Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th July 1829.
Reference Number: 18290716
Reference Number: f18290716-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., MAYOR.

SIXTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 16th DAY OF JULY, 1829, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT - HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY HENRY STOKES , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, NO. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1829.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON. AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir William Alexander , Knt., Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir James Parke , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Perring , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; George Scholey , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; John Garratt , Esq.; William Venables , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; John Crowder , Esq.; and Charles Farebrother , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

John Pottle ,

Samuel Neal ,

William Marshall ,

William Warden ,

William Mounsey ,

Alexander Clarke ,

William Fox ,

Richard Scarr ,

John Marriot ,

Ebenezar Harvey ,

Thomas Must ,

G. R. Whittingham .

Second

Jas. Josiah Arnold ,

James Bethel ,

John Chapel ,

William Clark ,

James Barber ,

Thomas Middleton ,

William Neat ,

John Wood ,

John Chas. Crook ,

Phillip Barnard ,

Chas. Jno. Freeman ,

Edward Henman .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Wm. Conset Wright ,

William Ashcroft ,

Thomas Thomas ,

John Goodwin ,

William Ashley ,

Michael Foot ,

Ashley Barret ,

William Bleakey ,

Thomas Freelove ,

William Fosbrook ,

Pike Channel ,

Thos. Wm. Dunch .

Second

Thomas Woodward ,

John Todd ,

Samuel Soames ,

James Steadman ,

John Seaborn ,

Thomas Ratcliff ,

John Rushmer ,

Thomas Pout ,

George Mills ,

John Rex ,

Isaac Thomas ,

Daniel Sergeant .

Third

Peter Doyle ,

James Kent ,

Thomas Dowding ,

Tim. Hutchinson ,

John Arnold ,

William Homan ,

William Bawtree ,

Godfrey Holdsworth

Joseph Clark ,

Andrew Cathrow ,

Geo. Aug. Clements ,

Robert Floyd .

Fourth

Rich. Peter Smith ,

John Humble ,

Thomas Smellie ,

John Kircaldy ,

Nathaniel Rex ,

John Leatherdale ,

Thomas Rogers ,

Charles Pollard ,

John Oliver ,

Richard Lumley ,

Rich. Hallet, Jun. ,

William Heath .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JULY 16, 1829.

THOMPSON, MAYOR. - SIXTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18290716-1

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1376. BRIDGET DELANY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 1 gold neck-chain, value 3l.; 3 brooches, value 3l.; 1 watch, value 30l.; 2lockets, value 14l.; 1 pair of shoe-buckles, value 5s.; 2 pocket-books, value 3s.; 1 dressing-gown, value 3s.; 4 pairs of trousers, value 2l.; 4 pairs of pantaloons, value 1l.; 9 waistcoats, value 9s.; 4 yards of silk, value 20s.; 1 scarf, value 20s.; 5 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 7 pairs of stockings, value 10s.; 2 chair-covers, value 2s.; 1 writing-case, value 5s.; 1 work-box, value 5s.; 1 sash, value 5s., and 1 gold ring, value 6s. , the goods of Anne Bentinck , commonly called Lady Ann Bentinck , in her dwelling-house, and ANN DELANY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

LADY ANN BENTINCK . I have a house in George-street, Hanover-square . I had let it to a Mr. McNamara, and was at Brighton at the time in question, and did not occupy it myself; the prisoner Bridget Delany had been in my service a few days before. I went there on the 2d of July - I had left some jewels in a cabinet in the house, precious stones, chains, rings, brooches, and a gold watch; they were all in the cabinet in the house; I first missed my watch, then the diamond ring, a brooch, and several things, all from the cabinet - Bridget was in the house when I went to Brighton, but I paid her her wages; I left her in the house -Mr. McNamara was coming in that day, and he took the servants; on missing the things, I went to Mr. Pollard, my agent, he is not here - the cabinet was not broken open; I could not discover how it was opened - the prisoner had been sent away at the time I missed the property; I had been to the house on the 2d of February, when I came to town, and I went to the cabinet and saw the things safe; I left the house in October - the property was safe then.

HENRY GODDARD . I am a Police-officer, at Marlborough-street. On the 2d of July I was employed by Mr. Pollard to examined this house, which I did; I saw the cabinet in the drawing-room - the property must have been taken out by means of a false key; the lid appeared as if a chisel had been used, but had not succeeded - I opened it with the key in her ladyship's presence; I afterwards went down in the wine-cellar, and found the door of that had been forced open; I then went to No. 4, Johnstone's-place, Marylebone, and inquired if they could tell me where Mr. McNamara's servant was, as I had a parcel for her to take into the country - upon that Ann Delany came down stairs; I asked her for Bridget - she said she would take me to her daughter's lodging in Kendal-mews; she did so- I did not find Bridget there; I then asked where she thought she was; she said very probably she was gone to her sister's, which was four or five miles from town, but she did not know where it was - in about half an hour I went back to Kendal-mews alone, and found the two prisoners in the room with a young man named Phillips; I called Phillips on one side, having understood he was in Mr. McNamara's service - I afterwards told Bridget that in the absence of her Ladyship her cabinet had been opened, and a watch and other jewellery taken away - this was in the hearing of Ann; she said she knew nothing of it - I immediately afterwards observed her whispering to her mother; I could not hear what was said, and I said they must come with me to Mr. McNamara's immediately - on coming out I locked the door, and put the key into my pocket; Ann Delany walked away without saying any thing - I took Bridget and Phillips to Mr. Pollard's; I left Bridget in the custody of Pollard while I took Phillips to the watch-house - I soon returned to Pollard's, and from information I afterwards received, I asked Bridget to return with me to her lodging, and asked her what she had done with the box which contained the jewellery; she said she would take me to Kendal-mews, and give it me - I neither threatened nor promised her; this was on the road there - when we got there, she showed me a key; she said that was the key of the box, but she dare say her mother had taken the box away, as she could not find it, for she had whispered to her mother, and told her to taken it away; I said "Was that what you told your mother when you whispered?" she said Yes; I left her at the lodging with Mr. McNamara, who had gone with me, and I went to Johnstone's-place in search of Ann Delany - she was not there; I got information, went back to Kendal-mews, and found her there with her daughter - she was looking over several things; I asked her where the box was; she then said to her daughter."What! you have not been telling any body about it - don't mention any thing about the young man;" at the same time holding her fist up to her daughter; the daughter said, "Let them have the box," she fell on her knees, and implored her mother to give the box up - the mother said,

very well, she would go and get it, telling me at the same time to stop behind; I told her No, she was in my custody, and I must go with her - she took me to Johnstone's-place, up two pairs of stairs, and reached down a key which hung over the fire-place - she took me down stairs into the yard, unscrewed the staple of the wash-house door, and behind that door was another small door, which she unlocked with a key she had taken from up stairs; I said, "What, are the things here?" and was going to stoop down to search for them - she pushed me aside, and said,"No, I hid them, and I can find them;" she then searched among the rubbish, and gave me this box, which contains a gold seal, a topaz brooch, a gold chain, a locket, a pair of gold ear-rings, and two other brooches - the neck-chain and locket were in a small pill-box, on the lid of which is written, "Lady Charles Bentinck;" I saw her endeavouring to conceal something - I asked her what it was; she said Nothing: I then took from her, out of a leathern apron, which she was in the act of throwing away, this box, containing a pair of buckles; I asked her who they belonged to - she said to her daughter - that her daughter had them given to her by Dr. Hill, who she had lived servant with three or four years ago; I then took the things in my possession, and took her to Kendal-mews; on the road I asked her how long it was since she had concealed the two boxes in Johnstone's-place; she said, "Three or four days ago;" when I arrived at Kendal-mews, I took her and her daughter on to Marlbourough-street Office, and on the road there I asked Bridget, in the hearing of her mother, if the box was in the room when I first got there - she knew I had found it then; she said that when I first came the box was on the table under the window, and that when she whispered to her mother, she told her to take it away, and that her mother returned when she left me, put the window up, and took the things away; the mother then said, that when I went away with Bridget and Phillips she had returned, pushed the window up, and took the things away to Johnstone's-place - I took Phillips to the office, and afterwards returned to Kendal-mews with Ballard, and on searching the room found several pairs of drawers, pantaloons, and waistcoats, on several of which was the name of the late Lord Bentinck; they were remanded till Friday - I took Ann to the New Prison myself, and on the road there I asked how long ago it was since she had received these things of her daughter - she said six or seven weeks ago, two days before Mr. McNamara came to live in her ladyship's house; she said she had been very uncomfortable ever since she had had them, and was afraid to offer them to pledge, or to dispose of them, for fear of being found out - Bridget told me at the second examination, that she had done it all herself, and she had been very uncomfortable; she seemed in great trouble - she said Phillips saw the things lying about, called her up stairs, and said, "Take these things, for her ladyship will never miss them, and if I were you I would take them;" she said they were lying about the room; Phillips is committed for re-examination to-morrow - we have been able to trace nothing to him, except what she had said, and that she has contradicted since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BALLARD . I went in company with Goddard, and found these clothes in the room at Kendal-mews, and on the top of the bookcase I found two duplicates, in a dirty bit of paper, one for a ring, pawned for 4s., and a brooch, pawned for 4s., in the name of Ann Lee , both at Neat's, in Duke-street - I found two gold watches in the room, which have not been identified.

JOHN STUBBING. I am servant to Mr. Neat. I have a brooch and ring pawned - I do not know who by.

BRIDGET DELANY - GUILTY (of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.) Aged 28.

ANN DELANY - GUILTY . Aged 69.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-2

1377. JOSEPH HENDERSON and JAMES WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , at Christchurch, 20 sheep, price 30l. , the property of Henry Vigne .

HENRY VIGNE , I live at Walthamstow, Essex . On the 2d of July I had twenty-two sheep - I saw them safe as late as nine o'clock, in my field; I did not count them, but saw the usual number - the gate of the field was fastened with a chain round the gate and the post, and a padlock through the chain links. On the following morning, at a quarter-past nine, I missed twenty of them - a link of the chain had been broken; the gate was closed, but unfastened - they were marked: I had bought eighteen out of the twenty of a man named Charles Burrell , about a month before - I should not know them myself.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you any partner? A.These sheep were my private property.

CHARLES BURRELL . I sold twenty sheep to Mr. Vigne in the early part of June; I marked them myself in two places, on the head and across the loin, with red ochre; I should know the mark again.

JOHN EVERSFIELD . I live at No. 9, White's-row, Spitalfields. and know Henderson. The sheep were brought to my house on a Friday morning; I saw Henderson at my house early on that morning - I do not know the day of the month; it was last Friday week: I was not up when he came - he told me there were some sheep coming; he came into the house - I let him in: he knocked me up; he stood there a little while, and then went away; after that he came back with some sheep - Lancashire Jack was with him, and the prisoner James Wilson; they had the sheep with them - there were twenty; they were left at my house, and slaughtered by my cousin and Lancashire Jack - Henderson is my cousin; they slaughtered them on the Friday, directly they brought them in.

Cross-examined. Q.What became of the carcases? A.They were taken away, and the skins also - I have not seen them since.

GEORGE FOSKETT . I am clerk to Mr. Pocklington, a salesman, of Newgate-market. On Saturday morning, the 4th of July, five sheep, all but one leg, were booked for sale; I do not know who by - they were ordered to be booked in the name of Brown, of Spitalfields - they were sold the same morning, and the prisoner Henderson applied for the account of the sale, between twelve and two o'clock the same day; I refused to give it him.

SAMUEL HARPER . I am in the employ of Mr. Boyce, a salesman, of Newgate-market. Last Saturday week, the 4th of July, four sheep were booked for sale by the prisoner

Henderson; he desired me to book them in the name of Brown, Spitalfields-market; I told him I thought they were not come honestly by - he said nothing, but went away; he said nothing after I made that observation - he said nothing more before than what I have stated.

Cross-examined. Q.Were you examined before the Magistrate? A. Yes, and I told the same story, word for word; I knew Henderson before, but only by the name of Joseph - I did not see the sheep sold, and do not know who bought them; they were sold at 3s. 8d. a stone.

WILLIAM OWEN . I am servant to Mr. Thompson, a salesman, of the Borough skin-market. Last Saturday week, between one and two o'clock, twenty skins were brought for sale by Lancashire Jack (Flitcroft) - I understand he goes by that name; they were sold, and he received the money for them - they were marked on the head or down the neck, and across the loin, with red ochre; I cannot say whether they were all marked the same way -I only turned one over, and saw it; they were sold to Corderoy, a fellmonger, of Bermondsey - I should know them again: I went to Corderoy's afterwards, to look for them - they were among five hundred more; the fellmonger picked them out, but I recognized them; they are here(looking at two) - these are the same skins I received from Flitcroft.

Cross-examined. Q.They were pulled out by Corderoy, and shown to you? A. Yes - he did not say they were what he bought of me - he pulled out a good many more, and these were picked out from them; a red ochre mark is very common - there were no letters to my knowledge: Lancashire Jack received 7s. 8d. for them, which was more than he ought to have had; they were sold for 5 1/2d. each, and are not worth more; the general price was 6d. - we sold them in the public market; I never saw Flitcroft before, but have no doubt he is the man.

JOHN GOULDING . I am a carcase-butcher, of Whitechapel-market. I saw Flitcroft on the Saturday, coming from Newgate-market, about half-past six or seven o'clock, with a porter's cart, which he had hired, and on the Saturday afternoon, the two prisoners were going by my shop, and were secured; Henderson was taken first - before he was handcuffed Wilson passed, and was taken.

JOSEPH BATES . I am a patrol of Farringdon within. I was in Pocklington's shop on the Saturday, about twelve o'clock - I was speaking to Mr. Pocklington about stopping the account, when Henderson came in, and asked for the account in my presence: I asked him who he had brought the sheep from - he told me from a person named Brown; he did not know where he lived, but he could find the man if I went with him, and I went with him - he said he was to meet him at the end of the Minories, to receive the account of the sheep; I went there with him, but met no person - we went into a public-house, three doors beyond the Minories, and looked round there, thinking he might be waiting there, as it rained very hard, but could not find him; he said he should be sure to find him at the Ten Bells, Spitalfields - we went there, and saw the landlord, the servant, and the pot-boy, but no such person as Brown was known: he said he was a master butcher, and had employed him as a porter; I brought him back to Mr. Pocklington, in Newgate-market, and saw Mr. Pocklington's nephew, who had refused him the account in the morning, and had directed me to his uncle, in Smithfield; I went there, and he told Mr. Pocklington that he was merely employed as a porter, and that he could bring Brown forward on Monday morning, and I suffered him to go, but took him into custody again about an hour after; White's-row, Spitalfields, is in the county of Middlesex.

JOSEPH STONE. On the 4th, I apprehended Flitcroft. I got two skins which I have produced, from Corderoy, the fellmonger, of Bermondsey: Owen was present.

CHARLES BURRELL . These are the skins of two sheep, I sold to Mr. Vigne; they have my mark on them.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you in the habit of selling sheep? A. Yes; the mark is not initials - I marked them in this way; I have sold others with the same mark, and so may a good many graziers in Essex - there is another mark on them, which would not be noticed; they had been shorn very badly, which disfigured them very much, and I ran the shears over them, and in doing so I found a small spot of paint, by which I know them: I saw eighteen of the skins, and on both these two there was a small piece of paint when they were found - I pulled it off - it is not visible now, for after skins have been in the pit the wood comes off very easily; I have no hesitation in swearing to these two skins, from the state they were in when I took them out of the pit, and here is the ochre mark, which I swear is the mark I put on them; there was a spot of a mixture called paint, which sheep are dotted with - it was on these two skins, but came off on my touching them.

COURT. Q. It was on them when you first found them? A. Yes, at Corderoy's - I identified them as they came out of the pit; three or four hundred were pulled out - I saw that private mark on five or six of them, but being in water the least thing will make it come off; I had seen that mark on most of them when I sold them to Mr. Vigne - it was not my own mark, I found it there when I marked them; I bought them of a Mr. Tye, a sheep-salesman, in Smithfield - he is not here.

JOHN FLITCROFT . I was in custody on this charge, and have been admitted a witness for the Crown. On Thursday afternoon, the 2d of July, I was coming up Whitechapel-market, and met the two prisoners in company; Henderson asked me if I was willing to go and earn 1l., for he had bought some sheep in the country - I said Yes, I was very poor, and much in need of it; we went through Clapton, and beyond Lee-bridge, all three together - we went to a field - Henderson opened the gate, and said those were his sheep: I do not know how he opened the gate, for he was before us - I do not see what he did to the gate; Wilson and I went in, and brought out twenty sheep - we brought them through Stratford, up the Mile-end-road; I took them to No. 9, White's-row - Henderson left us before we got there, and came to meet us again a little before we got to White's-row; we stopped to have a drop of beer, near the Globe, but Henderson had left us as soon as we came out of the field. The sheep were slaughtered at No. 9, White's-row that day, and taken to market; Henderson, I, and Wilson slaughtered them; I got to White's-row, about three o'clock: after they were slaughtered, six sheep were taken to Leadenhall-market, five to Mr. Challis, and one to Mr. Cross - four were sent to Mr. Mason's, of Newgate-market, and four to Mr. Boyce: Henderson told me he

delivered them at Boyce's - five went to Mr. Pocklington's; I delivered them there, and told Henderson I had done so- I did not go for the account: the other one was cut into pieces - one of the sheep at Pocklington's was without a leg: the skins were taken by me to Mr. Thompson's, Borough-market, for sale - I took twenty there; I laid them down at Thompson's to be sold by commission - I received 7s. 8d. for them; 8d. being the commission at 5 1/2d. each, that would be 8s. 4d.: I left the carcases for sale in the name of Brown, of Spitalfields - I do not know such a person; Henderson told me to leave them in that name. I go by the name of Lancashire Jack.

Cross-examined. Q.Why are you called so? A. Because I came from Lancashire - there is no other reason that I know of; I had not the slightest idea the sheep were stolen: Henderson was a very few minutes before us, and when we got there the gate was open - Henderson stood there, and said those were his sheep; I saw the gate, but observed no chain to it: I have heard the witnesses state where the sheep were disposed of - I heard there was a warrant out against me; I came into the neighbourhood directly, to be taken.

Q. Did it not strike you it would be best to give yourself up? A.Why, I should look better with clean linen, and went to my lodging to change myself; I was taken at my own lodging before I had shifted my linen - I was in custody about ten minutes before I told this story; I was not afraid for myself - it was for the sake of justice; it was more to my credit to state it.

Q. How soon did you suspect they were stolen? A. On Saturday evening; I was taken on Sunday morning -I did not give myself up on Saturday, as I did not wish to be in prison a night more than I need; I have heard of many sheep stealing cases in Lancashire, but was never charged with being concerned, that I swear - if I ever said so I told a lie, for I never was concerned: I have heard of many a forgery in Lancashire - I was accused of being concerned in a forgery in Lancashire, but not of sheep stealing.

Q. Did you abscond? A.Necessity compelled me to go, for want of work; it was not to avoid being taken up- my friends compromised the case; I paid the man the money for the bill myself: there never was a warrant out against me for forgery; I have been accused of something else - I am not obliged to tell for what; I was accused at Guildhall respecting some fat, the property of Lemington and Co. - it was beef fat; I was not accused of stealing - cwt. from the man the fat was sold to - I do not know Back; I was never accused of stealing - cwt. from any body.

Q. On your oath, were you not accused of stealing - cwt.? A. I am not obliged to answer that; I do not know where Back's is - I never was accused of stealing a - cwt. to my knowledge; I do not recollect it - I never was charged with it in my life; I have mentioned every thing I have been accused of to the best of my knowledge - I have been in town about seven years, and am married; I do not know where my wife is - I saw her last, four or five months ago in Somerset-street; I have now come from Giltspur-street - I have not been in Newgate; I do not know that my wife is in prison: I remember a - cwt. being put into the fat sack to make it weigh heavier - I was not accused of stealing it; I did not put it into the fat.

Q.You did not know it was there? A.That has been already tried; I went and sold the skins by Henderson s order - he hired me; I had known him about three months - we started from Whitechapel to fetch the sheep between five and six o'clock in the evening; it was morning when we got the sheep out - I never did such a thing before, but Henderson said they were his; we went a long way beyond Lee-bridge for them - it might be eight, nine, or ten miles.

Q. Of course Henderson paid you the pound? A. I received money for it; he authorised me to take the mo-money from Cross - I got 1l. 5s. 6d., which I kept - I received the money for the skins, and made 25s. of the sheep that was cut up: I had to account to him for the balance: Cross did not ask if I knew Brown - I acted as Henderson's servant; I have been out of service some time - I have jobbed about the market, and been haymaking when the weather admitted; I was last in the service of Mr. Brown, a carcase-butcher, of Whitechapel - he turned me away for neglecting his work, and getting drunk; he never charged me with theft to my knowledge- I give evidence for the sake of public justice, and to save myself certainly; I expect if they are convicted, I shall get off.

Prisoner Wilson. Q.Were you not aware that I was engaged to go for the sheep, and did you not see me paid? A.He told me he was engaged, and I saw him receive 10s. from Henderson's hands.

COURT. Q.Was that paid in your presence? A. It was; Wilson asked him for some money - he said if he would go to the Queen's Head, White's-row, he would give him some; we went there together - he gave him 10s., and said was that sufficient, and was he satisfied for his labour - Wilson said Yes; I have seen Wilson before, but was not much acquainted with him - he was present when Henderson asked if I would earn 1l., and heard what was said; I did not know where the sheep were to go to - he said he should go before us, and prepare a place, and meet us in Osborne-street, near Whitechapel; he went on alone to the field before us to open the gate: I do not think Wilson was present when he told me to deliver the carcases in the name of Brown - I did not see Wilson after he received the 10s., till he was in custody; I never knew Henderson deal in sheep before - he was a butcher, and I have been a butcher: I had known Henderson for three or four months.

Henderson's Defence. Three parts of what Flitcroft has said is false: I never employed him, nor went to get the sheep.

Wilson's Defence. I met Henderson on Thursday morning, about eleven or twelve o'clock; he asked if I had any thing to do - I said No; he said he had some sheep he was going into the country with, for a man, and was ordered to engage a man - if I would go I should have a few shillings for my trouble; I went and helped to lay them down to slaughter - they were done up, and I went to the public-house, received 10s., and saw no more of him.

Four witnesses gave Henderson a good character.

HENDERSON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

WILSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-3

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1378. DAVID BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 7 silver spoons, value 4l.; 1 wine-strainer, value 1l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 12s.; 1 fork, value 12s.; 2 butter-ladles, value 1l.; 1 nutmeg-grater, value 6s.; 1 knife, value 3s.; 2 forks, value 5s.; and 1 skewer, value 6d., the goods of George Fortescue , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE FORTESCUE . I live at Muswell-hill . On the 25th of June I was in my garden; I told Miss Gonin, who lives in the house, to bring me some seed - she came to me in the garden, returned to the house, called to me, and said a thief had entered and taken the silver, which was kept in the cupboard, on the left-hand side of the fire-place; I went out, and saw some men on Muswell-hill - they directed me after three men in a cart, who had gone down the hill, and at the bottom of the hill I met Mr. Smeeton; I went on in his cart, and in three or four minutes saw a cart on Mount Pleasant: before we got up to it, some men got out of it - they were about two hundred yards off; there were three men by the cart, but I had only seen two in it; one of them went down a lane on the left - the third, who was by the cart, went to the right, and one remained in the road; we drove up, and both jumped out of the cart -Smeeton collared the prisoner: our horse was very restive at being driven so hard, and I held it by the head; the prisoner, seeing this, struck Smeeton - he appeared to be loitering about the cart; when we got up he was about three yards from it - he got from Smeeton, and at that instant two men came up; one took the horse reins, while I followed the prisoner - he got through the hedge, and was secured by a man; I knew him to be one of the men I had seen in the cart - on searching the cart I found a plated knife, in a basket of willow-shavings; it was mine: the prisoner, as he ran, threw some lemons from his pocket - I have found nothing more; I could not see whether the other man took any thing away.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How far were you from the cart when he got out? A.About two hundred yards; he did not run till after I had seized him - the other two ran into the fields.

JANE GONIN . I live at Mr. Fortescue's. I took him some seed into the garden, and as I returned the prisoner came to the front door, which was open, with lemons to sell - I said we wanted none; I did not see him in the house: I saw him go out at the gate - I walked down the garden once, and as I returned I saw another man coming out of the passage; he had been into the house, and was offering willow-shavings for sale - I was flurried, and asked why he went into the house; he went out without answering - I went to the closet, and missed a basket, containg the plate stated in the indictment. I saw no cart, nor any body in the road.

JOHN SMEETON . On the 17th of June I was at the foot of Muswell-hill, about two hundred yards from Mr. Fortescue's, in a cart, and met three men coming down in a cart - the horse fell down, and threw two of them out; they got in again, and proceeded at full speed - I met Mr. Fortescue; he got into my cart, and we followed and overtook the cart, about half a mile off; it stopped before we got to it - the prisoner and another got out; the other went across the fields to the right - the third man had got out before we got sight of the cart: the prisoner did not attempt to run - I took hold of him, and in about two minutes he struck me and got away; he was pursued, and retaken.

THOMAS POULTON . I was at work at Mount Pleasant, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I went and helped to take the prisoner.

JOHN DOYLE . I live in the City-road. A constable came down to my house with the horse and cart - my name was on the cart, but it never belonged to me; I never saw it before.

JAMES WALLING . I am an officer. The prisoner was given in my charge; I found three lemons on him -I searched the cart, and found a knife, two pin-cushions, two spike nails, and a bottle of blacking.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MISS GONIN. This is the knife which was in the basket in the closet.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-4

Before Mr. James Justice Parke .

1379. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , at St. Marylebone , 55 yards of carpet, value 5l. 10s., the goods of Francis Franklin , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN RODEN . I am in the service of Francis Franklin , who keeps a carpet warehouse , No. 27, Oxford-street , in the parish of St. Marylebone; he lives there himself, and the dwelling-house communicates with the shop - there is only one entrance to the house, and that is the shop door; there is a staircase in the shop, leading to the house - the door is left open in the day-time. On the 30th of June Mr. Franklin, who was in the shop, called me, about half-past nine o'clock, and desired me to run after a man - I went out immediately, and ran down Rathbone-place- a person gave me information; I went to Greece-street, and when I got to the corner I saw a man with a carpet on his back - I called Stop thief! and he dropped it; I saw him run round a corner - I gave the carpet into the possession of Halls, a green-grocer, who lives in that street; I did not then examine it - I pursued the man, but lost sight of him when he turned the corner; when I first saw him with the carpet there were two or three persons near him, and one man, in attempting to run, fell down in the mud; I did not notice whether they run on calling Stop thief! the man who fell was running to catch him - I saw the prisoner in custody in about three minutes, at the corner of Tavistock-street, Bedford-square, which was the direction he had run; he was followed by a mob - he had not got into Bedford-square; Greece-street is on the right-hand side of Rathbone-place: I went with the porter to the green-grocer's, and fetched the carpet in about twenty minutes - I know it by the pattern; the green-grocer is not here: it is the property of my master - I had seen it in the shop about a quarter of an hour before the alarm, nearly three feet within the door - it is worth about 5l. 10s.; the selling price is 2s. 6d. a yard, and there are fifty-five yards of it: it was quite perfect - I took it back to the shop; it is here - I know it to be my master's: this is it - the ticket is on it, in my own hand-writing.

JOEL SPENCER . On the 3d of June I was in Caroline-

street, giving directions to a watchman - I am a patrol; I was immediately opposite Tavistock-street, about half-past nine o'clock - it leads from Tottenham-court-road into Caroline-street; I saw the prisoner running as hard as he could, about twelve yards ahead of a great concourse of people; I stopped him - he was quite out of breath: the people said, in his presence, that the shop-man was coming up behind; he said he was innocent, and that he was hired to carry the carpet by two people who had run away - he mentioned the word "Carpet;" he said they told him to run and let it fall, and he then dropped it; I secured him, and had a watchman with me, but as he seemed quiet I sent him away, and in Hanway-street he said he would not go further unless he was dragged; we got him into Oxford-street by force - several people came to my assistance, but a parcel of bad people afterwards surrounded me; Roden came up to my assistance - he resisted a good deal in Oxford-street, and I was obliged to put him into a coach to take him to the office; he said voluntarily, in the coach again, that he was hired to carry the carpet - that they told him to run, and then to drop it - he repeated the same at the watch-house. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Marylebone.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I am a supernumary watchman. I was in Charles-street, Soho, and heard a rattle spring; I came up to a mob, and found Spencer with the prisoner in custody - he asked me to assist, as there was an attempt to rescue; the prisoner told me as he went along, that he was hired by two men to carry the carpet, and they told him to run with it; when we got near the prosecutor's he laid down, and said he would go no further - we put him into a coach.

JOHN LAMPING . I was passing Mr. Franklin's shop, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner and another man take some carpet from the door - I went in and asked Mr. Franklin if it was right; only one man went into the shop - that was the prisoner, I am certain; I followed with Roden, who came out in about three minutes; he went down Oxford-street, and up Rathbone-place - we hallooed Stop thief! I saw the prisoner drop it and run; I followed, and never lost sight of him from the time he brought the carpet out till he was taken at the corner of Caroline-street; I am certain he is the man - I saw him put into the coach.

JOHN RODEN . The carpet is charged to us as fifty-five yards; we sell it to the trade at 2s. 3d. - master would not sell the whole piece at less than that; it cost more than 2s. a yard. (The carpet being measured in Court was fifty-seven yards.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Tottenhamcourt-road, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I instantly ran across into Tavistock-street, and was taken by the patrol - knowing myself innocent, I would not go without having a coach, as I did not like to be disgraced; I have lately come from Ireland, and have nobody to my character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18290716-5

Before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1380. WILLIAM DEVINE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Nicholls , on the 5th of July , and stealing 4 waistcoats, value 30s.; 1 coat, value 2l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 30s.; 2 shirts, value 12s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 5s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 7s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 2 blankets, value 1l.; 2 sheets, value 8s.; 1 counterpane, value 10s., and 3 sovereigns, his property .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS. I live in Princes-street, Bethnal-green - I rent the house; I sell water-cresses at the corner of Brick-lane, from five o'clock till nine every morning. On Sunday, the 5th of July, I got up and went to the corner of Brick-lane at half-past five, leaving my wife at home; I returned at a quarter before ten - my wife was not at home - she had passed my stand and given me the key; I found the door was on single latch, and on entering I saw a caddy on the floor - it usually stood on the table; and on the left-hand side of the room two cages had been taken down, the birds were gone, and the doors open; I looked over head, and missed sixteen birds out of seven cages - all the cages being in their proper places when I went out; I went up stairs and saw my box open and my wearing apparel gone, which was safe on the Saturday night; I had left it shut but not locked - the three sovereigns were wrapped up in a grocer's bill in my trousers pocket; the bed-clothes were all rolled up together in a bundle in the room - all the other doors were secure; I have known the prisoner as a customer for two years, he always paid me very justly for what he had; on Tuesday the 5th, about seven o'clock, he came to my stand, walked round me, and said, "Where is your old woman?" I said, "If you want water-cresses here are plenty for you;" he said, "Give me my cresses and let me go;" he bought some; I have seen him pass my house several times on Sundays, and have noticed him looking over my curtain - I thought he was looking at the birds.

MARTHA NICHOLLS . On the 5th of July my husband left me in the house; I went out about half-past seven o'clock - I double-locked the street door - I fastened the doors and windows myself, and gave the key to my husband as I passed his stall; I opened the blankets and sheets to air them, but they were not in a bundle - all the bird-cages were hanging up; I did not return till the evening.

THOMAS HARTLEY . I live in Virginia-row, and have a full view of Nicholls' window. On Sunday, the 5th of July, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I saw Mrs. Nicholls go out, and about five minutes after I saw two men come to the door together, one of them knocked, and the other walked a little distance from the door - I called out that I did not think there was any body at home - the one at the door said, "Joe, there is no one at home;" they went away; I was looking towards the house in about a quarter of an hour and saw two men come out of the front door and shut it after them - one of them had a black bag and the other a blue handkerchief - I knew both of them by sight; the prisoner is the man who had the black bag - it appeared half full; I have seen him about there before, but did not know his name - he was not one of the men who knocked at the door before; they went away together.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a patrol. I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of July; I had received a description of him from Nicholls the day before - I found nothing

on him; I have some handkerchiefs here which were dropped on the stairs coming down.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . There are three handkerchiefs, one is a blue one; I had two of this pattern; these two crossbarred ones were dropped on the stairs; my door fastens with a spring singly, on shutting it too; I had no black bag in the house.

THOMAS HARTLEY . The bundle was in a blue flowered handkerchief, similar to this produced; I gave information of what I saw on the Sunday afternoon.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning I was apprehended I pawned my child's frock for 1s. to buy provisions, the duplicate of which was found on me; it is not likely if I committed the robbery I should have been in want of 1s.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I found several duplicates for small articles at his house, and one for a frock pawned that day for 1s.

WILLIAM NORTON . I am a clock-maker, and live at Fryar's-mount, Bethnal-green. The prisoner lived in the same house with me; I always bolt the door myself, as I live at the bottom of the house - last Sunday week he was at home at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, for I saw him at the door and spoke to him; he came down in his shirt sleeves as I stood at the door; the quarters went half-past eight just as he came down; I live about half a mile from Virginia-row.

THOMAS HARTLEY . My window is thirty or forty yards from the prosecutor's door, and was open. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-6

NEW COURT, First Day.

Third Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1381. MOSES MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 dwt. of gold, value 4s. , the goods of John Law .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290716-7

1382. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Tomlinson .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-8

1383. GEORGE HODGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 piece of mahogany plank, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Nicholas Lowther .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 30.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290716-9

1384. CHARLES DENNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 1 watch, value 1l. , the goods of Catherine Markham , widow .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-10

1385. JOSEPH BENTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 9 yards of woollen cloth, value 3l.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 pair of gaiters, value 2s.; 1 razor, value 2s., and 1 razor-case, value 3d., the goods of John Atkins , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-11

1386. JOSEPH HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 4 live ducks , the property of John Bray .

JOHN BRAY . I live at Chiswick , and keep ducks . On the 4th of May I saw four ducks and one drake safe at half-past nine o'clock in the evening, in a small shed which was bolted outside - at a quarter-past seven next morning I went to the nest where one of the ducks had been sitting, the eggs were then cold, and the ducks and drake were gone; I went down to the prisoner's boat on the river Thames, in about three hours, he was in the boat alone - it was about three or four hundred yards from my place; I said, "Harris, you robbed me last night;" he said, "Bray, I have not;" I looked into his boat, and saw some feathers in a place called the well; I asked how they came there - he said a lady gave him a bantum fowl and he pulled some of the feathers off - I put my hand into the well and found a duck's foot; I said, "Is this a bantum's foot?" he made no answer - I got a warrant, and found my ducks in the cupboard of the boat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you know his boat had been unmoored and carried some distance? A. No; I left a man to watch him while I went for a warrant - I did not get into the boat the first time, I only stood by the side of it; the officer was with me when the ducks were found.

BENJAMIN SNELL . I am a constable of Chiswick. I went with Mr. Bray to the prisoner's boat to execute the warrant - I found the ducks in the cupboard and the feathers in the well.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the boat by myself for two hours, while he was gone for an officer.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-12

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1387. DAVID CAWVILL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July . 1 pail, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Bennett and James Hunt .

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am constable of the St. Katharine Docks : the prisoner has been a labourer there, but not lately. On the 2d of July, a little after eight o'clock, I was informed a pail had been left at a marine store-shop in Rosemary-lane; I went and got it - it is the property of Joseph Bennett and James Hunt, contractors for the St. Katharine Docks ; I went and found the prisoner in Peter's-court - I said I wanted him to go back with me about a pail; he said it was his own, and he had had it eight years; I took him back to the shop, and then he said he had had it eight weeks, and gave 1s. 4d. for it - this is the pail; it is branded in the bottom, and I have the brand here.

THOMAS BURTON . I met the prisoner on the 2d of July, about three or four hundred yards from the dock, with this pail; I said, "Old man, where are you going with that pail?" he said, "Home;" I said, "You must come back with me; that pail belongs to my master:" he said,"No, it is my own;" I followed him to a shop where there was a little girl at the door.

ELIZABETH DUNN . I live with my father, who keeps a marine-store shop in Rosemary-lane. The prisoner brought the pail, and asked if I wanted to buy it; I said No, my father was not at home - he asked if he might leave it; I made no answer, but he put it down.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it nine weeks ago, at Charing-cross, and gave 1s. and a pot of beer for it; I left it while I went to look for some lime - they came, and

took me for nothing; I never was served so by any one, By the blessing of God, I shall tell the King's brother how I have been served. GUILTY . Aged 70.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-13

1388. JAMES DAVIS and THOMAS BONNICK were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 gown, value 5s.; 2 gown bodies, value 3s.; 1 slip, value 10s.; 3 caps, value 7s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 8s.; 2 pairs of drawers, value 5s., and 4 shifts, value 1l. , the goods of Isaac Corrie .

GEORGE CHAMBERS . I am an officer. On the 17th of June, about six o'clock in the evening, I met the two prisoners near Hornsey-wood, in a field - Bonnick had a bag; they were in company - I stopped them, and asked what they had in the bag; Davis said Nothing; Bonnick said, "Some dirty linen:" I asked where they got it- they said from their aunt's, at Winchmore-hill, and they were going to take it to their aunt's, in Gray's Inn-lane: I said, "Perhaps you are going to take it to your uncle's." I took it, and found these articles in it, quite wet -I said, "You have stolen these from some washerwoman's line;" they said No; I handcuffed and took them to the cage - I found they had been taken about a mile from where I met them; they had been in company together some time.

