this silk, and said, "What do you want for it?" he said 8s. 6d. - I said "I will give you 8s." I have known him ten years; he is a general salesman, and deals in coats, hats, shoes, silks, and other things - he has been about three years in this business; he was before that foreman at a pawnbroker's - I have dealt with him for silks before; I should think that this is an old pattern -I believe I can get some of it within three hundred yards of here, for that price, at a public shop.

MR. BARRY. Q.Had you sold things to the prisoner? A. Yes; he asked 8s. 6d. per yard for it - I said I thought 8s. enough for it, to throw it into the window.

COURT. Q. What was the price to be? A. I said,"I will give you 8s." - he said, "When we settle we will see about it;" I did not think it cheap at 8s. 6d. - I thought it enough for it; he was foreman to Mr. Price, a pawnbroker, in Wentworth-street - I had worked for him at that time, but had no dealings with him; I had not heard that Mr. Price had been in difficulties - I have been to the house two or three times; I believe within these last twelve months he has been a bankrupt.

THOMAS KEENE . I am a linen-draper, and live at Brunswick-parade, White Conduit-fields. I bought a yard of silk of the prisoner on a Tuesday or Wednesday the latter end of November; I had it made into a waistcoat, and this is it - I think it was about the 24th or 25th of November.

MR. LEE. Q. Are you a master linen-draper? A. Yes, in a small way; purchasing silks is not in the way of my business, except for my own wear - I gave 8s. for this yard, and thought it a fair price; I have sold silks in my shop, but am not acquainted with this sort of article.

COURT. Q. Did you know him living with Mr. Price? A. Yes - he served his time to him, and I think lived there for twenty years; I never knew Price was in trouble.

MR. LEE. Q.How long have you been a linen-draper? A. I served my time to it, and have been five years with a linen-draper of Bishopsgate-street - twelve months ago I was warehouseman at a house.

JOHN FORD. I am a baker, and live in Portland-town. I bought three quarters of a yard of silk of the prisoner, which I had made into this waistcoat; it was on the Monday previous to his going away.

MR. LEE. Q.Was it the latter end of November? A. I do not know; it was the Monday before he was taken - I gave 3s. 9d. for it.

Prisoner. He did not buy it at all. Witness. My wife did - she said she paid 3s. 9d. for it; here is her handwriting to say what she paid.

WILLIAM BOOKER. I am an assistant to a linen-draper in Tooley-street. I called on the prisoner one Sunday, the latter end of November; I saw some silk there, and purchased a yard and a half for two waistcoats - one for myself, and one for my young master; these are the waistcoats.

MR. LEE. Q. It was the latter end of November? A. I think about the 27th; I paid 7s. a yard - I am not a judge of the value, but I should think that a fair price.

WILLIAM HENRY BYRON . I am a tailor, of Union-street, Whitechapel. I know the prisoner; I bought three yards and three quarters of this silk of him, about the 22nd or 23rd of November - I have made up two waistcoats of it, and this is the remainder; I was going to make it up, but I found the prisoner had got into trouble.

MR. LEE. I presume being a tailor, you are a judge of these things? A. I think myself a little judge - I gave 10s. a yard; I thought it was not dear.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-29

263. WILLIAM SANDERS was indicted for stealing, on 16th of December , 1 chaise cover, value 1l. , the goods of John Nash .

JOHN BRADSHAW. I am groom to Mr. John Nash; he lost a chaise-cover from Mr. Brown's livery stables, Peascod-street, Windsor , where he keeps his chaise; I had seen it safe on the evening of the 15th of December, and it was lost in the night - the chaise was in the coach-house, but it was not locked up; I saw the cover again in about a week, in the officer's possession.

WILLIAM STEPHENS. I am a Police-constable. On the 17th of December, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in Sidney's-alley

with this chaise-cover wrapped round his body; I asked what he had got - he said a roquelaire; I took him, and found it was this cover - I found the initials upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through Windsor, where I had applied for relief, and they told me I must come to St. George's parish; a gentleman gave me this to keep me warm - I came to London, and went to Mr. Powell, who gave me a note to go to the workhouse; they gave me a slice of bread and cheese, and 3d - I could not get a lodging for that, and was obliged to walk the streets; I got to Sidney's-alley, and the officer stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300114-30

264. GEORGE CROUCHMAN and ROBERT DOWDELL were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1500 lbs. weight of hops, value 50l., and 6 bags, value 15s. , the goods of Sampson Hanbury , and others. MESSRS. CRESWELL AND LEE conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DANBROOK. I am foreman to Sampson Hanbury and Co., Brewers . On the 26th of October I fastened up their hop-warehouse, which has a double door, a bolt at the top and bottom, and a lock. On the 27th I went and found the doors pulled too, but they had been broken open, and some bags of hops had been removed - upon examination, six bags were missing; I gave information to the Police; they were taken entirely away out of the warehouse, and an old padlock was left behind, which did not belong to the prosecutors.

WILLIAM BACK. I belong to the brewery. Danbrook came to me on the 27th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning; I went to Bell-lane store-house, and missed three bags from the right-hand side, and three from the left, immediately on getting in at the door - I had been there on the 24th, and all was safe then; on the 9th of November, I was sent for, and saw Mr. Willis and a constable - Mr. Willis had a sample of hops, which I compared with the hops which had been used that morning, and they corresponded exactly - I know Farren, and I told Willis to agree with Crouchman for the hops - on the 11th of November, I was at the corner of Wynyatt-street, and saw three bags of one mark, which were stolen, and one bag of another mark, which was stolen, in a cart, which was coming down the street, with Crouchman and Willis in it; they were delivered at a private brew-house, belonging to Mr. Farren's brother - these four bags were part of the property which was taken; I can swear they were part of the property of Messrs. Hanbury and Co.; Crouchman was then taken into custody - they were hops of two different growths,

Prisoner Crouchman. There might be some hundreds of bags of that growth, which Hanbury's did not buy. Witness. There were one hundred and sixty bags of the mark of Selby, and they bought the whole of that growth.

EDWARD MILLS . I reside in Helmet-row, St. Luke's, and let out carts for hire. On the 26th of October, in the evening, Crouchman came to my house and hired a van.

JAMES STAFFORD . I am a carman. Crouchman hired a horse of me, one Tuesday morning, about half-past five o'clock - he said he should want it about a couple of hours - it was a black horse, with white legs, and white face.

RICHARD ATKINSON . I am a carpenter. On the 27th of October, I was walking adjoining Hanbury's brew-house, as I went along Bell-lane in the morning: it struck six o'clock - I saw a van standing at Hanbury's warehouse door, and a man in the van, pressing down the fourth bag of hops; the morning being so dark I could not swear to the man - he was dressed in a dark brown dress; I cannot say Crouchman is the man - he has not the same dress on now, but by his size he appears to me to be the same person; I staid there a little while.

COURT. Q. What did you say at the office? A. I said I believed that was the man - he appeared to me to be the same sized person; that was five days after I had seen him - I believed he was the person then, and I believe so now.

ROBERT CRANE. I live in Dorsett-street. On the morning of the 27th of October I was in Bell-lane and saw a van loaded with hops, and drawn with one horse -I could not see what horse it was; there were two men with it - each had fustian coats on; it was going from the place where the hops had been towards Spitalfields-market.

JOSEPH HAYES. I am a watchman, and live in Cow-alley. On the morning of Tuesday, the 27th of October, I was in Aldersgate-street, about half-past six o'clock; I saw the prisoner Crouchman driving a van - I had seen him before, and have no doubt he is the man; there were six bags in it - I suppose that is three quarters or a mile from Hanbury's.

WILLIAM WILLIS. I know Crouchman - I met him in Old-street, and went with him to the Rum Puncheon, where we stopped an hour or more; he said, "I want to speak to you: I have got four bags of hops to sell, can you get me a customer for them?" I said I could not - he called me out again afterwards and I said, "I can't tell whether I can get you a customer or not" - he said, "If you will meet me at the Cock, at the corner of Golden-lane, I will bring you a sample;" I bade him good day, and did not see him again till the Wednesday morning, when he came to my house - I asked him if he had got rid of the hops: he said No - he wished I had got a customer for him; I said I had got one - by the customer I meant Mr. Farren, whom I had before agreed with; Crouchman came to my house afterwards, and we went to Mr. Farren's who agreed about the hops - I saw the hops in the place where they were deposited; I was to deliver the hops - I took the sample of hops to the prosecutor's - Crouchman carted the hops to Farren's from a place in Goswell-street-road, which I believe to belong to Crouchman; I helped to load them - when we got to Exmouth-street we were taken into custody by the officer.

COURT. Q. Did you go before the Magistrate? A. Yes, with the four bags of hops which were in the cart - I did not know, till the 11th of November, that the hops had been stolen, when Crouchman told me whose they were.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. Did he say from whom he got them? A. He said he got them from Trueman and Hanbury's; that he had sold two bags, and had only four left - he said afterwards where he had sold the other two.

HANNAH WILLIS. I am the wife of the last witness. On the morning of the 9th of November I found, in my husband's pocket, a brown paper parcel of hops, and on the 11th Crouchman breakfasted with us, between seven and eight o'clock - he inquired of my husband who Mr. Farren was whom he had recommended to buy the hops, and he went out with my husband; they returned, breakfast was ready, and they breakfasted - when my husband was gone out Crouchman said, "I suppose your husband has told you about the hops?" I said I had heard a little about it - the prisoner said, "It is a troublesome concern, I wish I was rid of them;" he said that he and another man took them from Hanbury's - I gave information.

Prisoner Crouchman. I leave it in the hands of the Gentlemen of the Jury.

CROUCHMAN - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

DOWDELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-31

265. JAMES HALL and JOHN HALL were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , 1 gun, value 1l. , the goods of John Stansfield .

JOHN STANSFIELD. I am a clerk at Staines-bridge, in Middlesex . On the 21st of December I went there about nine o'clock; the office was broken open, and the gun taken - I have seen the prisoners before; they live at Staines, and I believe are shoemakers.

JAMES ADAMS . I am a constable of Staines. On the 23rd of December, at six or seven o'clock in the evening, I saw James Hall turn the corner of my house with this gun concealed under his arm, with the butt against his foot - I went up to him, knowing him very well; he said,"I have a gun here" - I said, "Why are you seen about in the evening with a gun, when you know what a bad character you have in the town? take my advice, and go with the gun;" I looked at it, and gave it him back again - instead of returning home he went towards London, and it struck me that a person had informed me a gun had been stolen; I followed James, and saw his brother John join him, and he gave the gun to John - I called James, and he stopped; I said, "I want John, he has got the gun" - I went up to him and said, "Let me have the gun;" he resisted my having it, but James said "Let him have it;" James then said he had bought it - I said,"Tell me of whom, and I will go with you to the person"- but he would not; I took him to Mr. Bean, who had informed me the gun had been stolen - the prosecutor came and claimed it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. It was between six and seven o'clock in the evening when you saw James Hall? A. Yes; he was alone - I have seen a number a persons go out shooting; they do not carry their guns in the same way I think - it was not till after I had given him the gun back that John came up: they had gone about fifty or sixty yards - I know a man named Stepley, and I think he ought to have been here; James Hall did not say he bought it of Stepley for 17s. - I have an idea that Stepley was in the robbery; he was at the top of the lane when I spoke to James Hall.

James Hall's Defence. I had six witnesses, but they are not here - they could prove I bought it of Stepley.

JAMES ADAMS . When the prisoners were examined they said they had not time to get their witnesses - James did say he bought it, but did not say of whom: I said,"I will put my horse into the chaise to go any where to get the person," but he did not tell me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-32

266. JOHN LEE , RICHARD TAYLOR , MICHAEL HARE , and DANIEL MACK were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 9 shirts, value 2l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 2 waistcoats, value 4s.; 9 stock collars, value 4s.; 1 cravat, value 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s., and 1 night cap, value 3d. , the goods of William Allison .

JOHN SALTON . I am a foreman at Messrs. Hoare's wharf - the prisoners were all paid for working at the jigger on the 25th of December; Mr. Allison has no house there - these articles stated were in a bag in his counting - house, and the prisoners were at work about twenty yards from it - I was on the second floor; I observed the jigger was not going so fast as it should do - I came down to their floor to set it faster - I saw Taylor sitting on a box, and I asked what he was doing; he answered from the jigger that he was rather sick from drinking - I said where could he drink at that time in the morning; I asked him to get up - he said he would in a few minutes; I asked him again, but he did not get up - I gave him a shove; he fell off, and I saw this property there which he had been sitting on; I called the other foreman, who came up and said he knew the bag - we searched Taylor, but found nothing on him; the other foreman said it was not half the property, and he had seen Taylor coming from a privy about twenty minutes before - I afterwards saw Taylor putting his arm out of a window in the jigger.

JOSEPH GEORGE HOOD . I am a foreman there. I was called up stairs and found this property; I afterwards found this other part of the property at the back of the house - I did not see Hare or Mack do any thing.

JAMES LITTLE. I am an officer. I produce the property.

WILLIAM ALLISON . This property is mine; the most of it is marked - it was sent to me from Scotland.

Taylor's Defence. I know nothing of it; I had been at work a long time, and sat down to rest myself - I never threw any thing out of the window.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 33.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

HARE - NOT GUILTY .

MACK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-33

267. ROBERT LARDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 4 caps, value 2s., and 3 yards of calico, value 1s. , the goods of Mary Ann Boyce .

MARY ANN BOYCE. I am single . I lost my caps and calico off the top of my bedstead, on the 16th of December - I caught the prisoner coming out of my house with a latch in his hand, between ten and eleven o'clock; I asked what he wanted - he said, "Wood, a shoemaker;" and he said, "If you think I have robbed you, you had better search me" - I said, "I don't suppose you have, my good man;" but I took him two doors off with these articles.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS AMES. I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the door, and a sailor gave me these things; the man ran down the street.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-34

168. JAMES GRIEVE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 violoncello, value 2l. , the goods of James Willington .

JAMES WILLINGTON . I am the son of James Willington. This violoncello is mine - it was taken from my father's house at Kentish-town .

JAMES ALDOUS. I am a pawnbroker, in Berwick-street. This violoncello was pawned with me by the prisoner, on the 24th of December, in the name of John Morgan.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and in going down the passage at the office he said his father's apprentice had got the duplicate; I brought him up before the Magistrate, but he denied all knowledge of it.

JAMES WILLINGTON . This violoncello is my property; I went to dine with my father and mother on Christmas-day, and I took up a fiddle there, and asked where the violoncello was - my brother-in-law said he thought the prisoner had it; I know the prisoner - we brought him up from a child; he did not live in that house, but I suppose he went up stairs and took it.

CHARLES GEARY . I am the prosecutor's brother-in-law. On Christmas-eve I went to my father-in-law's; I went up stairs to hang up a great coat, and threw it against the place where the instrument stood; I then came down, and in the evening the prisoner went up stairs to get some coals, and I suppose at that time he took the instrument and put it against the door, as it was missed the next day; he has had a good character.

Prisoner's Defence. At the second examination they would not swear it was theirs; I have been brought up by the prosecutor, and have worked for them many years.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, who engaged to take him again into his service.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300114-35

269. JAMES CULLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 26 yards of linen, value 26s.; 6 yards of nankeen, value 4s., and 24 yards of calico, value 4s. , the goods of John Rowe and others.

JOHN ROWE. I am a linen-draper of Oxford-street , and have other partners; the prisoner was employed there from August, when I joined the firm, till the 3rd of December - on that day we missed some property out of the warehouse, and asked the prisoner about it; we sent to his lodgings, where he had been living some time - we had sent there repeatedly - the officer found there twenty-four yards of calico, six yards of nankeen, and a piece of linen.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.What marks have you on them? A. Here is my own private mark and the mark of the firm; before I joined them I lived in Lamb's Conduit-street - there are two other partners; I believe the prisoner is married, and has three children.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I went and found the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know how they came into my apartments; I was at the office when they were found.

GUILTY . Aged 35 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-36

270. JAMES BREWER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 17lbs. weight of buck leather, value 1l. 5s. , the goods of William Stevens .

JOHN CHARD . I am a shoemaker of Lisson-green. On the 1st of December the prisoner, who was a stranger, came to me, and said he had some leather to sell; I asked where he came from; he said, "The leather is coming out of the country" - he said he had five butts of it; I asked whether he was a boatman - he said he was, and appointed to bring me the leather the same night; on the 2nd he came to me again in the Edgware-road, and asked whether I would have that or not - I had not appointed to meet him there: he said he would bring it in half an hour, it was all quite ready, the stamps were all cut out, and it was drawn into the canal - I thought he meant the duty stamp, as all leather is marked before it leaves the tan-pit; he then brought me one butt doubled up in a sack, and said, if he could depend on me and I upon him we should do well - he turned the butt out of a sack into my passage: I asked what he wanted for it - he said, 25s.; I said, "You ask too much, I suppose you will take 1l." - we left it there and went to a public-house to get bread and cheese; I made an excuse that money was rather short, went out, and got the constable; he came and took him - he told me the second day I saw him that he had eight of them.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. Chard applied to me on the 1st of December, and told me that a man had offered him some leather, and on the 2nd he told me that the prisoner was the man; he had one butt in his possession at the time - the prisoner said he had bought it, and had given 15s. for it, to some boatman, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, near the stop of Paddington canal; I had known him before - he worked at a brick-maker's yard; he has been out of employ for some time - he said he could point out the man if he saw him; they were gone down to the City-basin - we went to Mr. Pickford's wharf; there were three boats in - he saw all the men, but said it was none of these; we then went to the lock - he said it was none of them; I at last found Mr. Stevens.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. He told you at once that he bought it? A. Yes; he did not propose to take me to his master.

GEORGE BENNETT . I am journeyman to Mr. Stevens, a tanner at Cowley. The canal runs through there; I assisted the Excise-officer in marking and weighing the leather, on Saturday, the 14th of November - the next morning I went to the warehouse, and saw the window open, and a piece of leather lying there; there were nine butts missing - I examined this butt when I was before the Magistrate; the Excise-office mark is cut out, but our private mark is still here, and I know it is my master's.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose the Excise marks are the same in one as in another? A. They are not the same

at different tanners; they have moveable letters - my master puts the same mark on every one he tans, and we sell a great many; I cannot swear that this had not been sold.

COURT. Q.Does your master cut out the Excise marks? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 15th of November I was at home at half-past six o'clock at night, and did not go out till past six the next morning; when I was taken to the office, at the second examination, the officer had the witnesses brought in one at a time - I did not know what they said.

PHILIP WEBSTER. He stated he was in the new Police at the time he was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 23. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-37

271. JAMES WILKINS and ELIZABETH HARLINGTON were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , 1 pair of trousers, value 7s.; 2 cups, value 1s.; 2 saucers, value 1s., and 1 wine-glass, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas William Morley .

THOMAS WILLIAM MORLEY . I am in the medical profession , and live in Leicester-square . Wilkins was my footman for about two months. On the night of the 21st of December, when I returned home with my wife at a quarter before twelve o'clock, I had occasion to go to the top of the house to a private room, and heard a noise; I went down and called the Police - I met with a private watchman and a Police-man; they went with me to Wilkins' bed-room, and discovered a closet, the door of which was locked -Wilkins said he had the key, but said there was no one there; I said, "Stand on one side and I will open the door" - I opened the door and saw Harlington sitting there in a chair; I inquired what she was doing there -Wilkins made no answer, but in going down he told the Police-man that he had taken her there; I then inquired if she was the woman that I had heard of as his sweetheart - he said, Yes; I sent him to the watch-house, then went to the cupboard where Harlington was, and found a hat-box, which I presume belonged to Wilkins, and in it two cups, two saucers, and a wine-glass; these are the articles - they are mine; I missed no plate - I searched Wilkins' box the next morning at ten o'clock; it was locked, and these trousers of mine, which are nearly new, were in it.

JOHN FLOOD. I am an officer. I took charge of the property.

Wilkins' Defence. This young woman is innocent of it- the hat-box was my master's; the trousers were my master's left off ones, and I wore them in the morning to save my livery - I had but one suit.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-38

272. JOHN ASSETER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , 36lbs. weight of hay, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Langston .

MARIA LANGSTON . I am the daughter of Thomas Langston, a gardener , and live near North-green. On the 26th of December I saw the prisoner taking a truss of hay from his stable, which comes into the road; it was about twenty minutes before six o'clock in the evening - he carried it into the road, and I went and spoke to him; he put it down and ran away - he was taken two or three days afterwards; I had seen him before - he lives close by; he never worked for my father.

JAMES PARISH . I am the constable. I know the prisoner very well; he generally goes about dusting - he applied to the committee of the parish for relief, and I took him upon this information.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300114-39

Fifth Middesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

273. JOHN DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 130 dozen pairs of gloves, value 80l. , the goods of William Towns .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM TOWNS . I am a wholesale glover - my warehouse is in Fleet-street . On the 21st of October I had a hundred and twenty, a hundred and thirty, or a hundred and forty dozen pairs of gloves; they were all safe that night - if they had not been there then I should have ascertained it; when I returned on the Monday morning I missed nearly the whole.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you in the habit of leaving any one to attend to the warehouse? A. No - I left it locked; no one resided there - some persons had been there before me, I believe, on the Monday.

SARAH KENNY . I live in Drury-lane. The prisoner came to my house, but I was not at home, my husband was; I saw a parcel laid on the table tied up - a young man in our house, named William Wood , packed it up, and sent it away; no other person came to the house but the porter to fetch it - it was tied up; the prisoner never came to our house he never came near the place; I do not know what the parcels contained - I never looked into it; I did not see it open - I do not know that Wood was a friend of the prisoner's; I do not recollect seeing a person named Francis Hodgkins - there was a man came for the box; I do not know whether I have always given the same account of this - I was very much flurried when at Bow-street.

COURT. Q.Have you always stated that you do not know who left it? A. I cannot tell what I said, I was taken in such a flurry; there was only one examination - I do not know the prisoner as a neighbour, but he has been at our place; I do not know what was in the parcel - it was tied up as a bed; I do not know what was in it- I never opened it; it was opened at Bow-street, and contained the gloves - Davies did not claim that parcel at my house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you able to come here last Session? A. No - I have since then had a child.

COURT. Q. You made your mark to an examination? A. Yes; I cannot remember whether it was read over to me - I think it was; I have no doubt about it - (Deposition read.)

I am the wife of George Kenny; a large parcel was left at our house, to be kept by a man I do not know - the prisoner Davies made the request for it to be left; the prisoner Davies opened the packet.

Q. Is that true? A. I really do not know what I did say; I was not at home when it was left.

FRANCIS MORRIS. I am an assistant Police-officer. In consequence of information I watched the residence

of the prisoner in Belton-street, Long-acre; I saw a packing-case brought to the door of a carpenter's shop by the prisoner - he put it on the porter's shoulder, who took it to the dwelling-house of this witness; the prisoner went by the shop, returned, and went into it - the same porter brought it out, and got a bricklayer's labourer to help him up with it; I followed the porter down to Glasgow-wharf, East Smithfield - he left it then, and came out with a paper in his hand; I went to Bow-street, and told Ruthven - we went together to the wharf, and I pointed out the box to Ruthven; this is it.

JAMES SINCLAIR . I am a clerk at the Leith and Glasgow-wharf. I recollect this package being brought to the wharf, where it was detained by the officer.

GEORGE THOMAS JOSEPH RUTHVEN. I am an officer. I took the prisoner; he said nothing of this case.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-40

274. WILLIAM MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 looking-glass, value 3l. , the goods of Edward Treslove Cox , his master.

EDWARD TRESLOVE COX . I am an auctioneer - the prisoner was in my employ. On the 17th of November I had a looking glass taken from my premises in St. James-street ; I had seen it safe a few days before - it had been deposited with me for sale, and the person some time after applied for the money it sold for; we searched for the glass, but it was not to be found - some days after a man gave me information, and I discharged the prisoner; I saw the glass at Marlborough-street on the day I was examined - this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You are an auctioneer? A. Yes - I do not know of any such phrase in our trade as a knock out; there is among the brokers - it means when an article has been bought at a low price it is put up among themselves, and the advance is divided among them; there never was a knock out on my premises, to my knowledge - I do not remember any wine, or two bottles, which came to my share; I have had no quarrel with the prisoner - there was a carpet sold to Mr. Beckford, but there was no quarrel about that; I am so particular about the Excise duty, that I always leave it to be made out by the clerk; the prisoner has never threatened to lay an information against me for any sale- he has never threatened me with an Exchequer process; he has gone into another person's employ - I never had a sale through his means; I believe he has brought some bidders - he made himself very useful; while he was with me the sales increased - he was in Mr. Foster's employ before he came to me; I know an auctioneer named Parnell - I recollect a gentleman here present did send me some sales of wine; I believe it was in consequence of the prisoner being with me, but this was an addenda to the sale; there might be thirty dozen - there were not sixty dozen sold; the prisoner was a very industrious servant - I do not know that I have lost his interest since he left me; the parties he solicited come to me, I think, as many as before he left me - I did not send my son to the prisoner's brother-in-law, and do not know of his going.

COURT. Q. Had the prisoner left your service, and gone to another auctioneer, before you made your charge? A. Yes.

JOHN RITCHIE. I am a porter. I was standing at Mr. Cox's door, and the prisoner said he should have a job for me bye and bye; I cannot say when - it was three weeks before I was before the Magistrate; the prisoner said it was to take this glass to Mr. Fairchild's, in Portland-street - I took it, and he overtook me; he went with me to the house, and asked permission to leave it there till the evening - it was wrapped up in some bedfurniture; he said he wanted to get it away on the sly, as it did not suit him to pay for it on the Saturday night, and if he got it away he should not have to pay for it till Saturday week - he gave it to me in the little room at Mr. Cox's, about half-past two or three o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not think there was any thing wrong in it? A. No - the foreman at a sale takes directions to send goods home to gentlemen, and what I thought he meant by the sly, was, that he was not prepared to pay for it - he wrapped it up.

HENRY ROBERTS. I am a carver and gilder. I made this glass, and took it to Mr. Cox's on the 11th of October.

WILLIAM BALLARD. I am an officer. Mr. Cox's son gave charge of the prisoner - I asked if he knew any thing of a looking-glass; he said No, at first, and then said he had told Mr. Hollands all about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know any thing about an Exchequer process? A. Yes - something was said to Mr. Cox, Jun., but the prosecutor was not there then; I replied, "If you had not said that, perhaps he would not have been so severe about this."

COURT. Q.What did he say? A. He said he would bring Mr. Cox to book for some duty not being paid on some sale - he said this after he was in my custody; he did not say he had threatened that before - he said he would do it.

JURY to JOHN RITCHIE . Q. Are you in the habit of working for the prosecutor? A. No - I work for any one; I know Mr. Cox and the prisoner - I have worked with him at Mr. Foster's.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300114-41

275. SAMUEL NICHOLS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 2 boots, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas George Cox .

THOMAS GEORGE COX. I am a shoemaker , and live at Brentford . I lost two odd boots and a pair of highlows on the 2nd of January, about five o'clock in the evening - I had seen them about half an hour before; my little boy called me into the shop, and I missed them - I sent my wife to the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner near your shop? A. No - he said they had been given to him by another person, whom he described; search was made for that person, but he has absconded - I had seen that other person about the town - he seemed younger than the prisoner, and is a bad character.

JOHN BURFORD . I am a pawnbroker. These boots were brought to be pawned by the prisoner - I saw no one with him; it was between six and seven o'clock on

the night of the 2nd of January - the prosecutor's wife had given me notice to stop them about half an hour before.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? A. No.

WILLIAM HUGHES. I am a constable. I was called to take the prisoner and the boots.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the other lad who has absconded? A. Yes, very well - I know him to be a bad character.

COURT. Q. What age is the other lad? A. Seventeen or eighteen; he has been about the barges, and has been in trouble - I had seen him about a week before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the town, and met this young man, who gave me these boots to pawn.

WILLIAM HUGHES re-examined. The prisoner first mentioned about the other boy the next morning - I had been seeking for the other on another charge; he had slept on board a barge that night, and went away the next morning.

JOHN BURFORD. My brother told me the other lad was waiting in the passage at the time the prisoner came in.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-42

276. DAVID LILLY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 2 trunks, value 10s.; 11 gowns, value 5l. 10s.; 1 watch, value 1l.; 2 brooches, value 16s.; 3 pairs of shoes, value 11s.; 2 scarfs, value 9s., and 5 shifts, value 10s. , the goods of Hannah Veale .

HANNAH VEALE. I am single . On the 17th of November I was engaged to a place in Argyle-place; my trunks, containing all these articles, and many more, were sent from No. 7, Oriel-terrace, Cheltenham. to Mr. Campbell's, Argyle-place; I came to town on the 24th, and found the articles at the office - the trunks were directed "Robert Campbell, Esq., to be left at the Green Man and Still."

JAMES LARKINS . I am a porter at the Green Man and Still. Nine parcels came from Cheltenham on Saturday, the 21st of November - they were unloaded from the waggon, and put down on the pavement; I saw the directions on them - I took the way-bill into the office, put it on the desk, and when I came out I missed two trunks - one was a round black trunk, and one was in a black cloth; I could not see which way they were gone - it was very foggy.

JAMES CONDIE. I am a Police-officer. On Saturday morning, the 21st of November, I was in Hanover-square, a little after five o'clock, speaking to a private watchman, and I heard a coach driving as rapidly as it could - it came down Princes-street, and passed by a gas-light; I saw the prisoner riding with the coachman on the box - the coach went up Hanover-street, down Regent-street, and there I saw two other young men; the coach stopped in Poland-street, and the prisoner got off the box - another man, with a white coat or jacket, went and opened the coach door, and a man in a dark coat came out and shut the door; I went up, and said, "What have you got here?" the coachman drove on - I took hold of the handle, and called to him to stop, but he would not: I at last took hold of the traces, and one of the horses fell - I looked round, and the men were all gone from the pavement; I then opened the door, to take the man who went inside, but he was gone - these two boxes were in the coach; the coachman took the coach and boxes to the office - the prosecutrix identified them.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You say Lilly was on the box? A. Yes - I have known him some years - he was employed about the rank; I do not know that the coachman was his intimate friend - I am quite satisfied Lilly was on the box; the coachman was prosecuted here last Session, but was acquitted.

Prisoner's Defence. The Police-man came to the lock-up place, and said, "Which is Lilly?" he did not know me, and then he came into the office and said he had known me three or four years - I expected the coachman, but he is not here.

JAMES CONDIE. I know him by sight, but not by name - I was asked if I wanted Lilly, and I said I did not know his name.

MR. LEE. Q.Was it not foggy? A. Yes; I was at no great distance when the coach passed me - when I saw the prisoner he was standing against a post, holding up his face, and bidding the coachman good night.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-43

277. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 2 table-cloths, value 4s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s., and 1 shawl, value 2s. , the goods of Ann Osten .

WILLIAM BUTLER PAIN. I am master of the Union School, Shakespeare's-walk . On the evening of the 18th of December I went to bed a little before eleven o'clock, and the house was then fastened; at two o'clock in the morning I heard a noise, went down, and found two doors ajar, which had been fastened; I went and found the kitchen window open, and a pair of trousers hanging across the cill of the window - I gave an alarm, and examined the various rooms with the watchman; when I went the third time into the front room I found the prisoner behind the door - I said, "Here is one of the rascals;" he put up his arm, and I gave him a thump on the head with the poker - the watchman then took him; I went back to the kitchen, and on the table I found two table-cloths and atowel, which had been in the drawer when I went to bed; the house must have been entered by crossing two or three yards, getting over a wall, and opening the shutters of a window, which was lifted up - the noise which awoke me was an attempt to break open the cupboard door.

JOHN ANDERSON . I am a watchman. I was called, and found the prisoner behind the door - I asked him if there was any more; he said there were two men who had gone across the palings, and he had come to see what the other chaps were doing - he did not mean to rob the house - when he came into the yard there was a dish full of water. he happened to kick it, and that disturbed them.

THOMAS AMES . I am a constable. I produce the property, which was given to me the next morning, when I went to examine the premises.

WILLIAM BUTLER PAIN . This shawl belongs to my servant , Ann Osten - the rest are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I belong to the Sarah Ward. West-Indianman, and came on shore to get a little grog; I got groggy, and saw two chaps get over the pales - I said"I will go and see what they are at;" I kicked against

something, and they ran away - I went into the house; this gentleman came and asked me what I did there - he did not give me time to tell him, but took me to the watch-house; I was going to sea the next morning - I had drank a great deal that night.

THOMAS AMES. I had seen the prisoner in the street that night, at twelve o'clock - he was very drunk, and insisted upon having some more gin; I took him to the watch-house, but did not keep him - I turned him out as a drunken sailor.

NOT GUILTY . (See page 105.)

Reference Number: t18300114-44

278. JOHN AXTILL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 1 jacket, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 6d.; 1 decanter, value 6d.; 6 pairs of scissors, value 2s., and 1 knife, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Swan Watson .

THOMAS SWAN WATSON. I am mate of the James . I was at Wapping on the 25th of December, and the property stated was taken out of my vessel; I had seen them all safe on the 24th - they were locked in the cabin; I had the key in my pocket - about ten o'clock the next morning I found the prisoner in custody, with them.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q.When was the prisoner in your service? A. He was apprenticed in May, 1828; he had left about a month before this happened. to take care of another ship - I found these things at the London-dock gate, on Christmas morning.

GILBERT DUNCAN . I stopped the prisoner with these things, at the London-dock gate; he had this jacket and trousers on, and the other things with him - he gave me no account of them.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300114-45

279. MARY WHITING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 10 yards of calico, value 6s.; 2 table-cloths, value 2s.; 1 yard of ribbon, value 6d.; 1 snuff-box, value 6d., and 2 pinafores, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Fowke .

GEORGE BANKS. I am an assistant to Mr. Thomas Fowke, linen-draper . of Ratcliff-highway - he did live in Tottenham-court-road. On Christmas-day some property was found in the prisoner's boxes; she had been in his employ for about six weeks - she was going away; she opened her box herself, and the articles stated were found, there were ten yards of calico, some children's pinafores, a pair of nut-crackers, and other things; she said some were put in by mistake, and some she had given her - there were two table-cloths and some soap found in a bundle which she had taken to a place where she was going to lodge - we sent for the bundle: it was opened in my presence - she did not give any account of the table-cloths; they were not new - here is a swan stock, which is new, and that she said she bought at Broomyard, where she came from, but it has our mark on it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Were not some of these wrappers used in the shop? A. Yes. I had no particular quarrel with her - the apprentice had, but I had not; she threw the footman at my head, but I would not quarrel with her: her box had not been taken away and brought back again - there was a pair of gaiters in it; they had not been thrown away.

WILLIAM WILSON . I took up the prisoner - she denied all knowledge of the things.

Prisoner's Defence. This witness shook the dusting-brush over my breakfast table in the morning - he was cursing and swearing, and told me to go to the devil and shake myself.

GEORGE BANKS. No - I went for the dusting-brush, and she told me to get it myself; I held it up to her, but I did not shake it over the breakfast - Mr. Fowke is not here: he is confined with an asthma.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-46

280. WILLIAM WINTER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 cloth pelisse, value 2s., 6d. , the goods of James Gideon .

WILLIAM TYE. I am in the employ of Mr. James Gideon, a pawnbroker , at the corner of James-street, Stafford-street . Mr. Leir told us on the 9th of December that a blue pelisse was taken from the shop; I then missed it -I had seen it about an hour before; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a man running - he dropped this pelisse, but I did not then know it was ours; Mr. Leir came and said, "This belongs to you;" I took the pelisse from him - I did not see the features of the person who was running.

JAMES LEIR . I was at my own door, watching the prisoner - I saw him stand there some time, and then he went to the side of the door, took down the pelisse, and ran away; I called Stop thief! he dropped the pelisse, and was taken by the Police-officer - I saw him stopped, and had not lost sight of him.

MICHAEL FOGARTY. I am an officer. I was on duty, and saw the prisoner running out of Great James-street, Lisson-grove, and a crowd of people after him - I made a prisoner of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The Prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300114-47

281. JAMES WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 hat, value 4s.; 1 cap, value 2s., and 1 hat-brush, value 4d. , the goods of Thomas Roberts .

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a hatter. I lost a hat, cap, and a hat-brush on the 6th of January; the prisoner was in my employ, at my shop in Chiswell-street ; I sent for the officer to search the prisoner, and the things were found - I can swear to them, though they had been worn.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you swear that he has not bought that hat? A. Yes; he did buy a hat of me, but that was stamped at the bottom - the one he bought was not found; I have stopped part of his wages in consequence of his losing with me when tossing up; he has not lost to the amount of 10s. a week, but perhaps 1s. -I have tossed with him for beer and gin and water; I have not thrown gin over him when he would not drink it.

BENJAMIN TUCKER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found this hat in a box in his room, the key of which I found on him - also this cap and hat-brush.

Cross-examined. Q. I dare say you never tossed with him? A. I went on Saturday night, and Mr. Roberts was

in a pet with him for being drunk, and I did toss with him - I am an officer of St. Luke's

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-48

282. JOHN TOMLINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 cloak, value 14s. , the goods of Joseph Prawl .

ALEXANDER OWEN. I am in the employ of Mr. Joseph Prawl, a linen-draper of Tottenham-court-road . Last Wednesday week, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was behind the counter, and saw the prisoner take down the cloak from inside the door; he ran away, and I after him, and took him in a minute and a half, in Newman-street - he had not got the cloak then, but I got it after I took him; I am certain he is the person who took it - he was not running when I stopped him; he had made a little halt.

JOHN UNDERWOOD. I am a cabinet-maker. I was going up Newman-street on Wednesday, the 6th of January; the prisoner came in contact with me, and had the cloak under his arm - I took it to be a coat; he threw it into an area, a few yards from me - I saw him stopped, and afterwards took the Police-man to the house, and there he got the cloak.

MARY ROUTER. I am a servant in Newman-street. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and found this cloak in our area; I gave it to the Police-man.

GEORGE POWELL . I am a Police-officer. I got this cloak from Router; I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been on an errand, and came through Newman-street; the gentleman took hold of me, and said I had stolen a cloak, but I had not seen it.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-49

283. THOMAS SANDERS and LYDIA SIMS were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 30s.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 1 razor, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 1 pin, value 4s., and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s. , the goods of John Strachan .

JOHN STRACHAN. On the 23rd of November I had a double bedded room at Mr. Nash's; I did not sleep there that night, but I went on the 24th, unlocked my box, and missed my trousers, waistcoat, razor, handkerchief, breast-pin, and a pair of gloves - these are the articles; I know nothing of the prisoners.

SARAH NASH . Lydia Sims came to the house, where I have apartments, in Robert-street, Grosvenor-square , on the 23rd of November; she said she wanted a lodging for a friend, who had written to her from the country - that she expected him in two or three days, but that he might come that night; I said she must let me know if he came that night - a little after ten o'clock that evening, the male prisoner came and asked if a woman had taken a lodging - I said Yes; he asked if she had given any deposit - I said No; he gave me 2s. off the the week's rent, and went to bed in the room which Strachan had slept in the night before; he said he should not want the bed the next night, as he was going to Walthamstow with a family in the morning, and wished to be called at seven o'clock; my husband called him - I went to see if every thing was safe; I saw the trunk locked, and supposed every thing was safe - the prosecutor came that same day, and missed the articles.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q.Then this woman did not go into the room? A. Only with me to look at the room; in the course of the day I looked into the table-drawer, and missed the razor.

DAVID TRAIL. I have two handkerchiefs pawned with me by a female, in the name of Ann Barnard.

THOMAS WILLIAM ANDREWS. These trousers were pawned with me on the 14th of November, by the female prisoner, I believe, but I am not quite certain.

JOHN ANDERSON . I took charge of this woman, and she denied knowing Sanders; I found him at her lodging - I found on him twenty-eight duplicates, among which were duplicates of the trousers, the waistcoat, and handkerchief.

SANDERS - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

SIMS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-50

284. SAMUEL SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 cloak, value 19s. , the goods of John Lacy .

WILLIAM LACY. I am shopman to Mr. John Lacy, of Cranbourn-street . On the 14th of December, a cloak was taken from the shop; I did not see it taken down, but I saw the prisoner with it a minute after it was taken - it was pinned close against the door-post; he had not got more than six yards - I took it as he was in the act of throwing it down.

THOMAS SLARK . I am a Police-man - I have the cloak.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to mercy - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300114-51

285. JOHN SWEET , JAMES STACK , and THOMAS STACK were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 20lbs. weight of pork, value 10s., and two pigs' heads, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Crandon .

JOSEPH CRANDON . I am butcher , in Fitzroy-market . On the 2nd of January, I lost two bellies of pork, two hands of pork, and two pigs' heads, from a blue dish outside the door - I missed them while I was at tea, about five o'clock; I had had them in my hand just as I went in to tea; I have never seen any part of them since.

ELIZA DUNN . I was going along a passage, No. 6. Market-street, Fitzroy-market; I saw James Stack go and take some meat of the blue dish, give it to Sweet, and tell him to cut it - Sweet ran round the street; James Stack went and stood at the dark door of No. 9, where the house is empty - Thomas Stack was standing at the parlour window; he saw what they were about - I do not know what he did; I went and told Mrs. Wildey what I had seen, and then I gave information.

