Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th June 1829.
Reference Number: 18290611
Reference Number: f18290611-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., MAYOR.

FIFTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 11th DAY OF JUNE, 1829, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY HENRY STOKES, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, NO. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1829.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Nicholas Conyngham Tindal, Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; William Venables , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; John Key, Esq.; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; and Charles Farebrother , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St . Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

John Chalmers ,

Edward Lee ,

Robert Whytt ,

John M. Morde ,

Robert Jenkins ,

Edw. Stockram ,

William Squire ,

Thomas Morton ,

Thomas Weston ,

James Thwaites ,

Charles Bennett ,

George Brashn .

Second

Eben. Warner ,

William Wilmot ,

Edw. Chapman ,

James Eden ,

John Mc. Laren ,

George Whittit ,

Thomas Archer ,

James Jones ,

Henry Rodwell ,

Arthur P. Ebden ,

Sam. Stammers ,

Peter Sharp .

Third

Henry Dixon ,

Morris Evans ,

William Pymer ,

James Oram ,

James Phipps ,

Henry Young ,

Thos. Burbidge ,

Richard Loader ,

Thomas Emerson ,

G. W. Bourne ,

E. Stockholm ,

James Thwaites .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Benoni Charlton ,

Watkin Charlton ,

William Chick ,

Nicholas Clarke ,

William Clare ,

John Cossins ,

George Collins ,

William Colbeck ,

George Cox ,

John Cooper ,

Wm. Christian ,

Saul Crisp .

Second

Wm. Dalgleish ,

John Dark ,

John Deal ,

John Drabwell ,

George Duke ,

John Dikes ,

William Each,

Wm. Edmonds ,

John Edwards ,

Wm. P. Eraser ,

Edward Everest ,

Wm. Ebbletite .

Third

James Gardner ,

John Gorton ,

John Goslet ,

William Gowen ,

Henry Gordon ,

William Grover ,

William Grub ,

John Goodwin ,

Daniel Harrup ,

William Harris ,

Jacob Harris ,

Edward Hunt .

Fourth

James Agate ,

John Alcock ,

John S. Archer ,

Christp. P. Aston ,

Jas. Y. Atwood ,

Thomas Adams ,

Jonas Barker ,

Frederick Bate ,

James Bissard ,

Nathaniel Beard ,

William Bently ,

Benjamin Bryan .

Fifth

Wm. J. Brown ,

George Brown ,

George Bridges ,

Charles Birkit ,

Robert Burrows ,

John J. Birkit ,

James Buckley ,

William Bushel ,

Edward Boys ,

Henry Callard ,

Chas. Carpenter ,

William Candler ,

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JUNE 11, 1829.

THOMPSON, MAYOR. - FIFTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18290611-1

1000. MARY POULTER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Emma Herbert , spinster , on the 11th of May , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 shawl, value 12s. , her property.

EMMA HERBERT. I am single, and live in Wardour-street. On the 11th of May, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon I had been out a very long walk, and was taken very ill; I sat down on a stone in Compton-street; I had been walking all day, seeking a situation as a servant - I sat down, and put my hand to my forehead; the prisoner came up, and said, "You have been drinking; " I said I had not, but was unwell: I never saw her in my life before - she asked me to go with her and have a cup of tea; I refused, but she pressed me - I got up and followed her to No. 29, Rupert-street , but do not believe I exchanged a word with her - I followed her up stairs; she took a key out of her pocket, and tried to open the room door - the street door was open: the moment she tried the key to the room door, a man caught hold of me, and she caught hold of my shoulder, and helped him - the man tore me down stairs head foremost; as he took hold of me, she took hold of the shawl. and pulled it off me - the man pulled me down stairs: I was senseless with the blow; I recovered a little, and went up stairs again, but the woman, the man, and shawl were gone gone; I went home. I found my shawl in pawn at the top of Compton-street, early the next morning; I informed a constable, who went with me to the house in Rupert-street, and took the prisoner - I am quite sure she is the person. I am a native of Wales, but have been in London thirteen or fourteen years.

Prisoner. Q. Did we have any thing to drink together? A. I did not drink with her at all, nor go to any public-house with her.

PETER TATE. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Princes-street, Soho. This shawl was pawned with me for 5s. in the name of Jones, on the 12th of May, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, by the prisoner; I did not ask where she got it, as she had pawned things before - she mentioned no name but Jones.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am an officer of St. James'. On the 12th of May the prosecutrix made a complaint to me; I went with her to Rupert-street, between twelve and one o'clock, to a house; I saw the prisoner on the stairs, and asked if her name was Mary Poulter - she said No; I was going up stairs - the prosecutrix called me back, and said,"That is the party;" I took her to the pawnbroker, who said she had pawned the shawl; she denied both the robbery and pawning it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather in liquor, and met this woman who was drunk, and a mob was round her; she complained to me of being ill, having knocked her head against a post - she said she dare not go home in that state, and if I took her home and gave her a cup of tea, she would pawn her shawl to pay for it; she gave me the shawl in the passage to pawn, but I said, "Let us put the kettle on first;" as we went up stairs my husband came home, and found us drunk - he threw us both down stairs- she told me she would come and breakfast with me after my husband was gone in the morning, instead of which she brought an officer.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Littledule.

Reference Number: t18290611-2

100l. ALEXANDER FINLAYSON was indicted for stealing on the 17th of April , 1 silver tea-pot, value 15l.; 1 silver cream-pot, value 3l.; 50 silver spoons, value 20l.; 20 silver forks, value 10l.; 1 silver soup-ladle, value 1l.; 1 silver fish-knife, value 1l., and 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s., the goods of Sir William Beechey , Knt. , his master, in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ANN MEMORY. I am cook to Sir William Beechey - the prisoner was in his service. On the night of the 17th of April, about nine o'clock, he asked me if I had seen any letters - I said No; he asked me if I had washed the plate- I told him I had; he asked if that was all, taking the plate up in his hand; I cannot exactly say what it was - it was but little; there were silver spoons and forks - he left the kitchen, and I heard the street door shut very hard, in a few minutes after; I went into the pantry, in about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, to make the prisoner's bed, and found the pantry all in confusion, as if it had been much robbed - I found the cupboard and drawers all thrown wide open, and the plated articles scattered

on different shelves in the closet; I saw the prisoner's box pulled out in the pantry with a Scotch plaid thrown carelessly over it - I went from there to the street door; I found the street door open, but the middle door shut too - I came down stairs, and went part of the way to the kitchen, and called Nunn, my fellow servant; we went up, and told Lady Beechey - Mr. Jackson, her son-in-law, came to the house immediately, and Captain Beechey followed him in a few minutes; there is no key-hole outside the street door.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is it your duty to wash the plate? A. Yes, and the prisoner's to put it away; he is generally engaged in the pantry: Sir William dines at six o'clock - the plate I washed had been used at dinner; some time before he came and asked for the plate, I went into the pantry to look for dirty plates - he was then in his knife-house, and appeared to be-cleaning knives; he could see me in the pantry - this was after dinner; the things are brought down about seven o'clock - the pantry is open to all the servants, but I believe the prisoner locks it when he goes out; I was in the pantry between seven and eight o'clock - every thing appeared as usual then; it was about nine o'clock when he left the house: all the silver articles were selected from the plated ones - there was no ring or knock at the door after he left; the door shuts with a spring.

MARY NUNN. I am servant to Sir William Beechey - we and the prisoner were the only servants. On the 17th of April, in consequence of something Memory said, I went into the pantry, and found all the drawers and cupboards open, and his box in the middle of the floor, that was about a quarter-past nine o'clock - the prisoner went out about nine; all the things were strewed about the room - I went and alarmed Lady Beechey; Mr. Jackson and Captain Beechey came to the house soon after - when Mr. Jackson came into the parlour, he had his watch in his hand, and said it was then twenty minutes past nine o'clock; the prisoner had left the house between nine and that time: I observed a handsome damask table-cloth on the table by the door in the pantry, unfolded, and another in the press: there was no key-hole to the street door - it cannot be opened outside; I saw the doors and windows below stairs after missing the property, they were all fast - it was not possible for any one to come in from below stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prisoner lived with Sir William? A. Nearly four months; I know he had a letter to deliver to Mr. Bell, in Oxford-street, and another in Long-acre, and I know he did deliver them; I was at needle-work in the kitchen from the time he went out till the plate was missed - I heard the street door creak about six minutes after the prisoner left; I had heard it shut, as I thought, when he left; the cook went up a minute or two after the door creaked, and found it open - the prisoner was absent an hour and twenty-five minutes - he seemed a little confused when he came in, but not particularly so; I believe every thing taken was silver, except two butterladles.

CAPTAIN FREDERICK WILLIAM BEECHEY . I am son of Sir William Beechey. I received information, and went to my father's house - I got there at twenty-five minutes past nine o'clock; Mr. Jackson, my brother-in-law, got there before me - the house is in Harley-street; I went into the pantry and found the drawers pulled out - the prisoner's box pulled out in the centre of the room, and his clothes were out of it; Mr. Jackson was looking over the cupboard where the plate was kept - we had some plated wine-coolers, I found them in the cupboard; I should not think a person could tell they were plated without examining them - they were at the back of the cupboard; any person looking into the cupboard could not avoid seeing them - I knew pretty well what plate my father had.

Q. Could any person in the space of six minutes separate the plated articles from the silver? A. I should think not, nor in three times that time; I found a pen-knife in the prisoner's box - I saw the prisoner after he came home; he appeared very much confused when Schofield spoke to him - we took him down to the pantry; he was asked if his clothes were gone - he looked towards his box in the middle of the room, and said they were gone; he was asked if he had any thing else in his box - he said he had five sovereigns, and that they were gone too; the box was about eight or ten feet from him - he could not tell whether the sovereigns were gone or not, without looking into it, and did not examine the box before he said they were gone; he took up a plated fork out of the tray, where he said he had left the plate - he was told to look into the tray where the plate had been left, and asked if it was all gone; he took up the fork without examining the other plated things, and said all the plate was gone - he looked into the tray, took up a fork, put it down again, and said it was all gone; I should not have known the silver from the plated articles without a strict examination: there were some papers, two or three small books, and a pen-knife left in the prisoner's box - he was asked what the sovereigns were in, and he said they were wrapped in a piece of sugar paper; he examined the box after he said they were gone, and was asked where he had left the sovereigns - he described the particular part of the box in which he had left them; after he said they were gone somebody in the room asked how he knew that without examining the box - I do not recollect that he gave any answer, but he went to his box, put aside some of the papers, and said they were gone, but even then he did not examine sufficient to ascertain it, in my opinion; Mr. Jackson showed him a penknife, and asked him how that penknife came on the landing-place or near the door - the prisoner said, "You did not find it there;" Mr. Jackson asked him how he knew that - the prisoner said, "Because you took it out of my box;" Mr. Jackson said, "How do you know that?" he replied, "Because I saw you;" I saw Mr Jackson find the penknife myself - the prisoner was not there then; he was asked if he had shut the street door after him when he left at nine o'clock, and said he did, and tried it; I observed that the pantry windows were shut and barred, and the area door shut - nobody could come in from below stairs: there was not less than 40l. worth of silver articles - the plated articles, to purchase them, were worth 20l.

Cross-examined. Q. Are your father or Mr. Jackson here? A. No; a silver skewer and wine-strainer were left behind - Lady Beechey missed no plated articles but two butter-ladles; a person could not tell that the wine-coolers were not silver, without examining them.

Q. All the answers given by the prisoner were to questions put by Mr. Jackson? A. Yes; he found the penknife in the prisoner's box - he did not say he had found

it elsewhere, but asked how it came there; that inferred that it had been found up stairs - he is a solicitor: the prisoner, in answer to several questions, was rather impudent, and Mr. Jackson said, "You need not answer unless you like;" he denied all knowledge of the plate - he came home at twenty-five minutes past ten o'clock - it might be an hour before he was taken to the watch-house; his box had evidently been rausacked - it was not turned over on its side; he might see that a greater part of his clothes were gone, but I should think could not see to the bottom of his box - he said the sovereigns were on some of his clothes, but I should think he could not know whether the money was gone; he might have seen that some of his clothes were gone - there might have been a waistcoat or some small things which he could not see: considerable search has been made for the plate, but without success; the pantry window looks into the area, but the shutters were closed and barred: he said he had received the sovereigns from Lady Beechey, which is true.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. On the 14th of April I was sent for to Sir William Beechey 's; I concealed myself behind the door, when the prisoner returned, and the moment the door was open, he said to Nunn, who let him in, "For why was the door bolted?" (meaning the street door) she made no answer, unless she spoke very low; I then came forward, and said to her, "Go forward with him, and let him remain with the gentlemen below;" I then watched him down - I particularly remarked that he was very much agitated, and seemed very much alarmed; I had not at that time taken him into custody, or told him I was an officer - Nunn took him down below; I overtook them at the foot of the stairs, and on entering the pantry the prisoner said,"What is the matter?" I said the plate was missing, and he was suspected of taking it, and leaving the street door open when he went out - he said he had shut the door, and tried it after him; I asked where he had been since he went out - he told me I might ask Lady Beechey, for she knew; I then told him I was an officer, it was my duty to ask those questions, and he might do as he pleased about answering - he paused for some moments, and at last said he had been out with three letters, which Lady Beechey had given him, that the clock struck nine as he went through the hall to go out - he then said he had taken one letter to Bell's, the chemist, in Oxford-street, and another to a chemist in Long-acre, and then he came straight home- then he corrected himself, and said he had been with another letter to George-street, Montague-square, and then returned home, and then remarked "It is only half-past ten o'clock," which was correct by Mr. Jackson's watch; I asked him where he had left the plate - he pointed to a large press cupboard behind the door in the pantry, gave me a key from his pocket, and said he had locked it up in that cupboard, which cupboard was then open - I examined the cupboard directly; there was no appearance of its having been forced - he gave me an inventory of the plate, which I produce; the plate and plated articles are distinguished in the inventory; he said the inventory was correct - I asked what part of the cupboard he had left the silver things in, as the cupboard was in such a confused state; he at that time was very much confused, and could give me no answer: I asked him where he had put the spoons he had fetched from the kitchen a short time before he went out - he pointed to a tray where there were about eight plated forks, and said he had put them among them; I then took up the plated forks - he said they were all plated; I said they were so well plated that I should not have known them from silver: I afterwards searched him, in consequence of Sir William Beechey coming in and giving him in charge, and found two sovereigns and two shillings on him; he afterwards stated, in answer to some questions from a gentleman, that he had lost five sovereigns out of his box - he had not at that time examined the box; he was about three yards from it at that time - I could not have discovered what was in the box without examining it - I told him so; he was very much confused, and said, "Oh, it was wrapped up in some sugar-paper," and then he went to look - it was a middling sized box. I examined the plated articles which were left behind - there was a great quantity in the cupboard; I found those articles correct with the inventory, as far as I compared them - I was present next day with the inventory, when Lady Beechey looked over the articles, and they corresponded; he said Lady Beechey paid him the five sovereigns - I asked him if the two sovereigns were part of the five she had paid him; he said, "What is that to you?" and he would not answer another question. I examined the street door - there was no key-hole at which a skeleton-key could be introduced; I examined the back of the house - there was no where that a thief could get in; I asked him particularly if he had fastened the house up before he went out - he said he had fastened up every place: I should think it would take a stranger an hour to open all the drawers, pack up the things, and take them away, from the confused state the pantry was in.

Cross-examined. Q. How long might he be under examination? A. I should think half an hour; Mr. Jackson was alone with him about ten minutes; I did not particularly attend when Lady Beechey compared the plated articles with the inventory. The prisoner was excessively insolent to the gentlemen in the house, and would not answer - he said, "I have no business to answer; I will not answer," and so on; I consider that insolent - I was absent about the house a good deal, and did not hear all he said; I think he said his money was at the bottom of the box, but I cannot say - he said something was at the bottom of his box, I know; I found all he said was true, except saying he had no relations.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If he had shut the door after him, and tried it, was there any possible way to open it without breaking it open? A. None.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When did he produce the inventory? A. When I asked him what plate he had under his care, he produced the inventory from a drawer.