FENSON HORTON . I am carrier to Mr. Isaac Corrie . I was taking the bag of linen on the 17th of June; I stopped at the Queen's Head , and left the bundle in the cart - I cannot say exactly what time of the day it was; I did not miss the bundle.

LUCY BOWLES . I am servant to Mr. Isaac Corrie . On the 17th of June I sent a parcel of linen down to the country house, by Horton - these are the articles; they are Mr. Corrie's.

Davis' Defence. I came from North-street, Battlebridge, to get some work; I was returning, and saw this lad - I was not a minute with him.

Bonnick's Defence. I was going to my mother's; a gentleman asked me to carry this bundle to the Sluice-house, and said he would give me 2s.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

BONNICK - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-14

1389. WILLIAM ELLWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 sack, value 1s. 6d., and 3 bushels of peas, value 6s. , the goods of Arthur Keef .

ARTHUR KEEF . I am a green-grocer . On the 20th of June I bought a sack of peas at Mr. Gregory's, in Spitalfields-market - his man put them into my cart; I gave him a penny - I was standing a little way off, and saw the prisoner take them out of the cart, put them on his shoulder, and walk away; I caught him about thirty yards off - I had seen him in the market before, but had never spoken to him; I asked where he was going to take them to - he said to his cart: I said they were mine - he said, "I thought they were mine."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Did you let him go? A. No, I kept him till a witness came and took them off his shoulder.

MATTHEW GRIGGS . Mr. Keef asked me to mind these peas; my head was turned - Mr. Keef came up to me, and said, "There goes my sack of peas;" I ran and took them off the prisoner's back, forty yards from the cart; he began fighting, and the officer came and took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear a little tipsy? A. Yes, I think so.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am a constable. On the 20th of June I was standing in Crispin-street, and heard that a sack of peas had been stolen - I went up, and saw the prisoner and Griggs fighting; they said he had stolen a sack of peas - he was very violent, and threatened me very much.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say he was drunk or mad? A. The Magistrate asked me if he was drunk, and I said, from his conduct, he must be drunk or mad.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-15

1390. RICHARD HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 1 saw and frame, value 10s. , the goods of William Brown .

JAMES BARRELL . I borrowed a saw of Mr. William Brown, and put it into an empty house in Charles-street, Hoxton , on the 12th of June; I locked it up - when I went the next morning the house was broken open, and the saw gone; I know nothing of the prisoner - he was not a workman there.

JAMES DUDLEY . I keep the Golden Heart, Spitalfields. On the 13th of June the prisoner brought this saw, and said it belonged to Moore, a sawyer; he asked me to let it lay there till the morning, as the yard was then locked up.

WILLIAM BROWN . This is my saw - I lent it to Barrell.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-16

1391. EMMA MARKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 1 pair of shoes, value 10s. , the goods of John Harnett .

JOHN HARNETT . I am a shoemaker , and live at Enfield . On the 26th of June, between six and seven o'clock, when I went to take the shoes in from outside the window, one pair was gone: the constable brought them to me next morning - the prisoner is a neighbour; I had seen them safe about half an hour before.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable of Enfield. I was sent for to take the prisoner the next day, for robbing another woman - I took her before the Magistrate, and she was discharged, but I found these shoes in her cupboard - when I went back with her they were gone; I asked where they were - she said the man who left them had fetched them away: I said it was false - I looked about, and found them up the chimney.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They were brought to me by a man at eight o'clock at night; he asked me to take care of them.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-17

1392. ANN ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the

24th of June , 1 gown, value 5s. , the goods of Annie Kerbey .

ANNIE KERBEY . I am single , and live in Sloane-square . This gown is mine; I lost it from the garden, where it was left to dry, on the 24th of June - I saw it safe at three o'clock; I went on the 26th to the pawnbroker's, and told them to detain it.

WILLIAM BLAY . I live with Mr. Perkins, a pawnbroker. The prisoner brought this gown to pawn on the 26th, in the name of Ann Smith; she came again in about a week, and I detailed her - I knew her before.

MARY ANN BELL . I am servant to the prosecutrix. I hung out two gowns at seven o'clock on the 25th of June; it is a walled garden - there is a gate, which was bolted inside: I do not think a woman could get over it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given to me by two boys.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-18

1393. CHARLES TAPP was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 2 sheets, value 7s.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 3 shirts, value 10s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; 3 aprons, value 1s. 6d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s., and 1 towel, value 6d. , the goods of George Isaac Chapman .

ELIZABETH FORTY . I live at Mr. Bowen's, in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell - Mr. Chapman lodges there. On the 4th of July, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, go up stairs without anything, and come down with a bundle in about ten minutes; I took it from him - he passed me, and ran out; I gave the alarm, and he was brought back immediately; I know him to be the same man.

FREDERICK BOWEN . I saw the prisoner go up stairs; I went up and locked my mother's door - I then saw another man stand opposite the house, who said he was a plumber and glazier; I told Forty, my grandmama - she went up and met the prisoner on the stairs, with the bundle; Mr. Chapman's room is the attic - I ran out of the parlour, and caught hold of the prisoner; he flung me off and got out of the door - I got up, and ran after him; he was caught and brought back.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer, and produce the property.

GEORGE ISAAC CHAPMAN . These are my property - I lodge in the attic; they laid in a bundle on the drawers, in this inner handkerchief, but not the outer one - that was put round it by the prisoner; he was a stranger to me, but I am told he has a sister who is a servant in the house, and he had been there once before, to see her, but he had not seen her that day.

Prisoner's Defence. This bundle laid on the stairs -I went up to see my sister; the woman came and took hold of it; this lad then came and took hold of me - I passed him, went out, and he called Stop thief!

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-19

1394. ELIZABETH WALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 7 books, value 7s.; 2 tea-spoons, value 3s.; 1 table-spoon, value 3s.; 4 yards of linen, value 4s.; 2 sheets, value 10s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 counterpane, value 6s.; 3 shirts, value 15s.; 2 table-cloths, value 4s.; 2 waistcoats, value 3s., and 1 set of bed-furniture, value 10s. , the goods of Sophia Lucas .

SOPHIA LUCAS. I am a widow , and live in Ossulton-street, Somers'-town . The prisoner had my first floor furnished - her husband is foreman to Mr. Cubitt, the builder; this property was taken between March and June - she had not left, but was taken for another offence, and then I missed it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.When did you find that she had robbed you? A.On the 16th of June; I did not know of her pawning these things -there were two table-cloths which I found at the pawnbroker's, on which I had received 4s. 6d., but I have not charged her with stealing them; the two table-cloths which are down are two common kitchen ones - I certainly did offer to repay her the 4s. 6d. if I got my property; I have another lodger in the house, an elderly gentleman, who has been with me twelve months - I never knew of her pawning these articles; I missed them, and spoke to her about them: no such word ever escaped my lips as that I did not care what things were pawned for the temporary use of my lodgers, so long as they were returned when they left the lodgings - I will swear I had not sold these sheets for 18s., nor any of these articles: I had not agreed to receive payment from her by instalments, except for those cloths on which I received the 4s. 6d.

THOMAS PEWTNER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Ossulton-street. I have nearly the whole of this property which was pawned by the prisoner at different times.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt, a pillow-case, and a towel, pawned by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My landlady has repeatedly told me when I was in want of money, that she did not care what I did with the property, so long as it was returned- I have remarked that I have been obliged to pawn, and she never asked what it was; I was to pay 18s. for the sheets, and 4s. for the table-cloths - I have pawned some things which she says some gentleman gave her at the'Change, in consequence of her distress; the tea-spoons she lent me - they were not let with the apartment: the shirts were given me to iron, and I pawned them; I am not aware of the books being hers - she has often had the money for which I pawned the things.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

1395. ELIZABETH BRIGHT and the said ELIZABETH WALTON were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 1 dress, value 1l.; 1 1/2 yard of gauze, value 5s., and 1 gown-skirt, value 15s., the goods of Thomas Simpson , their master .

HANNAH SIMPSON . I am the wife of Thomas Simpson, silk-mercer , of Regent-street . Walton was our temporary cook , and Bright had been my regular housemaid for about two months - I missed these articles from the first floor room, where they had been deposited, while the shop was undergoing some alterations; this skirt was found in the drawer at Waltson's lodging.

WILLIAM SAMUEL SMITH . I am assistant in this shop. I went with Andrews, the constable, to Walton's lodging,

in Ossulton-street; we found a skirt which had been in the first floor room - Walton said Mrs. Simpson gave it her, but afterwards confessed that she stole it; I then opened another drawer and found this dress, which she at first said she bought at Southampton, and then that she took it from the first floor room.

JOSEPH ANDREWS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and went to Walton's with Smith; I found this property -I searched Bright's drawer and found this gauze in it; she had not left the house - she denied that it belonged to Mr. Simpson; she had no box.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find any thing else in her drawer? A. No; I found this other piece of gauze at her sister's in Crown-street.

MRS. SIMPSON. These are my husband's; this gauze alone is of very little value, but it belonged to a dress, and was taken out and cut into a tippet - I heard her tell Walton so.

Cross-examined. Q.What is the value of this bit of gauze? A. Not much; the dress would be worth 2l. - I do not know whether the officer was there when Bright said she cut it up to make a tippet; I think he was gone up stairs - she told me she took it out of the drawing-room; I was not asked before the Magistrate what the prisoner said; Bright confessed that she had taken a shawl and other things - I know this pink dress; I have the dress-maker here who made the two dresses into one; it is different from any other in London; the gauze has no mark upon it -Bright has been in our service for about two months; I had a good character with her.

Walton's Defence. I had the dress made up for myself.

BRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

WALTON - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

There was another indictment against Walton.

Reference Number: t18290716-20

1396. THOMAS WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 2 fixtures, (i.e.) 2 pairs of window-sashes, value 50s., the goods of George Watkins, the younger , and fixed to a certain building .

EWIN WATTS . I am a watchman of the Commercial-road. On the 11th of July I met the prisoner with these four sashes on his shoulder, about half-past two o'clock in the morning; he said he brought them from Poplar, and was going to his master, Mr. Jones, a builder, at No. 19, John-street - I took him to the watch-house, went to see for his master, and found it was an empty house - I afterwards found that these sashes were taken from Henry-street , which is about a quarter of a mile from where I met him.

GEORGE WATKINS , JUN. This house was nearly finished - it is my property; the lock of the door had been stolen the night before, but the workmen had blocked up the door - these sashes had been fixed in the usual manner.

JAMES THOMPSON . I am a headborough. I was in the watch-house when the prisoner was brought there; he first said he had been to get these sashes from Poplar, but he afterwards made a full confession of where he took them from.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-21

1397. HENRY JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 watch, value 14s. , the goods of John Davis .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a watchman - the prisoner lodged in the same room with me in Paradise-place . On the 9th of July I had my watch over the head of my bed - it was taken while I was asleep, and when I awoke the prisoner was gone; I afterwards took him with the duplicate on him - I never permitted him to pawn it; he has been a carter in the employ of Messrs. Cubitts.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER . I went to the Merlin's Cave public-house, and found the prisoner playing at skittles -I found this duplicate in his fob.

JAMES MOTT . I am in the employ of Mr. Bull, pawnbroker, of Aylesbury-street. I produce the watch; I cannot say who pawned it - I have the counterpart duplicate.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-22

1398. JOHN HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 2 trusses of hay, value 5s. , the goods of Samuel Moate , and JOHN HOOPER was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM JONES . I am a Bow-street patrol. On Friday the 26th of June, at half-past three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoners at the corner of North-street, in the New-road, Chelsea , about two hundred or two hundred and fifty yards, from Mr. Moate's factory; there was a one horse cart, which had the name of Samuel Moate on it - the prisoners were standing behind it; two soap boxes were in it, and in them three trusses of hay, as they appeared to me, but one of them I understand, was only three parts of a truss- Hooper took one truss of hay and went across North-street, into Hooper's-court, and then returned and took another; as soon as that second truss was taken, Haydon drove off the cart, with the other truss remaining in it -I followed Hooper and asked where he got that hay from, and what he was going to do with it: he said it came from the factory, and was going to the stable for a horse belonging to the factory - I asked what stable; he said round the corner - I went to the stable with him, and saw a horse; I asked him if he was sure that horse belonged to the factory - he said Yes; I asked if it was a usual thing to remove hay at that time in the morning, for the horse - he said Yes it was; I asked if his master was aware of it, and he said he was - I asked if he worked at the factory; he said Yes, he was a carter, and did any thing there was to be done, and I might depend upon it, it was all right; I told him to be on his guard, for I did not think it was all right - I went after Haydon and overtook him in Knightsbridge; I asked if he knew whose horse it was that stood in Hooper's-court - he said No, he did not; I asked if he was sure he did not - he then said he did know the person, but had forgot his name; it was a horse that had done work for the factory, and his master kept it - I told him I meant the stable where he left the hay, a few minutes before, and asked if he had removed the hay, with his master's knowledge; he said No, he had not - I told him he must go to the watch-house, as I considered the hay was all wrong - he then said he would tell me the truth; he had taken the hay to make a little money of.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Did you take possession of the hay? A. Yes, and showed it to Mr. Moate - he did not say he could not swear to it; Crockett, a person in his service, appeared as a witness, who has been since discharged - he was not in custody: he was not bound over at all - I have since ascertained that at this very time, that man had the keys of the place where the hay was kept; I have heard from the neighbours that Hooper is a respectable person, and that he keeps a horse and cart, but I do not know that he worked at the factory - Hooper told me that it was for a horse that had worked on the factory, and he showed me the horse.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Do you know when Crockett was discharged? A. I believe the day this affair occured.

SAMUEL MOATE . I am master of the factory . Haydon was in my employ, for about ten years; he had been discharged once for a few months - I know nothing of Hooper; no horse belonging to the factory was kept in Hooper's-court, and no horse that I fed there - Hooper was not employed in any way in my service; Haydon was out early, as he was going to Bromley, and it was necessary to set out soon - he ought not to have taken more than one sixth part of a truss of hay; I saw the hay at the office, and I believe from the quality that it was mine.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON, Q.Will you swear it was your hay? A. I can only speak to the resemblance of it - to the best of my knowledge I believe it was mine; Haydon was my carter - I had a servant called Crockett, who was horse-keeper, and he had the care of the hay; he had the keys of the stable - he was before the Magistrate, but was not bound over - from what came out I undoubtedly thought it was my duty to discharge him; I believe he was concerned in stealing the hay - I believe they were both concerned; he ought to have had the keys on the night in question - it is impossible for me to miss any hay; I do not know why the Magistrate did not commit Crockett - I left it to him; I was three or four miles from the premises at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Did not Crockett and Haydon sleep next to each other? A.Crockett lived near the premises, but not Haydon - Crockett must have gone to the place; I have my hay from my brother's farm, and his servants bring it to me - the key of the hay was in Crockett's care; there were none of the doors broken.

COURT. Q. Did you authorise either of the prisoners to take your hay, for any horse in Hooper's-court? A. No.

COURT to WILLIAM JONES . Q.Did you let Hooper go? A. I left him at the stable - when I returned, I saw him in North-street - I called him and he stopped.

The prisoners received an excellent character.

HAYDON - GUILTY . Aged 29.

HOOPER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18290716-23

1395. THOMAS HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 1 truck, value 4l. , the goods of Henry Jarman .

HENRY JARMAN . I lost a truck from No. 1, Richmond-street , on the 1st of July - I found it again in Long-lane; I have seen the prisoner about the parish, but I do not know what he is.

JAMES BEALE . I bought the truck of the prisoner on the 1st of July - he said it was his own, that he was in distress, and his wife had left him; one of my neighbour's brought him to me with the truck - he said it had been his for some time, and that he was a painter and glazier; he afterwards brought a ladder, and I stopped him.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a man for 12s., thinking to get a few shillings.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner for stealing the ladder , to which he pleaded Guilty .

Reference Number: t18290716-24

1396. JOHN ENGLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 120 halfpence, value 5s. , the goods of Emma Free .

JANE FREE . I am the daughter of Emma Free - she is a baker , and lives in Brick-lane . On the 29th of June, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, there were two 5s. papers of coppers on the counter - the prisoner came in, and asked for a pint of water; I said I could not give it him - I turned my back, and he took one of the papers of halfpence and ran off; I pursued him, and called Stop thief! but lost sight of him - he was brought back in about five minutes with the halfpence; I am sure he is the same person.

JOSEPH PRITCHARD . I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running; I caught him, and the 5s. paper of halfpence dropped from him - I picked it up, and took it back to the house.

THOMAS HANKISON . I received the prisoner at the watch-house - this is the paper the halfpence were in.

JANE FREE . This is the paper.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-25

1397. JAMES PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 2 coats, value 3l.; 1 looking-glass, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 10s.; 4 keys, value 1s., and 1 set of fire-irons, value 9s. , the goods of Laurence Opperman .

LAURENCE OPPERMAN . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Rosemary-lane - the prisoner was one of my journeymen ; I paid him weekly - he boarded and lodged with me; he had been with me about five weeks. On the 2d of July I got up about half-past six o'clock, or near seven - I found my shop door was unbolted, the chain off, and the bar down; the door was open, but just pulled too - I missed the property stated in the indictment, and found the prisoner was gone; he had not given me any notice - a person found him in the City the next day; he had my boots on, and the street door key in his pocket - I never found my coats again; the glass he said he had sold - I asked him what he had done with my property, but I did not make him any promise or threat.

JOHN UPWOOD . I was at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought there - he had these boots on, which he said were Mr. Opperman's; he owned that he had taken two coats, a looking-glass, a set of fire-irons, and several other small things - there was no promise or threat made to him, but he was asked what he had done with the things;

he said he had taken them, that he had sold them, and was sorry for it.

Prisoner. Q. Did not the prosecutor say he would do every thing for me, as I was going to get a ship? A. No, he did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the coats - the boots the prosecutor lent me the evening before.

LAURENCE OPPERMAN. No, I never lent him the boots - my wife had lent him her boots to put on.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-26

1398. WILLIAM RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 1 picture-frame, value 10s. , the goods of William Fowl .

ISABELLA STEPHENS . At half-past six o'clock in the morning of the 27th of June, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Fowl's, with the picture on his shoulder; I went and gave information - Dorrell came out and pursued him.

GEORGE DORRELL. I am a brush-maker, and live in the same house as Stephens - she came and told me what she saw; I pursued the prisoner, and took him with this picture; I said, "I suppose you have been to a sale" - he said Yes; he appeared confused, and I took him back.

WILLIAM FOWL. I live in Carnaby-street, Carnaby-market . I had this picture in my shop for sale - I was very ill in bed; I was called up, and saw the picture; the door might have been open.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that a man had employed him to carry the painting from the house - saving that he was fearful it would be seized for rent, and had promised to follow him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-27

1399. JOHN GOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 36 yards of lace, value 8s. , the goods of Joseph Walker .

CATHERINE BOYLAND . Mr. Joseph Walker is an organ-builder , and lives in High Holborn - I am in the employ of Mrs. Walker, who is a milliner. I saw the prisoner in the shop about a quarter or half-past nine o'clock in the morning of the 6th of July - I was at the window; I turned round and asked what he wanted; he asked if we wanted the chimney swept - I said No; he did not appear at all like a sweep - I rang the bell, and Mr. Child came down; this lace was found on him, which I had been showing to a lady a quarter of an hour before.

JOSEPH CHILD . The shop-woman called me - I went down, and found this lace under the prisoner's jacket.

ANDREW SMITH . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and have the lace.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up just as I was going in at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-28

1400. THOMAS SPINK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 pair of driving-reins, value 6s., and 1 horse-cloth, value 1s. 6d , the goods of John Kirby and Thomas Kirby .

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a constable. On the 1st of July, about half-past three o'clock, a watchman came and said he had seen a man pass with a horse-cloth - I went with him, and we overtook the prisoner with a horse-cloth under his arm; I took him to the watch-house, and found this cloth, one of these long leading reins of a four-horse coach, in his great coat pocket, and this other rein was upon him.

JAMES FRANKLIN . I superintend the business of John and Thomas Kirby, of the George and Blue Boar, Holborn, on the North-road. This cloth was their property - it was in a stable at South-mims ; these reins had been in another stable.

THOMAS DORRYMORE . I am the horse-keeper, and know these reins - I know the mark on this cloth, but it was not in my stable; the reins I locked up in my stable a quarter-past nine o'clock at night - the door had not been opened, but I suppose the window had been put back, and then they could be taken out; there was no harness - I had seen the prisoner once before Dr. Owen.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked these things up just behind two waggons.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-29

1401. MARY SKELTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 2 pillows, value 5s.; 1 bolster, value 5s., and 1 pair of decanters, value 5s. , the goods of Margaret Johnston .

MARGARET JOHNSTON. The prisoner and her husband had a ready furnished lodging in my house, in Skinner's-place - they came there on the 12th of May; they owed me 14s. for rent - I took a broker, and then missed this property; I asked the prisoner where she had put them- she denied it.

FRANCIS PARKER . I live with a pawnbroker, in Skinner-street. I have a pillow, bolster, and a pair of decanters, pawned by the prisoner at different times.

Prisoner's Defence. We had not left the lodging - my husband had gone to get the money to take the things out; he did get it - she offered to settle it for two sovereigns; my husband would have given her one, but she would have two.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-30

1402. MARY SUSANNAH STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 2 pairs of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Thain .

JOHN THAIN. I am a haberdasher , and live at Cambridge-heath, Bethnal-green . About a quarter-past seven o'clock in the morning, on the 30th of June, the prisoner came and wished to be served with a yard of ribbon; I stooped to get it from under the counter, and when I got up I saw her closing her shawl I, but did not think she had had time to take any thing - when she was gone I missed a pair of shoes; I followed her with an officer, and found two pairs of shoes on her - she said she had bought them, and would go with me to the shop, but I knew them to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman, named King, told me to go and take them for her.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-31

1403. MARY ANN SAWYER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 15 lbs. of pork, value 10s., and 12 lbs. of beef, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Smellie .

THOMAS SMELLIE . I am a butcher , and live in High-street, Shadwell . I lost this meat from my salting cellar- I missed a piece of beef on the Sunday morning, and accused the prisoner, who was my servant, of taking it; she denied it - I asked where her mother lived; she told me - I went and found her mother ill in bed - I told her sister I came for a piece of beef which her sister had sent home that morning; she hesitated, but I said she had better show it me at once - she then took up the flap of a dining-table, and showed me one belly of pork, two hands and one piece of beef - there were 18 lbs. in all; I said

"You are as bad as your sister, for you fetched it;" she said,

"No, my little brother fetched it this morning."

GEORGE REYNOLDS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it because the children had nothing to eat; my mother was very ill - she died yesterday morning; I have no father, and no friend.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, having had a good character, and believing that her mother induced her to do it.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-32

1404. ELIZABETH BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 1 shirt, value 5s. , the goods of Septimus Miller .

SEPTIMUS MILLER. My wife is a laundress, and lives at Islington ; I assist in keeping the account. The prisoner was employed as an ironer ; this shirt was stolen from us, but I do not know from where - I had seen it in the drying ground on the 24th of June, and when I came to pack up the basket it was gone.

CHARLES COLEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Islington. I have a shirt pawned by the prisoner on the 24th of June, in the name of Miller.

GEORGE HARPER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicate of this shirt in her shoe.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Miller has been in the habit of sending me to pawn other people's property, which came to be washed; she has let me stand for weeks without one farthing of money - her husband knows he has taken me round in a cart before now, and I have gone to the persons they wash for, and told lies to cover their crimes.

SEPTIMUS MILLER re-examined. Q.Why is not your wife here? A. I do not know; the Magistrate did not tell her to come; the very week the prisoner took this shirt she had 18s. of me - I owe her now 5s. 8d., but I have missed several other articles, and have been at great expence to make them good; I have not been in distress so as to pawn other people's property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-33

1405. THOMAS COMBER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 1 box, value 6d.; 9 shirts, value 45s.; 2 coats, value 7s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 4s.; 2 pairs of boots, value 4s.; 1 clock, value 13s.; 1 jacket, value 2s.; 1 hat, value 2s., and 1 dressing-case, value 5s. , the goods of James Langan .

MARY ROURK. I am the wife of James Rourk . I employed the prisoner, on the 1st of April, to assist in packing some articles in a tea chest; he had worked for me occasionally, for nine years past - I saw all the articles stated in the indictment, put into the box; it was directed to Mr. James Langan, Hibernia-hotel, Dublin - he was the owner of the property; I gave it the prisoner to take to the booking-office, in Regent-street, to go by the steampacket; I desired him to see them booked, and gave him 2s. 2d. to pay the pierage - I told him to bring back a receipt; he went away, and returned in about an hour -I asked for the receipt; he said they gave no receipts at that office, but he saw them booked - I expected a letter or a note to state that they had arrived at their destination; I expressed my uneasiness to the prisoner, who was then at work in my house, at my not bearing; he made no answer. On the 18th of May, I received a letter, stating that the things had not been received - I have since found seven shirts and some other things, which were part of the property.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am an officer. The prosecutor applied for a warrant; I met the prisoner in July, and took him into custody.

GEORGE LAW . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Marylebone. These seven new shirts were pawned with me on the 25th of April, by the prisoner; he came afterwards, and had some more money on them.

THOMAS HUGHES . I am in the employ of Mr. Edward Baylis , a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of trousers and one plaid cloak, pawned by a man, but I did not take them in.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-34

1406. JAMES DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 40 lbs. weight of butter, value 40s. , the goods of Joseph North .

LUKE MATTHEW LEWIS . I am in the employ of Joseph North , a butterman . On the 30th of June, about a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning, I was out with butter; I left my basket hanging on some rails while I went back to fetch some things - I met one of our shopmen, to whom I said, "Give an eye to my basket for two or three minutes;" I came back in about that time - he pointed in the direction of my basket, and I saw the prisoner taking up the four corners of the cloth, which contained the butter, take it out, and run across Cavendish-square - there were about 40 lbs. of butter in it; I pursued him, and he dropped it at my feet - this is the cloth; the butter has been sold.

SAMUEL JACKSON. Lewis told me to mind his basket; I saw the prisoner go and take the butter - he ran across, and Lewis took him.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-35

1407. MARY GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 12 yards of printed cotton, value 8s. , the goods of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN . I live in Norton-fa lg at and am a

linen-draper . On the 17th of June, between two and half-past two o'clock, I was standing in my shop - a woman came in, and told me that she saw another run away with some print; she was pursued, and brought back with twelve yards of printed cotton, which had been in my shop within two feet of the door; I think she might reach over, and get it without coming in at the door.

MATTHEW HENRY PONTONY . I live in Bow-church-yard. I saw the prisoner, and took her with the prints upon her, several hundred yards from the prosecutor's - it might be half a mile; the print was concealed under her shawl,(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-36

1408. WILLIAM STONE and JOSEPH HANSON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 4 garden-pots, value 8d., and 4 flower-roots, value 4s. , the goods of William Cowell .

JOSEPH LAPRIDGE . I am a patrol. I met the prisoners in Hackney-marsh, about four o'clock in the morning, on the 17th of June, in the path leading from Temple-mills to Hackney-wick; Stone had a basket, with eight geraniums and one balsam in it, and Hanson had two under his arm - I waited for them on the river bridge, and asked what they had, and where they brought them from; they said from Layton - they had bought them of a man who sold them, but they did not know his name - he was a stout man; Campbell was with me: we took them - I found Mr. Cowell two or three days afterwards; he lives two miles and a half or three miles from where I stopped them.

JOHN CAMPBELL . I am a patrol. I was with Lapridge - what he has stated is correct.

HENRY HARRINGTON . I am a night constable of Hackney. The prisoners were delivered to me, and I have had the plants ever since.

WILLIAM COWELL . I am gardener to Mr. Cotton, a gentleman, who lives at Layton . These plants are my own- they were taken from my own house; they were in a little arbour by my door, twelve or fourteen yards within my garden, by the road side; they were all in pots - I can swear to this one geranium: I am not so certain of the balsam, but I missed one - these other seven I cannot swear to; I went to bed at eight o'clock at night, got up at four o'clock in the morning, and then missed them.

The prisoners put in a written Defence, stating that they had bought the roots of a fishmonger at Low-Layton, on the 15th of June, for 7s. 6d., and had fetched them away on the 17th, when they were stopped.

STONE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

HANSON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-37

1409. THOMAS KING THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 3 hundred printed papers, called magazines, value 3l., and 6 books, value 20s. , the goods of John Mason .

JAMES HOGSFLESH . I am clerk to Mr. John Mason , of No. 14, City-road. On the 29th of June a parcel was made up, containing three hundred magazines and six books, directed to the Rev. James Bate , Watlington, and was to go from an inn in Holborn - I think the Bull or the Bell; I sent it by Isaac Newton - he was ordered not to give it to the men in the yard, till he had paid the booking of it; I know nothing of the prisoner.

ISAAC NEWTON . I am fourteen years of age, and am errand-boy to Mr. Mason. I had a paper parcel of magazines and books on the 29th of June, which I was to take to the Black Bull, Holborn; I had 2d. to book it with, and 2s. to pay the carriage - the prisoner came to me in Benjamin-street, Cow-cross ; he was quite a stranger - he called out to me "Hallo! is not that parcel for Mr. Bate" - I said Yes; he said, "Is it not for the Black Bull, Holborn? what a while you have been coming - I have been to your master's, and he told me to take it of you;" he told me to take it to the bottom of the street where the post was, and then he would take and carry it - I asked if he was to take the money to pay the carriage; he said Yes - I said,

"What is it?" he said 1s. 6d. - I said I had 2s., and I asked him if he had a sixpence; he said No, but he would get it in the public-house - as we were going in he said,

"Oh, that's right - 2s. for the carriage, and 2d. for the booking:" he then took it, and ran- I thought he was making haste with it - I went back to my master's, and the shop was shut up; I went home, and about nine o'clock one of Mr. Mason's porters came to me, and said the constables were waiting for me - I went and told them about it; I saw the prisoner on the Saturday week, in Bunhill-row watch-house - I am quite sure he is the man; there was a plain direction on the parcel, part of it, I believe, was printed; I do not exactly recollect how I carried the direction; I might carry it uppermost.

Prisoner. Q. What dress had I on when I came up to you? A. I did not exactly notice your dress, as I thought there was nothing the matter, but I believe you had a blue coat on - I believe I did say at the office that you had a blue coat on, and I am pretty well sure you had.

EDWARD HANDS . I am a headborough. On the 29th of June I was going up Brick-lane, in the evening, and saw the prisoner crossing Old-street-road; he went down a street leading to Baltic-street, and then down some back alleys to Ball-yard, where there is a stable - he went in there, and dropped this parcel; I went in and took him, but he resisted, and got away - I took the parcel, and found where it came from; I had known the prisoner before - he was taken the Friday week afterwards.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you were not certain whether it was that day fortnight or that day week? A. No.

JAMES BUCKLE . I took the parcel to Mr. Mason's - this is the invoice and the paper they were in.

Prisoner's Defence. I was working that day from five o'clock in the morning till twelve at night, at my landlady's request, but she is not here.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-38

1410. THOMAS BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 3 wrenches, value 7s.; 3 chisels, value 1s. 6d.; 2 augers, value 1s.; 1 spike, value 2d.; 1 bit, value 2d.; 1 pair of compasses, value 2d.; 2 hammers, value 2s., and 1 spoke-shave, value 3s. , the goods of James Bell .

JAMES BELL . I am a coachmaker . I had been called out late at night on the 7th of July, to go to repair a coach at Lad-lane, and I left my tools in the front shop, opposite my master's house - I went there the next morning, and they were gone; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JAMES LAMBETH . I opened the shop about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, and went to call a man; when I came back the prisoner was coming out with these tools on his shoulder - I took him; he was quite a stranger- I kept him till the constable came; there was a little wicket-gate shut, which had been opened.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The things were close to the door, and the door was not fastened.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290716-39

1411. ELIZABETH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of David Cameron .

STEPHEN SHEPPY. I am in the service of Mr. David Cameron , a pawnbroker - he has one shop in Chandos-street , the business of which I conduct. On the morning of the 16th of June the prisoner came to pawn two handkerchiefs, and about the middle of the day she came to redeem them; she said she wanted to leave a shawl she had on her shoulders for them; while we were looking at the shawl, which was refused, she took up the handkerchiefs, and left this bundle, which was done up precisely in the same manner as the handkerchiefs were - it contains some pieces of stuff, of no value; we followed her, and brought the handkerchiefs back - we knew her before.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

1412. ELIZABETH DAVIS was again indicted for stealing, on 15th of June , 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of David Cameron .

HENRY POWELL . I am in the employ of Mr. Cameron, at his shop in the Strand. On the 15th of June the prisoner came and pawned two handkerchiefs for 4s. - in the afternoon she came to redeem them, and said she wanted to leave a shawl for 3s. 6d.; I said it would not do - she took away the parcel containing the handkerchiefs, and left this parcel, wrapped up as the handkerchiefs were, it contains a lot of rags, not worth a farthing.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

There was another indictment against the prisoner, for a similar offence committed at another pawnbroker's.

Reference Number: t18290716-40

1413. CHARLES DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Topham Bingley Davies , from his person .

TOPHAM BINGLEY DAVIES. I am a surgeon . I was in Tichfield-street at twenty minutes past eleven o'clock on the 8th of July - I had a handkerchief in my coat pocket; I felt it taken, turned round, and it was on the ground - the prisoner was immediately behind me, and a person with him; I collared the prisoner, but he struggled, and got away, and at the spot where he had stood I found my handkerchief; I am quite certain I felt one of them make a pull at my pocket - my wife was with me; the watchman came up, and I gave him my card.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many persons were near you? A. The prisoner and the person with him were the nearest to me; there was a multitude of people before me - I did not see the prisoner speak to the other, but when I seized the prisoner he got away; I did not say at the office that I did not think he was the person who took my handkerchief.

GUSTAVUS LIBBERTZ . I was in Tichbourne-street, and saw the prisoner in company with another person; I had some suspicion, and watched them; I saw the other encouraging this one to take the handkerchief, and the prisoner took it, as I presume, from the prosecutor; the prisoner ran, and I took him.

Cross-examined. Q.Was the other a grown up man? A. Yes. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290716-41

1414. CHARLES BENNET was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 bag, value 1s.; 1 snuff-box, value 20s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 purse, value 1s., and 1 sovereign, the property of Frances Harward , from her person .

FRANCES HARWARD . I am a widow . I was walking in Soho-square on the 10th of July, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon; I had my reticule in my hand- it contained a snuff-box, a handkerchief, a purse, and a sovereign; the prisoner snatched it, and ran away - I gave an alarm, and the witness caught him immediately; I am certain he is the man.

RICHARD BOOTH . I was in Soho-square, and saw the prisoner running, not far from the lady; I ran, stopped him, and brought him back - I took his hat off, and took this property from it.

JAMES HODGES . I am a constable. I produce the reticule, which I have had ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, and saw a boy run across Compton-street; he dropped this bag, and I took it up - I put it into my hat, was running after him, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290716-42

1415. MARGARET AINSWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 2 blankets, value 10s.; 2 sheets, value 8s.; 1 bolster, value 8s., and 1 pillow, value 4s. , the goods of Elizabeth Johnson .

The prosecutrix being married, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18290716-43

Fourth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1416. JOHN FOX POWER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 17 pairs of hinges, value 16s., the goods of George Cottam and Samuel Hallen , his masters .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-44

1417. THOMAS BROWN and JOHN PERFOOT were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Richard Box, the elder , from the person of Richard Box , the younger .

BROWN pleaded GUILTY . Aged 11.

PERFOOT pleaded GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290716-45

1418. GEORGE GUTTERIDGE was indicted for embezzlement .

ADAM DICKSON . I am a baker , and live in the Strand . The prisoner was my apprentice , and had been with me about fifteen months; he was entrusted to receive monies for me, and was to account for them as soon as he came home - I had a customer named Roodle.

ANN HADDRELL . I am servant to Mr. Roodle, who lives in Nelson-square, Blackfriars-road. We take bread from the prosecutor; I paid the prisoner 6s. on the 20th of June , for his master, and he wrote "Paid" on the bill - I am certain it was the 20th of June.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known him before? A. Yes, by his bringing bread - this is the bill which he wrote "Paid" on: I am sure I paid him- he knew that I kept the bill.

COURT to ADAM DICKSON . Q. Did he give you any account of this? A. No; he absconded on the 27th, and I found this and a great many other things against him.

Cross-examined. Q.Had you asked him about this money before he went? A. I was not aware he had received it - he was to account every day; I had booked his bread, but I had not asked him for the money - I made a regular rule with him that he was to pay me; I never allowed my wife to receive money for me; she has received money in my absence - she says she has not received this.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-46

1419. WILLIAM BRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 5 ozs. of tobacco, value 18d. , the goods of Edward Toplis and others.

EDWARD GEORGE BUTLER TOPLIS . I am in partnership with my father, Edward Toplis , and my brother - the prisoner was employed in our factory for about three years. On the 26th of June this tobacco was found on his person, it was not completely manufactured.

WILLIAM COX . I am an officer. I was sent for and searched the prisoner; I found this tobacco in his shoes - there are between five and six ounces of it.