Sweet. Q. Did I cut it? A. Yes you did, and ran round Grafton-street with it under your arm - I did not say it was in your apron; it was under your arm.

Thomas Stack . Q. You said I took it? A. No I did not.

WILLIAM COX . I live in Market-street, Fitzroy-market. On the evening of last Saturday week I saw James and Thomas Stack ; James gave Thomas some meat, and then James went and took another piece from

the dish - he put it under his apron, and ran round Grafton-street after his brother; I did not see Sweet.

CATHERINE WILDEY. Eliza Dunn came and told me what she had seen; I went and told Mr. Crandon, and they missed the meat.

Sweet's Defence. Last Saturday week I was coming down by the corner of the New Road - a boy said, "Mr. Frampton wants you;" I went to him, and he took me to Mr. Crandon.

James Stack 's Defence. I and my brother, went between two and three o'clock, to Covent-garden-market, to buy some oranges - we took them home, and a young woman said Mr. Crandon wanted us; we went to ask what he wanted, and his wife said, "They are not the boys;" we went away: on the Monday morning, about ten o'clock, as we were going to market, this gentleman came and said he wanted us, as he heard we had stolen some meat I said, "Can you bring any body to prove it?" he said Yes, and took me to Mr. Frampton's - he went with us to Mr. Frampton's, and then to the office, and they got this girl Dunn, who has been thieving about the market all her life.

Thomas Stack 's Defence. She robbed a man of 1s., and it was found in her mouth.

JOSEPH CRANDON re-examined. Q. Did you hear from Mrs. Wildey about these boys? A. Yes; I had seen them about a quarter of an hour before the meat was lost - they were seen on the Monday morning, and I went after them; I left my wife while I went to seek after the boys - I took another boy that evening, named Buxey, and Dunn said that was not the boy.

COURT to ELIZA DUNN. Q. Were you ever charged with stealing? A. Never in my life; I was never charged with stealing a shilling - I do not know what he means by saying there was a shilling found in my mouth; I swear that nothing of that kind ever took place.

CATHERINE ALLEN. I lodge in the house with Stacks and their parents - they live over my head; they have lived there these seven years - I never heard a bad character of them, but this little girl is a very bad girl; I knew her rob a girl of a penny - upon the oath I have taken I do not think she is to be believed; she is a notorious bad character.

ANN BUTLER . I am minding a child at Mr. Walker's, No. 16, Fitzroy-market. I have known the two Stacks - they have borne a good character; I never heard any charge against them: I was going down the court, and Mrs. Crandon asked me where the two Stacks lived - I took her to the house, and she asked Mrs. Stack if her boys were at home; she said No, they were at Covent-garden-market - when they came home they went to Mrs. Crandon, and asked her if she wanted them; she said, "No, I want two boys with light hair - you go away," and they went away.

COURT to CATHERINE WILDEY. Q.Did the little girl describe the boys? A. Yes; I heard nothing about light hair - I do not remember that she said any thing about that; she said it was Jack Sweet , Tom Stack , and Tim Stack - I do not think she mentioned any description, but the name.

MR. FRAMPTON. I am an officer - I took the prisoners. Sweet came to me on the Saturday night, and asked if I wanted him; I took him to Crandon's shop, and Mrs. Crandon said he was the boy - I believe she did not know him by name; I searched with Crandon for Stacks, whom I knew - I know this girl; I have not known any charge against her - I heard that she took a shilling from a neighbour; we could not find the pork.

JURY. Q. Did you search the prisoner's premises? A. No, I did not know where they lived - I understood they did not live with their parents; it was about half-past six o'clock when Sweet came to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-52

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

286. WILLIAM ROSS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Gentle , on the 9th of December , and stealing 1 watch, value 10s. , his property.

THOMAS GENTLE. I live in Gloster-buildings, Back-lane, Whitechapel . On the 9th of December, my wife went out between one and two o'clock in the morning, to nurse a woman; I went out at eight, leaving nobody in the house, and left my watch on the front parlour mantel-piece, and am sure I fastened the door with a spring lock - I put the key on a nail between the door and window; we always put it there for the lodgers: I have known the prisoner three or four years - he has been a groom, and was in the habit of coming to see my son, who is about his own age; he knew where I put the key - I returned at one o'clock, and left again at two; I am sure the latch of the door caught - the watch was on the mantel-piece; I returned at eight, and it was gone - I found the door fast, as I had left it, and the key in its place.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your son here? A. No; he lives with me - he went out, and returned with me - he was working at the same factory as me, but was not in my sight all the time; the lodger knew where to find the key.

WILLIAM ANDERTON. I am a pawnbroker, and live in the Commercial-road. On the 19th of December, in the evening, the prisoner pawned this watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see him before? A. I do not know - it was about six or seven o'clock; I am sure he is the boy.

SAMUEL PRENDERGAST . I am an officer, and apprebended the prisoner; he told me where the watch was pawned.

MRS. GENTLE. I went out about one o'clock in the morning, and was absent for three weeks.

GUILTY (of stealing only) . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-53

Before Lord Chief Baran Alexander.

287. JOSEPH BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 2 sheep, price 2l. , the property of James Hitchcock .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JAMES HITCHCOCK. I am a butcher , and live at Northhall, near Harrow . On the 26th of November I had forty sheep in a field adjoining the prisoner's house; I went to Smithfield, returned on Friday morning, the 27th of November, and, in consequence of what my young man

said, I missed two sheep on Saturday morning - on going round the field I found a sheep had been drawn through the hedge of his garden; there were the marks of wool in the hedge, and marks of two men's feet in the garden, going from the house - the heels were towards the house, and there were marks of sheep's feet; I could trace the sheep no where but to his house - going towards the house, in the path-way in front, there were marks of wool and blood coming out of the house towards the road; the other marks were in the back-garden - I saw Hodsden, Jun. on the 3rd of December, and, from what he said. I saw his father, who showed me two skins at his barn door; they had both got my mark on them; I found the bark and fat of the off shoulder on one of them - in the off thigh, part of the skin was out of the hide; I went to the prisoner's cottage next morning, the 4th of December, and found Mrs. Ball there -Levick. the constable, was with me; I found a leg and shoulder of mutton boiled in the cupboard - there was a piece cut out across the leg, as if it had been eaten; the shoulder had the fat and bark torn off the back - it was the off shoulder; the leg had got a piece of skin on the thigh, and matched with the skin - it was the off leg; I compared the leg and shoulder with the skin - they corresponded; I have no doubt the meat found belonged to that skin - I have been a butcher these twenty years; we went and apprehended the prisoner's son, at Roxey, about a mile off - he said something to me; he was discharged by the Magistrate, and we had orders to take the father - we went on Saturday, and took him at Mr. Holsden's; he said something before Colonel Clitherow , which was taken down I believe - I went to his cottage on Saturday, and found a raw leg of mutton, part of it cut away; it was in a blue handkerchief, and placed on the top of the bedstead in the prisoner's bed-room - there was a saucepan on the fire, with a pot full of pieces boiling; they were very dirty outside, and in a state it never could come from a butcher's - I found a knife and chopper in the back-room, and the blade of the knife had wool and fat on it; it had been used to cut and skin a sheep - the chopper had blood and fat on it, and a little wool in places - it appeared as if it had been used to cut up mutton hot, when it was just dead.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner is married? A. No - I do not know his daughter Emily. not by that name; I understand he is not married, but lives with a woman - he has two or three children; his family came to my house to kick up a row after the son was taken up - I have seen that young woman ( Emily Ball ) before; she came and kicked up a row; I never spoke to her in my life before that night - a young man, named Bolton, was taken up; he had been sleeping at the house, and started when we searched.

Q. Did you not tell him that Ball was taken and had split, and said that he, Bolton, had stolen the sheep? A. I did not - I knew Bolton, because he wanted to steal some sheep a year ago; I was at Brentford when Bolton was there - he was taken there to acquaint Colonel Clithe row about it, if he wanted him Colonel; Clitherow said we had no occasion to have him examined - I found the wool in the hedge on the Saturday, but did not go into the cottage to search till the Friday following, as I had not found the skins - I had no authority to go before; I did not search minutely on the Friday - I came away on finding the mutton, to go and look for the skins; boiling does not alter the colour of the fat much, and makes very little difference in the appearance; any butcher could identify it.

Q. Do not you know the prisoner was working nine miles off when you lost your sheep? A. He came home the night they were lost; my man had missed them on the 27th - he is not here; I keep a public-house, and am a butcher also - I never made Emily Ball an offer to go into any wood with her, or any thing of the kind.

MR. BARRY. Q.You saw her but once, that was when she came to kick up a row? A. That is all.

WILLIAM WELDEN . I am a butcher, and live in North-street, Edgware-road. I examined the skins of two down sheep at the prosecutor's house, and compared one with a leg and shoulder of mutton, on the Saturday before Christmas-day; there was a deficiency of the bark on the shoulder, and the remainder of the bark was left on the skin - they matched; there was a piece of skin cut off the thigh of the mutton - it caused a hole in the skin, and tallied with the leg.

Cross-examined. Q.Have you brought the leg here? A. Yes - it was boiled when I saw it; I compared it a full month after it was lost; I believe the shoulder was the first I ever saw boiled - the bark is not likely to come off in boiling.

JOHN LEVICK. I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's house on the 4th of December to search for two pigs which were lost, and found a whole shoulder and part of a leg of mutton - the shoulder attracted my notice by the bone not being broken; Hitchcock was backward - I called him in, and shewed it to him; I took the prisoner - I searched the house again on the Saturday morning. and on the tester of the bed found a leg of mutton tied up in a handkerchief; I produce the mutton and the skin - I saw the shoulder compared, and it matched; here is part of the skin left over it - the pieces in the pot were very dirty outside; I found a chopper and knife - there is wool and hair on the knife now.

Cross-examined. Q. Now do you call this a leg, or is there the third of a leg here? A. I never swore it was a leg: it is part of a leg - I am not a butcher; I saw it matched - the skin on it fits the place; there is only a piece cut off the shoulder - it has been over boiled; it was in this state then, except that it has shrivelled up.

JURY. Q. When you matched it, were you quite satisfied it tallied with the skin? A. I was.

JAMES HITCHCOCK . I swear this matches with the skin.

Prisoner's Defence. My son bought the meat at Watford market - we earn a deal of money, and generally buy enough for a week - he bought three joints.

HENRY BOLTON . I was taken up for stealing this mutton on Sunday, and not liberated till Monday - the prosecutor locked me up in his parlour; Lovell was the constable that took me - Hitchcock told me I had better confess, for Ball had split and accused me; I swear that; I was taken to Brentford, but not before a Magistrate.

MR. BARRY. Q.What are you? A. A poor lad, and a farmer's man - I have worked for Mr. Brown and Mr.

Arnold, but have been out of place for a fortnight; I lodged in the prisoner's house - I have known him four years.

EMILY BALL . I am the prisoner's daughter. I know Hitchcock, and have often spoken to him; I was never at his house till my brother was taken - there are some little woods in a field near my father's house; Hitchcock proposed to me to go into those woods - I refused; when I went out to go to Roxey he followed me, and offered me 5l., and then 10l. to go with him.

MR. BARRY. Q.What, to go into a wood with him? A.No, into a field; he enticed me over the wood - I am seventeen years old next April; I have been out of place six months - I lived with Mr. Knight, at Knightsbridge, and was not strong enough to do the work; it was a place of all work - I lived there six months; I went to the prosecutor's house when my brother was taken - they pushed me out of the house, and I told his wife how he had behaved to me; when I had done telling her I went home; I did not use violent language - I only told his wife how he had behaved to me; I live with my father - my brother had brought the mutton home on Thursday evening - there were two legs and a shoulder, but no pieces; the pieces found were cut up to boil - my brother had bought it on Tuesday at Watford, and brought it home on Thursday; we often put victuals on the top of the bed as we are troubled with mice and rats - my brother put it up there; we had chopped wood with the chopper on the Friday - I saw no blood on it or the knife; they hung up in the back kitchen when I left the house on Saturday morning, and I will be on my oath there was no blood on them.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time did you leave? A. Between seven and eight o'clock on Saturday morning; I went to the prosecutor's to see my brother; that was the cause of the disturbance.

JURY. Q. Did you complain of this offer before this? A. Yes, to my mother-in-law; she is here.

JAMES BALL. I am the prisoner's son. I and my father left the house on Tuesday morning for Watford to work - we returned on Thursday, and brought home two legs and a shoulder of mutton from Watford market - I was taken up for this on the Friday; I did not tell where I bought it - I was before Colonel Clitherow , who discharged me - Watford is nine miles from our house.

MR. BARRY. Q. Are you acquainted with Bolton? A.No; I have known him three or four years - I have not seen him for near a month; I have not lived at my father's lately, as there was no work doing there.

Q. Did you not say, when taken up, that you bought the mutton in London? A.No. so help me God, I did not; I swear I never did - I had slept at home for several nights before I was taken; my sister slept at Shepherd's-bush at her sister's - she stays there for a week, then comes home again; it is about nine miles off - she often goes there with Mr. Herbert's carter; I do not know that there was any wool on the mutton, or any dirt - I did not observe any wool on it, or any fat turn off the shoulder; I gave 5 1/2 d. a lb. for it - it came to 7s. 6d.; I do not know what it weighed - I think the chopper hung in the back kitchen when I saw it last; there is some blood and wool on it now, and some wool on the knife - the sheep got through the hedge into my father's garden, through a hole which was made to drain the ground, and I suppose tore the wool off in coming through; they told us, when we got home, that they had crept through - I did not see it myself.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.When your sister did not sleep at home, was she at her sister's? A. Yes; that sister is married - her husband used to drive Scott's brick-cart; Herbert's carman goes that way, and gives her a lift - we have known him some years.

JOHN LEVICK . This witness was given into my charge, and told me he had bought the mutton in London on the Tuesday; I swear that.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Did you hear him tell Colonel Clitherow that he bought it at Watford? A. Yes, I told the Colonel he had said he bought it on Sunday - the Colonel told me to discharge him, and take the father.

THOMAS BRANSGROVE, I have been a carpenter; but now live on my property; young Ball was in my custody, and told me he bought the mutton in London - I asked where; he said he did not know in what street.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you tell Colonel Clitherow this? A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-54

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

288. JOHN JONES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas William Fowls , on the 28th of December , and stealing 3 1/2 lbs. of mutton, value 18d. , his property.

THOMAS WILLIAM FOWLS . I am a butcher , and live in Brick-lane . On Christmas-day, at twelve o'clock at night, I was sitting in my back parlour; my mother gave an alarm, and I saw three persons in the shop - I went into the shop; two had gone out, and the prisoner remained; he had a piece of meat in his hand when I came out of the parlour - I ran, and caught him about a hundred yards off without losing sight of him; he had not got the mutton then - I did not notice if the others had any thing; it was a darkish night; he said he had done nothing - my shop has a kind of half door; the windows are broken out of the frame - it is a door with a glass, which comes half down; I had seen the door half an hour before, and left it latched - it is a spring lock, and pulls back; a person putting a hand through the glass, which was out, could unfasten it - as I brought the prisoner back my father found a piece of flap of mutton, about 2 lbs., and about 3 1/2 lbs. of neck was stolen; I had forgotten to put up the door shutter - the meat is worth about 1s. 6d.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where did you go on leaving the shop? A.Into the parlour: I had some friends, and sat with my back to the shop door - I have a lodger, who might have come down; I did not notice that the prisoner was tipsy - it might have been a jest.

THOMAS FOWLS . I was at my son's house, and saw him run out as my wife gave an alarm - I ran out and came up to my son, who had the prisoner in charge: I assisted in bringing him back, and trod on this piece of mutton - be said he had done nothing, and was running to keep himself warm.

Cross-examined. Q.Was it a cold night? A. Yes, a very sharp frost - there was a gas-light in the shop.

THOMAS FRANCK. I am a watchman. I received the prisoner in charge.

THOMAS WILLIAM FOWLS. My gas-light was burning on the half cock - I am certain of the prisoner.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was not your view of him very short? A. I never lost sight of him.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

Reference Number: t18300114-55

289. GEORGE HAMILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 watch, value 4l.; 3 seals, value 30s.; 3 keys, value 4s. 6d.; 1 ring, value 5s., and 1 chain, value 6d., the goods of James Bull , in the dwelling-house of William Lawrence .

JAMES BULL. I am a waiter at William Lawrence 's, who keeps Searle's coffee-house. The prisoner was also a waiter there; we slept in the same room - I saw the watch hanging over my head about nine o'clock in the morning of the 28th of November; I went to sleep, awoke about ten and it was gone - the prisoner slept in the room that night; I did not see him again till the 5th of December, when he gave himself up - he had absconded from the house; my watch had three gold seals, a gold ring, and a steel chain to it - it was worth 6l. altogether.

THOMAS MICKLEFIELD. I am shopman to a pawnbroker, at Woolwich. On the 30th of November the prisoner pawned this watch, in the name of Charles Romsey - I had never seen him before, but am certain of him; I value it at 3l. 10s.

JOHN BROWN. I am a constable, and live in King-street, Westminster. On the 4th of December the prisoner gave himself up to me, and said he had stolen a watch from Scarle's coffee-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BUCKNELL. I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought there; I had been informed of this robbery, and said to him, "Whatever you say you must be careful, as it will be given in evidence against you;" he said he went into the room, took the watch from over the waiter's head, and pawned it at Woolwich for 2l.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been unfortunately out of place for twelve months; I was there ten or twelve days, when Mr. Lawrence told me I did not suit him - that preyed on my mind, having suffered so much, being two or three days at a time without victuals; I made up my mind to enlist as a soldier - having no money I took the watch and intended to redeem it when I had enlisted, and send it back.

JOHN BROWN. He had applied to enlist at Woolwich.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 99s. only.

Recommended to Mercy, a Juror stating that he bore a good character.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300114-56

Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

290. JOHN FORSTER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Prendergast , on the King's highway, on the 27th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 sovereigns, 2 half-crowns, and 20 shillings , his property.

ROBERT PRENDERGAST . I keep a green-shop in Baker's-row, Whitechapel. I was out on the night of the 26th of December, spending the evening with a few friends, in Hart-street, Mark-lane; I returned home about half-past eleven o'clock, or rather later, and going down Butcher-row, Whitechapel, opposite Mr. Scales' shop, I met Anderton - we went into a gin-shop at the corner of Somerset-street and had a quartern of gin - I changed a sovereign there; we had a little porter, and I found myself the worse for liquor, and asked Anderton to come down the road with me; I had my hand in the pocket containing my money, and by the work-house in Whitechapel , we met four men, who passed us, and about ten yards further we met two or three more - one of them shoved violently against the hand which I had in my pocket; I turned round immediately, collared him with my left hand, and asked what he meant by it - he said, "Who are you?" I said if he was not quiet I would lock him up - Anderton came up and said, "Let that man alone, for he is an officer and will lock you up in the watch-house;" I am a headborough) - he said, "D - n the officer," and immediately sung out, "Jack, come back;" a man immediately returned, and I was knocked down by him, I suppose - I was stunned for some time; as I fell I saw one of the party catch hold of Anderton behind, and confine his arms; another was beating him - I heard them pick my money up as I lay, but had not sufficient power to rise; Jack was going to serve Anderton the same as me - while I lay on the ground Anderton said, "Mind what you are at, Jack, you know I can point you out;" this might be two or three minutes after I was knocked down - Jack said, "Don't hurt that man," meaning Anderton; he immediately left off- then I recovered myself a little, and Anderton asked him for a silk handkerchief he had lost; they had showed him one or two, but Anderton said they were not the right - they went off, and Anderton came and helped me up; they were all gone then - I had not missed my money then; as I was going home, up Baker's-row, I met a man, who I thought was one of the party, and charged him with it - he showed fight, and a scuffle ensued; a watchman came up, and I gave him in charge for being one of the party who knocked me down - we took him to the watch-house, and I found he was not one of the party, and did not have him detained; there was charge for charge, but they would not take me in charge - I then went home, put my hand into my pocket, and found I was 3l. 5s. deficient; I went to Anderton next morning, to know what company I had been in - I cannot swear who robbed me; I found the prisoner at the Two Brewers, about a quarter to five o'clock on Sunday evening; Anderton pointed him out -I said, "Jack, I want you to go with me," and said I had a charge of felony or highway robbery against him; he said he should not go - I said, "Don't you recollect knocking a man down last night or this morning, in Whitechapel-road, about twelve or one o'clock;" he said he was at home and in bed at that time - we took him to the watch-house.

Q. Can you swear whether you were robbed, or whether your money fell from your pocket? A.Whether it was knocked out with my hand, or they took it out, I do not know; it was lose in my pocket.

THOMAS ANDERTON . I am a butcher. I met Prendergast - we went to the Three Tuns: I walked home with

him - we passed the work-house, and met seven men together: one of them ran against him - Prendergast wished him to go on; the man shoved against him - I said, "This man is an officer;" He said, "Oh, d - n an officer," and sung out "Jack, Jack," and the whole six came back - Jack hit Prendergast and knocked him down: I went to his assistance - I was pulled back by two of them; they struck me on each said of my head - another came up and hit me twice, and cut my lip: Jack then came up, as I thought to strike me - I said, "Jack, I know you well:" he said,"D - n him, let him go," and they did so - I went to Prendergast's assistance, and saw some of them picking money up off the pavement: I heard it jink - they walked away: the prisoner is the man they called Jack, and who knocked the prosecutor down - he went away with the rest of the gang: about five minutes after Prendergast met a man, and wished to take him - they had a scuffle, and gave charge for charge; that was not one of the party, and he was let go; I have known the prisoner six or seven years - I cannot say who picked up the money: Prendergast said he did not know whether he had lost any thing - he had been drinking, but could walk - I was sober; he came to me next morning to know how this was - we apprehended the prisoner in the evening.

ROBERT PRENDERGAST. I lost two sovereigns and twenty-five shillings - I had four sovereigns when I met Anderton, and some silver: I changed a sovereign, spent about 18d., and when I got home I had a sovereign, five sixpences, and 2 1/2d. left.

JOSEPH STRANGE. I am an officer. I went with Prendergast to the Two Brewers, and took the prisoner - he denied the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-57

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

291. GEORGE ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 4 printed bound books, value 3l. 13s., and 45 other printed books, value 7l. , the goods of John Easthope . Esq. , and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Richard Heathfield .

JOHN MATHER. I live at Camberwell. I received information from our porter, and directed him to watch our premises, which are No. 13, Old Broad-street ; they are the offices of the United Mexican Mining Association - Mr. Richard Heathfield, the secretary , had some of the upper apartments, and occasionally sleeps there: Mr. Easthope is the chairman .

HENRY MOORE. I am a constable of Broad-street ward. On the 4th of January I received information from the messenger of the Company, that books had been stolen: on Friday, the 8th of January, I and my brother officer watched the premises, and about a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner come out of the house, with a bundle under his arm - he walked towards Leman's biscuit shop. about three hundred yards from the house, looked at the clock, then turned down Broad-street, Throgmorton-street, returned, and crossed over into Broad-street: Mecleburgh then crossed over and spoke to him - they went into the Rose and Crown; the prisoner came to the door in a half a minute - I stopped him, and asked what he had in that bundle; he said Nothing -I searched him, and found four volumes of bound books, which the messenger claimed: he never said how he came by them - I afterwards learnt where he lived; I went to his lodging, and found thirty-two book covers with "Mexican Mining Association" stamped on them.

MR. MATHER. I know these books to belong to the Association; we paid 3l. 13s. for them - I know them by frequently perusing them.

JOHN MECLEBURGH. I am messenger to the Company. The prisoner was not in their employ - I was present when he was apprehended; he said he merely wanted to read the books - the covers produced belong to the Company; the prisoner was acquainted with the female servant of the house - the books were kept in a wardrobe in Mr. Heathfield's office.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it an open wardrobe? A. It is open in the day time, but locked at night.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading distress, and stated that nothing but having to support a sick mother would have induced him to commit the act.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years

Reference Number: t18300114-58

292. RICHARD CHARLES NORRIS was indicted for embezzling the sums of 10l. 14s., and 20l. 5s., which he had received on account of Henry William Nunn , his employer .

These sums being joint property, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18300114-59

293. RICHARD CHARLES NORRIS was again indicted for embezzling 16l. and a 30l. bill of exchange, received on account of Henry William Nunn and another .

HENRY WILLIAM NUNN. I am a lace manufacturer , and live in Lawrence-lane - my brother, who lives in Kent, has a moiety of the profits of the trade. The prisoner was three or four years in our employ, and received money on my account; immediately on receiving it he ought to account for it to Mr. Davis, the cash-keeper - Mr. Watts was indebted to me 46l., which I have never received; the prisoner would apply for it in his capacity of collecting-clerk - I only asked him about it once, and think that was in December; he then told me he had made use of the money himself - he had no permission to do so: my brother does not take any active part in the business - the prisoner was taken up on the Saturday before Christmas, about half an hour after he told me he had used this sum.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Who do you account to for the profits of the trade? A. To my brother's trustee, because he is not in a fit state to attend to the concern - he has a committee; I have brought the rough cash-book here, as I have been requested - there is an entry of this sum received from Watts; it does not state when it was received - I put 13th against it myself three or four days ago: it is entered in the regular place, but it is not entered as received, because the cash-keeper's signature should be against it, as receiving it from him; I had access to this book, but this entry was not made till the day he was apprehended - I saw him do it; I said he had better enter in that book what he had received and not accounted for, and he wrote this 46l.; I did not mean to say it would be better for him if he entered it; I did not mean it as an inducement - I was aware what sums he

had taken; we have a fair cash-book, but I understood the notice I had was to produce this book, it being the one he made the entry in - he does not make entries in the other cash-book; it is a copy of this rough book, and is made up once a month - the notice mentions a book containing entries made by him, as such I have brought this one; I ascertained on Thursday that he had taken 20l. and not accounted for it - I went through the rough book that evening, and went to several customers, to ask what sums had been paid, and on looking at the cash-book I found several sums inserted, and endeavoured to be covered by a payment to Cowley, which was never made, and next day I got him to the books; I saw him enter this sum the night he was arrested, and he copied the other cash-book up from the rough one - I saw him enter it in both, because the other book was not made up; I insisted on his making it up, as the books were much behind.

COURT. Q.Was it his duty to enter it first in the rough cash-book? A. Yes, and to pay the money over to the cash-keeper, and get his acknowledgement for it immediately.

THOMAS WATTS. I deal with Mr. Nunn, and owed him 46l., which I paid to the prisoner on the 13th of June, and took this memorandum from him; I saw him write it- (read, "By bill and cash, 46l, R. C. Norris); Mr. Nunn applied to me about this in December - I gave the prisoner a 30l. bill, due on the 29th of July, which unfortunately was not paid; he brought it back to me himself the day after it was due, and I gave him the money - I gave him part of the 16l. in cash.

Cross-examined. Q. He signed his name to your account, which could be produced at any time? A. Exactly so; I live within thirty yards of Mr. Nunn.

MR. NUNN. The prisoner never brought me that bill.

JOHN DAVIS . I am cash-keeper to Mr. Nunn. The prisoner has been in his service between three and four years, and should pay to me the money he received, on the same day - I never received from him any part of this sum; he should receive my signature for the payment in this book.

WILLIAM BRAND . I took the prisoner into custody - I asked how he accounted for the absence of the money; he said he had parted with it by lending it to people, and treating people.

Prisoner's Defence. Had that cash-book been produced I should have satisfied your Lordship the amount I am accused of entering on the Saturday night was posted, as the marginal folio in the book will prove - I have never concealed nor disguised any thing; he asked me, in a friendly manner, to tea, the day he took me, and treated me like a brother - I entered the sum about the time I ought to have entered it; the cash-book would clearly prove it.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. NUNN. Q. Is this a copy of the notice served on you? A. I believe it is - I conceived this to be the book required, but I will send for the cashbook.

JOHN DAVIS. The entry in the cash-book would be made by the prisoner from the rough book. [The witness fetched the fair cash-book, and then continued his evidence.] Here is the cash-book.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there a ledger? A. Yes, that is at the counting-house; there are entries here to Watts; I have never seen the ledger myself - I have nothing to do with it; here is "Folio 119;" I do not know what that means - I never refer to the ledger, except to ascertain if a person should be trusted further.

MR. NUNN. I said I saw this entry made on Saturday night, and tell you candidly, from seeing this, that I have said wrong - it was another entry, a little further, on which you will see; I have said nothing intentionally wrong; I saw him make a quantity of entries, and conceived this was one, but there were a great many sums he had appropriated to his own purpose - I am not now perfectly satisfied that I am wrong, but I see this folio there, by which I presume it was posted prior to that; I cannot tell whether I am right or wrong, for there are five or six entries without a folio, some before and some after that, and those entries were put down on that night.

COURT. Q. Has the money been paid to you? A. It never has.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

The prosecutor stated his deficiency at 347l.

Reference Number: t18300114-60

294. RICHARD CATER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 4 lbs. of plums, value 7s. , the goods of David Levy and another.

JOHN LEVY . I am the son of David Levy , who has a partner; they are general merchants , in Botolph-lane . -Having been robbed to a considerable extent I desired our foreman to look out.

JOSEPH ASHEY. I am the prosecutor's foreman. On the morning of the 16th of December the prisoner came to the door, and asked if we had any speckled melons - I said No; he asked if I should have any next morning - I said I thought not; he said he was sorry for it, and went up the lane; I left the warehouse, and went to No. 38, which commands a view of our door - I went up stairs. and was sent for in a quarter an hour, and found the prisoner the custody of Fitt.

JAMES THOMAS FITT. I am in Levy's employ. I saw the prisoner come in about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; he inquired the price of imperial French plums - another man told him; Mr. Levy was not in the warehouse - he proposed to wait, and desired to see some eighth boxes of imperials, which the other man desired me to show him, and while I was doing so the prisoner came behind me, and looked at some cartoons - I turned round, and saw him put a cartoon under his coat; it contained 4 lbs, of French plums - he then declined having any plums, saying they were too dear, and walked out into the street; I followed, and took him in the street with the plums - he put them down on a bag of nuts, after I secured him; I cannot swear that the same were given to the constable.

CHARLES WEIR. I am a constable, and took charge of the box of plums; the prisoner said he did not intend to steal them, he only meant to go to the show board to look at them.

MR. LEVY. The box was delivered to me - I know it to be the same.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to inquire for speckled melons - I then went to Mr. Wright's, and bought one hundred oranges; I returned to this warehouse, and asked to see a box of imperials - I have dealt there nearly seven

years: he was opening a box - I said, "Never mind, here is one open - let me look at this;" I took it up, and went to the show-board - my basket stood at the door with lemons and oranges; I went to the door with the box in my hand - he laid hold of me, and said I was going to steal it.

JAMES THOMAS FITT. He had got off the steps, and was in the street, going away towards Thames-street - he had a basket in his hand when I took him; his baskets were within our warehouse.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-61

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

295. JOHN MEADS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 4 penny-pieces, and 17 halfpence , the monies of Edward Bird , his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300114-62

296. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for stealing 1 chair, value 4s. , the goods of Ann Norris ; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300114-63

297. JOHN DRINKWATER was indicted for embezzlement : to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-64

298. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 book, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Bennett .

CHARLES BENNETT. I keep a bookseller's shop in Bell-yard . I saw this book safe about five o'clock on the 6th of January, and missed it a quarter of an hour afterwards, from the board at the shop window - it is the "History of the Iron Age."

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I am a Police-officer. On the 6th of January I was on duty about half-past five o'clock, and saw the prisoner at the corner of Clement's-lane, Strand - he had this book in a parcel under his arm; I went up, and asked how he got it - he said from his master, Mr. Allen, in Dean-street, Fetter-lane; I went there, and his master said he never saw it before - he then said he got it from a stranger in the street; I took it to Mr. Bennett, who claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me that stole it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18300114-65

299. EDWARD KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 5 books, value 15s. , the goods of Emily Harriet Reed .

EMILY HARRIET REED. I lost five books on the 2nd of January, during the time there was a fire at the house I lived in, in Drury-lane ; I did not miss them till the officer brought them to me - I cannot swear to this one, as it has not my name in it, but the others have.

JOHN ANDERSON . I heard of the fire in Drury-lane, and went towards it; I looked about some time, and then went to Leicester-square, where I saw the prisoner with his hands in his pockets and no hat on - I asked where his hat was; he said he did not know - I then felt his pockets and found this book; I asked what it was - he said "Only a pocketbook," but it proved to be the Amulet; in his other pockets I found these other four books - this was about six o'clock on the Sunday morning; the fire was on the Saturday night - I took him to the watch-house, and, on searching him, I found this leaf of one of the books in his trousers' pocket; it has the prosecutrix's name on it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You found he had lost his hat? A. Yes; he appeared to be flurried and as if he had been exerting himself - I think he had been drinking; I had not seen him at the fire.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking at the Cheshire Cheese, a practice to which I am quite unaccustomed; I heard of the fire, and exerted myself in saving the things - I was much excited; I have no recollection of putting the books into my pocket, and I suppose I put them there to bring down some other property, and forgot to take them out.

JOHN CAREY. I am a boot-maker. I saw the fire, and saw the prisoner particularly active in bringing out a great deal of property, which he deposited in my shop, just opposite - he brought a great deal over: one was a glass jug, which I should think was more valuable than these books; he did not appear quite sober - I do not know that he lost his hat; he seemed very quick, and anxious about the goods- he came to my house with a friend after twelve o'clock, and his coat was very much burnt with the burning lead which fell from the roof; I had not known him before.

THOMAS ACTON. I was assisting at the fire; I went with the prisoner - he was very active in extinguishing the fire; he was in a great state of excitement, and I think it likely he might have put some of these books into his pocket without remembering it - he exposed himself to greater danger than I was disposed to do; I saw the lead fall upon his coat, and warned him of his danger - he said,"The devil a bit do I care about it;" he might have concealed female apparel and other things.

COURT to ANDERSON. Q. Did he say how he came by the books? A. He said he had bought them on Saturday night; I am sorry I did not mention that before - he said he bought four of them in Drury-lane, and the other in the Strand; he appeared in a great stupor.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he appear in such a state as not to know what he was doing? A.He did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-66

300. JAMES MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 cloak, value 2l , the goods of Frederick Walker .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-67

301. BARTHOLOMEW MARSHALL , JOSEPH BOSS , and THOMAS STAINES , were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 2 coats, value 27s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s., and 2 shirts, value 5s. , the goods of John Bell .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BELL . I am cellarman at St. Giles's work house . I had a box, containing these articles, standing on the landing place close by where I sleep - Boss was a pauper in the house, and had liberty to go about some parts of the house; I saw my articles safe about five weeks ago - last Saturday I found my trunk broken open, and the things stated were missing.

DANIEL RYAN. I am a pauper in the poor-house; Boss came to me on the Thursday evening, and told me to go and look for Staines - I went, and told Staines that Boss wanted him; he was to go to the dust-hole gate - he went there; I saw Boss go up stairs and bring a bundle down, which he threw on the ward, No. 32 - the watchman then came out of his box, and looked about the yard; he then went into his box again, and then Boss got on to the ward No. 31, and on to No. 32, and asked me to get up with him; I did so - he told me to look over, which I did, and saw Staines and Betsy Daly - he threw the bundle down, and I believe Staines took it up: I do not know the size of the ward - it has ten or fifteen beds in it; the wards are against the wall, and the windows look into the yard.

ELIZABETH DALY. I live in Drury-lane. On Thursday evening last, Thomas Staines came and said there was a person wished to speak with me in Short's-gardens; I went there - he went to the dust-hole gate, and a bundle came down off the back of the house; Staines took it up, and asked me to pawn it for him - it contained a coat and trousers, which I pawned in Tottenham-court-road.

JURY. Q. Did he know that any thing was to come down there? A. I do not know whether he expected any thing; he said a person wished to speak to me - he did not say any thing was coming down, nor any thing about it, but he took it up, and took it to the corner of Short's-gardens, and then told me to put it into my apron, which I did.

CATHERINE OLIVER. I live in King-street, Drury-lane. I met Marshall last Tuesday fortnight - he called me out, and asked me to pawn two or three things for him: I said I did not mind - I pawned a coat for 12s., and these two shirts and a waistcoat for 5s. 6d.

Marshall. Q.How many shirts did I give you? A. Two.

THOMAS LUCAS. I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker of Tottenham-court-road. I have a coat and a pair of trousers pawned on the 7th by this girl, who gave her name Elizabeth Daly.

GEORGE EASTMAN. I am an apprentice to Mr. Jones. I have a shirt and a waistcoat pawned by Oliver on the 28th of December.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LANE . I am foreman of St. Giles workhouse. I went into the yard, and saw Boss drop from a hole in the yard, on Thursday, the 7th of January.

Prisoner Boss. Q. You did not see me come down, you are short-sighted? A. Yes, I did see you - you brushed my arm as you came down; there were other persons there; I told the porter that you dropped down.

WILLIAM CULBERT. I am a tailor. I made this coat for Mr. Bell in July last - a part of it is my own work.

SAMUEL FORZMAN. I am an officer of St. Giles. I took the prisoners - Boss said he knew nothing about it.

Boss' Defence. I heard a voice in Short's-gardens, and got up to see - while I was there some persons called out, "The governor is coming!" and I got down, but Mr. Lane did not see me.

Staines' Defence. I went to the poor-house to get relief; Ryan called me to go and fetch Daly - I did, and then he told me to wait, as he had a parcel to give me for her to pawn - I waited there, and saw Ryan come across the roof of No. 32, and throw down the bundle; I took it up, gave it to her to pawn, and gave the money to him the next morning - I did not know they were stolen.

JOHN LANE . I omitted to state that Boss said before the Magistrate that Ryan wished him to take the bundle - I have always considered Boss as honest; he was stationed over the mills where they grind their own flour.

BOSS- GUILTY . Aged 21.

STAINES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARSHALL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-68

302. JOSEPH MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 jar, value 15d., and 1 oz. weight of tobacco, value 3d. , the goods of Mary Ann Johnson .

MARY ANN JOHNSON. I am a widow , and keep a chandler's shop in Punterson-place, Bethnal-green-road . On the 29th of December, about twelve o'clock at night, I was closing my shutter-bar, and the prisoner came up to the door; I turned to go in, and he followed me - I asked what he wanted, and he said half an ounce of tobacco; I got the scales, and asked which tobacco he wanted - he said, "The common tobacco," and while I turned to get it he said, "This will do for me," took this jar off the counter, and walked out of the shop with it; I went to the door, but he was gone out of my sight - I had a full view of him in the shop; I had a good light, and am possitive he is the person - the jar was found in about an hour, in a yard adjoining an empty house.

JOHN PEARCY. I am a watchman. I heard of this robbery a little before twelve o'clock, on the night of the 29th of December; the prosecutrix described this lad to me - I went after him, and found this jar in a yard adjoining an empty house, about two hundred yards from the prosecutrix's; I searched the empty house, but could not find the prisoner - I went there again in about an hour and a half with another watchman; I then found the prisoner asleep in a room, covered with some sacks - I had been in that same room before, and he was not there then; this tobacco was in the jar when I found it.

GEORGE FREEMAN. I went with Pearcy, and found the prisoner.

THOMAS ADAMS. I am the headborough. I received this jar at the watch-house - the prisoner was afterwards brought and locked up; the watchman went and fetched the prosecutrix, who identified the property and the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-69

303. WILLIAM LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 gown, value 10s.; 1 shawl, value 8s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; and 1 remmant of calico, value 3d., the goods of Unity Critchell ; and 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 8s., and 2 shirts, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Simpson .

UNITY CRITCHELL. I am single , and live at No. 5, Pleasant-buildings, Gray's Inn-lane . I lost this property from a front room on the ground-floor; some were in a drawer, and the gown hung behind the door - the prisoner lived at the next house for a few days; these things were all safe at half-past four o'clock on the 1st of January, when

I went out - I returned between six and seven, and missed them; I found them the same evening at Hatton-garden.

HENRY SIMPSON . I live at No. 5, Pleasant-buildings. I saw this property safe in the room the same evening - here is a coat, a pair of trousers, and a shirt, belonging to me; I am a shipwright - I missed the things about eight o'clock, and found the room had been entered by a skeleton-key.

EDWARD BELL. I am a Police-officer. At six o'clock in the evening of the 1st of January, I stopped the prisoner with these things; I asked where he got them - he said he was taking them from his mother's, in Somer's-town, to his sister's, in Old-street - I left him in the possession of an officer, and went to Old-street-road, but could find no person of the description he gave; I found on him fourteen keys, five of which are skeletons - one of them is the same size as the key of this room.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Holborn, and between Brook-street and Hatton-garden, I met a young woman, the daughter of a landlady with whom I used to live; I spoke to her - a young man came up, asked me to carry a bundle to the George the Fourth, Cloth-fair, and he would give me half a crown; I went on to Hatton-garden Office to get an affidavit of a waistcoat signed, but was too soon; I was going down Mutton-bill, and met the officer - I did not give him a satisfactory answer at first; I then told him if he would go to the George the Fourth he would find the person, but he refused.