MARY NUNN . I occasionally saw the plate; there was, a tea-pot and stand, a sugar-basin, tea-trays, a cream-pot and ten large table-spoons.

CAPTAIN BEECHEY. The plate lost was not worth less than 40l.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, contending that if he had committed the robbery he should not have left the house fastened up, and that he was not absent longer than necessary to deliver the letters he was sent with.

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I live at Mr. Bell's, of Oxford-

street. On the 17th of April a letter was brought from Lady Beechey, between nine o'clock and half-past; I cannot positively say the prisoner is the person who delivered it.

ANN MEMORY re-examined. I found the cupboard open - I cannot say it was forced open; there was no bolt to it, and a little thing put into the key-hole would have pulled it open - the bolt of the lock was out, as if it had been locked; there are two folding doors, and no bolt to either of them - the first was only pushed too, and the other locked; I pushed the bolt of the lock back myself -I was in the pantry about half an hour before he went out; I saw nothing in confusion then.

CAPTAIN BEECHEY. The bolt of the lock was shot; the door appeared to have been drawn open.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . The prisoner gave me the key from his waistcoat pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

Reference Number: t18290611-3

1002. WILLIAM YOUNG was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Crouch , on the 20th of December , and stealing 50 yards of calico, value 25s.; 50 yards of flannel; value 50s.; 108 pairs of stockings, value 5l.; 18 handkerchiefs, value 15s.; 14lbs. of snuff, value 4l.; 40lbs. of tea, value 8l.; 20lbs. of bacon, value 12s.; 2 cheeses, value 16s.; 56lbs. of pork, value 3l., and 30s. 2d. in copper monies , his property.

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

ISABELLA COTTRELL. I am a widow, and live in the house of William Crouch at West Drayton - he is upwards of sixty years old; I manage his business. On the night of the 21st of December, I know the house was safe - I missed a quantity of calico, stockings, bacon, cheese, tobacco and pork; some tobacco had been taken out of the jars, and some unpacked; there might be 30s. worth of copper- I know there was a two-penny piece which had been in the back part of the till for three years; it was safe with every thing else the night the robbery was committed - we had taken the silver out of the till that night; I missed some handkerchiefs - there were two of a particular nature, which I saw afterwards; I came down first in the morning, and found a hole made through the brick work under the window, and a hole cut by a sharp instrument in the wood work at the end of the shop window, large enough for a man to get through.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How soon did you see any of the property? A. I saw the two-penny piece two or three months after.

MARY BYTHERO . My husband is a seafaring man; I live at No. 44 North-street Manchester-square. I had frequently seen a two-penny piece in the possession of Crouch, and should know it again.

Cross-examined. Q. When had you seen it before? A. Not since August.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable of Twickenham, about six miles from West Drayton. In consequence of information from a man named Fisher, I went to a house at Whitton, the beginning of April, with a search warrant; I knew the prisoner lived in that house, for I have seen him going in and out there - I have known him these four years; he was in custody at this time - I have not seen him go in there above twice since December; I found there this copper coin - here are two two-penny pieces among it; I found them in his box, where his clothes were - I took the clothes to Bow-street, and he claimed them; I showed the two-penny piece to the prosecutrix - I went to search for other property, and found one handkerchief at a pawnbrokers, at Brentford, and redeemed it; Dalby produced this handkerchief in my presence at Hampton, where she lived.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you see him go into this house last? A. In April, about two days before he was taken, I think - his wife and family were there when I went; King, Kite, and another, who were tried at Kingston, have been executed - I cannot say whether the prisoner was a witness on their trial.

HARRIET DALBY . I live at Hampton. In the latter part of December I lived at Twickenham; I knew a man named Kite - I have seen the prisoner twice; I was present at a division of some property - I think it was on the 7th of December. On the 20th, Kite shewed me some property - Young was not present then; I never saw him after the 20th till he was in custody - not at Kite's house; I only know about the prisoner from what Kite said - Kite said he was one of the party.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18290611-4

1003. ELIZABETH HANKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 45 yards of lace, value 5l.; 2 sheets, value 7s.; 13 pairs of stockings, value 15s.; 1 shift, value 3s.; 6 night caps, value 3s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Allen , in his dwelling-house .

ANN ALLEN. I am the wife of Joseph Allen , and live in Chiswell-street, Finsbury - he is a wholesale lace-manufacturer - he occupies the first floor and attics, part of the shop, and one parlour; Mullins, the landlord, does not live in the house - we have one side of the shop, and a person named Powell the other; we rent ours of Mullins - Mrs. Powell is his sister; I conduct the retail business in the shop. The prisoner, about seven or eight weeks ago, came to buy a cap; she said she was a washerwoman, and should be obliged to me to have her when I wanted one, and I could have a number of respectable references - one place which she mentioned she had been at eleven years; I went to this place, Reily's pork shop, Whitecross-street, and asked if Hankin washed for them - they said they did not know her, she had not referred me there, but mentioned that place which was the only one I remember; I afterwards went to her house and left word for her to come to my house - she came that afternoon; I believe it was the 20th of May - I agreed for her to wash for me; she was to come to me on Thursday morning, which she did, and washed in the kitchen which Mrs. Powell and I have between us - she staid till half-past ten o'clock at night, and on the Friday afternoon about three, I missed some lace, and on looking at the book, I found it was forty-five yards; I had put it into the lace box myself when I was clearing the shop-window at night - it was in my part of the shop: I had seen it during the Thursday, and recollect wrapping one piece of it up on the Thursday night about ten o'clock; it was then in the box - I took it out of the window, wrapped it

up, and put it into the lace-box; I missed only two pieces at first, but when I came to recollect, about an hour after, I missed another, which I had also seen on the Thursday evening, but do not recollect wrapping it up - it was about the middle of the window; on the Sunday I missed from a drawer in my bed-room, three stockings which I had seen on Friday on a line at the top part of the house - I went up stairs and missed seven black silk stockings which I saw myself in a box on Thursday, about three o'clock in the afternoon, when the prisoner was up stairs with me; I am not certain they were all there - I missed thirteen pairs of my sister's stockings; the prisoner had every thing to wash that was dirty; she said to me on the Thursday morning, "You are so badly off for drying here, if you will allow me, I will take your flannels home to-dry, as they will dry better;" I said "Very well," and she did take them house - I did not give her leave to take any thing else; she went home about half-past ten o'clock on Thursday night, and about ten or five minutes after she took the things she had washed into the shop, and put them behind the counter - she asked my leave to put them there, saying, she thought it would be the best place for them; I was then in the shop and the servant also - I saw nobody else there; I believe we all came out of the shop together - at that time the things were put into a tub behind the counter, and I wished the prisoner to put some cold water over them - I was not in the shop when she did it; I heard the water poured over them - that was after we all three came out of the shop; I was in Mrs. Powell's room - there was nobody else to do it but her; I had told her while she was washing to take the things to any part of the house she liked to dry them; I told her to take some on the leads - she went into different parts of the house; my bed-room was not locked - she came on Friday night to bring home the flannels she had dried; I found them quite correct, and told her we had lost some lace; she said "Ma'am, I hope you don't think it is me;" I said "Oh no, I am sure I don't," nor did I- she went away; McCray, an officer, came to the house on the Friday night, and searched my sister's bed-room and Mrs. Powell's room; the prisoner came next day to iron - I saw her about ten o'clock; she persuaded me to have every body I had in my house searched, which had been done on the Friday night; there were lodgers in the house at that time. On Sunday I went to Worship-street - McCray and Lock went with me to the prisoner's house; I got there nearly at dusk - she keeps two rooms; she said they were hers, and in the first box we came to, in the back room, I found three or four pairs of stockings and two or three night caps, and in another, an old pair of white stockings, near the bed foot, on the floor, and in or near a box, an old black silk handkerchief, in the drawers in the front room, with a man's night cap, the lace is worth about 5l. at the wholesale price; it belongs to my husband - I found a card in my bed-room cut to pieces.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What is the value of the property found? A. Not much; the stockings cost me 2s. 6d. a pair - she offered to be searched herself when the lace was missed, and said I was too easy by half, she never saw such an easy woman - she said the stockings were not mine; the shop was shut when I put the lace away - she was going home at all hours on Saturday, but was there till twelve o'clock at night; she said she wondered at our coming on Sunday to search, and taking her by surprise - and when the stockings were found, she said she meant to bring them home on Monday when she came for a blanket, but I never intended to give her one to wash - I should not have prosecuted her for the stockings, but my girls were afraid they should be suspected, and I was persuaded.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a constable. On Sunday evening, the 24th of May, I went with McCray and Mrs. Allen to search the prisoner's lodging - she was at home; I told her Mrs. Allen suspected she had robber her, and I came to search her place - she said, "You may search my place, and welcome, I have got nothing belonging to Mrs. Allen;" we went into the back room, and the first thing found was a pair of stockings between two bedsteads - I showed them to Mrs. Allen, who said they were hers, and in one of the boxes I found two pairs of almost new stockings and a woman's night cap; the prisoner was present - I then went into the front room, and searched the drawers; I took out a cap, and Mrs. Allen said it was hers - the prisoner directly said it was given to her by the servant of the house, and if I looked further I should find a man's night-cap; she then said, "I brought the things home to wash, and meant to bring them back again" - I asked Mrs. Allen if she gave her leave to take those stockings and things home - she said No.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a judge of the value? A. I would not give 1d. for the night-cap - the things altogether are not worth more than 2s.; I cannot find the lace or the silk stockings.

DAVID McCRAY . I am a constable. I went on Sunday night, with Lock and Mrs. Allen, to search the prisoner's lodging; I found a handkerchief in a box in the back room - Mrs. Allen claimed it; the prisoner was asked if she brought that home to wash, as it was ironed ready for use - she said she brought it at the same time with the others, I believe.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 6d. only . Aged 56.

Confined Six Months .

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18290611-5

1004. JOSEPH BARNETT was indicted for breaking and entering the warehouse of Joseph Colebatch and others, on the 7th of March , and stealing therein 1 silver waiter, value 30l.; 4 silver candlesticks, value 20l.; 4 silver extinguishers, value 1l.; 1 pair of silver snuffers, value 24s.; 2 other silver waiters, value 16l.; 1 silver fish-slice, value 32s.; one silver wine-strainer, value 50s.; 2 silver gravy-spoons, value 60s.; 5 silver soup-ladles, value 6l.; 1 silver salad-spoon, value 1l. 10s.; 1 silver butter-knife, value 14s.; 12 silver dessert-knives, value 3l.; 12 silver dessert-forks, value 3l.; 36 silver table-spoons, value 25l. 10s.; 24 silver tea-spoons, value 6l. 15s.; 36 silver forks, value 18l. 15s; 1 silver mustard-pot, value 5l.; 1 silver mustard-spoon, value 10s.; 2 silver cream-boats, value 6l.; 4 silver salt-cellars, value 12l.; 4 silver salt-spoons, value 24s.; 1 silver toast-rack, value 3l. 15s.; 1 other silver strainer, value 11s.; 1 pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 7s.; 4 knife

rests, value 10s.; 2 pairs of nut-crackers, value 10s.; 1153 ermine skins, value 28l.; 5 sovereigns; 1 half-sovereign; 1 crown; 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence , the property of the said Joseph Colebatch and others.

MESSRS. ALLEY and CRESWELL. conducted the prosecution.

MR. JAMES COLEBATCH . I have some warehouses at No. 60, Lower Thames-street , and have two partners; there were several boxes in our warehouse - they had been there eighteen or twenty months; some of them belong to the Rev. Edward Oxborne - I never saw the contents; I leave the foreman to shut our warehouse up when I leave, and the keys are brought to my house. On the morning of the 7th of March, at nine o'clock, I found the premises had been broken into, and the property gone: the warehouse is in the parish of Allhallows, Barking - the windows have all iron bars to them; persons outside cannot look into the windows unless they get within the gates - I found the fronts of several boxes ripped down, and several articles taken away; the locks of the premises were all broken open - we found one silver candlestick left behind, and several plated articles; the warehouse which was broken open is at the back part of the premises - we let part of the front warehouses- the windows were perfect outside, but the interior was all dilapidated; the counting-house was broken open, the deaks and iron safe broken open, and money gone - there was a bag put up to prevent the party being seen.

Cross-examined. Q. Were several boxes opened, or one taken away? A. No boxes were taken away, but the contents were - one was entirely stripped, and the other partly; no outer door was broken that I could discover.

RICHARD WILLIAMS. I am warehouseman to Messrs. Colebatch. On the 6th of March I locked up the warehouse, and delivered the keys to the clerk; I left the premises quite safe - I went again about nine o'clock in the morning; Mr. Colebatch was there - I found the outer wicket secure, but the inner wicket open; the two doors of the salt warehouse were also open - I found a door on the staircase had been forced open by some instrument; I went up stairs, saw another box forced open, and things scattered about the floor - it was principally linen; five boxes had been forced open.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am a City officer. On the morning of the 7th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was in Paul-street, Finsbury, and saw the prisoner - he nodded at me, and I saw Haydon behind him, carrying a basket, about a yard and a half off; I was on the opposite side, crossed over, and questioned him -I found the basket contained plate; I then looked for the prisoner, but could not find him that day - I took Haydon into custody; he was detained till the following Monday, when I met the prisoner in Leonard-street, about eleven o'clock - I was going down by the Tabernacle, and all at once saw a person turn round and run a contrary way, but I was not it was him then - I saw the person run into a shop; I went to the shop, but could not see him - I went to the stairs which lead to the bake-house, and hallooed Joe come up (meaning the prisoner) and he came from the cellar where they bake; I said "If you go quietly I won't handcuff you," he said he would go quietly, and I took him to Guildhall - he was going to say something; I said, "Mind what you say to me," and nothing passed - I have had the plate ever since.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He knew you? A. Yes, and nodded - I followed the porter two or three yards, and then looked for the prisoner, before I stopped the porter, and he was gone in a moment; he could not have got out of my sight if he had walked - I went to look for him, but did not go to his house; I met him on the Monday, nearly on the same spot.

Q. Did he not say he had a complaint in his bowels which obliged him to go down there? A. Certainly not - I believe the baker's wife was in the shop.

COURT. Q. When he came up was there any conversation between him and the person in the shop? A. None.

THOMAS WHITE . I am an officer; I was with Herdsfield in Paul-street, and met the prisoner, and a porter behind him a few steps, with a large basket - Herdsfield crossed over the road, lifted up something, and called me over; I am certain the prisoner is the man who was there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you search the prisoner? A. I saw him searched, and 40l. odd found on him.

JOHN HAYDON. I am a porter, and generally ply at Spitalfields-market. I was there on the 7th of March, when the prisoner applied to me between ten and eleven o'clock; he asked if I wanted a job I said Yes - he said"Then carry these," and gave me a parcel wrapped up in a great coat - he put it into my basket himself; the officer took it from me in Paul-street - it is the same parcel; he went before me into Lamb-street, across Spital-square, up Primrose-street - we came at last into Paul-street, and I was taken into custody; the prisoner had ran away then - I had seen him not a minute before; he went away when the officer spoke to him - he had continued with me up to that time; the parcel the officer took from me was exactly the same as he gave me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Where do you live? A. In York-street, Shoreditch. I never saw the prisoner before; I never said I doubted his being the man, nor that there were so many faces alike, I did not like to swear to him - I said he was the man; I did not express a doubt of him, but swore positively to him; I have seen Herdsfield here - he has never called on me, nor have I had any conversation with him about swearing to the prisoner; he was about six yards before me, and saw him.

COURT. Q. Did you follow any other person but him from the market, till you were stopped? A. None.

