Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th September 1829.
Reference Number: 18290910
Reference Number: f18290910-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM THOMPSON , M.P., MAYOR.

SEVENTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURDSDAY, THE 10th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1829, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY HENRY STOKES , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, NO. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1829.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM THOMPSON , M.P., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Stephen Gazelee , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Vaughan , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; and William Venables , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; and Charles Farebrother , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Robert Hunter ,

G D. Webb ,

James Honey ,

Thomas Hyatt ,

Nicholas Stone ,

Robert Attmore ,

John S Holmes ,

John Jerrard ,

Robert Skarratt ,

John Salkell ,

Frederick Urver ,

Wm. Haywood .

Second

John Frost ,

Frederick Barry ,

John Lyon ,

John McDonald ,

Henry Bilk ,

Charles Banfield ,

George Evans ,

William Scorer ,

Edwd. Hesseltine ,

Thomas Briggs ,

Wm. Spenceley ,

Thomas Wilson .

Third

Edward Harvey ,

William Hill ,

James Reeson ,

Daniel Ferguson ,

Geo, H. Worral ,

James Robson ,

Samuel Deacon ,

Ben. Turford ,

Thomas Jones ,

Stephen Taylor ,

Chas. Lawrence ,

Thos. Hayward .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Robert Watt ,

R. Wedgwood ,

John Wells ,

John West ,

Fred. Wettige ,

Wm. Whitehurst ,

T. N. White ,

Rob. Whitaker ,

Wm. Wheatly ,

Thos. Wincott ,

Robert Winter ,

Joshua Woolley .

Second

Young Wagstaff ,

Thomas Wall ,

John Warren ,

Jas. Weddington ,

Jas. Wallington ,

William Weedon ,

James White ,

Richard Wynn ,

Richard Wilmot ,

Wm. Whitehead ,

James Winks ,

William Withers .

Third

Fred. Wilson ,

Joseph Wingfield ,

Samuel Wiseman ,

Saml. Wilkinson ,

Wm. Wonacut ,

Frederick White ,

Isaac Wilkins ,

John H. Wilson ,

Alex. Wilkie ,

John Worley ,

Samuel Wise ,

Richard Winch .

Fourth

William Wool ,

Harry Wood ,

R.A. Watkins ,

James Warne ,

Robert Waller ,

James Watt ,

Thomas Week ,

Robert Wade ,

Joseph Walker ,

James Watson ,

John Whales ,

Thomas Ward .

Fifth

John Walker ,

Thomas Watts ,

Benjamin Wall ,

Henry. T. Wells ,

Phil. Whitehead ,

William Ward ,

Thomas Wilson ,

Joseph Wilson ,

George Woodley ,

Wm. Woodgate ,

William Wrenn ,

James Welstead .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1829.

THOMPSON, MAYOR. - SEVENTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury-before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18290910-1

1532. JOHN WILSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Caroline Tatum , widow , and Jane Willats , spinster , on the 1st of August , at St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney , and stealing therein 2 spoons, value 3s., and 5 penny pieces, their property; and 1 knife, value 7s., the goods of the said Caroline Tatum .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Reference Number: t18290910-2

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

1533. THOMAS WALKER and JOHN WALKER were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July , at St. Mary-lebone, 4 bags, value 1s.; 97 sovereigns, 40 crowns, 80 half-crowns, 250 shillings, 100 sixpences, one 5l. Bank note, and 1 order, for payment of and value 6l., the property of David Budden , in his dwelling-house .

JOHANNA BUDDEN . I am the wife of David Budden; we keep the Lord High Admiral public-house, New Church-street, Portland-green, in the parish of St. Mary-lebone . On Sunday, the 28th of June, the prisoners came to our house, separately, and staid there an hour and a half, or two hours; I saw them come in and have dinner, and I believe they joined company, but I did not wait on them myself; I saw them again on each of the four following days, at the same place - they had refreshment together, and drank together, I believe. On the 1st of July Thomas requested me to give him four sovereigns for 4l.'s worth of silver, which I did - I went to the bed-room to get the sovereigns; I keep my money there; they sat in the club-room, close adjoining the bed-room, not and arm's length from the door. On Thursday, the 2nd, six or seven more persons came in and joined them, and while the prisoners were in the club-room the drays came with beer - it was between one and two o'clock, to the best of my knowledge; my husband and the barman had to go into the cellar to attend to the beer - I had to wait on the people myself, and my daughter was in the bar; I went into the bed-room twice that day, while they were in the clubroom; I went to take some money out to pay my servant's wages, which were appointed to be paid that day-the servant was down in the cellar with my husband; I found my box safe, and locked it, after taking out the money; I took the key, locked the room door, and carried the keys down stairs to the bar, where I keep them - in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes the prisoners came down stairs to the bar, which is on the ground floor, in a hurried state, and requested two small glasses of brandy, which they drank very quick, and went out without paying for it - I called them back, and told them they had not paid for it; they begged pardon, and said they had forgot it - Thomas came back, and paid me 6d.; I went up stairs immediately to fetch down the glasses and things from the club-room; there was not any body there then; I went into my bed-room in about a quarter of an hour -I took the key off the chimney-piece, and when I tried to unlock the door the key would not enter the lock; I came down to the bar to look for another key, supposing I might have the wrong one - I went up again with the same key, which I found was the proper one; I could not open the door with it - I knelt down, looked, and saw something was in the key-hole; I tried again: I took the handle of the door, and found it was open - it was not locked; a skeleton-key fell out of the key-hole on to the floor: I saw my strong chest was burst open, and all the money was gone, all the bills and papers, and our licence - the cash-box was burst open also, and a crow-bar laid on the floor with it; I had counted my money that morning, and I had 97l. in gold, 40l. in silver, a cheque for 6l., and a 5l. Bank note, and several receipts and bills. I believe the prisoners had come there that morning between twelve and one o'clock - that is the usual time they came, and they went away, to the best of my knowledge, between three and four; it was before four - they came down occasionally during that time, and stood smoking at the door, looking at the drays; I spoke to them at the door - Thomas admired the situation of the house. At the time I took the money out to pay the servant only the two prisoners were in the club-room, and nobody went up stairs after that before I missed the money - I am positive of that; there is no other room up stairs for company besides the club-room - they are all bed-rooms; I have not seen any of my money or papers since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it nearer to there or four o'clock when the prisoners went away? A. I believe it was between three and four o'clock, and think it was nearer four than three; I think I paid my servant about three o'clock - I think there had been seven

more persons in the club-room that day, but they were all gone; I had some knowledge of one of them, but the other six were strangers; when the prisoners left they came down stairs together - I am sure I saw them come down together - I cannot be mistaken; the other persons went away two or three at a time; we have not many customers - it is a new house: I was astonished at so many being there that day - I did not particularly notice what time the others left. While the beer was being brought in I was the only person who attended to the customers; my young man served them before - we have a tap-room opposite the bar; there might be five or six persons there during that day - I will not say there were not ten or twelve; I did not take an account of them.

COURT. Q. Is the tap-room below stairs or above? A. Below, even with the bar; I am positive that when I went up to get the money only the prisoners were in the room.

MARY ANN BUDDEN . I am the prosecutor's danghter. I saw the prisoners at my father's house in June and July; I saw them there on the 2nd of July, between the hours of one and four - I think they went away between three and four o'clock; I saw them drink the brandy - nobody went up stairs after they went out before my mother went up - she came down stairs before she missed the money; I was in the bar - nobody went up stairs then, or I must have seen them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is there a water-closet on the same floor as the bed-room? A. No, not exactly on the bed-room floor; it is nine or ten stairs below that, on the landing - there are nine or ten more stairs down to the ground floor; it is rather a small water-closet; I am not certain, but I consider it was not four o'clock when they left - there might have been seven, or perhaps eight persons in the club-room, not more; I saw them every one go out - there might have been three or four persons in the tap-room; I do not suppose there were more, but am not positive there might not have been twelve; the last person came down from the club-room a little before four o'clock, I think, but am not positive it was the prisoners - they were the last persons, and they left together; the last person besides them had left about half an hour previous, quite as long as that, I think - my mother was up stairs when that person came down; she came down before the prisoners: we have been in the house three years, but it was only licensed last Michaelmas twelvemonth: there were three or four persons in the taproom at four o'clock - I cannot say whether any of them were there when the loss was discovered; that was after four o'clock - I dare say it was half an hour after.

JEREMIAH COCKRANE . I am servant and barman to Mr. Budden. I first saw the prisoners at my master's house on Sunday, the 28th of June; I saw them on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday - I waited on them on all those five days: they came on Thursday between twelve and one o'clock, as near as I can teil - I went into the cellar with master to receive the beer, and left Mrs. and Miss Budden to wait on them; I did not see any more of them that day: I heard of the robbery soon after I came out of the cellar - I went up to the room to bring down some pots and glasses; there was nobody there then - I went next day to Fairlop Fair, with Buckeridge, the officer, in search of the prisoners - we went into different booths, and saw Thomas Walker walking along one of the booths, and as I came near him I thought he changed colour; he passed me, and changed countenance directly he saw me - I think he must have known me; I turned back, and asked how he did - he said very well: I asked if he knew me - he said very well; I asked if he had been at Mr. Budden's, at Paddington, Lisson-grove, yesterday; he said Yes - I then gave him into Buckeridge's custody, telling him he was one of the men, and to keep him while I went round the booth to look for the other prisoner - I went along the booth, and saw John smoking his pipe in the booth, with some tea things before him; I went and told the officer, who went down and took him - they both requested to be treated like men, and they would act so to us; in a few minutes Thomas called to a woman, whom he called his wife, and whispered to her for a length of time; I do not know what he said - she went off and spoke to some persons in the booth, not far from them; the men came forward - I cannot say how many there were; directly Thomas saw them come forward, he rushed through them, and said he would go and search for his umbrella - the men made way for him to go through; I followed him, calling Stop thief! they closed round me, and would not let me pass for a long time, till he had time to get a long way; I went after him at last, and got knocked down at different times by some persons unknown to me: I overtook and caught hold of him three or four times, but he got from me again - I followed him, calling Stop thief! a Bow-street patrol was passing, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was that officer examined before the Magistrate? A. Yes; I do not know his name - I do not know the prisoner's brother William; I cannot say whether a person has occasionally been there, who is very like them; we are in the habit of seeing so many faces, but I have seen the prisoners so often I know them - I was not exceedingly busy that day; I had to attend the bar - I attended in the club-room between twelve and one o'clock; the man who took Thomas had a red waistcoat on - I saw him have hold of him; I suppose I was within ten or twelve yards of him - I got knocked down and beat about.

ANN WAKEFIELD . I was servant to Mr. Budden, and left his service on the day of the robbery; I saw both the prisoners there that day - I saw them coming down stairs; to the best of my knowledge it was about three o'clock, but I cannot be positive of the time; as I came out of the bar-parlour door John was coming down stairs - Thomas was standing at the door, smoking a segar; I did not see them go away - I am certain of their persons: I had never seen them before. I saw Thomas that day every time I went up and down stairs, smoking at the door.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Every time you went up and down you saw Thomas standing at the door? A. Yes - he might be there for about an hour; I first saw him there about two o'clock, and till about three I believe he was at the door: I saw John coming down stairs alone about three o'clock - I was at the bar door at the time, and I cannot be mistaken in Thomas having been at the door for an hour, smoking a segar; I had not been in the club-room that day - I had been in the bar: I cannot say how many persons had been in the tap-room that day - there were a few persons - I cannot tell how many; I had agreed to leave my mistress some time before: no examination was made of the persons on the premises at the time

the robbery was discovered that I know of; I left that night; the robbery was discovered about three o'clock, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Was it not about the same time as you saw John coming down stairs? A. To the best of my knowledge; I cannot say how many persons were in the tap-room then - there were persons there; I did not wait on them.

COURT. Q. Was it your business to wait on the customers? A. No; I was the house servant - my wages were paid between two and three o'clock, to the best of my knowledge; I heard of the robbery after I was paid -I was doing the business of the house till I went away.

ANN KING . I live in Edgware-road. I was at Budden's house on the day of the robbery, in the bar, and saw the prisoners when they came down stairs; they were taking brandy and water - one of them was going away without paying; Mrs. Budden called them back - they paid then, and went away; I had never seen them before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was any charge made against them then, except about the brandy and water? A. No; they went away rather in a hurry. without paying, rather in a flurry; there was a little to pay for what they had had up stairs - they paid that, and were going away without paying for the brandy and water; I only saw them once; they were both together at the bar - it was in the afternoon: I went there about three o'clock: I did not go up stairs, nor notice whether any customers were in the tap-room - I did not look.

JOSEPH WOODWARD . I am pot-boy at this house. I know the prisoners by sight; I have seen them at master's house for five days running - I saw them both there on the day of the robbery (Thursday) at the club-room door, about half-past two o'clock, coming towards the stairs - they did not come down the stairs; I was going up to my bed-room - I staid up there about two minutes, and came by the club-room as I came down; I did not see them then; they were not there then - the club-room door was shut; they were not at the door - I am certain of their persons.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How often had you seen them before? A. Never before those five days; I was examined before the Magistrate at the first and second examinations, before the prisoners' witnesses were called; witnesses were examined for the prisoners in my hearing - I know nothing about their attorney protesting against it.

Q. Did you hear the Magistrate say, if the attorney did not call the witnesses he would? A. I heard something of that; I did not hear him say he could not go on with the examination for the prosecution till after the prisoner's witnesses were examined; I believe five witnesses were examined before me - I heard three witnesses called in and examined on the prisoners' behalf: I believe James Smith, Lewis, and another were examined - that was after me; they were examined a good deal and sworn.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am a constable of Marylebone Office. I was with Cockrane at Fairlop Fair - he pointed Thomas Walker out to me; I went and took him, told him he was charged with felony, and he must consider himself my prisoner - he asked what for: I told him for a robbery in Lisson-grove, and if he would step with me I would explain it more to him; he asked if I would allow him to go into the booth to pay his score; I said certainly I had no objection for him to go - he said he hoped I should not expose him; I said I should do nothing more than keep him safe; I went into the booth with him, and his brother John was sitting at a table there - he said to him, "I am going to town with this person;" Cockrane immediately said, "That is the other, take him as well;" I told him I should take him too - they paid their score, and then John got up; I got up, and moved to the same side as they were on - Thomas got up; I said, "Where are you going - I shall not permit you to go away from me;" he said he was going to his wife for his umbrella; we were immediately hustled, and he ran down to the bottom of the booth, pursued by Cockrane - I immediately closed on John, secured him, and handcuffed him immediately; I then proceeded down the booth towards Cockrane - John wanted to go out at the top of the booth; I said I should not permit that; I was still hustled by a parcel of persons - I told them I did not mean to leave him, and they might as well be quiet: at the bottom of the booth I saw Thomas taken by a Bow-street patrol; he closed in with him - the men turned round upon him, and prevented his striking him; Cockrane complained of having been ill-treated, but I did not see that done.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is the patrol who took Thomas here? A. No - he was at the office; the Magistrate did not deem his evidence necessary; I believe he was sworn and examined at the office, but cannot positively say - I have no doubt of it; if he was examined he was sworn; I believe I did administer the oath to him myself - I have no doubt of it, I think not; I know he was examined - three or four witnesses were examined for the prisoners; it was to prove an alibi for John.

Q. Were not witnesses examined for the prosecution after those for the prisoners - for instance, King and Wakefield? A. Certainly, if they were examined at a subsequent examination; I think it was on the second examination.

COURT. Q. How many examinations were there before the Magistrate? A. I think three; the prisoners' witnesses, to the best of my belief, were examined some on the first or second examination; at the second or third examination I was desired to get more evidence, and Mrs. King came forward.

Thomas Walker's Defence. You now behold before you an unfortunate individual, to be tried for an offence of which he is totally innocent; I acknowledge I was in the prosecutor's house on the afternoon in question, but solemnly declare I left the house five minutes after two o'clock. When I was apprehended Buckeridge and Cockrane came up to me, and directly I saw Cockrane I asked how he did - he answered very well, and asked if I remembered him; I said I could not be off remembering him, as he waited on me only the day before. Now I was in no place of secrecy when apprehended; Is it likely if I was concerned in so extensive a robbery I should have been in such a public place as a dancing booth? if I am found guilty of this offence, which I am innocent of, it will be the death of an aged parent and my wife, and bring me and my brother to an ignominous death.

John Walker's Defence. I am innocent of this charge - I know nothing of it.

RICHARD CHAPMAN . I am waterman at the coach

stand in Aldersgate-street. I know the prisoner John - I saw him on Thursday afternoon, the 2nd of July, between three and four o'clock, on the stand in Aldersgate-street, with his coach - I have known him three or four years; he left the stand between six and seven: I drank with him a little after five, in the watering-house - I know that was the time, as I go to work a little after five; it was on a Thursday as Fairlop Fair was on the Friday - I remember it by the fair.

COURT. Q. How long have you been at that stand? A. Going on for three years; I go on duty at six o'clock in the morning one week, and the other I go at five in the afternoon; I attend there every day - I sleep at the watering-house; I attend in the morning when I am morning-man - we go at six and leave at five; if I am night-man I go on at five and stay till two in the morning; I was night-man all that week. John Walker drives a hackney-coach. No. 196.

Q. How happened you to be there between three and four o'clock? A. I lodge there, and am generally on the spot; I was not at the fair next day, but know it was the fair; his coach was on the stand from between three and four o'clock till between six and seven; he comes to that stand at times - he does not put in there in the morning, as he lives at Whitechapel; I did not see him there the day before, nor on Tuesday, or Monday; he might not come on for a week.

STEPHEN MORRIS . I am a hackney-coach master, and live at No. 7, Castle-place, Whitechapel. On the 2nd of July the prisoner John was in my service - he drove a landau of mine, No. 196; he left my yard between eight and nine o'clock that morning, and returned a little after eight in the evening; I had ordered him home at that time, my horses being hired to go to Fairlop Fair; he brought me home 10s. as the earnings of that day - he had been nine months in my service, and was with me before for twelve or fourteen months; he bore an honest character, and was an industrious servant. When I heard he was before the Magistrate I went and stated this - Chapman was there also.

COURT. Q. What enables you to speak particularly to the 2nd of July? A. My horses being home early that evening to go to Fairlop Fair; they went next day - Darnell and I drove them in the coach, No. 196.

Q. How came the prisoner not to drive? A. I had a horse ill, and could not have my horses out; he was a regular daily servant, but stopped at home that day.

JAMES SMITH . I am horsekeeper to Mr. Morris. The prisoner John was in his service on Thursday, the 2nd of July: I saw him go out that day, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and I saw him between two and three o'clock, in Whitechapel, cleaning his coach; I did not speak to him - I was near him, and am certain he was there; I went before the Magistrate, and was examined.

COURT. Q. Do you mean that you saw him in your master's yard? A. No, in Whitechapel, two or three hundred yards from the yard; we sometimes clean coaches in the yard, and sometimes in the ranks; I know it was between two and three o'clock - I noticed the clock, and know it was the 2nd of July, because that day they ordered him to be home between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. What for? A. For Good Friday, for the horses to have a night's rest; I beg pardon, it was Fairlop Fair on Friday - it was a mistake of mine; I did not see him again till between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, when he brought the horses home; he did not go with them to Fairlop - his coach, No. 196 went; Mr. Morris, his master, took it, and John Walker laid still - I saw him between nine and ten o'clock next morning, in the stables; he might have staid there about an hour - I do not know what became of him then; I did not see him after; my master's man, Darnell, was out with the other coach on Thursday, the 2nd of July, and on Friday; I cannot tell the number of his coach - I do not know at what time he went out or came home; master has three coaches and six horses; two coaches were out on Friday - we have only two pairs of plates - one is a night coach; the plates are changed and put on it. I am sure master drove to Fairlop Fair himself - I cannot say who he drove there; I saw him go - I do not know which way Darnell went.

STEPHEN MORRIS re-examined. I drove the coach No. 196 to Fairlop Fair; I should have said 170 - Darnell drove 196.

JOHN GOGLE . I am a hackney coachman, and live at No. 2. Hare-court, Aldersgate-street. On Thursday, the 2nd of July, I saw John Walker on Aldersgate-street coach-stand, at three o'clock, and I saw him there again about five; he had his coach with him - I did not notice the number; it was a yellow landau: I saw him first at three o'clock, and again at five - it was about the sixth coach at three o'clock, and at five it was about the third; I have known him three or four years, and always considered him an honest industrious man.

COURT. Q. Do not you know the number of his coach? A. His master has two, Nos. 170 and 196; I know it was the 2nd of July because he generally does night work, and that day I remarked his being out in the day time.

JOSEPH OWENCRAFT . I know the Lord High Admiral, in Church-street, Lisson-grove. I remember being there on Thursday, the 2nd of July, the day before Fairlop Fair; I went about one o'clock, and left about four - I lived in Lisson-grove at the time; I am a tailor, and went there to meet a gentleman, to measure him for a suit of clothes - he promised to meet me there; I was up in the club-room - there were ten or twelve persons when I went, and when I came away, about four; I think there were five, six, or seven.

COURT. Q. When did you hear of this robbery? A. Some time the latter end of the week after - I live about a quarter of a mile from the house; I do not know either of the prisoner - I never saw them before; I was never at Fairlop Fair; but remember several people in the room were talking of going to the fair the next day -I was in the club-room from one o'clock to four; I was not in the tap-room at all.

Q. How do you know it was exactly four o'clock? A. I had to meet another gentleman at four, and when I saw it was four I went away.

WILLIAM BARNETT . I am a constable of St. George's in the Borough, and during the season I attend Vauxhall-gardens. On Thursday, the 2nd of July, the prisoner Thomas Walker came into my shop - it was the first and last time he ever was there; mine is a shell-fish and sodaw-ater shop, in Grosvenor-place, Borough-road - he came in

between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; another young person was with him - he did not pay for any thing himself; they had three bottles of ginger beer - another young man was in the shop talking with me; they got acquainted together, having recognized each other, and all three had a bottle of ginger beer; I know it was on the 2nd of July, because Friday was Fairlop Fair, and that morning I and three other constables went on duty to Whitechapel-road, being employed by the inspector of stamps, in consequence of the fair - we went down to regulate the vans and things, and on that morning this person went down towards Fairlop, and his brother William, not John, was with him; I saw them go by St. Mary's church, Whitechapel, about eleven o'clock in the morning, in a sociable, and two others in their company - I imagine that my shop is at least three miles from Lisson-grove.

COURT. Q. Did this man stay any time in your shop? A. I think he staid nearly half an hour; I suppose it was half-past three o'clock when he came - it was near four when he left, for he took a small silver watch out of his pocket, and said, "It is near four, I shall go to tea;" he was on foot.

Q. Is his brother William at all like him? A. He is a deal stouter than him - he more resembles him in the face than this one; William is stouter than either of the prisoners, but is very like him in the face.

Q. Which is William like in the face? A. He is more like Thomas than the other, but any one who knew them would know them to be brothers from their faces.

JURY. Q. You say that he was a stranger to you when he came into your shop? A. Not exactly - he passed my shop with another person, and I called him to me; I knew him before, but he had not been in my shop before - I knew him, and knew William; I think I have known William since February.

JAMES ROBERTS I am a hair-dresser, and live in Waterloo-road. Thomas Walker has worked for me for the last six months occasionally, making fronts - he did not bring home any thing on the 2nd of July; he brought me two fronts on the 25th of June - he is a good workman, and his character appeared very good; I dare say he could earn 2l. a week - the most I ever paid him was from 18s. to 20s. a week, and I know he worked for other people at the time.

JURY to STEPHEN MORRIS . Q. Was John in the habit of going out with his coach at half-past eight o'clock? A. No, he is in the habit of driving a night-coach - he went out this morning on account of keeping some horses at home that day for the fair; he does not usually drive a day coach - he brought me home the 10s. a little after eight o'clock in the evening.

MRS. BUDDEN re-examined. I cannot exactly say the time I went to get the money to pay the servant - it was during the time the prisoners were in the house; Thomas sat so close to the door he could have opened it with a key- this was between twenty minutes and half an hour before I missed the money; I am positive nobody was in the room but the prisoners when I went up for the money for the servant.

Q. You put the key in the door, and it would not turn- did you try the handle at that time? A. No - I found it would not open, and knowing I had not unlocked it, I went down to see if I had the wrong key; the skeleton-key fell inside the room door - when I got the money for the servant the club-room door was open; the prisoners could see me lock the bed-room door - I am positive I locked it after me; there were thirty half-sovereigns among my money - I examined it all that day; I have no doubt of the prisoner John; it was not a stouter or shorter person - he is the man, I am certain; I have not the smallest doubt of it; I served him at the bar with brandy - I am satisfied I saw Thomas on the 2nd of July, and spoke to him at the bar before he went away - he said it was a beautiful situation, and he should have no objection to take a house himself in that situation.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE re-examined. The bed-room door opens inward - the key will open and unlock the door; I have tried it - it will open it outside, and might be used to lock it inside again; I searched the prisoners - I found on Thomas five half-sovereigns, about 6s. or 7s. in silver, a watch, and some keys; they asked for the silver, and I gave it to them - I took the prisoners at half past six o'clock.

JURY to JEREMIAH COCKRANE . Q. Are you quite certain of the identify of the prisoner John? A. Yes, I am confident I saw him there on the Thursday; it was not a stouter man - he is the man, I am confident; I waited on him every day for five days, and waited on him early on Thursday - I am confident of both of them.

JURY to MARY ANN BUDDEN . Q. Are you quite sure John Walker was there? A. Yes - I have never seen William to my knowledge; I am sure it was John - it was not a shorter or stouter man; I had known them from the Sunday; I have not a doubt of John's face - I went up stairs three or four times on Thursday, and saw them sitting close to the club-room door.

WILLIAM BARNETT re-examined. I am sure I saw Thomas on the 2nd of July - my reason for knowing the time and day so particularly is, on Saturday I went to Union-hall, which I generally do, and heard of their being apprehended at Fairlop Fair; I said, "If I had known Thomas was wanted, I could have taken him in my shop on the Thursday afternoon, between three and four o'clock"- I first became acquainted with him at Union-hall, in February, but I do not suppose I spoke twenty words to him from then till he came into my shop - I have met him four or five different times, and have met his brother several times since this occurrence.

Q. What enabled you to speak to seeing him between three and four o'clock? A. I stopped at Union-hall till about three o'clock, when the prisoners leave there, then went straight home, and in about twenty minutes Walker passed; I said, "How do you do?" he came in, and a man named Seeley in my shop recognized him as having been to school with him; my shop is nearly opposite the Obelisk.

One witness gave each of the prisoners a good character.

T. WALKER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

J. WALKER - GUILTY. Aged 19. Judgment Respited .

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of their youth .

Reference Number: t18290910-3

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

1534. WILLIAM CARRINGTON was indicted for

stealing, on the 24th of July , at Hendon, 1 mare, price 28l. , the property of Robert Young .

ROBERT YOUNG. I am a farmer , and live at Hendon . On Friday evening, the 24th of July, my mare and two bay horses were turned into the field; I saw them safe about seven o'clock in the evening - the gate was locked; about six o'clock on Saturday morning my carter came to me - I went to the field, and this mare was missing; she was a black cart mare, three years old, off - I bought her a sucking foal, with her mother; I and my son went in different directions on the Saturday in the neighbourhood - I saw her near Mile-end New-town, Whitechapel, on the Monday morning following, about ten o'clock, locked up in the officer's charge; the prisoner was then in custody - I am quite sure it was the mare I had lost; it was worth 25l. or 28l.; I knew the prisoner very well - he lived servant with a gentleman named Southey, about two hundred yards from me, for six years; I knew him during that time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has he not borne a good character? A. Very good - he was backwards and forwards at my wife's shop for different things; every body gave him a good character - he was quite sober and steady.

GEORGE HARPER . I am headborough of Holloway. On the 24th of July, at four minutes to twelve o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner come through the Holloway-gate toll-bar, on a horse, riding - there was some suspicion that the horse was not properly come by; I went and asked him where he was going with it, and whose horse it was - he said he was employed by a man at Finchley, and was going to the Sugar Loaf, Whitechapel; I asked what he was, and how he came in possession of the horse - he said he was a hay-maker out of work, and was employed by a man he never knew or saw before, and was to have half a crown to take the horse to the Sugar Loaf, Whitechapel, where the person would meet him; it was a very tempestuous night; I said, "I will go with you, you must dismount and lead the horse, and walk with me" - I knew there was no such a house in Whitechapel; to be certain of it I went to Whitechapel watch-house, and asked the keeper in the prisoner's presence - he said there was no such a house, but there was the Three Sugar Loaves in Mile-end New-town; I said, "Well, we will walk together there" - I went, there was nobody there to meet him; I had put him into the Mile-end New-town watch-house before I went there; I put the horse at livery with the headborough of Whitechapel, who keeps stables; I asked the prisoner how he could be so foolish as to come on a job of that kind without drawing some money to pay the turnpikes, he being out of employment; he gave me no answer - I left him in the watch-house; I saw Young about six o'clock on Saturday evening, nearly opposite the Horse and Groom, at Highgate, and on Monday morning I met him by appointment at the Ram Inn, Smithfield - I went with him to the stables at Mile-end, and shewed him the mare - he claimed it; the prisoner was searched at the office, and on him were found two half horse-cloths, a bridle with a very strong bit, snares to catch hares, a pair of plated spurs, and two whips to tie on a stick to flog a horse with, a razor cut into notches, which will cut any gate through, a girth strap, two keys, one of which will open a gate I suppose; it is not a picklock-key - I have not tried it to the prosecutor's gate; it is the key of his own box, I dare say.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Why do you say you suppose it will open a gate? A. I think it will open any thing, it will certainly open a padlock; I have not tried it - it looks like a key for a gate; the razor will cut a gate - I know these are snares; I did not take him to the Three Sugar Loaves, because the houses were all shut up - it was two o'clock in the morning when we got there; I went to see if any body was waiting for him - the watch-house is within three doors of the house, and if I had seen and body, I should have fetched him to know if they were the same; he walked with me very quietly, and never made the least resistance - he was on horseback when I saw him; I have some turnpike tickets which were found on him - he had come through the gate when I first saw him, and paid two pence; I was by his side when I first spoke to him - he never attempted to ride off, nor to run away - there was nothing to prevent his riding off, which was the reason I told him to get off and walk.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the man in the road; he said if I would take the horse there he would give me half a crown.

ROBERT YOUNG re-examined. The prisoner knew my horses as well as I knew them myself, there is no doubt; he as been out of Mr. Southey's employ from four to six months; he was never employed on my premises - he lived about two hundred yards from me; he has seen my mare it work, and was backwards and forward about my stable and fields.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth and character .

Reference Number: t18290910-4

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

1535. ELIZABETH STUCK was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 1 waistcoat, value 20s.; 6 gowns, value 8l.; 5 shirts, value 2l.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 1 sheet, value 3s.; 1 quilt, value 5s.; 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 shawl, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Avern , in the dwelling-house of George Watson .

THOMAS AVERN . I am a coach plater , and live in West-street, St. Ann's . George Watson keeps the house - I have the second floor and attic; Watson does not live in the house - it is all let out in tenements. On the 26th of August I was in my workshop, which is the attic; my wife came up to call me to dinner - she went down and called me - I went down one pair of stairs, and found my apartment on the second floor open; the prisoner was inside, in the act of coming out - my wife held the door; I pushed it open, went in, and found her standing there, with a bundle - I asked what she did there; she began to cry, and said she would never do the like again if I would let her go; I examined the bundle, and found the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth 15l. - she was taken to the watch-house; the keeper's wife searched her and found eleven keys - I tried one to my room-door, which had been locked, and it opened it.

FRANCIS MAGE . I was fetched to the watch-house, and took the prisoner with the bundle.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY (of stealing only) . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-5

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

1536. GEORGE BADGER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Allsop , on the 1st of August , and stealing 500 yards of ribbon, value 15l.; 120 yards of lace, value 10l., and 2 cravats, value 5s., his property ; and MARY STEVENSON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS ALLSOP . On the 1st of August I lived in Great Castle-street, Marylebone ; my family consists of a wife, an assistant, and porter - I carry on business in Regent-street. On Saturday evening, the 1st of August my goods were moved, (as was customary) to my dwelling-house, for protection; and on Monday morning I missed two boxes of ribbons, and one of lace - information was given at Marlborough-street; it was put into the "Hue and Cry," and two days after an officer of Queen-square applied to me; a small portion of the ribbon worth 3l. or 4l. was shewn to me at the office, and some lace - I am certain it was my property; I had no private mark, but know the patterns both of the ribbon and lace - I undertake to swear to them.

Cross-examined by MR. RYIAND. Q. You yourself know nothing of the removal of the goods on Saturday night? A. I do not; I can swear to all the ribbons - they were all the same pattern as I had lost - three or four patterns of ribbon, and three or four of lace; I swear positively to the eight patterns - the manufacturer supplies other persons; the patterns may be found in many other shops - I did not say at the office I could speak to but one piece, and that by its length: I said I knew all by the patterns - the Magistrate asked how much there might he in one piece; I said two or three yards - I never said I knew it by the length; I never saw it measured - it was held up in the hand, and turned out to be from two to three yards.

THOMAS JACKSON . I am servant at Mr. Allsop's shop, in Regent-street. On Saturday night, the 1st of August, I took from the shop in Regent-street, two boxes of ribbon, and one of lace, to No. 20. Great Castle-street, between nine and ten o'clock; I left them in the passage at the bottom of the stairs - I pulled the door after me. and am certain it shut; I returned in ten minutes, and found the door still shut and latched, as I had left it, but the three boxes were gone.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you packed the boxes yourself? A. No; I saw the lids put on, and saw the contents - I had seen them put in from the window; I went alone from the shop to the house - the servant let me in; she is not here - the door opens with a latch-key from the outside; I pulled it hard after me - I did not try it, but am sure it fastened; when I returned, I did not miss the goods, as the servant had been in the habit of taking them up stairs - she let me in the second time.

ANN HUME . On the 1st of August I lived with the prosecutor in Regent-street. I put the ribbons into two boxes, and the lace in another, and gave them to the boy to take to Castle-street - the goods were worth 25l. or 30l.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the boy return? A. Yes; the shop is about three minutes walk from the house - he took another load and went off directly.

WILLIAM IVIMY . I am an officer. On Wednesday, the 5th of August, I went to a first floor front room in New Peter-street, Westminster, and found a quantity of ribbons and lace; I found the prisoner Badger there and asked him who they belonged to - he said to the wo - he lived with, and that she was out; I took him to the office, returned to the same room, and found Stevenson; I asked her who paid the rent of the room - she said she and Badger, that they each paid part; I asked if she had pawned any lace that morning - she said No; I asked who belonged to the ribbons - she said they were hers; I took her to Williams - he identified her as having pawned some lace there that morning, which he produced; she made no reply.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Great Chapel-street, Westminster. On Wednesday morning, the 5th of August, between eight and nine o'clock, the female prisoner pawned about six yards of lace, which I produce - I advanced 2s. 6d. which was all she asked; it is worth about 6s.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know her before? A. Yes; she gave me the name of M. Stevens, in Peter-street, which she always gave - I do not know Badger.

THOMAS JACKSON re-examined. The servant's name was Hannah Croft ; she still lives with Mr. Allsop; Mrs. Allsop was in the house, but not master; I never saw either of the prisoners at the house.

THOMAS ALLSOP . The servant knew nothing of it; the boy generally carries the goods up stairs, but brings them all first.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Badger's Defence. I purchased the goods of a man, who sold them to me as smuggled, on the Saturday night, for 3l.; on Wednesday morning I desired the female to pledge this lace for me, and while she was gone I was apprehended.

Stevenson's Defence. I am innocent of Knowing them to be stolen.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-6

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

1537. ANN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 67 sovereigns, and 19 half-sovereigns, the monies of John Frost , in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FORST . I am a baker , and live in Tavistock-street, Bedford-square . The prisoner was in my service at Midsummer last, and on taking stock I missed 200l. in money; in consequence of suspicion I went to the prisoner's room, with Sweetland, my brother-in-law; her box was searched in her presence - we first searched her drawers: she said they were my drawers, but the box was hers; she did not allow us to search the box willingly at first, but I said I would have it opened, and went out; I told her I was going for an officer; she then consented to have it opened; and Sweetland found, in my presence, sixty-seven sovereigns, and nineteen half-sovereigns - I made her no promise or threat: as soon as Sweetland took hold of the property, which was tied in a piece of rag, he said, "This feels heavy, like sovereigns; Whose are these?" she came and caught hold of me by the hand, and said it was my property - I asked how she came by it; she said she had

taken them out of my bureau, which was down stairs in the parlour; she said the key was in it: I asked her several times how she got them before she told me, but said nothing to induce her; Sweetland said I need not ask her any more - that no threat or promise had been held out and if she chose to tell, it was of no consequence. I put the money into my iron chest, and sent for Valentine; she had lived about nine months with me: I kept money in my bureau, but never missed any till I took stock - it could not have been taken all at once, or I should have known it: I go to my bureau thirty or forty times every day - at times there is not 20l. there, and at other times 200l. or 300l.

STEPHEN SWEETLAND . I am Frost's brother-in-law. I searched the prisoner's box, and found the sovereigns - I said, "Whose property is this? surely they are sovereigns;" she then caught hold of her master's hand, and said, "They are yours, Sir, and I am sorry for it;" Frost was pressing her how she got them - I said as no threat or promise had been held out, it was of no consequence, and if she chose to tell without that she might; she said she took them by one and two at a time, as she had opportunity; I put them into the iron safe, and afterwards gave them to the officer.

BENJAMIN VALENTINE . I am an officer. I was fetched to Mr. Frost's - Sweetland gave me sixty-seven sovereigns and nineteen half-sovereigns; I cautioned the prisoner not to answer me unless she thought proper, and then asked if she had said it was her master's property before I came; she said Yes: I said, "Do you wish to say it is your master's property?" she said Yes.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 99s only) . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-7

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1538. MARGARET O'BRIEN and ELLEN BURKE were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 1 pocketbook, value 1s.; one 20l., one 10l., and two 5l. Bank notes, the property of Thomas Suter , from his person ; and FRANCIS HACKETT was indicted for feloniously receiving one of the said 5l. Bank notes ; and JOHN MALONEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the said 10l. Bank note, they well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS SUTER . I am a wholesale rope and rag-merchant , and live in Rose-lane, Limehouse. On Saturday, the 22nd of August, between half-past eight and a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening, I lost a pocket-book, containing the property stated in the indictment; I was within fifty or a hundred yards of Tower-hill, and perfectly sober at the time - I had been doing business from dinner time till the evening, and not being home in time for tea I went with a Mr. Williams to the Bear and Wheatsheaf, Lower Thames-street ; we stopped outside the house for about a minute, and the two female prisoners crossed the street to us; I said to my friend, "I will go and take a glass of gin and water;" he went in with me - we had occasion to stop for a certain purpose before we went in, and the prisoners went into the house first; we found them there - I did not at all join their company; we sat a quarter of an hour together, and then O'Brien asked my friend if she might take the liberty of taking a little gin and water with him - he said she might; Burke said, "I suppose I may take the same liberty." and I passed it to her; we were in the parlour - I did not feel disposed to drink after them, and called for another glass for myself; we sat a considerable time - I then said to Williams, "We will settle our money matters;" he said we had better let it be till another time, and not settle there; I however looked at my pocket-book, and my notes were then safe: a man sat at the further end of the table, about three yards from us, very drunk; nobody was near us but the women - Burke sat on my left side, and saw me count the notes: I returned the pocket-book to my left-hand coat pocket, with the notes in it, and to be satisfied that it was safe, felt it a few minutes afterwards; after that I spoke to Williams, and leaned my head on my hand, which completely exposed my pocket - we sat twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour after that: I then said I should go, as it had done raining - the two women then went out; Burke first, and the other a minute after: I and Williams left together in about five minutes - neither of the male prisoners were in the room. After I had gone about one hundred yards towards Tower-hill I missed my pocket-book - there were about six persons assembled near the pavement as I came out of the public-house, but I did not go near enough for them to be able to touch my person; nobody had been near enough to touch me but the two women - we returned to the house, and mentioned my loss to the landlord - (I saw the women at Town-hall, Borough, on the following Tuesday, and was certain of them;) after mentioning my loss to the landlord, we went to Bull's Head-court, Borough. On Monday morning I went to Smith, Payne, and Co.'s, banking-house, for the numbers of my notes; I had received them for a cheque drawn by John Jones : I saw one of the 5l. notes at the Bank on Monday morning, having stopped payment of it, and a 10l. note at Town-hall, in the watch-house-keeper's hands - Mahoney was in custody- the other was taken on Monday morning.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you sure that is all you can tell us? A. It is; the landlord's name is Coleman - I do not know his wife; I saw a female in the bar: I did not go to the house with the women - they were there about a minute before me; nor did I leave the house with them. I am married; neither I nor Williams applied for beds at Coleman's house, nor were we informed that the rooms were double bedded; I did not say a double bedded room would be better, as I would have more fun. I did not say to Coleman or his wife when I returned, that the two women were not the women who took the property; that is as true as all I have said - I went there to have a glass of gin and water, not having taken any thing since dinner; I had been to Mr. Van's, in the Borough, on business - Coleman's house is nearly opposite the Custom-house; it was in my road home, and perhaps my nearest way - we had two glasses of gin and water each; the women came up as we stopped at the bottom of an alley, by the public-house; nothing passed at the public-house about beds: neither of the women charged me with taking indecent liberties with them, nor did I - I heard one call the other Mrs. Burke.

Q. How came you to find your way to Bull's Head-court? A. In consequence of one of the women saying to

the other, "I must go;" the other said, "Oh, it is not so far; Bull's Head-court is not so far," and Williams said he heard one of them say they lived there; I did not hear it myself - I am rather deaf: I suppose my pocket must have been exposed when I leant my head on my elbow - my pocket-book could be taken without my knowing it; I lost it between half-past seven and a quarter to nine o'clock - I was perfectly sober; the women were not in our company: there was an old man in the room - he went away; there was another man there, and these women - that was all besides us; Williams went out for a minute while I was in the house, not more: I swear neither of the women went with him - I had no intention of any familiarity with them; I gave neither of them any money.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I am a ship-chandler, and live in Wapping Dock-street. On the 22nd of August I was with Suter; we went into the Bear and Wheatsheaf, as near as I can guess, from seven to half-past, by ourselves; before we went in I observed the prisoners at the corner of the alley - I saw the same two in the house when we went in; I had no conversation with them before we went in: we sat in the parlour, and they were there - one was sitting at the same table as us, and the other standing up; in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes they asked to drink with us - we had no conversation with them before that; they had no liquor that I saw - I sat on the opposite side of the table to Suter: on their asking to drink with us I said she might - I think it was O'Brien; she was sitting near to me, but not particularly close - she was standing up at first; the other was sitting on the left of Suter: she also asked to drink, and he allowed her - she was near enough to him to touch him, I think; he pulled his pocket-book out while Burke was sitting by him, and said loud enough for them to hear, that he had a 20l., a 10l., and two 5l. notes; the women were sitting with us for an hour or an hour and a quarter - I observed Suter put his pocket-book into his pocket, after counting his notes; nobody was near enough to him to take it but Burke; one of us said, "Let us go," and then the women went out - we each had two glasses of gin and water; we had drank nothing, and were both perfectly sober; we left four or five minutes after them, and went down Thames-street, towards Tower-hill, which is the direct road to Limehouse; we got about one hundred yards from the house when Suter complained of his pocket-book being gone. In the course of conversation I heard one of them, (I think O'Brien,) say she lived in Bull's Head-court; we returned to the public-house, but I did not see them till at Guildhall, on the Friday following; a 5l. and a 10l. note were produced - I was not at Union-hall; there was no familiarity whatever between either of us and the women, nor any conversation that could lead to such a course.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you married? A. Yes; I saw the women first in Thames-street, but had no conversation with them - they did not cross to talk to us, to the best of my knowledge; several people crossed the street - I did not see them crossing; I saw them standing - I had no conversation with them in Thames-street, nor had my friend, to my knowledge; I believe I was out of his sight, about twelve yards, for a certain purpose; I did not see him talking to them - I dined at home that day: Suter came to my house - he did not dine with me; we had three or four places to go to on business, but went to no other public-house; I had no money but silver - I missed none; the women did not go into the public-house with us - I wanted none of their company; there was only one table in the room; we went into the parlour, it being the most respectable; nothing passed between us and them for a quarter of an hour - Suter and I were talking on business; I had not the slightest reason to believe them women of the town; I believe one of them mentioned her husband.

Q. Did not she threaten to tell her husband of Mr. Suter's conduct? A. She did not say any thing of the kind; I went out of the room for about a minute and a half, for a necessary purpose, but not with O'Brien; Burke was on Suter's left side - they might very likely touch each other; she sat close to him - I consider she was sitting near enough to touch him - he was in conversation with me- he was not directing his conversation particularly to her- the landlord came in three or four times; nobody asked for a bed in my hearing, nor was any thing said about a double bedded room; we were both perfectly sober - he pulled his pocket-book out because he said the corner of it was torn; he found his money safe: there was one person in the parlour: I heard Coleman say his wife was not at home - I think he said so to the person at the bottom of the table; they appeared intimate - I did not ask for a bed - all the conversation I had with him was about the reckoning; Suter did not say he was sure the women had not taken the pocket-book; he suspected they had took it, and I believe said so.

EDWIN TURNER . I live with Mr. Winstanley, a haberdasher. On Saturday, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, the two female prisoners came to the shop; I recollect their persons perfectly well; O'Brien tendered me a 5l. note for goods - I declined giving change for it, and handed it over to Mr. Winstanley; he said he had no change; I asked if they had 6s. 9d. to pay for the goods: they said they had not, and went out, taking the note and leaving the goods; Mr. Winstanley sent a young man after them, to say be could give change, and they came back- Mr. Winstanley took the note into his room to look at it; he came out, and said he doubted its being good, but if they would leave it till Monday morning he would ascertain if it was good, and they should have the change, which they agreed to, and went away; on Monday morning O'Brien came with the prisoner Hackett - Mr. Winstanley was out; I said if they would call again they should have the money if the note was good; Hackett said it was a hard thing the woman should be detained, as she wanted to go in the country - they left; Hackett called again, alone: master told him he could not pay the money without the woman being present; he went to fetch her - Mr. Winstanley sent a young man to watch where he went to, and he was detained; the woman never came - Hackett was brought to our shop and taken in charge; I saw O'Brien at Guildhall on Friday, and was perfectly certain of her being the person; I put my initials on the 5l. note.

Cross-examined. Q. When? A. Previous to its being given up to them on the Saturday night.

JOHN KINSEY . I am an officer of Town-hall. On Saturday, the 22nd of August, about ten o'clock at night, Mr. Williams and another gentleman came to me - I went to

McCarthy's house, but found nobody then; on Monday the 24th, about nine at night, I found O'Brien at the Bull, Bull-court, Tooley-street; I knew her before - I told her she was charged with robbing a gentleman, but she was half drunk; I took her into the kitchen of the publichouse - she had a large bundle; I took 19s. 7d. from her; she had changed a sovereign for a pot of beer in my presence; I went to McCarthy's, and found Burke partly concealed in a coal-hole; I took her out of the house - she had in her left hand a small basket with 11s. in it, and in her right hand a small paper rolled up; I endeavoured to secure that, but she snatched at it and fore it - I have the pieces here; it is a receipt for a 10l. note, No.3807, deposited with Basset, a watch-house-keeper, at Bermondsey, that evening; O'Brien said, in her presence, "That is the woman that robbed the gentleman;" Burke made no answer; at six o'clock on Tuesday morning, I went with Basset to Dockhead, and apprehended Mahoney, and a woman named McCray; I told Mahoney he was charged with claiming a 10l. note on Friday evening at the watch-house; he said he was drunk at the time or he should not have done it - (receipt read).

Cross-examined. Q. O'Brien said Burke had robbed the gentleman; did you not say she was very drunk? A. O'Brien was half drunk.

JOSHUA FREEMAN . I am a clerk in the Bank - I have a 5l. note, No.25,368, dated 7th July, 1829, which was stopped at the Bank on the 24th of August - it was claimed by Suter.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you receive it yourself? A. I got it from the Secretary's-office, from Mr. Stewart, who is not here - I only know it was stopped by a memorandum on it in Stewart's writing - who brought it to the Bank I do not know.

COURT. Q. Has it been paid by the Bank? A. It has not - if it had it would have been cancelled; if it had not been stopped it would have been paid - it is a genuine note.

JOHN BASSET . On Monday, the 24th of August, I was on duty for a patrol of Bermondsey - Burke and Mahoney were brought in, charging each other with a felony; Burke gave her name as Hackett and said Mahoney had robbed her of a 10l. note, and he said she had robbed him of one; they were both intoxicated; the note was in the possession of Burke - I never saw it in Mahoney's possession; I detained it, and gave Burke a receipt for it; she said her husband was foreman at the London-docks, and had earned it; the receipt produced is my writing - it has been torn since; I have had the note in my possession ever since -Suter claimed it before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. About what time did you see Mahoney at the watch-house? A. About five minutes to nine; I did not ask his address, for I knew him from his infancy, and knew his parents to be respectable; I apprehended him at his lodgings next morning - I believe he is married.

JOHN BRIANT PRIESTMAN . I am a clerk at Smith, Payne, and Co.'s. On the 21st of August I paid Suter a 25l. cheque, drawn by John Jones - I gave him a 20l. note, No.19,232, dated 10th July, 1829, and a 5l. note, No.35,368. dated the 7th July; I saw the 5l. note at Guildhall, and am certain it is the same. Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is the entry in your writing? A. Yes; I have seen Suter five or six times before, and am certain I paid it to him, for he applied to me very soon after for the numbers of the notes - I paid it about half-past three o'clock - the book the entry is in closes at four.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am a clerk at Sir R.C. Glyn and Co.'s. I have an entry of the payment of a cheque of 28l. 14s. drawn by Thomas Van , on the 17th of August, for which I gave two 10l. notes, Nos.3,807 and 3,808, dated 21st July, a 5l. note, No. 129, and 3l. 14s. - the 10l. note produced is one of them; I was applied to for the numbers afterwards - I am not certain whether it was for a cheque or bill.

THOMAS SUTER . I received this 5l. note from Smith and Co.'s, in payment of a draft of 25l. - I applied at Glyn's on losing my money; I saw this 10l. note. No.3,807, before the Magistrate - I received it for a draft drawn by Thomas Van, for 28l. 14s. from Mr. Thomas.

JOHN HELLIER . I am a linen-draper, and live in Bermondsey-street. On the 22nd of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening the prisoner Mahoney came with two women - I recollect Burke as one of them, the other is not here - they appeared intoxicated and scarcely knew what they wanted; Mahoney told me to take down a shawl marked 7s., both the women spoke about it - another shawl was taken down, they bargained for both, and produced a 10l. Bank note - it came from Mahoney's hands; I did not give change for it - it was snatched out of my hand by Burke, and she put it into her bosom - they ran away - I did not follow them.

JOHN HOLLAND . I am street-keeper of Holborn. I saw Hackett in the custody of Mr. Winstanley.s man - he delivered him to me: I found two letters on him - I do not know the hand-writing - it is sealed up and signed O'Brien.

O'Brien's Defence. She gave me the 5l. note to change, to treat myself with a silk-handkerchief, a pair of stockings and gloves; Burke told me Suter had presented her with the note - I was turned out of the room; I did not know where she got the note - she told me to say my husband gave it to me; I took my husband to change it - she had been alone with Suter for a quarter of an hour; I did not know what note it was, as I cannot read or write.

Burke's Defence. O'Brien held me in the room by my clonk, and put a piece of paper into my hand - I did not know what it was till I looked at the note.

WILLIAM COLEMAN . I am landlord of the Bear and Wheatsheaf. Thames-Street. I saw Suter and another gentleman at my house on the 22nd of August; I went into the parlour, twice while they were there - I was taking in beer - there were two females there, they sat on the same seat; I have no recollection of the prisoners; I cannot say whether they drank together - Suter came and asked me something; I believe a bed was named - I told him it was engaged - he said could he have a bed - I said it was engaged - we are rather particular who we take in - and when gentlemen and ladies come they have bagage - I said, "I had no single bedded room: and for man and wife, I had none at all." He said nothing about a double bedded-room - I saw the women leave before them; I thought the prosecutor had come from Gravesend, as the boat comes in at that time; he did not ask for a bed for more than himself - he merely asked if I had a bed; I

said, they were all engaged - I do not know why I said I had no single beds.

COURT. Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoners? A. I never saw them before - I think the women came up my yard before the men.

Prisoner O'Brien. Will you ask Mr. Williams if Suter did not give Burke the note.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . When I went out for about a minute, I believe, O'Brien was out for about half a minute; she came back and was in the house for full an hour after; they went away both together, after Suter expressed his intention of going.

THOMAS SUTER . I never used any familiarity with either of them, or made them a present of any thing; on my oath I did not ask for a bed at all.

O'BRIEN - GUILTY . Aged 25.

BURKE - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

HACKETT - NOT GUILTY .

MAHONEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-8

1539. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas John Dyer , from his person .

THOMAS JOHN DYER . I am in the East India service, and live in Burton-crescent. On the 1st of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in Fenchurch-street ; a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if I had not lost my handkerchief; I felt, and it was gone - I had not selt it after I left home at ten o'clock; a gentleman pointed out the prisoner, who had just crossed the street; I went over, laid hold of him, and he dropped my handkerchief from under his coat - I saw it fall from him, and picked it up; I took him to the street-keeper, and delivered it to Martin at the Mansion-house; he said at the watch-house that he took it, and asked me to forgive him, saying it was his first offence.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was any body present when he said that? A. No; the constable had gone out at the door - I saw it drop from his coat on the payement.