EDWARD BELL. He said he had them from his mother's in Somer's-town.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-70

304. JOHN WILLIAMS and JOHN WOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 20 lbs. weight of bacon, value 13s. , the goods of John Freeman .

SARAH FREEMAN. I am the wife of John Freeman , of Cecil-court, St. Martin's-lane - we keep a butter shop, and sell bacon . On the 6th of January, about a quarter-past six o'clock in the evening, Mr. Murray told me this bacon was taken; I then looked and missed it - it weighed about twenty-four or twenty-five pounds; I had left it safe on the bacon-board in the shop when I went into my parlour - I saw it again, and can swear it is mine; it corresponds in every respect - I know the cut of it; this cut was in it at the time; it was in two pieces, as it is now.

DAVID MURRAY. I was passing the court at the time, and saw the two prisoners, with another man, looking about the premises; I watched them, and saw Williams go into the shop and come out with the bacon under his arm - he gave it to Wood, who put it into a sack; I followed Wood, and gave him in charge - he pointed out the other two persons; the officer took them, and I took Wood to the Police-office - we went to the shop, and the prosecutor missed the bacon - it was about two minutes after I had taken Wood.

Williams. Q. You said at Queen-square that Wood went into the shop? A. No, I did not.

Williams. Q. Yes you did the first time, and then the second time you said I went into the shop. A.Certainly not, but while the clerk was taking down the examination they changed places, and I had not known their names before - it was Williams went and took it; I am quite positive, and he gave it to Wood.

FREDERICK UDELL . I am a Police-officer. I received Wood in custody; he said another went into the shop - we went back to the shop; Wood pointed out the other two, and I took them - I believe the men did change places while they were at the office.

Williams' Defence. I stood in one place, and never moved: he swore that Wood went into the shop and gave it to me - I was walking along when they came and took me.

Wood's Defence. He first swore to Williams and then to me - we kept our places; I had never been in the shop- at the watch-house it was said that Williams came out of the shop, and I took the bacon from the steps of a door.

DAVID MURRAY. They stopped at the steps of a door- the bacon was given from one to the other.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

WOOD - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-71

305. NATHAN STAFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 2 coats, value 2l., and 2 horse-cloths, value 10s. , the goods of James Dickinson .

JAMES DICKINSON . I live at Edmouton , and am a cattle-dealer . On the 12th of October I lost two box coats and another smaller coat out of the gig, which had been left safe the night before, and two horse-cloths out of a stable - I have never seen them since.

JOSEPH NORMAN. I am a labourer, and live at Waterford, near Hertford. On the 12th of October, about seven or half-past seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner offered me two coats for sale - one was a box coat, and the other a market frock coat: I had not money enough to buy them, and he tied them up in his bundle - he took out some bills belonging to Mr. James Dickinson; I had known the coats, as I had seen Mr. Dickinson wear them - I saw Mr. Dickinson about three days afterwards, and told him: I did not read the bills, and cannot say what was on them -I saw no marks on the coats, but the large one was a box coat, a kind of snuff colour; I do not know how many capes it had - it was not new, but it was a good one: I cannot tell whether the collar was velvet or silk - it was the same colour as the coat; I cannot say whether the pockets were inside or out - it was a smooth coat and had an edging round it.

JURY. Q.Could you swear to that coat from among half a dozen others? A. Yes, I could - I did not notice whether there were any buttons to the sleeves; there were no straps.

COURT. Q. What was the other coat? A. It was a fustian market coat, smooth, like a drover's; I could pick them both out.

MR. DICKINSON re-examined. Q. What was the colour of the big coat? A. It was a drab; I cannot be positive whether it was bound round or not - it had not a velvet collar: the other was a fustian frock, which I generally wear, with four or five capes to it; the prisoner was out of the way for some time - Norman did live next door to me.

JOHN CAMP. I am an officer of Edmonton. I took up

the prisoner at Enfield fair, the last day of November - he was here last Session, but he was not tried; I did not know about the coats when I took him - but the prosecutor told me of it in about an hour: I then asked the prisoner, and he said he knew nothing about them: he lived with the prosecutor three or four years.

Prisoner. Mr. Dickinson saw me several times - he saw me at Kingston fair.

MR. DICKINSON. Yes, I had seen him, but was a great distance from him - I never saw him near me after I lost the coats.

COURT. Q. Did you see him before you knew the coats were gone? A.Perhaps I might - I missed my coats one morning, and the same day the witness told me of it; the two horse-cloths were taken to a shop and sold.

JOSEPH NORMAN . I saw the horse-cloths hanging to dry on a hedge belonging to another man - it was at Edmonton; the prisoner offered them to me for sale at a public-house, about the 12th of October.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a witness here who heard what was said before the Justice - Norman gave me sixpence and said he would not come up against me, but I had knocked him about.

JOSEPH NORMAN. I did say something of that sort when they kept bothering me - I do not know whether I said any thing about his knocking me about; I might or I might not.

GEORGE DODSON. I heard Norman say to the prisoner, after he had been before Mr. Mores, when the prisoner looked in his face and said, "Joe, you know you have foresworn me" - "I know it, but it is because you hit me; but never mind, when I come up I will not hurt a hair of your head:" I said to Jeffkins the officer, "Do you hear that?" and he said, "No, I did not;" Norman gave him sixpence and I said, "If you have foresworn you ought to have your head knocked off;" he said he would make a flaw in the indictment.

JOSEPH NORMAN re-examined. He said something of that kind, but I did not say "I know I have;" I cannot say justly what I said - I kept telling them not to bother me; I do not think I said I would make a flaw in the indictment, and that I would not hurt a hair of his head.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-72

306. WILLIAM JONES and THOMAS WARD were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 8lbs. weight of bacon, value 3s. , the goods of Henry Hornblower .

HENRY HORNBLOWER. I am a cheesemonger in Hatton-Wall . I lost about 9lbs. of bacon on the 17th of December - the officer brought it back, and then I missed it; I knew it to be mine - I know nothing of the prisoner.

EDWARD BELL. I took this bacon from the prisoners in Hatton-garden, about two o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of December - Jones had it under his great coat; he said Ward gave it him, and Ward said they got it from a woman on Saffron-hill, but they would not go with me to the place.

Jones' Defence. I was going up Hatton-wall, and went to a woman to buy a pennyworth of apples; this boy stood there, and asked me to carry it for him - the officer came and took me with it; I said Ward gave it to me, but I did not know him before.

Ward's Defence. I bought it of a woman for 14d. - this lad said, "It is a cheap bargain;" and I gave it to him to hold while I tied it up in my neckerchief - there were others standing by; I was tired of carrying it.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WARD - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-73

307. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , three saws, value 10s. , the goods of Richard Pepper .

RICHARD PEPPER. I am a house carpenter . I was working in Camden-town , and left these tools in the house on the Tuesday night, and missed them next morning - they had been in a box; I knew nothing of the prisoner till I saw him at the office - these are the saws; I know them to be mine.

EDWARD SKILL . I am a Police-officer, I stopped the prisoner on the morning of the 7th of December, in Tottenham-court-road, with these three saws and other tools - it was more than a quarter-past five o'clock; he gave no account, and I detained him till I knew whose they were - he told them that he got them from Mr. Jackson, in Charlotte-street, and that he himself lived in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles' - I went there, and found it was not true.

Prisoner's Defence. A person came up, and asked me to carry these tools to the Strand; the officer asked what they were - I said tools, but I hardly knew what.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-74

308. THOMAS JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 counterpane, value 5s. , the goods of Augustus Lernoult Whitmore .

JOHN MORGAN. I am an inspector of Islington watch. On the evening of the 16th of December, I was going along Hopping-lane, Islington, and stopped a young man with a bundle - I said to him, "What have you got?" we came to the lamp to look at it; he turned and said, "Here is a young man knows me," pointing to the prisoner; I seized them both - we scuffled and fell, and the other got away; he left his hat, and this counterpane was in the parcel which he left - the prisoner claims the handkerchief as his, in which this counterpane was tied - the prisoner had some other articles about him.

EMMA MARTIN . I am servant to Augustus Lernoult Whitmore; he lives in Kentish-town - this counterpane is his property; it was washed on the 14th of December, and was left wet on the 16th - it was safe about six o'clock in the evening, and we missed it between six and seven; nothing else was missing - it had been out in the garden.

Prisoner's Defence. I had never seen this counterpane; it was in the other bundle - the man got away who I suppose had done the robbery; I had brought some shirts from Finchley, which a young man said he found in a ditch - I had them about me; I was at Finchley from three o'clock to six.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-75

309. JOHN HAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Johnson .

JOSEPH JOHNSON. I am a shoemaker , and live in Tottenham-court-road . On the evening of the 19th of December I saw the prisoner take these shoes off a chair in the shop - he was going out: I went, and took them from him - he had come in to buy a pair of shoes, and my shopman showed him some; he said he did it from distress.

JOHN PAIN . I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his distress.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300114-76

310. WILLIAM PATTERSON FLANNAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , 1 hat, value 4s.; 1 powder flask, value 6s.; 3 caps, value 6s.; 1 seal skin cap, value 2s.; 1 quilt, value 4s., and 1 blanket, value 2s. , the goods of James Clark .

JAMES CLARK . I am a licensed victualer . On the 23rd of December I lost this property, and some other things - they were in my child's school box on the Monday evening, and on the Wednesday, at half-past seven o'clock, they were gone - the prisoner lodged in my house on the Monday and Tuesday night.

DAVID DAVIES . I keep a sale-shop on Saffron-hill. On Wednesday, the 23rd of December, the prisoner sold this seal skin cap to my wife for 1s. - I was at the door, and gave the 1s. out of my pocket; I then went down to my other shop - my wife came there, and brought this powder-flask; I went back to my other shop with the Police-man, and the prisoner was gone - I looked, but could not find him: at last I found him in a privy - he had left the powder-flask with my wife; the Police-man said,"You are the man I want; you have stolen these things"- he said, "Don't handcuff me, and I will go quietly."

RICHARD EDWARD BARKER. I have a blanket and a quilt, pawned by the prisoner on the 23rd of December.

MAURICE NICHOLAS. I am a Police-man. I took the prisoner - I have three caps, which I found in the shop, and this hat was on the prisoner's head.

Prisoner. About ten days previous to last September a circumstance took place in which they attempted to implicate me in taking eleven sovereigns and a watch -I found the person who had been guilty of it; I advised him to return, but he would not - I then promised that I would take it all upon myself; I wrote a letter to my mother-in-law, stating that I had eight sovereigns and a half, and if they would send to me I would deliver them up - a Bow-street officer accompanied them, and took me; I was in confinement, and when I went into society again I could get no situation - I had one hundred and four guineas a year in my former situation; I had discharged some men for drunkenness, and they took this opportunity of injuring me - I am guilty of this crime, but previous I had been like Caesar's wife, beyond suspicion; I told the officer that I sought for transportation, as I was miserable - happiness is the pursuit of every man, and I must seek it through the means of transportation.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-77

311. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 10s., and 1 key, value 10s. , the goods of John Clark .

JOHN CLARK. On Saturday, the 26th of December, I went with the prisoner to a house in George-street, St. Giles' ; I took out my watch, and laid it on the table - she contrived to put the light out, snatched up the watch, and ran out with it; - I am certain she is the person; it was between ten and eleven o'clock at night, but I had been some time with her at a public-house and had an opportunity of seeing her - I swear she is the woman; the light might be in the room about five minutes; I was standing against the window when she took the watch - the table stood between the window and the door, and was between us; I have never seen the watch since; I was not acquainted with the staircase, and could not get after her, but I called the people in the house; they brought up a light, but the watch and she were both gone; she was taken, I think, on the Friday following - the officer found her - I had told him what had happened.

Prisoner. I never saw the watch, and that he knows; he gave me a penny to go and buy a candle when the candle went out; and when he came out of the public-house he began fighting with two men. Witness. There was no fighting - I was quite sober.

DAVID CLYDE. I met Clark as I was going to a tobacco-shop, and took him to a public-house to treat him with a quartern of gin; when I came out he did not come out - I looked, and saw him talking to the prisoner and some other girls - he afterwards came out; the prisoner came out and called to him to go with her - this was at the corner of Crown-street, at the bottom of Tottenham-court-road - he was sober; he came to me on the Tuesday following, and said the girl I saw him with had taken his watch from him; I said I would look for her; I afterwards saw the prisoner dressed differently to what she was that night; I went to her and said, "If you will give me the duplicate, I will let you go;" she said she would give it me; I went to her house - I would not go up stairs, I said I would wait - I waited, but she did not come down; I described her to the Police-man - he went in and took her.

WILLIAM SIMMONS. Clyde told me to take the prisoner - I asked if his friend would come forward - he said he did not know, but he came again in two hours and said his friend would; I found her next day from the description, and took her to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. On boxing-night the prosecutor was with four women talking in the street - he came over and asked if I would have any thing to drink - he took me to Mr. Clark's, and there we drank for about two hours; when we came out, a young Irishman and the prosecutor began fighting - I took him away - he said he would go home with me all night - I said I would take him to a house, and he gave me a penny to get a candle; I went out - there was a piece of work in the street, and two girls were taken to the watch-house; I went with them - I never saw this watch.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-78

312. ANN COLLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 12 thimbles, value 12s., and 1 box, value 3s. , the goods of George Flint .

GEORGE FLINT. I am a linen-draper , and live in Lower-street, Islington . On the 28th of December, I

was informed by one of my young men that two women had been there, and taken this box of thimbles from the counter - I had seen them safe an hour or two previous; I went out, and the two women were pointed out by one of my young men; I brought them back again, they had gone about one hundred yards - the prisoner was one of them; I told her I suspected that she had something belonging to me, she vowed she had not, and wished to be searched - I sent for an officer, and he found five thimbles in her pocket - they appeared to be mine, they were of the same size and the same pattern; she seemed very much confused, but gave no account of them.

JOSEPH WOODARD. I am in the prosecutor's employ; the box of thimbles were in another small box upon the counter - the prisoner took hold of the box, and drew it under her cloak; I was standing against the fire, and told the young man to tell my master.

WILLIAM JONES. I was sent for, and found the five thimbles loose in the prisoner's pocket - the box has not been found; there was nothing found upon the other person who was with her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300114-79

313. ROBERT HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 19 shillings and 5 sixpences , the monies of John Potter Coulson .

JOHN POTTER COULSON. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Shoreditch . On Christmas-day I found nineteen shillings and sixpences in the prisoner's pocket; he was then in my employ - I did not see him take it, but he owned it was mine; it was near one o'clock in the day, and the shop was shut all but one door; the man went to shut that door - the prisoner followed him; I heard something drop - I said."What is that?" - the prisoner said, "It must be a nail:" I was not satisfied, took a candle, and found a shilling in the passage, through which the prisoner had just passed - I said, "Turrell, my man, have you dropped any thing;" he said No - I said to the prisoner, "Robert, here is a shilling;" he said,"If it is, it must be mine, as I had 13 1/2d. in my pocket, which I have had all the week" - I took the prisoner into the parlour, and said, "If you have any more, show me what you have;" he turned out some of his pockets, but I only found 1 1/2d. -I searched him and found 19s. 6d. on him in different pockets; I gave charge of him to the officer, came back, and found 3s. more in his bed place - when I found the money, I said to the prisoner, "What have you been doing?" he said, "That is your money, and I have taken it" -I did not ask where he took it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you married? A. Yes; there are some stables behind my house -I do not know of any one going into those stables; I do not know of any females going there; upon my oath they never did - I have never given him money when any female went into the stable; females have gone into my parlour after my wife has gone to bed, but that has nothing to do with this.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-80

314. BELINDA GARDENER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 25s. , the monies of Robert Foot .

ROBERT FOOT. I am a labourer . I saw the prisoner on the 7th of December, in Drury-lane , and went with her to a public-house, to give her a quartern of gin; I was not there long - I took off my hat to pay for the gin; I had my money in a pouch in my hat - I missed my money, and charged her with it; she denied it strongly - I went out, got a Police-constable, and he searched her - he found the pouch on her with some money in it, but not all; I think he found 3s. - I do not know what could have become of the rest of the money: she had not gone out.

WILLIAM SIMMONDS. I was sent for, and the prosecutor said he had lost 25s. - I found 3s. on the prisoner in the tobacco pouch, and 8 1/2d. in her neck.(Pouch produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor had given her the money, and accused her of stealing it, because she would not accompany him to a house of ill-fame.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-81

315. WILLIAM CURREN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 shilling and 2 sixpences , the monies of William Chamberlaine .

ANN CHAMBERLAINE I am the wife of William Chamberlaine - we keep a tobacconist's shop , in Spencer-street, Goswell-road . On the 4th of January I was in the parlour, about seven o'clock in the evening, and saw something moving among the lights in the shop; I looked again and saw the prisoner - I cried Stop thief! and went into the shop; he ran out - I went after him as far as the next house; I could not pursue further, because there was no one in the shop; when I saw him first, he had his hand in my till - I saw the shopman in the next house pursue him, and said, that was the boy; he was brought back again, and begged me to let him go - he said he had not robbed my till; I gave him in charge, and then he dropped some halfpence in the parlour; I missed some silver and some halfpence from the till.

CHARLES AMOS. I live next door to the prosecutrix; she came and told me to go after the boy - I ran and took him, without losing sight of him; I saw him looking back as I followed him - I brought him back, and one shilling, two sixpences, and three halfpence were found in his shoe.

ROGER RAGON. I am a watchman, and received charge of the prisoner; he dropped one penny in the shop, and one penny outside - I took him to the watch-house; Brown searched him, and a shilling, two sixpences, and three-halfpence were found in his left shoe.

JOHN BROWN. I searched him, and found this money.

Prisoner's Defence. The money was thrown down in Goswell-street by a boy, and I took it up.

GUILTY . - Aged 12.

Confined One Month , and Twice Whipped .

Reference Number: t18300114-82

316. WILLIAM COTTEN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 3 lbs. weight of pork, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Gunster .

HORATIO FRANKLIN. I am shopman to Mr. William Gunster, a cheesemonger , in Coppice-row, Clerkenwell . I saw the prisoner take a hand of pork from his shop, on the 26th of December; I pursued - he dropped it -I took him, brought him back, and then took up the pork.

THOMAS JAMES CARTER . I took up the prisoner on this charge; I found in his great coat pocket, a loin of

pork, and seventeen potatoes - I inquired his character; I believe him to be a very poor man - I have heard nothing against him.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18300114-83

317. THOMAS COLLINS was indicted for stealing' on the 19th of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. ; the goods of William Hayhow .

GEORGE EAST. I am in the employ of William Hayhow, a shoemaker , in the New-road . I was sitting in the kitchen on the 19th of December, and heard a person sing out that a pair of shoes were taken - I ran up stairs, and saw the prisoner turning the corner of Shovel-alley; I went and took him with these shoes, which had been brought in about three hours before, and I had hung them up at the door - I missed two pairs, but one pair had fallen down.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them on the pavement, more than two feet from the house.

GEORGE EAST. I took them from under his jacket, and he said that was just what he wanted; he wanted to go to prison.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-84

318. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 1 set of chaise harness, value 6l. ; the goods of Thomas Arber .

WILLIAM GROOM . I am a groom to Mr. Thomas Arber of Bentinck-street, Manchester-square. He had a set of harness at No. 7, Lambeth-mews, Charles-street, Berkeley-square ; I saw it safe between two and three o'clock on the 30th of December - I returned about five, and it was gone; I found it in the possession of the officer - I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Is the prisoner a saddler? A. I do not know; I do not know whether Mr. Arber owed him any money for repairing any harness - I have been in his service about eight months; the harness is just as I took it off the mare, and I can swear to it.

JOSEPH JONES . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this harness at our house on the 30th of December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; the officer came to look at it at our house, and I took it to Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him before? A. Yes - he was a saddler, and has been in a large way of business, but is now reduced; he pawned it in his own name.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I went to the house in consequence of finding this duplicate in the prisoner's pocket, when I took him on another charge.

HENRY GODDARD . I took up the prisoner, and asked him whose harness it was he had in pawn for 1l. 2s. - he said it was a gentleman's harness, which had been sent to him to repair, and he had pawned it, being in distress.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say the gentleman was indebted to him? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman brought me a harness to put some ornaments to, which I did, and then he brought me this harness, and took the other away; I said I was so poor, I certainly must pawn this, as he had not paid me for the other - when he thought proper to redeem it I would do it.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-85

319. CHARLES BEVAN and ELIZA BEVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 cloak, value 20s. ; the goods of Elizabeth Mitchell .

ELIZABETH MITCHELL . I live in Titchfield-street. I went to a raffle on the 7th of December, and had a cloak, which I put over a bedstead up - it was in a poor person's room; the bed was turned up - I saw the made prisoner there; this is my cloak - I partly made it myself, and know my own work; the woman was not there - the man returned a little before eleven o'clock, and that excited my suspicion.

Charles Bevan. Q. Did you not borrow it? A. No, I bought it and paid for it.

LEONARD JAMES MITCHELL . I saw this witness at the raffle, and put the cloak over the bed, at half-past nine o'clock; the male prisoner came, took the cloak, and wrapped it up - I said, "What are you going to do with that?" he said, "Nothing, but keep it clean, and out of harm;" he afterwards pulled his coat off, and put that by the side of the bed - he went away about eleven o'clock, and put the coat under his arm; I did not see him take the cloak with him.

JOSIAH PEARCE . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. -This cloak was pawned by the female prisoner, in the name of Ann Smith ; I know nothing of her.

GOULD KNIGHT. I took up the prisoners from information, on Tuesday morning, the 8th; I took them in bed -I asked where the man was the night before; he said that was no business of mine-I asked how he got his living; he said that was no business of mine - I took him to the office, and when there the woman came, called me out, and said if I would let him go, she would give me the money - she had it in her pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Charles Bevan 's Defence. A man asked me to make one at the raffle - I was there all the evening, drinking, dancing, and playing at cards, till near twelve o'clock.

C. BEVAN - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

E. BEVAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-86

320. LEONARD BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 7 shirts, value 1l. 15s.; 8 handkerchiefs, value 12s.; 8 pairs of stockings, value 7s.; 2 waistcoats, value 15s.; 3 pairs of drawers, value 6s.; 2 night-caps, value 1s.; 2 sheets, value 12s.; 3 table-cloths, value 1l.; 11 napkins, value 1l.; 4 towels, value 1s.; 7 cloths, value 1s.; 5 shifts, value 4s.; 2 petticoats, value 2s.; 2 bags, value 1s.; and 1 basket, value 1s. , the goods of John Lee .

ANN VERNEY . I am employed in a laundry, and live in Pond-place, Fulham-road. I had four baskets of linen on the 9th of January, and lost one in Bury-street, St. James' - I did not see who took it, I was delivering another one at the time; all the articles stated were in it - they belong to John Lee ; the articles are here - Mr. Lee gave them to me.

JOHN LEE. This is my property. The officer who found them is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-87

321. THOMAS BALLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of John Cotterell .

WILLIAM NELMES . I am in the service of John Cotterell , a shoemaker , of Beauchamp-street, Brook's-market . A pair of shoes were taken from his place on the 31st of December - I had seen them safe half an hour before; I was out when they were taken - When I returned the neighbours told me they were gone; I saw them at Hatton-garden, and knew them - these are them; I know them by the make and appearance.

WILLIAM KELLY . I saw the prisoner take these shoes from Mr. Cotterell's shop, on the 31st of December - he went away with them; I gave an alarm to the Police-man- I am sure the prisoner took them; I knew him before.

WILLIAM KING . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned the shoes with me on the 31st of December, between four and five o'clock in the evening.

WILLIAM PORTEOUS. I am a Police-constable. Kelly gave me information, and by his description I took the prisoner, at half-past eleven o'clock the following night.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-88

322. SOPHIA BEVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 tea-spoon, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Bales .

ROBERT BALES . The prisoner comes to my house with linen from the mangle; I lost a tea-spoon on the 26th of December - it had been used the night before, and I was informed that the prisoner came to my house that morning- she had left a basket of mangling; I gave notice to the pawnbrokers.

JOSEPH HALL . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. The prisoner brought this spoon to pawn with me, on the 26th of December. about eleven o'clock in the morning - I stopped her from the information I had received.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-89

323. FREDERICK BUCKOKE and JOHN WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 3 half-crowns, 9 shilling, 2 sixpences, and 1 penny, the monies of David Williams , from his person .

DAVID WILLIAMS . On the 21st of December, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, I was in Gray's Inn-lane-road , and lost this money from my pocket- I was ill, and fell down; I do not know who took my money, or whether it was taken while I was down, but when I fell down I had 16s. or 17s. in my pocket, and when I came to myself I had none in the pocket it had been in - there were some half-crowns, some shillings, and I believe, some sixpences; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You say you fell down? A. Yes; I had been out all day, and had something to drink - I then went to the fire, and felt myself very bad; I then went out - some of this silver might have fallen from my pocket; I had 38l. 10s. in another pocket.

JOSEPH CLEMENTS. I am a Police-officer. I was coming out of Mecklenburg-square, and met a witness, who spoke to me, and I went up to four young lads, who were near the prosecutor - Wilson had hold of his right arm, and the other three were pushing him about; I asked Wilson where he was going to take him - he said home, by the order of some man; I then turned, and searched another lad, who is not here, and in the mean time I saw Buckoke run away - I told the witness to run after him, which he did, and took this bag from him; I saw him pick up something and put it into the bag - he delivered the bag and 17s. 7d. to me - when Buckoke got to the watch-house he told me Wilson had robbed the gentleman, gave him the bag, and told him to run away with it; he did not say he had taken the bag from the man.

JOHN WOODHOUSE . I was crossing Gray's Inn-road on the evening of the 21st of December, between seven and eight o'clock - I saw four lads about Mr. Williams; I passed them twice, and the big lad said, "I wish you would give us a hand to take this man home;" I said,"What have I to do with it?" they then pushed him down on the ground, and I saw one of them hand something to another, but I cannot say who it was; I spoke to the Police-man, and he went up to them - I saw Wilson with the prosecutor, and saw Buckoke start off, and another with him - I suspected the others had given him something; the prosecutor was drunk.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Where was Wilson when Bockoke ran away? A. By the side of the prosecutor - Buckoke ran as fast as he could; I said, "That is the lad that has got it, "and I overtook him; I took him with the money and the bag - he threw down 2s. 6d., and I took it up.

BUCKOKE's Defence. I was walking up the lane; there was some money scattering about, and I took it up, when the witness took me.

Wilson's Defence. The man asked me to see him home, and then I was charged with robbing him.

DAVID WILLIAMS. I had no such bag as this.

Four witness gave Wilson a good character.

BUCKOKE - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

WILSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-90

324. THOMAS ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Henry Ewers , from his person .

HENRY EWERS . I am a cabinet-maker . On the 24th of December, as I was returning from the City, through High-street, St. Giles' , my attention was drawn to a grocer's-shop, which was fitted up with illumination-lamps - it was about half-past ten o'clock at night; I felt something at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner drawing my handkerchief from my pocket, and hand it over to his accomplice - he ran over to some buildings - I ran, caught him before he got there, and gave him over to the Police, but the other got away with the handkerchief; I am certain the prisoner is the person who took it from my pocket - I kept my eyes upon him as he crossed the road, and never lost sight of him.

Prisoner. He caught another man, and I accused him of it. Witness. I did take his accomplice first, but finding

the prisoner making his escape, I ran after him - if the Police had been near I should have taken them both.

Prisoner. He came and asked if I had the property - I said, "No, Sir," and then he took me to the road, to see if I had thrown it down. Witness. No, I did not; I took him to the Police, but I had several other things in my pocket, and I thought I might have dropped some.

JURY. Q. Did he and the accomplice go the same way? A. No. - I laid hold of the accomplice directly; I did not go from the place.

JOHN THORP . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner from the prosecutor - I asked what he had done with the handkerchief; he said he had not got it.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny having it, or having seen it - I was crossing and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-91

325. JAMES WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 2 Sovereigns, 17 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of Thomas Baker , from his person .

THOMAS BAKER . I am a labourer . On the 4th of December, between six and seven o'clock. I was in a cart, going home from market, just by Knightsbridge-barracks- the prisoner was in the cart with me; I had employed him to go with me with a sack of potatoes, and then he helped me to load some dung; my money was in my jacket pocket - I had two sovereigns in a box; as soon as the prisoner left the cart I missed it, and when I got to the public-house I found the bottom of my pocket was cut; I took one of the horses, and gailoped down the road, knowing where he lived - I examined the bottom of the cart, and the money was not there, but there was a shilling. which he had dropped there; there was no hole in the cart - I had felt his hand in my waistcoat pocket, and asked if he was feeling for a bit of tobacco.

Prisoner. He was so intoxicated he could not get into the cart. Witness. No, I was not; there were four or five of us had three pots of half and half.

Prisoner. He was tossing with the landlord and landlady for five or six half pints of gin. Witness. No, 1 was not.

JAMES COOK . I am a constable of Hammersmith. I was sent for to the Red Coy, and saw the prosecutor, who said he had been robbed; he gave the same account that he has to-day, and was quite sober - I went for me prisoner, but could not find him: I heard he was in White-cross-street, where he gave him-self up to an execution; I charged him with the theft, and he said he knew nothing of it.

Prisoner's Defence. This constable came where I was. and I said, "You are looking after me, are you?" he said Yes - I petitioned the Thatched-house Company, and got out; I am as innocent as any person in this place.

JURY to THOMAS BAKER . Q. Did you stop at any place from the time of delivering the potatoes? A. No -I got in at the Ship, in St. James'-street, where I received 3l. for the potatoes; the prisoner told me to get in, and he would drive for me.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-92

326. THOMAS SMITH and SARAH WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 pencil case, value 4s.; 5 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Robert Davy , from his person .

ROBERT DAVY . I met the prisoner Williams near Temple-bar, on the 13th of December, and she asked me to walk with her - we went together to a house; as soon as I got in I was frightened, and wanted to get out, but she would not let me - she pushed me up stairs, and asked me for 1s.; she then pushed me into another room, and asked what money I had - I gave her 5s. 6d.; she said I had two sovereigns and a watch, and she would have them-she got me into another room, shut the shutters and the door, and began to knock me about: I tried to call out, but she would not let me - the male prisoner then came into the room; she said I had two sovereigns - he then asked for my money; I put the two sovereigns into my hat, and the man took my hat from me - they both then came round me, and took my pencil-case from me; the man got my hat from me and knocked me down - he called another woman and told her to take my clothes off, but as she came in I made my escape: I got my hat and the sovereigns - I went down and found the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You met the female prisoner, You say, at Temple-bar? A. Yes; there was no dispute between her and me as to the terms when we got to the house - I was sober; she demanded is. in the room she first pushed me into - I gave it her; she did not tell Smith that I had two sovereigns and a watch belonging to her; I did not before say that I had only lost 2s. - I did not lose my sovereigns, my hat, nor my watch; I did not give them sixpence to fetch gin - there was some gin brought in, and they wanted to drink; I know the landlord of the Angel inn - I never sent him to settle this if they would give me 5l.; I did not go back to the house and say if they would give me the 5s. I should be satisfied- I gave this 5s. 6d. to the woman because she asked for it.

Williams. I met him close by the Angel inn, and he had another young man, named Thomas, with him, who lodged at the Red Lion; the prosecutor said his mistress had turned him away from his place at a moment's warning, and he asked me for a lodging - I said I had known persons get lodgings at the Angel, and he went there and got a lodging at 6d. per night: on the Sunday night I met him again, and he said he would treat me - he went with me to this house, and gave me a shilling, which I took to the landlord; he then gave me sixpence, and I got a quarter, and half of gin - he said he was cold, and I took him into a room where there was a fire - he then gave me 3s.; which he took out of a sunff-box; he was with me for an hour and a half, and wished me to stay the remainder of the evening - I said I could not, and he wished to get the money out of my hand again, knocked me down, and tried to wrench it out of my hand; he then opened the door and ran down stairs - his hat fell off, and the landlord took it up and said, "Here is your hat;" I never saw a bit of gold about him. Witness. I did not try for wrench the money from her - I wanted to leave the house; I took up my hat in the room and the sovereigns were in it - I snatched them out, and then he took my hat and threw it down - my watch was in my fob, and my fob was twisted.

MR. LEE. Q. Are you subject to fits? A. I had one fit once, but I had none at that time; I fainted in the officer's arms.

JAMES HACKWELL . I am a Police-constable. On the

night of the 13th of December I was in Crown-court, and heard a cry of Watch! - I ran up the lane and saw this young man bleeding very much at the month; he said, "I have been very ill used in this house," pointing to No. 6, Little Shire-lane - I took him into the house, and the moment he got in he fainted away: he said Smith and Williams had both ill-used him - there was no pencil-case found; I accused Williams of being with him, and she turned her back to the fire, and dropped a shilling into it.

Cross-examined. Q. How many public-houses have you been in this morning? A. I do not know - I was as sober then as I am now, and as sober now as I was then.

JURY. Q. Did the blood on the prosecutor's face appear to be fresh? A. Yes, he was quite sober.

Williams' Defence. The prosecutor brought in this Police-man and gave charge; I said I was willing to go with him - I had 1s. in my hand; I said the gentleman had given me 5s.

Smith's Defence. On that Sunday evening I was sitting by the fire, reading the paper; the prosecutor had been in the house above an hour, and I heard a noise, and went up stairs, but it was all over and the prosecutor was coming towards the door - his hat was lying in the door-way: I asked what was the matter - he made no answer, but went out and brought in the Police-man; he then asked me if I would give him the 5s. which he gave the girl - I said I knew nothing about that, what he gave her she might keep; he then fell down on the stairs, and I ordered the servant to get a chair - his mouth was covered with blood; I called for towel and water to wash his face - the inside of his top lip was cut; the Police-man said, "He has got a watch," and he was putting it into his fob - the prosecutor jumped up and said, "I have got two sovereigns also;" he again asked me if I would give him 5s. - I said No; he then said he would give me and the girl in charge or illusing him - one of the Police-men asked if he had been robbed; he said, No, he had given the girl the 5s., and the shilling which he knew was to pay for the room, and 6d. for the gin, and in going out at the door he offered one of them 2s. to see him home, which they refused - in half an hour they returned and took me; nothing was said about a pencil-case at Bow-street, but only extorting 5s. by threats.

JAMES HACKWELL . re-examined. Q. Did the prosecutor tell you, in the first place, that he had been robbed both by a man and a woman? A. Yes, and had been very much ill-used: he did mention about the pencil-case at Bow-street - there was another officer with me; he did go away from the house, and afterwards return with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did you not take the prisoners into custody in the first instance? A. The prosecutor had been so knocked about he could not explain what he had been robbed of - he said, at first, he had been very much ill-used, and had been attempted to be robbed by a woman and by the landlord of the house.

MARGARET EVANS . I am a servant to Mr. Smith - he was reading the paper before the fire when the prosecutor came in with this woman, and went to the first floor; there was a bit of a row up stairs, and Mr. Smith went up - the prosecutor then came down, and hallooed out Watch! he was not sober - he was up stairs about an hour, then he went away for about an hour, returned, and said that they had both ill - used him; Mr. Smith had not been out of my sight - the prosecutor said he had two sovereigns and a watch in his pocket; he made no charge against them for robbery.

JURY to ROBERT DAVY . Q. When you went home with this young woman had you your pencil-case? A. Yes, I had it when I was with her - I had been reading all day, and I put it into my pocket when I was going home at night; they wanted me to give them some gin, but I would not - they got some and wanted me to drink, but they would not drink it themselves and therefore I would not.

COURT. Q. Was Smith present when you gave the 5s. 6d. to the woman? A. No; I did not see my pencil-case in the hand of any of the persons who ill-used me, but I felt it while I was in the house, and it was not in my pocket when I came down stairs.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 32.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300114-93

Fourth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

327. SARAH BATT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 14 silver spoons, value 3l. 14s. , the goods of James Robertson , her master.

MARRY ROBERTSON. I am the wife of James Robertson , a surgeon , of Long-acre - the prisoner had been in my service near a fortnight; I did not miss these spoons till the officer brought them one Saturday morning in December.

JOSEPH SADLER THOMAS. I am a superintendent of the Police. On the day before the robbery I was with the commissioners of the Police, when Breavington came and showed me a letter which came from the prisoner - I directed him to make the appointment; he met me on the following morning - we went to the premises, and according to the signal he tapped at the window; I saw him stoop down and receive something, but I could not see what; he came to me, and I asked what he had got; he said he did not know - he gave it me, and I took it to the officer; it was these fourteen silver spoons; I then went to Dr. Robertson's and knocked: the prisoner came to the door, and I spoke to Dr. Robertson - the articles in his parlour were all in confusion.

MARY ROBERTSON . I have seen the prisoner's writting, and I believe this letter to be her writting (letter read.)

DEAR FRIEND - I wish much to see you on particular Saturday morning, precisely seven o'clock, not exceed quarter past. I have a parcel I wish you to fetch. Take greatest care of, and put it under lock and key when you reach home. I will give you a shilling, Whatever you do, do not disappoint. I have something in view I think will be a great advantage to you; can say nothing till Sunday evening, when I hope to come for an hour or two. Excuse me, last Sunday I was an hour behind time. I shall have my kitchen window open, which faces the front of the street, because there if one side goes up Charles-street. Do not knock, I will look out for you. I wish you could make it convenient to go up west end between this and Sunday, to ascertain if that person has left, if you find he has, ask for the cook, and make all inquiries you can when he went, and further add, his wife sent you, then you will be able to judge for me. I must see him, but do not tell her so. Pray go if you can, and I will pay you. Also the parcel belongs to him, and I

am in fear he will find me out, for his brother see me cleaning the door-way yesterday. I am determined he shall not have it.

S.B.

WILLIAM GEORGE BREAVINGTON. I am a labourer. I have known the prisoner seven or eight months - I received this letter, which I believe came from her; I gave information to Thomas, and he took the measures he has stated - I received the parcel containing these spoons from the prisoner at the kitchen window, in Long-acre; I gave the letter to Mr. Thomas.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The witness persuaded me to do it on the Sunday evening, when I called at his house.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-94

328. JOHN MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 silk skirt, value 10s., the goods of John Griffiths , from the person of Charles Andrews .

CHARLES ANDREWS. I live as errand-boy to Mr. John Griffiths, of the Quadrant. On the 14th of December I was carrying a parcel for him, which contained a silk skirt, to Bridge-street, Westminster; a young man took it from me, and ran across the road with it he was about the prisoner's size, and was dressed like him: I cannot swear to his person - I believed at the time it was him.

Prisoner. Q.Did you see me snatch it from you? A. I could not swear it was you; it was a foggy night, I could not see above two or three yards.

HENRY LLOYD . I was at the corner of Carlton-street, about half-past seven o'clock that evening, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I could not see any body running - it was very foggy; the prisoner made for the street where I stood, and I made a snatch at the parcel - he darted into the road, and I after him; I scuffled with him, and knocked his hat off - he was secured by another person; he owned it was his hat. and wished me to give it up - I am certain the person who acknowleged the hat had this parcel, which was thrown down.

ROBERT ENNERES . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Mr. Currey, a hatter, for a situation - he was suited; I was returning, and saw the witness standing by a lamp-post - a man rushed by, and I thought he had taken off my hat; I ran after him, and I believe he dropped the parcel - a man in livery made a grasp at him, but missed him; he then took me and said, "I thought I would have one;" I said"It was not me" - I had dropped my hat, and then a man came and put my hat on.

HENRY LLOYD. I am certain the man I grappled with had the parcel - I knocked his hat off and took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-95

329. MARY SHEEHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 pair of boots, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of Jemima Parker , her mistress.

JEMIMA PARKER . I am a widow , and live in Seymour-place - the prisoner was my servant for three weeks- my lodgers gave me information, and I tried to persuade the prisoner to give up the things, but she would not; I sent an officer for her box, which was not at my house. and he brought it to my dining room - the prisoner first said it was not here, but at last she said it was, and gave up the key; I found these boots and this silk handkerchief in it.

THOMAS GILKES . I was sent for, and examined the box which I brought from Compton-place - I found these boots, this handkerchief, and some other things in it.

MRS. PARKER. These are my property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Your lodgers have not come forward? A. No; the prisoner did not say I gave her a book which one of the lodgers claimed -I never heard of that; Mr. Anderson was my lodger - he has left me, and I do not know where he lives; there was no quarrel with the prisoner about a pair of boots - Mr. Anderson said he had lost books and a pair of gloves; the prisoner did not say I gave her a book - there was one left on the side-board, and I said, "Take this up to Mr. Anderson, and this key;" she did not say I gave her the book - she was taken in consequence of the box being brought from her lodging: I made the charge against her on the Saturday - these boots were found in her box, which had not been kept at my house; she did not suit me, and I did not wish her box to be brought.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress had a false key which opened the gentleman's desk - she took three books out, and a history to read; she gave me a large book to carry into her room - the gentleman was three and I gave it into his hand; in a day or two he missed another book out of his desk - I went and got half a dozen books, and asked him if either of them was it; he said No - In a day or two he missed another: as gentleman then came to dinner with him, who wanted to borrow a book of him - he could not find it. and asked my mistress if she ever took any books from his desk; she said No - he called me up, and asked me if she did not give me that book to give him; I said Yes - my mistress said was not I ashamed to tell such a story; I said no it was no story. for she had done so - he then told me to go down stairs; these boots my mistress made me a present of for a Christmas-box.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-96

330. CHARLES REDDING was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 2 coats, value 20s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Henry Ross .