THE REVEREND EDWARD OSBORNE. I had left some plate in the care of the prosecutors, secured in a box, above a year ago; I have since seen, out of the box, some of the plate - that was before the Magistrate; I knew it to be part of what I left in their care - (examining the property) this is part of it; there is still some missing - the value of this is considerably above 100l.: I saw the box after the robbery - it was the same box as contained the plate.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent - it is all prejudice against me: Haydon strongly denied my being the person before the Magistrate, and said there were so many alike he could not tell: Herdsfield called at my house, and was

told I was gone out to see the paper; he came out, and saw me, and says I ran into the shop. Had I not forty-eight hours to escape if I had been guilty? it is nothing but a conspiracy.

JOHN THOMAS LATHAM. I am a baker, and live in Leonard-street. I have known the prisoner about two years - he dealt with me, and is a jeweller, I believe; he frequently called to see me - we both visited: he called the day he was taken up - he did not appear particularly ill; I came into the shop just after the officers - he often went down stairs without leave; he was familiar with the place: it was not unusual for him to go down.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-6

1005. JOHN NEWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 2 pairs of stockings, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of William Stephen Dew and another.

EDWARD INSKIP . I am in the employ of Mr. Phipps, of Newgate-street. On the 8th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening. I was in Mr. Dunnett's shop, at the corner of Paternoster-row , and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran out, and saw the prisoner in the custody of a gentleman, charged with stealing two pairs of stockings from Mr. Dew's shop, two doors from Foster-lane; he said nothing, but tried to escape, but could not - he was taken into a shop; he put his right hand under his waistcoat, pulled down the stockings, and dropped them between his legs; I saw that, and took them up - I saw them delivered to the officer; I went into the shop, and he was given in charge.

THOMAS PEAKE . I am a patrol. I found the prisoner in Mr. Dew's shop, charged with stealing two pairs of stockings, which laid on the counter; I took them in charge - he at first denied it, but afterwards said he took them from want, and he did not know what induced him to do it.

HORATIO MACKLIN . I am in the employ of Messrs. Dew. I was in the shop, and the prisoner was brought in; I had seen the stockings hanging on a bar inside the door almost immediately before.

Prisoner's Defence I saw them just by the step of the door; a gentleman said, "Take them into the shop," but being in want I ran away with them, not having had any bread all day.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-7

1006. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Robert Thomas Glyn , from his person .

ROBERT THOMAS GLYN ESQ . I live in Arlington-street, St. James'. On the 4th of June, at a quarter before three o'clock in the day, I was passing along Newgate-street , returning from the Anniversary of St. Paul's; there were a good many idle people standing about - I heard a noise behind, and one or two men rushed past me; suspecting something, I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; an officer ran by, and returned in five minutes, with my handkerchief and the prisoner in custody - another boy was taken with him, who he said had nothing to do with it.

JOHN GARTON . I am an officer. I was by St. Paul's, and followed the prisoner and another person; on turning round Newgate-street I saw them go close behind Mr. Glyn, and the prisoner put his hand into Mr. Glyn's pocket - I was going to lay hold of him, but a gentleman came by, and I missed my hold; I told the prosecutor to stand still - I followed, and took the prisoner three or four yards off - I observed him putting the handkerchief into his bosom; I immediately took it from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY MOORE . I am a constable. I was with Garton - his evidence is correct; I took the other, who was discharged - I did not see the prisoner take the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief was half out of the gentleman's pocket, and as I passed by I took it out, as I had had no victuals all day.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-8

1007. JOHN DOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of George Coleman Hamilton Lewis , from his person .

GEORGE COLEMAN HAMILTON LEWIS. I live at Wellington-terrace, Waterloo-bridge, and am clerk to a solicitor. On the 23d of April, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was between Holborn-bridge and Field-lane , walking with my sister-in-law - I felt a tug at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, which I had used shortly before - I turned round, and saw the prisoner darting down Field-lane, alone; I pursued, calling Stop thief! he was stopped by one Ford, and was taken to St. Andrew's watch-house - Ford took the handkerchief from his breast pocket in Field-lane.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am one of the day patrol. On the 23d of April the prisoner was given in my charge - the handkerchief was delivered to me; Lewis claimed it: I found another handkerchief in his hat, and another officer took two out of his pocket - three were found on him besides the prosecutor's; he had 6s. 9d. in his pocket.

GEORGE JOSEPH FORD . I keep a boot and shoe-shop, No. 3, Field-lane. I stopped the prisoner, seeing him put the handkerchief into his breast pocket - I collared him, and took it out; I had seen him turn down Field-lane, and collared him directly he came to my door - he was running very fast: Lewis claimed the handkerchief - I saw the other three found, which have not been claimed.

GEORGE GEORGE . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I took two handkerchiefs from him myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the handkerchief drop from two young men; one turned down Field-lane - I took it up, and followed, to ask if it was his.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-9

1008. JOHN JONES and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 1 coat, value 3l., and 1 cloak, value 2l. , the goods of Henry Nias .

HENRY NIAS. I am a surgeon , and live at Edmonton. On the 10th of April I was in Brunswick-square ; I had a coat and cloak in my chaise - I left my servant in the chaise - I was spending the evening there, and on coming

out my coat and cloak were gone; they were worth 5l. -I saw them at Guildhall, on Tuesday, the 14th.

JAMES GOWING. I am servant to Mr. Nias. On Thursday night I brought the chaise into Brunswick-square, about half-past eleven o'clock; the coat and cloak were on the driving seat - after some time I got out, and went towards the horse's head for a few minutes, and when I came back they were gone - I had only been away a few minutes; it was a very dark night: I saw nobody near the chaise.

DANIEL FORRESTER. I am an officer. On Friday, the 10th of April, about ten o'clock in the morning. I observed the prisoners and another person pass the corner of the Old Bailey, into Newgate-street - Jones had this cloak wrapped up under his arm, tied by a bit of string; Williams had a dark coat on his back - I followed them up Newgate-street (the other one left them at the corner) - I laid hold of them, and took them up a passage; I asked Jones where he got the cloak - he said he picked it up in Holborn the night before, about half-past ten o'clock, wrapped in a sheet of paper - I asked Williams where he got the coat, and he said he bought it of a Jew in Petticoat-lane, for 22s.; I asked him when - he said he did not know when: I asked him if any body saw him buy it, and Jones replied that he saw him buy it about three weeks ago - I then took them in custody, and on the Monday or Tuesday saw Mr. Nias, who claimed them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAMS' Defence. I went to Jones' lodging on Friday morning; I asked him to go with me to the Borough, and as we went along I asked him to carry the cloak - I was in bed at the time of the robbery.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-10

NEW COURT, First Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1009. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Jonathan Wood , from his person .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY. Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290611-11

1010. EMMA GARLICK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 2 veils, value 5s.; 2 caps, value 4s.; 2 frocks, value 3s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Elizabeth Checkeni , her mistress.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY. Aged 12.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290611-12

1011. DANIEL MACDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of John Drysdale .

JOHN DRYSDALE. I keep the Coach and Horses public-house, in Beer-yard . On the 27th of May the prisoner came to my house, and lodged there two nights; he left on the Thursday morning, and then owed me 5s. 10 1/2d. for what he had to eat and drink, besides the two night's lodging; I went after him, and found him in Windmill-street: I told him I came for the small bill he owed me - I asked him to go into a public-house; he at first objected, but did go in - I had missed a silk handkerchief from my bar the night before, and when I got him into the public-house he took it out of his pocket, and offered it to the landlady in pawn for a debt he had contracted there; I said it was mine- he denied it, and said he had bought a piece of them in Guernsey; there is no mark on it, but I have more of the same pattern - I do not think it is a very common pattern.

LUCY DRYSDALE . I am the prosecutor's wife. I hemmed this handkerchief, and know it is my work; I hemmed the whole piece of them.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) Having arrived at Southend from a voyage, on my way to town, I accidentally met with a young person, who stated himself to be a baker, and perceiving from his dialect that he was a countryman of my own, I was glad to embrace his services; he then introduced me to the prosecutor, Drysdale, who keeps the Caledonian Inn, Beer-yard, Drury-lane: I agreed to take my refreshment at a certain sum, and to take the same in the bar, with himself and family, during my stay; in the course of the day, Drysdale induced me to play with him at bagatelle; I was surprised at his having a board, and made some remark upon the subject, to which he replied he did not care for any person, as his spirit merchant was a Magistrate, and knew that the board was in his house, but that he had raised fifty pounds and purchased spirits of him, since which time he never took any notice of any thing that was done in his house, whether card playing, of which a great deal took place during the time I was there, and that since he had him on his side, being his licensing Magistrate, he did not care for all the others. In the evening he asked me for 6s. 9d., which he stated I owed him - being rather fresh, I said I would call by and by and settle with him, as I had not so much about me, but was going to see a friend, and I should call and pay him; on the next morning imagining he had not acted altogether fairly towards me, I was determined I would not pay him, as I did not consider I owned him any thing, and two days after I left his house, and where I had removed to he knew from the young man who had taken me to his house, having myself told him; he, finding all claims fruitless, and considering I might mention his allowing gambling in his house, took the advantage of seeing my handkerchief in my hand - he said it was his, and immediately looked at the corners to see if there was any mark, and which handkerchief I assure you, I purchased in Guernsey, together with six others which all being separate patterns, made the piece of seven - if the prosecutor knew the handkerchief to be his, what necessity was there for him to examine the corners for a mark? upon his first examination he said he could not swear to it, but upon the second examination, he then found as by a miracle, he could swear to it. Had I stolen his handkerchief I should not have taken it out openly to his face before him, but have disposed of it.

GUILTY. Aged 39.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290611-13

1012. JAMES BULGER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 saw, value 5s., the goods of John Gardner Edwards ; 1 axe, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Humphrey Jenkinson ; and 1 plummet, value 4d. , the goods of Thomas Richard Stevens .

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am a constable at St. Katharine's Docks. I received information on the 21st of April, and looked for the prisoner, but could not find him; he works as a carpenter's labourer there: on the 22d I saw him coming out as the men left work - I stopped him, and asked what he had about him; he said Nothing: I said he had something in his hat and pockets - he said he had not, and made great resistance; his hat fell off: this piece of wood and two plummets fell out of it - I got him back to the works; he made great resistance, and got away; I

followed him - he ran into a vault, took out three other plummets, and threw them down; I called for assistance, and it took six persons to secure him, he made so much resistance; I found on him a key, and went to his lodging in Charles-court, in the Strand - the key opened the door of his room: I found the duplicate of this saw in a bag in the room, also these four other plummets, and this axe.

HANNAH DAVIS . The prisoner lodged with me. The officer came and searched his room, and found these things.

NATHANIEL BARNES . I live at Mr. Dobree's, a pawnbroker, at Charing-cross. I took in this saw, and gave this duplicate for it; I do not know to whom.

JOHN GARDNER EDWARDS. This is my saw - I lost it from St. Katharine's Docks; the prisoner worked there, for the same foreman.

THOMAS RICHARD STEVENS. One of these plummets is mine.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you lend me that plummet for Joe Williams? A. I might; we are in the habit of lending things.

HUMPHREY JENKINSON. This is my axe.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had found the duplicate, and the axe in the Docks.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-14

1013. JOHN DUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 waistcoat, value 12s., and 1 shirt, value 8s. , the goods of Horatio Nelson .

HORATIO NELSON . I am a baker , and live in Old Compton-street ; the prisoner lodged in the same house for about twenty-four weeks - I believe he is an upholsterer . Davison gave me information on the 21st of May, and I missed this property; I went to look for the prisoner, and met him in the Strand - I collared him, called him a rogue and a thief; he asked me to let go, and he would go civilly with me - he then said he had pawned the things, and gave me the duplicate; he has broken his leg and is still lame - I believe he had no employ.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE. I received the prisoner in charge.

DANIEL MANSFIELD . I live with Mr. Laws, a pawnbroker, in Green-street. I took in this coat, waistcoat, and shirt - I do not know of whom, but I gave this duplicate for them.

SUSANNAH DAVISON. I have an apartment in the same house; I missed the coat, waistcoat, and shirt, from a drawer in my room - I had seen them safe on the 20th.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-15

1014. JOHN BURN and JAMES KENNEDY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th May , 56lbs. weight of lead, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Gildaurie .

JOHN GILDAURIE . I gave orders to Roberts, on the 11th of May, to take down a shop-front in Robert-street , and bring away the materials.

JOHN ROBERTS. I was employed to take down the shopfront, and set Burn about it; Kennedy had worked for me the week before, and was waiting to be put on again - there was some lead to be taken down, they were to take it to Mr. Gildaurie's, in Mount-street, St. Giles'; I saw it taken down, but do not know where it was taken - I cannot tell what day it was.

WILLIAM CORNER. I work for the prosecutor in Mount-row. Kennedy brought about 50lbs. of lead there, and Burn came about the same time - they afterwards came back together, and Burn said to Kennedy, "You have made a mistake about this lead;" he put it on Burn's shoulder, and they went away.

WILLIAM LEADBURY . I received charge of the prisoner; I have made every inquiry for the lead, but it cannot be found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-16

1015. PATRICK COCKLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 1 cloak, value 2l. , the goods of Christopher Bushell .

WILLIAM GILBERT. I am a private watchman at St. Giles' workhouse. At a quarter-past six o'clock on Sunday morning, the 26th of April, I saw the prosecutor go along Broad-street, St. Giles' , in a gig, and a cloak hanging over the back of it; I saw the prisoner running after it for several yards, and then saw him take the cloak and run away up a court; I sung out, Stop thief! he was pursued, and taken.

CHRISTOPHER BUSHELL. I was driving in the gig, and lost my cloak from the back of it - I heard an alarm, turned round, and saw the prisoner crossing the road with the cloak - this is it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the cloak, opposite Plumtree-street; I went down a court, a man pursued, and look me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-17

1016. PETER CRABB was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , 1 iron square, value 1s. 6d., and 1 plane, value 6d. , the goods of George Hoffman .

GEORGE HOFFMAN . I am a coachmaker . I lost an iron square and a plane from the bench where I work, at Mr. Richardson's, in the City-road , while I was gone to my dinner, on the 13th of May; the prisoner had occasionally been employed there, but was not there at that time.

JAMES CLARK . I was sent for and took the prisoner; he requested to go backwards - I went after him in a minute or two, and found this duplicate down the privy.

THOMAS KIRKWOOD. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old-street. This plane and square were pawned with me on the 14th of May - I do not know by whom; I gave this duplicate for them.

The prisoner put in a petition for a lenient punishment, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-18

1017. ELLEN FEATHERSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 13 yards of cotton, value 7s. , the goods of George Newbury .

GEORGE NEWBURY. I keep a linen-draper's shop in Hereford-place, Commercial-road . On the 19th of May I saw a crowd at my door - I went out, and found my lad with the prisoner in custody.

JOHN SAWARD . I live with Mr. Newbury. This print was hanging on the rail before the window - I did not see it taken, but heard an alarm at the door and went out; I

took the prisoner about eight doors from our house - she was rather on the run - I took the print from her.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you in the shop alone? A. No; there were two or three customers, and another young lady in the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by and picked up the cotton - I did not know who it belonged to.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290611-19

1018. JOHN SMALE , RICHARD KNIGHT , and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 7 cwt. of iron, value 2l. , the goods of William Wiggins , the elder, and William Wiggins , the younger.

