Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd December 1829.
Reference Number: 18291203
Reference Number: f18291203-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN CROWDER , MAYOR.

FIRST SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 3rd DAY OF DECEMBER, 1829, AND POLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY HENRY STOKES , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE,

1829.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON. AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable JOHN CROWDER , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Joseph Littledate, Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Vaughan , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; John Ansley , Esq.; George Scholey , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; John Garratt , Esq.; John Key, Esq., and William Taylor Copeland , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

William Marrott ,

Wm. Armstrong ,

Edward Pearse ,

Samuel Williams ,

John Raven ,

Frederick Syrett ,

James Almond ,

William Kilby ,

Edward Witham ,

John Lee ,

Thomas Downes ,

William Walker ,

Second

Thos. Bradberry,

Archib. Christie ,

Edward Collyer ,

Robert Nicholl ,

H. Eastman, jun.,

Samuel Swanhill ,

Josh. Southwood ,

Thomas Bunn ,

Ambrose Hakins ,

William Bestow ,

Jas. Yarlington ,

Joseph Smith .

Third

John Harwood ,

Christop. Stokes,

Alexander Black ,

Richard Suter ,

William Ford ,

W. S. Hutchinson ,

Thomas Kinder ,

Thos. Mc.Lallan ,

Charles Webb ,

Fred. Bennett ,

Samuel Butler ,

Jas. Chamberlain .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Peter Hall ,

John Hall ,

John Hughes ,

John Hodges ,

James Hawes ,

Chas. Hazledon ,

John Haddon ,

Henry Hamlin ,

A. B. Hopkins ,

John Hudson ,

George Hurrell ,

John Hudson .

Second

William Knight ,

Edward Keat ,

William Lewis ,

John Laxon ,

John Lucas ,

James Lindsay ,

John Land ,

Thomas Lovit ,

Richard Lellam ,

Benjamin Lea ,

James Liddon ,

Charles Lewis .

Third

Thomas Johnson ,

Francis Jacocks ,

Benjamin Jones ,

George Hen. Ive ,

Thomas Jones ,

Benjamin Ingram ,

Wm. R. Jones ,

John Ingram ,

John Jones ,

Matthew Kipling ,

Henry Kent ,

John Jenkinson .

Fourth

Samuel Evans ,

John Elliott ,

Thomas Anderson ,

R. Cruikshanks ,

Neale Dickenson ,

Robert Gibson ,

Wm. Garden ,

Samuel Green ,

James Garuham ,

John Gale ,

Matthew Garland ,

Thos. Gammage.

Fifth

John Goodge ,

John Grant ,

John Garnham ,

Benjamin Good ,

William Allam ,

Henry Hayes ,

William Holl ,

Richard Harris ,

William Holme ,

Elias Hoare ,

John Huss ,

William Hart .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 3, 1829.

CROWDER, MAYOR - FIRST SESSION.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

First London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

Reference Number: t18291203-1

1. THOMAS HOLBECK was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , at St. Sepulchre, 1 sheep, price 34s. , the property of Thomas Procter .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Benjamin Griffin .

THOMAS PROCTER. I am a master drover , and have been so for twenty years; the prisoner is a drover , and has worked for me off and on for two or three years. On the 2nd of November, about twelve o'clock in the day, I left him in Cock-lane, Smithfield , with two hundred and five sheep - he was to keep them there while I went for some more; he remained there about an hour, while I went and fetched twenty more to them - I had left another man with him, but he was at the bottom of the lane, and this man at the top; he delivered two hundred and four sheep to me, in about half an hour - he was merely to take care of them while I got the twenty; the one lost was a Linconshire wether, marked down the face and round the nose, with red ochre - I had only ten belonging to that butcher; I did not count them at the time he delivered them to me - I took them to different persons: the ten were to go to Queen's Elms, Chelsea, but when I got there, I had but nine - this was the same night; it belonged to Benjamin Griffin - I have never found the sheep or skin: I made inquiry, came to Smithfield next morning, and saw the prisoner that morning (Tuesday) between eleven and twelve o'clock, and said to him,"Holbeck, we want another sheep;" he stood still, and could not give an answer for ten minutes - he turned as white as a sheet; I said to him, "I shall go and get an officer, and give charge of you, for I think you are guilty;" while I was gone for an officer he ran away - the officer caught him on Saturday.

Q. How do you know he ran away? A.Because he could not be found - I and the officer went to twenty places to look for him.

HENRY SIMMONS . I work at Mr. Genelley's, imagemaker, Cock-lane. The prisoner came to me on Monday morning, the 2nd of November, and asked if my young master was at home; I said Yes, he was up stairs- he came back to me in a short time, and said my young master had given him leave to put a sheep in there; he did not see my master to my knowledge - a drove of sheep was in the lane; when he came the second time I saw them - he took one of the sheep out of the drove, and put it into the shop; I saw him do it, and said, "Mrs. Genelley is coming down stairs - she will make a noise about its coming through the shop;" he instantly threw it out again into the drove - I went round and opened our large gate where the cart comes in, he drove it in before him, and shut the gate after him - it was a very large sheep; I noticed a red mark down the face, but not round the nose - he left it there, and came with another man at dusk in the evening, and fetched it away; I went up and told mistress, that he had come for it - she said she dare say it was all right, and he took it away; I believe the mark was ochre.

GEORGE SIMMONS. I am the last witness' brother, and live at Geuelley's. I did not see the sheep brought; I had occasion to go into the mill-house, and saw it there in the afternoon - it was a large sheep, marked from the head down the nose, with red ochre, and then round the nose; I was in the mill-house with it for about an hour.

FRANCIS GITTINS . I am street-keeper of Smithfield, and was desired to apprehend the prisoner. I looked about for him every where, but could not find him till Saturday, when I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday, the 2nd of November, I was left with another person in care of the sheep; about a quarter to twelve o'clock, four or five sheep came running into the lane with a dog, which turned them all back except one, which got among our drove, and just after that I asked Mr. Genelley if I could put it into his yard - he said Yes; I went, and asked Simmons if I could put it in, and said his master had given me leave - he said Yes, and as I was getting it through the shop, he said Mrs. Genelley would be cross about it; I drove it out again, and drove it in at the gate, and said I would endeavour to find the owner - I went about the market, and told four or five people in the market I had a sheep which did not belong to me, and if they heard of one being lost to send the person to me; about four o'clock, a countryman, who is a drover. came to me, and described the marks - I went and showed him the sheep - he took it away; on the Tuesday, the prosecutor came to me at the Three Tuns, Smithfield, and said, "Where have you sold my sheep?" I said I did not know what he meant - I did not know he had

lost one; he repeated that I had sold his sheep - I told him I had left one at Genelley's, but he went away, and said"I shall give you in charge;" I went to find out the person who had it, but could not - I returned to the house, and he was not there; I do not live a quarter of a mile from the market, and was at home all the week: on Saturday I was taken at the same house; there was no mark on the nose - it was only down the face - I should think there are thousands of sheep marked in the same way; it is a very common practice among drovers to catch sheep when lost, and take care of them till somebody comes and describes their marks: when Mr. Procter came, he requested me to count the sheep out - I did so, and told him how many there were; he said they were all right; I met Henry Simmous in the market just as it was over, and he asked if I was going to take the sheep away - I said when the market was over I should go for it, but I had not found the owner; when the Simmons were asked about it they described the sheep in different ways.

JURY to HENRY SIMMONS. Q. Do you recollect whether the same sheep as he brought into the shop was put into the yard? A. I cannot say; he took it out of the drove - it stood on its legs, and ran about the mill-place, not like a worried sheep.

[Thursday, Dec. 3.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18291203-2

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

2. WILLIAM JAMES was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Delaney , at St. James, Westminster, about the hour of four in the night of the 2nd of November , with intent to steal the goods and chattels therein .

JOSEPH DELANEY. I keep a public-house in Great Windmill-street, Haymarket, in the parish of St. James . On the 2nd of November, I went to bed between twelve and one o'clock; I had secured the club-room windows about eight, and was the last person in the room; before I went to bed I went to take the glasses and the club-box out of the club-room - it is on the first floor: the windows were both safe - one looks into Archer-street, and the other into Windmill-street; they were fastened by a bar going across them: there was money in the club-box; I put out the lights, took the club-box into my bed-room, and went to bed in a few minutes - I was disturbed between four and five o'clock in the morning by the Police-officer knocking at my door; I went into the club-room, found the shutter partly broken away at the window in Archer-street- the window was thrown up, and part of the shutter broken away; that window was quite safe when I left the room - it is the middle window, and has four squares of glass on each side of it, one above the other; the window which was open is in the centre of them - it has three squares lengthways; there are twelve squares in the middle window; the squares on each side are fixed: the Police-officer has the part of the shutter which was broken off - that was broken off inside the room; the shutter goes over the whole window, which is five squares in length - it was not broken off at the part of the window which was thrown up, but at the side of the wall; the window had been thrown up first, and a hand put in to force the shutter away from the side, apparently by a chisel - the person must have been partly in the premises, or he could not get to that part of the shutter; his hand must have been partly inside the room to force the shutter off - he could not get at that part of the shutter without having a hand inside; there are leads about a foot and a half wide, on which he could stand, and throw up the window sash, and get his hand inside - there was no fastening to the sash; the bar of the shutter was not down - they had not time to do that, I suppose; the window was thrown up, and the shutter broken away from the side; the shutter had given way by being forced away inside, and that must have broken it where the hasp of the bar goes into: I am satisfied a hand had been inside the room at the side of the window - the window was down when I went to bed, and every thing secure.

JOSEPH SEAMAN . I am a Police-man. On the morning of the 3rd of November, between four and five o'clock, I was on duty in Rupert-street, and observed the shadows of three men at the upper part of Rupert-street; I observed them turn down Archer-street - I followed them in a few minutes, and on standing at the corner of Archer-street, I observed at the other end of Archer-street two men under Mr. Delaney's house, and one man on the leads; I made towards them, but the two men, I suppose, gave an alarm to the one on the leads, who instantly jumped down, and the three ran away - I followed them, and bad nearly got to them, when the one jumped down, one turned down Smith's-court, Windmill-street - I rather suspect that to be the prisoner; it was the man who was on the leads, I am positive - a man named Skelton (who was at Marlborough-street) stopped me at the end of the court, and dodged me, to prevent my pursuing; I cannot say he was one of the three men - I do not know what became of the other two men; I should not know the man again who ran down Smith's-court - the court is not a thoroughfare; I was within three yards of the man who ran down there, I should imagine -I remained at the end of Smith's-court, and directed Hobbs, the Police-man, who came up to my assistance, to go down the court, as there was a man down there - Hobbs came up the court again, with the prisoner; that was nearly ten minutes after I had seen a man go down the court - I was at the end of the court at the time the man who came off the leads ran down, and remained there till Hobbs brought the prisoner up - nobody went down there from the time he went down till Hobbs brought the prisoner out: we took him to the watch-house - I searched him there, and found on him a small piece of candle, in his coat pocket, which is here.

Prisoner. This man says he was not more than three yards from me - I should think he could tell whether I was the person who jumped off the leads - when I was apprehended he said I was not the person who jumped off the leads, for that person had no shoes on. Witness. I did not say he was not the person who jumped off, nor that he had no shoes on; I only said I was not certain as to the man.

Prisoner. He said two or three men ran down this coach-yard, and one person had no shoes on - he went back from the watch-house with two or three Police-men, to search for them. Witness. I did not say so - I said I left three Police-men there while I brought him to the watch-house, and that two or three of the Police had gone down after the prisoner, but no other person; we were sent out by the inspector to search the place where he was

concealed, not particularly to search for men, but for implements, or things of that kind; I did not say the man who jumped off the leads had no shoes - it was stated by a tallow-chandler, who was at work, that he supposed the man who ran down the court had no shoes on, by the lightness of his running; the prisoner had shoes on when brought to the watch-house.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a Police-man. On the 3rd of November I was on duty in Brewer-street, between four and five o'clock in the morning, and heard a rattle spring; I went down Windmill-street, and Seaman sent me up Smith's-court - I went and searched all the premises round the court; the doors were all shut and fast - it is no thoroughfare; I saw a dung-heap, and over that was a privy erected - I took my truncheon out of my pocket, put it round the dung-heap, and hallooed out "Come out;" I received no answer - I could see nobody there; I returned to a tallow-chandler who was at work in a court in Smith's-court, which is no thoroughfare, borrowed a lighted candle of him, returned to the dung-heap, and found the prisoner curled up underneath the flooring of the privy, laying on the dung; I said, "You d - d rascal, come out;" he put up his hands and robbed his eyes, just as if he was asleep, and said, "What do you take me for? what have I been doing?" I said, "You have been doing enough;.' I took him from the dung-heap to the watch-house, searched him, and found this chisel in his coat pocket; it was quite a dark night - I could not even see the dung, much more a countenance.

Prisoner. I told him I came there to ease myself, and had my breeches down at the time. Witness. He told me so - his breeches were unbuttoned, but not down at all - there is a privy seat for a man to ease himself, without going under on the dung.

GEORGE BLACKMAN. I am an inspector of the Police. I saw this chisel found on the prisoner by Hobbs, on the night of the 2nd of November - I afterwards went and examined Delaney's premises; I found two impressions on the folding shutters, which are inside the window - I fitted this chisel in the impression; it exactly corresponded with it - the piece of the shutter was left at Marlborough-street- it is not here: I fitted the chisel into the impression where the two small hinges of the folding-shutters go - I did not fit it on the piece of wood broken off; it was broken off at the hinges - the part broken off was brought to St. James' watch-house: I myself took off the part of the shutter the hinges were on - the part of the shutter which was broken off was at the hinges, and it exactly fitted the rest of the shutter.

Q. What was the state of the premises when you went there? A. Part of the shutter had been broken off - I did not fit the chisel to that, but to the part where the hinges go; that part remained fixed to the shutter - the part broken off was taken to the watch-house, and is not here.

Q. Did you fit the chisel to any part that remained at Delaney's house? A. No, only the part that was broken off - it was taken to Marlborough-street, and is not here; it is at Marlborough-street now.

Prisoner. I should wish the Jury to see it, for it does not correspond with the chisel, for I am sure it was never out of my pocket - I am certain it does not correspond. Witness. I am certain it did correspond.

JOSEPH DELANEY . The piece broken off was where the screws go into; it was at the watch-house with the other part, which was taken there - the chisel was not fitted into the part that was broken off, but to the part below that- I was not present when Blackman fitted the chisel; I saw the part of the shutter at Marlborough-street, and at St. James' watch-house; it was a part of the shutter which was broken off - there were two pieces of the shutter at St. James' watch-house, one which I found broken off, and another which I saw the chisel fitted to.

Prisoner. I am not satisfied about the shutter - he says it was broken off at the hinges and down the middle; if I broke it at the middle, what should I break it down the middle for? it was not done with that chisel - if I had used the chisel I could have made away with it while he went for the light: if I had done wrong with it I would not have had it about my person.

The prisoner then handed in a written Defence, as follows: I declare my innocence in the presence of God. Three days before I was apprehended I came from Watford, of which place I am a native, and served my time as a carpenter - I came to London to endeavour to procure employment, but got only a few days work at times. On the evening preceding the day mentioned in the indictment I went to the Theatre - on my return, I promiscously fell in with two females, and went to different public-houses, till my money was exhausted, and they left me; I was taken ill in my inside, and being intoxicated, went down this yard to ease myself; I was very drowsy, and am unconscious of how long I had been there. Having nothing but a chisel in my possession, I leave it to the Court to say whether I could be guilty of such a charge, and not conceiving I was committing any thing illegal in having such an implement in my possession.

[Thursday, Dec.3.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18291203-3

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

3. JAMES STEVENS , alias STEEDEN , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Robert Wissett , on the 11th of November , at St. Marylebone, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 14l. , his property.

JOSEPH METCALF. I am shopman to Charles Robert Wissett, a silversmith and jeweller , of No. 21, Upper York-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone - he keeps the house - the shop is part of the dwelling-house. On the 11th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I heard the shop window break; it was whole before, and not cracked- I ran out, and saw the prisoner running down the street; I followed him, calling Stop thief! up Circus-street, into Nelson's-place, and never lost sight of him, except while he turned the corner, and saw him again directly I turned- he stopped running, began to walk, and turned back the same way as he had run; I went up to him, and collared him - I told him I wanted him; he said, "Me! I ayn't the man that robbed you" - I said he must go back with me to Mr. Wissett's; he went back, and I left him in the shop with Mr. Wissett - Knowles, an officer, was sent for: I went out to see what was stolen, and found a gold watch was gone; a handkerchief was in the window, which he had broken the window with; it did not belong to us - I had seen the watch safe a few minutes before, in the window, close to the broken pane - the window was whole on this day; the watch was my master's: the prisoner was running when I went out.

Prisoner. Q. Were not the people coming the same way as I was myself? A.When I brought him back they were - he had stopped running, and turned back, and then the people following him turned back also; he passed me about a yard and a half before I could stop myself from running.

ROBERT KNOWLES. I was a Police-man at the time in question, but have now left for a better situation. On the 11th of November, at half-past five o'clock, I was on duty in Seymour-place, and saw a parcel of people round Mr. Wissett's window, and walked up; Mr. Wissett was there- the prisoner was brought up by Metcalf in custody; Mr. Wissett gave him in charge - I followed him into the shop, and searched him; I felt in his trousers pocket, and found a gold watch - I then took him to the station-house in Harcourt-street, Marylebone; I asked how he came by the watch - he said a man going down the street said to him, "Here, d-n it, take it;" I had not said it would be better or worse for him to confess - I produce the watch.

JOSEPH METCALF. This is Mr. Wissett's watch - here is the private-mark on it of what it cost; it is worth 14l. - we should sell it for 20l.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home from work, up Stingo-lane, and saw a man running at full speed; he flung something down on a dung-hill - I went to see what it was, and instantly picked it up, not thinking it any harm; I was coming along the street; a mob came with me - the young man asked if I was not the man who broke the window; I said I was not - I went with him, and did not deny having the watch; I did not say a man told me to take it.

[Thursday, Dec.3.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Reference Number: t18291203-4

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

4. CATHERINE RION was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , at St. Pancras, 1 purse, value 1s.; 16 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and four 5l. Bank notes, the property of John Bailey , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN BAILEY. I live in Osnaburg-street, Regent's-park, in the parish of St. Pancras , and rent the house. -The prisoner lived five days in my service, and on Thursday, the 29th of October, she left, without notice - I missed her about nine o'clock in the evening; we searched, and missed out of a box which stood in the parlour, a purse, containing four 5l. notes, and sovereigns and silver amounting to 34l. and upwards - the box was locked, and was broken open; I searched for her, and at last traced her to Bristol - I found her there on the Monday following, at lodgings there; an officer was with me, and I had a warrant - I charged her with robbing me; she said she did not know me - I am sure she said that: the officer took her home to his house - his wife searched her in the strong room; I learnt that she had passed a 5l. note - I went and asked her for the sovereigns she had received in change for the note; she said, "I have thrown them away, for what use have I for them in Ireland?" her boot was taken off, and five sovereigns were found in the lining of it - she was not dressed better than usual.

MARY ANN BAILEY. I am the prosecutor's wife; his statement is correct: nobody but the prisoner had access to the house - the box was locked safe; I had seen it half an hour before - the purse has not been found; it was a red net one - the notes were at one end of it, and the gold at the other.

Prisoner. Q. Are not the lodgers frequently in the parlour? A. The lodger is a respectable old lady, and was not in the room for three hours before.

MARGARET HERBURT. The prisoner came about half-past eight o'clock on the morning of the 30th, to my house in Bull-yard, Broad-street, Bloomsbury; she said she had just left her place, and wanted a room for her clothes - I had a room to let; I saw her with a red net purse, with gold at one end of it, and some paper at the other end - she gave me a sovereign out of it to change.

CHARLES GURR . I am shopman to Mr. Newman, a linen-draper, of Little Russell-street. On Friday, the 30th of October, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner bought some articles, amounting to between 3l. and 4l., and paid for them in gold; I saw her with a red net purse, with some paper in it, but cannot say they were notes - she tendered me a 5l. note before she gave me the gold, but I would not take it.

MR. BAILEY. I got one of the notes from Bristol - here it is.

ROBERT GREY JONES. I am a private gentleman. -This note, No. 25,865, was mine - I paid it to Mrs. Carter, my housekeeper.

ELIZABETH CARTER . I am housekeper to Mr. Jones. I received two 5l. notes from him, and paid them to Mrs. Bailey.

MRS. BAILEY. I did not mark the notes myself - I put the notes Mrs. Carter gave me into the purse.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

[Friday, Dec. 4.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18291203-5

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

5. MICHAEL GANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, 14 spoons, value 5l. 10s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 12s.; 4 rings, value 4l.; 1 buckle, value 5s.; 3 books, value 1s. 6d.; 1 trunk, value 2s.; 2 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 2 crowns, the property of Elizabeth Lydia McAuliffe , widow , in her dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH LYDIA MCAULIFFE . I am a widow, and live at No. 4, Weymouth-terrace, Hackney-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; it is my dwelling-house. The prisoner lodged in my second floor back room, and had the use of the front parlour - he was out of employ, and had been there five or six weeks; I do not know how he got his bread. On the 18th of November the property stated in the indictment was all in a box, which I am sure was locked - it was worth above 13l.; the box stood on a small bedstead in the back parlour, covered over with a small counterpane - it was taken about five or ten minutes before ten o'clock in the morning; I had seen it safe about half an hour before I missed it, and am sure it was locked and safe - the prisoner was then in the front parlour; I went up stairs to make my bed, and left him in the front parlour with Selina Waller - I was absent about ten minutes; Waller came up stairs for an apple, and when I came down stairs the prisoner was gone - I had heard the street door shut; I passed through the back parlour as I came down, and saw the quilt turned back in quite a different position to what I had left it, and having heard the

street door bang too, I put my hand under the quilt, and the box, with its contents was gone; the prisoner was to have left on the Monday, but not before - he had never told me he was going before; this was on Wednesday - he never returned; I have found none of my property. I went immediately I missed the box, and gave information - there was nobody in the house but myself, Waller, and my little girl, who is about three years old; no other person could possibly take it.

Prisoner. Q.Was not Mr. McDermot in the place at the time? A. He had been gone about ten minutes - he lodges in the house; not a soul came into the room after I saw the box safe; the prisoner was in the parlour at the time the lodger went out - the lodger never went into the back parlour - he still lodges with me.

Q. Did I not come up stairs to bid you good hye before I went out? A. I never saw you - you left a night cap, a night shirt, and a handkerchief behind, which you have never fetched.

SELINA WALLER (a child.) If I speak false I shall go to hell! I remember the Wednesday on which the box was lost - I was in the front parlour with the prosecutrix's little girl; the prisoner was in the parlour with us, and sent me up stairs to fetch an apple for him, and before I came down he was gone.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not send you for the apple for yourself? A. No.

ANN TILSON . I was on the steps of my door, No. 2, Weymouth-terrace, on Wednesday morning the 18th of November, and saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutrix's house; he banged the door, which made me look round; he looked up, as if to see if any body was at the window - he had a little bundle tied in something white; after he got off the steps, he ran, and about five doors down he turned, and looked through some iron railing.

Prisoner. Q. Was my back turned towards you before I ran away? A. Yes - you looked up at the window when you shut the door, and when you looked round, I could see your face - you turned down about five doors off.

Prisoner. I am innocent.

[Saturday, Dec. 4.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18291203-6

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Littledale

6. MARY CONWAY alias MARY (THE WIFE OF JOHN) DONAGHUE was indicted for that she, at the General Quarter Session of the Peace, holden for the County of Middlesex, at the Guildhall, in the City, and Liberty of Westminster, on the 18th of October, in the seventh year of His Majesty's Reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false money, and was sentenced to be imprisoned in the House of Correction for one year, and to find sureties for her good behaviour, for two years more; and that she having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards on the 27th of November , at St. Giles in the Fields, one piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a piece of good silver coin of this Realm, called a shilling, feloniously did utter to one Ann, the wife of William Davis, she (the prisoner) knowing it to be false and counterfeit; against the Statute .

MESSRS.SCARLET and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD JOSEPH POWELL. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Mary Conway, at the October Middlesex Session, 1826; I examined it with the original record, in the office of the clerk of the peace for Middlesex - it is a true copy (read).

GEORGE BRAND. I was principal turnkey of the House of Correction, Clerkenwell. I had the prisoner in my custody as a common utterer of counterfeit coin; she was convicted in October, 1826 - her sentence was one years' imprisonment, and to find sureties for two years to come; I was in Court when she was tried and convicted.

ANN DAVIS . I am the wife of William Davis, and live at the Three Compasses, Drury-lane . On Friday, the 27th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at our house - she came and asked for 1d. worth of gin: she gave me a shilling - I gave her a sixpence, 5d., and the gin; I put the shilling into my pocket, where I had two good shillings, and five sixpences, but no other change - a very short time after on that evening, she came in again, and asked for a 1d. worth of gin, and paid me another shilling; I served her, and gave her change - she took the gin and went out; I put the shilling into the same pocket - I saw her at the house again in a very little time, on the same evening; she had another 1d. worth of gin, and gave me a shilling - I gave her change, and put the shilling into my pocket; she came again the same night, a very little time after, and asked for 2d. worth of gin, and gave me another shilling - I gave her change, and put the shilling into the same pocket; I saw her again the same evening - she came and had another 1d. worth of gin, and gave me another shilling; I gave her change, and put the shilling into my pocket - she came again the same evening, almost tipsy, and asked for 2d. worth of gin, which I gave her; she offered me a shilling - I did not give her the change, but rang the bell for Blackburn, my servant, who came and said it was a bad shilling; I sent her over the way to get change for it, as I differed from her - she returned, an officer came in after her, and took the prisoner into custody; I took the five shillings out of my pocket, with two good ones, which I had before, and gave them to my servant, because my husband should not know it; I took all the shillings out of my pocket - I had five bad, and two good ones; I gave the five bad ones to Blackburn - I had received no other shilling between the time the prisoner first came, and my giving them to Blackburn, except what I received from the prisoner; the officer had taken her away when I gave them to Blackburn - I did not put the last shilling into my pocket, but gave it to Blackburn, and have not had it since.

Prisoner. I deny giving her more than one shilling, and she gave me change; if I was to die this moment, I never gave her another - at the first examination, the servant said I gave it to her. Witness. She paid me five, and was stopped with the sixth; she drank the gin in the house each time - it was last Friday week.

MARY BLACKBURN. I am Mrs. Brand's servant. I received a shilling from her last Friday week, about six o'clock in the evening; she told me to go and get change for it - I looked at it, and said it was bad; I shewed it to a young man named John Blackburn, who was in the taproom - he gave me back the same shilling, and I went over to the butcher's shop with it; the butcher took it in his

hand, looked at it, and said it was bad - he returned it to me; I kept it in my hand - it was not out of my sight, and is the same as I gave the butcher; as I returned home, I met the Police-man, Walters - I kept the shilling in my hand till I came to mistress' house, and then gave it to the Police-man; I received five more shillings from Mrs. Davis, a quarter of an hour after - she told me to put them into my pocket, that her husband should not see them; I put them into my pocket, and Walters came again - I took them out, marked them, and gave them to him; I had nothing else in my pocket, but a few halfpence.

THOMAS WALTERS. I am a Police-constable. On the 27th of November, I met Blackburn, about six o'clock in the evening - she said something; I followed her into the Three Compasses - she gave me a shilling, and said the prisoner, who stood there, had endeavoured to pass it; I produce the shilling - I examined it, and searched the prisoner - she was very willing to be searched; I found nothing of any consequence on her - I took the prisoner home, and searched her at home; I left her in the next room to the one she said she occupied, as she was so intoxicated - I went back to Davis, and Blackburn gave me five more shillings, which I have kept ever since, and produce; I then went back to the prisoner's room, and found her in bed in her own room - she was much more sober then; I searched the room, but found nothing - I made her dress herself, took her to the watch-house, and on the way there, I told her it would be better for her to confess; when I took her to her room she was very much intoxicated - that was about six o'clock - she got sober about ten, when I took her again; I was detained some time at Davis', and was looking for another party.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. The shilling produced is counterfeit, and made from white metal, and not silver - the other five are also counterfeit, and all from the same impression, and the same mould.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly went into the shop, and had a glass of gin; the lady gave me a sixpence and 5d. -I went in about an hour afterwards, and the servant objected to the shilling, and went over to the butcher's to ask if it was good - she was gone twenty minutes or half an hour, came back, and said, "Ma'am, I don't like it;" she took it into the tap-room, and shewed it to a young man, who said he did not like it - she went out, and brought the Police-man; he asked where I lived - I told him; he took me home, and I remained there till half-past eleven or a quarter to twelve o'clock, when he came, and took me - had I been an old offender, I should not have stopped in my own room from six to a quarter to twelve o'clock; the servant said I came in in different clothing, and then she contradicted that.

[Monday, Dec. 7.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

Reference Number: t18291203-7

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

7. JAMES DIXEY and WILLIAM SHEDWICK were indicted for feloniously assaulting William King , on the 29th of November , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, I watch, value 3l.; I hat, value 9d., and 1 handkerchief, value 2d. , his property.

WILLIAM KING. On Saturday night, the 28th of November, I had been drinking at Mr. Turner's public-house in Shoreditch; I do not know the sign - I got intoxicated, and do not know at what time I left; I had 2s. or 3s. about me, a watch, a hat, and a handkerchief in the hat: when I got home I had not my hat, my handkerchief, nor watch; I had the money - this hat, handkerchief, and watch are mine; I never saw the prisoner till he was at the office - I cannot say whether I received any blow, but I felt a pain at the back of my ear; I had been drinking with a person named Rouse - I did not know I had lost my watch till the officer searched me to see if I had it, and it was gone.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street. -I was on duty in Old Cock-lane, at the back of Shoreditch church; Attfield and the other officer were with me; it was just after two o'clock in the morning of last Sunday week - we were joined by Gooding, a conductor of the Bow-street patrol, and two of his men - I heard a bustle, and a rush at the corner of a passage over the way, which goes up to a public-house, and saw two men run across the street, which induced me to suppose something had happened; I ran in that direction, with some of the other officers, and I saw Shedwick, in a fustian jacket - he turned, and ran down Cock-lane, and up New Nichol-street - I lost sight of him as he turned, but I had seen him before he turned, and there was no person running in that line but him and me - I did not lose sight of him above two seconds when he turned the corners; I pursued him up Nichol-street, and into Short-street - he then ceased running, but kept at a brisk walk; I overtook him about the middle of the street - I took hold of him; we were both out of breath- I said, "Come back;" he lifted up his two hands, and said, "If I have done any thing I am willing to go back;" I said, "Willing or not, you shall go back, for I suspect you have robbed somebody;" I took him back, and in about an hour and a half afterwards I found the watch on the spot where I took him, in the mud; I took him down Nichol-street, and into Cock-lane - I there found Dixey in custody of an officer, and they had the prosecutor with them, who appeared to be very drunk; there is no doubt of it - we saw a light in a public-house, called the Ship - we knocked, and got in: I searched Shedwick, and found some money and duplicates on him - and after questioning him some time, as to where he lived, we took him to the watch-house; I received this cap from Gooding after we had gone to the watch-house: the prosecutor stated that he had lost a watch, but we had a difficulty in making out what he had lost, he was so much in liquor - I went with Attfield, and found this watch.

Prisoner Shedwick. Q. Did you see me throw it away? A. No, I did not, or I should have taken it up directly.

Prisoner Dixey. Q. Did you see me do any thing wrong? A. No - I saw two men run away from the place- I cannot be certain you are the man.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer of Worship-street. I was in company with the other officer, when we heard a noise, which made us bustle along; we saw two men run - Gooding pursued one, and Hanley the other - I did not notice their persons at that time; Gooding went nearly straight across the road - I believe it is called Half Nichol-street; Mills and I went up to the prosecutor - I caught him in my arms reeling from the wall; he would have fallen into the mud had it not been for me; we took

him down Old Cock-lane, and took him to the Ship public-house; the people were up there, and they let us in, when they found who we were; I searched the prosecutor, with the assistance of Mills - he at first said he had lost his watch, his hat, and his handkerchief; he did tell me the maker's name of the watch, but I forget it; the place was Halton, in Hampshire: the maker's name which he told me was on the watch, but I do not remember it - the prisoners were brought in by Gooding and Hanley; I went with Hanley, and found the watch.

Prisoner Dixey. Q. Did you see me do any thing to the prosecutor? A. No.

THOMAS GOODING . I am a conductor of the Bow-street patrol. Early on the morning of last Sunday week I was with the two witnesses - we were standing fronting New Turville-street, and looking towards Church-street, Bethnal-green; I heard a noise, and saw two men scuffling together; one went from the curb against the wall, and fell down - the other ran across the road, and up Half Nichol-street; I said to my brother officers, "There is something the matter;" I and Moggs pursued the man up New Turville-street; we turned to the right, towards where I saw the man run, and found Dixey, with" this hat in his left hand -I had not observed him so as to know that he was the man who had been struggling with the other; I had lost sight of him for about a minute and a half - I could not swear to his person - he was coming towards me, and was between a run and a walk; I laid hold of him, and said I thought he had been doing something wrong - I took the hat from him; he made an attempt to put his right hand into it, and said, "Give me my cap;" this cap was in the hat, and this handkerchief under it; I told him I would not give him any thing - I brought him back, and found Attfield, the prosecutor, and Mills; we went down towards Hackneyread watch-house, but saw a light in the Ship, and went in: I shewed the prosecutor my own hat first - he said that was not his; I then shewed him this hat, and he said it was his.

Prisoner Dixey. Q. Did you see me ill-use the man; there were other persons in the street? A. I did not see any persons - I did not see you ill-use him.

GEORGE ROUSE . I am a scale-maker. On the night of the 28th of November I was with the prosecutor at the Crown and Shuttle, in Shoreditch, which is kept by Mr. Turner; I went in a little after nine o'clock - the prosecutor came about ten: we remained there till past twelve - he drank pretty freely; he was sober when he came in: I was not exactly sober, nor quite drunk - he went away between twelve and one o'clock; I went outside the passage, and asked if he would go to bed with me, as I thought him too drunk to go home; I lodged that night at Mr. Turner's - the prosecutor then said he would go home, as he could get in at his father's at any hour; he then went away, and I did not hear of any thing happening till Monday night. I know Cock-lane - I suppose it is five hundred yards from Mr. Turner's; the streets about there are very narrow, and I believe some of them are winding streets- I saw nothing of the prisoners, and did not notice whether the prosecutor had a watch or not.

WILLIAM CASH . I keep the Jane Shore public-house, in Shoreditch; I suppose it is a quarter of a mile from Mr. Turner's; the prisoners had been drinking at my house till about seven minutes before twelve o'clock, when I cleared my house, and they went away together; they appeared sober - I saw nothing the matter with them: they paid me for one pot of beer, which I took in myself.

JOSEPH MOGGS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was with Gooding, and saw him take Dixey; I saw him at the time the was taken - I had seen two men running, but cannot swear to them; and one of them ran in that direction-Dixey said he had been drinking at the Jane Shore - I asked him how he got the hat; he said he received a blow from some person in the neck in crossing Cock-lane, and found the hat in the middle of the road.

Prisoner Dixey. I found the hat as I have described, and there were other persons about. Withness. I saw no persons but the prisoners, the prosecutor, and the officers.

RICHARD MILLS. I was at the Ship a little after two o'clock, and there searched the prosecutor - he had no watch; he was feeling his thigh - I thought he had lost his watch, and soon after he said, "I have lost my watch;" he described it in my hearing, but I forget the name he mentioned - he said the name of the place was on it: he kept rubbing the side of his head, like a man in pain - I did not see any blood, nor I did put my hand to feel if it was inflamed - he was very tipsy.

Dixey's Defence. As I was going home from the Jane Shore I picked up this hat in crossing the road, as any other person might have done; I did not know how it came there - there were two or three men on the other side of the way, with great coats on, and one of them hit me in the neck - I walked on; I did not know how the hat came there - I did not pick it up with an intention of stealing, nor know the person it came from, or I should have given it to them.

THOMAS GOODING re-examined. Q. When you saw the man run away did you see any thing in his hand? A. I did not see any thing - it was a wet night; I did not notice whether the prosecutor was dirty.

JAMES HANLEY . I did not see any thing in either of the men's hands.

DIXEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

SHEDWICK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.[Tuesday Dec. 8.]

Reference Number: t18291203-8

8. HANNAH alias ANN WELCH was indicted for that she, at the General Session of the Peace, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 29th of May, in the 8th year of his present Majesty's reign, (by the name of Hannah, the wife of Thomas Welch , alias Ann Welch ,) was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of false money, and was sentenced to be imprisoned in the House of Correction for one year, and, at the expiration of that time should find sureties for her good behaviour for two years more, to be computed from the end of the said year; and that she, having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards, on the 16th of November , at the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, 1 piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a piece of good silver coin of this Realm, called a shilling, as and for a good piece of silver coin called a shilling, feloniously did utter to one James Butt , she knowing it to be false and counterfeit; against the Statute .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only for feloniously uttering a like counterfeit shilling to one Thomas Davis , instead of James Butt .

MESSRS. SCARLET and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH POINT. I live with my father, who deals in glass and earthenware, at No. 5, Gray's Inn-passage. The prisoner came to his shop on Wednesday, the 21st of October, and bought two cups, which came to 3d. - she gave me a shilling, and I gave her 9d. change; I threw the shilling into the till, and afterwards discovered there was a bad shilling there; on the 26th of October the prisoner came again, about three o'clock in the afternoon - she bought two plates, which came to 6d., and gave me a shilling, which I thought was a bad one; I did not serve her, but sent for a Police-constable, who took her - I kept the shilling separate till I gave it to the constable; I also gave him the other bad shilling, but I am not certain I had that from her.

COURT. Q. How many shillings were there in the till on the first occasion? A. I cannot say - perhaps about 1l. worth of silver.

JOHN MANN. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner on the 26th of October, in Gray's Inn-passage, at Point's father's; Point gave me two shillings - one she said she thought the prisoner gave her, and one she swore she gave her that day; the first one was cut to pieces by the Magistrate's order - the last one I produce; I kept them separate.

ELIZABETH POINT. I gave them separately to the officer - the one cut up, was the one which was first taken.

JAMES BUTT . I am a linen-draper , and live on Holborn-hill. I saw the prisoner at my house on the 14th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening - she came to purchase a pair of hose, which came to 10d.; she offered me a shilling, which I discovered was counterfeit, and I told her so - she made no answer to that; I asked her where she lived - she said she sold apples in the street, and got the shilling of a gentleman going by; I marked the shilling, and put it into a pocket in which there was nothing else; I afterwards gave it to the officer - on the Monday following the prisoner came again, about seven o'clock, and asked my shopman, Davis, to take a pair of hose from the door; he took them down - they came to 8d., and she put a shilling on the counter; I saw if was the same woman - I went and took the shilling, which was bad, and sent for the officer - I kept that shilling in my hand, and gave it to the officer, and the one she at first gave me; I had marked them separately.

COURT. Q. Had she nothing for her first shilling? A. No - she asked if I meant to make it my property; I said Yes, till she brought a good one.

JOSEPH FAIRWEATHER . I am a Police-constable. I received the prisoner from the last witness on the 16th of November - I have two shillings, which I can swear were what I received from him on that occasion; this is the one first taken, and this is the one he took on the 16th, as he stated.

JOHN FIELD. I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. This shilling, taken by Point, is counterfeit, and these two, taken by Butt, are also counterfeit; these two appear to have been cast in the same mould, and from the same impression- this other is certainly not from the same mould.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am shopman to Mr. Butt. I was serving in the shop on the 16th of November, when the prisoner came to the door, and requested me to take down a pair of hose which hung at the door - while I was folding them up Mr. Butt came and took up the shilling which she had laid on the counter, and found it was counterfeit.

EDWARD JOSEPH POWELL. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Hannah Welch , at the May Session, at Clerkenwell, in the 8th year of the Reign of his present Majesty - (read).

GEORGE BRAND. I was chief turnkey of the House of Correction at the time the prisoner was convicted - I was in Court when she was tried, and know she is the person; she was sentenced to one year's imprisonment in the House of Correction, and to find sureties for two years as a common utterer.

[Tuesday Dec.8.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18291203-9

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

9. HENRY HOLMES was indicted for a rape .

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

Reference Number: t18291203-10

LARCENIES, & c.,

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, DEC. 3.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

10. MARY ANN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 watch, value 5l., and 1 key, value 1s., the goods of Maria Green , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Frances Sparrow .

MARIA GREEN . I lodge on the third floor, at No. 33, Exeter-street, Catherine-street. Strand . The prisoner sometimes lodged at No. 32, and sometimes at No. 33, the adjoining house; Frances Sparrow keeps the house - she is not here; she is single - we all live together in the house. On the 10th of November I had a gold watch, which I placed on the bed, against the pillow, and saw it there between nine and ten o'clock at night - I closed my room door, but did not lock it; I slept at No.32 that night, leaving the watch in my bed-room, at No.33 - I missed it next morning, at ten o'clock; the prisoner frequently visited me in my room - I have seen my watch since; I gave 12l. for it, about four months ago.

CATHERINE JOSEPH. I am a widow, and live in Coventry-court, in St. Martin's parish, not a quarter of mile from Exeter-street. The prisoner came backwards and forwards to my house; she came between eleven and twelve o'clock on Tuesday night, the 10th of November, with a gold watch - she said she was in great distress; that she had taken a female with her from Mrs. Conquest's - that female had gone to Paris, and robbed her of every thing; she asked me to lend her some money on the watch, which she said was bought of Mr. Norman, in Princes-street, by Mrs. Conway, who was her landlady, before she went to Sparrow's and lived in Lisle-street - she said she had money to pay Mr. Wright, for a free admission, and wanted 5l. or 6l. on it; I lent her half a sovereign and 10s., and said in the morning I would lend her the rest, as I had nothing but a 10l. note - she left the watch; I gave it to Mary. my servant - she came next morning, and I advanced her 5l. more; she said she would be sure to fetch the watch when her friend came - I sent the watch to Mrs. Conway, in consequence of what I heard.

SARAH ISRAEL. I am Joseph's niece, and live with her. I took the gold watch to Mrs. Conway, on the Thursday; I was present when the prisoner brought it

to my aunt, on the 10th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock; my aunt lent her 1l. - I did not leave the watch at Conway's, but delivered it to Leadbitter the same day.

GEORGE LEADBITTER . I am an officer. Israel delivered me the watch on Thursday; I apprehended the prisoner coming out of Drury-lane Theatre, on Friday night.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-11

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

11. WILLIAM KENT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Wright , on the 19th of November , and stealing 2 coats, value 5l. 1 pair of breeches, value 10s.; 20 handkerchiefs, value 3l.; 1 watch, value 15s., and 3 rings, value 30s. , his property.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I live in Cooks-ground, Chelsea , and am a cow-keeper . On the 17th of November, about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the morning, I went out, leaving my wife in the back room, and the door wide open; there are four rooms on the grounds floor - the windows were all shut down; I returned about a quarter-past eight, and found the door locked - I opened it with the key, and on entering, found the kitchen door shut, which had been left open - the blind of the kitchen window was drawn half way down; it was quite down when I left - my wife returned about nine o'clock; she came into the kitchen, and went into the dairy - we had breakfast directly, and I went into the cow-house; my wife went up to our bedroom after breakfast, and gave an alarm - I then went up, found the drawers pulled out, and things scattered about; I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which have not been found.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you go all ever the house before you went out at seven o'clock? A.I went into all the rooms up stairs; I was in the bed-room- I met my wife while I was out, and got the key from her; we might be half an hour at breakfast - I did not leave the street-door open when I came in; I do not recollect seeing any body in the street when I came home.

ELIZABETH WRIGHT. I left home at half-past seven o'clock; I locked the door, and pulled the blind down all the way - the door and windows were all safe; I returned at a quarter to nine - my husband was then at home; I had met him, and given him the key - I went up stairs after breakfast, and found a half-pint blue bason (which is not ours) by the wash-hand stand; I found the drawers out, every place rummaged, and all the things about the room, and missed the property stated, all of which I had left safe when I went out, and shut a great dog in the kitchen.

Cross-examined. Q. Your husband went out first? A. Yes; he left me in the dairy - I believe the door was shut; I left a quarter of an hour after him - I fastened the door myself; I do not suppose the window had been opened, though the blind had been altered - it was half an hour before we discovered the robbery; I had let nobody into the house during that time - the basin I suppose had been brought, supposing we were at home; it was impossible for any body to have got in at the door before I left, without my seeing them, as the door of the place I was in was not shut; it joins the passage - the passage comes into it.

PHOEBE BEESLEY . I live about a minute's walk from Wright's house. On 19th of November I went out, about half past seven o'clock, to fetch some coffee; I did not go by Wright's, but the other way, into the King's-road - I met the prisoner and two others; I did not know him, but saw him again, with a bundle under his arm, a few minutes after I returned home - he passed my window, as I was throwing some water out; I first met them going towards Wright's, about three minutes walk from it - they had no bundle then; Wright's place has no thorough fare - after I had been in doors a few minutes, I saw two of them go by, the prisoner having a large bundle under his right arm - they were going towards King's-road, in a direction from Wright's house; this was about five minutes to eight o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you sure the prisoner is the man? A. Yes, quite; I did swear to another man at the office, who was discharged - he proved he was at another place at the time; I did not swear he had the bundle - he followed the prisoner up the ground; he had a man and a boy with him - the man I swore to was before him when I met them; whether he was with them the second time, I cannot say, but there was a man going round the corner; the bundle was in a handkerchief, and appeared to contain wearing apparel.

COURT. Q. Did you notice the prisoner's walk? A. Yes - he was lame in his right leg.

SOPHIA COTTON . I am the wife of Samuel Cotton, of Robert-street - I live forty or fifty yards from Wright. On the 19th of November, about half-past seven o'clock, I went down Cook's-gardens a short distance, but was not in sight of Wright's house; I went along King's-road, and saw the prisoner - I had never seen him before, but particularly observed his lameness, and am sure it was him; he was coming in a direction for Cook's-ground - the church clock struck eight as he passed me; he had a very large bundle under his right arm, tied in a large cotton handkerchief - he was alone.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see Beesley? A. Not till afterwards; she had a halfpenny worth of milk of me- she said nothing to me about this - I heard her swear to one Nicholson at the office; she said she thought he was the person - I cannot say whether she swore positively to him; she did to the prisoner. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-12

First London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

12. WILLIAM PALMER , alias LANE , was indicted for stealing, on 28th of November , 1 ream of paper, value 25s. , the goods of William Thomas Heath and others; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-13

13. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 cloak, value 10s., the goods of John Roberts , from the person of Alfred Roberts .

PHILIP CASENOVE. I am a stock-broker. On the 13th of November, about two o'clock in the day, I met the prisoner coming down the stairs of our office in Broad-street, with a cloak under his arm, rolled up: the stairs lead to several offices - he was walking with a little boy in his hand; I asked what he wanted there - he said he had brought the boy to a gentleman there, whom he could not find: I asked whose boy it was, and why he brought him there; he said

he had him in charge from another gentleman, who he did not know - I asked the boy if that was the case; he said No, that he knew nothing of the prisoner - that he was going to school by way of Houndsditch, and the prisoner had invited him away, promising him a bird if he would come with him, and that the birds were to be caught with the cloak which the boy had on; the prisoner heard most of this - I said that was a very bad account, and gave him in charge: he had the cloak under his arm.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Where did this conservation take place? A.Partly in the street, and partly on the stairs; he must have heard it, but as several persons were talking he might not hear the whole - he got into the street before I stopped him: I saw him first on the stairs, walking quietly, not attempting to escape.

MR. JOHN ROBERTS . I am a surgeon, and live in Finsbury-circus. I sent my son out about two o'clock, with a cloak on - my attention was called to this between four and five o'clock - he is between six and seven years old, and has been instructed in his religious duties.

ALFRED ROBERTS . I was going to school in Devonshire-street, to Mr. Cutler's - the prisoner came and asked if I would have a live bird - I said Yes; he took hold of my hand, took me to No. 7, Old Broad-street, and said he must have my cloak to catch them - he took it off my shoulder up stairs in the house; I was coming down when I met Mr. Casenove; he had wrapped the cloak up under his arm - I believe he folded it up up stairs; I had never seen him before - I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is your school from home? A.About half a quarter of a mile; I go alone - he wrapped the cloak up before he got into the street; I met Mr. Casenove first in the street - I did not see him on the stairs; the prisoner never tried to run away.

MR. CASENOVE. I first met the prisoner on the stairs; part of the conversation was on the stairs - I followed him into the street, where the rest of the conversation took place- I first saw him at the bottom of the stairs, just as he was going out; he was on the stairs, and I was not - he had hold of the child's hand.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then the child must have heard you addressing the prisoner on the stairs? A. Yes - it was not in the street he first saw me; the child is mistaken about that - when I met him he was on the bottom stair, which comes into a small passage leading to the street.

GEORGE MORGAN. I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, and asked his name, which he would not tell me, saying he did not wish his friends to know any thing about it, and he cried.

Prisoner's Defence. There was no conversation in the house with the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-14

14. GEORGE JOHN CLARK , alias JOHN FREEMAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 paper bag, value 1/4d.; 3 crowns, 32 half-crowns, 149 shillings, and 80 sixpences , the property of Finlay Fraser .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of James Bearsford .