DAVID DAVIS . I keep a sale-shop, in Field-lane, Holborn. On the 18th of December the prisoner came and brought two coats, a waistcoat, a shirt, and a handkerchief; I asked whose they were - he said they belonged to a gentleman's servant; he asked so much under the value that I did not like to buy them - I said he must take me to the person; he took me to Clerkenwell, pointed down in a vault, and said there was the young man - I found no one there, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS MORFORD . I was on duty in Field-lane on the 18th of December. Davis gave me the prisoner and the property.

JOSEPH FLEXEN. I am a bricklayer, and live in the house with Ross, at No. 20, Northampton-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner was at work with me as a labourer, in

Ross' room, who was at the Three Tuns, and did not returns till ten o'clock at night - it was half-past three when the prisoner and I went to clear the room - I went out at four, and did not return till nine.

HENRY ROSS . I am ninety-five years of age. These things are mine, and were in my room on the 18th of December; they were locked in a box, which was broken open.

Prisoner's Defence. They were given to me to go and sell, and the man was to give me some of the money.

GUILTY . Aged 19 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-97

331. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Wharton Burdon , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-98

332. DANIEL SHELSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 1 half-sovereign, 9 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 12 halfpence , the monies of William Davis , his master.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a publican , and live at Kentish-town - the prisoner lived with me. On the 12th of December he said he wanted change for a sovereign for a lady at No. 3, Jeffrey-street, and he was to bring the sovereign back - I gave him a half-sovereign, 9s. 6d. in silver, and 6d. in copper; he never returned.

SOPHIA STANNAR. I lived at No. 3. Jeffrey-street. -My mistress asked the prisoner for change on the 12th of December, and he brought it on the Saturday, at three o'clock; my mistress said the young lady she wanted it for had got change - she did not give him the sovereign, and he did not leave the change.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-99

333. ANN WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 1 bolster, value 3s,; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 2 sheets, value 10s.; 1 blanket. value 2s., and 1 quilt, value 2s. , the goods of George Bateman .

JANE BATEMAN. I am the wife of George Bateman -we let lodgings . The prisoner came and asked what apartments I had to let: she said her husband was one of the Police. belonging to the Marylebone station, and she would come the next morning if he liked it - she came on the Friday, but did not agree for it; on the Saturday she came, and said her husband was on double duty. In consequence of the illness of the men, but she would take the lodging; she deposited a shilling with me and said she would come on the Monday: on the Monday she and a Police-man came, and they lived as husband and wife for six or seven weeks - I missed several articles, and one Sunday afternoon, knowing they had told me stories, I began to suspect them and on the Monday I sent for an officer, and took the prisoner.

HENRY JASPER TOY . I went with the prosecutrix to her house, and took the prisoner - I found all the articles at the pawnbroker's.

THOMAS WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Dake-street, Manchester-square. I have a pillow and two sheets, pawned by the prisoner and another woman.

JAMES HILL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Guildford-street. I have a quilt, pawned by the prisoner, and a bolster, blanket, and shift, pawned by another woman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that it was her intention to replace the property.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-100

334. ANN WATSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 2 sheets, value 4s., and 2 candlesticks, value 1s. ; the goods of William Mattocks .

SARAH MATTOCKS . I am the wife of William Mattocks - he lives in Gilbert-street; I let part of the house. The prisoner lodged nearly a week with me - I lent her some things to make up a bed in Bateman's house; I lent her the candlesticks - I did not know she had pawned any thing till I went to the office.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-101

335. ROBERT TURNER and THOMAS WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 1 truck, value 2l. , the goods of William Brown .

WILLIAM PARKER . My brother keeps a cheesemonger's shop in Great Saffron-hill. On the morning of the 26th of November, I saw the two prisoners drawing a truck up the hill; they left it at the door of a marine store dealer - I suspected all was not right, and went to Mr. Waddington, who apprehended them.

JOHN HAGGERSTON . I was in company with Waddington; we took the prisoner - Turner said it was his mother's truck, who was lately dead, and he wanted to sell it, and the other prisoner was his brother: Wilson heard that, and did not deny it; before the Magistrate, they contradicted their names, and said a man gave it them.

WILLIAM BROWN . I live at Poplar; the officer's owed me the truck, which was mine, and had been safe on my premises on the 25th of November, and the next morning it was gone - I am a smith , and let out trucks; I know the prisoners by sight.

Wilson, Q. Did not you lend the truck? A. No. it was taken before I was up, or any of my family.

Wilson's Defence. We were looking after a day's work; a man met us, and told us to take the truck up that way, and he would he there directly - we waited near half an hour, and the officer took us. I said a man hired us to take it there.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Weeks , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18300114-102

336. CHARLES SWINDELL was indicted for stealing. on the 7th of January , 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of Henry Newland .

HENRY NEWLAND . I keep a hatter's shop in Turnstile, Holborn . At a quarter-past seven o'clock in the evening of the 7th of January, the prisoner snatched this hat out of the window, and ran into Holborn - he then began to walk; I called Stop thief! - he crossed and dropped it in the road, and ran down Dean-street. Where I lost him; I returned, and some time after a neighbour came and told me he was in custody - I went to Dean-street, and found him in custody; I am sure he is the man.

JOSHUA BARTON . I saw the prisoner run across the road and drop the hat; I pursued up Dean-street, caught

him by the tail of his coat, and kept him till the officer came.

JAMES BARTON. I took the prisoner from Barton; this is the hat(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-103

336. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 trunk, value 1s., 3 waistcoats, value 3s., and 6 books, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Stone .

JOSEPH STONE. I live in White-horse-yard. Drury-lane . I have lodgers, but the prisoner was not one. On the 31st of December, he and another man knocked at my door and inquired for one of my lodgers of the name of Turner- I said he was at work; they said he was not - I said then I could not tell where he was; they went away, and I went in doors - in five or ten minutes. I heard some person go up to the garret; I went to listen, and presently I heard a person come down - I looked out at my door, and three parts down the yard I saw the prisoner with something on his shoulder; I followed him, and saw him with the trunk on his shoulder - I asked what he had got; he threw it down and ran away - I pursued, crying Stop thief! and the Police-officer took him - I am quite sure he is the person who was with the other, and knocked at my door; he was carrying the trunk - this is it; it contains the property stated.

JOHN TEDMAN . I am a Police-constable; I took the prisoner, and have had the trunk ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a young man with a blue coat and metal buttons; he asked me to carry a load for him; he knocked at this door, and inquired for Turner - the prosecutor said he was not at home; we then went away, and then returned - I stood at a distance from the house; he went and got the trunk, and gave it me to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-104

337. MARY PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 pewter put, value 1s. 2d. , the goods of Horatio Nathaniel Phillips .

JOHN KING . I am pot-man to Horatio Nathaniel Phillips , who keeps the Jews'-harp Tavern, Regent's-park . On the 20th of December I was collecting my pots; a young man told me that this woman had stolen some - I followed, and a boy, stopped her; this pot, which she had got is my master's.

HENRY WILLIAM MORRISON . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I took charge of her - this pot belongs to the prosecutor, and this other to Elizabeth Allison.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 56. - Confined Eighteen Months .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18300114-105

338. ISABELLA McCOLLIN and JANE SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 3 pairs of stays, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Philip Orton Roberts .

PHILIP ORTON ROBERTS . I am a stay-maker and haberdasher , and live in Grosvener-row, Chelsea . The two prisoners came together to my shop on the 18th of December, and asked to look at some black worsted stockings at 10 1/2 d. per pair; they said they were not good enough - I then showed them some at 1s. 6d.; Smith talked about a variety of things, but did not ask for goods, but McCollin did- she said the stockings at 1s. 6d. were too high, and she should like some at 1s.3d. - I said I had none at that price, but I should have some the next day, and I would let her have a pair of them at 1s. 4d.; I at last agreed to let her have a pair for 1s. 3d., but she said she would call next day - she then turned to Smith, and said, "You want a pair, don't you?" Smith said Yes - I said, "I have plenty that will fit her;" they said they would wait till next day, and they both left the shop - soon afterwards, I missed three pairs of stays from the corner of the window which Smith had been standing near; the officer afterwards brought the stays to my shop - I had never seen the prisoners before; McCollin offered me a bribe, which I refused.

JAMES PAYNE . I am a Police-constable; I took the prisoners at the corner of Eaton-square, Pimlico - Smith was carrying these stays.(Property produced and sworn to.)

McCollin put in a written Defence, stating, that she was not aware that Smith had taken the stays.

McCOLLIN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-106

339. WILLIAM MAYCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 6 lbs. weight of candles, value 15s. , the goods of Charles Freeman .

CHARLES FREEMAN . I am a wax-chandler , and live at No. 11, Green-street, Leicester-square . On the 8th of january, a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, I was fetched to the watch-house - these candles are mine.

JOHN HORNE . I am a newsman, and live nearly opposite the prosecutor. On this night week I saw the prisoner and five others parading before his door, and watching his house - I watched; one of them went into the house and bought a candle, and when he came out he put it into his pocket, and buttoned it up - the prisoner then went into the shop, and bought a candle; he came out with that in his hand, and this bundle of wax candles under his arm -I went and asked him where he got them; he said he had been in the shop and bought them - I took him, and the the others all ran off.

EDWARD ALEWOOD. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and have the candles.

MR. FREEMAN. These are my candles, and are all marked; I was in the shop, and served the candles - I missed this parcel about five minutes after they left.

Prisoner's Defence. The candles were taken in Leicester-square, and I was taken near St. Martin's church.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-107

340. JOSEPH LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 1 pocket-book, value 3s., and 1 pack of cards, value 5s. , the goods of George Watkins .

LYDIA WATKINS . I am the wife of George Watkins - he keeps a printing-office and circulating library , in Chapel-row, Ball's-pond. On the 2nd of December the prisoner and another came to my house, after eight o'clock in the evening - my husband and I were sitting in the parlour - I saw a reflection between the door and the gas-light; I got up, and saw the prisoner and another lad in the shop;

I went in, and they said they wanted to purchase a small book - I said I had not got it, but found I had; the prisoner then asked if I would buy some pin-cushions he had to sell - I said No, and they went away; soon afterwards I missed a pocket-book and a pack of cards from the window - my husband gave an alarm, and they were taken; this property was found on the prisoner.

JOHN SKIDMORE. I took the prisoner and the other lad; four packs of cards and a pocket-book were found on the prisoner.

WILLIAM MORTON I am a constable. I found this property on the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that his companion gave him the articles after they left the shop, but he was not aware how he had got them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18300114-108

341. MICHAEL KELLY and JOHN COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 25 gloves, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas Foulkes .

JOSEPH COLE. I am a Police-constable. On the 11th of December, about ten o'clock at night, I was walking through Buckeridge-street, St. Giles', in plain clothes, and saw six persons together - I laid hold of the two prisoners and took them into a house; I found on Collins four pairs and a half of silk gloves, and two pairs of leather ones -I saw Kelly throw something behind him; I looked, and found it was four pairs of gloves - the prisoners said they had picked them up; the next morning I found they had been taken from a window in Tottenham-court-road, and went to the place I took them to, and found four more gloves, which had been on the coals.

JOHN EGERTON. I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Foulkes , a haberdasher and hosier , of Tottenham-court-road . These gloves are all his property - I missed them at half-past nine o'clock on the evening of the 11th of December; there were twelve pairs and an old one taken from the window - they are all here; the window had been broken half an hour before, and had been mended with paper, which was also broken.

JOHN LEPPARD . I saw the two prisoners loitering about the prosecutor's shop for some time, about nine o'clock that night.

Kelln's Defence. I was sent with a horse and chaise, and had 1s. for it - I went to a cook-shop with this prisoner, and spent 8d. of it; when we came out we found the gloves laying on the curb.

KELLY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-109

342. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for stealing on the 5th of December , 1 coat, value 3l , the goods of John James Ford .

ROBERT ROBEY . I am errand-boy to Mr. John James Ford, who lives at the corner of Strand-lane , near the new church, and is a tailor . On the evening of 5th of December the prisoner came to me in the shop, and asked if Mr. Humphries lived there; I said No - he then asked if my master was at home; I went to call a servant, and saw the prisoner take the coat off the counter, and run away with it - he was brought back very soon, but the coat has never been found; I had every opportunity of seeing the prisoner, and am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What time was it? A.Half-past six o'clock in the evening; I had never seen the prisoner before - he was in the shop about five minutes; I have always said I knew his person - I did not say at the Police-office that I thought he was like the man; I am quite sure he is the man - he only asked me two questions; he was there about three minutes.

JOHN JAMES FORD. I am the owner of the shop. I was coming home accidentally, and heard my boy cry Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and stopped him; he had nothing - I saw no one else running: I missed a blue body coat from my shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not a great thoroughfare? A. Yes - he was seven doors from my shop; I could not swear there were no other persons running, but the prisoner was running across the road.

SAMUEL SLOWMAN . I was on duty, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prosecutor take the prisoner crossing the road, and I took charge of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you look for any body else? A. No, but there were other persons running after the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-110

343. ROBERT HALLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 2 scaffolding-boards, value 2s. , the goods of George Todd .

GEORGE TODD. I am building at Chelsea. These boards are mine, but I cannot say where I lost them from.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you not a great many boards? A. Yes - here is a mark on them; I never sell my old boards, nor give them away - they are burnt when they are done with; these are as good to me as new.

GEORGE HUNTLEY . I am a dismounted patrol. On the 2nd of December I fell in with the prisoner in Chelseafields, at half-past one o'clock in the morning; he had these boards on his shoulder - I asked what he was going to do with them; he said to make a pig sty, and his father-in-law gave them to him - I took him to his father-in-law, who denied it.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he gave his proper address? A. I believe he did - he was not intoxicated.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out late, drinking, and picked them up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-111

First Middlesex Jury,

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

344. HENRY STUBBERFIELD was indicted for feloniously assembling, with divers other persons, armed, in order to aid and assist in the illegal landing, running, and carrying away 200 gallons of foreign brandy, which was liable to pay duty; also for assaulting and wounding John Ellis and James Campbell , persons employed to prevent smuggling .

THIRTEEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the charge.

MR. SHEPPARD conducted the prosecution.

JOHN ELLIS . I am employed in the preventive-service on the coast of Sussex, and was stationed at the Martello tower, No. 53, in the parish of Bexhill . On the 1st of October, between one and two o'clock in the morning, I saw Brown coming from westward - he made a communication to me: I went to Lieutenant Warren, the commanding officer, who sent me and Brown westward to see about a boat - it was about half-past one; as I came within twenty or thirty yards of No. 55 tower, I saw a party of men coming over the full of the beach - there might be forty or fifty, or more; they were on the highest part of the beach, coming from the land side, with bats in their hands, some six or seven feet long, and some shorter - they are sticks; they sung out, "Here are the bl - y b - g - rs," and rushed towards us, lifting up their bats in the air - the nearest of them was within ten yards of us; I fired my pistol at them, expecting to be knocked down every moment - I retreated rather back, and as I fired a second pistol I received a blow which cut me down: the pistol went off as they hit me on the crown of my hat with one of their bats - I then received another blow in the eye, which knocked me down; I had a scuffle, and they took one of my pistols from me, but I got clear of them - I received several blows from them, about my body and thigh; my eye was swollen: I retreated eastward and met Sullivan coming to my assistance - I told him the smugglers had got Brown down then, and beating him; he was singing out - a great many of them were then in chase of me and were within ten yards of me; Sullivan fired his musket in among them, and they knocked him down - they stopped with him; I loaded my pistol and discharged it in among them - they followed me again: I retreated, and they turned on Brown a second time, and I followed them- they got round the tower, No. 55, and fell in with Campbell, who was coming out; I fired six rounds with my pistol - then they went towards a farm-house, and I saw no more of them; Brown was bleeding and cut about the head - next morning, about seven or eight o'clock, I went with Lieutenant Warren and some men to the prisoner's house, and inquired for him; he was denied - after coming out of the house his wife came out presently, and made across the field to the Star public house; our people ran a-head of her, and got into the Star before her - the prisoner and six more were drinking inside there; he tried to get out at the back door to escape with the rest, but a man named Pinner seized him at the door - we had said nothing of what we came about; we were dressed as preventive men - he was taken to No. 55, tower; there was blood on his smock-frock, and I believe there was a little drop of blood on his trousers; it seemed fresh - it was a clear star light morning. I observed a kind of round circle at the end of one of the bats, but could not tell what it was.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At what time did you see these men coming over the beach? A. I suppose between two and three o'clock - I was twenty or thirty yards from them; I saw the boat afterwards, about one hundred and fifty yards west of No. 55 - she was beached to the extreme of No. 55 station; the men were not coming as if from there - I saw nothing doing about the boat; I went to it next morning - there was nothing in it; it was the Dove, of Rye - the nearest men were ten yards from me when I fired; they were nearly together with their bats lifted - I do not know that their bats would hit me at that distance; a blow came on me as I fired the second time - I heard of nobody being killed or wounded from my firing; there is a canal close to the back door of the Star - he was going out at the back door as we entered; he could get away without going over the canal, he could get over a field - the blood on his frock appeared fresh; it was on the bosom, a small quantity; it ran down in a little thin stream - we have the frock and trousers here; he had a short frock on under the one I took off - the night was clear enough to distinguish one man from another.

MR. SHEPPARD. Q. When they were ten yards from you on the beach were they standing still? A. No, running towards me - they came up and knocked me down: I produce the frock.

JOHN BROWN. On the 2nd of October, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I was near the Martello tower, and saw some persons coming over the full of the beach, with bats in their hands, which they held up, and said, "Come up you b - g - rs;" Ellis was with me - they rushed down upon us off the full, holding their bats up, and as they were coming towards me I discharged my pistol - they could not be above six yards off me at the time, and their bats were raised; after I fired they knocked the pistol out of my hand with a blow of a bat on my arm - they knocked me down with a blow on my left side, and beat me very severely, and while I was on the ground they jumped on me, and hurt me severely; it made me insensible - when I recovered both my pistols were gone; I think I should know one of the men who appeared on the full: I thought the prisoner was one of them, but I did not know him at the time - I went towards my own tower; Campbell came to my assistance - there was a lot of men round the tower, and away to the west; I saw Campbell afterwards - he had been beat - it was a star-light night; there was light enough to know an acquaintance.

Cross-examined. Q. How near should you know an acquaintance? A. At the distance they were from me, six or eight yards. There might be about thirty men; I think it was nearer three o'clock than two - we keep time by watches - it might be half-past two, to the best of my opinion; I was the first man that was knocked down -I cannot tell whether Ellis fired; the mail generally passes our station between two and three o'clock - I do not know whether is had passed that night.

JOHN SULLIVAN . I am on the preventive-service, and was stationed on this night between towers Nos. 54 and 55; I heard a firing between two and three o'clock - went towards it, and met Ellis coming along the fall of the beach, and a party of between fifty and sixty men, armed with bats, running after him; as soon as I came up I fired my musket at them: Stubberfield and two more of the party then came down, armed with bats, and struck me - five or six more then came down and joined them, they struck me altogether, knocked me down, and took my arms from me - they beat me; I saw another man among them whom I know, he is not in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. There were fifty or sixty men? A. Yes; I suppose they were the same party as were

engaged with Brown - they were running after Ellis when I came up; I am sure there were more than twenty or thirty; as soon as the prisoner came within three yards of me I knew him; I was struck immediately; I saw him just as he was coming down upon me - I was quite positive about him - that was the only opportunity I had of observing him.

Q.Have you ever been positive about one Stonestreet? A. I swore to the best of my knowledge he was one of the men - he was taken into custody - but I never did swear positively to him; he was in custody three or four days; I believe when I told the Magistrate I could not swear to him plump and plain he was discharged; I had known him about two months; I only said, that to the best of my knowledge he was there; I said from the first that I could not be certain of him; I have known the prisoner nine months, and saw him often - I was well acquainted with his face and appearance, and am quite certain he is one of the men - I have always said so.

JAMES CAMPBELL. On the night between the 1st and 2nd of October I was employed on the preventive-service at the Martello tower, No. 55 - between two and three o'clock I heard Brown's wife sing out that her husband was being murdered, and immediately after I heard a firing; I got up, put part of my clothes on, and went out with my musket and pistol, to his assistance; I saw a great number of men about the tower - when I came down the ladder Brown was standing alongside, and the men laying on him; I tried to fire my musket, but it would not go off - I tried to reach over to hit them, but their bats were so long it would not reach them; I immediately fired my pistol - a man hit me over the shoulder and struck me with a bat; I seized a man who struck me with a bat, and who I take to be Stubberfield - we struggled some time as I seized his bat, and tried to take it from him; they gathered before and behind, and knocked me down against the man's breast who I suppose to be Stubberfield, and beat me most dreadfully - Stubberfield is the man; my head was cut - blood gushed out of my head befored I fell against him - I was knocked down and heat dreadfully; when I was down I think Stubberfield is the man that said "Come off, he is dead enough now;" he called them off, and they all ran over a stile; since that I have heard the prisoner speak, when I was laying in the hospital, and believed him to be the man - he was brought to the hospital to me.

Cross-examined. Q. Who brought him there? A. I think it was the Quarter-master; another young man was in custody with him. Whose name, I think, was Tysart - he was quite a small man, not so big as the prisoner; I heard the other man speak, but paid no attention to what he said - they were brought to the hospital to be examined - there was a Justice there; I had no knowledge of the prisoner before that night - I know him by his size and speech; I only heard him say "He is dead enough, come off;" I dare say sixty or seventy men were about me at that time - they were all making a noise; I had one wound before I pitched my head in the bosom of the man - I got the other afterwards; the first wound was not so very bad - blood came out - there was not a considerable deal of blood - it ran down all parts of me.

MR. SHEPPARD. Q. You fell down at the foot of the man? A. I fell on his breast - I was lying down close to him when I heard him say those words - the prisoner's voice struck me at the hospital.

LIEUTENANT CHARLES DUNCAN WARREN . In October I was in the employ of the preventive-service, and in command of the party at the tower, 53; I sent Ellis, and Brown on duty to watch for smuggling cutters - there was an alarm that night, and next morning, in consequence of information from Sullivan, I went to Stubberfield's house, and inquired for him, but did not find that he was at home; it was about six o'clock - I did not look at my watch; I saw his wife going towards the Star public-house, and ordered the party to go on, and get before her- I went and saw the prisoner coming out of the Star, in custody of one of the people I had sent; Campbell and Sullivan were under my command that night, employed to prevent smuggling; when the prisoner was apprehended I observed blood about his frock, some on his breast, and some on his trousers behind - the blood on the breast appeared to be fresh. I was an officer on full pay at the time.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure it was as early as six o'clock when you got to the Star, for Ellias says it was eight? A. To the best of my recollection it was about six - it was clear day-light; it might have been half - past six - I cannot swear to the time.

JAMES TYSART . I live in the parish of Bexhill, nearly a quarter of a mile from Martello tower, 55. I was looking out of window on the night, between the 1st and 2nd of October, about three o'clock, as I heard a firing; I saw a party of people coming along the road from the sea; they passed my house, and appeared to have something on their backs - I do not know what it was, as it was dark; I supposed it to be tubs, but am not certain - I guess there were one hundred people, but cannot tell; a good many of them had something on their backs.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you undertake to swear there was as tab on any one man's back? A. No - it was dark; I do not know any of them - I should not think it was light enough to know a man ten yards off, as I did not know any of them; my son was taken up about this - he was at home, and looking out of window at the time; he was detained a day and a night. I think.

MR. SHEPPARD. Q. Was it an up stairs window you were looking out of? A. Yes, I was above them as they passed.

JOSEPH BALLOWAY . I am surgeon of this division of the coast blockade. On the morning of the 2nd of October, I attended Sullivan, Ellis, Brown, and Campbell - Campbell was injured the severest; he had two wounds on his head - one about an inch long; his left arm, and shoulder were severly contused and swollen - his back and thigh severly bruised; Ellis had a wound in his left check bone- Brown was severly bruised over his left shoulder, arm, and thing; Sullivan was wounded over his left shoulder and thigh - I conceive them to be such wounds as might be inflicted by bats; the wound on the back of Campbell's head put on an unpleasant appearance- that was the only serious wound; he was confined to his bed about ten days, and ill about six weeks.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were Campbell's wounds?

A. On the left side of the bone, at the back of the head, and he had one small wound at the left side.

COURT. Q. Were his severe wounds? A. The one on the back of the head was a severe wound - danger was to be apprehended from the wounds on the head, but there was no apparent danger; dangerous symptoms often follow a wound in the head - no one dangerous symptom presented itself in this case.

The prisoner delivered in a long written. Defence, avowing himself a smuggler, and stating that at ten o'clock, on the night in question, he arrived off Pervensey-sluice, in a boat from Bolougne, having a few things attached by slings to stones, as sinkers, and had cut his thumb in the act of cutting off some of the sinkers; having got his goods ashore, he conveyed them to Hooe; that in the morning he found he had torn his trousers, and having but a short frock, he borrowed the one he was apprehended in, in order to cover his torn trousers. [The remainder of his defence will be seen by the following evidence.]

JAMES PEARCE I live at Sluice, in the parish of Bexhill, and am a carpenter. On the 1st of October, at ten o'clock at night, the prisoner called on me at my house, and in consequence of what he said, I went over the beach, and found something tied on a line to sinkers, which are heavy stones; we cut the sinkers off - Hammond, Quife, and Stonestreet were there; the prisoner was over the back of the beach - we met a cart out in the marsh, at Chapel-bridge, about a mile from Sluice, and put these things into it; we all four returned, and the prisoner went away in the cart, about one o'clock in the morning, going towards Hooe, which is about two miles from Chapel-bridge; it is about four miles from No. 55, tower.

Cross-examined. Q. How far from the sluice is Chapel-bridge? A. A mile - the things might be twenty rods from my house; we were from ten till one o'clock about this.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were from ten till one o'clock getting the things to the cart; did you do it at one turn? A. We went backwards and forwards - the cart was a mile from the things; there were fifteen things - three of us carried three; Hammond went for the cart - I went directly from the sluice with the prisoner; Hammond went and called two of the men.

COURT. Q. How many turns did you take? A. Hammond went for the cart - the prisoner went home and changed his clothes; we carried three things out, then Stubber went and got the rest.

ROBERT QUIFE . On the night of the 1st of October, Hammond called me - I went over to the sluice, to the water, found some things there, and carried them away; they were tied to sinkers - we carried them to Chapel-bridge, which is about a mile from the water-side; I went twice - there were four of us - we all carried the things over the beach; then Hammond went for the cart, which we put the things into, at Chapel-bridge, and I went home - the prisoner got into the cart; it was then about one o'clock - a lad named Samuel Freeman, went with him in the cart.

Cross-examined. Q. It was your object to get the work done as quick as possible? A. Yes; there was no particular hurry - we walked as quick as we could; we carried the things part of the way first, then went and got the rest - we hid them down over the beach, and took part of them to Chapel-bridge - the cart had not come; we then fetched the rest - the cart had not come then; I waited till it came, and as soon as the things were put in I went home - the prisoner got in, and went away with Freeman; I looked at my watch, and could see that it was one o'clock - Stubberfield asked me what o'clock it was; the house clock struck one just as I was called - I looked at my watch at Chapel-bridge; I had no lantern - it was dark, but I managed to see the time; it was not very star-light, but light enough for that.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Did you hold your watch very close to your eyes to see the time? A. Yes, very - we carried the things a little way first, because we wanted to get the others away, as we did not think any body would find them over the beach.

NIMROD STONESTREET. I live at the sluice. On the 1st of October Hammond called me up - I went over the beach after some things; I do not know what they were - we got fifteen; there were five men - Pearce, Hammond, Stubberfield, Quife, and myself; the things were on a line on the surface of the water - some stones were attached to the line; we carried them up the marsh, just beyond the Star and hid them, and after that carried them on to the marsh into Chapel-bridge - there was a cart there; Freeman and Hammond were with it - Freeman and the prisoner went away in it a few minutes after one o'clock; 1 know that, for Quife had a watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Who brought the cart? A. Hammond and Freeman - I first saw the prisoner about ten o'clock on the beach; Pearce was with him - I swear I could not tell what was in the things; Stubberfield stood back on the land side of the beach - I knew where he was all the time; I am sure he was there all the time, from ten o'clock to one; he did not go away - we found the things on the beach.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Though you do not know what the things were, perhaps you had a pretty good guess? A. Yes; when I first saw the prisoner he had a short frock on, a hat, and trousers.

SAMUEL FREEMAN. I live with my father, at Hooe. On the night of the 1st of October Hammond came to my father's for me to get the horse and cart - I went with it to Chapel-bridge, which is between three and four miles from Hooe; when I got there I saw the prisoner and other men - they put some things into my cart; the prisoner came away with me to Hooe in the cart - it was then about one o'clock; when we got to my father's, he asked for some cold bread and meat, which we gave him; he then asked if he could sleep in our stable - we told him he could not, because there were two horses there and it was very dirty; he went away - this was near two o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. You had gone to bed when they first called you? A. Yes; it was then about twelve o'clock - I am not certain of the time; it was a green cart, and one that drives quick - I did not drive very fast; I was more than half an hour going to Chapel-bridge - I found these men there with the things on getting there; they were put into the cart, and I drove off directly - the cart was left at our house with the things - Stubberfield lives about a mile from Chapel-bridge; I drove part of the way, and Stubberfield the rest - I do

not know at what time we left Chapel-bridge; I did not hear any body say what o'clock it was: if they had I think I must have heard them - we were altogether; I did not stay there above a minute or two - they merely put the things in, and then went off.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Might a man ask what o'clock it was without your hearing? A. Yes; they were sometimes apart; I was minding the cart - there is a parish road from Chapel-bridge to our house; the prisoner was dressed in a short frock, which came down to his waist - he had nothing over that.

WILLIAM FISHER . I keep the Red Lion at Hooe, and am a butcher. I have supplied the preventive-service with a few things, but not for these two months, or more; I had no contract for them. On the morning of the 2nd of October, I saw the prisoner, at two o'clock, at my house - I knew him before; he had a bed there, and I saw him at half-past five o'clock in the morning; I had locked the doors, and bolted them after showing him to bed - I was the first that got up in the morning; he came down at half-past five, and asked me to lend him a frock- before that I had been and called him; I found him asleep; I lent him a frock, as he had a very short one on- I did not know why he wanted me to lend him one; I believe it was longer than his own - the one I lent him was dirty; I had used it several times when I killed cattle - the one produced is what I lent him; I expect to find blood on it - I certainly expected to find it dirtier than what it is; here is a patch on the sleeve, which I know it by - when I heard the prisoner was in custody, I had business with Lieutenant Warren, and mentioned the prisoner's case to him.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you lend the frock to him? A. About six o'clock, within a few minutes of that time; he was not in possession of it before six - I expected there was more blood on it than I find, as I frequently kill in it; he did not leave his short frock with me.

COURT. Q.How do you know when this was? A. I am in the habit of keeping accounts, and write the day of the month every day; I cannot remember whether he knocked at my door, or came in - I was not gone to bed; I had some friends smoking, and they had just left - if I had been in bed I should have got up to accommodate him; my house is two miles from Chapel-bridge, or perhaps more; I cannot say, for it is a road I never frequent - he did not come to my house to change his dress at one o'clock.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How far is it from your house to No. 55 tower? A. Between four and five miles, to the best of my knowledge.

SARAH LINGHAM . I keep the Star. The prisoner was taken at my house; he had come in, and had a pint of porter - he had cut his thumb, and wiped it on his trousers.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did he first come in? A.About seven o'clock - I think about a quarter to seven; my house is about three miles, or three and a half from Hooe; I went to the bar to get a bit of rag for his thumb, and while I was gone the preventive-men came and took him - he did not attempt to run away; he came into my room to have the rag put on.

NOT GUILTY .

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18300114-112

346. SAMUEL JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 2 coats, value 2l. 13s. , the goods of David Farrow ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-113

357. JOHN CHILD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , 1 lb. 4 oz. of rhubarb, value 11s.; 4 ozs. of bees'-wax, value 6d.; 1 ruler, value 6d., and I linen wrapper, value 1s., the goods of Charles Davy and others, his masters; - also, on the 24th of December, 1 lb. 6 ozs. of rhubarb, value 12s.; 6 ozs. of bees'-wax, value 8s., and 26 sheets of paper, value 1s., their property ; to which indictments he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-114

348. JOSEPH APPLEBY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 cloak, value 40s. , the property of Matthew Parkins .

MATTHEW PARKINS. I am a woollen-draper , and live at Aldgate . On the 24th of December I saw this cloak moving from my shop, but did not see the face of the person who took it; an alarm was given - I ran out, and caught sight of the prisoner about ten yards off; he was looking round - he then ran down Jewry-street, and was stopped without my losing sight of him; I saw him throw something from under his arm, which turned out to be the cloak - I laid hold of him the moment he was stopped, and the cloak was brought to the watch-house; it hung on a line just within the door; he made a great resistance, struck me, and kicked my shins - he struck my son, and injured him very much; he was unable to lift his arm for two or three days.

MARGARET PARKINS . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw the prisoner at the window the moment the cloak was taken, and for three minutes before; I was speaking to a lady in the shop, and she gave the alarm.

WILLIAM PLAISTOW. I received him in custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-115

349. THOMAS ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of John Sutton Moore .

ELIZA OVERTON. I am servant to John Sutton Moore, of Plow-yard, Seething-lane . On the 12th of December this coat hung in the passage, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning - I went into the passage, and saw the prisoner there; he had just taken down the coat; the street door is generally open, as Mr. Moore is a school master - he had got this coat over his arm; he was a stranger; I asked what he wanted - he told me twice to go along; he ran out, and I followed, calling"Stop thief! he was stopped about a hundred yards off with the coat - I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined. by MR. LEE. Q. It was dark, I suppose? A.Rather - he turned round and spoke to me as he was going away; he ran, and I saw him taken in Savage-gardens - I kept him in sight all the time.

JOHN SUTTON MOORE. I live in Plow-yard. This is my coat - the prisoner is quite a stranger; the door was left on the latch.

WILLIAM BUDD. I am a wine-porter. I heard a cry

of Stop thief! and stopped the prisoner with the coat - he threw it across my arm; Overton was following about twenty yards off - he was calling Stop thief!

JOHN THOMPSON. I am a constable. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw him secured - the coat was delivered to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-116

350. THOMAS THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December 1 loaf of bread, value 8 1/2d. , the goods of James Warren .

JAMES WARREN . I am a journeyman-baker . I left a basket of bread by the side of an apple-stall. in Bishopsgate-street , and went with another basket about a hundred yards off; on returning I missed a loaf, and found the prisoner at the watch-house with it - I knew it, by its being my own moulding.

THOMAS SAPWELL. I am a constable. On the 28th of December, between one and two o'clock. I saw the prisoner coming along - knowing him before, I stepped into the watch-house, saw him take a loaf from this basket, which was by the side of a stall, and put it under his coat; I immediately secured him - he had a bag, with a loaf of brown bread, a large piece of cheese, and a piece of pork, and in his pocket four potatoes and 10 1/2d.

GUILTY . Aged 55. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-117

351. ISABELLA LAWSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 5 spoons, value 3l. 7s., and 2 silver forks, value 20s. , the goods of Christopher Davison , her master.

CHRISTOPHER DAVISON. I am a merchant , and live in Philpot-lane . The prisoner was in my service for about six weeks - her sister was in my service, and I took her for a short period, till I could suit myself: she left, and took these spoons without giving any notice - she had access to the spoons; her sister left ten days after her - there were two table, one dessert, and one tea-spoon, and two dinner forks: they were worth about 4l. 10s.

WILLIAM PEARCE. I am apprentice to a pawnbroker, who lives in Houndsditch. I have two table, a tea and dessert spoon, and a silver dessert fork, all pawned at once on the evening of the 17th of December, in the name of Jane Lawrence , Swan-street, for two guineas - I do not recollect the person; the prosecutor saw and claimed them.

JAMES FOGG. I am a surveyor of the Thames-police. I apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of January, and asked if she had lived with Mr. Davison in Philpot-lane; she said Yes - I then asked what she had done with the plate she took from there; she said voluntarily that she had pawned it: I said, "Where is the duplicate?" she said she had it in her pocket - I searched and found several. and said, "I don't find it here;" she said, "Oh, I forgot, I tore it up last night" - I said, "Where have you pawned them?" she said, "In Houndsditch," took me to the shop, and said she should not have taken them, but she had been drinking.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-118

352. DANIEL HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 chain, value 6d.; 1 seal, value 6d., and 1 key, value 10d. , the goods of George Amos Chapman .

GEORGE AMOS CHAPMAN. I am a carman , and live in John-street, Whitechapel. I left my watch in the watercloset at my master's, a wine-merchant, No. 12, Size-lane , about two o'clock on the 15th of December: I am sure I left it there - I did not miss it for two hours after; I then went to the water closet and it was gone - the prisoner had come there about two with a truck; I saw him there - I went to his employer, but he was gone: I saw the watch at Guildhall next morning, when he was in custody: I had seen him go to the water-closet half an hour after I left, and before I recollected having left it there.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you quite sober? A. Yes, I always am: the water-closet is in an open yard, but not a public one - I am certain I left it there: I am sure I never attempted to put it into my trousers.

CHARLES BAINES. I am clerk at an office in this yard. I went into the water-closet at three o'clock and saw no watch there.

JOSEPH WEAVER. I am shopman to Mr. Burltor, a pawnbroker of Beckford-row, Walworth. On the 15th of December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I took a watch in pawn from the prisoner's wife; I have seen them together - she pawned it in the name of Mary Hammond, Chiswell-street; she had been a regular customer for three years - she was at Guildhall: I never heard them address each other as man and wife - he has come to our shop with her.

GEORGE AMOS CHAPMAN. There was no woman in his company in the yard.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN ROW . I am an officer of the Mansion-house. I took the prisoner in Martin's-lane, Thames-street, and told him the charge was taking a watch out of a water-closet in Size-lane, the day previous: he denied all knowledge of it, and said he lived at No. 14, Brook-street, Walworth-road, but afterwards said No. 5, Chiswell-street, Camberwell, and gave his name Smith - as I came from the Compter he told me his name was Hammond, and that I had mistaken him in saying his name was Smith: I went to Chiswell-street, found his wife next day, and asked her for the duplicate of the watch her husband gave her the night before, and she gave me this: when I was going to lock him up after the examination, he said, "To tell you the truth, I have got the watch, and it is pledged in the Walworth-road," but he could not exactly tell where.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not add that he had found it? A. I do not recollect.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, stating that he found the watch in the privy, and was not aware he was committing felony. He received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 42. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18300114-119

353. CHARLES BARTHOLOMEW was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 wooden box, value 1s., and 54lbs. of raisins, value 20s. , the goods of John Frederick Fixsam and another.

EDWARD PASSEY. I am in the employ of John Frederick Fixsam and another, wholesale grocers on Garlick-hill. On the 24th of December I had four boxes of raisins and three hogsheads in my waggon to take to Pickford

Wood-street; a person came round the waggon in Collegehill , and asked if I had any small things in it - he informed me somebody had taken something, and I missed a box of raisins; I ran round the corner, crossed the street, and saw two men run across - I saw the box on the prisoner's shoulder; I cut him hard with my whip, and he dropped it - he was stopped in my sight; I picked the box up, thinking the other would take it - I went up to the prisoner; he said, "Let me go, you have cut me enough for this" - I would not let him go.

THOMAS BROWN. I am a carman. I stood at the corner of College-hill, between six and seven o'clock that evening: I did not see the waggon, but heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned round out of our stable-door, and saw two men running - I stopped one of them, which was the prisoner; he had nothing then - Passey came up with the box in a minute or two, and charged him with stealing it; the prisoner wished to be let go, saying he had flogged him enough for it with the whip.

Prisoner. He said I was not the man at the Mansion-house. Witness. I said no such thing: I said I thought he had a different dress on then, but was certain he was the man; I was not certain he was the man I stopped.

JOHN GOOD . I am an officer. I received the prisoner from Passey, for stealing this box; he said nothing to the charge.(Box produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The man said at the Mansion-house, that he cut me on the face and neck - the Lord Mayor said if I was cut I should have a mark: my handkerchief was taken off, and there was no mark - I was going fast to keep myself warm, it being frosty.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-120

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

354. THOMAS ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 watch, value 2l. , the goods of Richard Searle : to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-121

355. WILLIAM DAY was indicted for embezzlement ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-122

356. CATHERINE HADNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 2 aprons, value 6d.; 1 shovel, value 1s.; 1 pair of tongs, value 1s.; 1 poker, value 1s.; 2 ounces of tea, value 9d.; 1 canister, value 1d., and 3s. , the property of Thomas Burn .