JOSEPH MARTIN . The handkerchief was delivered to me at the Mansion-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking in Fenchurch-street- this gentleman and another came across; the gentleman said I had his property - he found it close at my feet.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-9

NEW COURT, First Day.

Third Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1540. DANIEL SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. the goods of Simon Andrew Foster , from his person.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen years .

Reference Number: t18290910-10

1541. JANE KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 5 silver tea-spoons, value 16s.; 2 gowns, value 10s,; 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 riding-habit, value 10s.; 2 sheets, value 8s., and 1 jacket, value 15s., the goods of Maree Louisa Rede , her mistress .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-11

1542. HANNAH FRENCH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 2 shifts, value 4r.; 2 petticoats, value 4s.; 4 gowns, value 8s.; 1 bonnet, value 6s.; 1 veil, value 9s.; 1 cap, value 3s.; 1 tippet, value 16s.; 1 neckince, value 18s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s., and 2 bed-gowns, value 3s., the goods of Daniel Newton Crouch , her master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-12

1543. JOHN SEARLE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , I chest of drawers, value 2l., and 3 mattresses, value 7l , the goods of William Bates .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-13

1544. EDWARD PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , 1 skittle-ball, value 4s. , the goods of David Faulkner .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290910-14

1545. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE STATHAM . I am a tailor , and live in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden . The prisoner was my foreman ; if he took a garment home and was paid for it, he was to bring the money to me directly. At the beginning of December he took a pair of breeches and gaiters to Benjamin Jones ; when he came back I asked how they fitted - he said Mr. Jones had not tried them on; he did hot account to me for the money.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When did he leave your service? A. I think in February; I keep a book of the goods sent out - I had but recently began business, and did not receive any payment till after Christmas; I did not expect the money for these articles to be paid before Christmas - I called on Mr. Jones in March, and was suprised to see the prisoner's receipt for it; I have not my books here.

BENJAMIN JONES. I ordered a pair of breeches and gaiters; they were brought home by the prisoner in the beginning of December - I did not pay him at the time, but he called afterwards, and had it; he gave me this receipt: he had 2l. 1s. in money, and 1ls. in spirits - this is the receipt.

RICHARD MYRES . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in Surrey on the 15th of April.

GEORGE STATHAM re-examined. The prisoner returned the day he took these things home; he did not tell me he had been Mr. Jones afterwards - I had no opportunity of settling with the prisoner when he left; he went to dinner one day, and did not return: I think that was in February

GUILTY. Aged 58.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-15

1546. SARAH BRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 3 petticoats, value 3s.; 1 table-cloth,

value 1s.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d.; 1 apron, vlaue 6d.; 1 gown, value 10s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 sheet, value 7s.; I blanket, value 4s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d.; 2 caps, value 6d.; 1 shoe-horn, value 6d.; 1 collar, value 6d.; and 1 pair of shoes, value 6d., the goods of Henry Willis , her master .

HENRY WILLIS . The prisoner lived in my service. On the 27th of June I got up in the morning, and went to call her, but she was then gone; I afterwards went to Allen's-yard, Kingsland, and found her two boxes, which I had seen, and knew were her's; the officer produced the key, and opened one of them, which was locked - the other was open.

ELIZABETH WILLIS . I am the prosecutor's wife - we live in Weymouth-terrace, Hackney-road . On the 27th of June the prisoner left our service, without notice; her boxes were brought to our house, and in them we found three petticoats, an apron, a gown, and some other things, which I know to be mine.

THOMAS CLEMMANS . I am a constable. I was sent for to Mr. Willis', and was desired to search for the prisoner: I found her the following day at a house in Henrietta-street, Hackney-road, where she had slept the night before; she had this shawl on her back: I found this key in her pocket, and went the next day with another officer to Stanborough's, and found two boxes - one was open, and the other this key opened; we took them to the prosecutor's, and this property was found in them.

WILLIAM MORETON . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I went the next day and got the boxes.

CATHERINE STANBOROUGH . The prisoner came to my house on the 26th of June, and asked me to let her leave her boxes, as she was going into the country; one of them was locked, and the other not; I gave them to the officer in the same state, I received them on Sunday, the 28th of June.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-16

1547. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of the Right Honourable Robert Peel .

THOMAS DAWSON . I am porter to Lord Farnborough, who lives in Whitehall-gardens . On the morning of the 17th of August I saw the prisoner running after Mr. Peel's carriage; I then saw him with this great coat, and went and took it from him - there was no servant behind the carriage: the coachman was riding and driving; Mr. Peel's servant owned the coat.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. No.

BENJAMIN COLE . I am Mr. Peel's servant. I did not go with the carriage that day, but I saw this coat behind it; it is the second coachman's coat - I know it by the buttons.

DAVID JONES . I am helper in the stable. I put this coat in the hind dickey of the coach; I buckled the apron all the way round it - it could not have fallen out; I did not know of its being taken till the afternoon.

RICHARD GODWIN MACE . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Castle-yard; the coach passed me - I looked behind me, and saw this coat, which I took up; I have but one arm, and I think it impossible that I could have taken it from the coach without some one seeing me - I saw Dawson coming towards me; I put out my arm, gave him the coat, and said I found it.

THOMAS DAWSON . That is not true; I saw him running after the coach, and said there was something behind the carriage; I then went and gave him the meeting - I asked where he got it, and he said he picked it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-17

1548. HENRY WILMOT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 dead goose, value 5s. , the goods of James Cooke .

JAMES COOKE . I am a poulterer , and live in Princes-street, Soho . About twelve o'clock, on the 18th of July, I saw the prisoner come up to my shop, and saw the goose go into his apron; I pursued, and saw him stopped, without losing sight of him - he dropped the goose and I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-18

1549. JAMES SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 8 handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of Edward Pike .

THOMAS JONES . I am in the employ of Edward Pike, a draper , at Knightsbridge . On the 28th of July the prisoner came and asked me for something for his neck - I said I would serve him directly; he went up higher in the shop - I saw him shuffling something under his coat, and I thought I saw something bulky under it; he then went out; I went out and collared him, took him into the shop, and he dropped eight handkerchiefs from under his coat, which were my master's; I detained him till the constable came - I had seen Mrs. Pike take these articles down from a shelf, to shew a customer, about twelve o'clock.

Prisoner. I went for the handkerchiefs, and took them to the door to look at them. Witness. He was outside the door and had got off the step - what he had was concealed all but the bulk.

ROBERT TURNER . I took charge of the prisoner and the handkerchiefs; I had known him some time - he has been a watchman in St. George's parish, and afterwards a patrol in St. James's parish; he had a good character, but was rather given to drink.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child; I went for a cotton handkerchief - I took them to the door to look at; he came and took me into the shop, and accused me of having them under my coat, which I had not; he struck me on the nose and made it bleed.

ROBERT TURNER . I only found 1d. on him.

Prisoner. There were a number of persons rushed into the shop while I was there, and my pocket was picked.

THOMAS JONES . He did say he had 1s. taken from him, but I do not believe it; he made a rush out of the shop, and tore Mrs. Pike's bonnet off - I think he was a little in liquor; he pulled some new books out of his pocket while he sat in a chair - he was very violent, and said he would

strike the first man that came near him; a butcher came in and tied his hands.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-19

1550. HENRY PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 1 trowel, value 1s., and 1 hammer, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Newth ; and 1 trowel, value 1s., the goods of John Vankwell .

THOMAS NEWTH . I am a plasterer , and was at work in the Five-fields, Chelsea , on the 8th of August - I left a trowel and a hammer there - when I went on Monday, the 10th, they were gone. and a number of other tools; these are mine, and this other trowel is my partner John Vankwell's; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN SOUTHERWOOD . I am an officer. On the 21st of August I heard some tools had been taken from a house in Elizabeth-street; the prisoner had been given to me by a private watchman, on a charge of stealing some other tools; he said he did not steal them but his brother did, and sold them to Kitchen; I went to the prisoner's mother's, who said he had a younger brother, who has since been punished; the prisoner told me, that Kitchen told him his brother had stolen them; I went and found Kitchen at work; I said I wanted the plasterers' tools; he denied having any; I said I had witnesses to prove it - and then he went into a foundation and got them out; he said he had them from Tintar, which is the name the prisoner and his brother go by; I took him to the prisoner, who said, "My brother gave me the tools."

Prisoner's Defence. I was up at Paddington walking with Kitchen - my brother and another boy called me; my brother said he had got two trowels and a hammer; there had been a fight at Chelsea, and he picked them up and a piece of bread with them, which he eat; I took the tools to Kitchen - he said the trowels were worth 1s. a piece and the hammer 9d.; I said he should have them for that - he put his hand into his pocket and took out the money; I gave it to my brother.

JOHN SOUTHERWOOD . Kitchen said he bought the tools on the Sunday about ten days before I saw him, and the prisoner had sold them to him - the prisoner's mother took some other tools back to the prosecutors, which had been taken at the same time.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-20

1551. DANIEL KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 1 shovel, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Sophia Raffles , widow .

JOHN CROSSWELL . I am butler to Mrs. Sophia Raffles - she is a widow, and lives in Grosvenor-square . I know this shovel to be hers - it was safe on the 26th of July about the middle of the day; the beadle afterwards brought it.

JOHN LACY . I am an officer. I took the shovel from the prisoner on the 27th of July, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; I took him to the watch-house; I had been watching him in several areas - I saw him bring something out of the prosecutrix's area, and then go down Davies-street, where he offered the shovel to a man who was making a sewer.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down to take the dust, and left my shovel in the area - I went back for it and

found this; my own was gone; I put it into my sack, and thought at first it was my own.

JOHN CROSSWELL . He had been there for dust, but he was not the regular dustman.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-21

1552. EDWARD HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1 bound book, value 30s., the goods of Edward Jeffery and another .

EDWARD JEFFERY . I am in partner ship with my son - we live in Pall-Mall . About twelve o'clock on the 1st of August, the prisoner and another came to ask the price of a book; I went into the street to see which book they meant, and while I went out the prisoner took this book and went away - when I went in I missed it; a man pursued him; I observed him in the shop, and am able to say he was one of the persons; I saw it at the office again in about half an hour.

Prisoner. Q. When you came to the office did you not say you did not miss the book? A. No; I missed a book; my son came in directly after and I told him - I could not leave the shop myself.

SAMUEL ROBINSON . I saw the prisoner at she top of the Haymarket with another - the prisoner looked into several shops, and then I saw him go into the prosecutors and bring out the book; he put his handkerchief over it, and put it under his coat - I followed him to she top of the Haymarket, and was going to take him - he dropped the book - I took it up; I still followed, and saw him taken.

Prisoner. Q. You saw me came out of the shop? A. Yes; and you turned and went up the Arcade; I was close to you - I was behind a pillar when I saw you go into the shop; the other did not come out of the shop when you did; I have not been a witness here above twenty times; I am often walking out on business, early and late.

GEORGE AVIS. I was sent by order of Mr. Dyer of Mr. Jeffery's - he said there was a book missing from there, but he did not know what book it was.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-22

1553. PATRICK GLEESON was indicted for stealing. on the 2nd of September , 1 pair of shoes, value 7s. , the goods of Joseph Perry .

JOSEPH PERRY . I am a labourer . I lost a pair of shoes on the 2nd of September; I went to lay down in the barn, at Clapham , where the prisoner was; I pulled off my shoes and laid down, and when I got up in the morning the prisoner was gone and my shoes likewise; a man and woman were gone besides him - there were a great number of persons in the barn that night; I suppose fifty people went away that morning; I saw him seven days afterwards on the banks of the new canal, with my shoes on his feet; I said; "What a man you were to take my shoes away;" he said he had purchased them down at Strood; but I can swear they are mine by a part of the lining of the heel, which is broken down; he said he went into Kent from Clapham.

Prisoner. I bought them at Strood, and paid 7s. 6d. for them; I should like to know how he knows that they are his. Witness. Here is the place in the heel where I stuck some shoemaker's-wax in, as I could not get it sewed.

JOHN SOUTHERWOOD . I was called and took the pri

soner - these shoes were pulled off at the watch-house and the prosecutor swore to them; the prisoner said that he bought them at a shop at Strood; he said at the office, that there was a person in Gray's Inn-lane who knew they were his.

Prisoner. I said Gravel-lane; it was John Sheen - I wrote to him to come here. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-23

1554. JAMES DUPEAR was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 1 silver snuff-box, value 30s., the goods of William Wust , from his person .

WILLIAM WUST . On the 16th of August I was walking in Portland-street with my wife, about a quarter before seven o'clock - two women on the opposite side of the way called to me that the young man had run off with my snuff-box; they pointed to the prisoner; I went after him and called Stop thief! a great many people followed - I did not see him stopped - I am sure he is the person they pointed to; he was running, and those women were on the opposite side of the way - they had not an opportunity of taking it; I did not see the prisoner near me; I should not have known it if the women had not have spoken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are either of those women here? A. No; I did not see him do any thing, only run; I had used my snuff-box about a quarter of an hour before.

ELIZABETH MARY COOPER . I was in Portland-mews, and saw the prisoner pass me, running fast, and two persons following him; I heard the cry of Stop thief! - there was no one running before him; I kept my eye on him, and saw him put his hand to his right thing, and throw something on a dunghill, which looked like tin - I went across the road and saw the snuff-box, and told my aunt of it.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was this from the gentleman? A. I do not know - I lost sight of the prisoner after he threw the box down; he was brought back in about three minutes - I know him to be the same person; I had only a few seconds opportunity of seeing him at all.

MARY ANN PIGGOTT . On the 16th of August, which was Sunday afternoon, I was lying down - I heard a cry of Stop thief! - my husband called me up - I went into the front room and saw the snuff-box on the dung-hill - I took it up.

Cross examined. Q. How many young men were running? A. I saw a mob running, but they had got past before I took this snuff-box up; I did not see the prisoner till he was brought back.

STEPHEN JAMES PENNY . The witness gave me this snuff-box: I took it to the watch-house, and gave it to Buckland.

JOHN VIRGO BUCKLAND . I produce this snuff-box, which Penny gave me; I had heard the cry of Stop thief! found the prisoner in custody - and took him; I saw the prosecutor directly afterwards, who claimed the box -I know nothing of the prisoner; I have been an officer about eight or nine years.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-24

1555. HENRY WILKS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , 2 gown pieces, value 10s.; 1 counterpane, value 5s.; 12 pairs of gloves, value 24s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 16s.; 2 remnants of muslin, value 2s.; 2 towels, value 1s.; 3 pairs of braces, value 15s.; 3 stiffeners, value 16s.; 2 pairs of garters, value 2s., and 3 remnants of cotton, value 2s., the goods of John Verey his master ; and MARY STAPLES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN JOWETT . I was in the employ of John Verey , a hosier ; the prisoner Wilks and been nearly eleven months in his service. I had given some instructions to Clements and Ballard, and on the 31st of July they came and brought four silk handkerchiefs and two silk handkerchiefs, four of which I could positively swear to, from a mark which was then on them, but which is now gone: this one I had had in my hand the evening before, and I bad missed them; I know the patterns of the others - we got a search-warrant and went to the house of Staples; she was present, and we found two gown pieces, this cambric handkerchief, three gloves and a variety of other articles; I can swear to the gown prints and to this muslin, which has a private mark on it; I believe them all to be Mr. Verey's; she said they had been given to her by Wilks.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She told you that, on their being found? A. Yes; she gave up a purse, which she said belonged to Wilks - I did not see how much was in it: I heard Wilks and she were going to be married - she lives with some persons who I understood were her parents; she said Wilks had given her all the things - many of them are small remnants, and are not of much value; some of the gloves were in the possession of her father - I believe he is a bell-hanger.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I was sent to watch the shop of Mr. Verey, in Regent-street , on the 31st of July; I saw Wilks coming out of the shop, and followed him with Ballard - as he was walking along Margaret-street I saw him take some things from his pockets, look at them, and do something with them; we followed him on to Mr. Chapman's, a pawnbroker, in Cleveland-street, where he offered these four handkerchiefs for 1s. 6d.; we took him, and then found other handkerchiefs in his pocket; we got a search-warrant, and went to Union-street. Oxford-street, where we found the female prisoner: I said to her, "Henry is in custody - we have a search-warrant, and are in possession of a good many facts to prove that you have received some things; you may do as you please about what you say to me:" she said, "I shall not deny it;" she then opened the drawers, and gave me these things - she said she had lived in the same family, and expected to be married to Henry - that they had bought those drawers and some other things; she gave me this purse of money, which she said he gave her to save for him. Wilks said at the office that he gave these things to her, and she knew nothing about them.

Cross-examined. Q. She at once told you of it? A. She gave me the money; I believe I first said, "Whose money is this?" there was no hesitation about her - she behaved very well: I believe it was not her father and mother who lived in the house with her.

WILLIAM BALIARD . I have nothing to add farther,

except that some of these things were in the possession of her father, as he is called; this stiffener was in the possession of her brother - one pair of braces had been sold by her mother to one of the lodgers; I found two duplicates in Wilks' pocket, which allude to some of these things.

JOHN WILCOX . I have a piece of silk, pawned with me on the 26th of July, by Wilks, as I believe - this is the duplicate I gave.

JOHN WILLIAM ANDREWS . I have some silk, pawned with me by Wilks, on the 21st and 28th of July.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILKS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

STAPLES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-25

1556. JANE PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 1 half-peck of oats and beans, mixed together, value 10d.; 12 yards of bed-tick, value 15s.; 10 yards of calico, value 5s.; 4 yards of linen, value 6s.; 12 yards of canvas, value 5s.; 12 yards of printed cotton, value 6s.; 4 pieces of soap, value 1s.; 4 knives, value 1s.; 4 forks, value 6d.; 11b. weight of thread, value 6d., and 1/4lb. weight of cotton, value 6d., the goods of James Jay , her master .

HENRY WHITE . I am a foreman to James Jay , an upholder who lives in Golden-square - the prisoner was in his employ for about seven years. On the morning of the 29th of July her basket was brought to me by one of the other workwomen; I found in it a piece of calico and a small quantity of oats and beans: when she came in Mr. Jay and myself taxed her with having some property in her basket - she at first denied it, but afterwards confessed that there was some property in it; the officer was then sent for, who went to her lodgings, where we found the other articles charged in the indictment; I saw her again - she said, "I know I have done very wrong, and I hope Mr. Jay will be merciful to me."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was Mr. Jay at the office at the time she said that? A. Yes; I did not press him to prosecute her - there are about twelve women in the employ now; I cannot say how many there were at that time - no person is here who heard her say the calico was in her basket; Mr. Jay and one of the clerks were present at the time: Mr. Jay was rather reluctant to prosecute - I am not aware of telling him that he ought to do it; I cannot swear I did not: I cannot identify any of these articles by a particular mark - I compared this calico with the piece we had then in use, and it matched exactly - here is a trifling stain of fruit on it, which I saw when it was taken out of the basket.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I was sent for, and the prisoner was given into my custody; she begged Mr. Jay would not prosecute her, and she would never be guilty of the like again; I asked where she lived - she said at No.53, Margaret-street: I asked if she had any property belonging to Mr. Jay - she said she had, and if I would go there with her she would give it up - I took her to the office, then went and took the things.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you think it your duty to question prisoners? A. I do, Sir - I did not tell her that I should use her answers against her.

Prisoner. He said Mr. Jay would not do any thing to me if I would tell him; he took every thing he could find. Witness. She begged of me to speak to Mr. Jay, but I did not say he would be merciful.

Prisoner's Defence. I have borne a good character up to this moment; the foreman has been doing every thing he could to injure me; it was a good for nothing infamous woman that did it.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . She said at first that a person had given her some things, but afterwards she said she took them.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 48.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-26

1557. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 sack, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Lambert; and 3 bushels of beans, value 6s. , the goods of Mary Wall .

MOSES SIMMONS . On the 25th of July, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come to Mrs. Wall's, a salesman , in Spitalfields-market ; he took a sack of beans from a stack, and carried them away- I spoke to Mr. Wall, and asked if he had sold a sack of beans to such a person; he said No: I then went after the prisoner, but could not find him; I gave information to Adams, and in about two hours I saw him in custody: I knew him perfectly well before; he denied it, and said he had bought three prickles of beans from a cart in Crispin-street, but there was no such cart there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you? A. An inspector of the watch. This was in East-street I believe, I am not sure - I will not swear at all; he took me to a street, I believe it was East-street - I do not know much of him, only by seeing him about for a year and a half; I was within a yard of him when he took them; I rather believe he saw me - he might know I was inspector of the watch, or he might have forgotten it.

COURT. Q. Why did you not stop him when he was taking them? A. I did not know but he might have bought them - I knew he was a dealer.

JOHN WALL . My mother's name is Mary. This witness came to me on the Saturday, and asked if I had sold a sack of beans, and described the man: I had sold four sacks that morning, but none to him - I looked, and missed a sack: I saw the prisoner afterwards in the watch-house - the sack is Mr. Lambert's; the beans were my mother's - we are salesmen; they were lying opposite my mother's place - I cannot swear that this is the sack, but I missed one like it.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Mr. Lambert here? A. No; the prisoner has bought things of me - I may have lent him sacks, but it must have been at least a fortnight before; we always send for the sacks the same evening the things are sold, except on Saturdays - we sometimes have wrong directions for them; I cannot say that I had not lent the prisoner half a dozen sacks of Mr. Lambert's.

COURT. Q. Would three prickles fill a sack? A. No

- a sack holds thirteen or fourteen peeks; three prickles are ten pecks and a half.

JOSEPH ADAMS . Simmons described the prisoner to me; I found him at the end of Lamb-street - I asked him what be had done with the beans: he said he had not had any - I took him to Simmons, and than he said he had had some beans, but he bought them of a cart in West-street; I had been up from four o'clock, and am certain there had been no such cart - he said he had bought three prickles; I found this sack on a truck, which they said was his-it was full of beans; he assisted in taking the truck to the watch house - there were other things in it.

Cross-examined. Q. What else was in the truck? A. A sack of peas, three half-sieves of currants, onions, and other things; there was no name on the truck, but he said it was his-he showed us where he bought the other things; West-street was in a very crowded state, and that convinced me that the cart he described had not been there; there were three fruit carts which were drawn on the pavement, at half-past three o'clock, and they were there when we went to see it; I am sure that there could not have been the cart he described.

Prisoner's Defence. I keep a greengrocer's shop , and had two sacks belonging to Mr. Wall, one on the 21st, and one on the 23d-on one called, and I took them to return; I went up West-street, adjoining the market, to purchase some peas and some beans, and put them into the sacks; I took them to my truck, Mr. Adams came and said I had stolen some beans-if I had stolen them, as Simmons says I did, at a quarter before six o'clock; I might have taken them home, and they would not have been found but knowing that I got them honestly, I let them be while I went to get other goods; when we went to Simmons' house he was in bed, and we waited till he came down; the prosecutrix swore to the beans she had to sell. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-27

1558. JOSEPH BRACE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 1 pair of shoes, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Eldrid .

THOMAS ELDRID . I lost a pair of shoes from under my bed on the 25th of March; I pulled them of the night before, when I went to bed; the prisoner slept with me that night, and no one else-it was at the Rummer public-house, at Enfield ; I found him afterwards at Edmonton-he gave me a duplicate of another pair of shoes, and said he would make it up on the Saturday night; I took the duplicate from him, and gave him to the constable - he has worn my shoes out.

JOHN MEAN . I am a constable of Enfield. I took the prisoner; he said he had worn the shoes out - I said they must be too big for him; he said, "They fitted me very well, when I had got a truss of hay in them."

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-28

1559. SAMUEL BEASLEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 28lbs. weight of cheese, value 20s. , the goods of George Thame .

GEORGE THAME . I am cheesemonger , and live in James-street, Oxford-street . On the 29th of August at five minutes before 12 o'clock at night, I was going to ge some porter and heard Stop thief! called-I turned and saw the prisoner drop the cheese from his shoulder; I pursued and took him - my wife took up the cheese.

WILLIAM WANDLER . I was in Oxford-street and heard Stop thief! called-I ran to Bird-street and saw the prisoner running - I took charge of him and asked what he had been doing; they said, he had stolen the cheese, and there were four more in the gang.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A person coming down Bird-street first caught hold of me, and then this person came up - a stout man came with a pipe in his mouth; he said, "Is this the young rascal that stole the cheese?" and they said, Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-29

1560. ALFRED BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 3 spoons, value 12s., 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; 3 yards of silk, value 10s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s., 1 apron, value 10s., and 2 yards of ribbon, value 1s. , the goods of Elizabeth Stapleton . widow .

MARIA KNIGHT . I live with Elizabeth Stapleton a widow, in Frith-street . On the 26the August she lost a pair of sugar-tongs, some tea-spoons, some silk and other things which where loose in a wardrobe; the prisoner lodged in the house-these are the articles.

Cross-examiend by MR. RYLAND. Q. How long had he lodged in the house? A. Since April. I believe he lived in a respectable house - he only slept there; he had before then slept at his master's - their house was repairing - Mrs. Stapleton is not here-she was unwilling to prosecute him.

GEORGE TURNER . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker in High-street, Bloomsbury. These tongs, and tea spoon were pawned on the 21st of July, and the tablespoon the same day-the prisoner pawned one; the other I did not take in.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I went to the prisoner's apartments and found him there; I said, I came to search the place-and if he choose he might tell me any thing before I commenced the search - he hesitated a short time; the witness said to him "If you will tell where they are my mistress will do nothing against you;" I stopped her but I do not know what I said - I then went over to the other side of the room, and the prisoner told me where the property was - I found some at the pawnbroker's, and the other articles at Queen's-row, Walworth, where he said he gave the duplicates to a friend of his, to be brought forth-but I have not seen them.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

The prisoner received an excellent character from his master, who engaged to received him again.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-30

1561. WILLIAM COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 4 books, value 8s., the goods of Eleanor Foxhall ; and 8 books, value 12s. the goods of Ann Sullivan .

SECOND COUNT, the property of Philip Tidy mn .

ANN SULLIVAN . I am pew-opener at the Baverian Chapel, Warwick-street . On the morning of the 22nd

of July I went there, and was informed that a person had been taken for stealing some books; I looked and missed twelve books - I saw them afterwards at the office, and knew them - also some keys and a bag.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Had the books any marks? A. Yes, one of them has the name of Eleanor Foxhall - I should have known them if the name had not been in them, from having seen them so often in my hands- these five were in my own drawer, two of them are my own, and three of them have the names of persons in them - the drawers were open; the lock of my drawer was picked - one of the books has a picture in it, which I know,

PHILIP TIDYMAN . I am clerk at the chapel - I went there on the morning of the 22nd of July, and took the prisoner with the books on his persons in the gallery - I asked him what he was doing - he made me no answer; I saw his pockets sticking out with the books and some of them in his hat - he gave no account of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take these books from him? A. He took them from his pocket while he was standing in the vestry, waiting for the constable; I let them lie till the constable came, and then he took them: I swear the prisoner took these very books from his pocket - they might be twenty minutes out of his pocket before the constable came; there were no others in the vestry but what he took out of his pocket.

THOMAS MINTON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner up, and searched him - I found one of the books on his person, and three keys, which opened the drawers.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the books you found in his possession? A. This is one; there is no mark in it- the clerk had taken the books from him before I got there.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-31

1562. THOMAS CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , 1 umbrella, value 28s. , the goods of John Cadman .

JONN CADMAN . On the 20th of August I lost a silk umbrella from within the door of my shop in the Strand while I was lighting the gas; a gentleman came in and told me of it; I went out and saw the prisoner running with it - I pursued, but lost sight of him; I cannot be positive to his person; Mr. Kearsley told me that a person had run into his house with an umbrella; I went into the tap-room, and saw the prisoner sitting in a corner - I charged him with it, but he strongly denied it; he seemed agitated - I looked, and found the umbrella behind him; I had seen it safe ten minutes before.

JOHN HALL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the property.

Prisoner's Defence. On coming down the Strand I saw the umbrella leaning towards the ground - there was a great crowd going along, and several people stumbled to pick it up; I took it, and went to have a pint of beer.

JOHN HALL . He said he picked it up, but it was quite clean - it had been raining in the afternoon, and the ground was very dirty. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-32

1563. JOHN HIBBART was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 5 wine-glasses, value 5s. the goods of Charles King .

HENRY RANDOLPH . I am in the employ of Charles King , a wine-merchant , in Oxford-street . I missed a glass between eight and nine o'clock on the 13th of August-1 did not see it taken, but I took a glass out of the prisoner's pocket; he said he did not know how it came there - the young woman who serves in the bar gave me information; these other four glasses are my master's, they were found at a pawnbrokers's; I do not know when they were missed; we had several of them, and lost them all.

ALEXANDER MANN . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took this glass from the witness; as we went to the watch-house the prisoner made his escape, a ran down a yard-I pursued, and took him; I found eighteen duplicates in his trousers, two of which relate to these glasses.

JAMES HILL . These four glasses were pawned by the prisoner at two different times, in July and August; I asked if they were his own; he said Yes, and that he had half a dozen of them.

Prisoner Defence. I had been to two or three public-houses and had something to drink; when I came home my wife sent me for a small quantity of gin - I went to the prosecutor's for it - I stood a minute or two, and the young woman said she missed a glass; I said I knew nothing about it - this young man came and searched my pocket; I said I did not know how it came there-these four glasses were given me by a young man who is gone to America with Mr. Edward Hall.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-33

1564. GEORGE KEENE and SAMUEL KEENE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 7lbs. weight of snuff, value 34s.; 3lbs. weight of tobacco, value 11s., and 12lbs. weight of segars, value 15l. , the goods of James Foot and Simon Foot .

MESSRS BARRY and CRESSWELL conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I was servant to James Foot and Simon Foot -their factory is in Vine-street, Minories. On the 31st of July the prisoners came there together - Samuel said he was recommended to purchase goods at our warehouse; he selected some, which were to be paid for on delivery; George said he would give me a reference - I said it was unnecessary, as the carman had had directions to bring them back if they were not paid for on delivery; I gave directions for making up the order, which consisted of tobacco, snuff, and segars, to the amount of 59l. 7s. - they were sent on Saturday, the 1st of August, by William Creed and a boy - I gave them both particular orders, as the prisoner were entire strangers, not to leave the goods without the money, and unless it was forthcoming to bring back the goods immediately; Creed returned about three o'clock in the afternoon, and said George Keene told him that his brother would come to us; I sent him back immediately-he did not return till past seven-I was then gone from the warehouse; the boy came back about five o'clock with George Keene , who said he wished me to allow him to keep the goods till Monday, assuring us that they should then be paid for; I told him that either the goods or the money must be returned - he went off immediately with the boy; I sent another person after them - I got back

part of the goods, and found on the Monday that there was a deficiency amounting to 17l. 9s. 8d.; they had been deposited in the counting-house - they were examined on the Monday as the prisoners did not apply for them, which they assured Creed they would do; there were 12lbs. 2ozs. of segars missing. 7lbs. 14ozs. of snuff, and 3lbs. 5ozs. of tobacco, which we have never had back; I received an account of a small portion of the goods; I went on the Monday and saw Samuel; I told him of the quantity that was deficient-he took it down on a slate; he said he was sorry the goods were detained, as they had an order for them, and his brother had gone to the banker's to see if they had received advice to pay a cheque - he said the goods were sold.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When did you have them taken up? A. George on the Tuesday, and Samuel on the Wednesday morning; there was never any concealment of this deficiency; it was said it should be paid for - he did not object to the amount I said was deficient - there was no application made on the Tuesday for the money to my knowledge; I applied for the goods - the firm is Lundy Foot and Co. - Mr. Lundy Foot is not in the firm now; he is alive, and is a clergyman; I have seen him within this twelvemonth - it was not agreed that these goods should be sent in on the Monday; I did not received any note from either of the prisoners; part of the goods were brought back on the Saturday, they gave them up themselves.

COURT. Q. When did you go to the premises? A. Not till the Tuesday; it is a shop in Brydges-street, Covent-garden - I did not notice whether the name was over the door; I saw some jars there, but do not know whether there was any thing in them.

WILLIAM CREED . I am a carman to Messrs. Foots. On Saturday, the 1st of August, I was sent with some goods from their warehouse to Mr. Keene's; I received instructions to bring back the goods or the money, and if I had a cheque, the boy was to go and see if it were good - when I arrived at the prisoner's I took the goods out of the cart, and put them into the back shop; George Keene called them over with the invoice, and said they were right - I offered the receipt, and George Keene said his brother was gone into the City with a cheque; I said I would wait - in about twenty-five minutes I went out and went over Westminster-bridge; when I came back he said his brother was now in the City, and no doubt he was waiting at our house - I then went home; Mr. Taylor told me there had been no one there - I was to go back and bring the goods or the money; I went back, and saw George Keene and a young woman - I said, "I must have the goods or the money;" George Keene them went with the boy into the City - before the boy went I saw a note in his hand; I opened it, and said it was not sufficient for my master, we must have the goods or the money-I waited till the boy and George Keene said his brother had got it; he gave me the goods from under the counter and from the window, and said they were all that were not sold, and what was accounted for in the note would make up the amount of the order - they gave me money for a pint of beer, which I got at the next house; the boy had part of it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell your master you got the pint of beer? A. Yes; he was not displeased at it - part of the goods were in the window in a paper; this is the note (the note was here read, containing several items, amounting to about 2l. 4s.)

WILLIAM MALKIN . I am in the service of Messrs. Foot. I went to the shop on the Saturday, and saw the goods delivered-George Keene opened part of the goods, said he was satisfied with part of the contents that his brother was gone into the City and would call at the warehouse and pay for them; Creed went away - I staid in the shop; George Keene opened the goods and wrote this paper - some of them were placed in the window and some under the counter; I was sitting on the counter; I looked over, and saw the goods close against a trap-door - the carman got a pint of porter, I had part of it; I gave the note to the carman - he asked if he might read it; the prisoner said Yes - he opened, and read it.

George Keene's Defence. The goods were not taken with any felonious intention.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-34

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1565. ROBERT LOCKWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 36 apples, value 1s. 6d., and 1 basket, value 3d. , the goods of Thomas Bowyer .

JAMES ASHTON . I live two doors form Mr. Bowyer's shop. On the 15th of August I saw the prisoner and another person come to the shop, and take out a sieve of apples - I told Mr. Bowyers, and he followed; I had lost sight of the prisoner, but he was brought back within ten minutes - I know he is the person.

THOMAS BOWYER . I live in Ratcliffe-row, Bath-street , and am a green-grocer . I was informed of this circumstance, and the prisoner was pointed out to me - he ran up Bath-street, and I took him; he had nothing then - this basket was given to me in two or three minutes; I had not seen it thrown away - I saw it safe about twenty mintues before; the prisoner was a stranger to me.

CHARLES DOWNER . I keep an oyster-stand. The prisoner ran by my stall, and threw down this basket, which I took up and gave to the officer.

THOMAS BENNETT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; this basket was given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-35

1566. RICHARD PINK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 1 silver spoon, value 10s., and 1 pair of nut-crackers, value 2s. the goods of John Robert Vincent .

JACOB VINCENT . I am a son of John Robert Vincent , a clerk in the East India-house , who lives in Claremont-place . On the 20th of July I returned home about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, and found the prisoner in custody - I went with the constable to a refiner's who produced this spoon, which is my father's.

BENJAMIN CATRULL . I was sent for, and took the prisoner in the prosecutor's house - he was charged with stealing a spoon and a pair of nut-crackers; I got the

spoon from Mr. Woolman, and the nut-crackers I found upon him - he told me where he had sold the spoon.

SARAH ANING . I am servant to the prosecutor. I missed the spoon at half-past four o'clock, from the bedroom on the second floor; the nut-crackers were taken out of the sideboard drawer - I had not known the prisoner till that day, when he came to work there as a paper-hanger.

The prisoner put in a petition signed by his parents, representing him to be an idiot - he received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-36

1567. EDWARD WILSON was indicted for stealing. on 14th of August , 1 pail, value 1s., the goods of John Pullen ; 1 pewter-pot, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Easton ; 1 pewter-pot, value 10d., the goods of Joseph Cundey , and 1 pewter-pot, value 10d., the goods of William Martin .

JOHN PULLEN . I am a carpenter . On the 14th of August I lost a pail, a pint pot, and some fire-wood from my house in Hoxton New-town .

THOMAS EASTON . I lost a quart pot from the house of a friend, but I cannot say whether this is it.

JOSEPH CUNDEY . I keep the Duke of Wellington public-house, in Cross-street, Hoxton New-town . I serve Mr. Pullen; this is my pot, and I believe was taken from his house.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I produce three pots, a pail, and some flower routs, which the watchman brought to me with the prisoner.

JOHN MILES . I am a watchman. I met the prisoner in Finsbury-place at half-past two o'clock in the morning on the 14th of August; he had the quart pot under his coat - the two pint pots and the roots were in this pail; he said he had nothing in the pail but flower roots - at the watch-house he said he gave 1s. 6d. for them.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I keep the Prince Regent public-house - this pot is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to carry a parcel for a gentleman, and he paid me for it - I got groggy, and met a man with a basket who sold me these things for 1s. 6d.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-37

1568. GEORGE WESTON and HENRY PAUL were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 1 jacket, value 5s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 7s. , the goods of William Wellington .

WESTON pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM WELLINGTON . I am a clothes salesman , and live at No. 7, Lower Marsh, near the gate at Lambeth ; this jacket and trousers were safe at my door at six o'clock on the 19th of August - they were taken before half-past eight; I saw them at Marlborough-street next day - I know nothing of the prisoners.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . On the 19th of August I was going down Drury-lane with Goddard; I saw the prisoners and three other boy s come up the lane and go down Duke's-court - we followed them; Paul had this bundle, and Weston took it of him in the court - I took Paul, and Goddard took Weston; the other two boys ran away - as I was going with Paul to the watch-house I asked him where he got the things; he said they were coming up the cut, that Weston took them from the nail, and gave them to him to carry - and he carried them till he was taken.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PAUL - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290910-38

1569. MARY COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 1 coat, value 16s. , the goods of William Gleeson .

JOHN CLIFFORD REYNOLDS . I am in the service of a pawnbroker in High-street, Borough. The prisoner and another woman came and brought this coat; I am certain the prisoner was one - the other woman asked the prisoner how much she was to ask for it; she said 25s. - I gave them 14s. for it - I do not know which took the money.

WILLIAM GLEESON . I live in Chapel-row, Chelsea . This is my coat; the prisoner and her husband lodged with me for a fortnight previous to the 25th of July - I took the coat in that evening, and put it into a box near the prisoner's bed; in the morning I got up at seven o'clock, and the prisoner was gone - I looked at the box between eight and nine, and the coat was gone; I made inquiry. and found the prisoner the Wednesday following in the workhouse - I have no other lodger.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know what was in the box; the pawnbroker said I was not the person that took it, and said he would shew him the person - he went with him, and the next day he said I was the woman; I never was in his shop in my life - he knows the person who pawned it, but will not bring her forward.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-39

1570 ANN LAWDEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 1 sheet, value 8s. , the goods of William Chase .

WILLIAM CHASE . I live in Maiden-lane, Covent-garden . The prisoner lodged with me the latter end of last year; I missed a great deal of property while she was there - I missed this sheet, which I found at a pawnbroker's in Chandos-street.

FREDERICK BALHAM . I produce a sheet from Mr. Cameron's, but do not know who pawned it.

JOHANNA LOUISA PRESTON . I know the prisoner. On the 25th of March the officer came to my house and searched her box; she called me into the yard, and said to me, "It is your sheet; I leave myself to your mercy;" I supposed she alluded to a sheet stolen from me, but this was not mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-40

1571. RICHARD CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 2 shoes, value 6s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s., and 1 pair of braces, value 3d. , the goods of Joseph Jasper Bourne .

JOSEPH JASPER BOURNE . I am a lighterman , My

barge was at Mr. Mercer's wharf, at West Drayton , on the 7th of August, about seven or eight o'clock; these things were in the locker, and when my boys turned into bed, they left them there - I then went down the village, and saw the prisoner in a public-house; he asked if I would give him a pair of trousers - I told him if he would call on board the barge in the morning, I would give him an old pair; he said he could mend them - I went on board at twelve at night, and slept there; I then missed the articles - I went to the Bells public-house next morning, and saw the prisoner asleep on the table; I awoke him up, and said, "You are a bad kind of man." - He said,"You want your things - if you won't hurt me, I will give them to you;" and he took me down a close, and from under some long grass, took them out and gave them me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-41

1572. ANN DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 1 shirt, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Bailey .

ELIZABETH BAILEY . I am wife of Thomas Bailey ; we live in Hadleigh-street . My husband has been afflicted for some years, and the prisoner came on the 30th of July to see him; she sat with us all the morning, and dined with us - it then thundered and lightened, she staid to tea, and then went away: after she was gone, I missed a shirt from a basket-full of clothes - I heard of it on the 8th of August, and found it the next day: it belonged to a person I wash for - I have known the prisoner seven years; there were other articles in the basket of greater value.

ELEANOR BISHOP . I am married. The prisoner came to me on the 1st of August; she said she would give me the duplicate of a shirt - I said I did not want it; she said she did not mean to get it out, and I might as well have it -I sent my little boy for it on the 3rd of August; this is the shirt he brought.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290910-42

1573. JOHN DOWNES and THOMAS DOWNES were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , 1 bedstead, value 10s. , the goods of Stephen Hardy .

SAMUEL BECKETT . I live opposite Stephen Hardy , near the Curtain-road - he is a broker . On Thursday, the 30th of July, I saw the two prisoners and their father together, about eleven o'clock in the morning; John Downes placed himself opposite the shop, and the father went and untied a bedstead from the house, put it on his shoulder, and carried it away; I cannot say where Thomas Downes was at that time - he had gone somewhere in the rear of my house; the prosecutor got his bedstead afterwards.

JANE BECKETT . I am Beckett's daughter. I saw the three persons go past the prosecutor's shop about ten o'clock, and then they returned about eleven; I did not see Thomas Downes at the time it was taken.

JOHN BECKETT . I saw what my father and sister have stated.

JOSEPH BIRCH . On Thursday, the 30th of July, the prosecutor came to me, and said he had lost a bedstead: I went with him to a house which a boy pointed out - I looked through the window, and saw the two prisoners and their father; the father was untying a bedstead - he made his escape, but I took one of the prisoners, and my son the other; I asked John Downes why he committed the act - he said he had had no victuals for three days.

STEPHEN HARDY . This is my bedstead.

JOHN DOWNES - GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing he was influenced by his father .

Whipped and Discharged.

THOMAS DOWNES - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-43

1574. EDWARD HICKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 1 trunk, value 3s.; 1 dress, value 13s.; 1 hat, value 8s.; 1 bonnet, value 5s.; 2 lace caps, value 8s., and 2 lace collars, value 2s. , the goods of Grace Milbourne .

GRACE MILBOURNE . I am single . I left two trunks at Mrs. Morell's, No. 31, Belton-street , as I was going to a situation; I left them on a Sunday, and on the Saturday afterwards I went, and missed one of them; I saw it again at Marlborough-street Office - it was locked as when I left it.

ANN MORELL . The trunks were left in my apartment - I saw them secure on the Saturday afternoon, and missed one of them at night; I had seen the prisoner come several times to a person in the house - I cannot say how he got in on that Saturday, but I had left the room door ajar, and the street door was on the latch.

JAMES DUNN . I met the prisoner at half-past one o'clock on the morning in question, in King-street, Seven-dials, with this trunk on his right shoulder; I asked where he got it - he said from No. 31, Belton-street; I said he should go with me there - he turned round, and walked a few yards, and then gave me the trunk; I followed him - he went to Belton-street; he did not stop there, but walked on - I could not get a watchman to take him till I got to the workhouse and got the private watchman; he went on till he got near the watch-house, and then escaped, but was taken immediately.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given me by a man named Sullivan; he said he would follow me - when I was taken to the watch-house I said, "That is the man I got it from;" he was taken on the Sunday morning.

JAMES DUNN . Sullivan was taken on another charge.

ANN MORELL . I have seen the prisoner come to my house many times, to visit the people on the third floor; I saw the other man brought up for another offence - I had never seen him at my house.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-44

1575. MARY HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , 1 gold chain, value 3l., and 1 nailbrush, value 6d. , the goods of Phineas Davis .

PHINEAS DAVIS . I am an officer to the Sheriff of Middlesex - I live at Hanger-hill . The prisoner was my

servant , and had been with me for four months - on the 23rd of August I gave her warning, as we had missed several things from time to time; she then went down, and spoke to another servant - I heard a basket had been secreted; it was looked for, and this gold chain was found in it.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Had you any other servants? A. Yes, the footman and housemaid; I am not aware that the footman gave the prisoner the chain; I had discovered the footman wearing my shirts, and he is now in Clerkenwell prison for threatening the life of the prisoner, who gave evidence against him for that offence- it was the prisoner who told me of that footman; I solemnly believe the footman did not give her the chain; she did live with a lady named Abrahams, and had a good character; I did not see the basket found.

WILLIAM KEARNEY . I am servant to Mr. Davis. I found the basket in the pantry, with this chain and brush in it - I gave it to Mr. Davis.

MARGARET DREW . I am servant to Mr. Davis. The prisoner showed me a chain, which I believe was this, when I had been there but a week; she said it was her own - she came into the kitchen one Sunday morning, and said her mistress was going to search her box, but she should not see all, as she would fill her basket out of it; I believe it was her own basket - it had stood by her bed side.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did she show you the chain? A. I cannot tell the time of day - it was in her hand; she did not say it had been given to her by the footman - I had seen the basket several times, and had seen it the morning it was found - she told me it belonged to her; I know it was the same basket by a string on it - I believe this to be the same chain as she showed me, but there is no mark on it; she showed me two chains - one was larger.

COURT. Q. She showed you a gold chain? A. Yes; it was about five weeks before this.

ROBERT EELES . I am constable of Ealing. I was sent for - Mr. Davis showed me a basket on a table, and a variety of other articles; this gold chain was among them - Mr. Davis asked me if I did not remember a gold chain being mentioned at the time the young man was brought up - I said Yes; he said, "This was the chain that was mentioned." As I was taking the prisoner to the watch-house, she asked me if it was any more harm to steal gold than any thing else; I did not know what answer to make - I might give some trifling answer, but I cannot recollect what; she asked what I thought she would be done to - I said it was not in my power to tell her that.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know that the prosecutor had charged the footman with stealing this chain? A. No - he said that he had found him wearing one of his shirts: and previous to that there had been a gold chain missing - the prisoner was the witness against him.

PHINEAS DAVIS . This is my chain - it was kept in my daughter's dressing-room; it was lost three months ago, some time before I took up the footman; when it was produced I asked the prisoner how she could stand by and hear of its being lost - she said, "I found it at the door."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not charge her with stealing a knife? A. Yes; I asked my daughter to lend me a knife - she said Mary had one; she brought a knife to me which I had in use for twelve months -I called up the prisoner and from her answers I was satisfied she was the pilferer about the house; I think she had been there about four months, and the footman about six months - this basket was concealed in the scullery - the servants have access to it; I have had frequent opportunities of seeing the chain; it had been a watch-chain, and had three rings on it, but my daughter took them off - I believe it to be mine; my daughter is twenty years old.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my own chain.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-45

1576. JOHN KEMBLE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1 cheese, value 14s. , the goods of Thomas Allwright .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-46

1577. GEORGE LARKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , 90lbs. weight of solder, value 40s., and 75lbs. weight of lead, value 12s. , the goods of John Harrison and John Hind .

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I met the prisoner in Cavendish-square, at half-past six o'clock last Sunday morning, with a load on his shoulder, covered with green baize - I went up to him, and said "What have you here?" he said "Lead, which I got from my masters;" I said, "Who is your master?" he said, "I suppose I must tell you, it is Messrs. Harrison and Hind's, of Duke-street ;" I found this lead on his shoulder, and under the waistband of his trousers I found 17 lbs. more - I took him to the watch-house, and found three keys in his pocket; I asked where he lived; he first said at his mother's, then he said it was at Barrett's-court, and this was the key of his box - I went there, and found his mother lying in bed, and by the side of the bed I found nine bars of solder, weighing 48 1/2 lbs.; Goddard, who was with me, unlocked another box, and found some more solder, making in the whole 92 lbs. of solder and 72 lbs. of lead.

HENRY GODDARD . I am an officer. I was with Clements - what he has stated is correct.

JOHN HIND . I am in partner ship with John Harrison ; we live in Duke-street. On the 6th of September the officer came to me - I have no doubt the solder and lead is ours; the prisoner was our apprentice for four years - I missed a great deal of solder, which is like this, cast in sand - solder is generally cast in moulds.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very faint for want of victuals: a man I worked with asked me if I should be at home the night before; I said Yes; he came and brought this solder, and told me to lock it up in my box - he told me on the Sunday morning to help him carry it, and as I was going along I was stopped; he said if any one stopped me to say it was lead from my master's, and they would let me go.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-47

1578. ANN LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , 2 sheets, value 4s.; 1 quilt, value 3s., and 1 looking-glass, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Ball .

ANN BALL . I am the wife of Joseph Ball . The prisoner lived in my house for four or five months previous to the 9th of August; she occupied the back-parlour - I missed the articles stated, which had been let to her with the lodging - she had left the house before I missed them; she gave me no notice.

GEORGE WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. These sheets and quilt were pawned with me; one was pawned by the prisoner - I am not certain of the other.

Prisoner's Defence. She lent me these things to pawn for myself, and sold me the glass for 6d.

ANN BALL . No, I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

1579. ANN LLOYD was again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , 1 watch, value 1l., and 8s., the property of John Foster , from his person .

JOHN FOSTER . I am a baker . On the 8th of August I met the prisoner, near twelve o'clock at night, in York-street, Westminster; I cannot say whether she spoke to me or I to her - I went with her to Union-place ; we went up two pair of stairs, I believe; I went to bed, leaving my watch in my fob, and putting my trousers under my head; my money was in my pocket - I awoke at four o'clock; the watch and money were gone, and the prisoner also - I went out, found her, and gave charge of her; I was sober - I had just come from the theatre; she said she had sold the watch for 7s., and I should have it on the Monday night if I would give her 7s.; I had given her 2s. 6d., I believe, for my night's lodging - my watch has not been found since.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a Bow-street patrol. The prosecutor charged the prisoner with robbing him of his watch and 8s. in silver; I took her to the watch-house - Simpson found 19s. and some duplicates on her - she said in the afternoon that she had sold the watch for 7s., and if I went wish her she would get it, but I would not.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that on going home to her lodgings she found a man and a woman had broken open her room, and occupied her bed; they ran out and she found the watch on the bed, which she detained, feeling certain it belonged to that man, and not to the prosecutor.

GUILTY (of stealing, but not from the person.) Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

Reference Number: t18290910-48

1580. GEORGE NEWLY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 2 pewter pots, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Owens .

JOSEPH OWENS . I keep the Anchor public-house, Bethnal-green . On the 25th of August the prisoner was playing at skittles in my ground - I had information that he had taken a pot; I went after him just out of the door - I found the pot under his coat - he denied it, and said I had taken it into the house - I brought him back, and this pint pot was taken from under his arm in my presence.

THOMAS COLTS . I keep a chandler's shop. I was at the skittle ground, and saw the prisoner - I took the quart pot from him; he denied having any pot about him - these are the pots - they are both bent up now, but were not so when I saw them in the skittle-ground.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw these pots in this state in a court near the house; I then went and played at skittles, and when I was coming out they came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-49

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1581. JOHN ROACH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Plant , on the 17th of June , at St. Marylebone, and stealing 5 coats, value 10l.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 2l.; 3 waistcoats, value 1l.; 1 jacket, value 3s.; 5 shirts, value 1l.; 2 shirts, value 6s.; 6 pairs of stockings, value 6s.; 1 shawl, value 1l.; 7 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 3 pairs of sheets, value 1l.; 2 petticoats, value 5s.; 1 gown, value 5s.; 10 sovereigns, and 15 shillings, the property of Patrick Lee .

ELLEN LEE . I am the wife of Patrick Lee , who is a labouring man - we lodge at No. 26, James-street, Manchester-square , in the front kitchen. On the 17th of June my husband went out at half-past five o'clock in the morning to work; I got up at half-past six and saw all my property secure that morning, I am certain; I have known the prisoner about the neighbourhood for six years, and cannot mistake his person; after nine o'clock, as I was going out, I saw him come down the stairs of my house - he came against me; he had no business there; I did not suspect him, and went out leaving him in the house; I believe him to be the person - he had the clothes on which are now in Court - an old round blue jacket; when I went out I locked the kitchen door and the window was down - I took away the key; I returned at twelve o'clock, put the key into the door, and could not open it - I went up to my landlady, came down, went to the area, and saw the window was up a little - it had been shut when I went out; I opened it quite, got in, and missed all the property stated in the indictment: the clothes were worth about 20l., and there were ten sovereigns - they were in two boxes, which were broken open and rifled - every thing was safe when I went out in the morning; my husband's black stock has been found - it was in the room inside my husband's handkerchief; I had bolted the window down - how they got it up I cannot tell.

MARIA PLANT . I am the wife of Thomas Plant , who rents this house and lives in it - it is in the parish of St. Marylebone. The prosecutrix came and spoke to me; as she could not get in at the door she got in at the window - we found the staple of the door drawn out and the lock forced out; I found a blue jacket, a black waistcoat, and black stock in my cellar; they do not belong to any body in my house; the prisoner was a stranger - I had not seen him that morning.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How many lodgers have you? A. About seven families; we have eight rooms - Lee has the front kitchen.