JOHN TOPLIS . I was present when the prisoner was stopped; on leaving our factory he was searched, and this found on him; he said it was the first time he had ever done so.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-47

1420. ANN COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , 2 shifts, value 8s.; 1 bed-gown, value 1s.; 1 piece of net, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 cap, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of Lancelot Shaw .

ELIZABETH SHAW . I am the wife of Lancelot Shaw; I am a servant, but am at present out of place. I lost this property from Miss Mitchell's, Cannon-house, Chelsea , the latter end of March; the prisoner was upper housemaid in the family and I was cook; it was taken out of my box and was found in the prisoner's box - she had not gone away; she said she found the articles under the bed.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When did you leave the service? A. On the 8th of April; I can swear these articles were in my box - I had not left them about the room; I do not know whether her box was locked - I was not in the room till after the officer got in.

FRANCES RHODE PORTLOCK . The prosecutrix told me she had lost some clothes - I advised her to have a search-warrant and go to Miss Mitchell's; she said they were such particular ladies they would not let an officer in there - I had been nursing the family; I went and asked them, but they would not permit it; they said the cook had not lost any thing, she always kept her keys in her pocket - the prisoner was there; she cried very much, and said she was innocent.

PHOEBE JUMPSON . I am a widow. The prisoner brought this bundle of articles to my house, and said they were Elizabeth's, the cook - I was to keep them till she came for them; these are the things.

Cross-examined. Q. How long ago was this? A. About three months; she fetched them away about three weeks ago.

JOHN LEWIS . I am an officer. I went to Miss Mitchell's on the 9th of July, and found these things in the prisoner's box in the garret.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not say that she found them? A. Yes, under the bed; she said they did not belong to Shaw.

MR. BARRY called -

ESTHER MITCHELL . I keep a ladies' boarding-school at Chelsea. The prisoner has been about six months in my service, and conducted herself to my satisfaction; she had the liberty of going to my drawers and to all the plate - she was perfectly honest, and I had a good character from a lady whom she had left, merely on account of illness; my servants quarrelled, and that was the reason why I parted with Shaw - I sent her out of my house that very day; I have no doubt of the prisoner's honesty, and would take her back to-night.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-48

1421. JAMES CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 1 candlestick, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Jackson .

JOSEPH JACKSON . I am a broker , and live in Old-street-road . I lost two candlesticks, but was not there when they were taken.

WILLIAM BELLNAP . On the 29th of June I saw the prisoner and two others on my beat, about a quarter before twelve o'clock, they were disorderly - I spoke to them to go on, they would not, and I took them to the watch-house; the officer found in Campbell's right-hand coat pocket this candlestick; I had not known him before.

THEOPHILUS WHITING . I am an officer. This is the candlestick which I found upon the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had bought the candlestick in Petticoat-lane.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-49

1422. CHARLES EMMETT & JOSEPH WALKER were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 fender, value 20s. , the goods of David Levy .

CHARLES EMMETT pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

BENJAMIN LEVY. I am the son of David Levy , broker , of St. John-street . This fender was lost from there on the

9th of July: I do not know the prisoner, but I saw him at the watch-house.

WILLIAM MENEB . On the 9th of July I was opposite Levy's shop near the Queen's Head; Terry, the officer, passed me, went over the street, and called out for assistance; I went - he secured Emmett, and told me to go and take the prisoner, who had then got about fifty yards off; I went and collared him; he said, "What have I done?" I said, "I don't know - come back."

JAMES TERRY . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner and Emmett at the prosecutor's house; Emmett took the fender and walked on to the prisoner - I went and took Emmett; I had watched them in company together for about a quarter of an hour.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I live in Ratcliff-highway. I had done half a day's work that day, and thought I would go and see my aunt at Islington; in returning I lost my way, and went down St. John-street - I asked Emmett the way to Ratcliff-highway; he said,

"You can go right across Smithfield;" I was walking on, and this gentleman came and laid hold of me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-50

1423. ALFRED GAZELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 2 saws, value 8s.; 1 carpenter's plough, value 6s.; two squares, value 4s., and 1 rule, value 1s. , the goods of Arthur Taylor .

ARTHUR TAYLOR . I am a carpenter . I lost my tools on the 17th of June from a building in Northampton-street, Islington - it was not inhabited, the doors were nailed up; the prisoner worked in the same street.

THOMAS WELLS . I am a pawnbroker. I took these two squares and this rule, on the 17th of June, from the prisoner.

ROBERT MOSS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a saw and a plough, which I took in of the prisoner on the 17th of June.

WILLIAM YOWELL . I met the prisoner on the afternoon of the 17th of June carrying two saws and a plough; I bought this saw of him - he said it was his own, he had got work in Kent, and was going to pawn his tools.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290716-51

1424. THOMAS HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 4 lbs. weight of brass, value 2s. , the goods of James Findon .

JOHN DEVERITH . I am in the employ of James Findon, he lives in High Holborn , and is an axletree-maker ; his premises were burnt down. The men used then to come into the kitchen to put their tools - we had some suspicion of the prisoner; and on the 4th of November we had a person in the kitchen cupboard to watch him - he saw him stoop down and take five caps; I went after him and told him to come back - he said he could not come just now; I took hold of him - he dragged me about, and four or five of his fellow-labourers came up and asked what it was about; they tried to get him away - he then pulled off his hat, and said to them,

"Take this away;" but I got the hat with this property in it; he was kept - this is the property.

MAURICE NICHOLAS . I am an officer. I have had the brass ever since; I took one man, but the prisoner got away that time.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that Jones, a carpenter, had given him the brass to take to Museum-street.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-52

1425. WILLIAM HIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 4 gowns, value 30s., and 1 shawl, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Martha Morgan .

MARTHA MORGAN. I am a widow . I lost a cotton shawl and four gowns from a drawer in my house on the 29th of June; the prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

MARY SPREADBOROUGH . I lodge in the same house -I took the property from the prisoner; he came in for change for a shilling, I could not change it - he went out again, and I saw him pass the door with this property; I went out, and said Stop thief! he did not get away - he was stopped directly.

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am an officer. I was called from Bedford-square, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-53

1426. GEORGE HANCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 1 seal, value 3l. , the goods of James Duncan .

WILLIAM HUNT . I am shopman to Mr. James Duncan - he is a watch and clock-maker , in Old Bond-street . On the 19th of June the prisoner came to the shop to look at some seals - I took them separately from the window to the counter, to show them to him; he looked at them. and said they were too dear - I missed one of them; I took him by the collar, and taxed him with having taken it - he said I accused him. wrongfully; he then put his hand to his left-hand jacket pocket, and shook out a seal and two brooches - I called the boy, and sent for an officer; he had been in the shop about a quarter of an hour- he said I should not bold him. There was no settlement for any sum of money - he said they were all too dear.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.What time was this? A.About three o'clock - I put eleven seals on the counter; we did not miss any thing else, but he shook the two brooches from his pocket as well as the seal - it was impossible that I could have dropped one in removing them to the counter.

JOHN CROSS. I am errand-boy there. The prisoner came to the shop, and asked to look at some seals; Mr. Hunt showed him some - he said they were too dear; I saw Hunt collar him - I saw the seal and the two brooches come from his pocket - I went for the constable, who took him.

Cross-examined. Q. The first time you saw them they were on the ground? A. Yes; I took them up, and gave them to Hunt - he denied having taken any thing.

JOSEPH PEARCE. I am an officer, and produce the property.

WILLIAM HUNT . This is Mr. Duncan's seal - it is worth about 3l.; I should charge from 4l. 10s. to 5l. for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent - there were two dozen seals put on the counter.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

1427. GEORGE HANCOCK was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 brooch, value 40s. , the goods of Edmund Trant .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

Reference Number: t18290716-54

1428. JANE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 3 half-crowns , the monies of William Gill .

WILLIAM GILL. On the 12th of July, early in the morning, I was in George-street, St. Giles' - I am single, and was sober; I am a tailor - I do not know where I met the prisoner, but I think it was near Coventry-street; I was going home with a young man, who is a tailor too- the prisoner was a stranger to me; I went with her to George-street, St. Giles' - I came from the Isle of Man; we went into a room on the ground-floor - I meant to stop all night; the agreement was such - I paid her 3s. 6d., and half a crown for the room; we went to bed together about half-past one or two o'clock - I had left three half-crowns and 18d. in my trouser's pocket; I went to sleep, and about half-past four in the morning the landlord came and asked me if all was right, as the prisoner had got up, but was not gone out, and he would not let her go till he asked if all was right - she was in the room at that time, and was quite dressed; I got up, put on my trousers, and then missed the three half-crowns - I am quite sure they had been there when I went to bed, as I took particular care to see what money I had; I wanted, for my own satisfaction, to know what money I had - the watchman was called, and she was taken into custody; three half-crowns and one shilling were found - I am sure I had not given her this money; I was perfectly sober and sensible.

Prisoner. You say three half-crowns were found on me, and the watchman can witness that only two were found; because I would not gratify you, you gave me in custody. Witness. There were three half-crowns found on her, and one shilling.

MAURICE NICHOLAS . I was beadle of the night - the prisoner was brought to the watch-house charged with stealing three half-crowns; I asked her if she had the money, and she said she had not; I asked what money she had - she said 3s. 6d., and pulled it out from under her garter; I asked what more she had got - she said no more; I said I was determined to know what she had got - I took hold of her arm, and found two half-crowns in her sleeve; I asked how she got them - she gave me no answer.

Prisoner. I said I had 3s. 6d. and 5s. 2d. besides; the prosecutor said he had lost five half-crowns, then he said four, and then he said a few. Witness. He did say he had lost a few half-crowns.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer did not take three half-crowns from me, beside what he had given me.

WILLIAM GILL re-examined. Q.What money did you pay the 3s. 6d. in? A. One half-crown and a shilling; when I first met her I had six half-crowns, a shilling, and some copper - I had a glass of spirits in her company, and gave a shilling for it; I went home with her, gave half a crown for the room, half a crown to her, changed another half-crown, gave her a shilling out of it, and put the 1s. 6d. and the three half-crowns into my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-55

1429. JAMES LONDON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 saw, value 5s. , the goods of Enoch Burford .

ENOCH BURFORD . I am a butcher , and live in the Hackney-road . About seven o'clock in the morning I left my shop; I put my saws and choppers away from the block before I went out - when I returned the saw was gone.

JOHN TURNBULL . I stood at my door, which is next to the prosecutor's; I saw the prisoner go and reach over the window, and take the saw - I went and took hold of him, and said he had taken a saw; he said he had not -I turned his apron on one side, and there it was.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290716-56

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JULY 17.

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1430. JOHN SMITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Rushbrook , on the 14th of March , and stealing therein, 4 coats, value 8l.; 5 boys' suits of cloathes, value 5l.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 3l.; 2 waistcoats, value 30s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 12s.; 3 yards of woollen cloth, value 2l., and 2 yards of baize, value 2s., his property .

CHARLES RUSHBROOK. I am a tailor , and live in Leather-lane . I got up on the 12th of March, about half-past six o'clock, to open the shutters, as usual, and the first shutter stuck a little; the prisoner, who was a stranger to me, was walking about - he came and asked if he should assist in getting it down; he pulled a knife from his pocket, eased the shutter and I took it down - I had an opportunity of observing him; he walked up and down before the shop, and as he went by once, he rubbed his hands together, and said, "It is a cold morning, Sir" - On Saturday the 14th, I got up about half-past six o'clock, and found a hole had been bored in a shutter, about six inches diameter had been cut out: I missed a good deal of wearing apparel, which was five or six feet from the window, and could not be got out without something being put in - I have recovered best part of my goods.

GEORGE BOOTH . I am a tailor, and live directly opposite Mr. Rushbrook. Two or three mornings before the 14th, I observed Mr. Rushbrook opening his shutters, and saw the prisoner there; I saw him take a knife from his pocket - he was walking about and continued to do so for some time afterwards; I am certain of his person- I heard of the robbery, and met the prisoner in Fleet-market. about six weeks after, in company with another man; I informed the prosecutor I had seen him.

ROBERT TYRREL . I am an officer. On the 14th of March, about half-past eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner in company with a woman, who was carrying a large bun

dle; they were going out of Finsbury-square into Sun-street - I watched them nearly to Petticoat-lane; they walked as I considered in company together - I stopped the woman, and asked what she had got; at that moment the prisoner, who was in company with another man, turned round and went off, and I saw no more of him - the bundle contained the best part of this property; I did not see the prisoner again till the 19th of June, when he was going into Smithfield - I took him, and told him I took him for a burglary, committed in Leather-lane. Holborn; he said he knew nothing of it - I asked if he knew any thing about Sarah Evans ; he said he did not - I searched his lodgings, and in a table drawer I found these three joints of a fishing rod, one skeleton-key, a phosphorus-box, and this hook; the joints screw into each other with a worm, and the book fastens in at the end - I found a fag end of blue cloth also.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure this is a skeleton-key? A. I should think it was; I conceive that he was in the woman's company - they were walking together; I was on the opposite side of the way, in Sun-street, and did not hear whether they talked - I saw them within three yards of each other; they might have been within two yards of each other - I never saw them nearer; I should have taken the prisoner, but he went off too quick - I knew him before; I went to different public-houses, to look for him - he told me where he lodged; the remnant of cloth is only a strip, an inch wide.

COURT. Q.Was he walking before and behind the woman? A. Yes, from the end of Sun-street, till they got into Petticoat-lane.

MR. RUSHBROOK . Here is one of the coats I lost - the officer has returned me the other articles; I lost three yards of woollen cloth, worth 2l. - I have examined this remnant; it is the same colour and quality, as what I lost, but I cannot swear to it.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there not millions of yards of that sort of cloth in the City? A. No doubt of it; the woman was tried last Session and acquitted - the prisoner never came to me to ask if I had any charge against him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-57

Before Mr. Justice James Parke

1431. THOMAS SAUNDERS and EDWARD SMITH were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Larke , on the 5th of July , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel , and stealing therein 1 canvas bag, value 2d., 13 pence, 50 halfpence, and 1 farthing, his property .

SMITH pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

JOHN LARKE . I live in Whitechapel-road , in the parish of St. Mary Matfellon; it is my dwelling-house - the shop is under the same roof; a door leads from the parlour to the shop, and the kitchen communicates with the parlour by a door. On Sunday, the 5th of July, at six o'clock in the evening, I went out, leaving my shop in the care of my brother Thomas and Mr. Archer; I returned about seven o'clock, as my brother sent for me - I immediately went to the watch-house, and my brother showed me a canvas bag, which contained 2s. 11 1/2d. in copper - it was my brother's bag, but the money was mine; I had put it into the bag the night before - I had left it in the parlour cupboard.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your brother in partnership with you? A. No; the money was my own - I know nothing of the prisoner.

THOMAS LARKE . I am brother to John Larke. I was left in charge of the shop on Sunday, the 5th of July; I had suspicion something would happen, and placed myself in the kitchen with Mr. Archer - my brother had fastened the shop door before he went out; I heard a voice in the parlour say, "It is all right; bolt the door;" I ran into the parlour, and the first person I met was Smith - I collared him, and took the canvas bag with the money out of his hand; I do not know where the bag was taken from - I had not seen it; I held Smith, and led him to the door - the street-keeper then came; we took him to the watch-house, with the bag, which was examined there, and the copper found in it; Smith had also a paper in his hand, with money in it - I had not seen that paper before; I took it to the watch-house with the bag; I did not see any body else in the parlour, but I saw a man running through the shop - Archer ran after him; when I collared Smith, he tried to put his hand into his pocket - he made several attempts to get from me; I examined, and found in his pocket four skeleton-keys - I tried one of them to the shop door, and it opened it; when I got Smith out he tried to get out of my hands, but finding me the strongest, he became quiet; I did not see the face of the one who ran through the shop - three more skeleton keys were taken from Smith's pocket at the watch-house.

WILLIAM ARCHER . On Sunday, the 5th of July, I was left in care of the shop; I was in the kitchen with Thomas Larke: I went into the parlour, and saw Smith there - I had heard him say, "Bolt the door;" I immediately went into the shop, and saw Saunders up close to the door, looking towards me - he was inside the shop, about two feet from the door; as soon as he saw me he turned round, opened the door, and run out - I followed him for more than half a mile; I did not overtake him myself - he was taken; I lost sight of him six or seven times when he was turning the corners, and when I turned I saw him still running; the shop shutters were closed, but there was a fan-light over the door - I had an opportunity of seeing his face when it was turned towards me, and have no doubt of his person whatever; I was very near him when he was taken - he turned the corner of a street which was no thoroughfare, and when I saw him again he was in custody.

Cross-examined. Q.From the time you first saw him till he ran out, how long might it be? A. About a minute; I did not see him till I got into the parlour - he was not more than a minute in my view in the shop, and during part of that minute I was looking at Larke and Smith; there was a light from the fan-light, which is about two feet by three - it has no bars to darken it; there was also a light from the parlour into the shop - I do not think I saw him for more than a minute; my attention was directed to the shop immediately I came out of the kitchen door - I did not meet many persons as I pursued - there were a great many people in Whitechapel-road, but not in the back streets; none of them joined in the pursuit, till at last I cried Stop thief! and about half a dozen persons followed - some were behind me, and some

before; they ran before me, and two of them caught him - he was searched at the watch-house, and two common small knives were found on him.

JOHN PASQUE . I live at No. 44, Hungerford-street, Mile-end New-town. On Sunday, the 5th of July, about half-past six o'clock, I was standing at my door, and heard a tumult in the street; I looked round, and saw the prisoner Saunders running towards the end of the street from Charles-street, and in a direction from Larke's house - he came towards me; I saw his face - he was running hard, and several people following him behind, crying Stop thief! William Archer was among them; when he got opposite my door, my wife cried out to him, "There is no thoroughfare;" he then turned the corner of Buttress-street, and did not go any further in that direction - he seemed very much exhausted, and threw himself against the wall, and at that time threw down this crow-bar into the kennel; I picked it up, and have had it ever since, except for half an hour, when the officer came to me - I am positive it is the same; he then delivered himself to two men, and was taken away - Archer followed him.

Cross-examined. Q.What do you mean by delivering himself? A.He threw himself against a wall completely exhausted, and when he saw the two men he went in between them, and gave himself up: I might be fifty or sixty yards off - I live about half a mile from Larke's; he was coming apparently in a direction from there - there might be twenty persons running; ours is a populous street - I had been at my door, in and out, some time; I did not go inside from the time I heard the cry of Stop thief! till I saw him deliver himself up - I took particular notice of a mark at the end of the instrument.

COURT. Q.Did Archer come by your house? A. No; he was in Underwood-street when I saw him; he would lose sight of him at the place he was taken - I could see that place from my door, but Archer could not; he was running about forty yards behind.

JOHN LARKE re-examined. When I went out in the afternoon, I locked the shop door; the shop window was quite secure - there was no other means of getting to the shop without opening the door; the door had been unlocked two Sundays before, and that caused my suspicion; I fastened the shop window on the Saturday night - all the back of the house was well secured: I had fastened it myself - besides the money in the bag, I had some money in a paper - it turned out to be 6 1/2d. at the watch-house; when I saw it opened I knew it to be the same paper - it was left in the same cupboard with the bag; it was produced to me by my brother, with the bag, and was safe in the cupboard on the Saturday.PTHOMAS LARKE. The bag with the copper in it, and the paper, I produced to my brother, is the same as I took from Smith.

Cross-examined. Q.Smith never got off the premises? A. No.

JURY. Q.Was the door locked, or only on the spring bolt? A.Double locked; it goes with a spring, and was locked besides.

Saunders' Defence. Smith is willing to acknowledge I am not the person who was seen on the premises.

Two witnesses gave Saunders a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

Reference Number: t18290716-58

1432. WILLIAM PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May . 1 watch, value 20l.; 1 gold chain, value 10l.; 1 gold pin, value 1l., and 1 silver box, value 6s., the goods of Richard Henry Beaumont , in the dwelling-house of Francis Joseph Humbert .

RICHARD HENRY BEAUMONT . On the 26th of May I lodged at the Hyde-park hotel ; I went out in the morning, about twelve or one o'clock, leaving a watch, a gold chain, a gold pin, and a small silver box, in my room; I returned in the course of the afternoon, and they were gone - the servant or landlady showed me the box and pin; I never saw the watch again - I have the box and pin here; they are mine - I do not know the landlord's name.

MARTHA PATIENCE BASSETT . My mother is servant at this hotel; I was there on the 26th of May - I have lived there these five years; Mr. Francis Humbert is the landlord, and I think his name is also John; the prisoner had lived at the house three or four years - he came to see me on the 26th of May, in the kitchen, and he wanted to brush his boots; he went up to the place where the brushes are kept, which is at the top of the kitchen stairs; Jane Overend went up stairs with him; I went up stairs shortly after, and saw her and the prisoner in the place where the brushes are kept; I did not hear her say any thing to him at that time; I returned into the kitchen, and went up again afterwards, and heard her accusing him of taking something out of Mr. Beaumont's bed-room - she had a pin in her hand at the time; I heard him say "What?" his hand was in his left-hand pocket at the time; I went into the prosecutor's room, and missed the silver box - I came out and told him not to say he had not got any thing, for he had got the silver box; he gave it me into my hand from his coat pocket, and begged of me not to mention it: Overend said if he would give up every thing, it should never pass her lips - he cried, and his lips changed as white as snow; he said he had not got any thing else, and we might search him - we did not search him, for he said he hoped he might not breathe again if he had got any thing else; Overend asked him if he knew the consequence of what he said; he said he did, for it was not that we lived now, but we live hereafter: he gave us a false address, " John James , No. 4, King-street, Holborn;" I knew his name, but did not recollect it at the time - we did not ask his name, but he gave us that; he then went out of the house - I went into the room soon after, and the watch was not on the table, whether it had been there in the morning I cannot tell, but it had always been there while Mr. Beaumont lived in the house: this is the pin, and this is the box - two flints were in it; we replaced them on the table: he had been at the hotel twice before within the fortnight.

Prisoner. I gave my address, "No. 4, Edward-street, Wardour-street." Witness. He said King-street, Holborn - I repeated it after him, and wrote it down immediately.

JANE OVEREND . I was at the hotel, and remember the prisoner coming there; I followed him up stairs when he went to brush his shoes - he went to the place where the shoes are cleaned; I staid with him there - I did not observe whether he went into any other room; he only went into the place, looked round, and found there were no brushes,

and went out of the place: Bassett came up stairs, and I left him in conversation with her at the top of the stairs - I went down into the kitchen, and left them; she came down stairs, and met me in the kitchen - I expected she had let him out, but I went up stairs, and found him standing at Mr. Beaumont's bed-room door, which I think was open: I could not tell whether he had been in, but he seemed confessed - I did not like his manner; he stood with his hands placed before him, as if there was something in them - I kept an eye on him; Bassett came up stairs - he directed his discourse to her; I told him to look at me, and not to look at her so much - he still kept his back towards me; I touched his arm, gave it a sudden jerk, and the pin dropped out of his hand - I am certain he dropped it from his hand; he let me pick it up very easily, he did not resist in the least; I then said, "You have taken some things from Mr. Beaumont's room;" he said, What? I did not know the pin at the time, but suspected it was so - I said, "You have come into this house to see this girl, for her sake and mine do not take any thing out of the house;" he said he had not got any thing - I saw him place his hand in his coat pocket; Bassett immediately went into Beaumont's room, looked on the table, missed a box, and said, "Don't say you have not taken any thing, you have got a small box with a steel and flint;" he ten took the box out of his left side pocket and placed it in her hand, and begged of us not to tell, for it was the first thing he had ever done; he cried - I promised him I would not if he would give me up every thing; he said he had not got any thing more if he never breathed again - I asked if he knew the consequence of what he was saying; he said he did - that it was not that we lived now, but that we lived hereafter. I had been into Mr. Beaumont's room about three-quarters of an hour before but had not noticed the watch; I went into the room after he was gone, but did not see the watch there - I had been in the habit of seeing it there; I do not know whether there was a chain on it, as I had not particularly noticed it; this is the box he put into Bassett's hand, and this is the pin I picked up.

MR. BEAUMONT. I am sure I left my watch and chain on the table; when I came home they were gone - they were worth about 30l.; the box was worth a few shillings.

MARTHA PATIENCE BASSETT . There was no one in the house but me and Overend - I had been into Mr. Beaumont's room that morning, but did not go near the table; Overend had been in the room.

MARY ANN CARR . I live at No. 42, Monmouth-street, and am servant to Mr. Emanuel, a clothes salesman. One night, the latter end of May, about ten o'clock, the prisoner brought a gold chain into my master's shop; I cannot say whether it was after the 26th - he produced a gold watch, and had the chain round his neck; I saw him take his hat off, and take the chain off his neck - the watch hung in his bosom fastened to the chain; Emanuel was at home - he is not here; he would not swear to him before the Justice; I know him to be the man - he staid there about a quarter of an hour, and my master gave the watch to him again; he wanted 18l. for it - my master would not buy it, and he went away; I am quite sure he is the man - I cannot recollect the day; my master was closing the shop up when he came, and told him to come next morning; but he did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the watch, and I never called at Emanuel's at all.

MR. BEAUMONT. The chain would go round the prisoner's neck - I have worn it round mine.

WILLIAM BALLARD . Mr. Humbert's name is Francis Joseph.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 99s. only.) Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-59

Before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1433. WILLIAM GRAINGER and EDWARD SPENCER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Alexander . on the 27th of June , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel , and stealing therein 1 seal, value 5s., and 1 necklace, value 18d., his property .

ELIZABETH ALEXANDER . I am the wife of Richard Alexander ; we live at No. 8, Old Montague-street , in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel - I do not know any other name to the parish; we keep a public-house . On Saturday night, the 27th of June, about ten o'clock, or a little later, I went up stairs to my bed-room; I had locked the bed-room door, and left the room quite safe about half an hour before - I fastened the window of that room with a drop-key at the side: it is a sash window, and opens into a lane at the side of the house - when I went up I put the key into the lock, and could not turn it one way or the other; I pushed against the door twice, and the second time it opened a little and sprang back in my face again - I found there was some one inside; I caught hold of the knob of the door, held it, and called out for my husband (the door opens inside the room); it was dark - I had left a candle in the room when I locked it; my husband came up, and just as he got on the landing the door was forced from my hold, and four men came out - I caught the first, and held him as long as my strength would permit, and then he escaped; my husband caught two of them, who are the prisoners - he kept them - I went into the bed-room, and found the light still there; I examined, and found one chest of drawers had been opened and the things, which had been in the drawers, tied up in bundles - two boxes were pulled from under the bed; I missed a small necklace from a second drawer - I had seen it that morning; the door appeared to me to have been opened by a chisel; I could tell by the marks that it had been broken open from the stair-case, and not inside - the room window was a little open at the bottom; it is one story high - the prisoners were taken away; I did not take notice of them myself.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Who had the key of the door? A. I kept it in my pocket; I was a good deal alarmed - there is a club-room on the same floor; it is seven or eight yards from the bed-room door - there was company in that room; I am sure four persons came out of the bed-room together - I have not stated that two came out first; some people came out of the club-room when the alarm was given, but not till after I had cried to my husband; I caught the knob of the door, and held it- the men forced the door from my hand just as my husband got up close to the door; it was before they came out of the room - they might have got out of the window if they had tried.

COURT. Q.Are you sure your husband came close to the door which you were holding before the four men came out? A. Yes; I cannot say whether the prisoners were members of the club, or whether they had been in the club-room that night - I had seen them drinking in a room down stairs about an hour before I went up; I should not know the man who I caught hold of.

RICHARD ALEXANDER . I keep a public-house in Whitechapel, in the parish of St. Mary; I do not know any other name for it. On Saturday, the 27th of June, about ten o'clock, I was serving in the bar; several customers were before the bar - my wife went up stairs to fetch the candle down, which she had left on the stove when she put the children to bed; she had not been up half a minute before she called to me, and said she was sure there were thieves in the room - I immediately took a candle which stood at the end of the counter, and ran up stairs; when I got to the top she was struggling with one man just in the door way - I placed my candle on a shelf at the top of the banisters as I saw her struggling, and I saw the next one come out; that was the prisoner Grainger - I saw him come out of the room; I saw him in the room, and as he came out, there is a step of about six inches, and he fell forward; as he fell I struck him on the nose - the next that came out was Spencer; I saw him come out, and as he came out he struck at me, and I struck at him - he tumbled over the other prisoner; they were both down together - another person came out of the room directly after, and made his escape.

Q.After the two prisoners were on the floor did you call for assistance? A. I called. and a young man, Henry, who lives in the house, and occasionally waits in the tap-room, came - I secured Grainger, and he secured Spencer; the candle went out during the scuffle - I cannot say whether it was before I knocked the man down or not, for a gas-light in the bar showed a light on the stairs - the light was burning when I saw the two prisoners come out of the room; I lost a gold seal from a bureau in the room - I had seen it safe two or three days before, about Wednesday; I delivered the prisoners to Brown the officer, who came - on Sunday morning, as soon as I opened the house, a man brought in a bunch of keys and a chisel; I knew him as a customer, but do not know his name - he is not here; I had not seen the prisoners in the house - neither of them were members of the club to my knowledge; I examined the door - it had been broken from the outside by a chisel or something, by the marks.

Cross-examined. Q.You have a club-room on the same floor? A. It is not exactly level, there is a difference of two steps - the door of one room can be seen from the other; Henry attended the club-room - he might go there every ten or five minutes; there are none of the club here - I placed the candle on a shelf at the head of the stairs - it would not cause a shadow to pass on the door; when the noise was heard the people in the club-room opened the door - I swear the prisoners did not come out of the club-room; I saw them come out of the bed-room.

COURT. Q.You are sure you saw four men come out of the bed-room? A. Yes; my wife caught the first - I took the prisoners, and the fourth escaped down stairs; I had got them both - the waiter came and took Spencer from me, and took him down stairs; I saw him in his custody all the time, till he was given to the constable - he was not out of my sight at all.

THOMAS BROWN . I am an officer; the prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Mary Matfellon . On the 27th of June, about ten o'clock, I was fetched there, and found the prisoners in custody - the landlord had Grainger, and another person had Spencer; I took them to the watch-house, which was not a quarter of a mile off - I searched them both, and in Grainger's trousers pocket I found this seal and necklace; he made no objection to being searched - I found nothing on Spencer.

Cross-examined. Q.Did not the man say he picked up the articles on the landing? A. He did not.

MRS. ALEXANDER. This is my necklace, and the one I mentioned.

RICHARD ALEXANDER . This is my seal.

Spencer's Defence. I was in the club-room and heard a female scream - I ran out with the people, who were drinking and singing, and when I got out they were all down stairs - I went down, and was taken close to the bar.

RICHARD ALEXANDER . The waiter took Spencer close to the bed-room door - he took him out of my hands on the first floor landing place.

GRAINGER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

SPENCER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18290716-60

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1434. EDWARD DARBY was indicted for entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Williamson , with intent to steal, and afterwards, about 12 o'clock in the night of the same day, feloniously and burglariously breaking out of the same .

JOSEPH WILLIAMSON . I keep the Sun public-house, Bethnal-green . On the 16th of June , I went to bed about one o'clock in the morning; I fastened all the doors and windows - I have one door at the bottom of the yard, and another back door at the landing place; I have known the prisoner a long time - just before two o'clock my wife awoke me, as the dog was making a noise; I got up - the watchman was coming along - I told him to go round to the back door; I went down stairs with a candle - I heard a terrible rush in the passage, and when I got to the bottom of the stairs, I saw the prisoner in the passage, through the rails; I knew him well before, and said "Darby, why for God's sake is it you that is in the house" - he had been in the house a little after ten o'clock the night before; I know he went out at the front door - he is a weaver ; he made no answer but ran away as fast as he could - I opened the stair case door, and followed him down three steps, from the landing to the yard; the door on the landing was unbarred, unbolted, and open - he went down the steps of the other door, which was open, into the yard, and at the bottom of the yard is a door which leads into a court; I never lost sight of him - he ran through the court; I pursued him close into Vine-street, and at the end of Vine-street, as I cried Stop thief! the officer caught him - he had had half a pint beer, and a pipe of tobacco that night; I always considered him an harmless inoffensive man before - I found the bar shutter broken open; they

were bolted inside when I went to bed - they had been broken on the Tuesday; I saw no marks of violence, but I found them wide open - they must have been opened by a person in the passage: the bar is in the middle of the passage - the shutters which shut the bar up, were opened, and a window in the bar was broken: I found the passage doors open - the dog who always lies against the bar door, in the passage, was fastened up in the tap-room - I lost nothing; there was a lot of things in the bar - the prisoner never lodged at my house; he used to come with his father, who belonged to a club - I cannot account for his being there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How long have you known him? A. About two years; I have found him rather silly; the people in the house once or twice had a little fun with him - I never knew them thrust tobacco into his mouth; he pulled off his shirt once in a joke - it was not done to hurt him; I never saw a rope got to pretend to hang him - he left his father's house one night, and my brother told him he had better sleep in my skittle-ground, which is covered over; I believe he slept there once or twice - people used to ask him to sing songs, and collected a few halfpence for him; be was singing in the house the night before.

COURT. Q.Was he made a joke of in the house? A.They did laugh at him; I believe he has been drawn in by others - many people thought him a foolish fellow; I thought nothing of his throwing off his shirt - none of my property was moved.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. On the morning of the 17th of June, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran and took the prisoner running, and the prosecutor after him; I brought him back to the house - the bar shutter had been forced open inside the house; no housebreaking instruments were found - there was no force used outside the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather tipsy, and went into the parlour to have a bit of sleep there, as there was a noise in the tap-room.

THOMAS HEWITSON . I live next door to the prisoner, and have known him for a long time; I always considered him half silly - he would play at marbles and buttons, although twenty-two years old.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-61

1435. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Marks , on the 21st of June , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , and stealing therein 1 pint of wine, value 2s.; 1 bottle, value 3d.; 200 needles, value 1s.; 1 twopenny piece, 72 penny pieces, and 48 halfpence, his property .

RICHARD MARKS . I keep a public-house in Old-street-road , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On the morning of Sunday, the 21st of June, about ten minutes past four o'clock, I was alarmed by the watchman; I went to the window, and the watchman told me to come down immediately - as soon as I came down I found the parlour window shutters down; they are outside shutters - the upper sash of the window was pulled down, the lower sash remained as it was left; I had secured the windows myself the night before, and had fastened the shutters and doors myself - I went to bed about three-quarters past twelve; I examined the shutters - some instrument had been forced between the shutters which slide up and down - by pressing some instrument against the shutters the inner shutter fell down; all the wood work was torn away by some iron instrument; I opened the door immediately, and the watchman asked what I had lost - I went to the till, and missed eight or ten shillings in half-pence; the parlour door leads to the bar without any passage between - there was a quantity of farthings among the copper, and one twopenny piece, which is not a common thing; I have taken three since I have been in the house, and threw them into the back of the till - there was a pint pot on the counter with some cider in it; it was about two-thirds full - that pint pot was not there the night before - the iron handle of the outside door was wrenched off; that was safe the night before; about one o'clock at noon I missed about two-thirds of a bottle of sherry from the sideboard in the bar - it was a common black wine bottle: I had about two hundred sail needles, which I had had about sixteen years - I had brought them from Malta; I should know them again - they were in a drawer next to the till; I had seen them a day or two before - they were wrapped in a paper; I have known the prisoner about eighteen months - he used to come to my house after a servant of mine; I have frequently seen him there - I discharged that servant about five weeks before this.

Prisoner. Q. Had you any reason to suspect my honesty? A.None, though I knew he had been in the Refuge for the Destitute.

EDWARD OXLEY . I am a watchman - the prosecutor's house is two beats off mine. On the Sunday morning in question I saw the prisoner, when I was at the top of Saunder's-gardens, at a quarter before four o'clock - I was near my box; I had not seen him before - he was sitting on the step of the Weavers' Arms, Saunder's-gardens, almost two hundred yards from Marks'; he was counting some copper - there were 5s. or 6s. worth, I suppose; he put them into his side-pocket as he counted them, and he had a black wine bottle by the side of him, with some liquor in it - he was in liquor; I asked him where he got the halfpence - he said he took them for his wages; I asked him to go to the watch-house - he said he would; he said he worked over in the Borough - that he got the liquor to go fishing with; the officer of the night took down where he said he worked - he said he earned 35s. a-week; he was dismissed from the watch-house that night, and I apprehended him again at a quarter before six o'clock - I took him to the watch-house, and delivered him to Smith, the constable of the night; he was then rather more in liquor - I have no doubt of his being the same man.

THOMAS RYCROFT . I am a watchman of Old-street-road - my beat is near Marks'; my box is within five or six yards of his house - it stands in his yard. On Sunday morning, about twenty minutes to four o'clock, this happened - I was then gone down to the watch-house; I had seen the prisoner, about ten minutes before two o'clock, at the top of a court on my beat, about fifty yards from the house - I have seen him about the street before; he spoke to me, and said he had lost a handkerchief down the court; he asked me to go with him - I went into a house in the court, where he said he had lost it; they produced

several handkerchiefs, which he did not own; he called out for Kirby in the house - she is the girl who had lived with the prosecutor; I know her - he asked her if she had seen the handkerchief; she said No, she had seen none but what he had got; she asked if he had lost any thing else - if he had lost any money; he said, "No, I have got none" - I am sure he said he had got none; he was turned out of that house by the man who kept it - I brought him out of the court, and turned him off my beat; he went away past Shoreditch church, and in about ten minutes I saw him come back to the same court again - I went back again, and sent him away; I asked where he lived - he said No. 24, Hoxton; I gave him a shove, and told him to go off my beat - I saw him again about three o'clock; he came past me by the church again, and went round by the church; he was going away from Marks' then - I saw him a fourth time about a quarter before four o'clock, going up towards the watch-house with Oxley, who had got a glass bottle in his hand; I did not know of the robbery at that time - he had no glass bottle the three first times that I saw him; he was not intoxicated the first time I saw him, but the fourth time I thought he was - he had been drinking; about ten minutes before four o'clock I saw Marks' window shutters broken open, and the handle of the door wrenched off - I alarmed him; I had passed his house about three quarters of an hour before - the shutters and door were secure then.