SARAH BURN . I am the wife of Thomas Burn, and live in Short's-gardens, Belton-street, Long-acre . About five weeks before this robbery, I was standing at my door smoking, and saw the prisoner - I said "What do you stand there for on this wet day?" she said she had no place to go to; I asked her to come in and warm herself - she cried and said she had no home, and had only one shilling a week from St. Giles's parish to live on; I said,"If you come in the day-time I will give you leave to sit by the fire, but food I have none, but I will give you a drop of coffee:" after some time it was very cold, and I said she might sleep with me, but she made such a noise in her sleep I could not let her remain; I then used to come down in the morning to let her in to light the fire; on Christmas-day I went out early to a marriage, I had put three shillings in my tea-canister the day before towards my rent; I did not return till early the next morning - the prisoner then came in very much in liquor - I said, "You had better lay down on the rug before the fire," and I covered her with my apron; I went to bed - when I awoke she was gone - I missed the fireirons and the tea-canister; I did not see her again till the Monday following, when I met her in the street, and said, "Tell me where my things are and I will redeem them;" she took me for a full hour up one street and down another, and said she had left them at an iron-shop for one shilling, and she would get them - she admitted she had taken them; I have found nothing except an apron, which she had on; I got an officer - she took him about for some time, and then he took her to Bow-street.

JOHN HANHAM. I am an officer. I took the prisoner - she said she had disposed of the fire-irons, but said nothing about the tea-canister; she told me of several shops, which I went to, but could not find them; I took this apron from the prisoner, which the prosecutrix claimed.

Prisoner's Defence. I know about the fire-irons, but I never touched any thing else.

GUILTY . Aged 43. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-123

357. ANN CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 watch, value 1l.; 2 seals, value 4s.; and 1 key, value 1s. , the goods of John Lindeman .

JOHN LINDEMAN. I am a sugar-baker , and live in Whitechapel. On the 27th of December I met the prisoner in Dock-street - I went to a house, and went to bed with her - my watch was then in my fob - I put my trousers in a chair; when I awoke between six and seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner was gone with my watch; this is the watch - I can swear to it; I gave her some money, but did not give her the watch.

JAMES FOGG. I am an officer. The landlady of the house, No. 6, Dock-street , told me that the man had lost his watch; I went with her to a house in Rosemary-lane, and found the prisoner with three or four men, drinking - the prosecutor said "That is the girl;" I said, "Where is the man's watch?" she said, "I don't know. I never saw the man;" I said, "You slept with him last night" - she denied it; I then searched her, and found this watch wrapped up in a handkerchief in her bosom; she then said some woman gave it to her.

ELIZABETH CRISPIN. This man and woman came to my house and had the lodging - the man paid 1s. for it; I afterwards found the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it me at seven o'clock on Saturday night, and told me to pawn it - he said he had no money; I said I would not, as he was drunk, and might make away with the duplicate; he might come on Monday and have it.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-124

358. ANN BASS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 4 handkerchiefs, value 6s. the goods of James Drew .

WILLIAM ASHTON. I am a Police-constable. The

prisoner was given into my charge on Saturday, the 2nd of January, for stealing a loaf of bread; I took her to the watch-house, and found on her two plumes of black feathers, and the next morning I found four handkerchiefs in a piece; she confessed she stole them from Mr. James Drew , who is a haberdasher in Bridge-street, and said she was in the habit of buying and selling such things.

JAMES STEPHENS . I live with Mr. James Drew . He had four handkerchiefs of this description - which were missed on the day in question.

Prisoner. I am a poor distressed woman, and throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 67.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300114-125

358. GEORGE DARBY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 2 coats, value 2l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 1l.; 5 shirts, value 5s., and 1 jacket, value 5s. , the goods of John Peacock Wood .

JOHN PEACOCK WOOD. I am a waterman . On the 17th of December my mother had taken the prisoner in out of charity, fed him, and lodged him; I lost my property, and found him at a public-house with my jacket - he said it was his own, and his father bought it for him six months ago, but his father died at Greenwich twelve months ago, with breaking a blood-vessel; I know it is mine by the buttons and a piece at the corner.

JANE WOOD. I am the prosecutor's mother, and took in the prisoner. This jacket is my son's - I have mended it many times. I am a widow. The other articles were taken from another room.

Prisoner. Q.You know you are only doing this out of spite, because my father owed you a little money? A. Yes, he owed me 4l. 10s., but I did not do this out of spite - I have had a very heavy loss by him.

JOHN ADAMS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and took this jacket off his back - he said it was his own.

Prisoner's Defence. If he says it is his jacket he says false - it is mine; I said my father bought it three years and a half ago.

GUILTY . Aged 19 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-126

359. ROBERT BURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 basket, value 6s., and 8 loaves of bread, value 6s. , the goods of John Thompson .

FRANCIS HISLOP. I am in the employ of Mr. John Thompson, a baker . On the 16th of December I was carrying out his basket of bread - the prisoner went with me during the day, and I left him in charge of the bread while I went, by his direction, to No. 5, Cadogan-place, to serve a customer - there was no such customer there, and when I returned to where I had left him, (opposite the Bedford Arms,) I missed him and the basket, with eight loaves in it.

ELIZA MILLER. I was looking out of a window on the 16th of December - I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor come up Cadogan-mews, and stop opposite the Bedford Arms; he left the prisoner with the baskets - the prisoner went part of the way up the street, and then returned; he took some bread out of the large basket, put it into the smaller one, and ran down the mews - the large basket remained on the barrow; when the prosecutor returned I told him what was done with the bread - he went after the prisoner, but could not find him.

THOMAS PHILIP SOURR. I took the prisoner on the 6th of January - I could not find him before; I found him in George-street, Whitechapel.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Chelsea to see some journeymen bakers - I met the prosecutor, and went round with him; we had a great deal of drink - I told him of a customer his master used to serve; I was going back and met a person I knew - I went with him, got intoxicated, and when I returned the basket was gone, and the prosecutor too.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-127

360. GEORGE HATTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 2 sheets, value 9s. , the goods of William Ridley .

SARAH RIDLEY . I am the wife of William Ridley, of Wilderness-row, Chelsea . The prisoner lodged in the one pair back room - he left me, without notice, on the 19th of December, and when I went to make the bed the sheets were gone - these are them.

JOHN SUTCLIFFE. I slept in the same bed with the prisoner - I left him between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and all was correct.

JOHN WHARTON. These sheets were pawned with me on the 19th of December, by the prisoner.

ISAAC FULLER. I took the prisoner on the same day, at a coffee-house, and found the duplicate on him.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300114-128

361. ANN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , I purse, value 1d., and 16s., the property of George Culham , from his person .

GEORGE CULHAM. I saw the prisoner on the 19th of December, in Osborne-street, Whitechapel: she invited me to go with her, but I refused, and kept straight on - when we got to Wentworth-street she closed on me, and shoved her hand into my trousers pocket; she drew out my purse- there were two more girls stood by; I could not see her hand in my pocket, but I felt it - they all closed round me and then ran down Wentworth-street; the prisoner was a-head - I followed her, and she went into a public-house; I went in, but could not see her, and was glad when I got out.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.What time was this? A. A few minutes after four o'clock in the afternoon on the Saturday, and she was taken on the Sunday; the two others were not in her company till I attempted to run, then they caught hold of my coat, and detained me - I felt a hand in my pocket; I had an umbrella in one of my hands - I called out that I was robbed, and Stop thief! and the other girls seized me: it had been in my right-hand pocket, and my right hand was at liberty; the prisoner was on my right side, and the other two behind- I had no opportunity of seizing her, but I felt the money rattle in my right-hand pocket; I had no thought I was going to be robbed, but I put my hand down, and found my pocket turned inside out - I certainly felt her hand in my pocket; I have never found my purse - I will not swear whether the prisoner went into the public-house or down an alley; I lost sight of her: there were 16s. or 18s.

in it; I had had it out at Mr. Ceal's, to pay for some tobacco; I had 24s. or 25s. when I was there - I had I lb. of tobacco, and had 16s. or 18s. left; I had not known the prisoner before - I was perfectly sober.

SAMUEL PRENDERGASS . I took the prisoner from information given at the office on Saturday night, by the prosecutor - I found her walking with two other girls, at half-past five o'clock the next evening; the prosecutor was with me, and immediately the prisoner saw him she turned her head - I took no notice of that, but brought all the three girls to the gas-light; the prosecutor pointed out the prisoner - she denied all knowledge of him or the robbery. GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-129

362. JAMES HUTCHINSON and SARAH EATON were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 loaf of bread, value 4d.; 8lbs. weight of potatoes, value 4d.; 4 ozs. weight of beef, value 2d.; 4ozs. weight of mutton, value 2d.; 1lb. weight of cheese, value 2d., and 1lb. weight of dripping, value 2d. , the goods of Joseph Dickinson .

JOSEPH DICKINSON . I live at Kilburn , and carry on business in town. On the morning of the 13th of December, about seven o'clock, a servant came to my bed-room, and said some men at the gate wanted to come in, and the cook , who was the female prisoner, would not let them in; I saw two or three Police-men, and Hutchinson with them -I had them let in; they brought this property with them - I could not swear to it, but my wife came down and said,"This is our property;" we called the cook up, and my wife asked her what she gave this out of the house for - she made no answer; Hutchinson was very abusive, and called Eaton his sister - she made no answer, I but cried, and appeared affected; he said the Police stopped him with the property, and I told the officer to take them both away; the next day I went before the Magistrate, and wished to drop the prosecution, but the Magistrate bound me over - Eaton had been a month in the place, and said she had no followers.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What office was it at? A.Marylebone, before Mr. Rawlinson - we had a six month's character with the woman - she was very much agitated; she hung her head, and would give no answer - the man was complaining of the Police-men

THOMAS YOUNG. I am a Police-constable. On the morning of the 13th of December I was in St. John's-wood-road, on a bit of waste ground, and saw Hutchinson with a basket; I asked what was in it - he said a gown and two petticoats, which belonged to his sister; I let him go, and in about an hour he came back - he saw me and my comrade: he called out, "I have a bigger load now than I had before: why don't you come now and search me?" I said, "We will search you," and we found the property stated in the basket - this was about two miles and a half from the prosecutor's; he then said these things were in the basket when I saw it first - I said, "You may as well tell me I am a liar at once;" he said, "You are. and a d-d liar" - we took him to the section-house, and then to the prosecutor; he told me at half-past five in the morning, when I first saw him, that he was going there, and that his sister lived there, and we went there with him about seven - I rang the bell, and Eaton came to the gate.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he called you to look into his basket? A. Yes; I should not have touched him if he had not called us - I have been in the army, but never went by any name but Young; I had met my comrade in the cross-road, but had not told him of this - we went together with the prisoner to the section-house: he carried the basket, and I took the prisoner - I told the serjeant this story, and asked him to go with us; I did not ask him for any thing to drink, nor did Staines, I swear; nor for any money for any drink, nor for 5s. - Staines did not ask him for money to let him go; I was in the 12th Royal Lancers - I did not know the male prisoner before; I never saw him to my knowledge - I was not with him that I know of; I did not know Staines abroad - he tells me he did belong to the 10th Hussars, but I did not know him.

THOMAS STAINES. On the morning of the 13th of December, I saw Hutchinson at the corner of Grove-end-road; he hailed my brother-officer, and said, "I have a heavier load than I had before, you had better come and search me" - he was standing still; I took up his basket, took it to the lamp, and saw what it was - he then abused us, and said he had it given him where he worked, and they had been in his cupboard for the rabbits; I said, "We had better take him to our place and let our serjeant see him; and while we were at the section-house he offered us gin, and we refused to take it - when the serjeant came, he said he had been to Kilburn-place to Mr. Dickinson's, to take some things to his sister; we asked him where he got the things in his basket - he said they were there before, and my comrade said they were not; he went with us to the place - he put his finger to the bell, and said, "This is the house;" Eaton came out, and said she would not open the gate, and she could not call Mr. Dickinson - I said I would call him if she would let me in; the other servant went to call him - Hutchinson was very abusive; he said he took these things to his sister, because she could not eat the bread in the house - I did not hear him say where he brought them from.

Cross-examined. Q. You never parted company with them? A.No; I heard all he said - I did not hear him mention any market where he bought the things; my comrade was present in the section-room when he offered us gin - he was quite a stranger to me - I did not know a man in the artillery of the name of Walker; I never went by that name - I went by the name of Payne in the 10th Hussars, because I ran away from my friends; I was in the artillery when a boy, by the name of Staines - my uncle bought me out; I was in Portugal in the 10th Hussars - I do not recollect a town there called Mellor; I was discharged on the reducement; I swear I did not know the prisoner in the army.

Hutchinson. Q. Were you never in Captain Blackwell's troop? A. No never in my life; I did not tell the other officer so.

Hutchinon. We were all killed but thirty-six men, and were obliged to borrow some men from other troops; and witness was one of them; he knew me, and I knew him well in 1811 and 1812. Witness. I never knew him in my life; I belonged to Captain Blackgrove's troop, and left in 1803 - I was only driver of the waggon - I did not know Corporal Batty.

Q. You say you went by the name of Payne in the

Hussars? A. I enlisted in 1802 in the artillery; I was then but thirteen years of age - I was there two years; in 1806 I enlisted in the Hussars in the name of Payne, and at the time his present Majesty was made Prince Regent, there was an order that every man should go by his right name, and I then took my name of Staines; I never went by any other names upon my oath.

COURT to THOMAS YOUNG. Q. Did this witness say any thing to you about being in the artillery? A. No; the prisoner did not appear to know Staines.

Hutchinson's Defence. When Young stopped me in St. John's-wood-road, he says it was half-past five o'clock, and I was not out of bed at that time; it was near eight when I saw him again - my evidence will prove where these things were got; I made my sister turn out her clothes, and the officer took them away; the prosecutor says he paid her wages to the officer - she has never had any thing, and would have perished if a friend had not lent her this cloak.

THOMAS STAINES. Her clothes are at the section-house.

Eaton's Defence. I sent for my wages and clothes, and my master sent word he had given them to the officer - I had been but a month in the house, and had given warning to leave; my mistress sent for me the morning afterwards to know if I would stop - I said No, she did not allow me common necessaries to cook with; she said I had not had an opportunity of knowing whether I liked her situation or not, would I stop another month I should not find a situation like hers in London.

JAMES ROBINSON . I know Hutchinson and his daughter. On the Saturday night I was at the Jolly Butchers, in Clare-market; I saw his daughter bring a basket with her marketing in there - there was some bread and cheese in it, and some of the men had some.

COURT. Q. You say she came in with some articles in a basket? A. Yes: all our hands were there - she took some bread and cheese out, and it was distributed among two or three men who ate some of it, and the rest was put back into the basket; I did not see whether there was a whole loaf in it.

MARTHA HUTCHINSON . I am Hutchinson's daughter. I was at the public-house, in Clare-market on the Saturday night - I had bought some meat, potatoes, cheese, dripping, and a little cake, in the market; my father and the men ate a piece of bread and cheese while I was in there - I was living with my father at the time: Eaton is my aunt - we have clothes washed for her, and they are sent to her; some things were sent that Sunday morning - my little marketing was left in the basket, and the clothes put on it.

COURT. Q. What was left in it? A. The bit of beef, dripping, potatoes, and bread - my father did not know they were in it till he got out into the street, and then he could not get in again - he used to take my aunt a little tea and sugar and her clothes, nothing else; I bought the dripping at a rag-shop, just going into the market - it was late when I got home, and we did not take the things out; I knew my father was to take the clothes - I do not know why my aunt is called Eaton; she is not married.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was there a woman of the name of White with you? A. Yes; she lodged in the same house with us, in Boswell-court - she is not here.

COURT to THOMAS YOUNG. Q. When you first saw the man with the basket did you take hold of it? A. Yes, and raised up the petticoats; there was some sugar and an apron, and nothing else - I can swear to that; when I took it again it was heavier than it was at first.

Hutchinson. Q. When you took it I said there were some clothes for my sister, and you were welcome look? A. I lifted up the petticoats, and saw the sugar and apron - there was nothing else I can swear; this is the basket; here is the dripping, the potatoes, and the cheese - this is the loaf, and I suppose this is the pan it was baked in; here are some pieces of bread.

MR. DICKINSON re-examined. Q. Do you know any thing of this pan? A. We have used it these twelve years - the cook baked that very loaf in it.

Hutchinson. That loaf my sister baked for me; my daughter was in the habit of putting things in the basket at night, because we are troubled with mice.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-130

363. ELIZA PROTHERO was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 watch-key, value 6s.; 1 sovereign, and 3 shillings, the property of James Havard , from his person .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES HAVARD. I am a carpenter , and live at Cockhill. On the 29th of December I went to a sale at the Two Mariners; while I was there the prisoner, whom I knew before, came over - the sale did not come on; I left at three o'clock, and went with the prisoner to No. 8, Vinegar-lane; I had been there many times before - I was not tipsy; I went with a young man who had been at the sale, and there were several persons there; we sent for some ale, and entered into conversation for the remainder of the afternoon - during that time the young man, the person who lived up stairs, the prisoner, and I got quite jolly: I went with the prisoner to another public-house, and in returning my foot stumbled, I fell, it being slippery, and knocked my head against the wall of the house - I then lost sight of the prisoner; I had been sitting on the sofa with her in the afternoon - she had been kissing me, and attempting to put her hand into my pocket; Richard Price, an acquaintance of mine, came up and helped me; the prisoner and I had been about one hundred or one hundred and fifty yards towards the Back-road - I had not my watch when I fell; I went with Price to the prisoner's house - she was not there, but another female was; in consequence of what the other female said, Price went out and returned with Mr. Fell - when they came, the prisoner came into the room and laid on the sofa - I was sitting by her; Price and Fell saw her hand in a situation it had been before -I did not see her do any thing; neither of them said any thing to her about my watch that I recollect - I was stunned by the blow; the officer has the watch.

COURT. Q. When did you see your watch before you lost it? A.About four o'clock; the prisoner was present then - I can swear that.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What are you? A. A carpenter. I knew the prisoner first in the middle

of 1825 - I was on the same terms with her that any man would be with a prostitute; I am married - my wife did not find out this till after I had the prisoner at thie Police-office - I told her of it myself; I had had some she rry and ale in the morning - I went with the prisoner about three o'clock - I saw Mr. Price about six o'clock; I was in a stupor from the fall - the liquor might have a little effect on me - I was not in a state of perfect drunkenness; what money I trusted the prisoner with I gave her - I never gave her a 10l. note - I never had one in her house in my life; I saw her perhaps six times in 1805, and not again for two years - I saw her perhaps six times afterwards; I did not find that she had got married - I had seen her the night before; I recollect having the watch, and missing it after I fell; I was at another house about one o'clock in the day, and a young man wound up my watch, as it was down, but that was not at the prisoner's - I took it out at her house to lend the young man my key; Price went for an officer, and I was sitting upright on the sofa when he came back; I did not speak to the prisoner - she was lying behind me; I had missed my watch and my money, and told Price who I suspected had taken it, and while he was gone, she came in, laid herself down, and was wanting to put her hand in my pocket; I was sitting by her when the officer came, but I was stunned; I was hardly capable of speaking - I do not recollect that I spoke to any one.

RICHARD PRICE. I am a builder, and live in Ratliff-highway, near Vinegar-lane. I found the prosecutor on the pavement and picked him up: he appeared to be quite stunned by the fall - he said he had lost his watch and money at No. 8, Vinegar-lane; I went there, but did not see the prisoner - I saw a female, and in consequence of what she said I went for an officer: I was sober - when I went out I saw Fell and his wife; I knew Fell and sent him for an officer - I went to the prisoner's house, and stood at the door till Fell and the watchman came; we then went into the parlour, and saw the prisoner lying at full length on the sofa behind the prosecutor, who was sitting up and appeared quite in a stupor: I did not hear any thing said to the prisoner by any one, but I gave charge of her to the watchman for robbing my friend of his watch and money- I am sure I mentioned the watch; the prisoner ran to the fire-place, took up the poker, and struck me in several places - she struck me in the small of the back with a three-legged stool, and followed me some distance out of the house; I did not hear her say any thing about the watch - she was taken by the watchman and some others to the watch-house - she might have said something about the watch without my hearing it, while she was hammering about me.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen the prosecutor before he was on the ground? A. No, not for several days- I did not consider him drunk; he told me very sensibly and clearly, that he had lost his watch - he was three or four yards from the door: I did not see that he was bleeding - when the watchman came the prosecutor was sitting on a sofa; he did not attempt to put his hand into the prisoner's bosom in my sight - I did not hear her say,"I have the man's watch, and I will give it to no one but him, when he is sober."

COURT. Q. Did he tell the same story he has to-day? A. Yes, it varies very little indeed.

ROBERT MANN FELL. I am a glazier. I was passing with my wife; Price came and spoke to me - I got a watchman, went to the house, and Price gave charge of the prisoner for taking the watch and money; she made no reply, but got the poker and began to hit Price - I heard her say out of doors, that she had the watch and would give it to no one but him.

Cross-examined Q.Then she did admit that she had it? A. Yes, in the street; I cannot say that she had been out of the house and returned - I cannot say she was sober.

WILLIAM SUMMERS. I am watch-house-keeper; the prisoner was brought in custody of the two last witnesses, and a watchman - the prosecutor was not there at the time; it was stated that she had robbed a gentleman of his watch and some money; I asked her for the watch - she said she had not got it, and should not give any answer; I went to search her, and from some part of her person she took the watch - I forced it out of her hand; I found on her 19s. in silver, and 4 1/2d. in copper - I was sober and am positive she denied having the watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Did either of the witnesses tell you she had acknowledged having it in the street? A. No; when I said, "I must search you, where is this watch?" she said, "I have got no watch;" she afterwards took it from some part of her person, and it was in her hand - Fell and Price both appeared in a state of alarm, and said they never saw such a violent woman.

MR. PHILLIPS to JAMES HAVARD. Q. What did you lose? A. A silver watch, a sovereign, and, I think, 3s., but I will not be positive - I told Price I had lost a watch and a sovereign.

Cross-examined. Q.You say there were several persons in the room? A. There was a woman who lodges there, Fletcher, a (man who associates with her) a young man who was in possession at the Two Mariners, the prisoner, and myself - none of them are here; I returned to the house after I missed the watch, and the prisoner was not there - I do not know whether she could have got rid of the watch; she had not been out of the house.

COURT. Q. Did the other woman tell you who had the watch? A. Yes; I would not bring such a woman as that here - her evidence would not be believed.

Prisoner's Defence. This gentleman gave his watch into my hand at three o'clock, to wind Mr. Fletcher's watch up, as it was down, and his own key would not do: he said, "This person drew up mine last night, and perhaps she can yours" - I bit the key and made it do; I returned the prosecutor his watch - my lodger then said, "Will you lend me 5s.?" he said, "I have but 3s., will that do?" she said No - he pulled out a sovereign; I went out, got change, and brought in half a gallon of ale, and 1s. worth of gin - they drank it, and then the others went up stairs; I was going out, and said to the prosecutor, "You had better give me your watch to take care of, I don't know who may come in;" he laid on the sofa, and my washerwoman put two pillows under his head - when I returned we drank again, and he asked me for the change; I said, "You slept with me last night, and I think there is not a great deal due to you" -I wanted him to go home to his wife, but he would not as he was jealous of the other man, and he said he would not do it - he knows he took me out of life, and first drew me

aside; I was acquainted with him four years before; I knew he had a wife - I then went to sea with a captain who was single; the prosecutor found me out twelve months afterwards, and used to come and drink with my husband, and told him I used to live with him - my husband got very suspicious of him, and used to ill-use me; I put my husband twice into the watch-house - I could not keep the prosecutor away; he dined with me on Christmas-day, and the next day he beckoned me over to the Two Mariners -I went there, and had a glass of brandy; then he came to my house, and drank till three o'clock - he gave me the watch and sovereign.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300114-131

364. THOMAS BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 23 yards of carpeting, value 3l. 9s. , the goods of William Rumney .

THOMAS ROGERS. I am warehouseman to Mr. William Rumney , of Long-acre . On the 24th of December I saw a man take part of a Brussels carpet from the lobby of the warehouse; I went out, but could not see him - I found this carpeting in a court about fifty yards from the house; the prisoner was brought in in about seven minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far within the premises was it? A. About five feet six inches.

THOMAS HATHAWAY . I keep a shop in the chandlery line. I saw the prisoner with this carpet on his shoulder on the 24th of December, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening - he threw it down; I showed the same carpet to Rogers, who took it up - I am certain the prisoner is the man; I followed him till the officer took him - I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is your shop? A. No. 3, Conduit-court, Long-acre. I was at my door, and called Stop thief!

JOHN RAWLEY . I heard Stop thief! called, saw the prisoner and the witness running after him - I took him back to the shop immediately.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-132

365. MARGARET SCULLY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 ring, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 8 shillings, and 4 sixpences, the property of Benjamin Staples , from his person .

BENJAMIN STAPLES. I met the prisoner on the 27th of November, at Mr. Holcroft's public-house; she came in there between one and two o'clock in the morning, with another person - I drank with them; I then went home with the prisoner to No. 5. Pheasant-buildings , and slept there - between nine and ten o'clock in the morning I awoke, and she was gone; I missed my money from the fob of my trousers, which I had kept on; I had a sovereign and 15s. in a purse in my trousers pocket - that was gone, and my handkerchief likewise, which had been in my hat; this is my watch.

Prisoner. I never saw the man in my life - he asked me at Bow-street if I knew him, and I said No; he then asked if I lived at such a place, and I said Yes. Witness. I am certain she is the person; I had had a little to drink, but not much.

EDWARD MARTIN . This watch was pawned with me by a person much stouter than the prisoner, as far as I recollect, on the 28th of November.

ELIZA THORNTON . I live where the prisoner does, and get my bread by needle-work. I was going down that night, and met the prosecutor, the prisoner, and Eliza Brown coming up with a light - Brown then went out, and they were quiet for some time; the prisoner has been there but a few weeks.

WILLIAM TILLING. I am a Police-officer. On the morning of the robbery I saw the prosecutor, the prisoner, and another young woman, against a coffee-stand in Holborn, about two o'clock; one of them got off the stool, and let the prosecutor into the mud; the prosecutor gave me notice of the robbery the next day - the prisoner has been in the habit of walking Holborn, but I missed her for a fortnight - when I saw her again I took her, and she denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. They are swearing false against me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-133

366. GEORGE HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 gander, value 10s. , the goods of Benjamin Dixon .

BENJAMIN DIXON . I live at Ealing . On the 6th of December my servant told me I had lost a gander - I had seen it safe that morning; this is it.

MARY BARNET . I am Dixon's servant. On the 6th of December, about half-past three o'clock, I was going to milk the cows, and saw the prisoner get over a gate into a field where this gander and a goose were; I went on, and got the milk; I heard the goose and gander make a noise - I ran to the gate, the prisoner got over, and I saw him driving them - I got over, and when I got to the corner of the hedge the goose was there, and the gander was gone; I saw the prisoner on the other side the hedge, with the gander under his arm; I said, "You good for nothing villian, I will follow you to the devil, while you have got my goose" - he then dropped it; it was alive, but it died soon after.

RICHARD STRONGITHARM . On the Sunday afternoon I heard the witness calling, and went up; the prisoner was running out of the field, where he had dropped the gander - he went down Ealing, and was taken the same evening; I am sure he is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not run - I had been under the doctor's hands for a fortnight, with a had foot.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-134

367. ELIZA JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 watch, value 15s., the goods of Samuel Parker , from his person .

SAMUEL PARKER . I am a soldier . On the 24th of December I was in Palmer's-village, Westminster , at a pub-house - the prisoner came in there between nine and ten o'clock; there were three more soldiers - a dispute took place about paying for beer; I went into the back yard for a necessary purpose, and they followed me - before I could button up my clothes I was knocked down several times, and then I missed my watch; the prisoner and the soldiers were then gone - this is my watch; I had seen it about an hour before, and felt it in my pocket while I was in the yard.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer of Queen-square. I received information on the 31st of December, and found the watch at Harrison's - I went and took the prisoner, and said I wanted her for a watch, and that a man was in Newgate for it; I said I should search her for the duplicate - she said I need not search, as it was burnt; I found no duplicate, except one for a petticoat - a bill was filed against Elder, a soldier, and the prisoner was a witness.

GEORGE KETTERER . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned by the prisoner, on the 26th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock.

MATILDA WELLS. I lived with the prisoner at No. 7, Old Pye-street; she came home on the evening of Christmas-day between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; she had this watch in her right-hand - she said the young man was fighting, and she went between them and drew him of his watch - she went out the next morning, and pawned it for 3s.; she bought the bonnet which she has here for 1s. 9d., and the other money she gave the officer.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me by one of the soldiers.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-135

368. DAVID LANGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 cheese, value 12s. , the goods of Thomas Davidge ; and that. at the Delivery of His Majesty's Gaol of Newgate, holden on Thursday, the 11th of June, in the 10th year of His Majesty's reign, he was convicted of felony.

THOMAS DAVIDGE . I am a cheesemonger , and live at No. 48, Minories . On the 14th of December I went to my tea at a quarter before six o'clock, and the cheeses were safe under my portico, on a pile up to the top of the doorway; I came from tea in about twenty minutes, and said to my shopman, "Richard, there is a cheese gone;" he had not missed it - this is the cheese; it has my mark on it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you know whether this cheese was on the pile? A. Yes - they were all marked No. 2, being of one particular dairy; I had sold some that day, but this is marked 24, which no other was - the shopman could not sell a whole cheese without my knowledge; there were eight of them, part of which I had put up.

JAMES FOGG. I saw the prisoner in Rosemary-lane, with the cheese, on the evening of the 14th of December; it was in a small green bag, on his head, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's - I asked where he got it; he hesitated some time, and then said two men gave it him at the corner of Four Awl-court, and I might go and see them - I put him into a shop, and handcuffed him; as we were going along he saw two men, and said, "They have just cut down the lane now;" he afterwards saw his brother, and told him to go with me and show me the persons, and said one of them was named Phillips; I went with his brother to the City of Carlisle public-house - he went in, and two young men ran out; one of them we took, but the other, whom he called Phillips, got away - when I had that young man before the Magistrate the prisoner said it was not him, but Phillips gave it him.

Prisoner's Defence. The young man gave it me to carry, and I was to have 6d. for it.

JOHN CUTHBERT . I produce a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner in June last - I know he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300114-136

369. JANE FAGERTY and MARY WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 watch, value 10s. , the goods of Timothy Hall ; and HENRY ROWE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

TIMOTHY HALL. I am a higgler , and live at Wisbeach. On the 8th of December I went to the Pavilion, in Whitechapel-road, with a friend; I had the head-ache, and did not like it - I went out, and was standing in the street - Fagerty came, and accosted me - we talked some time; Williams came up - they asked me for some gin, and we all went and had some; I then went to a house with the two women, and went into a room up stairs; I took out my watch, and locked at the time - it was past six o'clock - I gave them half a crown a piece, and then 1s. to get some gin, which Wiliams went for; Fagerty then kneeled before me, and we made an agreement; she took the watch from my pocket, but I did not see her do it; she had not been out of the room, but had gone to the door and come back - then I put my hand, and missed my watch; I said, "You have got my watch;" she began to cry, and the landlady came up - she asked her where the watch was, and took the candle to look on the bed; Fagerty said, "I took it from him, put it into my bosom, and gave it to Mary Williams - why did she go away and leave me; I will go and look for her;" I said,"I must take care of you - you shall not go till I have my watch;" I went down stairs to the people in the house - the landlady and I were going to look for Williams, we met Mr. Prendergrass - Fagerty said the same thing to him as she had to me; he took her - we went and found Williams, who took us into the room, and said to the landlady"If you will promise me three things, I will tell you where the watch is - if you will wish that you may never see your husband any more; that your house may be burnt to ashes, and that you may be burnt to brimstone, if you tell, I will tell you where the watch is - I took it, and gave it to Rowe"- we went and took Rowe; he swore in coming along, that he had it, but had not got it then - the watch has never been found; I went before the Magistrate the next day, and while I was in the public-house a rascally fellow came and spoke to me; I then went into the room to Rowe - he said, "I suppose you have lost your watch;" I said,"Yes, you know that as well as I do;" he said, "If you will go to such a house, I will treat you with a bottle of wine, and send for a man who will get the watch;" a man came showed me a duplicate, and said, "I have got the duplicate from Rowe;" it was pawned for 25s. - I went to White Horse-street, and saw it, but it was not my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.You went home with both these women? A. Yes, by their persuasion, but I did not see Rowe till after I had lost my watch.

SARAH EDWARDS. I keep the house to which these persons came; I let the room to Rowe and Williams, who live together as man and wife - I know Fagerty; I met her, Williams, and the prosecutor going in. as I was going out on the 8th of December; Fagerty said,******- and then Hall asked me to go and have some gin; I refused, but he forced me, and I did - I then went for some coffee and soap, and when I came back my husband said the girls had gone up stairs with a man; I went up -

Williams pushed me back, and went out; I afterwards heard Fagerty cry, and went up stairs - Fagerty said,"Williams has got the watch - I gave it her out of my bosom;" I told the prosecutor I would give him every assistance in my power - I heard Williams was gone to the Cross-keys, in Wentworth-street; we went there, but could not find Rowe - he was found opposite the Pavilion; I asked if he would give up the watch; he said he had got it, and intended to make good use of it, and he would not let it go - the prosecutor offered him four sovereigns for it; he said he would not let him have it by any means - the officer then took him to the watch-house; Williams said if I would swear by my husband's, and my own life, she would tell me where it was, that she gave it to Henry Rowe , and it was ten minutes past eight o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you married? A. Yes; my husband is a paper-hanger, and works at the East India warehouses - Rowe was found at the Three Ships, about half a mile from where I live; he had not been in my house that night - he did not say it had been in his hands for safe custody; he said he had made good use of it, and intended to keep it - I' gave my wedding-ring off my finger, and the certificate of my marriage to the prosecutor, because I was frightened that such a thing should happen in my house; I told him he should have the value of his watch - I was not with these women; he did not charge me with assisting them - I said I would see as far as the law would go for his watch - he did not say if he got his watch, he would not prosecute them; he said to Fagerty,"You own you had the watch, and gave it to Williams;" she said Yes - he said, "If you will give up the watch, I will give you four soverigns;" he did not say he would not hurt them.

Fagerty. That woman was with us, and told me, if I did not go and speak to the prosecutor, she would never let me into her house any more. Witness. It is false you may rely upon - Fagerty did not live in my house.

Williams. I took a room of this woman, as an unfortunate girl, and paid 7s. a week; I went out with her that night - this gentleman came out of the play-house - she went to a public-house, and treated us with a quarten of gin; the prosecutor came and spoke to Fagerty - she would not speak to him, and the witness said if she did not go and speak to the man, she would have her week's rent that she owed her; we then all went to the Royal Oak, and called for a pint of gin - the witness went up Whitechapel, and said "Take him home to your room, and I will be home directly;" she afterwards came home, and said, "Take him up stairs as your brother - I don't want my father and mother to know I keep a common house" - she kept Fagerty with her as a dress girl, to go and look for her living; the prosecutor sent me for two or three half-pints of gin, and while I was out I was taken. Witness. It is false.

Rowe. Q. Did not I drink gin with you that night? A. No.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . On the 8th of December I met the prosecutor with Fagerty, in Whitechapel-road; he gave charge of her, and said he had lost his watch - I asked what she had done with it; she said she took it, and gave it to Williams; I took her to the watch-house - Williams was brought in - I questioned her, and she said she gave it to Rowe; I went and found him at the Royal Oak, at half-past twelve o'clock; I said I took him for receiving a watch from a girl named Williams, knowing I to be stolen - he denied it entirely.

Rowe's Defence On the 8th of December I had been making a wager on a pony-match - I was going down the road, and met Edwards and the two prisoners; Edwards asked me to treat them - I said I had only five sovereigns to make the match good; she said she would stand treat -I then went on to the house where the pony was; I afterwards went to another house to a raffle, and the officer was one of the party; I then went to the Royal Oak - I had not been there half an hour before the witness came and said,"Give me the watch;" I said, "What watch?" she said,"You know;" the officer then came in, and said, "I take you as a receiver;" I said "I know nothing of it;" in going along the prosecutor came and said, "I will give you 5l. if you will give me my watch;" I said, "I know nothing of it;" he came to me the next morning, and said, "If you will give me the watch or the duplicate I will go away, so help me God;" I said, "I know nothing of it," and I was committed on the evidence of this woman saying she gave it me.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS re-examined. Q. How came you to take him? A.From Williams saying she gave him the watch.

FAGERTY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

ROWE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-137

370. CHARLOTTE ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 2 gowns, value 5s.; 1 cap, value 3s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 2s.; 1 pinafore, value 6d.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s. 6d., and 1 petticoat, value 6d. , the goods of George Taylor , her master.

HANNAH TAYLOR . I am the wife of George Taylor ; the prisoner was in our employ. On the 11th of December I left her in care of my children and property, at two o'clock, and did not come home till half-past nine in the evening - when I came home she was gone, and had left my children in the care of a woman on the first floor - the property stated was missing from the second floor front room; some had been in a cupboard, some in drawers, and under the bed - I saw the prisoner at the watch-house on the 13th.

JOHN BALLAM . I am a pawnbroker. I have some property pawned at six different times; this bed-gown for 6d. on the 30th of November, and this pinafore for 6d. on the 11th of December, I know were pawned by the prisoner; I cannot be positive about the others.

JAMES ROSS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a gown and cap, pawned by the prisoner on the 11th of December, about six o'clock in the evening.

SAMUEL CLEBERRY . I took up the prisoner by order of Mr. Taylor on the Sunday, at a quarter before four o'clock, I asked if she knew Mr. Taylor - she said Yes; I said I took her for robbing him - the duplicates were sent to Mr. Taylor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Taylor said if I would own

to it she would not appear against me - I asked her to lend me some money; she said she had not got it, but if I chose to pawn any thing I might - I left word where I was going to lodge.

MRS. TAYLOR. No, she never mentioned such a thing to me in my life.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-138

371. ANN CAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 milk-can, value 6d., the goods of William Waller , and 12 sixpences, the monies of Robert Hammond , from the person of Sarah Walter .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Sarah Waller , and stolen from her person.

SARAH WALLER . I am in the ninth year of my age -I know I must always speak the truth. My mother, Mary Waller, brought my breakfast in this can - we took our breakfast, and the 6s. were put into the can; the prisoner took it, and said she was going to take home a quart of milk for my mother - I began crying, and said she took my mother's money away; this was at the milk-house gate, in St. James'-park - a gentleman spoke to me, and he ran after her; a Police-man caught her - I did not see her stopped; a great crowd pursued her - I am quite sure she is the person who took the can, and the person who was stopped.

ROBERT PIERCY . I am a Police-officer. I was on duty in St. James'-park - I saw the crowd, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner at the head of the crowd with this can in her hand; this little girl said she had got her can and 6s. in it, all in sixpences.

MARY WALLER . It is my can, the prisoner sent the child for 6s. to the bake-house.

SARAH WALLER . The prisoner sent me to the baker's, Miss Hammonds, and to say my mother had sent me for 6s.; she gave it me, and the prisoner took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I spoke to this woman in the Park, and asked her for a lodging - she told me to come on the Monday; I did, and then she said she was going home to take a drop of coffee for her children - I went with her, and she left the can with them to get their breakfast; she then took me to a public-house; I said if she knew a man who could fetch my boxes, I should be glad - she sent one; I asked her for 6d. to pay him - she said, "I never lend money, ask my little girl to go to the baker's to borrow 6d.;" I went with the little girl, and stood outside till she went in to borrow the 6d. - she came out, and handed the can to me; I took it; she was frightened, and screamed - I was making all the haste I could, and heard the money rattle; I found there was 6s. 6d. in it - I put this money in my pocket, and went on; the Police-officer came up, and said I had robbed her.

MARY WALLER . I did not give her any authority to borrow any thing in my name.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-139

372. ROBERT RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 box, value 10s.; 1 cloak, value 1l.; 1 bonnet, value 5s.; 1 looking-glass, value 1s.; 2 spencers, value 1s. 6d.; 3 table-cloths, value 1s.; 2 work-boxes, value 6d., and 2 aprons, value 6d. , the goods of George Peach ; and JAMES FOX and JANE McCOY were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

GEORGE PEACH . I lost my wife's box full of wearing apparel from my house, in Little George-street , on Thursday week - I went out at half-past six o'clock, returned in half an hour, and it was gone; my wife is sick in the hospital - I know nothing of the female prisoner, but the man belonged to the same regiment as I do; I saw the property at Queen-square, the day after it was stolen.

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS . I lodge in the same house; Peach rents it - he came to me, and said it had been robbed; I went down, and got information that Richards had been there - I went in pursuit of him, and saw all the three prisoners on Westminster-bridge; McCoy had a bundle - I followed them to a pawnbroker's; McCoy went in, and the two men stood outside - I went in search of an officer, and gave them in charge; I kept my eye upon them all the time - the officer and I went to the shop, and found McCoy there pawning the property; we took them all to the watch-house, on a charge of robbing the house I lived in.

Richards. Q. What reason have you to think I stole the box? A. I got information that you had been there, and was seen with a box.