TIMOTHY LEARY . I am pot-boy at a house in Edward-street. I knew the prisoner before this robbery, and knew his person well; I heard of the robbery - I saw him in Edward-street that morning about half-past eight o'clock,

I think; he had a blue jacket on; I had seen him wearing it before; I knew it before, it had a piece let in behind; the jacket produced is the one I am certain - I had seen him wearing it before often; I saw him again about four o'clock that afternoon in a dark brown olive coat, drab trousers, and a black handkerchief - he was much better dressed than in the morning - it was on a Wednesday; I went to the office on Saturday, and went to where he was locked up - he could not see me but hear me; I said, " Jack Roach ;" he said, "Yes, who are you? are you young Leary?" I said No; he said, "Is he outside?" I said Yes; he said,"Does he say he knows my clothes;" I said, "Yes he does;" he then said he was hard up.

Cross-examined. Q. You were in the street about half-past eight o'clock on what morning? A. On the 17th of June, Wednesday; nobody told me it was the 17th; I know the witness Stockman - I had not been with him within four days before the robbery; I have had no quarrel with Stockman, and never told him I would do any thing to the prisoner - only one day after the robbery I said something; I was in trouble myself about eight months ago, it was only once; I have been in Newgate, but in no other prison; I was a little time there; I had been talking to the prosecutor before I went to where the prisoner was locked up -I had not quarrelled with Roach; I said I was not Leary, because he was put there in another name, and all the boys said he would kill me when he came out; he has worn a blue jacket constantly for about six months; I did not hear any body at the office swear the blue jacket had been worn by any body else.

JOHN STOCKMAN . I work with my father as a plasterer. I have seen the prisoner about Oxford-street; I saw him on the Monday before the Wednesday of the robbery - he was dressed in this blue jacket, an old waistcoat, and a pair of blue trousers; I have seen him in that old jacket ever since; I have known him about - I saw him after the robbery with all new clothes on.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you on the 17th of June? A. At work, but not all day, in Brown-street, Grosvenor-square; I was at work all the week at the same house I live in; I went to work at near four o'clock in the afternoon that day - I was not at work in the morning; I knew Leary by his mother's selling fruit at the next stand to my mother in Oxford-street; I was not acquainted with him - I used to go about walking with him - I am as positive of the waistcoat and trousers as the jacket; the waistcoat was a kind of drab colour; I was taken myself on suspicion of this, and locked up three days and nights; I was taken on the day of the robbery, about four o'clock, as I was going to work; I was carrying a hod of stuff into Oxford-buildings - I was never in trouble, nor ever in prison before; I was never charged with an offence, nor ever flogged.

Q. Not in any public prison? A. I was flogged once over the other side.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am an officer. I produce the clothes which were left in the cellar; I have had them ever since; the black stock was given to me by Mrs. Plant: I apprehended the prisoner on the 22nd of August in Tothill-fields prison.

ELLEN LEE . This is my husband's stock, it was found with the clothes - I believe this to be the same jacket, waistcoat, and trousers as the person I saw wore - I noticed this bit on the jacket.

Cross-examined. Q. You were going out about nine o'clock and met a person on the stairs; I suppose he had been up the stairs leading to other person's rooms? A. No; he came down stairs against me as I came up from my own room; my place was secure then - I secured the door; I had no suspicion, as I thought he was going to the privy, which is down there; I remained in my room till I went out that morning; whether he had been up to any of the lodgers I cannot tell - I know the witnesses by their living in the neighbourhood; I cannot say whether I saw them in the street the day before.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18290910-50

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

1581. GEORGE SEBO was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying John Neve .

JONATHAN HAIGH . I live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. On the 6th of August , about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was on the north side of Oxford-street, near Well-street with Mr. Crossley; I heard a shriek from the opposite side of the road - my attention was drawn to it, and I saw a person in the attitude of falling from a blow, either from a horse or the shaft of a vehicle; he fell, and the near side passed over him - two men were in the vehicle; there was a momentary pause before it passed over the body - after it had gone over it, the driver excited his horse to speed, by whipping, and endeavoured to get away; it went with speed - I let go of my friend's arm, ran up Oxford-street about thirty or thirty-five yards, and got hold of the reins; one of the men got out and returned to the place where the accident happened - I saw no more of him; the driver remained in the chaise - an officer came up while I held the horse, and took him; it was the prisoner - he desired me to let go of the reins, and used some threats to me for keeping hold of them; when he was stopped, he desired to get away, saying his name was Sebe, and offered me his card: I consider he was a little elevated in liquor, but quite competent to manage his horse; I did not see the deceased struck, but from the position he was in I suppose he must have had a blow when the shriek was raised - I did not see at what pace the chaise went.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you observe whether the corner shop was closed? A. The oyster shop at the corner was not closed; one shop at the corner is usually closed early - in the part of the street the chaise had passed, there is a coach-stand, and a few of the coaches were in advance, also a cabriolet was passing at the time, I am a certain - the horse appeared a fine looking animal; I made an angle and overtook him.

COURT. Q. Did the shriek come from before or behind you? A. From the opposite side, in front of me rather - the horse was coming towards me; I stopped it as it came by me.

GEORGE CROSSLEY . I was walking with Mr. Haigh, and heard a shriek - I looked across the street, and saw a person in the attitude of falling; he appeared to have been struck by the near shoulder of the horse, or the shaft; he fell and the near wheel passed over his body - there was a momentary stoppage, and repeated calls from the

people for the chaise to stop; the driver applied the whip, and the horse was forced into a canter - Haigh stopped it; I saw one person get out and go towards the spot where the accident occured, and the prisoner was taken; he appeared a little elevated with liquor, but I considered him fully competent to manage his horse - when he was stopped he used abusive language, swearing at his being stopped - he afterwards gave his card.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say any damage he had done, he should be glad to repair as well as he could? A. I believe he did tell the officer so; the shriek appeared to me thirty or forty yards off - I thought it was a female; I heard it plainly - it might frighten some horses; it was a spirited animal.

COURT. Q. Did you look over as soon as you heard the shriek? A. I did, and the man was in the act of falling.

JAMES BRADLEY . I live in White Lion-street, Seven-dials. I was in Oxford-street, standing at the corner of Berwick-street, and observed two men in a chaise cart, driving at a very furious rate; the deceased in crossing the road was knocked down either by the horse or shaft -I saw the near wheel go over his left leg, after he was down; I assisted in carrying him to a chemist's shop, and then to the hospital on a shutter - three other persons assisted; I have not seen them since - when he was put on the shutter, blood came from his mouth; I did not notice the cart afterwards, as my attention was directed to the deceased - two men were in the cart; I cannot swear the prisoner was one; it was going furiously - I should suppose at about twelve miles an hour, but I am not much acquainted with horses - several persons called to them to stop, but they did not, till they were stopped.

Cross-examined. Q. How far from where it happened was the horse stopped? A. About five yards from where the man fell - I merely judge of the rate it went; I am a waiter, and have no knowledge of speed.

COURT. Q. Did you observe how the horse went? A. When I saw him at first he was in a gallop.

MARY WYER . I live in Oxford-street. I heard an alarm, looked out of window, and saw something laying on the ground, but did not know what - I saw the mob go after the cart.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. In consequence of an application made to me I came up Poland-street, and took the prisoner, who was near the end of Poland-street, standing by his horse, with the whip in his hand.

CHARLES WAITE . I am senior house surgeon of the Middlesex-hospital. On Thursday night, the 6th of August, between nine and ten o'clock, the deceased was brought to the hospital; he was breathing with great difficulty, and expectorating blood mixed with mucus - he had a trifling wound on the face, and was only partially sensible at times; I found several of the ribs on the left side of the chest fractured, and it was evident the lungs were wounded - I saw him daily till early on the morning of the 8th, when he died; I opened the body, and in my judgment his death was occasioned by the external injury he had received on the chest - several ribs were fractured on the left side of the thorax, and the lungs severely wounded; there was an escape of air into the integuments of the thorax, and an escape of blood into the lungs; a wheel passing over his chest might have caused the accident.

JOHN LEE . I live in Marsham-street, Somer's-town; I have been a butcher, and I have belonged to a farm - I did not know the deceased. I was going towards Berwick-street on the evening in question, and observed a chaise cart coming along, with two men in it; the deceased was in the act of crossing, when the shaft struck him, and knocked him down; the wheel passed over him - the cart went on about fifteen yards, and was stopped; as soon as the man was run over, I observed that both men in the cart had hold of the reins, endeavouring to stop the horse - I should not suppose it went at the rate of more than eight or nine miles an hour before the accident; it afterwards went at the rate of nine or ten miles, I should think; the horse never stopped till it was stopped; I saw it stopped; one man got out, and went back to the crowd -I heard nobody call out - at the time he was stopped a cab came by, and asked him whose horse he was driving, and who had trusted him with a chaise; that perhaps might have made him more angry than he would have been - I did not know the prisoner before - I was there when he was taken; Valentine came up while he was in the chaise; he asked if he was a Police-officer; he said Yes - he said, "You are the man I want; if you will show me your authority I will get out, and go to the man;" he got out, and saw the man in Well-street, and told him he would make him any recompence in his power - the cart was taken to Blenheim-mews, behind Marlborough-street - the prisoner gave his address "Sago, Crawford-street;" Mr. Steel took the horse and cart home - it was coming towards St. Giles', from Regent-street; there was a brilliant light at the oyster shop at the corner of Berwick-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Do I understand you to say you have belonged to a farm? A. Yes; I have been used to horses for twelve or fourteen years - this appeared a spirited young horse; the persons in the gig did all they could to stop it - I had observed it before it got to the corner of Berwick-street, before the accident; it was then in a trot - I had a very good view of him; I was in the dark and the horse in the light - I should not think it was above seven or eight yards from me when it happened - the deceased was not in the regular crossing.

JANE EVANS . My husband is a stable-keeper, and lives in King-street, Bloomsbury. I have known the deceased many years; his name was John Neve; he was about sixty-seven years old, and lived at No. 46, Berwick-street - I had seen him about half-past seven o'clock on the evening of the accident; he was in very good health, and very sober - I saw his corpse at home after the inquest - I went to the hospital while the inquest was sitting, but did not see him there.

MR. WAITE. I saw the body after the inquest; the undertaker took it away - the deceased described what had happened while he was in the hospital, but it was necessary he should speak as little as possible, and he was not questioned much.

JONATHAN HAIGH . The cart was the width of Oxford-street from me; I was at the corner of Well-street - the accident happened at the corner of Berwick-street, which is nearly opposite; there was an excellent light from the oyster-shop, and also a gas lamp.

JAMES BRADLEY . I was at the inquest, but do not know what became of the body - on the night of the acci

dent he was dressed in drab trousers, a light striped waistcoat, an olive or blue coat, and black hat; he was about five feet six inches, rather stout, and an old man.

MRS. EVANS. I saw him at my house about half-past seven o'clock that night; he was dressed in a blue coat, striped waistcoat, and drab trousers - he was rather taller than the middling size, and had been stout, but was rather fallen away.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . The prisoner went with me to Well-street, where the man was, and offered to do any thing he could; he wished to go to the hospital.

The prisoner's Counsel called -

WILLIAM JACOBS . I am a dyer, and live in Harris-place, Oxford-street. I was facing the cart when it came up to the old gentleman; I saw it not a moment before the accident - it was in my opinion going at the rate of eight or nine miles an hour, at a middling trot; I am accustomed to horses.

COURT. Q. Were there many people about? A. I think very few.

FRANCIS CLARK . I am a butcher, and live in Queen-street, Edgware-road. I was at the corner of Berwick-street, and saw the gig, with two men in it, immediately before the accident happened; they passed me, going at the rate of eight or nine miles an hour, not more - the horse appeared in a trot; I saw the cart strike against something, but I was behind it; it made a momentary stop, caused by the jerk, and I saw the driver holding the reins in.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-51

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

1582. WILLIAM DAVIS . PATRICK FLYNN and MICHAEL DRISCOLL were indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Frederick Winkworth .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WINKWORTH . I live at No. 11, Osnaburgh-street, Regent's-park. I had a brother named Frederick. - On Sunday the 26th of July. I was outside the King's Arms, Tottenham-court-road, with him; a sawyer was with him, whose name I do not know - I was never in his company before; neither of the prisoners were there that morning - I met my brother at the same place on the following morning; he was having his shoes cleaned outside the door - it was about nine o'clock; I went from there to the Bromley Arms, kept by Eales, in Cleaveland-street, Fitzroy-square - my brother came there after me in a coach; I do not know who was with him: several were in the coach - Flynn and Driscoll, his two seconds, were at the house; whether they came in the coach I do not know - I did not hear in the prisoners' presence what the fight was to be for; I heard there was to be a fight, and the winner was to have a certain sum - that was said at Eales' previous to the coach arriving; Flynn and Driscoll might have come in the coach or after it - I was there some time before it arrived: I saw them there before it left - it waited there to take up somebody else; I do not know the names of the persons who went in the coach - I went for one, but got out in Hampstead-road, near the Mother Red Caps, and walked; my brother was one - I think there were five or six in all in the coach; neither of the prisoners were there that I know of, but as far as Hampstead-road there were five - I got out in Hampstead-road Paddy Flynn got in my place, and Chicken (Driscoll) was outside; I believe there were several outside - I believe Driscoll had been outside all the way; I had seen Driscoll and Flynn before - I think I have seen Flynn at the Tennis-court - Eales, who keeps the public-house, has been a pugilist, but has retired from the ring some years: Driscoll is called the St. Giles' chicken, and Flynn, Paddy Flynn ; I believe they have fought in the ring - I have read an account of them in the paper; I went to the Red Lion, at Hampstead , and met the persons I had left in the coach - the party assembled there: we went to a field at the back of the house called Tebbet's-field ; a ring was formed, and they commenced sparring-Davis and my deceased brother were the combatants; Flynn and Driscoll were his seconds - James Raines and Edward Murphy were Davis' seconds; several others, called "beaters out," were in the ring, and several with watches in their hands - I do not know that any particular time-keeper was appointed; I did not hear "Time!" called during the fight - I was in the ring part of the time; they first went into the ring about two o'clock, and began to spar - the constable interrupted them, and they went to another field not far off: I should think a good mile - my brother rode to the second field; he was in very good health, and said he never felt better in his life - a ring was formed before he left the coach; the two fighters, and the same four seconds entered the field - I believe, in getting over the fence of the field. my brother sprained his ankle, but it got better and he did not go lame into the ring; he was a much slighter man, and not so heavy as Davis - the fight began; my brother was gaining the battle fast at the outset, but in one part of the fight he slipped and fell without a blow being struck: several parties called out "Foul!" and went into the ring to see how he had slipped; it was found a hole had caused it, and it was declared fair - they went on fighting; I went into the ring at that time to take some brandy in, and to prevent the fight if I could, but I was beat out - my brother was generally undermost at the close; they fell together, Davis generally uppermost - when my brother fell Flynn and Driscoll picked him up, and attended to him as seconds generally do; I should consider the fight continued half an hour, but my anxiety was very great - I was chiefly attending to my brother; I was inside the ring at several parts of the fight - I was frequently at too great a distance to hear what my brother might say.

COURT. Q. You could tell what state he was in, whether he was able to go on? A. After he fell he gave two tremendous blows to Davis, and the battle was certainly very much in his favour - he was gaining ground till he gave in himself; the last round he fought, his seconds took him on their knees; he was brought up to the mark to fight again - he shook hands with Davis, and put an end to it himself.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you mean to say that at that time he exhibited no symptoms of weakness and exhaustion? A. He was weak the same as the other man - he stood to the scratch himself, and put out his hand; he did not speak a word from that moment till he died, for I

never left him - he was quite insensible when carried off the ground, and remained so till his death, which was about five o'clock the evening following; neither of his seconds assisted in carrying him off the field.

COURT. Q. Had he been training for the fight? A. In the morning at breakfast he had 1 lb. of beef steaks, and told me he had done so for a fortnight each morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he considered the favourite? A. He certainly was; he gained the battle fast at first, and was a much better man than Davis - he was afraid to come near him: my brother was generally the first to strike the blows - many people went into the ring when"Foul!" was called, and were beat out; it was after he fell that the fight was so much in his favour.

Q. When he came up to the scratch at the last round who bad the best of it then? A. It was evident my brother had the worst then, on account of the fall - it was proved the fall caused a concussion of the brain, and not any blows.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a broker, and live on Red Lionhill. I was going home, and went to see this fight at Child's-hill, Hendon; it joins Hampstead parish - I got there about a quarter-past two o'clock, and was there when the ring was formed, and the whole of the time; I consider the fight lasted about an hour and a quarter, sixty or seventy rounds were fought - Davis decidedly had the advantage at the latter part of it, but at first I considered the deceased to be a much better boxer; Davis was the strongest - the other two prisoners acted as seconds - they fought about half an hour, and then Davis appeared getting the advantage; the deceased often came up after that, merely to be knocked down - that was generally the case; he appeared weak, and incapable of resistance, merely striking a blow and going down with it; he seemed to fall with the blow often, without being struck by his antagonist - it was considered that it was done to gain wind: I never heard him say any thing; I saw him come up the last time - he was brought up by his seconds to the scratch, and they retired; he stood up, and put himself. in a fighting attitude, then dropped his arms, and put out his hand - Davis shook hands with him, and Winkworth was carried away; a very stout man took him up in his arms to the outside of the ring; he had not fallen down.

Q. Was he able to walk out of the ring? A. The ring closed in directly they shook hands, and I could not see them; I saw him being carried out of the field; he appeared in a very languid state, and insensible - his head lolling over the arms of the man who carried him away; they took him towards a coach, but I did not follow; I have been at prize-fights before - I heard no observation about taking him away; in my judgment he fought a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes longer than he ought to have been allowed - I heard Driscoll during the fight, urging him on, saying, "Give him one for me;" the seconds on both sides excited their men, undoubtedly.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you not a constable? A. No, I have been one; I did not act as one on this occasion - I know nothing about Driscoll surrendering himself; I heard, "Foul!" cried on one occasion, when the deceased fell without a blow - I was present when a constable of Hampstead interfered; he said they must not fight in that parish, but go elsewhere - I heard somebody say, "Go to Child's-hill, and fight it out there;" I cannot say whether that was said by the constable or not.

TIMOTHY COLLINS . I am a green-grocer, and live at Hampstead. I was at the fight at Child's-hill: Davis appeared the strongest man - I was in the ring, close to the deceased: he was distressed from the beginning of the fight, and as long as I stopped, which was not till the end - I thought at first he was the best man, but the weakest; he was in distress, but the best at sparring - he fell every time; sometimes they fell together, and sometimes he fell alone - I thought it was from weakness in his knee; he was always undermost while I stopped: I heard him say,"So help me G-d, I am not able to fight any longer;" that was when they had fought about a quarter of an hour or more - he said that to Flynn and Driscoll, his seconds; they took him up again directly, as usual, and one of them(I think Driscoll) patted him on the back; I stopped about a quarter of an hour after that, and left the fight going on- the deceased seemed very weak all the time; he was lead up to the scratch, and sometimes fell without being struck; he did not appear in a fit state to continue the fight.

Cross-examined. Q. How long do you think he fought after he said he was not able? A. I think it must have been three quarters of an hour after, from what I heard, but I left in a quarter of an hour; I went out of the ring and laid down - I saw no more, but in three quarters of an hour after I left, he was brought out of the ring; I heard him groan - I was in the field all the time; I heard"Foul!" cried once; there were not a great many people there.

JOSEPH HUNT . I sell fruit, and live at Hampstead. I saw the latter part of the fight; it had began when I got up - I saw the deceased brought up to a place; he seemed very insensible, and not able to fight - the seconds brought him up to the scratch, and when they brought him up he seemed to lay his head on his second's shoulder - they had hold of him by the arm, and he leaned his head back on one of their shoulders, when he got to the scratch, before they left him; it was then said the battle was lost - the people rushed in; he was put into a coach, and taken away.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you outside the ring? A. Yes; I did not see him put himself in a fighting attitude; he might have done so.

MR. WILLIAM HENRY STEPHENSON . I am a surgeon, and live at Hampstead. On the 27th of July, about half-past four o'clock, I saw the deceased at the Red Lion, in a perfect state of insensibility; I found bruises on his face, and blows about the eye - he had the usual symptoms of compression of the brain; I resorted to the usual remedies, but without effect - I had scarcely any hope of him: he died about five o'clock the next day - his head was opened in my presence, by Mr. Kearney, who is out of town: on the whole surface of the right hemisphere of the brain, there was from four to six ounces of blood effused, extravasated blood, on the surface of the brain, arising from a rupture of a vessel; that was quite sufficient to cause his death - a person falling repeatedly in pugilistic contest would be likely to occasion that.

Cross-examined. Q. Might the appearances have been

occasioned by a fall, as well as a blow? A. They might.

COURT. Q. Might not the very excitement or action of fighting, when the powers of the brain are put to their greatest extent, occasion a rupture? A. It is possible; I attribute the death to the whole fight, in combination; the brain being in that state, one particular fall would then cause it - the greater the excitement the greater the predisposition.

MR. CHARLES LAW . I am a surgeon, of Hampstead. I saw the deceased two hours after Mr. Stephenson, and was present at the opening of the head - I perfectly concur in his opinion; the blows and falls he received were quite sufficient to produce the extravasation of blood, which caused his death.

Cross-examined. Q. Might not a severe fall be sufficient to account for it? A. One alone might, but the circumstances altogether are more probable; one single fall might create the rupture, but which fall, I, of course, cannot say.

Davis' Defence. The deceased was a man who, for the last two years, was continually brow-beating me; he has struck me, and challenged me to fight - I have refused to fight a man with a family; I am a writer and engraver by trade, and have a family - I never would fight him till one night; he met me drunk a fortnight previous to the fight: he said, "Well, Bill, I should like to fight you above every body, because they call you the slashing painter - why won't you fight me; I can get money to fight;" I said," I shall not fight - you can get a living where I cannot:" I knew he had fought many battles before - he would, when intoxicated, up with his fist, and strike a man in a moment - he would go into public-houses, drink people's beer, and if they spoke, spit in their faces; when I told him of my wife and family, he said, "Wife and family be b-d; she is a bl-y wh-e;" I said, "Well, Bill, if it has come to that, I will fight you to-morrow, which was agreed to; he came to me in about an hour, and said, "I won't fight you to-morrow - I will fight you for money;" I said, "Where am I to get money?" he said"You can get money at Eales';" he appointed to fight me on Monday fortnight, and we fought.

Prisoner Flynn. I wish to ask Collins if I could hear the man say he would not fight any more.

TIMOTHY COLLINS . Yes; he was quite near enough to hear it; he did not say so only once, but several times.

EDWARD LOWE . I am a carver in wood, and live in Tottenham-court-road. I have known Davis two years and a half; he bore a quiet good character, and was a hard-working man; I was present when the deceased struck him - that was eleven months ago; he has frequently challenged him since: I have heard him call him abusive names - he has said, "I should like to fight you, because I could warm the wax in your ear-holes so nicely."

FRANCIS MAY . I am a shoemaker, and keep a house next door to Davis - I have known him nine months; I advised him not to fight the man, but he said he had been so grossly insulted he could not brook it any longer.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Twelve Months .

FLYNN - GUILTY . Aged 25.

DRISCOLL - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-52

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

1584. MICHAEL KENNEDY was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann Harris, alias Kennedy .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES WEEKS . I am a watchman of Pimlico. On Friday morning, the 7th of August, a little before three o'clock, I was on duty in Ebury-street, and heard a cry of Murder! I could not tell whether it was a male or female voice - I went into King-street , and when I got to No. 3, where the prisoner lodges, I saw the deceased laying on the ground in the street, with nothing but her shift and stockings on; nobody was near her - I sprung my rattle, and the prisoner opened the second floor window, looked out, and asked what was the matter; he said,"Is that my Nance laying on the ground?" he came down stairs, and opened the door; I believe he had nothing on but his shirt - he took her under his arm, and dragged her into the house; she was then laying with her head towards the window, and her feet towards the gateway, at full length, partly on her face and her side - she groaned very much, but did not speak a word; I did not speak to her - he took her up, and dragged her into the house; I believe he got assistance to get her in - I went for medical assistance; Mr. Bond came before I went away - I do not think the prisoner said any thing to me; I saw no more, but kept walking up and down the street.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you known the prisoner long? A. No - he is a foreigner; I have seen him in the street - he appeared to have just got out of bed; I went into the house, and saw the woman sitting on a chair when Mr. Bond came - I was not near enough to smell her breath.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When on the chair did she appear sensible? A. No, she kept groaning as she did before.

COURT. Q. He said, "Is that my Nance?" did he say any thing else? A. No.

JOHN SOUTHERWOOD . I am a beadle of St. George's, Hanover-square, Grosvenor-place district - King-street is in that district. On the 6th of August I was on duty in Queen-street, and was called, from the opposite side a few minutes to eleven o'clock, and found Mrs. Bryant, her son, and another woman standing there - I was informed that mischief was likely to happen at No. 3, King-street; I gave them a reply, and went into Queen-street again; a little after four o'clock in the morning, when I got to the watch-house in Robert's-buildings, two or three hundred yards from King-street, Weeks came to me, and I went with him to No. 3, King-street; we found the prisoner there, and about a dozen women - a woman laid on a bed on the ground floor very bad; the prisoner was sitting by the side of the bed, and said his wife would soon be better -Mrs. Myers was there, and kept rubbing her breast; she said, "Oh, my heart! oh, my belly! give me some water!" and, "Turn me, turn me!" she appeared in great pain -I could see her flesh rise up, she was swelling so fast; Myers then put her arm round her shoulder, and sat her up in bed; the prisoner did not leave till she died - he was by the side of the bed; Myers said to her, "Ann, how did this happen?" she answered, "It was father did it - he first ill-used me, and then threw me out of win

dow" - she asked her a second time, and then she said, looking at the prisoner as well as she could, and pointing to him, "It was you that did it - you first beat me, and then threw me out of window; you did it, so help me God!" the prisoner told her not to tell lies, for if she did she would not go to Heaven, she would go where they make horse-shoes - that is all that passed in my hearing; Myers said something to her about dying, which I do not recollect - she died about six o'clock, about an hour after this conversation; the prisoner said she had attempted to drown herself previous - that she had been drinking with other people the day before, and when he came home he had nothing but potatoes for dinner; this was after her death, when I went up stairs with him to get his things to take him to the watch-house, about half-past six o'clock - Mr. Martin had bled the deceased in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether the prisoner is a foreigner? A. He appeared so - his manner of expression was curious; I think the woman was too much in pain to be intoxicated - there were eight or twelve people in the room; I was about a yard and a half from the bed side - I cannot say whether she smelt of liquor, or not; there was a smell in the room as if there had been liquor there, but so many people were there I could not say who it was from - the prisoner was sitting on the bed side when I went in, and I should think sat there for an hour or more; he rose, and said he wanted to go backwards once - I told him to stop; he went backwards: he had neither coat nor waistcoat on - he had breeches or drawers on; I saw a man in the house, who appeared a foreigner - I sent him for a coach; I did not hear him called Francis - there were a good many people in the room; I saw no men but the prisoner and the foreigner.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When the prisoner went backwards, did you go with him? A. I went to the door, so that I could see him; the room that smelt was on the ground floor - he said she would soon get better, and he would make her answer for it; he slapped the side of her face, and kissed her repeatedly.

JANE MYERS . I am the wife of Daniel Myers - we lived on the first floor front room, under the prisoner and deceased. On Friday morning, the 7th of August, about three o'clock, I heard the rattle - I awoke, lifted up the window, and the deceased was laying on the ground under our window, which is straight underneath the prisoner's; I had heard no previous noise - she groaned very much; I saw Weeks, and shortly after that I heard the prisoner come down stairs - I had not heard his window open; I had remained in my room all the time till he went down - I then went down, and saw the deceased brought in and placed on a chair; she spoke in a few minutes - the first thing she called out was,

"Oh, my God! Kennedy, you have murdered me;" he was present - I cannot say whether Weeks was there; a great many women were in the room - I assisted her as well as I could; the prisoner was down by the bed side - she was on a chair; he and I helped her on the bed - she had nothing on but her shift and a pair of stockings; no cap or handkerchief: she was about thirty-five years old - I stood by her till she died; I turned her often, because she called to me, "Jane, dear, turn me - oh, my back! oh, my heart!" that was her cry in the prisoner's presence, she was in such pain and agony - I do not think she would have said any thing, but I said, "Ann, my dear, like a good soul, will you be so good as to tell me how this happened, that you are in this state;" the prisoner sat by her at the time - she said,"Father done it;" she always called the prisoner father - I said, "Like a good soul, with the dying words in your mouth, be cautions what you are saying;" she said, Kennedy did it, so help her God, putting her hands together; I replied, "Ann, my dear, this is death and life, be very cautions what you say" - she replied quite sharp, "How often will I tell you, Kennedy done it;" she was an Irishwoman - he replied, "You blackguard, don't tell lies - if you do you will never go to Heaven, but your soul will go where they make horse-shoes;" nothing was said about her wounds, or her coming out of window - she said he beat her and ill-used her, and was so savage he threw her out of window; I am sure these are the words she used before he replied, "You blackguard, don't tell lies" - the prisoner at this time seemed very much in trouble about her; he sat patting her on the cheek and kissing her, very much in trouble, and cried very much - he seemed quite sober; Mr. Martin came between five and six o'clock, and heard what she said to me - she appeared in a dying state at the time she made these answers; she took death to her, and prayed to God to take her in mercy - she had not any appearance of being in liquor.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether she had been drinking the day before? A. I was out at work all day, and cannot tell; my husband works in the same factory as the prisoner - we sleep under the room they lived in; I had been in their room about seven o'clock in the evening - I think it was about half-past eleven when they went to bed; my husband went to bed before them, but it was twelve o'clock when I went - I cannot say whether she slept in her stockings; there are three rooms in the house; the prisoner cried very much, and seemed greatly distressed - Weeks came into the room when the deceased was brought in; he had to go to call the hour - she was put on the landlord's bed; my husband came down about five o'clock.

COURT. Q. Mr. Martin was there when all this conversation took place; do you recollect at what time he came in? A. I should think about five o'clock, I cannot positively say - I was there when Mr. Bond came, between three and four; the deceased did not speak much then - her name was Ann Harris ; I think she thought herself dying, because she prayed to God to take her in mercy - I do not know whether Mr. Martin said any thing to her about dying.

JOHN JONES . I am watch-house keeper of Grosvenor-place district. On Friday morning, the 7th of August, about six o'clock, the prisoner was brought in by Southerwood; I asked what the offence was - he said in his presence, that he charged him with throwing his wife out of window; he was near enough to hear it - I knew him, and said "Kennedy how in the world did you come to do such a rash act;" he said"Oh, I was in a passion, Mr. Jones" - he was crying, laughing, and singing all the while he was in the prison, and he said he did not care about hanging himself, only his poor Nancy; but he did seem to know what he was about - I cannot tell all he said, he talked in such a manner.

JURY. Q. He appeared out of his mind, almost? A. He did so - I knew the parties very well, because I had been troubled with them so often by their drunkenness; I have had a great deal of trouble with the wife in particular - she was a most desperate drunken character, and the hushand is not much better.

HENRY BOND . I am a surgeon, and live in Queen-street, Pimlico. I was sent for about half-past three o'clock in the morning; I saw the prisoner and deceased - she was in the parlour, on a chair, and was quite insensible; there was no external injury to be observed - I heard what had happened before I arrived, and she presented the appearance a person would under such circumstances; I spoke to her, but got no reply - she did not groan loud, but appeared suffering great pain, and to be seriously hurt internally; her eyes indicated internal injury - her pulse was very slow and weak; she was at that time not in a fit state to be bled - I did not bleed her, but ordered her to bed, and sent her medicine; I called again between eight and nine o'clock, and found she had expired about six - I then examined her body more particularly, it was very much swollen; there were some marks of bruises about her breast, and a slight bruise on one foot - if the lungs had been ruptured, and the air escaped through that rupture, it would account for the swelling; falling or being thrown from a second floor window was very likely to produce a rupture of the lungs - I believe the body was not opened at all - I have no doubt the violence received was the cause of her death; the prisoner appeared anxious about her state, and kissed her several times.

Cross-examined. Q. And appeared in great distress of mind? A. He appeared anxious - I did not observe him cry; the cause of death was so evident, I did not think it necessary to open the body.

Q. In cases of habitual drunkenness, and great excitement arising from that, have you not known blood-vessels to burst? A. I have not known such a case - it may have happened; but that would not rupture the lungs, and I am certain they were ruptured; it was evident, because the whole body was distended with air from the lungs; that could not be in the manner this was, without the lungs being ruptured - she had nothing but her shift and stockings on - I had a full opportunity of examining her body, there was no external mark at that time; if she had been beat, there would have been marks.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were the indications she presented such as a person would being treated as described? A. They were, except that she was not fractured.

COURT. Q. Would not the bursting of a blood vessel occasion those appearances? A. No; I have no doubt her being thrown out of window occasioned her death - if she had been thrown out with violence I should have expected to have found bones broken.

Q. If she had fallen without violence, should you have expected it? A. It is impossible to say - I have known a man fall ninety feet without breaking any bones; a man fell from the clock of St. Martin's church.

JURY. Q. If you had bled her when you first went, would it have tended to hasten her death? A. It would; she would never have recovered her senses if she had been bled at that moment, for her pulse was scarcely perceptible - she was very cold, and the pupil of the eye dilated; I considered it a fatal case from the first moment.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Could a rupture of the lungs have taken place without perforation by a fractured rib? A. It is very possible to have happened without it; the concussion might do it.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a surgeon, and live in Eden-square, Pimlico. On the 7th of August, about six o'clock in the morning, I was desired to attend, and saw the prisoner and deceased; her face, neck, chest, and abdomen were very much swollen - she appeared sensible, and had a natural pulse; she presented appearances which might be expected in a person being thrown, or having fallen from some height; I attribute the swollen appearance of her body to a rupture of the lungs - I did not conceive medical aid could save her life; I bled her in half an hour, as re-action had taken place - I did it to prevent inflammation; the pulse had quickened from seventy to ninety - I was sure inflammation would follow such an occurrence.

COURT. Q. Might not a pulse be quick from irritation and debility as well as inflammation? A. Yes, it might be quick from irritability - when I first saw her there was not great nervousness and debility.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You made no internal examination? A. No; I attribute her death to a rupture of a blood vessel in the abdominal cavity as well as the lungs -I think it very likely to have been the mesenteric artery.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you mean before by saying you attributed her death to the rupture of the lungs? A. I attribute the swollen state of the body to the rupture of the lungs; the air escaping from the lungs would occasion the swelling of the body - I attribute her death to the rupture of the artery in the abdominal cavity.

COURT. Q. If the artery you speak of was ruptured, would bleeding tend to remedy it? A. It would not.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How much blood did you take? A. About eight ounces; my object was to prevent inflammation - I had no notion of a rupture of the abdominal artery then; the blood I took from her could in no ways contribute to the immediate cause of her death - if I had known a blood vessel was ruptured I do not think I should have taken the eight ounces of blood; if the case occurred again I should not bleed - I do not think it in any way hastened her death; if the case occurred again, and I had been aware of the circumstances, I should not have done it - I should be guided by the state of the pulse and the state of the woman; I do not think bleeding would do good when an artery is ruptured; I examined her body - no bone was fractured; her eye was closed with the swelling - I tried to open it, but could not; she had a fair natural pulse; I had not seen Mr. Bond.

COURT. Q. When you first saw her was she sensible? A. She appeared so - I considered her case fatal from the first; I have no reason to know whether she thought so - I did not hear the conversation between her and Mrs. Myers - I was there rather more than an hour; I left the room twice, for about five minutes; I had no conversation with her as to what had happened; she complained of a violent pain at the chest and belly - I did not tell her she could not recover, nor give her hopes of recovery - I did not hear her say any thing to the prisoner; he now and then asked how she felt, and appeared very anxious.

MR. BOND. I considered it a hopeless case from the first; her pulse was by no means natural when I saw it.

JANE MYERS . I was not there when Mr. Bond came; Mr. Martin came about five o'clock; I had been down stairs about an hour and a half then; the conversation which I had with her was after Mr. Martin came; it was a little before she was bled, and I thought Mr. Martin was within hearing; Southerwood was there; I did not notice when Mr. Martin went out of the room - there was a great many people there.

CHRISTIANA BISHOP . I am the wife of Thomas Bishop, a watchman, and live at No. 7, King-street, opposite the prisoner. On the morning of the 7th of August, I was awoke by a cry of Murder! from a female voice, and after that I heard something fall like a parcel of flower pots; I then heard a rattle spring; I looked out of window directly- my bed-room window faces the prisoner's; I saw nothing of him; I saw the watchman come to the body, and say,"What is this! here is a naked woman" - Kennedy was then at his own window; I saw him at the window, but did not see him come to it, nor hear it open; he said,"What is the matter, is that you Nance? she is my wife;" and then he said, "Good God! how came she there, I was fast asleep in bed - I undressed her last night and put her to bed, and we went to bed together" - I then saw him strike a light; he came down stairs; I went into the room afterwards; the cill of the window comes up to about my breast; the deceased was rather taller than me, and rather stout.

Prisoner's Defence. I came home to dinner: my wife was drunk; I had to run back to my work for fear of quarrelling with her; this was the Wednesday night before; Mrs. Myers came up and offered to lend me a shilling; I and my wife were in bed: I said "I don't want it," but my wife might put the shilling on the table, and she did; in the night we began to quarrel about the shilling: I said,"I must go to work in the morning, you go and give her the shilling back again in the morning." Well, next day she and Myers were drunk together, and in the evening, when I came home, my wife was drunk again; the tea-things were on the table; I was afraid she would throw them down, and I undressed her and put her to bed: I went out with Myers, and had two pints of beer at different places, and I thought I would take my wife a pint home, supposing she was sober. Well, she came and met me round the corner, and called me a blackguard; I said"Come home, here is a pint of beer;" she came home and sent for half a gallon of beer; I went out afterwards for another pot; I got her to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock, and about four, I always used to call her - I said"Ann, did you hear the watchman call out, for I must be up at five." Well, I felt in the bed and she was gone; I said, "Now she will get to her foolish tricks again, and hide herself;" she had gone to the water-side four times to drown herself; she had been married before to a Dutchman, who ran away from her, because she was always drunk. I could do no work when I came to this house, this woman of mine was always drunk with Mrs. Myers, for she would make her sell the last shift she had on, and has stolen my wife's money from her pocket when she was drunk; I could not keep the woman sober, but that was all the fault of that woman; she sold all my furniture for 7s. 6d. which was worth 3l. 10s., and that woman robbed her of the money; she was always beastly drunk in the street.

JOHN GORDON SMITH . I am a physician, and have been so nearly nineteen years - I have heard the evidence of both the medical gentlemen, and gave it all the attention in my power. I should say decidedly that the cause of the woman's death could not be ascertained without a post mortem examination.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you come here at the prisoner's desire? A. I came here accidentally, and sent the prisoner's counsel a note, disagreeing with the whole of their opinion.

COURT. Q. You have heard the situation in which the woman was found, having either fallen or been thrown out of window, and no account of any illness before, and have heard what the appearances were at this time? A. I have.

Q. Do you mean to state that you have any doubt whether being thrown out of window was the cause of her death? A. Such a cause would certainly produce death very rapidly; but as the body was not opened, and whatever violence was done seems to have been internal, and the body not opened, no man can draw any positive inference as to what was the injury; I should suspect her death arose from the fall, but not be able positively to ascribe it to that.

FRANCIS GUTSCHMID . I am landlord of the house the prisoner lodged in. I saw Harris the day before her death, about ten o'clock in the morning; she came into my room in liquor - I saw her all day going backwards and forwards in liquor: I saw the prisoner come home to dinner - he came down directly with two cold potatoes in his hand; I saw Harris after, and heard her, at half-past ten, talking to my wife.

MARY GUTSCHMID . I am the last witness' wife. I saw Harris about half-past ten o'clock on the night this happened; she was not sober - I wanted her to go up stairs; she said she would not - she wanted to go out; I would not let her, and bolted the door - she said it was nothing to me whether she went out or not; I said, if she went she should stay out, for I should fasten the door at half-past ten - she called me an old faggot; she did not say what she wanted to go out for.

DANIEL MYERS . I saw the deceased at nine o'clock on the morning before her death, intoxicated, and saw her at six in the evening in the same state; the prisoner was not at home then - I gave her a glass of spirits that night, for she had teased me all day for it; this was about half-past three in the afternoon - I afterwards went out with the prisoner; we had half-a-gallon of beer together, between six and seven; he brought a pot home into my room for Harris - she took part of it; they staid there drinking till about half-past nine, and went to bed at a quarter to twelve - their bed-room is immediately over mine; I heard them going to bed - I could hear footsteps; I heard no quarrelling in the night.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. At what hour did you go to sleep? A. I suppose about a quarter past twelve. I was awoke in the morning by my wife and daughter shouting out that Ann was thrown out of window; I did not hear the rattle spring, nor any cry of murder.

Q. You gave a drunken woman spirits? A. She teased me so long for it, I gave her two-pence to buy it; I got up immediately after the alarm, and was in the par

lour where the woman lay for about ten minutes - I went away at half-past five to go to work - I had got up about half-past three; I was in my own room all the time, except for about ten minutes - my wife was in the room with the deceased; she was sober - I did not hear her say any thing to the deceased, or the deceased say any thing to her; I was not in the room then - she was groaning when I was there - I saw Mr. Martin; I suppose a dozen people were in the room.

COURT. Q. What did your wife and daughter say? A."Murder, murder! Ann is thrown out of window!" They were in my room then; they awoke me telling me so - they were clapping their hands and shouting out; my wife had opened the window, it seems, to look out - she was naked.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-53

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1585. ROBERT INSKIP was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Gorton , from his person .

JOHN GORTON . I am a tea-dealer , and carry on business in Aldermary Church-yard. On the 31st of August, about a quarter to seven o'clock, I was returning home to High-gate, and near the end of Bartlett's-buildings, Holborn , I received information that my pocket was picked - I felt, and missed my handkerchief, and saw the prisoner in custody of a witness who produced it; it has my initials on it; the prisoner did not claim it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You were not aware of its going? A. No; I firmly believe I wore it that day - I cannot say when I felt it safe; I saw French, but did not see him lay hold of another person, to the best of my recollection.

WILLIAM FRENCH . I am a shoemaker, and work for Mr. Walker. I was on Holborn-hill, and saw the prisoner and another young man behind the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner make an attempt at Mr. Gorton's pocket - he did not succeed; a third young man met with them just by the church and joined them; I followed them nearly opposite Hatton-garden, and there saw the prisoner take hold of the pocket with one hand, he took the handkerchief out with his left hand; I collared him - he threw back his left hand and dropped the handkerchief on the ground; my wife, who was with me, picked it up and gave it to Mr. Gorton; the one who joined them tried to push me away from the prisoner, but I kept him, shoved him off, and said if he did not go about his business I would take him - he went away; I did not see the other afterwards; the prisoner said he did not do it; I am positive I saw him take it.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you work at your trade constantly? A. I have not full employ; I was out on business - I have been a witness once before; I was not on the opposite side to the prisoner, but behind him, more at his side - my wife was with me in the other case; I do not go out to look for thieves, it was accidental - I only saw one touch the pocket; I shoved Sullivan off, but did not lay hold of him; I was sent for when the other two were taken - I said I would not go against them unless I was summoned, as the Alderman spoke to me so very sharp about taking this boy because I was not in full employ - he did not scold me - he said perhaps young men not in full employ would play such tricks as this to make up for lost time; it was the prisoner took the handkerchief and not Sullivan; I had followed the two from Holborn-bridge - I had not power to take the others.

COURT. Q. If you had tried to catch the three, would you not have lost them all? A. Perhaps I should.

ELIZABETH FRENCH . I was with my husband, and saw the prisoner and another young man walking together; the prisoner put his hand into the gentleman's pocket and drew it out again - we walked behind him, and opposite Hatton-garden he put his hand in again, and took the handkerchief; my husband collared him - he threw it down; I picked it up, ran after Mr. Gorton, and he claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. You were examined some time ago in a case of this sort? A. Never; my husband was earning 3s. 6d. or 4s. a day at that time - he was not exactly in full employ, it is not our busy time; I was obliged to attend in the New Court before, about robbing a shoe shop where my husband worked, but he was not a witness.

THOMAS WILDEN . I am an inspector of the watch, and received the prisoner in charge at the watch-house; the handkerchief was given to me by Mr. Gorton, who claimed it; the other two were afterwards taken and discharged.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you send for French to attend as a witness? A. Yes; he said he did not like to attend unless he was summoned.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-54

1586. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 50 yards of gros de Naples silk, value 5l. 16s., the goods of Thomas Poole , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES WILSON . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Poole, of Fore-street, Cripplegate - he deals in silk . On the 31st of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in the shop - he asked for some calico, which I served him with; it came to 1s. 4d. - he had a bag which he put down on the ground by the side of the counter - while I was folding up the calico, another customer came in and inquired for an article; a youth named Sills came to attend to that customer; I desired him to fold up the calico and attend to the prisoner while I waited on the customer; the prisoner then asked for some fine twist sheeting; I went three or four yards to fetch it, and when I returned with it he had left the shop - I do not know whether he had paid for the calico; I missed a roll of about fifty yards of gros de Naples off the counter almost immediately - it laid on the part of the counter where he stood; there was nobody near enough to take it but him, except a female, and the prisoner stood between her and the silk, as such she could not take it - I had seen her at the shop before but did not know her; she remained there till after the loss was discovered - she had no bag; the prisoner's bag would contain the silk easily - I immediately sent the clerk to look for the prisoner, but he was not found; on the Wednesday or Thursday following I saw him in custody, and recognized him as the man who came for the calico, before I knew he was custody - I have no doubt of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many customers were in the shop? A. There were three or four

in the inside of the shop, but none but the female on that side to the best of my recollection - there was not more than three or four customers - I will swear there were not eight persons in the shop exclusive of shopmen; I believe there were two or three in the shop at the time I missed the silk, one or two had left; the woman had no cloak on, if she had I should have noticed it; I swear she had a handkerchief or shawl on, but did not notice her dress, but am positive she had no cloak, or shawl on or I should have noticed it; I think I should know every body who came with a cloak on if I waited on them; I turned my back to the prisoner to reach down the article he asked for - I had told Sills to wait on him, and receive the cash from him - but before I left him to wait on another customer he asked for this article, and while I was reaching it he left in a precipitate manner; I was informed he had paid for what he had - my back was turned about an eighth of a minute - Sills was with him at that time, and went in pursuit; the woman did not leave for some time after - I attended on her afterwards - she might have been in the shop for five minutes; I saw nobody leave the part of the shop the silk was laying in except the prisoner, but my attention was called to another part of the shop - it was impossible for any body to cross the shop and take the silk during the short time my back was turned - it is six or seven yards across; the silk has never been found.

COURT. Q. It was rather a large package, could a woman, without a cloak, conveniently conceal it? A. Impossible; she must have been observed if she had it- she bought several articles, and did not go till she was suited.

FRANCIS SILLS . I am cashier at Mr. Poole's. I saw the prisoner in the shop when he first came in; master served him - when the shopmen are busy I serve, but not generally; the prisoner paid me for something, but what he bought I do not know - he had a parcel which I gave him, and a bag; I could not observe whether it had any thing in it - Mr. Wilson missed the silk in less than half a minute; I had observed several rolls of silk on the counter, and could not tell one was gone - I immediately went out after the prisoner, but could not see him; I had observed his person - he was close to me; I saw him again about four days after, and am quite sure of him - the woman stood at the counter near the prisoner; no other customer was at that counter - there was a counter at the end of the shop, and two are opposite each other; nobody crossed the shop from the time I saw the prisoner there, till he left the shop, I am certain.

Cross-examined. Q. Wilson called you over to take the money from the prisoner? A. I came to serve the other customer; he said I had better take the money from the prisoner - I was perhaps two yards from him or less at that time; Wilson turned to reach something - my face was turned towards the prisoner; I had an opportunity of seeing him - I did not see his bag till he was going out - I could not see it across the counter; I did not see him take the silk - he could have taken it without my seeing him, and put it into his bag; I am sixteen years old - I swear he might have pulled the silk off the counter while I was looking at him, and I not see him; I cannot swear he did do it - I did not notice what he was doing particularly; I know I have sworn I was looking at him, but still he might take it without my seeing him - I can see across the counter, but not underneath it; it was between me and him - the roll of silk might be between half a yard and yard long; I think I had seen the prisoner in the shop once before, and have seen the woman more that once - I cannot say how often; I have been there about a month - the woman had a black bombazeen or stuff frock or gown, or something on, and a child in her arms; she had no cloak, for I saw her frock and she had nothing to cover it - she was the person I was called to serve; I do not know what she bought, for I went out to look for the prisoner - I cannot say whether the bag contained any thing, he went out so fast; there was a roller in the silk, and it was rather bulky - it was a middling sized bag.

Q. Could you not have observed the silk in it? A. He was close to the door, and went out in a quick manner - I do not know whether the woman was searched; I cannot say how many persons were in the shop.

COURT. Q. Was any body at the counter where the silk lay, except the prisoner and the woman? A. No.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. On Monday, the 31st of August, Mr. Poole came to me - I got a description of the prisoner from Sills, and on Friday morning he was driving up the City-road in a gig - I stopped him, took him to Mr. Poole's and asked some person there whether he could give us a better description of the man than I had before; the prisoner was with me - we then went up stairs to the bed-room where Mr. Wilson was ill in bed; I asked him if he could give us a description of the person supposed to have taken the silk - Mr. Wilson neither said the prisoner was or was not the man; I did not tell him the prisoner was in custody - he described the man as he had before; Sills was not in the way - I went to Guildhall and desired the prosecutor to bring Sills there, and as I and the prisoner stood at the Justice room I saw Sills coming - I told the prisoner to go in, and directly Sills came he pointed to the prisoner and said, "That is the man;" he did not know he was in custody - I had not told any body of it; the prisoner denied the charge in toto.

Cross-examined. Q. He went with you to the shop? A. Yes; he drove me there in the gig.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will consider the awful situation I am placed in, if any gentleman here resembled the person who took the silk it would be a disgrace to him as well as me - if I had been guilty I should never have let the officer come in my gig and drive him to the door; we went to the gentleman's bed-room and asked him if he could swear to the man who took the silk - he said he could not, having no recollection of him; a woman in the shop said the person was very much like a Jew - they said he was not, and the woman said "I will have it that he was;" she was asked if she could swear to him; she said she could - she pointed to me, and said it was a man a little taller than that man.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-55

1587. GEORGE TOOKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 2 spoons, value 10s. , the goods of Charles William Hales .

MARY ADAMS . I am servant to Mr. Hales. On the

20th of July the prisoner called on me as a friend - I knew him before; he is no relation; he staid in the kitchen nearly an hour - nobody else was there; I did not know what way of life he was in; these silver dessert spoons were in the kitchen closet - I did not miss them till the 22nd of July; I saw two of them afterwards at the Mansion-house, when the prisoner was in custody - I did not give him leave to take them; they have master and mistress' initials on them - I had left him alone in the kitchen while I went down to the cellar; the key is always left in the closet.

Prisoner. Q. Was not the boy who cleans the shoes in the kitchen? A. I do not think he was, for I had cleaned a pair of boots, because nobody was there to do them.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am a bricklayer. I went to the prosecutor's, hearing of the loss, and got a description of the spoons printed; I found two of them that night at Collins', in Shoreditch; I found where the prisoner lodged next day, and left word for him to come down to the hall, as the young woman wanted to see him about a situation - he came, and I apprehended him.

JOHN KEYS . I am in the employ of Mr. Collins, a pawnbroker. On the 22nd of July I took in two spoons, with the initials C. M. H. for 8s. 6d., from a lad, who I do not recollect.

MR. CHARLES WILLIAM HALES . I charged the prisoner with stealing the spoons; he begged I would not prosecute him, and if I would allow him he would recover the spoons, and replace them - he said he had pawned four, and given one away; I do not recollect his saying where he had pawned them - he said he had destroyed the duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never mentioned any such thing; if guilty, do you think I should go to the house, and wait for an hour before he came.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-56

NEW COURT, Second Day.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1588. WILLIAM CHAPPELL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1 watch, value 3l. , the goods of Mary Hughes .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-57

1589. DANIEL SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Anthony Rich , from his person .

ANTHONY RICH . On the 1st of August, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking with my brother in Drury-lane , and felt something at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his right hand - I called him; he threw it behind him; I took it up, and took him to the watch-house - I had had it in my pocket a minute and a half before; this is it.

Prisoner. I never saw it till it was lying on the ground; this gentleman's brother took it up; an elderly gentleman came up and said it was not me, he saw another boy do it.

ANTHONY RICH . There was a person who said there was another; but I did not look after any other, as I saw the prisoner with it in his hand.

JOSEPH COLE . I received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-58

1590. WILLIAM OTTAWAY and WILLIAM COLLISON were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 6 live tame geese, value 3l.; 1 live tame gander, value 10s., and 9 live tame goslings, value 2l. , the goods of Abell Yewer .

ABELL YEWER . I am a labourer , and live at Staines Moor - I had six geese, one gander, and nine young ones on the 20th of July; I fastened them all up that night, put a chain round the head of the gate, and twice round the pales - I had been out that morning, and some of the children had lost the key; I was called up at half-past one o'clock next morning, and was told two men were driving some geese - I opened my window; the gate was open, and all the geese gone; I went down, and Mr. Baker had Ottaway in custody - I found all my geese in the water.