JAMES FOGG. I am a constable of the Thames Police. Mr. Wiggins is a contractor for the St. Katharine's Docks, and has a smith's shop on his premises where he repairs his carts; on the 4th of June, about six o'clock in the morning, I saw a cart with his name on it at that shop, there Smale and Smith work; Knight is a farrier , and was there that morning - I left a brother officer to watch the cart, and I went some distance, as I was afraid the men would know me; the cart afterwards came by where I was; Smale was leading the horse - Knight was in the cart leaning over the front, with a hammer and a pair of pincers in his hand, and there was a long piece of wood in the cart; Mr. Wiggins has some other premises at a little distance, where Knight works - I let the cart go on till it got past there- I then went and stopped Smale, and asked what they had in the cart; he said, "A little old iron;" I said,"Where have you brought it from?" he said, "From St. Katharine's," which I understood was St. Katharine's Docks; I said, "I know better than that, it is one of Mr. Wiggins's carts, and you brought it from there;" he said,"Yes, and Mr. Wiggins allows it us as perquisites to get a drop of beer;" Knight heard this, and he said, "It is only for a drop of beer, master, it is not worth while taking us back:" I asked if Smith knew any thing about it; they said, Yes; I then went down to Mr. Wiggins, and saw Smith; Mr. Wiggins' foreman was with me, and he said to Smith; "Here is a nice thing, Smale and Knight are at the Thames Police;" Smith said, "What for?" I said, "For some iron they have taken from here this morning; do you know any thing about it?" he said, No; I said, "You must know it was taken from this place; you must have seen it go, it is a small place;" he then said,"Why I saw it go, and Smale told me Mr. Wiggins allowed it to him as a perquisite;" I asked if Mr. Wiggins had told him that; he said, No, it was only what he had heard from Smale; there was 7 cwt. of iron in the cart: part of it was nails; they were at the top, and the large pieces of iron at the bottom.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. What time in the morning was this? A. About six o'clock - there were several men at work on the wharf, but not at that place; I do not know whether the prisoners were employed by Mr. Wiggins at that time - there was a piece of oak in the cart, which I believe was to blind me - they had no business with it; I did not see Smith do any thing; I did not see Knight do any thing, but he told me it was a perquisite - Smith afterwards said he would attend at the Police-office; it was mostly old iron - there were some new pieces.

ROBERT MUTTON CREBER . I went with Fogg - I staid and watched the cart; it was standing with the tail on the ground, and the shafts upwards; there was no horse in it- Smale was at work at the other end of the wharf, not far from the cart; Smith was at work at a little distance -I saw Knight bring something heavy, and put into the cart; Smale could see what Knight was doing while he was loading the cart - while he was doing it, Smale went into the shop, and came out again; he gave a look into the cart as he went by, and went to his work again - I then saw him put his head to Smith, as if he was speaking to him, but I could not hear what was said; I then saw Smith come and undo the prop of the cart; he tried to pull it down, but could not - he went into the shop, got a hammer, and went to his work again; I went to the other side of the wharf, and saw a truck drawn in by a brown horse; I watched, and saw the horse taken and put into the cart, but I could not see by whom; the cart was then drawn out - I kept close behind; Knight was in the cart, and Smale led the horse.

Cross-examined. Q.There was no horse in the cart at the time you saw something put into it? A. No; I thought it was iron by the sound; I did not know Knight before -I could see it was a very heavy substance that he put into the cart.

WILLIAM WIGGINS. JUN. Our firm consists of my father, William Wiggins , and myself; the cart and the iron were ours - I believe there is about 7 cwt. of it; I had seen some of it in the shop on the Monday - Smale and Smith were wheelers, and Knight was a farrier, employed by my brother-in-law.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you ever said you would take every means in your power to prosecute Knight and transport him, but you cared nothing about the others? A. No, I did not; I have said I heard the officer had information that the iron was to be stolen - I can swear to part of this iron; this piece is part of an axle-tree of a cart; I broke up fifty of them, and cannot find one - many pieces of bolts were on my premises, and I have not seen them since; here is one piece I can swear to; I never allow pieces of iron to the men to get beer - I never heard of such a thing in the trade; some of these pieces may have been on the premises twelve months, and some not two days; they were up in a corner.

SMALE'S Defence. This large piece of iron I was going to make a tool of for Mr. Wiggins.

SMALE - GUILTY . Aged 29.

KNIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-20

1019. ELIZABETH HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 12lbs. weight of beef, value 7s., and 2lbs. of mutton, value 1s. , the goods of Samuel Summers .

SAMUEL OSBORN SUMMERS . I am the son of Samuel Summers, a butcher , who lives in Skinner-street Somers'-town ; the prisoner came to the shop about ten o'clock, on the Saturday night, and was rather troublesome - she had three pieces of beef cut off, but they did not suit her;

the man who was serving her, laid down the beef she had been looking at, on the block, and went to attend to other customers - she stood some time by the block, and then took the beef in her hand, as if she had been going to the scale, but she went out; I followed her about fifty yards - she carried the beef openly in her hand, till she got into a dark street, when she began to cover it with her shawl; I said, "What are you going to do with this?" she said, "I have paid for it" - I said, "You have not": she then said, "I was going to take it to my husband, and if he approves of it, I will bring it back and have it weighed" - I took her back, and my father found a piece of mutton in her basket.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. Did you know her? A. She had bought a piece of meat there once before, and I think left some money on it; I heard her say she lived servant in Burton-street - I suppose there were fifty persons in and about the shop; I think she was perfectly sober - there was 6s. 11d. found in her pocket; I thought she was not quite right when she once came to our shop - there was no sovereign found on her that I saw.

RICHARD COOPER . I took the prisoner, and found 6s. 11d. on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no recollection of what I said - I had had a glass of brandy.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-21

1020. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 2 silver spoons, value 8s. , the goods of Henry Philby .

JOSEPH HALL . I live with a pawnbroker, in Regent's-park. I have two spoons, pawned on the 8th of May, by the prisoner, in the name of George Thomas .

HENRY PHILBY . I am a solicitor , and live in Stanhope-terrace, Camden-town . The prisoner was sent to my house by an upholsterer to stuff some chairs; he had been at work in my kitchen for a day or two before the 8th of May - these are my spoons.

MARGARET FOLEY . I am servant to the prosecutor. These spoons were in the kitchen.

Prisoner's Defence. I left there at twelve o'clock on the Saturday; I had been there on the Friday - I did not pawn them on the Saturday, as the pawnbroker says.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18290611-22

1021. JAMES WHITE and WILLIAM WARREN were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 4 live tame fowls, price 12s. , the property of William Hester Wiggins .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ANN WIGGINS. I am the wife of William Hester Wiggins: we live at Watlington, in Oxfordshire , between forty and fifty miles from London: we had five guinea fowls on the 14th of April - I saw them safe that evening when they went to roost, and missed them the next day; I had had two of them for twelve months - they were a present, and two of them I bred from chickens; two of them were light, and two dark - I fed them almost every day: one of the dark ones was lame, from the nail being off the middle claw - I have seen their legs and wings since.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How many more guinea fowls had you? A. None; I did not tell the Magistrate I could not swear to them - I never saw the legs and wings till this morning; I do not know when they were found - I believe it was the next day.

THOMAS WALL . I am a green-grocer, and live in Fleet-market. On the 13th of April I saw White in London about half-past ten o'clock in the morning - it was on a Monday.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When did you see him again? A. On the 15th he came to me in Fleet-market, about two o'clock: he came to me on the Monday to return a coat I had lent him - I have known him five or six months; he lodged at a public-house.

JAMES GARRATT . I live at Watlington, and follow the plough; I have known White ever since I can remember any thing; I saw him at Watlington on the night of the 14th of April, between twelve and one o'clock, in Cushion-street, opposite Mr. Ives' - I did not speak to him, but I am sure it was him: there were two men with him whom I did not know.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you speak to him? A. No: he almost touched me as he passed - it was a moonlight night, but there was no gas-light; he was no acquaintance of mine - I had seen him before, and spoken to him, but did not on that night; I heard of the loss of these fowls soon after, but I did not tell Mr. Wiggins, or any body else of it nor go before any Magistrate; I was found at a public-house on Whit-Monday - I was quite sober; I am sure it was the night of the 14th, because my master had ordered me to get up that night to draw into Reading: I told this story when they came to me.

COURT. Q. How often in the course of your life had you seen White? A.Almost every day when he was at Watlington.

HENRY HODGES. I am servant to Mr. Stone. I know White well. On the morning of the 14th of April, I saw him and two other men in a cart, about half-past ten o'clock - they were about eighteen miles from Watlington, and going towards it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you go before the Magistrate? A. I went before the Grand Jury yesterday, and before a Magistrate; I have known White three months by sight; I cannot say how many times I had seen him; I did not speak to him that morning - I am sure he is the man.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am a constable of St. Luke's. On the night of the 15th of April I went to the Admiral Benbow public-house, in Golden-lane; I found the two prisoners and two other persons there; Warren seemed as if he had been fighting - he came out of the parlour, and said he wanted to give charge of a man who had been beating him; I saw Harrington, who was with me, take up this bag - he said to Warren, "What is in this bag, and whose is it?" Warren said, "It is mine, and there are four guinea fowls in it:" they were looked at - they were then dead: I said to Warren, "Who did you get them from?" he said, "That person in the parlour," and pointed out White, and said he gave 8s. or 9s. for them; White denied it - we did not take the fowls away that night, but

next morning I went with Buckle to the Benbow - Warren had left the bag there, and Buckle took it; the prisoners were taken, and conveyed to Worship-street, with a man named Pettit: as they were going along, I heard White say to Pettit, "If he can keep his tongue, it will be all right enough;" he was alluding to Warren, who was walking first with the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take the prisoners that first night? A. No; I left them and the fowls there that night - they knew I was an officer; I heard that there were some pheasants lost as well.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You say there was a quarrel? A.There had been a quarrel, and the inspector of the watch called me in; they were tipsy - the bag was there the next morning; White said if he would keep his tongue it would be all right - he pointed to Warren, but did not mention his name.

- I am inspector of the watch. I went to the house, and found the bag, which the landlord gave to Warren when he asked for it; White came out of the parlour, and said, "That is my bag," and he took it from him; I opened the bag, and took out one or two fowls, and left them there.

JAMES BUCKLE . I am a constable of St. Luke's. I went and got the bag, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning; I then took Warren, and told him I apprehended the fowls were stolen - he said, "I thought so too;" I asked who he bought them of: he said of a man named White, who would be there presently - White then came, and I took him; I wrote down to the constable of Watlington, and kept the fowls as long as I could - I then cut off the heads, pinions, and legs; the heads were offensive, and I could not keep them - these are the legs and pinions; one of the feet has a nail off one of the toes - this is it; I took it off one of the dark fowls.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Where did you find Mr. Wall? A. At his residence in Fleet-market; I believe it was after the first examination - I did not take the plough-boy; he was subpoened here - I did not go on the night before; I heard of it in the morning, and followed Warren and Pettit into the Benbow: White came in in a quarter of an hour; I had not heard of 50l. being offered for some pheasants till the second examination.

COURT. Q. You did hear of the reward? A. I heard there was a reward of 20l. for any burglary in that parish, and an extra 5l. from a gentleman who had lost some pheasants.

MRS. WIGGINS. I believe they are the legs of my fowls - I never had the lame fowl in my hand while it was alive, but I will swear that was the leg of it; I have seen it many times.

COURT. Q. You say two were light, and two were dark? A. Yes; light guinea fowls are rather singular.

WHITE'S Defence. I had the fowls delivered to me from a coach-office in Fleet-market. I asked where they came from, but they did not give me any information on that subject.

WHITE - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

WARREN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-23

1022. JOHN KERMAN and WILLIAM GOODEAR were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 saddle, value 25s.: 1 bridle, value 2s. 6d.; 2 chaise breeching, value 1l.; 2 bridles, value 1l.; 1 pair of reins, value 5s., and 1 chaise-saddle and rackband, value 1l. , the goods of Nathan Negus .

NATHAN NEGUS . I am a baker , and live in Petticoat-lane. I have a stable in Vine-court, Spitalfields ; I left my saddles and harness safe there on the evening of Tuesday, and next morning, at six o'clock, I missed all the articles stated in the indictment; I saw them at the watch-house on the 3d or 4th of May - I did not know either of the prisoners; I had heard of Kerman as being a bellhanger.

JAMES COLLINS . I am a harness-maker, and live at No. 15, Willow-walk. Kerman came on the 3d of May, and asked me to buy some second-hand harness; I had never seen him before - he took me with him to Sandy's-row, Widegate-alley; as we went along, he said "This harness is on the cross;" I suppose he meant that it was stolen; I said, "Never mind that, as I travel the country, it won't matter;" I saw some harness, part of which belonged to the prosecutor - he wanted 5l. for it; I agreed to give him 3l.; he asked me when it would suit me to fetch it; I said in the course of a couple of hours, as I was going to Smithfield - he said, "As I have nothing to do, I will go with you," and that I had better bring some bags for it; I said No, I would bring my horse and cart - he went to Smithfield with me; I could not get rid of him; at last I said the person I expected to see was not there; he then left me, and came to me again two or three times, and said if I had not got all the money, I could leave part of it - Mr. Wall afterwards came and asked me if I had a harness to sell; I said I knew of one; I at length got this harness from Goodear's house, in Dorset-street - the person down stairs said he lodged there; Kerman had shown it me twice; I am sure this is the harness which he offered to sell me.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Did not you go to the prisoner's house, and ask him if he had any harness to sell? A. No; I was never charged with any thing - I deal in all sorts of harness, and sometimes in horses - I do not keep a marine store shop; I am a general dealer - when Kerman said it was on the cross, I said, "Never mind," in order to find the property: I do not know a person named Godwin nor Watson - I did not go with Kerman to Godwin or Watson; the first lot of harness was at Sandy's-row, where Kerman lived; the other was at Dorset-street, where they said Dick Goodear lived, but I did not see him there.

JAMES DAVEY . I am a tailor, and live in Vine-court. On the 31st of March Mr. Negus's harness was safe in the stable at twenty minutes before six o'clock, and the key was given me by the man who was to clean it; the next morning it was missing; the man who was to clean it was gone in the country, and we could not find him - I do not know where he went; I saw the prisoners at Worship-street; I have seen Kerman in French-alley - I lived near him there three years ago.

THOMAS HART . I am a constable. I received the harness at the watch-house; I took the prisoners at No. 19, Montague-street; I said it was on suspicion of stealing

some harness; Kerman sat on the foot of the bed for some minutes without speaking; at last he said he supposed he must go with me - I found nothing on him.

NATHAN NEGUS. This is my harness. The key of the stable had been left at the next house, because I was not up soon enough - the person who had the care of it is gone into the country; at twenty minutes past six o'clock he came running home to me, and said the stable was robbed- I have seen him since; I accused him of stealing the harness, because the officer examined the stable, and found nothing disturbed.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you made inquiries about Goodear? A. Yes; he hears a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-24

1023. JOHN KERMAN and WILLIAM GOODEAR were again indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , 2 horse-collars, value 6s.; 1 pair of hames and tugs, value 6s., and 1 bridle, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Chapman .

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I live in Spitalfields. I have a stable in the Tenter-ground; it was broken open on the 2d of April, between eight and ten o'clock - I had not been there that day till about half-past ten at night, when the watchman sent to me; I went down, found the door open, and missed my harness; I saw it again on the 4th of May, at the watch-house - I went that night to the corner of Dorset-street; I saw a cart there, and two men in it, but I do not know who they were; I followed the cart - I had not known Kerman before.

THOMAS ROBERT CHAPMAN. I went to the stable with my father, and missed the harness - that is all I know.

JAMES COLLINS . This is the harness I went to see on the 3d of April; when Kerman came to me, he said it was on the cross; I had not known him before - I went and looked at the harness, and thought I knew part of it, but I could not swear to it - Mr. Wall came to me, and when he said Chapman had lost a harness, I told him of it; I did not intend to have it, but merely went to see it, that I might know what to say if any body came to me - when Kerman came to me at Smithfield, I said I could not find the man I expected; he called on me several times afterwards, and on the 4th of May, between twelve and one o'clock, Mr. Wall came, and asked if I had a set of harness; after some talk he said, "To tell you the truth, we have lost some:" I said, "When did you lose it?" he said, "On Good Friday;" I said I would do my best to get it - I never saw the prisoners together; it was I and Kerman who were in the cart - I went to buy Mr. Wall's harness, and Kerman said I should not have it without the money; I went and told Wall, who gave me a 5l. note, which I went and gave Kerman, and in that way we got the harness from Goodear's house - I had not inquired whose the harness was before Mr. Wall came to me, but I left word with my wife that if any body came about harness, I could give information.