JOHN EDWARDS . I went to Waterloo-road watch-house on Thursday week, and received a key from the constable of the night, of the room in which this box was found - Jane McCoy lives in that room, as I was told.

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS . I went into the pawnbroker's, and saw the property which the pawnbroker was wrapping up; I knew part of it, which I had seen the prosecutor's wife wear - McCoy said nothing, but the pawnbroker said she had pawned it, and she did not deny it; neither of the men said any thing, but asked why they were taken.

GEORGE PEACH . I know this to be my box, and this is my wife's wearing apparel which was in it.

Richard's Defence. I have not been near the prosecutor's house for four months - I had borrowed some money of him; I had been out two nights, and the serjeant tried to take me - I flew from him, and lost my cap; I went over the bridge to a gin shop and borrowed a cap, and was going home when I met Fox, who said he was going back, and had been out one night; I said, "We will go back together," and the officer came and took us.

Fox's Defence. I had been absent one night; I came through Lambeth - I met Richards, who said he would go with me; the officer and Williams came and took us.

McCoy's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

McCOY - GUILTY. Aged 23.

Judgment Arrested .

RICHARDS and FOX - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-140

373. JANE RAWLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October . 9 spoons, value 3l. 6s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 8s.; 2 sheets. value 10s.; 2 table-cloths, value 4s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s. 6d.; 2 blankets, value 2s.; 1 table-cover, value 2s.; 1 rug, value 1s.; 1 saltcellar, value 6d.; 1 bed-wrench, value 1s.; 1 brass cock, value 1s., and 8 towels, value 5s. , the goods of Dougald Livingstone . her master; and RALPH RAWLINS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing their to have been stolen .

MARY LIVINGSTONE. I am the wife of Dougald Livingstone - he lives in Harford-square, Commercial-road . The female prisoner was in my service - she came on the 17th of October; I missed property, but did not suspect her - she staid with me six weeks; I found fault with her for going out and stopping late - she said if I did not allow her to go out she would leave me; I said she might, - she said she was going to Lady Montague, with whom she said she had lived - she then went away; I missed a number of articles, and suspected the milk woman, whom the prisoner used to speak a long while to in the morning - I told the woman not to come in the morning, but in the afternoon; on Christmas-day I had occasion for some silver spoons - I looked for them, and missed them; some metal ones were put in their place - the knives and forks were taken away; I had a faithful dog, and he was poisoned the day after she left my service - still I had no suspicion of her, but thought it was some person who had a design on the house; I afterwards found that she was married to the male prisoner - he was one night in my house, and when I went down in the kitchen she put him under the table; this is my property, and these are my spoons.

Cross-examined by MR. COLLIER. Q. You must have been very careless not to miss these things before she went away? A. I missed the tea-spoons and salt-spoons, but still I let her stay; I know my other things were safe when I missed the spoons - that was when I was packing up my clothes; I had a dozen and a half of white-handled knives, which I gave her to clean - I did not examine the articles when she came, and give them into her care; I missed the spoons within a week after she came.

MARGARET POTTLE . My husband is a bricklayer. I serve the prosecutor with milk, which the female prisoner used to take in; when I have knocked at the door I have seen this man come, and speak to her at the door - I once took a letter from her, and gave it to the landlady of the house where he lives; I forget when it was.

Cross-examined. Q. You know nothing about taking the things? A. No - I have seen the man go away, and take nothing with him.

SAMUEL WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. I have some tea-spoons, pawned by the male prisoner on the 31st of October, and this table-cloth was pawned with me, but I cannot say by whom.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know this man before? A. Yes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES LEA. I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 29th of December the prosecutrix came and told me what she had lost; I went to Phillips-street, but they had removed from there - I found them at a house in Anthony-street, St. George's; they were at dinner - the prosecutor said, "They are my spoons, knives and forks;" I found these other knives and forks in this leather, in a box which the male prisoner said was his - he gave me the key to open it, but it was open; I found several duplicates - here is one of this table-cloth, in the name of John Rawlins, and another of a bed-wrench, and a brass cock; I found this table-cloth under the bed up stairs, with the mark M. L., No. 3, upon it, which the prosecutor claimed - the man said his mother gave him that, and it was her mark; I found this salt-cellar there - the prisoner said she purchased some of these things in Rosemary-lane.

Cross-examined. Q. The man made no resistance? A. No - he did not oppose my searching.

HARRIET INCH . The two prisoners lived with me - they used to go out in the morning about five o'clock; I never opened the door to the man with any parcels - I heard him say he was for seven hours in the coal cellar at the prosecutor's; that the dog barked, and would have bit him, but they put him away.

Ralph Rawlins . Q.Did you not say before the Magistrate that I was in in good time every night? A. Yes, except that night you always was - I did not say I would tell Mrs. Livingstone you had property of her's; your father said you had, and was uneasy about it.

JANE RAWLINS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

RALPH RAWLINS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-141

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

374. MICHAEL CANNON and DANIEL THEOBALD were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 coat, value 7l. 7s. , the goods of James Herbert Willis .

JAMES HERBERT WILLIS . I lost my coat out of a buggy, which I gave Barber to hold in Tichbourne-street , about six o'clock in the evening of the 4th of December, while I was gone for about a quarter of an hour.

JAMES BARBER . I am servant to a surgeon. I was holding the gentleman's buggy, and there was a dark olive great coat in it - Theobald came up, and offered me 2d. for my chance of holding it; I gave it up to him, and went home - I had not known him before; I did not see the other prisoner.

WILLIAM LINCOLN . I was on duty. The prosecutor came and said he had lost his box coat out of his buggy, and he had the names of the two men who stole it - I went after them with one Gibson, who knew them, and we found them on the Monday, at a public-house; I asked Cannon what his name was - he told me some other name; I asked the other prisoner, and he said Theobald - I called in the landlord, and asked if he knew the other prisoner's name; he said, "Yes, Michael Cannon " - Gibson is not here: he stated he should receive 15s. from Cannon's father to be out of the way. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-142

375. JAMES HAWES and HENRY GLASSOP were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 5lbs. weight of beef, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Pluckrose .

HENRY PLUCKROSE . I am a butcher , and live in Brick-lane, Bethnal-green . On the 15th of December my man was gone backward to kill; I served a customer, and went to book the meat - I came out and missed a piece of beef; I called my man to mind the shop, and ran down Slater-street - I saw the two prisoners; Hawes had a bundle under his arm; I ran on the other side of the way, crossed, and met them - I laid my hand on Hawes, and said, "You have got a bit of meat of mine;" I called an officer, and gave him in charge - as soon as I had spoken to him Glassop ran off; I pursued him with Winter, and took him.

GEORGE SMITH . I was passing the street, and saw the two prisoners; Hawes had the bundle - the prosecutor

spoke to him, and called out, "Hold this one;" I took him into a house, while the prosecutor pursued Glassop; when they came back I opened the bundle, which contained a piece of beef, weighing about 6 lbs.

Hawes's Defence. On the 15th of December I went to my uncle's, who is ill; as I went up Slater-street a man came and asked if I would have a bit of meat - I said Yes; I was going up the street, and the prosecutor came and took me.

Glassop's Defence. The only reason I had for running away was, because I own I am not one of the best of characters - I had been up at Worship-street, and I thought I was known there.

HAWES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

GLASSOP - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-143

376. WILLIAM COCKRAN and MARY HOBBS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 pair of trousers, value 6s., and 1 waistcoat, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Nathan ; and MARY JACOBS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen ; and that, at the delivery of his Majesty's Gaol of Newgate, on Thursday, the 10th of September, in the ninth year of the reign of his present Majesty, the said William Cockran was convicted of felony.

HUMPHREY COHEN . I live three doors from Mr. Nathan's shop on the other side of the way - his house is at the corner of Tylor's-court . On the 8th of December I was going through Tylor's-court, to go home, and when I got within a yard or two of the end, I heard Hobbs say,"Not yet," which induced me to think something was going on; when I got to the end of the court, into Berwick-street, I turned. and saw Cockran in company with another man taller than himself - I went on to my own house, and saw Cockran with his hands up against the prosecutor's window; the other man pulled down something, and they went off together - Hobbs was not more than three yards from them; when they got to the end of the court, they said to Hobbs, who followed them, "You stop here" - I walked after them, to see if I could see a Police-man; I heard Hobbs say, "Don't be long" - the two men then went to Jacob's shop; I stopped outside, and saw them show her a pair of trousers, which she appeared to purchase, as I saw some money pass - I went on, and saw a Police-serjeant; we went to Jacob's shop, and knocked two or three times, but could not get in - when we got in we found Hobbs there with them; I said."These are the two men who took the trousers, and Mrs. Jacobs, you have bought them" - I saw the tall man shuffling off to the back of the shop, and I said to the Police-man, "Do your duty;" he said, "Go to our station for some of our men" - I went, and there were none there.

Cockran. Q.Did not you say it was the shortest man took the trousers, and ran into the shop? A. Yes, and I say so now.

EDWARD HEDGES. I am a Police-serjeant. Cohen fetched me to the shop; I found Cockran, Hobbs, and Mrs. Jacobs: I took them, the trousers, and the money, three half-crowns, a sixpence, and 2 1/2d., to the office - the waistcoat has not been found.

SAMUEL NATHAN . These are my trousers, and were taken from my shop.

Cockran's Defence. I have been keeping company with this young woman for twelve months; I called and asked her to go to buy a shirt at Jacobs' - when I got there a short man in a dark coat was in the shop; I asked for the shirt, and she showed me one; while I was there they came and knocked at the door; the other man rushed out at the back of the house, and the officer said, "You are my prisoner;" I said, "What for?" he said, "You have sold a pair of trousers;" I said I had not; I gave the shirt back, and would not have it then.

Hobbs' Defence. This man asked me to go with him, and the officer came and took us.

JOHN HAGGERSTONE . I am an officer. I produce a certificate of the conviction of William Cockran, on the 10th of September, in the 10th year of His Majesty's reign, by the name of William Cox, for stealing a set of fire-irons - he was sentenced to six weeks' imprisonment in the House of Correction - I took him, and know he is the man.

COCHRAN - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

HOBBS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

JACOBS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-144

377. JOHN AVERY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of James Mumford Barr .

JAMES MUMFORD BARR . I live in Suffolk-street, Stepney . On the 4th of January the prisoner came to my place - my wife was putting the children to bed at a quarter past seven o'clock; I asked him to fetch me something, which he did, and sat some time; when he went outside I heard him knock at the side of the boards, and at that time he was shifting off my coat to take it away; I missed the coat about two minutes after he was gone - no one else came into the room; I took him on the Wednesday - this was on the Monday; he gave me a direction, but he had not lived at that place - he is a cow-man; I told Mr. Lea of it, and said there was a button with the shank off in the pocket of the coat - I knew the prisoner before.

JAMES LEA . I took the prisoner, and found this button in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. This man bought two pigs; I went on that morning to ask if he was going to kill a pig; there was a man there with two bottles of rum, whether he got them honestly or not I do not know - I staid some time, and when I went away, the girl was out on an errand; at the first examination he stated the gates were instantly closed, and on the second examination he said they were left open five or ten minutes - he said the watchman saw me with the coat, and it was put off to bring the watchman - he came, and they would not take his evidence; I moved some things some time ago, and this button was among the little things I moved.

JAMES MUMFORD BARR. This button slipped off my coat one day in my cart, and I put it into my right-hand pocket.

JURY. Q.Was there a man with two bottles of rum there when the prisoner was there? A. No, he was gone; I saw the coat after that man was gone - here is another button which belonged to my coat.

Q.Had you any other coat that had this description of buttons? A. No; this other button fell off at another time - they are but common buttons.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-145

378. WILLIAM BURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , 5 silver spoons, value 30s. , the goods of William Paynter .

THOMAS YOUNG SMITH. I am a private watchman. -On the 24th of December, at two o'clock in the morning, I fell in with the prisoner, as I was on duty at Kensington, near the gate - he set his dog at mine; I collared him, and asked who he was, and what he did it for; he said he was a gentleman - I said, "I will see who you are;" I took him to the turnpike-house - I found five spoons on him, which were broken, and the crest broken off; I put him into the watch-house.

WILLIAM BENNETT. I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I searched him, and found a number of duplicates - I asked where he got the spoons, and he told me where he had stolen them.

WILLIAM MABBETT. I am footman to Mr. William Paynter, of No. 4, Cornwall-terrace, Regent's-park . The prisoner was an acquaintance of mine, and was visiting me there on the 23rd of December - he left a little before eleven o'clock; he was in the pantry, where these spoons had been kept - they are five dessert-spoons.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-146

355. JAMES BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 13lbs. weight of pork, value 6s. , the goods of William Miller .

SAMUEL MILLER. I work for William Miller , a butcher , of Union-street East, Spitalfields . On the 5th of December I saw the prisoner near his shop for about half an hour- I saw him taken a side of pork from the door, put it on his shoulder, and walk away; I caught hold of him, and called my master - he came, and the prisoner hung the pork up again; he had taken it two or three yards from the door.

WILLIAM MILLER . It was my pork - I was at home; Miller called me, and I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. It hung two or three yards from the door; there was a mob, and I was pushed against it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Weeks , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18300114-147

380. ANN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 1 tea-kettle, value 2s. , the goods of Barnard Riley .

CHRISTIAN MARIA SPEED. I live opposite Mr. Riley, in Orchard-street . On the 12th of December I saw the prisoner take a kettle from his house, and gave the alarm; I am sure she is the person.

BARNARD CLARK . This witness gave the alarm; I followed, and took the prisoner with this kettle.

BARNARD RILEY. This is my kettle, and was in my back yard - the passage door is sometimes open; I know nothing of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-148

381. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 3 pairs of trousers, value 14s. , the goods of Samuel Nathan .

SAMUEL NATHAN . I keep a sale-shop . On the 7th of January some clothes hung just inside my door; the prisoner was walking by my window for full a quarter of an hour, and two others with him - my wife was taken very ill; I ran into the back place, and when I came back I saw the prisoner with his hand on the trousers - I ran after him, and two doors off he gave them to another person; I followed, and he ran up a court which was no thoroughfare - he turned, walked back, and I took him; I have never seen the trousers since.

THOMAS GOOK. I am a constable. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he suspected me of being one of the party, and the constable said that would not do, he must commit me on a charge of felony - the next day he said I took them, but before he had never said such a word - he said if I would produce them he would not prosecute me.

JURY to S. NATHAN. Q. Are you positive he is the man? A. Yes; the conversation he has stated did not take place.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-149

382. MICHAEL CARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of December , 26lb. weight of nails, value 7s.; 18 dozen of screws, value 3s.; 20 pieces of wood, value 7s., and 1 gimblet, value 2d. , the goods of James Pringle .

JAMES TERRY. I am a patrol. On the 22nd of December, in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Cow-cross; he went into two marine-store shops, and as he came out of the second I took him, and asked what he had got - he said Nothing; he then said, "A few nails" - I found 10lbs. of nails on him; the next day I searched his lodging, at King's-road, St. Pancras, and found 16lbs. of nails and eighteen dozen of screws.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Were you the first who spoke to him, and asked the name of his employer? A. The constable did in my presence; he stated who he worked for, and where he lived.

JOHN MILLER. I was watch-house keeper; I searched the prisoner, and took the basket from him with these 10lbs. of nails in it - I searched his lodgings, and found a gimblet, a quantity of wood, these nails and screws.

Cross-examined. Q.How did you find his lodging? A. He gave me his address.

JAMES PRINGLE . I am a builder ; the prisoner was in my employ - I could not swear to these nails; the wood is my property - here are a variety of mouldings; I can produce the plane that made them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the plane make these mouldings? A. I saw the man at work on them.

WILLIAM PRINGLE . I know these mouldings; I wrought them - I can swear to my own work; I left them on my bench at the prosecutor's premises.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any private mark on them? A. No; this is not a common moulding - I will not swear there are not thousands of these in London, but I do not think there are; I never saw one similar to this - Mr. Pringle gave me a drawing for it, and the plane was made according to it; it is his own invention.

JONATHAN PEARSON . I live with Messrs. Pearsons, ironmongers; we supply Mr. Pringle with nails - these nails are done up in paper, which were supplied from our shop,

but whether to Mr. Pringle or not, I cannot say; he had nails similar to these a short time before the prisoner was taken - here is my writing on the paper.

Cross-examined. Q.How many thousand papers have you sent out with the same marks on them? A. A great many.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-150

383. CATHERINE DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December . 3lbs. weight of pork, value 15d., and 1lb. weight of cheese, value 6d. , the goods of John Heathwaite .

JOHN HEATHWAITE. I am a cheesemonger . The prisoner came to our shop, and I saw this property under her cloak; I accused her with it, and she said she had taken it- she had not offered to buy any thing; she has four children, and I wish to recommend her to mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18300114-151

384. MARY DOWNS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 sheet, value 4s. , the goods of Alexander Smith .

SARAH SMITH. I am the wife of Alexander Smith ; he lives in Portpool-lane - I let the prisoner a furnished room at 3s. 6d. a week; she lived there for three weeks - this sheet was a part of the furniture; I went up to ask for my rent, and missed it - I asked where it was; she gave me no answer - I gave charge of her, and found it at a pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM TRANAH. I live with a pawnbroker. I took in this sheet from a woman - I cannot say who.

GEORGE OSBORNE. I took the prisoner; she said she had pawned the sheet, was in great distress, and had no food that day.

Prisoner's Defence. It was distress; I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 44. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-152

385. JEREMIAH EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 3 quarts of wine, value 10s., and 3 bottles, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Want .

DANIEL GRADY. I am waiter at Mr. Want's, the Crown and Thistle, in Chandos-street . On the 14th of December, about eight o'clock, I went out for about twenty minutes; when I returned, the bar-maid said there was some rum wanted - I took a candle and the key, and went down to the cellar: I found the hasp had been forced off the door; I went in the first cellar, but saw no one, but in the vault under the street I saw the prisoner doubled up in a corner; I put my hand on him, and said, "You d-d blackguard, I know you well," which I did, from his having been at work opposite; I saw a bottle of wine in his trousers, and said,"You are very bulky" - he then took out two more bottles of wine from his pockets; I told him to go before me out of the cellar, and when he got up, I pushed him into the yard, and called the Police-men; they searched, and said he was gone - I said, he could not get away, he must be in the next yard; the officer got over the wall and found him - I found eight more bottles in the yard, which he had put the e before.

WILLIAM LILLY WHITE. I am a Police-constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - he was rescued from me by some persons outside, but I took him again and he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been there, and had three or four half pints of gin; I went home to my tea, and then went back to bid my friends good night - I was running home, and the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-153

386. ANDREW GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 hat, value 7s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Green Phillips .

THOMAS GREEN PHILLIPS. I am a hatter , and live in the Hackney-road . I lost this hat on the 24th of December, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, but did not see it taken; I am sure I had not sold it.

SAMUEL TAYLOR. I am an officer. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house on another charge; I saw he had a new hat on, and he dropped an old one by his side - I saw the new hat did not fit him; I inquired, and found the prosecutor had lost one - I took it to him, and he claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in Shoreditch.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-154

387. DANIEL GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 muff, value 45s. , the goods of Richard Payze .

RICHARD PAYZE. I live at Laytonstone. I came to town on the 4th of January, and went to Drury-lane with my daughter - I had a box with a muff and tippet in it in my cart, and a sack covered over it; I returned to Bow , looked, and saw it was all safe - I went to a friend's house, and when I got into the cart again I saw the sack had been moved - I got home to Laytonstone at half-past seven o'clock; I looked into the box, and the muff was gone.

MARIA PAYZE . I was with my father on that Monday - I know the muff and box were safe; when we got home the muff was gone - I saw it at Worship-street on the Saturday.

WILLIAM DAVIS. I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 4th of January I was about half a mile on this side Bow, at a quarter before six o'clock - I met the prisoner coming towards town, carrying this muff tied up in a handkerchief, doubled up in his right hand; as he passed he shifted it to his left hand, and brought it before him - I stepped back, and asked where he got it - he said it belonged to his aunt; I did not believe him, and took him into custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young woman asked me if I was going to town; I said Yes, and she asked me to carry the parcel for her - I did not say it was my aunt's.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-155

388. CATHERINE GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Frederick Norrington .

ANN TERRY. I am in the service of Mr. Frederick Norrington . On the 19th of December, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I had occasion to leave the street door open - I did not go out of the house, but to the end of the passage: I returned in a minute, and met the prisoner at the parlour door, with my master's coat under his arm, which had been in the parlour - she ran away, and I

could not stop her as I had something in my hand; I ran up the street after her - she threw the coat on the rails; she did not get out of my sight - she was taken in Arling-street.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you servant at the house? A. Yes; I saw the coat under her arm; it had been on the counter in the parlour - my master called me to let the dustmen in; the dustmen were two doors off taking the dust from another house.

CHARLES JAMES LLOYD. I live two or three doors from the prosecutor's. I saw the witness running after the prisoner - the coat was on the railings, which the prisoner had run by.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you before the Magistrate? A. Yes; I did not say I saw the coat on the ground.

JOHN CHARLES RAY. I saw the prisoner running, and stopped her.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was that from the prosecutor's? A.About a quarter of a mile - there were about three turnings; the witness was behind her all the way - she could not be out of her sight.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going as far as the City-road, and this young woman came and accused me - they found nothing on me; they let me go - I got half way up the street, and the man came after me and said there was a coat missing - it was near an hour before the coat was produced; I was not near the house till the servant took me there.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-156

389. HENRY HAINES and WILLIAM WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 candlestick, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Oakley .

JOHN OAKLEY. I live in St. Martin's-street, Leicester-square - the two prisoners hired a back garret, and were to pay me the rent; they were there eight days, and left without paying or giving notice - I missed several articles - this candlestick was one.

SAMUEL LEWIS. I am a pawnbroker. I took in this candlestick from Haines.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT ENNEVER. I took the two prisoners this day week - I found twenty duplicates on Williams; one was for this candlestick.

HAINES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18300114-157

390. HENRY HAINES and WILLIAM WILLIAMS were again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 1 pillow, value 2s. , the goods of Sarah Broathwick .

SARAH BROATHWICK. On the 8th or 9th of January the two prisoners came to my house, and one of them took a lodging of me by the week; they only staid one night, and went away without paying - I missed a pillow.

BENJAMIN SMITH. I am pawnbroker. I have a pillow pawned by Haines on the 9th of January.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT ENNEVER. I found the duplicate of this pillow on Williams.

Williams' Defence. Neither of them were pawned with an intention to defraud, but to replace them - we did not intend to go away; - we were out but one hour when the officer took us.

HAINES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-158

391. RICHARD HUTCHINS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 2 pairs of clogs, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Dutton .

JOHN LOADER. I live with Mr. Thomas Dutton , in Chapel-street, Edgware-road . On the 10th of December, towards dusk, I was engaged with a customer, and the prisoner stooped down and took two pairs of clogs: the officer brought him in with them.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON. I am a Bow-street patrol On the 10th of December I saw the prisoner and another boy near the door; I saw the prisoner take something from the shop, and show it to Langshaw the other boy; I caught the prisoner, and he dropped these clogs in the kennel.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. About half-past five o'clock I was going down Chapel-street; I ran up against a young man, and this gentleman took me, pulled me into the road, and took up the clogs.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-159

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

392. EDWARD SHORT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Christopher Leman , and stealing 3 aprons, value 1s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 yard of calico, value 6d.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d.; 2 stockings, value 6d.; 2 sheets, value 3s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 9d. , the goods of Henry Brown .

JAMES CHRISTOPHER LEMAN . I keep the Swan public-house, Swan-street, Bethnal-green . On the 17th of December, John Brown, my servant, came up - I went down stairs and found the prisoner in the wash-house with the officer; his clothes were very wet - the staple had been drawn out of the wash-house door-post.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is there not a privy just by the wash-house? A. Yes: persons have access to it - there were fourteen or fifteen people in the tap-room.

JOHN BROWN. I live at Mr. Leman's. I went down at half-past ten o'clock and found the prisoner in the middle of the wash-house, near the water-butt; he said he thought it was the privy - I saw him drop a piece of calico and a pillow-case, and found near him a neckerchief and a waistcoat; they had been taken off a horse - I am sure I saw him drop the calico and pillow-case which had been in the copper; I was in the wash-house at seven o'clock, it was then all safe.

Cross-examined. Q. For three hours and a half you had not been there? A. No; I had been at home all the time, and saw the prisoner in the house; he asked me for some paper to go down stairs - I do not know that he had ever been to the privy before; it is on the left hand and the wash-house on the right - there was no light below;

persons do not go to the water-closet without leave: he had not been down above ten minutes - I saw him come in at half-past ten.

JOSEPH MOBBS. I am an officer. I was fetched, and found the prisoner in the wash-house; he said he had come to the privy - his left-hand trouser's pocket, his right coat pocket, the front of his shirt, and crown of his hat were wet; I found nothing on him.

Cross-examined. Q. No. instrument of house-breaking? A. No: he had a knife.

SARAH BROWN. I am the wife of Henry Brown. Not having a copper, I wash at Leman's; I left the wash-house at five o'clock, and all this property wet in the copper - here is a bit of calico, a pillow-case, handkerchief, and waistcoat: I also lost two sheets, two pillow-cases, three aprons, and other things which have not been found.

JOHN BROWN. I had a candle in my hand when I opened the wash-house door; there was no light there - the door was shut. NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice James Parke .

Reference Number: t18300114-160

393. JAMES FIELD was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Edward Card , on the 25th of December , with intent to steal .

EDWARD CARD . I live in Brunswick-street, Hackney-road . On Christmas-day I left home at two o'clock, and saw my wife lock the door; I saw that it was fast - we left nobody in the house; I went home about eight, in consequence of an alarm, and met the prisoner in custody, about fifty yards from my house - I went with him to the watch-house; a purse with 2l. 6s. 9d. was found on him; I then went home and found three drawers broken open in the front parlour - the lock of the front room door was strained so that it would not catch; I missed nothing - I had sent my son and nephew home about five o'clock; and my two sons again about half-past seven.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your wife here? A. No; she got home before me, as I went to the watch-house - I had left her in New-street, where we had been; she was dressing to follow me - I found the teacaddy with the sugar-basin broken to pieces.

WILLIAM CARD . My father sent me and my cousin Galliers home about five o'clock; I found the house safe- we unlocked the street door - the front parlour door was locked; I saw my cousin fasten the window-shutter and window - we left a rushlight in the room; I saw him lock the outer and inner doors and tried both to see they were fast; the front door was double-locked - we took the keys to my mother; I returned about eight o'clock with my brother - we took the keys; I looked through a crack in the shutter and could not distinguish the light - I heard something fall in the front parlour; I went next door but one, and got Mr. Hopley - he opened the street door with the key, and I saw two men rush out of the parlour into the passage; we shut the door - they pulled inside, but we kept it too; I placed myself by the front window and saw two men open the shutters and jump out, one directly after the other - there is a gas-light opposite; the first man was shortish, in a dark great coat and blue trousers, and a black hat - the other was taller, and in dark clothes; he had on a tail coat - they ran together, but one left the other when they got a little up the street; I called Stop thief, and stood by the window, and in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes the patrols brought the prisoner into our parlour; he had on a dark great coat, blue trousers, and a hat covered with snow - he is a short stout man, and the same size as the one who first came out of the window; I believe him to be the man by his dress.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate you could not say it was a black hat? A. Not to my recollection; I might have said so as I was frightened - the snow laid on the ground.

WILLIAM GALLIERS. On Christmas-day, about five o'clock, I went to the house with my cousin; I fastened the window and shutters, locked the parlour, and double locked the street door - I left a light there, and gave the keys to Mrs. Card.

WILLIAM HOPLEY . On Christmas-night, a little before eight o'clock, William Card applied to me; I went with him - the street door was singly locked; I put the key in, turned the lock, pushed it open a little way, and felt somebody pulling within - I closed the door, called Watch! and heard a noise, as if they were getting out the backway; I then heard a noise in the front room - the shutter opened, and two men came out nearly together, and both ran down the street, towards the gas-light; I saw one had a dark great coat flying open - he was about five feet four inches high, and appeared rather stout in his great coat - it was a rough great coat; the other had no great coat, and I think was a little taller - I kept calling Watch! as I ran, and about fifty yards from the house, I saw Fry, the beadle; he turned up Kent-street with me - they were then running along Kent-street; we there lost one, and the other in the great coat turned down Cumberland-street - I lost sight of him for a second or two in turning the corner, but there was nobody else in the street - I was within five or six yards of him; when he turned Cumberland-street he had no hat on, which he had when he left Brunswick-street - I pursued him about one hundred yards down Cumberland-street, and he leaped into a hollow space, left for some houses; I left him there, and left Fry going into the hollow, with the hat in his hand, with two patrols, who came up; I returned to Card's house - he had not got home; two or three doors appeared to have been broken open, apparently by a chisel; a tea-caddy lay on the floor, with the glass broken - I had heard a smash; I went home, and saw a mob coming up Kent-street, with the prisoner in custody: he had a dark drab great coat on, but no hat; it was a coat of the same description as the man I pursued wore - I saw it as I passed the gas-light; I conclude he was the man from every circumstance - there was a gas-light between twenty and thirty yards from the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it chiefly from the colour of his coat you speak to him? A. No; the great coat was something of an olive brown - I lost sight of him momentarily at two corners, and in the vacant space, which is no thoroughfare.

GEORGE FRY. I am beadle of Shoreditch. I was in Brunswick-street, thirty or forty yards from Card's house a little before eight o'clock, heard an alarm of thieves, and observed two men come out of Card's house, but could not see from what part, one was dressed in a great coat - he ran on the same side as the house (I think the other had a small body coat); I tried to catch the other, but missed my hold, and crossing the field opposite Haggerstone church, where there is a little cut, near the end of

Kent-street, the one in the great coat fell down - his hat came off - I picked it up; the snow was about five inches deep on the ground - I did not notice whether there was snow on the hat; I kept four or five yards from that man all the way - he went along Kent-street and turned down Cumberland-street; I lost sight of him for a minute as he turned the corner - he turned the corner of a vacant space, and I lost him; I went into that space - there is a rough sort of paling there, at the side of some gardens; I heard a crack like the palings cracking - I saw two patrols coming in the same direction; they came down to the space - Taylor looked over the paling and said something; I then looked over the paling and saw the man in the great coat laying down inside the paling - he got up out of the corner and sidled to a wash-house, then made his way over the next garden paling; I left the patrols to guard that end, and went through a private house at the end, about fifteen houses off, and afterwards found the prisoner in custody - he had the same sort of dress as the man I pursued; I think he had a hat on then - I gave Roberts the hat I picked up before I saw the prisoner with a hat on; I will not swear he is the man, but he is the same size; I observed at the watch-house that his trousers were torn across the left thigh - they were a dark colour; I saw his hat took off at the watch-house, and knew it to be the one I picked up, by the string which confines the leather being out of the loops - I had observed that when I picked it up - there were twelve or fourteen loops out; I looked at it in the garden when I had a lantern lent me; I observed snow on it as we went to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. How often did you lose sight of him? A.Twice. There was 2l. 6s. 6d. found on him at the watch-house, which was returned him; I consider him the man by the colour of his body-coat, I took it to be a dark olive - his great coat was unbuttoned.

ROBERT TAYLOR . I am a patrol. I was on duty in Kingsland-road, and heard an alarm given towards the new church at Haggerstone, which is near Card's house; I saw Price run across the fields into Cumberland-street, and saw Fry with a hat in his hand near the vacant space, which he directed my attention to; he was not above four yards from that space - I looked over the pales there, and told Fry that I saw a man - he was laying down, with his face to the ground; he got up as I went over the pales, and got over the pales of the next garden - he had a dark great coat and no hat on; he went over into several gardens - the pales were low enough for me to keep him in sight; I followed, but lost sight of him as he turned to the left in one garden - I looked about there, and saw him laying flat on the tiles of a wash-house in that garden, with his face towards the tiles; I ordered him down, and he came - he had no hat, a dark great coat, and trousers torn at the left thigh; Roberts, the patrol, was there, and gave him a hat, which he put on - it appeared to fit him; the prosecutor's drawers appeared to have been broken open by a flat instrument, about an inch wide - a chisel would have made such marks.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any instrument found on him? A. No, nor on the tiles. I only lost sight of him once, that was in the garden I took him out of.

THOMAS PRICE . I am a patrol. I was on duty, heard an alarm, and went with Taylor into Cumberland-street; I saw Fry with a hat; by his direction I went to the left of the vacant ground, through a private house, with him, into the garden. where I saw the prisoner taken on the wash-house, without his hat; we told him to come down - he said he would, for he was innocent; I heard no question put to him to make him say so.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a patrol. I received a hat from Fry - I put it on the prisoner's head, but did not observe whether it fitted.

WILLIAM HALL. I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and found nothing but 2l. 6s. 9d. in a purse - he refused to tell his name; I have a hat which I received from Roberts; it snowed the day after Christmas-day.

GEORGE FRY . This is the hat I picked up; I know it by the string being out of the loops.

JOHN PULLEN . I live in Cumberland-street. On the Monday after Christmas-day, about half-past two o'clock, I found under the snow opposite the Duke of Clarence, which is between the vacant space and Cumberland-street, seven skeleton-keys, in a glove - they were at the side of the channel in the street, two or three inches deep in the snow - it lay loose on them, not pressed down; the track of a cart wheel went right over them - I saw the top of one key sticking out; there were two loose - one of them was broken, and the piece was at the bottom of the glove.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not this a public street? A. Yes; there are not many people go up it.

JOHN TOLLIS . I went to Pullen's house, and received six skeleton-keys and a broken one - I have only part of the broken key; I tried one of them to the prosecutor's parlour door, and it opened it - the key has a spring lock; I tried the broken key in the front door, but cannot swear it would open it without having the broken part - there is no other that would.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the Duke of Clarence? A. Yes, it has not been opened a year.

The prisoner put in a writen Defence, stating, that being intoxicated, he met a female at a public-house, and accompanied her to the back of Brunswick-street, where they had a dispute about 1s.; that a man and woman passed them, and the woman called out that she would tell his wife of him; the girl charged him with robbing her, and as he was running home, he heard an alarm of Stop thief! and thinking it was raised by the girl, he got over into the gardens, where he was taken.

LYDIA HILL. I am the wife of Frederick Hill - we live in Whitmore-buildings, Hoxton. On Christmas-night I went home with a female friend; George Sutton accompanied me back - he is now at Oxford; I know the prisoner by dealing at his wife's shop - she sells pigs' cheeks; I saw him at the corner of Brunswick-street with a female, at ten minutes to eight o'clock, as near as I can tell, and as I passed I said "Field, I will tell your wife;" he made no answer - I heard the female say, "You have it;" I do not know what she alluded to - I went home.

COURT. Q. Did the female speak in a loud tone? A. Yes. They were at the corner of Brunswick-street; the prisoner had a dark great coat on - I only guess the time NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-161

First London Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

394. CHARLES JOSEPH PERRY was indicted for wilful murder .

ELIZABETH BLAGG . The prisoner and I have lived together

for eight years: we lodged in St. John's-court - the decaesed child was twelve months old: its name was Joseph - it was mine; he is the father - we have two more. On Sunday evening, about six o'clock, we were both very much intoxicated; we were in the back room second floor, with the three children - we have two rooms; the prisoner was by the fire - I aggravated him a great deal, more than a man could bear, and spit in his face; he had the iron heater in his hand, and was going to stir the fire with it - after spitting in his face I went about two yards from him, and he accidentally threw the heater, not with the intention of hurting me or the child - it went through the child's head - the child was at my breast; I went to the fireplace when I spit at him - I went very quick, and sat down two yards from him; he then threw the iron - he threw himself down on the ground, cried, and got up again; he flew to the table where the knives and forks were, and was going to make away with himself - I took them from him, and said, "Don't, Charles, make away with yourself;" he went out for a few minutes, and then returned - a gentleman came and took him in charge; when the iron struck the child, I showed him what he had done - he said, "Mary, Oh, my God! I have hurt my baby;" I kept it in my arms - blood came from it - he took it into his arms, kissed it, and told me to put it to the breast - I said it was of no use, for it was dead; he wished it to be taken to a doctor, but it was of no use - it did not live above two minutes after it was struck; we had been quarrelling for a quarter of an hour - he was always very fond of the children, and indulged them in their faults; no blows had passed between us.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was he not particularly fond of this child? A. Yes; he maintained and treated me kindly - I had been brought home very drunk that morning, and he was a good deal intoxicated; the heater was in his hand at the time I spit at him; it was the heater of an Italian iron - the child being killed sobered me, and I recollect what happened; I do not recollect raising my hand to him - I am sure I spit at him.

ELIZABETH STEWART. I live in the room over the prisoner. On Sunday evening, between five and seven o'clock, I heard the prisoner and Blagg quarrelling, for a quarter of an hour before I was called down - I heard both their voices, and something fall down; Blagg called me down, and asked me to take her child - I said I could not, as I saw it was dead; Perry stood behind her, and begged me to take it to the doctor - I said it was of no use, the child was dead; they had both been very much in liquor all day, and on Saturday evening; the prisoner continued in the house a short time, then went out, and came in again - he appeared in a very distressed state; he was a quiet wellbehaved man, and a tender father when sober - I have seen the woman very much intoxicated before, and him drunk; they never had words when they were sober.

WILLIAM HENRY HOOKER . I am a constable. On the 6th of December, about seven o'clock, I was directed to the prisoner's lodgings by the patrol; I found him and Blagg sitting in the room, with two or three children - I asked what had been the matter there; they seemed confused, and I thought endeavoured to conceal the real cause - I said it had been intimated to me that murder had been committed in the house, and I would open every room but what I would find it out - Blagg then said, "I and my husband have been quarrelling, and our child has been hurt;" I asked where it was - she took me into the next room; I there saw the child on the bed, a little warm, but quite dead - she told me how it happened; the prisoner was not in the room - I went into the room where he was; she took the iron from the fire-side, and said that was the iron it was done with - they both appeared half drunk, and, I am sorry to say, he did not appear to have the feeling he ought; a conversation passed with him, which I do not recollect.

Cross-examined. Q. He was half drunk? A. Yes, and rather confused in his manner - the woman appeared more alarmed than him; the iron was clean, but perhaps it had been in the fire.

THOMAS STALION . I am a patrol. On the 6th of December, at a quarter-past six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner at the corner of Sharp's-alley, West-street, very much in liquor; I said, "What brought you out in this state? you are drunk, go home" - he said, "Patrol, I wish you or somebody would shoot me;" I pressed him to go home - he asked me to shake hands, saying he would go home. I went to the house about seven o'clock with Hooker, and found the child dead - Hooker said, "How was it done?" Perry answered, "Neither of us did it, it was done between us" - Hooker asked what it was done with;" the woman said, "The iron-heater," and gave it to them from the fire.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he and his wife had been quarrelling? A. Yes.

MR. JAMES FARISH . I am house surgeon of St. Bartholomew's-hospital. I saw the child about eight o'clock that evening; it was quite dead - I found a wound on the left side of the head; next day I opened the head, and found another wound in the right side, in which the bones were broken inward - they had broken outward at the other wound; there was a wound through the brain leading from one fracture to the other - all the wounds had been given at one time; the instrument had pierced through - this iron would have effected it, if thrown with violence; the point must have struck the head - if it had struck in any other way, it might have produced death, but would not have made such a wound; if the iron had struck the woman, I cannot say what would have been the effect; it would depend on the strength of the throw - I think she might have had a severe wound, if it had struck her with the point; the child's wound would produce almost instant death.

Cross-examined. Q. It might not have penetrated the scull of a grown person? A. I should not expect that it would.

Prisoner's Defence. I solemnly assure you I had no intention of doing it, neither before nor at the time; she abused me more than a man could hear, and attempted to strike me, then spit in my face, and ran across the room - having the iron in my hand to stir the fire, I threw it at her, and struck the child; no man can have suffered more than I have since.

GUILTY (of manslaughter only.) Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18300114-162

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

395. EDWARD NICHOLAS LADD was indicted for a rape . NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-163

396. JOHN GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , two 5l. Bank-notes , the property of Thomas Hurst and another, his masters.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT BROWN . I am in the service of Messrs. Hurst and Chance, booksellers , of St. Paul's Church-yard. On the 1st of December the prisoner was in their service, as extra porter - between five and six o'clock that evening, wanting change for a 5l. note for my own use, I got it from Taylor, who had charge of the till - I wrote my name and the date on the note.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you recollect where you obtained it? A. From Barclay's - I received ten; I did not take the numbers; this was only the second I had disposed of, but I had not paid any other away for a week previous.

SAMUEL TAYLOR. I live with the prosecutors. I gave Brown five sovereigns from the till for a 5l. note, which I put into the till: I saw him write his name on the note - I received no other from him that day.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you in the habit of frequently taking notes from him? A. No; I had charge of the till while Mr. Orr, the shopman was at dinner - the key is generally left in the till.

WILLIAM ORR . I am in the prosecutor's employ, and have the care of the till - while I was at dinner it was left with Taylor; on the 1st of December, about a quarter-past four o'clock, I received a 5l. note from Mr. Johnson, and put it into the till; I made up the till-account at eight o'clock, and by the cash-book there should have been 28l. 1ls. 2d. in it - there were 10l. short; there were no 5l. notes in it - the prisoner had no right behind the counter.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner did not live in the house? A. No; the till may be in the care of three persons in the course of the day.