JAMES BEARSFORD . I am servant to Finlay Fraser, of Lea-bridge-road, nurseryman . On the 7th of November the prisoner went with me from Layton to town; I received at Mr. Oliver's, in Kingsland-road, about twelve o'clock in the day, a paper bag of silver, also a parcel of halfpence and soap; I was to take them to Mr. Fraser - I put them into a basket in my cart, and covered the horse-cloth over it; I was going home - the money was safe when I was at the Castle, at Clapton: the prisoner was with me all the time, but did not get into the cart after we had the money- he walked behind the cart, and I by my horse; he got on the hind part of the cart in Hackney-road - he said he was tired, and wanted to ride; I told him to get down and walk, as the load was heavy - he got down: I did not miss the parcel till I got home; the prisoner left me about a quarter of a mile before I got to Mr. Fraser's - I only missed the parcel of silver; I told my master my suspicions, and went with Huckel next morning, and found the prisoner in Black Horse-court, Fleet-street - some of the property was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Did you give him a ride? A. No: I knew him before, but the load was heavy - we both rode going, but not returning; I did not give him any of the property - he might have rode four miles in the cart.

COURT. Q. Did he work at Fraser's? A. No; he was an acquaintance of mine; the money was in a basket on the top of the load at the tail, and covered with a horse-cloth.

JOHN HUCKEL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th, about a quarter-past three o'clock in the morning, coming down Black Horse-court, with a girl on each arm; I found on him a bag, containing 12l. 4s. 6d. in crowns, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences, and in his pocket 3s. 6d., with a bill of parcels.

RICHARD OLIVER. I am a grocer. I received a cheque from Fraser on the 7th of November, and gave Bearsford 14l. 4s. in silver, half a cwt. of soap, and 3l. in copper - there were three crowns, about 5l. in half-crowns, 2l. in shillings, and the rest in sixpences; this is the bag, and this bill of parcels with the soap and account of the money was in it.

FINLAY FRASER. I sent Bearsford for this money.

Cross-examined. Q.Did he tell you he had a stranger riding in his cart? A. He told me he suspected the prisoner had it, and that he rode with him to London, but not back.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-15

15. GEORGE WILTSHIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 12 silver mounted corals, value 8l. 8s., and 12 coral necklaces, value 4l. 10s. , the goods of Joseph Price .

JOSEPH PRICE. I am a jeweller , and live at Birmingham. I come to town every month, and the prisoner acted as my porter . On the 12th of November, about half-past eleven o'clock, I sent him with the articles stated in the indictment to Mr. Harding's, No. 120, Fleet-street, to deliver them there on my account; finding he did not return, about five o'clock I went to Mr. Harding's, who had not received it; I immediately took an officer to the prisoner's lodging, who searched his room, and brought the parcel out, with Mr. Harding's name on it - this was about six o'clock that evening; twelve coral necklaces, and twelve bells, silver mounted, were missing from it.

JOHN BURCHALL . I am conductor of the Bow-street patrol. On the 12th of November I went with Price to the prisoner - he was at home; I looked into a box and found this parcel directed to Harding, No. 112, Fleet-street - it contains the rest of the articles; I found a tin box in his pocket, with five half crowns and two shillings in it - I asked where he got that; he said it was what he had sold the articles for - that he and a man named Bell, sold them in Petticoat-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, and fell in with a chap who I knew - he took me to have a pot of beer; he told me to come home with him - I went, and he took the parcel from me, opened it, and said he would go and sell some for me; he took something out, then rolled it up, and told me to wait till he came back - he was gone about an hour; I laid on his bed, and went to sleep - he awoke me and gave me two sovereigns; I did not say the money was what I sold them for - I worked for it.

JOSEPH PRICE. I heard him say it was what he sold the goods for.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-16

16. MARGARET MAGRATH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 1 shirt, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Sprague , her master.

THOMAS SPRAGUE. I live in Watling-street . The prisoner had been nearly eight months in our service; we gave her notice, and she left us on Thursday, the 26th of November - we missed some shirts and things: I inquired at different pawnbroker's, but found nothing - I got a search-warrant on Tuesday, and found some of our property in her possession, in Lascelles-place, St. Giles'; I had asked her address when she left, and she gave me that address - it was the apartment of a woman named Fenning; she was not at home.

EDWARD CALVER . I am shopman to Mr. Chaffers, a pawnbroker. I have four shirts, a waistcoat, and a diamoud pin; the shirts were pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Gray.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-17

17. GEORGE ALBERT BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 17 yards of merino, value 26s. , the goods of Thomas Leigh .

FREDERICK GRAY. On the 7th of November, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take a piece of merino from a pile inside the door of Mr. Leigh, a linen-draper , of Bishopsgate-street - I am his shopman; he ran away; I followed, and took him about a hundred yards off with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-18

18. BARNEY WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 coat, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Swift .

THOMAS SWIFT. I live in the Minories , and am a haberdasher . On the 9th of November I was called into my shop to a customer, and while engaged with him I heard somebody say, "Mr. Swift, you are robbed - if you come out we shall catch the person;" I instantly ran out, and he pointed out the prisoner, who ran a few yards, and then began to walk; the young man laid hold of him - he gave himself a twist, got from him, and ran away; I followed, calling Stop thief! but not overtaking him I returned, having left nobody in the shop - he was brought in in about five minutes; this coat hung inside the shop, near the door.

JOHN BOUTLE. I was in the Minories, and saw the prisoner go to Mr. Swift's door, and take a coat, which he gave to two others, who were standing there; I ran, and snatched the coat from the man, and threw it into the shop, then ran after the prisoner, till I caught hold of him. brought him back - I am certain he is the man who took the coat from the shop; since he has been in custody I have been attacked by the other two, and had several severe blows - I should know one of them again; they stood looking in at the window when he took it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. This gentleman struck me once or twice - I was going into the shop to buy a pair of stockings; I had 1s. in my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-19

19. JAMES JUCHAU was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 18 yards of ribbon, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Hall .

ROBERT WHITE. I am servant to Thomas Hall. a haberdasher , of Bishopsgate-street . On the 27th of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, and asked for a pair of black kid gloves - I was behind some calicoes in the window, and the moment the lad turned round to get the gloves, I saw the prisoner take a piece of ribbon off the counter, and put it into his bag - he did not offer to buy it; I came out, and secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who was in the shop besides you? A. We have about five shopmen; it is a large shop - I believe he was the only customer; I never prosecuted any body before - I have not seen his father - I do not know what the other shopmen were doing- I am certain the ribbon did not drop off the counter; there is a bar to prevent that.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found this piece of ribbon in the prisoner's bag - he had got 3s. 2d.

Prisoner's Defence. It fell into my bag.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-20

20. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November, 2 shirts, value 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 14s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Owen : to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-21

21. JOSEPH WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Richard Rogers King , from his person .

RICHARD ROGERS KING . I am an officer of the Merchant Tailors' Company . On the 4th of November, about a quarter to three o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the corner of Bouverie-street and Fleet-street , and felt a tug at my coat pocket - I felt, and missed my handkerchief; I turned round, and the prisoner was close at my elbow - on looking him in the face I suspected him; he turned down Bouverie-street - I followed him about ten yards down,

collared him, and accused him of it: he denied it - I insisted that he had it in his possession; I got him into a door-way, and saw him drop it at his heels; I held him till Half took him; a gentleman had his pocket picked within twenty yards of the spot just before.

JOSEPH HALL . I am an officer, and took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-22

22. DAVID THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of John Batho .

JOHN BATHO . I am a lighterman , and live on Old Fish-street-hill . The prisoner came to lodge at the house on the 28th of September - I lost my coat on the 30th; I apprehended him on the 6th of November, at Pimlico and told him he was the person who stole my coat- he said he did not steal it; that it was given to him by my wife to pawn, and he pawned it for 1l.; he is a jobbing man.

MARTHA BATHO. I missed my husband's coat from the room; the prisoner left the house at the same time, without notice - he was only with us two nights; I never gave him leave to pawn the coat - I left him in the room, and went into the yard, returned in a few minutes, and he was gone; I missed the coat next morning - nobody had been there but him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come and ask you to lend me 1l.? A. It is quite false; I said nothing about not wishing my husband to know it - it is false.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had obtained the coat from the prosecutrix through a false representation, but not feloniously.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-23

NEW COURT.

FIRST DAY. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

23. MARY TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 tea-pot, value 6s. , the goods of Matthew Howit and John Addisson ; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-24

24. WILLIAM STITCHBERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Pengelley ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18291203-25

25. GEORGE LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 looking-glass, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Stephenson ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-26

26. EDWARD HIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of Charles Bell .

JAMES CUTMORE . My father keeps a general sale-shop. On the 31st of October, at half-past two o'clock, I was going up Frith-street , and saw a carriage at the corner - the prisoner took a coat from the dickey, and told me not to say any thing; I ran to the coachman, and called out Stop thief! the prisoner ran down Bateman's-buildings, and I lost sight of him - I saw him again in about ten minutes, in Greek-street, and am certain he is the man.

THOMAS MAPLE. I am coachman to Mr. Charles Bell. I was turning from Frith-street into Soho-square, with his pheaton; Cutmore told me the coat was taken - I turned, and missed it; I drove on in the direction he said the prisoner had gone - I saw the prisoner in the custody of the beadle, who had this coat, which is my master's.

JOSHUA IVORY . I am a beadle. I saw the carriage as I was crossing Frith-street, about half-past two o'clock; I went to Bateman's-buildings, where I live, and knocked at my door - while I was waiting the prisoner ran by me with this coat; I followed - he ran into a shop which was shut up, but the door was open; he dropped the coat on the floor - I took him and the coat, which was about two yards from him; he was about one hundred yards from the carriage when I first saw him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to dinner - I saw this coat in the road, and took it up; I saw no carriage.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-27

27. MICHAEL HART , GEORGE LILLEY , and ROBERT PAINE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 2 handkerchiefs, value 12s. , the goods of Charles Keene .

LUCY KEENE . I am sister of Charles Keene , a hosier , of New Bond-street; I conduct a shop for him in Davis. street . On the 19th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, Hart and Lilley came into the shop, and asked to look at some comforters - they bought one, for which they paid 2s.; they then asked for some black handkerchiefs - I said I had none but what I was afraid would be too expensive; they then asked for some silk pocket-handkerchiefs - I shewed them some; they said they were not the sort they wished, and did not buy any- they went out, and in about ten minutes the officer brought in the three prisoners, and asked if I knew them- I said two of them had been in the shop before; they then asked if I had lost any thing - I said not that I was aware of; they then produced a bag and two silk handkerchiefs - they asked if the handkerchiefs were mine; I said one of them certainly was, and the next morning I knew the other also - each of them had my private-mark- I knew they were in the shop when they came in; I showed them to them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you sold any of these handkerchiefs? A. Not that day; I had before - I believe we had sold all but this one of this pattern; I cannot say which of them bought the comforter -I believe it was Lilley - they were both in the shop; there was a lamp in the shop.

COURT. Q.Did you observe their faces? A. Yes, and I am sure they are the persons; they were ten minutes in the shop.

JESSE PHILLIPS. I am a constable. On the 19th of November I saw the three prisoners together in Glass-house-street: one of them went into a hatter's-shop - I followed them to the prosecutor's; I saw Hart and Lilley go in - Paine stood at the door - I got two Police-men; we followed, and each of us took one of them - this bag and two handkerchiefs were found on Paine.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you not the china-man? A. Yes; I perhaps have appeared in two or three cases

against prisoners for stealing from persons unknown - I will swear I have not appeared twenty times, nor ten.

JAMES CONDIE . I am a Police-man. Phillips came to me; I went to the shop, and saw Paine outside - the other two came out of the shop, and joined Paine; they spoke to each other - we followed them down three or four streets, and then stopped them; I took Paine, and found these handkerchiefs and bag on him - we took them back to the shop; the lady owned this handkerchief that night, and next morning she owned the other - she said Hart and Lilley had been in the shop, and one of them bought a comforter.

Cross-examined. Q. Could she tell which of them bought it? A. No - I did not see any thing transferred from one to the other in going along.

JOHN GOODWIN. I am a Police-man. I was at my door in Davis-street; Phillips spoke to me - I went and saw the three prisoners: we followed, and took them - Paine had been at the door of the prosecutor's shop while the other two were inside.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you see any transfer of property? A.No - nothing was found on Hart or Lilley but the comforter.

Hart's Defence. I was going along Coventry-street, and met Lilley, whom I knew - he said he was going to purchase a comforter; I went to a hatter's shop, in Glass-house-street, and looked at a hat - I then went with Lilley, and bought the comforter.

Paine's Defence. I know nothing of the prisoners; I had been to a glass-cutter's to get a job - I was going home, and when these young men were taken, the Policeman took me; he took these two handkerchiefs from me, which I said I had picked up over the way - I had never been into the shop; the lady said they had been in a box.

LUCY KEENE. They had been in a box, but I took them out to show the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose if one of these young men had taken them, he might have done it without the other seeing him? A. Yes, I think so.

HART - GUILTY . Aged 19.

LILLEY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

PAINE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

Reference Number: t18291203-28

28. FRANCIS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 chain, value 20s.; 1 ring, value 5s.; 2 seals, value 10s., and 1 key, value 4d. , the goods of John Carter .

JOHN CARTER . I live in Hackney-road , and am a watchmaker . On the 18th of November the prisoner came to my shop, about half-past two o'clock, and asked if I had any small pieces of silver to sell - in about twenty minutes I went into the shop, and saw him lying on the counter; he had got my glass-case open, and this watch, which was hanging in the window, was in his hand - I sprung upon him, and secured him with it in his hand; he did not say any thing, but attempted to get away.

JAMES BROWN. I was in Hackney-road, and met the prisoner and the prosecutor; I took charge of the prisoner - he had only 2 1/2 d. on him - I have made inquiries about him, and believe he was in great distress; he has no parents.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-29

29. THOMAS EMBRY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 purse. value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-crown, and 3 shillings , the property of David Solomons .

MR. DAVID SOLOMONS. I live in York-buildings, Regent's-park. On the 19th of November my footman requesting a morning's holyday, I desired the coachman to get a man togo with the carriage into the City; he got the prisoner, and he went with the carriage into the city - Mrs. Solomons went into the City, and made a purchase at some shop in going along; I did not go with the carriage, and Mrs. Solomons is not here, but when she returned I heard the purse had been lost, and there was reason to suspect the prisoner - I asked him about it; he denied it: I urged him to give it up, and save further trouble - he still denied it - I sent for a Police-constable, and it was found on him.

Prisoner. He asked if I had the purse, and said if I would confess he would forgive me - I said I would speak to him in another room; he said, "I will speak to you here." Witness. There was nothing passed like what he has stated; I merely asked if he had the purse - he denied having it.

JOHN MARTIN. I am a Police-constable. I was on duty, and was called in; the prosecutor accused the prisoner of stealing the purse - he denied it several times to him, and to me; I was going to search him, and he said to the prosecutor, "If you will step into the parlour I will speak to you;" I said he should not go out of my sight - he then said, "Have mercy - I have the purse," and gave it up - he had it in his boot; the money was out of the purse; he gave that into my hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been out of employ eight months, and have been very much embarrassed - I picked up the purse on the ground, and did not know it belonged to Mrs. Solomons; when I had denied it once, I certainly did deny it till Mr. Solomons said he would forgive me.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18291203-30

30. JOHN JONES and ROBERT FUZ were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 2 hats, value 16s. , the goods of John Smith .

EBENEZER FOX. I am an oil and colourman - I live opposite Mr. Smith's, a hatter , at the corner of Frith-street and Compton-street . On the 21st of November, about three o'clock, I saw two persons, who I believe to be the prisoners, standing at his door - I had but an indistinct view of them; one of them, who I believe was Jones, took two hats down, and walked down Frith-street - the other was close to his elbow at the time; I ran and told Mr. Smith's man two men had taken some hats - I staid in the shop while he went after them, and took the two prisoners to the watch-house; I did not see them again till Wednesday - I have no doubt they are the men.

ROBERT EWERS. I am in the employ of Mr. John Smith . Fox gave me information - I went in pursuit, and came up with the prisoners when they got two or three

streets from my master's house; I cried Stop thief! and a person who is here stopped them; they had each of them a hat - these are the hats; they are my master's - I had not known the prisoners before.

GEORGE HALL. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoners, and stopped Fuz - he had a hat in his hand; he said,

"Jones did it, and I can't help it" - Jones had the other hat in his hand.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 22.

FUZ - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-31

31. MARY ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of George Robert Dawson , Esq.

BARNARD MANNY. I am in the employ of George Robert Dawson, Esq., of Upper Grosvenor-street . On Monday week, about half-past three o'clock, I heard the area gate open; I watched the gate, and saw the prisoner go out - I went into the kitchen, and asked the cook if any one had been there on business - she said No; I then got my hat, and pursued the prisoner - I asked what business she had down the area in Upper Grosvenor-street; she said she had not been there; I raised her shawl, and found these shoes, which had been taken from the servants' hall- they are my master's.

Prisoner. I did it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 43. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-32

32. THOMAS JOHN HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 2 pairs of braces, value 8s. , the goods of Benjamin Baker and Susannah Baker .

BENJAMIN BAKER. I am a breeches-maker , and live in Piccadilly - I am in partnership with Susannah Baker; the prisoner was in our employ as a piece-worker for two or three years - he did not reside in the house till within five weeks of the time in question. On the night of the 14th of November my house was broken open, and about 20l. worth of property stolen; as soon as I discovered it I called in the Police-officers, and, in consequence of their representing that it must be somebody who knew the premises, I sent to the prisoner's lodgings.

JOSEPH FREDERICK CLEMENTS. I am an officer. I went to Castle-court, Broadway, Westminster - the prisoner had met me in the street, said where he lived and gave me the key of the lodging - his wife came while I was there; I found this pair of braces in a table drawer, which Mr. Baker's foreman identified - there was a box, which was locked; I sent to Avis (who had the prisoner in charge) for the key of it - Avis brought it, and in the box another pair of braces was found.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I searched the box, which I opened with the key I got from the prisoner, and found this pair of braces in it; when I went back to the prisoner he asked if I had found any thing - I said, "Yes, these braces;" he said they were his own manufacture, and not Mr. Baker's.

BENJAMIN BAKER . I am quite clear that these braces are my property - this pair I have had twelve months in my window; the last five weeks I have paid the prisoner by the day - I have lost the braces since he has been there, but I cannot say when; I lost none on the night of the robbery.

JOHN HARBOROW. I am a brace-maker. I made these two pairs of braces for Mr. Baker, I have no doubt; this pair I can particularly speak to, because they are a sort of leather which is not generally used - I think they have been made since September twelve months.

Prisoner. Q.Did you not supply Mr. Hunt, Mr. Field, and others? and if a number were to be kept separate, and they got mixed, could you select them? A. I could select this pair; I have bought articles of the prisoner to be used in brace making.

GEORGE ESDAIL . I make braces for Harborow. I know this pair was made in his shop, and this other pair I helped to make about September twelve months, when my master was in the country.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the braces were his own manufacture.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-33

33. ANN KEGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of November , 1 bolster, value 2s.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 1 blanket, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 6d.; 1 pocket, value 6d.; 1 pair of boots, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 1s.; and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. , the goods of James Smith , her master.

JANE SMITH. I am the wife of James Smith, who keeps a Tallow Chandler's Arms, in St. James-street . The prisoner was in our service from the 5th of October, and was to leave on the 23rd of November, but on the evening of the 22nd of November Mr. Attwood brought this bundle, which contained this bolster, pillow, and other things, which are my property - I sent for an officer, who took the prisoner, and in her box we found a pair of boots, a pair of gloves, a pair of stockings, and an apron; I never gave them to her.

THOMAS GEORGE ATTWOOD . I am a hair-dresser, and live in Great Marlborough-street. On the 22nd of November, the prisoner brought this bundle to me, and asked to leave it for five minutes - she had been at my house once before to leave a front to be dressed, and on the 22nd she brought it again with the bundle; I said I was going to close my shop - she said she should not be longer than five minutes; I waited for an hour, and then took it to the prosecutor's - it contained the articles here produced.

GEORGE AVIS . I was sent for, and took the bundle. I then went into the prisoner's bed-room, and found these other articles in her box - she said they belonged to Mr. Smith, and she had only borrowed them; the box was not locked.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of what was in the room except the boots, which I understood did not fit my mistress, and she was to deduct the price of them from my wages.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-34

34. JOHN BAGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 seal, value 25s.; 1 watch-key, value 20s.; 1 ring, value 7s.; 1 split ring, value 5s.; and 2 gold slides, value 3s., the goods of John Latchford , from his person .

JOHN LATCHFORD . I am a bit and spur-maker , and live in Piccadilly. On the 18th of November I was going home at half-past eleven o'clock at night - I saw some persons round the watch-house - a man said his wife was in there, and he could not get to see her; I said I was

an old parishioner, and I dared say I could get him in - I knocked at the door, got in, and was immediately seized and locked down stairs in the cell, without being asked how I got there - when I got in to the cell I saw the prisoner and four or five others; before I had been there two minutes the prisoner knocked my hat off - I said to him,"Don't ill use me, I don't interrupt you, let me sit quiet;" he said, "You be d-d, you are one of us" - I got my hat again, and in two minutes he knocked it off again; I said, "Don't ill-use me, I am a gentleman" - he said,"What money have you got about you?" I said, "I have three sixpences in silver" - he said, "Give me that," and I gave it to him, because I was afraid I should be ill-used; the other persons who were there sat very quiet - I was not particularly afraid of the prisoner, but I wished to sit quiet- I had sent for bail, as I wished to go home to my family; I called out to Mr. Baker that I had been ill-used, and the prisoner came up again, knocked my hat over my eyes, bruised my nose, and stole my seal, key, and rings from my person - it was a violent blow on my hat, and the snatch was at my watch; I felt the things taken - when the door was opened I told the officer I had been robbed by the prisoner; he was searched, and the property was found on him - I had never seen him before.

Prisoner. He was quite tipsy - he was there before me. Witness. I was not tipsy - he was there when I went down stairs; I do not know whether he was tipsy - I was not; I had not drank more than six glasses of wine.

WILLIAM BOND. I am a serjeant of the Police. I was at the watch-house - there was a great disturbance at the door, with a man whose wife had been locked up; the prosecutor came to the door, and attempted to get in - some of our people were ordered to go and clear the people away; the prosecutor was brought in, and charged by them with an assault and making a disturbance - those persons are not here; the name of one of them was Oliver- I do not know the other's name; he was not under my command - the prosecutor was put down on a charge of assault and disturbance outside the watch-house; the prisoner was there before, charged with assaulting his master, who is a publican, and making a disturbance - the prosecutor called through the bars that he had been robbed; Mr. Baker went down, and the prosecutor pointed out the prisoner, who was tipsy - I cannot say the prosecutor was sober; he had been drinking, but was not so far gone but he recollected what he was about - he charged the prisoner with robbing him of his seal, key and rings; I asked the prisoner if he had them - he said No, he had not; I am positive of that - he had heard the charge, and said he had neither taken them, nor had he got them; I commenced searching him - I took off his jacket, waistcoat and shirt; I found nothing in them - I told him to put them on again, and to pull off his trousers; as he pulled them off I heard something jingle - I felt something in the lining at the bottom of the trousers; I took my knife, and opened it - I found this key, seal and ring: each of his trousers pockets had holes in them and would not hold any thing - it would go down between the lining and the trousers; he said they must have been put there by some one, and that he knew nothing about them - I found this part of a ring under the seat where the prisoner had been sitting, and the other part was in his trousers.

MR. LATCHFORD. This is my property - I had not drank more than I have stated; I was very unwell - I knocked at the watch-house door when the man said his wife was locked up, and he could not get in - when the door was opened I was laid hold of, and taken down; I told Mr. Roe the circumstance as it occured - I have lived twenty-five years in the parish; I heard no charge made against me, and I know of no name being entered in the book.

WILLIAM BOND. The charge was entered and produced before the Magistrate - it was regularly entered; the inspector received it - I was present, and I locked up the prosecutor: they were discharged on paying 1s., the prosecutor and the man who was with him.

MR. LATCHFORD. I was not taken before the inspector, and had no man with me at all.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking at my master's, and became quite insensible - I made a disturbance, and my master sent me to the watch-house; when I got there I fell on the form, and went to sleep - the officer came to search the place, and shook me; he said I was to get up, and be searched - I got up, and the things were found on me, but I know no more of them than a child.

JOHN LATCHFORD re-examined. I should think there were half a dozen persons in the cell - it is but small; I have served the office of constable in the parish - it was about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock when I was robbed.

MR. HENCHAF. I am a publicar. The prisoner lived with me as pot-boy, and behaved well, but on the day in question he got so drunk I was obliged to put him into the watch-house.

GEORGE WOODWARD. I am a Thames Police-officer. I have known the prisoner between three and four months - I was at his master's on the night in question; he would not be persuaded to go to bed, and he was forced to be dragged to the watch-house by a Police-officer - that was about eleven or half-past eleven o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-35

35. SARAH WOOTEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 watch, value 2l.; 3 pairs of gloves, value 3s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 2 pockets, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 1s.; 1 pinafore, value 1s., and 3 yards of calico, value 1s. , the goods of John Ballingall Whyte .

JOHN BALLINGALL WHYTE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Upper East Smithfield . The prisoner had been twice in my service; the first time for about sixteen months, and the last time about a month - she absconded on the morning of the 27th of November, and my watch was missed; I took an officer, and found her the next day - the watch was in her pocket, and the other articles in a bundle on the table - it is all mine.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I went with the prosecutor to a house in Baldwin's-court; I found this property in a bundle on the table - I then found this watch in a pocket of hers, at a house in Trinity-lane; which I had been at before.

GUILTY . Aged 21 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-36

36. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 pair of spectacles, value 30s., and 11 sovereigns, the property of John Norman , from his person .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN NORMAN . I live in Somersetshire, but I was staying at a house in Park-street. On the 11th of November, I had dined with a Mr. Saunders, and left his house about half-past eleven o'clock at night; I called a coach in St. Giles - I had eleven sovereigns, and two or three shillings in my pocket; I had a pair of silver spectacles in my waistcoat pocket - I told the driver, to drive to St. James'-street; I had drank pretty freely, and told the coachman I was intoxicated - he took me to Leicester-square , but did not stop at the pavement; I was astonished he did not stop at the pavement, but I got out, and I then saw the prisoner, who said he would go and have an oyster with me - I put my hand into my waistcoat-pocket, and found I had no silver - I then felt in my trousers pocket, and missed my sovereigns; I seized the prisoner by the collar, and said, "This man or the coachman has robbed me;" the coachman called the Police-officer, and I gave the prisoner into custody - I was not sensible of his being in the coach; my spectacles were shewn me the next morning at the office.

COURT. Q.Can you say whether the prisoner was in the coach? A. I could not say whether any one was with me in the coach - I am certain my money was secure when I got into the coach.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect being in Soho-square? A. I certainly was not; I had no female with me - I gave nobody money for particular purposes; I was not holding my hat in my hand.

Prisoner. One of the females said, "You have not given me any money;" you felt your pocket, dropped your spectacles, and said, to me "You seem a respectable man, I wish you would see me home, and call a coach;" and I did. Witness; I deny it all - I called the coach myself; I had a watch, but I was not in Soho-square - I told the coachman to drive to where I stated; I do not know that it was in the way to go through Leicester-square - I did not propose to stop the coach, and say I would take you to an oyster-shop, and treat you; you were a stranger to me.

Prisoner. Did I not in Leicester-square offer to pay the coach, and then found I had no silver; the coachman said we were both strangers, and he wished us to have another coach - I said I would go to Mr. Percy's, and get change; the coachman was not satisfied with that, and I gave my watch, as security, and you asked me to go and have an oyster with you. Witness. I asked the coachman the fare, and he said 1s. - I put my hand into my pocket, missed my money, and took you by the collar; you could not have escaped while the officer was called - I have to regret I was asleep, or I should have put you or any man out of the window, who had come into the coach without my consent.

GEORGE SAUNDERS. I am a portrait painter, and live in Edward-street, Portman-square; the prosecutor dined with me on the day in question - he left my house a quarter before twelve o'clock at night, and was drunk.

GEORGE GREEN. I am a hackney coachman. On the morning of the 11th of November I was near St. Giles', at the end of Oxford-street, and took the prosecutor into my coach - he was very drunk; the prisoner was with him - the prosecutor told me to drive to St. James'-street; he said, "I am very drunk;" I said, "It is a dull heart that never rejoices;" I asked the prisoner if he knew the gentleman - he said Yes, and that he was going with him - he ordered me to go to Leicester-square; when I got to Leicester-place, the prisoner told me to turn to the left - I did so, and he told me to stop on the stand, and said, "D-n you, can't you hear?" I said, "I am on the stand;" I got down, went to the door, and to the best of my belief, by the voice, the prosecutor said, "Draw to the pavement;" I did so - the prisoner got out first, and the prosecutor next; I am sure the prisoner got in, and got out - the prosecutor asked the fare; I said 1s. - he put his hand to his waistcoat pockets, then in his trousers pockets, and said he had no money; the prisoner said, "Never mind, I will pay the coachman - you stop there;" he then took the prosecutor's arm, and said, "We will go and eat some oysters;" I said, "A shilling, is a shilling to me, and I don't know you;" the prisoner again said, "You stop there," and he gave me his watch to hold - they walked forward; I followed them for thirty or forty yards - the prosecutor then said he had been robbed by the prisoner or me - he laid hold of the prisoner; I said I will call the Police, which I did, and Slark came - I told him the number of my chariot; he said he was going to St. James' watch-house, and I followed them to the Quadrant.

Q. Where was your chariot when you were called? A. I was coming home down Oxford-street, near St. Giles' - I was coming to Eagle-street, where I live; the prosecutor and prisoner were standing together.

THOMAS SLARK . I am a serjeant of the Police, and am stationed in St. Martin's-street. I was called, and took the prisoner in Leicester-square; the prosecutor charged him with taking eleven sovereigns from him, but mentioned nothing else at that time: I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and found on him nine sovereigns and these silver spectacles - I saw the prosecutor the next day, and he mentioned about his spectacles to the other officer.

Prisoner. Q.Did I object to go with you? A. Yes; you wanted to go to a public-house - the prosecutor was very tipsy; I took hold of the prisoner's arm - he could not have thrown away the spectacles without my seeing him; I do not know whether he had time to have thrown them away before I came - I held him part of the way, when I saw he wanted to shuffle away; Bond and I searched him together - three sovereigns and the spectacles were found in his coat pocket behind.

GEORGE GREEN. The coach was called about ten minutes after twelve.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. You have heard my questions, and I leave my case in your hands.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18291203-37

37. WILLIAM WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 copper, value 6s ., the goods of James Trye .

JAMES TYMMS. I am a patrol of Hackney. On the 6th of November, I met the prisoner and another man - the prisoner had a basket on his head, and this copper in it; I asked what he had got - he said a small copper; I asked him to let me look at it - he did so, and said he had brought it from his sister, who lived at Dalston, opposite

the Tyson Arms ; I went there, but could find no such person - he was a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's when I took him.

JAMES TRYE . I live at Kingsland . I lost this copper from a back cellar at my house, on the 6th of November - it was shut up; I never saw the prisoner.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had found the copper in a laue near his sister's house, and had told the officer so. He received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-38

38. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 3s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3d., the goods of Joseph Shaw , from the person of Mary Smith .

ELIZABETH SHAW. I am the wife of Joseph Shaw , and live in Baltic-street. On the 14th of November, I sent Mary Smith to her mother in Old-street, with these trousers and handkerchief; I heard her cry out, went, and saw the prisoner in custody.

REBECCA FRENCH. I heard the watchman spring his rattle, and a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running with the bundle under his jacket - I went to lay hold of him, he twisted out of my hand, and dropped this bundle, which I took up.

MICHAEL O'BRYAN . I am a watchman. I was going round my beat at half-past ten o'clock, and heard the child cry; I made up to the spot, and saw the prisoner run - I pursued, and took him.

CHARLES TUCKER. I was the night officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and French brought this bundle.

MARY SMITH . I am eight years and a half old - people who tell lies go to the wicked place. Mrs. Shaw gave me the bundle to carry to be mangled; the prisoner pushed me down, and took it from under my arm.

Prisoner. Q. Was you not tying up your stocking? A. I was pulling up my stocking - the bundle was under my arm.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-39

39. WILLIAM TALBOT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 2 trunks, value 10s.; 11 gowns, value 5l. 15s.; I watch, value 1l.; 2 brooches, value 16s.; 3 pairs of shoes, value 11s.; 2 scarfs, value 9s., and 5 shifts, value 10s. , the goods of Hannah Veale .

HANNAH VEALE. I live in Argyle-place. I sent two boxes from Cheltenham to come there on the 17th of November, by a waggon - they contained the property stated; I sent nine packages in all to Mr. Campbell's.

JAMES LARKINS . I am porter at the Green Man and Still. Two boxes came by the Cheltenham waggon last Saturday week, about a quarter before five o'clock in the morning; I took them out of the waggon, and put them on the pavement - I went into the office, and laid the bill on the desk; I came out, and missed two boxes - I know the prisoner - he is a hackney-coachman; I do not know whether he was on the stand that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You say you know him as a hackney-coachman? A. Yes, for two or three years; it is usual for coachmen to sit on their boxes while the waterman puts the passengers' luggage in.

JAMES CONDIE. I am a Police-constable. On the Saturday morning in question. I heard a coach running, a little after five o'clock, in Hanover-square; it attracted my notice, as it was going as rapidly as the road would allow- I went to a private watchman in Hanover-street, who was just beginning to cry five o'clock; we walked up the street, up Regent-street, and into Hanover-square again- we stopped talking; I heard the coach again, and saw the prisoner and another man on the box - I thought the other man seemed rather fresh, and I had some suspicion; I followed the coach, and saw a young man run across the square towards it - it went up Hanover-street, up Regent-street, and down Argyle-street, and there I saw the young man join in company with another; they went on to Poland-street, and then I lost sight of the coach in the fog - I ran up Poland-street, and got sight of the coach, and saw the other man get off the box; the two young men came up to the side of the coach, and another man with a white jacket or waistcoat, opened the coach door, and went in - a man with a dark jacket came out of the coach, and shut the door; the man who had got off the box wished the coachman good night - I said Halloo! and ran up to take the number of the coach; I cannot say whether the coachman heard me, but he went on - I laid hold of the handle of the coach door, and it went on to the end of Poland-street; I kept calling all the way Stop! Stop! Stop! as loud as I could - I then let go handle, made a spring, got hold of the trace, and one of the horses slipped; I put my foot on the box - the coachman then stopped; I got down to take the men on the pavement, but they were gone - I then went to take the man in the coach, but he was gone; I made an alarm, and two of my partners came up - the coachman said two men came and called him, and said he need not get off the box; these two boxes were in the coach. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-40

40. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 2 sieves, value 8s. , the goods of Andrew Wood .

ANDREW WOOD. I am a stone-mason , and live in Blackmore-street. On the 5th of November I lost two sieves from my workshop, at the back of Craven-buildings - I found them next morning; they cost me 13s., and are worth 8s.

ANN WARWICK . I deal in marine-stores, at No. 14, White Lion-yard, Drury-lane. I bought these sieves of the prisoner, on the 5th of November, for 1s. 6d. - he asked 2s. 6d. for them; I said I did not wish to have any thing to do with them, for my husband was not at home.

Prisoner's Defence. I received them from a man I had seen once before - he asked me if I could sell them for him; he was acquainted with a shipmate of mine.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-41

41. GEORGE PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 2 pairs of shoes, value 7s. , the goods of Samuel Costa .

SAMUEL COSTA. I am a shoemaker , I went out on the 9th of November, and when I returned I missed two pairs of shoes from my front window - on the 12th of No

vember, as I was walking with two little boys and an officer, the prisoner was pointed out as one of the boys who had stole them; I gave him in charge - he said he was not the person who sold them, but they were sold for 9d.; he said he was with the boy when they were stolen, and had part of the money - I found them at Mrs. Jacob's.

SOPHIA JACOBS. I keep a marine-store shop, and deal in shoes. I bought this pair of shoes of a lad, who said his name was Thomas Smith , living in Brick-lane - it was not the prisoner; I gave 9d. for them, which I consider the full value in the way of trade - I had been offered 10d. for them the day they were claimed by the prosecutor; I saw they had not been worn, and asked the boy how he came by them - he said they were too small.

MOSES SIMMONS. I am an officer. I saw the prisoner, and took him - he said he had been with two other boys; that one of them pushed the shoes into his hands, and he went with another and sold them.

Prisoner. They were put into my hands - I did not know where they came from.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18291203-42

42. CHARLES NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 cloak, value 1l. 15s. , the goods of Charles Clift .

HANNAH SMITH . I know Mr. Charles Clift , a linen-draper , of Regent-street . I saw the prisoner take the cloak from his shop, about six o'clock in the evening of the 14th of November - he ran away, and another with him; the prosecutor sent the Police-man after him - I am quite sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. No - it was dark, but there were four or five gas-lights in the window; a person could take the cloak without going in, by putting in their hand- I did not see him for more than a minute - there was another waiting for him; I saw them together - the other went in, and the prisoner took it.

CHARLES CLIFT. I keep this shop - I heard a rustling at my door, and ran out; a boy told me a man had taken it - I ran a few paces, saw a Police-man, and told him; he brought it back, with the prisoner - this is it.

EDWARD DRURY. I am a Police-officer. I received notice, and pursued in the direction; I saw the prisoner and another crossing to the other side of the street - I followed them; they looked, and saw me coming - they ran, and dropped the cloak; I took it up, and still pursued till the prisoner was apprehended - they were so near together I cannot say which dropped it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had they turned any corners? A. They turned one, but it was very wide; the lamps had been lighted - the other person was rather taller than him; there was no alarm, but what I made myself when they dropped the cloak - I was some distance from the shop when I saw the prisoner.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-43

43. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 47 hinges, value 26l. , the goods of Robert Johnston .

WILLIAM RICH. I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in King-street, Seven-dials, about eight o'clock in the evening, on the 24th of November - I saw the prisoner coming through the street; I suspected, and followed him to Drury-lane - I there stopped him, and found on him twenty-three pairs of patent brass hinges; he said he was going to Field-lane, but he would not tell me where he got them from - I took him to the watch-house, and the next morning found the owner; the prisoner had three pairs in his hat, some in his right-hand pockets, and some in his left-hand pockets.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you mean to say he did not tell you where he got them as soon as you asked him? A.No; he said at the watch-house that he found them in a court in Crown-street; he told me he was going to Field-lane, and in going along the street he said if I liked to go with him, I should see where he was going to; he said at the watch-house he would go back to the place, but he did not tell me where it was - our inspector and two or three more were there at the time; there was a man with me when I took him - the prisoner said he got them in a court, and when I locked him up I went there, but there was no such thing, nor had any person seen any; he was coming from Crown-court, towards Field-lane, when I took him - I believe there is a shop in Field-lane where they buy such things.

STEPHEN GAMMAN. I am in the employ of Mr. Robert Johnston , of Greek-street - he is the proprietor of a hinge warehouse . I can swear to these hinges as his; I have the inspection of every hinge that is brought into the warehouse.

WILLIAM WICKS. I am shopman to Mr. Johnston. I missed a number of hinges from a tier of shelves near the door, and some from other shelves - on the evening of the 24th, at a quarter-past eight o'clock, I had double locked the shop door; on the morning of the 25th I found the key would not open the door, and then I missed the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove that I had been at a witnesses house till half-past nine o'clock that evening, and had not come out many minutes when I picked up these hinges.

WILLIAM STROUD . I am a bricklayer, of Grafton-street, Soho. I have known the prisoner these ten or twelve years -I saw him last Tuesday week, which I believe was the 24th of November: I met him in the street at seven o'clock, and he stopped with me till half-past nine - I am quite certain it was more than a quarter-past nine.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-44

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

44. JOHN HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 4 pairs of stockings, value 5s. 6d., and 3 yards of linen, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of William Foster Smith .

WILLIAM FOSTER SMITH . I am a hosier , of Middle-row, Holborn . The prisoner came to my shop at a quarter-past ten o'clock on the evening of the 25th of November - he looked out some things, desired them to be wrapped up, and when they were rolled round he said, "I want a pair of gloves" - my young man turned round for them, and the prisoner took the parcel and ran out; my young man

pursued him, and I ran after him - he took the prisoner, who threw down the things in the street, and said, "D-n" you, if I can't get away I will spoil your property;" he was taken by the Police-officer - here are five pairs of stockings, and three yards of linen, in the parcel.

Prisoner. It was done entirely out of distress.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-45

45. WILLIAM COLLIER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 2 books, value 12s. , the goods of Robert Martin .

ELIZA MARTIN . I am the wife of Robert Martin, bookseller , of Great Queen-street . The prisoner took two books from our shop on the 23rd of November, and ran down Wildstreet; I went to the door, but seeing I could not overtake him. I sent a little boy after him, whom I was going to serve - he was brought back soon after.

THOMAS SWEET. The prisoner was pointed out to me by a boy as having taken some books - I followed, and took him with them; I took him to the shop - he said he took them through distress, being out of work.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-46

46. ELEANOR CONOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 saw, value 3s., and 2 planes, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Claxton .

THOMAS CLAXTON . I am a journeyman carpenter . I lost my saw and planes on the 4th of November, from a house in Milton-street, Dorset-square , between one and two o'clock, when I returned from dinner; I had left them safe when I went - I cannot say when I had seen the other plane - the prisoner comes there with his father's dinner and breakfast - he is a stone-sawyer.

THOMAS HARVEY. I am a pawnbroker. I have a saw pawned by the prisoenr on the 4th of November, in the name of Ellen Collins - she said it was for her father.

MR. LAW. I am a pawnbroker. I have a plane, pawned with me on the 30th of October - I cannot say who by. NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18291203-47

47. HENRY HUKE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 2 coats, value 40s. , the goods of John Townend .

JOHN TOWNEND. I am a tea-dealer , and reside at Tottenham. I lost two coats, but I was in town at the time they were taken; they were safe a day or two before, when I left to come to London.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. When had you seen them? A. On the Monday or the Tuesday - I saw them again on the Saturday.

SARAH METCALF. I am servant to Mr. Townend - he lives in Hanger-lane, Tottenham . On Friday, the 6th of November, I saw the prisoner, with two coats on his arm, going out of the stable door - I called my fellow-servant, Godward, and he came; I went out to the gate, and saw the prisoner running - Godward went after him; I picked up the coats, which he threw down - I took them into the hall, and hung them up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you lose sight of the prisoner? A. Yes, while I called my fellow-servant.

RICHARD GODWARD . I was called, and went out - I saw the prisoner sixty or seventy yards from our gate, running - I ran and overtook him; I saw the coats which were dropped on the gravel walk, but I did not see him drop them.

JOSEPH WEBB . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am gardener to Mr. Clarkson. On the 6th of November I saw Godward go down the lane after the prisoner, and bring him back.

SARAH METCALF . I first saw the prisoner when I was coming up the road - he had not stolen the coats then; I had observed his; person before, and am certain that he is the man; he was brought back in about ten minutes after I had seen him - the coats had been in the hall.

The prisoenr received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-48

48. JONATHAN WICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 5 looking-glasses, value 7l. , the goods of George Cooper , his master.

GEORGE COOPER . I am a carver and gilder , of Piccadilly - the prisoner was my apprentice . I had reason to suppose he removed some of the looking-glassed from my premises, and I got an officer to watch him - these glasses are mine; I saw them in a dark corner, under a staircase, in some workshops of mine in Little Vine-street, in a sack, covered with some hay and shavings, and I marked them - I have not the least doubt they are mine, and I have missed articles of this description; he has been with me five years.

WILLIAM CORNELIUS MOORE. I am in the service of Mr. Stubbs, a blind-maker - he has a workshop in Vine-street, over the prosecutor's. On the 4th of November I heard a noise in the workshop, and saw the prisoner bring in a sack and put it under the stairs - I went and told Mr. Cooper, who came and found these five looking-glasses in it; this was about seven o'clock in the morning, and about a quarter-past nine the prisoner came and took the same sack away - I followed him into he street, and then went and told the Police-officer.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Had you seen him before? A. Yes, and had spoken to him - I asked him the price of putting a glass in a frame which I had; he said he would put it in as cheap as any body.

JAMES CONDIE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Regent-circus with these glasses in the sack - he wanted to know what I wanted him for; I said there was a person in Vine-street who wanted to see what he had got - he bounced a good deal, and said I should get into trouble by taking him, he was a respectable person.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-49

Fifth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

49. SUSAN DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 3 hats, value 50s. , the goods of Robert Hugh Franks , her master.

GEORGE FRANKS. I am the son of George Franks . The prisoner was in the employ of Robert Hugh Franks , a hatter , of Newgate-street - these three hats I know to he his; I did not see the prisoner till she was at the office - they had not been sold; I know that by the numbers in them, which I compared with the number book

- I put this writing in the hats myself; the prisoner was employed to sweep and clean the place, but not in the shop - I did not miss the hats till the officer came with her.

FREDERICK PRIEST . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned these hats in the name of Ann Brown , on the 9th of October, and the 13th of November; and on the 17th of November she came again - she could not tell where she got the last from, and we stopped her.

Prisoner. I did not steal them - they were given me to pawn.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-50

50. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 boot, value 8s. , the goods of Joseph Darke .

JOSEPH DARKE . I am a shoemaker , of Tottenham-court-road . On the 14th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was sent for while I was absent, and told there was a boot stolen - the officer had it, and I found it was mine; this is the boot - I had left it safe about a quarter of an hour before.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD. I am a cabinet-maker. On the 14th of November I saw the prisoner and two others at the prosecutor's door - one of his companions took the boot from just inside the door, and gave it to the prisoner, who was close to this elbow; when he took it he put it under his coat, and crossed the road; I took him back- he said, "I did not take the boot, a boy gave it to me."

EDWARE OKELL. I am a constable. I took him into custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up the road, and saw two boys running - they chucked the boot to me; I ran, and that gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-51

51. ELI THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 144lbs. weight of iron, value 5s. , the goods of William Wiggins and another.

JAMES BOLAS . I am a Thames Police-constable. On the 23rd of November I was near Mr. Wiggins', in Old Gravel-lane - I saw the prisoner carrying a bag of something on his back; I followed him to an old iron shop, and he put it down on the floor - I went in, and asked where he brought it from; he said from Mr. Wiggins' stable; I asked who gave it him - he made me no answer; I said he must go with me to Mr. Wiggins' stable - he then said no one had given it him, he had taken it himself.

JAMES CROAST . I am servant to Mr. William Wiggins and his father - they had some iron in their stable on Monday week; we had not missed it till the prisoner was taken - I had seen it five or six days before; there were chalk marks on it, and so there are now - I believe this iron was part of that which was in the stable; some persons have been tried and transported for stealing the same iron before - I had been about the stable on the 24th of November, and went to dinner about ten minutes past one o'clock, leaving the prisoner on the premises; a cart afterwards happened to break down, and I went to assist in getting it up - during that time the officer took him.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the witness, Croast,. had directed him to take the iron as waste, and procure a few shillings on it to spend in drink, it being the carman's birth-day.

JAMES CROAST . I did not desire him to take the iron.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy, believing it to be his first offence.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-52

52. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of John Boards .

GEORGE WILLIAM DEAN. I was foreman to Mr. John Boards, a pawnbroker , of Shoreditch . On the evening of the 5th of November I saw some one come and take hold of the handkerchief, and give it a sudden jerk - I thought it was some one going to buy it; I was going round the counter, but he got out, and by the time I got to the door the prisoner had got about six yards off; I overtook him- he was walking fast, and I saw him whisping a handkerchief up, and putting it into his coat; I brought him back, and when I got him about half way he dropped it at his feet; I saw it fall, and at my request a child took it up- I took the prisoner back to the shop, and sent for an officer; while the officer was sent for he said, "I beg your pardon."

GEORGE LAZARUS. I am a patrol. I went to the shop about seven o'clock, and took the prisoner.

JOHN ROBINSON. I produce the handkerchief, which I got from Dean; I saw Lazarus - there was a great mob round - Lazarus said he was afraid to take the prisoner out, and I assisted.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, and he laid hold of me - the handkerchief laid on the ground; he said he saw me drop it, which I did not, and I had no coat on.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-53

53. LYDIA QUAY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 sheet, value 4s.; 1 quilt, value 4s., and 1 frock, value 2s. , the goods of Mary Grey .

It being the property of Matthew Grey, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18291203-54

54. LYDIA QUAY was again indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 3 shirts, value 20s., and 9 towels, value 6s. , the goods of Robert Guthrie .

ELIZABETH DONALDSON . I live with Mr. Robert Guthrie , of Clifford-street, Bond-street . The prisoner came and said she came from Mrs. Harland, who mangles for Mr. Guthrie, and I gave her two shirts and nine towels - I cannot say when it was; I never saw the articles again.

SARAH HARLAND . I mangle for Mr. Guthrie. I never sent the prisoner to his house for any linen.

WILLIAM JEMMETT. I took the prisoner, but nothing relative to this charge was found; she asked me what I thought they would do to her if she was found guilty - I said I did not know, perhaps transport her; she said," I hope I shall go abroad, and I may get a husband."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-55

55. LYDIA QUAY was again indicted for stealing,

on the 31st of October , 1 gown, value 16s., and 1 apron, value 2s. , the goods of Mary Williams .

MARY WILLIAMS . I am single , and live in Maddox-street, Hanover-square . On the 30th of October the prisoner came to me, and said that Mrs. Taylor, her sister, who used to mangle for me, was very ill, and I gave her for Mrs. Taylor, a gown and an apron, to be mangled - I saw the prisoner again at the watch-house, and she had the same clothes on as when I saw her; I have not a doubt of her being the person.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR . I mangle for the last witness - I never sent the prisoner to her for any thing.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-56

56. LYDIA QUAY was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 4 shifts, value 20s.; 5 night-gowns, value 5s.; 28 yards of Holland, value 20s.; 5 pairs of drawers, value 12s.: 3 shirts, value 6s.; 1 dress, value 8s.; 3 sheets, value 15s.; 3 cloths, value 3s.: 1 table-cloth, value 4s.; 9 pillow-cases, value 18s.; 2 napkins, value 1s., and 1 night-cap, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Dawes .