MARY DEXTER . I live next door to the prosecutor. I heard a noise, and saw these two prisoners bring the geese along; I thought I knew them to be Yewers; I saw the prisoners so as to distinguish their persons - Ottaway was the one nearest to me; I went and called Baker; he came out - the prisoners ran, and Baker pursued; I am quite sure they are the men - it was moonlight, and Ottaway was not out of my sight.

THOMAS BAKER . I was called out, and saw the prisoners just making a start to run: they ran through the gate, and I called to them to stop; Ottaway said, "I shan't stop," and ran on about ten yards farther - Collison jumped over a gate into a plantation; I pursued Ottaway - he said he would beat my brains out, and struck me over the head with a stick; he struck at me a second time; I caught it on my arm, seized him, and took the stick from him - I brought him back to the prosecutor's, and asked him if he was not ashamed to rob a poor man, who only had 12s. 6d. a week; I then went and took Collison in the plantation; he could not get out any other way - I am quite certain he is the man I saw get over; I was within two yards of him.

Ottaway's Defence. I did not strike him. I had been to look for work, and met a friend, who took me into a public-house, and this young man came in - we were going along the road, and I never went out of the road.

Collison's Defence I had been travelling all day for work, and went into the public-house, and saw this man - we had rather a drop too much, and stopped late; I went on, and kicked against this bit of chain on the side of the road - the geese were on the side of the road; we did not drive them.

OTTAWAY - GUILTY . Aged 30.

COLLISON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-59

1591. SARAH PARSONS was indicted for stealing,

on the 5th of September , 1 collar, value 4s., and 4 yards of ribbon, value 2s. , the goods of Elizabeth Brakenbury .

ELIZABETH BRAKENBURY . I am in service. I lost my lace collar and four yards and a half of sarsnet ribbon from the back kitchen, at No. 20, Park-street, Camden-town ; I went down at seven o'clock in the morning and locked the door; my mistress was then out - when she came home she found the door open - I then went down and missed these articles; this is the collar I had bought on Holborn-hill two months before - the prisoner was living in the service of the lady in the first-floor; I went and fetched an officer, and we taxed the prisoner with it; she said she had not been in the room, and did not believe that I had lost the things - I called the landlady down, who said she had seen the things in my trunk before - the prisoner said she had been to Mrs. Collins, a laundress, we went there, but found nothing - we came back, and I said I wished her to be searched; she had every thing taken off, but nothing was found - I said "You will bring yourself into a great deal of trouble if you do not own it;" she then acknowledged that the collar was in the coal-cellar, but said she knew nothing of the ribbon.

WILLIAM JAMIESON . I went with the prosecutrix, who said she had been robbed - what she has stated is correct; the staple was out of the door-post - the prisoner denied that she had broken the door open, and said it must be the landlord's son who had done it - her mistress gave her a good character, and said she supposed it arose from jealousy.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My fellow- servant and myself being on no friendly terms, and having had a slight contention respecting a sweetheart, I took this collar, which I am charged with stealing, and hid it in the coal-cellar, for no other purpose than preventing her from wearing it on going to see him.

ELIZABETH BRAKENBURY . There is no truth in that; I am no lover.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-60

1592. ANN PUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 jacket, value 2l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1l.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 2 shirts, value 8s., and 2 stockings, value 1s. , the goods of William Anderson .

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I am second mate of a brig , and lodge at Mrs. Cruickshanks, in Wapping-street . I went to sea for about nine months, and left these articles at my lodging; I returned on the 14th of August; the prisoner lived at that place. and on the Saturday evening she asked if I wanted my clothes; I said I did not, as I had another suit to put on - on the Monday I was going with the brig to Peterhead - I then asked her for them; she said she would give me them, but when I came to look they were gone.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Is not the prisoner your sweetheart? A. No, I believe she was servant there - I did not leave these clothes in her possession, but in her mistress' - the prisoner did not return with my things, but she asked if I wanted them; she did not say that one of the servants wanted money, and she had pawned them.

CATHERINE BOSTON CRUICKSHANKS . I keep the Queen's Arms; the prisoner lived with me; the prosecutor had lodged at my house, and asked me to let his things remain there; I said certainly; he returned in August; the prisoner was still in my service; he asked me that Monday to allow the prisoner to give him his things; I told her to go and fetch them - she said she would - I told her twice, and in the evening she told me he had got them; but on the Tuesday he said he had not - I told her to go and fetch them down; she said they were in his own room; I told her to go and fetch them - she did not, and I told the other servant to go; the prisoner then brought down the jacket and trousers - I said "Here is not all" - she then said Ellen, the other servant, had pawned them, and had the money; I said I should send an officer for Ellen, to make her restore them - Ellen came and met the prisoner in my house in the officer's presence - while he was there the prisoner's mother brought the shirts and the handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Then the prisoner did bring down the jacket and trousers? A. Yes, and told me the things had been pawned by Ellen Wardrobe - the prisoner had lived with me a year and nine months, and behaved very well, as far as I know - I do not think the prosecutor was paying his addresses to her.

ELLEN WARDROBE . I was in the service of Mrs. Cruickshanks. About Christmas last I told the prisoner I wanted some money to buy some things - she told me she would lend me a jacket of a young man's, and I pawned it for 12s.; I returned her the duplicate and the 12s. in about three weeks or a month in the back wash-house, and said, "Shall I get it out, or will you?" she said she would; and I gave her the interest.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not say she had a jacket of the prosecutor's which she would lend if it were got out before he returned? A. Yes.

BOYD SILVESTER . I am a constable. I was sent for; the prisoner's mother came with two shirts and a handkerchief - I asked the prisoner how she came to do it - she said her mistress gave her no money to buy shoes, and she took them to buy shoes.

LAURENCE MAQUIRE . I live in Wapping-street. On the morning of the 18th of August the prisoner came to my house and asked for a sovereign for her mistress - when I heard she was down at the office I told her mistress, and she said she had not sent her; the sovereign has been returned; she did say it was to redeem some things.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-61

1593. JOHN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 set of fire-irons, value 6s. , the goods of James Hales .

JAMES HALES . I live at St. Luke's . I lost a set of fire-irons on the 25th of July, from my shop, between two and three o'clock; I saw the prisoner take them while I was at the back of the shop; I went out, and pursued him - I lost sight of him while he turned up a court: I came up to him, and took him with them in his possession.

DAVID ALLMAN . I stopped the prisoner with the fire-irons; the prosecutor came up directly, and claimed them.

JOHN SWAIN . I was sent for, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along Goswell-street, between two and three o'clock, and saw the fire-irons laying against the wall, two or three yards from the prosecutor's.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy, having a good character .

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18290910-62

1594. JOHN PENNINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 2 gowns, value 12s.; 1 shawl, value 5s.; 2 shifts, value 6s., and 1 table-cloth, value 1s. , she goods of James Fine .

MARGARET FINE . I am the wife of James Fine - we live at Wapping . I missed these articles on the 25th of July, from a chest in the room in which the prisoner slept - he had been with me four weeks, but was not at home then; he came home about a quarter-past eleven o'clock at night - I had an officer ready; he was charged with the robbery, and denied it for some time - he then said he had sold the things to a Jew in Rosemary-lane; the next morning he acknowledged that he had taken one of my gowns to a girl, who had pawned it at Mr. Murray's; he was taken to the girl, and she produced this gown.

JOSEPH GALLOWAY . I am an officer. I went there and got this duplicate, which produced this gown - it had been pawned by Mary Allen .

ROBERT STUPART . I am in the employ of Mr. Murray, a pawnbroker. I produce this gown, which had been pawned by Mary Allen , whom I saw at the Police-office.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18290910-63

1595. HENRY ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , 2 boots, value 14s. , the goods of George Dupen .

GEORGE DUPEN . I am a boot-maker , and live in Ratcliff-highway . On the evening of the 14th of August, about nine o'clock, I was backwards in the kitchen, and heard a scuffle in the shop; I went forward, and saw the prisoner in the shop, in the custody of a young man, for stealing a pair of boots; I asked how he came to take them- he said he was in distress.

THOMAS CROOK . I live at the prosecutor's. I saw the prisoner come and take the boots while I was behind the counter - he took them off a book inside the door; I seized him with them.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am an officer. I was called in, and took the prisoner - he said he was in distress.

WILLIAM GRANT. On the 14th of August I heard something drop at the door - I went and found these boots.

Prisoner's Defence. I was destitute of a home for a fortnight, and was much afflicted.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-64

1596. JAMES REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 6 books, value 6s. , the goods of Edward Rainford .

THOMAS POWELL . I am a shoemaker, and live in Red Lion-passage . On Friday, the 28th of August, I saw the prisoner go to Mr. Rainsford's shop, take the books, and run away; I pursued, and he dropped them - I only lost sight of him when he turned the corners, and can swear to his person; he dropped them at the corner of the passage, near the square, and was taken in Eagle-street.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I was in Red Lion-square, and heard Stop thief! called; I saw the prisoner running, and throw these books down - they were taken up, and part of them were given to me; these are them - I am sure he is the man.

EDWARD RAINFORD . These are my books; I had seen them a few days before.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-65

1597. JOSEPH STEBBINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , 15lbs. weight of fat, value 4s. , the goods of Joseph Ordway .

JOSEPH ORDWAY . I am a butcher . I was told this fat had been taken away on the 1st of August; I looked, but could not miss it, as the fat had not been weighed - I got it again, and believe it was mine.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the prisoner in your employ? A. No; he used to go to the place where the fat was; I generally sign my name "J. R. Ordway."

JAMES FRENSHAM . I heard the prisoner was at the slaughter-house, and saw him taking what I supposed to be fat, as there was nothing but fat there - I watched him; he went to Mr. Ordway's mother's shop, to take the keys back: he was then going away, but he was called back, and the fat was taken from him - it was between eight and nine o'clock in the morning; he said it was the first time he ever took any, and he hoped it would not be made known to his father and mother; he had gone to the slaughter-house to get a head - I saw him standing on the steps, and putting something in his bosom; no person had fat there but Mr. Ordway.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290910-66

1598. JEREMIAH HEMS was indicted for that he, on the 21st of July , at St. Mary, Whitechapel , feloniously did break and enter the warehouse of John, Blackburn and another, and steal therein, 1 quadrangle, value 10s., and 1 weight-scale, value 2s., the goods of the said John Blackburn .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-67

1599. JOHN TYLER was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 1 pair of hames, value 2s.; 1 pair of traces, value 4s.; 1 pad, value 3s.; 1 crupper, value 1s. 6d.; 1 bridle, value 2s., and 1 rein, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Barrow , the younger.

WILLIAM BARROW , JUN. I am a hackney-coach master . I had seen the prisoner about my premises two or three days before I missed this property. On the morning of the 22nd of July, about six o'clock, I met him coming out of my yard, with a sack on his shoulder - he dropped it; I ran after him, and he was stopped - I returned, and saw the sack - it had my harness in it: I told a person to stand by the sack till I returned from the watch-house, and I found it just where I had left it; when I took the prisoner I said he should go to the watch-house - he said he would rather lose his life, but I took him; he told me if I would let him go he would tell me where some reins were, but that was not connected with this robbery. I missed these articles from my stable.

The prisoner received a good character, and pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-68

1600. MATTHEW WARD was indicted for stealing on the 21st of July , 5 half-crowns, and 4 shillings , the monies of Francis Tucker .

JOHN WORDSWORTH . I am shopman to Francis Tucker, a tallow-chandler , of South Molton-street . I suspected the prisoner, who was in his employ - when I returned from breakfast on the 21st of July, I ordered the other man out, and marked 12s. with a cross; I went down stairs, and ordered the prisoner up to the shop to call me if any thing was wanted - I staid about ten minutes, then came up, and sent him down; I missed 3s. out of the till: I waited till Mr. Tucker came from Kensington, and told him of it - he wished to have some farther confirmation, and told me to mark some more money; I then marked five half-crowns and four shillings, with a W. - I stationed myself at the back of the shop, and saw the prisoner come through a private door, open the till, and then go down again; I then missed four half-crowns and two shillings: my master desired me to go for an officer, who searched him, and found four half-crowns and two shillings of that silver, and the three shillings which he took in the morning - this is the silver; it has the marks which I put on it.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long has he been in your service? A. About nine months; he was frequently sent to the banker's with money - he was a melter ; there was no other person on the premises but the female servant, who was below; there was 5l. 1s. 6d. found on him besides, which he said was his own money; that was not marked; he had in a Saving-bank about 11l., which he said he had saved when at sea - he had a good character; I went for the officer immediately after I missed the half-crowns, leaving the prisoner below - I swear there had been no other person in the shop from the time I put the half-crowns in the till; no quarrel had ever taken place between him and me - he had conducted himself very well, except staying on his errands, or so.

ALEXANDER MANN . I was sent for, and searched the prisoner - I found the money, part in his trousers, and part in his left-hand coat pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he had saved it when he was at sea? A. Yes, but that was not the money found on his person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-69

1601. JOHN WOODWARD , WILLIAM KING , and JOHN SAMVELL were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , 2 live tame ganders, price 10s., and I live tame goose, price 5s. , the property of Lewis Holt .

LEWIS HOLT . I am a market-gardener , and live at Barnes . On the 17th of August, I shut up ten geese in a goose-house, in a yard on my own premises, about eight o'clock in the evening; the next morning I went into the yard, about five o'clock, and saw some blood and feathers against the gate - I went to the goose-house, and missed two ganders and one goose; about eight o'clock in the morning Mr. Atliff came and said some men were at the watch-house at Hammersmith - I went there, and said I had lost two ganders and a goose; the watchman told me he had got them in his sack, and asked if I could swear to them - I said not to the two young ganders, but I could to the old goose; I did not see any difference in the ganders, but I am positive the goose was mine - I did not miss any feathers from them.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What colour was the goose? A. A brown one, very much speckled; the constable has the ganders' wings - I have not kept any part of the goose; there was no particular mark on it.

JAMES HICKS . I am a lamp-lighter, and live at Hammersmith. On the morning of the 18th of August I was returning home, about five o'clock, and putting out my lamps; I was in the middle of the road, near the Black Bull, and saw a watchman standing - from what he said I went with him to the Red Cow, where I saw the prisoners together; King and Samvell were drinking out of a horse-trough, the other stood by a ditch opposite - I spoke to the two, and said that was curious drink to get drunk with; I then saw a milkman come up, and take a sack out of a ditch - I looked into it, and saw some geese; the prisoners all ran off - I pursued, and caught Samvell, and two men out of a building caught the other two.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure of the two persons? A. Yes - I have always said so; Samvell had no coat on.

GEORGE BRANDSGROVE . I am a baker, and live in Crombie's-place, Hammersmith. I was going towards London about five o'clock, and saw the three prisoners walking before me - King had a sack on his head; when they came opposite the Red Cow, Samvell turned off to the right of the road, and then came back and told King to put down the load, which he did; it was in such a sack as they put corn in - I went and spoke to the lamplighter and the watchman; the sack was put down close by the side of a ditch - I then went on towards London, and when I got through Hammersmith turnpike I saw the three prisoners running as fast as they could; King said to me, "Don't stop us, mate, because we shall be too late for work" - they were all together; I did not stop them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far is that from the prosecutor's? A. I understood he lived at Barnes, which is three miles from where I saw them.

THOMAS JENKINS . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 18th of August, Brandsgrove told me he saw three men; I went and saw two of them by the horse-trough, and the other opposite, near the spot where the sack was pulled out of the ditch - Woodward was standing near the ditch; the sack contained three geese, which I shewed to Holt, who claimed them - the prisoners were afterwards given up to me, and I locked them up; I saw them run away - Hicks asked me if he should follow them, and I said Yes; they were brought back in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; Hicks brought Samvell, and the others were brought back about the same time.

WILLIAM LAURENCE . I am the toll-collector of the Hammersmith-bridge. About a quarter before five o'clock I saw the prisoners come over the bridge in company; King had a sack on his back, which appeared nearly half full - it was a sack similar to this one; I saw red letters on it, which there is on this - I did not notice what letters they were.

WILLIAM PETHER . I took the prisoners to the Magistrate, and cut off the wings of the geese.

JAMES HICKS re-examined. I took Samvell in a brick

field, nearly opposite Lord Holland's - they were all running; two men came out of a building and secured the others; they were brought back, and delivered to Jenkins.

Woodward's Defence. I saw the men running after me, and gave myself up.

King's Defence. I gave myself up.

Samvell and Woodward received a good character.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

WOODWARD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

SAMVELL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-70

1602. ELIZABETH WATERS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 2 sheets, value 3s.; 2 aprons, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 3s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of John Powis .

PETER LOW . I am a butcher. I was sitting in my master's truck, by Mr. Powis' door, on the 28th of July, in Anchor and Hope-alley, St. George's in the East ; I saw the prisoner come out with a bundle under her arm, between three and four o'clock - I went and told Mrs. Powis; her brother came out, and ran after the prisoner- she ran down the alley; Mrs. Powis' brother and I stopped her with the bundle in her hand - she said it was her own.

ELIZABETH POWIS . I am the wife of James Powis . Low came and told me a bundle was taken; I sent my brother, who brought the prisoner back with this bundle; it contained a pair of sheets, a shawl, and two handkerchiefs, which had been in my house not ten minutes before - I cannot recollect any thing of the prisoner; she begged my pardon, and said she had no father or mother.

JOHN ADAMS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-71

1603. JOSEPH WATERHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 1 writing-desk, value 15s. , the goods of Mary Widgeon .

MARY WIDGEON . I am single , and live in the Lying-in-hospital . I lost my writing-desk on the 4th of August from a small room on the right-hand side of the door, but I did not know it till the next morning, when a person came and asked if I had lost any thing; I had used it between three and four o'clock the afternoon before.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What time, on the morning of the 5th, did you know it was gone? A. About nine o'clock - I know nothing of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I took the desk from the prisoner in the City-road, about five minutes before seven o'clock, on the 4th of August - he had it in a basket; I said, "Young fellow, where did you get this?" he said,"It is my own," that he lived in Charles-street, and I might go with him - I said, "You are only giving me trouble;" he said, "Well, it's of no use," and I took him to the watch-house - I did not see any person near him.

Cross-examined. Q. What distance was he from the hospital? A. I suppose one hundred yards - he went very willingly.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a man to carry it to Shoreditch-church.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-72

1604. STEPHEN WINTER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , certain fixtures, (i. e.) 6 glazed window-sashes, value 20s., of and belonging to William Young Knight , and fixed to a certain building .

GEORGE TWEEDY . I live in Cooper's-gardens, Hackney-road, and am agent to William Young Knight, Esq . - I look after his houses, one of which is in Whithall-yard, Loggerhead-lane, Bethnal-green - I saw it between six and seven o'clock on the evening of the 17th of July; it was then safe - the doors and shutters were closed; next morning I heard something, and went to the house- I found the shutters open, and I think five glazed sashes were gone; I went to the prisoner, who had been a tenant of ours - he then lived in Moffatt's-court; I found the sash-frames there, partly cut to pieces - I took the pieces to the house, and a carpenter with me to fit them; they matched exactly; the prisoner was out at the time - I saw him afterwards, and told him they had been found at his house; he said his wife had picked them up in the garden.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you know whether there are any other persons interested in the property? A. No - Mr. Knight is the King's attorney; it is a house with two rooms and a small kitchen - only the prisoner, and a woman who lived with him, lived in the house, that I know of; Mr. Knight pays me for looking after these houses - I have a written authority.

JOHN IMPEY . I am a chimney-sweeper, and live in Moffatt's-court - the prisoner lived in that court. About a quarter before four o'clock one morning, my little dog awoke me - I saw the prisoner go into a shed, get a ladder, and put it up against the house, No. 2, Moffatt's-court; in about half an hour he went up the ladder, pushed up the sash, went in, took a knife out of his pocket, and began to cut the strings of the sash - then he went down stairs, and broke the shutters; he came and put the sashes down under the window - he saw me, and said, "Halloo, Jack!"

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where were you? A. Partly in my father's room, and partly in the garden; I had one leg inside - I did not say at one time that he looked up at the house for half an hour, and then that he went up instantly; I said he stopped half an hour before he went up - I do not think I ever said he went up instantly; he opened the gate, and went in - I then came out, went up - I do not think I ever said he went up instantly; he opened the gate, and went in - I then came out, went back, and went to bed; I did not call my father or give any information till eight o'clock.

THOMAS HARFORD . I am a constable. I received notice to examine the house - it stands in a very peculiar situation; I went to the prisoner's house, and found some wood burning in the fire - here is one of the fellow-sashes which had not been taken; the pieces of sashes which were found seemed to match in every respect - the prisoner was not at home; he came in, and said his wife picked them up.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain it is the same house? A. Yes - I know Mr. Knight; I do not know that he is solicitor to any parties - they are not new houses.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-73

1605. MARIA PARROTT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 30 yards of ribbon, value 30s., the goods of James Shoolbred and Gregory Cook ; and that at the delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on Thursday, the 11th of September, in the 9th year of the reign of his present Majesty, she was convicted of felony.

JOHN ADAMS . I am an assistant to James Shoolbred and Gregory Cook , linen-drapers , of Tottenham-court-road . On the 7th of August I was walking outside the counter, and saw the prisoner in the shop concealing a piece of ribbon - she had bought one yard; she put the piece she concealed in a small basket, covered it with a handkerchief, and was then going away - I detained her, took her into the warehouse, and said, "I must send for an officer;" she desired me to let her go, but I said I could not, as it was the second time she had been there- she then gave me a second piece of ribbon, which had been concealed under her shawl.

THOMAS SIPLESS . I am a street-keeper. I took the prisoner into custody, and produce the property.

Prisoner. I was intoxicated at the time. Witness. No, she was not.

HENRY GODDARD . I produce a certificate of the conviction of this prisoner last September, of the name of Maria Drury , for stealing some ribbon - I took her, and attended the trial; I know she is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-74

1606. WILLIAM BUMPSTEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 gold seal, value 1l., and 1 piece of ribbon, value 2d., the goods of John Grubb , from his person; and that he, on the 7th day of April, in the 6th year of His Majesty's Reign, was convicted of felony .

JOHN GRUBB . On the 29th of August I was in the skittle-ground of the Boot public-house, in Cromer-street ; I saw my watch safe about eight o'clock, and missed it about half-past eight - I felt it go; I had seen the prisoner there before it was taken, and at the time it was taken several persons were round me - I laid hold of the prisoner directly, at the time of the scuffle, but I have not got my watch.

WILLIAM SILLITOE . I am a tailor. I was at the Boot about half-past eight o'clock with the prosecutor -I saw the prisoner and upwards of thirty more in another part of the ground; they came up to our part and took a pot of ale from us - the prosecutor said it was not right - we then had a pot of porter come in, and they took that; I was knocked down by some of the party, and when I got up I saw the prisoner and Mr. Grubb in contact - I saw the prisoner drawing out the watch by the black ribbon from the pocket; I said they had been robbing him - one of them knocked me down again and said,"What is that to you?" there was then a great rush out; I said to a coachman, "Shut the door, we will let no more out till we get an officer;" the prisoner then went and sat down as if nothing had happened - the watch has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it; the gentleman played with me for a pint of porter.

ISAAC KIMPTON . I was present when this prisoner was tried in April 1826, for stealing seventeen yards and a half of cotton - I produce a copy of his conviction, and I know he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-75

1607. JAMES HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , 1 table, value 2l., the goods of John Arrow ; and that, on the 11th of June, in the 10th year of His Majesty's Reign, he was convicted of felony by the name of William Clancey .

JAMES BARNES . I am a cabinet-maker, and work for John Arrow , an auctioneer of King's-street, Bloomsbury . I was in his shop on the 21st of July - I saw the prisoner come in and look at the furniture; he then walked away with the table - he walked up the street, then crossed, and came down the street on the other side of the way - I took him with the property on his shoulder; he came and put it down where he took it from, and begged me to let him go.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say I should suffer for all that your master had lost for the last three months? A. No; I said I should not let him go as we had lost so much.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking in a picture-shop - a very respectable person came and said he would give me 1s. to take the table for him - he gave me 6d., and was to give me 6d. more when I got to Southampton-street; the witness then came and took me - the other person ran off; I told him that was the man, but he did not offer to pursue him.

GEORGE FORDVCE . I took the prisoner for a robbery, for which he was tried last June and sentenced to fourteen days' imprisonment - I am certain he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-76

1608. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 3 shillings and 1 penny, the monies of George Bevan , from his person .

GEORGE BEVAN . I lost my money on the 29th of August out of my right-hand breeches pocket, at the prisoner's lodgings, Ropemaker's-fields - I had been at work with him; he asked me to go and have some beer- I paid for a pot of stout, and then he paid for some beer: he asked me to go to his lodgings, and then asked me to send for another pot, which I did - I then had 3s. 1d., and while I was drinking he came and took it out of my pocket; I asked him for it - he called me a young b-r, and every thing he could think of, and knocked me down - I went to the door; the watchman was coming by, and I gave charge of him.

Prisoner's Defence. He had been working with me - we went to the Spread Eagle and had some stout:

then we had five pots more with the company - he would go to my lodging; I never had one halfpenny of his money.

DONALD McDONALD . I am a watchman of Limehouse. I was crying twelve o'clock, and saw a crowd round the door - the boy was crying in the crowd; he said he had been robbed by Clark - I said, "Where is he?" he said,"He's in the house;" I called him out and said, "Are you playing your lark with this boy or not?" he made no answer, and I took him - neither of them were tipsy.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-77

1609. WILLIAM DOWNES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Walter Blount , from his person .

WALTER BLOUNT . On the 5th of September, as I was crossing over by St. Clement's church, in the Strand , about seven o'clock, I heard a noise, turned round, and the officer came and told me my handkerchief was gone; I had it in my pocket about five minutes before - I did not feel it taken; the officer and the prisoner were on the ground - my handkerchief was taken from the prisoner's pocket.

RICHARD AMBROSE . I saw the prosecutor in the Strand, and the prisoner following him - I followed them into Pickett-street, and saw the prisoner take up the tail of the prosecutor's coat; I caught hold of him, and called to the prosecutor to come back - the prisoner and I had a tussle together; the prisoner threw me down - a man standing by assisted me, and took this handkerchief from the prisoner's pocket.

Prisoner. This man came and said, "You must come, you are the principal person to come against him"- and then he said he would come. Witness. I took hold of him as soon as he lifted up the tail of the gentleman's coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a scuffle, and went to see what was the matter - they did not know who it was that picked the pocket; a man struck me on the head, and then they said it was me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-78

1610. HENRY GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Daniel Mesman , from his person .

DANIEL MESMAN . On the 21st of August, as I was coming down Bruton-street , about one o'clock in the day, I felt something at my pocket, I turned, and saw the prisoner close at my elbow; he had a new blue coat on and white trousers - I did not think he was the person, but on looking at him I saw my handkerchief in his coat; I took it from him, and collared him - I said, "You rascal, you have got my handkerchief?" he aimed a blow at me, but missed me and got away - I raised an alarm, and he was taken shortly after.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BROWN . I was in Bruton-street on the 21st of August, and saw the prosecutor; the prisoner put his hand up the prosecutor's coat, and took the handkerchief from his inside coat pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How soon was the man taken? A. Almost at the very moment; he ran, but I did not lose sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down the street, and saw two boys behind the gentleman; they dropped the handkerchief, and I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-79

1611. FRANCIS MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Murray , from his person .

JOHN MURRAY . On the 24th of July, as I was passing through Holborn , about eleven o'clock at night, I felt a tug at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I turned and saw the prisoner and another; I followed the prisoner about thirty yards, and then charged him with it - he denied it, but I found it in his bosom; it has my mark on it.

DANIEL LYON . I am a watchman. I received charge of the prisoner from Murray.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Holborn and saw the handkerchief lying on the ground - I saw a person treading on it, and then I took it up - the prosecutor came to me, and as I was going to give it to him, he took it out of my bosom.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-80

1612. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Abraham Canner , from his person .

ABRAHAM CANNER . On the 18th of July I was in Mr. Reynold's shop, in Whitechapel ; I felt a pull at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner behind me with my handkerchief hanging out of his side pocket - I took hold of him, and took it from him.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . The prosecutor came into my shop, and was paying for some goods; the prisoner came in, went behind him, opened his pocket with his right hand, and with his left I saw him put the handkerchief into his own pocket; I came round the counter - the prosecutor then had hold of him, and I gave him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop on the Saturday night; this gentleman was standing at the counter with his handkerchief half out of his pocket; I said,"Your handkerchief is hanging out." Mr. Reynolds was selling bacon, and he wanted to pretend that I wanted to steal some, but I did not; and then the prosecutor said I wanted to pick his pocket; and when before the Magistrate he told the gentleman to say I wanted to take it out of his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 75.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-81

1613. ELIZABETH SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 watch-chain, value 6d., and 1 watch-key, value 1d., the goods of Anthony Alexander , from his person .

ANTHONY ALEXANDER . I am master of the Peggy, of Newark . I was near Cock-hill, Shadwell , on the 3rd of August; the prisoner came by the side of me - I walked a little way with her; she asked me for some gin; as we were walking up the street she drew my watch from my pocket - I took it from her, put it in again, went on to a

corner, stood there a minute or two, and she took the watch from my pocket; she stooped down, and put it behind a post - I took hold of her, and gave charge of her to the watchman: this is the watch.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a watchman. I came up; the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner, and said she had got his watch; she denied it - I asked where they came from; he said, "Up this lane;" I then went and found the watch behind the post.

Prisoner's Defence. He came and asked me to drink; he took me to the White Lion, and had some gin, but I did not; he went down this lane, then came again, and wanted to take liberties with me; he then called the watchman, said he had lost his watch, and would sell my life as a butcher would an ox.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-82

1614. MARY ANN DODD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 3 half-crowns, 1 sixpence, and 1 farthing, the monies of Thomas Bowen , from his person .

THOMAS BOWEN . On the morning of the 16th of August, about one o'clock, I was in Queen-street, Seven-dials - the prisoner came up, and solicited a penny to buy her a bit of bread; I said I had not a penny, but I would give her a halfpenny; I was pulling it out, and she picked my pocket of three half-crowns, a sixpence, and a copper farthing; I gave charge of her to the watchman - she turned away, and said, "I won't have your halfpenny; if you have not a penny, I won't have any:" she was taken when she had got about twenty yards from me - I was sober.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you dropped one halfpenny, and that I picked your pocket when you was stooping for it? A. I did not.

JAMES DUNN . I am a watchman. I was in the Seven-dials; the prisoner was given charge of by the prosecutor- I found on her three half-crowns, one sixpence, and a copper farthing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along; he came up, and put his arm round my neck: I asked him to give me something, and he put it into my hand; I did not know what it was - I thought it was copper; I said I should go and get something to drink, he said I could not; I then said Yes I could, at the watering-house, and he gave charge of me.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-83

1615. JOHN MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , one coat, value 3l. , the goods of John Wray .

JOHN WRAY . I keep the Bricklayer's Arms, in South Molton-street ; the prisoner lodged in my house, and left on Friday, the 4th of August. In consequence of information, I went to the bed-room on the second-floor, and missed a blue body coat; the prisoner had a fellow lodger at my house - I sent for him, but he did not come to my house: on the 14th of August I went out, and found the prisoner in Henrietta-street - I told him I had lost a coat, collared him, brought him to my house, and sent for an officer - he denied it at first, but he afterwards owned it; he pulled out a spectacle-case, took out the duplicate of the coat, and gave me.

WILLIAM PACKES . The prisoner pawned this coat with me on the 20th of July, and I gave this duplicate - I had known him before by the name of Henry Adams .(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not do it with the intention of robbing him. I pawned it, meaning to get it out in a few days.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 52.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290910-84

1616. GEORGE EMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 6s., and 6 shillings, the property of Peter Gaze , his master ; and EDWARD CALLANAN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

PETER GAZE . I am an egg-merchant ; Empson lived in my service. I lost a coat and a pair of gloves on the 19th of July; I missed them on the Sunday morning, and I knew no one but Empson could do it - I know nothing of Callanan.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did not Callanan come to you, and tell you the part he had taken in it? A. Yes; he came and told me the name of the pawnbroker, where I found the articles.

GEORGE AVIS . On Sunday, the 3d of August, Callanan was brought to me, charged with robbing this gentleman; he said Empson stole the property out of a lost, put it under some straw, and told him to go and take it - that he went to pawn it at one place; they would not take it in; then he went to another place and pawned it.

Cross-examined. Q. This was after Empson was in custody? A. Yes; Empson told me, on the way to the office, that he had taken the coat, put it under the straw, and directed Callanan to go and get it.

THOMAS WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am a pawnbroker. This coat was pawned with me by Callanan, in the name of Coleman; he said he brought it from his father.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Empson put in a written paper, expressing his contrition for the crime. Callanan received a good character.

EMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Seven Days , and Whipped .

CALLANAN - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18290910-85

1617. WILLIAM SQUIRES was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , 1 half-sovereign, 8 shillings, 1 pint of rum, value 2s., and 1 bottle, value 3d., the property of Ann Southall , spinster , his mistress .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

MARY SOUTHALL . I am sister to Ann Southall , the prisoner, and was in her service. On Sunday evening, the 2nd of August, the prisoner came and asked me for a bottle of rum and change for a sovereign, for Mr. Curling, of Canonbury-square - I gave him the rum, a half-sovereign, and 8s. in silver; he did not return; I went up to the room which he occupied, and his clothes were gone - I told my father and pursuit was made.

JANE NICHOLLS . I am servant to Mr. Curling, of

Canonbury-square. I know nothing of the rum being ordered - there was no rum nor silver brought there.

BENJAMIN SOUTHALL . I am the prosecutrix's father. She gave me information, and I went up to Highgate; I returned, and found the prisoner at the Crown, at Holloway; there was a bottle of rum, and 13s. 10 1/2d. found on him - the bottle has my daughter's name on it.

JOHN MORGAN . I am an inspector of the watch. I have the bottle of rum and money; the prisoner said nothing at the time; I do not know what he said before the Magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence (written). - On the 2nd day of August two persons stopped at the door, and I called for a pint of rum and change for a sovereign, as requested by those persons; the sovereign was not given to me - on my obtaining the rum from the bar, I desired that 5d. might be taken for a pot of beer which was before owing, and received 17s. 7d. as the change out of the sovereign; on my going to the door with the rum, I found the persons who asked for it were gone.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-86

1618. JOHN HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 10th of August , 1 flute, value 5l., the goods of William Milhouse and Richard Milhouse , of a certain evil disposed person, he well knowing the same to have been stolen .

RICHARD MILHOUSE . I am in partner ship with my father, Mr. William Milhouse - our shop is in Oxford-street. On the 12th of August we missed a flute from the glass-case in our shop - I had seen it three or four days before.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You missed it on the 12th? A. Yes; I cannot swear that I had not seen it the day before.

HENRY GODDARD . I received information, and on the 18th of August I apprehended the prisoner going into No. 177, Tottenham-court-road; I called him, and asked if he had pawned a flute at Mr. Duprees - he said he had; I asked him what he had done with the duplicate; he put his hand into his pocket, and said, "I can't think what I have done with it, I have lost it;" he told me at the office that he had it of a man named Ferguson, that Country Joe engaged him to go and pawn it, and that all he got above 25s. he might keep - he said he pawned it for 30s., gave Country Joe the 25s., and kept 5s. himself - he did not say where he had received it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he had seen the young man a night or two before at a music party? A. He said he had seen him once or twice before when he was at the office; he did point out a person who he said had employed him - that person is not here, he is committed on another charge; the prisoner gave his correct address at the pawnbroker's - he was going into his own house when I took him.

WILLIAM SIBLEY . I have known the prisoner some years. On the 11th of August he came to my shop in Whitcombe-street, and said he had the duplicate of a flute to sell - I went to look at it at Mr. Duprees; I bought the duplicate for 12s. - 30s. had been advanced on it.

EDWARD DYER . I am in the service of Mr. Dupree, a pawnbroker. On the 10th of August the prisoner pawned this flute with me; I knew him as a customer - I do not know his family.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you aware that Mr. Dupree is acquainted with his mother? A. I do not know; he asked 2l. for the flute, I lent him 30s. - I heard him point out a person at the office who gave it him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-87

1619. JOHN NEWMAN was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN ARROW . I am an auctioneer and appraiser , and live in King-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner was in my service, and if he received money he was to bring it to me immediately - he never paid me 7l. 7s. from Mr. Scott - he had been with me about five weeks, and left me on the 3rd of February; I never saw him again for five months - there were no wages due to him.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. Has he not parents who have been tolerably strict with him? A. I believe not; I did not see him again till the 27th of August; he did not tell me he had lost the money and was afraid to return - his father told me so; I have not heard where he slept that night.

WILLIAM PULTENEY SCOTT . I paid the prisoner, on the 3rd of February, 7l. 7s. for the prosecutor - he gave me this receipt; I wrote it, and he signed his name to it between twelve and one o'clock in the day - there were seven sovereigns and some silver.

JAMES HERBERT . I am an officer. I took him up near his father's door.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not tell you where he had lost the money? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to rob my master; when I went to this gentleman's I asked if he would have a receipt; he said he did not mind, but he got one - if I had intended to rob I should not have given a receipt.

JANE BAILEY . I have known the prisoner fourteen years; I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane, and go out charing; when he lost this money he came to me crying bitterly - I said, "John, what ails you?" he said, "I have lost my employer's money, and if you will let me stop here to-night, from my father's, I will thank you;" I put him to bed with my son that night, and in the morning I gave him 6d. - he said he would go home to his parents.

COURT. Q. What time did he come to you? A. Between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - it was some time in February; I told his father of it afterwards, and he could not find him; about five or six weeks ago he came to me without a shirt, or a bit of shoe to his foot.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-88

1620. WILLIAM ASHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 5 silver spoons, value 20s., the goods of Theophilus Barnes ; and 3 gowns, value 40s., the goods of Sarah Barnes .

THEOPHILUS BARNES . I am master of Shelton's charity-school ; the prisoner was a scholar there. We missed one silver spoon on the 17th of August, and four on the 25th - these are them.

SARAH BARNES . I am the prosecutor's daughter, and live at the school in Denmark-street , adjoining the vestryroom of the church. On the evening of the 25th of August I went out for a walk with my father and mother; my mother locked the top room door, and put the key in the

kitchen - my father locked the gate, and put the key into his pocket; I returned home alone at a quarter before eight o'clock, and found the top door was then open - I went into the room, and there I saw a trunk which I had left shut, but not locked; the things were all in disorder - I then went into the parlour, and missed four silver spoons from the dining-table, which I had left after dinner; when my father came home I mentioned the circumstance, and then I missed three gowns from the bed-room - the prisoner was taken up the same evening; we did not miss the seal till it was found on the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. Were you at the Police-office? A. Yes, the next morning; I believe the prisoner did mention a boy named Saunders, who I think has instigated him to do it - I have known him ever since March; he had a good character: he had the key to come in, in his turn to clean the boots and shoes.

JOSEPH COLE . I am a constable. I heard of the robbery, and went to the prisoner's house in Drury-lane; I found him in bed, and asked him if he knew any thing at all about this property - he said No: his mother took out of his pocket two half-crowns, a heart, and a seal, which she said he said he found in St. James'-park - I questioned him rather closely, and his father and mother told him it would be better to tell the truth; he then said he had pawned the spoons and dresses at Mr. Newby's - that he tore up the duplicates, and threw them down by a lamppost; I went there, and found the bits of them; he wanted to say something to his brother in secret, but I would not let him - he then told me there was a purse under the bed; I went and found it, it had a sovereign, two shillings, and a sixpence in it; he said a boy named Saunders had been speaking about the money, and had instigated him to do it - I could not find who he was; the things had been pawned for 1l. 11s.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say Saunders instigated him to steal them? A. No, he said to do it - he did not tell me that Saunders was in the service of the surveyor of the sewers, nor do I believe he has any boys in his employ- I found this key in his pocket.

COURT. Q. Did he use the word "Instigated?" A. I do not know that he did - I do not know that his statement followed the mention of the pawning.

WILLIAM WILCOX . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned these things with me, between six and nine o'clock in the evening; I have known him fifteen months - he frequently pawned things for different people in the neighbourhood; he said these things were pawned for a Mrs. Shepherd, to make up her rent - I do not know that he ever pawned plate with me before, but he has pawned very good articles.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the neighbours for whom he has pawned them? A. No; he said Mrs. Shepherd lodged at No. 3, Drury-lane - I knew him, and knew his mother - I had no suspicion of him; his parents, I believe, keep a house, but I am not certain of it; the things he pawned have generally been redeemed again.

CHARLES MOORE . On the 25th of August it was my turn to light the fires and clean the shoes; the prisoner came to me, and asked me for the key of the gate, and I let him have it. GUILTY. Aged 13.

Strongly recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-89

1621. JOSEPH BEDFORD was indicted for stealing on the 23d of August , 1 pair of boots, value 20s. , the goods of John Scott .

JOHN SCOTT . I lost a pair of boots from the shew-room, where they had been left to be cleaned, on Sunday, the 23rd of August, about ten o'clock in the morning - I put them there on the Friday; the prisoner was in the same employ that I am, and had access to that place.

FRANCIS MACE . I am a constable. I received charge of the prisoner on another offence, and found on him the duplicate of these boots.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. I took in these boots of the prisoner, and gave this duplicate, on Monday, the 24th of August.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the boots, or the duplicate either.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-90

1622. WILLIAM BREEMER, alias BEAUMONT , was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 10s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of William Scales .

SAMUEL SCALES . I am a labourer, and live at Heston . On the 17th of August I lost a waistcoat, a pair of shoes, and a handkerchief, from my bed-room in my father's house; I left them safe when we all went out to work - when I returned at night they were all gone; the prisoner lodged at my father's, and slept in the same bed with me.

JAMES LEDGER . When the prosecutor came home, and missed these things, he told me if I saw the prisoner to take him; I did take him, and this waistcoat of mine was found on him at the time.

GEORGE WESTON . The prisoner was brought to me -I found two duplicates on him, which relate to Scales' things.

RICHARD HOLDING . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Old Brentford. I have a waistcoat, a pair of shoes, and a handkerchief, pawned with me, but I cannot say by whom- I gave this duplicate for them, on the 17th of August.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-91

1623. SARAH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 1 cap, value 7s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s., and 1 napkin, value 1s., the goods of Henry Hornblower ; and 1 apron, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Mary Forster ; and ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 napkin, value 1s., well knowing it to have been stolen , & c.

HENRY HORNBLOWER . I live in Holborn . Sarah Brown was in my service, as a charwoman ; her mother, Elizabeth, used to mangle, and clean the pots - I missed a great many things from time to time: one day Sarah called at my house, and brought her child; on the child was a bed-gown of my child's - her mother was sent for; she said she did not know how it was, it might be some mistake in the mangling - some days afterwards Sarah passed the door again, with her child, which had a cap on belonging to my child; I apprehended her, and got a warrant - a number of articles were found in her box and in some drawers belonging to her mother.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. What things were found? A. A pair of silk stockings, a cap, some napkins, and other articles - I certainly was not in her debt at all; she had access to the whole of the house - she was paid regularly when she had done her work; when she came to me with the child, she came to ask me to give her something; she perhaps might have had some things to wash, and then did the mangling; I should think there was a great deal of difference between the caps of her child and mine; when her sister came to compare caps, she wanted to withdraw mine and leave the other.

WILLIAM ECKETT . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's lodging in Red Lion-street, and asked for the key of her box, which she gave me; I found a pair of silk stockings - these are the things which I have brought here.

MARY FORSTER . I live with the prosecutor. I know this cap, stockings, and napkins belong to him.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know these stockings? A. Here is a hole which I mended; my mistress sent me to look for them, and they were gone - I recollect her working for Mrs. Hornblower while Mr. Hornblower was in prison - I knew she paid her money; the name over the door is Elizabeth Dyer - I do not know who she is; I do not know Mrs. Hornblower's maiden name.

Q. Upon your oath, who do you believe passes for Elizabeth Dyer? A. I do not understand what you mean; I cannot recollect when the name over the door was altered - I do not know whether it has been since he was a bankrupt; I do not believe the woman called Mrs. Hornblower is Elizabeth Dyer.

Q. Do you believe Mrs. Hornblower is Elizabeth Dyer? A. Yes - I do not know by whose direction Elizabeth Dyer was put over the door: the baby to whom this cap belonged is Mr. Hornblower's; these napkins belong to her, and this apron belongs to me.

HENRY HORNBLOWER re-examined. Q. Are these things yours? A. Yes - I bought this cap of Mr. Manning, near Museum-street; I cannot swear to the other things, because I have lost such a quantity - here is a handkerchief with the name of Topping on it, which I do not believe is mine.

Cross-examined. Q. When was this alteration of the name? A. About two months ago, after I had passed my examination; the name refers to my wife's mother -Mrs. Hornblower's name was Elizabeth Dyer ; I suppose this cap is mine; I purchased it for Mrs. Hornblower's baby; her mother does not live in the house - she is there at times; she lives out of town: she certainly has not lived there within the last two months - the rent has been paid to a gentleman in the country by the mortgagee.

Q. How comes the name of Elizabeth Dyer to be over the door? A. I put it there after my own was taken down - I decline stating in what church Mrs. Hornblower and I were married, or whether I am married.

Q. Upon your oath are not these the property of Elizabeth Dyer? A. They are mine; no person of the name of Elizabeth Dyer was ever married to me - most likely Elizabeth Dyer's baby has worn the cap; it was bought for my own baby - I shall decline answering for what women's baby it was bought.

MRS. FORSTER. I know this cap; I went as nurse to Mrs. Hornblower, and have been there these twelve months - it was bought for her child; I have washed and ironed it twenty times.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-92

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1624. JOHN CANCE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 1 book, value 10s. , the goods of John Noble .

JOHN NOBLE . I am a bookseller . On the 15th of August I lost this book from my door - the prisoner was brought back with it.

RICHARD DENNIS . I saw the prisoner and another standing near Noble's shop; I was in and out of my own door - I watched them, and saw them go by; the prisoner had this Bible in his left hand, in an apron; I took him with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-93

1625. CHARLES BOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 sovereign , the money of William Farmer .

WILLIAM FARMER . I was in the skittle-ground of the Two Brewers - I took the prisoner to be a waiter there, and sent him for change for a sovereign - he went to the bar, and then went out.

JOHN HEWITT , I am a hair-dresser. I saw the prosecutor give the sovereign to the prisoner, to go to the bar for change; he appeared to be a pot-boy there - I believe there were three pots of beer to pay for; the prisoner was taken again in four or five hours.

JAMES GILL . I am a constable of St. Bartholomew the Great, and was called to take the prisoner about nine o'clock in the evening of the 5th of September - he said he knew it was for a sovereign which a gentleman gave him, and he was very much obliged to him - he thought it was for setting up the skittles.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking a good deal, and was rather tipsy; two strangers followed me; and said, "Don't return the change - I dare say he gave it you for setting up the skittles."

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-94

1626. HENRY COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 2 sheets, value 4s. , the goods of Robert Waters .

MARY WATERS . I am the wife of Robert Waters , who keeps the King's Head, Church-street, Bethnal-green . The prisoner came on the 1st of September and asked for two nights lodging; he slept there that night, and went away in the morning - I then missed the two sheets; he had paid for his lodging.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am assistant to Mr. Harvey, a pawnbroker, in Brick-lane. The prisoner brought these two sheets between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and I stopped him with them, as I had had information from a Mr. Graham, the day before, that he had lost a sheet.

MARY WATERS . I believe these are mine, but there is no mark on them. He said, before the Magistrate, that he took them from the bed where he slept the night before.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-95

1627. JOHN DAVIS and JOHN BRADBURY were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 1 saddle, value 15s.; 2 stirrup leathers, value 2s.; 2 stirrup-irons, value 1s. 6d.; 1 girth, value 1s. 6d.; 1 bridle, value 5s.; 2 traces, value 12s.; 1 pad, value 7s., and 2 sacks, value 4s., the goods of William Waterhouse and another .

JOHN MORGAN . I am an officer of Islington. I know Mr. Waterhouse's premises. On the 20th of July, about half past three o'clock in the morning, I was riding down Highgate-hill, and saw Bradbury coming out of a field with a sack; he saw me and returned into the field; Davis then came out with a sack, and I asked what he had got there; he made no answer - I took the sack and found it was harness - I gave him to a watchman, then went and took the other prisoner; I found this other sack in a privy near where he was.

Prisoner Davis. Q. What was found in my sack? A. The riding saddle and bridle - I brought Bradbury out of the field before I took his sack.

JOSEPH BENNETT . I am in the service of Joseph and William Waterhouse. I manage their horse business, and know this harness to be theirs - it was kept at Holloway .

JAMES HICKFORD . This property was taken from the stable, which I locked at seven o'clock on the Sunday evening, and at six the next morning I found it broken open, and the lock laid by the side.

Davis's Defence. When Morgan brought Bradbury into the road, he was looking in his sack; there were several persons there, and one said it belonged to an ostler who had a stable there, and he knew it by the saddle.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BRADBURY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-96

1628. WILLIAM DEACON and EDWARD LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 2 brushes, value 2s. , the goods of William Dennish .

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a carpenter - William Dennish is a brush-maker , and lives by Whitechapel-church. On the 24th of August, at ten minutes to eleven o'clock, I saw the two prisoners looking into his shop window; Lawrence then came away; Deacon went and took the brushes off a nail; Lawrence was not more than two or three yards from him; they went off together - as soon as they turned the corner Deacon gave them to Lawrence, who took a handkerchief out of his hat and covered them over - I went into the shop, got an officer, and took the prisoners with the brushes.

Prisoner Deacon. Q. Where was I standing when they were taken? A. On the cill of the door; you reached up and took them off a nail.

WILLIAM DENNISH . These brushes are my property. I was not at home at the time.

Lawrence's Defence. They were given to me, and the young man asked me to carry them home - I was going home and was taken.

DEACON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

LAWRENCE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-97

1629. JOHN DEVINE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 piece of mahogany, value 1l. , the goods of John Darbyshire .

THOMAS WHITE . I am porter to Mr. John Darbyshire , a cabinet-maker , of Whitecross-street . On the 18th of July, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I was on the premises, and saw the prisoner taking up a piece of mahogany; he was just on the threshold of the door; there seemed to be another person with him; but I could not positively swear that - I saw the prisoner walk away with it - I followed, detained him, and called the prosecutor, who claimed it; the prisoner said he was employed by a person to carry it to St. John-street; the prisoner took it up, but I think there was some one who put it on his shoulder.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you see the other man put it on my shoulder? A. I said there were two, but you took the piece on your shoulder.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer. I have the mahogany, and took the prisoner.

JOHN DARBYSHIRE . This is my mahogany. I know nothing of the prisoner; my gate is partly open in the morning for the men to go in.

Prisoner. Q. Was there not a man in your yard? A. I went out and saw a man in my passage, but I did not know then that a robbery had been committed - the prisoner said another man gave it him to carry - I asked the other man what he wanted there; he said to buy some mahogany - I said I did not sell it; then my man came and said a man had gone off with a plank.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a paralytic stroke ten months ago, and it is impossible that I could take it up by myself.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-98

1630. HENRY DEMSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 1 writing-desk, value 1l. , the goods of Robert Smith .

JOHN JAMES . I am a Bow-street patrol. I took the prisoner in Surrey, about half past nine o'clock, on the morning of the 3rd of September, with this writing-desk; I asked him how he got it; he said a friend gave it him to sell - I asked where he lived; he said in some back street in Westminster - I took him to the watch-house, and found a bunch of keys and a brush in his pockets, and in his hat a number of papers and receipts.

ROBERT SMITH . I live in St. James's-place, St. James's-street . This is my property; I presume it was taken from my parlour; I had seen it the day before, to the best of my knowledge - the door is not open, except when the servant is cleaning the passage.

Prisoner's Defence. It was given me to sell.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-99

1631. THOMAS EDWARDS and WILLIAM WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July , 6 printed books, value 7s. , the goods of William Sharpe .

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a constable. At half-past nine o'clock, on the 27th of July, I was in High-street, Pentonville; I saw Williams running out of Hermes-street, and Edwards came, in about a minute, in the same direction - I took Williams, and found four books on him; Edwards was stopped at the same time, and these other two books were found on him - I went and informed Mr. Sharpe, a bookseller, who lives in the main road.

WILLIAM SHARPE . I am a bookseller . These are my books; I know them perfectly well; they were taken from a stall in the front of my premises - I had not seen the prisoners before.

Edward's Defence. I had been out of work a long time, or I should not have done it.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . Aged 27.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-100

1632. WILLIAM GRAVES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 1 plated waiter, value 15s. , the goods of Edward Bullock .

WILLIAM KIBBLE . I am a porter, and am generally employed at Mr. Edward Bullock's auction-rooms in High Holborn . On the 29th of July he was not selling any thing, but the property was in the auction-room; I saw the prisoner in the room, and about half-past five o'clock I saw him take up a plated waiter, put it under his coat, and turn to walk out - I called to Mr. Bullock's man, and asked him if he saw the man take the waiter; he said,"No, stop him." I followed him up Southampton-street; I called Stop thief! and saw him take it out of his coat, and throw it down an area - I followed him to Silver-street, and brought him back; he said, "What is the matter?" -I said, "There is not much the matter, but you must go back with me." This is the waiter.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. This is a public auction-room? A. Yes; there were four or five persons there - I did not particularly notice him while he was in the room, but I can swear he is the man; I did not lose sight of him after he left the room - I suppose it was found about fifty yards from where it was taken; I swear this is the waiter - it was given me from the area; I suppose the prisoner went twenty yards from the area before he was taken - I do not know that this is the one he threw down.

COURT. Q. Did you see him take one from the room? A. Yes, he appeared to me to be sober; he walked and ran very steadily.