THOMAS HART . I took Kerman into custody about nine o'clock in the evening - I saw the two men in the cart, but did not then know who they were; I followed them into the house, and found they were Kerman and Collins - I did not observe what was in the cart, but I met Collins coming down the stairs with this bag of harness; I went up, and took Kerman.

THOMAS WALL . I went to Collins' on the 4th of May: he said a lot of harness had been offered him for sale, and described it: I said it belonged to Mr. Negus - I lent him my cart, and saw him go with Kerman to Dorset-street, where part of the harness was found; it was my 5l. note; Kerman eat it in the watch-house.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I saw him eating some paper in the watch-house - two or three of us tried to get it from him, but could not.

KERMAN'S Defence. If any person received a 5l. note he would naturally open it; I never received a farthing - I was merely at the place at the time, and know nothing about the property; I had no dealing with Collins - he is a prejudiced man; I never put any thing into my mouth - I had a bad cough at the time.

KERMAN - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

GOODEAR - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-25

1024. THE SAID JOHN KERMAN and JOHN WATSON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 1 chaise harness, value 4l. 10s. , the goods of Mary Wall .

JOHN KEMPSTER. I am in the employ of Mary Wall. I left her harness safe on Good Friday night, about a quarter before eight o'clock - I went the next morning, and the stable was broken; the harness was gone - I saw it again at the watch-house a week or a fortnight after - it has my mistress' name on it.

JAMES COLLINS . Kerman came to me about some other harness; I went for that, and he said he had another thing set, which he would show me another time - I said I had plenty of money, and we went to Montague-street; he pulled the harness from under a bed, in a bag - I agreed to give him 45s. for it; I gave him 2s. 6d - we went to a public-house, and had something to drink; I was to meet him in Dorset-street in an hour - I went and told Mr. Wall and the officer of it; Mr. Wall got the horse and cart, and we took the harness.

THOMAS WALL . This is Mary Wall's harness; I saw Kerman eat the note at the watch-house - we made every exertion to save it.

THOMAS HART . I went and took this harness in the cart; I saw Kerman chewing the paper, but could not see what it was.

KERMAN - GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years, to commence from the expiration of his former term .

WATSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-26

1025. JOHN BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , 1 cwt. of gum, value 50s.; 28lbs. weight of grain tin, value 25s.; 8lbs. of cochineal, value 4l. 10s.; 140lbs. weight of safflower, value 9l.; 11lbs. weight of indigo, value 3l. 10s.; 11lbs. weight of antimony, value 3s., and 12lbs. weight of smalts, value 27s., the goods of Henry Barnes ; 1 carpet bag, value 2s., the goods of Henry Gill ; and 1 pair of trousers, value 3s. , the goods of William Longmate .

SECOND COUNT, for receiving the said goods knowing them to be stolen.

HENRY BARNES. I am a dry-salter , and live in Long-

lane . My shop was broken open on Thursday night, the 17th of April, and this property taken - I have seen part of it since at the Mansion-house; some samples of the property were offered me on the Monday by Taite, which I believe to be mine - we followed the prisoner and Taite to Peter-street, Westminster, the same evening, and there they met another man in a cart; the officer got some further information, and seized a coach with this property.

WILLIAM TAITE . I sell drugs on commission, and live at No. 33, Bedford-street. The prisoner came to me on the 21st of April, and offered me a sample of some grain tin and safflower, and said he had some cochineal - I was to meet him about eleven o'clock and got a sample of it; I went to him at twelve - he said he could not get a sample; I was to see him again at three - he then said he had not the goods, but was to have them next day, and if I called at one o'clock I should see them; I went next day - he was not there - I showed the sample he had left me to Mr. Barnes.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Had you known him before? A. Yes, for nine or ten years - I knew where he lived; he was aware that I knew him.

HENRY GILL. I am clerk to Mr. Barnes. I only know the place was broken and the property stolen: there was a dog on the premises who was stabbed in two places, and was dead.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.About what o'clock in the evening had you seen the premises safe? A. Ten minutes to eight o'clock on the Thursday night.

WILLIAM LONGMATE. I am servant to Mr. Barnes. I lost a pair of trousers.

BENJAMIN IBBERTSON. I am a Bow-street officer. Mr. Longmate came to me - I searched the premises, and found the dog's throat cut.

DANIEL FORRESTER. I went to Brick-lane on the 21st of April - I saw a cart and two boys; the prisoner gave them some wrappers; I followed the cart to Blackfriars-bridge and then to Westminster-bridge - the two boys were put out there; Walker had joined the cart on the road; the next morning I went with Herdsfield to Wheeler-street - I saw a coach stop at a house and the prisoner got out; I went up to him, and said, "Get in again, what have you got here?" he said, "I brought them from the market;" I said, "What market?" he said, "I shall say nothing more at present."

Cross-examined. Q. It was open day-light? A. Yes.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I took the prisoner - I found in his pocket a pocket-book, with some memorandums in it of the goods, and the prices as if he had bargained for them.

RICHARD BAXTER . I am a dry-salter. I have known the prisoner forty years - he came with Walker, and told me he had some safflower and other things to sell, and wanted me to value them; I said, I must have a larger sample; he came again, and I was out.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in a fair way.

NOT GUILTY .

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18290611-27

1026. THOMAS GOODMAN and JOHN WHITE were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 1 half bushel of oats, peas, and beans, mixed together, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Sherman .

THOMAS PALMER. I am servant to Mr. Edward Sherman; he lives at the Oxford Arms, Warwick, and is proprietor of the Bull and Mouth inn . On the 20th of April I went to Whetstone , where Goodman is horse-keeper , at Mr. Sherman's stables - I was in the club-room, about forty yards from the stable, and saw Goodman in it with Franks, who has been discharged; I saw Goodman give this bag of corn into White's hand, who took it out, and put it into a cart, belonging to Franks, under a coal sack and a measure - this was a little after four o'clock in the afternoon; I got a constable - we took White and then the others; Goodman said to me, "Don't be a fool, it is the first time," and White said he knew nothing about it - I had left the bag in the cart when I went to get the constable, and when I came back I found it there - it has oats, beans, peas, chaff and bran; Mr. Sherman has no such mixture, as that, but there is bran in one part of the stable; I did not hear Goodman say that it was the sweepings of the stable, or of its being given to horses who had a cold - I did not say so before the Magistrate; White is not in Mr. Sherman's employ: what I said to the Magistrate was not read over to me; I did not make this cross on this paper.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am a constable. I went to the stable a little after four o'clock; I found this bag concealed in a cart belonging to Franks - when I took White, he said he knew nothing about it; I then took Goodman, who said, "Don't be a fool, it is the first time, and look over it;" he afterwards said it was only the sweepings of the manger; he said his lower ground horses were unwell, and had a running at the nose - the top of this corn was mostly bran, the lower part is very good mixed corn.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-28

1027. EDWARD HERBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 pair of check braces, value 30s. , the goods of William Baldock Edridge .

WILLIAM BALDOCK EDRIDGE. I am a coachmaker , and live in the Haymarket - the prisoner was in my employ. On Thursday morning, the 7th of May, I took off his hat, and found this pair of check braces in it - he did not say any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long had he been with you? A. A fortnight or three weeks; no man in our employ had quarreled with him to my knowledge - my foreman stopped him, and told him to come back to the counting-house - this duster was in his hat as well; he might have put it on without knowing they were in it; he was perfectly sober - he said at the office that he did not know they were there.

WILLIAM ALLICK . I took the prisoner and property.

Prisoner's Defence. I found these things in my hat; I had had some words with a man there, and he said he would do my business for me - he went into the counting-house, and reported that I had these things in my hat.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-29

1028. ELEANOR JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 6 spoons, value 12s.; 1 snuff box, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and the sum of 15s., in monies, numbered , the property of Francis Colls .

FRANCIS COLLS. I am a gardener , and live at Edmonton ; the prisoner was a charwoman at my house.

On the 19th of May I lost six spoons,; they were taken from my premises, and two locks had been broken - I had seen them that morning; there was one table-spoon, and four tea-spoons in the bar, and one spoon was in a tea-pot in my room, which I had seen some months before - I missed them about four o'clock in the afternoon; the spoons which I had had at breakfast, were not locked up, the others were - I would not swear that I had had them at breakfast; sometimes I do not get tea or breakfast - I am sure I saw them the night before, for I used them; my general time for going to bed is ten o'clock - the prisoner was in the house that day; she was employed about my premises - when I went out in the morning I left her making the bed, for what I know.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You keep a public-house? A. No, Sir, there has been no licence to it for fifteen years; the prisoner was more like a charwoman than a servant - she slept in the house; she came there first as a lodger - I had a man in the house who worked for me; the prisoner had been there twelve days - I am certain I locked up these spoons the night before; these two spoons were on a tea-caddy - the bar door was locked outside; I got my dinner in the bar, and when I went out, I locked it up again, and shut the outer door - she was up stairs for what I know; her bedroom was on the first floor, over the tap-room - she slept in a room opposite mine; we slept in separate rooms.

JOHN MEAD . On the evening of the 19th of May, a man told me that Nelly had been robbing her lodgings- I went to a lodging-house and took her, about eight o'clock in the evening; I took her to a public-house, and found these spoons in her pocket - she said it was the cursed drink, and I do not think she was sober at that time; she said at first it was distress - I said that could not be, as she had had a sovereign at the Bench, on the Wednesday, which she said was to get some things, to come to live at the King's Arms, public-house, in St. Paul's-church-yard, and she was to return it in six months, instead of that she went and spent the money; she then said "Don't ask me any more questions, I am quite ashamed of myself."

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-30

1029. SARAH LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 1 tippet, value 2s.; 1 yard of carpeting, value 1s., and 1 table-cover, value 1s. , the goods of Mary Ann Lenham .

MARY ANN LENHAM. I am single . I knew nothing of the prisoner till I saw her brought back to my house by my landlord's son, in Duke's-court, St. Martin's-in-the-Fields , at about half-past two o'clock: this table-cover, tippet, and carpet were brought back; they are my property - I had seen them safe five minutes before.

JOHN PERCIVAL . I saw the prisoner go out of the house with the things; I pursued her into Long-acre, and took her - they were in her apron; she had got about two or three hundred yards - she gave no account of them.

THOMAS CUTTENDEN . I am a Bow-street officer. I took the prisoner; she gave no account of the things.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-31

1030. JAMES PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 10 books, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Barns .

THOMAS BARNS . I am a bookseller : I have a warehouse in Great Pulteney-street. On the 28th of April, about half-past ten o'clock, I was going from Covent-garden to my home, and as I went along Little Pulteney-street, I met the prisoner with a bag of books - I suspected they did not belong to him; I felt the bottom of the bag, and found they were books - I asked him where he was going with them at that time of night; he said he was going to the Bull or the Bell, in Holborn - the waggon went off early in the morning, and that he had brought them from Regent-street; I went on to the corner of Dean-street, and there I saw a watchman - I said, "This young man says he has stationery in this bag, I want to convince myself that it is so;" he put down the bag, and I found ten of my books in it, which I had seen in my warehouse a day or two before; I went to my warehouse, and missed them- they are Journals of the Houses of Lords and Commons; the warehouse was locked up, and had been opened with some key - I have had lads to sleep there.

ROBERT QUADLING. I am a watchman, and took the prisoner; these are the books.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work for some time; a man stopped me in Brewer-street, and asked me to carry this parcel to the Bell inn, Holborn.

THOMAS BARNS. He said so at the time, and that the person had given him some bread and cheese.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-32

1031. ISAAC MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , one 50l. Bank-note , the property of John Digby .

HANNAH DIGBY . I am the wife of John Digby - we live at Limehouse . On the 26th of September I got three notes from the Bank of England - my husband sent me for them, but I do not know what they were, as I cannot read nor write; I gave them to my husband. On the 9th of April I was in the shop, about half-past eleven o'clock in the day, and two men came in - I cannot say that the prisoner was one - they were both alike in features; I did not know one from the other - I bought some sweatmeats of them; one of the men, but I cannot say which, had been at my shop the week before - on the 9th they came together, when I bought the box of goods of them, one came first, and then went and fetched the other: the box of sweat-meats was brought from a cart by one of them - I was to pay 5l. 7s. 6d. for it; 3d. was taken off by the gentleman who took the money - I cannot say whether the men were dressed alike; I had never seen them before - one of them called the week before; I sent to my husband for the key of his box - it was brought; I unlocked the box, and took out two notes, but I do not know what they were - I do not know any difference between a 1l. note and a 50l. note; I gave one of the notes to the men, who said it was right - that was all I gave him, except the 7s. 6d.; he put the note into his pocket: I swear I do not recollect any thing particular in his manner of doing it - they went away together, and I saw no more of them; the box of sweatmeats was left, and the box was to be called for on the following Saturday, but they did not come.

JOHN DIGRY. I had a 50l. note, which my wife brought from the Bank of England last September; I had seen it about the middle of April, two or three days before the sweetmeats were brought - it had not always been locked up: it was in a box, of which I sometimes had the key, and sometimes not; when I am out I give my wife the key - I do not know that she had had it that week, I think not - I have got no part of the money since; I was before the Magistrate: I did tell him that it was in a box, of which I kept the key. When I came back on the day the sweetmeats were brought, the note was gone; I think the key had not been out of my possession after I saw the note safe - I have some lodgers in the house, who go into that room the same as myself.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-33

1032. WILLIAM MAYER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 looking-glass, value 25s. , the goods of Isaac Bird .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-34

1033. RICHARD PRINGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; 2 shirts, value 7s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of James Mason : 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Owen Connell ; and 1 bed tick, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Boyle .

JAMES MASON . On the 22d of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, I missed a pair of shoes, a pair of stockings, and other things from my sleeping-room, on the third floor at the Robin Hood public-house, in Church-street, St. Giles' ; the prisoner was pot-boy there - some of my articles were hanging up, and some were on the table; I saw them safe about six o'clock in the morning: I think the prisoner has one of my shirts on now.

OWEN CONNELL . I slept in the same room; I missed a coat, a waistcoat, and a handkerchief, which I had seen safe about half-past four o'clock that morning; he said he sold my coat in Rose-lane, for 3s., and the other things in Mommouth-street.

THOMAS BOYLE . I keep the Robin Hood. The prisoner was in my service; he had a linen tick to throw over his bed, which was taken the same day - he left me without notice: I took him myself on the 9th of May; he had Mason's shirt on - he said he would pay for the articles at 2s. per week, but the Magistrate would not permit it; he had been with me two or three months.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work for eight or nine months; the prosecutor took me in to clean pots, and gave me my victuals; I heard of a place, and I had not got a stitch of clothes on my back, so I went into the room, and took the things - I did work for a fortnight, but I did not leave the neighbourhood; I was only in the next street: I sent two notes to offer to pay for the things - there were better articles, which I did not take.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290611-35

1034. JAMES ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 2 books, value 2s. , the goods of William Thomas .

WILLIAM THOMAS. I am a bookseller , and live in Shepherd's-walk, City-road . On the 13th of May I missed two books from a rack in the window, about three o'clock in the afternoon; they were Harley's Life of Lord Charlemont, in two volumes.

THOMAS BENNETT . I took the prisoner - he told me he had pawned the books in Aylesbury-street; I went there, and got them.

EDWARD BULWORTHY. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Aylesbury-street. On the 15th of May these two volumes of the Life of Lord Charlemont were pawned with me, by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Bennett said if I would own to the books the prosecutor would not prosecute.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-36

1035. JAMES STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 2 wheels, value 2l.; 2 iron springs, value 15s.; 1 axletree, value 7s.; 1 scroll-iron, value 1s.; 3 iron bolts, value 1s., and 5 iron nuts, value 6d. , the goods of James Comwell .

JAMES COMWELL. I am a coal-dealer , and live in West-street. On the 30th of April Smith gave me information; I went to my shed, and found all the screws had been taken out of my cart; one wheel, the axletree, and the springs were removed from it, but were not taken off the premises; the cart stood upright - I saw the prisoner, and asked how he came to take these things off my cart, he said he was employed by a person, but he would not tell me who - this was about nine or ten o'clock in the morning; the cart was standing near the Three Colts public-house, in Dog-row.