ANN BETTON . I am in the service of Mr. Charles Dawes , of Maddox-street, Hanover-square . On Friday, the 28th of August, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came and asked for the mangling things; I asked if she came from Carnaby-street - she said Yes, for the mangling things for her sister, who was very poorly, and not able to come herself; I said they were not quite ready, and asked her down stairs - she staid five or ten minutes, and then took the things, some folded, and some not; she said her sister could fold them, but was not able to come for them- she counted the things herself; there were three dozen and eleven; I had an opportunity of observing her person and dress, and swear it was her - I saw her again the day she was taken, in Bond-street; I knew her again the moment I saw her - I felt quite sure of it; Ann Wood , of Carnaby-street, mangles for us.

Prisoner. I think that is the person who said at the office she would say the same as the others did - that I was about the heighth of the person who committed the robbery. Witness. I never said any thing of the kind - I never expressed any doubt about her.

ANN WOOD . I mangle for the prosecutor. I never sent the prisoner for any thing; I was not ill.

JOHN WILLIAM HADLINGTON . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker in Cambridge-street, Golden-square. I produce some articles, pawned on the 20th of August, by a female, in the name of Ann Cooper, No. 8, Silver-street, but I do not know by whom.

WILLIAM JEMMETT . I took the prisoner - I have nothing more to add; she said she knew nothing of the articles.

ANN BETTON . These four pillow-cases are Mr. Dawes'.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer told me if I had any papers to destroy them; I know nothing at all of the case.

WILLIAM JEMMETT . I never told her any such thing.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-57

57. HENRY POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 14 yards of floor-cloth, value 21s. , the goods of John Simmons .

JOHN SIMMONS . On the 18th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in my counting-house, and Morris told me I was robbed; I went up New-street, and saw the prisoner standing with his back near a house, and close by him was this piece of floorcloth, which is mine - I cannot exactly say whether it was on the ground or on his shoulder; I had seen it safe but a few minutes before - he had got about two hundred yards from my shop.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I was in Old-street , and saw the prisoner take the cloth from the door, and put it on his shoulder; I did not see any one else with him: I went into the shop, and the prosecutor told me to go and take him -I followed up a turning, and he then stopped, with it on his shoulder; I observed his person when he took it, and can swear to him - he stopped when he saw me coming, and then put it down.

JOHN THOMAS WRIGHT . I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-58

58. WILLIAM PRITICHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 wooden till, value 6d.; 19 penny-pieces, 94 halfpence, and 22 farthings , the property of John Cagings Sparrow .

JOHN CAGINGS SPARROW. I am a potatoe-merchant , of High-street, Marylebone . On the 3rd of November I was at dinner in the room behind the shop - my wife said there was a man in the shop, and she thought he had taken the till; I went and missed the till - I went out, and a girl directed me up Great Marylebone-street: I looked, and saw the prisoner running, and when I got up he was in custody; he had my till then in his possession: it usually stands upon the top of the potatoes - there was 5s. 11d. in it when I took him; I had not counted what was in it before.

GOULD KNIGHT. I am a Police-officer. I was going up Marylebone-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running - he said, "I am not the man; I am running after him:" I said, "What is this under your arm?" he made no reply - I found this till under his arm. I have seen his wife and family - they are in a state of starvation.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court - great distress drove me to it. GUILTY . Aged 60.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18291203-59

59. WILLIAM HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 saw, value 1s., and 1 plane, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William Hawkes ; and 1 plane, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Dunbar .

WILLIAM HAWKES . I am a carpenter . On the 24th of November I was working in Church-lane, Whitechapel - I had a saw and a plane there; I went to dinner, and missed them when I returned - I found them at the watch-house the same day.

THOMAS DUNBAR . I was working in the same house, and lost my Plane.

YOUNG LAKE . I am a painter. I was going on the premises to work, and met the prisoner coming off with something concealed under his apron; I had some suspi

cion, and followed him to a pawnbroker's shop - I told the pawnbroker to put the tools which he offered by till I got an officer: the pawnbroker put them on a shelf, and when I returned I saw them in the same place.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. It was distress made me do it.

GUILTY . Aged 52. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18291203-60

60. JOHN KILPATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 24 prints, value 5l.; 64 sheets of paper, value 14s.; 1 portfolio, value 2s.; 1 book, value 4s.; 9 pieces of pasteboard, value 5s., and 24 pieces of leather, value 5s. , the goods of John Fairbairn , his master.

JOHN FAIRBAIRN . I am a book-binder , and live in Duke-street, Adelphi - the prisoner was my errand-boy On Saturday evening, the 17th of October, Schofield and two other officers came to tell me they had taken him with a gang of thieves, and on searching his lodgings found some articles which they thought were mine - I went on the Monday to the office, and found the articles stated, which are mine; I had seen some of them but a few days before, and some about a fortnight or three weeks; I had given him the prints to gather up.

WILLIAM BALLARD . On the 17th of October I went with Clements to search a room in Sherrard-street, Golden-square, where the landlady told me the prisoner lodged with his brother - I found a box. which I got the key of from the prisoner, I think, but I will not be positive - he was in custody; I told him I had searched his lodging, and found these prints and other things, which I suspected were Mr. Fairbairn's; he said the prints were his own, and he could prove where he bought them.

Prisoner. There was no lock or key to the box; the prints were in a bundle on the table, and some under the table. Witness. I will not be positive whether the box was locked or no; the prints were in the box - the pasteboard and paper were in a bundle, partly; I had two keys from him - one was a door key.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I went to the lodging; the box was opened by taking off a cord - I believe it was locked; these prints and papers were found, and I found some other articles in another part of the room, in a chair - these are the articles; this book and portfolio I received from a pawnbroker.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD. I have four prints, which I got from Hanbury.

JOHN THOMAS HANBURY . The prisoner gave me these prints on the 16th of October, and asked me to mind them for him; he was in his shirt-sleeves, and said he was in a hurry, but he should come and take them at night - this was at the George, in George-court, where I am servant; he lodged there then, but afterwards removed to where the officer went.

CHARLES BOORE . I am a pawnbroker. This book and portfolio were pawned at our house by the prisoner, on the 24th and 30th of September - I am positive he is the person.

WILLIAM BUCHANAN . I know this portfolio by a fillet which is worked upon it, and I know the fillet has been in Mr. Fairbairn's warehouse for two years.

Prisoner. Q. Do not you often lend fillets out? A. That fillet was never lent out while I was there; I know this book by the paper and leather.

MR. FAIRBAIRN. These prints are mine; these three belonged to a work in the shop, which was waiting for the index - they are illustrations of Bowyer's History of England, and these others belong to the Florence Gallery; I had seen them a day or two before, and urged the prisoner to move them to another part of the shop, as the wet had come in - this book and portfolio we had not seen, as the prisoner had done them when we were out of the shop; I know this marble paper and the Morocco, which correspond with my materials; this pasteboard I had had in use, and here are some marks of glue on it.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Fairbairn has sworn falsely to many of the articles. and so has the witness; the box was not locked, and the prints were on the table - this paper and board may be bought at any stationer's in London; the prints are common enough, and the fillet is lent to many binders.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-61

61. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 2 pairs of boots, value 9s. , the goods of James Taylor .

JAMES PAGE. I am a shoemaker, and work for Mr. James Taylor. On the 11th of November the prisoner came into the shop, and asked when Mr. Taylor would be at home - I said I did not know; he said "He was to look me out a pair of boots, but you can do it; "I shewed him some, and while I was engaged in the front shop with a gentleman - he went into the back shop, and I heard the case creak; the prisoner then went out, and I said, to him as he went," Will you come again?" he said, "Yes, at dinner time;" I called him back, and said, "Will you come again or no?" he said Yes, and ran off; I pursued, and took him in Glasshouse-street with these two pairs of ladies's boots in his hat.

WILLIAM MULLINS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I beg for mercy - I believe my master has been to the prosecutor.

JAMES PAGE . Yes - he came yesterday, and said he was a man he had entrusted with property, and never knew him guilty of any thing in his life, and he would employ him again; his name is Cox.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-62

62. JOHN RICHARDS , JOHN JONES , THOMAS STREET , and CHARLES JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 6 table-cloths, value 3l.; 4 aprons. value 4s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 4 shirts, value 3l.; 1 pillow-case, value 5s.; 4 children's shirts, value 3l.; 3 cravats, value 3s.; 1 table napkin, value 5s.; I pair of stockings, value 1s.; I waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 gown, value 2s., and 1 night shirt, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Monks .

THOMAS MONKS."I keep a steam-washing establishment , at Camden-town . I had a great quantity of linen to wash - I did not see any taken, but the officer came to me, and asked if I had been robbed; a pane of glass had been taken out of the window of a room in which the foul linen

is kept - I think the hole was large enough for the prisoners to get in; I had the linen examined, and part was missing.

ELLEN STEPHENSON . I am in the prosecutor's employ. The articles were in his place to be washed - it is in the back garden; I was called to examine the linen, and missed four shirts, a pair of stockings, some cravats, and other things; I have seen some of them since - I know nothing of the prisoners.

GEORGE MEYRICK. I am an officer. On the 10th of November I was on duty at a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoners come through the turnpike near the Yorkshire Stingo - one of them had some grass cut in his lap, and another had a bundle; I let them pass me, and then pursued them with my brother officer -I took street, who had the bundle, and Jones; as we were going to the office I saw the sleeve of a shirt hanging through a hole in the knee of Jones' breeches - I took a neckcloth off his neck; the prisoners said they had found the things under a hedge between Blood-hill and Primrosehill.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a Police-constable. I saw the four prisoners coming through the gate, which is about two miles from Camden-town - I took Richards and Johnson; Richards said he had only some grass, but I found these table-cloths on him - I found nothing on Johnson; I went to the prosecutor's, and found the window had been broken.(Property Produced and sworn to.)

Richards' Defence. I had nothing to do, and took a walk up Primrose-hill, to see the bird-catchers - one of these lads called me to see what was in the hedge, and we found this property; we agreed to take them to some workhouse, to find the owners.

Jones' Defence. I called the boys to see the things.

Street's Defence. I was going to look for work, and found them.

Johnson's Defence. I know nothing of the boys at all.

RICHARDS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

STREET - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

JOHNSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-63

63. JOHN FLINT and JAMES BINGLOW were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November, 1 yard of velvet, value 1s. 8d.; 2 yards and a half of shalloon, value 4s., and 1 yard of kerseymere, value 6s. , the goods of Daniel Hill ; and SARAH EVANS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

DANIEL HILL. - I am a tailor , and live at Wandsworth. On the 14th of November, between three and four o'clock, I went to the Ship public house, at Charing-cross , to wait for a coach - I had a parcel, containing some scarlet kerseymere, velvet, and shalloon; I laid my bundle on the table, and took some refreshment - when I had been there half an hour or three quarters, it was gone - I did not see it taken, but I missed it after it was gone: it was in a brown paper, and tied with a string - I had seen the two male prisoners there: they said they were very poor, and I gave them some beer and something to eat - when I missed my bundle I accused them of it, and in a few minutes they made their escape; I did not see them go.

THOMAS BICKNELL. I am an officer. On the 14th of November, between six and seven o'clock, I went to No. 17, Dacre-street, Westminster; I saw the three prisoners in a room, with a man named Comerford - I searched Flint, and found this property in his pocket; I put it on the table, and went to handcuff them, Flint took up a shovel, and said he would knock my bl - y brains out- he first struck me on the hand, and cut it; he then struck me on the loins and the side - they then all closed on me; I drew Flint to the door, locked the door, and put the key into my pocket - Flint then drew me towards the fire; they pinched me in a part of my body which gave me great pain, and kicked me - they got the key from my pocket, and got the door open; I dragged Flint to the door, and we both fell out - I got him to the door, and another officer, who was going by, assisted me, and we handcuffed him: I went to look for the property which I had left on the table, and it was gone - I got over the wall, into the yard of another house, where I found it.

Prisoner Flint. Q. Was I not lying on the table? A. No, he was standing by the fire - Binglow and Comerford were sitting down; I cannot say which of them pinched me.

AUGUSTA WRIGHT . I am the wife of Charles Wright . Evans lived in our parlour - I was sitting by the fire in my room, and heard a cry of Murder! I came down, and saw Flint lying in the passage, and two officers trying to handcuff him - Bicknell then asked where his hat and the parcel were; he went into the room, and the parcel was gone - I had seen Evans go towards the yard with a parcel; we went and found it over the wall of the next house.

ROBERT TYRRELL. I am a Police-officer. On Sunday, the 15th of November, I took Evans in Westmister; I accused her of the robbery, and asked her why she threw the bundle over the wall - she said she was in such a flurry she did not know what she did; I then went to Bedfordbury, where I had information Binglow was - I knocked at the door of the room, but got no answer - I burst the door open, and found him there, in the dark, without his shoes.

JOHN HOOD . I am porter at the Ship. I saw the two male prisoners and the prosecutor at our house, about three o'clock that day; I heard the prosecutor say he had lost his parcel - the prisoners and the other man went out the back way; I went and told the Police.

Prisoner Flint. Q. Were there not others there? A. Yes, two or three other persons.

DANIEL HILL. I know this is my velvet - I bought it an hour before; this kerseymere is the last of a piece, and this other is the first of a piece, which makes them remarkable.

Flint's Defence. I had nothing to do with the articles - I was going to my mother-in-law, and knowing Evans I called upon her; I went into her room, and asked if she would have any thing to drink - I sent for something: I own I had been drinking with the prosecutor, and was rather intoxicated; I laid my head on the table, and when the officer came in, I was roused up with the parcel in my pocket, but I do not know how it got there.

Evans' Defence. I am innocent - I had been out that morning to a lady, about a lying in letter; I threw the bundle into the passage in my flurry.

FLINT - GUILTY . Aged 23.

BINGLOW - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18291203-64

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

64. WILLIAM JOSEPH BANES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October, 19 spoons, value 8l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; 10 forks, value 3l.; 6 knives, value 30s.; 1 time-piece, value 2l.; 20 books, value 40s.; 2 coats, value 20s.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 ring. value 5s.; 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 pipe, value 5l.; 2 polished stones, value 5s., and 1 trinket, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Hyde Villiers , Esq. , his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

The prisoner was also indicted for forging a receipt for 3l. 3s. in the name of William Jameson, but no evidence being offered he was acquitted.

Reference Number: t18291203-65

65. LOUISA HESKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 2 dresses, value 2l. 10s.; 1 gown, value 3s.; 1 pair of stays, value 5s.; 2 bed-gowns, value 2s.; 3 petticoats, value 4s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 3s.; 11 handkerchiefs, value 11s.; 9 neckerchiefs, value 12s.: 11 caps, value 11s.; 4 aprons, value 5s.: 3 pairs of stockings, value 18d.; 2 thimbles, value 18d.; 3 boxes, value 3s.; 2 silver spoons, value 4s., and 1 bonnet, value 1s., the goods of Frances Needham , in the dwelling-house of George Hale .

FRANCES NEEDHAM. I am a widow , and lodge at John Hale 's in Clipstone-street , Fitzroy-square - the prisoner came there six or seven weeks before this, as a servant out of place, and slept with me; I did not know her before. On the 6th of November I went out a little after ten o'clock, and left her at home - I returned at three; she was gone, and I missed all this property, part from the drawers, and part from a box: I found her at the watch-house about one o'clock that night, with the property.

JOHN QUIN . I belonged to the Police, and received information of this robbery, when on my heat, on the 6th of November, and a few minutes to one o'clock in the night I found the prisoner in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles', with another girl; she stopped at this girl's lodging - I detained her, went into the girl's house, and found the property; she said she had left it there.

MARY ANN LLEWELYN. I have known the prisoner four months - she came to me on the 6th of November, at five o'clock in the evening, with a trunk, to lodge with me for two or three days; she asked me to go to the Theatre with her - we went, leaving the property in my place, where the officer found it.

Prisoner. She was the first who persuaded me to commit the robbery. Witness. I never did, on my oath.

ALPRED JOHN LIST . I am a Police-constable. On the 6th of November I found the trunk at Llewelyn's room, containing the property.

JAMES STEWART WALLIS . I am servant to Mr. Aldous, a pawnbroker, of Berwick-street. I have a gown, shawl, shift, four towels, and a pelisse, pawned by the prisoner, on the 6th of November.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Another lodger robbed her as well as me - she accuses me of both robberies.

GUILTY (of stealing only) . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First London Jury - Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18291203-66

66. WILLIAM PUTTOCK & BENJAMIN McADAM were indicted for feloniously assaulting Pierre Francois Simeon Despres , on the 10th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 30l.; 1 chain, value 6l., and 1 snuff-box, value 70l. , his property.

PIERRE FRANCOIS SIMEON DESPRES , (through an interpreter.) I am a native of France, and am a distiller -I live in Bevois-terrace, Vauxhall-bridge-road, and have been in London four years and a half. On the 9th of November I dined at Merchant Tailors'-hall; I looked at my watch as I left, and it was half-past twelve o'clock - I had sat down to dinner about six, and drank about my ordinary allowance of wine; one is a little more gay with liquor than when dining alone, but I was perfectly sober: I was accompanied from the hall by my brother, Mr. Loveday, Pope, Mott, and a young man called Frederick, who is clerk to Mr. Leplastria; Pope and I had dined at the hall - the rest were invited to the dessert, and all left together; my brother, Frederick, and Mott quitted us - Loveday left me soon after, and I remained to speak to Mr. Pope; we talked about the pleasant evening we had passed - when Mr. Loveday was twenty-five or thirty steps before us, I perceived a man assault him, and went to his assistance; the instant I was going to his assistance, the same man came to me, and struck me in the lower part of my belly; I will not positively swear it was the same man, but believe so - I felt stifled with the blow, and at the same moment the man who struck me seized the chain of my watch; the end of the chain being appended to my waistcoat button, I attempted to get hold of the chain with my left hand, but could not - I passed the middle finger of my right hand into the button-hole of the man's coat; while I was holding him and struggling with him, another man arrived, and struck me on the head with something which he had in his hand, but what it was I do not know - I fell down from that blow, perfectly senseless, and think I brought the other man down with me; I recollect that the skin of my finger was grazed in the struggle - I do not know how long I remained in that state; while on the ground I received a blow on my arm, and one on my head - whether they were from feet or what I cannot say, but I felt them, and revived to a certain extent; I endeavoured to get up, and was taken to the watch-house, where my senses returned - I was sitting down on a little bench near the table - I felt for my handkerchief to wipe the sweat and blood from my face; the first thing I observed was that my watch was gone, and on searching for my handkerchief I discovered that my snuff-box was not in either of my

pockets; five or six minutes after complaining of the loss of my snuff-box, the hand of somebody passed behind my back, and at the same instant somebody said, "Sir, is this your snuff-box." but this was not till some persons' pockets had been searched, and the contents put upon the table - I had it when I left the hall. I presume my watch was taken when the chain was seized - I did not use my snuff-box after leaving the hall, and cannot say whether it was taken- I think Puttock is the man who seized my chain, but I do not mean to affirm it, and believe he is the man who struck me in the lower part of the belly; it was the same man in whose hand I saw the chain - I think McAdam is the one who struck me in the head, but will not swear it -I saw something shining in his hand as the blow descended - I do not know London sufficiently to state where I was attacked; it was very near the Bank - I had left the hall five or six minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was it not after the prisoners were searched that your snuff-box was given to you? A. Yes - it was about the time they were talking of searching their pockets; it was at that period that it was produced - I do not recollect stating that the pockets of some persons had been searched before: if I did, I beg it may be stated that I mean to swear it was about the time there was a talk of searching their pockets - I do not mean to say the contents of their pockets were on the table: I drank sherry and port, but no claret - I had punch made of wine and water; I was sober when I left the hall - I had no quarrel with any person in the hall - there was a young man who had his sleeve torn.

Q. Were not the beadles of the hall obliged to follow you and your party, to keep you quiet in the street? A. There was a quarrel between a young am and Mr. Leduke, and I begged my brother to carry off the young man- I do not recollect the beadles following me; I was two or three minutes in the watch-house before I said I had lost my watch, but I cannot exactly state, as my senses had not perfectly returned - I swear my snuff-box was not in the same pocket as my handkerchief, for when I took out my handkerchief I found it was not there, for I felt for it - that is one of the first things a snuff-taker does; I immediately complained of losing it, and it was passed to my right-hand, and put on the table - I did not see who handed it to me; it was neither of the prisoner, for they were on my left, and it was passed to the right - it was a dark night, but the lamps were lighted; I was knocked down a minute or two after they came up.

DOUGLAS LOVEDAY. I did not dine at the Merchant Tailors '-hall, but was at the dessert; I left with Mr. D spres - a great many persons came away at the same time, his brother, Mr. Hope, Mr. Mott, and young Frederick; I cannot state the time - I believe I was the cause of their leaving; Mr. Despres appeared to be sober - I was sober; there had been a quarrel and disputes at the hall - Despres was not a party to them; after we left I separated from the party, in two or three minutes, went on alone, and in about two minutes I met two men, who appeared a little in liquor - I do not know who they were; they appeared to be coming from some feast, and having a little wine in their heads, they invited me to go and take some wine with them - I not having had enough, consented, but did not go, for recollecting Mr. Despres was a foreigner, I thought I had better return to him; I went towards him, and when in a part that was pretty well lighted, there came out of a place very ill lighted (called Bartholomew-lane) a man, who without ceremony struck me a blow in the face - I had never seen him before; I felt the blood run from my nose - I returned the blow with my left hand, upon which something like a regular fight took place between him and me: during the struggle my umbrella was broken: the stick of it was a came - finding I was nearly a match for him, he endeavoured to throw me down, and succeeded; I fell undermost, and found my umbrella completely broken, leaving only the came in my hand - I cannot say it was one of the prisoners, but it was the same man who struck me, that afterwards struck the prosecutor; I planted the umbrella on his neck, and said, "You are the better man. but take care," and continued to strike the umbrella on his neck, and he quitted me without my receiving any further injury - this occupied two or three minutes - I then found myself in the custody of somebody, and was taken to the watch-house; the prisoners were there- I cannot say whether they were there before me or after; I think every thing that took place was in their hearing - on going into the watch-house, I inquired whether I was a prisoner or not, and was told I should know presently; Mr. Despres was brought in apparently lifeless, but bleeding from a would in the forehead - he was pale and covered with blood; the officer asked if I knew him - I said he was a friend of mine; I was then told I was complainant - having some sticking-plaster, I drew the lips of his wound together, and bound up his head with my pocket-handkerchief, and washed his face; he appeared better, and then putting his hand to his watch-pocket, said, "But my watch is gone;" the prisoners were both present - he said it was worth about sixty guineas, and putting his hand to his coat-pocket he said, "And my snuff-box is gone also;" he appeared considerably affected at this loss, as he declared he would not have lost the box for 500l. - the officer ordered the prisoners' pockets to be searched; some duplicates were found in them, and a tin box, with "Warren's patent blacking" written on it - there was a red mark on it, which had the appearance of blood; whether before or after the prisoners were searched, I cannot say, but much about that period; some person in the watch-house said, "I wonder whose snuff-box this is?" Despres immediately recognized it - I asked the person in the prisoners hearing where he found it; he said, "On the bench;" it was placed on the table -I asked both the prisoners if they would state which of them had struck me; both denied it - they were taken to the Compter; I believe Puttock to be the man who struck me; I have no other reason for that belief, than that his lips were cut and bleeding at the watch-house; the prisoners are not the persons who asked me to take wine- they were well dressed, and the prisoners meanly; I recollect striking the man in the face, and thought I might have cut his lip, but cannot say.

JOHN DASHFIELD. I am a watchman of Broad-street ward. On the night of the 9th of November, at half-past one o'clock, I saw McAdam, I believe, strike Mr. Despres a blow on his forehead, it was with his hand, I think, for I saw nothing else - he struck him only once; the blood

directly flowed from his head, and I directly took McAdam into custody - I am certain it was him: I had heard a noise and scuffle and went among them - McAdam directly struck the blow, and I took him; I called Howard, my mate, who came to Mr. Despres' assistance - I collared McAdam the moment he struck the blow; there were ten or twelve persons there - I do not know who they were.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not at first swear you believed McAdam struck the blow? A. If I did, it was unknown to me; I did not mean to say so - he had nothing in his hand, when I took him; Despres was on his knees- the blow was the first thing I saw; they were about three hurdred yards from Merchant Tailors'-hall - I had called half-past one o'clock; they could not have come straight from the hall, if they left at half-past twelve - I cannot be mistaken in the time.

COURT. Q. Where was this? A. At the top of Bartholomew-lane; I did not search McAdam.

GEORGE HOWARD . I am a watchman of Broad-street ward. I was out on the night of the 9th of November, and heard a noise; I went to the top of Bartholomew-lane, being called by Dashfield; when I got up he had McAdam in custody - I went over to Mr. Despres, and saw him laying bleeding; I rose him up; I saw Puttock cross towards the piazza of the Exchange, from the place where the prosecutor lay, and took him in charge - before I took him he used a had expression, and said, "I won't see my friend ill-used;" Lloyd came to my assistance, and we took him, and Mr. Despres to the watch-house - both the prisoners were searched there, but the property was not found.

Cross-examined. Q. No watch or any thing was found on them? A. No - they were searched instantly, and both complained that they had been assaulted and ill-used in the street; Puttock said he would not stand by and see his friend ill-used; it had gone half-past one o'clock: what took lace was before I got up - I picked up the snuff-box in the watch-house, alongside Mr. Despres; I suppose it had fallen out of his pocket, as he pulled his handkerchief out; it was on the bench alongside him where he sat - as soon as I picked it up I gave it to Jones, who gave it to the officer of the night: the prisoners had been searched before I picked it up; neither of them could have put the box where I found it - they were quite on the opposite side of the watch-house; one of them said he had two pairs of trousers on, and desired both should be searched.

JOHN GIRTON. I was officer of the night; when the prisoners were brought to the watch-house it was nearer two o'clock than one; Despres had a cut on his forehead, and Mr. Loveday dressed it - Despres pointed to Puttock, saying he was the man who had struck him; Dashfield said No, it was the short one who struck him - Despres afterwards said it was the short one who struck him; in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes he put his hand to his fob, and said he had lost his watch - he pointed to Puttock, and afterwards to McAdam, and said he was the one who struck him; I immediately searched them - Despres was taking his handkerchief out of his pocket, and after that a snuff-box was found by his side, by Howard, and given to Jones, and by him to me.

Cross-examined. Q. He at first pointed to Puttock, and when Dashfield said it was the little one, he pointed to the little one? A. Yes; he was equally positive of both - he was not exactly asked which struck him, for we could not make him understand, but he pointed to the party; the box was found directly he pulled out his handkerchief - it could not have laid long there without being observed: it was quite away from the prisoners - they could not have put it there; they both complained that they had been assaulted, and had returned the assault.

Puttock's Defence. I am innocent.

JAMES SHEFFIELD . I was attending to trim the lamps at Merchant Tailors'-hall on Lord Mayor's Day, and saw Mr. Despres and Loveday; about six more were in their company - they left the hall about one o'clock, and in consequence of something that was said I watched the party along the street; Mr. Despres seemed very drunk, but Mr. Loveday was not so tipsy - the whole seven of them in the hall were tipsy; - Mr. Despres had hold of Mr. Loveday's arm; they stopped in Threadneedle-street, and I saw the two prisoners coming along towards Bartholonew-lane, by the side of the Bank, and by the time they got to the corner of Bartholomew-lane, within a yard, Mr. Loveday and Mr. Despres came up meeting them, and Mr. Despres struck McAdam, and directly one of the prisoners said to Mr. Despres, "You are mistaken;" the prisoners directly pulled off their hats, threw them, into the road, and struck again; there was a scuffle - the watchmen had not come up at that time; they came up very shortly after the scuffle - they stood a minute or two, and interfered at last; I told the watchman the prisoners had been struck and insulted first, and struck again in their own defence - the watchman said then it was his duty to take them; the beadles of the hall came up - they were sober, and so was I - I am certain the prisoners were struck before they touched Despres or Loveday; they got close against the wall to make way for them to pass - McAdam was struck before any blow was given to the prosecutor.

Q. From the time they left the hall till they got to Bartholomew-lane, was their conduct peaceable or otherwise? A. They were fighting. I light the lamps at different halls, and of this Court.

JOHN PRICE . I live in Finch-lane, and am ward-officer of Broad-street. I was attending at Merchant Tailors '-hall: I consider that the prosecutor left form half-past one to a quarter to two o'clock - they were decidedly tipsy, all of them; I consider so from their behaviour in the hall -Mr. Loveday was the most sober, but I should not consider him sober: we followed them out; one, who is a livery man was going the wrong way - I tried to put him right, but did not succeed; he was one of this party - I begged him to go his own way; he said he would not, he would go after his friends - I followed at a distance, to see that no quarrel took place in the ward; I saw a scuffle, but no blows - Sheffield was before me, and interrupted my seeing the first of it; I came up after the scuffle, and in consequence of my interference the whole set were taken to the watch-house; after Despres charged the prisoners with assaulting him they replied that they were assaulted first; they were singing and going on in the hall, and in the coffee-room I parted four of them from fighting, but can only swear to one of them, which is Mr. Loveday - I know nothing of the prisoners.

MR. DESPHES. I wish to ask the witness (Sheffield) if he means to swear we were arm-in-arm.

JAMES SHFFIELD. I swear they were arm-in-arm; Loveday seemed as if he was conducting Despres - they had passed Broad-street, and some of he party had left them, and gone, I believe, up Finch-lane; Despres had hold of Loveday's arm till they got to the corner of Bartholomew-lane - six or seven of them were fighting and quarrelling in Threadneedle-street; Despres and Loveday were among them - he might have hold of his arm for a hundred yards; just as they got by Broad-street Loveday seemed to conduct Despres from the rest - Despres took hold of his arm, and had hold of it when he struck McAdam: there is but one door to Merchant Tailors'-hall; that is the front.

JOHN RAWLINS . I am an officer of the ward, and live in Threadneedle-street. I attended at Merchant Tailors '-hall in my official capacity, and saw the party to which Loveday and Despres belonged; they came out of the front door of the hall - there is no other; they came out pretty quiet - I let them out of the gate; I followed them soon after - there was a row in the street before they came up, and they got into the midst of it; I saw one gentleman placed up against the wall, as he was so drunk he could not stand - I went to the corner of Broad-street, and stopped there with Price; Sheffield had gone on before him - we observed a scuffle at the corner of Bartholomew-lane; we went up, and saw the watchmen take the whole party to the watch-house - I am sure it was after one o'clock when they left the hall.

MR. LOVEDAY. I was conducted to the watch-house by a witness here, and he is the only one who had indentified McAdam; it has been suggested that I was a little drunk which was not the case - I quitted Mr. Despres either in Broad-street or Threadneedle-street; we were not arm-in-arm in Bartholomew-lane - I wished them good night, went home, and I did not see Mr. Despres again till he was in the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-67

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

67. STEPHEN DRUCE & BRYAN BRETHEN were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Harris , on the 2nd of November , and stealing 1 pocket-book, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, and 1 half-sovereign , the property of Mary Burns .

MARY BURNS. I am servant at the White Lion, at Paddington , kept by James Harris : the prisoner Druce slept at the house for five or six weeks, and Brethen slept there on Saturday and Sunday night, the 1st of November- they were in the tap-room some time on Saturday night, adn about half-past nine o'clock asked me for a light to go to bed - they both went up together; there is a door at the bottom of the staircase, which I unlocked, and locked after them; in half or three quarters of an hour I opened it to let an old man up to bed, in the same room; he slept there one night before - the key of the staircase door hung in the bar; they slept on the second floor, and I on the first - they would pass my door to go to bed; it was locked when I lit them up, and the key in my pocket- I did not notice the door in lighting the old man up, but just as I came down I lit another man up; he slept in the next room to me - I then observed the lock of my bed-room was broken off, and laying down near the door; there was no key in it - I ran down. told mistress, and sent for the watchman; I had given the prisoners a candle about an inch long, and when I went up I found nothing but a wick left - I should think it would burn about half an hour; I observed part of a screw in their candlestick - I searched in my bed-room, and found my box open; I had left the key in it - a pocket-book, containing a sovereign and a half, was gone; I had seen the book safe the night before - I always keep the key of the room in my possession; I had not opened the pocket-book since the Thursday week before, and put the money in then - the constable went to search the prisoners' bedroom; I took the screw out of the candlestick - it was broken; we found the other part of it left in the door - they corresponded; on coming down stairs we found the casement window on the staircase open - it was fastened in the evening, and the waiter in my presence found the pocket-book thrown out there into the horse-trough, which is under the window; the money was gone - we could find no money in the prisoners' room; there was nobody but the prisoners up stairs - they slept together.

JOHN WILSON. I am a watchman. I was fetched to the house - I went to the prisoners' room, and found no money; I saw the screw fitted to the door - as I took the prisoners to the watch-house, Druce said, "Recollect, watchman, we had some carriers left the house this morning;" I said evening was not morning.

PHILIP WEBSTER. I am an officer. I took the broken part of the screw out of the door, and matched it with that found in the candlestick - it tallied exactly in thickness and every part, and was quite fresh broken; the servant showed me the lock.

MARY BURNS . The screw I showed to Webster was what I found in the candlestick.

Druce's Defence. I had been in bed a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes when he brought this man up, and on going down found the door broken open - we were going to sleep when the watchman and servants came up, but found no money; I have lived in several respectable families.

Brethen's Defence. I wish to ask Harris if he recollects, on coming into the room, calling for another candle as it was burnt in the socket; he sent a woman down for a candle, which she brought up without a candlestick and it was put into the one on our dressing-table, which was handed over to the pot-boy - I did not see it afterwards.

JAMES HARRIS . I am landlord of the house; a candle was brought up and put into a candlestick in the room -I did not see two candlesticks; she held the candle in her hand till the one I had cooled - I was not long up stairs; Druce was out of a situation - I let him sleep there, and gave him victuals; he was handy in the house.

MARY BURNS . There was nobody up stairs but the prisoners, the old man and young one - the door at the foot of the stairs was locked all the time; I lighted the young man up just as I made the discovery - the old man had only gone up that instant; the stair-case window looks into a yard, not into the street - it is too high to be reached from the yard.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-68

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

68. HANNAH (THE WIFE OF THOMAS) THORN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 3 printed

bound books, value 15s., the goods of James Hall ; 1 printed bound book, value 5s., the goods of Edward Thompson , and 1 printed bound book, value 5s. , the goods of Isaac Sewell .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WALTER POWELL . I have been many years clerk to Messrs. James Hall, Edward Thompson, and Isaac Sewell , of Salters'-hall , solicitors ; the prisoner was in the habit of coming to the offices every morning as charwoman - books were kept in three offices, of which she lighted the fires; we have been missing books for the last four months. On the 3rd of November I accompained the officer to Mann's house - he handed us five volumes, which I recognized to belong to our office; the prisoner was then in custody - three of the books belong to Mr. Hall as his separate property; one to Mr. Thompson, and the other to Mr. Sewell - they are all law books, and belong to sets which are spoiled; some of them cannot be replaced.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MANN . I am a bookseller, and live in the Commercial-road - I know the prisoner very well; she has often been to my shop; here is "A Digest of the Laws of England," the seventh volume of "Lord Coke's Reports" with a name scratched out, but I have no knowledge of that - "Carey's Chancery Reports," and "Proceedings of Conveyancey," by Barton; and the sixth volume of "Vesey's Reports;" I bought them all of the prisoner as waste paper - the covers are on; I bought them at 3d. or 4d. a lb - the books are valueable, but any gentleman in the profession knows we are much exposed in our line; I am a bookseller, but deal in waste-paper.

Q. In the front of this book the name, which was pasted on it, is torn out, you know nothing of that? A. No; here is an erasure where a coat of arms is usually pasted - I never noticed that before; I bought them as odd volumes, without looking for the names; I think I told her I would buy no more with the covers on - I have no doubt of it, because they would be in a better shape to sell as waste-paper; I knew the sets were valuable - I asked how she came by them: she said they belonged to her son. who was in an attorney's office.

Q. How did she say she came by "Vesey's Reports." which cost 30l. or 40l.? A. She only brought an odd volume; they are all odd volumes.

COURT. Q. How long have you been in the trade? A.About twenty-five years; I do not pretend to know the value of law books - I buy them as waste-paper, and sell them as such; I told her I would buy no more with the covers on, as I would rather buy them in the shape of waste-paper - I made no deductions for the covers; I took no notice of the names being erased - I did not examine them inside; I do not know the value of them - I gave her 3d. or 3 1/2d. a lb.

Prisoner. I am very sorry for what I have done - extreme distress occasioned me to do it; Mr. Mann told me to bring them without the covers - he gave me 3d. a lb.; I acknowledged where I took them to directly.

GUILTY. Aged 53. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18291203-69

69. ISAAC DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Edward Birt Acton , from his person .

MR. EDWARD BIRT ACTON. I am a student of the Temple. I was in St. Paul's church-yard about half-past three o'clock on the 6th of November, and stopped to look into a shop; Britten touched me on the arm, and said I had lost my handkerchief - I looked round, and saw it laying over the prisoner's arm; a witness had got him in custody.

NATHANIEL BRITTEN . I was going up Ludgate-hill, and saw the prisoner try a gentleman's pocket; he did not succeed: I afterwards saw him try another gentleman's pocket, but he got nothing - I followed him to a picture-shop in St. Paul's church-yard, and saw him put his hand into Mr. Acton's pocket, and take out this handkerchief; I went up, and laid hold of his arm, as he was in the act of putting it into his bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief laid on the ground; I picked it up, and the officer took me.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-70

70. JOHN FREDERICK WALLBOHN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 keg, value 1s. 3d., and 30 herrings, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of William Edward Gedge .

GEORGE SKINNER. I am shopman to Mr. Gedge of Lower Thames-street . I saw the prisoner take this keg of herrings from the shop window, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning - I ran out, and took him with it, about one hundred yards from the shop.

WILLIAM EDWARD GEDGE . This keg is mine. I know nothing of the prisoner.

The prisoner pleaded distress, and stated himself to be a German.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18291203-71

71. WILLIAM GEORGE STRINGER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 great coat, value 2l. 10s., the goods of William Howard , from his person .

WILLIAM HOWARD . I am a tailor . On the 16th of November I met the prisoner, (who was a stranger to me,) at the bottom of Holborn, with a friend of mine, who asked me to go and have a glass with him; the prisoner went with us - we then went to another public-house in Smithfield, stopped there some time, and then went to a pie-shop in Long-lane; the prisoner and I had several pies together - my friend had left us - I had a great coat tied in a bundle, and when I came out of the shop he snatched it out of my arm, and ran away with it; I have not recovered it- I met him on the Wednesday, coming out of a coffee-shop, and took him.

Prisoner. Q. You gave it me to tie up in the shop - I have not seen it since I returned it to you? A. I did not.

JOHN SEAL . I keep the pie-shop. The prisoner and prosecutor came in, and in about twenty minutes, the coat laid on the form; the prisoner took it up, and put it on his lap, and after having more pies went out with it under his arm; and in five minutes Howard came back, and asked if I had seen the man; he said, "I am done, and robbed;" I said, "What, of your coat?" he said Yes - I am sure the prisoner took it out of my shop; they had been drinking, but Howard was quite sober.

WILLIAM HOWARD . He took it from me in the street, just outside the shop; I carried it out of the shop.

Prisoner. I took it out of the shop - he wished me to go and have more beer; I said No, and gave him the bundle, and he went into a public-house.

HENRY GRAHAM. On the 6th of November I went with the prisoner to the bottom of Holborn, to buy some cloth, and on returning met Howard, who I had not seen for twelve months, and from eleven o'clock to half-past four, we were drinking with another friend - they were singing among very low company, and at half-past four o'clock I left them in a public-house; I wanted to get Howard away, but could not; they were all very merry.

SAMUEL EVANS. I took the prisoner in charge on the 18th of November; he said he had been in the prosecutor's company, but had returned him the bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. He was not sober, and must have been robbed by somebody else - we were at several public-houses. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-72

72. JOHN DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 1 watch, value 35s.; 1 ribbon, value 1d., and 1 key, value 1d. , the goods of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I live at Mr. Phipps', the Crown, in Idol-lane . I got acquainted with the prisoner in July; on the 27th of August he asked master to let him have a bed - he said he could not, but he might sleep in the taproom; I told him he might sleep in my room - he went to bed about eleven o'clock; I got up in the morning, leaving him in bed, and my watch under the pillow - he came down in half an hour, and was going out; he said he would he home by two o'clock, and had turned the bed up- I said, "Where is the watch?" he said he had left it inside; I went up in half an hour, and it was gone - nobody but him could have taken it; I believe he is a gamekeeper.

CHARLES COWLEY. I am a constable. The prisoner was described to me on the 23rd of November, and on the 24th I found him at the Tavistock coffee-house, Great Russell-street, Covent-garden, cleaning knives, and told him he was my prisoner - he said, "I know perfectly well what it is about, a watch."

Prisoner's Defence. I had a setter dog to break in for his master - he lost a very excellent dog for me; the boy left his watch in the bed - I took it, and said to the maid-servant, "He is very careless about his watch; I will wind it up, and take it down to him," and when I got down he had let out two dogs which I had there; I ran out in my fright to look for them, and put the watch into my pocket: when I returned the dogs were safe in the house - I had to go immediately to Bagshot, and forgot the watch; I found it in my pocket at Bagshot - I asked a person to take it to his master; he said if he saw any body he would send word that I had it, and if not he should be there on Sunday - I went to Croydon, and on returning the Magistrate had had a pointer stolen; I was desired to look for it - I came to town about it, went to the Black Dog, Long-acre, and got stupified with liquor - my fob was cut, and the watch and nine sovereigns and a half taken; I saw Mr. Phipps, and asked him for two guineas which he owed me, to make the boy's watch good - he said the boy had lost the dog I had left in his care, and that would make it even; I said, "Tell the boy I will make it good as soon as I can," but I did not call there, in consequence of a quarrel with his master; it was two mornings before, that I said I had left it in the bed.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. He had no dog there that night- when he came down I was taking the shutters down; he said he should he back at two o'clock, and had left my watch in the bed; I had not desired him to put up the bedstead.

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-73

73. THOMAS REED was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of George Clamp .

WILLIAM CLAMP . I am related to George Clamp, a pawnbroker , of Aldersgate-street . On the 18th of November I saw the prisoner lurking about the window - I watched, and in two or three minutes saw a handkerchief snatched down from the door; I ran round the counter, and caught him with it, not a yard from the house - I could tell by his looks that he wanted to steal it, and not buy it; it was within the threshold - he tried to throw it down when I caught him; I had a hard matter to bring him into the shop.

Prisoner. I was looking into the shop, and the handkerchief was on the ground; I never touched it - I did not struggle with him.

WILLIAM CLAMP. I caught it in his hand; I cannot say I saw him take it - there were two of them concerned.

JURY. Q. Was he running from the door? A. He had not time to move; I was round the door upon him immediately. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-74

74. WILLIAM BINLEY was indicted for stealing, on 25th of November , 240 pairs of gloves, value 3l. , the goods of Daniel Deacon , and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of George Frederick Minton .

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am an officer. On Wednesday evening, the 25th of November, between six and seven o'clock, I was in Wood-street, Cheapside , and saw a cart belonging to Daniel Deacon and Sons, of the White Horse, Cripplegate, standing there; I saw several suspicious characters standing about; and after stopping a few minutes I saw the prisoner get on the cart-wheel, take hold of the side, with his left hand, reach over, and with his right hand take up a brown paper parcel; a lad who was in the cart flew from the opposite side, where he was standing, and the prisoner quickly endeavoured to get down, but in the act of doing so, struck his hand against the side rail of the cart, which caused the parcel to fall into the cart again - he attempted to run away, but I secured him; I am quite sure the parcel was in his hand - a desperate struggle ensued between us, and several others immediately came between him and me: they were no doubt notorious thieves - they rescued him; I struggled as long as I could, but at last he got away - I re-took him, and conveyed him to the watch-house; I am certain he had the parcel in his hand - I saw him lift it up, and let it fall by the boy against the rail.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It fell into the cart? A. Yes - whether it fell into the same place as he took it from I cannot say; it was a fine night - he did not get a yard from me before I re-took him: I lost my hold, and he was at liberty - I felt the effects of their violence,

but am sure he was not out of my sight, nor out of the reach of my stick, which was in my hand; he was the only person in front of me - those who endeavoured to rescue him appeared thieves; I have seen them lurking about, not in the way a person would on business - three or four of them came near me; none of them were in front of me after the prisoner got away, but were while I held his arm; I never lost sight of him the whole time.

COURT. Q. Are you sure the person you ultimately seized is the person who had the parcel? A. I am - it was the prisoner.

THOMAS BUTLER. I am in the service of Daniel Deacon and his partners. I was in the cart in Wood-street, and saw the prisoner step on the near-wheel, reach his hand over, and take hold of a brown paper parcel belonging to Mr. Minton - he lifted it up, and got it out of the cart, but knocked it against the top rail, which prevented his getting it out; he jumped down, and turned to run away, but Henman took him - four more rushed on Henman, and rescued him - he was afterwards taken: I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. How far did he run when the four persons rushed forward? A. Not out of the reach of the officer's stick; I saw no handkerchief over his face.

RICHARD MATHEWMAN . I am a clerk to Daniel Deacon and Sons. This parcel was in their cart.

Prisoner's Defence. I think the officer has learned the boy what to say; both their evidence correspond: it was a dark night - I had a red handkerchief round my neck; he swore at Guildhall that I ran twice round the cart to get away, but he is able to swear any thing for a better situation.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-75

75. SAMUEL WILLIAMS was indicted for embezzling the sums of 6l. 10s., 7l. 14s., and 3l., which he had received on account of Richard Armfield , his master ; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 34. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-76

76. DENNIS HAYNES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Thompson , on the 7th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 unfinished coat, value 25s. , his property.

ROBERT THOMPSON . I am a tailor , and live in Jamaica-street, Commercial-road. On Saturday, the 7th of November, about twelve o'clock at night, I was in Jewry-street, Aldgate , with an unfinished coat in a bundle - I was rather drunk, but not much; I recollect being knocked down all on a sudden, by a blow on the head, but cannot say by whom; it was more than one man - I do not know whether they spoke to me: I came to my senses about six o'clock, and found myself in the watch-house - I do not know how I came there; my head was bruised: I had a blow on my side - I lost my hat, coat, and handkerchief - I know nothing of the prisoner.

PHILIP WHITE. I am a watchman. On the 7th of November, about five minutes to five o'clock, I found the prosecutor laying on a step in Jewry-street, quite intoxicated, without his hat, and took him to the watch-house - he had 15s. 3d. in his pocket.

JOHN BEAUMONT. I am a watchman. On the 7th of November, about a quarter-past twelve o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner in Rosemary-lane, about five minutes walk from Jewry-street, with this bundle under his arm, and this hat in his hand; I asked where he got them - he said it was a parcel given to him in the Borough, to bring over to Rosemary-lane, but he did not know the party who had given it to him; I am sure he said it was given to him in the Borough - I took him to the watch-house; some men were passing - I asked who gave it to him, and he said, "Those men there," and made a faint call after them- they turned round, but took no notice of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you to stop the people, who were not three yards off? A. He said they gave him the bundle, that is all; I told the Magistrate you said it was given you in the Borough.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He stated quite different to the Magistrate, who was going to discharge me; I met the party coming over the hill - they asked me to carry the parcel, and promised me part of a pint of beer; I pointed them out to him, and he could have put his hand on them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-77

NEW COURT, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

77. EDWARD TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 looking-glass, value 2l.; and 300 leaves of gold, value 18s. , the goods of Charles Sweet and another; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-78

78. WILLIAM REID was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 17 shawls, value 21l.; 41 yards of satin, value 5l.; 10 handkerchiefs, value 2l.; 19 pairs of stockings, value 3l.; 1 collar, value 5s.; 9 yards of stuff, value 9s.; 1 gown, value 10s., and 1 buckle, value 2s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , his masters; and ELIZABETH HISLOP was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

ROBERT BURGOYNE WATTS. I am shopman to Messrs. Sewell and Cross, who are haberdashers , and have a shop in Lamb's Conduit-street , of which I am superintendant - The stock was selling off - Reid was in their employ, as porter ; on the 11th of October I saw three parcels of goods secreted in a wall in a dark cellar - they contained silk handkerchiefs and other articles, the property of my employers; I had suspicion, and ordered Joy to watch Reid - he was taken into custody three days afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are either of the prosecutors here? A. No; this prosecution certainly is not without their knowledge - they are perfectly acquainted with it; they are the purchasers of the stock - the assigners of White and Metcalf are not interested in it - I only known that Sewell and Cross are the proprietors by what they have told me: there is nothing about the shop, nor in the window to denote that it belongs to them; but their names are sometimes used.

COURT. Q.Who put you in possession of that property? A.Sewell and Cross, and I receive a salary from them.

CATHERINE POWELL. I am servant at the house in Lamb's Conduit-street. I am employed by Sewell and Cross. About three weeks ago I was in the carpet-room, and Reid, who was in their employ, gave me a veil; the officers came to the house and took that from me; I was taken into custody, and when we got into the cart I said to Reid, "William, what is all this about? if you know any thing, tell me" - he said, "I am very sorry, Catherine, you should be brought to prison, for you know nothing about it, for while you were out on the Sunday evening, the cook put me into the sitting-room, and took the things, and did not want you to know any thing about it" - I said, "What things?" he mentioned them, and I said, "They are the things I have been asked about;" he said, "You know nothing at all about it" - he said the cook was always teasing him to get her things, and he never had any peace with her - I asked if he had ever taken any thing; he said, Yes, and had given them to a young woman - I said,"What young woman?" - he said, "The Tartan-plaid young woman." Mackay is the cook.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Were you taken into custody? A. Yes; I came from the House of Correction to-day.