GEORGE SOWARD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 2nd of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, a person, who I believe to be the prisoner, came and bought a watch for a guinea- he paid me a 5l. note, and gave the name of John Walker , No. 10, High-street, Islington, which I immediately wrote on it; this is the note (looking at one) - it has that on it, with the figures 2-12-29; I have since seen the watch I sold. About a fortnight after I went with Mr. Chance to St. John-street, where the prisoner works - he came with us to Bishopsgate-street; Mr. Chance told him he had come about the 5l. notes they had lost - he replied that he had picked up two 5l. notes opposite Mr. Chance's door the day he worked there.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. The 5l. note produced was paid in there on the 11th of December.

ROBERT BROWN . This note has my hand-writing, and the date; it is the one I paid to Taylor on the 1st of December.

WILLIAM RACKHAM . I am ostler at the White Hart, St. John-street. On the Friday before the prisoner was taken I changed watches with him; the officer has the one he gave me.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD. I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 16th of December; he told me he had found two notes opposite the door, had changed the other at Shadwell, and bought a great coat. I have a watch which I received from Rackham.

WILLIAM RACKHAM. This is the watch he gave me.

GEORGE SOWARD . This is the watch I sold the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the notes up by the counting-house, and being ignorant of the law I changed them.

JURY to ROBERT TAYLOR. Q. Had he an opportunity of going round the counter? A. He had no business there- he must have gone there to get at the till; he could not reach over - Brown had occasion to leave the shop for two minutes to come to me in the warehouse - the prisoner was then alone in the shop, and I may have left the till while I was in charge of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-164

397. ROBERT COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 gown, value 5s.; 8 yards of printed cotton, value 8s.; 1 shawl, value 4s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of John Newman .

ELIZABETH NEWMAN . My husband's name is John - we have parted, and he lives one hundred miles off. I left my situation at Mr. Stevens', in Bishopsgate-street, on the 2nd of December - my property was in the attic at my father's, in Half Moon-passage, Aldersgate-street ; I was staying there till I got a situation, but slept out - I saw my things safe in my box, which was locked, between six and seven o'clock in the evening of the 7th of December, and next morning, before eight, I found my box broken open, and some of my things gone: I found them at Guildhall that day, when the prisoner was in custody - he is my brother-in-law, and lodged in the house with his father.

GEORGE CLAMP. I am a pawnbroker. I have eight yards of printed cotton, pawned on the 7th of December, after seven o'clock, by the prisoner, for 4s. - I am certain of him.

JOHN VARLEY . I am a pawnbroker, of Redcross-street. I have a gown and shawl, pawned by the prisoner, for 3s. 6d.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am the prisoner's brother. I called at my father's, where he lived, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening - my father was in bed; I saw this box broken open, and went to look for the prisoner, but could not find him - I returned, and found him on the stairs - we went up stairs together; I accused him of taking the things, and said he had better tell - I found the duplicates on my father's bed.

JOHN WILLIAM HARRISON. I apprehended the prisoner in Half Moon-passage - he said nothing to the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-165

398. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 hat, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Adams .

SAMUEL ADAMS. I am a hatter , and live in Sun-street . On the 1st of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, the officer brought the prisoner in with this hat, which was taken from the door-post outside.

GEORGE HOOPER . I am a bricklayer. I was in Sun-street, and saw the prisoner snatch this hat from the door-post - I stopped him with it, and gave him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE HALL . I received him in charge - he pretended to be intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300114-166

399. THOMAS GRIGG was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 4lbs. of pork, value 2s. , the goods of William Robins Carden .

JOHN BULL . I am apprentice to William Robins Carden , of Newgate-street , cheesemonger and salesman . On the 29th of December, at a quarter-past five o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop, took this pork off a bench in the shop, put it under his coat, and went out; I stopped him two or three doors off with it, and gave him in charge.

THOMAS PEEL . I am a patrol, and took him in charge- I found nothing on him.

Prisoner. I cannot deny taking it.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-167

400. SOPHIA MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 pillow, value 4s. , the goods of Henrietta Howard .

HENRIETTA HOWARD. I am single . On the 5th of December I left the prisoner in care of my children while I was in a situation - I lived in Rose-alley, Bishopsgate , on the first floor; I left her there four months, and on my return missed a pillow, a blanket, a sheet, and other articles, which I found at the pawnbrokers' - she had 5s. 6d. from the parish: I allowed her money for rent, and gave her half a bushel of coals.

THOMAS JAMES SHUTE . I am shopman to Mr. Adams, of Sun-street. On the 5th of December a pillow was pawned for 1s. 6d. - I think it was by a woman, in the name of Sophia Miller ; I cannot say it was the prisoner.

EDWARD PRATT. I apprehended the prisoner at Howard's, and told her the charge; she gave me the duplicate of the pillow.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had pledged the articles to procure food for the prosecutrix's children.

MRS. HOWARD. My children were provided for well by my mistress.

EDWARD PRATT. She did not state this at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-168

401. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 looking-glass, value 20s., and 200 printed bound books, value 150l. , the goods of John Mc-Candie .

JOHN MCCANDIE . I am a law-student . I went to Scotland in July, leaving the prisoner in charge of my chambers, No. 5, Essex-court, Temple - I returned in October, found him gone, and the chamber empty; I had left a looking-glass and about two hundred volumes of books, worth about 150l. there - I have only found one volume, which is "Read's Essays," and some plates out of another- I did not see the prisoner till last Tuesday, when I found him in custody: he did not reside at the chambers, but had 2s. a week, merely to go once a week or fortnight to see that all was safe.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner last Tuesday, in St. Mary-axe, and told him the charge - he said he was very sorry, that he was in great distress, and that I should find the looking-glass at Bassett's, in Queen-street, Long-acre; I found it there -I asked what he had done with the books; he said he cut the covers off and burnt them, cut the books in two, and sold them to two cheesemonger's in St. Giles'.

JAMES BASSETT. I am a pawnbroker, of Great Queen-street. On the 28th of September this looking-glass was pawned with me for 20s - I am not certain of the prisoner.

(Glass produced and sworn to.)

HENRY BARRETT. I am a cheesemonger, of High-street, St. Giles'. I bought of the prisoner three or four times printed books, as waste-paper - there was about 5lbs. each time: I gave him 4d. a pound; I used it in my shop, and did not read it.

Prisoner's Defence. I merely did it out of necessity; I was to have 2s. a week to stay at the chambers every day from half-past ten o'clock till two, to receive letters and forward them - I had no other employ, and was much distressed; I went and asked Mr. Thomas, a friend of the prosecutor's, to advance me 5s. of my wages - he wrote to master to know if he might; master wrote that I was not to have a farthing, and I made away with a few things.

GUILTY . Aged 65. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18300114-169

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant

402. THOMAS WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 basket, value 9d., and 1 basin value 6d. , the goods of Ellen Gibson ; to which he' pleaded.

GUILTY . - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18300114-170

403. JOHN JAMES WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 3 waistcoats, value 16s., and 2 pairs of trousers, value 2l. , the goods of Timothy Breese ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-171

404. JAMES PARSALL and JOHN COOK were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 90lbs. weight of hay, value 4s. , the goods of John Pomfret ; and THOMAS COOK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same ; and that at the Session of the Peace, on the 23rd of February, in the 9th year of His Majesty's reign, the said James Parsall was convicted of felony.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN POMFRET . On the evening of the 5th of January I had been cutting some hay from the stack, and tied it up in bundles with some bands of rowen hay, which had been prepared by myself and my boy - my hay was full of clover which had grown among the grass; I left it at five or six o'clock - there were two large bundles of hay and a bundle of loose hay; I covered them up, and the next morning I and my boy went before seven o'clock and two large bundles were missing - I gave information to the constable, and in two or three hours Mr. Tuck the farmer came; from his information I went to the constable, and went with him to Thomas Cook 's house - we found a large cupboard under the stairs, which was locked: John Cook was there - he said his father was out and he had the key in his pocket - we opened it and found some hay shook

in loose; Thomas Cook keeps a horse and cart - these bands we found there, which I twisted myself and can swear to them, and a great portion of hay was in one of the bands; I am able to state that it is a portion of the hay I left near my stack - John Cook was then taken, and Parsall a little time after; we took Thomas Cook on the road - he said, "I would not go to steal your hay;" I said,"No, but if you send your son and two others to do it it is the same" - he said he had a great quantity of hay brought into his cellar, and did not know how it came there; I heard the statements made by Parsall and John Cook before the Magistrate - it was read over to them; the whole of it is Dr. Robinson's writing - Thomas Cook 's house is across a field and up a little passage from mine.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Are you a dealer in hay? A. No - I may by chance have sold some hay, but no bundles; I sold a quarter of a load from the same hay, but to Mr. Payne for his own horses - I have not sold any to any other person; I know it because it is mixed with clover, trefoil, and rye-grass - I swear to it by the bands more particularly; they are made of rowen - bands may generally be made of that, but this is what I rolled up for my own purpose; I thought any thing was good enough for the purpose - here is one of them; I can swear to that - Thomas Cook keeps a horse; he was discharged without bail on his promising to come to the Angel the next day, which he did and was admitted to bail; there was a person of the name of Grimes, but he was not found.

RICHARD OAKLEY. I am a labourer. On the night of the 5th of January I saw John Cook and Hugh Grimes in Mr. Offwood's garden, about four hundred yards from the prosecutor's - they were coming out of the garden, and each had an arm-full of hay; they took it down Lloyd's yard, where Thomas Cook 's house is - this was between seven and eight o'clock, as near as I can guess; Offwood's garden is between Pomfret's and Cook's.

Cross-examined. Q. Do many people live there? A. There are six houses in the yard; it was a moon-light night - it was not concealed; they brought it by me as I was in my mother's garden.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I am a constable of Tottenham. I went to Thomas Cook's, and found some hay in a cellar under the stairs; I locked up John Cook , and then went after the father - I took them before the Magistrate; what was said by Parsall and John Cook was taken down in writing by Dr. Robinson; he read it over to John Cook , and he put his name to it - this is it: - (read.)

JAMES PARSALL being asked by me what he had to say, and being previously cautioned, said, I had 8 1/2d. of the money; I have nothing else to say."

JOHN COOK being first cautioned, and told that what he said would be put down in writing, and made use of against him, at his trial, voluntarily and freely confesseth, and saith, "Last Tuesday evening, between six and seven o'clock, Hugh Grimes and James Parsall came to me while I was standing at the bottom of Brook-court, Tottenham, "where my father, Thomas Cook, lives; I live with my father: Hugh Grimes said to me, "Jack, have you a mind to go and get some hay;" James Parsall stood by at the time - I said I did not mind; Hugh Grimes then said he knew where he could get some, and asked if I would buy it; I said Yes; I, Hugh Grimes , and James Parsall then went to a field, at the bottom of Waggon and Horse-lane, belonging to John Pomfret , where there was a stack of hay - there were three bundles of hay tied up, lying close by the side of the stack; Hugh Grimes took one of the bundles, and lifted it over the fence, that surrounded the stack, which I took of him and laid it down - James Pursall took another bundle, and handed that over also to me; we left the third bundle where we found it, under the stack - Hugh Grimes , and James Parsall then came over the fence from the stack; Grimes and Parsall each took up a bundle of the hay, and carried them across the fields as far as the stile, and then I took the bundle of hay from Parsall, and carried it to the palings, next my father's yard -Grimes carried his bundle of hay all the way; I threw one bundle over the fence, belonging to Mr. Stevens who keeps the Coach and Horses ale-house, and Grimes threw over the other bundle into Mr. Offwood's garden, which adjoins my father's premises - I then fetched one of the bundles, and took it into my father's cellar; and Grimes took the other, and put it into the cellar; after the hay was in the cellar, I gave Grimes 2s. for it - my father was not at home at the time, and knew nothing of it. JOHN COOK.

Taken before me W. ROBINSON.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Was any promise made if they would make any confession? A. No.

COURT. Q. Was Parsall there at the time John Cook said this? A. Yes; they were all told to listen to what was read - it was after John Cook made his statement that Parsall said he received 8 1/2d.

John Cook's Defence. My father was not at home at the time, or he would not have encouraged me in it; I fetched an arm-full of loose hay from Mr. Offwood's garden.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I have a copy of the record of the conviction of James Parsall , in February, 1828, for felony- I was present at his trial and know he is the man.

PARSALL - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

JOHN COOK - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

THOMAS COOK - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-172

405. JAMES MULLIGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 46 lbs. weight of iron, value 5s. , the goods of John Richardson and Thomas Want .

JOHN RICHARDSON . I am in the building line , in partnership with Mr. Thomas Want . On the 6th of January we lost some pieces of balconies; I did not see them taken - there are no marks on them, but these match, and I know them to be mine; they were taken from No. 17, Nottingham-place, Kingsland-road .

GEORGE SMITH. I am a headborough, and keep a shop in Kingsland-road. On the 6th of January I received information that a man had offered some iron for sale; I went and saw the prisoner - I asked what he had got? he said some old iron, it was all right, he was going to take it to his master, just over the bridge; I said he must go with me - he then said his master lived at Ball's-pond; I took him back and found where the iron came from - there were forty-six pounds of it.

JOHN WILLIAM WINTLE. I deal in iron. The prisoner came and asked if I bought iron, and produced a piece; I said I did not buy such as that - he had a piece in his hand, and the rest, I believe, in a parcel on his shoulder.

JOHN WILLIAM ROWE . I am a carpenter. I saw these balconies safe at day-light on the morning of the 5th of January; in the evening I saw the prisoner go out with

bundle, which I thought was a bundle of hair to mix with mortar; he is a plasterer's labourer there - when he was brought in, he said he was going to take the iron to Mr. Richardson, who desired him to do so.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-173

406. WILLIAM MAJOR and GEORGE REDMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 16 pairs of shoes, value 4l., and 2 pairs of boots, value 12s. , the goods of Samuel Musgrove .

SAMUEL MUSGROVE . I am a shoemaker . I lost shoes and boots at various times, and on the 19th of December I came into the shop at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and found the two prisoners there; Redman had been in my employ as journeyman , and Major used to pass as his brother-in-law; I told them to come about nine o'clock; I sat up the whole of the next night, thinking they would come again, but they did not, and I got a warrant to search Redman's premises, at No. 22, Anne-street, St. George's; I found both the prisoners there - they said they knew nothing at all about my property; I found one duplicate for shoes in Redman's trousers pocket; I know these shoes and boots to be mine, but I cannot swear any of them were on my premises on the morning of the 19th of December; Major had been at my house almost every morning, and brought a bag with him.

JOHN COLLINS. I am in the prosecutor's employ. On the morning of the 19th of December the prisoners came before my master was in the shop - they were in the habit of coming early in the morning; Major had a bag, and used to say he worked at coal work; I had no suspicion of them till the 19th, when they got shuffling me about, and I thought they wanted to steal shoes - Major used to call Redman his brother-in-law.

Redman. He used to ask me to take down the shutters for him, and said he would give me a penny for it. Witness. No, I did not.

ROBERT STUPART . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of shoes pawned on the 19th of December by Redman, and some on the 14th - I cannot be certain who brought those.

JOHN DANIEL HAWES . I am a pawnbroker. I have five pairs of shoes pawned by Redman at different times.

FREDERICK LANE . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of shoes and a pair of boots pawned by a woman who calls herself Major's wife.

THOMAS SIZER. I am a pawnbroker. I have five pairs of shoes; I cannot say who pawned them.

BOYD SILVESTER . I took the prisoners, and found this duplicate of a pair of shoes pawned on the 14th of December, in the name of John Smith on Redman - he said he did not know how it came in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Major's Defence. I never pawned nor had a pair of shoes.

Redman's Defence. I know nothing about them.

JOHN COLLINS . Redman has offered me presents to go out - on the morning of the 19th he offered me a dog.

MAJOR - GUILTY . Aged 23.

REDMAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-174

407. GEORGE MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 1 shovel, value 2s., and 1 hammer, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Plucknett .

CHARLES PLUCKNETT. I keep a coal-shed . I lost a shovel and hammer on the 28th of December; I went out and met the Police-man coming back with the prisoner and the property; I had used the shovel just before.

SAMUEL WAKEFIELD . I took the prisoner in Cleveland-street , where the prosecutor lives, with this hammer and shovel; I asked him where he got them? he said he had been at work with the shovel; a woman came and said she had seen him about the prosecutor's house.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who had been working at St. Katharine's docks - he got into conversation, and turned from me; he then came running after me with this shovel and hammer; he said, "I have taken them from a shop, hold them while I lace my shoe;" in the agitation I said I had been at work with them.

GUILTY . Aged 28. Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18300114-175

408. ELLEN McHENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 sheet, value 2s., and 3 pairs of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Frances Head .

FRANCES HEAD. I am single , and live in Lichfield-street . The prisoner lodged with me. On the 7th of December I told her she should go; when she was gone I missed a sheet and three pairs of shoes from a box in the room she lodged in - these are them.

Cross-examined by Mr. LEE. Q. How do you get your living? A. By shoe-binding; I have one other female lodger; I never lent her things to pawn; I met her in the Old Bailey after this, and I said, "Oh, Ellen, how could you rob me so?" she said, "I never did;" I said, "Give me the ticket;" she said she would pay me, and I promised to forgive her; I have had no quarrel with her since; we went to a public-house and had a pint of beer, which I paid for, because it was so cold.

COURT. Q. How came you to take her up? A. She did not come at six o'clock, which she had promised.

JAMES HOPPER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of shoes pawned by Welch on the 7th of December.

SARAH WELCH. The prisoner came into my room, and said if I would let her stop there and have her breakfast she would give me these shoes to pawn; she said she had bought them at a shop on the Saturday.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at the public-house? A. No, I am on good terms with the prisoner - I did not say if she would give me money I would not appear here; it is not a fair question to ask whether I was ever here -I was tried here about fifteen years ago, and acquitted.

THOMAS DEWDORS PERRY. I am a pawnbroker. I took in the sheet of the prisoner, I believe. on the 7th of December.

THOMAS GRIMWOOD. I took the prisoner and I found some duplicates in possession of her mother.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix and Welch have sworn falsely - the prosecutrix used to lend me things - on the last occasion she lent me a sheet, which I pawned for 1s. 6d., and most of the money, when she did lend me things, was spent in drink.

FRANCES HEAD . I never lent her any thing in my life, I would take my oath of it.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-176

410. WILLIAM NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 20 rolls of bread, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of John Muidie .

JOHN MUIDIE. I am a baker , and live in Shoreditch . On the 4th of December I saw the prisoner take twenty rolls from my window, and walk away; I went and took him with them; he said he was in distress.

DANIEL CRACKWELL. I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was three weeks out of work; and was a day or two without victuals.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18300114-177

411. JOHN PANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 1 watch, value 50s.; 1 watch-chain, value 12s.; 1 ring, value 3s.; 2 seals, value 10s., and 1 key, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Brown .

MARGARET BROWN. I am the wife of Henry Brown . He lost his watch-stand from the mantel-piece, with the watch in it, on the 2d of December; we went out about half-past two o'clock, and left it safe - we returned a little after five, and it was gone; the prisoner lodged in the next room - he returned after us, and came to our room for a light; he returned to his own room, and told a young woman that he was going out for about an hour; I followed him; he saw me about halfway down St. John-street, and began to run - I returned home, he came back a little after seven, and went into his own room.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Do you know whether he was very much distressed? A. I believe he was - he was quarelling with the young woman about money in the day time.

GEORGE SHEPHERD. I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned by the prisoner, on the 2nd of December, between six and seven o'clock.

THOMAS WATERLOW. I took the prisoner - he denied it altogether - I saw his father the next day, found he knew something of it, and found it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Six witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18300114-178

412. JOHN PETTET was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of January , 1 live tame fowl, price 5s. , the property of Edmund Butterworth .

ELIZABETH BUTTERWORTH. I am the wife of Edmund Butterworth , a tailor , and live in John-street, Bedford-square - we keep fowls in our yard - I missed one out of twenty-two on the 3rd of January, about ten o'clock in the morning - I had seen it a few minutes before - it had slipped out of the yard into the gateway - I saw it again on the Tuesday following, in Brick-lane, at a pigeon-fancier's, named Dallos.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.You say it had got out? A. Yes, into the yard - Dallos lives two or three miles from my house; I lost it on Sunday, and found it on Tuesday - I think this is the fowl; he carries his tail on one side - you will not see one in a thousand do so; it is what is called Watney-street breed.

RICHARD DALLOS . I am a pigeon-fancier, and live in Brick-lane - the prosecutrix came and asked if I had a Malay cock to sell; I showed her this one - she told me to catch it, which I did, and put it into her possession; she said, "Oh, my dear, I have got you once more;" I had bought it of a young man, but not the prisoner - I never saw him till he was at Lambeth-street.

COURT. Q.Did not you say, upon your oath. that the prisoner came on Sunday morning with the fowl? A. I did not say "the prisoner;" the person who brought it asked 2s. 6d. for it - I gave him 1s. 6d.; something was read over to me, but I do not know what - I did sign something; this is my hand-writing. (looking at his deposition.)

JOHN NORRIS . I took up the prisoner; this witness behaved in a very ruffianly manner before the Grand Jury, and would not answer a word. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-179

413. ANN RUDD was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 2 gowns, value 6s. , the goods of Mary Barnes .

MARY BARNES. I am a widow . I lost two gowns on the 2nd of January, from the table behind my door on the first floor - they had come from the mangle on the 1st, and on the next day but one I missed them - on Friday I was out, but locked my door; when I stepped down to the door I left my door open; the prisoner lived in an adjoining room.

JOHN ROBERTSON. The prosecutrix came to my house; on the 2nd of January, and I went to Cumberland-street where the prisoner was - she denied knowing any thing about the property; but while I was looking she said if the prosecutrix would look over it, she would tell that she had taken them.

JOHN GREGORY JACKSON . I am an officer. The prisoner confessed where the things were.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300114-180

414. HARRIET SMITH and HARRIET TAYLOR were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 1 watch, value 2l. , the goods of William Colling .

WILLIAM COLLING. On the 11th of December I met Taylor in the street. and went with her to a house in Ship-yard, Pickett-street , between four and five o'clock in the morning; Smith came into the room shortly after I went to bed with Taylor; I confess I was not very sober, but I know we were in bed together, and then Smith came in and took my watch out of the fob of my trousers, which were laying on the floor; there was no candle in the room, but there was a strong gas-light opposite - I cannot say that I saw her take the watch, but I suspected her, and endeavoured to search her; she resisted, and got out of the room - Taylor prevented my following her- I saw my watch again in about an hour in the officer's hands; Taylor held the door while I was going after Smith - I was undressed; I am certain of Smith's person - I am not aware that I had any money, but I told Turner I would make all right in the evening; Smith was not then in the room; I did not give her the watch.

Smith. He went home with me and Taylor, and said he had no money and nothing but his watch, which he gave into my hands for 5s. each - I went to see if I could get a light, and could not get one; he wanted some liquor; I left him and Taylor in bed, and went to try to get some. Witness. It is totally false; I did not send for liquor.

Taylor. He said he would leave his watch for 10s. with us; he was quite agreeable to have some liquor sent for, and Smith went for it - he was so tipsy he fell down on the stairs. Witness. I was not aware of it.

JOHN STEPHENS . I saw Smith in the Strand; she was running along at some distance from Ship-yard - I laid hold of her and said I must search her; I took her into a shop and she said, "I know what you want, you want the watch;" the prosecutor had come to me undressed, and stated what he had lost; I put my hand into Smith's bosom, but could not find the watch - she then gave it me; she said it had been left in pawn, but did not say she was going for drink; the prosecutor gave a distinct account.

THOMAS THORPE. At a quarter-past five o'clock, the prosecutor said Taylor was active in the robbery; I went up stairs, found the door locked, and the things on the stairs - I demanded admission; there was no answer - I waited three minutes, and then broke open the door; I found Taylor there with her clothes on - she denied all knowledge of the watch, and said nothing about its being left in pawn; the prosecutor was not so very tipsy - he gave a pretty fair account of the thing; he said if the watch was given up he would not hurt her.

Smith put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor had given her the watch to raise money upon to procure liquor.

Taylor's Defence. He took part of his clothes off in the room, and he ran down stairs undressed as he was - he said he was married, and wanted to get home; he said he would settle with me next day - he has said he has sent three females out of the country, and he will try how many more he can send.

WILLIAM COLLING. I do not remember saying so; I have not done so, and do not remember asserting any thing of the kind - I have not sent any woman out of the country.

JURY. Q.Are you aware of having no money in your pocket? A. I believe I had not; it was arranged between Taylor and myself - I had not known her before.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 28.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-181

415. JAMES SAYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 26 plates, value 3s. , the goods of William Morse .

SARAH MORSE. I am the wife of William Morse ; he deals in earthenware . On the 8th of December I was in the parlour - the prisoner came, and took twenty-six plates off the shelf; I ran after him across the road; I saw him placing the plates in his apron and took hold of him.

EDWARD PAYNE. I am an officer. I was coming down the street about six o'clock in the evening; I saw the witness pursuing the prisoner - she took him, and gave him to me.

JOHN DAVIS . I took the prisoner; I found 1s. worth of halfpence on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running by the door, and the woman took me; I had not the plates.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300114-182

416. CATHERINE SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 silver watch, value 5l. , the goods of William Bannan .

WILLIAM BANNAN . On the 24th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Great Tothill-street; she asked me to give her some gin, and pleaded hard for it, as it was very cold - I said if she would show me where I could get a glass fitted to my watch I would give her some; she pointed out a shop at the corner of Little Tothill-street - I got a glass there; I had two half-crowns and some halfpence in my pocket - the man said it came to 6d.; I said I would give him 5d., but I had not been accustomed to give more than 4l. - I changed one half-crown to pay him, and put the change into my breeches-pocket; I turned out of the shop and the prisoner with me - she pressed me to go home with her, and said she had a good fire; I said, "I want nothing to do with you, I have a good partner at home" - she met another person, and they staid a little behind: I walked on at a good smart pace - at the corner of the street the prisoner came up to me; I said, "I will not be worse than my word, I promised you some gin" - I put my hand into my pocket, and was stunned at missing my money; at that moment I was pinioned behind, and the prisoner took my watch - I got from the clutches of those who held me, and but for a blow she gave me, I should have succeeded in taking the prisoner - she turned down a turning; I followed very near her, and had not the door of a house been open I must have caught her; I went in and followed her up stairs, and only for the thoughts of the consequences I might have found her - I returned down and told the landlord.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.How many children have you? A. Two; I had not been in any gin-shop that night - I had been in two public-houses that day; I was as sober as I am now - it was not a particularly dark night: there were shops all the way; I did not say I did not think she was the woman, but the voice was like hers: I swear to her person and her voice - she was not discharged by the Magistrate, nor by the night-officer; there were two drunken charges in the watch-house, but she never went out - I understood she was told to go about her business, but I interfered; I do not remember the Magistrate saying, if I could not give a better account she must be discharged - I positively deny saying at the watch-house, that I could only swear to by her voice; I never mentioned such a word as that I did not think she was the person; there was no row when the watch was taken from me, nor when she was taken into custody - I saw no one but her; I felt some one pinion my arm - I followed her into a house about one hundred and fifty yards off; it was not exactly a straight road, but I am quite sure I did not lose sight of her - I saw her into the house; she might be with me a quarter of an hour - I understood she was taken a quarter before twelve o'clock; no other wo

man was taken on this charge - I was talking to the Police-man when the prisoner came up to know what the row was: I do not know what the row was about - I positively deny that it was about my charging another woman with stealing my watch; I am sure the prisoner is the woman.

COURT. Q. You said you had seen her conversing with some one before you lost your watch? A. Yes; I pursued her up stairs in the house, but from fear that something might happen, I came down and spoke to the man in the parlour - he said he could not give me any advice what to do; while I was talking to him I heard some one come down and go out at the street-door - I ran out right and left, and the door was shut - I could not find the house again.

ROBERT CAMPPEN. I am a Police-officer. On the night of the 24th of December there was a drunken woman fell down in the street; my fellow-officer and a woman were by - the prisoner came up the street, and the prosecutor said that was the woman; he did not hesitate a moment - I had seen him about five minutes before; I thought him sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he give a clear account? A. Yes, of his being robbed, and the time; he and the prisoner were on the opposite side to where the row was- he said she was the person; he did not say he could swear to her by her voice - the watch-house keeper did not say if he could not give a better account she must be discharged; there are gas-lights about where he was robbed.

COURT. Q. Was she set at liberty? A. No; the Magistrate did not say any thing about his not telling a clear story.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking at the row when he looked at me and said, "Take this woman;" I said,"What for?" he said, for his watch, and if I would tell him who had it, he would not take me; he said he knew me by my voice - the night officer said he would not take the charge from such a drunken man, and he said I was discharged; I staid a few minutes, and the prosecutor said he would insist that I was the person - the Magistrate asked if he was not drunk - the Police-man said he was a little in liquor, but not so drunk but he could tell the person; I had gone out for some butter when I was taken - they asked for the key of my room, and I gave it up; I had not been out ten minutes; the prosecutor said he did not think I was the person, but I was one of the party - the Police-man swears false, for he heard the officer say he would not take me on the charge of such a drunken man; I will send for my landlord, and persons who saw me, to say I was at home all night - it does not appear very likely that I would stand looking at him.

ROBERT CAMPPEN . She had some butter in her hand.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-183

417. CHARLOTTE SINGLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 silver spoon, value 5s., and 1 set of bed-furniture, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Cummings .

THOMAS CUMMINGS. I attend on a gentleman in the Albany-chambers - the prisoner is my daughter, and I have occasionally employed her to assist her mother in cleaning the chambers; on the 8th of January I missed the spoon from the chambers, and on the 9th of January the bed-furniture - the constable took her, and found the duplicate on her; the things were under my care - these are them.

WILLIAM BAKER . I live at the George. in Brown-street; the prisoner came there about five weeks before this, and asked me to let her have this spoon.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I owe you 2s., and give you this, and say I would leave it with you? A. You owed me for a few glasses of gin, but you did not leave the spoon to pay for it.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I took the prisoner, and found on her the duplicate of the furniture - she said she had left the spoon and a ring with the last witness; he gave up the spoon, but denied all knowledge of the ring - she said she had pawned the bed-furniture, but her mother gave it her, and she wished to be sent out of the country.

Prisoner. I said my mother had lent me the bedfurniture to redeem the spoon. Witness. No, I deny that; she said on the Monday morning that her mother had a gown in pawn.

Prisoner's Defence. I owed Baker a few shillings; I went and asked him for some gin - he said he did not dare to let me have any more; I went home, the spoon was in the cup - I took it and left it with him; I had been to him twice to know what I owed him - he said he could not tell without John was at home; I asked him then what it was, as I had been pawning the bed-furniture for 2s.; my father came in with the officer and said there was his prisoner; I had asked Baker if he would let me have the spoon, he said he would not till he got his money; I did not like to tell my father of the spoon as I thought it would get him into trouble - the gold ring is a keeper that John took in; I should have returned the spoon in the course of an hour.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-184

418. MARY TOBIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of December , 2lbs. weight of candied horehound, value 4s.; 11 cards, value 4d.; and 2ozs. weight of candied lemon-peel, value 2d. , the goods of James Biddell .

JAMES BIDDELL. I am a confectioner , and did live in Whitecross-street. On the evening of the 23rd of December I was at a wine-vaults, and had a bag containing these articles; while I was being served with a small bottle of gin, my bag was taken away - the prisoner stood at the counter, and then went out; I missed the bag about two minutes after she was gone - the officer has the bag, which I know to be mine; the articles were given me by order of the Magistrate.

JOSEPH SIMONS. I am a watchman. At half-past eleven o'clock on the night of the 23rd of December, I was on duty, and saw the prisoner coming down Old-street, and William Crute following her; he called me - I went up, and saw the prisoner drop this bag from under her cloak; I took her to the watch-house, and met the prosecutor - he went to the watch-house, saw the contents of the bag, and gave charge of her.

JOHN ATTERWELL. I am the officer. I asked the prosecutor what was in the bag, and he stated all that was in it.

WILLIAM CRUTE . I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner - the prisoner had nothing, but I saw her take the bag from the bar, where the prosecutor stood drinking a glass of gin and water - when she was gone he said,"God bless me, I have lost my bag!" I said, "That woman has it;" I ran out and gave charge of her.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw this man at the corner of the street, talking to the watchman; he asked me to have some gin - we went into the house with another woman; when we came out he said he had a very bad wife - we went into another public-house, and I asked if that was his bag; he said Yes, and I might take it in my hand; he then came out, and asked if I would go home with him, as his wife was dead - I threw him the bag, and he gave me in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-185

419. JOSEPH VINE was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of January , 7 shillings and 3 sixpences , the monies of John Aggus .

JOHN AGGUS . I am a general shop-keeper . My money was on the end of the mangle on the 2nd of January; I had laid it there a few minutes before; my wife was in the shop, and I went into the back room; the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for half a pint of beer, and while my wife drew it, he took the 8s. 6d. - I did not see him take it; I went to the door - my wife went into Brick-lane and brought him back.

REBECCA AGGUS. I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner came into my shop, and the instant he was gone, I missed the 8s. 6d. which my husband had laid down for me to go to market - I took the prisoner in Brick-lane, about thirty yards from our shop; he had had half a pint of beer - I had not seen him before, but am certain he is the person; the officer found some money on him.

HENRY PAGE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; I asked him if he had any money - he said, Yes, and pulled out 4s. 6d. some halfpence, some Spanish liquorice, and a ring; I said, "Is that all you have about you?" he said Yes, but I found 3s. more in his gloves.

REBECCA AGGUS re-examined. Q. Had he time to have bought the liquorice and ring? A. Yes, I think he had; I am quite sure the prisoner is the boy who was in the shop - here are two sixpences I can swear to; I had paid some money to the coke-house the day before, and they had been refused.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer did not ask if I had any more money; I had been out all day selling things about the street - my mother gave me 6s. in the morning, and I was going to take my basket home at night.

GUILTY - Aged 15. Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300114-186

420. HENRY WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 8lbs. weight of beef, value 4s. , the goods of William Weller .

ELIZABETH WELLER. I am the wife of William Weller, a butcher , of Whitmore-row, Hoxton . Between one and two o'clock on the 21st of December, I saw the prisoner reach over the board, and take this beef from a fore-quarter of beef; I went to the door, and hallooed Stop thief! - I saw him about twenty yards from the door; the meat was then on the ground - I saw him stopped, without losing sight of him.

THOMAS RICHARDS . I stopped the prisoner when the witness called Stop thief! she took the beef from the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 10.

Fined 1s. , and delivered to his Brother.

Reference Number: t18300114-187

421. JAMES BAKER and MARY HAINES were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , three shillings and 1 cap, value 2s., the property of Mary Cammel , from her person .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-188

422. ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 5 sovereigns and 1 half-sovereign, the monies of Theodore Peter Couture , from his person .

THEODORE PETER COUTURE. On the 10th of December, I saw the prisoner in Holborn, at one o'clock in the morning, with another female, and we had a quartern of gin; I went with the prisoner to her room - I had this money in a pocket-book, and some silver in my breeches' pocket; I went to bed, and left my pocket-book in my coat-pocket, and my coat on a chair - I did not awake till eleven o'clock in the day; the prisoner never came to bed at all - when I awoke, my coat was there, but I missed the pocket-book; I inquired where I could find the prisoner- they said, in Little Shire-lane; I went, and found her and two other females - I went back to the house where I had slept, with the officer, and found the pocket-book in the bed, but the money was gone.

EDWARD GONOND. I am a Police-officer. On the morning of the 10th of December, the prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner; she denied the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-189

423. CHARLES KIMBER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 sovereign, 3 half-crowns, 14 shillings, and 7 sixpences, the monies of Thomas Powell , from his person .

THOMAS POWELL . I am a shop-keeper . I had this money loose in my pocket on the 26th of December, and was going with a truck for something; I met the prisoner in Church-street, Spitalfields, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and he pretended to lend me a hand - I did not want his assistance, but he proffered it; when we got to Booth-street , he stooped down, lifted up my hand, turned my pocket inside out, and took the money - I left the truck, and followed him; he was stopped immediately with my money.

Prisoner. He first accused me of stealing 20s. in silver; the officer sent for his wife, and she said he had two sovereigns; he was quite tipsy - I saved the money to buy a donkey-cart. Witness. When he was taken, they asked how much I had - I said I could not say exactly, but I know I had changed a sovereign about an hour previous; the Magistrate sent for my wife, who said I had had two sovereigns - I was not tipsy.

JOSEPH MALIN . I am a whip-thong maker. I saw the prisoner running very fast up the street; a man stopped him - we took him towards a public-house, and met the prosecutor: I took from the prisoner's pockets, a sovereign and 1l. 4s. 6d. - he said he had 22s. or 23s. in his pocket.

JOHN HOLSWORTH . I was at the Rose and Crown

when the prisoner was brought in; they had taken the money from him - he said he had 24s. of his own, but no sovereigns; he would not be taken without an officer - I had been appointed to the new Police, and I took him.

ZACHARIAH LONG . I received the prisoner in charge; I asked what he had in his pocket - he said 22s. or 23s.

JANE POWELL . I am the prosecutor's wife. He went out about half-past four o'clock, quite sober; he had two sovereigns from me, and had some silver in his pockets - he changed one sovereign, and had the other with him.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-190

424. PATRICK KENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 1 watch, value 5l., and 2 seals, value 30s.; the goods of John Battyll , from his person .

JOHN BATTYLL . On the 13th of January, as I was going down Bridges-street into Catherine-street , I met the prisoner, and the moment he met me, he snatched my watch out of my pocket - it was near one o'clock; I was coming from the theatre - there were no persons about but him; I called Stop thief! he ran across the road; I pursued and caught him - he dropped the watch directly; I had not lost sight of him; I was not five yards from him.

JOHN PENNY. I am a Police-constable; I took the prisoner, and the prosecutor gave me this watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of the play-house, and heard Stop thief! called; I came across the street; four or five gentlemen stopped and picked up the watch; it is a thing impossible that he could see me - the street was crowded with people, and there were four or five ranks of coaches.

JOHN PENNY. There were people on the other side of the way, but none about that particular spot.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300114-191

425. MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 sovereign, the money of William Johns , from his person .

WILLIAM JOHNS . I am a shoemaker , and was at the Crosby's Head on the evening of the 5th of December, about seven o'clock; three of us had a pot of beer, which I paid for; I had then two sovereigns in my pocket and three half-crowns - I left there, and went home; I went and bought a joint of meat - I then went to the Black Boy, and had a pint of beer and a pipe; my wife came and said she was going to Hackney-fields - I said, "You go on, and I will come after you;" I left in about half an hour, and just by the London Apprentice, the prisoner laid hold of my arm, and said "My dear, come home with me" - I said I was going to meet my wife; I turned a very little out of the road, and found her hand in my right-hand trousers pocket; I caught hold of her hand, and said, "You have robbed me;" I felt in my pocket, and missed a sovereign - she said, "Come home with me, I will make all right;" I said, I would not - she called two or three people, who began to hustle me about - the prisoner then said, "You may search me;" she was searched, but nothing was found on her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had been to two public-houses? A. Yes; I only went a little aside with her, that the people might pass; I did not take her out of the way; I do not know that my coat was buttoned; I did not unbutton it there - she was not searched there; she called to two of her companions to come to her assistance - they came and got round her, and then she said, "You may search me;" I did not finish my pint of beer at the Black Boy - there was only a thimble found on her; I did not claim that - I was searched, and a sovereign was found on me; I am sure I had two when I left the Black Boy; I had given my wife what other money I had.

WILLIAM BREYER. I was called by the prosecutor on the night in question: I saw a mob at the London Apprentice - I went to remove it; he gave the prisoner in charge, and said she had robbed him of a sovereign; she said she was willing to go, she had no sovereign - there were two or three women about, who were strangers.

Cross-examined. Q. She was searched? A. Yes; and no sovereign found on her.

ANN DURANT . I was with the prosecutor on the night of the 5th of December; I saw he had two sovereigns and some silver.

JAMES PINKERTON. The prisoner was brought to me by the witness, and it was said, she had taken a sovereign from the prosecutor; I took her into the lock-up place, but found nothing on her but a thimble - the prosecutor said she had robbed him; I searched, and found one sovereign on him.

Prisoner's Defence. He came up to me in a very rude indecent manner; he wanted me to go up a turning, and I would not - he pulled me about; several persons came up, and said he ought to give charge of me; he is a very bad old man indeed, or he would not have behaved in such a manner to any woman.

WILLIAM JOHNS. I swear I did not take any liberties with her; I felt her hand in my pocket.

WILLIAM BREYER re-examined. Q. Did she make any complaint of his conduct? A. She said he accused her first in Old-street-road.