WILLIAM UNWIN . I am a porter to Mr. Bullock. I was in the back room when the prisoner took this out of the auction room; I did not see it taken, but saw it down Mr. Luke's area - the servant took it up and gave it me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner run a distance after it was said he had thrown this down? A. Yes, I suppose twenty yards; I lost sight of the waiter while I followed him - I then came back and knocked at the door, and they gave it me; there is no particular mark on it - here is a sort of cross; the servant came to the door - I should not like to swear this is the waiter; it is not my duty to inspect the plate - I know nothing about the waiter but what has been told me by the last witness.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-101

1633. CHARLOTTE HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , 1 tea-pot, value 6s.; 1 time-piece, value 10s.; 2 sheets, value 2s., and 2 lbs. weight of feathers, value 2s. , the goods of John Woodward .

ANN WOODWARD . I am the wife of John Woodward - we live at Newington . The prisoner is my own sister - I left her in my house, to take care of it, on the 4th of August, and came home on the 10th - I then missed the property, and found it at the pawnbroker's; the prisoner lives in Spital-fields.

DICKINSON SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields. I have a tea-pot pawned by the prisoner on the 10th of August.

MARTIN SUTTON . I live with a pawnbroker in Brown's-lane. I produce a pillow pawned by the prisoner on the 10th of August.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicate of the pillow pawned for 1s., and the tea-pot for 3s.

ANN WOODWARD re-examined. Q. Did you leave her any money? A. I left her plenty of victuals; I had more valuable property in the house - she is not married.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-102

1634. ANN HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 1 rug, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Williams .

MARY WILLIAMS . I am the wife of Thomas Williams . We live in Half-Nichol-street . On Whitsun-eve I lost this rug from a seat by the fire-side, and on the Monday following I found it at a broker's shop, hanging up for sale -I know it by a particular mark on it; I have a pair of them - I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN JOHNSON . The prosecutrix came to me on the 8th of June; I went with her to a little broker's shop, where this rug was hanging up - she swore to it, and pointed out a particular thread that ran round it.

NATHANIEL HUBBARD . I am a broker. I bought this rug of the prisoner on the 6th of June for 1s., which was all she asked - I knew nothing of her before; I gave her the full value for it - I could sell new ones for 1s. 6d.

The prisoner put in a written defence, denying that she had ever been in possession of the rug, or ever seen the broker.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-103

1635. ANN HILLYER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July , 5 pairs of gloves, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Philip Palmer .

PHILIP PALMER . I live at Highgate , and am a linen-draper . On the 28th of July the prisoner came to my shop in the evening, in company with two other persons; they asked for some silk, and one of my young men showed them some - there were some gloves on the counter, and some of them got on the floor; I saw the prisoner stoop and push something under her clothes - as soon as they were served they went out, and when they

had got about five doors, the prisoner was pursued and brought back; she produced these gloves - they had paid for what they bought, which amounted to about 4s. - I know the prisoner very well; she is married, and lives in the neighbourhood - she had dealt at my shop.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Was your attention directed to her? A. Yes, perhaps more from the person she was with, than from her own conduct; I did not charge her with it when she stooped down - we let her go away to be sure of the matter; I knew she had taken something - she was then about two yards from the door; I do not recollect these gloves, but I had seen some gloves on the counter - when she returned she produced these, and said she picked them up at the door; there is nothing on the gloves that I can swear to.

WILLIAM NEWINGTON . I was serving in the shop - I saw the three women come in; I began to show them some silk, and then another young man took them - I stood opposite, putting away some goods; I saw some gloves on the counter were pulled off in some way, but I cannot say how - the prisoner stood opposite them; I saw her stoop - I do not know what she picked up; the others paid for what they had - when they went out I followed them, and overtook the prisoner; I asked her to walk back with me - she came back and produced the gloves, which she said she picked up at the threshold of the door - I believe they are my master's.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the three persons staud together? A. No, a little distance; there was no one else near enough to pull the gloves off.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS. I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. The gloves were not concealed: I said, "I picked them up at the door" - I had no shawl or cloak on.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-104

1636. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 1 jacket, value 4s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 3s. , the goods of William Arnold .

JANE ARNOLD . I am the wife of William Arnold . The prisoner and two other boy s came into our shop on the 26th of August, and asked for a pair of braces - I showed them some; the prisoner said he had not money enough to pay for them - they came to 1 1/2d., and he wanted me to take 1d. less; I said I could not, and they all went away- they then returned with the 1 1/2d.; I did not miss these articles, but Mr. Brown saw them with them, and I knew they were mine.

EDWARD BROWN . I am an upholsterer. I saw the prisoner and two others come out of the prosecutor's shop- the prisoner had a bundle in his apron; he ran off - I took him with these articles in his apron.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290910-105

1637. JOSEPH UNWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 36 lbs. weight of cherries, value 4s.; 2 baskets, value 2s.; 1 pair of scales, value 1s., and 2 weights, value 9d. , the goods of Thomas Powell .

THOMAS POWELL . On the 15th of July I sent the prisoner to Whitechapel to sell 36 lbs. of cherries - he had two baskets, one pair of scales, and two weights; I went some time afterwards to see how he got on - he said, very well, but complained of the scales - I went and brought him another pair, but when I came back he had absconded; I had employed him about a week - I could not find him till the Friday; he had the scales and weights, and one basket - I never sent him out alone before.

EDWARD JOHN BELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the charge of stealing the cherries - he was then selling fruit in front of Vauxhall-gardens - he had this basket, these scales and weights; he said he had run away, but he meant to pay for them some time or other.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-106

1638. WILLIAM ROBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 1 ham, value 6s. , the goods of Richard Sharwood .

RICHARD SHARWOOD . I live at No. 3, Willow-row. Kentish-town , and am a cheesemonger . About nine o'clock, in the morning of the 22nd of August , I saw the prisoner go down the steps of my shop with a ham - I ran up stairs, pursued, and took him with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a man in the road- I was going by the shop, and the gentleman pursued me, and said it was his property; I gave it up immediately - one of the carmen said he would aver the same thing; I do not know whether he is here.

RICHARD SHARWOOD . I saw no person near him. except three or four who were pursuing him - I have made inquiries about him; his character has been respectable.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290910-107

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1639. ELIZABETH SWIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , at St. Andrew, Holborn, one 10l. Bank note, the property of Robert Rochester , in his dwelling-house .

PHILLIS ROCHESTER . I am the wife of Robert Rochester , who is an assistant to Mr. Hand, a messenger , and lives at No. 12. Southampton-buildings, Chancery-lane - I do not know the parish. The prisoner had been living with us as maid servant between six and seven months; I changed a cheque at Dixon and Co.'s, Chancery-lane, for 11l. 0s. 8d. on the 6th of May, and received a 10l. Bank note for it - I have the cheque here; I put the note into a drawer in my own bed-room, which was locked - nobody but the prisoner had access to the room; I missed the note on the 4th of August, she was taken on Monday the 6th - the last time I saw the note was on the 5th of July; I found my drawer locked as I had left it; I frequently left my bunch of keys in the kitchen drawer; on missing the note, I went down and told her the note was taken from the drawer, and I suspected she must have taken it, for nobody else could have done it; she said at first that she did not steal it she took it by mistake; I said it was impossible for her to make a mistake - she then said she had taken it and

changed it at the baker's, and spent part of the change; she said this before I threatened to send for an officer - I had no other 10l. note in the house.

JOHN ARCHER . I am a baker, and live in High-Holborn. Southampton-street is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn; the prisoner frequently came to the shop - I do not remember giving her change for the note at all; I do not remember taking a 10l. note from her at all; I wrote my name on a note which I received in my shop; I was examined before a Magistrate and signed my deposition - it was read over to me - this (looking at it) is signed by me, it is the same as I say now; I say to the best of my belief, I took the note of the girl.

Q. You have not said that now? A. I did not tell the Magistrate I was positive of the prisoner; I know her, and know she lived with the prosecutrix; I do not remember the circumstance, though I know I did take the note, because I have written the prosecutrix's name on it, and said at the office I believed I did take it of the prisoner, and I do believe I received it from her - I wrote on it, "Mrs. Rochester, 12, Southampton-buildings," this is the note(looking at it) I have put that name on it.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank, and produce a 10l. note, No. 13,155, from the Bank, where it has been paid in.

STEPHEN PEGLER . I am a clerk to Messrs. Dixon and Co., Chancery-lane. I have an entry of having paid this cheque, drawn by Mr. Humber, to Mrs. Rochester, by a 10l. note, No. 13,155.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. I was sent for by Mrs. Rochester; I went to a house in Holborn on the 10th of August and saw the prisoner; I held out neither threat or promise to her; she said she took the 10l. note from her mistress, and changed it at the baker's, and that a girl, who I took up at the same time, had taken part of the change from her.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix and Jury, on account of her character, and believing it to be her first offence .

Reference Number: t18290910-108

1640. TIMOTHY DRISCOLL was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Teasdale , on the 30th of August , at St. George, and putting her in fear, taking from her person, and against her will, 1 reticule, value 5s.; 1 sovereign, and 20 shillings, her property .

JANE TEASDALE . I am single , and live in John-street, Commercial-road. On the 30th of August, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was in Watney-street , Commercial-road - I had my reticule round my arm hanging by a double chain; it contained 30s. in money, two pieces of coin in a purse, a pocket handkerchief, a bunch of keys, and a silver fruit knife - the prisoner did nothing to me, but wrenched it violently from my arm - but some body else struck me on the back.

Q. Did the person who took it come behind you or meet you? A. He met me; it had a double chain, and was pulled away with a tremendous pull; he gave a tremendous pull before he got away - it was not a sudden snatch but a wrench; my arm was very sore afterwards, for some time the clasp of the chain broke - he got the reticule, and rushed away with it - I called Stop thief! and he called Stop thief himself! somebody then came behind, struck me on the back, and made a catch at me, to prevent my running in pursuit, but he was taken directly on the spot, without being out of my sight; he is the man -I am quite sure of it - it happened on Sunday evening; my purse was found on the Wednesday following, over a garden wall, which the prisoner passed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I take it for granted you were very much agitated? A. I was - I had never seen him before; it was done momentarily - there was a person standing at a door as I passed round the corner, and her brother pursued him; I had to turn a corner in following him, but did not lose sight of him.

GEORGE ANDERSON . I am a journeyman baker. I was in Dean-street, standing at my father's door; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running and calling Stop thief! his hat dropped off - he did not stop to pick it up, so I thought he was the thief himself - he was coming towards me; I told him if he did not stop I would knock him down - he paid no attention to that -I ran after him up Dean-street and laid hold of him, but missed my hold; I secured him at the top of Dean-street; he said he had done nothing, he was not the thief, and was very resolute to get away - I held him, and said,"What as he robbed;" the lady said he was the man immmediately; I took him into a public-house, as the rest of the persons round said I should not illuse him.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not a good many persons behind pursuing him? A. Several were running after him, calling Stop thief! whether that hid him from the lady I cannot say - I did not see her till she came up to me - if I had let my hat fall I should have stopped to pick it up- I kept very close to him; there was nobody between him and me, I swear - I did not see him do any thing; the others were all just behind him when I first met him.

Prisoner. I leave every thing to my counsel.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his friends .

Reference Number: t18290910-109

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

1641. RICHARD GIFFORD was indicted for that he, on the 6th of March , at St. Christopher le Stock , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counfeited, and did willingly act and assist in the false making, forging and counterfeiting a certain transfer of a certain part, to wit, 125l., then and there standing in the name of William Green , and being part of certain Annuities, established and made transferable at the Bank of Engand, by an Act of Parliament made in the 25th year of George II, entitled, "An Act for converting the several Annuities therein-mentioned, into several joint stocks of Annuities, transferable at the Bank of England , to be charged on the Sinking Fund, &c.", and by divers subsequent Acts in that behalf made and provided, the tenor of which said false, forged, and counterfeit transfer is as followeth:-

No. 23,151. I, William Green, of Crucifix-lane, Bermondsey, brazier , this 6th day of March, in the year of our Lord 1829, do assign and transfer 125l. of my interest or share in the joint stock of 3 per cent. Annuities, erected by an Act of Parliament of the 25th of George the second, entitled, "An Act for converting the several Annuities therein mentioned into se

veral Joint Stocks of Annuities transferable of the Bank of England, to be charged on the Sinking Fund;" and by several subsequent Acts, together with the proportional annuity of 3 per cent, per annum attending the same, unto James Clelan , of the Stock Exchange, gentleman, his executors, administrators, or assigns.

Entered by W. ROGERS. Witness my hand, W. GREEN.

Witness to the identity of Wm. Green,

THO. LINTON. Witness B. OVINGTON.

with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England ; against the Statue.

2nd COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intent.

3rd and 4th COUNTS, like the 1st and 2nd, only stating his intent to be to defraud William Green .

5th and 6th COUNTS, the same as the 1st and 2nd, only stating his intent to be to defraud James Clelan .

TWELVE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge, and reciting the various acts passed relative to the said Stock.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

1642. RICHARD GIFFORD was again indicted for that he, on the 22nd of July , at St. Christopher le Stock, feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain dividend warrant , as follows:

No. 58,391. Consolidated 3 per cent. Annuities.

154th - 29,333. To the cashiers of the Bank of England. Pay to Richard Mann, Chelsea, the sum of 4l. 10s. for half a year's annuity, at 3 per cent, per annum, which became due on the 5th of July, 1829, on the sum of 300l. interest or share in the joint stock of Consolidated 3 per cent. Annuities, &c. &c.

Examined, H. D. H. BLAKE.

I do hereby acknowledge to have received of the Bank of England the above-mentioned sum, in full payment for half a year's annuity due as aforesaid. Witness my hand, this 6th day of July, 1829. RD. MANN.

Witness, G. TAYLOR.

with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England; against the Statute.

2nd COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like warrant, knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited, with the like intent; against the Statute.

3rd and 4th COUNTS, like the 1st and 2nd, only calling it a certain receipt for money instead of a dividend warrant.

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18290910-110

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

1643. JAMES SUFFOLK was indicted for that he, on the 28th of August , at St. Mary-le-Bow , feloniously did falsely make, forge and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making, forging and counterfeiting a certain will and testament , as follows:

This is the last will and testament of me, Thomas Brandrith , of Langley, in the County of Kent, bachelor, made this twentyeighth day of August, in the year of our Lord, one thousand, eight hundred, and twenty-eight. First, - I hereby revoke and make void all former wills and testaments, by me at any time heretofore made, and of this, my last will and testament, do constitute and appoint James Suffolk, of Langley, in the said County of Kent, yeoman, sole executor; I give, devise, and bequeath all and singular, my real and persenal estate and effects, of what, now, here, or kind soever, into the said James Suffolk, his heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, for ever, he paying all my funeral expences of being interred, in the parish church-yard of Langley, in the said County of Kent, all my money invested in the funds In the bank of england, whatsoever and wharesoever, I give to the said James Suffolk, of Langley, in the said County of Kent; in witness whereunto, I set my hand and seal, this twenty-eight, and in the eighth year of the reign of our sovereign Lord, george the Fourth, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, defender of the faith, and in the year of our Lord, one thousand, eight hundred, and twenty-eight.

THOMAS BRANDRITH , his X mark.

(Witness) MICHAEL WHYMAN ,

FRANCIS TROWEL , SEN., his X mark,

LUCY WHYMAN,

The aforesaid will, containing one sheet of paper. with intention to defraud James Makin and Catherine his wife , and James Harrison and Elizabeth his wife; against the Statute, &c.

2nd COUNT, that he on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did utter and publish as true, and cause and procure to be uttered and published as true, a certain other false, forged and counterfeited will and testament, as follows: (setting it out as before) with a like intent; he at the time he so uttered and published as true the said last-mentioned false, forged and counterfeited will and testament, well knowing, &c.; against the Statute, &c.

3rd COUNT, that he on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did offer, dispose of, and put away a certain other false, forged and counterfeited will and testament, as follows: (setting it out as before) with a like intent; he at the time when he so offered, disposed of and put away the said last-mentioned false, forged and counterfeited will and testament, well knowing, &c.; against the Statute, &c.

4th, 5th, and 6th COUNTS, the same, only stating the intent to be to defraud the next of kin to the said Thomas Brandrith , deceased, at the time of his death.

7th, 8th, and 9th COUNTS, like the first three Counts, only stating the intent to be to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

10th, 11th, and 12th COUNTS, like the first three, only stating the intent to be to defraud the said James Harrison .

13th, 14th, and 15th COUNTS, with intent to defraud the said Elizabeth, the wife of the said James Harrison .

16th, 17th, and 18th COUNTS, with intent to defraud the Right Reverend Father in God Charles James , by divine permission Lord Bishop of London , Ordinary of the Diocese of London.

19th, 20th, and 21st COUNTS, the same as the 7th, 8th, and 9th, only omitting the names of the attesting witnesses.

22nd, 23rd, and 24th COUNTS, like the 10th, 11th, and 12th, only omitting the names of the attesting witnesses.

25th, 26th, and 27th COUNTS, the like, only with intent, as in the 13th, 14th, and 15th Counts.

28th, 29th, and 30th COUNTS, the same, only with intent, as in the 16th, 17th, and 18th Counts.

MESSRS. BOLLAND and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

JAMES MASELY . I am a labourer, and live at Langley,

in Kent; the deceased, Thomas Brandrith, lodged with me at the time of his death, and occasionally for years before - he came last the latter end of August, 1828; he had been in the army. He had been with me three weeks; on the 13th of September, 1828, he came home to his lodging, at ten o'clock that night, fell forward out of his chair, and almost immediately expired: I knew the prisoner; he is a pensioner, and lived about forty roods off; he had been in the army, and was acquainted with the deceased - I went to his house, and told him what had happened; he and his wife came back with me to my house, stopped there all night, and left about six o'clock; after they were gone I found two keys belonging to the deceased, and took them to the prisoner's house - the deceased had a portmanteau at his house; I gave him the keys - he asked me to go up stairs, and see the portmanteau unlocked; I went up with him; he unlocked it, and opened it in my presence with one of the keys I took; it was searched in my presence, and two papers found in it, which appeared about the size of a letter; Suffolk did not appear to take any notice of them - he did look at them, and said they were Brandrith's soldiering papers; I did not see any other papers in the portmanteau; (looking at a will produced by J. Beams) I saw no paper of this sort found in the portmanteau - I saw it emptied; there was some wearing-apparel and things, and two sovereigns.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Suffolk was an acquaintance of Brandrith's? A. Yes; he was with him almost every day, and only came to my house to sleep - he came down from year to year to visit him; I have seen him there for years; and I believe he slept with me, because Suffolk had no place for him to sleep; the prisoner asked me to go up to see the portmanteau opened; he looked at the papers carelessly, and said they were soldiering papers.

Q. Looking at this paper folded up as it is, can you undertake to swear it was not among them? A. I cannot; the things were turned out of the box, and put in again - some were not taken out; I believe they were all turned over, and all moved; but some might not be taken out - it was a leather portmanteau, lined with paper, I think; I think the lid was lined.

Q. Was any search made in the lining of the lid? A. I cannot say that I saw any part of the lid open - Suffolk took the two sovereigns; I do not know that he paid for the funeral; all the time I knew Suffolk and Brandrith they seemed very friendly, and always walked about the common together - I was with them but very little; Brandrith never told me what he or his family were; I never heard him say what he meant to do with his property after his death - I knew a man named Whyman in the neighbourhood; I fancy he has been a schoolmaster; I do not know that he used to do writing for the neighbours - he lived at Sutton Valence, and has gone away; I do not know that search has been made for him - people have been enquiring after him: I never heard of his being found.

MR. BODKIN. Q. What sort of a lining had the portmanteau; do I understand that it was lined with paper? A. The sides and the bottom; I think the inside of the lid was lined with cloth, or something - I went up at the prisoner's desire to search it.

WILLIAM HENRY GAMBIER , ESQ. I live at Langley, and know the prisoner; he came to me early on the Sunday morning as the deceased died on the Saturday night, and asked if it was necessary to have a Coroner; I told him he must have one, on hearing the particulars of the man's death - I asked if he knew any thing of the deceased; he said he did, that he was an old comrade of his; I asked whether he had any property - he said, "Yes, considerable." I asked what he meant by that - whether it was any thing he derived an income from, or if it was property; he said he had property in the Bank of England -I then asked if he knew whether he had left any will; he said No - I asked if he had any near relations that he knew of; he said he had a sister, and he believed she lived in the City of Chester - that he knew her maiden name, but did not know her name now; I told him she ought to be informed of his death, as the property was hers - he said of course the property was hers; he then said, the weather was hot, and the man must be buried, there was not time to give her the information, for he would not keep, and as there was sufficient property to bury him; he would bury him, and when they came, if they liked to pay him the expenses of burying him, he would give them up the property, which I understood was the money and different things which were found - this was about half-past eight o'clock in the morning; we always breakfast at eight, and were at breakfast when he came - he said he would write to the sister, and went away; I saw him again on the 1st of June this year; I had met him once before that in the road, near Christmas, and asked if he had ever had any answer from Brandrith's sister; he said No, the letter had been returned to him from the returned letter office, as they could not find her - I asked if he ought not to take other means to endeavour to find her out; he said he would write again - this was, I think, two or three days before Christmas; I recollect nothing more passing then. On the 1st of June Mr. Matheson came to me with a letter of introduction from Manchester; I went with him to Masely's house - he wished for information about the death, and to see Masely and the witnesses attesting the will, of which he shewed me a copy; while we were at Masely's, Suffolk came up to the door - I said to Mr. Matheson, "There is the man himself;" Matheson at first said he would not take any notice of him - he afterwards said to me, "I think I may as well at once;" he then called to him and asked whether he had not taken some money under a will of Brandrith - he said he had, that Brandrith had made a will, by which he had made him whole and sole executor, and left him all his property; that he had administered to that will, and had taken more than 300l. from the Bank of England - I then said to him, "How do you account for this? you told me Brandrith had made no will, and now you say he has made a will, leaving you executor and all his property?" he was very much confused, and hesitated for some time - at last he said, "I know I did, I did not then know that there was a will;" we asked him how long it was after Brandrith's death that he found the will - he said it was about a month; I said to him, "It is very extraordinary the will should bear date on the 28th of August, and he die on the 13th of September, and you living in so small a cottage, he should not tell you any thing about it, and that you should not know any thing about

it;" we then asked him who made the will; he said he did not know that he was bound to tell - Mr. Matheson said he did not know that he was bound to tell, but he would most likely be made to tell in some other place, if he would not tell him; we pressed him very much to tell who made the will, and he said to Mr. Matheson, "I should like to know who you are;" he said, "I am an attorney at Manchester; I am sent here by the deceased's sister: and unless you like to give up the money I shall take proceedings against you, and very briskly" - he said he did not wish to hurry him, he might take his time about it and should confer with Messrs. Hoare and Beal, whom he should appoint his agents; Matheson asked him several times after, I should think a dozen times, to tell who made the will, and then we left him and went away - we asked if he could bring any respectable person forward who was present and saw the will made or any thing of that sort, but he would not give any answer - I do not think any inquiry was made of him respecting the witnesses; Saturday following (the 6th) I went to his house and told him I had received a letter from Mr. Matheson, wishing me to ask him two questions and he must do as he pleased about answering them; I would read the questions as they were written in the letter - one question was, at what precise time he wrote to the sister of the late Mr. Brandrith, and how and when he learned that the letter had been returned; he said he wrote on the Sunday, the day after the poor man died; that he got Rouse to write, and did not write himself; that he did not know the date of the return of the letter, but it was some considerable time (he told us in the conversation, on the 1st of June, with Mr. Matheson that when he found the will it was between the lid of the trunk and the lining, and about a month after the deceased's death - I asked him whether it was probable a man, who had made an instrument like a will, which was only to come in use after his death, would hide it where it most probably never would be found; he made no reply) - the second question I was to ask him was, "How long after Mr. Brandrith's decease it was when he found the will, as he stated, under the lid of the trunk?" he said he thought it was more than a month; he then asked me some questions about the matter- I told him I had no doubt Mr. Matheson would proceed against him, and that he knew best about the will, if it was a genuine will; he had better produce the witnesses or those who saw it made, that he might avoid getting into trouble, as I did not know in what way Mr. Matheson would proceed, but I thought most probably by a warrant - I told him if Mr. Matheson proceeded by an action against him it would put him to a considerable expense, even if the will was correct; he said a law suit would ruin him, he had better give up the money - he asked me for Mr. Matheson's address, which I gave him; I asked if he could told me the name of the sister, as I had forgotten it, though Mr. Matheson had told me- he immediately said her name was Makin, but I am not quite certain whether Mr. Matheson did not tell him her name on the 1st of June.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When you and Mr. Matheson first saw him you did not tell him, in the first instance, who Mr. Matheson was? A. No; I have not stated the conversation quite exact in point of time - he was asked who made the will full a dozen times; he was asked two or three times before Mr. Matheson told him who he was, and several times after - he asked who Mr. Matheson was before he was told he would be made to tell who made the will.

Q. It was on some interference of Mr. Matheson that he asked who he was? A. Yes; he asked the prisoner two or three times who made the will, and then the prisoners said, "I should like to know who you are?" but he was also asked after that who made the will.

Q. Finding he was an attorney who came to claim the property, he declined answering him some question? A. Yes; it was after Matheson told him who he was that he said he should proceed pretty briskly - he answered both the questions I put to him from Matheson's letter; I know Whyman by sight; he can write, but not very well - I believe he has been in several different businesses; he has been rather unfortunate; the only thing I know of his having written is a notice, but not in very good writing - I believe he has left the neighbourhood entirely.

COURT. Q. Repeat the answer Mr. Matheson gave when asked who he was? A."I am an attorney of Manchester, and am sent here by the sisters of the deceased to inquire about the will;" Suffolk said "I only knew he had one sister" - whether either of their names were mentioned, I do not know.

JOHN BEAUMONT ROUSE . I am an auctioneer, and live at Sutton Valence. I was employed to bury the deceased; the prisoner gave me the directions for the funeral, he said if I would do it he would see that I should be paid - he knew Mr. Brandrith had died worth property, and he would see the expenses paid - he said he supposed there would be a will found, by which he expected the property would come to him, but if it was otherwise, the deceased had a sister living near Chester, and he wished me to write her (looking at a letter produced by the prisoner's counsel) this is the letter I wrote by his desire; it is written as from myself, and was returned to me from the post-office - (read.)

Sutton Valence, September 14, 1828.

MADAM - I am sorry to inform you that your brother, Thomas Brandrith died last night, in a few moments after he was taken ill; he was visiting at my house, where he had been a month - I should wish for you to come as early as possible, as I am aware that he has money and property to a considerable amount, and as he died so suddenly, his things are at several places, and as I understand you are the only sister, it is only right that you should have the property that he may possess, and a delay of your coming, a part of it may be made off with; he died in his full strength - he must be buried without delay, but I hope you will not fail coming immediately. Please to inquire for the Plough, in Sutton Valence, near Maidstone, Kent; the coaches leave the Borough four times a day. I am, &c.,

JAMES SUFFOLK .

To Mrs. -, maiden name Allen Brandrith , City of Chester, or elsewhere, since married, name unknown; from Thomas Brandrith - hopes this will be delivered immediately.

This letter was enclosed in the usual circular from the Post-office, dated the 16th of October, stating that the party was not known.

JOHN BEAUMONT ROUSE . The prisoner's letters are al

ways left at my house - I broke this open myself - Langley is the adjoining parish to Sutton Valence; I was in the habit of seeing him frequently, almost daily - he came to me four or five days after the letter was sent, to know if I had received an answer; and so he did day by day - the letter was returned about a month after it was sent - I told him it was returned, and gave it him; a very few days after the letter was returned, he said if his sister was living, and there was no will, the property would belong to her - but he said he thought he knew the place where the deceased's trunks were in London, and he should go to London and see if it could be found there; he said he knew one place where there was a trunk, but he thought there were two or three different places where he had trunks.

Q. At the time he talked of going to London to search the trunk there, did he say any thing about the trunk at his own house? A. He said he had searched the trunk at his own house, but could find nothing there in the shape of a will; he said he should go to London to search the trunks, to see if he could find a letter to tell where the sister lived, if she was living; I cannot fix a date to this conversation; it was not many days after the return of the letter - he told me afterwards that he had been to London; I saw him on his return - I should think he had been absent a fortnight - he told me he could find no will; he paid me for the funeral after he returned from London; and when he paid me, I told him I was surprised how he could obtain the money without a will, as he told me he had got 380l. from the Bank; he had been to London twice; after he had been the first time I gave him a paper which I wrote; it was merely an account of what I had heard Mr. Brandrith say respecting him, both in his presence and out of it - I gave it him at his own request; and after he received that paper he went to London a second time; some time after that he paid me for the funeral - I do not think that was for nearly three months after the decease; he paid me about 14l., including money I had lent him - in answer to my question, how he got the money without a will, he said there was no will, but the paper I gave him was as good as a will; he said he had been at a great expence and trouble in getting the money - I think he stated he had received the 380l. from the Bank, both at this conversation and before- I saw him afterwards; he said it was very strange the sister had not written nor come up, as she must have heard of her brother's death; but he understood they were not very good friends - he came to me about the beginning of last June, and told me there had been a solicitor down respecting Mr. Brandrith's will; I said, "I thought you always told me there was no will" - he said there was a will - that Whyman had made a will - he asked me where Whyman was; I told him I had put him in possession, under a distress for rent, at Tunely - he was occasionally employed by me; he said he should go down and see him; (it is about twelve miles off) he came back next day, and told me he had been down and seen Whyman; I know Whyman's hand-writing; I have often seen him write (looking at the will) - I believe this to be Whyman's hand-writing; it is not the hand he usually writes; but it is his hand-writing, I am sure.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do I understand that you knew the deceased and the prisoner both? A. I knew them both very well; he was on particularly intimate terms with the prisoner, and came down every year to pass some time at his cottage; they lived and boarded together on the most intimate terms - they frequently came to my house, which is a public-house, and it was always a matter of indifference who paid; I am a publican as well as an auctioneer - they frequently talked of the services they had been in together abroad; and I heard they were in the same corps.

Q. You communicated something he had said both in Suffolk's presence and out of it; was it not that he should leave Suffolk all he had in the world? A. No; Brandrith, when he was down the year before, told me he should stop about a fortnight longer in the country; he lodged at my house - he came home that night, and said he should go home next day - I said, "Why you said you were not going home?" he said, "Yes; but I cannot bear to stay here to see that poor Jem in such misery for the money he has lost by Boddin - I have told him not to grieve; I will take care of him as long as I am alive, and if I die I will take care of him; I am going home now to arrange my affairs" - this was in 1827 - he did not say when he should return to Sutton Valence; I saw him when he returned the following year - he lodged at my house then, and repeated the same sort of conversation respecting his intention towards Suffolk; I have heard him say the same sort of things several times, and one night in particular - when he gave Suffolk's wife his watch, he said, "Sally, when you hear I am dead, come and take my watch, it was given me by Lord Barrington; I should like to wear it all my life, and after I am dead it is your's;" he said Suffolk and him, between them. had money enough to bring them to their graves' end comfortably - he could not bear to see Mrs. Suffolk dragging about the leasing-field, when there was no occasion for it.

Q. Did he not say Mrs. Suffolk would have his watch, and the rest of his property would go to Suffolk? A. I do not think he ever said the whole of his property - he always said he should take care of Suffolk, he should secure Suffolk; I do not think he ever said he would leave him the whole of his property - he said Jem would have his property, or he should take care of him; I know it was his intention that Suffolk should have his property - he told me and my wife so when he has been talking to us; he has said he should give Suffolk property, but I do not think he ever said the whole of his property - I will not say, I have not stated that he said all his property should go to him, nor will I say Brandrith did not say so; I think it was before the prisoner's first journey that he told me he was going to London to look for letters to find the sister's direction - and on his return, I think he told me he had not got access to the trunks at all; I do not speak from dates, I only recollect this as a general conversation - I merely conjecture that it might be three months after the decease that he paid me.

Q. He told you Whyman had made a will - did he not, in the same conversation, say Whyman said he had made the will? A. Yes; he said Whyman told him he had made a will; but I said, "If there are any secrets in it don't tell me;" he said, "There are no secrets on my part;"

I told him it had been said about the place that I had made the will - that I was out of it, and wished to keep out of it; I wanted to hear nothing about it; he said Whyman told him he had made the will for Brandrith, but I do not recollect any day being mentioned when it was made.

Q. Then Suffolk mentioned it as a matter Whyman had told him, not as knowing it himself? A. No; it was what Whyman had told him; I know Whyman very well - I believe he was always about that part of the country, not exactly at Sutton, but in the neighbourhood; he formerly kept a school; I do not know what has become of him now, I do not think he can be found - I have looked after him; I saw him on Sunday, the 15th of June, for the last time; I think Suffolk was in custody then, but am not sure; I told the constable if they wanted Whyman I knew where to find him; they said they did not want him; on the very day Suffolk was sent from Maidstone to London I met Mr. Makin, and said if he wanted Whyman I could find him; he said he did not want him that he knew of, there was nothing against him; the constable, I know, told me there was nothing against him.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Was the 15th of June the last time you saw Whyman? A. It was; I gave the prisoner a paper to the purport of the conversation I have stated relative to the disposal of the property; I was paid nothing for my trouble in drawing this paper - I received 3l. from him besides the funeral bill; I had been laying out of my money a long time; I charged him the same as was paid - I had not lent him the 3l. - it was for laying out of money, and I had lent him money; he made me a present of the 3l. as a compliment for that; it was a long time after I gave him the paper.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You charged for the funeral exactly what the undertaker charged? A. I did; if it had been any body else I should have had a profit, but as I knew him I expected he would give me something without it; the 3l. had nothing to do with the paper.

COURT. Q. You stated, that in June he inquired where Whyman was, and you told him at Tunely? A. Yes; and he went there - I saw Whyman after that; I went to see him, most likely on the 7th day, as the goods would be condemned that day; I saw him in possession of the goods I had left him with - I have known the prisoner five years, he bore the character of an honest respectable man.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer of the Marshalsea. I have known the prisoner since November last, when I saw him at the Horse Shoe and Magpie, in Fetter-lane - the landlord informed me, in his presence, that the prisoner had applied to him to recommend him to somebody to advise him how to act respecting a debt from a man named Brandrith, who had died in his house - he stated that the person had died in his house and left no will; that he owed him 79l., I think - I told him he had better apply to an attorney; he told me there was property in a box at the Grosvenor Arms, Chelsea, but he did not know what it was; in a short time Mr. Beetham, an attorney, who was in the habit of calling at the house, came in - I introduced him to him, and said he was as fit a person as I knew to attend to his business; he stated to Beetham, that Brandrith had died in his house in his debt, that he had left no will that he could find, and there was a trunk containing some property, of which he had the key, at the Grosvenor Arms , Pimlico; Beetham said it was necessary a proctor should be engaged, and he went to Mr. Clarkson, at Doctors' Commons - either I or Beetham recommended him to apply to the landlord of the Grosvenor Arms to let him see the contents of the box to ascertain whether there was a will; he said if he obtained the amount of his debt he would pay both me and Beetham liberally - I believe that is all that passed then; I saw him next day - he told me the landlord of the public-house would not allow him to open the box; I had gone the day before with Beetham to the proctor, the prisoner was not there - I saw him several times every day for a fortnight nearly at the same public-house; the next circumstance I recollect, was going with Beetham and the prisoner down to Pimlico to examined the box, which was on the 8th of December, about a fortnight after I first saw him; Beetham applied to the landlord to let him see the box, and Beetham produced a will in the prisoner's presence - this is the will he produced (looking at it) - the landlord then delivered up the box to be examined; there were clothes, books, and some Bank Stock warrants found, but no will there; there was a quantity of letters and papers, but none of any importance - an inventory was taken of the different articles; I got a tape tied over the box, sealed it, and left it in possession of the landlord, taking away the inventory; a very short time afterwards I saw the prisoner, when he and his brother made an application to Beetham to give up the will; I heard the application made - he refused to give it up till his bill was paid; Beetham afterwards instructed me to go with him and the prisoner and his brother to fetch the trunk from Pimlico; we all three went with a man to carry it - the landlord delivered it to me and the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. At the public-house, he mentioned a box at Pimlico to be searched; did he say he thought a will would be found somewhere? A. Yes, he presumed it would be found in that box; he spoke as if he expected there was a will in existence, though it had not been found - no secret was made about it; it was known to us and to twenty other people - a man named Whyman was there on some occasions; the first time I saw him was after the will was produced; I saw him the day before or the day after the will was produced to the landlord - I did not go with Whyman to Doctors' Commons; I only went the first time with Beetham - I made an affidavit before the Lord Mayor; I saw Whyman once, twice, or three times.

Q. Was it not stated by Whyman that the will had been made by him, and found by him? A. Not in my presence - I heard nothing about the will, only that it was produced; it was stated either by the prisoner or his brother that it was found in the ticken of a portmanteau or a trunk - I did not know at any time that the will had been written by Whyman; he was called the schoolmaster.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. You say you saw the prisoner nearly every day, do you know whether he went out of town during that time? A. I think he went out of town twice during the time - he went out of town and was absent at least a fortnight; I think there had been a Iapse of a fortnight from his first application to Clarkson and his demanding the box, and during that time I did not see him; I did not see the will before it was produced to the land

lord - I think the prisoner had been in town about two days before it was produced to the landlord.

JURY. Q. Can you tell whether the prisoner or his brother told the landlord where the will was found? A. It is impossible for me to say who said it.

Q. Was the expression that the will was found, or that he had found it? A. It was said in general conversation that it was found in the ticken of a trunk or portmanteau.

CHARLES BEETHAM . I am an attorney. I was passing the Horse Shoe and Magpie, Fetter-lane, the latter end of last year; I think it was the beginning of November, and was introduced to the prisoner by Lee; they were standing in the street as I passed up - Lee said, "Mr. Beetham, these gentlemen want you to do some business for them;" I think there were two others; I am sure there was one -I was addressed by, I presume, the prisoner's brother; the prisoner was present; I believe he is rather deaf - the brother said a man named Brandrith had died in their village, and he believed he had made a will, but that will they had not in their possession; they suspected it might be in possession of a person at a public-house at the west end of the town, somewhere by Chelsea, where the deceased had a box; they said they had applied to search this box, but the landlord had refused them; they had previously said the deceased was indebted to the prisoner 60l., I think - he shewed me a letter which had been written to the deceased's sister, and returned "Not found;" I advised him to obtain letters of administration, as a creditor; that was agreed to - I immediately went down to my proctor, a Mr. Clarkson, and gave him instructions; I did not see the parties again for some time; they returned into the country, I believe; however, in about three weeks, (I think) the prisoner, with his brother and a third person, who I understood to be Whyman, came to my house, which was then in Grenville-street, Brunswick-square; they then produced to me a document, purporting to be a will; I think this (looking at the instrument) to be the same.

Q. Had you before that been shewn a paper signed Rouse? A. I do not know the name; I gave the paper into the hands of Robert Suffolk , who had brought it to me; he was in company with the prisoner and Whyman - they were all together when I received it and when I returned it; I think it was a month before I returned it.

Q. A month intervened, during which time the will was in your possession? A. Yes; I did not take any part in proving the will; I gave it to him to take down to Mr. Clarkson - it had not been out of my possession during the month; I am sure I gave it to Robert Suffolk , and that I received it from him, the prisoner and Whyman being present on both occasions.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When the will was brought to you, was it stated by Whyman that he had made the will? A. It was, and that in the prisoner's presence; Michael Whyman 's name was to it as an attesting witness - he stated that he made the will for Brandrith.

Q. Did Whyman or the brother take the most active part in these interviews? A. The brother took the whole - when they brought the will the prisoner's brother stated that it had been found in the lining of a portmanteau; I negociated the matter entirely with the brother; he was living in London, and the prisoner in the country.

WILLIAM GEERING CLARKSON . I am a proctor of Doctor's Commons. I have seen the prisoner; he produced this will to me (looking at it); he was sworn on the 12th of January; I had seen him about a month before on the subject of the will - Beetham came in the first instance, and instructed me to enter a caveat - I afterwards understood Beetham had the will, and refused to give it up for about a month; the will was produced to me by the prisoner; I am not aware whether I or my clerk was present when he was sworn - the jurat is in my hand-writing; it was written on the 12th of January; the signature to it is Dr. Coote's - my office is in Doctors' Commons; probate was granted on it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you recollect distinctly from whom you received the will, whether from the brother or Whyman? A. I believe the brother was present; but whether I received it from the prisoner or his brother I cannot tell; I believe the prisoner was present; I should say so from the jurat - the will was not in my hands till the jurat was written; Beetham was not present when I received it - I believe the brother and Whyman were there.

Q. Have you a clear memory, or are you sure the prisoner was present when you received it? A. I should have some difficulty in swearing that positively; I am sure I wrote the jurat, but who swore to it I do not know; I am not certain whether I went to Dr. Cootes, or my clerk- who took the oath I do not know; I do not recollect that I got him sworn.

Q. Whether the brother or any body else swore it you do not know? A. No, I feel some difficulty in swearing the prisoner was there; I am not positive.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Had you seen the prisoner before on business? A. He had been to my office before with a person, and stated the business in my absence; I cannot swear the prisoner is the person who appeared before Dr. Coote, and swore this; the impression on my mind is that the prisoner is the person; I should say so from the name in the jurat - I believe he was there when it was brought, if his name is James Suffolk .

Q. Look at him, and tell the Jury whether he was there or not when this will was produced - was he not one of the three persons present? A. I say I feel great difficulty in swearing to him being the executor to the will.

COURT. Q. The question is not whether he was the man before Dr. Coote, as you do not know whether you were present yourself; it is when that will was put into your hands (you say three people brought it to you;) was the prisoner present or not at the time the will was produced to you? A. I never had any previous acquaintance with him, when he came to prove the will; I feel great difficulty in swearing positively to his person - I feel a difficulty in swearing whether he was one of the persons present at my office on that particular business.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Had you never seen him before in your office? A. I believe once - I had seen Mr. Suffolk in my office, I believe, before Christmas.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell, me whether he is not the man? A. I have said I have a great difficulty in swearing to him, as I had no previous acquaintance with him, but looking at the jurat -

Q. Do not look at the paper, but look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you saw him before that jurat was sworn? A. I cannot swear positively to him - I feel a great difficulty in swearing to the man.

COURT. Q. Looking at him, do you believe him to be the man who was present when the will was produced? -A. I cannot swear positively to him; I feel a difficulty - I wish to swear positively if I could, but from the tenor of the jurat I suppose so.

Q. Do you believe him to be the man? A. I have no recollection of him; I have not sufficient recollection to enable me to form a belief; I believe I saw somebody on the subject of the will, about the middle of December - I have no doubt of it; the prisoner might have been one of the persons I saw then - I believe he might have been; I believe he was among them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you believe it from the recollection of his person, or from other circumstances? A. Not from a recollection of his person, but from the tenor of the jurat and other circumstances - I have not sufficient recollection of his person to enable me to form a belief of him.

JURY. Q. Where did you acquire the information relative to the amount of the personal property? A. From one of the party in attendance; I do not recollect whether the prisoner was present at the time the information was given.

COURT. Q. Is the signature to the jurat yours? A. Yes - It is not usual to state in the attestation of a will, who the actuary is; the memorandum is in my hand-writing - the signature at the bottom is a private mark of the registry.

JOHN BEAMS . I am a clerk in the Prerogative-office of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and produce the will from there; the signature of Dr. Coote is in his hand-writing, I believe.

FRANCIS TROWEL , JUN. I live at Sutton Valence. -My father died on the 3rd of November, 1828 - he lived at Sutton Valence in August, 1828.

HENRY COLLISON . I am a bricklayer, and live at Sutton Valence. I know a man named Whyman, who was a schoolmaster; he came to me some time between October and Christmas, towards the winter: I am sure it was as late as October - I lent him the copy of a will; this is it -(looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you know from what precedent this paper was written? A. I wrote it myself, from another will of Ann Collison's, who left me some money.

Q. Do not you know that a man wishing to make a will goes to some form by which to do it? A. I cannot say what it was taken from; I never saw "The attorney's pocket-book."

COURT. Q. You say it was between October and Christmas, towards winter - can you give us the time nearer? A. I cannot - I never saw the will produced before Saturday.

WILLIAM PIZEY . I am clerk to a stock-broker. I know the prisoner - he applied to me in December, and said he had got some stock to sell out under a will of a person named Brandrith; I sold the stock for him, and paid him the produce of it; I did other business for him before that - I first bought in some Long Annuties, in January.

Q. Well, but that was after December? A. Yes; he applied to me in December, but I sold the property on the 10th of February; it was 266l. 12s. 5d. New 4 per Cents., 115l. 16s. 9d. 3 1/2 per Cents.; the produce of the two sums was 367l. odd - I have seen him on different occasions at the Bank, no where else; he showed me a will - Michael Whyman was with him at the time; I believe the will produced to be the one he presented to me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you make any mark on it, so as to know it again? A. No - he showed it to me about the middle of January; I told him he must take it to a proctor.

Q. Was it about the 15th of 16th of January? A. I dare say it might; I will not swear it was not later, nor do I swear this is the paper; I think it was about the middle of the month - the probate lay in the will-office three weeks before it was acted upon; I know that because I took it away from the will office myself - the document shown to me was paper, not parchment.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. When are the 4 per cent. dividends due? A. On the 5th of January; I saw the prisoner about the stock the latter end of January; I went to the office myself to take the probate there - the prisoner gave it me to carry there.

Q. You have stated this will was shown to you - under what circumstances was it produced? A. Suffolk, the prisoner, told me he had left the will with an attorney named Beetham; this was some time in December - I had told him nothing could be done without the will, and upon that it was produced to me at the Bank; I told him he must take it to a proctor; I made no mark on it, but the will produced appears to be the same - I read it over, and recollect the names of the witnesses; I believe it is the paper he produced to me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You made no mark on it? A. No Whyman and another man, who I believe is the prisoner's brother, were with him - which of them produced it to me I cannot say; they were all present.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. The prisoner gave you the direction about the stock, and you paid him the money? A. Yes; I am sure the prisoner gave me the direction about the stock.

COURT. Q. When did the prisoner first make application to you? A. In December; he asked for Mr. Brazier at first, and on inquiry I found Brazier was dead; there were two persons with him; the prisoner was the one who asked for Brazier - I told him he was dead; the prisoner then asked me if I would do some business for him, and said it was to sell some stock under a will - I found some difficulty in transferring the stock, as the names were differently spelt; I saw the prisoner several times before I could make the transfer; he was waiting in expectation of it every day - he mentioned in December about the will being at Beetham's; he said it was lodged there, and he found some difficulty in getting it away - I told him I must have it, or nothing could be done, and it was brought to me in January, by the prisoner; the other two were with him then - I cannot tell which of them produced it; this was at the Bank; I told him that very day that he must go to a proctor - I got the probate three or four days after

that; the prisoner brought it to me - his brother was with him then, but not Whyman; I lodged it in the will office, and after that the transfers were made.

CATHERINE MAKIN . I am sister to the deceased, Thomas Brandrith ; I am his own sister - he has another sister married; her name is Elizabeth Harrison ; he has no relation so near as us.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you know whether he was born before your father and mother were married? A. No he was not, it was after; I am older than him - I was born after they were married, I am certain.

COURT. Q. What is your husband's name? A. James; my sister's husband's name is James Harrison.

The will was here read; also the copy produced by Collison, which was a duplicate of the one charged to be forged, both in spelling and words, differing only in the description of the property and names, and having the words "lands, tenements, and hereditaments."

GEORGE THOMAS RUTHVEN . I am an officer of Bow-street. I took the prisoner into custody on Sunday, the 21st of June, at Battle-bridge, at his brother's house; every thing seemed to be packed up for the purpose of going away - I found this book and paper in the pocket of a coat in a trunk; the prisoner claimed it as his, and told me to be particularly careful of it, and not part with it; I found a card and paper in his hat, which he claimed - (read).

I, J.Rouse, of Sutton Valenoe, in the County of Kent, innkeeper, do certify, that Mr. Suffolk and the late Mr. Brandrith was frequently in the habit of using my house, and I have often heard Mr. Brandrith tell Mrs. Suffolk, that if she should survive him, it was his wish that she should have his watch, and that his property of every nature and kind, he wished that Mr. Suffolk should have at his decese, and Mr. Brandrith have told me repeatedly that Mr. Suffolk, at his death, would have something wery hansom.

Witness, my hand, this 3rd of November, 1828, J.B. ROUSE.

The card contained Mr. Beetham's address, and on the paper," John Matheson , attorney at law, Manchester."

MRS. MAKIN re-examined. I live at Penlington, two miles beyond Manchester; my sister lives at Salford, near Manchester - Chester is about forty miles from Manchester; I was born at Chester, and lived there till I was about sixteen years old - my sister was born there, and left when about fourteen.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I was acquainted with Mr. Brandrith many years, having served together in the army; we were on the most friendly terms - he repeatedly told me and other persons that he intended to leave me all his property; when his death took place, knowing he had property, and not knowing whether he had made a will, I immediately wrote to his sister, hoping she might be able to give me some clue where the will might be found - I accidentally mentioned the circumstance to Whyman, among others, and he informed me he had made a will for him shortly before he died; Whyman afterwards produced the will to me, and I had every reason to believe it was the one Brandrith had made, and being ignorant of business, I left it to my brother and Whyman, to do what was necessary.

JURY to COLLISON. Q. Did you ever lend that copy to any body else? A. I never lent it before or since.

THOMAS FERRIS . I was quarter-master in the prisoner's regiment; I came here by request of the officers of the Grenadier Guards, which the prisoner was discharged from in 1814 - I think he was in the regiment about twenty years; he was at Walcheren and fell ill with the fever - Brandrith was in the same regiment and discharged, being old; while I knew the prisoner in the Guards he bore an unblemished character, and was respected as much as any non-commissioned officer - I knew him as an honest man, and he was considered a very excellent soldier.

JURY. Q. Was he in the habit of reading and writing in the Guards? A. Yes; he could write and read himself - he had returns to make.

GUILTY (of uttering only). DEATH . Aged 52.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his excellent character, and believing he might have been ill-advised .

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

Reference Number: t18290910-111

1642. WILLIAM BLAKE was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying William Spring .

MARY WESTON . I live in Kepple-street, Chelsea-common, and am a dress-maker - William Spring was in my service; he was about eleven years old. On the 24th of August, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, I employed him to draw a truck with a small bed on it, from the Kent-road to Chelsea; I accompanied him - he was standing resting in the carriage road with his truck; I was on the pavement near him, and saw a cart coming at a very quick pace - before I had time to warn him, the cart struck against the truck; it had been a rainy night, but was clear then - I saw the cart about four yards from me; the driver must have seen him if he had used proper caution, I certainly think - I saw the cart strike the truck; the boy called out twice before it struck, but the cart did not slacken its pace till it struck the truck - the shaft must have struck it and knocked the boy down, and the wheel went over his body; the blow overset the truck, and threw the contents out - the boy screamed violently, and I went to him; the cart was stopped - there were three men in it; the driver got out, and gave himself up as soon as it was stopped - he was not sober, but quite in liquor; he was driving very quickly - the boy was taken to an apothecary's, and then to Westminster-hospital; he was very near the curb-stone when it happened.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was he sitting on the truck? A. No, he was standing within the handle in his proper place - I saw the shaft of the cart strike the truck; I think the wheel struck the handle and broke it - there was some kind of metal in the cart, more than 3 cwt. it was said; a crowd got round the cart, and stopped it - I cannot say whether the man pulled the horse up himself; I rather think he did stop- I called several times to know who was the driver, and he gave himself up - I am sure he did not himself take the boy in his arms.

COURT. Q. Was he trotting or what? A. It was a kind of very quick trot; it was a dark night, but there was sufficient light from the shops to show the truck - the gas was not lighted.

ANN JONES . I live in Chester-street, Grosvenor-place. I was in Arabella-row, Pimlico , and saw the boy resting on the handle of the truck, and the cart coming at a very

quick pace - I did not hear any body call out; I think the cart struck the truck, and threw it down - the boy was thrown down, and the wheel went over him; the cart was stopped, and the prisoner, who was the driver, got out - he was intoxicated; a tall thin man picked the boy up - it was not the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner assist in carrying him to the doctor's? A. No; he came in a few minutes after he was carried in, and appeared to wish to speak to the boy - I do not think he appeared very anxious about it; it was rather a dark night, but not very- there were too many people for me to see whether the cart stopped itself, or was stopped; he gave himself up when the driver was asked for; I was too much frightened to notice the other two men - the man, who took the boy up, is not here; I was crossing when it happened, and was nearer to the cart than the truck - I was at the side of the cart, but I saw the truck long before I ran; I saw a piece of the flap of the truck fly off into the road.

COURT. Q. At what pace was he going? A. Very quick; there was light enough for a person, who was ordinary cautious, to see the truck.

WILLIAM SCALES . I am a butcher. I was standing at my master's door, in Arabella-row, seven or eight doors from where this accident happened, looking towards the spot, and saw the horse going at a tidyish trot, of about six miles an hour - I do not think it was going too fast; the boy was resting about three feet from the curb- I heard him, or the lady, halloo out, and ran up before it happened; I saw the lad knocked down - I think it was the horse came against the truck, and broke the handle; it overturned and broke - all the things were thrown out; I saw the off-wheel go over the boy's loins - I could scarcely see the truck at the distance I was first at; three lamps, a little further off, were not lighted - there were no shops that gave any light of any consequence; if the driver had been ordinary cautious he might have avoided the truck if it was not for the hill, but it is a steepish hill, going down - the road is pretty broad; there were no other carriages - the lad was on the left side, and the driver coming on the same side, which was the near side; he appeared to me a little intoxicated - I should not know him again.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the truck three feet from the curb? A. When I got there the lad seemed to be trying to save the truck, and it must have been three feet from the curb - that part is shockingly lighted; the gas was not lit at all - it was a darkish night, and had been a wet evening; I know it is impossible to draw up in a moment, for I have a troublesome horse to deal with- it is a very awkward place to pull up at immediately; I saw the man throw the reins on the horse's head and get out - he followed the lad to the doctor's; he did not assist to carry him there - the cart would go quicker with a heavy load, at the brow of a hill, than in any other part; he had just got to the foot of the hill where he would have the least power over his horse - the cart was on its wrong side; I think two carriages might pass on the road; but the cart-horse turned out when it happened, and the truck was sent more into the middle of the road - there was room for another carriage to pass when it happened.