WILLIAM TOY. I am assistant to Sewell and Cross. I was desired to watch the movements of Reid - on the 12th of November, at eight o'clock in the morning, I was in Lamb's Conduit-street, and saw Reid talking to Hislop; he left her, went to Sewell and Cross', and in a few minutes returned to Hislop, where he had left her - they walked together down Theobald's-road and Harper-street, went into a public house, came out again in a few minutes, and he gave her a parcel from his pocket; she put it under her cloak, under her left arm - they walked to the bottom of Harper-street, round the corner, returned, and walked to Lamb's Conduit-street - he left her and went to his employers'; I went back and told Watts what I had seen - I did not see where Reid got the parcel from; it was but small.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know his age? A. No: I saw him take something from his lefthand coat-pocket - I will not swear it was not a pocket-handkerchief; I cannot say it was tied up - it was not a bunch of keys; I saw a parcel, it might be a little larger or smaller than my wrist - he had a blue coat on; I was on the opposite side of the way in Harper-street, ten or twelve yards from them - that street is darker than Lamb's Conduit-street; the house is called Navarino-house - we deal in perfumery, carpets, silks, woollens, and linen; I will not swear the parcel was not a pair of dirty stockings.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you told the reason of being sent to watch? A. I was told there was a suspicion of my employers being robbed; I swear I saw a parcel taken from Reid's left-hand coat-pocket, and given to Hislop - she had nothing before, because I saw her arms swing; her hands were free, and it would have dropped down; I do not know whether her arms were under her cloak - I think they were not; but I know I saw her arms swinging - I think it was a cloak with armholes in it; I think it was not a close cloak with her arms inside - I think they were outside - I think they did not walk arm-in-arm, they walked close by each other's side; I think they had been together ten minutes before any thing passed from him to her - it was a minute or two after they came out of the public-house; they went half way down the street, and then he gave it her - I did not interfere at the time, because I had no strong suspicion before that; I was told to watch them - I thought the transaction would be sufficient to convey to Mr. Watts: they separated in Theobald's-road - I had seen Hislop one morning before, when she came to the door and asked for William Reid , but he was not within; I think I spoke to her that night, after she separated from Reid, just after she went into an oyster-shop, at the bottom of King's-road - I asked where she was going; I wanted to see what she had got, but I could not see any thing.

COURT. Q. Do you know what the words were you said to her at the oyster-shop? A. I do not know exactly; I do not think they had seen me before, for I turned my face as they came up the street.

WILLIAM HUBBARD. I am in the employ of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , at their house in Compton-street. About six o'clock in the evening of the 13th of November I saw Reid, and I think Hislop; I had never seen her before - Reid came out of Navarino-house; Hislop joined him in Theobald's-road, and they went to Compton-house together - Reid went in, and Hislop remained outside; he came out in about ten minutes, and they walked back to Navarino-house together.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you know of any agreement between Sewell and Cross, and the assignees of White and Metcalf? A. No; I believe White and Metcalf were not indebted to Sewell and Cross.

THOMAS CLEMENTS. I went with Mr. Cross on Saturday, the 14th of November, to Navarino-house; I took Powell, Reid, and Mackay - I took this vell from Powell's bonnet; I then went with a search-warrant to No. 130, Old-street, and on the second floor I found Hislop; I told her I had a warrant to search the house for the things she had received of William, at Navarino-house - she hesitated, and then said, "I have some things, and I will show them you;" she showed some articles, and I found two duplicates in her pocket; she admitted that these things were given her by William, at Lamb's Conduit-street, and said she had received a great many more - she named shawls and handkerchiefs, satin, and some silk stockings, most of which she had pawned and given the money to William, and said he desired her to destroy the duplicates; she had given him some of them, and he had torn them up in her presence - she said he told her that they had hung one or two persons whom they had prosecuted.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. There was no hesitation? A.There was some slight hesitation; she certainly told me every thing - the articles I found were a cotton gown, a lace collar, a band, and one or two things.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer. I went with Clements - I searched the back room; I found thirty yards of satin, and a piece of stuff - I asked Bislop where she got them; she said, "From William Reid ;" I had been desired to go to the watch-house, and ask Reid where Hislop lived - he told me, at a tobacconist's in Old-street, and that I should find some things there; I went, and found her.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I take it for granted you did not promise or threaten him any thing? A. I did not - Mr. Cross told me to go to the watch-house,

and ask him where Hislop lived, and I did; I never heard Mr. Cross say he believed another person was the guilty one, and if Reid would tell-the truth, or tell what he knew, he would forgive him.

CHARLES BATH. I am a pawnbroker, of Goswell-street. I have a pair of stockings pawned on the 3rd of November, one pair on the 5th of November, one shawl on the 26th of October, and one on the 7th of November, all by Hislop, in the name of Ann Paine.

ROBERT UPSALL. I am a pawnbroker, of Barbican. I have a shawl pawned on the 11th of October, a shawl and two handkerchiefs on the 17th of October, a shawl on the 26th of October, and four pairs of stockings on the 3rd of November, all by Hislop, in the name of Paine.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shawl, two pairs of stockings, and two yards and a half of satin, pawned by Hislop, in the name of Paine.

WILLIAM DAVIS. I am a pawnbroker, of Clerkenwellgreen. I have three silk handkerchiefs, pawned by Hislop, in the name of Ann Paine .

CHARLES WORLEY. I am a pawnbroker, of Old-street. I have two shawls, two handkerchiefs, and two pairs of stockings, pawned at different times in October, in the names of Mary Paine, Elizabeth Paine, and Ann Paine.

GEORGE CURTIS. I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt and a pair of stockings, pawned by Hislop, in the name of Paine.

ISAAC HUGHES PUGH . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Aldersgate-street. I have a shawl and two pairs of stockings, in the names of Elizabeth and Ann Paine.

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES. I have a shawl and a pair of stockings, pawned on the 4th of November, by a female.

JOHN ADNUM . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Newgate-street. I have two shawls, pawned, I believe, by Hislop, but I am not certain.

ROBERT BURGOYNE WATTS. I believe these to be the property of Messrs. Sewell and Cross; most of them have marks, and Reid said -

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Before this, had you had any conversation with Sewell and Cross? A.Certainly not; this conversation was not in the presence of Mr. Cross - there was a conversation between Reid, Mr. Cross, and me, up stairs, which was before what I am about to relate - Mr. Cross did not promise him forgiveness if he would tell the truth; he did not say he would be merciful to him - he said, he believed he was led in the first instance into it by the cook, and that he was sorry for him; that is all that I remember - I believe Reid had before told him of the things he had taken, but I cannot tell; Mr. Cross said, he never forgave any one, and he would certainly send him to Newgate - he did not then ask him what he had to say; I think he asked him whether he chose to tell him any thing or not - he did not say he would send him to Newgate if he would not tell him; I believe this conversation was before he asked him if he chose to say any thing.

COURT. Q.What did Reid say? A. He said he was led into it by the cook - that she called him into the kitchen on Sunday morning, and told him he might take her up stairs and kiss her, and do what he desired, if he would allow her to go and take any thing out of the shop; that she went and took some lawn, and two or three other things - and he said he took several things himself, and had given them to a girl, named Hislop, in Old-street; I went to Reid's mother's, saw his box, and found a silk handkerchief, the property of my employers - I then went to Old-street, and saw these other things produced.

Prisoner Reid. Mr. Cross told me he would not punish me.

Hislop's Defence. I did not know they were stolen when I received them.

The prisoners received a good character.

REID - GUILTY . Aged 18.

HISLOP - GUILTY , Aged 17.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-79

78. JOHN STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 shoe, value 3s. , the goods of George Dupen .

GEORGE DUPEN. I am a shoemaker , and live in Ratcliff-highway . I saw the prisoner come to my shop door, put his foot in, and lay hold of a pair of shoes; he gave them a snap, and one of them came off - I ran out, and caught him in Shadwell; this shoe is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.Where did you get that shoe? A. He threw it into the mud in Ratcliff-highway - a person took it up, and gave it to me; he appeared to be in distress - my shoes were a yard within the door.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18291203-80

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

79. WILLIAM DAVIES and WILLIAM WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 3 table-covers, value 5s., and 1 blanket, value 5s. , the goods of Francis Cross .

JAMES LANGTRY . I am a Police-constable. On the 11th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I met Wilson in Gloucester-place carrying this bundle - I asked him what he had got; he said some things which did not belong to him - I asked where he got them - he said if I would go to Mr. Robinson's, No. 5, Little Lisson-street, he would tell me all about it; I took him to the Police-station, and said I would go to Mr. Robinson's - he then said he was so irritated at the time he did not know what he said, but if I would go to Mr. Cross, Park-street, Davies, the footman, would tell me all about it; I went there - Davies came to the door; I asked if I could see Mr. Cross - he asked my business; I stated to him that I had detained a man, and described the property - the butler then came to the door, and Davies said "Very likely it is our washerwoman's husband;" I asked him to describe him, and by the description I was positive it was not the same man - I then asked if there was a person of the name of William Davies in the house; the butler said, "Why your name's William Davies' - the butler then went away; Davies came out to the door with me, and said he recollected he did give the bundle to the man to keep it for him, as he had no place to keep it in the house - I said, "If it is all right I don't wish to detain the man;" I bade him good night, and was going away - he called me back and said,"Well, I suppose if the man is liberated, master will know nothing about it;" I said, "No, certainly not. I will go home and liberate him" - he said he hoped his

master would know nothing about it, as it might get him into trouble; I went to the Police-station and mentioned what Davies had said to a superior officer, who advised me to go and apprehend Davies, which I did - I asked him what clothes they were, whether they were saddle-cloths or what; he said they belonged to him - I said,"I suppose they are your perquisites?" he said, Yes - I went to Mr. Cross' again and told the butler.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.When you went to Mr. Cross' did you tell Davies what the parcel contained? A. Yes I did, in the first instance; he did not say it would appear very odd for him to be charged with any thing whether he was guilty or not - he made no attempt to escape.

LETITIA LAKE . I am housekeeper to Mr. Cross. These three table covers and blanket are his property - I cannot swear to the blanket; Davies had been there about ten months.. I gave them to him to take to wash; they certainly did not belong to him.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot swear to the blanket? A. No; there is no mark on the table-covers, but I had them in use every day - I think I could swear to them; I do not know of any perquisites being given, or of one or two being used in the stable - I cannot swear these had not been given him.

Davies' Defence. When the officer took me he said if I would confess it should go better with me at the trial, and the butler said the same. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-81

80. FREDERICK BLAGG was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES HAWKINS . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Little Ormond-street - the prisoner was in my employ; he had been with me two or three months - he was to receive monies; if persons paid him he was to bring it to me and see me cross it off in my book.

ANN WORLINGTON. I am housekeeper to Mr. Madan, of the Museum; he dealt with the prosecutor - I paid the prisoner 3s. on the 19th of September, and on the 13th of October I paid him 7s. 6d.; I have no receipt - I am sure I paid him.

MR. HAWKINS. He never accounted to me for these sums, nor did I know he had received them till he was taken three or four weeks ago - he had run away about ten days before I found this out; when he was apprehended I told him I had been at the Museum to inquire about this 10s. 6d. - he said he had done it, and so on; I do not know that he said any thing further.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-82

81. WILLIAM HUCKLEBY and JOHN LAWNEY were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 2 sacks of coals, value 8s. , the goods of Edward Green and Joshua Barratt , their masters.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD GREEN. I am in the service of Edward Green and Joshua Barratt , coal-merchants of the City-road - the prisoners were employed by them to carry out coals; they had a customer named Oakgood, at Hadlington - there was an order from him on Saturday, the 31st of October, for sixty-three sacks of coals; the waggons were loaded with them on the Saturday evening, and on the Sunday morning I saw the waggons; one had thirty-five sacks in it and the other twenty-eight - the tickets were made out for each in the usual way; I told them to leave early on the Monday morning, but did not say what time - when I got there, a little after six o'clock, they were gone; Huckleby was driver of one waggon and Lawney was his mate. but I did not see them go out together - Seaney and Hughes went with the other waggon - the prisoners had the ticket for the waggon with thirty-five sacks in it, but I believe they took the one which had only twenty-eight; the waggons were corded up on the Sunday.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Are you one of the partners? A. No; it was on Sunday morning I saw the sacks in the waggons - the prisoners were on the premises at the time, but not with me; the waggons stood till Monday morning - whether any sacks had been taken out I cannot say; it is a private wharf, enclosed by gates.

MR. BODKIN. Q.Could any of the coals have been taken out without undoing the cords? A. No, certainly not; and there are coals loose about the wharf.

THOMAS SEANEY . I am a waggoner to Messrs. Green and Barratt. I went on the Monday morning with the waggon, which contained the thirty-five sacks of coals, and Hughes with me as a mate; the other waggon was in the yard, but the prisoners had not come when I started - their waggon was corded up, but I did not count the sacks in it - I stopped at Whetstone to bait my horses, and the two prisoners came up with the other waggon; we stopped there about three quarters of an hour, and then went on to Mr. Oakgood's - when we got there, there was some complaint made by his servant; and Huckleby told me to speak to the footman - I told him that Huckleby wanted to speak to him.

Cross-examined. Q.What time did you start? A. A quarter before five o'clock; it was dark.

DANIEL MAYO . I am a footman to Mr. Oakgood. I saw the two waggons of coals come to his house; I saw the two prisoners at the time - Lawney told me I was wanted in the coal-cellar; I went down for a minute, but I found I was not wanted - I came back, and saw Lawney in the act of taking two empty sacks out of the second waggon which had just come into the yard; Huckleby was down stairs with Hughes at the time - Lawney was running with the sacks down the yard, to where the empty sacks of the first waggon were put, but seeing me he concealed them behind the dog-kennel: I had before that asked Huckleby for the ticket of that waggon, and he said he had come away and forgot it - I counted the number of sacks in the second waggon, and there were but twenty-six; I examined the sacks which had been put behind the dog-kennel - they were regular sacks, and appeared to have had coals in them; I said to Huckleby,"As you have no ticket with this waggon, I shall count your coals" - I counted and said, "There are but twenty-six;" he said he knew they were short, and he hoped I would not say any thing about it - Lawney was by the other waggon, but he was within hearing, and not more than five yards off; I said to Huckleby, "As you had the charge of this waggon, you must be answerable for the coals" - he said they had been left at Holloway; I said, "That won't do for me, I must have my coals correct" - he then said it was at the Red Cap, or Mother Red

Cap, I am not certain which, and wished me not to say any thing about it; I told him I certainly should acquaint Green and Barratt of it - he then told Seaney to come to me, and make it up - when Seaney came to me with a message from Huckleby to make it up, and I refused, Huckleby said he would pay me for them if I would say nothing about it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you by when the waggons were unloaded? A. Yes, all but the first six sacks, which had been taken out of the first waggon; I think Lawney was within hearing when I spoke to Huckleby - when Huckleby said they were short, I understood short of the number; I made him no promise or threat.

THOMAS COPE . I am an officer. I took both the prisoners on the 4th of November - Huckleby was in the City of London public-house; I told him what I wanted him for - he said, "I am sorry for that;" Lawney said nothing.

EDWARD GREEN re-examined. Q. Did the prisoners return home after this transaction? A.Lawney did, but not Huckleby.

MR. LEE. Q. How long has Huckleby been in their service? A. He has been twice in their service - I think this last time about six or seven months; I cannot exactly say how long Lawney has been there.

Huckleby's Defence. I returned to the wharf the same evening.

HUCKLEBY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

LAWNEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-83

82. CHARLES BANBURY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 27th of October , 1 coat, value 20s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 1 snuff-box, value 6d.; 1 pen-knife, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shirt-pin, value 4s.; 1 watch, value 25s., and 1 watch-guard, value 12s., the goods of James Legg , the said goods having lately before been stolen by some evil-disposed person, he well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

JAMES LEGG . I am a bookseller , and live in Chapter-house-court, St. Paul's Church-yard. On the 26th of October, about nine o'clock I fell in with a girl of the town. whose name was Flora, - she took me to a lodging-house, No. 5, Laurence-street, St. Giles'; we went up stairs, and I went to bed - I put my watch-guard and pin into my hat before I went to bed; I was merry, but knew what I was about - I awoke in the morning, about half-past seven o'clock; Flora was gone, and my watch-guard, pin, and great-coat - I went down stairs, and met a young woman, named Cracknell; I saw the prisoner standing opposite the house - I went and asked him the name of the person who kept the house; he said Grant -I described to him all the circumstances of the robbery; he said, "The property is gone now, you will never see it any more," and that these things often occured in that house - I went in the afternoon to make further inquiries, and saw the prisoner near the same house again; he passed by me.

MARY ANN SIDNEY . I live at No. 4, Laurence-street, next door to this house. On the Tuesday the prisoner came to my room, and shewed a watch to Porter, who I live with - it had no guard on it at that time; he asked what we thought it was worth - I had seen Flora; the prisoner lives with Ann Norey, who is partner with Flora- the prisoner said Flora had committed a robbery, and shewed the watch; this was between eight and nine o'clock on the Tuesday morning - I saw him again at four in the afternoon, with the same watch in his possession.

EDWARD PORTER . I live with Sidney as a husband - what she has stated is correct; the prisoner brought up a watch, and asked what I thought it was worth - I did not understand from him who had committed the robbery; I heard it in the course of the day - he said that Flora Norey had knocked him up at two o'clock in the morning, and left the watch in his care.

WILLIAM PACKERS. I am a pawnbroker, of Oxford-street. I have a watch, pawned on the 27th of October, in the evening, by the prisoner.

HENRY POPE. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, on the 12th of November, at Marylebone - he said he had the watch the morning after the robbery, and pawned it, but had no benefit from it.

Prisoner's Defence. The watch was left with me by the person now missing - they asked me to pawn it, which I did.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-84

83. THOMAS WOODS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 3 pecks of oats and beans, mixed together, value 3s. , the goods of George Wyatt and Henry Thompson , his masters.

CHARLES HEBARD. I was on duty on the 18th of November, between Red Lion-street and Gray's Inn-lane, at ten minutes past five o'clock in the morning, and met the prisoner and another person in company - I passed them, and on turning round I saw something bulky about the prisoner; I followed him to Red Lion-street, and asked what he had got - he said a feed of oats, and was going to the Greyhound-yard, to a horse which Mr. Wyatt had been in the habit of borrowing; I said it was more than one feed - he said it was for the whole day; I found in his coat about half a bushel of oats and beans - I then went and found Mr. Moore.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he no tell you to go with him? A. Yes - he said he was going to a person named Cockerell.

GEORGE WYATT. I am a brewer, in partnership with Mr. Henry Thompson . The prisoner was our head horse-keeper, and had to take care of the corn in the stable; he never had authority to take oats and corn out of the stable - I believe this to be ours; here is rather more than half a bushel of oats and beans mixed together.

Cross-examined. Q.Will you swear to it? A. I believe it is ours - the prisoner has been twelve months in our employ; I always thought I could depend upon him- I never borrowed a horse of Mr. Cockerell; a man in our employ went by the nickname of York - he has absconded.

Prisoner's Defence. The under horse-keeper came to me, and said he had borrowed, or was about to borrow, a horse for the prosecutors, and he wanted to feed him previous to doing so; I said, "Where is this horse?" he said near the Greybound-yard; I said, "I will go with

you and see the horse" - he said," How shall we carry the feed?" - I said, "In my pocket," and I took them.

JOHN COCKERELL . I am a carrier, and live in French Horn-yard, Holborn, near the Greyhound. I lent a horse, as I understood, for the use of the prosecutors; I bargained with the man who had it, that he should give it a feed of corn - York answered, "That I will do;" they had it for three hours, and then brought it back again - I had agreed to lend it on the day in question; I do not consider this quantity too much to give a horse for a day - he will eat a peck at a feed, if he can get it. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-85

84. THOMAS MOUNTJOY and EDWARD CARR were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 10 iron horse shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Dennis Woodin , their master.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

DENNIS WOODIN . I am a veterinary-surgeon - I have more establishments than one. Carr has been in my employ about three years, and Mountjoy about ten months - previous to the 26th of October, I received some information from my servant; the prisoners were employed at an establishment of mine in Upper Park-place - all the iron and horse-shoes there were mine.

ROBERT THOMAS LAMBERT . I am a Police-officer, and apprehended the prisoners.

HARRIET ANN ANSTEAD. I am in Mr. Woodin's service. On the 26th of October I opened the door at No. 2, Park-place - Mountjoy and Carr came in; I went into the drawing-room, and saw Carr placing some pieces of iron bar against the wall opposite the drawing-room window; I then saw Mountjoy take some shoes from the lath-rail, I suppose eight or ten - Carr was present at the time; he placed them where Carr placed the bars - Carr then took one or two pairs of shoes from off a heap, took some from under them, and put the top pairs on again; Carr then went to the street, and looked up and down; I went to the parlour window, and saw him - he then went into the shop again; I went into the drawing-room, and saw Mountjoy fill a bag, which seemed to be a nail-bag, with the iron, and Carr filled his pockets - I went to the parlour window, and saw them go into the street; I then lost sight of them.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Where is this drawing-room? A.Close to the shop - the horse-shoes were on the rafters at the top of the shop; I could see them distinctly, and have no doubt they were horse-shoes; Mountjoy took them down with an iron bar - different persons had permission to go into that shop; when I went into the parlour I could see them in the street; it was a quarter-past six o'clock in the morning - I do not know whether it is usual for workmen to take horse-shoes from one shop to another.

MR. WOODIN. The workmen at Gloucester-mews place have often taken things, but not these men; they had nothing to do with any other shop but that in Park-place - they formerly worked at another shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not common for men to take shoes from one to another? A. They do sometimes, at the season of the year.

Mountjoy's Defence. I have carried shoes from Park-place to Gloucester-mews, and I fetch coals.

Carr's Defence. I have carried shoes from one shop to another. MOUNTJOY - GUILTY . Aged 34.

CARR - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were two more indictments against the prisoners. The prosecutor stated that he had lost above 2000 horse-shoes within two months.

Reference Number: t18291203-86

85. THOMAS EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 4 iron horse-shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Dennis Woodin , his master.

DENNIS WOODIN . This prisoner was in my employ, at the same shop, and at the same time as the two last prisoners; he had 1l. 8s. a week, and 1s. for his Sunday morning's work - he had been nine or ten months with me.

ROBERT THOMAS LAMBERT. I am an officer, and apprehended him; his master stated what he was taken for: the prisoner said he wished it might fall on the right man.

HARRIET ANN ANSTEAD . On the 27th of October Carr and Mountjoy came in, and went to work - I saw the prisoner come and take two or three pairs of shoes from the laths in the shop, and put them into his pocket; I was watching in the drawing-room - I went from there, opened the street-door, and saw him go into the Gloucester Arms, with the property in his possession; this was about ten minutes past six o'clock in the morning.

MR. WOODIN. I had not empowered the prisoner to take any thing; he should come to work about six o'clock, and they generally remain there till dinner-time - they breakfast in the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. It is quite false - I used to go to the shop, and then to the public-house; I never robbed my master. GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-87

86. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of John Bevis .

JOHN BEVIS . I live in Wellington-square. I lost a coat from a building where I was at work.

WILLIAM PAY. I am a carpenter, and was working at the same place. I saw the prisoner with the coat on his arm on the 13th of November - I took him, and asked what he wanted; he said the foreman of the plasterers - I asked the foreman's name; he said Wilson: I said, "We have no such person;" I asked whose coat that was - he said his own, and he brought it from home.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not have it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-88

87. WILLIAM WOODCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 boot, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Walker Rayne .

ROBERT WALKER RAYNE. My shop is in Shadwell . This boot was hanging outside - I saw a hand put in and take it; I went out, and saw the prisoner going into the White Swan, and took him - he threw this boot in the mud, and I took it up.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you not seize him at your own door? A. No, he was at the fur

ther end of my window; he had gone about twelve yards before I caught him - he was intoxicated at the time; I think it was not taken down to ascertain whether it would fit him - it was quite dark, and likely to be foggy.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-89

88. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 2 half-crowns, and 2 shillings , the monies of John Sterritt .

JOHN STERRITT. I keep stables in Berkeley-street, Edgware-road. I fell in with the prisoner on the 4th of November, and took her to my lodgings in Moor-street ; it was about three or four o'clock in the morning; I had seen her once before - I gave her a shilling, and had two half-crowns and two shillings in my breeches pocket; I took my breeches off, and put them under my pillow - she got up about half-past five o'clock, and bade me good morning - she had not undressed; I got up directly after, and then missed my money, which I have not seen since; I was not sober, nor yet drunk - I looked all about the bed, to see if the money had tumbled out; I did not shake the blankets.

JOHN KELLINGSTON . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner - she denied all knowledge of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-90

89. JANE RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 2 shirts, value 7s.; 2 caps, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of John Mabbott .

HARRIET MABBOTT. I am the wife of John Mabbott, of London-terrace, Hackney-road . The prisoner was servant to Mr. Lynn, who lives in the house. On the 5th of November I washed some shirts and other things, and hung them out at half-past two or three o'clock - I saw them safe at four, and at half-past five they were gone; I asked the prisoner if she had taken them in - she said No: I said,"Are you joking?" she said, "I am not - upon my soul, I have not been out of the kitchen this evening;" I went and told my husband of it, and said no more - but on the 23rd I saw the prisoner with my petticoat on; I said nothing to her then, but mentioned it to a lady, and then got a search-warrant: she was apprehended in the kitchen - the officer searched her, and she gave him some duplicates out of a little bag in her pocket, and told me if I would go up stairs with her, she would give me two caps, if I would not hurt her; she gave me two caps out of her box - this neck-handkerchief, which I had lost, was found on the kitchen-dresser.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.When did you go and ask for 10s. to settle it? A. Her master, Mr. Lynn, came and asked if 10s. would settle it. I had had no quarrel with her about washing the stairs, nor any gentlemen coming there; she was not in the habit of wearing my clothes - I never wore hers: I never drank with her -I have never put any of my clothes on her; I wanted to try a petticoat body on her before I went for the warrant, that I might be sure whether it was mine - I know this petticoat by its having a button-hole on the hand.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner - I cut off her pocket, and in her pocket I found this duplicate of a shirt, pawned on the 19th of November, the name of Ann Masters .

Q.Was Mrs. Mabbott sober? A. Yes, perfectly so.

GEORGE HIGHAM. I am a pawnbroker, and live at Mr. Harris', in Hackney. I produce the shirt for which I gave this duplicate; I cannot say who pawned it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She has offered to lend me her petticoat, and has done so - as to the shirt, I did not know it was hers.

THOMAS LYNN. I live at No. 21, Hackney-road, and am married. The prisoner was in my service on the 23rd of November, and has been so these two years; the prosecutrix was a lodger of mine - there was an intimacy between her and the prisoner; I have come and caught my servant in her apartment, and I have said, "Don't be so thick with the lodgers, for bye and bye you will be quarrelling;" the prisoner cannot read or write - she has pawned things for me, and did not know but that this shirt was mine; before she was taken she told me she had pawned a shirt - I remember her being taken; Mrs. Mabbott said she was very sorry, but she would not hurt her if I would pay for the shirt, and for the officer, that it would not come to above 10s., and she would not go up to the office, and as to her caps, she said she might have them for what she had done for her; I have known her to wear Mrs. Mabbott's clothes, and Mrs. Mabbott has worn hers: if she was discharged I would take her again.

COURT. Q. Is your wife here? A. No - I am a bricklayer and builder; she said she took a shirt and pawned it- when I have seen them drinking together, I cannot say that I have not taken a drop with them; I did not think it odd that Mrs. Mabbott should wish to be compensated, if she had not lost a shirt, but I said to her, "You are one as bad as the other;" I have no reason to believe the prosecutrix ever pawned my property - I did not know whether it was my shirt; I never saw it: I would not compound a felony - I thought it was mine; I do not look or count over my shirts - I leave all that to her: I did not know whether it was mine - she might have wanted a few shillings; I did not authorize her to pawn any property of mine on the 4th of November, nor between the 4th and the 23rd - she was at liberty to pawn any thing when she wanted it; she was a very honest girl: my wife has left me these three years.

JOSEPH FORRESTER. I know the prisoner and Mrs. Mabbott - I went to Mr. Lynn's, and Mabbott let me in: I went down into the kitchen to Lynn, and Lynn went up to the parlour, which Mr. Mabbott occupies - Lynn called me up, and I saw Mrs. Mabbott there; she said she was sorry that any thing should occur, and if Mr. Lynn would pay 5s., which she had paid for a shirt in lieu of the one pawned, and something as a consideration for the officer, she would not appear at Worship-street, any further than to have her discharged; I said, "I suppose 10s. will do?" she said Yes, 10s. would he plenty - I said, "What have you lost?" she said the shirt was the principal thing that Jane had washed for her, and she did not care about them; she said Jane had the petticoat on, and she wanted to fit a body on, or something of that - she did not say any thing to me about stealing the clothes; I had seen them together once or twice before, when I have gone there on business - I have observed them in company, and as it were, connected together in one room or the other.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-91

90. REBECCA REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 2 books, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Stenson .

HENRY HEMMINGS . I am in the employ of Charles Stenson, a bookseller , of Rathbone-place . On the 10th of November the prisoner came and took these two books - I ran out, and caught her as she was passing the door; she turned round, and threw them on the pavement - a gentleman took them up; a Police-officer came by, and I gave charge of her - these are my master's books.

Prisoner's Defence. I was only looking at them.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18291203-92

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

91. BRIDGET ROOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 2 shillings, 1 sixpence, 9 halfpence, and 1 penny , the monies of Peter Spencer and another.

PETER SPENCER, JUN. I am the son of Peter Spencer, who has a partner - they are feather bed-makers ; the prisoner was in my father's employ. On the Sunday afternoon, I marked some money, and put into the desk in the counting-house; on the Monday, between eight and nine o'clock, I missed it - I went to Furzman, who searched her, and found the money on her which I had marked; she said she had a shilling from me, and a shilling from my cousin, which was not true; there was some marked money left in the desk.

SAMUEL FURZMAN. I was sent for on the 16th of November - the prisoner was sent for from the factory into the shop, a little before nine o'clock in the morning; I searched her, and found in her tobacco-box 2s. 6d., nine halfpence, and one penny-piece, all marked; she stated that Spencer had given her one shilling, and his cousin another - in going to the watch-house she said her husband gave them to her.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18291203-93

92. EDWARD PHILLIPS and JOHN SCROGGINS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 5 handkerchiefs, value 14s. , the goods of George Trotter .

THEODORE KIRBY . I am in the service of George Trotter, a linen-draper , of Whitechapel-road . On the 30th of October, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, the two prisoners came into our shop; I had seen them before, and concealed myself at the end of the shop, to watch them - they asked for silk handkerchiefs, and were shewn several pieces; I saw Phillips take a piece containing five handkerchiefs from under a piece which they were looking at - as he attempted to put it into his pocket they came unfolded - they were shewn several pieces afterwards, and when they were going out I came down, and took the handkerchiefs from Phillips; they were in his hand, which was down by the side of the counter - when I went to take him he said, "There are some down here;" they had been in the shop full half an hour - it was full a quarter of an hour after Phillips took the handkerchiefs; Scroggins was nearest to the shop door - he could see what Phillips was doing; they were both looking at the handkerchiefs.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Who else was in the shop? A. Only my shopman; no other customers - the shop is perhaps a dozen yards long; I saw no other boy in the shop - when I took hold of Phillips, Scroggins ran away; I do not know which asked the price.

WILLIAM ASHFORD . I am an officer. I went to the shop, and took Phillips into custody; I took Scroggins nearly three hours afterwards - these handkerchiefs were given me by Mr. Trotter.

Phillips' Defence. I was going to get a place - a lad named Beaumont overtook me, and said he was going to buy a handkerchief; I went with him, and one piece fell off the counter - I took it in my hand, and was going to give it to them.

ANN BROWN . On the 30th of October I saw Scroggins at home at a quarter-past nine o'clock in the morning, and from that to twenty minutes after; I lodge in the same house with his father, and have lodged there twelve months.

COURT. Q.Where does his father and mother live? A.At No. 18, Wood's-buildings, Whitechapel-road; he had not been out that morning, he had been at home - he went out about twenty minutes after nine; he had been before that cleaning his shoes in the kitchen - he got up at near eight o'clock, to the best of my recollection; it was near ten o'clock when I went out - this is about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Trotter's; I do not know that I ever saw Phillips.

THEODORE KIRBY . I am quite sure Scroggins was one of the boys - I had seen him before passing the house; they did not buy any thing.

WILLIAM ASHFORD . When I took them one had 22s., and the other had something.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

SCROGGINS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-94

93. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of George Trimlet .

GEORGE TRIMLET. I am a shoemaker , and live in Monmouth-street . On the 25th of November I missed a pair of shoes from my place, which I had seen safe not a minute before; my wife pursued the prisoner for about ten houses, and took him; I had seen him before - he came with another lad to buy a pair of boots; it was about four o'clock in the afternoon when he took the shoes.

HARRIET TRIMLET . I am the wife of George Trimlet . I did not see the shoes taken, but missed them, and went out; I took the prisoner by the arm, and brought him back - he had got about eight or nine houses off, and was turning into Monmouth-court; he had the shoes in his apron - he said he had just bought them; I swear they were my husband's, but the officer is not here with them.

Prisoner's Defence. Another boy asked me to go and buy a pair of boots; he gave me the shoes to go to White Lion-street, to wait there for him.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-95

94. RICHARD POSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 1 table-cloth, value 2s , the goods of John Best Webb .

GEORGE WILSON . I am principal waiter at Mr. John Best Webb's hotel, in Piccadilly . This table-cloth was missed on the 29th; the prisoner was there that day - as he was coming out, I asked him to step round to the White Bear tap, and have a glass of something to drink; I went

there and told him my suspicions, and that I must insist upon having him searched - he fell on his knees, implored forgiveness, and produced this table-cloth, which is my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. Yes; it is usual for waiters to put tablecloths on their arms, and napkins in their pockets; he had just left the premises when I asked him to go to the White Bear - it was about half-past twelve o'clock.

COURT. Q. Do not waiters use napkins? A. But this could not be mistaken for a napkin.

JOHN FIRNS . I am a Police-constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; Mr. Wilson took the table-cloth off the chair, and told me to take charge of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I solemnly protest I did not put it into my pocket, with an intent to take it off the premises - I had occasion to go to various rooms to get things, and I put it into my pocket, because I could not bring it down in my hand; I intended to take it out when I came down, but I forgot it. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-96

Fourth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

95. MARY MACKAY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 26 yards of linen, value 2l. 7s.; 13 yards of lawn, value 10s.; 5 pieces of nett, value 5s., and 10 yards of bombazeen, value 13s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , her masters.

ROBERT BURGOYNE WATTS. I conduct the establishment of Messrs. Sewell and Cross, in Lamb's Conduit-street ; the prisoner was cook in the house - this property was found, and I know it to be my employers'.

ANN DRYDEN. I live in Stepney-causeway, and am a servant. On the 1st of November, the prisoner gave me at Sewell and Cross', some nett and some lace; she told me to hem it, and make it into handkerchiefs - on the 8th she gave me a piece of Irish linen to make into shifts for her; she gave me a piece of lawn, and some bombazeen, which she told me to keep till she came to my place, on the Sunday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Were not these things found at your house? A. Yes, and then I stated these facts; I went to Sewell and Cross' to see her - I had no opportunity of taking any thing out of the shop; I used to go in the afternoon - I had not the least suspicion these things were stolen; I thought she came by them honestly- she told me they were come fairly by; I was taken up - I did not accuse her, till after I was put in prison; I did not know any thing of it till I was taken for; the officer and Mr. Cross came together - I told every thing I knew, but still they put me in gaol; I swear I had not the least notion where these things came from - she said she bought them; she had been there twelve weeks; I believe she said she bought the linen, but had not paid for it - I believe she said there were eight yards and a half of the bombazeen; the long lawn was new - the linen is cut up; I had worked on some of it - I have known her three months; I am still detained in the House of Correction -I wish to clear myself, and I expect if I get her convicted, I shall get out; I generally went to the house once a week- I was there four days as a char-woman, and slept there; I went through the shop to get to the kitchen.

CATHERINE POWELL . I was servant to Sewell and Cross. On the 14th of November I was taken to prison; the prisoner was not with me - on the Friday evening I came down into the kitchen, and the prisoner said, "I have been much frightened - there has been a gentleman down stairs, and said that William has been robbing the shop;" I said, "Why, are you frightened? you have not been robbing the shop;" she said she wanted to see William, and he came down, but what she said to him I do not know, for I went up stairs - when I came down she said,"There is a parcel yonder;" I said, "I don't know what you mean by yonder - I see nothing;" I then went into the water-closet, and while I was there, I heard a jump -I came on, and she said, "Here are two parcels, and these are stockings, which William has been taking;" she had another parcel, which she said were handkerchiefs -I said it was very wrong of William; we should all get into prison for nothing - the next morning Mr. Cross came and asked me about several things; I could not tell him - he asked me about this, and I was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. That other person was convicted? A. Yes; William was - these are not the articles I speak of; I know nothing about these - on the Sunday night I went out from four o'clock till nine; Dryden was there four days together - I have seen her pass the carpet-room; there were chests of drawers, and things of that kind there - she might have been in the shop without my seeing her; the four days that she was at the house ended about a fortnight before I was taken; but she had been there on the Monday evening.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner, and got these stockings and silks from Navarino-house - I told the prisoner I was aware of what she had done with the stockings, she had put them down the privy, and I wanted to know what she had done with the silk; she said, "Then I will tell you" - I did not say, "You may as well tell me;" I said, "You and Catherine have put the stockings down the privy, I want to know what you have done with the silk;" she said, "There is a young man here, (but I will not mention who he is,) who says there is going to be a terrible hubbub in the house, and I put the stockings down the privy, but I had not the heart to put the silk handkerchiefs down, and put them into the rice-bag"- I went to the rice-bag, and there I found them; these are them - I know of no information being given to the prisoner of what Reid had said.

ROBERT BURGOYNE WATTS. I never spoke to the prisoner about any conversation I had with Reid.

(See page 32.) NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-97

96. MARY MACKAY was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 8 pairs of stockings, value 12s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 4s., and 1 half-handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , her masters.

ROBERT BURGOYNE WATTS. I saw these stockings secreted on a wall in a dark cellar, on the 11th of November; they were in a paper that had a mark on it - these handkerchiefs were also on the wall, and they have still our mark upon them.

HENRY THOMLINSON COOMBE. I was desired by Mr. Cross to watch; I went to Navarino-house an the 18th of

November, to watch who came to take two parcels from a wall under the shop floor - I secreted myself in a waterbutt, and about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning the prisoner came, and hammered a nail in the wine-cellar door - she then went away and swept the place out; nothing occurred till about four in the afternoon, when she opened the wine-cellar door, and took out a bottle of wine - I remained in the water-butt till about half past eleven at night; but about nine o'clock the prisoner and Powell went in the water-closet, which is in a line with the waterbutt - the prisoner put up her hand and took down the two parcels from the place described, she took them into the privy, and was there about five minutes - she came out; she had a broom-stick in her hand, the bottom of which was wet, and put it into the dust-hole, and then called out to the other servant, as if she had been at a distance, "If I were you I would make Thomas carry up the coals;" I saw no coals.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long were you in the water-butt altogether? A. About eighteen hours; I took a bottle of sherry with me, and nearly finished it - Mr. Watts brought me down a penny loaf about two o'clock; I think I left about one glass in the bottle -I was not in the least affected by it; I have seen the young man who was convicted this morning - whether he placed the things there or not I do not know; I drank the wine neat - I did not sleep at all, and was not in the least drowsy; there was just room for me to put my feet down -I had a stool to sit on; I had two holes made to look through, one to view the wine-cellar, and one to look at the parcels - I raised my head over the water-butt when no one was there, but when any one came with a light I looked through the holes; a person might have come and put the parcels there while I was drinking - I believe Reid was a sweetheart of hers, and had access to the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-98

97. DANIEL O'KEEFE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Doggett .

THOMAS DOGGETT. I deal in second-hand clothes , in Marylebone-lane . On the 15th of November I was across the road, and saw the prisoner come out of my shop with a pair of shoes, as if he had bought them; when he got a few yards from the door I went to him, and whether I took them from his hand, or from the ground, I am not certain; but the officer came up and took him - he offered me 1s., and said I had offered them to him for that; but I had not seen him.

WILLIAM GREEN. I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner, and saw these shoes taken from his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in the shop, and took up the boots; there was no one there, and I brought them out to look at them.

THOMAS DOGGETT. He was ten or twelve yards from the shop - he cried very much, and seemed sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18291203-99

98. CATHERINE McDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 1 cloak, value 20s. , the goods of Catherine Williams .

CATHERINE WILLIAMS . I am a dress-maker . On the 23rd of November, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I lost a cloak from my bed-room - I had seen it about eleven in the day; I did not see any one but the prisoner go into the room - she lived in the house.

BRIDGET HALLARAN. I met the prisoner - she gave me the cloak about half-past six o'clock; she told me to get as much as I could for it - I went with it to a pawnbroker's and could get but 2s.; I then took it to Mr. Knapp and got 2s. 6d. for it - the prisoner went away that night.

SAMUEL THOMAS KNAPP. I have a cloak, pawned by this witness.

GEORGE OSTERMAN. I took the prisoner; she said she knew nothing about it. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-100

99. HENRY MACKENZIE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 seal, value 10s., and 1 watch-key, value 5s. , the goods of William Brydie .

WILLIAM BRYDIE. I lost a watch, seal, and key, on the 6th of November, out of the bake-house - I hung it on a nail; at one o'clock I went out with some bakings - when I returned the prisoner was there; I went out again, returned, and soon after went out again - when I returned the watch was gone; I got an officer, and had the prisoner taken - he said he had taken it and sold it to a Jew in Monmouth-street, the first shop on the right hand side; I went there with an officer, but found nothing - the Jew was ordered to attend that evening, and the boy said, before the Magistrate, that he sold the watch to him; the Jew denied it.

WILLIAM ELLIS . I received charge of the prisoner on the 6th of November; he said at first that he had not taken it, but afterwards said he took it and sold it to a Jew at the corner of Monmouth-street for 5s.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-101

100. WILLIAM MORRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 1 pair of boots, value 15s. , the goods of George Savage .

GEORGE SAVAGE . I lost a pair of boots from just inside my shop door, in Tottenham-court-road , on the 2nd of November - I was at tea; a young lad came, and asked if I had lost a pair - they had been safe an hour before; I went out, but could not find them - I returned, the lad was still in my shop; he gave me a minute description of the person who took them - he came to me on the Friday; I went out with him, and saw the prisoner - we followed him till I met a Police-man, and gave him into custody; he said he knew nothing of them.

MICHAEL SLIGHT . I was looking in at Mr. Savage's shop, and the prisoner stepped up to the door and took the boots off the hook - I was not certain whether he came out of the shop, but I told the prosecutor of it; I saw him a few days afterwards, and knew him again.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-102

101. ELIZABETH MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 shawl, value 5s. 6d. , the goods of John Prickell .

ALFRED SMETHAM . I am in the employ of Mr. John Prickell , a pawnbroker , of Tottenham-court-road . On the 13th of November I was at the corner of the court, and saw the prisoner in the box passage - she must have

taken down the shawl, and was going about to find a place to hide it; she pulled the box passage door too, and put it behind the door - Mr. Prickell gave charge of her; I did not see her take it, but I saw it in her possession.

THOMAS FRAMPTON . I am an officer. I received charge of the prisoner - she denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going on my own business, and as I came out he gave me in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-103

102. SARAH KIRK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR . On the 7th of November I had been drinking, and was going home with this coat on my back- I did not miss it till I was told it was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Then you do not know how you lost it? A. No; I do not know whether I told the prisoner to pawn it to get some gin - I had not been drinking with her in the Broadway; she came in before I left the house - I do not know whether I went to the Brown Bear, or whether I was in a wine-vaults in King-street; I never went to the prisoner's father - my landlord paid me 9s.; I did see the prisoner's father when he came to my house - I did not say I had spent 9s., and if he would give me that I should be satisfied; I had 5s. in my pocket, and 6s., and what became of it I do not know - I had 12s. at first, and spent about 1s. at the Broadway.

THOMAS KILLIN. I was in an alley with Swanton, and saw the prisoner on the prosecutor, who was on the ground- it was dark; I do not know what she was doing, but she spoke to him and he gave her no answer - his coat was half off; I saw his shirt sleeves.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner drunk? A. She looked sober - she stood up when she was taken; I heard nothing about pawning the coat.

ROBERT SWANTON. I was with Killin - I saw the prisoner stooping over the prosecutor, trying to take the coat off; we went to find the officer, and I asked if he saw a woman go by with a coat.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she sober? A. Yes.

JOSEPH PEARCE . I was on duty in the Coal-yard. I saw the prisoner come out of an alley with this coat - I asked what she had got; she said, "My husband's coat" -I said, "People generally pawn things on Monday morning and take them out on Saturday night;" she said if I would go to where she lived, I should find it was right - I let her go; these two boys came and told me what they had seen - I ran after her, and took her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met him and three other men in the street - I knew a man the prosecutor lodged with; they gave me some gin in the Broadway - the prosecutor then took me to the Brown Bear, and several other places- he then asked me to pawn his coat for 2s., and said he would redeem it when he got home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-104

103. FREDERICK IRELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 cloak, value 25s. , the goods of John Hannam Pemberton and Eliezae Lloyd Williams .

JOHN EVANS. I am a linen-draper , in the employ of John Hannam Pemberton and Eliezae Lloyd Williams of St. John-street, Smithfield . On the 24th of November the constable brought this cloak to the shop; it is their property - I had not seen it that morning; it was brought back about four o'clock in the afternoon - here is a mark on it.

WILLIAM BECKLEY. I am a constable. On the 24th of November I saw the prisoner and three others in Goswell-street. making an attempt at a shop - I watched them on to the prosecutor's and saw the prisoner snatch down this cloak and give it to another; I ran, and the prisoner sung out "Drop it!" the other boy threw it down - I took it up, and caught the prisoner; the other ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-105

104. EDWARD HENNISON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 3 pairs of trousers, value 12s.; 5 waistcoats, value 20s.; 1 hat, value 9s.; 1 coat, value 4s.; 3 yards of calico, value 2s.; 3 waistcoat-pieces, value 8s.; 1 pair of boots, value 12s.; 1 yard of kerseymere, value 12s.; 1 seal, value 2d.; 1 ring, value 1d.; 1 box, value 1d., and 1 tooth-pick, value 1d. , the goods of James Hedges .

JAMES HEDGES . I live in Hoxton-market-place , and am a tailor . I lost the property stated on the 21st of November from a box in my room, which I occupy, in my my father's house - the box I had kept locked, but the lock was broken off; I saw the prisoner for the first time about eleven o'clock on the 21st of November - he had lodged in the house for a fortnight, but I had been in the country; I gave information to a constable, who took him in his own room - he took from him this seal and ring, which are mine; he found this seal-box on the table - this tooth-pick was my brother's.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat and waistcoat pawned with me on the 18th of November, by the prisoner.

HENRY BAILEY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of boots, pawned by the prisoner.

ANDREW TIMS. I have a pair of trousers, pawned with me by the prisoner.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE. I took the prisoner - he was playing a fiddle; I said, "I want you on a charge of felony;" he said, "I am innocent" - I searched him, and found these things; he gave no account of the articles at the pawnbroker's - I found them out myself.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MRS. HEDGES. I am the prosecutor's mother. I let a room to the prisoner, who said he was about to be a Police-man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a lodger to pawn the articles - he paid me for my trouble; I returned the duplicates and the money - he gave me the seal.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE. There is only one old man in the house - the prisoner did not state this at the time.

MR. HEDGES. The person he alludes to is my nephew, who is here.

- I caught the prisoner one day in the parlour; I went, and asked what he did there - he

took the key off the mantel-piece, and said, "I want to get a drop of beer;" his wife was on the stairs - he mentioned a man of the name of Peligraft having told him to take them.

Prisoner. He asked me to go up with him as his aunt was out of the way, and said he would have a drop of beer - I never had the key in my hand; this witness told me to use the name of Peligraft.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-106

105. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , 1 saw, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Clark .

ROBERT CLARK . I am a cooper . I lost a saw, which I had hung up on the 30th of October in the workshop, No. 153, Kingsland-road - on Monday morning I missed it.

JOHN PROBETTS. I am a pawnbroker. I produce the saw, which was pawned by William Brown, not the prisoner. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-107

106. HENRY HODGSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 2 silk handkerchiefs, value 5s. , the goods of William Hodgson .

WILLIAM HODGSON. I am the prisoner's father - he robbed me of two handkerchiefs, which he has confessed, and said what he had done with them; he lived with me.

JOHN BARNFORD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner; I questioned him in going to the watch-house - he said he had pawned them, and torn the tickets up.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. I am pawnbroker. I have a silk handkerchief, which I took in from the prisoner on the 9th of November.

GEORGE WEBB . I am a pawnbroker. I have a handkerchief I took of the prisoner, I believe.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-108

107. WILLIAM HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 1 pencil-case, value 1s., and 1 comb, value 1d. , the goods of David Hills .

DAVID HILLS . I live at Addington, near Croydon. I was lodging in East Smithfield - I went to bed on the night of the 29th of November, and left these things on a chair; I awoke at seven o'clock in the morning, and they were gone - the prisoner slept in another bed in the room, and he was gone when I awoke; there were two other persons in the room - the door was not fastened; these are the articles.

JOSEPH GALLOWAY. I took the prisoner, and found these articles in a chest on board his vessel - he pointed them out to me, and said he must have taken them by mistake.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday I came on shore with two shipmates, and we got drinking till it was too late to get into the dock - I went to get a lodging; I got up between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and put on my clothes as I thought, but it was a mistake.

WILLIAM HALL . He left about six o'clock in the morning - he did not leave his own clothes behind.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18291203-109

108. TIMOTHY HURLEY and JAMES GAVIN were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 wooden till, value 1s., and 5 shillings , the property of William Gray .