Prisoner. Q.What did I tell you I had lost? A. A handkerchief, nothing else; I heard you playing a flute in the house - you did not say you lost a flute.

COURT. Q. You have been examined before the Magistrate - did he not say he had lost a flute? A. He did not say so at first, he did afterwards.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you to go down with me to find it, and you beat me away? A. I went to the house - there were several Irish people, who all took off their hats; it was full three-quarters of an hour from the time I saw him till the time the house was broken open - I saw him come down Shoreditch; the fourth time was when I saw him with the bottle - I was about twenty yards from him when I saw him with Oxley, and could see that he was more intoxicated.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a constable. On Sunday morning the prisoner was brought to the watch-house. about three o'clock the first time - Oxley brought him again a second time; the first time he brought him was about a quarter before three - he had a bottle then.

Q.What time was it that he was finally taken into custody? A. I found him at the watch-house between five and six o'clock; he had no bottle then, but he had it the first time, which was a little before three, to the best of my recollection - that was the time that Oxley brought him, he said in his presence he had seen him on the steps counting some farthings and halfpence, and a bottle by his side, and did not think it was all right; the prisoner said he lived with Richard Austin, No. 101, Kent-street, Borough, and he received it as his wages - which were 1l. 16s. per week; I asked what was in the bottle - he said it was liquor; that he generally got it as he was going a fishing - I said, "You could not get liquor at this time in the morning"; he said Yes, he had got it from Mr. Percel's - a man of that name keeps a house, I find; I tasted the liquor - it consisted of different sorts of spirits; there appeared to be wine and rum; I examined him the second time he was brought, and found 2s. 2d. in halfpence, eleven penny pieces, one twopenny piece, thirty-three farthings, one half-crown, two sixpences in silver, one knife, one key and one bundle of needles; I said, "What do you call these?" he said, "Oh, they are one or two bodkins;" the needles were in this paper - I went afterwards to Mr. Marks'.

Prisoner. Q.Did you not ask me the first time to treat you in the watch-house with something to drink? A. After I said you might go, the houseman, said, "You have no objection for us to taste your liquor" - you said, "No, you may taste it all round."

RICHARD MARKS . This packet of needles is my property - I know it well; they were rusty, and a few weeks before I observed the papers they were in, were loose, and I tied them up in this piece of newspaper, which they are in now; this twopenny piece I know by being bright - I believe it to be mine; I had a great many farthings, more than thirty-three, in the till - I do not think there was any silver in the till - there might be one sixpence; I am certain I lost no half-crown.

Prisoner's Defence. Oxley saw me the first time at a quarter to two o'clock; I had been down where he was three times - he beat me away; I must have broken open the house, gone there three times, took the property, and got to the watch-house in less than an hour, which is a thing impossible for any body to do - I had the property put on me at the place I lost my handkerchief in; I could say so if I stood before a higher tribunal than this - if I had been guilty, should I have staid two hours near the place to be taken? Smith has been to the house, and found the flute which I lost.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and by the Prosecutor, as he had stated the girl to be the cause of the robbery.

Reference Number: t18290716-62

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1436. CHRISTOPHER ANGIER was indicted for stealing. on the 6th of June , 2 coats, value 5l.; 1 jacket, value 35s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 28s.; 1 handkerchief, value 5s., and 7 yards of woollen cloth, value 3l., the goods of James Norris , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES NORRIS . I live at Stepney . On the 6th of June, about half-past ten o'clock in the morning, I went out, leaving my daughter Jane in care of the house; I returned in ten minutes, found her standing at the door, and missed the articles stated in the indictment from the counter; the cloth I had frequently cut, and am not certain of the quantity; it was worth above 3l. or 4l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were the things all new? A. Yes; I am a tailor - I did not meet any man dressed as a sailor as I returned.

JANE NORRIS . I am the prosecutor's daughter. On the 6th of June my father went out for about ten minutes, leaving me alone in the shop - and almost immediately he went out three men came in; they were all dressed in blue jackets and trousers - two of them had white stockings and shoes on; the other had lace-up boots: one of them asked if my father was at home - I said he was not, but he would be in a few minutes; he said he wanted to be measured for a pair of morine trousers; I asked if he

would wait - one of them stood with his back against the counter, and another sat down in the shop; the third walked about, and was talking to the baby which I had in my arms; my mother called me - she was at the parlour window, in my sight; I went out of the shop to her: I came back directly, and the men were all gone - the shop door, which was closed before, was open; I went and looked out, but could not see them - my father came back while I was looking out; nobody had been in the shop but those three men after he went out: I told him what had happened, for as soon as I came back to the shop I missed a roll of black cloth off the counter - I did not know any of the men; I am certain the prisoner was one of them: there was something particularly vulgar about him and the others looked genteel; he talked to the baby: I am sure of him - I described him to Norris, and saw him in custody in about a fortnight, dressed the same as he was in the shop.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you quite sure it was not because you saw him in a sailor's dress, that you thought him the man? A. I am sure of him - they were all three dressed alike, except one wearing laced-up boots; I should know the others again - I never saw them before: they came in directly my father went out - he turned to the right; they seemed to come from the left; they had not been in the shop above two minutes when my mother called me, and when I returned they were gone; I can swear more particularly to the prisoner - I am sure I should know the others: I was not looking at the prisoner all the time, I suppose about half a minute; I told the officer the other two were of a dark complexion - they had hats on; I am thirteen years old: we had nothing but light goods hanging in the window.

COURT. Q.There was light enough for you to see the prisoner? A. Yes; I am sure of him; his face was broken out - I saw him at Lambeth-street, with another man, and knew him.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. Jane Norris described the men as mates or sailors - that one had a red face, with pimples on it, and the other two were about the same size; I took the prisoner and another man to the Cherry Tree public-house, but not from her description; both were dressed as sailors: Norris and his daughter came to the office - she went into the lock-up room, where there were several, and picked him out from the rest - he was not pointed out to her; I had seen the prisoner several time before, but not since the robbery; she did not know the other man - she was positive of the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q.Did she describe the others except by their dress? A. No - she said she should know them again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-63

1437. DANIEL READING was indicted for killing and slaying John Dwyer >.

JOSEPH DICKASON . I am a constable. The surgeon's assistant who examined the deceased's body, is gone to Edinburgh; the surgeon did not open the head, the body was in such a dreadful state that we could not go near it; it was about an hour after the man's decease - nothing was said about a fight then; the fight took place on the 13th of June , and on the 25th he died - Mr. Stirling was the Coroner; I know nothing of the matter: I saw the body at Old Brentford on 25th of June - I never saw him alive - the surgeon himself knows nothing about it; he said it was in such a condition he could not examine it, and that apoplexy might have caused his death; I saw no marks of violence on the body, nor did I look for any.

MARY MOLINEY . The deceased came to my house for a lodging, at Brentford, near Ealing, on Wednesday. the 24th of June; he died the next morning - he came on foot, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and appeared in pretty good health; he said he had a severe pain in his head - that was all the complaint I heard; I saw no marks of bruises on his face. I was called just before three o'clock next morning, and found him in a dreadful state; I did not hear him speak - his wife was in bed with him: one of the people who lodged in the room alarmed me - I went for a doctor, but could not make him hear; I returned, and sent another person for one; the apprentice came and bled him immediately, but he was dead before he came: I saw the doctor examine the body all over - I did not observe any bruises; he examined his head, and felt about him.

MARY DWYER . The deceased was my husband; I accompanied him to Brentford - we had been lodging at Deptford before that; he complained of a pain in his head on the Monday morning, and died on the Wednesday; he had fought on the Saturday, and ended the fight on the Sunday - I was present at that fight - I do not know what day of the month it was: he was taken speechless at three o'clock, and died that morning.

Q. What was it made you first suppose him to be dangerously ill? A. I cannot tell - he never spoke to me in the night; one of the lodgers awoke me about three o'clock, and said he was dying - the fight was on the Saturday before the Inquest was held; the prisoner and my husband were coming up the street, and heard a woman cry out Murder! it was five or six women beating each other - my husband fetched a constable: and on Sunday morning the prisoner and the rest of his comrades came out of Rending's house, and struck my husband three times - he ran into the back yard; the prisoner followed, knocked him down, and kicked him while he was down: several men came and kicked him - my husband had struck him once or twice before he was knocked down; the prisoner struck the first blow - I did not see any blows on my husband's head; he had a black eye and a scratch on the side of his face. On the Monday my husband got a warrant against him, and we staid at Deptford till the following Friday; my husband kept his bed until Thursday - he did not look ill on Thursday: we left Deptford on the Friday, and walked to Wandsworth; we staid there till Tuesday morning, and walked from there to Brentford, but not in one day - we were obliged to sleep out of doors one night, as we could not get a lodging; he first complained of his head on the Tuesday morning, as we left Wandsworth.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-64

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1438. HENRY STEADMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 1 coat, value 2l.; 2 pairs of trousers,

value 28s.; 4 waistcoats, value 28s., and 1 jacket, value 4s., the goods of Robert Morrison , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-65

1439. JOSEPH PRATT and ELIZA PRATT were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 7 linen bags, value 10s. 6d.; 12 yards of wrapper, value 7s.; 2 sheets, value 7s.; 6 aprons, value 3s. 6d.; 9 caps, value 4s. 10d.; 12 pairs of cuffs, value 2s. 6d.; 12 pairs of braces, value 7s.; 29 pairs of half stockings, value 17s., and 17 pairs of stockings, value 27s., the goods of William Ward and another, the masters of the said Joseph Pratt .

LEONARD CLARE MATHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. On the 13th of June the female prisoner offered to pawn six pairs of black stockings - I detained her; she said her husband gave them to her that morning to pawn.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a constable of St. Luke's. I was sent for to take the female at Mr. Mathews' - I locked her up, and went to her lodging, No. 4, Philip-lane; I then asked her where she got these stockings; she said her husband gave them to her, and that he was a hawker - I asked where he was; she said he was in the country, and had bought the stockings in the course of business; I locked her up, and went to her lodging with Mathews - they both said they lived there; the female said she lived at No. 4, Philip-lane, but I found it was No. 4, Bird-court, Philip-lane - the male prisoner came in while we were searching; Mr. Ward was sent for and gave charge of him - I told him it was on suspicion of robbing Mr. Ward; he made no reply, but asked if he might change his clothes - I said, Yes; I found in the lodging some night-caps, stockings, braces, cuffs, sheetings, and bags; Mr. Ward identified them - the prisoner said nothing while we were finding them, but on the way to Guildhall he exclaimed, "Oh, my God! What shall I do? it will break my poor father's heart; bad company has brought me to it - I did it to extricate myself from a little trouble;" he then asked what he must say before the Justice - I said he must act for himself; he was remanded - he asked me if Ward and Brittle had sworn to any of the property; I said they had - he then said, "Recollect, the nap coating don't belong to them - I bought the coating and my wife bought the cotton."

Prisoner Joseph Pratt . Q.Did not this conversation pass in a public-house? A. I went into a public-house: I myself bought a penny loaf - I drank your health; I did not ask if you meant to employ a legal adviser.

JOHN BROWN. I am keeper of Bunhill-row watch-house. I went to the prisoner's lodging with Hooper - his evidence is correct; under the bed I found a canvas nailed over the sacking - it formed a pocket, and in that pocket I found part of the property.

JOHN McMAHON . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Ward, who live in Wood-street. I know these bags by a number which I put on them myself; I know nothing but the bags, but have no doubt of the remainder of the property; my masters deal in these articles - they are worth more than 2l.; he had been eight months in their employ.

Joseph Pratt 's Defence. Part of the property is what I bought; I bought five pairs of stockings at Gloucester, and I bought three more pairs - they have been worn, and are mended; the other articles I took for a debt of a hawker, fourteen pairs of stockings, twelve night-caps, twenty-four pairs of half hose, twelve pairs of braces and cuffs - I had occasion to have the bags out on business; four of them I had out the previous evening.

JOHN McMAHON . He never had occasion for this number of bags at a time; they may be taken out with goods, but should be brought back again - if the warehouse was closed he should return them in the morning.

WILLIAM HOOPER . Three of these bags were under the bed, covered with the clothes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-66

1440. ROBERT WICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , 16 yards of woollen cloth, value 10l., the goods of Stephen Mounsey and another, in the dwelling-house of Philip Foxwell .

CHARLES JARDINE . I am in partnership with Stephen Mounsey - we carry on business at No. 29, Basinghall-street ; Mr. Foxwell does not live in the house, but two of his servants live there to protect the property - he does not carry on business there, and has no property there; we rent the lower part, and are woollen-drapers . Between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning of the 8th of July I had this cloth in my hands; a friend called on me soon after eleven and gave me information - I had placed the cloth on a pile near the door and missed it; the postman had come into the counting-house, which is at the bottom of the warehouse, and delivered a letter to me - he left the door open; I ran across to the Justice-room, Guildhall, and found Morgan, the officer, in possession of my cloth and the prisoner.

GEORGE WILLIAM MORGAN . I am a constable. I was in Coleman-street between ten and eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner and another person - I suspected, and followed them through White Rose-court into Basinghall-street, they went towards London-wall - I missed the prisoner for a short time, and his companion was standing opposite the prosecutors' - when he moved I saw the prisoner with the cloth on his shoulder about ten yards from the prosecutor's door; I could not see him come out of the door as the street turns there; I let him walk on, the other crossed over to him, and I caught hold of both - the prisoner threw the cloth down: the other man said, "You don't want me, Sir, let me go;" he struck me in the face, and got away; I kept hold of the prisoner, got assistance, and took him before the Alderman; Mr. Jardine got there almost as soon as I, and claimed it.

FRANCIS NEVETT . I am a watchman of Queenhithe ward. I was coming along London-wall about eleven o'clock, there was a mob - I looked, and saw this piece of cloth on the ground - the officer and prisoner were there; he seemed resolute, and I assisted in securing him.

MR. JARDINE. I am positive of this cloth, it has my private mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was asked to carry it for a man as far as Finsbury-square for sixpence.

GUILTY of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-67

1441. MARY SULLIVAN and MARY BATCHELOR were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 2 half crowns, 1 shilling, and 5d. in copper monies, the monies of Leonard Alderson , from his person .

LEONARD ALDERSON . I live in White's-alley, Chancery-lane, and am a chairmaker . On the 28th of June I had been to the pay-table, and did not get paid till eleven o'clock - I was a long time coming home; I left there about twelve - when I got into Holborn I rested myself against the shutters, being fatigued, when the two prisoners caught hold of me and got talking a parcel of stuff to me, and pulling me about; being lame, I could not prevent them - I told them I wanted nothing to do with them; they felt me about, and got my money from my waistcoat and breeches pockets - I had two half-crowns, a shilling, and 5d.; I was sober - they got all the money; they had got about three houses off when I missed it - I could not follow as fast as they went; I am sure the money was safe before - it happened nearly opposite Fleet-market: I desired a watchman to take them- he said he knew them, and went after them: I found them in custody in an hour and a half - I am certain of them.

RICHARD SAUNDERS . I am a watchman of St. Andrew's, Holborn. I saw the prosecutor about half-past twelve o'clock, standing with his back against some shutters to rest himself - he appeared sober; I saw the prisoners in the act of hugging him - they passed me, and turned down Field-lane; he described their persons to me minutely - I knew them before, and described them to the next watchman who brought them to me; I took them to the watch-house, and directly the prosecutor saw them he said they were the women who had taken his money - they denied having seen him; I searched them, and found 16 1/2d. on one and 5d. on the other, but no coin that the prosecutor could identify; they were out of my sight upwards of an hour.

Sullivan. Q.Were you not drinking with the prosecutor till we were taken? A. I was not.

Q. Have you not received 15s. not to appear? A. The prosecutor and I were drawn by stratagem to a public-house on Monday last - I was brought there by a message that the prosecutor wanted to see me; I went, and was told he had just gone out, but would be in in an instant - he came in soon after, and a proposition was made for him to receive what he had lost, and drop the proceedings; I told him the consequence of it, and he had better get away - they wished us to drink, and we refused; he being a cripple could not get out of the house so fast, and they thrust 15s. into his hand.

Sullivan's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor till he came to the watch-house - my friend went to ask him about it, and he said if he got his money he would not trouble us any further.

Batchelor's Defence. I never saw the man till he was in the watch-house.

JOHN MAY . I live in Lower West-street, Smithfield, and am a whipmaker - I have not worked in London, but at Bristol; I have been here about two months - I have known the prisoners two months; one of them lives with her mother, but I cannot say in what part of London - I have heard the mother say so; I have heard she is her mother - I have seen the prisoners in the street where I live; they do not lodge in the same house as me- I have seen one with her mother in different parts of the street many times; I have come to certify that I have seen the prosecutor make up what damage there was.

Q. How did you know they were taken up? A. A friend of theirs met me, and asked me to have a drop of porter the day before yesterday - I did not know they were in custody before the young man told me; he said a friend of his was charged with robbing a man of 6s. - I believe he is a plasterer or bricklayer; I have seen him with his fellow-tradesmen, plasterers - I was not very intimate with him; I have many a time treated him with a pot of beer, but not in the prisoners' presence - the last time I saw the prisoners was in Holborn in the street; I have seen them at the Horse Shoe and Magpie, Saffron-hill, with their mothers - I forget their names; I might know them, and not their names - I saw the prosecutor at the Three Tuns, Brooke-street, Holborn; we went there together, for this girl's friend brought me into his company (pointing to Sullivan) - I do not know where he is, or his name: I saw him this morning, but not since - the prosecutor lives in a street leading out of Holborn to the left: the young girl's friend brought him to the house, and asked how much he had lost by the girl - the man said he did not know that the girl had taken anything; the friend said so - and he said he had lost 6s.; he mentioned 6s., neither more nor less, to the best of my opinion - the young man said he was very sorry for it, and if he would be satisfied to take it, and what expense he was at afterwards, he would pay him; I heard this.

Q.How came you to be wanted on this occasion? A. The young man asked me to drink, and I did not know what it was upon; I did not think what it could be about till I got into the house - then it was talked over; I said nothing, only that it was an unfortunate job that it happened - he had told me it was for picking a man's pocket; I was present at the time the money was offered - the man got 15s., and said he should be satisfied with it, and he took the 15s.; this young woman's friend gave it him - I do not know where he is; he did not send me here.

Q. How came you here? A. I was walking about the yard as other people - I had no business to bring me here; her mother told me the trial was coming on to-day; she was in the street: on my oath the prosecutor stretched out his hand, and took the 15s. in the public-house himself, and shook hands with the party when he left - it was not thrust into his pocket; Saunders was present at the time; the money was reached to the prosecutor, and he took it - it was not put into his pocket in my presence; I saw him receive the money - I swear it was not put into his pocket; when this was done I parted with him.

Q.You knew what was to be done, that the prosecutor was to have his money returned? A. When I came into the house I did; he did not exactly say he was going to make it up; he had 13s., and another person lent him 2s. - that was the man who came in here with me (Boyd;) I knew the prisoners, one as much as the other - I have been at several houses with them; the Horse Shoe and Magpie - I was never in a private house with them; I do not know where they lived - I was never in their mothers' house; I only know them by meeting them in public-houses.

ALEXANDER BOYD . I am a hawker, and live at No. 10, West-street, Smithfield, when I am in town - May also

lodges there: I have lodged there, off and on, for nine months. I only know the prisoners by seeing them walking up and down in the street; the young man, Sheen, met me - he is a bricklayer; he does not keep company with the prisoners to my knowledge - I have seen him speak to them, that is all; I have known Sheen about a twelve-month - he lives in White Bear-yard, at the top of Leather-lane - I think it is Ayre-street-hill; I was walking up Holborn-hill the other evening, he asked me to go to White's-alley, Chancery-lane, for he was going to meet a person - I went with him to a public-house, sat down and drank a pint of porter, and after we had drank, this short man came in; I did not send any message for him - I do not know that Sheen did; he came in after Sheen - they sat down, talked about one thing or another, and then began talking about his friend being in prison; I believe Sullivan is his friend.

Q.How came you to know her name? A. Why, yesterday morning I saw it up on the gate, and he showed it to me on the gate outside the yard; I do not now know whether it was her name - he asked the man if he wished to come to any terms, and not prosecute his friend; May was sitting alongside in the same seat at the time - the man said he did not know himself what to do; he did not wish himself to do any harm, but he would speak to the watchman first - he went down to Greystoke-place, and inquired after the man; we went altogether, and then returned to another house - I went out a bit, and when I came back the watchman was there: I have seen Sheen outside the Court, but not for this hour and a half. After the watchman came in they began talking, and he asked what expences he was at; he said 15s. - he said, "Will that satisfy you?" he pulled out his money, and said, "All I have is 12s." - he happened to find two sixpences more; I lent him one for about an hour, and his brother, I believe, gave him the other.

Q.Then four of you were raising the money to prevent the prosecution? A.He asked me for the money; I knew what it was for, but I was sure of the money.

Q. Do you mean to say the man took the money. or was it put into his pocket? A.Sheen sat at one end of the table - he handed it down, and this gentleman took it up, whether he put it into his pocket I do not know, but it was said it was better to put it into the landlord's hands till the following evening.

MARY ANN MITCHELL . I live at No. 4, Greystoke-place. About seven o'clock, on Tuesday night, four men came to the house. and asked for Richard Saunders , the watchman; I should not like to swear that May was one of them, but from his appearance I judge he was - I think Boyd was one. but should not like to swear to him; they said they had come from a person named Alderson, and wished to see him at the Three Tons, Brook-street, almost immediately - I told them it was uncertain whether I should see Saunders or not, but if I did I would tell him; I did see him, and told him of it.

LEONARD ALDERSON . I went to the Three Tons; they sent after me - I was taken by surprise; I went in consequence of the message; I could not swear to the person who took me there - I certainly took the 15s. to get out of their company, and I sent it on Wednesday night, but there was nobody there to take it; Boyd is one of the men I saw at the public-house - I did not hear him say any thing about it.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BATCHELOR - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-68

1442. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 1 piece of silk handkerchiefs, containing 7 handkerchiefs, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Smith and another.

THOMAS SMITH . I am in partnership with my brother - we are silk manufacturers , and live in the Poultry . On the 1st of July I lost a piece of handkerchiefs from the warehouse window - I had seen it three hours before it was stolen; I was not at home at the time - I saw it at the Mansion-house the next day, and have no doubt of it.

JAMES PEARCE . I am in the service of Messrs. Smith. I saw the prisoner and another young man come into the warehouse - I was in the counting-house: I recollected having seen them two or three times before, but they never brought any thing; I went up stairs, watched, and in two minutes saw the prisoner with his hat off, and when the shopman went from the window, I saw the prisoner take a piece of handkerchiefs and put it into his hat - I walked down stairs, went out at the door, and as he came out I called him back and asked him to let me look at his hat - he said he should not, and ran off and I after him; I stopped him, and brought him back to the ware-house - he took his hat off, took the piece of handkerchiefs out, and threw it over the counter; I picked it up, and gave it to the constable.

Cross-examined. Q.Were there some pieces on the ground? A.There were, but I am sure this came from his hat.

JOHN ROE . I am a constable. I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-69

1443. SAMUEL GODDARD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 seal, value 10s.; 2 keys, value 2s.; 1 ring, value 2s., and 1 ribbon, value 1d., the goods of William Mott , from his person .

WILLIAM MOTT. I live in Fleet-street, and am master of St. Bride's workhouse . On the 4th of July, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was passing along Cheapside , nearly opposite Bird-in-Hand-passage, and the prisoner ran forcibly against me, and snatched my watch from my fob; he ran into King-street: I pursued him about ten paces, was tripped up, and fell; I lost sight of him for a moment: I saw him running when I got up, and called Stop thief! he was stopped in Ironmonger-lane - I am confident he is the man; I saw the watch before the Lord Mayor, and am confident of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was it not darkish? A.Not very dark; the lamps were lighted, and it was moon-light - I lost him in King-street; I had dined at home - I had been to see my brother-in-law, and took some ale; I was not intoxicated - I am confident of him; I had a full view of his face, his figure, and every thing.

WILLIAM STYLES . I am a watchman of Cheap ward. I heard the rattle springing, and heard the cry of Stop

thief! about one door up Ironmonger-lane; I instantly pursued, and the prisoner came, turning the corner - I caught him in my arms; we had a struggle, and he said,"Let me go - it is only my brother and I larking;" we had a skirmish, and he fell down: nothing was found in my presence - I took him back to my brother watchman, who said he had robbed a gentleman of his watch; the prisoner made no answer: I saw Mr. Mott in about two minutes - he said, "That is the man who robbed me of my watch;" I saw it produced at the Mansion-house, and he claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Mott far from you? A. The prisoner had turned the corner.

WILLIAM STOCKER . I am a watchman. I was in Guildhall-yard, heard a rattle spring, and went towards the sound; when I got there the prisoner was in Styles' custody - there were sufficient to hold him; Styles told me where he had been stopped - I went there, and found the watch by the grating, on the exact spot; it had a ribbon, three keys, and a seal - I gave it to Scott: I afterwards saw it before the Alderman and the prosecutor claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find it in the street? A.Under a window, with a railing before it; it was under the grating - I found it three hours after.

WILLIAM SCOTT . The watch was delivered to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman said he had lost his watch, but did not see who took it, and he thought it was me, but after a bit he was so intoxicated that he swore to me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290716-70

1444. RICHARD ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 jacket, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Rosseter .

CHARLES ROSSETER . I live in Back Church-lane, and am a paviour . On the 30th of June, about a quarter to twelve o'clock in the day, I was in Threadneedle-street - my jacket hung on some rails near the South Sea-house; I missed it about a quarter of an hour after I had seen it there. I went to the Mansion-house, and found the prisoner there with it.

WILLIAM BROWN . I work as a paviour, and was at work with Rosseter; I did not see the jacket taken - a gentleman said a man had taken it; our foreman jumped up, and said, "See if all your things are right," and Rosseter missed his jacket; I pursued up Threadneedle-street, and saw the prisoner about a hundred yards ahead - I did not call out, but ran, and as he turned Finch-lane I collared him, and said, "What have you got in your basket?" he opened it, and there was the jacket - I gave him in charge.

JOHN BRADY . The prisoner was delivered to me with the basket, and I found this piece of cane and a crooked wire in it; I found seven duplicates on him, for handkerchiefs, waistcoats, and things; he attempted to get the cane and wire out of the basket - I said, "What are these?" and he dropped them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. That thing in the basket is an umbrella stretcher - I did not think I was committing any offence - I kicked the jacket before me, and picked it up at the impulse of the moment - I was going to the Post-office, and have no doubt as I came back I should have given it to the street-keeper, to find the owner; I question whether I have committed any offence, for it laid on the pavement, and the law does not allow any person to take advantage of his own wrong.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-71

NEW COURT, Second Years.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1445. ALEXANDER CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 saw, value 3s., and 1 wheeler's tool, called a burr, value 4s. , the goods of William Wilson .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged. 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-72

1446. ANN GOLDSMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 2 yards of muslin, value 3s.; 2 petticoats, value 4s.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 9d. , the goods of Charlotte Fraser .

CHARLOTTE FRASER . I am a widow . On the 30th of June I lost these things out of my box; I had seen a frock there on the Monday, and missed it on Tuesday, with the other articles - I do not know whether the other things were there on the Monday or not; I have known the prisoner a long time - she lived in the house with her daughter; I charged her with taking them; she said she was very sorry, but she had pawned them; she has pawned things for me before, but I had never authorised her to pawn these.

GEORGE HASHILL . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 1st of July - she delivered up the duplicates to me, which relate to this property, and here is one for three towels, which the prisoner says the prosecutrix lent her to pawn.

WILLIAM FULLWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. I have the articles, which were pawned by the prisoner at different times.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had pawned the property, as the prosecutrix was in her debt.

MRS. FRASER. I never owed her any thing; I always recompensed her as far as laid in my power - I never employed her when I could not afford it; I have parted with things to raise money, to pay her and to keep her; I lent her the towels one night when I could not lend her 1s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-73

1447. JEREMIAH PETHER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 pair of shoes, value 7s.; 2 waistcoats, value 1s.; 3 jackets, value 3s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 2s.; 3 pairs of boots, value 5s., and 2 shoes, value 2s. , the goods of John Lawrence .

JOHN LAWRENCE . I live at Hampstead , and am a schoolmaster . On the 27th of May I lost these articles from my boot-house; some of them were on shelves, and some on boxes; I had seen the prisoner on the day before the robbery - my servant missed them on the morning of the 27th: the prisoner was afterwards brought in, and it was said he had them.

JOSEPH WHITE . I am one of Mr. Lawrence's pupils. Some of these articles are mine.

RICHARD DAKIN . I am night constable of Kentish-town. I met the prisoner on the 27th of May, at twenty minutes before six o'clock, with this bundle; I took him to the watch-house - he said he had bought them at Mr. Gatton's school, at Highgate.

Prisoner. The officer took a man to the watch-house, and he got away, and on the 12th of June he took me for the other man. Witness. There was no other man with him; when I took him I left him with a watchman named Colley, who walked out, and the prisoner escaped; I took him again afterwards, and am certain he is the man, by the scar on his face - I went to look for him at Crouch-end; he was found at Tottenham, and brought to us.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I am a constable of Tottenham. I received information that Pethers was wanted for felony - I knew him before, and caused him to be apprehended: I stated to him what I took him for, and he said if it was so he supposed it would only be a Botany concern - it would not scrag him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had found the property under a hay-stack.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-74

1448. ANN LILLY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 2 Leghorn flats, value 39s. , the goods of John Shaw .

JOHN SHAW . I live in Great Leonard-street, Shoreditch . On the 18th of June I was at work, and heard my wife call out - I went and missed these flats.

ANN SHAW . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw the prisoner in the parlour first - she came in with a man; she dropped one of these flats in the street, and one was taken from her.

GEORGE VINT . I saw Mr. Shaw at the door, and saw a woman run across the road in a hurried manner; I heard a butcher-boy say, "There goes a woman with a bonnet under her gown" - I ran and took the prisoner.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ for three months, and was in great distress; I met a man, who took me to the place, and gave me the flats - he escaped; when I heard some one coming I concealed them.

MRS. SHAW re-examined. Q. Was it possible that she might be brought there by that man? A. I cannot judge any way - he was at one end of the room: she ran into the street, and Mr. Shaw ran after her.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-75

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1449. WILLIAM PALLISIER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 5 fowls, value 12s. , the goods of Joseph Benwell .

JOSEPH BENWELL . I live in Mile-end Old-town - I keep fowls in a house in my garden, which is surrounded by a wall six feet high. About a quarter before three o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by the watchman; I got up, ran out without any thing on, and saw the watchman with my fowls in his hand, which were then dead -I did not see the prisoner there, but I have seen him pass and re-pass with his wife very frequently; he formerly lived in the neighbourhood - I put on my trousers, and ran to the Dog-row, where I saw the prisoner's wife; I met Mitchell - he desired me to come to the watch-house, where I saw my fowls.

JOHN CHUMLEY . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 20th of June, before three o'clock, I saw the prisoner and his wife going up a private path leading to some gardens; I saw the prisoner go by the prosecutor's premises, then return, and spring upon a wall, which was not the right one - he got down, and then sprang over the prosecutor's wall; I went and got my coat, and when I came back I saw four fowls thrown over the wall - I waited, and saw a fifth fowl come over; the prisoner then came over, but at some distance from me - I took up the fowls, and followed him nearly a quarter of a mile; I saw Mitchell and three watchmen - they pursued him, but lost him in the fields; I knew the prisoner, and am certain of his person.

Prisoner. When I was in the public-house next the office, he sat along side of me, and said if I would give him a sovereign he would not swear to me - I said, "I am innocent, and have no sovereign." Witness. That is not true, upon my oath.

LEWIS MYERSON . I am a constable, and took the prisoner on the 23d of June.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . On the 20th of June I heard the rattle, and saw the prisoner running; I knew him, and said, "Pallisier, stop," but he ran off, and I lost him - I knew him well, and am certain of him.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-76

1450. THOMAS PEPPER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 2 pieces of leather, value 5s. , the goods of John Giblett and James Giblett .

JOHN GIBLETT . I and my brother James are leather sellers , and live in Drury-lane . On the 19th of June the prisoner came to buy some leather - he went up stairs, and selected two pieces; he brought down one piece to me, and asked the price - I said the price was marked on it; he said it was 3s. - before he came down one of my men had come down, and said they had suspicion of him; I sent up to know the price of the leather - the prisoner said he would go up too, and he did go; I sent for a constable, and these two pieces of leather were found, one in his hat, and one in his pocket - the one in his hand he was going to pay for.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you known him? A.About a year and a half - he is a master harness-maker ; this is the piece found in his pocket.

JAMES LAWSON . I am in the employ of Messrs. Gibletts. The prisoner came up stairs to buy some leather; I watched him, and saw him put this piece in his coat-pocket - I then saw the person who served him cut this piece, which he took down in his hand; I did not see the third piece - I told my master.

Cross-examined. Q.Then you did not see the third piece? A. No - it is usual to mark the leather up stairs, that the person below may know what to charge; I did

not state I saw him take this piece out of his hat and put it into his pocket - he took it off the place where the man cut it; this other piece he took out of his hat - he has come to the shop these twelvemonths; I know this to be my master's, by his taking it from the place where it was cut, and putting it into his pocket.

WILLIAM HUNT . I attend the cutting-room. The prisoner came and asked me to cut a pair of patent leaders, and then got me to change two pieces which he had had before - he said I need not tell the master; I said No- they are about the same price; he then wanted two strips of harness leather - I took a hide from behind me, and run out these two strips; he rolled them up separately - I took one of them, and marked 7s. on it, as it is my place to mark on it what I think it is worth; the customer goes down and pays the master; he took them down with him - this third piece I did not sell him.

Cross-examined. Q.Will you swear this third piece is your master's? A. I cannot, with a clear conscience; it is a great deal like my cutting - there were between forty and fifty of them there; there are other leathersellers not far off - he ordered these two pieces of me; he might have carried them off without my detecting him as he took them down stairs - if my master had asked me I should have accounted to him for two pieces.

MR. GIBLETT. The prisoner produced to me one piece and said it was 3s.; I said, "Let me see the mark" - he became alarmed, and said, "I will go up;" my brother sent a man up with him, and the man who saw him put one piece into his pocket, saw him take this piece from his hat - I asked him if he had any more; he said, with an oath, he had not - to the best of my belief, this piece, which was in his pocket, belongs to me.

Cross-examined. Q.You did not cut it? A. No - I will not swear that I should have known it if it was off my premises.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, having a good character.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290716-77

1451. RICHARD PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 10 bushels of coals, value 8s. , the goods of Benjamin Berthon .

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am a waterman and lighterman- these coals were taken from Mr. Benjamin Berthon 's barge, in the Regent's-canal dock ; I have known the prisoner some years - he has worked for Mr. Moulden, a stone-merchant. On the 12th of July, between eleven and one o'clock in the night, I saw the prisoner go from Mr. Moulden's barge, the Sister, to Mr. Berthon's barge, the William - he stepped from his own barge to that, and took some coals, some of which are here; I was employed on board my own barge, which was loaded with stone for Mr. Freeman, of Westminster, I was pumping - it was about ten minutes after twelve o'clock when I first saw the prisoner taking coals from the William barge, and putting them on board the Sister; I watched him for about twenty minutes - I think he took between nine and ten bushels; when he was putting them under the head sheets of his own barge I went to him, and said, "Richard, you are going on too hard" - he said, "I am only getting a bit to burn in my cabin;" I said, such weather as this, it was more than was wanted - he said I ought to trouble my head about my own business, every poor man ought to live; I called the watchman from the dock - he came with his lantern; the prisoner said the watchman should see what there was, but I should not, as I was no officer - he then said there was only one bushel; the watchman put down his light, and identified that there was more than that - I then sent for the lighterman, but could not find him; I sent to fetch Jones, the officer - the watchman went for him, and the prisoner made his escape; he told me if I would say no more about it he would take the coals forward, and put them back - there were from nine to ten bushels found in the fore-sheets.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Why did you not stop him? A. I had no power; he escaped out of the dock - he did not surrender himself the next morning; he was taken by Jones and Jordan in the Commercial-road - I have known him four or five years; I had no quarrel with him - I was pumping the water out of my barge, about eighteen feet from the William; the moon was darkened by a cloud - I hid myself in a steam barge; there was no other person on board to my knowledge - he said he had taken a knob or two to light his fire; and he had not been working at it for twenty minutes - he took them with his hands.