JOSEPH SMITH. I am a silk dyer. I saw the prisoner about half-past four o'clock in the morning, at work with Mr. Comwell's cart, under the shed; I got on my clothes, went down, and took him - he had this hammer in his hand. which I told him to drop, and he did; one wheel was off, and the other partly off the cart; he said if I knew his troubles I should not interfere with him - I had seen the cart between six and seven o'clock at night; it was then perfect, and lying down on the shafts.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was employed to take the springs from the cart, by a man who represented himself to be the prosecutor's brother.

JOSEPH SMITH. He did not tell me the man employed him, but he said the man lived near Three Colt-lane, and that he hopped as he walked, one leg being shorter than the other; we have made every inquiry for such a person, but cannot find him.

Prisoner. I gave the best description I could of the man who employed me; I have done my best endeavours to bring him forward.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-37

1036. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 2 sheets, value 7s.; 1 blanket, value 2s., and 1 pillow and a case, value 1s. , the goods of George Chivers .

ELIZABETH CHIVERS. I am the wife of George Chivers ,

a bricklayer - we live in Coal-yard, Drury-lane . I let a room furnished to the prisoner on the 11th of April - he came there with a little boy that evening, and put the child to bed; he and his wife went out, and came home in liquor about twelve o'clock - they brought some liquor in with them, and made me drink; it went on till the 14th - they had been in liquor every day; I went up and missed the things, got an officer, and took the man to the watch-house - the articles stated were let to them.

GEORGE BICKERS. I am a shopman to a pawnbroker. This sheet was pawned with me, on the 15th of April, by a woman.

RICHARD ROBERTS. I am a pawnbroker. I have a sheet, pawned by a woman.

WILLIAM KING. I am an officer. I was called up to take the prisoner, who was struggling with the prosecutor; the pillow was given up at Marlborough-street by the pawnbroker - the prisoner said, "The things are pawned, and if you will give me time I will make them good;" I found the duplicates by the bed-side - I found four different keys in the room, of different apartments where they had lived.

Prisoner's Defence. My wife did it through distress; I knew nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-38

1037. WILLIAM DOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , I live tame fowl, price 2s. 6d. , the property of John Cater .

JOHN CATER. I am a labourer , and live in Globe-street, Hackney . I had some fowls about my yard the day before the 12th of May, and they were safe at breakfast time that morning: while I was at work that day, Mr. Hesse came and told me that he saw a person enticing the fowl under a gate - we went to the place; I told a person to watch him; Mr. Hesse afterwards brought me the prisoner, with one fowl, which I knew to be mine.

THOMAS LEWIS . I was at work in the middle of the ground with the prosecutor - Mr. Hesse came and said he saw a man enticing the fowls; I ran down to the place- Cater told me to go and see what that man was doing; I got over a bank, and saw the prisoner throw this cock from under his coat - he was then taken.

BENJAMIN HESSE. I saw the prisoner enticing the fowls through the gate; I gave information to Cater, and be pursued him; I am sure he is the person I saw take the fowl, and put under his jacket.

JAMES MOBBS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found a piece of bread in his trousers pocket - he said two men threw the fowl over the hedge, and he went to see what it was.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went up the bank, and saw a man throw the fowl from under his coat - I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-39

1038. WILLIAM FRIEND was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 4 gallons of wine, value 4l., and 25 bottles, value 25d. , the goods of Thomas Brooks .

JOHN EAMES. I am a carpenter - Mr. Thomas Brooks odged at my house at Hornsey ; the prisoner was in my employ as a labourer . On the morning of the 19th of May I heard a noise, about half-past three o'clock; I got up, undid the bolt of the door, and heard a man's footstep run away - I did not open that door, but went round and met the prisoner; it was all within my own premises - I saw him get over two fences; I went round and met him again, and took him - he had with him this coat, which I had given him, and three bottles; one was full, and the other two were broken - these other nineteen bottles were found in a sack; I put this one to them- it was old port whie, and belonged to Mr. Brooks; it had been left in my care in a hamper - it was put into the cellar, which was not locked; the bottles had not been tapped, the seals appear to be the same as the others.

WILLIAM COWLAND. I assisted in taking the prisoner in a field adjoining the prosecutor's house.

GEORGE CHAMBERS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner - I found these nineteen bottles of wine in the sack, and this one, which was found on the prisoner, I put with them; the other two were broken.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-40

1039. JAMES SAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 fixture, (i. e.) 1 bell, value 2s., the goods of James Sander , and fixed to a certain building of his; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN PERRY . I am groom to Mr. Powell, at Muswell-hill. About half-past five o'clock, on the 14th of April, I heard a noise at our bell - I went up to the gate, and saw the prisoner and another young man with him; the prisoner had an apron - I saw them open the apron, and put a bell in it - I went up to them, and they both ran away; I pursued, and never lost sight of them - the prisoner threw himself into a hedge; there were six bells in the apron - Mr. Sander claimed one of them; I missed our bell when I went up to the gate.

JAMES PAGE . I am a labourer. I was getting up that morning, the 14th of April; I looked out of the window, and saw the prisoner and another standing on the top of the hill, facing Mr. Norris' gates - they came about half way down the hill, and crossed the road; that was about half a mile from Mr. Sander's - I then saw them in the field, and found two of the clappers of the bells near where they had been standing.

JOHN CLARK . I saw the bells lying in the foot-path as I was going to work, near Mr. Powell's; I took up the apron - there were six bells in it; I saw Perry coming along the road with the prisoner at the time.

GEORGE MORTIBOY . I was at Miss Norris', at Muswell-hill, that morning - we missed two bells at the same time.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my custody between six and seven o'clock, and this bundle of bells; I went to Mr. Sander's- a bell had been taken from there very recently - I have brought this handle from Mr. Sander's - it matches exactly with this bell; his name is James John Sander .

Prisoner's Defence. I live at Holloway; I have been out of work for two months - I was going to Cheshunt to work for a brick-maker; I was passing that gentleman's

house, and saw a man I knew by sight, looking at the bells - I stood looking at him, and this man came and caught me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-41

1040. JAMES SAMPSON was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 fixture, (i. e.) 1 bell, value 2s., the goods of Henry Powell , being fixed to a certain building of his; against the Statute &c.

JOHN PERRY . I am servant to Mr. Henry Powell . On the morning of the 14th I heard a noise at the door; I went out, and saw the prisoner with a check apron in his hand carrying it off - there was another young man with him; I saw them untie the bundle, and put in our bell, which had been safe at eleven o'clock the night before - both the men ran away; I followed the prisoner, and took him- the other got away; the apron was picked up by Clark- our bell was in with the rest; this is the spring of our bell, and matches it.

Prisoner. Q.How far was I from the gate when you first came out? A. About one hundred yards - you had the apron in your hands; there was a person with you, and he put the bell into the apron.

JOHN CLARK. I saw the bundle of bells in this check apron by the side of the road.

Prisoner's Defence. The young man asked me to carry the bundle; the witness came out - I went away, and left the bundle there.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-42

1041. JOHN POLLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s., and 1 pair of boots, value 2s. , the goods of John Smith .

MARY SMITH . I am the wife of John Smith, a bricklayer ; we live in Ward's-row, Paddington . On the 30th of May I lost a pair of blue trousers and a pair of boots - I gave a little boy leave to take a pail of water; I did not watch him out, but when he was gone I missed these things; I do not know who he was, but there had been no other person there after him - the door of the room was not open, he must have opened it; these are my son's boots and trousers - he is thirteen years of age.

JOHN WHITE . The prisoner was given into my charge between ten and eleven o'clock; he voluntarily acknowledged that he had taken the trousers and boots, and said if I would liberate him he would fetch the trousers back - the trousers have not been found, the boots he had on.

HENRY PRICE . About half-past nine o'clock I was on the wharf, the prisoner came, knocked at the door, and sat down by the fire with me - he said, "Here is a good pair of stampers;" (meaning shoes) - I saw him take a pair of trousers from under his arm, which appeared to me to be black; he said he went into this lady's house for a pail of water for Cummings - he saw the trousers in the bed-room, went in and took them; I said he had better take them back to save all row about it, as the woman would know them if he wore them - he doubled up the trousers, and asked me if I would go with him down the wharf; I said No, I was going to bed - I saw no more of him till Monday.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-43

1042. WILLIAM LYNCH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Westley , from his person .

THOMAS WESTLEY. On the 29th of April I was in a field in St. Pancras , between four and five o'clock in the evening - I felt the prisoner pull my coat three times - I took no notice of it twice, but the third time I turned and saw him concealing my handkerchief under his jacket, and I took it from him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.What were you doing? A. I was walking in the field - I believe there was a fight, and I happened to be passing; I did stop - I might be looking about ten minutes; I seized the prisoner immediately; I was outside the mob - there was no one outside me but the prisoner; he ran off - I pursued, and took him in about a minute and a half; I did not beat him, he was not bleeding; I am a baker - I do not know who the persons were who were fighting.

WILLIAM STANCEY . I am an officer. The prisoner was running and getting over a fence, and I took him - he said he had not robbed the gentleman, he had picked the handkerchief up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find the handkerchief on the prisoner? A. No; the prosecutor gave it me - I should think there were above a hundred persons round this fight.

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing the field, and saw a mob round the fight; I had not been there many minutes before I took up this handkerchief - the prosecutor came and asked for it; I gave it, and he shouted out that I had picked his pocket - several of his companions told him to duck me in the pond; he made use of some very bad expressions, and struck me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-44

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JUNE 12.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1043. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , at Paddington, 1 coat, value 1l.; 7 silver spoons, value 2l.; 1 pair of nutcrackers, value 4s.; 6 glass tumblers, value 12s.; 30 wine glasses, value 30s.; 4 cups, value 4s; 4 saucers, value 4s.; 1 pelisse, value 2l.; 1 shawl, value 15s.; 2 table-cloths, value 6s.; 6 towels, value 3s.; 2 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, the property of George Wheeler , her master; and 1 shift, value 1s.; 1 tippet, value 1l.; 1 purse, value 2d.; 1 bag, value 2s., and 3 sovereigns, the property of Ellen Clarke , in the dwelling-house of the said George Wheeler .

GEORGE WHEELER . I am a surgeon , and live in Orme-street, Bayswater, in the parish of Paddington ; the prisoner was nearly five weeks in my service - she was to have 10l. a year; she left without notice on the 29th of April, about ten minutes before eight o'clock in the morning; I did not see her leave the house - immediately she was gone I missed the property stated in the indictment, and subsequently much more; I had seen the greater part of it secure the evening before - the money was in a purse, which was in a bag belonging to Mrs. Wheeler; I had seen it at eleven o'clock the night before - it contained two sovereigns, a half-sovereign, a half-crown, and a shilling; I lost property worth about 15l. - the prisoner

had not been out after eleven o'clock; I saw her again at Marylebone Office four or five days afterwards.

ANN ALLARD . I live in Lyons-court, Wingmore-street; the prisoner called on me on Wednesday morning, the 29th of April, about eleven o'clock, and brought a table cloth, and a dressing gown, to mangle - she left them with me, and returned next day to fetch them, but left them; she came again on the 6th of May, to fetch them, and was taken up - I saw nothing else, except a pair of nut-crackers, in her bag; I sent for an officer, as I had read about the robbery in the newspaper - I thought they were silver, and asked her how she came by them; she said they belonged to her master, and she was going to take them back again; I gave the things to the officer.

Prisoner. Q.Did you not tell me to stop at your house, and you would give me a night's lodging? she came on Thursday, and said she had lost seven sovereigns and a half, and three gold rings, and pretended to be very ill.

GEORGE KAINES . I am an officer. I was fetched to Allard's house, and took the prisoner into custody - I found two duplicates on her; she gave them me out of her hand - she had a bundle on her arm, in which I found another duplicate; it also contained a black bag, a green purse, and a silver pencil-case - Mrs. Allard gave me these things.

Prisoner. Q. Did not Mrs. Allard give you the duplicate out of the drawer? A.No you gave them me yourself.

JOHN WELLS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gilmore-street, Grosvenor-square. I have a silk pelisse, a tablecloth, and a shift - I cannot say who pawned them, but two of the duplicates produced are what I gave the person.

WILLIAM DEMPSTER . I live in Drury-lane. I have a coat, and three table cloths pawned by two women, who I do not know - this is the duplicate I gave them.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am a constable. I produce a fur tippet, a red shawl, and a cap, which I took off the prisoner's person on the 6th of May, at the office.

MR. WHEELER. This is not the bag the purse was in, but it belongs to Miss Clarke, my wife's sister - my wife's bag and money were taken from behind her pillow; this coat and table spoons are mine, and all these things are Mrs. Wheeler's.

ELLEN CLARKE. I was on a visit at Mr. Wheeler's. This tippet and bag are mine; the bag contained a green purse, with three sovereigns in it, when it was taken - I saw it safe the day before.

Prisoner's Defence) written.) I was taken up for robbing my master of sundry articles of wearing-apparel, and some silver spoons; they have got down in my indictment that I had robbed them of some china and glasses; I know nothing about the under-mentioned articles: the purse I picked up in the dusthole when first I went to live there; I went up-stairs to my mistress, as she sat in the back-parlour, and told her I had picked it out of the dust-hole; she said that it was one that Master George had been playing with, and that it was of no value; I put it into my pocket. The first week that I went there I had a great deal of cleaning, and in the coal-hole I found a great many broken glasses, likewise in the beer-cellar a quantity of broken glasses, which I suppose the servant that lived there before had broken, and put them there; she told me to clean underneath the stairs, for there were some childrens shoes, and boots of my master's. I then found some more broken glass, and likewise china; I said to my mistress,"There is a great many broken pieces," which she saw; she said if she kept her other servant much longer, she would be the ruin of her, as she was such a careless servant. I asked her for an inventory of the glasses and china, but she put me off from day to day. I went to the mangling-woman, and told her what I had done to my master; she told me never to mind, not to go back, and she sent part of the articles which I robbed my master of: if it had not been for her, I should have gone back and delivered myself up to my master. My husband has abandoned me, and that was the occasion of my going to service. I have worked hard for my bread.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

Reference Number: t18290611-45

1044. THOMAS BIRMINGHAM was indicted for the wilful murder of Sarah Waite .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and CRESWELL. conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a watchman of Kensington. On Thursday morning, the 14th of May, about four o'clock, I was on duty - and in Addison-row, at ten minutes past four, as I was leaving duty, and going towards the Uxbridge-road, I saw a woman lying on her face in the horse-road, her face rested on the edge of the footpath - I went over to the body, and when I moved it she felt quite cold and stiff; I turned her on one side to perceive her face, and saw she had been wounded in her left side - her clothes were not the least disordered - there was not the least appearance of a scuffle having taken place; she had on a dark cotton printed gown, a white bonnet, and white kid gloves; the one for the left hand was on, and a half-crown in the glove in her hand - the other glove was off, and clasped in her right hand; I went and told Mr. Parkin, the surgeon; I had not passed that place in the course of the night - it was beyond my beat; I heard no noise or alarm in the course of the night.

HENRY PARKIN. I am a surgeon, and live in St. Mary Abbott's-terrace. On the 14th of May Davis called me up at about four o'clock in the morning - I saw the body of the young woman lying on the road quite dead; she had a wound in her side - I did not remove her clothes or examine her further till the constable came; I then found merely a wound in her side, which must have been inflicted by something like a knife, but rather large - I have since seen a knife which is capable of inflicting such a wound as to the size, but I do not think it probable that that was the knife - it was a flat wound; that knife corresponded in size with the wound; I had her removed to the public-house, and placed a constable there to prevent her being touched - I afterwards examined the wound more particularly - it was four or five inches deep; it passed between the ribs through the lower part of the heart, and penetrated through the left lobe of the liver - it is a wound which I should conceive would cause instant death; I perceived no other marks of violence on her.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Any cutting instrument would make such a wound? A.Certainly; I think the knife produced had not done it, as the cut in the liver was done with a very sharp instrument.