WILLIAM SHEEN . I was in the cart with the prisoner when this happened; it was loaded with about 3 cwt. of cast-iron; another of my shopmates was in the cart, and a little boy belonging to the prisoner - the road is six or seven yards wide, as near as I can judge - there is room for two carriages to pass easily - I did not see the truck till the cart struck it; it was very dark; there was no lamps lighted at all - there were candles in the shop windows - the cart stopped directly it happened, as the boy screamed; I never heard any hallooing out till he was knocked down - the prisoner did not appear to me unable to take care of the cart - he had been drinking, and I dare say was not sober; I think he was in liquor, but able to conduct himself - he was on the right-hand side of the road, going towards Pimlico; the truck was on his right-hand side; that is, on the off-side - I saw nothing to prevent his going on the near side.

Cross-examined. Q. You are in the service of Mr. Cubit, the builder? A. Yes; the prisoner came to out place from Mr. Gabriel's, and one of my shopmates said he would give me a lift home in the cart - I was sitting on the same seat as him, on the near side; he was in the middle - I heard nobody cry out for us to get out of the way - he stopped, and got out directly the boy screamed; he was going at a smart trot, not a gallop - he was driving a lightish cart.

RUTHERFORD ALLCOCK . I am a surgeon of the Westminster-hospital. The deceased was brought there, and another medical gentleman saw him; I did not see him till early next morning - he was very drowsy, and unwilling to answer questions; he complained of a pain across his stomach - he died next evening; I opened him - his liver was ruptured, and no doubt he bled to death; I have no doubt the injury caused his death.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge doing the act, and am very sorry for it; I did not see the boy till after it was done - I got out directly, took him up, and asked him if he could walk.

GUILTY. Aged 34.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to mercy .

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-112

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1643. RICHARD CHICK , MARY (HIS WIFE ) CHARLES WILLIAM ELLIOTT , and MARY (HIS WIFE ) were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Wilson , on the 13th of July , at St. Botolph Without, Bishopsgate, and stealing therein 205 yards of woollen cloth, value 144l.; 400 yards of kerseymere, value 128l.; 200 yards of serge, value 33l.; 50 yards of silk, value 15l.; 2 yards of stain, value 10s.; 180 yards of ribbon, value 1l. 10s.; 150 yard of ferrett, value 1l. 5s.; 100 yards of galloon, value 8s., and 5lbs. of silk-twist, value 8l., his property .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MR. HENRY WILSON. I am a woollen-draper , and live at No. 80, Sun-street, in the parish of St. Botolph Without, Bishopsgate . On Tuesday morning, the 14th of July, at half-past six o'clock, I observed a hole had been cut through the party-wall, dividing my house from the next, which was empty; woollen and silk goods, to the amount of between 300l. and 400l. were missing - on the following

Friday I saw about 30l. worth of that property at Worship-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you any other Christian name? A. No, nor any partner - I saw the property safe the night before.

COURT. Q. Did you sleep at home that night? A. Yes - the opening in the wall was made into the shop; I sleep on the second-floor - I heard no alarm in the night.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you give Mrs. Dobson, a witness, 5l.? A. I gave Mrs. Dobson something, for information.

COURT. Q. Was that before the information, or as a reward for it? A. As a reward for information, which she had before given me - I gave her 10l.: she was examined before the Magistrate, and was held to bail - two persons, named Wear and Vaughan, were held to bail.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a constable of St. Botolph. I went to the prosecutor's premises on Tuesday, the 14th of July, at a quarter past seven o'clock in the morning - the adjoining house was empty; I examined and found an opening in the wall, so that a boy or man could get through - the partition had been bored by a centre-bit, in the first instance; there were about three holes made in the wooden part of the partition, and then I think it must have been cut by a knife - I think I could get through the hole myself; the wall was first cut away, and then this wooden partition bored and cut with a knife - I found there a small jemmy, a gimblet, a chisel, centre-bit, and stock; knife, a dark lantern, an old key, and an apron - they a were on a shelf in the empty house, over the hole, which was quite large enought to get the property through.

Cross-examined. Q. I take it for granted you made diligent inquiries in the neighbourhood to discover the thieves? A. I made no inquiries - I did not find a man named Vaughan in the empty house; I only know he was at Worship-street - I believe he was charged with stealing the fixtures of the empty house, but I do not think I heard the charge; I was in another room - I heard him examined on suspicion of being a swindler; I did not examine to see if the fixtures of the empty house had been taken away - I know Vaughan and Wear had taken that empty house before, but only from information- I do not know of their being charged with this robbery; I was not in the office - I was in the room, but do not know what the charge was; I was only called to give evidence of what I found, and know nothing of others being charged with the robbery.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am a watchman of St. Botolph. Mr. Wilson's premises are on my beat; I was on duty early on the morning of the 14th of July - I know the prisoner Chick, and saw him that morning, between half-past four and five o'clock, standing with his back towards Mr. Wilson's premises, and near it there is a gateway within one house, and he was near the gateway, as near as I can say fifty paces distance; I suppose he was within three or four yards of Wilson's premises; I did not see him do any thing, he was standing still when I first saw him, and at other times walking he walked towards me - when I saw him start for walking: he passed quite close to me - we passed each other; the gas was not alight, it was quite daylight, a bright morning between half-past four and five o'clock; I have not the least doubt he is the man I saw.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you known him? A. I did not know him before the 14th of July - I never saw him before to my knowledge; I do not know Vaughan; I do my duty as well as I can - I looked after the empty house that night the same as the rest of the premises; I saw it was fast - I have no box - I have a seat within fifty paces of Mr. Wilson's; I go out of the street to the back and front of the premises on that side, and that is all I have to do; I do not know a person named Wear, and do not know of the empty house being taken - I did not see any body go in there that morning, nor ever said I did.

Q. Am I to understand you swear deliberately that you never said before the Justice the person you saw with his back to the premises was Vaughan? A. I do not understand you; I never said I saw Vaughan, or that I believed it to be Vaughan, or that I would not swear it was Chick; he was in my sight five minutes from my first seeing him till he passed me - he went towards Crown-street and I towards Mr. Wilson's; he was standing still when I first saw him - there were other people passing and re-passing that morning, but not at that time to my knowledge; I do not recollect seeing any body from half-past four o'clock till five; I saw Chick, he was the only person on that side of the way - I had seen other persons pass in the night; I came on at three o'clock, and saw several people going to market.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you observe Chick particularly? A. Yes; because he observed me - he looked me full in the face as he passed, and of course I looked him full in the face; I have not the least doubt of him - I knew him as soon as I went into the office.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know who the empty house belonged to? A. No; Mr. Collins, the butcher, had the letting of it - I do not know that it had been let.

MARY HOWELL . I am single. On the 14th of July I lived with Mr. Grimsell, at No. 2, Sun-street; I got up about a quarter-past five o'clock that morning - Mr. Wilson's house is nearly opposite ours; I was opening the parlour shutters, and observed a man passing on Mr. Wilson's side of the way - the street is about thirty feet wide; I observed the person distinctly, and believe Chick to be the man - when I first opened the shutters he was passing Mr. Wilson's house; as he passed the next house to Mr. Wilson's some other man came out of the empty house; I have a recollection of that man's person, it was not the prisoner Elliott - Chick passed the empty house, and the other man followed him directly - they went towards Bishopsgate-street, one following close to the other; they did not appear to be talking; I saw them go not quite to the end of Sun-street towards Bishopsgate; I then lost sight of them - I afterwards saw the same persons again coming down in the same direction towards Wilson's house; I am quite sure they were the same two persons - I saw them go into the empty house, and while they were in there a cart drew up to the door of the empty house - I saw four large bundles put into the cart by the same two men, and they drove away directly; there was a man in the cart, he did not get out - the cart went towards Bishopsgate-street; I have no recollection of the driver's person.

Cross-examined. Q. It has been said you have sworn to Chick? A. I have not sworn to him, I cannot, but I believe him to be the man as far as I know; I had never

seen him before to my knowledge; I have seen Vaughan and Wear at Worship-street in custody - I saw one of them in Mr. Wilson's shop; I do not know where I saw the other first; I think not more than five minutes elapsed from the time I saw the man I suppose to be Chick, till the two men returned to the cart; the watchman was off his beat at the time - it was a fine bright morning; I had seen Vaughan and Wear bargaining for the house one evening, it was too dark to discern much of them; they were not charged with the felony in my presence - it was for removing the fixtures of the empty house that I saw them in custody; they were not removed till after the 14th, for they moved into the house after the robbery; I saw them bargaining for the house on the Friday before the robbery - they did not move in till after it.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Do I understand you distinctly to say Elliott was not the other man who came out of the empty house? A. He was not.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer of Worship-street. In consequence of information I went to a house. No. 28, Vincent-street, Bethnal Green, on the 17th of July, with Garton and Attfield, between twelve and one o'clock in the day; I went into the parlour by breaking the door open, and found in that parlour Chick and his wife and a woman named Dobson - I knew Chick before, and am certain of him; on a table in the room I found two pieces of silk serge, which I produce - also on the left side of the room six pieces of different coloured silk, mostly for waistcoats; some were on the floor, and some on a yard measure - Garton found some pieces of ribbon and ferret - we made a further search; Attfield, in my presence, found in a cupboard two skeleton keys, and in the table drawer a quantity of small files, a centre-bit and screw-driver - he has them in his possession; the outer door was open - we did not ask leave to go in, but broke in, that we might enter without giving notice; Attfield asked Chick how he came by this property - he said he should tell somebody else about that, or words to that effect; we took them all in custody - Dobson was afterwards discharged; between six and seven o'clock the same evening we went to No. 26, Vincent-street, and found the lower room open - nobody was in it at the time; it is next door but one to Chick's - I know it was Elliott's house, for I saw Mrs. Elliott afterwards, and asked if that was her room, the parlour; she said it was - they were not there when I went in; Attfield found some silk there in a bonnet-box, and Vann, who was with us, found some cloth.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Chick was asked how he came by the silk, and said he should tell somebody else? A. Yes; I have a full recollection of what passed - that is all the conversation I took notice of; I had known Dobson for three or four years, and often saw her before - I cannot swear how she gets her living.

Q. When Attfield asked Chick how he came by the silk, did he not point out Dobson as the woman who had brought it in, and that within ten minutes of that time? A. No, he said nothing of the sort in my hearing, I swear; he could not have said it without my hearing it. I never paid Mrs. Dobson any money in my life.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You went to Elliott's six hours after Chick's, from whose house you had taken property? A. Yes, in bundles; the street was full of people when we brought the property away; it was well known in the neighbourhood that the officers had taken property from a house two doors from Elliott's- no opposition was made to our searching Elliott's, for nobody was in the room; we searched thoroughly - there were three of us; I have heard Mrs. Elliott is a dressmaker - the silk was in different pieces, as if for dresses, and in the progress of making up - it was cut, and part of a body made; the first examination had been that day - it was over when we went to Elliott's; we had not got information about Elliott till after the examination - I believe Attfield left word for Mrs. Elliott to attend the office on the Saturday; there was no examination on Saturday - I saw Mrs. Elliott at the office on Saturday, but did not see her husband; whether a message was left for him to come I cannot say; Mrs. Elliott was not detained - the next examination was on the Wednesday following; Mrs. Elliott was told to attend, and she did so - I did not see her husband there till I saw him at the bar of the office; that was at the second examination.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer of Worship-street. On Friday, the 17th of July, in consequence of information, I went with Brown to No. 28, Vincent-street; Garton came immediately after - we burst open the door, and found Chick, his wife, and Dobson in the room; I found a mallet, a hummer, a pair of pincers, seven or eight files, a latch, two skeleton keys for an inner door(Mr. Wilson gave me the centre-bit); some silk and ribbon were found by Brown - we went to Elliott's between four and five o'clock that afternoon, and in a sort of hat or bonnet box in the back part of the parlour I found about sufficient silk to make two gowns, and Vann found some cloth at the bottom of the same box.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where did you find the silk and ribbon at Chick's? A. About the room, in different parts; some on the table and some on a measure - I knew Dobson; they are weavers by trade, but what else she does I do not exactly know; she was brought to the office, and held to bail; Vaughan and Wear were at the office, but I know very little of them; I only knew of their having taken the house from hearsay- they were charged on suspicion of being concerned in this robbery, and examined twice; they were charged with taking away the fixtures of the empty house, I understand - I cannot say whether they were in possession of the empty house on the night of the robbery; after I had done searching, I said to Chick, "How came you in possession of this property?" Dobson was in the room; his answer was, "I decline giving any account till I go before a Magistrate;" he looked round when I asked how he became possessed of it, and said, "The piping dues are on," meaning somebody had been giving information, and they would get paid handsomely for it.

Q. Did he say any thing about Mrs. Dobson? A. I am not certain that he did - I never heard him state that she had brought the silk in a bundle a few minutes before I came in - he asked me if there was any reward; none had been offered to my knowledge; I know nothing of 10l. having been given to Mrs. Dobson - she lives in Cock-lane, Bethnal-green; all that neighbourhood is a common resort for thieves.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you happen to know Mrs. Elliott is a dress-maker? A. From what I have heard; I found the silk partly made up; I saw Mrs. Elliott in a neighbouring house some time after we had taken the property out of their room, she was crying; I had left a message for her to come to the office next day, and she did; she was desired to attend another examination, and did; at the last examination but one she was attending, and was ordered into custody; her husband was there on the 22nd, which was the last examination but one; he came voluntarily - I was sent to the public-house; I went and called Elliott. he came to me directly, and I took him into custody; I asked Mrs. Elliott how she became possessed of the property on the very night when I saw her crying; she was alone; I asked her how she came by the silk found in her room; she said Mrs. Chick had given it to her to make up into dresses, and I believe she has told that story ever since - I do not remember her husband saying he had been dining with his club on the night of the robbery.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever heard of piping dues before? A. Never; it was a new term I thought - he said it a little time after I asked how he came by the property; Mrs. Dobson was let go by the Magistrate; she attended again, and gave bail to appear at the Session if any indictment should be preferred.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was it Dobson that explained the meaning of piping dues to you? A. No, nor Chick.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer of Worship-street. I went to Chick's house, and afterwards to Elliott's; I found this cloth; it is cut for two coats, two pairs of trousers, and two waistcoats; it is not cut out into any pattern, but it is a sufficient quantity for that - I found a quantity of mortar, or lime, on this piece of black cloth -Mrs. Elliott said she was a dress-maker, and had the silk given her to make up by Mrs. Chick; she was then asked who brought the cloth, and said, "Mrs. Chick;" she was asked at the office who brought the cloth, and said, "Mr. Chick;" she was then ordered to be detained.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You imagine them to be coat lengths by the quantity? A. That is all; they might make a woman's or child's pelisse - it is a very small part of the property; she said Mrs. Chick had brought the silk when I first saw her, and that she had brought the cloth also - about a week after she said Mr. Chick brought the cloth; I had seen Mr. Elliott at the office before he was in custody; I heard no account where he was on the night of the robbery.

MR. WILSON. I have seen the property at the office; the whole of it is mine, I have no doubt.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Have you noticed the property found at Elliott's? A. Yes; I should judge that to be worth about 5l. 10s.; the cloth was all in one piece when I lost it; it has been cut since; there was no lime or mortar on it when I left my house.

COURT. Q. Was this property loose on shelves or drawers? A. The cloth was on shelves, and the silk in drawers, which were not locked; if the cloth had been taken through the hole it would be likely to get marks of lime or mortar.

Richard Chick's Defence. When the officer entered my house I was handcuffed; they asked me who brought the property there - I said I should make no reply till I got before a Magistrate, but requested them to go and take Mrs. Dobson, and to go and search her premises - they took her, and searched her premises; Mrs. Dobson and one of the officers went into my back yard; a lodger, who is ill in the workhouse, overheard her say to the officers, "You have come too soon - you ought to have let me go out before you came in;" at the first examination the watchman stated that he could not swear to me positively - he had seen a tall thin man very much like me, but could not swear I was the man - at the final examination he came and swore I was the man. On Thursday night, about ten o'clock, on the 16th of July, I and my wife were going to Shoreditch to purchase something for supper - we passed Mrs. Dobson's house; she was at the door; she came after us, called us, and said to me, "You make yourself very strange;" I said, "Why, I know you are a neighbour, but I never had any conversation with you;" she said, "Well, the reason I called you was that I have some silk and cloth that I can let you have - I have enough to make your wife three dresses, and yourself a suit or two of clothes; they are my husband's - he buys and sells silk and cloth on commission, and he is a weaver;" I said I thanked her, and would consider of it, I would call in and let her know when I came back - I went into her house, and asked her to let me look at some patterns; she showed me several -I said I should like to have two yards and a half of drab kerseymere, two yards and a quarter of olive, and a yard and three quarters of black cloth, three quarters of a yard of brown cloth, and enough silk to make three gowns - I had eleven yards of fawn, twenty-two of brown, and a small piece of figured silk, and a piece of black to make my boy a waistcoat; she said if I would call in the morning I could have it - I went in the morning, and received from her the cloth produced and the silk found at Elliott's - they live next door but one to me; his wife was in the habit of making up dresses for mine for four years; I called, and told her Mrs. Dobson had sold me the silk, and she should have the making up of the dresses; in the morning I and my wife went and got the goods - I went out; my wife sent in for Mrs. Elliott, and gave her the silk to make up; I had asked Mrs. Elliott if she knew of a good tailor; she said she knew a gentleman who made clothes for a friend of hers - I said I would get her to show him to me, and when my wife said she had given her the silk, I took the cloth in, for Mrs. Elliott to show me where the tailor lived; there was a female in her house; I laid it down in the bundle handkerchief now produced, and said I would come in presently - I went out, and was in my house about half an hour, when in came Dobson; she said, "Mr. Chick, have you put out the silk and cloth to make;" I said I had - she said, "I know a person who can make it up good and cheap for you;" I said I had put it out - she said, "I have a quantity of silk and ribbons which I wish to measure - it is going to a silk-mercer and draper's on Ludgate-hill, who I have served for some years, and having converted my house into a brothel, I have so many people coming in and out, I don't like to measure it there;" I said by all means she could bring it to my house to measure, as she had been so kind as to let me pay for these goods at 2s. a week - she went away, came back in five minutes, and said she must bring some brown paper in - she had forgotten the yard, which she

fetched (that should be produced, for I believe it has her name on it;) after she went out for the paper, in about five minutes, a little girl, who I believe to be her daughter, came in with a book yard, and said her mother would be there directly; Mrs. Dobson was a long time, I thought it strange; in the course of three quarters of an hour she came into my house, confused, with the paper - I had taken hold of some of her silk after the yard was left, and measured some of it; I said I dare say it was right - she said she dare say it was; she was so confused she could neither look at me nor my wife, but I had no idea of the villany and trepan-game she was going on with; she asked if we had a bottle to get some gin - I said I had not: she asked for a pen and ink; I said I could borrow some - a pen and ink, and a bottle was brought, and in five or ten minutes in came the officers; she began to abuse them scandalously. calling them Mr. Bounce, and every thing she could think of; when they asked who brought the property, I said I should decline giving an answer till before the Magistrate - I requested them to take her and search her premises; she went out with the officers - whether they searched her premises I cannot say; I and my wife were taken before the Magistrate - the officers stated they brought me and my wife on suspicion of a robbery recently committed in the City; and he said he found part of the property on as - the Magistrate said he should remand us; I said, "Your Worship, what is the reason Mrs. Dobson is not brought forward, she is the woman who brought the property to my place;" I think it was Garton said she was in custody - they went out and brought her in; she said, "What do you want with me?" I said, "You base hussey, you have brought goods to my house, knowing them to have been stolen;" a little whispering went on between the officer and Magistrate, and Mrs. Dobson was let go - at the final examination she was bailed to answer any indictment, but she is not produced here; as to the watchman, every man, on the examination, was ordered to put their hats on - I being placed individually at the bar, and pointed out to him; if I had been with other men I should not have been pointed out - he was asked if he had seen the man since; he said No; he was shewn me, and said he believed me to be the man, but would not swear it; but at the last examination said he had no doubt I was the man - I have not the least doubt the officer persuaded him to say I was the man; Vaughan and Wear were produced at the examination, and I believe the servant swore to Vaughan being the man. - My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, You now behold before you an unfortunate individual, brought to the tribunal of justice for an offence of which he is innocent: I now avow myself innocent, but it is for you to decide and act impartially; this trial is a base attempt on my life. and supported by that guilty individual, Mrs. Dobson: I hope you will consider the awful situation I stand in, should you find me guilty of this offence, of which I am as innocent as a baby unborn: I have a wife and large family which I support by honest industry; I leave myself to your merciful consideration, and should your verdict prove against me, it will cause distress to a large family, and myself an ignominious death. I say and avow again, that the lamb that never leaped the grass, was never more innocent than I am.

Charles William Elliott 's Defence. On the 17th of July I was at work by half past five o'clock in the morning till ten at night; I came home, and finding my wife with a deal of property, I asked what was the cause of it; she said she had taken in work for Chick: I said, "My dear, I hope you have spoken the truth, and the truth will never be blamed;" she said she had, and she was to appear on Monday; she went up on Saturday; I went up to the office; she was let go till Wednesday; I went there on Wednesday, and took hail there for her appearance; I had not been there long before an officer came into the adjoining public-house, and called Elliott; I went to him, and was taken, and committed till the following Wednesday; I knew nothing of the property being brought, or any thing of the kind; on the Monday before the robbery I was dining with my brother tradesmen at a feast - I came home and went to bed.

Mary Elliott's Defence. On Monday we were at White Conduit-house till half-past one o'clock in the morning, when the person of the house let us in, and fastened the house, and before we were up she came into our room - we know nothing of the robbery; the silk was given me by Mrs. Chick, and the cloth afterwards by Mr. Chick; the officer came to my house between seven and eight o'clock - I was not at home; they saw me afterwards, and said I was to be at the office in the morning - I went; Brown came and told me I should not be wanted till Monday, when I went, and was detained; my husband was there all the afternoon - Vann said he dare say I should be bailed on Wednesday, and when he came on Wednesday with bail they detained him; he was not at home from five o'clock in the morning till eleven at night, when the property had been taken from my place.

MR. WILSON. The value of all the property found is about 36l.

RICHARD ANDREWS . I am a gold-beater, in the employ of Mr. Jacobs, of Fore-street. Elliott is a goldbeater , in the employ of Styles, of Rosamond-street; I have known him fifteen years - he bore an excellent character; we belong to a gold-beater's club, and dined together on Monday, the 13th of July, at White Conduit-house - Elliott was there, and his wife and my wife; his wife is a dress-maker - we were together at White Conduit-house at one o'clock in the morning, in the dinner room; dinner had come on the table about twenty minutes to three o'clock - Elliott was not sober at one; I should consider him the reverse.

COURT. Q. Where do you live? A. At No. 28, Field-street, Battle-bridge; I saw them both at one o'clock - I did not see him after that.

GEORGE PECK . I am a gold-beater. and live in Turnmill-street - I am in Mr. Jacob's employ. I have known Elliott upwards of twenty years - I belong to the club, and was at the dinner at White Conduit-house on Monday, the 13th of July, with my wife; Elliott and his wife were there - I staid till eleven or twelve o'clock; I saw Elliott about half an hour before I left - he was not then much the worse for liquor.

JOSEPH SADLER . I am a gold-beater, and live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury - I work for Mr. Dixon, of Blackfriars-road. I have known Elliott intimately for seven years - I am one of the club, and was at the dinner

at White Conduit-house on the 12th of July, and staid till three o'clock in the morning; my wife was not there - Mrs. Elliott was; I had something to drink with Elliott a little after twelve o'clock, and do not recollect seeing him after that - I went with a private party into another room; when I left him he was drunk.

COURT. Q. Were you a good judge whether he was drunk at that time? A. Yes, for I had been dancing for five or six hours.

RICHARD PHILLIPS . I am a gold-beater, and have known Elliott fourteen years - I am one of the club, and was at the dinner; I think I saw him there about half-past twelve - I think he was a little in liquor; I did not see his wife - I do not know her.

JOSEPH WHITE . I am a gold-beater. I was at the dinner, and staid till two o'clock - I saw Elliott there, to the best of my recollection, about twelve; I do not know his wife.

CHARLOTTE HERRING . I am married - my husband is a wheelwright; I lodge in the same house as Elliott. On the 13th of July he went out between eleven and twelve o'clock, and by his desire his wife was to go in the afternoon, and she did - I had the care of their family; I let them in in the morning at nearly three o'clock - they came home together; Mr. Elliott was very much intoxicated indeed, particularly so - we had a difficulty to get him to bed; he fell on his bed at last - I fastened the street door, and took the key up to my room to prevent his getting up to go out; I saw him in bed at eight o'clock in the morning, when I went up for a light - Mrs. Elliott is a dress-maker.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you a clock in the house? A. No - I know the hour by the watchman going by, and I asked him; I do not lock the door and take the key up every night, but I did it particularly that night, as he seemed anxious to go out again for drink, and it being late we wished to keep him in - it was the key of the front door; I had also the key of the back door - I am certain I knocked at his door for a light in the morning, and Mrs. Elliott said, "Walk in;" they do not burn a light, but Mrs. Elliott was up, getting breakfast, and had a fire - she opened the door, gave me a light, and I saw him in bed; the room the officer found the property in was their's.

R. CHICK - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

MARY CHICK - NOT GUILTY .

C. W. ELLIOTT - NOT GUILTY .

MARY ELLIOTT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-113

NEW COURT, Third Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1644. JOHN EDMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 4 coats, value 10l.; 3 pairs of trousers, value 4l. 15s.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 30s.; 1 pair of pantaloons, value 25s., and 1 waistcoat, value 16s., the goods of Thomas Parks , the elder, and Thomas Parks , the younger, from the person of James Culmore .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-114

1645. JOHN SHORE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , 2 shirts, value 6s., and 5 shillings , the property of Dennis Collins .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-115

1646. JOHN READING was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , 2 gowns, value 5s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 2s.; 3 waistcoats, value 1s. 6d.; I quilt, value 2s.; and 1 petticoat, value 1s., the goods of Benjamin Loring ; and 2 shifts, value 3s.; 1 gown, value 1s., and 2 window-curtains, value 1s., the goods of Elizabeth Loring .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-116

1647. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 key, value 2s.; 4 crowns, and 4 shillings , the property of John Northage .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-117

1648. JOHN CHARLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 2 shifts, value 2s.; 2 pinafores, value 1s.; 2 aprons, value 6d.; 1 sheet, value 6d.; 1 pillow-case, value 1d.; 2 towels, value 6d.; 2 bed-gowns, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 1s.; 1 napkin, value 3d.; 1 shirt, value 2d., and 1 pocket, value 3d. , the goods of John Sharpe .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 10.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-118

1649. SOLOMON BARLIENER and PHILIP LEVY were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 6 watches, value 8l. , the goods of Matthias Lassar .

Barliener pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27.

Levy pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-119

1650. MARY JOLLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 2 shifts, value 3s.; 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s., and 1 shirt, value 2s. , the goods of William Saunders .

SARAH SAUNDERS . I am the wife of William Saunders. On the 16th of July these things were taken out of a dirty clothes bag - I had seen them in the course of the week; the prisoner had lodged in the same house - the landlord turned her out, and I took her in; I charged the prisoner with the robbery - she said I might do as I liked.

ANN FEASEY . The prisoner came to my house in Mount Pleasant on the 13th of July - I bought a shift of her for 1s.; on the 14th I bought a petticoat, and on the the 15th another shift; she said her name was Mary Jolley , and she lived at No. 10, Wilton-place - on the Sunday morning I had occasion to send to Mrs. Saunders- the prisoner, who was there, told my little girl she was not at home; I afterwards saw Mrs. Saunders pass my house, and told her what I had bought.

CATHARINE DOHERTY . I live in Spread Eagle-court, Holborn. I bought a duplicate of a gown of the prisoner on the 16th of July - I redeemed it, and gave it up.

SAMUEL HAMPSTEAD . This shirt was pawned with me by the prisoner.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had taken the things to provide herself and the apprentice with victuals, the prosecutrix having gone out, and left them without any.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy, believing it to be her first offence .

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18290910-120

1651. CHARLES LAW was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 1 hat, value 21s. , the goods of Thomas Gale .

THOMAS GALE . I am a sadler , and live in Brewer-street, Golden-square. On the 24th of August I was at the Fox, in Sherrard-street , between ten o'clock and three; my hat was on a table behind me; I do not know exactly when it went; I saw the prisoner there about one o'clock; he did not stay long; I saw the hat the same evening on the prisoner's head in Charles-street; I did not see any hat on his head when he was in the house - he said it was his own, and he had bought it six months ago; I had bought it but two days before.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you playing at bagatelle? A. No; I looked at some persons who were playing - I had taken some half and half; there was an old hat left behind; the prisoner did not say if it was my hat he would return it; I did appoint to meet him the next morning at the Fox, but on second consideration, I thought the sooner I got my hat the better; I took him to a public-house, and kept him till the officer came; I asked him to go, but did not say I would settle it there - I did not take part of a pot of ale and a biscuit; there were two or three other hats on the table - the old hat was found on the table; he and his friends were playing at bagatelle.

JOSEPH WILDMAN PAINE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he said the hat had been his for six months.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you the hat? A. Yes; this is it; I do not know who this belonged to.

JAMES ANDREW . I sold this hat to the prosecutor on Saturday, the 22nd of August, for a guinea; I am in the employ of Mr. Ruttle.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any private mark in it? A. Yes; the drawer-string under the living, which I never saw before.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the public-house with my hat on, with two friends - there were several gentlemen in the room; I played at bagatelle, and had one pot of beer; this hat laid on the table - mine was as good as new, and I took this and put it on my head, and did not know but it was my own; the prosecutor came and asked if I had made a mistake, and taken a wrong hat; I said, "No, but if I have this is it," and that I would meet him the next day at the Fox, and if any one could say it was his I would give it up; I had been drinking a little.

NOT GUILTY

Reference Number: t18290910-121

1652. FRANCIS PARSONS , THOMAS JACKSON , and MARGARET JACKSON were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 211lbs. weight of bacon, value 4l., and two hams, value 13s. , the goods of Thomas Brown .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a wholesale cheesemonger , and live in Grafton-street, Soho . On the 24th of July, about nine o'clock in the evening, Parsons came and asked me to shew him some bacon - he looked out three sides, which weight 311lbs.; I made him out a bill which came to 4l. 7s. 11d. - he then asked if I had any hams at a low price - he looked out two, which weighed 31 1/2lbs., and which came to 13s. - he said if I would send them with him he would pay; I said he must wait till my other lad came in as I had only one there; I asked him his name - he hesitated some time; I asked him three times, and then he gave the name of Parsons - I asked where he lived, he hesitated some time, and then said, "Not far from the top of Crown-street;" I said I could not send the goods without knowing where he lived; he said it was of no consequence, he would go with the boy and send the money back; the other boy then came in, and I sent the two boys with him, the sides of bacon, and the hams; in about half an hour Stephen Sadler, one of the boys, returned - he brought no money, but in consequence of what he said I ran with him as fast as I could to Bainbridge-street, St. Giles', and there saw Thomas Jackson shutting up a window; I took him by the arm, and said, "What have you done with the goods these boys brought here?" he said, "I know nothing about them;" I said, "You must know something about them, because you were the boy who brought the light;" he said he knew nothing at all about the hams; I then asked him if he knew the man who came with the goods - he said he knew nothing of the man nor the hams or bacon; I then ordered Sadler to take him into custody - he took him into the room where the goods had been left; I then went into the shop and saw Margaret Jackson - I asked if she knew what had become of the goods; she said she knew nothing of the goods - I asked if she did not know the back premises; she said No; I asked if she did not know the man who ordered them - she said No; the watchman was with me, and I said I should not go out of the house till I had searched - she took a key out of her pocket, and said I might search where I pleased; the watchman was by my side, and said, "We need not go far to search the house;" he took me into the next room, in which there was a bed, by the side of which there was a trap-door which shut down very close; I should not have seen it if it had not been for the watchman - he lifted it up, it led into a cellar - I took his lantern, and we found the three sides of bacon and two hams, which I knew to be mine; I then ordered the watchman to search for the prisoner; he went into a back cellar and brought up Parsons; we then secured the property, and took it to the watch-house with Thomas Jackson and Parsons.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you any private mark on it? A. No; but I weighed them out and in; I could tell my own goods if they were down in Yorkshire - I had perhaps five or six tons of them - there was some rubbish in the shop; I saw one pig's head there - I never saw the prisoner before; I have no doubt but this bill of parcel is mine (looking at it), and no doubt he bought these goods and paid for them - he might have come when I was out; this bill is dated October, 1828 - it is the writing of one of my people in Rose-street, where I have another warehouse; I do not know that Jacksons are mother and son - Parsons came alone for the things.

COURT. Q. You do not mean to insinuate that the

others were outside the shop at the time? A. I did not see them - there were shop windows to the house in Bainbridge-street, but I did not notice any name over the door - it was dark.

PETER JEFFERYS . I lodge in the house in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles'. I know the three prisoners; Parson's lives there; on the night that Mr. Brown's lads brought the hams and bacon I was in their back kitchen; the two Jacksons were at home and took them in - they were at first placed on a bench in the back kitchen; Mrs. Jackson and the boy removed them into the cellar, I saw them do it - that was after Parsons went away with the two boys - it was about a quarter past nine o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not you that put the hams and bacon into the cellar? A. No; I would not do such a thing for the world - there was nothing else in the cellar; I lodge there but my wife does not, she is in prison; I never was in prison - I never said to any one that I had been transported for seven years - I never told any of the prisoners so; I have been twenty-three years in this country, and get my living by selling fruit - I was not taken up with my wife; I was not living with her when she was taken up - she has been in prison about three months.

GEORGE SADLER . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Brown . On the 24th of July Parsons came to his shop, and in consequence of my master's directions I went with my brother and Parsons - we took the bacon and ham to a house in Bainbridge-street; Parsons assisted in laying it on a bench - Parsons then called for a light; Thomas Jackson brought one - Mr. Brown had told us, in his hearing, not to leave the goods without the money; when we had put down the goods, Parsons told us to come with him - when we got outside the door he said he wanted some cheese, and he would go to Mr. Brown's for one; when we got part of the way he said it was too late to go that night, if one of us would return he would pay - I returned with him, and my brother followed behind; when we got back to Bainbridge-street, Parsons told me to go into the room where we had delivered the bacon and hams, and he would bring me the money - the bacon and hams were not there then; I waited three or four minutes, and then a woman, not this prisoner, came and asked if I was waiting for Mr. Parsons - I said Yes; she said I need not wait, he was gone down to pay my master- I said I should wait three or four minutes to see if he came back; she then went out of the room - I went to the door and told my brother, and sent him for Mr. Brown, who came shortly and gave me charge of the boy Jackson, whom he brought into the room to me - I had only seen him at the time he brought the light.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not he acting as a servant? A. He brought the light; I saw Margaret Jackson standing in the house when I was going to take the bacon to the watch-house - Parsons did not say that he had only 4l. 10s. in the house, but he would go and get the difference; I did not notice whether there was any counter or any articles in the shop.

STEPHEN SADLER . What my brother has stated is correct - the first I saw of Margaret Jackson was when we were going to the watch-house.

CHARLES BANNIS . I am a watchman of Bloomsbury. I know the house in Bainbridge-street; this time twelve months Mr. Jackson lived there, the husband of this woman, and the father of this boy - Parsons married Jackson's daughter, and came to live there - Jackson and his wife were indicted by the parish and went to prison; I heard the rattle spring, went, and met Mr. Brown, who told me what he wanted and said he should search the house - I heard him ask this boy where the bacon was; he said he knew nothing about it, that it was not in the house - I heard Mr. Brown ask this woman, and she said the same; she reached him the keys, and said he might search every room in the house - I told him to come in with me, I knew where it was if it was in the house, and I showed him the trap door in the back parlour - I lent Mr. Brown my light, then went down, and found the bacon and hams under my feet; the lad came down - I went to another part of the cellar and found Parsons there doing nothing; I asked him whether he stole the bacon - he said he bought the bacon, and did not care any thing about Mr. Brown.

Cross-examined. Q. You asked him whether he stole it, and he said he bought it? A. Yes; I asked him if he paid for it; he said he had not - I did not see this woman in prison; I was not at the marriage of Parsons and Jackson's daughter - I was watchman of that beat.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you known Parsons and Jackson's daughter to live together as husband and wife? A. Yes; Jackson was tried for keeping five or six bad houses, and that house was one - she had six months' imprisonment: Parsons came there while they were in prison.

MR. BROWN re-examined. Q. Can you form any idea of the value of the articles in the shop? A. I suppose there were not more than 2l. worth of goods - I saw some small bits of bacon and some other little things.

STEPHEN SADLER . From the time Parsons' came to the house to their going to the watch-house, I suppose an hour elapsed - they went to the watch-house about ten o'clock.

GEORGE SADLER re-examined. Q. What time elapsed between Mr. Parsons' desiring you to go with him, and he would pay Mr. Brown, and your coming back and finding the bacon gone from the bench? A. I suppose about twenty minutes; we walked down a few streets, and stopped talking I suppose for five minutes.

Parsons' Defence, I told him to wait five minutes while I went to borrow 10s.; I went to a neighbour in the same line in the next street to borrow 10s. - when I came back he was gone: I said, "Is he gone?" this woman said, "Yes, he did not wait half a moment;" I said, "I suppose he won't come back to-night?" and directly Mr. Brown, with a lot of watchmen, came and broke open our doors.

PARSONS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

M. JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOS. JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-122

1652. EDWARD LAW was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , 4 live tame ducks, price 3s. , the property of John Pursar .

JOHN PURSAR . I am a carman . On the 7th of Sep

tember, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I was in the shed; my wife called me into the house, and I found the prisoner there - the ducks had gone out; the prisoner said he had not hurt them - I had seen them safe that morning; I had six of them.

NANCY PURSAR . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw the prisoner, who had the four ducks, in his apron at the end of a court, about three doors from our place in Globe-fields - I asked what he had got there; he made no answer - I laid hold of his apron, and some of them fell down; I took hold of his coat and he said, "Let me go, I have not hurt them."

GEORGE HOY . I heard a noise, looked out of window, and saw the prisoner come out of the court with the ducks in his apron; the prosecutrix laid hold of him - I came down, and took hold of him; he said he was going to sell one of them to get bread for his breakfast.

Prisoner's Defence. I never said I meant to sell one of them.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor, having heard a good character of him .

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-123

1653. REBECCA MONKSFIELD and JANE MULLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , 17 pairs of shoes, value 3l. 8s. , the goods of Thomas Deeble Dutton .

THOMAS DEEBLE DUTTON . I keep a shoe warehouse in the Borough . On the 8th of August I received information, and missed eighteen or twenty pairs of shoes - I had known Monksfield for two years; she used to bring a few pairs of shoes of her own manufacture to my shop, for sale two or three times a week.

MARY BURNESS . I live in Cock-alley, Norton Falgate, and know Monksfield by her coming down that alley to see Mullins. On the 8th of August I was in Camberwell-road, and saw the two prisoners together, a good way from Mr. Dutton's shop - they asked me where I was going; I said I was going home - Monksfield said she was going to the shop to get some shoes to bind; Mullins and I waited - Monksfield went to the shop and brought out six pairs of shoes, and gave them to us to mind, on the step of a door; she said she had to go back in half an hour - that was some distance from the shop; I did not see the shop - she then brought out some more, and put them altogether in her lap; and as we were coming over London-bridge, Monksfield said, "Mullins, how you tremble, if there is any thing amiss I will take it all on myself" - we went home and counted the shoes on the bed; there were seventeen pairs, which she said she had from Mr. Dutton's to bind - they were bound, and I said they did not want binding; she said they did - we then went out with them, and she pawned some; she said she wanted 1l. 12s. to get a young man out of prison - she pawned one pair at Mr. Cotton's, and one pair further on, and then we stopped at the corner of Old-street, and she said she pawned some, but I do not know how many - I pawned one pair at the corner of Long-alley, and gave the money to Mullins; I went to pawn another pair in Aldersgate-street, and there I was stopped.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. How long have you known Monksfield? A. About two years - we were at a considerable distance from the shop; I did not see it - we watched her as far as we could see; as we were coming past the shop, she said that was Mr. Dutton's - I thought it must be wrong when I saw the shoes were bound; it was the first time I had been with her - Monksfield was at the door when I was taken; I did not partake of the produce - Monksfield bought a penny pie, and gave us some of it; I met them casually on the road.

JOHN JOHNSON . I received information from Burness' father went to a house in Shepherd's-court, and saw Monksfield, and took her - Mullins was there on a bed; I took them to the watch-house, and told Monksfield it was my duty to ask a few questions, and that what she said might come in evidence against her - she then said she had got six pairs from Mr. Dutton's; had given some of them to the witness, some to Mullins, and she had pawned some herself.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was Monksfield? A. Behind a bedstead - she went into hysterics; I put her into a chair, and told her not to be frightened, nobody would hurt her - Birch was below stairs when I took her; she said she was pregnant.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I went with Johnson. I said to Mullins, "I suppose you know our business?" she said, "No, I don't" - I said it was about some shoes; she then began crying, and said she knew, and that she had pawned one pair - Monksfield had been denied by the woman of the house; but Mullins said she was concealed up stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go up stairs where Monksfield was? A. Yes - there was no violence used towards us.

GEORGE CHAMP . I live in Aldersgate-street, and am a pawnbroker. Burness came in and asked 4s. on a pair of shoes - she said they belonged to her father, who was a shoemaker; I asked if he made them - she said Yes; I knew that to be false, as I knew they were Northampton shoes, and I gave her into custody.

JOHN BUNCE . I received Burness in charge with this pair of shoes.

FRANCIS COTTON . I am a pawnbroker. I took in these shoes on the 8th of August, but I do not know of whom.

RICHARD BARREN . I am a pawnbroker. I have three pairs of shoes, all pawned by Monksfield, at different times - the last two pairs on the 8th of August; I questioned her, and she said they belonged to her father - I examined them, found Mr. Dutton's name, and gave information.

Cross-examined. Q. How often have you seen Monksfield. A. About four times - they were pawned in the name of Monksfield and Sharter, and different addresses, which raised my suspicion; I found the label on a pair which had been pawned on the 27th of June, which I examined when she left the last pair.

MATTHEW POULTER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Holywell-lane. I have some shoes pawned by Monksfield, on the 8th of August, in the name of Rebecca Towers .

Cross-examined. Q. You knew her name was Monksfield? A. Yes - when she gave me the name of Towers, I asked if that was her name; she intimated she was

married, and her husband was a shoemaker - I took in two pairs.

HENRY ATTENBOROUGH . I am a pawnbroker. I took in these shoes of Burness on the 8th of August, between ten and eleven o'clock, in the name of Davis.

MR. DUTTON. This pair of shoes were given up to me at Guildhall; these I have brought to match - this pair have my own writing in them.

MONKSFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

MULLINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-124

1654. MARY ANN NEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 coat, value 2l., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of James Hayes ; 1 shirt, value 4s., and 1 apron, value 1s., the goods of James Norton .

JAMES HAYES . I went to reside at James Norton 's, with my wife and child, where the prisoner lodged - I had only been there two nights, when the prisoner said she wanted to get up early on the Sunday morning, to go to the first prayers - I heard a noise about six o'clock, and saw her moving my coat; I thought she was looking for something - she again said she wanted to go to the first prayers; soon afterwards the young woman came up and said to her sister-in-law, "Have you taken down James' shirt, that laid in a chair down stairs?" I sat up, and missed my coat - the landlord and I went out in search of the prisoner; we went to Church-street, St. Giles': a woman there gave us information.

MARY HAYES . I am the prosecutor's wife. We went on Thursday and stopped the prisoner in the street, going to the workhouse; we got an officer, and she was taken -I asked if she had left us for good; she said No, she was going back that night - Norton's wife then said, "How came you to serve me as you did?" she began to cry, and said, "Don't knock me about, but take me to the watch-house;" I mentioned to her that we had lost a blue coat, a silk handkerchief, and a case of razors - she said, "I am guilty, but don't knock me about."

BRIDGET NORTON . I am single. The prisoner slept with me; I had an apron of my sister-in-law's - she said she wanted to get up between five and six o'clock, to go to early prayers; I got up about six o'clock, and missed the apron and a shirt of my brother's; Hayes said his coat was gone - we found her afterwards in St. Giles', when she took the duplicate, and began to chew it.

ELLEN NORTON . I am the wife of John Norton . The shirt was his - the apron was mine; I found the apron at a pawnbroker's; when we took the prisoner she put this duplicate into her mouth, and I took it out.

JOHN WATERS . I am an officer, and took up the prisoner; this duplicate was given to me by Ellen Norton, who took it from the prisoner's mouth.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the duplicates were given her by a Mrs. Smith, and that she never had possession of the articles.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290910-125

1655. JAMES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 2 coats, value 10s.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 3s.; 2 waistcoats, value 3s.; 1 knife, value 2d.; 2 shirts, value 1s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s., and 3 neck-cloths, value 1s., the goods of Jeremiah Rice ; and 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 hat, value 10s., and 1 hat-band, value 2s., the goods of Sanderson Turner Sturtevant .

JEREMIAH RICE . I am in the service of Sanderson Turner Sturtevant . I lost a livery coat, a hat, and a silver band, of my master's, and two coats, two pairs of small clothes, and other things of my own; part of them were in a box, and part on the balustrade - they were safe at twelve o'clock, and were gone at two. On the Wednesday or Thursday, about half-past one o'clock, I took the prisoner in the coach-house - he had a pair of small clothes, a shirt, and a neck-cloth of mine on; I said, "They are my property;" he made no answer - the rest of the property I have not seen.

JOSHUA CLEMENTS . I was sent for, and found the prisoner in custody - the witness identified these things, which the prisoner then had on.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-126

1656. MARY SEAGAR was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , 2 pairs of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of William John Huetson .

WILLIAM JOHN HUETSON . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Kingsland-road . On the 14th of August I was in the parlour - my young man called to me, and pointed out the prisoner; I took her four or five doors off, and found two pairs of shoes on her.

GEORGE ARNOLD . I am in the service of Mr. Huetson. I saw the prisoner come to the shop, and take a pair of women's shoes, and then a pair of men's; I saw her by the reflection of a looking-glass.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner - I asked how she came to take them - she said it was distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290910-127

1657. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , 1 boot, value 5s. , the goods of William Jackman .

MOSES PACKER . I am in the service of Mr. William Jack man - he is a boot-maker , and lives in High-street, St. Giles' . This boot is his property; I did not miss it till the prisoner was brought in with it by Hale; he said he picked it up under the window, and was going to bring it in.

WILLIAM HALE . I am a milkman. I saw the prisoner and some others, looking through the prosecutor's window; the prisoner had the boot concealed under his coat - I asked what he was going to do with it; he said he had picked it up - I said I had no doubt it belonged to Mr. Jackman, and I took him there.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I was going to take it back? A. No - it appeared to be concealed.

FRANCIS JOHN GATES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and bring the boot - one of the loops is cut.

Prisoner. Q. Was there not a person came into the house, who said I picked it up? A. There was a little boy said so, but he did not come to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not long left work; the boot must have been cut down by some person - there was nothing found on me, neither knife nor scissors.

MOSES PACKER . I had seen it safe about eight o'clock- there was nothing found on the prisoner by which it could have been cut.

WILLIAM HALE . The prisoner was not moving at all; I stood at my door, which is the next house, and saw him for nearly a minute - the other boot was hanging just inside the door, seven or eight feet from where he was.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-128

1658. GEORGE WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 1 fixture, (i. e.) 1 copper, value 30s., the goods of William Cox , and fixed to a certain building .

It being the property of Elizabeth Cox , widow, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18290910-129

1659. THOMAS TRIBE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , 1 pair of pincers, value 3s.; 1 hammer, value 1s., and 1 steel baffer, value 6d., the goods of Samuel Townley , his master .

SAMUEL TOWNLEY . I am a farrier , and live near Bedford-row . The prisoner was in my employ on the 6th of September - he had been working with me till the Saturday, and on the Sunday morning I said, "Will you come and shoe some horses in Doughty-mews, and I will give you your breakfast;" he came and took some tools, and went - he came back, and laid down the rasp; I thought he had laid down all the tools, but he had not - in the afternoon I heard that he had sold them; these are the articles; I took him about nine o'clock in the evening - he was not in liquor in the morning.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a farrier. I saw the prisoner at the bottom of Melborne-street that morning: he offered me these tools for sale - I asked if they were his master's; he declared they were not, and said he wanted 6d. to get himself some breakfast; I said, "If you want 6d. you shall have it; and if the tools belong to your master, come to-morrow morning, and you shall have them."

JAMES WOOD . I was present when the prisoner came up and asked Harris to buy these tools; he declared they were his own - what Harris has stated is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. This witness was quite drunk - he had been all night at the Roebuck.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-130

1660. WILLIAM KIRSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 dead goose, value 6s., the goods of William Hayward ; and that at the Delivery of the King's Goal of Newgate, holden on the 9th of day of April, in the Tenth Year of the Reign of his present Majesty, he was convicted of felony .

WILLIAM HAYWARD . I am a poulterer , and live in Red Lion-street, Holborn . On the 18th of July, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was standing in the shop, speaking to a gentleman, when some persons outside gave an alarm that some person had stolen a goose; I went out, and saw the prisoner running with it in his hand; he dropped it before I caught him - I did not see it taken up.

WILLIAM LLOYD . I heard Stop thief! called; I run up, and took the prisoner from the prosecutor; some person afterwards brought the goose to Mr. Hayward at the shop - I produce a copy of a former conviction of the prisoner by the name of Luke Kirshaw - I was present; he received three months imprisonment - she prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-131

1661. SAMUEL PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 2lbs. weight of pork, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Peter James Crosby .

THOMAS PENNINGTON . I am shopman to Mr. Crosby, a porkman , of Shoreditch . On Friday, the 24th of July, Daniels came in, and told me something; I went out, saw the prisoner walking on the edge of the pavement, and took him; he had nothing on him then - I missed a piece of pork from my master's board inside the window.

JOSEPH DANIELS . I was near Mr. Crosby's, and saw the prisoner take a piece of pork from off the board; he walked away, and when he got a good way he put it into his coat; I went and told the man - I do not know what became of the pork; the prisoner had a lame chap with him at the time.

RICHARD REEVES . I am a constable. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along, and the gentleman said, "What have you got about you?" I said Nothing; he took me to the watch-house, and then told the boy to say I had put it under my coat.

JOSEPH DANIELS . re-examined. No one told me to say he put it under his coat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-132

1662. ISAAC QUINCE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 4 chairs, value 8s.; 2 candlesticks, value 2s.; 1 piece of baize, value 6d.; 1 clock, value 6s.; 3 pictures, value 4s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s, and 1 carpet, value 4s. , the goods of James Merchant .

JAMES MERCHANT . I keep the Virginia-row Sunday school, Bethnal-green . I was in the school-room on the 6th of April; these articles were there then; next morning the door was broken open, and they were all missing - that was on the morning of Good Friday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How soon did you see the chairs again? A. In about three months.

THOMAS CARRANT . I took the prisoner into custody on the 14th of July, and found four chairs in his room - I found these house-breaking implements at the bottom of a tub of water.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I went to the same place, and found these pieces of green baize there.

ANN DOLLWOOD . I was a teacher in this school. I I know this chair from its having some ink on it, which stained my gown.

EDMUND DARNLEY . I am a pawnbroker. This pair of candlesticks were pawned with me on the 27th of June, by Esther Brakshaw .

ESTHER BRAKSHAW . I pawned these candlesticks; Mary Baker, whom I have seen in the prisoner's room, gave them me to pawn.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-133

1663. JOHN FOLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Charles Ball , from his person .

CHARLES BALL . On the 12th of August I was in Church-street, St. Giles' , about three o'clock in the morning; I felt my handkerchief taken, turned and saw the prisoner behind me; he ran off; I chased him, and caught him - he threw down the handkerchief, and I took it up; this is it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me throw it down? A. Yes - there was no young woman with me.

THOMAS SWEENEY . I received the prisoner in charge, and this handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing still - he came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-134

1664. THOMAS LAZARUS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , 1 purse, value 1d.; 1 sovereign, and 11s., the monies of James Salter , from the person of Ann his wife .

JAMES SALTER . I was out with my wife, on the 27th of July, at the corner of Old-street, opposite Shoreditch-church , about nine o'clock at night; we were close together, but she had not hold of my arm; she gave an alarm, and said the prisoner had picked her pocket - I collared him; he held out both his hands, and said, "See, Sir, that I don't drop any thing;" I took him to the watch-house.

ANN SALTER . I was there looking to see if a man was hurt who had been run over; I found the prisoner's hand in my pocket; he took out a purse with 31s. in it - I saw his hand come from my pocket, but I did not see the purse - I had had it not three minutes before, and had not taken it out for any thing; there were other persons near; I saw him put his hand behind me, to give it to some one; there were three duplicates in the purse.