CHARLES JONES . I am a Thames Police-officer; the watchman came to me - I went on the barge, between twelve and one o'clock; the prisoner was not there - I found under the fore-sheets of the Sister, about ten bushels of coals; they were what are generally called round coals - it appeared to me that the bulk of the William had been broken, and the coal in the Sister was of the same quality - there were two different sorts of coal; he took part of each - I locked the coals under the head sheets, till the morning, when I saw the bargeman.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Where is the watchman? A. He was not bound over; I was examined at the Thames Police in the absence of the prisoner, but the deposition was read before him - I do not know that the watchman said it was all spite against the man, and he would have nothing to do with it; he was not in before the Magistrate, when I was - I did not find any coals in the cabin, but only some small dust; upon my oath I did not find half a dozen lumps of coal there - it would not take a man long to carry ten bushels of coals in his hands, from one barge to another; they were lying close together - I met him in the Commercial-road, on the Sunday; he did not surrender till we took him - I have known him two or three years; I cannot prove any thing against him before, and will not say any thing I cannot prove - I did not go for him that night, as it was so very late; I knew he lived at Paddington; I was going to see for him on Sunday, and met him - he did not ask me if there was a warrant.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am a Thames police-officer. I went to take the prisoner; we found him just before five o'clock on the Sunday afternoon, coming down towards the canal; I asked if his name was Parsons; he said Yes - I asked where he took the coals from; he said he took four lumps, three he had kept, and one he threw back again - on taking him to the office he said he was very sorry for it, and he hoped he should get off with a fine - I

went on board the William, and found in the room where the Welch coals were, that some had been taken from the bulk; I missed some lumps from that room, and from another room as well - I did not see the coals on board the prisoner's barge, they had been removed; I brought a sample of the coals here - the prisoner said he was very sorry, and had a wife and four children.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say he took them for his fire? A. He said he was wet through and took them to make a fire; we all went in before the Magistrate together, but the depositions were taken in the private room - they are often taken in the absence of the accused, but they are read over to them; we are not sworn till we go before the Magistrate - it is taken down and then we go and swear to it; it is read, and, we are asked if it is all true - there was a watchman there; I did not hear him say he would have nothing to do with it; I was in and out of the room very often - the watchman was in the office waiting, but the clerk thought his deposition was not of any importance; I heard him say that the prisoner went over the wall of the dock - I had never known the prisoner before; his barge was in the Regent's canal - he was coming there on the Sunday - my brother officer knew him and I saw him talk to him - I went and asked if his name was Parsons; I believe my brother officer knew that he lived at Paddington - I did not see Jones till about twelve o'clock on the Sunday; I told him I would meet him at three, at the canal.

JOHN SKINNER . I am a lighterman, in the prosecutor's employ. The coals in the William were his: I was shown some coals by the officer, and, as far as I am able to judge, they appeared to be of the same quality - the bulk had been broken; I went to examine it, and think about nine or ten bushels had been taken - there were some Welch coals, and some others.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known the prisoner? A. Yes, between two and three years; I had no particular acquaintance with him - he was a working man; I saw his wife at the Thames Police-office, and he has, I believe, two children.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the coals; there are lads in the canal who belong to barges, frequently out of births; they are glad to get into barges to make a fire and sleep there - I have gone often and seen a fire on board the barges, when I have not been there for twelve hours; whether they put the coals there or not I do not know.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-78

1452. HENRY SOUTH and THOMAS JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 2 pairs of shoes, value 9s. , the goods of James Valentine Silverside .

JAMES VALENTINE SILVERSIDE . My father keeps a shop in New Turnstile . On the day in question the prisoners came to our shop together; Johnson asked if I had any Oxonions, I said No, but I shewed him some Blucher boots - he said he would sit down and try some on; I showed him several, which would not fit - I then showed him a pair which would fit him, but he said they were too strong; South went towards the window, and having some suspicion I looked in the window, and from a pile of six pairs of gentlemen's pumps I missed two pairs - I accused South of it, he said he had not got them; I said he had - he said "Count them over again;" I said that was of no use, they were gone - he then took one pair from one pocket and one from the other; he said he was very sorry, and hoped I would excuse him - I sent for a gentleman, and when my father came home he sent for an officer; on one of them was found 6d. and a ring, and on the other a few halfpence.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you search Johnson's fob? A. I did not; he was asked whether he had any money to pay for the shoes, and he made no answer - he was about two yards from South; I had perhaps shown him half a dozen pairs - sometimes people buy small shoes to make their feet look smaller; he was not long trying them, for I saw I had not a light pair to fit him - the shoes in the shop are my own property.

GERARD DE CUSTA . I went and took the prisoners -I searched them minutely; I found on Johnson a sixpence and three or four pence in copper, and this ring - I found on South a penny; I searched Johnson's fob, and asked him particularly if he had any money to pay for a pair of shoes; he made no reply.(Property produced and sworn to.)

South's Defence. I had nothing in my pocket; I had the shoes looking at them - I had no intention of taking them.

Johnson's Defence. I am not acquainted with this prisoner; I went into a public-house and he was sitting there - I then came down to the court and saw a great many shoes; I went in and he was there - I was looking at the shoes, and then this gentleman accused the prisoner of taking some.

JAMES VALENTINE SILVERSIDE . They came in together; I did not see them speak together - South said his shoe had burst at the side, and asked me the reason; I said it was bad leather.

SOUTH - GUILTY . Aged 25.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-79

1453. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 12 penny-pieces, and 24 halfpence , the monies of George Saunders .

HENRY JOHNSON . I am in the employ of George Saunders , a pork-butcher , of Langham-place, Commercial-road . On the 10th of July I was in the parlour lighting the fire, I heard some one in the shop - I got up and saw the prisoner lying across the counter with his hand in the till; he got up and went out, and said to a boy who was with him, "Here he comes, here he comes;" and then he put down 4d. on the step of the next door, the rest I suppose the boy took away; there had been half a crown's worth of copper in the till, and there was only 6d. left - I secured the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290716-80

1454. JAMES BURRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 2 half-crowns, 1 shilling, 1 sixpence, and 7 penny pieces, the monies of William Watson , from his person .

WILLIAM WATSON . I am a brick-maker . I was with

the prisoner about three years ago, and I happened to see him again on Saturday night, the 21st of June, at the White Bear , where I went to wait for my wife - I was tipsy, sat down, and went to sleep; I had four half-crowns in my pocket and no other money - I changed a half-crown there, and had two pots of porter and a quartern of rum; I then went with the prisoner to Mr. Kingsbury's, changed another half-crown, and had two pots of ale; I treated the prisoner, and was with him two or three hours; I know I had my money while I was there - I sat by the prisoner; I went to the bar, put my hand into my pocket, and it was all gone but a farthing.

HENRY KINGSBURY . I am landlord of this house - I have seen the prisoner there repeatedly, and have ordered him not to use my house; he came that night with the prosecutor, who was in liquor - they sat down in front of the bar; I saw the prisoner put another man aside, and put his hand into the prosecutrix's right-hand waistcoat pocket - I said, "Burrett, you are robbing that man, leave my house;" he would not, and I went for a watchman to put him out; when I came back he was gone - he was taken about three o'clock the next morning.

GEORGE WHITE . I live at Mr. Kingsbury's. I saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's left-hand pocket, when my master was gone, and take out some money, which he put into his own pocket - he then went away; I told my master when he came home - the prosecutor had only a farthing left.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a watchman. I was sent for and searched the prosecutor - there was only a farthing found on him; I took the prisoner in Union-street, Hackney-road, about half-past two o'clock on the Sunday morning; I went up and said, "Burrett, I want you;" he said, "For what?" I said, "They will tell you at the watch-house;" he refused to go till some one gave charge of him - I told him at the watch-house what it was for; he had no money.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to have a pint of porter, there were three or four in the box sky-larking - a pipe was thrown at me, and I got up to see who it was; the prosecutor awoke up and treated me - it was near twelve o'clock; we were turned out there and went to Mr. Kingsbury's, and had two pots of ale and half a pint of gin.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-81

1455. EDWARD DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 bag, value 1d.; 1 sovereign, 4 half-crowns, and 5 shillings, the property of Patrick Henessey , from the person of Johanna, his wife .

JOHANNA HENESSEY . I am the wife of Patrick Henessey . On the 5th of July I was going to the chapel in Duke-street , to the eight o'clock prayers - it was pretty well crowded; I had a bag in my pocket, and I felt the prisoner bruising me very much at the side of the pocket, but I did not feel him take any thing from me; I saw him go to a woman who was near me and feel her pocket - she looked very sharp at him, and said he was a pickpocket; he then went to another woman and robbed her; then he came and put his hand into my pocket; a woman said to me, in his hearing, "If you had any money, you are robbed;" he was close to me, and I took hold of him on my right side - he was taken to the door and searched by the beadle; my bag was found in his hand, and my money in his waistcoat pocket.

MARGARET JOYCE . I was at the chapel - I saw the prisoner and the prosecutrix; I saw him put his hand into the prosecutrix's pocket, and then into his own - I told her she was robbed; I saw him searched, and the bag and money found; he held his hat over the people's shoulders with his right hand, and with his left hand he took it.

MICHAEL RUBLE . I am beadle of the chapel. The prosecutrix called me, and I searched the prisoner - I found this purse and 1l. 19s. in money on him.

The prisoner put in a written defence stating, that he had made some observation on the subject of Catholic emancipation to a bystander, and that the purse must have been put into his pocket for the purpose of revenge.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18290716-82

1456. GEORGE ENGLISH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 1 necklace, value 10s., the goods of Caleb Cusack , from the person of Susan Cusack the younger .

SUSAN CUSACK . I am the wife of Caleb Cusack; I have an infant, eighteen months old, named Susan. On the 19th of June I was in Princes-court, Drury-lane , with her in my arms - she had a necklace on; the child became restless, I turned, and saw the prisoner with a handkerchief in his hand, to which the child's necklace had been fastened; he had broken the string - I took hold of him, and gave him into custody with the necklace.

JOHN LEFT . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner and the necklace.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-83

1457. GEORGE FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 purse, value 1d., 1 crown-piece, 3 half-crowns, and 2 shillings, the property of Sarah Bedford , from her person .

SARAH BEDFORD . I am single , and live in York-gardens, Westminster; my father is a chemist. I was coming to town on the Fulham stage , on the 12th of July; my brother was sitting by my side - I had a purse in my right-hand pocket, containing this money; I did not feel any thing done, but my brother saw the prisoner get behind the stage, and when he got down again, he asked me if I had lost any thing; I put my hand to my side - I found a hole in my petticoat, and my purse was gone; my brother got down, and took the prisoner - I had not seen him behind the coach.

JOHN BEDFORD . My father works at a chemist's. I was on the Fulham stage, and saw the prisoner get up and hand behind the coach at Hyde-park-corner; he came on for some distance, then got down, and went to another young man - I spoke to my sister, then got down, and secured the prisoner; he threw the purse over the rails at Lord Coventry's - we took him to the watch-house, and then I came back, and saw the purse where I had seen him throw it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me move my hands at all? A. No, I did not; a person came to you, and you got down, crossed towards Lord Coventry's rails, and threw it over the rails - I do not know what pocket you took it from.

LEWIS JUNIOR . This boy was brought to the watch-house; I went with the witness, and found this purse at Lord Coventry's.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to see my uncle; I was tired, and got behind the coach - I got down again, and crossed the road; this young man came, and accused me of cutting his sisters pocket; I said I had not, and I would go to the coach; a young man came running up, and said it was me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-84

1458. ELIZABETH RANDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 silver watch, value 3l., the goods of John Smith , from his person .

JOHN SMITH. I am a boatman to Horsley and Co. I was at the Crown and Sceptre , about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 6th; I had a little beer, but was quite sober - there were three of us captains there; I had spent my money, and the company frowned upon me; I said,"Sooner than be exposed, I will leave my watch in the bar"- I did not see the publican, but the prisoner, who was there, took it out of my hand, and walked off; I had never seen her before to my knowledge - I do not know but what she did have a little beer; she did not return, and I employed a man to go and take her - I certainly did at first think it was a joke; the officer found the watch in her bosom - I do not think I had any conversation with her.

EDWARD HANDS . I am an officer. A young man came to me in Golden-lane, and said a man had been robbed of his watch; I went to the Crown and Sceptre to ask what sort of girl it was - she had left her bonnet there; by her bonnet I thought I knew her, and I went and found the prisoner in Golden-lane - she at first denied having any watch: I took her into a house, and found it in her bosom.

Prisoner. I can be upon my Sacrament oath, that I never denied having the watch. Witness. Yes, you did, and in going along, she said, "For God's sake don't tell the man; you may keep the watch;" the prosecutor appeared to have his faculties about him.

- BABY. I was at the public-house, and saw the prosecutor there - he was a little in liquor; he said,"Take this watch, and get a pot of beer;" the prisoner took it, and went away - he did not give it her; she went out without her bonnet.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not tell my friends that you saw the man give me the watch? A. No, I never said a word about it.

COURT. Q. Did you ever tell that girl, or any of her friends, that the prosecutor gave her the watch? A. No, I did not.

Prisoner to JOHN SMITH . Q. Had not you and I three pots of beer together? A. No; I only know of two pots - she was not in my company; two boatmen were in my company.

Prisoner's Defence. I was with him almost two hours, and had three pots of beer; he wanted the fourth - the landlady brought it, and he had no money; he then took his watch out of his pocket, and said, "Here, my wench, take this:" that is the truth, so help me God.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290716-85

1459. LUKE TOOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 watch-chain, value 3s.; 1 seal, value 1s., and 3 watch-keys, value 1s. 6d., the goods of George Adderley , from his person .

GEORGE ADDERLEY . I am a truss-maker . On the 12th of July I was in Chapel-place, leading from Duke-street to Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields , about half-past ten o'clock at night - when I was about midway I was met by a respectable looking female; she asked me where I was going - I said, "Home;" she said, "Come with me to Johnson's alamode-beef shop" - the prisoner came up while we were talking and said, "What are you doing;" he took my watch, and ran off down a passage- I pursued, and made a grasp at him; he got from me and I fell, but got up again, pursued, took him, and kept him till assistance came - I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you tipsy? A. No, Sir - the woman went to the watch-house, but I have never seen her since; my clothes were in the same state they are now - I will swear that, or else I could not have run fast enough to catch him; it was not a very obscure place - the woman dragged me into the place on the side of the road; I did not give her into custody - she did me no harm: I do not know how the prisoner came to say, "Halloo!" he said, "This won't do;" I will swear that, to the best of my knowledge; my clothes were buttoned - my watch was found just at the place where I caught the prisoner, up against the dead wall, at the end of the court, thirty yards from where I was with the female; the watchman saw that I was sober - I did not strike any body with my umbrella to the best of my knowledge; I swear I was not tipsy - three of us had had three glasses of gin and water in the evening: that was all I had had after dinner - I had porter at dinner; I live at No. 40, Great Wild-street - I had been by the New Bethlem; I returned over Westminster-bridge. and met with a respectable old gentleman by the Horse Guards, who asked me to direct him to Holborn - I said I was going near that way, and went with him to Holborn; I was returning home, and it being rather late I cut down this place for the nearest - I did not drop my watch from my clothes; I saw the prisoner throw it from his hand and he said, "I have not got your watch - I have not got your watch."

ARTHUR CARLEY . I am a watchman. I heard the alarm, and went down to the bottom of my beat, where I saw the prosecutor in Chapel-place with the prisoner in custody - there were a good many more there; the watch was given to me - I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and asked how he came to do such a thing; he said it was done, and it could not be helped - that was his expression.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he speak English? A. Yes; and I understand English - the prosecutor did not seem to me to be drunk; he was able to make out his way - I did not notice whether he was in liquor; he was able to walk, run, and stand - there was a female with him; she went to the watch-house, and said she would go to the office and prove that this was the man who took the watch; I did not keep her, and she did not go before the Magistrate - the prosecutor went one way and she

the other; his clothes were all right when I came up - I do not know that that lady walks about there.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-86

1460. WILLIAM TUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 3 shillings, the monies of Thomas Henlow , from his person .

THOMAS HENLOW . I am a pensioner . I was at the Cheshire Cheese, Grosvenor-road, Chelsea , on the 2d of July; I took a man who I lodge with, and gave him a pot of beer - I saw the prisoner there; I had never seen him before - I had 7s. or 8s. in my pocket when I went into the Cheshire Cheese along with Jack Lowndes ; I had part of three pots of beer - the prisoner had come and set up the skittles; he then came and sat down on the right side of the form - a man said, "Have you any money?" Yes, said I - I put my hand into my pocket and I had not a halfpenny; I had just before paid for a pot of beer, and had the 3s. and some coppers in my hand - the people said to me, "There's the man that took it out of your pocket;" I said to the prisoner, "Young man, that is my money; give me my money" - he said, "No, it is my own;" he opened his hand - the man said to him, "If you don't give it up, I will knock your bl-y head off;" I said, "Don't hit him - I will send for a constable."

Prisoner. Q. Were not we playing at four corners, and you were my partner? A. No such thing; you did not lose any beer, you paid for none - I had more money than I lost; I had 7s. when first I went into the yard - I did not see you pull 2s. out of your pocket - to the best of my knowledge you did not play at all.

JAMES DONAHUE . I went in to look at the people playing, and saw the prisoner putting up the skittles; but I did not see him play - I saw the money taken out of the prosecutor's jacket pocket; I asked him if he had any money; he said, "I have none - I am done;" I said, "That is the man that took it;" I saw silver and copper in the prisoner's hand - I am a pensioner; I have been in the first Highland regiment - I never saw the prisoner in my life before; he said he had a good mind to knock my d-d little head off.

Prisoner. Q. Were we not playing at four corners? A. I saw them playing - I was no more in liquor than I am now; you had the money in your hand which you took from the prosecutor - it was silver and copper?

WILLIAM JOHN WRIGHT . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was sent for about eight o'clock to take the prisoner - the witnesses were perfectly sober; he was charged with taking money from the prosecutor's jacket pocket - he said he was not certain what it was; I took him to the watch-house, and put my hand into his pocket - he said,"I know what there is there; there is 9 1/2d." - I found 1s. 9 1/2d. in it - he said, "I meant 1s. 9 1/2d."

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you 1s. 9 1/2d. at first - I had 2s. in my pocket when I first went in; I paid for a pint of beer, and had 1s. 9 1/2d. in my pocket? A. No, you did not.

Prisoner's Defence. Does it stand to reason if I were guilty, and had an opportunity to go, I should not have gone. GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290716-87

1461. THOMAS WILLIAMS and WILLIAM CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 necklace, value 7s., the goods of James John Graham , from the person of Ann Graham .

ELIZABETH GRAHAM . Ann Graham is my sister's little girl - she had a necklace on; her father's name is James John Graham . I was standing at the street door on the 23d of June - she was playing opposite; I saw the two prisoners close to the child; I saw Williams unsnap the necklace, pull it, and it fell on the ground; the other did not do any thing, but he was in company with him - my sister ran over, and took them both; the necklace was picked up, and the girl, who had been nursing the child, gave it me - I know it was the same the child had on: the prisoners were both secured.

PHILIP RILEY . I am a beadle of St. Giles' . I was in Queen-square, and saw the two prisoners running - I took Williams, and Clark was taken by some other person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Clark's Defence. I never touched it.)

Williams' Defence. This boy knows nothing about it.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-88

1462. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 1 snuff-box, value 5s., the goods of the Rev. John Lee , from his person .

THE REV. JOHN LEE. I am a Roman Catholic clergyman . I was in Regent-street last Monday night, about half-past eleven o'clock - I had a snuff-box in my coat pocket; I did not feel it taken, but the watchman asked if I had lost any thing - I felt, and the box was gone; the prisoner was in his hands.

TIMOTHY MCGILL . I am a watchman. I was in Regent-street, and saw two lads and a girl close to Mr. Lee; the prisoner was one - he put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, took it out immediately, and turned into a court; I ran, caught him by the collar, and asked what he had taken from the gentleman's pocket - he said Nothing; I saw the box in his hand, and said, "What is that in your hand?" he put his hand down to his apron - I said, "Come after the gentleman;" I took him along, and he threw down the box - I took him and the box to the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence The watchman called after me when I was half way up the court, and this box came right past my feet; the watchman said I took it from the gentleman - I had just left my work; I was in a hurry, and turned into the court.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-89

1463. WILLIAM SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 22 yards of cotton, value 16s. , the goods of George Clark .

RICHARD THOMAS JONES . I am shopman to George Clark, a linen-draper , of Oxford-street . I saw the prisoner run from our door with the print in his apron; he

ran into several streets, and I took him in High-street - he had not got it then; it was delivered to me.

MICHAEL HOLDEN . I am a constable. I received the prisoner, and have had this print ever since; he had a whitish brown apron on.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Marylebone-lane; a gentleman came and said I was the boy who took the print; I have no parents, but live with my grandmother.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-90

1464. DANIEL SHEPPERDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 30 pence, and 60 halfpence , the monies of Sarah Press .

The coin being the monies of William Press , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18290716-91

1465. LOUISA MORRISS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 6 lasts, value 4s. , the goods of William Lowndes .

MARY LOWNDES . I am the wife of William Lowndes ; we live in King's-place, Commercial-road . I saw the prisoner near our shop on the 13th of June; she untwisted something from the door, and went very quickly away - I went out, and saw her putting three pairs of lasts into her basket - I went and caught her with them in her basket.

CHARLOTTE BLACKBURN . I was standing at my father's door. I saw the prisoner, and asked what she had got - she said Nothing; I took hold of her - she slung me round against the door, and put my thumb out, but I would not let her go - it was a market basket, and had several things in it: there was a bunch of onions, three lettuces, and a bit of cheese - she had been drinking.

Prisoner. It was mere distress; my five fatherless children were without food, and I was tipsy.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-92

1466. GEORGE WILLIAM KERRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 watch, value 30s. , the goods of John Henry Cross .

JOHN HENRY CROSS . I lost my watch on the 17th of June, from Mr. Clowes', Duke-street, Stamford-street ; the prisoner was an apprentice there - I missed it from where I had hung it, over the board; I have known the prisoner nearly four years - he was there on liking.

DAVID ISAAC . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitechapel. This watch was pawned with me by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-93

1467. JAMES PINK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 hat, value 20s. , the goods of John Young .

The prosecutor was in such a state of intoxication that his evidence could not be taken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-94

1468. RICHARD MILLION was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , 1 cart, value 4l. , the goods of Hubbard Thomson .

JAMES JACKSON . I am a sweep, and keep a cart. I was going along Castle-street, Saffron-hill, with a truss of hay; the prisoner came up and offered to sell me a cart- he asked 25s. for it; I thought it was very cheap, and told him if he would bring it down to me I would buy it: he brought it down - he said it was his, and he had had it some time; I detained the cart and him, and sent for an officer.

HUBBARD THOMSON . The officer showed me the cart; I knew it to be mine: I had seen it safe in the evening on the Wednesday week - it was taken from Cavendish-street, New North-road .

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and the cart; I sent to the prosecutor - when I got to Jackson's the prisoner was going out, and I stopped him; he said he would take 18s. for it - he brought two boys with him to push the cart.

JOSEPH SHEEN . I was in the field - the prisoner came and asked me and another to help him home with the cart - he got a horse and got it out of the ditch; he said he would give us a shilling a piece; we went to the witness - he said he gave 3l. for the cart, and sold the harness for 30s.

HUBBARD THOMSON . It was my cart; I had left it in a ditch at the back of some buildings, and thought it was safe - it is worth 5l.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy came and said if I would earn 18d. I might get the cart out of the field; he went and got the horse.

JOSEPH SHEEN . He got the horse himself.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-95

1469. JOHN MEERS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 hat, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Parker .

THOMAS PARKER . I am a labourer . On Sunday, the 5th of July, I went to the Turkish Slave, public-house. Brick-lane , and went into the tap-room; I took off my hat, which was a new one - I had a pint of beer, and fell asleep; before I went to sleep I recollect seeing the prisoner there, and he had an old hat - when I awoke my hat was gone, and also the prisoner; he was a stranger to me: I was asleep when he went out - there was a very old hat left, such a one as I had seen the prisoner wear.

JAMES BROWN . I live with my father, who keeps this public-house. On the 5th of July, between six and seven o'clock, the prosecutor came in for a pint of porter - he laid his hat on the table; I took the money, and went out; in a few minutes the prisoner came and asked for a paper; he then had an old greasy hat on - he made some remark about the weavers, and went into the tap-room again; in a few minutes he went out - no one went out but him; the prosecutor came to me, and said he had lost his hat, and this old one was left, which I believe is the one I had seen on the prisoner's head.

JAMES BROWN . I keep the house. When I came home my son told me what had happened; I went to look for the prisoner, but could not find him - I found him the next day, and said, "I want you;" he said he would not go with me, as I was no officer; he got from me, and run away - I pursued, and took him; he then had an old hat on, which did not fit him.

EDWARD SHERMAN . I met the prisoner on the Monday morning; he went and had two or three pints of beer - he said he had no money, but he would go and sell his hat,

which appeared to be a very good one - I did not take particular notice of it; he sold it to a man in Rosemary-lane for 3s., and then we went and drank - I supposed the hat was his own.

THOMAS WATERS . I took the prisoner into custody; he denied it at first, but when the last witness came to give evidence, they brought a new hat and gave the prosecutor. The prisoner was out of the way for two or three days - I was forced to go after him; this is the old hat that was left.

JAMES BROWN , JUN. I believe this to be the prisoner's hat - he is a weaver .

Prisoner's Defence. That hat never was mine.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-96

1470. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 1 hat, value 10s., and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s. , the goods of Stephen Rothery .

STEPHEN ROTHERY . I am a solicitor , and attend the Rolls Court . On Wednesday, the 15th of July, about half-past eleven o'clock, I was there; while I was engaged in a cause, the officer came in, and told the Master of the Rolls he had taken a man, whom he suspected of stealing a hat; I looked round, and missed my hat and gloves - I went, and saw the hat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you any initials in the hat? A. No; I would not venture to swear to it - I would not swear to my own hand-writing; there were other hats there.

JAMES BAKER . I belong to Bow-street, and attend the Lord Chancellor's Court. I was on the alert outside, and saw the prisoner go into the Rolls Court, and sit in the window - he had a hat on when he went in, which I particularly remarked; in about half an hour he came out with another hat, and a pair of gloves; I said, "That hat does not fit you very well." and he said his own hat had laid by the side of the gentleman's; I took him into the lodge, and he owned it was not his; I found 6s. on him, and the duplicate of a hat - this is the hat the prisoner left in the Court. and which I believe is the one he went in with.

Cross-examined. Q. When you said, "This is not your hat," he owned to it? A. Yes; he said, "Mine lies there," and it did; the hat he had on came over his eyes - it did not at all fit him.

The prisoner was desired to put on the hat, which seemed to fit him extremely well.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer of the Rolls Court. I saw the prisoner go into the Court with this old hat; within half an hour he came out - I went, and said that was not the hat he had on when he went in.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever make a mistake in your life? A. I may; the prisoner did tell me where to find his hat - he said it had laid on one side where the others had been; he did not say he took it by mistake.

Prisoner's Defence. It was entirely a mistake; I should have returned it in a moment. I have been in the habit of attending Courts for seven or eight years; I was intended for a very different character to this.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18290716-97

1471. JOHN DODD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 1 carved skull, value 10s. , the goods of George Jones .

GEORGE JONES. I live in Leicester-street, Leicester-square , and am an auctioneer . This crucifix was entrusted to me to sell by auction; on the 3d of July it was quite perfect, with this skull at the bottom of it - it was on view that day; I missed the skull on the following Monday -I had a gentleman who was in treaty for it; I said I had been unfortunate in losing the skull, and as he dealt in such articles, if the skull should be offered him I wished him to stop the party; he said "God bless me, it has been offered to me in a shop in St. Martin's-lane;" this is the skull - it is beautifully carved, and has two initials on it -I do not know what is the value of it; twenty guineas have been offered for the whole, and refused.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you happen to know the prisoner? A. I have seen him occasionally at the rooms; I do not remember having seen him between the 3d and the 6th of July - there were other persons attending.

WILLIAM NEATE . I am a jeweller and silversmith. I bought this skull of the prisoner, I think on the 6th of July, for 5s.; I have known him these twenty years, and I should have bought any thing of him - I would trust him with 5000l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you seen the prisoner before? A. Yes; he came and asked what it was worth, I said about 5s. - in the afternoon he came and sold it; he knew I was in the habit of putting curiosities in my window - I sometimes purchased a great deal of him.

COURT. Q. Did he give any account where he got it? A. No; we never ask dealers - it is but of small value itself.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner on the 9th July. I told him it was for stealing a skull; a young man with me said it was a skull stolen from Mr. Jones' room, in Leicester-square - he said he did not know any thing about it; I took him to the Mansion-house - we went to Bow-street next day, and then the prisoner said he had had a skull and sold it to Mr. Neate; he had had it three weeks, and bought it of a man in Mr. Robins' rooms, but he did not know his name; Mr. Halls put it off from Wednesday till Saturday, but he did not produce him - he was remanded till Wednesday again, and then Mr. Neate came; the prisoner declined saying any thing more.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He was not accused of stealing a skull from the auction room? A. Yes, he was, but he said he had not done it; I then went to Mr. Neate's, and found this in front of his window.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 3d of July I was in the City the whole day, and not near his place; and on the Saturday I went to see what sales they had for the next week. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-98

1472. ELIZABETH MARLOW and BRIDGET RIAN were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 watch, value 20s., the goods of Timothy Fitzpatrick , from his person .

TIMOTHY FITZPATRICK . I am a labourer . One Sunday night, I think about three weeks ago next Sunday, I met Rian, between nine and ten o'clock; I was not very sober; I went with her to her room, in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane - I cannot tell whether it was her lodging; I had a watch in my pocket - when I had been with her about a

quarter of an hour I missed my watch; I had not taken it out of my pocket - I said to Rian "You have taken my watch," and told her to give it me; before I had missed it Marlow came into the room - I cannot say which of them took it - Marlow was near enough to take it; when I missed it she wanted to shove me out of the room; I gave an alarm, and the watchman came - I did not leave the room, nor did they, till he came; he took Rian to the watch-house; I did not see my watch till the next day, this is it - I am sure I had it when I was going into the house; I believe I gave Rian about a shilling.

CHISTOPHER WARD . I heard the prosecutor cry out Murder and watch! I went into the room, and found him and the two prisoners - I had known them before; he said"Watchman I am glad you are come, I am robbed and murdered - put this woman out of the room;" I said to Marlow "Go along to your own room;" the prosecutor still kept hold of Rian, and said she had robbed him; this was on the last Sunday in June, I believe.

ROBERT STUPART . I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned with me on the 29th of June, by Marlow; she stated that it had been left with Rian by a sailor, who had been lodging with her for a week.

Rian's Defence. I was in the Three Compasses with some sailors - the prosecutor came and called for a pot of beer - he asked me to drink, and asked where I lived; he said he would go with me - he went home, he then had a half-crown and a shilling, and he gave the shilling to me; but before we left the house we had some gin - he then went away, and came back in half an hour; he took me by the collar into a public-house, and said he had lost his watch in my room; I went to my room with him, and unlocked the door, no watch was found - he then went with me to the watch-house.

Marlow's Defence. I went to wash for this woman - I found the watch and pawned it; I went to the watch-house - they let me go, and the next day three of us were taken to Clerkenwell.

MARLOW - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

RIAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-99

1473. DANIEL STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 1 jacket, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Nicholls .

THOMAS NICHOLLS . I am a seafaring lad . This is my jacket; on Saturday evening, the 21st of June, I saw it safe at six o'clock when I went on shore, and on the Monday the officer sent for me to see it.

THOMAS MORGAN . I am a constable of the West-India Docks . On the 21st of June, I saw the prisoner and another come in about one o'clock - I asked what they were going to do: the prisoner said they were going to work for Mr. Sellin, a rigger - about four o'clock, they both came out, and each of them had a jacket; I took the prisoner with this jacket - he had come from on board the Wellington, which the prosecutor belongs to.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the jacket was given to him by a person who had employed him on board the Wellington.

COURT to THOMAS MORGAN . Q. Did he say where he got it? A. Yes; and I went on board, and saw the Custom-house officer, and no one else - on the Monday I saw the steward; he said he had not let him have it: I have never known any thing against the prisoner before.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290716-100

1474. JOSEPH HINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 coat, value 3s.; 1 jacket, value 1s. 6d.; 2 aprons, value 6d., and 48 farthings , the property of William Robinson .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-101

1475. JAMES GOODARD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 1 tin can, value 20d., and 1 lb. weight of treacle, value 5d. , the goods of Mary Jones .

MARY JONES . I live in Old-street , where I keep an oil shop . On the 22d of June, about four o'clock, I lost a tin can, containing about 1 lb. of treacle - I was in my little room; my son was behind the counter, and a little boy came in, and asked the price of a ball in the window: he showed a halfpenny one, and walked out: in two or three minutes afterwards, I heard a cry of Stop thief! and then missed the can of treacle from the counter - the prisoner was brought in in about five minutes.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a carpenter. I was near the shop on the 22d of June, and saw the prisoner and two others looking in at the window; I crossed the road, and passed them; I crossed again, and heard one of them say,"I have no money - give me some money, and I will go in:" I then went across the road again, turned, and saw the prisoner with the can in his hand - I followed him to George-court, where they went up; they gave the can to each other; when I took hold of the prisoner, one had hold of the nossle and the other hold of the handle of the can - I took the can and the prisoner - the other boy got away; I took him again, and got him on to Old-street; some people came and rescued him - I kept the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Had you seen me with the boys? A. Yes: I had watched you from the mad-house up to the prosecutor's.

ROBERT LOCK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290716-102

1476. WILLIAM FELSTEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 15 gallons of beer, value 2l. 13s. 4d. , the goods of Henry Sylvester Parsons .

HENRY SYLVESTER PARSONS . I keep the White Hart at Tottenham : the prisoner was in my service. I took the house on the 29th of March, and was taken ill; I trusted to him as potman to carry out the beer - in about five weeks I recovered enough to investigate what he had done, and told him I though he had booked more beer to the customers than I thought they had received, and asked where they lived - he said he had no objection to my knowing, and I wrote the bills out according to my book which he had entered it in every morning; I found on presenting the bills that they had not had the quantity - he went with me; the people said they were overcharged - I went

to six, and they all objected to the charge; he then acknowledged that he was wrong, and asked them if they would pay me, and he would pay them again - I suppose the people being labourers, could not afford to give him credit, but they deducted so much from each of their bills - I took the account of the beer every time he took it out; I have only their statements as to what beer they received - he took out the beer, and charged it to these people; I have not the account here of what quantity he took - we know the quantity he takes out every dinner and supper, and what he brings back; the quantity he booked he was expected to pay for; here is a book in which he booked beer to a Miss Johnson, but I can find no such person - it is my writing; the whole amount to her is 1l. 0s. 6 1/2d.

COURT. Q. How do you know he took out more beer than the persons actually received? A.According to his statement, and my booking it at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to say that you saw him take out all this beer? A. Certainly; I drew it when he called for it; here is April written the margin of this book - that is the way we put it; we are not very particular when we have no doubts - here is an entry of the 6th of April; I drew the beer for Miss Johnson that day, and have a distinct recollection of it - my wife sometimes might draw beer when I was ill; she is not here; my son sometimes does - he is not here; I kept the prisoner in my service for eight days after this, thinking he would be sorry for what he had done; and he knew the customers - he appeared to be sorry, and said he would behave better, but he did not - I did send him round to shew another boy the customers; I did not take him up for almost five weeks - I did not wish to hurt him.

Q. I will give you a second opportunity of considering that answer; what was the reason you left it five weeks before you took him? A. His sister came and cried to me - then he came and insulted me; I did take money of his sister - this receipt is not my writing; I think it is my wife's; I did not take the money myself, but I understood we got it; I think it is my wife's writing, but I never saw it before - my wife is not here.

COURT. Q. What was the insult you speak of? A. He came and demanded wages of me - there were a good many people standing at the door and the back garden.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you receive any money into your own hands? A. No. - I know Martha Felstead ; I understood the sum received was 13s. - 8s. 6d. was paid on the 13th of May; 13s. was paid in all - I did not go to either of his sisters, and threaten them; I spoke to them when they came to my house - Martha Felstead did pay my wife some money, on an understanding that I would not hurt her brother; she said she would pay me by instalments - he himself acknowledged that he had done wrong; he confessed that he had sold the beer, and converted the money to his own purpose - he was out of the way, and I hoped would keep out of the way.

Q.When you went before Mr. Mores, the Magistrate, did he not say that he would not commit him till the next morning, and that if he paid you the money he would not commit him? A. No - a person did come and offer me the entire of the money; I was told not to take it - I will swear that I never received one fraction from any body since his apprehension; I had received 2s. of him, and he was paying me off as he could - I have not received any money from any body else since he left my service, to my knowledge; I think I can swear that he had paid me 12s., but I had not discharged him, and then he paid me 2s - then my wife got 13s. from his sister; I think I can swear I never received any money from any body else on his account, but it is a long time ago.

MATILDA SAMPSON . I am a customer of the prosecutor's - he came to my house with the prisoner, but I was not at home, and I went down to the prosecutor's; I found the prisoner and prosecutor there - the prisoner said he had booked me more beer than I had had; he said he had sold the beer elsewhere and charged it to me- I am sure he said that; he came down to me in the week, and told me to pay Mr. Parsons, and he would pay me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he had charged you with more beer that you had? A. Yes - this was about a week before he was discharged; he was sent round to the customers with another boy - his master told me he had got 12s. from him.

JOSEPH FOSTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he said he was sorry for selling the beer and robbing his master, and wished his friends to settle with his master.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he use such an expression as that he had robbed his master? A. Yes - the Magistrate did tell the prosecutor that he would give the defendant till the next morning to consider of it; I will not swear whether he said it was to pay the money, or not.