COURT. Q.Was it such a wound as might have been inflicted by the person herself? A. I should think not; it would produce instant death, and prevent her making any

cry; she was found in the position in which she appeared to have fallen; her glove was in her hand and nothing disturbed; had she thrown an instrument away, she must have thrown the glove at the same time - and she had not struggled at all.

ELIZABETH PRICE. I knew the deceased, she used to go by the name of Mary Ann Brown, but I am certain her name was Mary Ann Waite - she was an unfortunate girl; I had known her about three months - I lived with her for that time; she had lost her right eye, it was quite closed; I knew the prisoner for about five or six weeks before her death - the first time I saw him was when I met him one evening, accidentally, with the deceased at the Camden Arms public-house; I have seen him with her about four times.

Q. Do you remember any thing about this pin (producing it)? A. Yes; I saw that pin taken from him by the deceased about a fortnight before her death - he was intoxicated, and she took it from his neckerchief; I saw them together after that - I went out with her on the evening of the 13th of May; she had the pin then in her cap - she took it out with the intention of showing it to Birmingham; I walked with her to between Knightsbridge-barracks and the Halfway-house - I parted with her at the Halfway-house about ten o'clock, and did not see her again till after she was a corpse, at the Holland Arms public-house; I first heard of it about ten o'clock next day, and again between twelve and one; I then went to the Holland Arms, I saw nobody but the officers showing the body; I saw the prisoner before Mr. Sketchley - he was asked if he knew a person named Mary Ann Waite, otherwise Mary Ann Brown, or Mary Ann Smith; he hesitatingly said, "No, he did not;" he was also asked if he knew the person who had lost her right eye, went by the name of Mary Ann; he hesitatingly said No, again; I was standing before him at this time - the body was not there; I said, "Thomas, don't hesitate, this is a serious circumstance, poor Mary Ann is murdered, she is no more - speak the truth;" he then said,"I recollect her;" this was about three o'clock - I know they were intimate, he knew her extremely well.

Cross-examined. Q.When you saw the body the pin was still in her cap the same as when she left home? A. Yes; I first saw the body about two o'clock; I believe the Magistrate sent for him. because I spoke of her going to deliver the pin to him; Mr. Sketchley questioned him. as if he suspected he could give some account of her that night.

WILLIAM BENNETT. I am the watch-house-keeper of Kensington. I was sent by Mr. Sketchley to Kensingtonbarracks on Thursday, the 14th; I first went and saw the prisoner in the stable saddling his master's horses, and said to him, "Thomas, the gentleman wishes to speak to you at the workhouse;" this was about three o'clock in the afternoon; he said, "It is impossible for me to go now, for I can't leave my master's horse;" I said, "You had better go Thomas;" and kept asking him several times to go - and he said, "Not only that, when master is gone, I am obliged to be at some Club-house in St. James'," which he mentioned - I said, "You had better go down, very possibly if you don't it will cause further trouble;" he said it was an impossibility, and he could not; I said, "You say you won't go?" he said, "I can't go, it is impossible;" I was about turning to leave the stable, his back was to me - he looked round, and said, "What do they want with me?" I said, "I don't know; but I believe it is for you to satisfy them where you were last night;" he said, "I know nothing about the murder whatever;" I had not mentioned any murder to him - nothing more passed; I returned to Mr. Sketchley, and in consequence of directions from him I went to fetch the prisoner down to him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The murder had excited attention in the neighourhood, and every body knew it? A. Yes, and that it was committed the night before; the town was all in alarm - I went to him again in about ten minutes, and he was brought down to the barracks by order of his master, Lieutenant Ives - the barracks are three or four hundred yards from the work-house.

RICHARD JOWITT. I am a foot patrol on the Hammersmith road. I saw the deceased after she was dead; I had known her before by seeing her walking the road as a girl of the town, but I do not interfere with them: I saw her about two o'clock on the morning of the 14th, near the Broadway, Hammersmith, in company with a young man, who appeared to be a gentleman's servant, as he had a round had on, with a cockade in it, and what appeared to me to be a short light drab coat, cut round; I did not observe the rest of his dress; as they passed me, the woman either pushed or struck him, and said, "Do you mean to serve me so?" the man was about five feet three or four inches high; he seemed much shorter than myself; I am five feet nine - I returned, and looked at them as they walked on towards town, but did not follow them; they did not appear to be quarrelling - they walked arm-in-arm. In consequence of a report from the Home Secretary's office, I went next morning to Kensington; I saw the body of the deceased; I then saw the prisoner at the barracks; he had a cap on; I said if he was dressed in that cap the preceding night, he was not the person - after being taken before the Magistrate, he was asked if he ever wore a round hat with a cockade in it; I am not positive whether he said he never wore one, or that he had not got one, but I think it was he never wore one; I was then directed to go with him and Bennett to his room at the barracks, to see if there was a hat with a cockade in it - he said there was a hat of that kind; it was then fetched; I believe two were brought - he put one of then on and on seeing him in it, I thought he resembled the man I had seen more than he did before, but I am unable to swear he was the man - there was no watchman in Addison-row but a patrol - I had passed the corner of the road about four o'clock in the morning, and spoke to Davis as I went by; I know where the body was found; I did not go up far enough to have seen it if it had been there.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q.The prisoner is five feet eight inches, it must have been a shorter man than him? A. I thought he could not exceed five feet four, but cannot say positively - he appeared to me shorter than the prisoner does, but it was night. I have known innocent people tell a falsehood when accused of crime.

COURT. Q. You say when he put the hat on, he was more like the man; that is, a man in a hat is like a man who wore a hat? A. Yes.

WILLIAM CHICHESTER REYNOLDS. My father is an attorney. On Sunday morning, the 17th of May, I found a knife forty-four yards from where the body was found, in Addison-row, and on the opposite side of the way; it

was about three-quarters of an inch stuck into the earth -I knocked my stick against it, and found it; I produce it in exactly the same state as I found it.

WILLIAM LEE. I am a prisoner in the New Prison, Clerkenwell, charged with felony; I was taken there on Easter Tuesday; I have been in custody several times on charges of misdemeauors and felony: I was there when the prisoner came in; he was brought into the infirmary on Friday evening, between five and six o'clock I think; he was brought up stairs - the turnkey showed him the bed he was to sleep in; we were smoking, and asked him to take a pipe of tobacco, which he did - a prisoner asked him what he was there for, and I immediately told him not to answer any questions; nothing further was asked him then - we talked on different things that evening, and next morning I had some conversation with him; I was cleaning the yard; and after we had been to chapel, he walked up and down the yard, and I walked with him: I said, "This is a terrible piece of business that you are here for;" he said, Yes, it was; I said, "You have left a pen knife in the lodge, I understand;" he said "Yes, I did;" I said, "There looks as if there were stains of blood on the knife, is it so?" he said, "No, it is rust on the pen-knife, which I tried to rub off, but could not - it has been on some time;" I said, "Then she was not murdered with a pen-knife?" "No, (said he), she was not;" I did not say any thing further then, but talked about what I was there for: I afterwards said, "How is it this young woman had a half-crown found in her glove when she was murdered?" he said he knew that, but he gave her no money, so help him God! that night; I said,"How do you account for having the breast-pin found in her cap?" he said, "I am not going to own it, and do not think any body can prove it is mine;" I do not think any more conversation took place that morning: after this I made a communication to the Governor of the prison: we were walking in the yard again; I said to him, "It is a most surprising thing about this murder, about this girl being found; what time did you leave her that night?" he did not reply to that question; I said, "How do you account for getting over the barrack-wall?" he said, "O, I am in the habit of getting over the barrack-wall at all hours in the night;" I think I put the question to him again about the pen-knife, and said, "Was it done with a bayonet? for I understand, (said I,) she was stabbed to the heart;" "No, (said he), it was not; and what it was done with I do not think it very likely they will find;" a great deal more conversation passed about one thing and another - he often told me he hoped what he had told me I should never state again; I believe that was all that passed at that time; but on Monday morning, about one o'clock, he started up in his bed, and said, "By Jesus, Mary, I have done it; where am I?" I then said, "Birmingham, what is the matter?" he said, "Oh! I am only dreaming," or some words to that effect: my bed is nearly opposite his, and I was ordered to pay particular attention to him: I asked how long he had known the girl; he said he had known her at Hounslow, and had known her some time. On Saturday there was a talk about clubbing for a newspaper; he said he would not be one; but we joined, and had a paper between us - I was present after chapel; the prisoner was lying on the bed; Arundel came running up with the paper, and said, "Birmingham, here is your case in the paper, I will read it to you;" the turnkey came up - the prisoner got off the bed, and sat on a seat, and I said, "His countenance seems very much altered since the paper has come in;" and while it was being read, there was an observation in it about his being a good singer, and using a public-house at twelve o'clock at night; I said to him, "Why you told me you was not there at twelve o'clock at night;" he replied, "You know nothing about it - don't you interfere:" we conversed again together before he went to be examined (he expected to go up between eleven and twelve, but did not go up till one), and he said he hoped the saddle would not be put upon the wrong horse, and hoped what he had told me would not go any further; we then talked about different persuasions of religion; and he was saying if he was in Ireland, for 2s. 6d. a man could have absolution - that was all that passed, to the best of my recollection.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Why, you treated him like a guilty man, and asked him how it happened? A. I asked him how it happened; I have no interest in it one way or the other - I told him not to say any thing before the persons in the room; I talked to him about our own affairs, and this conversation came up- I said there seemed to be stains of blood on the knife; I forgot to state that he said, "If I had done the murder with a knife, I should not have been such a fool as to have left it at the lodge;" I never went by any other name than Lee - I was circumsized by the name of Woolf, which is William in English; my wife's maiden name was Gable: when I came from India I took a shop, and put her name over the door - I was never committed by that name to my knowledge, nor ever known by the name of Thompson or Leach; I recollect about Mosely Woolf being tried for a conspiracy - I was committed in October, 1816, by the name of Lee, alias Gable, alias Thompson, and was acquitted at this bar; it was for stealing twenty-nine yards of sarsnet - there was no evidence against me; I was also committed for burglary, but no bill was found for that - the prosecutor was my brother-in-law; I was committed by Mr. Alderman Smith, when he was Lord Mayor, for obtaining goods by false pretences, that was when I employed you - I was acquitted; I have been sworn on the New Testament - I have always attended church and chapel since I have been married; I conceive if I call God to witness the truth, one oath is as binding as another: this affidavit (looking at it) is my writing; it is signed Lee - it is an information against a man having stolen stamps in his possession; an application was made to me by Bill Reid of Hatton-garden about it, and I swore to the best of my belief about it - the house was never searched, I believe. I was tried at Hicks'-hall for getting some tea and sugar in the name of Lee, an officer, but I gave my own name and address - I had twelve months imprisonment for it, through false swearing.

SAMUEL ARUNDEL. I come from the New Prison, Clerkenwell, and was there at the time the prisoner was, on Sunday morning, the 17th, he was lying on the bed, when the newspaper was brought in - having it in my hand, I offered to read the article respecting the Kensington murder; he seemed not at all willing, but rather rejected it - I began to read, and after reading a few lines

a stranger entered the room; Birmingham at that moment became alarmed - he immediately got from where he was lying, and seated himself on a form near the fire-place; about the fifteenth line of the article the woman's name was mentioned, and as I read Mary Ann Waite , I could not help noticing the change being apparent in his countenance.

THOMAS STIRLING , ESQ. I am Coroner of Middlesex. I have produced a pin here, it is the same as I saw in the cap of the woman - I took it out of her cap; it has been in my custody ever since - the prisoner did not see it, to my knowledge.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

LIEUTENANT FERDINAND IVES . I am Lieutenant of the 15th Hussars: the prisoner was my servant - I give him a very good character for humanity; he has been in my service nearly three years. On the evening of the 13th of May, about seven o'clock, I sent him into town - he returned about half-past nine; I saw him on his return at the barracks - he remained there till eleven that evening; I then went out to a ball - he assisted me in dressing; I told him to leave a light burning for me against my return - he was not to sit up for me; I returned about half-past one o'clock, and found my light burning - I had no reason to suppose he was not in bed.

CHARLES DAVIS . I keep the Camden Arms public-house, which is opposite the Kensington barracks. The prisoner was at my house on Wednesday, the 13th of May, about nine o'clock in the evening - he went away about ten o'clock, and came back again about a quarter before eleven; I had a club meeting at my house that night, and the prisoner was up stairs in the room they assembled in - he left at half-past eleven o'clock, as near as could be; I saw him go out - there was no difference in his appearance that I observed.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Did you ever see him in company with a young woman with only one eye? A.Once.

JOHN BRYANT . I am a private in the 15th regiment, and know the prisoner very well. I saw him between half-past eleven and twelve o'clock on the night this murder happened - I was centinal that night; he was coming out of his master's room - he went up into the guard-room; when he came out of his master's room he asked me where he could get a light - he got one; when he had put the light in his master's room he went up stairs as if to go to bed - his room turns to the right; (I staid on guard from eleven o'clock till one;) I saw him pull his hat and jacket off - I saw him through the window as if going to bed; I went on guard again at five in the morning - Duckworth relieved me at one o'clock; I saw the prisoner next morning coming down stairs, about a quarter or twenty minutes to six, as if he had just risen from bed - he went into the stable; during the time I was on guard it is not probable that he could come down, and go out without my seeing him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Did he go into his master's room after asking you where he could get a light? A. Yes - he took a light in there; his bed-room is one story high -I stood on the ground, but could see into his window; I saw-him take off his hat, it had a cockade in it - he had a fustian jacket; the barrack wall is low - any body can get over it; the part of the wall he could get over was not in my sight.

MR. CURWOOD. Q.Was it a stable jacket without skirts that he had on? A. Yes.

THOMAS DUCKWORTH. I am a private in the 15th regiment stationed at Kensington barracks. On the night in question I relieved Bryant, as centinal, at one o'clock; I remained on duty till three o'clock - I do not think the prisoner could have left the barracks while I was on duty, without my seeing him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He could have got over the wall at a part which was out of your sight? A. Yes, over the Park wall.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Is it not your duty to walk to and fro? A. Yes; he could not pass me without my seeing him.

COURT. Q.Does the door of his passage come out at the place where you are stationed? A. No; a person could not come out there without my seeing them, for it was almost daylight - it was break of day at two o'clock; I was quite diligent on my post.

JONAS BRADLEY . I am a private in the 15th regiment. I remember the night this girl was murdered; I relieved Duckworth at three o'clock that morning, and was on guard till five; I know the room the prisoner slept in, and the part of the wall where people can get over into the Park - he might come out of his room and go out that way without my seeing him, when my back was turned; he might get through without passing me - I did not see him go out.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.How long is the walk you parade? A.About thirty yards - there are two front entrances to the barracks; we only walk at one end - he could have gone out in front without my seeing him.

DANIEL DAVISON. I am serjeant to the 15th Hussars. On the morning of the 14th I got up at five minutes to five o'clock, and went to call the men to the stables: until a quarter to six I was at one stable or the other, and from then till a quarter-past six, I was sitting on a bench in front of the door, or walking about - I saw the prisoner come down stairs about a quarter to six o'clock; he came down the stairs which lead from his bed-room - he was in the state he usually comes to the stables; his neck handkerchief was in his hand - he was not perfectly dressed; he generally went to the stable between five and six; he does not belong to the regiment - he went into the stable.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you seen him in company with the deceased? A. I have seen him with a woman who had but one eye.

RICHARD EDWARDS . I am clerk at Hatton-garden Office, and have frequently seen Lee there - I do not think him a person to be believed on his oath.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you heard him examined on oath? A. I have heard him swear to informations, which I believed to be false, and he has been charged with felony.