WILLIAM MORTON . I received charge of the prisoner; I have 3s. 6d. and one duplicate which I found on him.

ANN SALTER re-examined. I was outside the crowd; there were some persons on the other side of me, about half a yard from me; I laid hold of the prisoner directly, and called my husband.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man run over; I went to see what was the matter; there were about one hundred and fifty people; this woman caught hold of me, and said,"I have lost my purse, you rascal, I have, and my money;" I said, "Don't collar me, I never stole any thing in my life;" I said, "Feel again;" she did, and then called her husband.

ANN SALTER . It was not a dark evening; I have no doubt as to whether I seized the person whose hand had been in my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-135

1665. CATHERINE FENNICK was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 1 half-crown, 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of John Crabb , from his person .

JOHN CRABB . On the 26th of August, about twelve o'clock at night, I was going down the Uxbridge road ; I felt the prisoner come behind me, and take 4s., a half-crown, and sixpence, which was loose in my left-hand waistcoat pocket - she came behind, then came beside me, and drew my money; she had asked where I was going, I said Home; as soon as she got the money she ran away; I called Stop thief! a watchman, who was close at hand, took her - the money was found on her.

JAMES CLARK . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner, and saw the money found on her.

PETER HOLT . I am a watch-house-keeper. The prosecutor told me what he had lost, and I found the money on the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-136

1666. WALTER FLEMING was indicted for bigamy .

The witnesses did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-137

1667. WILLIAM CONNELLY was indicted for bigamy .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am parish-clerk of St. Giles'. On the 26th of December, 1827, William Connelly and Eleanor Halfpenny were married; I signed the register - the other witness was Thomas Fitzpatrick ; I remember the woman, but I will not swear that the prisoner is the man.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . The prisoner's first wife gave him into custody, and said he was her husband; she said,"Connelly, you know you are my husband;" he said he could not help it; when I came down the father of the second wife put a certificate into my hand.

CATHERINE FOGARTY . I married the prisoner on the 29th of June, 1829, by the name of Patrick Connelly.

Prisoner. I never saw this parish-clerk in my life till I saw him at the office; at the time he states the first marriage took place I was at sea.

WILLIAM TAYLOR re-examined. Q. Did you see the first wife? A. Yes, before the Magistrate - she was the person who was married that day; a particular day was appointed for them to be married; they came, and then we found there had been no banns published; that occasioned some delay - she mentioned that to me at the office, and I remembered the circumstance; I cannot swear to the prisoner; it was a man named Connelly.

Prisoner to BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . Q. Were not many persons present when you came to take me? A. No one but myself and his wife; she knocked at the door; he opened it, and said he was her husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-138

1666. MARY SEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , 9 sovereigns, and 18 shillings , the monies of John Whitehouse .

JOHN WHITEHOUSE . I am a boatman . I was at the canal in the City-road, and on the 12th of August I went with George Yarnell to the King's Bench; on returning we met with the prisoner and another - we went to a public-house, had a pot of beer and a drop of gin, and afterwards I went home with her to Chequer-alley ; Yarnell went to the same house with the other woman - the prisoner and I went into the one pair room, and Yarnell and the other to the room above; before we parted to go to sleep we had all been in one room together, and had a gallon of beer, or half and half - I had rather too much; when I went into the room with the prisoner, I found a young man under the bed - I called down Yarnell, and he turned him out; the prisoner and I then went to bed - I cannot say that I locked the door; I believe I went to sleep, but whether the prisoner did or did not I do not know - at six o'clock in the morning Yarnell came down and said, "Come, Whitehouse, I am done clean, how are you?" he took hold of my small clothes, and there was nothing in them; my purse, the keys of

the cupboard of my boat, and some papers, were lying on the floor, but the money was all gone - there had been nine sovereigns in my fob, and 18s. in my purse; I put ten sovereigns into my fob as I was going to the Bench, as I thought there might be some street rows - I afterwards took one out, and changed it to pay for the beer; when I awoke in the morning the prisoner was gone - we went to Paddington, came back to the same room, and met the landlord of the house; he said, "One of your mates is quite drunk" - we went up to the room, and saw the prisoner as drunk as an owl; I said to her, "If you will give what is left, I will not hurt you" - she up with an oath, and d-d my mortal eyes, she struck at me twice, but I kept off the blow; she was taken into custody, but I never got 1d. of my money.

GEORGE YARNELL . I went to this house, and had a girl up stairs, and so had he; I was done clean, as well as him - I was not drunk, I knew what I was doing; he had some liquor, and was rather further gone than I was - he called me down: there was a man under the bed, and I took him out - I did not observe whether there was a lock to the door.

SAMUEL MOORE . I am a boatman. I went with these two men, and had some drink - they said they had had their pockets picked; I went with them to Chequer-alley and saw the prisoner - she began to wink and laugh at me; I went and sat down by her - she said the people down stairs took the money, gave her two sovereigns, and she had bought a Leghorn bonnet, a shawl, and a pair of stockings; Whitehouse said she had better give him the money, and he would say no more about it - she said, "How much did you lose?" he said, "You know;" she said, "If you will let me go down stairs, I will go and find the money; if it costs me my life."

THOMAS WALKER . I took the prisoner on the 13th of August - she was very tipsy.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the road; they came and asked where I was going - I said, "Any where;" they asked me to have something to drink; two females came up, and one of them said she had 2d. towards half a pint of gin - they were then going away, and he told me to call one of them back, who lived with me, which I did; we afterwards went to several other places and drank, and then went home - when we got to my room my brother was there; he said he should not be there; he called the other man down to put him out, and said he should come up stairs and sleep with him - we then went to bed; the prosecutor got up and said he was very thirsty, he wanted some water - I said I could not get any; he struck me twice, and I had a black eye - I went to try to get some beer, and could not; a young woman said I could get some in Smithfield - we stopped there drinking; when I got back there were four of them in the room.

GUILTY (of stealing only.) Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-139

1669. GEORGE BARBER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 14lbs. weight of lead, value 1s. 4d., the goods of Richard Phillips , and fixed to a certain building ; against the Statute, &c.

RICHARD PHILLIPS . I am an auctioneer - I have a dwelling-house in Chiswell-street, St. Luke's . On the 3rd of September I was informed that the prisoner, who was in my employ, had been selling some lead; I went to examine under the attic windows of my house, which he had been cleaning, and missed lead - I went to the house of Mrs. Ridley, a dealer in marine-stores; she said she had taken some lead to a Mr. Jay, next door, a plumber - we went there, and got this lead; I matched it to my house, and it corresponded exactly - it is a piece that went under the window, and overhung the window; there are nail marks in it which exactly correspond - I had seen it safe the week before.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I produce the lead, which exactly fitted the place; Mrs. Ridley said she took it to Mr. Jay's - the prisoner owned that he did it; he said he had got a wife and child, and hoped his master would forgive him.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-140

1670. DANIEL WITHEY and ANN WITHEY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , 2 blankets, value 12s.; 2 sheets, value 6s.; 2 pillows, value 3s.; 1 bolster, value 7s.; 1 set of fire-irons, value 6s.; 2 flatirons, value 1s.; 2 saucepans, value 3s.; 2 pillow cases, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 1s.; 1 pail, value 1s.; 1 Italian iron, value 6d.; 2 trays, value 1s.; 1 tea-pot, value 1s. 6d.; 1 frying-pan, value 6d.; 1 towel, value 6d.; 20lbs. weight of feathers, value 20s., and 1 bed-tick, value 4s. , the goods of William Woodgate .

ALICE WOODGATE . I was the wife of William Woodgate ; he is lately dead - the prisoners lodged at our house on the 11th of August; they left without giving us notice - the articles stated were missed from their room; two pillows and a towel were produced at the office - I am certain all the articles were there when they went to live there; my husband was then living.

WILLIAM TYE . I am a pawnbroker; I have two pillows pawned by a female, but I do not know by whom - one on the 3rd of August, and one on the 11th in the name of Withey.

THOMAS BURCHELL . I have a towel pawned in the name of Ann Withey ; I do not know who brought it.

THOMAS HENRY THOMPSON . I received the duplicate of the towel from Mrs. Woodgate; it had been left in their lodgings.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I apprehended the man, and asked if he had lodged in Devonshire-street; he said Yes - I asked if he knew any thing of the things going out of the room; he asked if they missed any thing -I said Yes.

Daniel Witney , in a long defence, stated that he had quarrelled with his wife, and left the room, at which time all the property was safe.

Ann Withey's Defence. I left the lodging through my husband's ill-usage; I left every thing there but the pillows, which I meant to put in their place again.

ANN WITHEY - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Month .

DANIEL WITHEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-141

1671. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 time-piece, value 2l. , the goods of Samuel Player .

MARIA PLAYER . I am wife of Samul Player; we live at Hackney . We lost a time-piece off the mantel-piece in our front room, about the middle of last September; I had seen it about five hours before - the prisoner was left in charge of a horse and cart opposite our house, and was there nearly the whole of the day; my husband was out of town, and I had occasion to go out - when I returned the time-piece was gone; the horse and cart were still there, and the prisoner was about the premises - I told him of it, and so did my husband: he said he had gone into the house to light his pipe, but had not touched the time-piece.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am in the service of the prosecutor; he is a chimney-sweeper - the prisoner was in the yard minding a cart; I know the time-piece was on the mantelpiece.

JOHN KALTANBACK . The prisoner sold this time-piece to me in the middle of last September; he looked like a brewer's servant.

Prisoner. When the officer took me to his house, he said, "I never bought a time-piece of you - I never saw you." Witness. He came in the evening, and I could not tell him then, not having a proper view of him, but I know he is the man.

SAMUEL CLEBERLY . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner; the witness did not know him at first.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the yard with fifty bushels of soot; the mistress said the time-piece was lost; I stripped myself in the yard, and they saw I had not got it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-142

1672. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , I saw, value 5s. , the goods of James Buck .

JAMES BUCK . On the 18th of May, I met the prisoner in Mile-end; he asked if I wanted a job; I said Yes - he said he was foreman over a job at Tottenham, and wanted another man; he engaged me at 30s. a week, and told me to take my tools down to the Half Moon in Smithfield; I went there, and took a man with me - he engaged him to come on the following Monday; we went off to go to Islington, where he said we should get a ride - he asked if he should carry my two saws; I said No, he might carry the big one, and I would carry the other in my basket; we went on to the George the Fourth, in Old-street , and he told me to set down my tools, and he would be out in a few minutes - he went through the house, and got away - I never saw him again till he was taken up.

JOHN CLARK . I received charge of the prisoner; he said he was not the person; I found six duplicates on him- five of them were for carpenter's tools; one is for the prosecutor's saw, and one for a coat.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor overtook me a fortnight ago, and asked me about the saw; I said, "What saw? I never saw you in my life:" I went with him to four places to find an officer, and we could not; we then went to this officer, who took me to Worship-street; I can safely say, I never saw him before he took me.

WILLIAM BUCK . I was with my brother, and saw the prisoner take the saw.

JAMES BUCK . I am certain he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-143

1673. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 1 work-box, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Moore .

THOMAS MOORE . I lost a work-box on the 19th of August: it had been standing on a glass-case in my shop, No.26, Rathbone-place - I had seen it in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any private mark on it? A. Yes.

DANIEL RIORDAN . I was in Crown-street, about half-past eight o'clock, and saw the prisoner and another; I followed them - they separated, and joined company again; I then took the prisoner, and asked what he had got; he said what was that to me; I took this work-box from under his arm - he said he had it to take home for his sister; I took him to the watch-house; he then said he bought it of a young man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you tell him you would give him a lift for being saucy? A. No; he was rather bounceable; he said, I am a respectable man, and will let you know it;" I had seen him about four months ago.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man came up, and asked the way to the Seven-dials; the officer then came up, and asked what I had got - I said what was it to him; he said he was an officer - I said, "It is a workbox I bought of a young man for my sister;" he then took me: I was in London five month's ago, but have been in the country since.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-144

1774. CHARLOTTE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 2 pairs of shoes, value 5s., and 1 jacket, value 3s., the goods of William Hutchinson , and 1 counterpane, value 2s., the goods of Elizabeth Beteux .

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON . On the 13th of July I met the prisoner about midnight, near Smithfield, and took her to my lodgings; I locked the door inside - I awoke about six o'clock in the morning; she was gone, with two pairs of shoes and a jacket - the counterpane was gone from the bed, but I did not miss that till it was found at the pawnbroker's; the lower part of the house has a passage which leads to a bath-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure you locked your door? A. Yes; I was not perfectly sober - I recollect locking the door perfectly well; I did not give the prisoner any money, but I promised her 2s. -1 had 15s. in a drawer in the same room.

ELIZABETH BETEUX . The witness lodges in that house - I keep the house; he had a quilt of mine on his bed - this is it.

RICHARD EDWARD BARBER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 14th of July I received these shoes from a woman, who I believe the prisoner, but she is very much altered now, to when I saw her at Hatton-garden - they were pawned in the name of Ann Freeman ; I received this jacket the same day, but not at the same time, in the name of Ann Sullivan - I received this counterpane the same day, in the name of Ann Taylor - I cannot say from whom.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You would not swear to the other articles being pawned by her? A. No- only the shoes; I believe a different woman pawned the other things.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a constable. I took the prisoner about the 17th of July - I found nothing on her; I heard Mr. Barber, at Hatton-garden, say he thought it was her, but was not certain; I do not see any alteration in her - I should know her again. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-145

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin

1775. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , 1 grafting tool, value 3s., and 1 pickaxe, value 3s. , the goods of James Bunyan .

JAMES BUNYAN . I am an excavator , and live in Southampton-court. On the 10th of August I was sinking a sewer for a gentleman, and left my tools while I went to dinner - when I returned these two articles were gone; I went to the lodgings of the prisoner, who worked for me, and asked if he had taken the things - he said he had not; I asked if he would allow me to look in his room - he took me into his bed-room, and pulled out the bed and bedstead in the middle of the room, and took the bed off the bedstead - he then opened two cupboards, but they were not there; I then saw another cupboard - he said that was locked, and he could not open it; I said I would have it opened - I put my hand to it, opened it, and found the tools. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290910-146

1776. WILLIAM KING was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 1 pick-axe, value 1s. , the goods of William Stiles .

WILLIAM STILES . The prisoner had been in my employ for a fortnight before the 31st of August; I am a stone-mason - I missed my pick-axe on the 31st of August; the prisoner was not there then - he had access to the pickaxe on the works; it has not been found.

THOMAS DORMAN . I work for the prosecutor. Last Monday-week, at half-past eleven o'clock, I was called out of a public-house to go and unload a cart; I saw the prisoner go into the carpenter's yard, and take master's pick-axe, and go off with it - when I had done unloading I went to master's brother, and asked if it was lent to him; there was another pick-axe there.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw any thing of it - I took my rammer and went home at ten o'clock; I did not go out till past two.

THOMAS SHAW . The prisoner is a lodger of mine, and has been so for three months; he has been honest and just - he was in my house from ten o'clock till a quarter to two that day. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-147

1777. WILLIAM ROW and WILLIAM SANDERS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , I live tame rabbit, price 4s. , the property of Jeremiah Dodd .

WILLIAM HALL . I am an inspector of St. Luke's watch. On the 20th of August, before twelve o'clock at night, the prisoners passed me in Windmill-street- Row had something under his jacket and Sanders had a jail dress on; I followed them - they walked quickly on to Finsbury-square, and then Sauders ran away: I took Row, and asked what he had got - he said a rabbit which he had found in Hoxton; I asked where he lived - he said he had no home, but slept in Fleet-market - next morning he told me he had found it in Tabernacle-square; I found Sanders on the 28th, about three quarters of a mile from the prosecutor's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it because Sanders had a jail dress on that you suspected him? A. No, I knew him before - Row could not run away, because I collared him.

CAROLINE DODD . I am the wife of Jeremiah Dodd; we live in Hoxton . On Thursday, the 20th of August, I locked up my rabbit at nine o'clock in the evening; it was gone the next morning - four files had been taken off the roof of the shed; I knew Sanders before.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did Sanders live? A. On the same floor with me; I know the rabbit, it has a cut in one of its ears - this is it; I have fed it from its birth - we lost a pick-axe and some other things; I do not know Row.

Row's Defence. I was coming through Hoxton that Thursday evening, and saw the rabbit running across the road; the other prisoner was with me - we ran, and caught it up a gateway.

Sander's Defence. I never had a prison dress on in my life; it was a dress I had from the parish.

ROW - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SANDERS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-148

1778. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 2 shoes, value 4s. , the goods of George James Underwood .

ANN CLAYBROOK . I know the shop of Mr. Under-wood, in Great Wild-street ; he is a shoemaker . On the 23rd of July, about half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner near the shop, and he walked away with a pair of shoes; I told my mother of it.

JAMES BROWN . I am an apprentice to Mr. George James Underwood. On the 23rd of July, at half-past three o'clock, I was down stairs, and heard an alarm-I ran up, and saw the prisoner going with the shoes; I went, and took them from him - I hung them up in their place again.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was he drunk? A. He was a little intoxicated, but knew what he was about; he had told my master, the night before, that if he did not give him money he would take a pair of shoes, and he told him the next day that he would take another pair if he did not give him money - he worked for my master.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-149

1779. ELIZABETH PARKER was indicted for for stealing, on the 30th of July , 4 collars, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s. 6d.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 6d., and 1 window curtain, value 4d. , the goods of Alexander Bowen Hopkins .

ALEXANDER BOWEN HOPKINS . I am a tobacconist , and live in the Commercial-road ; the prisoner was in my service about six weeks. In July several things had been missing, and suspicion was raised against the prisoner- her box, which stood in a cupboard by the kitchen door, was desired to be searched; she told Rosanna Haywood she might search it, but desired her not to let me or her

master see it - her box was searched after she was gone to bed and these articles were found; the next morning we got the officer, and she was taken - her box was not locked; she said she intended to put them back when her master was out of town - she washed for the family; she had given no notice to quit.

ROSANNA HAYWOOD . I am a servant to Mr. Montefiore, who lives at the prosecutor's. I saw the box opened, and the property found; I know the linen; it is marked.

The prisoner put in a written defence stating, that the articles were placed in the box by mistake.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-150

1680. JOHN ENGALL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 jacket, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Rooke ; and 1 thermometer, value 2s.; 6 plants, value 2s., and 6 garden-pots, value 6d., the goods of Benjamin Cook Griffinhoofe .

MR. BOOKIN conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM COLLEY . I am a watchman of Kentish-town. On Friday morning, the 17th of July, at half-past one o'clock, I was near the prosecutors, and saw the prisoner getting over the wall with something on his arm; I could not see what it was - I was about forty yards from him; he ran, and dropped what he had - he was stopped by Cannon, another watchman; I did not lose sight of him, and am sure he is the man - I took him, and sent a man back to where I saw the articles dropped; I knew him before - he lived with the same gentleman about two years before.

WILLIAM CALLAGHAN . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner; he was running across a field, and had one shoe in each hand when I took him.

JOHN PURDON . I am a watchman. I was sent to the place described by the witness, and found this jacket.

THOMAS ROOKE . I am gardener to William Cook Griffinhoofe . This is my jacket; it was hanging up in a shed at the back of the hot-house - I saw it safe at half-past six o'clock on the evening before; there was a thermometer in the hot-house, which was removed to another part of the garden - some plants were torn up by the roots, and tied up in a gardener's apros.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-151

1681. MARY ANN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 1 veil, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel James Wood .

FRANCIS THOMPSON . I am an apprentice to Samuel James Wood a pawnbroker , of St. John-street, Clerkenwell . On Monday afternoon, the 24th of August, at four o'clock, I looked up, and saw the prisoner on the other side of the counter - I saw her go out of the shop, and take this veil; I went out after her, and took her two doors from the shop; I brought her back with it - she said she did it through distress.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I was sent for, and took her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-152

1682. HENRY OTWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , 1 garden-roller, value 30s. , the goods of Edward Bickersteth , clerk.

WILLIAM PENTECOST . I am gardener to the Rev . Edward Bickersteth, who lives in Barnsbury-park . On Wednesday, the 5th of August, the prisoner, whom I knew before, came into the garden, and said, "William, can you lend me your roller?" I said No - he said, "Why, are you going to use it?" I said No; he said, "you know it is for Mrs. Blossom;" I then said he might take it, and asked if he would return it at five o'clock - he said he would; he went away, and I did not see him again: I let him take it, expecting it was going to Mrs. Blossom's, with whom my master is acquainted; the prisoner is a gardener.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 18th of August, at the corner of Turnstile, Holborn; I said I took him on a charge of stealing a roller- he said, "I am glad you took me, or I should have given myself up; I have been miserable;" he was in a wretched state.

THOMAS COPE . I was with Taylor; the prisoner told me where I should find the roller.

JOHN DOBINSON . I am a broker, and live at Kingsland. The prisoner and another brought this roller to my shop for sale, on the 7th of August, in the middle of the day - the prisoner said he took it for money owing to him for wages, it being no further use to the person it had belonged to.

WILLIAM PENTECOST . I do not know whether the prisoner ever worked for Mrs. Blossom; I knew he jobbed about - there is no person here from Mrs. Blossom's.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-153

1683. RICHARD MUNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Sarah Hawkins .

SARAH HAWKINS . I deal in second-hand clothes , in Spitalfields-market . I saw the prisoner and some other boy s there, and while I was disposing of a gown the officer came up with this waistcoat, and asked if it belonged to me; it was mine - he took the prisoner into custody.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I was in the market on the 29th of August, and saw this boy and another near the prosecutrix's stall; I saw the other take this waistcoat and look at it - I thought they were bargaining with the woman for it; I then saw him nod to the prisoner - the prisoner took up his apron, and the other put the waistcoat into it - they ran off; I pursued, and took the prisoner with it; I fell over a stool, or I should have had them both.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the other boy had thrown the waistcoat at him.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-154

1684. MARY McPHERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 1 petticoat, value 3s. , the goods of William Clark .

WILLIAM FOWLER . I am a coal-dealer, and live opposite the prosecutor's. On the 2nd of September I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's house, between four and five o'clock in the evening, putting something under her clothes; I pursued, and brought her back - she took out this petticoat, which Mr. Clark owned.

MARY CLARK . I am the wife of William Clark . I

saw the petticoat at the office, and knew it was mine; I had left it on the table in my apartment, on the ground floor, about a quarter-past one o'clock on the 2nd of September.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going past, the door was open, and the petticoat laid by the door - I took it up, and was going on with it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-155

1685. THOMAS LOOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 waistcoat, value 18s.; 1 jacket, value 30s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 1l. , the goods of Richard Taylor .

RICHARD TAYLOR . I am a brick-maker . I have known the prisoner three months; he is a brick-maker . -On the 9th of July I lost my property from the bed-room where we slept, in Hospital-row, Chelsea: there were other lodgers in the house - when I missed it the prisoner was gone; I did not see him again till the Monday.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live with Mr. Atwood, at Stratford. I have a pair of trousers and a coat, pawned by Bishop.

CATHERINE BISHOP . My husband is a sweep. I have known the prisoner more than two years; he has worked for my husband - he came on the 9th of July to see us, and sent me to pawn these things, which I did, in my own name.

GEORGE CURTIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Aldersgate-street. I have a waistcoat and handkerchief, pawned by Bishop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-156

1686. JAMES KING and THOMAS CONDON were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , 1 handkerchief, value 9s., the goods of Loftus Henry Bland , from his person .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a parish officer. I heard a cry of Stop thief! on the 31st of July, about six o'clock in the evening, in King-street; I saw the two prisoners running, Condon first and King after him - I took King, and called to a gentleman, who took Condon; I took this handkerchief from a person who picked it up - I did not see it dropped; I went to the office, and heard a gentleman, who stated his name to be Loftus Henry Bland, examined; he stated the handkerchief to be his.

MARTIN CHARLES BARTON . I am an upholsterer, and live in Brownlow-street. I was in Bloomsbury-place , and saw three gentlemen walking together, the middle gentleman had his handkerchief a little out of his pocket; I saw the two prisoners together - they went up behind him, and King took the handkerchief; I had watched them for some time - I went up to the gentleman, and said, "Sir, have you not lost your handkerchief?" he felt, and said, "I have;" the prisoners went off, but were pursued and taken directly; the gentleman, whose pocket I saw picked, went to the office, and gave his name as Loftus Henry Bland.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How far from the place were the prisoners taken? A. They had just turned round the corner of King-street; I did lose sight of them; I do not know who took the handkerchief from the ground; I was told it was taken up at the corner of Bloomsbury-place, at a fishmonger's shop - the prisoners went quietly to the watch-house.

THOMAS BENSON . I was with the officer, and took Condon; I received this handkerchief from a boy.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you receive the handkerchief? A. Within about twenty yards of where it was thrown down; I saw it thrown, and it was given me by a baker's boy - I was taking Condon back to the place to take it up; I should think it was not a minute from the time it was taken.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . This is the handkerchief - I saw the prosecutor sign his deposition.

Condon's Defence. I am an apprentice to Mr. Samuel Bentley, of Salisbury-square.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 23.

CONDON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-157

1687. JANE KING was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 1 shawl, value 5s.; 3 frocks, value 3s.; 4 caps, value 6s.; 2 night-gowns, value 2s.; 3 petticoats, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s., and 2 yards of ribbon, value 6d. , the goods of Rebecca Hardwick .

REBECCA HARDWICK . I have been in service - I had been but a short time in London; the prisoner lodged with me in a room in Crown-court, Soho - she had been with me a fortnight; I had been out of place, and had all this property in my trunk in the room; I was awoke on the morning of the 2nd of September when the prisoner got up - she was a servant out of place; when I got up I missed these articles from my box - it had not been broken; it was locked, but it must have been opened by a false key - I went down to the landlady, she came up and charged the prisoner with it, and sent for a constable - he took her; and when she got to the office she confessed she had taken them and pawned them; I never allowed her to pawn my things.

SAMUEL LINDLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody at the office; she said she had taken the articles and pawned them - that the duplicates were in a cupboard, and I found them there.

THOMAS DONDERS PERRY . I am in the service of Mr. Aldous, a pawnbroker, in Berwick-street. I have a shawl and a bed-gown, pawned by the prisoner on the 31st of August.

HENRY WILLIAM PARS . I live with Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker. I have some caps and other things pawned by a female who I do not know.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, having been out of place three weeks, and rather than go on the town I did do it; I have been a servant four years in London, and never had any thing laid to my charge.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-158

1688. GEORGE HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , 1 live tame fowl, price 2s. , the property of Robert Hutchinson .

JAMES SIMMONS . I am a watchman of the Commercial-road - Mr. Robert Hutchinson lives there and is a

cooper . A little before one o'clock, in the morning of the 9th of August, I saw the prisoner coming along with something in his hand - I went to him, and said, "What have you got?" he said, "Don't you see" - I said,"Where did you get it?" he said, "Do you know Stepney-church?" I said Yes; he said, "I did not get it there then" - I said "I shall detain you till I know where you did;" I took him to the watch-house, and he said he bought it of a man for 1s. 6d. - this was about one hundred and fifty yards from Mr. Hutchinson's; the fowl was quite warm, and its neck broken.

EDWARD HUNT . I am servant to Mr. Robert Hutchinson . I saw the fowl, and knew it to be my master's - it was a remarkable one, and was bred on the premises; I had seen it on the afternoon of the 6th of August, which was on Friday - the fowls stray about in various parts of the building; there were two lost.

GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290910-159

1689. ELLEN GORSUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May , 1 tea-spoon, value 2s. , the goods of Ann Longhurst .

JOHN FROST . I live with Ann Longhurst , who keeps the Castle and Falcon, in St. John-street . The prisoner came in there one day in May, and was drinking some half and half with a party - I took out the glass, and the spoon was gone.

JAMES TERRY . I am an officer. I have a duplicate which I took out of a drawer in the prisoner's room - the man she cohabits with took us to the room; she was in custody at the time - she confessed she took the tea-spoon, and she said it was at Mr. Tyrrel's.

JOHN BALL . I live with Mr. Tyrrel. I took in this spoon of Mahoney, and lent 1s. on it.

ANN MAHONEY . I go out to work. I have known the prisoner four years - she has lived with a man; she gave me the spoon to pawn - I have frequently pawned her clothes when she has been short of money; I think I pawned in the name of William Williams - it was a name she desired me to use - I did not ask whether it was her's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up outside the door - we had no spirits in the house.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-160

1690. PHOEBE DUMVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , 1 writing-desk, value 12s. , the goods of Ambrose Bradley .

MARTIN SUTTON . I am in the service of Ambrose Bradley , a pawnbroker , of Brick-lane, Spitalfields . The prisoner came to the shop about half-past six o'clock, on the 10th of August - I turned my back and she went out; at ten at night she came again - she stooped down and weat out; I got on the counter and missed this writing-desk, which had been tied to another, and to some saucepans, which would have made a noise if it had not been prepared before - I went on the Tuesday, and found it had been pawned; - she had been to our shop on the Monday, but I took no notice of her.

THOMAS HART . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner a few doors from Mr. Bradley's - I found in her pocket a duplicate of the writing-desk.

JOHN BARRS . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this desk of the prisoner on the 10th of August - I gave her this duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop, and a person asked me it I was in a hurry - she said she had an article to sell, and offered me this desk; I gave her half a crown, and went to a pawnbroker in Whitechapel, and got it out for 5s., and on the Monday I wanted money, and took it to Mr. Cassell's - the next week I went to pawn a gown at the prosecutor's and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18290910-161

1691. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July , 1 pair of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of Ralph Wilcoxon .

JAMES EADE . I am shopman to Ralph Wilcoxon , a shoemaker . On the 23rd of July the prisoner came to his shop, in Walker's-court ; he took a pair of shoes, put them in his apron, and walked off - I pursued; he dropped them - I took them and him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through the court; there was a young man at the window - four pairs of shoes dropped; I stood still - the witness came up, and said I had stolen a pair, and he saw me cut them, and hold my apron under them; but I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-162

1692. ELIZA CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 1 frock, value 1s., and 1 petticoat, value 6d. , the goods of James Rickman Folkard .

HENRY JOHN PARKER . I am in the employ of James Rickman Folkard , a pawnbroker . On the 2nd of September the prisoner's daughter came to pawn an apron not worth a farthing - the prisoner came and said something to her daughter, and I suppose she took down these articles; as soon as they were gone I missed them - I went after the prisoner; she dropped them from under her shawl, and said she had picked them up at the door - but I hung them up myself.

SUSAN SMITH . I saw the things hanging up - the prisoner took them, and went out with them under her arm.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290910-163

1693. MARGARET CAIN and ANN MILTON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of William Sabine .

WILLIAM SABINE . I am a shoemaker , and live in Monmouth-street . On the 6th of September the prisoners came to my shop, at half-past twelve o'clock, and wanted a pair of shoes to fit Milton; she came in, but Cain stood at the door - I had none to fit her, and they went away: they returned in ten minutes; then both came in, and said if I could not fit one could I the other; I said No; they went away, and in ten minutes I received information - I went out, and found Cockalin; he went with me, and we

saw the prisoners in the street; he said, "There they are?" they ran, and hid themselves in a privy; when they man out, I asked them where the shoes were which they took from me; they said they knew of no shoes; a witness then called to me, and said, "Here they are:" I know them to be mine; they are mens' shoes, and had been on my counter.

JOHN COCKALIN . I am a shoemaker, and live in Monmonth-street. The prisoners came to my shop with a pair of shoes; my wife dealt with them first; when I came into the shop these shoes were on the counter - I paid Milton, 1s. 6d. for them.

ABIGAIL COCKALIN . The prisoners came to our shop together; Milton asked if I would buy the shoes; I offered them 1s. 6d. for them; they went to the next shop, and then came back to our shop; my husband gave 1s. 6d. for them - my husband said they were Mr. Stabine's, and said, "Take them to him."

The prisoners put in a written defence, declaring the property had never been in their possession.

CAIN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

MILTON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290910-164

1694. WILLIAM COX was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 set of fire-irons, value 16s. , the goods of Thomas Hodsell .

ROBERT LANGMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Hodsell. A witness gave me information; I went out and followed the prisoner, on the 24th of July - these fire-irons had been close under the shop window.

THOMAS PLUMB . I am a green-grocer. I saw the prisoner come from the shop with the fire-irons, and gave information; I saw him drop them, and am quite sure he is the man - he said he was running after a man who had dropped them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The witness stated he saw me with them in my possession, and he swore to me at the office by my having a white apron on; he said there that he did not see me take them nor drop them.

THOMAS PLUMB . I said I saw him drop them; he was not above three doors from the house when he passed me, and he was endeavouring to conceal them with a white apron.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290910-165

OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1695. HENRY HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , 1 pocket-book, value 2s, and two 5l. Bank notes, the monies of Sir George Farrant , from his person .

SIR GEORGE FARRANT . I am a Magistrate of Middlesex . On Thursday, the 10th of September, a little after twelve o'clock, I was on the north side of Grosvenor-square , and felt a slight sudden touch at my pocket, hardly perceptible; I turned round, and saw the prisoner walking behind me, with his hand in his pocket, as if he was lame; I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my pocketbook, I immediately collared him, and said, "You have my pocket book;" he said, "Me, Sir; what, Sir, your pocketbook? I said, Yes; I put my hand into his breeches pocket, and took my pocket-book out of his hand, which was in his pocket, it contained two 5l. Bank notes - I took him to the office. I felt the slightest touch; if I had not seen him with his hand in his pocket, and walking as if lame, I should not have suspected him; it was done with great skill and adroitners - nothing could be done neater.

Prisoner's Defence. There were three more boy s behind the gentleman; I saw them go on - the pocketbook laid on the ground; I picked it up - the gentleman asked if I had any thing; I said Nothing belonging to him - I had a right to pick up what laid on the ground.

SIR GEORGE FARRANT . There were two boys further back, but he was the nearest.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-166

1696. HENRY MURRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 1 watch, value 5l.; 3 seals, value 10s.; 1 key, value 10s.; and 1 gold chain, value 10s., the goods of William Bell , in his dwelling-house .

ANN BELL . I am the wife of William Bell , who is a saddler , and lives in George-street, Euston-square . On the 20th of July we had the house to let, but resided in it at the time - the prisoner, who was quite a stranger, came to look at the house, as we had a bill up to let it; I was out at the time - the servant sent for me, and when I came I found him there: I took him up to the first floor, and told him it was not convenient to show him the upper part- I told him the terms, and came down; as he said he wished to see the upper part, I went up to ask the lodgers if they would let him; I left him on the stairs - I only knocked at the second floor door, and then came down; I had left him on the first floor stairs - my husband's watch hung on the mantel-piece of the first floor room, which was above the landing-place where he stood - I was not absent above a minute or two; when I came back, I perceived the door a little open, and suspecting he had been in, I went in, and immediately went to look on the mantel-piece for the watch; it was gone - I could not see it there; my husband had not taken it out in the morning, as he went out early; when I turned round, the prisoner was on his knees before me, with the watch in his hand - he said, "Lady, I have taken your watch do forgive me; I took it through distress - I have a wife and child;" I had not spoken to him about it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Before he knew you missed it, he repented, and told you he had it? A. Yes, before I asked him for it; I had missed it, and felt certain he had it - he gave it up of his own accord; I was alone.

Q. There was nothing to prevent his running away? I had given no alarm, but there were lodgers in the house.

WILLIAM BELL . I was sent for, and found the prisoner in the house; he fell on his knees and begged forgiveness - I took him to the office; he said he had taken the watch through distress, and was very sorry for it - here it is; it cost me five guineas sixteen years ago.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 99s. only.) Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-167

1697. JOHN McGHEE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Fitchett , on the 27th of July , and stealing therein 1 live tame rabbit, price 3s., his property .

HENRY FITCHETT . I am a baker , and live in White Lion-street, Goodman's-fields . On the 27th of July, at five o'clock in the morning, I was in bed; my lodger caught the prisoner in the back kitchen - he called me up, and I found the prisoner in the back kitchen; he was quite a stranger to me - he got into the house by taking off four tiles out of the back kitchen; he got through the tiles - no other part whatever had been removed; he came down into the yard from his father's house, who lives two doors below- the tiles were all secure when I went to bed; there was a rabbit fastened up in the hutch, and I found it outside, on the tiles on the roof of the kitchen, quite frightened apparently - he would not move.

JOHN BRUCE . I lodge in Fitchett's house. I came down stairs from the garret into the back kitchen, and found the prisoner close to the hole where he got in, standing upon a hamper, with his head through the rafters, attempting to get out; the rabbit was found out on the tiles.

HENRY FITCHETT re-examined. I have no lodger besides Bruce; I am always the last in bed; I went into the back kitchen that night with a candle - it is a lean-to, having an internal communication into the dwelling; no doors were opened so that the prisoner could have got into the house - there is no area; he got through the tiles, where they are about six feet high, and then dropped down into the wash-house - there was no other place open; I cannot say how he knew that I had a rabbit, for I never saw him in my house before; there was very trifling property in the wash-house - there was more in the house.

GUILTY (of stealing, but not of breaking) . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-168

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

1698. JOHN POTTER was indicted for that he, having in his custody a certain bill of exchange, setting it out(dated 24 July, 1829 , for 60l. drawn at three months after date, by John Potter, on James Burton , Cowley, near Uxbridge), feloniously did forge and counterfeit an acceptance of the same, with intent to defraud James Burton .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud John Wilson Neil .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN WILSON NEIL . I am a varnish and colour manufacturer , living at Battle-bridge ; I know the prisoner, and had dealings with him. In January last he purchased goods of me to the amount of 26l. 16s., and gave me his own acceptance for them, at four months, which I have with me; the bill was at two months, but it was two months after I sold the goods that he gave me the bill; it was dishonoured, and I made several applications to him; he told me that he was very sorry that he was not able to take up his acceptance; that he had been disposing of some property in the country, for which he would not be entitled to be paid in cash for three months, and that he would be much obliged if I would take the gentleman's acceptance: he afterwards wrote me this letter upon the subject - it is his hand-writing - [See Letter, No. 1.] -In consequence of that letter I saw him again next morning, and told him that if he would give me the address of the party, and I found he was a respectable man, I would take the bill, and I would give him the balance, either in cash, or otherwise give him goods; he told me the name, and I wrote it down at the time, "Thomas Burton, Cowley, near Uxbridge" - he desired me to call at the tallow-chandler's shop, next to Day and Martin's, in High Holborn, and make my own necessary inquiry as to Thomas Burton 's respectability; I accordingly went to the tallow-chandler's, and from what I learnt there, was satisfied that Mr. Thomas Burton was a respectable man -I wrote to the prisoner, and the next morning I received the bill enclosed in a letter; I received an answer to my letter before I received the bill - I received this letter on the same day; it is in the prisoner's hand-writing. [See No. 2.] I did not write to him again - I received that letter on the Saturday, and on the Monday his boy walked into my shop with this letter, and the bill in it. [See No. 3.] This is the bill which was enclosed in that letter - the bill is,

"Accepted, James Burton , payable for the Uxbridge Bank, at Messrs. Glyn and Co. s, bunkers. London;" I did not expect that name upon it, but the name of Thomas Burton - I sent Field, my man, to Glyn's, and, in consequence of what he reported, I sent him to the Uxbridge Bank with the bill; in consequence of what he learnt at the Uxbridge Bank, I had the prisoner apprehended the next morning on a suspicion of forgery - I was at a short distance from the prisoner when the officer apprehended him; he brought him to me: the prisoner said that he was very sorry that he had deceived me, and told me a parcel of falsehoods - he said that if it was a forgery he had been made a dupe, and that he was certain he should get through it; he said very little more about the bill - he said that he had taken it from a man of the name of Askam, in the way of business; he afterwards contradicted that part of it when we were near the office, when he saw I was taking him to the office, and said that Askam was in the habit of lending accommodation bills, and things of that description - that he did not care any thing about it, and should get through it

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What do you mean by saying that he contradicted that; did not he say all through that Askam had been the person that gave him the bill? A. Not exactly - he said that he had taken it first in the way of business; he did not name Askam as the person that had given it, nor any body else - I had him taken up without asking any explanation about the bill; I had known him from about last October - he was taken up at his own home.

Re-examined. He had never, in all his conversations with me before I got the bill, mentioned the name of Askam as a person he was to deal with, or any other name, except Thomas Burton - he told me he had disposed of a piece of landed property to Thomas Burton , and that the bill he was to procure was in payment for his landed property that he had sold to Thomas Burton ; for previous to my ever selling him goods, he told me that he had a piece of land of his own; I have seen his house - it

was a baker's shop; I was there the day that it first opened.

The following are the letters referred to.

[No. 1.] Six, - I have been out all day in hope of getting the money to pay your bill, or part, but have failed in so doing; but a person that owes me 68l., which will not be due for three months, will give me a bill for it at that date, so if you will send over to me to-morrow morning. I will give you the names and address of the parties, should you like to take it, and let me have goods for the balance: I am sure you will approve of it, as they are right respectable, and it will be made pay able at Messrs. Glyn and Co.'s, as the person lives on his own estate, near Uxbridge, and keeps cash at Messrs. Hull and Co's., Messrs. Glyn being the town agent.

47, Oakley-street; July 24, 1829.

12. Winter-place, Lambeth-walk, July 31, 1829.

[No. 2.] SIR, - You may depend on my getting the bill as soon as possible, I think I can say to-morrow; but if any thing should prevent me having it to-morrow, I am sure on Monday, and the moment I do get it you shall have it; I shall be glad if you can let me have (when I give you the bill) a small firkin of lead, about 1 cwt., and the rest in varnish, to make the balance, which will be to me equal to money.

12, Winter-place, Lambeth-walk, August 1, 1829.

[No. 3.] SIR, - The money due to me from Mr. Burton is in three months from the 24th June, 1829, so I have got the bill drawn accordingly: I received it from him this morning; I have endorsed it, and sent it you according to promise, &c.

JOHN FIELD . I am in the employ of the prosecutor. I went to Messrs. Glyn's, the bankers, to make inquiry respecting the acceptance that was upon a bill which I took with me - I repeated that which I heard, faithfully to my master; and I afterwards, by his direction, made inquiry at the Uxbridge Bank, and stated to him the information I got there; I took the bill there, and returned it to my master; I went with Mr. Neil to the house and saw the prisoner apprehended; I made inquiry for him, and he was called from another room - I had an officer with me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did he not say, in your presence, that if the bill was a forgery he had been the dupe of others? A. Yes, he did; I believe he mentioned the name of Askam, but I will not be positive - he did not say where he was to be found till he went to the Police-office; the question was not asked before that - there was nothing said respecting Askam's name; the prisoner gave to the Magistrate such information as led to the finding of a person named Askam.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am the officer who attended the last witness - I heard the name of Askam mentioned at the Police-office; the prisoner gave me a direction where to find him - I saw Askam at the Mail Coach, in Sherborne-lane, which was the place where the prisoner told me to find him; he told me that he was the man that he received the bill of - Askam promised to attend at Queen-square.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not also say that if this bill was a forgery he himself had been duped? A. He did; I went into his house at No.5, near Lambeth-walk - Mr. Neil's young man went in first and spoke to him, and then he came out; I desired Askam to attend at the office, and give an account of the transaction - I told him what time to attend in the evening; I did not endeavour to find him afterwards, and have never seen him since.

Re-examined. The prisoner wished Askam to come; I did not tell Askam at the time that the prisoner said he was duped by others.

JAMES BURTON . I live at Beel-heath, near Cowley. I had no account in January last at Glyn's, the bankers, nor any money in the Uxbridge Bank: nor ever had at either of them - I am not a man in circumstances to give acceptances for 60l.; I do not know the prisoner at the bar - this bill is not my acceptance; I never authorized nor employed any other person to accept that paper for me; I did not, in January last, owe the prisoner any money- I have a brother named Thomas living at Uxbridge; he is a brickmaker, and a man of property.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What are you? A. A brick-maker , and make bricks for my brother; I have been in that business nearly thirty years; I became a bankrupt in it in 1824 or 1825 - I did not obtain any certificate; my debts under that commission amounted to between 3000l. and 4000l. I have been in the habit of accommodating a few of my friends with my acceptances; I do not think I have accommodated twenty persons with my acceptances, but I will not swear that I have not; I was examined about a month ago at the Queen-square Police-office - I do not recollect stating there that I had never given any acceptance as an accommodation; I recollect afterwards swearing that I had given one within six weeks of that time, to a person of the name of Marcus, who is a general-dealer, I believe, in some sort of things, and lives at No. 6, Red Lion-court, Fleet-street; I stated at Queen-square Police-office, that I did not know where in Fleet-street Marcus lived - I forgot then, it slipped my memory; the amount of that bill was 19l. some odd shillings; I do not recollect that I stated to the Magistrate that I did not know the amount of the bill, or where it was made payable: I have not seen Marcus since, and do not know where I could find him; I know where he lives if I should be fixed with the payment of that bill; I never lent my name to Mr. Marcus as an accommodation but that once - I have been fixed with the payment of these bills in every instance in my former accommodations; I do not remember whether I have ever been reimbursed - I have had no money transactions with any persons - I never got from Mr. Marcus 10l. on account of a bill of exchange, purported to be accepted by my brother; my brother gave me a 100l. bill which he accepted in my favour, I think about two or three months ago; I heard of Mr. Marcus then for the first time, and that he was in the habit of discounting bills; I went to him, and gave him the bill to get discounted for me - he kept it for near ten days, pretending he could not get it discounted; I was kept in London waiting for the bill ten days; my brother was a little uneasy about it - he came up and saw Mr. Marcus, and demanded the bill back, which Marcus gave him; then Mr. Marcus came to Cowley, and made out his bill for 8l. for expences, and desired to get the bill discounted; he said he wanted me to pay him the 8l., then he said if I could accommodate him with a 19l. bill he could pay it away for some stoves that he wanted to put into his house, and when the bill became due he was to find his part and I mine; this was the acceptance of the same brother, who is represented to be a person of fortune; it was not an accommodation to me; when my father died he left some property in my hands, and this was a part of it; Marcus gave up the bill to my brother, the acceptor; I

have had in my hands a bill of exchange for 90l., purported to be accepted by my brother.

Q. Did you not take a bill of exchange out of the hands of Keating and Co. to avoid a prosecution? A. I refuse to answer; I never in my life accepted bills of exchange in blank, to my knowledge.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were the accommodation bills you accepted used before you became a bankrupt? A. Before; I do not believe any of them were proved under my commission - part of them were in existence before the commission; I cannot say how many I have excepted since the commission - it is not ten, certainly; I never put my name on a blank piece of paper for the last two years, certainly - when I speak of my brother, I always mean Thomas, the brick-maker.

JOHN ELLIS . I am a brick-maker and scavenger; I live in George-street, New Road. I know James Burton, and have seen a great deal of his writing - if he had sent this bill to me I should have thought it was not his handwriting; it is not in the usual way he writes - I was examined at Queen-square; I do not know on whose behalf - it was about the 12th of August.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do I understand that you have seen James Burton write? A. Many times; I have 1327l. worth of his bills, which are unpaid.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have 1327l. of James Burton's bills; when where they given to you? A. At different times before his bankruptcy; I am his assignee - they were bona fide bills, for goods delivered.

THOMAS WANT . I am a builder, and live in Grove-street, Camden-town. I know James Burton; I have not seen his hand-writing for five years, but think I should know it if I saw it - the acceptance to this bill does not appear to me to be his writing.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you ever see him write? A. Yes, five years ago; he owes me about 2000l. - I am one of his assignees; I have known very little of him since, for he was shy of me - I was going to render him once or twice; the amount of debts under the commission is nearly 4000l.

COURT. Q. Was any of your debt secured in bills? A. I advanced him money to make bricks; he did not give me bills, but I had his books, and saw his writing in them.

JOHN FIELD re-examined. I have inquired at Uxbridge for James Burton ; I could find no Burton there.

The prisoner delivered in a long written Defence, stating, that a Mr. Askam, of John-street, Blackfriars-road, had engaged to provide him with the acceptances of a Mr. Burton, of Cowley, as his wife had some money in the Court of Chancery, and that he had received the bill in question from Askam - that he had done wrong in representing that Burton was his debtor, but he was fearful the prosecutor would not take the bill if he had not so done; he denied representing him as Thomas Burton , and stated that on one occasion, when Mr. Neil called, he had torn off a piece of his letter, and written on it an address where Burton could be inquired about.

MR. NEIL. I have been from the residence of James Burton to Uxbridge, and believe it to be about half a mile- I went to a house next door to Day and Martin's, in Holborn, and inquired about Thomas Burton of Cowley.

BOSWELL HEMSON . I am the prisoner's attorney. I was engaged at the time he was taken up, in endeavouring to get same money belonging to his wife from a will, and expected to get it before the Chancery Office closed for the vacation; the last I knew of him before he took the baker's shop is, that he was engaged in buying and selling varnish on commission for about six months in the last year, during which time he had sold this house at Lambeth: I took proceedings against a Mr. Farmer for a debt due to him for varnish.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where does Farmer live? A. Somewhere about Peckham; it was a Surrey writ - the amount was 6l. 8s. or 10l.; I always understood he was a baker before he sold the house in Winter-place, and this summer he told me he was going into the house again - he then said he was selling varnish on commission, that was November last; I proceeded against Farmer, and the debt was paid: I live in Bond-court, Walbrook - I do not know of any other dealing of his in varnish.

MR. BARRY. Q. Farmer's was the only writ in which you was employed to sue? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Has he got into the same or a different house? A. He stated to me that it was the same - before that we used to direct to him in Oakley-street, Lambeth.

MOY THOMAS. I am clerk to Mr. Hemson. About Michaelmas term I served a writ on Farmer, at the suit of James Potter - he lived somewhere opposite the Bricklayer's Arms.

JOHN PAUL . I am a miller and flour-factor, and live in Grange-walk, Bermondsey. I have seen Askam two or three times - he brought me a bill of exchange some time in July - this is it (looking at one); he gave it to me on account of the prisoner, for flour I had delivered on account of the bill - I kept it a day or two, and then returned it to Potter, as it was drawn, contrary to my stipulation, at three months instead of two.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you tell me when in July he brought it? A. Somewhere between the 27th and 31st; Potter owed me 30l. - I have no mills; I have no flour ground at Newbury - I put no mark on the bill; it was the same number and amount as this - it was endorsed by Potter when I had it; I made no enquiry about Burton- I delivered the first of the floor on the 24th of July; Potter had promised me a bill on Burton, of Cowley - he mentioned no Christian name.

MR. NEIL. When I went to the prisoner he gave me the name; I put it down on my own card, and went directly to Holborn to inquire - he did not tear off a piece of my letter, and write it himself, I am positive; I had the card at the office, but have lost it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-169

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

1699. JOSIAH NATHAN, alias JOSEPH LATHAM, alias JOSIAH JONES , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Newton , on the 22nd of April , at St. Dunstan, Stebonbeath, alias Stepney, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 10s.; 7 spoons, value 1l.; 1 pair of boots, value 10s.; 1 hat, value 10s., and 1 lb. of tea, value 6s., his property; 2 pairs of shoes, value 10s.; 2 pair of bracelets, value 9s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 5s.; 2 necklaces, value 3s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 7s; 1 locket, value 7s.; 1 sovereign, 1 crown, and 5 shillings, the property of Mary Drysdale Newton .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM NEWTON . I live in Philpot-street, Mile-end Old-town, in the parish of Stepney . In the night of the21st of April, or the morning of the 22nd, about two o'clock; I was awoke by my eldest daughter, and in consequence of what she said, I went into her room, and discovered that almost every article of box or trunk had been rummaged - I do not mean that all the contents were gone, but some were gone; they had been well examined - the boxes were not broken open: a watch, which hung at my daughter's bed-head, had also been removed - I was the last person up the night before, and went to bed about eleven o'clock; I examined every part of the house at that time, and saw it was perfectly secure, the doors, windows, and every thing; in the morning I found a pannel moved from the back-door of the house, leading to the garden, by means of a centre-bit - it appeared they had got in through the aperture, which was quite large enough to admit a body; the door was wide open - they had also unbolted the front door, and unlocked it; that had evidently been opened from within, and I suppose, with a view to get out that way - I made an alarm in front of the house on my daughter giving the alarm; a watchman appeared, and came over the yard to the back door - I then went down, and observed things as I have stated; I, the watchman, and aninspector of the watch of an adjoining parish, examined the premises behind - we found a small crow-bar in the kitchen, a stick by the back-door at which they entered, and a hat and a round for cap in the timber-yard at the side of the premises; I had a watch-dog in the yard - I believe it was partly a bull-dog; it was perfectly well over night, about eight or nine o'clock, when I saw him, and in the morning he appeared in extreme agony - his hind-quarters seemed in great weakness, and about six o'clock that morning he died; I thought I observed a swelling about his neck - he was skinned after death, but I did not see the carcase; I prosecuted a man, named King, for this felony. Having found the cap, stick, and hat on the premises, I made application at Lambeth-street next morning; Shelswell accompanied me to where the hat and cap were - I shewed them to him; he has had them ever since - in consequence of my application to the Police, the prisoner was apprehended about the 16th of May last; he was examined and remanded, probably about seven times, and was not detained on this charge.