Prisoner's Defence. The day I went to the Magistrate he said if my sister and my master could bring matters to bear, before eleven o'clock the next morning, he would not commit me.

MARTHA FELSTEAD . I am the prisoner's sister. I spoke to Mr. Parsons, in July, on the subject of the charge made against my brother, and I had before that paid some money to Mr. Parsons.

SARAH FELSTEAD . I am the prisoner's sister. I was before Mr. Mores, the Magistrate - he said if I could make it up with Mr. Parsons, or any of my relations, my brother would not be hurt.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-103

1477. HANNAH FENBY and GEORGE FENBY were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 2 pairs of shoes, value 11s. , the goods of John Cooper .

ISAAC WARBOYS . I am a shoemaker, and live in Whitechapel-road . On the 12th of June I missed some shoes from the shop, but I did not see them taken away; I knew the parties who had been there, and suspected them - the prisoners are mother and son; I saw them both in the shop - my lad brought the boy back, who had the shoes on him - the woman returned to beg him off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE WARBOYS . I am in the prosecutor's employ. On the 20th of June I saw the two prisoners in the prosecutor's shop - I did not see any thing done while they were there; after they left the shop, the prosecutor said,"I have lost some shoes" - I went out after the persons

who had been there, and overtook them about fifty yards from the shop; I said to the boy, who carried a basket,"What have you got there?" he let it down - he would have run away, but I would not let him; I told him he must go back with me; at that time I did not see the woman - she came afterwards to beg the boy off; they had been in the shop three or four days before - neither of them said any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. They both went out together? A. Yes; when I went out of the shop, and looked about, I did not see the mother; she was not in that street - the woman, when she came, looked out for a pair of shoes for her husband; I do not know how soon after the boy was taken she came to the shop, because I was gone to Lambeth-street to get an officer.

ISAAC WARBOYS re-examined. I should think the woman came about a minute after the lad was brought back - she came voluntarily to beg him off; when I saw them in the shop, the boy had the basket in which the shoes were found.

DAVID HEALEY . I am an officer of Lambeth-street, and was sent for on the 12th of June - I found the boy in custody in the shop; his mother was also there - I asked what the basket contained; the prosecutor said shoes, and pointed to the boy; I then took him, and said to the mother, "Do you know any thing of this basket?" she said, "It's my basket, and there is a handkerchief in it" - I found one on searching it.

ISAAC WARBOYS re-examined. They were a quarter of an hour in the shop - the woman was looking at some shoes, and stood in one place all the time; the boy was walking round the shop; she looked two pairs of shoes out, and wished them to be put by - she said she would call again in ten minutes; she said her husband was at the gin-shop, which she named, and that she was charing there herself.

HANNAH FENBY - GUILTY . Aged 43.

GEORGE FENBY - GUILTY . Aged 9.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-104

1478. JAMES DAVID INCHES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 2 shillings, the monies of Thomas Venables and William Venables , his masters .

JOHN VENABLES . I am a linen-draper - we had some premises in Oxford-street for two months to sell the stock; during that time, and before, the prisoner was in the employ of William and Thomas Venables , who then carried on business in Oxford-street. I employed Avis, the officer; a person was to call and buy some goods on the Saturday, with marked money; Avis marked that money, and he was to send the person - I saw the person who brought the money - she laid out 10s. 6d.; Inches put only 9s. 1d. into the till - I went to the person's house to inquire what she had paid; what the prisoner put in was only 9s. 1d. - I always gave a cheque; the cheque is not here- it was only for 9s. 1d.; the prisoner was afterwards searched by Avis, and some marked money was found on him; the prisoner then wished to speak to me privately, but the officer would not allow him - he said he hoped I would look over it, as it was necessity that compelled him to do it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The prisoner had no salary? A. No; I know that his friends are respectable - his father is a reduced officer in the army; he had been with my brother from fifteen to eighteen months; I have reason to believe he had no means of clothing himself - my brother advanced him, I think, 5s. about three weeks before the robbery.

COURT. Q. Had he no compensation for his services? A. No; none whatever - he was to serve us two years to learn the trade; we searched the till, and there was more money in it than what I have alluded to - we have no other means of knowing what was put in except by the cheque; he was sometimes employed until eleven o'clock at night.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I was employed to watch this young man on the day previous to this, and marked some money, which I gave to Mrs. Morrison to go and lay out at the shop; I was called upon on the Saturday night to apprehend the prisoner - I found one shilling on him which I saw Venables mark, and in his box I found one of my marking; I did not search the till; he wanted to speak privately to Mr. Venables, but I would not allow him - he said he had done it through want.

Cross-examined. Q.Supposing a man had half a crown, and put it into the till, and took change, might he not have had this shilling? A. Yes, he might.

MR. VENABLES. I did not look to see how much of the marked money was in the till; I know that he could not have had any other money than what he had of us.

SARAH MORRISON . I was employed by Mr. Avis to take some marked money, in the month of June, to a shop in Oxford-street, and on the first day I laid out to the amount of 1l. 0s. 2d. - it was all marked; on the following day, the 27th, I went again, and paid the prisoner 10s. 1d. with all marked money - I purchased stockings, and various other things.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your husband? A. A fishmonger.

HENRY MORRISON . I directed my wife to go to the shop - I know nothing more.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you expect for this? A. Nothing but my expenses; I have not had any thing already.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 3 Months

Reference Number: t18290716-105

1479. ELIZA CHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , 1 glazier's diamond, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Benn Sowerby .

JOB VALENTINE WATKINS . I am shopman to Thomas Benn Sowerby , a pawnbroker . On the 6th of July the prisoner and another woman came to pawn a glazier's diamond, they stood about five minutes, and a man came in and asked if we took such things in - I said "Yes, if they cut;" the other woman then said, "Give him the glass box;" he said he wanted 5s. for the diamond - I said I could sell him as good for 3s. 6d., and showed him some; I turned to give an answer and missed a diamond - the two women were gone, but the man staid there trying the diamonds; I went to the door and met the prisoner's companion coming in -I asked where the prisoner was; she said she did not know, she was no friend of her's; I looked out and saw the prisoner down the street - the officer found the diamond, and took her the same evening.

DANIEL McCRAIG . I am an officer. I took up the

prisoner about ten o'clock the same evening - I found the duplicate of the diamond on her; and she acknowledged she had pawned it that afternoon, but did not say where she got it.

THOMAS JEROME . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this diamond, and gave this duplicate to the person who pawned it; it was a woman, but I cannot swear to her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated, and took the diamond for the one I went to pawn.

JOB VALENTINE WATKINS . She was intoxicated; I think the man must have put it into her hand.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-106

1480. THOMAS COLLINS and GEORGE ARTHUR were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of James Pitt .

JAMES PITT . On the 7th of July, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I was in bed; my landlady called me, and said that two boys had taken a silk handkerchief out of my hat, which stood on a box in the room; I dressed myself, and went out - I met Bain; I went on with her till I saw the prisoners, and she said they were the persons; I took them - they both denied it; I have never found my handkerchief.

AUGUSTA BAIN . My mother keeps this house. On the the morning of the 7th of July, I saw the prisoners come and look in at the shop window, while I was standing at the parlour door; they went away, and returned immediately - I am sure they are the boys; I had not seen them before - I saw Collins put his arm in, and take the handkerchief out of Mr. Pitt's hat; I told my mother - she told me to go after them; I did not see what they did with it - I am sure they were in company, and close together; I met Pitt near the Yorkshire Stingo, and went with him after the prisoners.

Prisoner Collins. Q. How can you swear I took it out of the hat? A. I saw you put your arm in, and take it; I can swear to you by your jacket, and your features.

Prisoner Arthur. Q.What do you swear to me by? A. By your features; I told Mr. Pitt you did not take the handkerchief, but was with the other.

THOMAS PERRING . I am the officer. I was at the corner of Circus-street, and saw the prosecutor collar one of the prisoners; the other was going off, but I took him - they denied having the handkerchief: I asked where they had been that night, or what brought them out so soon in the morning - they said they were going to look for work; Collins said he had slept at home, but after I had locked them up I went to Collins' mother, who said she had not seen him for a week.

Collins' Defence. I met this young man at the corner of Stingo-lane; we came down Circus-street, and were going to look for work; the prosecutor and girl were standing there - the girl said, "I think that is one of the lads."

JAMES PITT . When I saw them in Circus-street, I said to the girl, "Be sure which is the boy who took the handkerchief;" she did not express any doubt that either of these were the persons she saw.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

ARTHUR - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-107

1481. WILLIAM CAWFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 watch, value 2l. , the goods of George Richardson .

GEORGE RICHARDSON . I am a waiter , but am out of place. On the 18th of June, I was at the Red Lion, in the Strand , where I had slept the night before; the prisoner slept in another bed in the same room - when I awoke I took my watch from under my pillow, and found it was not quite seven o'clock; I laid it on the table, and went to sleep - I awoke again at half-past seven, my watch and the prisoner were gone; I went down, and saw him - I asked him about my watch, and he denied it; I sent for a constable, who searched the room in which the prisoner was, and found the watch hid in the seat of the chair; there was nobody else in the room.

JOHN GIBBS . I am waiter at the Red Lion. No one had left the house before the constable came that morning.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any stranger slept in the house? A. No; one gentleman slept there, but no stranger.

JOHN JONES . I am a silversmith, and live next door to the Red Lion. I was in my yard at a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes past seven o'clock that morning; my attention was drawn by the ringing of a bell - I looked at the wall, and saw the prisoner on it; I remonstrated with him, and he got off.

Prisoner. Q. What dress had I on? A. A jacket, and a glazed hat.

MARY CLARK . I live at the Red Lion. On the morning of the 19th of June, I saw the prisoner on the wall a little after seven o'clock; he was dressed as he is now.

Prisoner. You were down before me, and in the room.

Witness. No; you were in the yard before I came down.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was intoxicated on the previous evening, and had come down early in the morning for some drink, but denied having seen the watch.

GEORGE RICHARDSON , No money was found on him; there were the marks on the wall, where he had attempted to get over, and the mortar stuck to his shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-108

1482. WILLIAM BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 watch chain, value 30s.; 3 seals, value 3l., and 1 watch-key, value 10s., the goods of Joseph Simpkin , from his person .

JOSEPH SIMPKIN . On the 25th of June, I dined at the Eyre Arms tavern, St. John's-wood ; when I came out at night I turned to the right, to ask a hackney-coachman what he would take us to Oxford-street for, as one of my friends, who was deputy-chairman of the meeting, was tipsy; while I was speaking the prisoner came in front of me, and took my watch - I caught hold of him, and said, "You villain, you have got my watch;" others came up at the time, but I did not let the prisoner go till I gave him to the officer -I did not get the watch; it was passed away some how.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILIPS. Q.What are you? A. A plumber . My wife and some other ladies came to the tavern that evening; I was sober - there were persons passing in and out of the tavern, but this was about six yards from the door: my wife came up to me as he got the watch, and I saw his hand pass, but I did not see the watch go; the deputy-chairman did not join our party till about eight o'clock, when he came down to the garden,

where our wives came to have a walk - I went there at half-past two; there were four of us, and we had four bottles of sherry - some of it was left, and some given away; we then took light sherry again - I think not more than four bottles in all - there could not be more than five; the deputy-chairman joined us about seven o'clock, but he sat down while we walked round the gardens.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I was in the passage, and the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner; I went up to him - the prisoner said he knew nothing about it; the prosecutor was sober.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear as if he had been drinking nothing? A. I should not expect he would go there and drink nothing; the lady said she could not identify the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-109

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY, SATURDAY, JULY 18.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1483. TIMOTHY CREAMER and ANN CREAMER (his wife) were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Pittway , on the 13th of July , at St. Mary Islington , and stealing therein 1 bed, value 12s.; 1 coat, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 2 pails and yokes, value 20s.; 6 chairs, value 12s., and 1 set of China, value 8s., his property .

THOMAS PITTWAY . I am a milkman , and rent a house in the parish of St. Mary, Islington. I believe the prisoners are married; the female prisoner was in my employ - her business was to bring the milk from Lime-house to my place; she had 7s. a week - on the 13th of July, a little before nine o'clock, I went out, and fastened all the doors, and the street door; she was not there then - the man was not in my employ; I returned about four o'clock - the house was still fastened, but on going into my room, I was astonished to find it was empty - I missed the articles stated in the indictment; it appeared to me that somebody had got in with a key, or some instrument; it was a spring lock - I had had a little difference with the female prisoner in the morning; her week was up on Saturday - this was Monday; I had paid her on the Saturday, and lent her a shilling; I suspected her, and went for an officer - I went with him to search her house the same evening, and found both the prisoners in bed, on the top of my bed; I found my property there, and an instrument was found in one of the milk pails - it will open my door - the officer tried it; when I claimed my property, the woman said that she went and took the things, and that I owed her a month's wages - she lives a considerable distance from me; the bed and all the property found is mine; the shutters were all fast - they must have entered at the door.

Ann Creamer Q. Do you think I stole them for my own use; did you not give me orders that if you were taken up, (which I thought was the case,) that I was to take care of all your things? A. No; I never gave any body leave to take any thing out of my house; I suspected her because a little girl gave me information - I deny telling her if I was absent from my walk for two hours, that she was to suspect I was in trouble, and to take charge of my property; I have a sister living near me, who I should have given such a job to if I had been in trouble - I owe money to a person, but is a friend, and I was not afraid of him.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer. I went and searched the prisoners' house, and found them in bed; I found the articles stated in the indictment, in the room; the prosecutor claimed them - the woman stated that she had taken them for a month's wages, a month's warning due to her.

DAVID HEALEY . I am an officer. I went to the place, and found this instrument in a pail, which I tried to the door, and it opens it.

THOMAS PITTWAY , I am certain I fastened the door - it was a spring lock, and I generally try it after me; I can swear I tried it that morning, and it was fast.

Ann Creamer 's Defence. My master left me that morning on the walk, which he never did before - I walked all over the walk, but could not find him; I then went to the house, put my hand to the door, and it opened - he often put his back to the door, and it opened; I washed the pails, put them down, and stopped there till eleven o'clock - master being in debt, I thought he was taken up; this sort of thing happened about eight years ago, and then his sister and mother took his things; I thought the same thing had happened to him, and took them to my place - I put the door ajar, and the chairs to it; on my return I found the place as I had left it, and said to myself, "What would I not pay to a body to assist me?" I gave a girl a penny to take care of some chairs, while I ran with the rest of the things; I met a man going to market, and asked him to assist me to take them as far as Spitalfields-market - I then got him to help me to the turnpike; I there took master's blue coat and pawned it for 1s. to pay the man, and that was my day's wages; I piled the things up in my room, and said, "If master comes to night, all his property is here, and to-morrow I will try and find his sister," as I did not know where she lived then; I tried to keep the walk as well as I could when he was in trouble before, for five months; I have a young family, who have no support but from me, and they are now about the streets - he has been a kind master to me, and I thought to do it for a good purpose; he owes Mr. Gunn 25l., and they told me last Saturday, if he did not settle it they would take him up.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I asked how she came to take the things; she said she took them for a month's wages - she did not state this then; she lives about three miles from the prosecutor's.

THOMAS PITTWAY . I never permitted her to take any property away; I certainly did go away once, having married a woman, which caused a few words - I left London for two years - that was about eight years ago; I am in no more difficulty now than other tradesmen - I do not say I could pay at this moment every farthing I owe; I had no apprehension whatever of my goods being seized.

Q. Then there is no truth in what she asserts? A. Not in that point.

JURY. Q. Did you on a former occasion give her leave to take your goods? A. No - my brother-in-law took

every thing away to his farm; I cannot say whether she had any thing to do with it, but my wife was at home, and of course took care of it: she came into my employ the last time, a fortnight before Christmas.

Ann Creamer . Q. Did I not keep the walk for you for five months? A. My brother-in-law, I believe, took possession of every thing; I never saw this instrument before - I did not give her permission to go into my house in my absence to wash the pails, unless I gave her the key.

Q. Was not our agreement for a month's wages or a month's warning? A. No agreement of the kind was made - I cannot say whether it is the custom of the trade, it may be with some people.

ANN CREAMER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

TIMOTHY CREAMER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-110

1484 EDWARD COVER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , 1 watch, value 3l.; 2 guineas; 26 sovereigns, and 15 shillings, the monies of William Brunsden , in the dwelling-house of Richard Campbell .

WILLIAM BRUNSDEN . I was at Hanworth , and slept there, at Richard Campbell's house. The prisoner and I went to bed together on Sunday evening, and on Monday, the 29th of June, when I awoke, about four o'clock in the morning, I missed my watch and money - I turned round, and missed my bed-fellow; I then turned round to the window to look at my watch, and found it was gone - I looked round for my trousers, and my pockets were both turned inside out; I am sure the money was in the pockets before I went to bed; I received the money between seven and eight o'clock, and went to bed about nine - I did not take it out to count it, but am sure it was safe when I went to bed; I have known the prisoner about three weeks or a month, but this was the first night I had slept with him - we are labourer s.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you drunk over night? A. No, quite sober; it is Campbell's house- I used to trade in pigs and potatoes in Gloucestershire: I left there about three months ago - I had saved this money: the prisoner had seen me with it; the prisoner and I have been working at Mr. Maines, at Hanworth-park - I had 14s. a week; I carried this money about, because I thought it the safest way.

COURT. Q.How long had you had the money? A. The twenty-six sovereigns had been in my pocket for three months.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable. On the morning of the 29th of June, the prosecutor applied to me, and said he had been robbed of twenty-six sovereigns, ten shillings, and his watch; the Magistrate granted a warrant - I went to Hanworth with him about two days afterwards, and traced out where the prisoner came from - I went to the place, but he was gone; I left instructions with the constable of the district, who brought the prisoner to me with part of the property.

THOMAS HORE . On the 29th of June the prisoner asked me to buy a watch - this was in Ramshaw parish, Hampshire; I do not know how far it is from Hanwell - he asked me if William Britten wanted one - I told him I did not know; he then asked me to take it to him, which I did - I should know it again; I did not sell it to Britten - I only had it to carry to him.

Cross-examined. A. Do not you know how far you live from London? A. It is near fifty miles - the watch was in my possession about a quarter of an hour; I should know it by a stamp at the end of the handle - Britten works for the same gentleman as I do; I knew the prisoner before - I had not seen him the day before; it was on a Monday, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; he had his working clothes on.

WILLIAM BRITTEN . I received this watch from Hore- I was to have it a month on trial; I had some conversation with the prisoner about it on the night I received it - I was to give him 2l. 5s. for it.

WILLIAM BARRETT . Ramshaw is considered fifty miles from London - the prosecutor's landlord goes by the name of Kemble; it is a private house.

WILLIAM BRUNSDEN . This is my watch, I have had it six months; I think my landlord spells his name Kembel.

Cross-examined. Q. Who sold you the watch? A. George Box , of Gloucester.

GUILTY of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-111

1485. ELIZABETH BEVIS and MARY ANN JONES were indicted for feloniously assaulting Michael McGowan , on the 8th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, and 15 shillings, his monies .

MICHAEL McGOWAN . I live at Dunbar, in Scotland. On the 8th of July I was in St. Mary-axe; I had been to receive two sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and one shilling; they were in my waistcoat pocket - I went through Whitechapel, and got into Wentworth-street , about five o'clock in the afternoon; as I passed by I saw the two prisoners standing at a door - they called me to them, and asked me to give them some gin; I said I had no money - they pulled me into a private house, and immediately after three more girls came in; I told them I would give them sixpence to get some gin - I took it out of my waistcoat pocket; they brought the gin - when they had drank it, they shut the door and laid hold of my right and left hand; I had no power to take care of my property - one of them said, "Put your hand in his grouper;" they had me down on my back, and tore my coat to pieces, and took every penny I had - I am certain the prisoners are two of them; they are the persons I saw at the door, and who pulled me into the room - they continued in the room the whole time; when they got my money they went out at the door - I saw them again in about three quarters of an hour; I inquired for an officer, and went to the office - the officers mustered eight or nine girls together, and the prisoners were two of them; I saw them at a house in the same street - he brought them out one by one, and showed them to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it impossible for you to make a mistake? A. It is not possible to mistake them - I had a little drop of drink, but was not out of reason; I was sober enough - I was not drunk; the Magistrate did not refuse to commit them that night because I was drunk - I did not lay down in the office

and kick about, to show the Magistrate the way it was done: but when they showed me into an inner room I laid down, as I had no bed to go to - I afterwards was taken to the watch-house, and picked out the two women; I did not say I would swear to them - I told the Magistrate one was not the woman, and I told the witness so before I went to the office - I said in two minutes after that she was not the woman; I never said she was the woman who tore the cuff off my coat - three women were brought before me; I said they were some of the women who robbed me, and in a minute after I said they were not the women - I did not point out another young woman in the yard of the office - I had two glasses of gin and a pint of beer that day; I was not drunk.

COURT. Q. What did you say about an inner room? A. I went into an inner room in the office, as I had not a farthing to pay my lodging - the officer said I might lay down in the watch-house; I laid down on a form to go to sleep - I did not lay down on the floor to show how this happened.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer. The prosecutor came to me on the 8th of July and said he had been robbed in Wentworth-street by four or five girls - he described one or two of them; I think I took nine or ten- I got them all into the City of Norwich public-house, Wentworth-street; I made them all stand round in the tap-room - I brought him in, and he almost immediately identified Bevis; he at first passed over Jones, as she stood with her back to the window, but as she was going out of the tap-room, on seeing her face, he instantly turned round and said Jones was one of the girls - he had described a cross-eyed woman; Jones does squint - he had not fixed on any other woman at that time; he went to the watch-house that night, having no home - on the night of the examination he told the Magistrate how they had attacked him, and laid down on his back to describe the way they got on him, and tore his coat; they were committed the next day, and I received orders from the Magistrate to take him to the work-house, as he had no place to go to, and no money - it was not to see any body; what passed there I do not know - when I first saw him he was the worse for liquor; he had been drinking, but was capable of knowing what he was doing.

Cross-examined. Q. If he meant to tell the truth, must he not have known that he laid on the floor in the office? A. He certainly must know that - I did not bring the women one by one into the street - I sent them out as he could not identify them.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

WILLIAM HIGGLEY . I am master of Whitechapel work-house; the prosecutor was brought there to be taken care of. On the Monday an officer brought a woman there, and requested me to let two women be placed with her - I called the first two I saw, Wood was one; the prosecutor was then asked if those were the persons who robbed him - he immediately pointed to Wood and the one who stood next to her, who had come from the office; he said Wood tore his coat and said to her, "You know you are the person who held me down and tore my coat;" I knew myself she had not been out of the work-house for a fortnight or three weeks, and told him it was impossible - I think he said more than once that she was one; he did not express the least doubt of her - but when he got to the office he would not swear to either of them.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I am an officer. I took a woman named Potter to the work-house, and placed her by the side of two women - the prosecutor was told to look at them; he immediately laid hold of Wood and said, "That is the one who laid hold of the cuff of my coat and tore it; and that is the other who held my arm - she held me down while a third took my money;" I told him over and over again to be cautious - he said positively they were the women; the master said it was impossible Wood could be - I took Potter to the office, and he said there, she was not the woman, she was too thin; and at the work-house gate, he said he was mistaken in Wood - be had declared several times she was one of them - Higgley had said it was impossible.

SARAH WOOD . I was placed by the side of two women, and the prisoner said I had torn the sleeve of his coat in taking his money from him - I had not been out of the work-house for three weeks.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-112

Before Mr. Justice James Parke .

1486. JAMES BROWN , alias KING , and FRANCES BADKINS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Galilee , on the 12th of April , at St. Paul, Shadwell , and stealing therein 1 silver sugar basin, value 50s.; 1 pair of silver sugar tongs, value 8s.; 13 silver spoons, value 40s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 8s.; 2 tumbler glasses, value 2s., and 2 wine glasses, value 1s., his property .

EMMA WHITHALL . I am servant to Samuel Galilee, who lives in Love-lane, Shadwell . On the morning of the 12th of April, I got up at four o'clock, and found a pannel had been taken out of the counting-house door by some instrument - the pannel is here; these two holes were in it, and the marks at the side - I saw corresponding marks in the door; I missed this property; I think I should know the tumblers again - one of the same pattern was left behind; I had been in the habit of washing them - one of them had two small marks at the bottom; one of the marks was larger than the other; the tumblers were used the day before - my fellow-servant put them away that night; I fastened the street door, and my fellow-servant fastened the others - this tumbler (looking at it) is one that was left behind - I had seen the spoons the day before.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is your master here? A. No: I know he has no other Christian name; I have seen two tumblers produced - they are a very common pattern (looking at one produced by David James) this is the same pattern; I certainly do not wish to swear to it.

COURT. Q.Look at the one you say is marked? A. Here are two marks at the bottom - they had similar marks to these, but I should not like to swear to them - one is a brown mark.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is it not common to find these marks in glass? A. Yes; there is a brown mark, and an air bubble - they are like the marks.

ELIZABETH CANNON. I am cook to Mr. Galilee. On the night before the robbery, I fastened all the doors and

windows except the street-door and garden-gate; at four o'clock in the morning, the watchman rang the bell - I informed master, and came down with him; the pannel was taken out of the counting-house door, and stood outside - these circular marks were on the end of it then; the articles stated were missing; I had been in the habit of washing the tumblers - I put them on the side board in the parlour that afternoon; there are two marks on this tumbler by which I know it - one is a bubble in the glass, and the other a brown spot; I had noticed these marks, and it is the same pattern exactly: I cannot swear it is the same tumbler - the place under the sideboard was broken open, and the sugar basin, tongs, and spoons taken.

Cross-examined. Q. What business is your master? A. A rope manufacturer, and resides in a house on the ground - the counting-house is in his dwelling-house; these are common cheap tumblers.

JURY. Q. How long have you been in the habit of washing the tumblers? A. I have been there a year and a half, and was there some time before - this tumbler was there all that time; only two were left out of a dozen- only one in the dozen had these marks.

DAVID JAMES . I am a shopman to Mr. Peart, a pawnbroker, of Whitechapel. On the 18th of May, two glasses were pawned by Turner - these are them; one of them is now broken.

Cross-examined. Q. Have they been in your possession ever since? A. Yes; under my care, in a closet; Turner was a regular customer.

COURT. Q. Are the glasses ticketed so as to be known? A. The counterpart of the duplicate is put inside - I found it there when the officer came - it is a very common pattern.

MARTHA TURNER . I pawned two glasses like these with James, but cannot swear to them - I received a duplicate for them; the female prisoner gave them me to pawn; I took them immediately to the pawnbroker's - I had frequently seen her in her room: she lodged in George-street - she sent for me, and asked if I would go and pledge two tumblers; they were on the mantel-piece- she slept in the room, I suppose, as there was a bed there.

Cross-examined. Q.You do not know whether any body else slept there? A. No; it is a lodging-house; when I returned - she said it did not signify their being pawned in my name; she did not tell me to conceal it.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 27th of May, I apprehended Brown at a lodging-house in George-street; I do not know who keeps it - both the prisoners were in the same room; I had seen them both in bed together in that room about a month before - I have seen them in the house several times, but do not think I have seen them in that room together above twice; I always considered that Brown lived there- I found two duplicates on the mantel-piece, which I gave up to the witness - when I took Brown he was nearly undressed, sitting by the fire; the female prisoner was in the room; I found this small chisel in a table drawer in the room - I went next day to the prosecutor's, and compared it with two holes in the pannel of the counting-house, and one hole which had been made in the street door - it fitted that hole, and fits the two holes in this pannel - I did not take the female prisoner for two or three days after - she was then in the same room.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you believe that pannel has been extracted by means of a centre-bit? A. No; it has been marked with a centre-bit all round the edge, but I consider that an instrument has been used to pull it out after it was worked with the centre-bit; I do not swear the holes have been made with the chisel - the female prisoner is an unfortunate girl.

COURT. Q. How often has the chisel been tried to these holes? A. About half a dozen times; Miller, our chief officer, who has been a carpenter, was sent for to give his opinion on it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is it uncommon to find strangers with the female prisoner? A. No; I have been over the house before - there may be two or three persons living there; I have seen the male prisoner in her company a good many times - I have been to the house five or six times, and always found her there, but only found the man there once, except when I apprehended him.

THOMAS SHELLSWELL . I am an officer. I was with Lea when Brown was apprehended; I afterwards went to search the lodgings - I have seen the prisoners in bed together when I was with Lea before, and have seen them in the room together three or four times before they were apprehended; after Brown was taken I went to search the room, and saw the female prisoner - she said we ought to know she was too good a judge to have any thing there that would injure her old man.

Cross-examined. Q. Did other girls live in this house? A. One or two girls of the town - I do not think there are more than three or four rooms in the house; I returned to the room immediately I had locked the man up- the woman was still there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-113

Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

1487. JAMES BROWN , alias KING , was again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Newton , on the 21st of April , at St. Dunstan Stebonheath, alias Stepney , and stealing therein 1 hat, value 10s.; 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 12s.; 1 shawl, value 20s.; 1 watch, value 10s., and 7 spoons, value 20s., his property .

WILLIAM NEWTON . I live in Philpot-street, Commercial-road , in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stebonheath, alias Stepney; I rent the house. On the night of the 21st of April my house was broken into - I had examined all the doors and windows before I went to bed, and they were secure - I was the last person up; I was alarmed about two o'clock in the morning - I got up, and found the trunks in my daughter's bed-room rummaged, and all the things out of their places; the greater part of the things were scattered about, and some were taken away - my daughter had alarmed me; there was a watch missing from her bedroom - I gave an alarm; two officers got over into my yard, and after that I went down stairs and found the pannel of my back door had been removed by a centre-bit; it was quite safe the night before - the hole was sufficiently large for a man to come through, but the door was open when I got down; I missed a hat, which I had worn the

day before - I had had it in common wear for about three months, and bought it at Kirkness; it hung up in my passage the night before: I had come home about nine o'clock, and hung it up - I am not positive as to the exact time. I went with the officers in two or three days, and saw a hat in the George, George-yard, Whitechapel, on the prisoner's head - he was in a back room of the house, playing at cards; when I saw him there, I said to the officer, "That is my hat," but not loud enough to be heard by the prisoner - I looked at it while it was on his head, and as soon as I looked at it I made that observation; the hat was then moved from his head - I looked inside it, and perceived the lining had been changed, and that it had a different lining in it when it was stolen; I looked at it, but did not take it into my hands - it was returned to the prisoner: from what I observed of it I felt convinced it was mine, as I do now - he was not apprehended then; I did not let him know that I believed it to be mine - an old hat, a fur cap, a stick, and a small crow-bar were left on my premises.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do I understand you did not wish to excite the prisoner's suspicion? A. Yes; the officer taking his hat off might have done so. but I understand something passed after, which lulled his suspicion; he was not then asked how he came by it - I did not say it was mine loud enough for him to hear; I did not see him again till he was apprehended, which was four, five, or six weeks after the robbery. I know Morgan - the hat has not been traced to his possession; he is a hatter - I have seen him on the subject of this hat: he swore the lining now in it was once his.

COURT. Q.Did you see the hat after he was apprehended? A. It was brought to my house by the officer the day he was apprehended.

ANN NEWTON . I am the daughter of William Newton. On the night of the robbery I was alarmed by two persons in my room; that was not the thieves - the thieves were not in my room, they were just outside the door; I did not hear any thing, but the boxes and trunks, which stood just outside the door, were all turned out - by that I say the thieves were just outside the room; I heard a noise about two o'clock - I did not awake my father: I had a sister in the house - I was in the habit of brushing my father's hat; he had had it about three months: I should know it again; I used to brush it every morning.

JAMES LEA . I am a Police-officer. Three or four evenings after this robbery I went with Mr. Newton to the the George, George-yard, Whitechapel, with Shellswell - the prisoner was in a room, playing at cards; Mr. Newton went into the room, and directly he saw the prisoner I heard him say, "That is my hat that is on his head;" he said so to us - the prisoner could not hear it; Shellswell took it off the prisoner's head - Newton looked at it, and said he had no doubt of it, but it had got a fresh lining; that was not loud enough for the prisoner to hear - the bat was returned to him. I apprehended him on the 27th of May, in a room in George-street, not fifty yards from this public-house - he was sitting by the fire, nearly undressed - he dressed himself, and put on a hat, which was on the table; I told him I took him on a charge of robbery - I did not mention this particular charge: here is the hat which he put on - when we got to the office, but not before the Magistrate, I asked him where he got that hat; I had not then informed him of this particular charge - he said,"I don't know where I got it - it has been looked at before;" when he came up on the second examination, (he had been examined on this charge then) I told him Mr. Newton claimed the hat which he had on his head; I asked him where he got it - he said he bought it of a hawker at Crawley, near Brighton, Sussex.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear he said he did not know where he got the hat? A. He said in a careless sort of way, "I don't know where I got it;" those were his words; after his examination I interrogated him again - that was not for the purpose of making a case out against him particularly; it was not to extort a contradiction - I did not caution him, or tell him what he said would be stated in Court; he was taken about a month after he was at the George - the hat was returned to him at the George; I did not intend him to know I had any charge against him when I was at the George; we whispered together, out of his hearing - one Morgan was examined before the Magistrate; I told him to come there by the Magistrate's order - what he said was not taken down; he was examined in the prisoner's presence, and identified the hat lining.

THOMAS SHELLSWELL . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I accompanied Lea to the George at eight or nine o'clock in the evening, a few days after Mr. Newton's robbery - I found the prisoner sitting in a room; after looking at him for a minute or two. Newton said, "That is my hat; I think that is my hat;" he said it to me, not loud - he spoke to me first, Lea was standing at the door, I was inside the parlour - I then took the hat off the prisoner's head; Newton looked at it, and said, "It looks like my hat, I think it is my hat, but if it is there is a different lining in it;" we came out of the room, consulted together, and did not take Brown that night.

Q. Was what Newton said about the lining said in the prisoner's hearing? A. I do not think the prisoner did hear it - I returned the hat to the prisoner; I do not recollect saying any thing to him - he said to me, "Well, are you satisfied;" I said, "For the present;" that was all I said - I was present on the 27th of May when he was apprehended - he had a hat on when he came away; Lea took it from him at the lock-up house.

Cross-examined. Q. You had a consultation about the hat outside the door? A. Yes; Newton said that it was his hat; my reason for not taking him then was, because I have a hat and cap in my possession which was left on the premises, and the moment I saw the cap, and the description of the party who had been seen about the premises the evening before, I said I knew the cap to belong to Joe Latham , and believe the hat to be Brown's, having seen him wear a similar one; I thought it best to let him be till we could get them both at once - we have taken Latham, he is committed for trial at Surrey; Morgan came voluntarily before the Magistrate, having been desired to come by me or Lea - I might have told him myself; we certainly went to his house, for Latham's sister lived there; he was brought to the office, and gave an account how the lining went out of the house - I believe he was sworn, but cannot say whether; what he said was taken down - the clerk was there; I might be four or five yards from him, or only a

few inches, as we shift about - he did not, to my knowledge, state that another person brought him the hat; the prosecutor had sworn he positively believes the hat to be his; he did say if it was his it was a different lining.

JAMES KIRKNESS . I am a hatter. I supply Newton with hats; I sold him one the beginning of this year of this description, texture, and size; I purchase my hats, I do not manufacture them - I have been twenty-seven years in the business, and this hat has been shown to the manufacturer; I only have this particular sort of hats from one manufacturer - I can only swear I sold the prosecutor one of this description, and that this is the manufacture of the person of whom I purchase, and I am satisfied this is not the original lining of this hat; here is some paper put in to prevent the colour of the hat coming through the lining, and in re-lining they have taken part of it out but not the whole - it was fastened with a little bit of paste; the lining is not mine - it is inferior to the lining I put into such hats.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to state this part of the lining was not there originally? A. I speak generally of the lining - this under the leather is the lining; it is a fine hat 6 1/2 diameter - when it was finished the size was chalked in it; I do not mark the size in ink; it is a common size, but not so common as seven inches - I cannot tell how many hundreds of this description I have had - I have not bought thousands; I believe the maker supplies most of the respectable houses in the City - he would be as likely to know it as me; the texture, size, and description are all common.

MR. NEWTON. This is my hat; there are two or three circumstances connected with it which induces me to say so - in consequence of my head not being very well I ordered a light one, and the general shape of the hat was neither liked by myself or family; in the next place, I observed that the beaver was worn off it just here near the leather, and it fits me - and from these circumstances I conclude it is mine; I have tried it on several times - it is the hat I saw on the prisoner's head three or four days after the robbery; I looked then at the mark, near the piece of leather - I did not hold it in my hand to feel the weight of it, I only looked at this mark; except when I saw it on his head, from the general appearance of it, I was convinced it was mine - the leather lining is not the same I had.

Cross-examined. Q. Put it on; I suppose you are not acquainted with the hat trade? A. No; it is a light hat, my family did not like the shape - it may be as common a shape as is worn.

Q. Have you a better reason now for believing it is yours than before? A. I certainly have - for I have examined it closer than I did at the George; it was not in my hands there, but in the officer's.

Q. Did you not state if it was your's it had a different lining? A. I think I said it was my hat, but it had a different lining - I have no doubt I am correct about it; I will venture to swear it is my hat from its general appearance, the dislike to the shape, and the particular wear near the leather - it is not the shape I usually wear, it is too narrow in the brim.