JOHN CURTIS. I am a baker, in the employ of my brother-in-law, William Gray, of Union-street, Somer's-town . I lost the till from the shop between twelve and one o'clock in the day, on the 30th of November - I did not miss it for half an hour, when I went to serve, and it was gone; this is the till - I know it by the handle, and the bottom of it; there might be 1l. in silver in it.

JOSIAH WILLOUGHBY . About half-past twelve o'clock that day I was on a scaffold - I saw a mob, and Hurley was running; I came down a scaffold-pole, and pursued him - I saw him turn up his right-hand waistcoat pocket, and some money fell out; he jumped over a ditch, and fell - I jumped over, and took him; he wished me to let him go - I found two shillings and some halfpence in his pocket, and then took the people to where I saw him turn his pocket up; I saw Gavin coming, and told Thomas to take him.

DAVID THOMAS. I was on the scaffold, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I took Gavin, and saw him drop a cloth on the ground - I then went to the spot where I had seen Hurley turn out his money, and picked up 6s.; I did not see the till till I had been to the watch-house.

JONATHAN GODLEY. I saw Hurley throw this till into a ditch - it had been on the ground, and the two prisoners were sitting down with it between them in a field; some persons called Stop thief! and Hurley threw it into the ditch - they then ran away; I did not see them stopped.

WILLIAM LANGFORD . I am a constable. I took the prisoners, and received a good deal of money from different people, and this till; I produce them - Gavin had an apron in his hat.

Hurley's Defence. I went to look for work at nine o'clock in the morning - I was coming from Somer's-town and walked by these fields; I heard some persons call out, and I ran about a dozen yards - the man took me.

Gavin's Defence. I heard Stop thief! called - I went to see what was the matter, and was taken; I was not running.

HURLEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

GAVIN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-110

109. ISAAC GUTTERIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 great coat, value 10s. , the goods of William Robins .

WILLIAM ROBINS . I lost a great coat, on the 15th of November, from the stable of Mr. Tattersal, at Dorling, near Arlington, in Middlesex - I left it safe between one and two o'clock that day, and missed it on the Monday following; I knew the prisoner, but he had nothing to do there - I charged him with taking it on the 22nd of November, and he said if it was mine I was to take it.

JOHN CORDERY . The prisoner came to my house on Sunday, the 22nd of November, and had this coat on his back - I had heard there had been a coat lost, and I asked him about it; he said he had it given him at Feltham, but did not say when.

ANN BRETT . The prisoner came to Mr. Tattersal's on the 15th, between six and seven o'clock in the evening,

to say that my master's bullocks had been running over Mr. Shepherd's grounds, and we must have the gaps stopped the next morning - I thanked him, and gave him some beer.

SAMUEL SMITH. I am a constable. I had information, and went and took the prisoner - he said the prosecutor might take the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Confined One Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-111

110. WILLIAM FITTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 18s.; 8 pairs of stockings, value 3s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 10s. , the goods of Edward Brown .

EDWARD BROWN. I live in Palace-street, Westminster . I missed these things on the Friday evening, when I went to bed - the prisoner lodged in the same room; these are my stockings, they had been tied in a handkerchief and put into a cupboard in the room.

GEORGE COLLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on Sunday, the 22nd of November, in Palace-street - I got these three pairs of stockings from a female, named Margaret Shields, at No. 4, Edward-court; she was bound over, but has not appeared - the prisoner at first denied it, but in going to the office he asked what I thought he had better do; I said it was not my duty to advise him - he then said he thought he had better tell me the truth, and took me to a place where he said he had sold the shoes, but the man had sold them again; he said he had sold the trousers in Fleet-market.

HERBERT FRENCH . I slept in the same room with the prisoner and the prosecutor - the landlady asked me to go and see if the prisoner had given a right reference; I went, and he was not known there - I went to another house the next morning; he came in, and was taken.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-112

111. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 100 biscuits, value 3s. 6d., and 1 sieve, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Duncan .

THOMAS DUNCAN. On the 7th of November I lost a flour sieve, full of biscuits, off my counter, at Pimlico -I am a baker ; they had been brought up about six o'clock in the evening, and were gone in a quarter of an hour.

JOHN EBLING . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner at the Gloucester Arms, Rochester-row, on the 7th of November, selling these biscuits; I called him out, and asked where he got them - he at first would not give me an answer - he then said he bought them in the City, and then that he brought them from Portsmouth, but I found they were quite warm; this is the sieve.(Sieve produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I lived at Portsmouth thirty-three years. I bought these biscuits of a man who was selling them in the street - I bought 1d. worth of him, and ate them; he said he would sell me the rest a bargain - I thought as it was Saturday night I might get a shilling by taking them to public-houses; I sell a few little things, which I buy of Mr. Brooks, in Tothill-street, where I took the officer, and he gave me a good character.

JOHN EBLING. I went to Mr. Brooks - he said he was in the habit of buying hardware of him.

GUILTY . Aged 65. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-113

112. DANIEL DANIELS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 sideboard, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Ridge .

THOMAS RIDGE. I live at No. 15, Cumberland-street Middlesex-hospital , and am a broker . I lost a sideboard on the 7th of November - I did not see it taken, but my next door neighbour asked if I had sold it, and I said No; she said there was a man going up the street with in - I followed him, and just got sight of him turning into a coal-shed; it was the prisoner - I went up, and he was endeavouring to conceal the sideboard among some coals; I brought him back - he persisted that he had bought it; I thought he might have bought it of my wife, but she denied it.

JOHN McCRAW . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he said he would give me a sovereign to let him go, but he had not got one.

ANN DUSON. I heard the sideboard moved from the prosecutor's door - I went and saw the back of the person, and told the prosecutor.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had bought the sideboard of a person who stood at the corner of Tottenham-street, for 1s. 6d.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-114

113. ELIZABETH DUGGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 76 yards of ribbon, value 24s. , the goods of Joseph Brown .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-115

114. JOHN CANEW was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 2 boots, value 2s. , the goods of George Dupin .

HENRY JENKINS. I am in the employ of Mr. George Dupin, shoemaker , Shadwell High-street . On the 21st of November, a woman came and said a boy had taken a pair of shoes - I went out, and saw the prisoner running; I took him about fifty yards from the shop, and took the boots from him - these are them; I had seen them safe an hour before.

WILLIAM BURN. I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-116

115. ROBERT CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 pick, value 7s. , the goods of William Cubitt .

The witnesses did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-117

116. SARAH CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 2 blankets, value 5s.; 1 sheet, value 2s.; 2 flat-irons, value 1s., and 1 looking-glass, value 1s. , the goods of William Poole .

ELIZABETH POOLE. I am the wife of William Poole we live in Golden-lane . The prisoner lived in a furnished lodging of ours, and left it on the 14th of November, with out notice; she left the key in another lodger's room -I went up stairs, and missed the articles stated, which had been let to her as part of the furniture; these and them.

SAMUEL THOMAS KNAPP . I am a pawnbroker. I have two flat-irons pawned with me - I cannot say by whom.

DANIEL GARDINER . I have some blankets pawned with me by a woman - I do not know who.

CHARLES BATH . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet pawned with me by the prisoner on the 14th of November.

JAMES FORDHAM. I have a blanket and a looking-glass, which I got in Long-lane - the prisoner said they had been left there, the glass for 6d., and the blanket for 9d.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18291203-118

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, DEC. 5.

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

117. BRIDGET HAYES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Sherry , on the 28th of November , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 3 glass cruets, value 3s.; 1 tumbler, value 4d.; I loaf of bread, value 8d., and 2 shillings , the property of Henry Sherry .

MARY SHERRY. I am the wife of Henry Sherry, and live in Tothill-street , Westminister. On Saturday, the 28th of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in Tothill-street - my daughter was with me; I have known the prisoner five years - her parents once lived in the house with me; she is a girl of the town - she said to my daughter, "How do you do, Mrs. Robinson? your mother don't speak to me, but I hope you will;" my daughter said, "I shall not" - I went home - she followed me up stairs, and came into my room; my daughter went out for a candle in about ten minutes, leaving her there.

Q. Did you not desire her to leave the room? A. Yes - I do not turn her out, as she is such a character she would insult and knock me down, and my daughter had her child in her arms - I do not think she was at all in liquor; while my daughter was gone for the candle she pushed me down on the bed, jumped on me, and got her knee on my breast, put her hand into my pocket, and took out two shillings - I could not call out, for she squeezed my throat; I got round, and saw her take the cruets, a tumbler, and loaf - she went out of the room; my daughter was coming up stairs - I called out, "Stop her, she has robbed me!" I could not follow her, I was so ill, and did not know where she lived - I told an officer, who took her on Sunday; it was all done in a moment - the two shillings were wrapped in a piece of newspaper; she did not take the tumbler away.

ANNETT ROBINSON. I am the prosecutrix's daughter. The prisoner did not appear to me to be drunk - she followed us up stairs - I went out for a candle, and on returning my little boy was crying violently; when I entered the room the prisoner was on the bed on my mother, but the candle was out - I lighted it, and took her off; she said my mother had thrown her on the bed - my mother said"No, she threw me on, but I have kept my hand on my pocket;" that is all she said - I then went out for some porter, and as I came back met the prisoner on the stairs - my mother called out, "Stop her! she has taken something;" I called to the landlord to stop her, but he could not find her - I had left her in the room with my mother; it was not my place to turn her out - she went out for something to drink before it occurred.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am an officer and apprehended the prisoner - she denied the charge; but on taking her to the prosecutrix's room she acknowledged having been there, and said she was in liquor; Robinson gave me a glass, and said she took it out of her pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. She asked me to go and have some liquor when I met her, and afterwards asked me up to her room; I went home, and heard nothing of this till Sunday - the tumbler was never out of the room, but she said she saw me take it from my pocket, and put it on the shelf. NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

Reference Number: t18291203-119

118. THOMAS KNIGHT was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18291203-120

119. FRANCIS FULL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 1 leather case, value 4d.; 10 sovereigns, and 2 crowns, the goods of John Nutt , in the dwelling-house of George Full .

MARY NUTT . I am the wife of John Nutt , and live in St. Luke's work-house - we have been separated since 1808; I have every reason to believe he is still alive: I had 30l. left me three years ago. On the 16th of August, I went to Bethnal-green church, in the morning, and from there to my brother-in-law's, George Full's, in Wellington-street, Bethnalgreen ; the prisoner is his son, and my nephew - I got there about two o'clock; the prisoner does not live there, but only calls occasionally - his father is a Custom-house officer; a little boy opened the door, and the prisoner was sitting in the room when I went in - my brother-in-law was out; the little boy is a son by a second wife - I sat down about five minutes; the prisoner was there all the time: I laid my reticule on the table when I went in- it contained a pocket-book, with ten sovereigns and two crown-pieces in it; I laid a handkerchief on the reticule, and my umbrella on the table - I went into the back room, to the prisoner's mother-in-law and her three sons; I stopped in that room with Mrs. Full not more than five minutes, then returned into the front parlour, and the prisoner was gone; my reticule was there, but the pocketbook and its contents were gone - I looked for it immediately as I came into the room; I am confident the money was there when I laid it on the table - it was tied in the reticule with a black ribbon, very tight; I gave an alarm, and told his mother he had run away with my pocket-book - I went to Lawson, the officer, within a quarter of an hour: I have not found my money or pocketbook - I had not promised my nephew any of this money.

Prisoner. When my aunt came in I was standing up- I asked how she did, and walked out as she came in. Witness. He did not - I left him setting in the room as I found him; I heard nobody else go into the front room while I was absent.

JOSEPH GRIMWOOD. I am a headborough of Bethnalgreen. I received information, and apprehended the

prisoner, on the 13th of November, in Jews' - row, Petticoat-lane, about half a mile from his father's - I had been looking for him before at different times; he did not live at his father's - he travels the country with pencils and sponge; he said he knew nothing of the robbery - he went quietly with me; I had received directions from Lawson to apprehend him two months before.

CHRISTOPHER LAWSON . I am a headborough. I received directions to apprehend the prisoner on the 16th of August; when he was apprehended I found nothing on him but two shillings and a few halfpence - I cannot find Barwood, who was to have been a witness.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not live at my father's, but called on Sunday - he was not at home; I was going home to dinner, and before I could get to the street door there was a knock - my little brother let my aunt in; I shook hands with her - she walked into the next room, and I walked out; I knew nothing of what was alledged against me till I was taken.

ELIZABETH JONES. I live in Wellington-street, and have known the prisoner nine years. On the Sunday Nutt was robbed, I was going to the baker's for my dinner, and met her - she stopped me, and said she had lost her pocket-book, with ten sovereigns out of her bag; I asked where she lost it - she said she did not know, for she had been at an eating-house, an old clothes-shop, and to Frank Full's house, and did not know where she lost it; she showed me her bag, which had a great slit in it -I said perhaps she had lost it out of there; she said she could not say - this was a few minutes after one o'clock; I asked if she was sure she had it - she said she had it that day three weeks, when she went to a charity sermon, and she did not know what she should do, for she dare not go back to the work-house without it: I am a married woman; it was a black stuff bag - she seemed sober; she is in the habit of drinking.

MARY NUTT . I saw Jones that afternoon, and told her of my loss; I did not say I did not know who had taken it, nor that I had been to an old clothes-shop or eating-house - I had not dined; I said I was at George Full 's - she asked if I was sure I had it; I said I was confident I had it when I went into the house - I said nothing to her about a charity sermon; I was perfectly sober, and had come straight from church - there was a little tear in my bag, but not sufficient for the pocketbook to fall out; she said perhaps I might have lost it out there - I said I had not, that I took it into the house, and left it on the table; the last time I had seen the money was about three weeks before, when there had been a charity sermon, but I had the pocket-book in my reticule, and have every reason to believe the money was in it by its weight - I had drawn it into a black silk stocking, which was in my bag, and tied the reticule up with a ribbon; when I returned to the room the ribbon was on the ground, the bag open, and pocket-book gone - I had seen the pocket-book on the Monday morning, after the charity sermon, and had it in my hand almost every day, but not out of the stocking; I have not seen the stocking or any thing since - I put it into my reticule that morning.

MARY FULL. I am the prisoner's mother-in-law. On the Sunday in question, the prosecutrix came into my kitchen, and said, "I have not come to dine with you unless you have got a couple of fowls:" I said, "I have not one" - this was a little before one o'clock; she laid a pear on the mantel-piece, and returned to the front room again - that room opens into the street without a passage; she said, "I have lost my money out of my bag," which she called her reticule - it is made out of a black stuff petticoat; I asked how she thought she had lost it - she said some of the boys had taken it; I said, "What boys?" she said Frank Full had got it, she supposed, and said it was ten sovereigns and two half-crowns; I asked her if she was sure she had it - she said she saw it three months ago (I am sure she said months) when she got change in Long-lane or Long-ally, and had then put it into her pocket-book, five sovereigns on one side, and five sovereigns and two half-crowns on the other; she then said he was gone up stairs with it - I told her to go up after him; she went up, but he was not there - she said she had put it on the table, which is about two yards from the door; when I came into the room, both the street door and the window were ajar - I had opened the window for air; she fetched Lawson to the house, and said I could state the case to him - I said I could only state what she said to me; she said, in Lawson's presence, that she had lost ten sovereigns and two crowns - I asked if she recollected telling me before that it was two half-crowns; she at first told me she tied it together, and then said she tacked it together with a nail and needle - she was told she might say what was proper in our house; I asked if she might swear a man's life away in our house; she said what she swore before the Grand Jury would be the case - she went away, and on the Monday told a neighbour, in my hearing, that she had brought the money to our house to relieve us, as we were walking about the streets, wanting bread; I asked if she had ever shown any charity to me - she said No, but she had brought it to relieve my children by a former husband, as I had acted friendly to her; she has frequently said she should like to come and live with us, if we would allow her 2s. 6d. a week.

MARY NUTT. All she has said is perfectly right, except about the half-crowns; I did go with the intention of relieving her - I had seen the money three months before, and also three weeks; the window was not open - the door was shut when I went out of the room, but open when I returned.

NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18291203-121

120. SOLOMON ISRAEL was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18291203-122

121. JOHN BRENAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one 1000l. Bank note , the property of Joseph Bowman and Richard Winter , his masters.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-123

Third London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

122. WILLIAM HOMEWOOD alias JOHN HORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 2 gauze handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 2 gauze shawls, value 8s.; 2

scarfs, value 10s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 11s.; 1 piece of handkerchiefs, value 24s., and 8 yards of silk, value 10s. , the goods of Edward Eyles and another, his masters.

JOHN CRAWLEY LITTLE. I am a Police-constable. On the 1st of December I was at Mr. Dobree's, a pawnbroker, in Oxford-street, on business, and the prisoner came in to pledge a piece of velvet; he was asked his address, and gave John Wells, 27, Well-street, Oxford-street - the pawnbroker said he must make a mistake, for he knew the people at No. 27; I then stepped round to the side box, where he was, and told him he must go with me to No. 27, and see if it was correct; he went as far as the door, then told me it was of no use knocking, for he knew nobody there - I asked how he came by the velvet; he said, "To tell you the truth, the fact is, I went home with a young woman last night, gave her a sovereign, and she gave me this velvet, as she had no change to give me, and I thought a sovereign was too much for her:" I said he must go to the watch-house, and on the road he begged me very hard not to handcuff him, or lay hold of his collar - I allowed him to walk by my side, and he ran away some distance; I hallooed, and he was stopped - I overtook and secured him; I searched him at Marylebone office, and found three new silk handkerchiefs in his pocket - I went next morning to Mr. Eyles, and searched a box, which the shopman pointed out as his, in his bed-room, and found four silk handkerchiefs, two gauze scarfs two gauze shawls, two gauze handkerchiefs, a pair or two of gloves, and other things: I found eight duplicates in his trunk, and one in his possession.

EDWARD BENTON . I live with my father, who is a pawnbroker. I have eight yards of silk, pawned on the 26th of November, and two yards and a half of velvet, on the 19th, by the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Did you know him? A. Not before; I am certain of his person - he brought the velvet into the boxes, and the silk into the shop.

JOSEPH AVANT . I am shopman to Mr. Gray, pawnbroker of Fleet-street. I have four silk handkerchiefs, and a remnant of silk - two of them were pawned by the prisoner, on the 24th of October, and the 25th of November; I did not take the others in.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him before? A. No; I cannot swear to all our customers, but recollect taking these articles of him.

PHILIP EATON. I am a pawnbroker, and live in High Holborn. I have two yards and a half of velvet, and a piece of silk handkerchiefs, pawned on the 26th of November - I believe the prisoner to be the person who pawned them.

Cross-examined. Q.Why do you say he is the man? A. From his appearance; he is rather a remarkable young man - we are not in the habit of serving many so respectable in appearance.

JAMES PALMER . I am shopman to Mr. Muncaster, of Skinner-street. I have a remnant of velvet, and another of puce coloured silk; the silk was pawned by the prisoner - I did not take in the velvet.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. No: there was nobody else in the shop.

EDWARD EYLES. I have a partner. The prisoner was six months in our employ, as junior clerk ; I had sent him out on an errand - I was present when his box was searched- it was his box, to the best of my belief; the property found in it is ours, and so is that produced - I cannot swear to the velvet, but to the best of my belief it is ours; we never permitted him to pawn goods.

Cross-examined. Q. How many young men have you? A. Eight - three sleep in the prisoner's room; all the clothes in the box are the prisoner's, and as such I believe it to be his box - I have every reason to believe the velvet is mine; here are patterns corresponding with one piece -I bought it of a wholesale dealer; it is a common sort - the handkerchiefs have our shop mark on them; shopmen at times purchase articles, and put them down to their accounts - the prisoner has done so; I am confident these articles are not entered - I have no private mark on any thing but the handkerchiefs: the tickets have come off since they were found - a loose ticket was found in the prisoner's box.

GUILTY. Aged 17. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18291203-124

123. ROBERT LAW , JUN, was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 2,200 sheets of printed paper, value 3l. 10s., and 159 books, value 3l. 10s. , the goods of Thomas White .

THOMAS WHITE . I am a printer , and live in Johnson's-court, Fleet-street. The prisoner served part of his time to me, but left about twelve months ago - I lost this paper out of the side warehouse, which he had access to just as he pleased, as his father and him had both been in my employ, and the front door is constantly open; he was not in my employ - on the 25th of November, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I missed three bundles of paper, consisting of 2,200 sheets, and forming a novel called"Much to Blame;" I afterwards found part of it at Mills', Gray's Inn-lane, who gave me information; I left it in the hands of a serjeant of the Police.

MORRIS NICHOLAS. I am a serjeant of the Police. I found part of the property at Mills', and apprehended the prisoner; when I went into his room his wife began to cry - before I said a word to him he began to cry, and was hardly able to answer my questions for some time; I told him I took him for stealing a quantity of paper from White- he made no answer; I called Scarborough up - he identified him as having sold the paper; I found more paper at Carter's.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Leather-lane. I bought this paper of the prisoner; there are about three pounds - I gave him 11d. for it as wastepaper; I never bought any more of him - I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS CARTER . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Upper North-place, Gray's Inn-lane. I bought 6lbs. of waste-paper of the prisoner, at 4d. per 1b. - I did not examine it till afterwards; I saw it was waste-paper - the sheets are damaged and torn - I do not particularly swear to him, but I believe him to be the man.

STEPHEN SCARBOROUGH . I am foreman to Mr. Clark, cheesemonger, of Gray's Inn-lane. I bought about 6lbs. of waste-paper of the prisoner; it came to 1s. 7d.

THOMAS WHITE. I am convinced this is my property; but the title pages are torn off - it is of considerable value to me. GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy, believing him to be in distress.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-125

124. THOMAS LOMAX was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 cask, called a puncheon, value 20s. , the goods of Richard Boyden Burleigh .

ROBERT WALLACE. I am in the employ of Richard Boyden Burleigh, wine-merchant , of Bishopsgate-street . On the 30th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner and another man take a puncheon away; they rolled it down the yard - I followed, and they were lifting it into a cart; (I have seen him before - he had no business on the premises) - I asked what they were going to do with it, and the prisoner ran away, I followed and brought him back.

Prisoner. I was employed to assist in lifting it into the cart; I did not roll it down the yard. Witness. He was rolling it across the street, and helping it into the cart.

JOSEPH KINGSTON. I am carman to Thomas Bull, of Great Dover-street. I was in Bishopsgate-street; the prisoner stopped me, and said he had got a 6d. job for me, to take a puncheon over to the Borough - I stopped my cart; he and another man rolled the puncheon from the yard, and were putting it into my cart, when Wallance came up, and collared the other man - the prisoner ran off, but was stopped.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say a person had a 6d. job for you? A. You said you had a 6d. job.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Bishopsgate-street; a person asked me to step over and ask that carman if he was going to the Borough - he said he was; I said I believed there was a 6d. job for him, to take a puncheon - two men brought it to the cart; I lifted it in, and was to have 6d. for my trouble - the officer found 6d. on me; the man who hired me sung out that it was stolen, and we should all be taken - I thought it best to go.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-126

125. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 2 pairs of boots, value 4s., and 1 oz. of leather, value 1s. , the goods of Henry Rugless , his master.

HENRY RUGLESS . I am a bootmaker , and live in Crombie's-row. The prisoner worked for me; I gave him these boots out to mend, and new leather with them, 16d. to get his tools out of pawn, and 6d. to get a breakfast - he never brought them back; I found him in a public-house, and gave him in charge - he directed us to Rosemary-lane, where we found two pair of boots; I consider him my journeyman - I hired him by the job; he was not a regular servant in my constant employ.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-127

126. JOHN GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 500 sheets of printed paper, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of James Webb Southgate .

BENJAMIN GRIMSTONE. I am clerk to James Webb Southgate , at his book auction-rooms, in Fleet-street. On Tuesday evening a gentleman from Messrs. Longman's called to inquire the names of persons who had purchased some books, and on referring to the stock I missed fifty copies of Mavor's Spelling-book, and fifteen copies of Joyce's Arithmetic; I went to Longman's and found the exact quantity of copies - I had seen them a week before: I know nothing of the prisoner.

DAVID KERRIDGE . I am apprenticed to my father, a ham-dealer in London-house-yard. The prisoner came and asked if we bought waste-paper; I asked what it was, he said, "Refused sheets misprinted" - I weighed it, there was about 14lbs.; he gave me a bill of it, receipted - I laid it on the back bench, and next morning untied it; I had not opened it before - I looked at it and saw Longman's name, and the date, 1829, on it; I immediately thought it could not have been honestly come by, and my father sent to Longman's - the prisoner had promised to bring some more the following evening; he called with a quantity of Johnson's Dictionary, and was detained.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of selling toys and turnery; I called at a shop - a person followed me out, seeing I had goods wrapped in paper, and asked if I bought waste-paper: I said, "Not usually" - he said he had some to sell cheap, if I would call and see it, or he would bring it to me as he lived near - if I would appoint a place he would let me see a sample; I did so, and exchanged goods with him for it.

GUILTY . Aged 67. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-128

127. JOHN GRAHAM was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 800 sheets of paper, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of James Webb Southgate .

BENJAMIN GRIMSTONE . I am clerk to Mr. Southgate. These sheets of Johnson's Dictionary are his property; I missed them on receiving information of the former works.

HENRY KERRIDGE . I live in London-house-yard; my son gave me information, and next evening the prisoner brought this paper - my son took hold of it and said, "This is not like the paper you sold me last night;" he said, "Oh yes, it is every bit as large" - I put my hand on him and said he must go to Longman's - they sent me to Southgate's.

GUILTY . Aged 67. - Transported for Seven Years, to commence from the expiration of his former Sentence .

Reference Number: t18291203-129

128. WILLIAM COPPING was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 3 1/2 yards of silk, value 16s. , the goods of Edward Stavely Briggs .

EDWARD STAVELY BRIGGS. I am a hosier , and live in Leadenhall-street . On the 2d of December the prisoner came into my shop with another boy, who bought a pair of scarlet cuffs for 6d.; while the shopman was serving him I was in the parlour behind, watching, and saw the prisoner take a piece of handkerchiefs off the counter and hand them to the other boy, who put it under his apron - I immediately went out and collared the prisoner; the other dropped the handkerchiefs, ran out, and escaped.

Prisoner. I never took them.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-130

129. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William James , from his person .

WILLIAM JAMES. I am a servant out of place. On the 9th of November I was in Blackfriars , among the crowd, looking at the Lord Mayor's show; I felt my handkerchief taken from my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner with it hanging out of his coat-pocket; I pulled it from him, and an officer took him.

Prisoner. Q. Can you look me in the face and say you

took it out of my coat-pocket? I had no pocket. A. It was inside his coat, in an inside pocket.

WILLIAM HICKS. I am a labourer. I saw the handkerchief inside the prisoner's coat-pocket, and took him into custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see it taken out of my pocket? A. Yes, it hung down from your side coat-pocket.

JOHN HARRISON. I was one of the new Police. I was at the corner of Bridge-street and heard a noise, looked round, and saw James taking this handkerchief from the prisoner's pocket; I took him in charge, and found this pair of scissars on him - they are very sharp pointed.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was another Police-man there; I should like to know if he would say what this one does -I am a whitesmith, and use the scissars to cut wire for tobacco-stoppers; I was unable to walk ten yards, much more to do such a thing - I had no pocket.

JOHN HARRISON. He had an inside pocket on his left side - I shewed it before the Alderman.

GUILTY . - Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-131

130. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 tumbler-glass, value 6d. , the goods of Theodosius Williams .

THEODOSIUS WILLIAMS. I keep the New Post-office coffee-house, St. Martin's-le-Grand . The prisoner was a customer, and in consequence of suspicion, two gentlemen who frequent the house, watched him. On the 4th of November, as he was leaving the house, I caused him to be stopped - I said, "What have you got here now?" he put his hand to his pocket, and said, "Only a tumbler," and gave it up; he had been in and out two or three times that day - it was in his coat pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not charge me with having taken a magazine? A. I told you that the night previous I suspected you had taken one; you produced the cover of one to me - it was taken from your pocket at the watchhouse; my waiter said he gave it to him, and I was satisfied - I could not have sworn to the tumbler if it had been out of the house; I marked it at the watch-house - I shewed the Magistrate that mark.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am an officer. I was desired to watch, and laid hold of the prisoner at the time, and Mr. Williams asked him what he had got - he said a glass, and that he took it to take medicine out of; he did not say it was not Mr. Williams'.

Prisoner. Q. Do you remember his charging me with taking a magazine? A. He said he missed books and glasses - you produced a book at the watch-house.

The prisoner in a long address, stated that he was in the habit of making extracts from different publications, and about ten days previous to the transaction in question the waiter had given him the magazine cover as a cover for his book, and this, from its similarity to a magazine, might be mistaken for one, and caused some gentleman to inform the prosecutor he was in the habit of taking magazines - that the glass was his own, and was in his pocket for the purpose of taking medicine.

Prisoner to MR. WILLIAMS. Q. Have you other glasses of this size? A. Yes, and some larger and well cut - most of those are gone; I have lost seventeen or eighteen, besides cruets, and a table-cloth.

Q. Have you lost several since my committal? A. Not one.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-132

131. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 2 pewter quart pots, value 1s. , the goods of Charles Stennett ; and that he had been previously convicted of felony.

CHARLES STENNETT . I keep the Blue Last public-house, Little Bell-alley . On the 16th of November, between five and six o'clock, I was in the tap-room, and was called out - I found my boy in the court, holding the prisoner, who had a rush basket in his hand; I could see a pot in it - I took hold of him, and sent for an officer - he begged hard that I would forgive him, and let him go, but I have suffered so much I would not; he called me by name, and said he knew me very well - I found two pots in his basket; he had taken them out of my shed.

JAMES GREY. I am in Mr. Stennett's employ. I saw the prisoner in the shed - he had no business there; I stopped him with the pots in his basket.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

JOHN TOOK . I was constable of Shoreditch last year. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction;(read) I was present when he was tried - he is the same person.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-133

132. GEORGE WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 2 boots, value 20s. , the goods of William Peterson and another.

ROBERT SMITH. On the 3rd of December I was at work in the shop of Mr. William Peterson, a shoemaker , in the Poultry ; I saw the prisoner take two boots from the door, and walk away about fifteen yards - I secured him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18291203-134

133. ANN CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 cloak, value 10s. 6d. , the goods of William Shepherd Love .

WILLIAM SHEPHERD LOVE. I keep a draper's-shop , in Bishopsgate-street . On the 19th of November, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner was brought into my shop by my lad.

HENRY HIGHUSON. I am shopman to Mr. Love. I saw the prisoner take this cloak from the door; I followed and took her with it, behind the houses, about a hundred yards off - she said it was given to her by a man, but I saw her take it; it hung inside the door, fastened with six blanket pins.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up by the side of the door - I did not look at the shop, and did not know it was a linen-draper's.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-135

134. ANN CURRON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 peck of coals, value 5d. , the goods of Micheal Pearson and another.

ROBERT CREBER. On the 1st of December I was on Blackfriars-bridge, and noticed the prisoner going along the barges, taking coals out, and throwing them down by the side of another barge - another woman was coming up

- I saw her several times take some lumps of coals off the barges, and throw them down; she then went and swept them all up into her apron, and wrinsed them - I went and told Mr. Pearson, whose barges they were; he told me to take her - directly I went on the barges, the coal-heavers hallooed out, "Here comes the Police," to give her notice - they then both ran off; I jumped into the mud after them, and took the prisoner - I took the coals from where she had thrown them; it was low water - there was about a peck in that heap, which she had thrown out - I found about a bushel thrown down in another place.

MICHAEL PEARSON . Creber shewed me the barge the coals were taken from - it belonged to me and my partner; we are robbed to a great extent by these women.

Prisoner's Defence. He never saw me take a bit of coal- he perjures himself very much; I had but a peck, and they were stones which the heavers threw over.

GUILTY . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-136

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

135. ABRAHAM LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September . 13 coats, value 10l. , the goods of Jacob Davis , his master.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JACOB DAVIS. I am a tailor and clothes-renovator , and live in St. John-street, Smithfield. On the 7th of September the prisoner was in my service, and I sent him to receive thirteen great coats from Aaron Simmons - he did not return; I did not see him again for seventeen or eighteen days - he was then in custody: I have not been able to find the coats. The prisoner was remanded for a fortnight, and was discharged.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to swear that from the time you sent him, you did not see him again for seventeen or eighteen days? A. I am not sure to a day: I will say fourteen days - he never came to me on the same day with a letter in his hand, crying, and stating that he had been robbed: I do not know Richard Baker - I never saw him, nor heard of him, to my knowledge; no person came with him to me that day, who found him crying in the street - I never heard of it; there was no letter produced to me - I did not see him till he was in custody; I did not try to get any money from his father to settle this - I do not know Samuel Pope; I do not really know that I was ever in a public-house called the Fountain; I have been in a public-house in Little Catherine-street, Strand, which the prisoner's father and several of his acquaintance frequent - I have seen them there; I do not think it is called the Darkee - there are a great many houses of ill-fame about it; I go there to dine sometimes, when I have been at sales - I saw the prisoner's father there - I never met him to talk on this business; I never said if he would pay me 10l. I would not prosecute - it is about three years since I took the benefit of the Insolvent Act; I was remanded for three months, but not for a fraud, I will swear- but when I was arrested and sent to prison, my friends offered what little property I had to my creditors, and they would not accept of it; my effects had produced 30l. or 40l., and as I was arrested for a mere trifle, and did not owe above 200l., my attorney advised me to take the proceeds, and support myself and family in prison; the Commissioners did not state that it was for a fraud - it was merely for appropriating this money to my own use; my attorney was Mr. Watkins - I do not know where he lives, nor where he did live; when I went into the prison I was beset by prisoners and attornies; I employed Mr. Watkins, and by his advice I appropriated the money - I never asked where Watkins lived; he was in the prison every day - I do not know his Christian name; the prisoner was eight years in my service - he will be out of his time in March: he was discharged after three examinations, and has surrendered to-day - I afterwards went before the Grand Jury, and got the bill, because the Magistrate had not investigated the case; all the examinations did not last more than three minutes, I will warrant - the first time I merely stated I sent him to receive some work, and he never returned: the Magistrate said, "Have you found it?" I said No - he said "Step down," and remanded him for a week; on the second occasion he said, "Have you found your property?" I said No - he said, "I will remand him for a fortnight;" on the third time I had not found them; he said, "I don't think you use due diligence - I must discharge the prisoner;" he was hurried out, and before I could explain he was gone - I believe he came to my house the day after he was discharged, but I was not at home; the Magistrate did not mention any thing about my taking him back; I believe I did see him the next day, in Holborn, and a person who was with him, told me he had been to my house.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What did the prisoner come to you for? A. To ask if I would take him back, or give up his indentures.

COURT. Q. You say you were sent to prison for a mere trifle? A. Yes, I was arrested for 12l. 10s. - I owed about 220l.; I did not pay my creditors any thing.

AARON SIMMONS . I am a publican, and live in Middlesex-street, Whitechapel - I deal in clothes; I had a shop in Monmouth-street. The prisoner came to me on the 7th of September, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, for thirteen great coats, which I delivered to him myself; they were put into a bag - I have not seen them since.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.Have you any interest in the house the prosecutor lives in? A. Yes - it is in my name; I pay rent and taxes - he is in partnership with me; he conducts the business, and I have the profits, but his renovating business is his own - I have no connection with that; I pay him for that - I have known the prisoner from a child; I never heard any thing against him, except some nonsensical things of his master.

HENRY LEVY. I live in Petticoat-lane. I know the prisoner; I met him on the 7th of September, near Pickett-street, St. Clement's, with a bag on his shoulder, which was a little broken, and I saw the appearance of part of a coat - this was between ten and eleven o'clock.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that as he was going through Sun-street he stopped to rest his bag, when a gentleman, in appearance, offered him a shilling to take a note to Mr. Brooks, Peter-street, Sun-street; he left the bag with him, and on finding Brooks did not live there, he returned, and the bag and man were gone - that he met one Baker, who accom

panied him to his master, and informed him of his less - that he replied if he did not produce the bag he should give him in charge; he was alarmed, and went to Birmingham to enlist as a soldier, but was advised there to surrender to his master; which he did, and was apprehended.

RICHARD BAKER . I have known the prisoner two years; I saw him on the Monday of Bartholomew-fair, about half-past eleven o'clock - he appeared in great distress, and was crying very much; in consequence of what he told me, I went to a clothes shop in St. John-street, which he said was his master's - I saw the prosecutor there; the prisoner said that was his master - he told him, in my presence, that he had lost his clothes, bag and all; that he had gone somewhere with a letter for a gentleman, and left the things with him - his master said he would stand no such nonsense, and that if he did not go back and fetch the clothes or the man, he would send him to Newgate, and have him tried for his life; I went back with the poor boy, down Sun-street, Bishopsgate, and down a long court, where the women sit with fish - we inquired about every where; he gave me a description of the man, but we could find no such person, nor the things - he had a letter directed to Mr. Brooks, which he gave into his master's hands before my face, saying that was the letter the gentleman had given him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.What business are you? A. I am porter to a broker; I live in Marquis-court, Drury-lane - I work for Mr. John Tucker Angel-court, Strand; I have been in his service rather better than nine years. On the 7th of September, I was going to Goulston-street, Whitechapel, for him to draw a bill; I know it was on a Monday, in Bartholomew-fair - it was about half-past eleven o'clock, or it might be rather latter; I did not know about the prisoner being taken up - I heard he had been before a Magistrate; I dare say that is five weeks ago - I heard it in the tap-room of the Fountain; the prisoner's father was not the person who told me - I never heard it from his mouth, for he and I are not friends; I never speak to him - he subpoenaed me three days ago to come here; I never went before the Magistrate - I did not hear of this before the end of September; it might be a month or five weeks ago - upon my oath I saw the prosecutor before I served him with this notice to produce the letter (looking at it) I do not know who served this other notice - I cannot say but what I might serve it; I served only one, which I received from the prisoner's father.

COURT. Q. Do you mean you do not know whether it was this notice or the other? A. I think it was the other; I cannot read or write very well - I wrote my name on a copy of it, which I kept.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Have you got the copy? A. No; I received the notice from the prisoner's father, in Russell-street, near Bow-street - he said, "I want you to go and serve this notice;" I said, "What notice;" he said "A notice of trial;" we had not been very bad friends, but were not good friends - I was at the Fountain this morning with Mr. Pope; I do not know that I know Sergeant's-inn, in Chancery-lane - I never was bail for any body in my life; I do not know when I was at the prisoner's father's last - it may be a month or six weeks ago; I swear I have not been fifty times, nor twenty times, nor three times within the last two months - I am not regularly in Mr. Tucker's employ; I sit to be employed - he puts me in possession, and to do other jobs; no person was with me when I saw the prisoner - I was coming along Sun-street, and I met him; I saw no one but the prosecutor when I went to the shop, in St. John-street - it is two doors from the corner of a street there; I never went to him to complain of his having prosecuted the boy - he was a stranger to me; I do not know that I ever saw him twice before - I did not know before that the prisoner was in his service; when he had explained this to his master, we went away together, to where old Bethlehem was; I went on with him, till I told him I could not wait any longer - I did not see a person that day of the name of Michael Davies , to my knowledge; I do not know him - I know this gentleman (Mr. Davies) I do not know that it is Michael Davies ; I have known him these twelve months - I swear I have not known him ten years, nor five years; I understood he was an attorney - I do not know who delivered the brief to Mr. Phillips; I do not know what a brief is; I saw some papers - I was not in company with Mr. Davies when he gave him the brief.

COURT. Q. Did you see him deliver any paper to Mr. Phillips? A. I did not, to the best of my knowledge - he might have delivered it before my face, but I did not take notice of it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know Mr. Davies' handwriting? A. No - I have not seen him write a hundred times, nor fifty times, nor ten times; I did not come with Mr. Davies to this Court to-day - I came with Mr. Levy.

ABRAHAM ISAACS. I am in the service of Mr. McGwinnes, of Peter-street, Sun-street, Bishopsgate. I remember the prisoner bringing a letter to my master's house one day in September, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day - it was directed for Mr. Brooks; he had no one with him, and nothing in his hand but the letter -I answered there was no such person there, and he ran away quite confused.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.When was this? A. One day in Bartholomew-fair time - I do not know Mr. Brooks; he asked for such a person - I know Richard Baker; I cannot say that it was not on the 3rd of September - I am quite sure it was one day of Bartholomew-fair; I do not know what day it ended this year - Mr. Levy came to me with the prisoner, and asked if such a person came there with a letter for Mr. Brooks; this was about a fortnight ago - I did not go before the Magistrate; I had not been acquainted with the prisoner before.

SAMUEL POPE . I know the Fountain public-house, in Little Catherine-street. I do not know that I have seen the prosecutor there above once or twice - he is the master of the prisoner, and he said in my presence, that if the prisoner's father would pay 10l. for the goods he would not prosecute him, but if he would not, he would prosecute him as far as the law would admit of - his father replied he would not give him one farthing.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When was this? A. About three months ago - I cannot be certain to the time; I do not think it was six months ago - I cannot tell whether it was or no; I believe it was about the beginning of Bartholomew-fair - I cannot justly tell whether it is nearer six months than three; I am sure it is as much as three

months - Mr. Levy was with me, and two or three respectable gentlemen; I do not know their names - Baker was there, and heard it; that I will swear - Baker is no acquaintance of mine, but I have seen him; it was rather a darkish day - I believe it was on a Monday, and we were in the Darkee; I swear it was not on a Sunday - I am a boot-maker, and live in Conduit-street, Long-acre; I keep a house and shop; I had business with Levy at the Darkee - that was the reason I went there; the prisoner was not there - if he had his master would have been ready to take him; the 10l. was not produced, but the prosecutor said if they would give it him he would drop the prosecution, and take the lad - he came in, and said that. the prisoner had decamped with 10l. worth of goods; his father was very much burt about it - we were going to have something to drink, and had a glass of ale afterwards.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you make any note of the time? A. No - I have lived in the neighbourhood where I do now for these thirty years.

MR. COPE. Bartholomew-fair ended on the 7th of September - it was proclaimed this year on a Thursday, and closed on a Monday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-137

136. CARL ADOLPH MARYIANSKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 6 shoes, value 13s. , the goods of John Walter Shields .

The prisoner, being a German, had the evidence interpreted.

JOHN WALTER SHIELDS . I am a shoemaker , of High-street, Shadwell . I lost six shoes on the 23rd of November - I did not see them taken; I had seen them on the Saturday evening, and missed them on the Monday morning - I heard that the prisoner had been to my shop on the Sunday, but I did not see him; I found two of these shoes at Colchin's - they are all my property.

ELIZABETH COLCHIN. I am a servant to Mr. Josephs. who keeps a shop in Brook-street, and I sell for him - I suppose it is half a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's. The prisoner brought these two odd shoes to me on Monday, the 23rd of November, and I bought them.

BOVD SILVESTER. I went, and took the prisoner - I found 2s. 6d. on him; he said he had got 8s. from his master. the captain - he afterwards said he had sold two shoes at Colchin's, and took me there; I took him to the houses where he had been offering them, and at last he took me to the witness - she said she gave half a crown for them; I afterwards went to the Calcutta - she was lying at Stone-stairs, and found two shoes, which he had sold for 2s. 6d.

NATHAN PHILLIPS . I am a salesman, and live in Shadwell. On the Sunday morning, about half-past eight o'clock the prisoner came and asked me to buy two shoes; I said, "What do you want for them?" he said 2s.; he said he wanted the money - I said I would give him 18d.; he went out, came back again, and said I might have them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-138

137. HENRICH AUGUST HEYER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 jacket, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Ann Kirwin .

The prisoner, being a German, had the evidence explained by an interpreter.

ANN KIRWIN. I keep a chandler's-shop , in Rosemary-lane . The prisoner slept at my house on the evening of the 17th of November, in the same room with my little boy, but not in the same bed - in the morning he got up, and went out before I was up; this jacket is my little boy's, and was in the room the night before - there was a square of glass out, and I put the jacket to fill up the hole; I did not miss it till the officer brought it in.

DAVID DAVIS . I am a salesman, of Shadwell. The prisoner came to my shop on the Monday morning to sell this jacket; I said I did not think it was his own - he said he had bought it of his landlady; I said it was not likely he should buy a school-boy's jacket - he ran out of the shop, and said he could bring the person; I stepped to the door, saw the Police, and had him secured.

GEORGE REYNOLDS . I took the prisoner as he was running - this jacket the witness gave me.

Prisoner. I am very poor; I took it through want.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-139

138. ESTHER CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 sheet, value 11s. , the goods of John Ransom .

HARRIET RANSOM. I am the wife of John Ransom - he keeps the Three Swedish Crowns, in Old Gravel-lane . The prisoner came to our house between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; after she had gone I went into the parlour, and missed a sheet, which had been on a chair behind the parlour-door - I went to her house, and found her examining my sheet; part of my initials are on it - I have no doubt she had picked part of them out; I took it from her, and charged her with taking it - she said she found it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.What situation was she in in your house? A. She came for some gin; there is a small passage between the bar and the parlour, where the sheet had been left - while I was sitting in the bar I could not see a person passing from the parlour; it was but a few minutes before I missed the sheet, and there was no other person there - I had folded the sheets, and laid them in the parlour ten or fifteen minutes before; she lives but a short distance from me.

JOHN ADAMS. I am the officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 57. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-140

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

139. ABRAHAM HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November, 1 pair of spurs, value 15s. , the goods of Edward Drake Manners .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD DRAKE MANNERS , ESQ. I live at Kenton-park, Sunbury . On the 1st of November I had a pair of plated spurs in my servants hall; the prisoner came that morning with a parcel - I heard some misunderstanding about the price, and I spoke to him; I did not see my spurs at that time - he shortly after left the house; he was taken by me and my brother, and given into custody.

SAMUEL WISTERTON. I am a servant to Mr. Manners. The prisoner came to the house, and stood near where the spurs were, in the servants' hall; I afterwards pursued him, and saw him throw these spurs away - my mas

ter took them up; I am certain these spurs were in the hall when the prisoner came there.

MR. ROBERT MANNERS. I am the prosecutor's brother. I went after the prisoner, and saw the spurs picked up - I did not see him throw them down.(Property produced and sworn to.)

STEPHEN OBORN . I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I went with a parcel, stopped there and had some beer; when I came out they pursued me, and one of the gentlemen came up, struck me, accused me of having the spurs, and said I had thrown them out of my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-141

140. WILLIAM INWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 8 live pigs, price 8l. , the property of Smith Henry Bigg .

MR. ESPANIZE conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HALFACRE. I am in the service of Mr. Bigg, of Harrow - he had eight pigs. On the evening of the 2nd of November, about six o'clock, I locked them up - about six o'clock the next morning I found the sty had been broken open, and they were all gone; I saw them afterwards at Brentford market, which is about seven miles from Sunbury - I think it was about ten or eleven o'clock; there was no person with them - I had seen the prisoner on the Sunday at Sunbury; the pigs were lost on Monday night, or early on Tuesday morning.

GEORGE HALFACRE. On the 3rd of November I went to Brentford market with William White , and saw Mr. Bigg's pigs; we found the prisoner in Gunsbury-lane, Ealing - he said he had been hired to drive the pigs, that he had sold them, and was going away; he said the man, who hired him, was gone, but he did not know where - that he had brought the pigs from Willesden-green; he said, "Don't hurt me."

WILLIAM WHITE. I was at Brentford market, and saw the prisoner there - I helped him to put eight pigs into the pen; they remained there till a man came - he offered him three of them for 15s., the man thought he had not come by them honestly.

COURT. Q. What was the weight of the pigs? A.Some of them, I suppose, was seven stones - he dealt with them as if they were his own.

MR. ESPANIZE. Q. What did the prisoner say? A. He said he could show the man he brought them from, and the gentleman and he went away together - after a little while the witness came and owned them; he and I went and caught the prisoner - he said, "You can't hurt me, as you have got your pigs;" he said nothing else.

THOMAS FISHLOCK . I saw the prisoner with the pigs; he brought them there that morning.

SMITH HENRY BIGG. The pigs were my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to drive them.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-142

141. JAMES WILSON , THE YOUNGER, was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 21st of November , 22 yards of crape, value 24s., the goods of Joseph Gront and others, from some evil-disposed person; he well knowing it to be stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BAYLIS . I live in South-street, Ponder's-end, and am in partnership with Joseph Grout and others; we are crape manufacturers - this crape is ours, and is worth upwards of 24s.; we had not missed it - we allow no perquisites; this is not in the state in which we send it out - we cut off about fifty yards, and send it to London; the prisoner's father was in our employ, but he absconded the morning after the robbery - the prisoner had worked for us some years, but left us about a year ago.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you miss any property? A. No; we have sold considerable quantities of the same description as this - I cannot swear this might not have been sold.

WILLIAM DAVIES . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the evening of the 21st of November I met the prisoner about half-past seven o'clock, with a small bundle under his arm - I asked what he had got there; he said a shirt and a pair of stockings - he was coming towards London; I took the bundle from him - I took him to the toll-house, and on the way he told me that there was a little crape in it; I opened it at the toll-house, and it contained this crape only - he then told me he had received it from his father at the Bull, at Tottenham; that he had asked his father for a little crape to present to a friend in town - he said his father worked at a crape manufactory, and that it was his perquisite - he told me he would give me a yard if I wanted it; the tollman knew him and his father, and he told me he had no doubt it was all right, as he and his father worked in a crape manufactory for a Mr. Grout, who lived just by, and I might go and inquire of him - here are six remnants of crape.

Cross-examined. Q. Has not the father absconded? A. Yes.

JOHN SHEPHERD. I am a Bow-street patrol. I was with Davies, and what he has stated is correct.

ALFRED LANGFORD . I am a clerk to Messrs. Grout and Baylis; there are no perquisites allowed in their factory.

Cross-examined. Q. You never knew of any? A. No - men are allowed to work over time, for which they are paid; I believe this crape to have been theirs - I cannot say it had not been sold.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw my father on the Saturday, and he gave me some money to get a quart of gin and take to him at the Bull - he said he would give me a shirt and a pair of stockings; he gave me this parcel - I did not know what was in it.