Q. After that, in consequence of some disclosures, did you employ the Police again? A. I went to Lambeth-street in consequence of information, and got a search warrant - I went with the officers to execute it; we called on the prisoner's wife on Fish-street-hill, where she worked - we took her from there to her lodgings, in Prince's-place, Walworth-common, Surrey; we were introduced to the sleeping-room of the wife, made search, and there we found a pair of bracelet-snaps in a small box - I supposed them to belong to my daughter, and in consequence of what she said, I returned to the premises, and found a pair of gold ear-rings, and brought them away in consequence of a description from her - Shelswell has got them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You have said the prisoner was in custody on another charge - do you happen to know he has been acquitted on that charge? A. Yes - I think it was on the 5th of August that I searched the premises at Walworth; I have ascertained that the prisoner and his wife have been some time separated - I found the wife living in Prince's-place; I understand the prisoner was not living there - he was not apprehended there, certainly; I found nothing but the bracelet-snaps and earrings, that I claimed - they are not of much value, and a very small portion of the property stolen; in the first instance, the bracelet-snaps were said to belong to the prisoner's wife's sister - his wife's sister said so; the same person has claimed the ear-rings - I did not see that my dog bled at all; I suppose he had been beaten to death, because there appeared to be a swelling on the neck - it might be half an inch larger than the night before.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What was the value of the property you lost that night? A. I suppose 20l. or less would replace the whole that was taken away - I first saw the prisoner in custody in the middle of May; he was in custody from that time till the Croydon Assizes - his wife was at large when I saw her.

COURT. Q. Did you hear any noise in the night? A. I heard footsteps when I left my room to go to my daughter's, when she gave the alarm about two o'clock - they were not my daughter's footsteps; they were down stairs by the back-door of the house, and could not be the footsteps of any of my family - I have a wife and seven children; I did not hear the dog cry at all - my daughter did not come into my room; she gave the alarm by knocking at the door - I was asleep when she gave the alarm.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am a watchman. I was on duty on the night of the 21st of April, near Mr. Newton's house - in the course of the evening I saw some very suspicious looking people, and directed my attention to the people passing and repassing, and among them was James Brown, who was convicted last Session; and I observed the prisoner at the bar - I saw them together; they were passing between eleven and twelve o'clock - about half past eleven they were passing by Mr. Stevens' oil-shop, about twenty-five yards from Mr. Newton's.

Q. Look at the prisoner - speak advisedly, and tell me whether he is the man? A. I know him perfectly well -I have not the least doubt of his person; he had, to the best of my recollection, a round hairy cap on, and a stick in his hand - I did not notice his dress further; I had seen him about my beat before, and knew his person before -I was relieved about a quarter to one o'clock; Mallett succeeded me - I gave him notice to be vigilant and attentive, having some suspicion on my mind respecting those two men.

Cross-examined. Q. One man has been already executed for this robbery? A. He has; I recollect giving evidence on the former trial.

Q. Now, did you state on that former examination, that you saw two men, one of whom you knew, and the other you did not know? A. No, I did not say exactly that -I said I saw two men, and the prisoner Brown I knew well; I do not recollect your asking if I had as good a knowledge of the other as I had of Brown - I will swear I did not say I did not know the other; I went before the Magistrate in May, and stated that I knew them both - I stated what I have stated here; the prisoner was not discharged - he was

manded; I believe he was not at that time in custody for another offence-I believe no bill was preferred against him for this offence till now; there was a Session here in June and July-no bill was preferred against him at those Sessions, that I know of; I expect I was not more than ten yards from the two persons I saw - I never swore I was not more than one hundred yards; I believe I did state, on the last trial, that I knew one of them better than the other-I recollect I did say so; and that the prisoner I knew so well was Brown.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was Brown tried here at the Session next after you had been before the Justice? A. I believe he was-I believe there has been a session between that and the present; I have not a doubt of the prisoner being the man I saw that night-one was about a head taller than the other; the prisoner was the tallest-I always described him so: the tall man had the cap and stick.

COURT. Q. You have said at the trial here last Session, that you knew one better than the other? A. I had seen one oftener than the other; the expression I made use of might be that I knew one better than the other - I have no doubt of the prisoner, but I had known the other longer; I recollect the prisoner about the neighbourhood for three or four months; I considered that he did not live faroff-I did not know his name, but knew his person for three or four months before the robbery; I never spoke to either of them.

Q. What induced you to notice him so as to know him again? A. I had frequently seen him as I have desribed, with a cap and stick, the same sort of hair cap; I never heard him speak, to my knowledge - I never knew his business, or where he lived, but considered he lived across the Commercial-road, by seeing him go srequently that way.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you appeared at the several examinations, and Brown was committed, was he committed alone? A. He was; the prisoner was not committed with him.

WALTER MALLETT . I am a watchman of Mile-end, and succeeded Andrews on his beat at one o'clock on this night - he said something to me about some men; about two o'clock Mr. Newton called out of window for assistance-I went to the house, and saw a person making his escape over the pales in front of Newton's premises; he saw me, retreated back, and made his escape at the back of the premises - I did not see him escape; I was near him when he got over the pales in front-I did not see more than one man on the premises; I saw two men coming from the premises, by the gas-lights at the Bedford Arms, which are at the back of the premises-I observed as they ran by the light, that one had a hat on, and one was a head taller than the other; the one who had not hat on was the tallest-I cannot positively say whether the other had a cap, but I believe he had neither hat nor cap on; I am positive he had no hat-I could not see them so distinctly as to swear to them, other wise than by their size; Andrews had mentioned to me about some men he wished me to have an eye upon, and the two men agreed in size with his description.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you venture to swear that you stated on the former trial, that the man had no hat on? A. I said I could swear the short one had a hat on; I think I said the other had no hat on, nor cap - I will swear I stated so; I said the bind one had a hat on - the short one was the hind one; the other had passed the gas-light- I think I stated the other had passed the gas-light before I could discern him, but I stated he had no hat.

Q. Did you not state he had passed the gas-light, and you could not see what he had on? A. I do not recollect stating any such thing.

Q. Will you swear you did not? A. I believe I did - well, I did; I could not see what he had on, by the gaslight - I could not see what he had on.

Q. Then, what do you mean by swearing that he had not a hat? A. That is the best statement I can give - I said I could not see what he had on; I saw him after he had passed the gas-light, and then I am positive he had no hat on - I pursued him after he passed the gas-light; I had not been pursuing him two minutes when the short one passed the gas-light. I stated on the last trial that I had a great coat on, and the man kept gaining ground on me; I have not said now that I was nearer to him.

Q. You have said you saw him nearer after he passed the gas-light than before, and he had no hat on then? A. Well, I do not know but I might be nearer; they did gain ground - I believe I said on the last trial that he had no hat on; I will swear I did: I believe I did not state that I could not tell what he had - I said he certainly passed the gas-light before the other, and I could see the other clearer than the first, but to the best of my recollection I said he had no hat - I did state so.

Q. Are you perfectly certain that you swore he had no hat? A. I really forget now; I stated on the former trial that I saw he had no hat on - I am quite positive of that, but the other one I saw clearer than him.

COURT. Q. On the former trial Brown was the only person tried? A. Yes; very few questions were put to me respecting the tall one.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you not asked by the counsel for the prosecution on the former occasion, whether you could or not say what the other man had on? A. I think I stated I could not see him so perfect as the other - I was not asked whether he had a hat or not; I believe I was not asked whether I could see what he had on.

Q. Do you mean to state positively that you said on the former occasion that the other had no hat on? A. I think I did not state no such thing.

COURT. Q. What are we to understand by that - you are asked whether you recollect the tall man? A. I believe the question was never put to me.

Re-examined by MR. CLARKSON. I certainly stated I could not see him so clear as the other, but I think I said in my first statement, that he had no hat on, if I have a recollection - I believe I did not state on the former occasion that I could not see what the other had on; I said he had no hat on, but that Brown had a hat - I do not recollect stating that I did not know what he had on; I think I stated he had no hat - I did not state that I could not see what he had on

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Brown alone was on trial then? A. Yes; the Judge asked the questions on that trial; Brown's counsel did not cross-examine me about the manner the tall man was dressed - I believe he asked how far I was off, and whether I was in a box; he asked very few questions - I do not recollect his asking me about the tall man at all.

JOHN LARKIN . I am inspector of the watch of St. George. On the 22d of April, about ten minutes past two o'clock in the morning, I went to Mr. Newton's premises; before I reached the back door, I stumbled over some articles of wearing-apparel; I did not see any person on the premises - I found the pannel of the door taken out by a centre-bit; a person pointed out where he had seen a man getting over the front, and then retreating back; I then traced footsteps over four or five garden-walls towards Bedford-street - I think they were the steps of two persons - I stumbled over some wearing-apparel, which Newton has; I found a hat and a cap stuffed in it, and also a walking-stick and small crow-bar; I brought the crow-bar here at the last trial - the cap was a round hairy one - (Shelswell here produced the cup and stick.)

JAMES LEE . I belong to Lambeth-street. This stick and cap were brought to me by Shelswell; after seeing them I went to No. 43, Rose-lane, Spitalfields, and apprehended the prisoner, suspecting he was the person, having seen him wear a cap similar to that, and carry a stick like that frequently - he lodged there; I knew that before - he was coming down stairs; we desired him to go up again, and when we got into the room I told him I wanted him for a robbery; he said, "What robbery?" I told him for a robbery down the road, meaning the Commercial-road: he said if any one wanted him, they might come there (to his lodgings) to see him; I told him that was not the way I did business, he must go to the office - he then went to the fire-place, took up a poker, made use of many oaths, and said he would not go; that I only wanted him to give him trouble; I told him he had better put the poker down - if he did not, we should certainly shoot him; Shelswell had a pistol, and pulled it out; he then sat down, and afterwards said he would go quietly; I searched the room, and found a crow-bar, dark-lantern, matches, phosphorus-box, and skeleton-key - I took him to the office; he underwent several examinations, and was not committed on that charge.

Cross-examined. Q. When was this? A. On the 16th of May; I knew he had lodged in Rose-lane two days before, and have ascertained since that he had been there three weeks - I have since ascertained that he was living separate from his wife.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Can you tell whether, though they might live in separate places, he was not frequently with her? A. I cannot; she lived at that time in Prince's-place, Walworth.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I am an officer. The things produced are the same as were found at the prisoner's lodging; this is the cap and stick found at the prosecutor's premises - I know the prisoner, and knew his wife; I saw them together in February last; the prisoner was dressed in a blue jacket and trousers, and a hairy cap, as much like this as possible: in August last I and Mr. Newton called on the prisoner's wife; she went with us to her lodging in Prince's-place, Walworth; I had not seen them together there in February; that was at the George, George-yard, Whitechapel - we found a pair of bracelet snaps, in a small box, in the prisoner's wife's room; Newton wished to take them for his daughter to see, and we took them to her; in consequence of what she said, we went back again, and found a pair of ear-rings - Miss Newton had described some ear-rings; it was that induced us to bring them away, and nothing else; they were in the same box as the snaps - I saw the cap and stick on the morning after the robbery; Newton gave me some description; I knew the prisoner was in the habit of wearing blue trousers and a hairy cap; as soon as I saw the cap I took it up, and suspected it belonged to the prisoner at that time, and desired Newton to keep it safe.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you search at Walworth? A. On the 5th of August; I was before the Magistrate in May, and stated all I knew; I have not seen the prisoner and his wife together since February; I do not know whether they have lived separate since then - I knew his wife was living in Prince's-place, and he in Rose-lane.

MARY SHEPHERD . I live in Prince's-lane, Walworth-common; I am the prisoner's wife's sister. The search was made at my house in August; she had lived in that house ever since the latter end of October - I have not seen her husband with her since October last, I am positive; I do not know Sarah Stevens, nor Samuel Barwick.

Cross-examined. Q. Have they, to your knowledge, since October lived separate? A. Yes; these bracelet-snaps were found at my house in possession of the prisoner's wife; I know them - I do not know whose property they are; I know nothing of them; I had a pair of ear-rings like these; if these are not them, they are exactly the same pattern (looking at them); they were my husband's mother's, and one was broken in her ear when she was dying, twenty-five years ago last June; one of these are broken - to the best of my belief they are the same.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had they been in your possession since your mother died? A. They have never been out of my possession - the box was mine; my sister had nothing there; she had free access to my place.

Q. Do you mean to swear positively these are your mother's ear-rings? A. No, because there are so many nlike.

COURT. Q. You say the things were in your box; did she keep any thing in your box? A. Yes, she kept articles of her own in it; the box is in my possession now.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Has any box been burnt? A. Oh, my sister said she burnt a box, but I never saw it - the box is not here.

SARAH STEVENS . I live at No. 44, Rose-lane, Spital-fields. I have seen the prisoner several times, but never spoke to him but once; he took my apartment, (at least a woman who came as his wife did). about the middle of April this year; they slept together as man and wife, I believe, for three weeks; I never heard to the contrary-Lee shewed me the house-breaking implements found in the room; the prisoner came to me in the name of James Jones , a carpenter - he occupied my apartment from the middle of April till the 5th of May.

SAMUEL BARWICK . I am a tailor, and live at No. 30, Lower Chapman-street, St. George's East. I know the prisoner and his wife - I have known the wife about a year and a half; I saw them together in January or February at my house; the wife's brother rented an apartment at my house, they came to see him - they were there together; I do not recollect seeing the prisoner but once there with his wife; I think it was in the afternoon; I did not see them

go away; I do not know what time the prisoner went, but his wife stopped all night; I heard her say in the course of the evening that he was gone, and she was going to stay all night; I believe this was in January - it was then or in February.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know where the prisoner lived at the time? A. No, nor where the wife lived; I heard she was his wife - I have not seen them together since that; whether they came together I do not know; I have not seen the wife since - I had seen her at my house often before, but never saw him before.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I thought you said you had known the prisoner and his wife a year and a half? A. Yes; I think I have, but do not recollect seeing them together except at the time I mention; the prisoner has been at my house I know; he called on his wife's brother I suppose; I have not seen them come together.

Q. Well, but in the same course of time have you seen them going to visit the brother? A. Each going, certainly - it has not been half a dozen times I should think.

COURT. Q. Have you seen each going to your house separately at different times? A. I do not know that I have; I think I have seen the prisoner at my house more than once, but not in her company, not to my knowledge.

MARY DRYSDALE NEWTON . I live with my father. On the night of the 21st of April I heard a noise in the house, and alarmed my father about half-past one o'clock; my room was plundered - I lost a watch from my bed, and a box containing some trinkets (looking at the bracelet snaps) - I think these are mine; I have a very strong opinion of it; I had such a pair like them in all particulars, but no particular mark on them; I had a pair of ear-rings, which I described to my father and the officer when they brought the snaps - these are them I am positive (looking at them) - I have not the least doubt about them; I have bad them eight or ten years - they were given to me by my aunt Drysdale; I broke one after they were given to me.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not speak positively to the snaps, but think they are yours? A. Yes; I am positive of the ear-rings by the colour, and the manner in which they are broken; I believe them to be a common pattern.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you only know them by the break? A. I know them by the look and appearance - they are the same colour, make, and shape altogether; and are set the same as what I lost; I should not have the least hesitation in saying they were what I lost if I had seen them any where; I should not have known them so well if I had not broken them.

JANE DRYSDALE . I am Miss Newton's aunt. I gave her a pair of ear-rings; I had had them between seven and eight years when I gave them to her, which was ten years ago - these produced are the same I am quite sure; I should know them as well if they were whole as broken.

Cross-examined. Q. What enables you to speak positively to them? A. Because I had them so many years before I gave them to her; they are not a very common pattern - I never saw any like them; I bought them of Mr. Coffee, Commercial road, opposite Bermondsey-street; I know them by the shape of the stone and the colour of the stone; they are a particular dark cornelian; I may not have seen them for a year or a year and a half till they were before the Magistrate; they were broken when I saw them last-I knew them by nothing but the darkness of the cornelian. and the shape; I was before the Magistrate.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see them there? A. Yes, and had no doubt about them; there is now a part of the broken piece left on the joint, but I had not noticed that.

MISS NEWTON re-examined. I know there was a piece of the broken part left in the joint, as this is now.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentleman of the Jury, - I beg leave to state that I have been unfortunately tried capitally three times within the short space of three weeks, and am the victim of a foul conspiracy of the officers of Lambeth-street; I do not know why; they have declared, since I have been in custody, that they would hang me if there was a possibility to do it; there must be something more than the ends of justice attached to that - I have no more to say, but trust entirely to your superior judgment; as to the officers speaking to my identity, if they had given such evidence at the office I should have been committed for trial with the unfortunate Brown, and they had it all fresh in their memory then.

RICHARD ANDREWS re-examined. Q. You have spoken of being on duty between ten and twelve o'clock, and seeing somebody who excited your attention - look again, and tell the Jury whether you are positive that is the man? A. I can speak that he is positively the man - I had repeatedly seen him on my beat before; I did not notice his dress particularly, any more than the cap and stick - he had a cap of that description.

The prisoner here, at his own desire, put the cap on.

Prisoner. It is quite a boy's cap.

RICHARD ANDREWS . I am not at all mistaken in the man.

Prisoner. If he had given this evidence at the office I should undoubtedly have been committed with Brown, but no such evidence was given.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18290910-170

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

1700. JAMES CHARGE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , at Hendon , 1 gelding, price 12l. , the property of Peter Coles .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE COLES . I am the son of Peter Coles, who lives at Small-dean farm, Wendover . On the 13th of August I heard him desire Wooster, the servant, to place the horse in the paddock, and on the morning of the 14th it was missing - I received information, and went to Highwood-hill on the 17th, and saw the horse in possession of Hill; it was the same as I had missed - it was well worth 12l.

THOMAS WOOSTER . I am a servant to Peter Coles . On Thursday evening, the 13th of August, between eight and nine o'clock, I remember putting the horse in the paddock by my master's direction; there is a gate to the field, which I fastened - I went next morning, between four and five o'clock, to the paddock to look for the horse; it was not there - I found the gate shut and pinned; I knew the prisoner, his name is James Charge .

HENRY HILL . I keep the Three Crowns, at Highwood-hill. On the 14th of August, a little before ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my house with a horse;

I saw the horse tied to the sign-post - it seemed as if it had been rode hard in the night - I asked the prisoner whose horse it was; he said it was his - it was put into the stable; I understood he wanted to sell it, and asked him if he would sell it - he said he would; I asked what he wanted for it - he said 12l.; I offered him 5l - he said he could not take that, it was too little; I bid him him 10s. more, and he offered it to me for 6l. - I have had horses in my possession many years; I think it worth 10l. or 12l. - I told him I could not give more than I had offered, and should detain him and the horse, as I suspected it was stolen; he said, "Very well," and sat down contented - I sent for a constable; I asked his name in our conversation - he said it was Jem; he gave me no other name till we got before the Magistrate; he then gave his name as James Kirby - I asked him where he had the horse from; he told me that, on the 13th of August, it was at the Black Boy, at Hampstead-he said he had bought it at Dunstaple fair; that a gentleman had it from the Black Boy on the 13th to the Woolpack at St. Albans in his gig, and he had been to fetch it - I asked if they would know him at the Black Boy if I went to make inquiry; he said both the master and boy would know him, that the ostler had started him the day before from the Black Boy, at Hampstead, and the master saw him go likewise - I shewed the horse to Mr. Coles, jun. when lie came up, and gave it up to him - it was the same as the prisoner brought to my house.

JOHN WELLS . I am ostler at the Black Boy, at Hampstead. I know the prisoner's person; I did not see him on the 13th of August - I think the last time I saw him was between five and six weeks before; I am quite sure he was not at the Black Boy with any horse on the 13th.

FRANCIS ELDRIDGE . I am a blacksmith, and live at Wendover. I know Mr. Coles' horse, and saw it at my shoeing-house on the 13th of August.

GEORGE COLES . Our house is thirty-four miles from town.

THOMAS WOOSTER . I had seen the prisoner in the winter - I do not know where he had been living since that.

Prisoner's Defence. I was engaged to bring a horse from St. Albans to Hampstead for a man - he agreed with me, and paid me 5s. for the job; I brought it to Highwood-bill - it being wet I put up there; I had two pints of beer - Mr. Hill detained me, saying he thought it was stolen; I did not know any thing of its being stolen - I had brought it up for the man; he never went to see after the man till eight o'clock at night.

JOHN WELLS re-examined. I did not see the prisoner at our house on the 13th - it did not start off with a gentleman in gig; there was no such person.

MR. COLES. I do not know the prisoner, but have heard of his character being pretty good - St. Albans, I should suppose, is upwards of twenty miles from Wendover.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character till about three years back, since which time they had not known him.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18290910-171

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1701. DANIEL SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August . 1 pair of boots, value 9s. 6d. , the goods of James Nicholas Waylett .

JAMES WOLSONCROFT . I am in the employ of James Nicholns Waylett , a boot and shoemaker , on Fish-street-hill . On the 4th of August, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop with a coconnut, which he offered to sell for 6d.; I said I did not want any thing of the kind - he then offered it for 4d., and 3d., and down to a halfpenny, and then wanted to leave it and call for the half-penny next day; I made no reply. but turned my back; and when I turned again I missed a pair of boots which had stood by his side, and which I had been cleaning three minutes before - I ran down the hill, saw him running across Monument-yard, and followed him round the chapel in Eastcheap; he made a full stop - I saw him take the boots from under his left arm there; I saw them in his hand - I sprang forward, and took hold of the skirt of his coat; he threw down the boots and ran away, but I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Was it darkisk? A. It was nearly day-light; there were not many persons passing - there were two or three; I met hardly any body-he turned three corners, but I had him in sight each time; he turned round before me, but was not out of my sight a moment - we call the property Blucher boots; they are not shoes.

JOHN MANNING . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to me with the shoes; there were a number of people round him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked the gentleman to buy the not - he said No; I went out, and met a young man, who asked if I was a Jew - I said I was; he asked me to buy the shoes, and as I dealt in old clothes I bought them for 4s.; the prosecutor came and took them from me - if I had been remanded I could have brought the witness who saw me buy them; I did not run with them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18290910-172

1702. JOHN MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , 1 watch, value 20s., and I key, value 1d. , the goods of Sarah Thompson .

SARAH THOMPSON . I am single, and live on Collegehill ; I keep a gentleman's house there. On Saturday, the 29th of August, at twenty minutes past one o'clock, I left my watch under a vegetable-cover in the larder, and missed it about eleven at night; the prisoner worked at the house as a plasterer's labourer , till half-past six that day, and had an opportunity of going to the larder; a great many workmen were employed in the house - they were all gone when I missed it; the porter of the house went after the prisoner on the Sunday morning, and on the Monday I saw it before the Lord Mayor, and am certain it is mine. He had worked at the house before.

REECE JONES . I am porter to Mr. Drew, of College-hill. Thompson was minding the house; I heard of her lose between eight and nine o'clock on Sunday morning; I went and found the prisoner in Shoe-lane, where he lives - I had given information to his master: I went for

an officer, and on returning found him with his master at the corner of the court where he lived; the officer took him back into the house, and asked where the watch was-he denied all knowledge of it; the officer refused to take him in charge in the morning - I went in the afternoon with another officer; he then took the watch out of his sob, and I caught hold of it.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, and in crossing from Plough-court, Holboru towards St. Andrew's watch-house, he called Jones - I saw something pass from him to Jones; I saw him take it from his sob - I caught hold of it; it was this watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I worked at Mr. Drew's, and was several times in the kitchen; I saw the watch under the cover, with the key hanging out - something tempted me to take it; I kept it, but did not mean to steal it; I wore it on Sunday, and meant to return it on Monday morning - I denied having it on Sunday, because I meant to return it: in the afternoon I put it in my pocket, and meant to go to Mrs. Thompson's with it; Jones said he would do nothing in it if I would give it to him, and I did; If I had wished to steal it I could have made away with it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-173

1703. WILLIAM BRYDON was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES DEDE . I am in the employ of James Milner , of Crown-court, Old Change, callender and packer ; the prisoner was his servant , and collected money for him - he was to account daily for what he received: he never accounted for this amount - he has lived there longer than me; I have been there three years.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Is Mr. Milner here? A. No - I am sure his name is Milner; I never heard him go by the name of Mellor - I did not know him at Manchester; all the sums the prisoner received were to be paid into my hands; he entered them himself in a rough cash-book in the office, which I have hear; I charge him with embezzling 27s. on the 6th of June, received from Inglis and Co. and 3l. 16s. 6d. on the 4th of August, from Charles Meekin.

Q. Do you recollect when he came home wet one day, telling you he was going out to receive this 1l. 7s.? A. No - I cannot recollect his going out when he complained of being wet; I will swear he did not bring me home this 27s., place it on the desk, and desire me to enter it in the rough book. Three waistcoat-pieces which were found among his clothes have been kept back, considering them to have been stolen; they are at home, not exactly in my possession - I told the officer I meant to detain them, considering them Mr. Milner's; Mr. Milner has discharged an old servant since I have been there.

JAMES INGLIS . I live in Old Fish-street , and keep a carpet warehouse. I paid the prisoner on the 6th of June, 1l. 7s., for Mr. Milner; I know his person, and am certain he is the man - I had paid him money several times for Milner; I saw him write this receipt - (read).

Cross-examined. Q. Had you paid him money before? A. Yes, generally small amounts, for two or three years; I was applied to for this five or six weeks ago, and produced his receipt.

JOHN SPEECHLEY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner about five weeks ago, and brought him to his master's counting-house - he was still in the service; he denied the charge: Mr. Inglis' was the only amount mentioned then.

Cross-examined. Q. When was the second charge made? A. At the third examination.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am clerk to Charles Meekin , of Holborn-hill; he was indebted to Mr. Milner 3l. 16s. 6d. - the prisoner produced a bill to me, and I saw him write a receipt for it, which I produce; he wrote it before me, up in the counting-house, and took it down with an order, which I wrote on the back, for Thompson to pay it.

Cross-examined. Q. He was quite a stranger to you? A. Yes; I know him, because while he was looking down to write the receipt, he had rather a particular head of hair, which struck me he must be a man of colour, and I looked at his face, to see if he was; I did not tell the Magistrate I knew him by a rag on his finger.

ALEXANDER THOMPSON . I am servant to Mr. Meekin. On the 4th of August the prisoner came down to me with a receipt, and an order on the back to pay it; I paid him 3l. 16s. 6d., which I put into his own hands - he thanked me, and walked out; I never saw him before, but am certain of him; I could swear to him as well as to my own brother: here is the receipt, with the order on the back of it.

Cross-examined. Q. You never saw him before? A. Never; my master is in a large way of business - I take cash from hundred's daily, but I can swear to him; I noticed a rag on his finger, but do not speak to him solely by that.

JAMES DEDE . I have seen the prisoner write, but could not swear this receipt is his writing; it appears to me to be feigned hand; he has never accounted for either of these amounts; I am the person he should account to - the bill is attached to this receipt; it is for business done by Milner.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you happen to know that he came to Mr. Milner's from the service of Mr. Glover, of Watling-street? A. I understood so; I have the rough book here.

COURT. Q. Turn to the 6th of June - is there any entry of 1l. 7s. from Inglis? A. There is no such entry; he was not authorized to collect on the 4th of August, so there is no entry on that day - there is no entry of the transaction at all.

MR. BARRY. Q. Did he not account sometimes to Mr. Milner as well as yourself? A. No - if Mr. Milner himself receives money he accounts to me for it; it is the prisoner's duty himself to put down the money he received - I never took money from him till he himself entered it, and the party he received it from; there is no entry of his without a name to it - I do not recollect an instance of Mr. Milner having given me money received by him, for he has not been able to attend to business for six months; I make up my account every morning - I pay cash into the banker's, but keep a floating balance; I have never been urged to make up my accounts quicker than I did.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, declaring that he had paid the 27s. to Dede, desiring him to enter it, as he had come home wet, but denying that he had ever received the

amount from Mr. Meekin's, and stating that the charge arose from vindictive feelings on the part of Dede.

JURY to WILLIAM JOHNSON . Q. Did the prisoner bring the bill with him? A. No; he asked for Mr. Milner's account, which had been left - our regular settling day is the first Tuesday in the month; I paid several others that day - I think he asked for the precise sum, as I always ask what they call for; I am positive of his person - if a stranger had asked for the account, and named the sum I should have paid him.

ALEXANDER THOMPSON . I paid no other sum of 3l. 16s. 6d. that day, to my recollection; I swear I paid that sum to the prisoner; I never saw him before.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY (of embezzling 27s.) Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-174

1704. THOMAS HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 hat, value 10s., the goods of James Muston ; and 1 hat, value 10s. , the goods of the Rev . Caleb Morris .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH HUNT . On Sunday, the 19th of July, I was at the Independent chapel, Fetter-lane , in the clerk's pew, and had a good view of the vestry window; I heard it creak, looked towards it, and saw it raising up - I saw the head of a person at the window, and intimated to the clerk what I had seen; the window is in a court, and could be lifted up the person without climbing.

RICHARD AXELBY . I was at the chapel; my attention was called, and I saw a man getting out of the vestry window with a hat in each hand; I immediately went out of the chapel, round into Cursitor-street and Castle-street, and at the end of Norwich-court, leading into Fetter-lane, I saw the prisoner going deliberately along, with two hats in his hand; when I got within arm's length of him, he saw me, threw them down behind him, and ran off as fast as he could - I followed, calling Stop thief! he had a hat on; I followed him across Fetter-lane, as far as New-street-hill, and on turning the corner Pavey had tripped him up; they were both rolling together - I caught hold of him, and we brought him back with difficulty; he pleaded for mercy when I first laid hold of him; but at the top of Dean-street he began to be violent, and vowed he would not go to prison for nothing; he struck me, and tore my neck handkerchief - I lost my pin; we were obliged to carry him to Holborn-hill - he vowed he would not walk, and dropped down; he was very desperate at the watch-house - they were obliged to lay him on his back and handcuff him: and even then he got to the fire-place, seized the poker, and would gave done some violence had he not been prevented; I do not believe he was drunk - I swear he is the man; one hat was brought back to the vestry, and given to Mr. Muston, I believe.

ADOLPHUS PAVEY . I am a butcher. I tripped the prisoner up as he was running; I took up a hat in Norwich-court, and gave it to Axelby; he kicked me in a dreadful manner - he did not appear at all in liquor, and ran very fast.

ABRAHAM COLEY . I am an officer. This hat was given to me by Mr. Muston; I was obliged to take the prisoner to the Compter in a coach, he was so very violent.

JAMES MUSTON . I am a deacon of the church. I hung my hat in the vestry, and saw no more of it till it was brought in with the thief; the service was going on when I hung it up; the Rev. George Burder was preaching, and the Rev. Caleb Morris hearing him - this is my hat.

REV. CALEB MORRIS . I left my hat in the vestry - it was given to me after service; I do not know who by.

Prisoner's Defence. I certainly was very much in liquor when I was taken - the gentlemen know it as well as I do; I have a wife and child dependent on me, and will take care I am never guilty of the like again.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-175

1705. GEORGE GIBBS and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Augustus Haywood , from his person .

AUGUSTUS HAYWOOD . I live in Gray's Inn-road. On the 24th of July, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Beech-street, Barbican - I put my hand into my pocket to use my handkerchief, and missed it - it was safe twenty minutes before; a gentleman almost immediately came up and gave me information - the prisoners at that time had run away; I joined in pursuit, and laid hold of Jones in a court in Upper Whitecross-street - he took his hat off, and handed me the handkerchief, saying, "Pray, Sir, is this your handkerchief?" I said it was, and kept him; they had run in different directions; I saw Gibbs in about ten minutes - I had not seen them near me.

WILLIAM HARDING . I live in Tower-street, Westminster-road. I was in Beech-street, on the opposite side to Haywood, and saw the two prisoners following him about the length of two houses - and nearly opposite Beech-lane I saw Gibbs take the handkerchief out of his pocket and give it to Jones who put it into his breast, under his coat; they passed on to the corner of the lane; I saw the prosecutor feeling for his handkerchief - I heard one of them say, "He is nobbing for it;" they directly ran down the lane; Haywood came over to me and we pursued; they divided - I saw Jones run down a court, and called to the prosecutor to tell him; I was close behind him when he took him; he gave the handkerchief from his hat - he had changed it from his breast; he said, "Is this yours Sir?"

JOHN WILEY . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners running down Beech-lane together; I followed them into a court into Redcross-street - I ran round Redcross-street, and apprehended Gibbs in Whitecross-street; I found Jones in custody, and took them to the Compter; I found a handkerchief in Jones' hat, which has not been claimed; he said it was his own.

Jones's Defence. There was rather a shorter boy than this before me; I was ten or twelve yards behind him - I saw the handkerchief drop and picked it up - being out of work, I put it into my breast and turned down Whitecross-street; they called Stop thief! I thought I might get away with the handkerchief, which would fetch me 1s. or 2s. - the gentleman called after me; I asked if it was his - he said Yes; and if I would give it him I might go.

Gibbs's Defence. I know nothing of Jones.

GIBBS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-176

1706. WILLIAM GRAYSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Yallowley , from his person .

JOHN YALLOWLEY . I live at Wapping-wall. On the 7th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was at Bartholomew-fair , and went into Wombwell's menagerie - I felt my handkerchief safe not two minutes before I missed it; I had seen the prisoner near me not ten minutes before - on missing it, I spoke to my friend Geddes, who pointed to the prisoner; I immediately seized him - he appeared in company with others, but they were at a distance; I saw them in his company about ten minutes before - he dropped the handkerchief immediately I took him - I did not see him drop it, but I took it from under his feet; he denied taking it - we took him to the watch-house.

CHRISTOPHER GEDDES . I live at Lower Shadwell with my brother, who is a chain dealer. I was with Mr. Yallowley, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his pocket, and put it into his own; I pointed the prisoner out to Mr. Yallowley, who seized him, and the handkerchief dropped at his feet - he denied taking it; another handkerchief, quite a different colour, was found on him - I am sure I saw him take it.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . The prisoner was brought into the compter - I searched him, and found an old ragged handkerchief and 2d. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. Here is the handkerchief I had, it was not torn at all; I was coming through the fair - there was an immense crowd opposite a show - the mob forced me against the gentleman's pocket; he charged me with the robbery - I said I had not seen it; he felt in his pocket, then turned round, saw it laying down, and charged me with it.

MR. GEDDES. I am sure of his person - he never moved after taking it; nobody but him could possibly take it.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-177

1707. ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 4 sovereigns, and 1 pocket-book, value 6d., the property of Edward Redding , from his person .

EDWARD REDDING . I am a boatman , and live near Coventry. Between twelve and one o'clock at night, I lost a pocket-book and four sovereigns from my waistcoat pocket - I was not drunk: I had been drinking at Spring's public-house, in Holborn, for about an hour and a half, with my brother - I only drank ale; we had some spirits with the prisoner - it got late, and rained very hard; I asked Mrs. Spring if she could accommodate me with a bed - she could not; I met the prisoner in the street, and went into a private house in Gloucester-place - I believe we had 3s. worth of drink among the prisoner, myself, my brother, another woman, and the woman of the house; we paid two shillings each for a bed - I had money in my pocket, besides the sovereigns in my pocket-book; I shewed my pocket-book to the woman of the house, when I paid for the bed - I told her what was in it, and that I should expect to find it all good in the morning; I put my clothes under the pillow - my brother and another woman had gone to sleep in another room; I missed my money between twelve and one o'clock - I had not been to sleep, I am certain; the door was not locked - the prisoner was in bed with me, and I felt her draw the pocket-book from under my head she jumped out of bed directly, and I after her - she got out of the room; I could not find the way out - I gave an alarm; the woman of the house brought a light up, and the prisoner was then sitting on the stairs, opposite the room door - she did not get out of the house; the watchman found my pocket-book under a chair in the room we had been in - I am certain it was in my waistcoat pocket, when I put it under the pillow.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had you been roving about that day? From about two o'clock in the morning - I fell in with her about twelve; I went to no public-house but Spring's, except the Blue Posts, to get a bed - I had a pint of beer at the King's Arms about two o'clock; nothing else - I understand Spring is a boxer; I was with nobody but my brother - he is no friend of Spring's, nor is he a fighter; I swear I was not drunk, nor off my guard - I do not think I had above one pint of beer at Spring's, but will not swear what I paid; the prisoner and the other woman were at Spring's - I am not married; I left Spring's between eleven and twelve o'clock - Spring sent no person to the Blue Posts to get a bed; the prisoner's is an up stairs room - the woman pulled the door after her; it was not locked - I paid the prisoner 3s.; I did not have two quarts of gin - we had 2s. worth of gin among us five; no money was found on the prisoner - the watchman took up my brother's woman, and all he found in the house; I am certain the money was in the book, for I shewed it to the woman of the house - I bet 23s. at Spring's on Deaf Burke fighting Cousins; I did not pull out my pocket-book to make the bet - I gave the stake to Mrs. Spring; I was not drunk when I went to bed, or I should have gone to sleep - I never said if the money was given up I would say nothing about it.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a watchman. Spring keeps the Castle in High Holborn - I was sent for a little before five o'clock in the morning, to No. 12, Gloucester-court; it is a common house - the prosecutor had called the watchman, who called me; I found the prosecutor standing at the street-door - he said he had been robbed of a pocket-book and four sovereigns, by a woman up stairs, who he had been with; I went up with him to the room he said he had been in - I found the prisoner in that room; he pulled her out; he was quite sober - the prisoner stood at the end of the room; his brother and another girl were there - he stated he had called his brother down to inform him of the robbery; I found the pocket-book in the room, close to where the prisoner stood - it was the room they had been to bed in; I searched every where else, but found no sovereigns - a man named Hawkins keeps the house, but does not live in it; the woman who manages it for him came up and told the prisoner she must have it, and recommended her to give it up, saying,"You know I saw it, and you saw it, the night before" - the prisoner said she had not got it; the brother said the woman he had been with could not have taken it - the woman of the house was taken up, but discharged; there was a woman sleeping by herself in another room.

Cross-examined. Q. They were all taken up? A. I took the woman and the prisoner - I have often given information of this house to our people; there was a window to the room - the curtains were down; I searched every place as minutely as I could, but did not search any of the women but the prisoner - he insisted that nobody but her could have it, for nobody had been near her; I left the servant to search her more closely than I could -I did not find three shillings on her; she said he had given her three shillings - they were both dressed when I saw them; the servant said she had the key, and she could not get out without being let out.

ABRAHAM COLEY . I am an officer, and was fetched a little after five o'clock - I searched the prisoner; she had half a crown and sixpence, which she said the prosecutor had given her - I searched the house all over, but found no money.

MR. PHILLIPS to EDWARD REDDING . Q. How soon after you went to the house did she take your money? A. In about three quarters of an hour after we went to bed, which was as soon as we had drank the gin - that did not take more than a quarter of an hour; the watchman was not sent for before, because the old woman of the house kept begging her to give me up the money, as she was certain she had it - when I left the room I left my brother sitting with her; the money was not likely to be found on her - she had thrown it through the window, which she owned.

JURY. Q. Was she drunk? A. I cannot say that she was - I met her by the Blue Posts, and took her to Spring's, but did not stop there a minute after - Mrs. Spring would not let me have any thing to drink; I looked under the bed, and am certain nobody was in the room - I felt her drawing my pocket-book out, and could not resist her; she did not take my waistcoat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-178

NEW COURT, Fourth Day.

Fifth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1708. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of James Shears and others, and stealing therein 50lbs. weight of composition metal, value 1l. 5s., and 1 iron bar, value 3d., the goods of James Shears and others .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-179

1709. JOHN WILKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , 2 shirts, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 waistcoat, value 1s., the goods of Hahor Luming ; 2 shirts, value 1l., the goods of Richard Shrimpton ; 2 shirts, value 5s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 2s., the goods of Charles Frederick Auguste Bodahl ; 3 shirts, value 2s., and 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s., the goods of Hugh Rose Fraser . Also for stealing on the same day, 9 shirts, value 32s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s., and 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s., the goods of the said Hugh Rose Fraser .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-180

1710. SAMUEL ROWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 frock, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Keep .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290910-181

1711. JAMES MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 12 knives, value 2s., and 12 forks, value 2s., the goods of John Hinton and another .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290910-182

1712. JAMES LEGG was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , 1 jacket, value 4s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 20s,; 2 shirts, value 10s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; 6 cravats, value 6s., and 2 sovereigns , the property of Joseph Loader .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-183

1713. JOHN FISHER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 2 sow pigs, value 3l. , the goods of William Heard .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-184

1714. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 2 check braces, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Lynes Stephens , Esq .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18290910-185

1715. CORNELIUS NEHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , 30lbs. weight of leaden pipe, value 10s., and 2 cocks, value 3s., the goods of Margaret Harris , and fixed to a certain building .

MARGARET HARRIS . I have a house in St. George's in the East , which I let to the prisoner in the latter end of May; the water pipe was then safe; it was under ground - here is a copy of the agreement for letting the prisoner the house, in which it is stated that he was to lay on the water at his own expense, but he has not done it.

MARGARET GARLING . I live in the same house. The prisoner said he had agreed to take it, and we were to commence his tenants three days afterwards; he took the locks off the doors, and said he was going to send in some furniture.

PHILIP PARISH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; he said he had taken up the lead pipe to put down iron, and had taken off the locks to mend.

Prisoner's Defence. I was to lay the pipe from the main to my house; the pipe was rather in the ground - the locks I took off to get keys.

MRS. HARRIS re-examined. Q. Suppose he had to lay down the water pipe, was it necessary to remove the other? A. No, he was to lengthen it to run into the yard, to make a lodging-house of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290910-186

1716. MICHAEL CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of Mary Powles , widow .

JOHN LANHAM . I am errand-boy to Mary Powles, widow; she keeps a butcher's shop , in Oxford-street . I saw the prisoner take a hat from a board on the threshold

of the door, on the 24th of August; I went to him, and he gave it to me - he seemed quite stupid.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe he was very tipsy? A. No, not at all; he seemed stupid, and said, "Here, here?" he must have got on the step to take the hat.

JOHN BARRETT . I was on the opposite side; I saw the prisoner take the hat, and after he gave it up he ran off -I pursued him to Hanway-street, where he was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-187

1717. JOHN BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 2 pairs of shoes, value 6s. , the goods of Samuel Bassett .

WILLIAM GILBODY . I am in the employ of Mr. Samuel Bassett, a shoemaker of Whitecross-street . On the 3rd of September I did not miss these shoes till the officer brought them back with the prisoner, between five and six o'clock in the evening - they had been taken off the counter; the man had not brought them in above half an hour.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD BURROUGHS . I called at Mr. Bassett's at a quarter before four o'clock on that day, and saw the prisoner walking to and fro, and looking into the shop; I wrote this writing on the bottom of the shoes, which had been sent in as a sample, to get the parish contract.

WILLIAM EDWARD COOPER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the corner of Old-street, near Bunhill-row, about one hundred yards from the shop; he had these shoes tucked up in an apron, and was looking back to see if any one was coming; I went to him; he ran to Featherstone-street, and into a court - when I came up to him he had the shoes in his hand, ready to throw over a wall.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man asked me to carry these shoes for 2d.; he said, "Put them in your apron, and run on to Shoreditch-church;" I went down a turning, which was no thoroughfare.

WILLIAM EDWARD COOPER . He told me at the time that a person gave them to him, but he did not point out any one - he ran as fast as he could.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290910-188

1718. HENRY BELCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , 5lbs. weight of beef, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Jones .

THOMAS SPEAK . I am a journeyman butcher , in the employ of Mr. Henry Jones, of Tottenham-court-road . About two o'clock, on the 31st of August, I was hanging up the meat, and when I was going for the second piece, three lads came and said, "Butcher, a lad has taken a piece of beef;" I turned, and missed a piece that I had salted, out of a dish; I ran out, and saw the prisoner and two other boy s; they ran up Percy-street, and into Rathbone-place; I turned back, went up another street into Rathbone-place, and saw the persons in Church-street; the prisoner went on to Soho-square, and to Carlisle-street; - he dropped the beef; I took it up, and took him; the two other boys had left him.

TYSON ORCHARD . I saw the prisoner drop the beef.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-189

1719. SARAH BLAKENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , 1 cheese, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Hallett .

HENRY HALLETT . I am a cheesemonger , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 24th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I lost a cheese from under the window of my shop; I did not see it got, but I was sent for, and found the prisoner in custody - it had been unloaded from a cart about two minutes before.

ANN HALLETT . I was minding the shop, saw the prisoner stoop, take up the cheese, and put it under her apron - she was walking away; I came out, and took her.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-190

1720. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , 18 yards of printed cotton, value 10s., the goods of Samuel Belcher and William Jones ; and that at the Delivery of the King's Goal of Newgate, holden on the 23rd of October, in the Ninth Year of his present Majesty's Reign, she was convicted of felony by the name of Sarah Raffles .

JOSEPH KAYE . I am in the employ of Samuel Belcher and William Jones , linen-draper s, High Holborn . On the 17th of August. I saw the prisoner take this print from within the door; I followed her, brought her back with it, and gave her to an officer - I did not lost sight of her; she had got about one hundred yards.

Prisoner. He said I put it in my apron, and I had no apron on. Witness. She had some sort of cloth round her, like an apron.

JOHN COOPER . I am a watchman. I received the prisoner and the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that as she was passing the prosecutor's shop, she saw a boy drop the print, which she took up, and was immediately apprehended.

JAMES MEDLYCOTT . I produce the certificate of the prisoner's conviction by the name of Sarah Raffles ; I know she is the person - she was imprisoned for three months.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290910-191

1721. CHARLES PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Edward Flower , from his person .

WILLIAM CHIVERS . I am a porter to Mr. Young, of Bear-street, Leicester-square. On the 20th of July I was standing at the corner of Bear-street ; I saw a gentleman and lady come up the street; the prisoner went behind them, and took a handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, the gentleman turned, seized him, and took the handkerchief from him; a person came up, and took the handkerchief and the prisoner - I did not hear what the gentleman's name was.

Prisoner. Q. Who gave the officer the handkerchief? A. The gentleman did; I went to the watch-house.

Q. Were you outside the door when the night constable asked you if you knew any thing of the transaction? A.

He did not ask me that; he said, "Is there any one else to come in;" but I did not, as I never was before a Magistrate in my life.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am an officer. I produce a handkerchief belonging to a gentleman named Edward Flower , of No. 8, Chichester-rents; he promised to attend the next morning, but he did not; I went to the house, but he was gone into the country - I know nothing of the facts; but I was in Bear-street, and the gentleman gave the prisoner to me - he said he saw the handkerchief on the ground, was going to give it to the gentleman, and he took him.

Prisoner's Defence. What I stated was the fact. I saw two men pick the gentleman's pocket; I crossed the road, and took it up; the gentleman turned, and laid hold of me; I said, "It is your handkerchief, I am going to give it you;" he said, "I think you picked my pocket, and I will give you a night's lodging." I am a spring-maker, and work for Mr. Baxter, in Long-acre.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-192

1722. HENRY WOODWARD , HENRY KEYS , and JAMES KELSEY were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of James Kennerly , from his person .

JAMES KENNERLEY . I was coming down High-street, Bloomsbury , on the 25th of August - there was a mob occasioned by two men fighting; I saw Woodward come up close behind me - he then went to the other side of the mob, came to me again, and took my handkerchief; I saw it in his hand - he went round the mob, and put my handkerchief into his inside pocket, he then went a considerable distance and took a snuff-box from another person; I told the person - he was then taken; there were two others with him; my handkerchief was found in his hat.

JOSEPH COLE . The prisoners were given into my custody; this snuff-box, key, and ring were taken from Woodward's pocket.

Kelsey's Defence. I was looking at a man selling stuff for corns, and was taken.

Woodward's Defence. I picked up the snuff-box at the corner of Rathbone-place.

WOODWARD - GUILTY . Aged 15.

KEYS - NOT GUILTY .

KELSEY - NOT GUILTY .

1723. HENRY WOODWARD , HENRY KEYS , and JAMES KELSEY were again indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Geronimo Valle , from his person .

GERONIMO VALLE (through an Interpreter). I was walking on the 25th of August with my lady - I felt I had lost something - I felt in my pocket, my handkerchief was gone - I saw it afterwards in Woodward's hat - this is it; I had it a few minutes before - I saw the three prisoners together at the time I lost it.

JAMES KENNERLEY . I followed the three prisoners from the crowd in St. Giles' to the other side of Rathbone-place; I saw Woodward take the handkerchief; the other two were close to him; I went and spoke to the prosecutor, but he did not understand me, the lady did - the prisoners then went to the corner of Hanway-street, and looked at a person selling stuff for corns; I laid hold of the three, and said, "Give up the handkerchief you took from that gentleman, and the one you took from me;" Woodward said he had no handkerchief - but a young man took off his hat and there it was.

JOSEPH COLE . I am an officer. The prisoners were given to me; I had seen Woodward and Keys together.

Woodward's Defence. I picked up the two handkerchiefs and the snuff-box in them.

Keys's Defence. I had not seen him at all.

Kelsey's Defence. I had not seen him at all.

WOODWARD- GUILTY . Aged 15.

KEYS- GUILTY . Aged 15.

KELSEY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-193

1724. GEORGE MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a certain man unknown, from his person .

HENRY WILLIAMS . I am a patrol of St. James's. On the night of the 24th of August I was in the Quadrant, in Regent-street ; I saw the prisoner go behind a gentleman -I followed, and as the gentleman crossed the road, the prisoner picked his right-hand coat pocket of this handkerchief; he ran off as he saw me going to lay hold of him, and threw down the handkerchief - I took it up and followed him, calling Stop thief! the watchman sprung his rattle, and he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What time was this? A. About ten o'clock at night - it was dark, but this was between two lamps; he ran down by the County Fire-office and into another street; here is a mark on the handkerchief; as soon as we had taken him I endeavoured to find who the gentleman was, but he was gone, and I could not find him; I was on the opposite side of the way, and did not lose sight of him as he turned the corner; I swear I saw him throw the handkerchief from his hand at the corner of the Quadrant, where it was quite light; I was hardly five yards from him - I swear I saw him take it.

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a watchman. I heard Williams cry Stop thief! I sprung my rattle, and pursued the prisoner up the street; Williams had picked up the handkerchief - I saw him in a stooping position when the prisoner ran from him; I pursued to Queen-street, he made a halt at the door of the Catherine Wheel, and I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. What distance was the officer from the prisoner? A. I should think not ten yards - there were no sharp turnings, they were in a slanting direction; I did not see the handkerchief thrown away.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-194

1725. CAROLINE KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 purse, value 2d.; 2 sovereigns, 2 crowns, 7 half-crowns, 14 shillings, and 6 sixpences, the property of John Morgan , from his person .

JOHN MORGAN . On the 17th of July, about ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Mile-end-road - we went to a public-house and had something to drink; I was going towards home - she still walked with me down Mutton-lane and down another lane; I had a purse containing 4l. 4s. 6d. - I took sixpence out to pay for the drink, and then returned the purse into my right-hand breeches pocket; we then went on to Assembly-passage or place , and within

twenty yards of the top she made a sudden stop, and drew the purse from my pocket; I did stop, but nothing was done to my dress by myself or her; when I missed my purse I taxed her with it; she said she had not got it - I said I would walk up the place to see if I had dropped it; a watchman was crying half-past eleven or twelve; we then searched again for it, and in going down she turned to the right, and I caught her in the act of throwing it away - I saw that she took it from her bosom.

HENRY HOSEMAN . I was on duty and was called - I saw the prisoner throw this purse away, and the prosecutor caught her; he said before, that he had lost a purse of money - the prisoner said she wished she was dead, and had never been alive.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me throw it away? A. Yes.

The prisoner delivered in a written Defence, representing that the prosecutor had given her the purse and money, but as she afterwards refused to comply with a very unnatural proposal, he charged her with a robbery, and ill-treated her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-195

1726. ELLEN KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , I half-crown, and 4 shillings, the monies of John May , from his person .

JOHN MAY . On the 21st of August I was returning from Bagnigge-wells tea-gardens and met with the prisoner, who forced her company upon me, and would walk with me - I repulsed her: and while I was pushing her from me, she took the money stated from my pocket and went off; the money was loose in my pocket.

Prisoner. You said you would go with me, and made use of very bad language, which made me go away.

JOHN SPARDON . I was near the witness, and saw him coming after the prisoner - she was walking; he took hold of her, called Watch! and gave her in charge; while going to the watch-house she dropped half a crown, and I took it up.

MATTHEW DALE . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner; I heard something fall - this half-crown was found, but the shillings were lost.

SAMUEL MOUNT STEPHENS . I am a constable. I received her and the half-crown.

Prisoner's Defence. He said I robbed him of 4s. and a half-crown piece, and I said I would go as far as the Union in the road; I met the watchman, and gave myself up to him - he left me six yards off, and then turned and charged me with the robbery.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-196

1727. WILLIAM EARL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of James Lucas , from his person .

JAMES LUCAS . On the 6th of September, about a quarter-past seven o'clock, I felt a slight touch at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I saw the prisoner running; I followed, and cried Stop thief! I lost sight of him, but he was stopped at the corner of Earl's-court and had my handkerchief in his possession - I suppose not half a minute had elapsed.

HAMMOND WEBB . I have the handkerchief, which I received from the prosecutor - I saw the prisoner run up Byder's-court and then on to Earl's-court, where a man knocked him down and I took him.

Prisoner. He brought me nearly up to Newport-street before the gentleman or the officer came up. Witness. No, it was not so - the handkerchief was in his hand, and he was on the ground.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running up Earl's-court, a person came up and said, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I shall stop you;" he took me into Newport-street- he had the handkerchief in his hand, and said he had picked it up; he would not go to the watch-house - he said he had stopped me, and that was all he had to do.

JAMES LUCAS . The person did come to the watch-house, and I asked the watch-house-keeper if it was necessary for him to sign the book - he said No, two were sufficient- I am positive the prisoner ran away, and no one else was near me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290910-197

1728. JOHN COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

GEORGE SUELTON . I am a street-keeper. I was on duty at the Seven-dials , on the 19th of July, at a quarter-past eleven o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner take this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket - there was another person just behind him, and as I was following the prisoner the other turned back; I said to him,"Old man, it will not do;" the prisoner then turned back, an