ANN NEWTON . This is my father's hat, I brushed it every day - I speak to it from the appearance of it; I have no particular mark that I noticed.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am a watchman of Mile-end Old-town. My beat is within twenty or thirty yards of Mr. Newton's house - I recollect the night his house was broken open; on the night before the robbery I saw two persons passing very near Mr. Newton's; they looked rather suspicious - I looked at them and they went on; it was the night of the robbery, rather before twelve o'clock - there was a gas-light near them, I could see their faces, and should know one again better than the other, having frequently seen him passing my beat before - it was the prisoner; they passed by, and stopped by the lamp for a short time - I was five or six yards from them then; I was relieved by another watchman soon after one o'clock, and communicated what I had seen to him, and gave him a description of the persons I had seen - the other man was nearly a head saller than the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you first hear of this house being robbed? A. In the morning, as soon as I got up - I went and told Newton what I had seen; I was not taken to see the prisoner till he was at Lambeth-street; I did not tell Newton I knew one of the men - I said I had seen two suspicious characters, and described their dress; on my oath I did not know the prisoner's name - I had frequently seen the parties on my beat; I said I had seen two suspicious persons, and described their dress, but I did not know their names; when I went to Lambeth-street I saw the prisoner; Lea did not tell me he was the man who had committed the robbery - I went before the Magistrate at the request of Newton - it was about a month ago; I had never spoken to the prisoner in my life - I had seen several persons about the street that night, men and women too; I never heard the prisoner's name till it was mentioned at the office; it was not by Lea - I believe he mentioned it himself

COURT. Q. You described the prisoner to Newton? A. Yes; I did not tell him I knew his person - I described his height, appearance, and dress; the tail one had a fur cap, and the other a hat - they were about thirty yards from Newton's when I saw them.

WALTER MALLETT . I am a watchman. I relieved Andrews on the morning in question a little after one o'clock, and received directions from him, in consequence of which I kept a look out - I saw nothing happen till Newton gave the alarm that there were thieves on his premises; I went to his assistance, and saw a person getting over his fence towards the street - as soon as he saw me he retreated back on the premises again; I sprung my rattle, and another watchman came to my assistance - I stationed myself in front and heard a rattle spring, went to the spot, and saw two men running about fifty yards before me - I had my great coat on and they gained ground on me - one ran after the other as close as they could; one of them was about the prisoner's size, and the other about a head taller; Andrew's had given me information of having seen suspicious characters lurking about, and said one was short and the other a head taller - the bind one had a hat on, the other had passed the gas-light, and I could not see what he had on - the short one had a hat; nobody was nearer to them than I was that I know of

Cross-examined. Q. Did they not run close by the gaslight? A. Yes; I saw them before they got to the gaslight - I saw the short one better than the taller; I heard no disturbance till Newton alarmed me - I was not in my

box; I was twenty yards from Newton's - I had been pretty near the house all the time; I had been my round.

JOHN LARKINS . I heard the alarm. I am superintendant of the parish; I ran to assist - I was the first person by the prosecutor's gates; he was at his window; I climbed over the gates, with a watchman's lantern, and on going to the back door, I stumbled over a cloak, and some boots outside the house - I then found a pannel out of the door; I showed the cloak and boots to Mr. Newton - I found a hat, cap, and a small crow-bar on the premises; the crow-bar was in the kitchen - I examined the premises, and found the trunks open, and linen spread in different places; a watch dog was killed in the yard - it was not quite dead when I got over; it had been knocked on the head, I believe; I saw no marks of its having been stabbed.

Cross-examined. Q.How did you know it was knocked on the head? A. I apprehend so - it died shortly after; I never saw it after it was skinned - I was subpoened here this morning, I believe by Lea, but I did not see the person - I went before the Magistrate, but my deposition was not taken.

MR. NEWTON. The great coat and boots shown to me by Larkins, were my property; I had a watch dog - he died about six o'clock in the morning, and was quite well when I saw him at nine the night before; I saw the skin after he had been skinned, and there appeared to be a settlement of blood about the neck.

MR. CLARKSON to JAMES KIRKNESS . Q.Do not you know that many hatters do mark the dimensions of a hat with ink? A. Very probably - I do not think it is common for a hatter lining a hat which he did not make, to mark the dimensions - this lining is marked 6 1/2 in ink; it is not my mark, nor the manufacturer's - I mark my hats on the paper, outside; no maker would mark it as this is done - this leather has been put in by a hat liner.

THOMAS MORGAN . I am a hat seller, and occasionally line hats. I was examined before the Magistrate; I went there voluntarily - Lea, the officer, told me to come- I was sworn; I believe Lea and Shellswell heard what I said - they were in and out; I believe what I said was taken down - I did not take notice; I signed no examination; I do not know the prisoner - I know the lining of this hat; I cannot say that I lined it, but to the best of my belief, I did - the leather is mine; it bears my private mark - it is not my own writing but I know the hand; I do not manufacture hats - I know the leather, but I cannot speak to the other part of the lining; I do not recollect lining a hat, but I have an entry in my book of a job having been done on the 26th of April, which might be for lining.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Are you able to say on your oath, you never sold that hat? A. I swear I did not; I have no recollection of lining it, but many things are done in my shop which I do not know of; I was asked before the Magistrate if I had lined it for the prisoner, and said I did not.

GUILTY - DEATH Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18290716-114

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander .

1488. THOMAS CAMPLIN , JOHN BEARD , and WILLIAM SAWYER , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Sole , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 shilling, 1 sixpence, and 2 1/2d., his monies .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS SOLE . I am a labourer , and lived at Edmonton . On the 11th of July I left the Cock, at Ponder's End, about half-past eight o'clock; I had part of a pot of beer there with my father; I then went to the King's Head, Lower Edmonton, and had part of a pint with Charles King -I left there a little after ten o'clock, and came to the Lion, and took part of sixpenny-worth of gin and water - I was not drunk, I knew what I was about; soon after I came out of the Lion I saw the three prisoners - this was before twelve o'clock; I saw no other men that I knew - I left the Lion because my mistress was going away from me, and I went after her, as a young man took her away with him, and I did not like it; I had a shilling, sixpence, and 2 1/2d. in my pocket, with a key and tobacco-box; Camplin, Flood, and Taylor came up to me at the Wooden-bridge; I have known Flood and Taylor some years - I had not seen them that night before they closed round me, and took my money out of my pocket; they turned one pocket inside out; one was in front and the others on each side of me - one of them caught hold of my pocket; I lost my money, key, and tobacco-box; it was master's key -Camplin had been in my company on Friday night, and I knew him; when they got my money I said to Camplin"I thought you would be the last to do any thing of this sort - I treated you last night, and now you are treating me;" I told them they had got the key of master's gate, and I could not fetch the horses without it, and John Beard brought it me in about two minutes afterwards; they went away, and I went to the young man who took my mistress away - his name is Harwood - I did not go home till morning; I told Harwood what had happened, and the next morning I told several people - I gave information, and described them to the officers.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to insist that your "Mistress," as you call her, is your wife? A. She is not; she is a woman I lived with, a prostitute; I had not been with her that night - I was sober enough to know what I was doing; I had been at the King's Head in the day time, and between five and six o'clock, but had nothing to drink; I work for the landlord, and had been there at six o'clock in the morning; I had a pint of beer at one o'clock, and drank again at half-past nine - I had part of a pot of beer with my father at the Cock, then went to the King's Head, and had one glass of gin and water - a woman sat in the same box as me; Harward came in there, and she went out with him - I followed them in five minutes; three other men went out at the same time - I did not offer to fight any body, and had no quarrel; 2 1/2d. fell out of my pocket, but there was no fighting - Flood picked it up and gave it to me; Sawyer and I were shoving one another about, we knew better than to fight - this was a quarter of an hour before I was robbed.

Complin. When I was by the Lion he said "Let us have a lark; go down the lane to the first archway, and you will find this wh-re;" we went, and when we got back he got fighting with Sawyer; they threw each other down. and 3 1/2d. fell out - I picked it up, he said "There goes 2s." Witness. There were no words about

the girl; I said I had dropped some money - Flood picked it up and gave it to me; I was squaring with Sawyer - I fell down, and it came out; we struck each other, but not in malice.

MR. BARRY. Q. How far were you robbed from where the scuffling took place? A. Three stones throw.

JOHN CAMP . I am constable and beadle. I apprehended Sawyer at the Lion, at Edmonton; the robbery was on the Saturday - I took Beard that night, at the Fleece; I took Camplin next morning, at his father's house, asleep on the bed, with his clothes on; I told him what it was for - he said d - n the the money, he did not know any thing about it, he did not have it, some of the others might; I brought all the prisoners to Newgate, and on the road they kept swearing they did not care whether they were lagged this time or another, they did not doubt they should be lagged before the summer was out; Sawyer and Camplin said so, but Beard seemed very much cut up and in tears - sometimes they talked of being docked.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am a constable, of Tottenham, and assisted in bringing the prisoners to the watch-house. Sawyer, with many oaths, said he expected this would lag him, but he did not care, as he expected he should be lugged before the summer was out; Camplin said the same, but Beard was in tears the whole time.

Sawyer. It is a parish concern altogether.

EDWARD HARWOOD . I was with Sole at the Lion, Edmonton - I knew a woman who was acquainted with Sole; I went out with her that evening, and did not see Sole again till a quarter-past six o'clock, when he found me at the cow-house, and told me five men had been robbing him- he had been drinking, but knew what he was about; his waistcoat hung all over his shoulder, where it was torn, and his breeches pocket was turned out.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he come to you to complain? A. No; he came after the girl; I was sober - the woman was drinking with Marn and Camplin; Sole was not drinking with her - I saw no gin and water; Sole was on one side of her.

Complin's Defence. The officers are inducing this man to say what he does.

Sawyer's Defence. The parish officers want to get us clear off.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-115

Before Mr. Recorder.

1489. LOUISA DRURY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 6 silver spoons, value 3l., and 3 silver forks, value 3l,, the goods of Robert Bell , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am servant to Mr. Robert Bell , of Great Ormond-street . Last Wednesday week I missed these articles - they were not all taken at the same time; the prisoner was a daily-servant , but did not sleep in the house; she had only been there within the last three months- I have since seen three tea-spoons, one desert-spoon, and two table spoons - they have master's initials on them.

JOHN JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Boyce, a pawnbroker, of Theobald's-road. On the 8th of June, the prisoner pawned a tea-spoon in the name of Brown, of Ormond-yard, also one tea-spoon on the 2d of July, and another one on the 14th, in the same name, for 3s. each; one tablespoon, on the 10th of July, for 10s., and a dessert spoon for 6s., on the same day.

FRANCES PHILLIPS . The prisoner lived in Little Ormond-yard, two doors from me; I pawned a table-spoon for her at Brown's, in Gray's Inn-lane - she told me it was her sister's; I got 12s. on it.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am servant to Mr. Brown, a pawnbroker, in Gray's Inn-lane; I advanced 12s. on this tablespoon - Bell claimed it.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner - she voluntarily said she had pawned the things produced, but denied taking the forks.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Phillips came to me, and said she was in a deal of trouble - that she had pawned her husband's clothes unknown to him, and asked me to get her something to pawn to get them out on Saturday night; she was to pledge them again on Monday, and take these things out.

GUILTY (of stealing only .)

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-116

1490. WILLIAM POOLE and JOHN SALMON were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Thomas Francis Freemantle Lindsay , on the 13th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 handkerchief, value 4d.; 2lbs. weight of pork, value 20d.; 1 half-crown, and 7s., his property .

JAMES THOMAS FRANCIS FREEMANTLE LINDSAY . I now work at the West-India Docks: I am foreman of the ship's hold . On the 13th of June, at a quarter-past twelve o'clock at night, I was coming from the Needle-makers' Arms, Commercial-road, where I had taken a pint of ale -I had been drinking, but knew what I was about; after leaving there I had occasion to go to my mother's, in Margaret-street , which is twenty or thirty paces from the Needle-makers' Arms, and as I went I was tripped up from behind by somebody, and came on the ground - after I was down, they bustled me about; there were two persons engaged in it - I found out what they were at, and sung out to them; I begged of them not to hurt me - they d - d and b - d me, and told me to hold my tongue. and after hustling me about, the tallest of the two walked away a few paces.

Q. What do you mean by hustling you? A.Shaking me about to fatigue me; rolling me about - as I was singing out for mercy louder, the one, who had gone a few paces, called out, "Poole, cut his bl - y throat;" I had seen Poole's person before, but not to know who he was - there was sufficient light for me to be certain of him; I knew his features, and was certain at the time that I had seen him before - I am certain he is the man who stood over me; after the other had left, and called out to him, seeing the watchman coming, the other sang out to him again: and Poole thrust his hand again into my pocket - he thrust the whole of it in a second time; I had, when I left the house, 14s., some halfpence, and a blue handkerchief, with a small piece of roast pork, and a piece of Berwick pork in it, that went from me at the same time with my money - I had half a crown, some shillings, and sixpences; I am certain I had half a crown - they were loose in my waistcoat pocket; they did not con

tinue with me above three or four minutes - I was more frightened than hurt; they went away on the watchman's coming up - I am positive of Poole by his features; I never saw the other man's features, and cannot speak to him - I saw Poole at the watch-house on Monday morning, and knew him; I have not seen my property since.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you mean to say you were not drunk? A. I do; I told the watchman I had lost my hat - I did not say I had been robbed of all my money: I found I had left my hat at home - I always do so, unless I am going some distance; I went to the watch-house almost directly - I said the man, who wore the straw hat, was the tallest; I had been at three public-houses that evening, and drank at them - I had a glass of water at the watch-house; I drank nothing but water after the robbery.

EMILY TANNER . I was ten years old last November, and live at the Needle-makers' Arms. I was looking out of the window, about a quarter-past twelve o'clock - I had seen Poole in the tap-room; before I went up stairs he came to the bar - I had not seen Lindsey; Poole came to the bar about half-past eleven o'clock at night, just before the bar was shut - I went up, was at the window, and about ten yards from the house I saw a man down on the ground, and two men leaning over him; I did not know any of them - one man was taller than the other, and the tallest one had a dark straw hat on; I did not take much notice, for I thought it was a man named Collins, who I had seen in our house, and who was rather intoxicated; but it was not him.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew Poole before? A. Yes; but not to be certain of him.

JAMES DIXON . I am servant at the Needle-makers' Arms. Salmon was at our house that night, and had a straw hat on; I saw him and Poole leave the house together, about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock - I did not see Lindsey there; I heard a noise, as if people were quarrelling, in two or three minutes - I did not go out of the house, as my master would not let me; Salmon's hat was an old straw one, and it appeared to me as if it had been painted.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Salmon before? A. No; I am sure he had a straw hat on - It was a very dark colour; I saw it was straw, for it was not painted under the brim - the scuffle appeared to be just outside the door; they were not knocking at our door to get in again.

JOHN MATHEWS . I keep the King's Arms, Limehousefields, about a quarter of a mile from Tanner's. Poole called at my house soon after twelve o'clock, on the night of the 13th, with a man, who I do not know - he had a straight-jacket on, and a straw hat.

JAMES TANNER . I keep the Needle-maker's Arms. I know Lindsey; he left my house on the night in question, about ten minutes after twelve o'clock - I know Poole well, but never saw Salmon till the evening in question; both the prisoners left my house together with four or five others, five or six minutes after Lindsey -Lindsey went out alone; he had been drinking, but knew what he was about, or I should not have let him have ale - at twelve o'clock I cleared the house; I got all the people out about ten minutes past twelve - Dixon came, and said there was a fight; he wanted to go out - I said the door should not be opened.

Cross-examined. Q. Should you have objected to give Lindsey more drink? Q. I do not think I should.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer. The prosecutor came to my house, about one o'clock, on Sunday morning, and complained of having been robbed the night before; I went in the afternoon to the Needle-maker's Arms, in consequence of the description he gave me - I went in search of the prisoners at Poole's house, about three o'clock on the Monday morning, but did not go in - I met him about five o'clock that morning, coming down Salmon's-lane with the watchman; I took him to Lime-house watch-house - I took Salmon in Farthing-alley, about nine o'clock on Monday morning, and asked whose company he was in on the Saturday night; he said he was at the Needle-maker's Arms in company with Poole, and that he left him tossing in the house - he said he had been rambling about all night, and found himself, at two o'clock, at Temple-bar, and had not been home; I told him the charge - he said, "Well, I shall not get myself into trouble for any body, I will tell all I know about it;" but he said nothing to me - I searched Poole at the watch-house, and found half a crown and a sixpence on him; I asked Poole where he had been on Saturday night - he said in company with Salmon, at the Needle-makers Arms; I asked if he had borrowed any money of Mr. Tanner - he said he had borrowed 6d. of him to pay Salmon's passage over the water to Dock-head; but he was very late, and walked round to London-bridge and did not cross the water.

Cross-examined. Q. What hat had Salmon on? A. A beaver one.

JOHN TAYLOR . I keep an eating-house in High-street, Shadwell. Poole came into my house and had supper, on Saturday, the 13th of June, about half-past twelve o'clock- I did not notice any body with him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear to have been scuffling? A. No - he staid in the house about a quarter of an hour.

Poole's Defence. The gentleman who keeps the shop, and Matthews, have sworn false - I was never near the house.

WILLIAM GOODWIN . I was constable of the night. I first saw the prosecutor between one and two o'clock in morning; he came to the watch-house with Mason, and was very drunk - the watchman said he did not exactly know what to make of him, but he had been bothering him, saying he had been robbed - I asked of what; he said his money: I asked in what manner they took it - he said, "They seized me by the throat, and took it out of my right-hand waistcoat pocket;" he put his hand to his throat to show me how they did it; I said, "See if you have any money left;" he pulled out a penny-piece and another coin, which was a halfpenny or a penny - the watch-house-keeper asked if I wanted a pint of porter; I said Yes, and this man hinted that he would pay for it - I said I would pay myself; he said, "You will allow me to have a pint:" I said, "By all means, but I think you have had enough;" he pulled 1s. from his trousers pocket - I said, "I thought you were robbed of all your money;" he said, "Yes. but they did not exactly get that;" he drank

a pint of beer in the watch-house - I am sure it was not water; he had no water there: he drank porter with me -I assisted him home, and in Margaret-street he knocked violently at a door, and said his mother lived there, but she would not answer; this was in the next street to the Needle-makers' Arms - he then wished us good night.

COURT. Q. Did he go from the watch-house to the office? A. No - he went home; I believe his mother did live in Margaret-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-117

1491. MATTHEW HENDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July , 1 jacket, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s.; 4 pairs of trousers, value 19s.; 5 shirts, value 15s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 6s. 6d.; 1 Guernsey frock, value 1s.; 1 hat, value 5s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of John Jeffries .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-118

1492. WILLIAM GODWIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Comber , on the 7th of July , and stealing therein 10 pieces of silk, value 80l., the goods of the said William Comber .

RICHARD COMBER . I am the son of William Comber, a silk manufacturer , of Union-street, Bishopsgate-street - I live with my father at Hackney; the servants reside at Union-street: he is the owner of the house. I left the house at four o'clock on Monday afternoon, the 6th of July - all was safe then; we have a porter lives in the house- my father had not been in town that day; I returned on Tuesday morning, and had information from the porter - I examined, and found a strange key in the warehouse door, which is connected with the hall; it cannot be got at without entering at the street door - it is an inner door; I afterwards saw the real key in possession of the porter - I missed ten pieces of silk from the warehouse; they are valued at 80l., which is considerably under the value; I had seen them safe when I left the house - I have seen nine of them since, and am certain of them; (the prisoner is an entire stranger to me) he was then in custody at Worship-street; the warehouse is part of the dwelling-house.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Your father does not sleep there? A. No, he has not for six years - the servant sleeps in the lower warehouse, from which the goods were taken; they had been sent from Colchester, in a basket, two days before the robbery; my brother put tickets on them, with the length and quality, and those tickets were on them when I saw them at the office; some of them have come off since, as they have been handled about. I think I can identify them without the tickets, but will not say till I see them.

JOHN SPARROW . I am servant to Mr. Comber; I have slept there these twelve months as his servant. I went to bed on Monday night, about nine o'clock; the house was all safe then - I was not disturbed in the night; I got up between six and seven - the warehouse door was secure, as I had left it at night; I had left the key in the door: after I got up I went into the upper warehouse, where I have a little room - I remained there till between seven and eight o'clock; when I came down I unlocked the warehouse door, put the things right, came out at eight, double-locked the warehouse door, and took the key up stairs with me - all was safe then, and the street door also; I came down about twenty minutes to nine o'clock, and had to go about eight doors off - I was gone two or three minutes, and as I came back I found the warehouse door ajar, and a strange key in the key-hole; I stepped into the warehouse, and saw a letter lying on the floor - it belonged to the gentleman who had sent the silk up, and should have been in the basket - I was then certain the basket which contained thirty-one pieces of silk, had been opened; I found only twenty-one pieces left - I had left the street door ajar, and found it still so: some person belonging to Mr. Smith's family, who live up stairs, had opened the street door; I saw the silks at Worship-street last Saturday, and the prisoner in custody - the silks were wrapped round with square pieces of paper, attached to each piece, but at Worship-street the paper had been taken away, and was loose in the bag, but the tickets were on the silk; I am certain of its being the same.

Cross-examined. Q. You are the prosecutor's servant? A. I have charge of the warehouse, and sleep there; I pay no rent, and have not less wages on account of sleeping there - the property was taken from the lower warehouse; I saw it safe that morning - I am certain it was safe at eight o'clock, for I am sure nobody had been in the warehouse then: I went to No. 10, at twenty minutes to nine - the warehouse was broken open between eight and the forty minutes I was up stairs; I am quite sure I locked the door.

SARAH WHITTON . I live at No. 7, Vincent-street, behind Shoreditch-church. The prisoner lodged with me; his wife came on a Friday, seven weeks ago, and took my room - he came on a Saturday; I was at Camberwell-grove with the braziers on the Monday - I came home about half-past five o'clock in the morning, and went to bed; I never saw the bag which was found, till I saw it in the passage in possession of Tyrrell, last Tuesday week, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning - the prisoner was taken up about nine - they took him away; I have no other lodger, but a young man: a young man and woman (the witness) were in the house - they do not lodge there, but had come in with me.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a Police-officer. A little after nine o'clock, on the 7th of July, I went to Whitton's house- the street door was open; I found the prisoner's wife in the room - I asked her if she had any thing there that did not belong to her; the prisoner was not present - I searched under the bed, and found a black bag, containing nine pieces of silk, which were afterwards claimed by Mr. Comber; I took the woman to the office, with the silk, returned to the house, and in a little while saw him go in in company with another man - I followed, and took them both into custody in the passage; I asked the prisoner if any property had been brought in there, for I took him for some silks - he said he knew nothing of any silks at all, for no bag of silks had been brought in before he went out; I took them to the office - the other man was discharged; Mrs. Whitton lives in the lower part of the house: I found in the room two skeleton-keys on the top of the drawers, and four other keys - I tried one of the skeleton-keys to the warehouse door, it would open it with difficulty;

I saw the key which was in the warehouse door - that was a skeleton-key; some of the silks had papers round them, and the paper of the others were loose in the bag - there were nine papers in all, and tickets to the silks - some were loose in the bag; here are five papers which were loose in the bag - the tickets have all come off since.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you kept them ever since? A. Yes; I found only his wife at the lodgings at first - the prisoner made no resistance; I handcuffed them - the wife did not refuse to go with me; she told me there was nothing there, and when I found it she said it was brought in by somebody who she did not know, while her husband was asleep.

MARY ANN WHITTON . I live with my mother; the prisoner and his wife were the only lodgers: nobody slept in the house; on the night of the robbery my mother was at Camberwell, I and the children sleep down stairs: about half-past eight o'clock, on Tuesday morning, the prisoner came in with another man; I saw nothing with them then; they did not come down stairs again, but about five minutes after Godwin came in, two men came to the door, and asked if we had lodgers up stairs; the prisoner's wife came down (the prisoner was up stairs with the other man): she said she did not think of seeing them that wet morning - they had a great black bag; the prisoner came down, and helped them up stairs with it - I did not hear them say any thing; all the four men went up together - Tyrrell came in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and took Mrs. Godwin away with the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner came in with another man, but the other two came some time after? A. In about five minutes: they were all four up stairs together for five or ten minutes.

COURT. Q. Used you to go up to their room at all? A. No; Mrs. Godwin cleaned it.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street. On Tuesday morning, the 7th, about eleven clock, I was seat for to Mr. Comber's warehouse; I examined the premises, and found the skeleton key in the door - I took it out, and tried it; I at first could not unlock it, as the key was bent a little; I got a locksmith, took off the lock, and found it would unlock it, but it had been strained in unlocking it; when I got back to the office I found the prisoner in custody with the bag, and the silk - I saw the silk in it; Mr. Comber swore to it, and described the tickets before he saw them - they corresponded with his description.

MR. COMBER. I know the hand-writing on the tickets to be my brother's - I am positive of the silk; I know nothing of the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. You know the silk by the tickets? A. That is a very strong corroborative circumstance; the goods are manufactured at Colchester - there is a particular make about the Colchester goods; I could not identify it by the fabric by this light, but I saw it by day-light at the office. and have no doubt of it; we are the only manufacturers at Colchester - we make for wholesale business - retail dealers would have such goods no doubt; I think I can identify them without the tickets, which were on the goods at the office, and I know them by the peculiar manner my brother folds them.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out about nine o'clock; I had been out about two hours, and heard my wife was taken; I instantly ran home to see what she was taken for, and does it stand to reason, if I could be concerned in the robbery, I should have run home to get myself into danger?

JURY to MARY ANN WHITTON . Q.Was the prisoner at home all night? A. He came home about half-past two o'clock in the morning, went out about six o'clock, and came back again about half-past eight; his wife came home with him at night, but did not go out in the morning.

MRS. WHITTON. The furniture in the room was their own. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-119

1493. JOHN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 95 lbs. weight of lead, value 10s., the goods of Elizabeth Ballard , and fixed to a building .

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a constable, and live at No. 29, London-wall. On Wednesday evening, the 3d of June, I was standing in Aldermanbury, the prisoner came along with a sack on his back; I watched him into Grub-street, to a dealer in marine-store shop, kept by Biggs - he put the bag down, and I asked what he had got; he said lead; I asked if it was his own or his master's - he said his master's; that he was going to sell it there by order of his master, and had brought it from a job at Walworth, where his master was; I knew him to be in the employ of Mr. Roberts, a painter, in Wood-street, and I detained him - I afterwards saw Mr. Roberts; I went to a house in Little Love-lane, Aldermanbury, and applied the lead to that house, to part of the lead of the sink, and it corresponded with it, and made the whole complete - it weighed 60lbs. or 70lbs.; I am certain it came from there: the other part has been ripped away, but remained in the kitchen.

JAMES TONKIN . I am a patrol of Cripplegate. I went into the marine-store shop with Henman, and saw the prisoner with the lead, and took him.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a plumber and glazier, and live at No. 35, Wood-street; the prisoner was in my employ: about half-past five o'clock that day, I saw this lead at Guildhall; I never gave him authority to take it - I was not employed to move any from Little Love-lane, and know nothing of it; I never authorised him to take any lead from any where - I had no job at Walworth; I had no lead.

WILLIAM HUNT . I was in the employ of James Chadwick and his partner, of Little Love-lane; they left the house thirteen months ago - Mrs. Elizabeth Ballard is the landlady; she let the house to them - Mr. Chadwick left the fixtures in the house, with permission for Mrs. Ballard to dispose of them.

Prisoner. Q. How long is it since you were in the house? A. It might be two months; the doors were open in the day-time for the workmen - the house was plundered of almost every thing.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the care of my master's property, which was not filled in his schedule. I was tried for this last Session, but was so conscious of my innocence, that hearing I was wanted again, I gave myself up.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-120

NEW COURT, Third Day.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1494. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the

2d of July , 2 shirts, value 14s., and 1 handkerchief, value 8d. , the goods of William Herbert .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-121

1495. JAMES BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 1 powder-flask, value 6s.; 1 shot-belt, value 1s.; 1 fishing-rod. value 7s.; 24 knives, value 1l., and 24 forks, value 10s., the goods of Ebenezer Benham , his master ; and CHARLES ROSE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen, against the Statute .

EBENEZER BENHAM . I am an ironmonger , and live at Uxbridge , in Middlesex. I have missed a variety of articles and money for a long time; Biggs had worked for me several years - I had turned him away on the Saturday previous to the 26th of June; Rose lived nearly opposite: one of the witnesses and Biggs had a quarrel in the Market-place, and the word 'Thief' occurred - the witness said,"I am not the thief;" this led to inquiry, and some articles were brought to me.

CHARLES BENHAM . I am shopman to the prosecutor. I went to where this powder-flask and shot-belt were, and got them; I know them to be my master's - they were new, but have been used by the person who bought them.

GEORGE DRINKWATER . I live with my sister, who keeps a public-house. I bought this shot-belt and powder-horn of Rose - I gave 3s. for the horn, and 2s. for the belt; it was a few months ago: he told me they had been used once, and the powder-horn was bruised - I know Biggs by sight.

BENJAMIN POWELL . I saw Drinkwater buy the shotbelt of Rose.

WILLIAM MASSER . I used to work for Mr. Benham -Biggs used to work in the shop; I saw him take two sets of knives and a tea-pot out of the shop, but I do not know that he took them off the premises - it was six or seven months ago; he likewise took a fishing-rod - I cannot say whether it was at the same time.

JOHN BIRCH . I am a tailor, and live at Uxbridge. Six or seven months ago I was in a public-house, and Biggs, who was there, said he had been to Ryslip, and had been raffling with six others for these knives and forks at 1s. a piece, and he had got them for 1s., - he offered them round, and I asked what he wanted for them - he said 5s., and I bought them; there are knives and forks of the same appearance sold about, at that price - I did not know he was in Mr. Benham's service, but as soon as I heard that Mr. Benham had been robbed, I went and asked if these were his - he said they were.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How came you to go to Mr. Benham? A.Because Drinkwater said he bought this powder-horn and shot-belt, which were Mr. Benham's.

JOHN HOLLIS . I bought this dozen of knives and forks and this tea-pot of Biggs, six months ago, for 3s. 6d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BIGGS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROSE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-122

1496. AMELIA SMITH was indicted for stealing. on the 22d of June , 1 tub, value 2s. , the goods of George Spillman .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-123

1497. ELIZABETH SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Letton .

REBECCA LETTON . I am the wife of Henry Letton, a gardener . On the 23d of June, I went to the Blind Beggar, Bethnal-green , on business, and left a bundle tied up in this handkerchief on the table - I went out and forgot my bundle - when I missed it I returned, and it was gone; the officer found it at the prisoner's - it had had some sugar and bacon in it.

JAMES PIPER . I searched the prisoner's house, and found this handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ELIZABETH TURNER . I live with my mother - I went with the prisoner to the Blind Beggar, on the 23d of June; she said to me, "Bring the bundle, Betsey, and let us go;" I took the bundle, and gave it to Mrs. Robinson- the prisoner was inside when I took it, and I am sure she told me to take it.

Prisoner. It was Mrs. Robinson told you to take it, you know that well; I live in your mother's house. Witness. You lived at my mother's, and it was you told me to take it.

ELIZABETH HOLMES . I am bar-maid at the Blind Beggar. I served these persons with some gin - I saw the prisoner there, and saw the girl take the bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. It was another person told her to take it: I do not know who put the handkerchief in my yard.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290716-124

1498. CAROLINE CARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 1 coat, value 25s. , the goods of Robert Dodd .

LYDIA DODD . I am the wife of Robert Dodd : we live in Dove-place, Dog-row ; I lost this coat from behind the door in my lower room - I had seen it safe on the morning of the 7th of June; I know nothing of the prisoner.

SOPHIA WELLS . I live on the first-floor of this house. At half-past seven o'clock in the morning, I was going up-stairs, and saw the prisoner sitting there - Ellis was there, and told me she had given her refuge from her husband, and asked if she had done right; I said, "You should be careful what you do in the absence of your mistress; where is your mistress?" - she said she was in bed, and I went and awoke her; I went down again, and saw Ellis go out for something to drink- I saw the coat safe then; I did not like her to go out, and went myself - when I came back, I met Ellis at the door; she said "The woman has run away, and says you may have the spirits, and I may have the change;" the coat was then gone.

ANN ELLIS . I live at Mrs. Dodds. The prisoner came while I was cleaning the place; she said, "Give me refuge from my husband, he is ill-using me;" she stood behind the door, and said, "Look out, and see if my husband is there;" I looked out, and saw a man

there with a fustian coat and trousers on: I went in - she sat down; Mrs. Wells came up, and I said, "Did I do right to let her in?" she afterwards went away, and the coat was missed.

WILLIAM BIRD . I am an assistant to a pawnbroker. On the 8th of June, a little girl brought this coat to pawn- while I was bargaining with her, the prisoner came, took the coat, and pawned it with my master, and took the money.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-125

1499. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 2 sheets, value 20s.; three table cloths, value 26s., and 1 shirt, value 10s. , the goods of Charles Baumer .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Stephen Smith .

CATHERINE SMITH . I live in Cochrane-terrace, Marylebone . I had these articles from Mr. Charles Baumer to wash; I have known the prisoner many years - she is no relation; her husband brought the duplicates of these things to us.

CHARLES PORTER . I am an assistant to James Porter , a pawnbroker. I have two sheets, a shirt, and three table cloths, which I took in at different times from the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and stated that the prosecutrix received 3s. not to prosecute her.

MRS. SMITH. I did not take 3s. - my husband said if they would make it up he would not persevere, but they would not.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-126

1500. ELIZABETH BRIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April, 1819 , 1 box, value 10s.; 3 rings, value 12l.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 5s.; 3 brooches, value 1l.; 2 necklaces, value 7s.; 1 locket, value 1l.; 1 medal, value 7s.; one muslin dress, value 2l.; 2 shirts, value 1l.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; one lace square, value 1l.; 2 veils, value 1l.; 2 petticoats, value 10s.; 1 chain, value 10s.; 1 spice-box, value 2s.; 1 trinket box, value 1s.; 18 crowns, 3 shillings, one 30l., two 5l., and five 1l. Bank notes , the property of John Richard Taylor , (since deceased); and THOMAS BRIGGS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZA TAYLOR . I am the widow of John Richard Taylor - he was alive at the time this property was stolen - we lived at No. 30, Fleet-street ; he was inspector of franks at the General Post-office . On the 12th of April, 1819, Elizabeth Briggs, the prisoner, was in our service - I knew all the rest of her family, but not her father, who is the other prisoner; I had another servant at the time - on that day, we were at dinner about four o'clock, and I heard Elizabeth scream on the stairs; we all ran out, and saw her screaming, and very much terrified - I asked what was the matter; she said there were thieves at the top of the house - we ran up stairs, and found the wardrobe open, and every thing in the bed-room in disorder; I eventually missed all the property stated: I have found a black square veil, a brooch, a spice-box, and a pair, of black ear-rings, which are now in Court - they were found on the 30th of June last; I had left my articles all safe at two o'clock on the day they were stolen - I had been very unwell, and had not left my bed-room till that time: I had no suspicion at all of Elizabeth Briggs - she remained in my service from six to nine months afterwards - I never discovered who the thieves were; I lost a 30l. note and some medals in a mahogany case.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.This girl had been in your service some time? A. Yes; two years before this happened, and conducted herself exceedingly well.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am a constable of Mile-end Old-town. I have known Thomas Briggs about six months - he is the father of the other prisoner - he came to me on Monday, the 29th of June, respecting a warrant which he wanted against his son George for striking him- I said he must apply to the office; he then said he wished to speak to me respecting a robbery which took place ten years ago; I told him to go to the watch-house, and said I should be there presently - he went to the Hay Field public-house, and I found him there; he told me his daughter had committed a robbery on a Mr. Taylor, of Fleet-street, and among the other property was a 30l. note; he said that note had been changed at Mr. Manning's, a linen-draper, at Aldgate, and with the produce of it he had built a cottage in Pocock's-gardens, Bethnal-green - he said there were a number of medals which he had pawned at a pawnbrokers's, in Church-street, Mile-end, New-town, and that the property was brought away in a mahogany box, and the box was sawed up for fear of a discovery; I went to Mrs. Taylor's, and found the robbery had been committed at the time; I found Elizabeth Briggs by the direction which her father gave me in writing, at No. 34, Union-street, Well-street, Oxford-street, where she was living with her uncle, who is a shoe-maker - I said I wished to speak to her; I went upstairs with her and Mrs. Taylor - I asked her if she knew any thing of the robbery - she burst into tears, and said she did; I asked if she knew any thing of the mahogany box - she said she did; she at first said she found it on the stairs, but afterwards said she did not, and admitted that she took it home to her father and mother, then living in St. John-street, Clerkenwell, but could not recollect how she took it - I asked if she knew the contents - she said she did not, it was not opened in her presence; I searched her box, and found this lace square, and after her examination she told me I should find these other articles at her brother's - I went there, and found two boxes which were sealed and brought away - these things were in them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ask how she came to do this? A. Yes, and she stated that her friends were in great distress, through her father's miscorduct and drunkeness, and she had never had a day's health since; she was in great distress - I had her in my arms for nearly two hours at the office; she said she had many times thought of going to divulge it to her mistress - I have heard a very good character of her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Thomas Briggs . I told you I found the medals in a

drawer; I had no box, and as for the 30l. note, I never saw it. Witness. He said he did not see the note, but it was changed, and he had built the cottage with the money.