JAMES PINKERTON. When she came to sit by the fire in the middle of the night, she said he had taken liberties with her, and bugged her round the neck.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not she say at first, that he first accosted her? A. Yes, and I did not take charge, because I did not know whether he had lost a sovereign or not.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-192

426. WILLIAM BOOTHMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 2 planes, value 10s., and 1 knife, value 1s. , the goods of William Glibbery , his master.

WILLIAM GLIBBERY. The prisoner is my apprentice ; I had not missed these tools; I have a journeyman who uses the same sort of tools, and I know these are mine - I did not miss them till I was told of it.

JOHN WHITTAKER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker; these tools were pawned at my employer's; I took in this plane of the prisoner on the 25th of November.

THOMAS HENRY WESTCOTT. On the 10th of December, I took the prisoner, and found in his pockets six duplicates, three of which are for these articles; I charged him with taking the tools; he said "I do not deny it."

Prisoner. Q. You never asked whether I had pawned the planes? A. Yes I did, and you said I do not deny it.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been left in the house with his master's son, who was a notorious pick-pocket, and had been twice in prison, and he had persuaded

him to pawn the tools to raise money he had received on his master's account, and which the son had taken from him.

WILLIAM GLIBBERY re-examined. Q. Is there any truth in this? A. There may be in some parts, but the principal part I can stoutly deny; he behaved well for about six months, but he is a most notorious liar, my son-in-law has been wild, but I can declare the prisoner has been 100l. out of my way; I have heard that my son has been charged at Clerkenwell, but not till lately - I should think that has nothing to do with this case; I can swear to these planes and this tool.

THOMAS PAUL. I know these tools to be the prosecutor's property; I missed them about the time the prisoner was taken to Bow-street.

THOMAS HENRY WESTCOTT. The prisoner said he certainly had taken them, and said to one of the sons as we were going to Bow-street, "You have done for yourself now."

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-193

427. JAMES LINCH was indicted for embezzlement .

VALENTINE SIMMONS . The prisoner was in my employ on the 9th of December; he was to receive money for me, which it was his duty to bring to me directly. I sent him at ten o'clock that morning to Messrs. Salt's, the bankers, and desired him to make haste back; he was to get 18l. 7s. 6d. for a cheque - he never returned, and I did not see him again till the 21st; when his wife had committed some assault, and he went to bail her - my servant saw him, and gave charge of him; he had been eight months in my service.

FREDERICK RIDLER. I paid this cheque on the 9th of December to a man, I think between eleven and twelve o'clock; I cannot swear to the person.

VALENTINE SIMMIONS. This is the cheque - when he was brought to me he said his wife had got 10l, which he would give me the next day - I said to him, "You are a pretty fellow, what is the reason you did not return with the money?" I am sure I said that; he said he was very sorry, he had been robbed of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home with the money, and was very thirsty - I went and got something to eat and drink - when I came out I had lost the money in the public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-194

428. JOHN BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , certain fixtures, (i.e.) 3 window sashes, value 30s., the goods of Daniel Cornthwaite and others, and being fixed to a building; against the Statute .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of John Stratton and others.

DANIEL CORNTHWAITE . I have a house, No. 6. Haberdasher-street, Hoxton , which belongs to myself, my brother, and sister - I lost the sashes out of that house; I know they are ours.

HANNAH PARKER . On the 28th of December I saw the prisoner go into the prosecutor's house, about half-past two o'clock in the day, and cut a sash from the back parlour; he took out the beading, took down the sash, and cut the ropes.

THOMAS CLINKSCALES . I went to the house from Parker's information - just as I got there the door gently opened, and there was the prisoner - I asked what he wanted; he begged me to let him go, as he had a wife and a large family - Hampton took him; I looked inside, and found these three sashes tied up.

WILLIAM HAMPTON. On the 28th of December I went with this witness - we saw the door opening; the prisoner came out, and I caught him - he begged me to let him go; we took him to the watch-house, returned, and found the sashes.

JAMES PINKERTON. I received the prisoner in charge; I went to the house, and found the three sashes, which fitted exactly in the places, and the cutting of the ropes matched - I found on the prisoner a key, a turnbuckle, and a knife.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-195

429. JOHN GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 45lbs. weight of butter, value 37s., and one tub, value 1s. , the goods of Joshua Needham .

JOSHUA NEEDHAM . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Shoreditch - I lost the tub of butter on the 28th of November; I did not know of it till the 11th of December, when my servant told me - I saw it at Mr. Cox's, and could swear to the tub.

GEORGE TAYLOR. I am a watchman of Shoreditch. On the 28th of November I was standing at the corner of Church-street, a little before seven o'clock in the morning; I saw the prisoner and another man walking together; I followed them; they both came together - just before I came up, the prisoner hung back, and got before me; I asked what he was about; he made no answer - I collared the other man, who had the tub of butter; he threw it back, which broke my hold, and he ran away - I pursued, but lost them both; I took the butter to the watch-house -I suppose it was thirty or forty yards from Mr. Needham's where I saw them; I inquired, but could not find any one who had lost it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You never saw the prisoner with any tub? A. No, the other person had it - the prisoner was with him at first; it was Saturday morning, and many people were about with carts.

COURT. Q. What did you see the prisoner do? A. Nothing; but when I went to make up to the man who had the butter, he got before me, and tried to prevent my getting to him.

JOHN JOHNSON . I received information from Taylor that the prisoner was wanted, and I took him.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . I received the butter from Taylor.

WALTER COLLETT . I am servant to the prosecutor. I had selected this cask out for a customer - I did not think of telling Mr. Needham of it till the 11th of December; I had mentioned it to every one but him.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any other person in the shop but you? A. Yes, one more, and Mr. Needham at times - here is G.T. on it, which means George Topham ; I had selected it for him - this T.N. is the importer's name; I can say this was not sold in the regular way.

COURT. Q. When did you mark it? A. On the 26th of November, and I saw it safe at half-past six o'clock the next morning; George Topham was to call for it on the 30th.

WILLIAM COX. Mr. Harris left this tub at my house, but I was not at home - I found Mr. Needham to be the owner.

JOHN HARRIS . The tub was brought to the watch-house, and I left it at Mr. Cox's - this looks like the tub I left, but it has no private mark on it.

COURT to GEORGE TAYLOR . Q. Did you take any notice of the tub? A. No, I took it to the watchhouse, and delivered it to the officer of the night.

Prisoner to JOSHUA NEEDHAM. Q.Did not you say if I would tell you the person who took the butter, you would forgive me? A. Yes, certainly, because I was afraid I had a party in my house who might have assisted in removing it; he said he knew nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-196

430. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 pair of scales, value 5s. , the goods of William Henry Wiley ; and that at the Delivery of his Majesty's Gaol of Newgate, on Thursday, the 3rd of December, in the 10th year of his present Majesty's Reign, he was convicted of felony.

WILLIAM HENRY WILEY. I am a tobacconist , and live in St. Giles' . On the 6th of January my wife saw the prisoner cut the string - she ran out, and took the scales from him.

ELIZABETH WILEY . I saw the prisoner in the shop as I was in the back parlour, and heard the scales rattle - the prisoner had the scales, which he had cut, in one of his hands, and the knife in the other; I asked him why he did it - he said "A pinch of snuff;" I said that was not the way to get it - my husband told him to go out of the shop, and he did; about one o'clock in the morning the Police-man came, and asked if it was the same man - I said Yes; he said he should certainly take him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to ask for a pinch of snuff - I had not 1d. to buy it; I did not take the scales - I lived thirty-three years in Portsmouth, and had not a blemish on my character; I had freehold property to the amount of 3000l.; since the peace I have been reduced.

JOHN EBLING . I produce a copy of the record of the prisoner's conviction last Session, and he had a month's imprisonment; I know he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 65. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300114-197

431. DANIEL BUDD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 90 yards of linen cloth, value 2l. 12s. , the goods of Humphrey Sexton .

HUMPHREY SEXTON . I am a linen-draper , and live in Hackney-road . On the 19th of December, about four o'clock, I lost a piece of Scotch sheeting from the step of my door - I had seen it in the morning; this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Are you in a large way of business? A.Not particularly so; here is the private mark on it, made with my own hands.

JOHN MATAULE . I am a waiter at the Durham Arms. I saw the prisoner and two others walking by the shop; I saw the prisoner take this cloth from the step of the door under his arm; he carried it across the road, and put it on his shoulder - he went down another street; I and Mr. Sexton went after him - we met him and his companions with the cloth; I carried the cloth to the officer's house.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him before? A. No, but I had seen him the day previous; I was carrying the porter out when I saw him - it was rather darkish.

JOHN MAUNDER . I took the prisoner - he did not say he had purchased the linen.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy, having a good character.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-198

432. EMILY ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 1 pelisse, value 2s.; 1 piece of net, value 6d.; 1 night-cap, value 6d.; 1 penknife, value 6d.; 1 thimble, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 4d., and the sum of 6s. 6d. in copper monies , the property of William Thomas , her master.

MARY THOMAS . I am the wife of William Thomas ; the prisoner was in my service, but had left me on the Monday before the 17th of December; I asked her to open her box, as I had missed a spoon - she opened it; I found this property in it - she said she was very sorry to say the articles were mine; this knife was in her pocket - the thimble and copper were tied up in a paper.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18300114-199

433. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing on the 9th of January , 17 handkerchiefs, value 10s. , the goods of John Joseph Ing .

JOSEPH CRAFT. I am a shopman to John Joseph Ing - he keeps a linen-draper's shop in Mount-pleasant . On the evening of the 9th of January, I saw the prisoner and two others inside the door - the prisoner pulled down this parcel, and dropped one piece just inside the door - I followed, and took him; the other got away - I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner. When I got to Warner-street he did not know whether it was me or not. Witness. I am certain of his person; I had seen him inside the door.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The mob ran, and I ran with them.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18300114-200

434. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 tub, value 3s. , the goods of James Finch .

JAMES FINCH. I lost a tub on the 15th of December, from the side of my door, on Eyre-street-hill - I did not see it taken; this is it.

EDWARD PROBERT. On the 15th of December I saw the prisoner take the tub from Mr. Finch's door; I took her with it - she said she picked it up.

WILLIAM WILSON. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner and the tub.

Prisoner's Defence. I am coming down Eyre-streethill I saw this tub, and no one belonging to it; I took it, and they stopped me - I said, "If it is yours, you shall have it;" I did not steal it; I was in great distress, and could not get relief.

GUILTY . Aged 61. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18300114-201

435. EDWARD THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 umbrella, value 6s. , the goods of Robert Williams .

JOHN CATMORE. On the 21st of December I was in Mr. Robert Williams ' shop, who is an umbrella manufacturer , at a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening- I saw a man stand on the step, put his arm round, and take the umbrella - I followed him; he ran out, and gave it to the prisoner, who was about three doors from the shop; I took him with it.

THOMAS VATER. I took the prisoner in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-202

436. WILLIAM WRIGHT and JOHN HAWKES were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 2 pairs of stays, value 11s. , the goods of William Williams .

CHARLES GREEN. I live in Union-street, Middlesex Hospital. I met the prisoners on the 11th of December, at ten minutes after five o'clock; I watched them - they attempted several shops; I saw them go to Mr. William Williams' - Wright took a pair of stays down, and gave them to Hawkes; he then came back, and took another pair; I took Wright, and the officer took Hawkes,

JAMES AUSTICE. I am an errand-boy. On the 11th of December I was coming down Tottenham-court-road, and saw Wright take a pair of stays, and give them to Hawkes; he then took another pair, went over the way to a public-house, and was taken there.

WILLIAM WILSON. I am the officer. I took Wright, then went, and took Hawkes with the two pairs of stays.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Wright's Defence. I was in the public-house, and the officer came and took me; a person said the other prisoner had got them - he let me go, and took him.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 21.

HAWKES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-203

Fourth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

437. JAMES DUFF and CHARLES MORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 16lbs. of beef, value 9s. , the goods of William Bransgrove ; and that, at the Delivery of His Majesty's Gaol of Newgate, on Thursday, the 10th of September, in the 10th year of His Majesty's Reign, the said James Duff was convicted of felony, by the name of Francis Duff .

GEORGE PATERSON. I live with Mr. William Bransgrove , a butcher , of Rose-street, Covent-garden . On the evening of the 9th of December I was taking care of the shop - there was no one at home but me; I saw the two prisoners walking up and down about the door for about a quarter of an hour; Duff then came to me, and said, "Is your master out;" I said Yes - he then came and wanted to play with me, and to tickle me; Morris was walking up and down by the wine-vaults next door - Morris then said,"I should like a mutton-chop for my supper;" I said he should have it if he paid for it - he laughed at that; they walked up and down, and wanted me to play with them - they had made a mess before the door, and I took the broom to sweep it away; the handle came out - Duff took the broom, threw it through the window, and broke it; he then put his hand into the window, and I thought he wanted to steal something - they then came into the shop, and Duff held me down and put saw-dust into my mouth, while Morris took a rump of beef and ran off with it, and in a few minutes Duff ran away; they were taken in about a quarter of an hour - my master never got his rump of beef; I am sure they are the men - I had seen them about before.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.Then you knew Duff? A. I had seen him about, and knew his name - I do not know whether it was what they call larking - Duff staid in the shop a minute or two; I saw Morris reach his hand up, take the beef, and put it on his right shoulder; Duff was with me till Morris was gone; a man came to the shop and asked me if I had lost any thing, but I did not think of this at that minute - I thought he meant something off the block; that was about five minutes after: I know the consequences of an oath, and swear I saw the beef taken, but when the man came I thought he meant something off the block - I did not think of this at that time; this happened between eight and nine o'clock - I saw the prisoners again in a coffee-shop in Bedfordbury, a little before nine; I said they were the men - I looked round the shop to see if I had lost any thing when the person came to ask me, and I began to cry; I thought my master would be very angry.

COURT. Q.There was a rump of beef hanging up, and it was gone? A. Yes.

THOMAS YOUNG. I sell hardware in the market. On the night of the 9th of December I saw the two prisoners running about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's - Duff was running first: he called out, "Charley, you make haste on;" Morris said, "D-n you, I am making haste;" Morris had a rump of beef on his shoulder, and the hook fell out of it - I took up the book, and went to the prosecutor's shop; this boy was standing outside.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this? A. Between eight and nine o'clock; it was dark, but I know both the prisoners - they lived in the neighbourhood; I went to the shop, and saw the boy - I asked if he had lost any thing, and at first he said No; I said, "Has there not been two men here?" he then burst out into very heavy tears, and said, "I have lost a rump of beef;" he was crying at the door when I first went - he said his mouth had been crammed with saw-dust.

RICHARD GRANTHAM . I keep a coffee-shop in Bedfordbury. The prisoners came to my shop on the night in question, and brought in some ragged pieces of beef, not much like a rump - I should think there were 3lbs. or 4lbs. of it; I did not see any bone - they filled the fryingpan with it twice; it was about a quarter-past nine o'clock- my shop is about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's; the Police-man came and took them.

Cross-examined. Q. Then they brought no more steak than would serve two men? A. I do not know; the Police-men took it away, and eat it the next day.

WILLIAM BRANSGROVE. It is my shop - I returned home at a quarter after nine o'clock, and missed a rump of beef, with a bone in it, weighing about 16 lbs.

Duff's Defence. I left work a little after eight o'clock, and met Morris at the corner of New-street, Covent-garden - he had some steaks, which he said he bought in Clare-market, his father was not at home, and he was going to cook them at a public-house; I said, "I am going to a

coffee-shop, if you like to go there you may;" we went there, and I had a bit on a bit of bread - I had no plate; the officer came and took me - I was earning 5s., or 6s. a day: if I stood on a scaffold instead of here I should say I was innocent - the boy says he saw Morris take the meat, and if I held his head down how could he see it; I declare before God, my maker, I had no act in it.

Morris' Defence. I bought the steaks in Clare-market- I met Duff, who said he was going to a coffee-shop; I said, "I am going to have some steaks, if you like to have any you may;" they were just turned out of the pan when the officer came and took us.

ROBERT PAYNE . I produce a certificate of the conviction of Duff, by the name of Francis Duff , for stealing a coat and a pair of trousers of his master's; he was sent for six weeks to the House of Correction - I took him, and gave evidence on the trial.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you speak from a recollection of his person? A. Yes - he is the same person who was then tried; he said they had put his name wrong.

DUFF - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

MORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-204

438. JAMES POWELL was indicted for stealing, On the 1st of January , 1 watch, value 20l.; 1 watch-chain, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 4l.; 1 watch-key, value 10s., and 2 rings, value 10s. , the goods of James Foley ; and that he had been previously convicted of felony.

ANN FOLEY . I am the wife of James Foley - he lives in Trinity-place, Borough . On the 31st of December, the prisoner was at my house - he had been there once or twice before; he called that day to pay me a debt of 3s. 6d. - he waited till my husband came home; my husband asked me the time - I looked, and told him it was twenty minutes past five o'clock; I then closed the drawer with the watch in it - my husband went out for some tobacco; I then left the room, and the prisoner in it near the drawer - he staid about twenty minutes longer, then took his hat and went away in haste; after he was gone about twenty minutes I missed the watch, the chain, two seals, and a key.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. The prosecutor came to the office and got a search-warrant; I went to the prisoner's house on Saffron-hill - he is a marine-store dealer; he was sitting smoking his pipe in his back-parlour - while I was searching I turned and found he had decamped; we went out, and I traced by the snow that he had gone to the next yard - Duke staid there while I went into the next house, and found him in a cupboard; he made great resistance - I was surrounded by about six people, and had great difficulty in making a capture of him; I lost my hat and handkerchief for some time - here is the watch; I found it under the window in his back room under some old iron.

ROBERT DUKE. I was with Waddington, and was holding the candle to him; I turned, and the prisoner was gone - what has been stated is correct; he denied knowing any thing about it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. She said she would be a mother to my young man, and she would be glad to have such an one; she and I sat drinking gin and water at the fire that day as we had done at every meeting, and Foley came home unexpectedly.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, representing that he was in the habit of visiting the prosecutrix in her husband's absence: that on the day in question he was intoxicated, and she proposed to go and live with him, intimating that he could have the plate and watch; that she frequently put the watch into his hand, and on getting home, and becoming sober next morning, he found he had brought it away.

THOMAS COPE. I am an officer. I have an examined certificate of the former conviction of the prisoner; I attended and know he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 47. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300114-205

439. EDWARD BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 picture, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Bayes ; and that, at the Delivery of his Majesty's Gaol of Newgate, on Thursday, the 9th of August, in the 10th year of his present Majesty's reign he was convicted of felony.

THOMAS BAYES . I am a broker , and live in Tottenham-street ; I know this picture to be mine.

SAMUEL COBHAM, I am an oilman, and live near the prosecutor's shop. I saw the prisoner on the 8th of January look into his shop, and take this picture, put it under his right arm and walk towards my house; when he came to my door I took him with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have no other way of getting my living.

SAMUEL MOUNTSTEVENS . I produce a certificate of the former conviction of the prisoner - I know him to be the person.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300114-206

440. THOMAS CREED and HENRY HOBSON were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 5 lbs. weight of flour, value 3s.; 1 bag, value 2d., and 4lbs. weight of beef, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William McBean .

EDWIN BATCHELOR. I live next door to Mr. William McBean. On the evening of the 4th of December I was standing at my door at nine o'clock, and saw Hobson at the rails; in a few minutes Creed came out of the prosecutor's house with a white bag, which he gave to Hobson, who put it under his coat, and they both ran down the street together - Mrs. McBean came to the door, and I told her - I knew Creed before and had seen Hobson.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Were you at the Police-office? A. Yes; I said I thought they were the men - I did not like to say before their face that they were the men, but when they were away I said I was sure they were; I am thirteen years of age - I had not known Hobson long; I did not say I was afraid the officer would beat me if I did not say they were the men.

ELIZABETH McBEAN . I am the wife of William McBean; he keeps a pie-shop. On the day in question, a little before nine o'clock, we had a bag in our shop which contained about five quarterns of flour, and by the side of it about six pounds of meat; I was in the back parlour, and heard a noise - I went out and missed them; I have never seen them since.

WILLIAM GANNON. I am a Police-constable. I was going round about nine o'clock; the witness called me and said she had lost the flour; I ran down two or three streets, but could see nothing of it - I told another Policeman, came back, and this boy gave me a description of them; I took the prisoners about ten o'clock - there was a mark of flour on Hobson's waistcoat.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Hobson? A. Yes; when I lived in Chelsea he was waiter at the Woodman and had a good character - this lad did not like to say any thing because he knew Creed.

Creed's Defence. I had carried a box to Baker-street and met Hobson as I returned; we were coming up Chapel-street, and the officer said to him, "I want you;" and he said to me, "You may as well come" - he took us to the shop, and the little boy said he did not think we were the persons.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-207

441. MARTIN FLANAGAN and JOHN KEYS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 4 locks, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of David White .

CORNELIUS LEARY. I know Mr. White's shop, in Gee's-court . On the 17th of December I saw the two prisoners going towards his shop; I saw each of them take a lock from the board outside his shop, and walk on - I followed them till the Police-man took them.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.What time was it? A.Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I live next door to the prosecutor - I was confined three months for a piece of timber.

WILLIAM IRELAND. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoners; I found all this property on Keys, none on Flanagan.

Cross-examined. Q. What is all this? A. Four locks, a knife, and a book; I took them eighty or a hundred yards from the prosecutor's.

DAVID WHITE. I had such locks as these, but they have no marks on them; I missed them when I was told of it.

Cross-examined. Q. How many did you miss? A. Four or five; we have them in a row - if one is taken we can tell; these are the same size as those I lost - perhaps there were eight or nine on the board; I have sold a great many locks - Mr. Leary lives next door; my house is very handy to him.

COURT. Q. Did you lose such locks as these? A. Yes; I believe these to be mine.

Key's Defence. I saw two boys running in Henrietta-street; they dropped these locks, and I took them up.

FLANAGAN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

KEYS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-208

442. JAMES GARDINER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 bridle, value 20s. , the goods of Samuel Wimbush and another; and that he had been previously convicted of felony.

RICHARD ROBERTS. I live with David Jones, a pawnbroker, in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. On the 14th of December the prisoner came and brought a bridle, which he offered to pawn - Mr. Jones asked him where he bought it; he said of a person in St. Martin's-lane, but he did not tell his name; we sent for an officer.

CHARLES MAHEW. I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I produce the bridle.

GEORGE JOELL. I live with Mr. Samuel Wimbush and his partner, in Oxford-street . They are job-masters and hackney-men ; I know this bridle to be theirs - it was lost out of a harness-room adjoining the stable on the 14th of December - the prisoner used to come to the yard to buy hay-bands; he came that day and asked for a man named Simmonds.

AUGUSTUS BETRAUN . I am an officer. I produce a certificate from Mr. Clark's office, of the conviction of the prisoner on the 10th of April, in the 10th year of his present Majesty's reign, for stealing a bridle; he had fourteen days' imprisonment in Newgate - I was a witness, and know he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18300114-209

443. CHARLES HATTON and THOMAS OAKES were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 4 fowls, value 4s. , the property of Thomas Warlters .

JOHN MORGAN . I am inspector of the Islington watch. On the 17th of December I was with a patrol at the foot of the canal bridge, and saw the two prisoners coming out of Mr. Rhodes's brick-field - I got off my horse and asked Cakes what he did in the field; he said he was looking for work - I examined his pockets, and found two fowls; the patrol searched Hatton, and found two fowls in his pocket, and a quantity of snares - this was about a mile and a half from the prosecutor's; I showed him the same fowls, and he owned them.

JOHN LOYEDER. I was with Morgan - what he has stated is correct; the fowls were dead.

WILLIAM BURROWS. I live with Mr. Thomas Warlters , at Holloway . On the evening of the 16th of December, his fowls were all safe in a cow-house, which opened in the yard - it had two doors, one was locked, and the other latched and bolted, and has a strong chain; I fastened it up at five o'clock in the evening - next morning I went, and they had got the fastenings of the door undone which was not locked, and six fowls were gone: I saw four of them at the watch-house, and knew them all, but one more particularly; here is the cock's head and leg - he had lost one eye, and was lame in the foot; I know nothing of the prisoners.

Oakes Defence. We went to Islington, and a man employed us to go through the tunnel, and asked us to take four fowls in lien of money.

HATTON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

OAKES - GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-210

444. JOHN PETER JUNGCLAUSEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 2 yards of woollen cloth, value 16s. , the goods of Emanuel Charles Josephs .

SARAH JOSEPHS . I am the wife of Emanuel Charles Josephs , he lives at Brook-hill . On the 28th of December, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, I went into the parlour to put on the children's dinner, and before I could cut the potatoes, I saw two men in the shop; I went into the shop, and caught the prisoner at the threshold with this blue cloth under his arm; the other man got away -I said to the prisoner, "You have got my cloth;" he said No, and shoved me; I caught hold of him, and he

dragged me out at the door - I called my neighbour, who took him.

THOMAS MORFORD. I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner, and have the cloth.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN KILBY. I live opposite the prosecutor; I went up and took the cloth from under the prisoner's arm - he made great resistance.

Prisoner's Defence. A man met me near the door, and asked me to buy a piece of cloth for 12s. - I said I had not got that. but I had a pair of shoes and a handkerchief which I had bought, and 5s., and if he would take that for it I would have it; this woman came and said it was hers - I said it belonged to that man, and he ran away.

GUILTY. Aged 20. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18300114-211

445. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 5lbs. weight of pork, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of George Barkwith .

WILLIAM BINDON. I live with Mr. George Barkwith . of Duke-street, Lincoln's-Inn-fields . On the 20th of December, between twelve and one o'clock, we were cleaning the door; a woman pushed the door open - the prisoner put his hand in behind the woman, and took the pork off the book; he put it under his right arm, and I pursued him - he took it out and held it to me, but it dropped.

RICHARD TICKRIDGE . I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work some months, and had had no victuals for two or three days.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-212

446. JOHN KEMBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 book, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Henson .

HENRY HEMMINGS . I live with Mr. Charles Henson , a bookseller , of Rathbone-place . At half-past two o'clock on the 14th of December, the prisoner came and took a book off the shelf in the window; he walked away, and I took him about twelve yards off, with it under his coat.

JAMES THOMPSON . I am a Police-officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a man in the street- this young man saw me make the bargain, and said the book belonged to him.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-213

447. PETER PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 2 rabbits, price 3s. , the property of Samuel Hoinville .

JOHN BARBER. I live with my father in Bethnal-green ; I know the prisoner by sight; the prosecutor's house is about half a mile from my father's. On the 15th of December, the prisoner came to my father and brought two rabbits, which he wanted to sell; I said my father was not at home - he staid till my father came in; he wanted 5s. - my father said, "Can't you take 3s?" he said, "Will you give another shilling?" my father said No - he took them out, and in about five or ten minutes he sent another young man, who said we should have them for 3s.

HENRY PIGE . I was in Mr. Barber's shop; the prisoner first brought the rabbits in, and then another young man came and brought them - these are them.

SAMUEL HOINVILLE . I keep rabbits; I lost these from the hutches in my yard in Henrietta-street, Hackney-road - I know they are mine.

GEORGE MILLER . I know the prisoner; I met him at the corner of Brick-lane - he said, "Take these to Mr. Barber's he has offered 3s., for them, and I will give you something for your trouble;" I was taken, and the prisoner was taken also.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 15th of December, I got up at seven o'clock in the morning, and in turning up Church-street I saw a man with a basket, who asked me if I could get a customer for these rabbits; he said if I would go to Brick-lane, there were two or three shops - I said I could not; he then said I should have them for 3s. - I said I had but 2s. 6d.; he took that for them, and when I had had my breakfast, I took them to Mr. Barber's, who offered me 3s. - I went to another place, but could not sell them; I then saw this young man, and asked him to take them to Mr. Barber's - he came out, and said they would not buy them of him, they wished to see the man they belonged to; I then thought they were stolen and would not go in.

GUILTY . Aged 21. Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18300114-214

448. JOHN POOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of December , 1 tea-caddy, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Hall ; and MARTHA LAVER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

JANE HALL. I am daughter of Thomas Hall, of George's-buildings, Old-street-road . On the 7th of December I was going into the back parlour - I saw Poole in the shop, and two boys were outside; Poole took this tea-caddy from a table, and threw it to a boy out of the shop - I pursued, and took hold of him: three or four blackguard young men came up, and reseued him from me - I do not know what became of the caddy; the boys he threw it to had run away - I went back to the shop; Poole was brought in in about ten minutes with it.

WILLIAM HILL . I am a baker, and live in George-street.? On the 7th of December, at a quarter before eleven o'clock, I was going down Old-street; I saw a mob, and inquired what was the matter - from what I heard I went in search of two boys I suspected, and saw this caddy in Laver's window; I asked who brought it-she said a boy had left it for a short time, and he was coming again - while I was waiting at Hall's, a young woman brought Poole in; I gave the caddy and the two prisoners to an officer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then Laver gave you answer directly? A. Yes, and told what she knew about it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

POOLE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

LAVER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18300114-215

449. MARY SCANNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, 1 shilling, 1 sixpence, and 1 penny , the monies of David Fife .

DAVID FIFE . I am a labourer . On Monday night, the 14th of December, I was going home, and fell in with the prisoner in Whitechapel, between ten and eleven o'clock at night - she accosted me; I went home with her to Went-

worth-street - I gave a man 1s. for the bed in an up stairs room; I gave the prisoner a compliment before I went to bed - I had a sovereign, a half-sovereign, and about 2s. in my fob; I put my breeches in a chair in the corner of the room, and went to hed; I was not drunk, nor yet sober -I felt my money safe while I was in the room; the prisoner went to bed with me - I awoke about three o'clock in the morning by something falling on the floor; the prisoner was then up; I said, "What is that?" she said nothing, and came to bed again; I said, "You have been robbing me;" I got up, felt my breeches, and the pocket was cut open - I then accused her; she cried out for the landlord, got up, and wanted to get away; the landlord called the watchman, who came, and I had the prisoner in my arms, crying, at the door - the watchman searched, and found exactly the money I had lost, between the bed and the sacking.

JAMES SUTHERLAND . I was called, and found the witness and the prisoner; he accused her of robbing him of a sovereign, a half-sovereign, and about 2s.; she denied it -I searched and found this money under the bed, on the sacking.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him in Whitechapel-road, he gave me 1s., and said he would give me half a crown the next morning; after he got to bed, he got out and put his money away - he then said I had robbed him; the watchman found the money where he had put it.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18300114-216

450. ELLEN WARREN was indicted, for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 pair of trousers, value 4s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 gown, value 4s.; 7 yards of cotton, value 5s; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; and 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. ; the goods of James Murphy .

HANNAH MURPHY. I am the wife of James Murphy. On the night of the 4th of January I went out for about half an hour; the prisoner lodged in the same house with me on Saffron-hill ; I had left my door open, and when I returned, I missed all this property; I found it at the pawnbroker's.

MR. LEE. Q. Are you married? A. Yes; I sometimes have my doors locked; I never authorized her to pawn any thing, nor suspected her.

GEORGE MOXON. I am a pawnbroker; I have a pair of trousers, a silk handkerchief, seven yards of cotton, a gown, a pair of shoes, and a waistcoat, pawned on the 5th of January; the cotton, handkerchief, and trousers, by the prisoner, two in the prosecutor's name, and one in the name of Donnahue.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. No; she pawned some of these at a quarter before eight o'clock on the 5th of January; she was in the shop five minutes - there were other persons there; I can swear she is the same woman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She brought up two Police-men, and one of them asked if she suspected this woman; she said she is the stoutest woman I can find - I took them into my bed-room, and overhauled every thing; I then went with them to this pawnbroker's, and he said I pawned them- "Look back to your conscience (says I) and do not say that I ever was in your place."

GUILTY . Aged 45. Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18300114-217

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Justice Gaselee.

451. JAMES WELCH , GEORGE LEWIS , and WILLIAM WALKER were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Brown , on the 20th of December , and stealing 9 cheeses, value 9l. , his property.

WILLIAM BROWN. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Ratcliff-highway . On Sunday morning, the 20th of December, about nine o'clock, when I got up, a person rang my bell, and said my house was broken open; I found the bar of the shutter forced, and a large square of glass broken out of the window - there was room for a person to go through; it was fast the night before; I found the things turned over one another in the shop, and missed nine cheeses - my house is at the corner of Pell-street; I had heard a noise about seven o'clock, but did not think my house could be broken open at that hour, and took no notice; the glass was jagged, as if a hand had been forced through, and blood on it. Captain Williams , of Pell-street, gave me two cheeses, which were left at his door.

ROBERT YOUNG. I string shoes, and am nearly fourteen years old - I live in Thomas-place, Pell-street. On Sunday morning, the 20th of December, between seven and half-past seven o'clock, I was sweeping the snow from the door, and heard a disturbance in the street; I ran to the bottom of the court, and saw two men in Pell-street, carrying cheeses - they were so heavily loaded that they rested, and left two cheeses at Captain Williams ' door, which is nearly opposite; they carried the rest up the street, rested, and changed arms by the pump - they turned to the right; I watched them half way up Christian-street, and lost sight of them - I first saw them about a dozen doors from Brown's, and coming in a direction from there; they came back in a quarter of an hour for the other two cheeses, and knocked at Captain Williams ' door three times, but he would not let them have them - I had seen him take the cheeses in five minutes after they left them there; they both went up the street together, and I saw no more of them - I had seen them before, but did not know their names; about a quarter of an hour after they had gone, a man came up, and asked if I had seen two men go along with some cheeses - I said No; he ran up the street, met one of them, and said, "Halloo! how get you on?" the other said,"Oh, very well," and both went up the street together; Welch was the third man - Walker and Lewis are the men I saw in the street with the cheeses; I saw Lewis that night at the Sweedish Flag, Princes-street, and saw Welch there on Monday morning; I had only seen Walker once before, but Lewis three or four times - they were in my sight about ten minutes; I am sure of all three.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was it not rather foggy? A. No, it was snowy; the disturbance was they kept saying, "I will go and fetch a knot;" I was asked at the office to point out who had the cheeses - I do not think I touched all three, but cannot be certain; I had seen Walker once; it might be a year before.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long after you saw them with the cheeses did you see Welch? A. A quarter of an hour; he came from Ratcliff-highway - that was in a direction from Brown's.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.Did the officer

tell you you were going to see somebody suspected of the robbery? A. Yes, he told me he was going to take me to see if I knew the men - I went into the tap-room to see them; I had seen Lewis a week or a fortnight before - I told the Magistrate he had a dark dirty blue coat on; I recollect having said it was black.

COURT. Q. Why do you now say it was dirty blue? A.Because the gentleman told me to think; I did not call it to mind just at that moment - at first I thought it was blue; now I recollect it was a dirty black - Welch was in a rough white coat, and Walker in a sailor's jacket; I heard Mr. Brown had been robbed, and went and told him- Lewis' mother lives in Betsey-street; I believe he lives with her.

JOSEPH WHOWELL . I am fourteen years old, and live in Pennington-street; I was going by Pell-street about seven o'clock, and saw two men standing up by Mr. Brown's shutters, in Pell-street; Lewis stood by the door, as if he was drunk; he said to me, "Little boy, can you tell me where Wellclose-square is?" he had his clothes down almost - he said, "If you do I will give you a halfpenny;" I said, "Yes, Sir," and he gave me a halfpenny; I showed him the square, but he did not go on, and I noticed him, seeing him drunk, and the two men by the shutter - I thought something was the matter; a sailor came by, and he asked him the same question, and in two or three minutes I thought I heard a smash - I would not go back, as I thought something was the matter, and they would do something to me; I was coming down Rosemary-lane, about half-past eight o'clock, and saw the three prisoners and a lot more men; I turned to look at them, and Walker up with his foot and kicked me - I could not move for about two minutes; I then went home; I said nothing to any body, but on Monday morning, when I went out for coals, I went and told Mr. Brown's son what I had seen - he asked me to come over presently; I did not like, but on Tuesday Brown and Prendergass fetched me to Lambeth-street, but I was not examined till the next time -Lewis was dressed in a blue coat; I did not see Walker and Welch so particularly then, but I saw their dress -Walker had a blue jacket and trousers, and a light waistcoat; Welch had a white coat, gaiters, and boots, like a carman - when the glass broke Lewis went off; I did not see what became of the others - I had not seen either of them before; I speak to them by their dress, and looking at them; the man who gave me the halfpenny said, "Go up to No. 47, in that alley, and I will come and give you such a tuck out" - the alley is in the square; this was a little before I heard the glass break - I did not go to the alley; there are not above twenty houses in it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you have no great kindness towards Walker for kicking you? A. No; I know he is the man that did the robbery - I saw him up the street; I would not wish to do him any harm or good; Prendergass took me to the watch-house - they told all the men to stand up, but I could not see exactly; there were about fourteen - I told the officer directly I came out that black-eyed Billy, which was the name I understand he goes by, was the man who kicked me; I did not know them exactly in a moment, and said I did not know them - the three were afterwards brought into the office by themselves; I was told they were the men suspected; I am not certain who said so - it was one of the officers, but I knew them by their dress; I could see them better then - the Magistrate did not ask me any questions the first time.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. After saying you could not speak to them exactly, did not one of the officers say, "We have got the wrong men?" A. Not in my hearing.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Are you quite sure it was a blue coat? A. Yes, I am sure two were in blue, and one like a carman; I did not go to Brown on Sunday, as his shop is never open - I was never in trouble.

COURT. Q. How long was the first examination after the second? A. I went first on Tuesday - I was examined, I believe, on the Thursday week after.

SAMUEL PRENDERGASS. I belong to Lambeth-street office. I saw MR. Brown on Sunday night, and about six o'clock went to Young's - in consequence of what I heard from him I apprehended Lewis that evening, and Welch next morning, and Walker on Tuesday, in consequence of Young's description; he identified Lewis at the Swedish Flag, Welch next morning, and Walker at night - on Wednesday morning the prosecutor sent Walker a pint of porter - he held out his left hand to take it; I asked him to put out his right hand - he did so, and the middle knuckle was cut; I asked how it was done - he said with striking his old woman: I saw her on Wednesday, and she had no visible marks of violence - the first examination was on Wednesday, the next on Monday, and the third on Thursday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not Walker tell you he had hit the wall in trying to strike the woman? A. He did not; I took Whowell to the lock - up place, but did not talk to him about the prisoners; I know a suspicious character, called Gipsy - he wears sailor's clothes, and every kind of dress; I did not tell Walker I was looking for Gipsy, and if I had found him I would not have taken him (Walker) - I told Whowell I was taking him to the lock-up place, to see if he could identify the men; Gipsy is taller than either of the prisoners - I have not been looking for him; he was in the house when I took Lewis, if I had wanted him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you mean to say you have not been looking after other persons? A. Not about this robbery, but in consequence of information which came from the prisoners in Newgate; I took Whowell to the lock-up place - we had about nine people there; I desired them all to stand up, and immediately he looked round he said, "None of the men are here;" as such we paid no more attention to him, but when they were coming out to be examined, he said,"Why, I can identify all these three men, they were in Mr. Brown's robbery" - that was immediately they were brought in; he was sworn, but what he said was not taken down then - I have heard him say he was not examined, but he was; he was fully examined the second day - Welch was in bed when I took him; he put on a pair of cord breeches, and a long fustian coat.

MR. BROWN. The cheeses were delivered to me by Captain Williams, who went to sea the next day; I have had them ever since - I lost seven more.

ROBERT YOUNG . Some of them were cheeses like these.

Welch's Defence. I can prove I was in bed at the time; when I was taken, the boy said he did not know me, except seeing me in the highway with two girls, on Sunday morning - Prendergass took him aside, then came to me, and said, "You are identified; the boy says you had top boots on, a long jacket, and was carrying four cheeses;" the boy could not be off knowing me, for I have stood in Princes-street four years - Prendergass said he was satisfied it was not me, and if he could have seen Gipsy, he should not have taken me.

Lewis and Walker both stated they could prove an alibi.

ANN MARTIN. My husband is a labourer at the London-docks. On the Sunday before Christmas-day, at five o'clock in the morning, Walker called on his uncle, who lodges with me, in Wells-place, Goodman's-fields; he wanted to go to Woolwich, to see his aunt, and they went out together in five minutes, to the Windmill public-house; I went to the Windmill at seven o'clock, and saw them there - it is about a quarter of mile from our house; I staid there with them till half-past eight - he then came home with us, and stopped at my house till twelve o'clock, and then went home.

COURT. Q.What enables you to say it was the 20th of December? A. I had a little boy lying ill, and have the doctor's bill to prove it.

JOHN MARTIN. Walker's uncle lodges with me. On the Sunday before Christmas-day, I and his uncle went with him to the Windmill, about twenty minutes after five o'clock, and staid there till about half-past eight - he then went to my house; he has an aunt and uncle at Woolwich, named Haines.

COURT. Q. What took you to a public-house at five o'clock on Sunday morning? A. We went to have something to drink - one of our young ones was ill, and we got up early - they did not go to Woolwich, as it was too late, and they had rather too much to drink; they returned to my house at half-past eight o'clock, and staid there till nearly two o'clock, as Walker was rather in liquor.

Q.When did you attend here for the first time? A. This is the first time; I was was not desired to come before- nobody has asked me to come now; this is the first time his uncle or my wife have come - I do not know