MR. BAYLIS. I have given pieces of crape to the prisoner's friends; they are very respectable.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-143

142. ELIZABETH CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 bed-gown, value 1s., and 1 frock, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Ladd .

ELIZABETH LADD . I am the wife of John Ladd, of Field-street, Kensington - the prisoner lodged in my house, and boarded there; I lost these things from my parlour - I am a laundress, and had them to wash; the prisoner used to wash for me.

TIMOTHY PERRY . I am shopman to Mr. Wells, a pawnbroker, of High-street, Kensington. I have a frock pawned by the prisoner on the 10th of November, and a bed-gown on the 11th.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged with her for a month - she gave me 1s. 6d. per week to wash and iron, and do what was wanted; she went out on Lord Mayor's day, and left me no victuals for that day and the next, and I pawned them to get some bread and cheese.

ELIZABETH LADD . I did go to the Lord Mayor's show, but I gave her six pennyworth of halfpence and left 1lb. of beef for her dinner - I never employed her to pawn any property; when I returned, about five o'clock that evening, she was very much intoxicated - I saw she had brought home two family's linen and I said, "I hope you have not lost any;" she said, it was all there for me - I asked her for the bill, and found there was a sheet missing; I went to inquire for it, and then found these things, which I had not missed.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18291203-144

143. EDWARD CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 cask, value 20s., and 8 gallons of brandy-wash, value 40s. , the goods of William Spicer .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM SPICER . I keep the Tower wine-vaults, Lumber-court St. Giles' . I had a brandy piece out at my door, which contained 141 gallons; there was about eight gallons of brandy-wash in it, which is of use in the trade - I saw the piece at my door on the morning of the 15th of October, and in the evening it was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not the prisoner taken up? A. Yes, and brought to my house; but I was not at home, and he was let go - he came afterwards to get a glass of brandy or rum and water; he had a new jacket and smock-frock on - a witness came in and said, "This is the man who took the cask;" and I had him taken directly - I went to his lodgings, where his children were, with a search-warrant; I believe there was a fustian jacket mentioned to the children - he had not desired me to go for a jacket, but when I saw his new jacket I asked where his jacket was; I believe the children said they had not seen his jacket for some time, and they did not know what he had done with it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He came to your house, was not that a fortnight afterwards? A. Yes; I went up to him and said, "How dare you take that cask from my door? and what did you do with the brandy-wash in it?" "Me!" said he, and turned as pale as death - a witness came in and said, "That is the man I saw rolling the cask along, and no doubt he thought it was brandy:" we made search for a jacket and a frock - no one else has been taken up on suspicion.

JOHN LENTON . I am a pork-butcher, and live in Lumber-court. I remember a cask being at Mr. Spicer's door on the 15th of October - I saw the prisoner take it; I am certain of his person - he had a short smock-frock on and a jacket under it, which looked like a fustian jacket; he turned it about as if he had bought it, or was going to buy it - this was about four o'clock in the afternoon; he did not take it from the door.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see him take it from the door? A. No; I do not know whether people are in the habit of looking at casks, when they are put out.

THOMAS BURTON. I am a fishmonger, and live in Lumber-court. I saw the prisoner roll the cask down the court, about ten minutes or a quarter after four o'clock - he rolled it by the dead wall; I did not see it afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. How was he dressed? A. He had a short smock-frock on, and a dark waistcoat - I saw no jacket; I did not hear Mrs. Spicer say he was not the man - I was before the Magistrate when serjeant Riley brought the prisoner there; he was discharged because there was another fishmonger who said he did not think he was the man.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. At the time he was brought there was Mrs. Spicer at home? A. Yes; Mr. Spicer was not- Mrs. Spicer said she knew nothing about it.

WALTER POWEL. I saw the prisoner, on the 15th, take the cask from the door, roll it down the passage, and down St. Martin's-lane.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before? A. No - I had not seen him for a long time before, but swear he is the man.

FRANCIS MACE . I am a constable, and took the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell the children that their father had sent you for the fustian jacket? A. I asked where their father's jacket was, and said perhaps he would want it.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring his innocence.

MRS. SPICER. I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner was brought to our house by Riley, about a fortnight before he was taken; I did not say the prisoner was not the person who took the brandy cask, for I did not see it - he was let go.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-145

144. DAVID DAVIS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 4th of September , at St. Marylebone , 1 watch, value 20l.; 1 brooch, value 10s.; 1 seal, value 1l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 1 silver spoon, value 7s., and 3 rings, value 40s., the goods of Alexander Cabbell Mann , which said goods had been lately before stolen by some evil-disposed person, he well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. DUNBAR (on behalf of the prosecution) declined offering evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-146

145. WILLIAM BATCHELOR and HENRY TURNER were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 quart pot, value 1s., and 12 pint pots, value 10s. , the goods of George Hambrook .

GEORGE HAMBROOK . I keep a public-house , in White Conduit-terrace . I know these pots to be mine.

ROBERT WESTLAKE . I am servant to Mr. Hambrook. On the 21st of November I saw the two prisoners at the corner of Gainsford-place; I took twelve pint pots and one quart from them - I had tied the pots up against a rail, and when I came back I saw Turner untie the string, Batchelor took up his apron, and tooks the pots in - they bolted away together; they are all my master's pots except one - I know nothing of the prisoners.

BATCHELOR - GUILTY . Aged 21.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-147

146. ELEANOR BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 13s.; 1 collar, value 2s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 8d.; 1 apron, value 9d., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Mary Rowan ; and 1 blanket, value 3s. , the goods of Mary Fyning .

MARY ROWAN. I live in Whitecross-street , in the same house with the prisoner. I went out about eleven o'clock on the 14th of November, and returned at two; the prisoner was then gone - I left my box locked; when I came back it was broken open, and the property stated was gone- Mary Fyning lost a blanket; she is the landlady - I had only known the prisoner four days: I have found a pair of stockings, a shift, and an apron, which were on the prisoner when she was taken, at nine o'clock the same evening - I found nothing else.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lend me these articles? A. No.

MARY FYNING . I am the landlady of the house. I lost a blanket and a handkerchief out of the same room, in which the prisoner slept - she took the lodging by the week; she was only there four days: I have never found my property.

PHILIP COX . I was the night-officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house at ten o'clock, and these articles were found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged with this old lady for a month, and kept her: I went out, and when I returned they accused me of stealing these things.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-148

147. BETSY BRACKINGBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 cornelian stone, value 3s.; 1 amethyst, value 5s.; 1 topaz, value 2s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of John James Sturz .

DAVID HARDING. I know the house of Mr. Mitchell - it is near the Regent's-park; the prisoner was a servant there - I used to go and clean shoes, and do other work. One Monday, early in November, she gave me a bundle, which was afterwards opened, and property found in it; she told me to take it home, and take care of it - I took it home, and put it into a large box; she said she was going to leave her situation, and wished me to look out for a lodging for a single person; the next morning she gave me a little parcel screwed up in a piece of newspaper, which contained the articles stated in the indictment; I opened them, looked at them, and then told what I had seen - she was taken into custody; this is the property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long has she lived there? A. I believe about four months; she never gave me a pair of shoes, except in the bundle - she once gave me an old pair of man's slippers; I did not desire her to take them - she never lived in my house; I was no acquaintance of hers - the slippers she gave me were not worth a penny; they were quite mouldy, and had been lying about the house - I thought they might belong to her - they were of no use to me; I burnt them - I have occasionally been in one of the bed-rooms.

JOHN MANNING . I took the prisoner, and produce the property.

JOHN JAMES STURZ . I have the second floor in the house in which the prisoner lived; she did not wait on me, but I believe she made the beds - this property is mine; the cornelian is engraved with my initials - I know the other articles; they were all in the bed-room - two of these stones were in a drawer, but I generally left the key in the drawer.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Harding? A. Yes, he cleaned my boots - I did not lose any shoes but those that are here; I had none that were only fit to be burnt - he only comes into my bed-room when I am in bed, to bring up my things.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-149

148. BETSY BRACKINGBURY was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 coruelian heart, value 1s.; 1 cornelian cross, value 1s.; 1 prayer-book, value 1s.; 2 petticoats, value 4s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 3d.; 1 cap, value 3d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s., and 2 yards of muslin, value 1s. , the goods of Fanny Hassell .

JOHN MANNING . I produce a bundle, containing this property, which I received from Harding.

DAVID HARDING. I clean boots and shoes at Mr. Mitchell's house; this is the first bundle which the prisoner gave me; she told me to take it home, and take care of it, as she was going to leave her situation, and wished to live with a single person - I told Mr. Mitchell of it the next day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not a talk in the house about something being lost before? A. Not that I know of; I do not know whether she had a box to put this bundle into - I did not ask her if she had a bedroom of her own; I took it home, and the next day she gave me the other - I hardly ever changed a word with her; I never did so for any servant-maid before - I had no great regard for her; I have been in the bed-room many a time - I never said I would have brought down the shoes myself, but Mr. Sturz was so sharp; I do not know whether the slippers I burnt would fit Mr. Sturz - there is another gentleman lives in the house; I generally go between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and sometimes in the evening.

FANNY HASSELL . I lived in the house - the prisoner had access to my property; this property is all mine - it had been taken from my bed-room.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you miss it? A. On the Monday, about twelve o'clock; I spoke of it in the house - the prisoner continued there till she was taken up.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven years, to commence from the expiration of her former sentence .

Reference Number: t18291203-150

149. WILLIAM BILBY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 coat, value 3s.; 2 waistcoats, value 5s.; 1 pair of compasses, value 6d.; 3 punches, value 6d., and 3 awls, value 6d. , the goods of John Sweet .

JOHN SWEET . I am a dealer in harness , and live in Cottage-lane, City-road - the prisoner lodged with me for thirteen weeks, On the 26th of October I called him up, and left him the key to go in and out while I was in Smithfield-market; I saw the prisoner in the market - I went home at two o'clock, and missed these articles; I found my coat at a clothes shop, in Liquorpond-street - I found nothing else, but he told the Magistrate and me that he had sold them, and spent the money - I had never given him

leave to take my things, and my wife was in the country at the time.

ELIZABETH RASELL. I am the wife of Richard Rasell, and keep a shop in Liquorpond-street; a man came to my shop about three weeks before the officer came - he said he was on the tramp from the country, and he must sell the coat to get through the night - this is the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-151

150. MARIA BEAVIS and REBECCA MARKHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 20 yards of cotton, value 10s. , the goods of James Brown .

WILLIAM SHEATH. I am in the employ of Mr. James Brown, a linen-draper , of High-street, Shadwell . On the 3rd of November I saw the two prisoners outside the shop, looking in at the window for some time; they then took the pins out of a piece of printed cotton at the door, and folded it up - they went away, and came back to it several times: at last Beavis took it, and walked away - the other was close to her; I followed and took them - they did not say any thing; this is the cotton - there are about twenty yards of it; they moved it several times, to get it into a smaller compass.

Beavis' Defence. He took it and did something to it, and then he brought it out in a small compass, as if he wanted one of us to take it.

Markham's Defence. If I had been guilty I should have resisted; I was standing at the window, looking at an intoxicated man - the gentleman came out, and took me, and instead of using me as a Christian, he used violence; he brought out a string, and tied us both together.

BEAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

MARKHAM - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-152

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

151. JANE COLEMAN and ELLEN CONNER were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 seal, value 10s.; 1 watch-key, value 3d.; 1 piece of ribbon, value 1d., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Peter Tanson , from his person .

PETER TANSON . I am a ship-carpenter . I was in Shadwell on the 8th of November, at nine o'clock at night; I met the two prisoners in the street - I had seen Coleman before, selling fish in the highway; they asked me to give them something to drink - I had a little to drink myself, but not much; we had a pint of beer and a quartern of gin - I remained with them about ten minutes; while we were in the public-house the watchman came, and asked what time it was; I took out my watch, and said it was half-past nine - he told me to put my watch into my pocket, and take care of it; the two prisoners went out of the house with me, one on each arm - we went down the street, and they went and had something more to drink at another house, but before we got there my watch was taken from my pocket by Conner; they both ran away - I pursued, but did not come up with them; I called the officer, and he got one of them on the Monday, and the other three days afterwards - I did not see them again till I was at the Thames Police; I was not drunk that evening - this is my watch, it has a private mark inside it; this is the seal, and this is my handkerchief, but my name has been picked out of it; there was another seal which has not been found.

JAMES LICKFOLD. I am a watchman. On Sunday evening I saw the two women and Tanson on my beat; I told them to go about their business, and let the man alone- I am certain they are the women; they went into the King's Arms public-house - I went in to get half a pint of porter, that I might know them again; I asked the prosecutor what time it was - he pulled out his watch, and said it was half-past nine; I said, "You are sadly out of the way, it wants but ten minutes to eleven" - I told him to put up his watch, and went out; and at five minutes before eleven o'clock they came out.

CHARLES TICKLE. On the morning of Lord Mayor's day I met the prosecutor in the street; he was in trouble, and I asked what was the matter - he described what he had lost, and described Coleman; I said I would get her in about two hours - I went into Old Gravel-lane, and took her with this handkerchief round her neck; I took her to the public-house, and the pot-boy said she was one of them.

JAMES WAYLING. I am an officer of the Thames Police. I was with the other officers, and asked Coleman the name of the woman who was with her; she said she would tell me, and she would not get herself into trouble - that it was Ellen Conner, who lived in Seven Star-alley; that Conner had taken the watch to Bermondsey, and pawned it for 15s., and had pawned the seal at the back of the Borough-market for 5s., and all that she had given her was a little tea and sugar.

JAMES WILSON. I am shopman to Mr. Roberts, a pawnbroker, of Park-street, Borough. I have a seal which was pawned by a girl, in the name of Ann Conner, on the 9th of November, but I do not recollect the person.

ALEXANDER MAYESBACK . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Tooley-street. I produce a watch, pawned with me by Ellen Conner, in the name of Mary Anderson .(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner Conner. I am not having a fair trial; they are all swearing false against me.

Coleman's Defence. I had been at a funeral; I met this young woman with a man very much in liquor - they asked if I would take part of a pint of porter; I went into a public-house with her and a man whom I do not know - they had a pint of ale and a quartern of gin; the watchman came in, and I gave the glass of gin to the watchman; the woman then asked the man if he was going to have any thing more to drink - he said he had no more money; I went on to Fox's-lane, bade them good night, and went home; the next morning I met her, and she said she was going to get an affidavit of a gold watch, and asked me to go with her - I said I could not, but I was going for some little things, and I would wait till she came back; I waited, and she said, "I will make you a present of this handkerchief;" I put it on my neck - she said she had pawned a watch for 15s., and a seal for 4s., and while we were there the watchman came and took me, but she got away; I kept the handkerchief on my neck, and never gave it a thought - my friends came to see me, and I could have given it to them; the officer came and asked me the name of this woman, and I told him - the officers know me and my mother, and know that I work hard.

Prisoner Conner. What she says is all false; I know nothing about it, or her either.

CHARLES TICKLE . I know Coleman as a hard-working woman; she sells fish and fruit about the streets - I never knew any thing against her before.

JAMES WAYLING. I have known Coleman many years, an honest, industrious woman; I never knew her in any trouble.

COLEMAN - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Judgment Respited .

CONNER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18291203-153

152. JOSEPH POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 watch, value 50l.; 2 half-crowns, 10 shillings, and 10 sixpences, the property of John Michael Goodere , from his person .

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MICHAEL GOODERE, ESQ. I live at Llandovery, in Carmarthenshire. On the 7th of November I was in town, and went to the Tavistock coffee-house, with a friend, and had supper; I afterwards had a glass of punch - I took out a sovereign to pay, but my friend would not allow me; I desired the waiter to call a coach - I stepped down and saw the coach; I took out my watch, and it was near twelve o'clock - I told the coachman to drive to the Gloucester coffee-house, Piccadilly ; when we arrived there he opened the door and I asked the fare, the coachman said, 18d. - I felt, and missed my silver; I said, "Good God! I have lost my silver" - I looked down, and found part of my watch-guard hanging to my neck; I said, "You have robbed me" - the prisoner, who was the coachman , said,"I rob you! it must be that woman you took up;" I said,"What woman? I took up no woman" - he said, "Yes, I will take you to the place where I sat her down, it was in Portman-place;" I took an officer with me, and we went - when we got there, he got down, and said, "Oh, your honour, I have forgotten the place;" I told the Police-man to take the number of the coach, and the prisoner was taken the next day - I have never seen my watch since; it was of immense value to me as a family-piece.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you dined? A. Yes, at the Gloucester hotel, with a friend; we had only a bottle of port between us - after supper I believe I had two glasses of punch; they were rather large - I did not walk to Charles-street; I never walk after dinner - I had been fagging all the morning, and felt tired, but not affected by what I had drank; I believe I went to sleep immediately I got into the coach - the windows were closed; I did not feel any person in the coach - I swear I did not speak to any person in my road at all, nor to any women; there was a man examined, named Michael Fowler, who was called by the prisoner - a person might have got into the coach, and I not have known it; I did not say any thing about a sovereign, or of having lost any -I put seven sovereigns into my pocket in the morning, but had laid out most of them; the watch has not been found - I was sober; I told Mr. Rawlinson, the Magistrate, I was the worse for what I had.

COURT. Q. How lately had you seen your watch? A.About half a second before I got into the carriage; it was fastened with a guard, and the guard was broken - it was but a common guard.

THOMAS SMITH . I am head waiter at the Gloucester coffee-house, Piccadilly. On the night of the 7th of November Mr. Goodere came home there a little after one o'clock; when I opened the door he was out of the coach, and said to me, "Smith, I have been robbed - I have lost all my money and my watch;" he had the ring and the guard in his hand - I said, "Have you indeed, Sir? has the coach been searched?" the prisoner replied, "Yes; but the gentleman has had a woman in the coach, and I can take you to the place where I set her down;" Mr. Goodere said, "Smith, get your hat and go with me;" I said, "I can't well go, Sir, but here is the Police-man, he will be of more use than I shall" - the prisoner said he saw the gentleman with the watch in his hand when he got into the coach.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not Mr. Goodere a little tipsy? A. He had been drinking, I dare say, but I thought him sober enough to know what he was doing; I did not help him up to his bed-room - the prisoner got on the box again and drove from the door, with the prosecutor and the officer inside; I did not see any coachman or cuds about, nor hear any thing said about sovereigns.

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM. I am a Police officer. On the morning of the 8th of November, the prosecutor called me, and said the prisoner had been robbing him of some money and a watch; the prisoner said, "It was not me, it was a lady he took up on the way, I can take you to the house she went into" - he acknowledged that he saw the watch in the gentleman's hand, but he gave no further account of it; the prosecutor desired me to go in the coach, and we went to Portman-place; when there, I said to the prisoner,"Which is the house the lady went into?" he said, "That I really can't say;" I said, "I am an officer, I insist upon searching you,' which I did, but found nothing; I searched the coach, and the prosecutor said, "Take the number, and ask where he lives;" I went to the address which the prisoner gave me the next morning, but could not find him - he was taken by a brother officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you help the gentleman into the coach? A. No, he got in: it was a chariot - I do not know whether the prisoner looked at the houses or not.

Witnesses for the Defence.

MICHAEL FOWLER . I drive a cab. I know the prisoner; on the night of the 7th of November I saw him, and spoke to him - he had a gentleman in his carriage, speaking to a lady outside; I did not see the gentleman's face, but I had just put down a fare at the end of a court - I went and spoke to the prisoner - the gentleman was then speaking to the lady, and he desired the prisoner to let the lady into the coach, which he did, and they drove on towards Piccadilly: I am certain the prisoner is the man; it was a quarter-past twelve o'clock.

COURT. Q.Where did you see this? A. In Coventry-street; I had put down a gentleman at the end of Coventry-court.

MR. DOWLING. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? A. I cannot tell; I have seen him at different ranks, perhaps a couple of years - I do not know the number of his coach; I am sure it was not half-past twelve o'clock, because I had noticed the time, as we always do when we take up a fare; I had taken up my gentleman in Bond-street, at twelve or a few minutes past - my face was 1s.; I cannot swear what sort of a lady it was - I took very

little notice of her; she was dressed very gay - I know there was a cloak of some dark colour; it was a very fine night - I asked the prisoner how he got on: there might be a few more words said by us - I did not speak to him two minutes, only just while he got down and let the lady inside; one of his horses was a chesnut, and the other a black one - I cannot tell the colour of the lady's bonnet or hat; I was examined before the Magistrate, and stated these facts; the Magistrate did tell me I was tipsy - I believe he said he would not believe what I said; I did say I could not tell whether it was a coach or a chariot, but now I know it was the same coach or landau that he always drives - I cannot tell why I could not tell the Magistrate.

WILLIAM WADE. I am ostler to the prisoner. On the evening of the 7th of November he went out with his landau, and returned it a quarter before nine o'clock on Sunday morning; it is No. 317. - one was a chesnut and the other a black horse; he has three pairs of numbers.

NOT GUILTY .

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18291203-154

153. JOHN CLUES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 Bible, value 25s. , the goods of Alfred Baxter ; and that at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, on Thursday, the 15th of January, in the 9th year of the Reign of His present Majesty, he was convicted of felony, by the name of John Crews.

ANN MASON . I am in the employ of Mr. James Hitchcock Lovegrove, a bookseller. This Bible was left at his house for sale by Mr. Alfred Baxter - it had been there I think three months; I missed it on Tuesday week - I know nothing of the prisoner.

ANGELIUS BETRAUN. I am an officer. On the 21st of November, about half-past six o'clock, I was near the Seven-dials, and saw the prisoner with a bag upon his shoulder - he saw me, and hastened his pace; I followed him to Castle-street - I came up with him, and asked what he had got; he said he did not know - I said "I must know," and took it; he then said a gentleman gave it him to take to Bedford-street, Covent-garden, but he did not know him; I went with him, but there was no gentleman there - I then took him to the office; the prosecutor's shop is in Greek-street: this Bible was in the bag.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had it to carry, and was to have 1s. for it - I know nothing of the stealing it.

RICHARD JONES. I have a copy of the prisoner's conviction - I saw him tried, and know he is the man; I apprehended him for stealing eight books from Mr. Doyle's, in Holborn; he was found guilty, and had three months' imprisonment.

Prisoner. I never was here in my life - it is totally false.

MR. WONTNER. We believe he has been here, and I charged him with it as soon as he came.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18291203-155

154. THOMAS ARCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 watch, value 4l. and 22 shillings, the property of Francisco Denegrie , from his person .

FRANCISCO DENEGRI. I lost twenty-two shillings and my watch, on the 4th of November - I do not know where I was; I had been at a coffee-house, and drank too much- I did not miss it till I awoke the next morning; I saw my watch safe about nine o'clock in the evening when I went to the coffee-house - I left about ten at night.

MR. LAWRENCE. I keep Serle's Coffee-house, in Carey-street. The prosecutor was in my house on the night of the 3rd of November, when he was playing the guitar to some gentlemen - after he had been there some time, he was going away, and I observed he was tipsy; I called him, and asked his address - I then called the prisoner, who is my porter , and said, "Don't leave this man, till you take him home to his house;" they left together, and I heard no more till the next morning, when the Police-officer came and asked me who went home with the Italian - I called the prisoner, and he said, "I went part of the way with him;" I then said, "Before he goes from here, you shall search his box, and every thing belonging to him;" he searched the prisoner, but found nothing; I then searched him myself, and said, "You have a fob, have you any thing in it?" he said No - I said "Yes, here is a watch in it;" I took out this watch and this bit of guard to it - the officer said, "That is sufficient, for I have the other part of the guard;" we were going to Hatton-garden, and the prisoner said, "I put the money on the stairs;" we then went back, and found 13s.; the prisoner had been with me three months - I had no complaint to make of him.

JAMES MEAD. I took the prisoner. I found in his trunk 6s. and some halfpence.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor gave me the watch and the silver - I took it home; I told the Police-man it was his watch when he found it.

GUILTY (of stealing the watch.) Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-156

155. EDWARD SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 watch-key, value 3s.; 1 seal, value 15s., and 1 watch-chain, value 2s., the goods of Aaron Mendes Belisario , from his person .

AARON MENDES BELISARIO. On the 7th of November, as I was at the corner of George-yard, Whitechapel , at five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner pulled my watch out of my fob, and ran away; I am lame, and could not follow him - no one followed him; there is a gas-light close by, and I noticed his person - as soon as he was gone I was surrounded by a gang of men, who said, "Have you been robbed, Sir?" and took hold of me to prevent my pursuing; I described the prisoner, and he was taken -I went to the office, saw him among a number of men, and knew him.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I took the prisoner on the 9th of November, from the prosecutor's description; I said it was for robbing a gentleman of his watch on Saturday night - he denied it.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-157

156. JOHN POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 seal, value 15s.; 1 watch-chain, value 1d., and 1 watch-key, value 5s., the goods of Benjamin Prior , from his person .

BENJAMIN PRIOR . I lost my watch in Holborn on the 3rd of November, at a quarter-past ten o'clock at night -

I had been in a shop, and had just come out, and some person took it; my little son was with me - this is the watch.

Cross-examined by MR. DUNBAR. Q. Where had you been? A. I was coming from my duty in the Strand, where I am in the employ of the Post-office; I had been into that shop to look at my watch, and then put it into my fob; I was crossing towards Day and Martin's at the time - there were persons coming along; I felt it taken quite suddenly - I could not exactly tell from where the snatch came; I did not see the person or the hand - I did not turn to look in the direction it went; I had dined at home, at Battle-bridge, I think about three o'clock, and this was a quarter-past eight - I was on duty at five o'clock, and gave it up at six; I had called at a friend's house in Lincoln's Inn-fields, and there I had part of three pots of ale among four of us - I had left there about a quarter of an hour when I lost my watch; I saw the man when he ran away - I cannot swear to the prisoner; the shop I went into was a pawnbroker's, to ask what they would lend me on it - I am sure I did not slip it down by the side of my fob; I had a thick great coat on - it was not buttoned; I saw a man taken to the watch-house, but cannot say he was the man I saw run.

PHILIP RILEY. I am a serjeant of the Police. I was in Holborn, and saw the witness - he cried Stop thief! I saw a man running - he ran round a cab, and dropped down before me; I took him - it was the prisoner; the watch was given to Tisdale.

Cross-examined. Q.Where was this? A. A short distance from Little Turnstile - he was running from Day and Martin's; I was not aware of any fight - I saw a number of persons run when stop thief! was called; the cab was standing as if waiting for some person who had called at some house - I think the street was slippery; I thought the prisoner was struck at seeing me, but I do not know whether he fell by accident or design - I found these seals and chain in his hand; they do not belong to the prosecutor, and have not been claimed - at the watch-house I found six duplicates on the prisoner - two of them are for watches.

SAMUEL TISDALE. I was on duty about eight o'clock- I saw the prosecutor, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I pursued a man I saw running - he slipped under a horse's head, and fell: the prosecutor was calling out,"Where is my child?" or, "Where is my boy?" and a hand was reached over with dark clothes - whether it was a pelisse or a coat I do not know, and some one said,"D-n your child, here is the watch;" I received the watch within five minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. If the cab had been going on he must have been run over? A. Yes; I went up to the prosecutor when the prisoner was secured, and the watch was handed to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running home from working with my cousin, who is a farrier, and I slipped down at the side of the curb - they said I had robbed the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-158

157. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Henderson , from his person .

JOHN HENDERSON . I lost a handkerchief on the 7th of November, on the way from my ship to Lloyd's Coffeehouse, about half-past twelve o'clock - it was in my left-hand pocket, and I saw it a few seconds before the officer handed it to me; there are no marks on it, but it is similar to one I have - a person passed me; I heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned, and saw the officer with the prisoner.

THOMAS OBOURNE. I was in East Smithfield - I saw a bustle, and heard people say, "That is the person who has the handkerchief;" I took the prisoner with it - he said a person who walked before gave it him; I took him to the prosecutor, who owned the handkerchief - another person was pointed out to me, but he got away; I believe the prisoner received it.

Prisoner's Defence. A person threw it down, and I took it up; I called out to the gentleman, and he turned round.

JOHN HENDERSON. Yes, he did

NOT GUILTY :

Reference Number: t18291203-159

158. THOMAS DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 watch, value 50s.; 2 seals, value 5s.; 1 key, value 3s., and 1 ring, value 2s., the goods of Robert Mandar , from his person .

ROBERT MANDAR . On the 9th of November I was at a public-house with the prisoner, and he took me home about half-past two o'clock; I got rather tipsy, but I had my watch when I came out.

Cross-examined by MR. DUNN. Q. Was there a young man with him? A. Yes - I could have walked home if he had let me; I understand I got home about three o'clock - I certainly was very drunk; my wife asked what had become of my watch - I said somebody had got it; I did not say I did not know who brought me home - he stopped in my house about five minutes; I went to sleep, and in about an hour went to several houses to look for him.

AUGUSTUS KIRBRY. I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned with me by the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q.Had you seen him before? A. No - I knew him at Hatton-garden, and should have sworn to him if he had not been in custody; I swear he is the man - he had a blue coat on; I will not swear whether it was black or blue - I described him as pockmarked; he had a hat on, and I believe it was a black one.

WILLIAM HALL. The prosecutor told me he had lost his watch, and I took the prisoner on the 16th of November; he said he knew nothing about it.

DOROTHY HIERON. I am the wife of James Hieron -I live at Baker's-place with the prosecutor; I remember him being brought home very drunk by the prisoner and another man - the prisoner was there but a few minutes; he said he was tipsy, and he had brought him home.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he not too drunk to get up stairs? A. He was drunk.

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, stated that he and another man in a blue coat had gone home with the prosecutor, but he knew nothing of the watch - they had been to several public-houses; he was quite intoxicated, and they carried him home.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-160

159. JOHN SHADBOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 half-crown , the money of Francis Steele , his master.

FRANCIS STEELE . I am a silversmith and jeweller -I live in Oxford-street . I lost a half-crown from my till last Tuesday; I had marked it, and put it into the till on Saturday morning, and saw it there at three o'clock on Tuesday - the officer afterwards took it from the prisoner, who gave no account of it; he is in my employ.

SAMUEL CLEBERRY. I am an officer. The prosecutor called me in, and told me he had suspicion of the prisoner's robbing his till; the prisoner was then in the stable - he was called, and said he knew nothing about it; I searched him, and found this half-crown, with the mark on it, in his left-hand trousers pocket - he said, in going to the watch-house, that it was in consequence of his father not sending him up linen from Hertford, and he meant to convert it to his own use.

Prisoner. On the Friday morning I received two half-crowns of my master, and one is what they took from me.

MR. STEELE. No - I made the punch on Saturday morning, and marked them in ten minutes; that was after I gave him the 5s.

The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring that he had received the half-crown from his master. He received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18291203-161

160. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 prayer-book, value 3s. , the goods of John Booth ; and that he had before been convicted of felony.

SPENCER HALL. I am shopman to Mr. John Booth, Duke-street, Portman-place . I lost a prayer-book from his shop; I did not see it taken, and cannot say the precise time - I heard a gentleman say, "You rascal, I've caught you;" I ran forward, and took the prisoner, who was standing at a glass-case, opposite the shop door - he appeared to he attempting to cry, and begged me to let him go; this is the book.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Is that gentleman here? A. Yes; the prisoner had asked for a copy of Tom Jones - it is not unusual for persons who come to buy to look at books; I saw the book taken from his breast coat pocket.

SAMPSON LOW. I was in the prosecutor's shop on the 10th of November: I saw the prisoner take another book from the glass-case, and put it back again - he then took this book, and put it into his breat coat pocket; I stepped forward, took him by the arm, and said, "I have caught you."

Cross-examined. Q. He had taken one book, and put it back? A. Yes - I drew his hand out of his pocket; I do not know whether he might have returned this book.

FREDERIOK ELLIS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he begged the gentleman to let him go; there was 11s., 9d. found on him, and a watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to purchase a set of books, and put my hand to my side pocket, to take my handkerchief: the gentleman came and said."You have stolen that book;" I said, "I beg your pardon, I have not;" the book was never in my pocket, and that the gentleman knows.

MR. LOW. There was no handkerchief in his side pocket - to the best of my recollection it was in his hat.

WILLIAM BALL. I produce the record of the conviction of the prisoner, by the name of John Simmonds, in June last - I apprehended him, and know he is the person; he pleaded guilty, and had three months' imprisonment.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18291203-162

161. THOMAS THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 14lbs. weight of raisins, value 6s., and 14lbs. of currants, value 9s. , the goods of John Curtoys and William Curtoys ; and that, on the 6th of April, in the 7th year of His present Majesty's Reign, he was convicted of felony.

ROBERT BEAVER . I am apprentice to Mr. John Curtoys and William Curtoys , grocers , of St. John-street, Clerkenwell . On the 12th of November they lost 14lbs. of plums and 14lbs. of currants, which were on a barrel when we went into the little parlour to dinner, at some distance from the door - when we came out they were gone; the officer brought them in again - they were in parcels, and were my masters'.

EUSEBIUS BEALE. I saw the prisoner four or five hundred yards from the prosecutors' shop on the 12th of November - he had a bundle, with one paper of plums and another of currants in it; I took him - he said they belonged to his master, and mentioned a name, which we could not find; we took him to Hatton-garden, went to several shops, and found the prosecutors.

JAMES TERRY. I am an officer. I saw the prisoner and another about a hundred yards from the prosecutors' shop; I watched them, and called Beale, but he did not come soon enough, and the other got away - we took the prisoner.

Prisoner. I made no resistance. Witness. He said he should not satisfy me about it - he was on his master's business.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Coppice-row, and a man asked me to carry the parcel to the Bull and Mouth - I was to have 6d.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS. I have a copy of the record of the prisoner's former conviction; I took him on that occasion, and attended the trial - he had three months imprisonment.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18291203-163

162. JAMES PICKETT was indicted for breaking and entering a building, within the curtilage of the dwelling-house of Sophia Coles , on the 5th of November , and stealing therein 2 bags, value 3d., and 8 live tame fowls, price 9s. , her property.

SOPHIA COLES. I live at Ponder's-end, in the parish of Enfield , and am a widow - it is my own house; there is a hen-roost in the stable, within the yard: I had eight fowls there, which I saw safe and alive on Wednesday night, the 4th of November, and missed them between eight and nine o'clock the next morning; I saw five of them again at Enfield, on the Friday - they were then dead, but I could swear to four of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to swear to them all? A. No, to four or five; no part of

them are here - I could swear to four pullets, which I had often fed and had them in my hand; one was red.

JOHN WILSON . I am constable of Enfield. I searched the prisoner's house at Enfield-highway, on Friday, the 6th of November - it is about half a mile from the prosecutrix's; I found two bags, with some walnuts and nuts in them, and eight fowls, three cooked, and five not cooked - these are the bags.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she swear to the cooked ones? A. No, to those with feathers - they were common.

COURT. Q. Were they so common that a person who fed them would not know them? A. A person used to them might know them.

MRS. COLES. These two bags are mine - one was in the stable, and the other in the wash-house.

THOMAS HARE . I am a constable. I was with Wilson when these things were found: I took the prisoner about an hour afterwards - he said he found the fowls on the road going from Ponder's-end.

Cross-examined. Q. He at once told you he found them? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and saw a man going before me - he went on first, threw down the bags, and ran off.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-164

162. PETER DORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , 1 shirt, value 2s.; 4 collars, value 2s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 pair of overalls, value 1s. 6d.; 1 hat, value 8s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s., and 1 brush, value 1s. , the goods of Benjamin Williams .

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS. I am a pensioner . I was at the Snow Shoes public-house, at Chelsea , on the 16th of November - I had the articles stated in the indictment there, and missed them about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; I slept there that night, and left them in a back parlour - they were missing when I got up; I saw the prisoner there the day before, but he was gone that morning; these are my property.

WILLIAM NORMAN. On the morning of the 16th of November, I went to the Snow Shoes, about ten o'clock, and the prisoner was brought in by Trays.

JOHN TRAYS. I met the prisoner in the Old Kent-road, with these articles; he said they were given him at that house, and I took him there - he was five miles from there when I saw him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had them given to me by Tyler, an invalid; I had been robbed of my prize-money for the storming and caption of Bhurtpoor - I spoke to the landlord about it, and Tyler said he would make up half a sovereign; he kept me a long time, then brought out this bundle, and gave it me; I belong to the 59th regiment, which is now at Weedon.

WILLIAM NORMAN. Tyler was taken, but he denied it.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-165

OLD COURT. MONDAY, DECEMBER 7.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

163. ELIZABETH REEVES was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Ann Brown .

ROBERT BROOKS . I am a journeyman weaver, and lived at the same house as the prisoner, in Vine-court, Spitalfields ; she is married - the deceased lived at No.9, in the same court. On the 9th of November, about seven o'clock in the morning, I went down to the street door, and saw Ann Brown in the entry of the house, calling out for her husband; I do not know that he was in the house- she kept calling out for him some time, then went through the house into the yard, and broke a window; I then heard a scuffle, and went to see what it was - I saw her standing on the step of the door; the prisoner came out - Brown and her got disputing, wrangling, and abusing each other; I think I saw her attempt to strike the prisoner, but I am not certain - I believe she did, and told the Magistrate so; I did not see the prisoner strike her, but I heard her fall in the passage, whether from a blow I cannot say; she was pushed out, got up again, and began talking to the prisoner again, calling her a brute, to have her husband there all night - then the prisoner took her two hands, and shoved her backwards; I do not know where the husband was - the deceased was intoxicated no doubt.

MARY ANN WALKER . I live in this house. I went down, and saw the deceased lying on her left side, near the kennel; the prisoner was standing by her, and when I was going up again, the prisoner beckoned to me, and asked me to let the bed down, for her to lay the deceased on - she was bringing her through the passage, to put her on the bed; I let the bed down - she let go of the deceased, who threw herself across the foot of the bed on her face, and said, "Oh, my my poor head!" I went up again, and heard her say, "Don't beat me any more."

ISAAC TAKEN . I am a dyer. I was coming along Vine-court, and saw Brown lying on the steps - I saw the prisoner push her down the steps into the street; she laid with her head and shoulders in the street, and the prisoner turned her over out of the passage quite into the street - she merely turned her heels round; she appeared intoxicated, and I believe the prisoner was so also - the deceased got up and said, "That brute has had my husband in her house all night:" I said, "Don't murder the woman - let her alone;" she pushed her down on the stones - I said,"Go in and shut the door, if you don't want her in;" the prisoner said, "No, I won't leave her here, I shall go and see her home;" she knocked at the deceased's door several times, while she laid in the street - I then went away.

SAMUEL BYLES I am a surgeon, and live in Spitalfields. I saw the deceased on the 9th of November, about four hours after her death - she had a bruise over her left eye, and a few slight scratches on the face; it appeared to have been done by the nails - she died of a fractured scull; there was a considerable quantity of extravasated blood on the brain - it was certainly caused by a fall; there was a small quantity of fluid in the stomach, which smelt of gin- she appeared to have been a stronger woman than the prisoner, and if sober, able to overcome her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-166

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

164. JEREMIAH READING was indicted for that he, not being employed in or for the Mint, or Mints of our Lord the King, nor authorized by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, or Lord High Treasurer of England, on the 27th of November , 1 mould, made of plaster of Paris,

in and upon which was impressed the figure-stamp resemblance, and similitude of the obyerse side of a lawful and current shilling, feloniously and traitorously had in his possession .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only substituting the word reverse for obverse.

MESSRS. SCARLET and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WHEATLEY. I am a serjeant of the Police. On the 27th of November, I went to No. 10, Bloomsbury-market , to the second floor front room - I knocked twice at the door, and called Jerry, in consequence of information; the door was then unlocked by a female - I went in and saw the prisoner sitting in front of the fire, with his coat off, and his shirt sleeves tucked up - when I entered the room I saw him put something out of his right hand, down by his side, among the ashes, but what it was I could not see; he rose up, and I secured him - he had something in his left hand, which he passed to his right, and endeavoured to put it into his right hand pocket; I took it out of his hand, and handcuffed him, then looked at what I took from him, and found it was a plaster of Paris mould, quite warm, and a shilling in it; the mould was wrapped round with paper to prevent it burning his hand - I found nothing on him; I found three good shillings and a good sixpence on the female; I then searched the room, and on the mantelpiece found two pieces of metal, which had been melted - one piece was something in the shape of a nail; the other is shaped as if it had been melted in a spoon - I found a brown paper bag, with plaster of Paris in it, in the cupboard; also some silver sand, a file, with white metal in the teeth, and an earthen pipkin, which had metal melted in it- there was dross of metal on the sides of it; I found a small piece of white metal in the ashes - I have kept every thing separate; my brother was with me - I saw him take an iron spoon out of the ashes with metal in it; here is the mould with the shilling still in it, and the piece of metal like a nail (which is called a gate, I understand) attached to the shilling - I produce the things in the same state, as I found them; I took the prisoner to the watch-house - I said nothing to him, nor did any body in my presence hold out any inducement to him to confess; as we went along he said it was all up with him - he did not care what they did with him, so long as they did not hang him, if they would spare his life - I told him to hold his tongue.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I do not ask who it was, but is the person here who gave the information? A. No; Smee, the officer, who gave me some information is - the prisoner did not tell me he had been just put there by a person who had betrayed him; I know the person by sight who gave the original information - I saw him on Saturday; he is in good health - I know nothing of the prisoner having been put there by him; I found no base coin on the prisoner's person - the room door was opened the moment I called; I saw no disguise or concealment about him - I knew him before.

MR. ELLIS. Q. Do you know any thing about how long he had been in the room? A. No.

EDWARD ADAMS WHEATLEY . I am a Police-constable. I accompanied the party to the prisoner's room - I entered the door after my brother, and saw the prisoner sitting by the fire, and saw him put something from his right hand; my brother took this mould from his right hand - he was endeavouring to put it into his pocket; I found an iron spoon in the ashes on the hearth - it was hot, and contained melted metal; I suppose this was what he put out of his right hand - it has been in my custody ever since; I found, on the mantel-piece, this shilling, and a piece of metal; I have had them ever since.

THOMAS SMEE . I did belong to Bow-street, and am now one of the new Police. I was with the witnesses, and saw Edward Wheatley take the iron spoon and the metal from the cinders - I found this pewter pot under the fender; part of it is broken away - I found too small pieces of metal on the floor, just by the fire place, and in the cupboard I found another pewter pot.

JOHN FIELD. I am an inspector of counterfeit coin at the Mint. This is a plaster of Paris mould, for the purpose of casting a counterfeit shilling - here is a counterfeit shilling in it; I have seen a great many of these moulds- this has the impression of the obverse and reverse sides of a shilling on it; it is the impression of a lawful and current shilling - the shilling in it has what is called the get or ridge attached to it; it is produced by pouring hot metal into the mould which adheres to the channel - this mould will produce the obverse and reverse sides of a shilling; I have had frequent opportunities of seeing coining implements all my life - the pipkin appears to have had metal melted in it; it is generally done in a pipkin - the metal is at times poured into the mould by a tobacco-pipe, but sometimes with a spoon of this description; this shilling was cast in the mould - I have compared it; it is counterfeit, made of white metal similar to pewter - I cannot exactly say what the other metal is- it is generally made of pewter mixed with tin; it is not silver.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not a chemist? A. No; I consider it to be plaster of Paris from its appearance.

MR. FRANCIS KERBY . I am a practical chemist, and assistant to Dr. Lardner, at the London University. I have analysed part of this mould, which I scraped off, and found it to be what is commonly called plaster of Paris; the powder in this bag is plaster of Paris - the same as the mould.

RICHARD FRANKLYN , ESQ. I am a moneyer of the Mint. The prisoner was not employed at the Mint.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been at the Mint? A. Seventeen years; there are now about sixty men and boys employed in the moneyer's department - I dare say there are a hundred persons in the service of the Mint altogether - I will not swear there are not one hundred and fifty; there may be many of them whom I never saw, or whose names I never heard.

MR. SCARLET. Q. Can you undertake to swear the prisoner was not employed at this moment at the Mint? A. No, I cannot - he is not employed in the moneyer's department certainly; that is the department in which the coming is carried on entirely from beginning to end - if he had been employed in the manufacture of coin I must have known it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you the principal in the department? A. No; I have hired the various persons for that department for ten years; there are five others who

also hire - I can swear decidedly to each workman in that department.

MR. SCARLET. Q. Is this the sort of mould at the Mint? A. No; nobody could have a mould without authority of some of the moseyer's - there is no such thing as a mould in the Mint; the money is made in a different way - I know every person in the department.

COURT. Q. Could the prisoner be employed in any way in making money without your knowledge? A. Certainly not; I never saw him about the Mint.

Prisoner's Defence. I never did such a thing in my life before - I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

MR. FIELD re-examined. Q.Look at the shilling with the get to it, was that made in this mould? A. Yes, certainly; the obverse and reverse sides were produced by this mould - I have no doubt of the other shilling being also produced from this mould.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Look at the reverse side of the shilling found in the mould, it seems run and rather imperfect? A. Yes, it is an imperfect cast certainly - there is a sinking on the bottom of the head on the obverse side; it is an imperfect cast on both sides - there is no way to refresh the moulds; I have seen much worse shillings in circulation - I remember a half-crown mould being produced here last Session that had been nearly destroyed.

MR. SCARLET. Q. The mould sometimes produces a good and sometimes a bad impression? A. Yes; it depends in a great measure whether the metal is at a proper pouring heat; if it is too cold or too hot the impression will be bad - the shilling found in the room appears a tolerable fair impression for the mould; I think the mould is capable of casting a better impression.

COURT. Q. Is it capable of casting such a figure or resemblance, or similitude as to impose on the world? A. I think it is.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-167

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

165. CATHERINE CONNOLLY & MARY FITZGERALD were indicted for a like offence .

MESSRS. SCARLET and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS DREW . I am a conductor of the Bow-street Police. On the 23rd of November I went with Keys and Fowler to No. 1, Horn-alley, Liquorpond-street , between one and two o'clock - I went up to the first floor room door, rapped, and a woman named Cartwright opened it; Keys and I went in - Cartwright then talked in Irish to the two prisoners, who were in the room; they answered her in Irish - I then saw Fitzgerald sitting on the right side of the fire-place; Connolly was sitting on the left hand-I had my eyes on them both; I saw Fitzgerald move her chair nearer to the stove - she put her hand towards a pipkin, which stood on the hob, and took something; but it being dark there I could not see whether her hand went into the pipkin or not; but she took up something, and threw it into the fire - I saw Keys take it off the fire directly, it was white metal in a solid state, and in the shape of the bottom of the pipkin, which it fits - I took the pipkin off the hob; there was nothing in it then - I took a tobacco-pipe which laid by the side of the pipkin, and the stem of it from the bowl was full of white metal; I found a file on the floor, with white metal filings in the teeth of it - there were two beds in the room, and under one of them I found a pair of moulds, which I produce; they were folded in a bit of rag - I also found on the bed a woman's pocket with a bag in it, with plaster of Paris and a piece of glass paper - about twenty minutes after I entered the room I saw Keys take a pair of moulds from under Connolly's left arm.

COURT. Q. You went there in consequence of information, I suppose? A. Yes; I had received information some time before - I did not know the prisoners before; Cartwright kept the house - they were all three in the room; there were two beds and two bedsteads - Fitzgerald said she was married, but that her husband was sent to Ireland; I did not hear which bed each one slept in - neither of them claimed the pocket.

FRANCIS KEYS. I am a Police-constable. I accompanied the witnesses to the room; the door was shut - I do not know whether it was locked; I knocked, and Cartwright opened it - Cartwright addressed the prisoners in Irish, and they said something to each other; I saw Fitzgerald put her hand towards the fire-place, lay hold of something, and throw it into the fire - she reached her hand to the fire-place. and threw something into the fire; I pulled it off, and it was this metal - the pipkin was on the stove: I saw Drew put the metal into it; fits the bottom, and appeared to correspond with it - I searched under the fire-place, among the ashes, and found several pieces of plaster of Paris, and one of them appears to resemble the obverse side of a shilling; I found a counterfeit sixpence on the hob, not exactly finished - I got a candle, and on a ledge up the chimney found some more pieces of plaster of Paris; I found in a cupboard in the room, a mug, with plaster of Paris, and another mug of sand - I found a piece of tin, with plaster of Paris adhering to it, and a piece of rag, with plaster of Paris on it: on the mantel-piece over the fireplace, I found a new Queen's metal spoon - I found two iron spoons by the side of the fire-place; one appears to have been put on the fire - I found two knives with plaster of Paris on them. I was afterwards left in the room with the prisoners and Cartwright; Drew had gone down stairs - Connolly had been sitting on the side of the fire, on a pillow and blanket; she asked me to leave the room, as she wanted to use the chamber utensil - I refused, saying I was a married man; she went to the chamber-pot, then came back, and sat down in the same place again - in a few minutes she asked me again to leave the room; she went to the utensil, and while she was there Drew came up to the door - I said, "Wait a minute," but he opened the door, and came in; she went to the same place as she had been sitting in - I saw something white on the pillow, like plaster of Paris; I picked it up, and saw the impression of part of the obverse side of a sixpence on it; I produce it - it is now put more together: during all this time she had a child on her left arm - I told her to shift the child on to her right arm, which she did - I lifted her elbow up, and found this other piece, which has the grove in it, under her arm, between her skin and shift, and at the same time this bit of metal dropped from her; I have matched it with that mould, and it fits the get - I said, "What did you put them there for?" she said they were on the grate or hob when we came into the room, and

she put them there out of sight - she said, "What will be done to me for having them;" I told her to ask me no questions - I had said nothing to induce her to say any thing.

Prisoner Connolly. I did not desire him to leave the room, but to turn his back to me. Witness. Her words were, "Sir, will you leave the room?" I did not hear her desire me to turn my back; I omitted to state, that when they had been in conversation together, Cartwright ran down stairs, and I called to Fowler to stop her, which he did.

JAMES FOWLER . I am an officer. I was waiting down stairs, that nobody should escape.