Thomas Briggs' Defence. I will swear most solemuly that none of that property ever came into my hands; my wife has brought all this evil upon me and my family - a little while back she sold the house in my absence, and absconded; I wanted my son-in-law to take the remainder of my things, but my son George came and took them unknown to me; I went to him to get him to sell them to a broker; he said the broker would only give him a few pounds for them - I went to him on Sunday week, for my blacking-brushes and some other things, and he was going to turn me out; I would not go out, and he knocked me down in the passage, and gave me a black eye; I went to the office to get a warrant, and in the heat of my temper I told the officer this; I have been like a madman since my wife left me.

Two witnesses gave Elizabeth Briggs an excellent character.

ELIZABETH BRIGGS - GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her youth at the time of the robbery, her good conduct since, and believing she was induced by her father to commit the offence.

Judgment Respited .

THOMAS BRIGGS - GUILTY . Aged 59.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-127

1501. JOHN TICE was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS KEARTLAND . I am a watch-maker , and live in Chester-street, Kennington-cross . The prisoner lived with me twelve months - he received money for me; he was to pay me as soon as he received it.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Jones. I paid the prisoner 12s. for his master on the 23d of May- he gave me this receipt - (read.)

THOMAS KEARTLAND . He never paid this money to me- I found, by going to my customers, that they had given him orders, and he had taken them to other places.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you your books here? A. No; we have an account-book, but I cannot write.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-128

1502. JAMES TUCK was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 1 fender, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of John Salmon .

CHARLES SALMON . I am the son of John Salmon, who lives in Windmill-street . I was standing at the door, and saw the prisoner take this fender - I called my mother; she ran after him, and brought him back with it.

MARY SALMON . I caught the prisoner, and brought him back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman offered me the fender for sale for 2s. 6d.; I gave her 1s. 6d. for it: I said I had bought it, but she would not let me go to see where the woman was.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling, and delivered to his friends .

Reference Number: t18290716-129

1503. JAMES WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 watch, value 4l.; 3 seals, value 1l.; 1 watch-key, value 5s.; 1 ring, value 5s., and 1 watch-ribbon, value 2d., the goods of Francis Dungate , from the person of Mary, his wife .

MARY DUNGATE . I am the wife of Francis Dungate - he is an undertaker : he was at a public dinner at the Eyre Arms, on the 25th of June; I went there, and sat in the gardens till they had dined - we were coming home about ten o'clock at night; I had a reticule in my hand, which contained the watch and the articles stated; it was on my arm - as I was in the passage I felt some one push me, and it went away from me momentarily; I saw a person run away, but I could not swear who it was.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there a great many people running? A. Yes.

JOSEPH BRENT . I heard the alarm, and saw a man come running towards me; I put out my foot, and tripped him up; he got up, and cried Stop thief! himself - I cannot tell who it was, because it was dark in the passage, but as soon as he got through the passage into the gardens, I saw another person running after him; I found this watch and seals where I tripped up that person.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you dined there? A. Yes, I had drank very little.

SAMUEL WHATMORE . I bad been at the dinner, and was in the passage. I saw this lady with her reticule - I saw the prisoner take the watch out of the reticule, and run off; he had not ran far before he made a plunge, and fell down - I was within a yard of him, and am certain he is the person who fell down; a friend of mine was waiting in the passage, and I came away immediately.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see a man take the watch, then fall down, and yet not touch him? A. I was forced away by the crowd - I do not know that the Magistrate asked me why I did not give assistance; I was put into the watch-house about two hours afterwards, for being disorderly: I was charged with being drunk, but I was sober.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. I was standing at the entrance of the gardens, and heard Stop thief! called - I saw the prisoner run, and pursued him; he ran into a booth where there were two or three hundred people: I caught him round the neck - several persons told me to let him alone, as he was a publican's son; I took him back to the lady, and asked her which was the man - she said that was him; I took him into the parlour, and searched him - I found on him a ticket of admission to the dinner, 33s., and a handkerchief; he wished to see the lady, but I would not let him.

MR. PHILLIPS to MRS. DUNGATE. Q. Did you tell Smith he was the person? A. I did, but there were so many hundred persons running I think I might be deceived my husband has no other name but Francis.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES PERREN . I saw the prisoner in custody at the bar; he said, "Let me see the lady, and I will make it all right; let me go."

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, and I hope you will be satisfied of it; why did not this man take me, if he saw what he says - I was apprehended in about five minutes; I said, "Take me back to the lady, she will be convinced I am not the person."

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-130

1504. ELIZABETH WALTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 pint measure, value 3s.; 1 funnel, value 6d., and 1 funnel-stand, value 2s. , the goods of William Dingley .

WILLIAM DINGLEY. On Tuesday evening last the prisoner came into my house, and called for a pennyworth of gin; she had it, and then hung about my counter, which caused me to have some suspicion of her - I went to the door to look for an officer, and while I was speaking to him the prisoner came out; I said, "That is the woman" he took her, and found these articles which had been on my counter.

Prisoner. I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-131

1505. JOSEPH FLAYLAND was indicted indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 necklace, value 3s., the goods of Elisha Davies , from the person of Sarah Davies .

CATHERINE MARGARET DAVIES . I am the wife of Elisha Davies. My daughter Sarah was about five yards from me in Little Cambridge-street , on the 14th of July, and had a coral necklace on, with two rows of heads; the prisoner pulled it off her neck, and ran away- I have not seen it since; I am sure he is the person -I pointed him out to my husband, and he took him at the Victory public-house.

Prisoner. Q. Where did I take it from? A. From the child's neck, against the gate, at the end of Little Cambridge-court.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290716-132

1506. CAROLINE FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , 1 pair of boots, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Fines .

MARIA FINES . I am the wife of John Fines ; he lives in Crown-court . On the morning of the 17th of July, about half-past ten o'clock, the prisoner took these boots off the window - she then came into the shop, and asked the price of some little shoes at the side of the door; I told her - she said, "That don't suit me" - I took hold of her, and said, "It don't suit me;" she said,"Go along, go along;" but I held her, and sent for a constable - these are the boots; I saw her put them under her arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been laying on the boards for several days without a bit of food; it was the height of distress led me to take them - it was the devil caused them to come in my way; I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-133

1507. SARAH BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 piece of ribbon, value 1d., and 1 metal key, value 1d. , the goods of Richard Osborne .

RICHARD OSBORNE. I am groom to Mr. Du Bourg . I was in town, and slept at a public-house, in Wigmore-street , on the 13th of July; I went to bed at eleven o'clock, and awoke at a quarter-past five next morning; my watch was safe then - I went to sleep, and awoke again between seven and eight o'clock, it was then gone; I did not get up then, but when I did I made some inquiry - the prisoner was servant in that house; I had not locked the bed-room door, for my fellow-servant had not come in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where is the pot-boy's bed-room? A. The next to mine; the prisoner slept in a room through her uncle's - he is master of the house.

JOHN BROWN . I am the pot-boy. On Sunday evening the prisoner told me to get up soon in the morning - I got up at a quarter before six o'clock and said to her,"Shall I go now?" she said, "It is too soon;" I said,"I will go, and get some of my pots in;" and at ten minutes before eight I said, "Shall I go now?" she said Yes - she went into the bar-parlour, and brought out a tin box, took a watch out of it, and told me to go and pawn it at the corner of the street for 1l., which I gave her; there was one five shilling piece, six half-crowns, and the duplicate wrapped in a little bit of paper - she gave me 1s.; I did not tell of this as soon as I heard it was lost - I heard of the watch being lost, but did not know it was the same; I told this to my father on Wednesday.

Cross-examined. Q. Who do you think ought to be standing at the bar now? A. It is not a tobacco-box that she took it from; it is a little oval box - I will swear it was ten minutes before eight o'clock; after I pawned it I said to her, "What has that young man lost up stairs?" she said, "A watch;" she went in directly - I was almost out of my mind; I did not know what I was about - it never struck me that it was the same watch; she said she had had it ten years, ever since her mother's death -I did leave the house without giving notice.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-134

1508. JAMES CRAYFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 1 writing-desk, value 10s.; 1 rule, value 6d.; 1 pencil-case, value 3d.; 1 stick of sealing-wax, value 2d., and 2 ink-stands, value 1d. , the goods of Halsey Ianson .

WILLIAM TURNER . I am in the employ of Halsey Ianson, a cloth-manufacturer . On Tuesday last I saw the prisoner in the fore-court of his house with this writing-desk in a band-box; he was walking away with it; a young man called to me - we went and asked him to let us look into the band-box; he said he would not - when he got near the gate he threw it down and ran away; this desk was in it - it is Mr. Ianson's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Is it not the property of a young lady? A. Yes; Miss Louisa Ianson, his daughter.

GEORGE LINSELL . I saw the prisoner near the window when I was going there for orders; the servant came out, and the prisoner was walking away with her boxes on his arm - we went to look at them, he threw them down, ran to the gate, and went to jump over, but he fell, and we took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged-19.

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-135

1509. MARGARET DALE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 4 half-crowns, and 10 shillings, the monies of John Lynch , from his person .

JOHN LYNCH . I am a labourer , and live in St. Giles' . On Sunday morning, the 5th of July, I had four half-crowns and one shilling in my pocket - I was going to chapel, and was going to give my money to Mrs. Fox to take care of for fear I should be robbed; the prisoner came and snatched it out of my hand, and put it into her bosom - she was quite a stranger; I took hold of her - there was a mob; I called out and she was taken - I lost my money.

Prisoner. He struck me in a broker's-shop before that. Witness. No, I did not.

JOHN MURPHY . I was going by between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and saw a great many people; the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner - he said he had been robbed, but I was afraid to interfere, there were so many thieves about; I told him not to let her go; I got another watchman - I saw the prisoner take some half-crowns from her bosom, and give them to a dustman.

MORRIS LEONARD . I am an officer. I was called; I saw about forty thieves there and some girls of the town; I did not see the dustman, he was gone; the prisoner owned to me that she had the money.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290716-136

1510. MARY HAYES and MARGARET BUXTON were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , 1 ring, value 10s.; 2 stockings, value 1s.; 3 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence , the property of Ralph Davis : and MARGARET TRACEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

RALPH DAVIS. I am mate of a ship . Last Monday night, about twelve o'clock, I fell in with the prisoner Burton in Ratcliff-highway ; we went to a house - I wanted change for a 5l. note, but could not get it; I got it about seven o'clock next morning - I was then in bed with Hayes; Buxton had gone down the night before and came up that morning; when I got the change from the landlady I put the money into my pocket-book, and put it into my coat pocket - I went to sleep about nine o'clock, and awoke again about eleven; the girls were then gone and the money also - I saw the eldest prisoner but did not speak to her; I went down to the landlady, and Eliza Kelly said she saw Margaret Tracey throw something from her side; I have seen my ring since, but nothing else - it was found in the kitchen grate; the two girls were both in the room when I went to sleep in the morning; I did not see any one take any thing from me.

ANN COSAR . I am owner of the house - my husband is at sea. Tracey came to me about a quarter-past twelve o'clock at night, and asked me if I could let her have a bed for a young man and woman; I said Yes - in about ten minutes these two young women and the prosecutor came to the house - I asked him 2s. for the bed; he gave me a 5l. note - I said I could not get change that night, but I could in the morning; I told Tracey she could come down stairs, and sit with me - in the morning, at seven o'clock, I got change, and gave it to him in bed - the two girls were there at the time; he asked me to get breakfast for him, and take it up stairs, which I did - there was coffee, eggs, and ham; I did not see his watch; I saw Hayes come down stairs, call her mother, (Tracey is her mother) and whisper to her; I said she must not whisper, and she went up again - she then came down and told me to get a pot of ale; when I came back with it, Mrs. Tracey told me the girls were gone out - I then awoke the young man, and he said he had been robbed; I did not find the ring - the girls did not go to the kitchen where the ring was found; Buxton had lived with me - her mother was a hard working woman till lately, when she has turned out what she is; Margaret Tracey bought two new pairs of stockings that morning.

ELIZA KELLY . On the morning in question I was in the kitchen, and saw Mrs. Tracey sitting by the fire with a child in her lap - when she heard the officers were coming she tried to put something down the child's bosom; she saw me, and threw something into the fire-place - I told the people, they looked and found the ring - there was nothing else found in the grate.

JAMES FOGG . I went with the prosecutor to the house No. 31, Union-street - I saw the prisoner Tracey there; I asked her if she knew any thing of it - she said No; I said,"I must go to your house;" and there I found the stockings that the prosecutor said were his.

Hayes' Defence. I met this man and went with him - there was no fastening to the door; I stopped there that night - the next morning my mother came to me and I went home with her; when I left him I put his watch under his head and his money was all right - in the afternoon I was taken in the highway.

Buxton's Defence. He gave us the money to buy the stockings.

Tracey's Defence. This woman came to me and said I was wanted to buy some stockings; I went there and took these dirty ones to wash - I am innocent about the ring.

JURY to ANN COSAR . Q. Did any one come to fetch Hayes away? A. No; they both went out together

HAYES - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BUXTON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

TRACEY - GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-137

1511. GEORGE BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 1 cart cover, value 50s. , the goods of Walter Long .

WILLIAM PICKETT . I was at Clapton on the 15th of July - I met the prisoner about ten o'clock in the morning carrying this cart cover; I asked him how he came by it; he said he found it down the road - I was not satisfied; I got assistance and secured him; he was two or three miles from the prosecutor's.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I live with Mr. Walter Long - his farm is at Hornsey . I saw this cloth on his cart on the Tuesday night, close to the house, on our own premises - it was tied on; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down a lane and found this cloth in the road, and thought there would be some reward for it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner,

Reference Number: t18290716-138

1512. WILLIAM SIMPSON and JOHN COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , 1 handker

chief, value 5s., the goods of Henry March , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-139

1513. ANN FITZGERALD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 1 purse, value 6d.; 30 shillings, and 4 sixpences , the property of Elizabeth Davis .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-140

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1514. JOHN MASTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 15 silver spoons, value 5l.; 13 silver forks, value 5l.; 3 shirts, value 1l.; 3 table-cloths, value 10s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 5s.; 1 pair of pantaloons, value 5s., and 1 pair of boots, value 10s., the goods of Richard Baker Wingfield , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-141

1515. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 6 table-cloths, value 14s.; 4 aprons, value 2s.; 10 pinafores, value 5s.; 5 shifts, value 5s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 1 towel, value 6d.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; 2 table-covers, value 3s.; 1 flannel jacket, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 6 frocks, value 17s., and two clothes-baskets, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Richardson .

HENRY RICHARDSON . I keep the Ship, in Hart-street, Mark-lane . I saw the prisoner about five o'clock in the afternoon of last Wednesday; I did not know him before; he passed my bar with a basket of linen, covered with another basket; I hastened round, and asked what he was going to do with it - he said a man outside had told him to take it to Piccadilly, and he was to have 2s. for it; it was my property, and had been in the passage.

THOMAS DEVEY . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-142

1516. SAMUEL SMITH and RICHARD GRAHAM were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Gansden , on the 22d of June , and stealing therein 2 coats, value 30s., the goods of said William Gansden .

The coats being the joint property of Gansden and Jacobs, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18290716-143

1517. JOHN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of William Brock , from his person .

WILLIAM BROCK . I am a fishmonger . On the morning of the 17th of June, between seven and eight o'clock, I was in Billingsgate , and was told my handkerchief was taken; I saw the prisoner with it in his hand.

JOHN GOLUDHAM . I am clerk of the market. I was there, and saw the prisoner; I watched him, and saw him take the prosecutor's handkerchief - he put it into his small clothes and walked off; I followed shook him, and insisted upon his giving it up, which he did.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing Billingsgate, and saw a number of men hitting one another with baskets - as soon as I got into the place I got a hit on the head; I made off, and kicked my foot against this handkerchief; I took it up, looked at it, and threw it away again.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-144

1518. JAMES WETHERSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 1 turbot, value 10s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Hill Freeman .

THOMAS HILL FREEMAN . I am a retail fishmonger . At half-past four o'clock last Monday morning I was away from my stall for about ten minutes; on returning I missed a turbot, which weighed about 6 lbs.; I inquired of my lad, who said he knew nothing about it - I inquired of an officer of the market, he brought it back in about ten minutes; I have sold it for 10s. 6d. - by what I understand, the prisoner is a night patrol of Tooley-street .

Prisoner. Q. Was the turbot the officer gave you the one you lost? A. I cannot swear to it, it was as near the size as possible; I told Mr. Rangecroft I was very well satisfied that I got my turbot back; I did not say I did not wish to hurt you - I said so to your father.

JESSE HILLIER . I was in the market; I saw the prisoner, with Benn and Hamilton, near the prosecutor's stall - I knew them before; I heard Benn say "Go on, it is all right;" they were all together some few yards from the stall - Hamilton had the turbot then.

Prisoner. Q. Were they standing is a position to see me take the fish? A. I cannot tell that; I did not tell the Lord Mayor that they must have seen you.

WILLIAM JOHN BAILEY . I am a fellowship porter. I was near Freeman's stall, and saw the prisoner take the turbot - I was about two yards from him; I saw no one with him - he walked away with it; I was not there when Freeman returned, but upon my oath he is the man who took the turbot - I cannot say what time it was.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see Benn and Hamilton? A. No; I had a load on my head, and I did not know but the owner had sent for it.

JOHN RANGECROFT . I am constable of the market. I saw the prisoner with the turbot in his hand, at the top of the stairs, five or eight yards from the stall - it was a quarter before five o'clock in the morning; it was a middling sized turbot - I did not see him take it, and was not aware but that it was his own; I afterwards heard Mr. Freeman had lost one.

Prisoner. Q. What was the conversation that took place between you and Mr. Goludham? A. I pointed out the prisoner, and said "That is the man who had the turbot in his hand," and Bailey saw him take it; I wished to take him then, but Mr. Freeman said "No, we will wait till he has something on him."

Prisoner. Q. You say I was on the stairs, and one of the witnesses says I walked away? A. I was on the dumb-lighter, and saw you with the turbot in your hand, towards the water-side.

RICHARD BENN . I am an officer of the market. I know Hamilton and the prisoner; I was on duty at five o'clock on Monday morning; the prisoner and Hamilton came up; we passed the compliment of the day, and Hamilton said he should like a little bit of fish for breakfast; the prisoner said he would get him a bit, and it passed on for some minutes - the prisoner then went away, and Hamilton

said to me "Will you stand a drop of gin?" I said "No. it is your treat this time;" he said "Very well, we will go and have a drop:" we went into the public-house, and the prisoner came up with a fish, but what fish it was upon my oath I do not know; it was a plaice or a small turbot - I was not going to breakfast upon it, and I did not pry into it, knowing him to be an officer; when I came out of the public-house, and went round the market, Mr. Freeman told me of his loss - I then thought that was the fish, but I was lost for a moment to think that I should be in company with the thief; Fox gave me the fish: I have been four weeks in the market - I did not tell Mr. Freeman what I had seen; I thought I knew where it was, and when I returned the fish, I said I had every reason to believe the prisoner was the man.

Prisoner. Q. What conversation took place between you and Mr. Fox, the landlord, when he delivered up the fish? A. I went to the George and said, "Mr. Fox give me that fish as I suspect there is something wrong"- he gave it me; I took it to Mr. Freeman - there was no other conversation; when there was a stir made about it, I thought it was a turbot - Mr. Goldham gave me no orders, and knowing you were a night patrol of St. Olave's, I thought you were honest; you were gone when I got the fish back.

GEORGE FOX . I am landlord of the George, Billings-gate. On the morning in question, Benn and Hamilton came into my house, and Hamilton gave me a bundle tied up in a handkerchief; I put it on the seat - I thought it was a fish; it was about 6 lbs. weight - they had some gin and bitters, for which Hamilton paid; Benn came and fetched the fish away on a stick, in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say before the Lord Mayor that Benn saw the fish fly? A. No.

JOHN GOLUDHAM . I was at Billingsgate market , and heard that my officer was as bad any body else; this roused my feelings, and I gave my officer orders to take the man - when he saw him on the Tuesday morning, he came and knocked me up; I got up and went down, but the moment my door was open, some one gave the prisoner notice, and he was out of the market; in two days afterwards, I went down in disguise, pounced upon him, and took him; I sent for another officer, and found there was more than one concerned in it - Hamilton is an officer of Union-street, and Benn has been lately appointed; the prisoner is a patrol in Tooley-street.

EDWARD HAMILTON. I am an officer of Surrey.

Prisoner. Q.Do you think a person in my circumstances could afford to make you a present of a turbot? A. Certainly not: I knew nothing of its being stolen -Benn brought me my handkerchief the same morning; I did not see you at the Surrey theatre on Tuesday night, to the best of my recollection.

Prisoner's Defence. I can assure you I was at this time, in a state of intoxication - these men made a tool of me: I had no occasion to do such a thing - my friends could afford to keep me, if I had no situation; I did not attempt to conceal it - I ran about the market like a drunken fool; there were a hundred persons in the public-house, and if they had acted like friends, they would have returned it to the man, and there would have been an end of it; but they kept it till they were obliged to give it up, and then come against me - if I am detained in prison, I shall be obliged to resort to what I have now done in a drunken frolic, to get a living.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-145

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1519. THOMAS HONE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 10lbs. weight of silk, value 10l. , the goods of William Hora .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HORA . I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Union-street, Bishopsgate . The prisoner was in my employ to sell goods on commission ; he took a quantity of goods out on the 29th of May, and returned in the evening- I asked him about the sewing-silks; he said the persons in the employ of Messrs. Leafs had not determined whether they would keep them or not; if he had sold it he ought to have returned the money - he was allowed a commission of 2 per cent.; I asked him some time afterwards, and he said they had refused to keep them, but he thought Mr. Sturts, at the west-end of the town would take them; I went there, and made inquiries: there is no one here from them - I afterwards found my silk at Upsal's, a pawnbroker.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long is it since you employed him? A. Since 1827; he had goods at this time in his hands of mine, to much greater amount - I have received from him perhaps 500l.; I never came to any settlement with him - he has pawned goods for me, and I have had the duplicates - I saw him after I went to Sturts'; we had some conversation - I took him before the Lord Mayor, for a large quantity of property which he had made improper use of; we were directed to leave the Court, that we might arrange it: the common account was about 50l. - an arbitrator was spoken of.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-146

1520. JOHN WILLIAMS and JOHN BRYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Treacher , from his person .

THOMAS TREACHER . On the 10th of July I was passing the Royal Exchange , about half-past twelve o'clock in the day; I was touched on the arm by a person, and told I was robbed - I missed my pocket-handkerchief, which I had had half an hour before; the officer picked it up from the ground - he had hold of both the prisoners, within a yard of me: Williams begged that I would be rather considerate towards him - I do not think the other said any thing.

CHARLES THOROGOOD . I am a constable. I saw the prisoners coming down Sweeting's-alley, and knew them; I watched them, and saw them follow the prosecutor -Williams took the handkerchief from his pocket, and gave it to Bryan; I seized them directly, and Bryan dropped it at his feet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Williams' Defence. I am a shoemaker , but was short of work, and went to the London-dock: I was returning, when the officer accused me of robbing this gentleman, which I had not done.

Bryan's Defence. I went to the docks for work - I was coming home, and saw two young men following the

gentleman, and pick his pocket - they dropped the handkerchief, and the officer took me.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 23.

BRYAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-147

1521. CATHERINE McCABE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 1 umbrella, value 3s.; 1 coffee-pot, value 2s.; 1 pewter quart pot, value 2s.; 1 sugar-basin, value 5s.; 1 tin box, value 1d.; 2 petticoats, value 6d.; 2 frocks, value 2s., and 1 pair of stays, value 1s. , the goods of William Morrison .

ANNE MORRISON . I am the wife of William Morrison , of Fenchurch-street . On the 20th of June my servant had gone out and left the door open, and in ten minutes I heard a noise, which seemed to come from the kitchen; I went to the top of the stairs, and called, but there was no answer - I called again, and thought it was the servant; I then saw the prisoner come out of the kitchen, go down stairs, and she was going out of the door - I took hold of her with these things; she threw them behind the door, and ran out - I pursued, and called, but I lost sight of her- I had observed her so as to be sure of her person, and this pair of silver sugar-tongs were found on her at the watch-house; she did not appear to me to be in liquor - she said she was a friend of the servants.

DAVID PARRY . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I found these tongs in her bosom, and a towel in each pocket - these other things were brought by the watchman; she did not appear intoxicated.

Prisoner. I did it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 2 Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-148

1522. BENJAMIN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 1 coat, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Baker .

RICHARD BAKER . I lost my coat on the 24th of June, from the door of my own house; I am not aware how it was taken - I believe this is it; I cannot swear to it, but from its appearance, I have no doubt it is my son's - I had seen it the evening before; I was told of the loss as soon as it was taken from the gig, but I cannot swear it had been there.

JOSEPH HARRIS . I saw the gig at the door, and I put a coat into it, which I believe to be this; I had got Mr. Baker's son in my arms, and was going to put him into the gig; the prisoner ran by, and the officer seized him; I did not see him till then.

THOMAS TONKIN . On the 24th of June, at ten minutes before six o'clock, I was crossing towards Coleman-street- I saw the prisoner come to the corner and turn back; he went to the gig, and took the coat - I took him directly - he dropped it from under his arm; I seized him, and his waistcoat came unbottoned; he got about ten yards, was taken by two men - I did not lose sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been without victuals two days; I met a young fellow, who said he could get me some work - he gave me two or three glasses of liquor, and as I was going along the coat fell from the back of the chaise on my shoulder; the officer took hold of me - I pushed him off, and two gentlemen took me.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-149

1523. EDWARD WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 211 lbs. weight of sugar, value 6l., the goods of William Huckle , his master .

WILLIAM HUCKLE. I am a carman . The prisoner was in my employ; I sent him to the docks on the 26th of June, with a cart, to fetch twenty bags of sugar, in the morning, about ten o'clock; he came back to me on Saturday, and I thought he had delivered them - he said he had stopped, and given the horse a bait - he offered me the change; I said he had better settle with the person he took it of.

WILLIAM THOM . I am an elder belonging to the East India Company. On the 26th of June the prisoner came and received twenty bags of sugar, in a perfect state - I saw them put into the cart, and they were all in a sound state, as they had been weighed, but not weighed at the time he had them.

JAMES TYLER . We gave the warrant to Nicholls to bring up twenty bags of sugar for Robert Smith and Co.; the prisoner brought them to the warehouse about five o'clock that afternoon; we were weighing, to send five of them into the country, and we found two of that pile deficient in weight; one was 1 qr. 6 lb., and the other 1 qr. 13 lbs. deficient - the two bags had evidently been cut open and sewn up again, but I could not judge whether that had been done recently; they were very dirty - the prisoner was gone before we discovered it.

BENJAMIN ALDRED . I heard the prisoner was wanted, and on the 8th of July I saw him; I said, "They want you;" he said, "What for?" I said, "About some sugar"- I went to Mr. Smith's, and found seven bags, which they said were deficient; the prisoner said he knew nothing about it - I took him to the Mansion-house.

WILLIAM THOM re-examined. We only weigh the bags when they come in; I will swear they were in the same state when I delivered them to him - they had lain in the warehouse, and none but our men had access to them; none of them were cut then.

JAMES TYLER . We found five more bags deficient in weight on the Tuesday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the docks for them; I stopped at the King's Arms, had my dinner, and gave my horse a bait; they were in the same state as when I received them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-150

1524. SARAH HENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 sovereign , the money of Amelia Smith .

AMELIA SMITH . I am single , and live in Ship-yard. I went to the prisoner's house last Saturday morning, between two and three o'clock, and saw her there; I had a purse, with a 5l. note and five sovereigns in one end, and one sovereign in the other end - I gave it her to look at; I was in the habit of calling there sometimes - I called there for my umbrella; I asked her for my purse back - she tied it up, and gave it to me; I said, "Is the money right" - she made no answer; I looked and missed the sovereign - I was going home soon after, and I said,"Give me that;" she called her husband, and they began to abuse me - I went home, and went to bed; I did not think she meant to keep it - I went the next day, and asked her for it; she said perhaps it would be found about the room

- her husband then came in; I said I would see further into it - they said I might do my best and worst: I got the officer and took her - she said if I would wait till Saturday she would make it up; I shewed her this letter, which relates to the 5l. note - the prisoner has seen the writer of it once or twice.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. What are you? A. An unfortunate woman; there were three or four persons in this house - I do not know the name of any of them; I was perfectly sober - I went to my house to get my purse to shew the prisoner, because she wanted to see it; I did not give it her to keep for me - I have not accused any other person of stealing this sovereign; I do not know Emma Russell - I never charged her with stealing it; this was on the Saturday, but I did not know which way to proceed till I had been to Guildhall - I was not lying on the floor, and persons applying vinegar to my forehead - I had received 9l. from the same person three weeks or a month before; I had spent 3l., and had 6l. left - I did not sit on the knee of any person; there was a dark gentleman who put his shilling to mine - the prisoner kept his shilling, and sent my shilling out; I did not say,"I think I have lost a sovereign, but I can't tell where"- I did not say, "Mrs. Henry, I don't think you have the sovereign, but I think Emma Russell has."

MARTHA CLARK . I am married. I saw the prisoner going to the Compter last Tuesday - she said if Amelia would wait till Saturday she would make it up, but all she had in her pocket then was 1s. 6d.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. Yes; I did not tell her, whether she was guilty or not it would be better to pay the money; Amelia said if she would give up the sovereign she would spend it freely - the prisoner said she did not take it, but if she had money in her pocket she would make it up.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner - she said she had not got the sovereign, and had not seen it.

Prisoner's Defence. When she came in she had only 10l.

CHARLOTTE HARRIS I live at No. 13, Serle's-place, Carey-street. On the 10th of July I saw the prosecutrix at Apollo-court - she was very tipsy, sitting on a chair, and a person, named Pears, was washing her face with vinegar; her cap was off, and her hair in disorder - I was not there when she missed the sovereign, but I saw her give her purse to the prisoner: she took it out of her basket, and said, "Mrs. Henry, take care of my purse, I will trust my life in your hands" - Mrs. Henry said all who were there should see what was in it; I saw it counted - there were four sovereigns and a 5l. note in one end, and one sovereign in the other.

MARIA BENN . I live in Apollo-court . The prosecutrix was very much intoxicated that night; I do not think she knew what passed - she said she did not suspect the prisoner.

EMMA RUSSELL . I live in Shire-lane. On the night of this robbery I went into the room; the prosecutrix made use of a very bad expression, and said, "You have my sovereign" - I said, "Indeed, we will see that, I have but 15s. about me;" she said, "I believe Mrs. Henry would not take it;" she was lying on the floor when I first went in - I went out and came in again, and she was sitting on a chair.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-151

1525. WILLIAM SMIDMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 1 bag, value 1d.; 1 half-sovereign; 15 shillings, and 6 half-pence, the property of James Dyer , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-152

1526. THOMAS MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 shawl, value 1s. 9d. , the goods of Daniel Stubbs .

JOHN NOBBS . I am a shopman to Mr. Daniel Stubbs- he lives in Fleet-market . On the 20th of June I saw the prisoner standing at his door for about half a minute - then called a person in the street, of the name of Goff; he then jumped up, and took down this shawl - he ran up the market, and round the end of it; I jumped over the counter, and pursued him - I did not lose sight of him for two seconds all the time; I can swear he is the man- the shawl is my master's.

JOHN HOLLAND . I am the officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290716-153

1527. BARNEY WELFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a person unknown, from his person .

HEZEKIAH WELMER. I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in Newgate-street , at half-past nine o'clock in the evening, on the 5th of July - I saw two gentlemen walking arm-in-arm; he followed them - when they got near Butcherhall-lane he took this handkerchief from the outer gentleman's pocket; I called out, but the gentleman walked on - the prisoner ran into my arms, and dropped the handkerchief.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, positively denying the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-154

1538. JOSEPH SORRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 2 gold seals, value 3l.; 1 watch-key, value 10s., and 1 ring, value 2d., the goods of John Hill , from his person .

JOHN HILL. On the 31st of June the prisoner came up to me at the corner of Brook-street - he made a sudden snatch, and I thought he had got my watch; I felt, and the seals and key were gone - the ribbon had broken about the centre; I followed him, calling Stop thief! -I am sure he is the man, but I did not overtake him; he was stopped in Castle-street - he had been a short time out of my sight; they were found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you been drinking at all? A. I was quite sober - I lost my watch out of my pocket the same day; I was beset by a gang of thieves at the corner of Hemlock-court, Carey-street, while I was looking at a bill; I had never seen the prisoner before.

RICHARD BROWN . I am a watchman. On the night of the 30th of June I heard Stop thief! called, while I was calling eleven o'clock; my back was towards Hol

born, and I was going down Castle-street - I turned back, ran to the spot, and saw the prisoner come a little way down - he was running; he made a stop, and a gentleman said, "That is the person;" he turned and went into Holborn - I darkened my light, followed, and took him: he said he was not the person; I did not see any one following him - I sent a watchman for the and prosecutor, and he came; he was in the midst of a crowd of persons - he said the prisoner I had hold of was the man; the prisoner said it was a mistake.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you find any thing on him? A. No - it was two or three minutes before the prosecutor came up; the prisoner was out of breath - he turned quietly round into Holborn, and I took him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-155

1529. MARY BENGE and FRANCES ROSS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 12lbs. weight of flour, value 2s. 6d., and 16 lbs. weight of other flour, value 3s. 4d., the goods of William Harrow ; and one apron, value 6d. , the goods of James Richards .

GODFREY THOMAS HARRIS . I am a waiter at Mr. Whittaker's coffee-house, Fleet-market . On the morning of the 18th of June I saw a woman lower a bag out of Mr. Harrow's window down to Ross, who stood in the street and received it; it was about the size of a small pillow-case - she put it into her apron and crossed over; I went to meet her, and said, "What do you call this?" she said, what was that to me; I spoke to the watchman, he said he could not do any thing, as it was not his ward - soon after another watchman came up and went for the officer; I was not aware that I had a right to take the woman or I would have done it - I am quite sure Ross was the person; I saw her in custody in about an hour.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am a constable. I had information, and went to the prosecutor's house; I found Mr. Harrow - he was out of town; I saw Benge, and asked what she had let out of the window to a person in the street- she said flour which she let down to her daughter, who lived in Plumtree-court, Shoe-lane; I sent the watchman, who brought her to me - I then went to that place, where the two prisoners lived together; when we got there, Benge said, "Where did you put it?" Ross went to a drawer, and, took this out - on further search, I found this second quantity of flour.

JAMES RICHARDS . I am shopman to Mr. William Harrow ; he has a house on Snow-hill, opposite Fleet-market, and is a baker . We had some flour which is kept over the shop up one pair of stairs - Benge was nursing my brother who was very ill in thehouse - she had left my brother about four o'clock; she generally used to get him a cup of tea, but she had not that morning - this apron belongs to me; the place the flour was in, looks into the street, opposite where the witness lives.

Benge put in a written Defence, pleading distress, and stating that the prosecutor had detained her wages as a compensation for his loss.

JAMES RICHARDS re-examined. Q. Has your master made any agreement with her? A.No, he has not seen her - I had employed her; I did not know what I was to give her - I asked her what she was to have: she said 1s. 6d., and I gave her 2s. - she came on the Saturday, and staid till Thursday, the 18th; a relation of hers called on him afterwards, and I said I should not pay till this was settled - she had her food in the house.

The prisoners received a good character.

BENGE - GUILTY . Aged 54.

ROSS - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 2 Months .

Reference Number: t18290716-156

NEW COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JULY 20.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1530. MARGARET NAY was indicted for bigamy .

SAMUEL HARRIS . I live in Phoenix-street, Spitalfields, and am a butcher . I married the prisoner at St. Luke's thirteen or fourteen years ago - I did not know her former husband, and whether he is alive or dead, I do not know; I have a certificate of his burial.

JOHN >KIRBY. I am a weaver. I was at the marriage of the prisoner with William Nay , about twenty-one years ago, at Stepney church - she was married in the name of Moore; I worked with Nay for a few months, and then he went away and I did not see him for several years - the last time I saw him was about twelve years ago, I believe; I had not heard of his death.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290716-157

1531 LORENZO PARDO was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of Francis Clark .

MARY STEWART . I am servant to Mr. Francis Clark , a coach-manufacturer , of Gloucester-place, New-road . On the 18th of June, about a quarter-past five o'clock, I was cleaning the stairs, and saw the prisoner come in at the side door, leading from the office: there was no one in the office at that time - I leaned over the ballustrades, and saw him take this coat off a hook in the hall; I called to him - he did not stop, but held up his hand in a threatening way and ran off; I came down as fast as I could, and ran out; but he escaped - I saw him again about ten minutes before six o'clock; the officer had the coat then - this is it.

WALTER AKASS . I am in the prosecutor's employ, and was in the first loft; the witness came into the loft, and said a man had taken the coat - I went out with several of the men; I went down Circus-street, Baker-street, and into the Regent's-park - I saw the prisoner coming with the coat under his arm; I laid hold of him, and asked him what he had got - he said, "My coat, my coat," in broken English; he then gave me the coat and said"Let me go, let me go" - I understood him pretty well; I secured him.

WILLIAM BURRIDGE . I am an officer of Marylebone. The prisoner was brought to our office with this coat - he had nothing about him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I came out of my house without a halfpenny - I went into a house to beg charity, and some Englishman gave me a few halfpence; he told me to go and get the great-coat - I thought he was the master of the house; I was a little in liquor, and do not know whether the gentleman gave it me or not.

WALTER AKASS . He was sober.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .


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