Mr. FRANCIS KIRBY . I am a practical chemist. I have seen these moulds, and analysed part of those found under the bed; they are plaster of Paris - the others are the same materials, and the stuff in the bag.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. These moulds found under the bed are for casting counterfeit shillings; they bear an impression of the obverse and reverse sides, and are capable of producing an impression of a shilling likely to impose on the public - these other parts appear to be moulds for casting sixpences; both sides are here - one is broken, but here is the whole impression on it, on putting the two together: it is capable of giving the impression-stamp in similitude of a sixpence, which would impose on the public - the obverse side being broken, would of course not now do it; the reverse side is perfect - I cannot say whether it had been broken recently; this tin band might be used to form the mould into a shape - the plaster of Paris is poured into it; a tobacco pipe and pipkin are often used in coining - here is a piece of glass-paper, which is often used to rub off the sharp edges of the coin, to appear as if it had been in circulation; it is generally found in possession of coiners - I believe the sixpence produced to have been cast in this mould; it appears to fit it - this spoon is made of Britania metal, which is used in coining, and is often found in the possession of coiners; it is made of tin and antimony, which is the metal constituting the coin; the get produced appears to fit the mould for sixpences; the shilling moulds are as perfect as they are usually found - the impressions are as perfect as they generally are.

COURT. Q. In your judgment, are the moulds capable of producing impressions likely to deceive the world, and to be passed into circulation? A. Yes - a farther process is required; after they come out of the mould the get has to be separated, and the edges filed down - the moulds only produce the impression; the sixpence must have been produced by the whole mould in a prefect state.

MARGARET CARTWRIGHT . I am the wife of William Cartwright , and live in Horn-alley, Liquorpond-street. The prisoners rented a room of me, for five or six weeks before they were apprehended, and occupied it continually till then; they both slept there, and both took the room, and were each to pay half - they owed me 8s. 6d; when they did pay I generally received half from each - I saw no man there at all; they told me they made night-caps and sold them in the street: they bad a parcel of nightcaps when they were taken - I saw them netting them; I was found in the room with them, and kept in prison about a fortnight: nobody but the prisoners had any thing to do with this room - there were two bedsteads in it; I did not want them, and said they might have the use of them - there are other lodgers on the second floor.

Prisoner Connolly. Q. Was I not confined in one of the beds? A. Yes, a fortnight or three weeks before you were taken; no man visited her then.

ANDREA ANTONENI . I make images from plaster of Paris. The prisoner Fitzgerald came to my shop, and bought 3d. worth of plaster of Paris, three weeks ago - she took it away in a bag; it was superfine, and would make what has been produced; this mould is the same quality - it is the same colour and sort.

Connolly's Defence. When I came to lodge there I was in much distress; I came to lay-in, and had neither money nor victuals - as to this woman, she is quite innocent of it.

Fitzgerald's Defence. I had nothing to do with it; I sold caps in the street, and was out all day - I never saw any thing of this till the officers came; I never bought the stuff.

NOT GUILTY .

There was another indictment against Conolly, for having the mould bearing the impression of a sixpence, but no evidence was offered.

Reference Number: t18291203-168

First London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

166. JOHN SCROGGINS and THOMAS BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 40 yards of gros de Naples, value 5l., the goods of Thomas Matthews and another, in his dwelling-house ; and JOHN JAMES and ELIZABETH JAMES were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

FRANCIS ELAND. I am in partnership with Thomas Matthews ; we are haberdashers , and live in Aldgate High-street . On the 29th of October, between twelve and one o'clock, Baker came into the shop with another boy, whom I believe to be Scroggins, but cannot swear to him - one of them asked for a halfpenny ball of cotton; I said I had none but three-farthing balls - he said he would go and ask his mother if that would do, and left the shop - the same two boys returned in about ten minutes, with the witness Bowman; that was the first time I saw him - we were very busy; I was at the further end of the shop, and was called to attend them - they asked for a ball of cotton, which I gave them, and they left; they were not there three minutes, and were altogether; this was on Thursday, and on the Saturday an officer came, and asked if we had lost a piece of silk - my young man looked, and missed a piece of gros de Naples, which I had seen on the counter with several others at the very time the boys came in; it has not been found - it was a blue black, and worth 5l.

WILLIAM SCOTTER . I am an officer. I apprehended Bowman on the 31st of October, for robbing his mother -I knew nothing of this charge then.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer, of Lambeth-street. Scotter brought Bowman to me; he took us to the prisoner James' house, in Wentworth-street, and said, in Mrs. James' presence, that she had purchased the silk of him: he did not mention any particular silk then - she denied all knowledge of him, or ever seeing any boys whatever; I searched her place, but found nothing.

RICHARD BOWMAN . I have known the prisoners six

months: I was going up Whitechapel one day last month, between one and two o'clock, and saw them - they said,"Dick, here is a nick for a roll of squeeze;" that means, a chance for a roll of silk - they went into the prosecutor's shop, and asked for a halfpenny ball of cotton, then came out and I went in with them; they made me take the silk off the counter and put it under my coat - they kept touching my toe for me to take it; I carried it a little way -Scroggins then took it, and carried it into James' house; he went in first, Baker and I next - Scroggins said, "Mrs. James, I have got a roll of silk;" she said, "Oh, you young rascal, where did you get it?" he said, "Out of Whitechapel;" Baker said, "A shilling a yard" - Scroggins said,"No, we will take nothing less than 18d.;" she said she would give us that - she pulled it off the roll and measured it; there were forty yards and three quarters; she asked us to give her that bit for a bonnet, and we said Yes - she gave us a half sovereign, and told us to come at six o'clock and she would give us the rest; it came to 3l. - my share was 13s. 6d. - they gave me 3s. 6d. out of the half-sovereign: I went with them at six o'clock - they got 1l. 19s. 6d., and gave me a half-sovereign, and told me I must be contented with that; it was a blue black silk - John James, her husband, was looking over the shopboard with a drover; Scroggins said to me, "Ayn't you going to stand any gin, stand half a pint;" I gave them 6l. - Mr. James gave the drover a bottle, and he went and fetched the gin, and poured out a glass for a baker who was there, sitting by the fire.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was all the talk about the silk before the drover? A. Yes; I am sure of that - I always heard the prisoners call silk a roll of squeeze; I know I am not very honest - I am nearly fourteen years old: I was accused of robbing my master, Mr. Plumber, of Eastcheap, of silver spoons - my mother paid for them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-169

167. GEORGE OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 apron, value 6d. , the goods of George Cole .

CHARLES TEMPLAR . I keep the Bull's Head public-house, in Smithfield . The prisoner is an occasional drover ; this apron was locked in a cupboard in the tap-room - on the 30th of November, about ten o'clock at night, I went into the tap-room, and saw the prisoner with part of his body in the cupboard, which was broken open: I said,"You rascal, what are you doing? I will give you in charge;" he had this apron in his hand - he put it back into the cupboard, shut the door, and said, "You may give me in charge and be d - d:" the watchman came in and took him - the cupboard belonged to a master-drover; I had seen it locked before - the different drovers have cupboards there: I am sure I saw the apron in his hand - George Cole is the owner; he is ill - there were three other persons in the tap-room; they ran away.

SAMUEL CHANTRY . I know the apron belonged to Cole: I had worn it for three weeks, as he was confined to his bed - we were fellow-servants; I gave the apron to Guiver that afternoon, to put in the cupboard.

JAMES GUIVER . I put the apron into the locker about five o'clock that afternoon.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this house with five others, and played at cards: I went out to buy some bread, and when I returned the cupboard door was open - I was leaning against it, and he said I had broken it open: what he thought was an apron, was the front of my smock-frock. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-170

168. THOMAS CRAWFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 9 1/2 quires of engraved note-paper, value 12s. , the goods of John Dennison .

JOHN DENNISON . I am a stationer , and live in Liverpool-street, Bishopsgate . On the 3rd of December, while at dinner, I was beckoned into the shop, and found my apprentice questioning the prisoner as to what he had under his apron: I went round, took up his apron, and found this paper under it - he would say nothing, except that he lived in St. Luke's.

SAMUEL PACE . The prisoner came into my master's shop, and asked to look at a 3d. box of paints; while I turned to get it, he took something off the counter, put it on the steps, and then asked for a 6d. box - while I was getting that, he put it under his apron; I beckoned to my master, who took it from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-171

169. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s, the goods of Samuel Fowler , from his person .

SAMUEL FOWLER . I am an oil-man , and live in Leather lane. On the 23rd of November, about eight o'clock at night, I was on Blackfriars-bridge , and felt a slight touch at my coat pocket; the prisoner passed me at that instant, and was putting something into his pocket - I felt, and missed my handkerchief; I accused him of it - he denied it, but I gave him in charge, and saw it found on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am beadle of Bridewell. The prisoner was brought to the lodge; I found the handkerchief in his breeches pocket, under his knee - he had a pocket hole, but no pocket; he said he had not got it, and I might search him.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief on the ground; a person passed into the road - I picked it up put it into my pocket, and thought it no harm - I did not take it from the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-172

170. JOHN DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 5 pieces of printed paper, value 6d., and 25 leaves of printed paper, value 6d. , the goods of Samuel Deacon .

JOHN RILEY. I am a waiter at Samuel Deacon 's coffee-house, Skinner-street, Snow-hill . On the 2nd of December he desired me to watch the prisoner, who was in the coffee-room, about nine o'clock at night; I got on the leads outside the window, and saw him take a leaf out of a volume of newspapers, double it up, and put it into his pocket - I then saw him cut a leaf out of another volume, and put that into his pocket; I went for an officer, and twenty-five leaves of newspapers were found in his

pocket - I compared two with the volumes; they corresponded.

SAMUEL DEACON . I keep this coffee-house , and directed the prisoner to be watched, as he had a volume of newspapers before him; the waiter gave me information, and I sent for an officer, who found twenty-five leaves on him, which matched with a volume I have had for six or seven years; I believe he collects paragraphs for periodical publications.

THOMAS PIKE. I am an officer. I took the prisoner as he went out, and found twenty-five leaves in his pocket, and a quantity of smaller leaves, which had been cut out of books.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-173

171. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 tea-chest, value 2s., and 87lbs. of tea, value 30l. , the goods of Zachary Langton and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to William Huntress .

JOHN CHURCH. I am in the employ of Zachary Langton and others, carriers , of the Castle inn, Wood-street . On the 31st of October, about ten minutes to seven o'clock in the evening one of Pickford's vans was at in the inn - I saw this hest of tea put into it to go to Mr. Huntress, of Gospeloak; I saw the prisoner come and take it out of the van, and asked what he was going to do with it - he said to carry it into the office; he took it up the yard, and I thought he was going to the office, and that he might belong to it or something - he walked up the yard with it, and some how concealed himself in the yard, for I missed him, on going into the office to give the clerk an account of another van which was loading; in about five or ten minutes the watchman of the gate reported that the chest of tea was gone out of the yard.

Prisoner. Q.What height was the van from the ground? A. I should think from three to four feet; it was the usual height.

JOHN BUNTING. I am a watchman of Pickford's yard. On the 31st of October, about ten minutes before seven o'clock, I met the prisoner coming out of the yard with a chest of tea on his shoulder - I was at the gateway, and asked where he was going with it; he said to Deacon's, which I thought meant the White Horse - I let him pass, followed him into the street, and stopped him again; he said he had left seven chests in the yard, and should have left but six, and was taking this back - I let him go, believing him; I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Look at me. Witness. I am certain of you- I first stopped you under the gas-light, and next time about ten yards further; I went up the yard to inquire, but did not see you again.

JOHN HOLMAN. I am a porter at Pickford's. On this Saturday night I saw the prisoner in Wood-street, with a chest of tea on his back, just opposite Bull's Head-passage - he crossed the road; I went over, and he threw it off his back into the passage - I do not know whether he saw me; he ran away as fast as he could, and I after him calling Stop thief! he was caught in Noble-street - I am sure he is the man; I saw him taken - the tea was there when we returned, and the officer took it.

JAMES TOMKINS. I am an officer. I was going up Love-lane, and saw the prisoner coming down Wood-street with a chest of tea on his shoulder - I watched him; he turned into Bull's Head-passage, and threw it on our feet - Holman pursued him calling Stop thief! he was stopped in Noble-street - I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am warehouseman to Evrington and Co. This chest of tea was directed by them to William Huntress , of Gospeloak, and in the care of Mr. Langton - it weighs about 30lbs.

JAMES POWER . I am a clerk to Zachary Langton and his partners. This chest of tea was in their care; I booked it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in the yard that night; the witnesses have not looked at me; they are determined to swear to me, right or wrong - the officer says he saw me when coming up Love-lane, twenty yards off; that passage has no light; I certainly was going up the passage, and lost my hat, which was taken off my head; I told him he had taken the wrong man - some man, who took the tea, had run down Staining-lane; I never had it on my back- I could not reach it with my arms.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-174

172. WILLIAM BALES was indicted for obtaining goods, value 4l. 13s. 8d., by false pretences ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-175

173. JOHN HILL was indicted for a misdemeanor .

HENRY KEBBEL. I am in the employ of William Thompson , Esq. Alderman , whose premises are in Allhallows-lane. On the 4th of November, between four and five o'clock, I observed the prisoner loitering about the premises - I watched, and saw him come into the warehouse and try four locks by taking hold of the doors and shaking them; I was out of sight - he was a stranger; the warehouse door has a lattice work to it - he put his hand through, and tried the lock again; he went out, cut a birch-broom to pieces, and took the stick, which forms a hook, put it through the lattice work, and fastened it on some shot bags, and was drawing it towards him but was disturbed - he went out, came back, pulled something out of his pocket, and got his stick back again; he was again disturbed, took his stick and went out - came in again, and put it through the opposite door - he went up stairs, got over the bannisters, through the lattice into the warehouse; I then came out from where I was concealed, and had him secured.

JOHN GOOD. I took him in charge, and found a knife on him.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined 1 Year and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18291203-176

174. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM BODLE. I am in the employ of Messrs. James Bailey and others, of St. Paul's church-yard. On the 11th of November the prisoner came to the shop, and produced an order to me - he said he came from Grace Bracebridge ; we have no customer of that name, but he said he brought it for Bailey, of St. Paul's church-yard - we believed him, and let him have two pairs of black silk stockings, at 5s. 6d. a pair, believing the order correct (read.)

Messrs. Bailey, St. Paul's church-yard, - Please to send me

two pairs of your best black silk stockings, of a strong substance. Queen-square. G. BRACEBRIDGE.

GEORGE PALMER . I am in the prosecutors' employ. I took a letter to Queen-square; there is a Mr. Bracebridge there, but no G. Bracebridge - I made every possible inquiry.

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am a beadle. I apprehended the prisoner on another charge, and found on him part of an order torn in half; it is "Messrs. - please send by bearer" - I have been to Queen-square, and found there is no Grace Bracebridge there; there was a person of that name there, but she has been married two years, and is in Persia.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42. - Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18291203-177

NEW COURT. MONDAY, DECEMBER 7.

Fifth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

175. ANN GOLDSBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 11lbs. weight of beef, value 4s. , the goods of John Burman ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18291203-178

176. BENJAMIN GUILLOIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 saw, value 5s.; 1 axe, value 3s.; 1 hammer, value 1s., and 1 pair of pincers. value 1s. , the goods of John Bowling ; and that, on the 10th of April, in the 9th year of His Majesty's Reign, he was convicted of felony, by the name of Benjamin Guillis.

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BOWLING . I am a surgeon , and live at Fulham . On the 16th of October the prisoner applied to the overseers for relief, and having known him when he was an apprentice, I employed him to nail up some palings and make some rustic chairs for my garden - I bought the tools mentioned new for him to work with at my house, but he was not allowed to take them away - he worked there on the Saturday, Monday, and Tuesday, and came on Wednesday morning, the 21st - in the course of that day he went away, and the tools were missed; I have never seen them since - he was taken two or three weeks afterwards; I asked what he had done with the tools - he said he had left them on the premises.

JOSEPH ELLIOTT. I am a servant to the prosecutor. The prisoner came on the morning of the 21st of October, but I missed him about nine o'clock - he had given no notice of going; I missed the tools, which I had seen in the coach-house that morning, where he was at work.

Prisoner's Defence. I left them in the stable.

- BENNETT. I had a copy of the prisoner's former conviction, but it is not here - I had it before the Grand Jury; I took him in custody, and was a witness on that trial- I know he is the man.

The record itself was brought in and read.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18291203-179

177. WILLIAM FARRAND was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 3 brushes, value 6s. , the goods of John Day .

HENRY WILLIAM MORRISON. I am a Police-officer. On the evening of the 5th of November I passed Mr. Day's house, at ten minutes past eight o'clock - Mrs. Day described the person of a young man, who she said had stolen three brushes; I went to a place, and found the prisoner in charge of a watchman - I handcuffed him, lifted him out of a vault in which he was, and took him to the watch-house; I found the brushes in the vault where he was - he owned he had taken them, but said he had been out of work three weeks.

MARY DAY. I am the wife of John Day . These brushes were taken from his shop door, in Osnaburg-street - I saw the prisoner, and described him to the officer.

CORNELIUS MURRAY. I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Watch! I did not see the prisoner till I found him in a vault.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not say I took them. Mrs. Day said at the office it was not a man with an apron on.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18291203-180

178. RICHARD CORNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 4 bullocks' skirts, value 2s. 6d. , the goods Thomas Crump .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of John Dinely .

THOMAS WARBURTON . I am a slaughterman to. Mr. Thomas Crump . On the 3rd of November, about five o'clock in the evening, I was in his slaughter-house at the back of Newport market - I saw two sides of a bullock move; I went to the spot, and saw the prisoner and three bullocks' skirts lay at his feet - he dropped one, and I gave him to the officer; he had lived as pot-boy at the next house about a fortnight before.

GEORGE TESTER. I was at the slaughter-house, working with Thomas Warburton - I saw the prisoner found with the three skirts at his feet - he was taken across the slaughter-house, and I saw another skirt fall from him, which made four in all - they were Mr. Thomas Crump's property; the slaughter-house belongs to Mr. Dinely, but it was Mr. Crump's meat.

GUILTY. Aged 15. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18291203-181

179. WILLIAM CORNELL and WILLIAM BLACKMORE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 2 gallons of gin, value 16s. , the goods of John Anderson and others.

JOHN WATSON. I am a Police-constable. On the 19th of November I saw a distiller's waggon in Portman-square - I heard a splashing, and stopped at some distance; I thought I saw a man moving, as if he was pouring something out of a can - I cannot tell what he poured it into: there were two men - I think the tall one was pouring; he was in the waggon - the other was standing close by: I followed the waggon, and when they got twenty or thirty yards they stopped, and the tall one, which is Cornell, who was still in the waggon, appeared to pour some more out, but it was foggy, and I could not see distinctly; I do not know how they had filled the can - I judged it was a bottle, which he held in his left hand; the second time Blackmore was by the horses; I then followed the waggon on to Mr.

Johnson's, a publican - I went to another public-house to ask if it was usual to draw any thing off on the road, and then went on to where the prisoners were: I got a light, and looked into the waggon - I found two bottles, one was sealed, and had a direction on it; it was delivered at the place the same night - the other contained some gin, but had only some straw in the neck of it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What time was this? A. After five o'clock - the lamps were lighted; I do not know whether it is usual for spirits to splash in casks; I was twenty or thirty yards off when I first saw it - I did not examine the cask to see if it was leaky; it appeared to me to be a distiller's can that it was poured out of - I would not undertake to swear the prisoners were the men, but their dress was similar, and one man was taller than the other - they appeared to me to belong to the waggon.

JOHN SEWELL. I am in the employ of John Anderson and Co., of Holborn. I sent one hundred and twenty-five gallons of gin in a large pipe to Mr. Johnson; I did not examine the pail when it went out, but I believe there was nothing in it - I have been fifteen years in the service; they took out a can with them: we occasionally send a little in the can, if the cask is short of measure, but this cask had its full measure, and was bunged down properly- Blackmore had been thirteen years in my masters' employ, and Cornell about twelve months.

Cross-examined. Q. Had they a good character? A. Yes - we have not heard of any gin being deficient.

FRANCIS ARNOLD JOHNSON . I keep a public-house in St. John's-wood-road. The waggon arrived, brought by the two prisoners, about six o'clock in the evening - they said they had brought the pipe of gin, and delivered the note; they took it out as usual, in a four gallon can - I put it down on a slate; they brought in the last can, and said that made the quantity right - I said it did: Cornell then said to Blackmore."I think we can squeeze master out another, and if we can I dare say he will stand something handsome;" I took out a light, and they turned the cask up to empty it into a pail; it was about three parts full -I considered I had good measure, and was very well satisfied; all the gin in the pipe was my property - it does sometimes run over measure; the officer found two bottles- one had a seal on the cork of it, and that was also directed to a Mr. Johnson; the other bottle had only straw in the neck - it was gin, and certainly appeared of the same quality as that in the pipe - this is the bottle.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you are liable for one hundred and twenty-five gallons? A. Yes - I considered I had that and the overplus; I was quite satisfied with the quality - I proved it by an instrument.

JOHN SEWELL . I have not tasted this in the bottle - it does sometimes happen that there is over measure; we allow for re-measuring - it was the usual quality, about 25 per cent. under proof.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-182

180. RICHARD MOODY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 machine for sweeping chimnies, value 30s. , the goods of George Bagley .

GEORGE BAGLEY. I am a chimney-sweeper . I lost this machine from my warehouse at Uxbridge , on the 15th of November; the prisoner worked for me a little before, and he knew where it was - I saw it safe about half-past five o'clock the evening before; I took the prisoner, and he told me where he had sold it - this is it: it was given to me by the Society; I should think it worth 30s.

GEORGE CASTLE. I am a chimney-sweeper, and live at Shepherd's-bush. I bought this machine of the prisoner on the 16th of November, I think - I gave him 1ls. for it - he said it was his own.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-183

181. SARAH JEFFERY and ANN NEWMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Macready .

MARY MACREADY . I am the wife of John Macready ; we live in Providence-place, Tash-street. I was in Gray's Inn-lane on the 5th of November, about five o'clock, going to Mr. Nicholls', a pawnbroker; I saw Newman in the street - she seemed very much in liquor, and struck a woman with a plaid cloak' on: I stood on Mr. Nicholls' steps; Newman came up to me, asked what I had to do there, and struck me in the face - Jeffery then took my bundle from me, which contained the articles stated; I saw one pair of stockings fall on the ground - the prisoners were quite close together; Newman struck me repeatedly, and knocked my bonnet over my eyes - I got on to the oil-shop next door, but the gentleman refused to let me in; Jeffery got away - I went on eight or ten doors after her, and met a constable, who took them both; these are the stockings that were dropped - the officer took them up; I had not seen the prisoners before that day.

Prisoner Newman. Q. Did you not insult me? A. No; you struck me, but I had never seen you before - they were both intoxicated, Newman more than the other.

HENRY POOLE . I am a Police-constable. The prosecutrix said she had been robbed by the two prisoners - I saw this pair of stockings fall from one of them, but they were close together, and I could not see from which - they were both drunk, but were able to move very well, and knew what they were about; I took Jeffery first, but was obliged to take Newman, as she was striking the prosecutrix.

Jeffery's Defence. There was a mob, and this young woman struck another person; I went up - I was not capable of taking any thing up if it had been at my feet; she swears she never lost sight of us, and what could I do with the property.

JEFFERY - GUILTY . Aged 45.

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-184

182. WILLIAM HOWSELL and SAMUEL JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 4 cheeses, value 13s. , the goods of Benjamin Southcomb .

JAMES JOSLER. I am a Bow-street patrol. On Wednesday evening, about eight o'clock, I was at Stoke Newington, and met Howsell with a cheese tied up in this apron, under his arm - I asked what he had got; he said a Gloucestester cheese, and he had brought it from up above; I asked the name of the place - he said he got it of a man with a donkey, for threepairs of shoes; I asked the value of the shoes - he said 5s. 6d. a pair; I said he must go to the watch-house.

CHARLES WALLER . I was with Josler, but know no more.

SARAH SOUTHCOMB. I am the wife of Benjamin Southcomb . We lost this cheese and four Dutch cheeses on Wednesday evening, the 25th of November; I know nothing of the prisoners, and did not miss the cheeses till the officer brought them - I can swear to this Gloucester cheese, and one of the Dutch ones.

JOHN CALLOW. I am a watchman. I was in Kingsland-road - I saw Jones and another coming along, about half-past seven o'clock on the Wednesday evening - I asked Jones what he had got; he said Nothing: I said, "You have?" he then said his companion gave it him, and gave him 1s. for carrying it, and his companion had got two more; I gave Jones in charge, and pursued the other man- he threw down these two cheeses and this pair of shoes; he got away, and I took the property - this cheese I found on Jones.

JOHN ELSON . I received Jones from Callow.

Howsell's Defence. I was going to seek for work, and had three pairs of shoes; I met a man with a donkey, who had this cheese and several others with him - I asked if he would buy a pair of shoes; he said he had no money, but if I liked he would have the shoes for this cheese.

Jones' Defence. I was coming along, and saw a man with these cheeses - he asked where I came from; I said Manchester, and I was a weaver - he asked me to carry this cheese, and said he would give me 1s. and something to drink; when the watchman came I said I had the cheese of that gentleman - he could not see him; I said, "That is he;" he told me to shout after him - I did so, and he pursued him.

HOWSELL - GUILTY . Aged 21.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-185

183. EDWARD HARTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Sarah Lowns .

SARAH LOWNS. I am single , and keep a little haberdasher's-shop - I heard these shoes cut from the door, and went to the door - I saw the prisoner running, called Stop thief! and he was taken.

THOMAS PATTEN. I saw the prisoner run, and drop these shoes.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did it through distress; I was obliged to sell my shirt for victuals - the parish would do nothing for me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing him to be in distress.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18291203-186

184. WILLIAM FELSTEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of Henry Skeggs .

HENRY SKEGGS . I am a horse-keeper . I hired the prisoner by the day to assist me - he had been but two or three days with me, and left on the 14th of November, without notice; when he was gone I missed a pair of shoes from the manger - I found him on the Thursday after at Mr. Stacey's, and asked if he knew any thing about them- he said No, and he did not know that I wanted him any more; I found my shoes at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES KING. I am a pawnbroker. These shoes were pawned by the prisoner on the 16th of November.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a person about half-past seven o'clock on the Saturday night, who asked me if I wanted to buy a pair of shoes; I said Yes, and gave him 1s. 6d. - I wore them on Sunday; they were rather too short, and I pawned them.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-187

185. MARY COX was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 sheet, value 1s.; 1 blanket; value 1s., and 1 quilt, value 1s. , the goods of William Bates .

MARY BATES . I am the wife of William Bates - we live at Brentford . I let the prisoner a furnished room - she had been with me three weeks, when I missed the property stated, on a Saturday night, and several other articles; she lived with a man who has gone home to his parish - the prisoner used to work in gardens.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I took the prisoner, and found on her duplicates of the property.

WILLIAM HARRISON. I am a pawnbroker, and live at Brentford. I have a sheet, a quilt, and a blanket, pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39 - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-188

186. FRANCIS BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 6 handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the goods of John English .

EDWARD MEREDITH . I am in the employ of Mr. John English , a hosier , of the Strand . The prisoner and another boy came to his shop on the 13th of November, to look at some silk handkerchiefs; the prisoner wished to leave 9d. with the other boy, for a silk handkerchief - I went to the end of the shop for a pair of scissors, and when I returned I missed a piece of silk handkerchiefs; the prisoner had a black apron on, and I made no doubt but the handkerchiefs were under it - I ran to him; the other gave me a shove, pushed me against the counter, and got off - I took the prisoner, and he gave me these handkerchiefs from under his apron; I have made inquires, and find his friends are honest people - I think the other boy led him into it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18291203-189

187. JAMES COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 tea-kettle, value 10s. , the goods of Peter Paillet .

PETER PAILLET. I am a publican , and live in Cable-street, Wellclose-square . On the 10th of November the prisoner was in my house, in company with two others they all went away together, and I missed the tea-kettle from the tap-room; the prisoner was taken up the same evening.

THOMAS WHITTER. I am servant to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner and two others come to our house - I saw the kettle while they were there; I missed it when they were gone, and there was a quart-pot over the fire, with hot water in it - the prisoner and his companions had a basket; I do not know which carried it.

WILLIAM ESTILL. I am assistant to Mr. Price, a pawn

broker. The prisoner brought this kettle, and asked 4s. for it; my master said I might lend 2s. on it, which I did.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There are many thousands like it- I am innocent of it; the pawnbroker cannot know me, as I never was in his house in my life - I had two shipmates with me, and if any one had taken the kettle it must have been seen.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-190

188. JOHN FEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 copper-ball, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Edward Kelly , and fixed to a certain building of his .

EDWARD KELLY , I have some houses in Marylebone . The prisoner lodged in one, which another person rented of me - the tenants ran away in the night; I saw this ball safe on the 2nd of November, when I put a man in possession of a few things which were left.

THOMAS OSBORNE. The prisoner came to me, and said,"Will you buy a cock, a ball, and some pipe?" I said,"Where did you get it?" he said, "Over the way, at one of Kelly's houses;" I said."It don't belong to you;" he said, "It matters not - will you buy it?" I said, "You may bring it;" he went and got it, and I told Mr. Kelly, who had him taken. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-191

189. WILLIAM WICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 plane, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Skinner .

JOSEPH SKINNER. I am a carpenter . I lost my plane, but did not miss it till a person came and asked if Mr. Wicks worked there; I said, No - they then produced the plane, and I knew it to be mine: it had been in my workshop, in Frederick-place, Hampstead-road - I knew the prisoner, but he did not work there; he has assisted the men, but I suspected him, and gave the men orders not to admit him - I have lost many tools.

WILLIAM HOLT. On the 21st of November, at a quarter past five o'clock I met the prisoner in the street; I asked what he had got, he said a plane which he was going to pawn - I asked what he was to have for it; he said 2s., and it was his father's.

(Property produced and sworn to.) GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-192

190. JAMES SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 1 shift, value 2s.; 3 frocks, value 2s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Mary King .

JOSEPH PEARCE . I am a Police-constable. On the 23rd of November I was in the Coal-yard, Drury-lane, about half-past six o'clock in the evening; I met the prisoner with a bundle under his arm - I asked what he had there; he said some things he had taken out of pawn - I looked, and found they were wet, and said they would not take them in in that state: he said Yes they did, and he would take me to the house - I said I would go; in going along he said he got them from his mother, in Short's-gardens; I took him to the watch-house and went there, but found no such person - I went to him again, he burst into tears, and told me where he got them.

MARY KING. I am single , and live in Fox-court , about half a mile from Drury-lane. I lost this property from my counter, on the 24th of November; it was damp - I had had them hanging on my door, and put them on my counter: I went out, and when I returned they were gone.

GUILTY . Aged 17. Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-193

191. MARGARET ROWCLIFFE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 5lbs, weight of beef, value 2s. , the goods of William Ryder .

CHARLES BENTLEY. I am servant to William Ryder , of Dean-street, Westminster . On Saturday, the 28th of November, about ten o'clock in the evening, 1 saw the prisoner looking over the salt beef tray, which stood partly outside - she took a piece, and I thought she was coming to have it weighed, but she walked off with it - I went after her, and said, "What are you going to do with that beef?" she dropped it, and I took it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to mercy by the Jury.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18291203-194

192. GEORGE ROLFE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 3 live same ducks, price 4s. 6d. , the property of Edward Clarke .

GEORGE WILLIAM BELL. I am fourteen years of age. I know Mr. Edward Clarke - he lives opposite Bartholomew-place , and had nineteen ducks, but he has lost them all - they used to go about: on the 27th of November he had six in a ditch behind my father's house, and about twelve o'clock I saw the prisoner and two others in the field; I watched them, and saw two of them get into the ditch, the others drove them up, and the prisoner put one into his pocket, and another lad took another - I went up stairs, got out at window, and went to Mr. Clarke's- a man and I pursued the prisoner: they had taken all the six ducks, and three were found on the prisoner.

WILLIAM THOROUGHGOOD. I live with Mr. Edward Clarke . He had six ducks; Bell told me some boys were taking them - I ran and overtook the prisoner and another lad; there was one on before them with a bag, and no doubt he had the other three - I found these three in the prisoner's pocket, and knew them to be my master's; I asked what he had got in his pocket - he said it was nothing to me; I put my hand into his pocket, and found these three ducks.

Prisoner. A young man asked me to help him catch six ducks, and told me to carry these three with him to Holloway.

RICHARD DEYKIN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found on him this tinder-box and this hammer; this tinder-box is such as thieves generally use, if they cannot afford a phosphorus-box.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the field.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-195

193. WILLIAM PAIN was indicted for stealing on the 16th of October , 2 hats, value 38s. , the goods of Samuel Silk .

SAMUEL SILK. I am a hatter . The prisoner is a hatter , but was not in my employ; I gave him leave, when he had work, to do it at my shop, which is near the Coburg Theatre: on the 16th of October he was there at work - I said I had two hats to take to Mr. Lewis, a publican, and one to another person: the prisoner and I went to Mr.

Lewis, and he was not at home - we sat down and had a glass of refreshment, and he said he would take the hats to the bar for safety, as people were coming in; he got up and took them, but did not return - I inquired if they were left, and the landlady said he took them out; he was taken on the 6th of November - these are the hats.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What were you doing? A. Taking a glass of rum and water, and playing at bagatelle: I could swear to these hats - the linings were out: I did not swear to them before the Magistrate - I believe they are mine.

JOHN WILCOX . I am a pawnbroker. I took in these hats on the 16th of October, I believe, from the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-196

194. THOMAS ROBERT LURCHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 tea-kettle, value 3s.; 1 book, value 1s., and 1 shawl, value 3s. , the goods of Catherine Lurchen , widow .

CATHERINE LURCHEN. I am a widow. The prisoner is my grandson; he has lived with me some years - I found a number of duplicates one Sunday morning; but I did not miss these articles till I saw them before the Magistrate.

GEORGE WILLIAMS. I am a pawnbroker. I have a book, pawned by the prisoner, and a tea-kettle, pawned by Richard Avent.

RICHARD AVENT. I have known the prisoner three months; we used to go to school together - he asked me to pawn this tea-kettle for his grandmother, and I did for 3s.: I gave the prisoner the money - he went in doors with it, then came out and gave me a halfpenny.

FREDERICK LANCE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shawl, pawned by a person in the name of Smith: I think it was by one of these witnesses.

RICHARD AVENT. I pawned it for the prisoner; he said his grandmother was ill, and in want of money, and if they asked the name, I was to say Smith.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

CATHERINE LURCHEN . He is a terror to the whole neighbourhood, as well as myself; he gave me a blow on my head on the 5th of November.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-197

195. ABRAHAM HANDFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 5 tiles, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Smart .

JOHN BIGLEY. I know the stack of tiles near Halfmoon-crescent : about half past twelve o'clock, on the night of the 15th of November, I heard a rattling among them -I went out and took the prisoner, with these tiles on his shoulder: I asked what he had get - he said it was nothing to me; I said they were tiles, and belonged to Mr. Smart: he said it was nothing to me - I said, "You shall go to the watch-house," and took him up the street; he tried to get away - I called Watch! and the watchman came: there was another man with the prisoner - he dropt the tiles he was carrying, and got away; here are twenty-five tiles in all - he said he was going to build a pig-sty.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Where were you? A.At the corner of Vittoria-street: I had been spending my evening at the Marquis Cornwallis - I was sober; I do not know who took the tiles from the stack.

ROBERT NICHOLLS . I was with Bigley; what he has stated is correct.

JOHN WRIGHT. I am a Police-constable. The prisoner was given into my charge; I asked him where he got them- he said, "From a building," but would not satisfy me from what building.

RICHARD SMART. I had a tile-heap at Half-mooncrescent: I looked at it the morning after this happened, and at least one hundred tiles had been taken.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you not aware there was another person? A. I have heard so; I have not told the prisoner if he would tell me who the other was I would let him go, nor did I authorize my son to write word so to him - the prisoner is married, and worked for me for four years.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of jobbing for myself, and had a job for Mr. Schofield; the tiles I had were part of what I had left - here is a bill of them.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-198

196. RICHARD FARNSBY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 4 brushes, value 3s. , the goods of James Percival and another.

HENRY ALDER . I was in the shop of Mr. Percival, an oilman , in High-street, Whitechapel , on the 29th of October, and was told a man had taken something; I ran out, and as the prisoner was turning up Angel-alley he dropped these brushes: I took them and brought him back.

CHARLES PERCIVAL. I am in partnership with James Percival . These are our brushes; they were taken from the door-post, two or three feet within the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I was pushed into the shop; I did not do it with any design to rob - I had been having a pint of porter.

GUILTY . Aged 37. - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18291203-199

197. BENJAMIN ENNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 trunk, value 1s.; 11b. of thread, value 1s., and - oz. of sewing silk, value 6d. , the goods of Sarah Rowe .

SARAH ROWE. I keep a stay-shop , in High Holborn . On the 1st of December, at half-past six o'clock in the evening the prisoner came in, and took a trunk off a shelf behind the counter: I saw him in a looking-glass - I went out, pursued, and a gentleman gave charge of him; the trunk contains the property stated.

JOHN SMITH. I am a Police-constable. I was on duty, and saw the prisoner carrying the trunk; a gentleman told me he had stolen it, and I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18291203-200

198. SAMUEL BRAIL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 tub, value 2s. , the goods of George Rogers .

WILLIAM WHITE. On the 14th of November, I saw the prisoner with this tub; I asked him where he got it - he gave me no answer, and I took him into custody.

MARY ROGERS. I am the wife of George Rogers . This is his tub, and was in the drying ground, where we dry the clothes; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner. I did it through hunger.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-201

199. JOHN BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 8s. , the goods of William Jackman .

JAMES KENNERLY . I copy music. On the 28th of November, at half-past five o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another boy; they went by Mr. Jackman's shop, and round the corner of Denmark-street - the prisoner shortly after came away from his companion, and went up to the shoes, which were fastened at the door with some iron wire; he pulled one pair, and another pair fell - his companion came up, and held out his hand to take them; the prisoner saw me coming, and dropped them - I took them up, and watched his companion, who went on to another street, and joined the prisoner; I gave charge of the prisoner - I had never seen him before, but I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where do you live? A.At. No. 68, Davies-street - I have given evidence in a case before, in which I took the prisoner, because I saw him commit a felony; I was a prosecutor myself once, and have given evidence in two cases, I believe - I was here last Session, and two or three Sessions before; I saw the prisoner try to take some cloaks in Oxford-street - I did not try to take him then; he was in Crown-street when I took him - I had my expences in the former prosecutions.

CHARLES TODD. I was in the service of Mr. William Jackman . On the 28th of November I heard a pair of shoes fall; I went to the door, and saw a pair lying - I looked out, and saw a man run away; the witness gave me these shoes, which are my master's - he went out, and brought the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether your master was asked to come here to-day? A. No, he was not- the person I saw running was about fifteen yards from me; he went in a straight line - I heard no cry of Stop thief! this witness was formerly in my master's employ.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my father's, and turning down Crown-street, when this man came and took me - I had not been near the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18291203-202

200. JAMES ARTHUR was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 band-box, value 1s.; 4 dresses, value 3l.; 5 night-caps, value 5s.; 1 pair of stays, value 3s.; 2 bonnets, value 1l.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 2 collars, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 3 aprons, value 3s.; 2 night-gowns, value 4s.; 2 petticoats, value 2s., and 1 shawl, value 10s. , the goods of Mary Ann Bristow .

MARY ANN BRISTOW. I am single . I lived at Mrs. Maylin's, No. 56, Wigmore-street , previous to the 24th of November - I went there that day, and packed up a box containing the articles stated in this indictment; I went out, and saw the prisoner in Cavendish-square - I asked him if he would earn 1s. to take a box to my uncle's, at the Bull, in Leadenhall-street; he said Yes, he should be very glad, for he had been looking for a job all day, and could not get one - I told him to go to Mr. Maylin's, ask the servant for Miss Bristow's box, and take it to the Bull, in Leadenhall-street ; I waited for him in Cavendish-square, and his brother waited with me - I waited ten minutes, and then told his brother to go to him, and tell him to bring the box to me at the Bull; I went there, but the prisoner did not come - I have never seen the box nor its contents since; they are all lost - I afterwards found the prisoner at No. 9, Sandford-street, Lissongrove; I asked what he had done with my things - he said he did not know me, nor any thing about the box -I gave him in charge; he afterwards said he gave it to a man at the corner of Bird-street, while he went to look for the lady.

MARH BUSH. I am servant to Mr. Maylin, of Wigmore-street - Miss Bristow lodged there some time. On the 24th of November the prisoner came for her box - he said he had come for a box for the lady who had just left, to take to the Bull, Leadenhall-street; I gave him the box, which I know was full, because it was very heavy; I do not know what was in it - the prisoner said it was of no consequence about its being tied up, as he could put it on his head; I helped it on his head - he said the lady was waiting for him in Cavendish-square.

GEORGE ROGERS. I am a Police-officer. I went with Miss Bristow to Sundford-street, Lisson-grove; I found the prisoner, and asked if he knew any thing about a box he had to take to Leadenhall-street - he said No; I asked him again, and then he said he gave it to a man in the street, while he went to look for the lady, and when he came back, the box and the man were gone.

Prisoner's Defence. She did not say where I was to take it - I left it with a man while I looked for her, and it was gone.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-203

201. THOMAS SNASHALL was indicted for bigamy .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WOOD . I am a sawyer. I know the prisoner -I saw him married at Maidstone to Rebecca White ; twenty-three years ago last July, they lived together as man and wife - I saw her about a month ago; she now lives in town.

ELIZABETH GANDER . I married the prisoner four years ago at Stepney church - he professed to be a widower; he was out of his mind some years ago, and was in Bethnal Green mad-house - I had two children by him.

WILLIAM WILSON . I have a register of marriage which I got from Maidstone church; I examined it by the book- (read.)

Prisoner's Defence. Elizabeth Gander knew I was married, and the parish of Stepney gave me money to marry her; we had lived together sixteen months before we were married.

GUILTY . Aged 48. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18291203-204

202. JAMES DOHERTY was indicted for receiving, on the 23rd of November , 11 pairs of spectacles, value 2l.; 1 eye-glass, value 14s., and 1 perspective-glass, value 2s., the goods of Edward Wrench , which had been lately before stolen, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES ALDRIDGE. I am errand-boy to Mr. Edward Wrench, of Gray's Inn-terrace, Gray's Inn-lane. On the 23rd of November I was going down Saffron-hill, and saw the prisoner in his shop - he called me, gave me 3d., and asked where I worked, and what I worked at; I told

him, and he said,

"Do you think you could get any thing?" I said, "I dare say I might," and then went on my errand; that was the first I saw of him - on the Saturday night I took him three pairs of spectacles; I thought he meant could I steal any thing, when he asked if I could get any thing; on Saturday night he was behind his counter - on the Monday I went again, and took him seven pairs more; he gave me 2s. for them, but said they were not so good as those I took him at first. and he could get such as them at 4d. or 6d. a pair - he had given me 1s. for the first three pairs; I afterwards took him a little telescope, six pairs more of spectacles, and a gold eye-glass - he gave me some money, and said it was only plated.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Have you ever had any conversation with him before? A. No - by"getting" I understood him to mean to steal - he did not say what he would give me; I mentioned this to the Magistrate at the second examination - I was told by a boy to take a silver spoon about a month ago; it was taken to Mr. Saunders' by the boy - he was stopped, and we were both taken; I said I knew nothing about the spectacles - I did not say I would swear I never had them; my father took one pair, which I told him I had found - they were stolen; my father said, "Tell me the truth where you found them, and I will keep them till I find an owner."

JOSEPH EVANS. I live with my parents, in Ravenshall-rents, Liquorpond-street. Aldridge came to our house, called me out, and gave me a silver spoon to sell; I sold two pairs of spectacles and an eye-glass to the prisoner on Saturday week - he gave me 8d. for the spectacles, and 3d. for the eye-glass; I saw Aldridge take two pairs of spectacles to the prisoner's shop, for which he gave him 8d. - I took two more, for which he gave me 8d.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If he has sworn you told him to steal the spoon. it is not true? A. No - he told me he had picked it up; I never stole any thing- I have not come from the prison; my father bailed me - I was in prison about six months ago, for being with some boys who stole a vice and some snuff-boxes; the Magistrate liberated me - I was never in prisoner about any thing else; I am twelve years old.

JOHN LIMBRICK. I am an officer. I received information, and went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's on the 23rd of November, and asked if he had bought any spectacles of a boy - he hesitated; I said I should search if he did not answer - he then turned, and gave me eleven pairs and an eye-glass off the shelf; I asked if he had any thing else - he said No; I took him to Hatton-garden and saw Aldridge, who said there was an opera-glass - the prisoner then said, "Yes, I have one - it is on a shelf in my window;" I went back, and his wife gave it to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Has not the prisoner served the office of constable, and carried on a respectable business? A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18291203-205

203. WILLIAM SEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 7 handkerchiefs, value 14s the goods of Henry May .

ELIZABETH MAY . I am the wife of Henry May - I live at Notting-hill , and am a laundress. On the 23rd of November I lost seven silk pocket-handkerchiefs from my garden; I put them out at five o'clock in the evening, and went about seven to take them in - I then missed seven out of sixteen; they belonged to different persons who I work for - I have seen the prisoner about the place.

Cross-examined by MR. DUNN. Q.Did not a gentleman claim them at the office? A. No - here are three of them marked with my private mark, and four with the gentleman's name; here is C. R. for Mr. Collin Robertson , D. R. for Mr. Divie Robertson, and C. F. W. for Mr. Philip Williams - I am positive these are the handkerchiefs.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON. I am a Police-patrol. I saw the prisoner, at a quarter before six o'clock, on the 23rd of November, run out of the Uxbridge-road, about a mile from Tyburn-gate - knowing him, I went and caught him; I asked what he had got - he said Nothing; I put my hand into his bosom, and pulled out a wet pockethandkerchief - he pulled it out of my hand, and said,"What do you want with my pocket-handkerchief?" I called my brother officer, and we took him - I found these other handkerchiefs wet on him; he said they were his also.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he found them? A. Yes, in Black Lion-lane, wrapped up in a white rag, which he had thrown away - they were in his different pockets.

JOHN BICKER. I was with Thompson - what he has stated is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in a cloth; I took them out, and threw the cloth away, as it was all over mud.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-206

204. THOMAS LEE and JABEZ PHILLIPS were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 tea-kettle, value 10s. , the goods of John Stewart .

THOMAS FOGG . I am a Thomas Police-constable. On Friday, the 13th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I saw Phillips in the shop of Mr. Stewart, a coppersmith , in Cable-street , and Lee was walking by the door; I saw Phillips hand out this kettle to Lee - I took Phillips, and my brother took Lee.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. What distance was Philips from Lee? A. He was talking to him for some time; he was walking sometimes, and then he stood and talked to him.

JAMES FOGG. I am a Thames Police-constable. I had had some conversation with Mr. Stewart, and went to the shop; I saw Lee and another boy walking backwards and forwards, and Phillips working in the shop, and now and then he came to the door and spoke to Lee - I told my brother to go one way, and I would go the other; in a few minutes I saw Lee come along with this kettle - I caught him; I did not see who he got it from - he said a boy had given it, him. and had ran away; I took him to the Ship, and asked if Phillips was the boy - he said No;

he afterwards told his sister at the office, that Phillips gave it him, while he put his coat on.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say Phillips gave it him to take to a person? A. No; there is no window to the shop - it is a half sash, and the door was closed; he could see what Phillips was doing when he stopped - he spoke to him two or three times.

JOHN STEWART . This is my kettle; Phillips was in my employ - I had seen it in the morning when I went out; when I came back, the place, where it had stood was vacant.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen that kettle in the morning? A. I saw the shelf full; I do not know that I I had seen this - if one had been sold, I should have been told of it; I have, I suppose, a hundred kettles - they are all marked.

Phillips' Defence. I was not at work; I never work after six o'clock at night; it was a quarter-past six - I went up for my jacket; I put it on, and called my mate Dick - while I was calling him the gentleman came in, and said, "Who gave this boy a kettle;" I said, "What kettle?" he said, "You gave the boy a kettle;" I said No, and he put on the handcuffs, and took me to the watch-house - if I had robbed my master, it was easy to escape.

Lee received a good character.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-207

205. CORNELIUS GLANDFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 20lbs, weight of pork, value 10s., and 1 dish, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Nathaniel Crossland .

NATHANIEL CROSSLAND. I live in Brick-lane, St. Luke's . I lost a piece of pork from my window last Saturday, at half-past seven o'clock in the morning; the tray in which it stood was full two feet from the window - a girl who was lighting the fire said some person had taken a dish of pork; I ran out and saw the prisoner carrying it up Seward-street; I followed him - he saw me, threw it down; and ran off; I called Stop thief! several persons came up, and met him - he turned back, and I took him; my little boy was close after me, and he took the pork up- when I brought the prisoner back, he offered to pay for the dish.

EDWARD BURFORT. I saw the prisoner come into Seward-street, with the pork, and a ticket on it; I saw him throw it down, and the prosecutor took him.

WILLIAM CHURCHILL . I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Brick-lane, and saw a young man go past; he took this dish off the window, and gave it to me - I went up Seward-street; the prosecutor came after me - I put down the dish, and he took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-208

206. GEORGE OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 tub, value 1s., and 4 baskets, value 7s. , the goods of Richard Booth .

RICHARD BOOTH . I am a labourer . On the 28th of November I had a tub and some baskets in my yard, in Chequer-alley, White Cross-street , and did not miss them till I saw the prisoner offering the tub for sale, at half-past ten o'clock the same night, in Whitecross street; I said,"What are you going to do with that?" he said no one should buy it for less than a bob - I am sure it was mine; I had put on the bottom hoop myself, and it had some letters on, but they are almost out; I saw part of one of my baskets burning - I know it was mine; the bottom handle is off one side, and the top handle on the other.

Prisoner. I do not know how he can swear to that basket - I have had it to hold my stuff for more than twelve months. Witness. I put some grains into it, and there were some when I found it.

GEORGE HOOKER. I saw the prisoner with this tub, - the prosecutor gave charge of him, but said he did not wish to press the charge, and begged me to let him have his property, and let the prisoner go; the prisoner begged very hard to be off, and I let him go: in half an hour the prosecutor came again, and stated that he had lost four baskets - I went with him, and found the prisoner in Whitecross-street; I found this bit of basket at his house.

GEORGE WOOD . The prisoner was Brought to the watch-house - the prosecutor stated he had lost some baskets; I asked the prisoner where he got the tub - he said a man named Harris gave it him to sell for 2s., and they were to divide the money; I went to Gravel-walk to the prisoner's house, and found this part of a basket.

Prisoner's Defence. This basket is my own.

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18291203-209

207. MARY RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 1 pewter pot, value 1s. the goods of Samuel Brown Underwood ; and 1 pewter pot, value 1s. , the goods of William Boyce .

SAMUEL BROWN UNDERWOOD . I keep the Ship public-house in Upper Marylebone-street . On the 2nd of December, the officer found this pot, which is mine; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN MAHEW . I am a Police-constable. I saw the prisoner in Charlton-street - I thought she looked rather bulky; I took her in a chessemonger's shop - I found one pot under her arm, one in her pocket, and one under her petticoat; one belongs to a Mr. Squires, but he is ill, and is not here.

HENRY PORTER. I am in the service of Mr. William Boyce . This pot is his.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at work over the water; I had been to several houses in the street, and I went into this shop - I did not see the officer; he came in, pulled me about, and took things from me - I had no pot about me; I had been out as a nurse, and went to ask the shop-keeper for Mr. Jamieson.

GUILTY . Aged 60. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-210

208. JOSEPH TURNER and MICHAEL HOGAN were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 3 coats, value 5l. , the goods of Thomas Howard .

THOMAS HOWARD . I keep a livery-stable in Jermyn-street, St. James' . These coats were in a coach-house at the bottom of my yard, on the 2nd of December; I had seen them safe ten minutes before they were taken - I was in the counting-house, and heard Stop thief! called; I went out, found my yard thronged, and

Turner in custody - we then went to the watch-house; the other prisoner was there, and these coats were produced, they belong to different gentlemen, and were in my care.

THOMAS WILTSHIRE . I am ostler at this place. I put these coats into a gig at ten minutes after four o'clock; in a few minutes there was a cry, and the prisoners were taken.

FREDERICK MANAFIELD . I was in Jermyn-street, and saw four or five ill-looking fellows about the prosecutor's yard; Turner was one of them - he and another went down the yard, went to the gig, and took out three coats; when they came to the top, one of them had two coats, and the other had one - the man who had two, said to the men at the top, "Come, take one;" I ran, and told my father - he ran out, and I cried Stop thief! I cannot say who had the two coats, whether it was Hogan or not.

Prisoner Hogan. When I came to the watch-house. he said he knew nothing about me. Witness. I say so now - I do not know who it was; I picked up one coat.

GEORGE DUCKETT . I have one coat, which I picked up in the street, after I had taken Turner, and given him to my serjeant; it was dropped by a man who made his escape.

CHARLES BRINSDON . I have one coat delivered to me by the witness; I saw Turner running up Air-street, and a mob after him.

WILLIAM LONDON . I was on my beat, in Leicester-square, and met Hogan with this coat under his arm, at a quarter-past four o'clock on Wednesday last - he was walking; I challenged him - he at first said it was his own, and then that he found it.

Hogan's Defence. I saw it on the step of a door in the Haymarket; this witness said, "Come along with me -I thought it would be d - d odd if I did not have one for the Sessions as well as another," and he took me to the watch-house.

Turner's Defence. I was walking down Jermyn-street; I went into the yard, and saw a boy with two coats - I ran up the street, and was taken.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HOGAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-211

209. RICHARD SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 22lbs. of cheese, value 11s. , the goods of Henry Jacobie .

MARY ANN JACOBIE . I am the daughter of Henry Jacobie ; he is a coffee-roaster . On the 1st of December the watchman came, and asked if I had lost any cheese -I said No; but on looking round I missed it from about half way in the shop; I had seen it half an hour before -I found it at the watch-house; this is it - I can swear to it by a piece I had cut out of the side, and it has my father's name on it; it is dirty, because it was thrown down.

JOHN SHIELDS . I was on duty, between nine and half-past nine o'clock last Tuesday evening - I saw the prisoner and another man - the prisoner had this coat, and something rolled in it; I followed him close, and said "What have you got there, friend?" he made no answer, but ran away- this was in the Back-road, St. George's in the East, where the prosecutor's shop is; I pursued, but I fell over some dirt - I got up, and sprang my rattle; I still pursued - I came up to him and said, "What have you got?" he said, "Nothing but this;" and gave me this coat - he said, "I was running after the thief;" he had dropped the cheese, but I did not see it drop - his hat fell off, and there was some hay in it.

JOSEPH WOODROW. I was going up the Back-road, and followed the prisoner; I saw him drop this cheese out of the coat, at the corner of Clark-street - I took it up, then threw it down, and followed him; I stopped him - Shields and another man took him; I had not lost sight of him after he had dropped the cheese - he only ran about thirty yards.

JOHN SKUES . About half-past nine o'clock last Tuesday, I heard the rattle; I ran up towards my brother watchman - as I turned the corner I saw this cheese on the ground; I took it up, and followed the prisoner - a woman took up his hat, and gave it me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to carry a chest - I was returning home, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran after the man, and they took me instead of him.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-212

210. JAMES SEELIE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 14lbs. of cheese, value 9s. , the goods of James Lee .

JAMES LEE. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Oxford market - this cheese is mine. On the 30th of October, I saw the prisoner take it off the pile, and go out with it; I could not leave my shop - I saw him take it, and throw it down.

Prisoner. I was waiting for a coal-heaver who I had been at work for; the prosecutor came to the door, and told me to be off - I saw no cheese. Witness. I saw him take the cheese, and go out of the shop - I do not know that I told him to go off that night; I have done so before.

JURY. Q. Did you tell him to be off on the night he stole the cheese? A. I do not think I did, but I have before - I have sent my son to tell him to leave his wicked ways.

Q. Do you think it likely, having lost the cheese, that you would have told him so? A. I declare to God I did not; I am certain I did not that night.

Q. How far was the cheese from the shop when you took it up? A. I suppose a yard and a half.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-213

211. JOHN STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 24lbs. weight of butter, value 24s., and 1 half-firkin, value 4d. , the goods of John Topts .

JOHN TOPTS . I am a cheesemonger . I lost a tub and some butter in it, about eight o'clock at night, on the 2nd of December, from a show-board inside my shop, in Charlton-street, Somers'-town - I had seen it about two minutes before I went out; I was out about an hour, and when I returned it was gone.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM. I saw the prisoner and a companion of his, standing near the prosecutor's door - his companion took the tub off the board, and the prisoner received it from him - he crossed the street, and I followed him; I saw no one come up - I went and asked

where he got it - he said he had just picked it up in a field: I said that was wrong, collared him, and took him to a public-house - he said he was sorry for it, and that distress made him do it; I took him to the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-214

212. SUSAN SCARBOROUGH and ELIZA MURRAY were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 1 jacket, value 30s.; 1 waistcoat, value 15s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 20s.; 1 hat, value 14s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 9s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6s., and 1 pair of braces, value 2s. , the goods of Andrew Brown .

ANDREW BROWN I am a sailor . On the 3rd of November I went with the articles stated, on my back to Murray's house, between eight and nine o'clock, with Scarborough - I was rather tipsy; after I had been there a little while, I did not undress myself, but Scarborough undressed me - I went to bed; my clothes were put on a chair - in the morning I found myself on the floor, and Scarborough was standing by the bed and said, "I am going to get you a pint of beer and a quartern of gin, as you were drunk last night;" my clothes were were all gone, and I have never seen them since - I sat there till the afternoon before I got any thing to put on; I have nothing to say against Murray; there were two men up stairs, who seemed to be Scarborough's companions.

Prisoner Scarborough. Q.Did not you come in with a shipmate named Duncan? A. Yes.

SAMUEL JAMIESON . The prisoner, Scarborough, owned at the public-house, that she knew about the jacket, waistcoat, and handkerchief, belonging to the prosecutor she said she had 8s. on the jacket, 3s. on the waistcoat, and 1s. on the handkerchief; when she was taken to the watch-house she had a kind of handkerchief tied round her wrist, which she said was part of the handkerchief.

Prisoner Scarborough. Q. Were not you in the City of Canton public-house? A. Yes; it was there I saw you - I did not want to drag you to the watch-house; I waited till the officer came, but I did not fetch him - you were the worse for liquor.

COURT. Q.Why did not you go before the Magistrate? A. I did; I think it was on the 3rd of November - I saw Scarborough at the public-house, about eleven o'clock; it must have been in the night, or early in the morning that she had the things.

Scarborough's Defence. My mother keeps a lodging-house; the prosecutor came in, and said he would stop with me all night - he gave me 6s.; he sent for some liquor - I was taken up to bed, and so was he - when I awoke he was lying in a beastly state; I got up, and went out - when I returned I was told he was gone to Poplar; I am innocent, and I believe my father and mother, and this man want to send me out of the country.

SCARBOROUGH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

MURRAY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-215

213. ELIZA PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 15 yards of printed cotton, value 13s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 6d. , the goods of Henry Bordin .

JOHN WALKER. I am in the employ of Henry Bordin , of Whitechapel . On the 3rd of December the prisoner came in, between four and five o'clock - the lad in the shop said she had stolen a piece of print; I jumped over the counter, and took it from under her shawl - on examining her basket I found a pair of stockings, which are also my master's; she had been bargaining in the shop for three quarters of an hour; she had bought some calico, and I think a pair of socks - when she was taken she said she did not intend to take the things, or something to that effect.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18291203-216

214. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 2 pairs of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of James Blake .

JAMES BLAKE . On the 3rd of December I was in my parlour in Southampton-place, Camden-town ; my wife said, "There is a man taking some shoes;" I went out, and saw the prisoner running - he dropped the shoes, and I took them up; these are them - I took him, and he said it was distress made him do it.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-217

215. SARAH DAVIS and ANN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 27 yards of printed cotton, value 20s. , the goods of Benjamin Williams .

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS. I am a linen-draper , of Whitechapel-road . The two prisoners came to my shop between four and five o'clock on the 30th of November; Davis asked to look at some prints - I think I had seen her before- I am sure she is the person who came in, with the other prisoner: I showed them a great variety of prints; they were very difficult to please, but after a length of time Smith selected a piece, and told me to cut off seven yards; she paid me a shilling, and said she would call on the Saturday following, and pay me - as they were going from the shop my young man said he thought they had taken a piece of print- we pursued, brought them back, and Davis dropped this print; I had gone two or three times to the window, and to the end of the shop, to get prints for them.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. It is not at all unusual for poor people to pay part? A.No; I did not look on the counter before I went after them - Davis dropped this piece on the floor; I did not say I did not see her drop it, but saw her take it from the floor: I brought Smith back, and my young man brought Davis; they were not examined in the street - they were only just outside the shop - we went in altogether; I am sure I saw Davis drop it - she was in a stooping position. and it is difficult to say whether it dropped from her shawl or her petticoat; I am sure this print was not laying in the shop when I went out, for I must have stepped on it or have seen it.

COURT. Q.Were they close together when they were bargaining? A. Yes - they talked together, and one rose while the other sat down in the chair.

MARTHA WARNER . I am in the prosecutor's employ.

I saw the prisoners come in - they were together, and the things were shown them; the prosecutor went after them, and brought them back - I saw Davis drop this print from under her gown.

Cross-examined. Q. What part of the shop were you in? A.In the middle, behind the counter - they all came in together; when they were brought back, Davis did stoop to take this up. but I saw it come from her gown- I have always stated so.

Davis' Defence. We went to buy a gown - Smith paid 1s.; we came out - the prosecutor and shopman followed us, and said, "Come back;" I said, "Certainly - what do you want?" he said he should send for an officer, as we had stolen a piece of print; I said, "How can you say so? here is a piece on the floor;" he said at the office that I dropped it, and he put it on the counter, and then the young lady said I dropped it from under my gown.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-218

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8.

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

216. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MESSRS. SCARLET and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

SARAH BURRIDGE. I am the wife of John Burridge , and keep a chandler's-shop in Cock-lane, Smithfield. On the 15th of October the prisoner came and asked for 1d. worth of bread and cheese, and then asked for 2d. worth - he said he was in a great hurry, and gave me a half-crown- I said I had not change for more than a shilling, and gave the half-crown to Yeoman to get change; while she was gone the prisoner wasin a great hurry, and asked me for the shilling which I had in my hand; he said he had a friend waiting, he would take the shilling, and call in a quarter of an hour for the rest of the change; I gave him the shilling, and he went away - Yeoman came in directly, and returned me the half-crown; I went round to Burton's winevaults, which is about two hundred yards off, and found him drinking there - I showed him the half-crown, and told him it was bad; he asked me to walk out with him - he took it in his hand, looked at it, and said it might be his or not; I asked him for my shilling - he took it out of his pocket, and I took it out of his hand; I told him to pay me for the bread and cheese, or I would apprehend him - he said he could not do that, for he had no money; I got hold of his hand, and took the half-crown out of it; the tried to get away - I followed him towards Giltspur-street, and stopped him in Bartholomew-close; I gave the officer the same half-crown - as nothing was found on him, my husband thought it best to discharge him.

MARY YEOMAN. I was charing at Burridge's, and she gave me the half-crown; I could not get it changed, and returned it to her.

FRANCIS GITTINS. I am a street-keeper, and was present when the prisoner was stopped; Burridge gave me the half-crown, which I marked, and now produce - I found nothing on him, and let him go.

RICHARD ROBERTS. I keep the Queen's Head public-house, Whitecross-street. On the 11th of November the prisoner came in with another man and a female, and called for a quartern of gin, which came to 4d.; the prisoner gave me a crown-piece - they began to drink the gin, but I discovered the crown was bad, and would not allow them to finish it; I told them it was bad - they began to abuse me, and said it was not bad, and that they were in the habit of taking more money than me - I sent for an officer, and they were secured; they had said they had no more money, but the officer found halfpence enough among them to pay for the gin - I kept the crown-piece, marked it, and delivered it to Howard.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not take it out of your pocket? A. No, it never went out of my hand.

ROBERT HOWARD. I took the prisoner in charge, and received this crown-piece from Roberts; I found no money on the prisoner, but 1l. 0s. 6 1/2d. in good money on the other man.

JOHN FIELD. I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. This crown-piece is counterfeit, and the half-crown also.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined 6 Months , and to find sureties for 6 Months more .

Reference Number: t18291203-219

217. MARY BRADDICK was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM HICKSON . I am a fruiterer, and live in Bull's Head-passage, Leadenhall-market. On the 24th of October the prisoner came to my shop, and asked for 3d. worth of apples - she tendered me a crown-piece, and I gave her change without noticing it, but afterwards found a bad one among my money. On the 29th she came again, about three o'clock in the afternoon, for 3d. or 4d. worth of apples, and gave me a half-crown; I went into the counting-house, took out the had crown, and said, "Good woman, you must know this crown-piece;" she said No - I said,"Well, you must know this had half-crown - where did you get it?" she said she took it at a shop up the market"- I said then she could show me the shop; she walked along the market, and let something fall from her person, which I took up, and gave to the officer - it was seven half-crowns in a cotton handkerchief; I said she was a bad woman, and asked how she came to pass such bad money- she said she was extremely sorry; I gave the eight half-crowns to the officer - I put the whole together.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I apprehended the prisoner, and received a crown-piece, eight half-crowns, and two shillings, from Ilickson.

JOHN FIELD . These eight half-crowns are counterfeit, and all impressed from one mould; the two shillings are also counterfeit.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined 1 Year , and to find sureties for 2 Years more .

Reference Number: t18291203-220

218. HANNAH McCARTHY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-221

219. GEORGE KEMP was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 43 paintings, value 400l. , the goods of John Hewetson ; and WILLIAM ALEXANDER MALCOLM , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Louisa Dibbin .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HEWETSON. I deal in pictures , and live in Brook-street, West-square, Lambeth. I have known Kemp six years; about the 1st of August last I employed him to assist me in the sale of some pictures - I went to Bristol with him, and took the paintings with us; after being there some time I had occasion to come to town, and left him there with them - he went to Weymouth, Exeter, and Southampton, then returned to London, and delivered me forty-three paintings, at the Gerrard's-hall, Basing-lane, about the middle of October; they were Flemish and Dutch paintings chiefly - he said, "There they are for you, safe and sound;" I said they were not sound, for one was badly packed - I went to Gerrard's-hall on the Tuesday, and cleaned it - they were all there then: on the Sunday following I went to Gerrard's-hall, and they were gone; I found them next day, the 29th of October, at Mr. Smart's, Titchbourne-street - I did not then know Malcolm; I went and saw him at Greenwood's, a map-seller, in Regent-street - I then went to a Police-man, called on Malcolm, and asked him about my pictures: he said he had them in his possession, and I might do my best - I asked where they were; he would not tell me - he said he got them from Kemp, and had given him 80l. for them; and that I might go to law to recover them; I said I would get a warrant to apprehend him - he said that was not the way, that I should go regularly to law: the pictures are now in the officer's possession - they are invoiced to me at 457l.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Did you ever advertise in the Times for a situation as lithographer? A. Yes; I never proposed to Kemp to go to Dublin and set up as a surveyor and architect - he made such a proposition to me seven years ago: when we went to Bristol our agreement was that I was to give him one third of the profits on pictures he sold: they were mine - they were sent to me by Cune and Marniffe, at a certain price; they have often drawn bills on me for pictures before I sold them - they sent me some on commission, and some at a certain price; these were sent at a price - I was to have all I could get above that sum, and agreed to give Kemp one third of that profit on what he sold; we travelled together - I never heard of his pawning his watch to keep me from starving, or a double-barrelled gun; I heard of a gun being parted with - I did not get the money; I received 20l. from him when he sent me an account of pictures sold - I do not know who had the delivery-ticket for the pictures, or whether there was one: I was not told there was one, and I could not have them without it - the prisoner had brought them from Southampton; he did not tell me there was a delivery-ticket - I told the people at Gerrard's-hall they were to remain there a few days.

Q.Had not Kemp a claim on you for 79l. and upwards? A.After Malcolm was arrested he made that claim, but never before - he has paid me 54l. 2s. 8d., on account of pictures.

Q. Have you not produced an account of a payment of 54l. 2s. 8d. by Kemp, and yourself of 61l. 4s.? A. I do not recollect the items; I have given the account that was settled by Kemp - I have got 31l. 10s. above the invoice price on a picture, but, calculating the expences, there was no profit - ten guineas of that was Kemp's property, but the expences were to be borne equally by us; he was only to have a share in the profit on what he sold - I told him I was not obliged to pay Cune and Co. for them, till I had sold them, and that I was at liberty to return them: I never said, if sold at less than the invoice they reduced them -Kemp participated in the difference between the invoice price and what they sold at; they were consigned to me by them - I told Kemp I had sold a pair of pictures for 35l. which were marked at 15l. I frequently go to the Shades, in Westminster-road; so does Kemp - we have met there a dozen times, I dare say; I never took my invoices there, and could not have shown them to him there- he has had them in his possession; he was to have one third of the profits - he was engaged as my agent or servant, and I was the agent of Cune and Co.; the pictures left in Kemp's custody, were what he was to sell- he told me he was in the habit of canvassing for Greenwood and Co. at Bristol, which induced me to employ him; it was never proposed to allow him one half the profits - I got a 45l. bill discounted with Mr. Tenant; it was not that money that took me to Bristol; I received it about a week before I went, and left it in town - Kemp paid the expences down and at Bristol; but he kept an account of it, and the expences were to be divided; it was done with my money, but his hand paid it - it was not his money; I gave him money as soon as we got to Bristol - he was to pay one half.

Q.Did he not pay 20l., out of his own pocket, towards a bill of 80l., drawn by Cune and Co., that was dishonoured? A. Yes, when he came to London - it was not dishonoured; I had received 60l. at Bristol - he said he wanted to come up to see his wife and children, that he had a 20l. bill in London, which his friend Malcolm would discount, and he would advance the 20l.; I had only three day's notice of the bill - I did not tell him if he could not advance the 20l. they would send no more pictures, for I knew they would; I had 400l. coming due in a very few days - I never had an execution in my house; I never produced a letter to him stating that there was.

MR. ALLEY. Q. The pictures were consigned to you, and were your exclusive property? A. They were: he had not the least title to them - he was not at all responsible for the payment of them to the consignees; he sent me an account of money due to him, three days after Malcolm was taken - here is an account I settled with him before Malcolm was taken; it is the final settlement, when he came to town, and by this he makes himself a debtor to me of 8l. 15s. 9d., and adds 3l. odd for expences, making 15l. - that is his settlement, in his own writing; I then discharged him; I paid him the 20l. he advanced - I never intimated that he was to consider himself my partner; he had no authority from me to do any thing with the pictures, after delivering them at Gerrard's-hall.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

Reference Number: t18291203-222

220. ANN WESTON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 shirt-pin, value 4s., the goods of William Wiber , from his person .

WILLIAM WIBER . I am a dyer , and live in Camden-town. On the 5th of December, at midnight, I had been at a friends, in Holborn, and was going home; the prisoner accosted me in Holborn , and asked for money to get a

lodging - I said I had none: I turned up Museum-street - she still followed, asking for a few halfpence; I said I had only one in my pocket - she said, "Give me that, it will get me a bundle of wood in the morning;" I leaned myself forward to get it out of my pocket, gave it to her and turned away - I had felt her hand on my neck; I put up my hand, missed my pin, went across the road and stopped her; I said, "You have taken my pin" - she said, No; a Police-man came up - he stooped and picked it up, about twenty yards from where we had the conversation.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am an officer. I was on duty in Museum-street, saw them talking together, and told them to go on - the prisoner left the man; he called to me that he had lost his pin - I followed, and came up to her; I began to search her, but could not find the pin - my brother officer came up; I heard something drop, and immediately saw the pin on the ground; she must have dropped it - she was standing over it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MICHAEL DRISCOLL . I am an officer. I saw Davis searching the prisoner; I went over, heard the pin drop from her person, and took it up.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor accosted me; I turned up Museum-street with him till we came to Blower-street - we walked to the corner of Duke-street, stood there. and he gave me 6 1/2d., for a certain purpose; I said I should not stop for that trifle, and wished him good night - he ran and accused me of having his pin; the Police-man searched every part of my dress, and said I had not got it - this man came up and found it - whether it dropped from his person I do not know.

WILLIAM WIBER. It is not true; I had but one halfpenny - I did not wish her to go with me.

GUILTY . Aged 30 - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-223

221. MARIA READ was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 waistcoat, value 4s. 6d., and 1 pair of stays, value 6d. , the goods of John Swaine .

MARIA SWAINE. I am the wife of John Swaine; we keep a second-hand clothes shop in Brick-lane - I have known the prisoner six years. On the 28th of November she came for a gown, which she had paid something on - she bought a shawl, and as she went out, I thought something projected nacer her arm; she crossed the street - I called her back; she said she could not come- I went and caught her about twenty yards off, and found she had this waistcoat; I let her go, but on returning, missed the stays from the counter; I followed her, and found she had them - she said she was going to bring them back; she was very much intoxicated, and might have taken them by mistake - part of them hung, out not concealed; she said she did not know she had them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-224

222. WILLIAM CLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 pair of carriage-steps, value 20s. , the goods of David Davis , his master.

SAMUEL OYLER . On the evening of the 28th of November, the prisoner brought me a pair of carriage-steps for sale as old iron; I am a dealer in marine-stores - they appeared new; he said he brought them from his master, Mr. Smith, of John-street - I desired my boy to go with him, and see if it was correct; he said, "If you doubt me, you may send the money by the lad," and told the boy to tell his master he was gone for some blacking - I then thought it was right, and let him go, but did not pay him - he did not return for the money.

DAVID DAVIS. I am a coach-maker , and live in Wigmore-street. The prisoner was my errand-boy - these steps are mine; they are second-hand, but too good to sell as old iron - they were among the old iron; he was a very good boy - I would take him into my employ again.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18291203-225

223. BENJAMIN ROBERTS was indicted for that he, the 1st of November , in and upon James Wilby , feloniously did make an assault, with intent to rob him .

JAMES WILBY . I am a gardener , and live at Walthamstow. On Sunday evening, the 1st of November, about eight o'clock, I was in Tile-kiln-lane, Clapton ; my wife was on my right arm, and my son on my left - I met three men all abreast; I saw them all three make towards me, and tried to shun them - the prisoner still kept coming straight towards me; when he came up to me, he knocked me down with a blow from his fist on the side of my head; I fell on my hands, and as I rose up I felt a hand go at my watch, as if it drew it out; I had got the seals under my waistband - I lost nothing; I am certain the hand went to my watch - my wife was immediately knocked down; I believe that was done by the prisoner, but I did not see him strike her - I saw her after I got up, and she said the prisoner had struck her over the left eye; she had a terrible swollen black eye - they all ran away; my wife called Murder! and Watch! and they hallooed Watch! also - I called Watch! and Patrol! as soon as I could raise myself up, and that was the reason they ran away; I had never seen the prisoner before - I saw him again on Tuesday, three days after, about twelve or one o'clock, in Newgate-street, when his brother (who was taken at the time) was waiting to have his trial; I did not have him secured, because my wife was so very bad; I thought I would not take him till she was better to give evidence; she gave evidence against the brother; his brother was standing with him - he had been taken up, and bailed; he had a pack of bird-cages on his back when it happened - he was tried and acquitted, because I said I might be mistaken in the man's hand; I am sure the prisoner is the man (who was on the right-hand of his brother) that knocked me down.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. The brother was acquitted, because you said you might be mistake in the hand that touched your watch? A. Yes; as there were two or three round me, I might mistake which hand of the two rose up - the other man was nearest to me; I had been to Islington, but had nothing to make me intoxicated - I had part of two pints of beer before we started; we had a glass of gin, and two glasses of gin and water among five of us before we parted - I swore to the other man's person, but not that he struck me; when he was taken he said,

"What the devil is the matter?" he was the only man who spoke to me; I am perfectly sure the prisoner is the man who knocked me down - the other man surrendered to be tried, and so has the prisoner; I applied for a warrant when my wife got better, and he surrendered, but he was not to he found when I went fora officer to the gravel-pits - I saw he was not at work in

came across, and met him at the corner - he fell back to shun me, and went round somewhere; on the night of the robbery he had a fustian jacket on - I will not swear it was fustian; it was a brown jacket of that kind - he did not wear a coat; I gave his description at Worship-street.

COURT. Q.Are you quite certain the prisoner is the man? A. I am certain of it.

MARTHA WILBY . I am the prosecutor's wife, and was with him - we were perfectly sober; three men met us as we were walking down the hill in the main road - the middle man had a bird-cage pack on his back; the right-hand man knocked my husband down - that was the prisoner; he did not say a word - I called out Watch! and Murder! - I looked at the prisoner, and said, "How dare you insult my husband, he never spoke to you?" he then up with his hand, and gave me a blow on the left eye -I swear he is the man: my husband, I believe, was getting up at that time; I cried Murder! - my eye swelled immediately very much; they all ran away in the same direction - the prisoner also called Watch! as we went up the hill we met the one with the pack coming back, and he said, "What the hell is all this about?" he has been tried, and acquitted; I had him secured by the watchman - I am certain the prisoner is the man who knocked my husband down, and struck me in the eye.

Cross-examined. Q. You were just as certain about the other man? A. Yes - he had a bunch of onions; I also knew him by his clothes, and his face - I did not speak to his voice; I was in Newgate-street with my husband on the Tuesday afternoon - I had walked from Walthamstow that day; I suffered a good deal through it - I am sure he is the man.

COURT. Q.Were you ill when you saw him in Newgate-street? A. Yes.

JAMES WILBY . I am fourteen years old, and was with my father and mother - we were all quite sober; I saw three men come up, one with a pack on his back; the prisoner, who was on the right-hand, came and struck my father on the side of his head - he fell on his hands; I saw the prisoner strike my mother in the eye - she was calling Watch! and Murder! and so did I; they all three ran away - I am positive the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the man with the pack, as well as the prisoner? A. Yes - I was not at the last trial; I was obliged to look after things at home: there are bird-catchers in those fields on a Sunday - I never saw more than three or four parties there.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I had a warrant against the prisoner for an assault, and he surrendered to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near the place at the time - I went over to Mile-end to see my cousin; I could not find him, and got into a public-house with some strange men - I drank rather freely; it made me so drunk would hardly stand.

SARAH ROBERTS. I am the wife of John Roberts , a gravel-digger, who was tried for this offence. On Sunday night, the 1st of November, I saw the prisoner at my house in St. John-street, Stoke Newington - he arrived there about twenty minutes past eight o'clock; he had on the coat which he now wears - he asked me to make him some tea, which I did; he laid his head down, and went to sleep, and about a quarter or half-past eleven o'clock went home to his lodgings, Bowling-green, Stoke Newington - he had been with me till then.

COURT. Q.How far is Stoke Newington from Clapton? A. I dare say it is better than two miles, or more, from Tile-kiln-lane - I know the time, for the eight o'clock beer had come; the lad had hardly gone from the door when he came, and we have a clock; my husband had been to Woodford that day to meet his father and two of his brothers - the prisoner was not one of them; he went out between three and four o'clock that morning, with a pack on his back; he did not return, but was taken to the watch-house - the prisoner lodges about a quarter of a mile from me; he did not tell me my husband was taken up - he has assisted my husband to catch birds on a Sunday, but seldom on a working day; he did not appear to have been running, but was very much intoxicated.

JAMES RICE. I work at the gravel-pits for Mr. Hindle- the prisoner has worked there for eight or nine years; I remember his brother being taken for this robbery on the Sunday; on the Tuesday after that the prisoner was at work with us from eight o'clock in the morning till sever at night all through the day; it was the 3rd of November - I went to dinner at twelve, and left him in the gravel-pits; I returned about a quarter to one - he has four brothers; they are not so much alike as to be mistaken for each other.

THOMAS BARKER. I work at Mr. Roll's, and know the prisoner: I saw him on Sunday, the 1st of November, as near eight o'clock in the evening as can be, either before or after, in the footpath between Hobson's brick-fields, near Dalston - he had the same coat on as he has now, it was a long coat of the same colour.

COURT. Q.Did you ever see him in a jacket? A. Yes - Newington is about half an hour's walk from Dalston fields, but he was as tipsy as he could be; I have known him catch birds, but never on a Sunday - it was in frosty weather, when he could not work. I stood talking to him, and noticed his coat - I knew nothing of the last trial - I happened to say I had met him, and his brother came and asked me to come here; I heard the prosecutrix had said he had a jacket on - he was with me all day on Tuesday.

JOHN HINDLE. The prisoner was upwards of ten years in my service, and is an industrious, sober, and honest man; I know he was at work in my field on the Wednesday, and I paid him for a day's work on Tuesday- Roberts was with me all day on Friday, and surrendered here about five o'clock; he could not have been in Newgate-street.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

Recommended to mercy, on account of his character.

Reference Number: t18291203-226

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

224. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , 2 lbs. weight of tea, value 2s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants of England, trading to the East Indies , his masters.

SECOND COUNT. stating it to be the goods of a person unknown.

MESSRS. BRODRICK and BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LINES . I am a deputy-assistant elder in the East India Company's service; I have the charge of the second-floor, at the warehouse in Haydon-square - the prisoner was a labourer , and had been employed there fourteen years; the first floor is used for stowing away goods, and mending chests and Jobs; the second, third and fourth floors are for showing goods for sale - the prisoner was employed on the first floor, on the 3rd of November, mending chests; he had no business to go on the second floor, but there is a communication between the first and second floors - the men all lunch at eleven o'clock; at lunch time, on the 3rd of November, I went down stairs, and then went up to the second floor; I walked down one of the alleys, and up again - I went down another alley in the room, No. 34; when I came to the top of the second alley I heard a rustling - I went down to the bottom of the alley, and saw the prisoner on the top of a chest of bohea; he stepped from it, and I said to him, "Halloo! what are you doing here?" he said, "I only came to sit down a few minutes" - I stepped over the chest, and said,"This is your sitting down, is it?" his trousers were down to his heel, and this bag was tied round him - it has two strings at the bottom to tied up between his legs behind; it contains about 2lbs. of tea - I looked at the chests, and several of them had been plundered, some of 5lbs., some of 7lbs., and some of 10lbs. of tea; the tea in this bag appears of the same quality with that in the chests.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you bring any tea from the chests? A. No - one tea is very like another; the prisoner is a weekly servant, and has a wife and two or three children.

ALEXANDER MORGAN. I am a commodore in the service" of the East India Company. Lines called me to his assistance - I found this bag on the prisoner's person, as he has described; I compared the tea in the bag with that in the chests, and it corresponded.

GUILTY . Aged 46. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-227

225. THOMAS MAYER was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting off to John Thurtel , 5 counterfeit shillings, at and for a lower rate and value than the same did by their denomination import, and were counterfeited for .

MESSRS. SCARLET and ELLIS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN THURTEL . I am a Police-officer. I first saw the prisoner on Friday, the 13th of November, at the Pheasant public-house, in Gray's Inn-lane; I told him I had a letter, and I wanted some bobs and tanners, by which I meant sixpences and shillings - he said he had none at that time; I said I would go again on the Tuesday, but being on duty, I went on the Wednesday, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day; I showed him the letter, which I stated came from Mary Sullivan - this is it; I was acting under the authority of Mr. Powell, the solicitor, and some other persons(read.)

House of Correction, November 11, 1829.

DEAR JOHN, - By your not coming to me on Wednesday, I was afraid your were in trouble; I was sorry to hear it was through illness, and not being able to do any thing for yourself, nor me able to help you - things have been very bad, and much altered for the worse since I was here before; Mary Sullivan, that used to stand by me in Walling-street, came here, and told me that if you go to Tom Marr , and mention her name, he will serve you with what you want at the same price he serves her, tanners at 1d. and bobs 2d. - she says you will find him at the corner of Hand-alley, or No. 17, Gray's Inn-lane; the old woman that brings the 6d. will tell you how to send in a little tea and sugar, and a few halfpence if you can. Dear John, I long for my time to be up, as I have heard you are so very ill. I must conclude by wishing you better. I remain your friend, ANN SWEENEY.

JOHN THURTEL . The prisoner read part of this letter, and asked how much I wanted; I told him I had but 1s. 3d., but I wanted a few of each tanners and bobs - he said he had a few shillings, but they were not clipt; he then left me outside the Pheasant, and went and brought six shillings, which he gave me - I marked them with a stamp, and gave them to Riley; a female came in, and the prisoner gave her two or three shillings at the same time; I saw him again between six and seven o'clock the next evening- I then bought five shilllings of him for 1s. 1/2d.; I stamped them, and gave them to Riley. On the Wednesday after I met serjeant Riley, Seymour, and Mansfield, at the King's Head, Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields - my things were all taken off, and I was searched; I had my coat and waistcoat taken off, my trousers were down - my boots were taken off, and my pockets turned inside out; I had nothing on me but a punch to mark the money - I then received from Riley one shilling and one halfpenny, which he said he had marked; I went with Seymour to the Pheasant - I sat down, and Seymour sat at some distance from me - the prisoner was there when I went in, and offered me some beer; he asked what I wanted - I said five; he said, "Give me the money, and I will fetch you five good ones," as I had complained of the others being badly finished - he then left me, and was gone about ten minutes- he then brought in five bad shillings, and threw them down; I had given him the shilling before - I said, "I have to give you another halfpenny, and that will make all right;" the shilling and halfpenny I gave him were what I had received from Riley; the prisoner was then taken by Riley, Mansfield, and Seymour, and searched in the public-house - I was then taken to the watch-house; the five bad shillings were in my right-hand trousers pocket: Riley took them, and marked them.

PHILIP RILEY. I am a serjeant of the Police. Thurtel acted under my directions - on the 23rd of November I searched him in the presence of Seymour and Mansfield -I searched his coat, waistcoat, and trousers as narrowly as ever I searched a person in my life; I have known him since he has been in the Police, and have reason to believe he is an honest person - I went afterwards to the Pheasant, with Mansfield, and remained there about three minutes at the door, when Seymour came out, and said, "It is all right;" I then went in, and saw Thurtel sitting, and the prisoner standing by his side - I said to Thurtel, "What have you got there?" I took his left hand, opened it, and the shillings fell on the table; I said, "Where did you get these?" he said, "From that man," pointing to the prisoner; I handcuffed them both together - I put my hand into the prisoner's pocket, and took out a shilling and some halfpence, which I put into Mansfield's hand; Thur

tel took the five bad shillings to the watch-house - I found the shilling and halfpenny which I had given to Thurtel in the prisoner's pocket, and about 6d. worth of halfpence more.

WILLIAM SEYMOUR . I am a Police-constable. I was at the King's Head, Little Queen-street - I saw Riley search Thurtel, and a shilling and a halfpenny were given to him, which I had seen Riley mark before; I have heard the witness, and what he has stated is correct, as far as I know.

JOHN MANSFIELD. I am a Police-constable. I was at the Pheasant on the 23rd of November - I received from serjeant Riley the money, which I saw him take from the prisoner; I put it into my right hand breeches pocket, where I had no other money - I declare the money I produced at the watch-house was what I received from Riley- I have it here now; here is one shilling and a halfpenny marked, and 6d. in halfpence besides.

PHILIP RILEY . Here are the five shillings which are counterfeit - the shilling and halfpenny are what I marked- here is a small hole drilled with my penknife on them.

JOHN FIELD. I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. - These five shillings are counterfeit; it is usual to mill shillings at the Mint - these other six, which were got on the 18th, are counterfeit, but not of the same mould; these five, got on the 19th, are counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocently led into this - I had known this man from about March last, and had drank with him at different times; at the latter end of August he came to me, and said, "I have got so and so, and I do not mean to keep them any longer - if you like you may have them;" at the times in question he came to me, and said,"Have you disposed of them?" I said No - he said, "I have some friends I can depend upon to make away with them," and on the four different times he had these of me- I had sat with him on the Friday the greater part of the day, and he said if I would lend him a little he would pay me. and I lent him 1s. 4d. or 1s. 6d.; he went out, came in again, and said he wanted five of those things which he gave me, and I gave them to him; I acknowledge I had them, but I got them from this man, and he was afraid I should have him up for something he owned me.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-228

226. WILLIAM ELMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 15lbs. weight of pork, value 7s. , the goods of Joseph Pullen .

JOSEPH PULLEN. I keep a chandler's shop . On the 28th of November a person came into my shop, and said, "That was a beautiful piece of beef I had of you," and as he spoke I thought there was something wrong, and missed a side of pork from my door; I went out, but saw no one - I afterwards saw Mr. Keymer at his door, twenty or thirty yards from me; he told me the prisoner and two others had come out of his house just before - I went into his skittle-ground, but no one was there; I went back to my shop, and a little boy told me something - I went up the street, but I have not seen the pork since.

GEORGE RICHARDS. I am eleven years old. On the 28th of November I saw the prisoner with a side of pork in his apron - I do not know where he got it; he was then at the public-house door, and went up Old Castle-street -it was a side of salt pork; I saw Mr. Pullen go after the prisoner, but he did not find him.

Prisoner. This lad said it was a sailor man had it in his apron.

GEORGE RICHARDS . I did not know him before, but I know him by his face and his dress - he was in a sailor's dress, and had an apron on.

GEORGE SMITH . I saw the prisoner and another man stand at the corner of the prosecutor's house, when I went in - in a few minutes the pork was gone; the prisoner was in a sailor's dress - he had no apron on, but the other man had; I did not see him with the pork.

ABRAHAM KEYMER . I keep a public-house nearly opposite the prosecutor's. I was standing at my door - he came to me, and asked about it; I told him two or three persons had gone out of my house, and I told him the name of Grey, Elmore, and another - they had brought in 2ozs. of beef, and ate it in my house.

JAMES HANLEY. I took the prisoner at the Feathers public-house the same evening - he had a sailor's dress on then.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a customer of the prosecutor's ten or twelve years, and it was impossible for me to take this without some one seeing me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-229

227. THOMAS SEABOURNE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , I watch, value 1l. 10s.; 1 key, value 2s.; 1 seal, value 1s., and 1 ring, value 4s., the goods of Charles Harris , from his person .

CHARLES HARRIS . I am a bookseller , and live at Hoxton. On the 4th of November, at half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was returning home, up Bishopsgate-street; whether I accosted the prisoner and his friend, or they me, I cannot say, but they said they were going my way, and took hold of my arm - I said they were very kind; when we got on to Shoreditch church I said, "I will bid you good night, but if we can get any thing to drink I will treat you" - we knocked at a public-house, but could not get in, and one of them said, "We can get it a little higher up;" we went to a house in Kingsland-road, and knocked at the door - I put my hand to my pocket to get 6d., but could not find it; I had a hole in my pocket, and supposed I had lost it - they seemed irritated to think I had made fools of them; I said, "To convince you that I have property, I will leave my watch" - I took it out of my pocket; the prisoner took it out of my hand, and ran down a turning - I pursued him, but just as I came up to him I fell down; I got up again, and to my astonishment the prisoner was in custody - I said to him, "You rascal," with an intermediate word which I have no occasion to repeat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you sober? A. I had taken a little to drink, but I was not exactly drunk - this watch was my own; I was never accused of stealing it - I was accused of stealing a watch, but nothing else; I do not recollect being charged with stealing a box from Smith, a painter - I know him, and have drank with him; he might have said it out of a joke- I did take a brooch out of his shirt once, and gave it to Collins, the publican; I said, "I have got Smith's brooch," and we had a glass of brandy and water - Smith

was not asleep at the time; he was standing in the skittle-ground; he never turned me out of the house - I am a book-vender; I know the Tiger public-house; I was in the custody of an officer, but I do not think proper to tell you what for - to the best of my recollection it was for breaking the shutter of a bad house, where I had been insulted; I remained in custody till I got out.

COURT. Q. How long were you in custody? A. A few hours - I was brought before the Magistrate, but he would not hear the evidence; there were two or three prostitutes came against me, and the watchman with the bit of the shutter - I am a subscriber at the Ivy-house, and one evening I wished to get home soon, and I asked a young man what time it was; he felt his pocket, and said "I have lost my watch" - I said, "If you think I have your watch, I wish you may have lost it;" I was surrounded by I suppose fifty persons, and one of my friends said, "If you have taken it in a joke give it back, and another said I will go with any friend of yours, and see if he left it at home;" they went, and found it at his father's, and his father came to the public-house and said,"I don't wish to have any thing done to my son;" he offered me any money, but I would not take it, and he went, and spent 10s., because I had not prosecuted his son for charging me with so diabolical an act.

EDWARD OXBY. I am a watchman. On the night of the 3rd of November, at half-past twelve, I heard a cry of Watch! I was in Kingsland-road - I ran over, and saw the prisoner come out of a court; I took him - I found nothing on him, but this inside of a watch at his heels - another watchman found the case: I did not see it fall - the prosecutor came up, and said he had lost his watch; he was surprised to see the prisoner in custody.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a watchman. I was on duty, and heard a call of Watch! I crossed the road, and saw the prisoner who looked as if he had thrown something from his hand - Oxby took him, and I went to where I saw something fall, and found this watch-case.

JAMES HILL. I am an officer. This watch was given to me, and I asked the prosecutor if he could describe it- he said his name was in the inside, on some tissue paper, and it is so.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring his innocence.

MR. SUMPTON. I have acted as constable in Shoreditch, in my own right - I had the prosecutor in custody for three hours on suspicion of stealing a watch.

COURT. Q. Was he discharged on the watch being found? A. I do not recollect, it is some time ago - from what I know of his character I would not believe him upon his oath; I have known him eight years - he goes about swindling people in skittle-grounds.

RICHARD KEMP. I live in Bridport-place, Hoxton. I was an officer last year - I never had the prosecutor in custody, but I know him, and would not believe him on his oath.

THOMAS COLLINS . I keep the Tiger public-house, and know the prosecutor - I would not believe him on his oath.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-230

228. JULIA DIAS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 3 half-sovereigns, 3 half-crowns, and 12 shillings , the monies of James Gravenor .

JAMES GRAVENOR. I saw the prisoner and another person between one and two o'clock in the day, on the 17th of October - they asked me to treat them with something to drink; I took them to a wine-vaults, and gave them a glass of something to drink - I then went home with the prisoner; I did not know there was any other person in the room - I had three half-sovereigns and three half-crowns, which I took out of my trouser's-pocket and put into my coat-pocket in the room - I pulled off my coat, and put it on a side-board; I had not turned my back more than two minutes when I heard some one else in the room - I turned and saw another woman go off with my coat: I tried to go after her, but the prisoner prevented me by getting before me and shutting the door - when I got down I could not see the other, but I went down the street and heard some one call out "Hoy," and the woman I had seen take the coat. put it down at a door; I went and took it, but all the money was gone except 6d. - I went and gave information; the other woman was taken and convicted last Session - on the 5th of November I saw the prisoner, and had her taken; I had taken her once before, but she was rescued from me - I am sure she is the person.

FRANCIS KEYS . I took the prisoner from the prosecutor, on the 5th of November; he had described her to me before - there were five or six women together, and the prosecutor said, "There is a woman whom the Judge desired me to take if I could find her;" I know the woman who was tried last Session - the prisoner was acquainted with her.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent; he transported one, and now he is doing the same to me.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-231

229. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 pair of boots, value 1s. 6d., and 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. , the goods of Alfred Walter , his master.

ALFRED WALTER. I am a butcher , and live at Chiswick . The prisoner was in my service, but had left me before the 24th of November; I missed a pair of boots and shoes from the slaughter-house - I suspected the prisoner and had him taken; he had the shoes on his feet.

Prisoner. He gave me the boots for the purpose of killing. Witness. I allowed him to wear them for killing, but did not give them to him; when he came for his other things he took them.

JAMES COOK. I took the prisoner on the 28th of November; I went to his new master's, and called him out -I said I had a warrant to take him, and brought him to the prosecutor - he had the shoes on his feet, and said he understood his master gave them to him: he told me if I went to Mr. Woodward's I should find the boots, which he had sold for 3s. 6d.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18291203-232

230. BENJAMIN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 2 stoves, value 10s. , the goods of John Rayment .

JOHN RAYMENT . I live in Great St. Andrew-street.

On the 4th of December, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening I went into a vault attached to my workshop, and missed two stoves which I had seen a few days before.

ROBERT KILBY . I am a broker. On Tuesday evening last the prisoner brought me one of these stoves, and on Wednesday the other - he is a regular hawker of stoves; I bought them of him - the prosecutor came to me with the prisoner, and said he had lost two stoves, and if I would give them up he would not prosecute me - I said I could not afford to lose them.

JOHN RAYMENT. I saw the stoves at Kilby's door, and had suspicion of the prisoner; I got him and took him to the house.

JOHN ASHLEY . I have a part of the prosecutor's shop, and sometimes employ the prisoner to sell stoves, but did not employ him to sell these.

THOMAS CARMODY . I took the prisoner from the prosecutor, in a public-house, but he did not tell me the charge; I said the prisoner was at liberty if he did not tell me the charge - the prisoner then ran off; I pursued and took him - I asked him if any one was with him; he said Yes, another man opened the door for him to get them out.

Prisoner's Defence. I have carried stoves about, and a man asked me to sell these.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18291203-233

231. MARY ANN GAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of December , 2lbs. weight of bacon, value 1s. 3d. , the goods of Richard Darvill .

EDWARD SIMPSON . I am in the employ of Richard Darvill , a cheesemonger . Last Thursday evening I was told some bacon was taken - I went out , and took the prisoner with this bacon, which had been in my master's window, which was open.

GEORGE BALDOCK . I saw the prisoner take the bacon from the window.

Prisoner's Defence. I have five children, and had no one to give them any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18291203-234

232. HENRY LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of December , 1 pelisse, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Rogers .

THOMAS ROGERS . I keep a clothes-shop , in Cranbourne-street . I heard that a pelisse was taken, but I did not miss it; I cannot say that I had seen this pelisse at all- it has my shopman's writing on it.

GEORGE DOWDING . On the evening of the 2nd of December I took the prisoner with this pelisse in his possession, about a yard and a half from the prosecutor's door - a companion of the prisoner's took it, and gave it to him; I saw the transaction - the prisoner was close to him, and must have seen him take it.

JOHN GROOM . I took up the prisoner - I had seen him in company with the other for two hours before.

Prisoner's Defence. Two boys took it down, and threw it at my feet; the gentleman took me, and said I had stolen it, but I had not seen it.

GEORGE DOWDING . He took it from the other boy, and moved off - I took him.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18291203-235

233. MARY LOMBARD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 2 blankets, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Ryan .

THOMAS RYAN . I live in Maynard-street, St. Giles' . The prisoner lodged with me for five weeks in a furnished room - I desired her to quit, and put a padlock on the door, but they got a false key and got in; on Friday one of the neighbours told me that the prisoner went out with something in her apron - I told my wife to go up to this room, and see if any thing was missing; she went up, and missed the blankets; she said, "Where are the blankets ?" - the prisoner said, "I pawned them, and do your best."

THOMAS WILSON . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner on Friday night, and asked where the duplicate was - she said, "My husband has got it;" I found nothing on her, but the next morning I heard she had it, and went and asked her for it - she gave it me, and said she had pawned them , but did not say where.

BENJAMIN BIRDSEYE REEVE . I took the blankets in pawn from the prisoner.( Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them, but did not steal them; I had but a few shillings to go to market with; I said to my husband, "I will pawn these blankets" - I was unlucky in not taking money, and could not release them.

GUILTY . Aged 40. - Confined One Month .


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