SAMUEL GOWER . I am a linendraper, and live in Tottenham Court-road. I know Lee, and would not believe him on his oath.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBETTER. I am a City marshals-man. I have known Lee more than twenty years, and believe him to be a very bad man; I have had him in custody twenty-five years ago - I should be very doubtful of believing him on his oath. NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18290611-46

1045. HENRY THOMPSON , alias MASON , was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , 1 clock, value 6l., the goods of Charles Scudamore , in his dwelling-house .

FRANCIS SHERRINGTON . I am foot-boy to Dr. Charles Scudamore , who lives in Wimpole-street . On the 13th of May the bell rang - I opened the door, and found the prisoner there; he asked me what time Dr. Scudamore saw patients - I told him this was the time, but he was then engaged; I asked him in, left him in the hall, and went to the butler to ask how long it would be before master could be seen, and in about two minutes we heard a scuffling by the door - the butler ran up; I followed, and the prisoner was gone: the door was open - the butler went out, and I missed the clock from the hall, off a bracket, about seven feet from the ground; I saw it safe when the prisoner was there - I went out, and saw the butler bringing the prisoner back, with it under his arm, about ten yards from the door - I did not see him stopped; he was brought back.

Prisoner. Q. At what hour did you let me in? A.Half-past twelve; you remained in the hall about two minutes - no other person came in: there was no knock at the door after I went down stairs - the noise was your going out and opening the door; I brought the clock back into the hall - I did not swear I saw the butler take it from you ten yards from the door; I swore you brought it back yourself, and laid it on the hall table.

JOHN RUSSELL . I am a constable. I was sent for to Dr. Scudamore's on the 13th of May, about half-past twelve o'clock; the butler and foot-boy were there, with the prisoner - Dr. Scudamore came out of a parlour adjoining the hall, and gave him in charge for stealing the clock, which was on the table - I took charge of it: I should not think it worth 6l. The prisoner said nothing.

Prisoner. Q. You asked me to confess? A. I did not- you said something about being a ruined man.

HENRY STOWELL . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the office about one o'clock, with a clock - he was desired to sit down on the form - he opened the office door, went in, and fastened the door; I went in, and found it fast - I ran through the clerk's office, and found him going out at the street door, in front; I brought him back - Mr. Rawlinson asked him where he was going; he said to make his escape - I afterwards searched him, and found a silver watch, two seals and a key, a purse, with six sovereigns and a half in it, and two snuff-boxes, one of which has been owned.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the house to consult the Doctor - I had not been there a minute before a person knocked at the door, whom I let in; he took the clock down, and went out with it - I did not know but he might be a clock-maker; seeing him alarmed, I went out with him, as he run in a flurried way - I suspected something was wrong.

GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 99s. only . Aged 48.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18290611-47

1046. ANN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , 7 spoons, value 20s.; 1 thimble, value 6d.; 1 shawl, value 1s.; 5 gowns, value 5s.; 2 petticoats, value 2s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 1 night-gown, value 6d.; 1 shift, value 6d.; 4 sovereigns, and 1 guinea, the property of William Johnson , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Yarrow .

ELIZABETH YARROW . I am a widow, and live in Grosvenor-street, in the parish of Marylebone , and keep the house. The prisoner lodged with me for thirteen months - she and her husband occupied the first floor back room; Johnson and her husband have lodged three years with me, in the room opposite the prisoner's - I live in the front parlour. On the night of the 2d of June, at ten minutes after eight o'clock, in consequence of information, I went to the top of Foley-street, and overlook the prisoner with a large bundle; I told her I suspected it was some of my property - she said it was not; I demanded to see what it was - she said she had not stolen it; I looked at it, and said it was Johnson's - she said Mrs. Johnson had left it in her room for security; I took her back, took the bundle from her, and left her in the house while I went to look for Mrs. Johnson - when I returned she had got over the wall into a neighbour's premises; I had locked the bundle in my own room - I found her in the next house; the watchman took her there at nine o'clock - when I took the bundle from her she gave me the key of her room, and told me I had no further demand on her.

MARIA WILLIS . I am the wife of James Willis , who is a green-grocer - the prisoner has dealt with us. Last Tuesday week I saw her after seven o'clock in the evening, at the corner of Norfolk-street - I was on the opposite side of the way; she called me, and said she was going to buy a pair of shoes - she bought a second-hand pair, and then asked me to mind her child and bundle for five minutes, while she went to Windmill-street; I kept the child and bundle upwards of two hours - it was a large bundle; she did not come to me, and I went to her lodging and left the child - I kept the bundle; I afterwards gave it to Yarrow's daughter.

EDITH JOHNSON . I am the wife of William Johnson , and live with Mrs. Yarrow in the first floor front room. The prisoner's room joins mine, and there is a middle door, which was fastened up - on the 2d of June, about half-past six o'clock I went out, leaving nobody in my room; I locked it, and took the key in my pocket - I returned soon after nine, and found the things in the room very much disturbed; the drawers were open - I had made the children's bed on a deal box, some chairs, and the ironing-board; that was removed and the chest opened; the bed clothes were taken off - I missed out of a till in the deal box four sovereigns, ten old silver coins, a half-crown, and a 6d. in a tin box, and in another one a guinea, and about 5s. 6d. in silver: the till could be opened easily - there was no lock to it; I cannot say whether the chest was locked, or not - there were five gowns, about five yards of new cloth, two new petticoats, which I had to make for a lady, a night-gown, a shift, two pairs of stockings, and seven silver tea-spoons, marked A.L. and E.L.; I had seen the money the day before, and some of the gowns that day, but I had not been to the deal chest - the clothes together were worth under 1l.; I saw my property afterwards in the possession of

Yarrow's daughter - it was brought back to the house; Eliza Yarrow brought me one bundle, and while I was examining it she brought another up stairs; I went down and saw Willis, as having brought it - I cannot say whether she gave it to Yarrow, or not; the bundles contained the clothes I have mentioned - the second bundle had the spoons in it; I had used some of them in the morning - ten pieces of old coin, one sovereign, and the lid of the box were found on her at the watch-house; the old coins are half-crowns, a shilling of George the Second, a crooked sixpence, and a French coin - I have seen them all again; a silver thimble was found on her.

THOMAS MARMAN . I am a watchman. I was calling nine o'clock, and the landlord called me in; I at last found the prisoner in the next house - I took her to the watch-house, searched her, and found a sovereign, ten pieces of old coin, a silver thimble, two keys, the lid of a small tin box, and a pair of scissors; she said if I would let her go she would give me 2s. 6d. - she gave me the things from her pocket herself.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL DUTCH . The property was given into my charge at the office - where it came from I do not know.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating she had put the property into a bundle with some things of her own by mistake.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 30s. only.) Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18290611-48

1047. THOMAS WESTWOOD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Worman , on the 15th of May , and stealing 1 coat, value 30s.; 2 waistcoats, value 20s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 7s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 18s.; 1 hat, value 3s.; 4 gowns, value 20s.; 1 clock, value 10s.; 1 shawl, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s., and 5 silver spoons, value 10s. ; his property.

JOHN WORMAN . I live at Edgware . On the 15th of March I left my house, between one and two o'clock, and returned between three and four - I had locked the house up, and put the key into my pocket; when I returned I found the front door unlocked, but not forced, for I could lock it again with my own key - four drawers in my bed-room were unlocked, and three broken open; nearly every thing I had was gone - I have seen nothing except my hat; I found that in the possession of the officer a few days after the robbery.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I live at Edgware; I have known the prisoner nine or ten years. On the 15th of May I met him within twenty yards of the prosecutor's house, about five minutes before two o'clock in the afternoon, going towards the house - the road goes by the house; I did not speak to him - I am sure it was him.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know me? A. By drinking with you at the Mason's Arms public-house, Edgware, seven or eight years ago, and I saw you cross the field nine or ten days before this, but did not speak to you.

JOHN ARGUST . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of May, in Seymour-place, Marylebone; I said, "Let me look at that hat" - he gave it me of his head; I asked where he got the hat from - he said he bought it at Hall and Johnson's, Edgware-road; I said, "Then you must go with me to Johnson and Hall's" - we went, and saw Mr. Hall in the shop; I asked if he knew that hat - he said Yes; he took it in his hand, and said he thought he had served him with such a hat - Mr. Johnson then came into the shop, and Hall said, "Do you know any thing of this hat?" he said, "No, we have not got such a hat in the shop, nor have we had for some time" - Johnson then measured it, tried it in Hall's presence, and then said they had not got such a hat in their shop; he measured it with his rule, and with other hats - Hall said he thought it was one of theirs at first, but on looking at it he found it was not; I told the prisoner I must take him up - I asked him how he came to pull the lining out of the hat; he said he chewed tobacco, and used to put the quid into the hat, which dirtied the lining - I shewed it to the prosecutor on the 23d; he looked at it, put it on his head, and claimed it.

ROBERT HALL. I live in the Edgware-road, and am a tailor and salesman, in partnership with Johnson. The prisoner dealt at our shop more than once or twice; on the 22d of May Argust brought him to my shop, and produced a hat - when I first looked at it, he being a customer, I thought he had bought it of me; when I saw it was of consequence, having looked at it more particularly, I was certain I never sold the hat, and that it never was in our shop - I am certain I never had one of that shape; I never sold him a hat, to my recollection - Mr. Okey, of London-wall, is the only manufacturer we buy of, and he has not got a block of that size; it was never in our shop

Prisoner. Q.Did you not say I bought it of you? A. I did at first, but said if I looked at it I could tell better; you asked if it was not one of ours when you took it off, and I believe I said Yes - you asked if you had not bought it seven or eight weeks ago; I said,"You never bought it of us."

JOHN OKEY . I am a hat manufacturer, of London-wall, in partnership with my brother. We supply Johnson and Hall with hats; we never had a hat similar to this in our warehouse for three years, and have not supplied them with such a hat.

JOHN WORMAN. This is my hat - I lost it on the 15th of May, with other things; Argust produced it to me on the 22d, I think - I have found nothing else; I bought it of Mr. Burton, at Edgware, eight or nine days before - I had only worn it twice; I bought it to go to my brother's funeral - I was very particular in fitting it, and here are several marks on it inside, by which I know it; the man brought me six or seven before I could get one to fit me - it had a lining in it when it was taken away, and was drawn with a piece of blue ribbon; it is my hat - there had been a band round it, and the band was found in the field.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the hat of Johnson and Hall for 7s. about nine weeks before.

MR. OKEY. I can find no manufacturer's mark on it- these hats are made in Lancashire and Cheshire, and not in town; I should charge 5s. for it.

ROBERT HALL. I moved to a new shop last Michaelmas, and particularly remarked we had not such a hat in the shop then.

NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18290611-49

1048. SAMUEL WATTS was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 32.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-50

1049. OLIVER EWINGS was indicted for embezzleing the sum of 29l. 9s. 6d.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-51

1050. LOUISA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 12s.; 1 seal, value 1s.; 3 pairs of sleeve-buttons, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pencil-case, value 1s.; 1 pair of scissars, value 6d.; 2 rings, value 2d.; 3 snaps, value 1s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 1s. 6d., and 2 pieces of gold, value 6d. , the goods of Lyon Samuel , her master.

LYON SAMUEL. I live in Fleet-street, at Mr. Watson's; I lodge on the first and second floor. The prisoner was in my service for five or six weeks - she was servant of allwork; I am a dealer in jewellery - I missed a sovereign out of my pocket; she had some new things, and my wife asked how she came by them - she said her mother gave them to her; we had suspicion of her, and took her up on Sunday the 24th of May - I told her I suspected she had robbed me by her having so many new things; she said,"Do you think I should rob such a kind master as you are;" I did not miss any thing before I gave charge of her - it was because she was dressed that I suspected her; I said it would be better for her to confess to whatever she had taken; I only suspected she had robbed me because she was dressed so - she threw out the contents of her pocket, and there was a pencil-case which was one of a parcel of six which I had, and a pair of scissars; the pencil-case has no mark on it, but it corresponds exactly with the rest - I bought the scissars of Mr. Clark, of Exeterchange - they have his name on them; there was also a few pieces of coral - I sent for an officer, who found in her box, which was not locked, two pairs of gold ear-rings, a seal, which I cannot swear to, three pairs of sleeve-buttons, a snap, a small piece of gold wire, and part of a watch key.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. You took her up on suspicion of having a new pair of stays? A. Yes, and other things, as I knew she had no money; I swear to the pencil-case because it is the same as the others; there are quantities of that pattern made - one pair of the gold ear-rings are an old fashioned pattern which you will not find in London.

RACHAEL SAMUEL . I am the wife of Lyon Samuel. The prisoner lived five or six weeks with us; when she came the first time to us she was very badly clothed - she bought herself several new things; I missed a sovereign on Sunday - I asked how she came by her new stays; she said they were not new; I said, "Now, Susan, have you taken some of my things to get the money to buy these things?" we asked what she had taken - she put her hands into her pocket and pulled out a pencil-case, a pair of scissars, and two or three pairs of silver buttons; I think the buttons were in her pocket, but am not positive - the officer searched her box, which was open - she was present; he found two pairs of ear-rings, a seal, two pairs of cotton stockings, and two pieces of gold - the stockings are both marked B. and were mine; I have eight more pairs like them - my husband bought them ready marked; I do not know whether there were any stockings of her own in the box; I know them by being a particular kind - they have been worn, and are not worth 3s. 6d. - they were fine and not much worn; a key was found in her box which fitted four of my drawers - it would not open her box.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any mark on the pencil? A. No; but we have five more like it; I had never worn the stockings - my husband bought a lot second-hand - and I had looked them over and seen them three or four times.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT. I am a constable. I was sent for to take the prisoner in charge; Samuel charged her with robbing him - saying he had seen her with several new things, which caused his suspicion; he handed over to me a pencil-case and a pair of scissars - I searched the prisoner's pockets, and found two small bits of gold, a few pieces of cornelian, a pair of blue snaps, a small ring, and two or three beads; I found her box open, and in it this purse, with two pairs of ear-rings, a seal and ring, and three pairs of sleeve-buttons - they were all in the purse; I also found two pairs of stockings - I do not recollect seeing any more stockings there; she said she meant to give the things back again - I found 9s. 2d. in money.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Samuel sent me out for a newspaper the day before, and while I was gone she and her mother searched my box; they said nothing to me, but when I came home, I found all the things out of my box: mistress seeing me with new stays, asked me where I got them - I said it was not her money that bought them; she afterwards said I had stolen a sovereign, and sent for an officer - they took off the stays, saying it was not my money that bought them, and I should not have the pleasure of wearing them.

MRS. SAMUEL. I did not search her box in her absence; the stays were taken off her back - they are at my house; she could have put them on again if she liked - her box is still at my house; her mother was to send for it, but has not - her sister called for it once when I was out; I have not looked at her box since she left, and do not know whether the stays are there.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . Her stays were not pulled off in my presence - I desired the prosecutrix to search her in another room.

LYON SAMUEL. I bought the stockings at a sale - I did not examine how they were marked.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-52

1051. CHARLES SMITH and HENRY PIKE were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , at St. Michael Bassishaw, 19 yards of wollen cloth, value 21l., the goods of Edward Price and others, in their dwelling-house .

EDWARD PRICE. I am a Black wellball-factor , and live at No. 28, Basinghall-street - I have two partners; we all live under the same roof - it is our joint dwelling-house, and in the parish of St. Michael Bassishaw. On Friday, the 22d of May, this piece of woollen cloth, containing nineteen yards, was on a pile of goods inside the warehouse, about nine feet from the door - a person must come into the warehouse to take it; I saw it safe about nine o'clock

in the morning on the pile - I am certain it had never been sold; I missed it about twelve or half-past - the prisoner Pike came in, and inquired for a situation about twelve o'clock; he was scarcely a second in the warehouse - I told him I did not know of one; a neighbour gave me information, and I went to Guildhall and found this cloth - both the prisoners were there in custody; that was about half-past twelve - I had not seen Smith before; I know the cloth to be mine - it is worth about 21l.

CHARLES THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 22d of May, a little before twelve o'clock, I was in Basinghall-street, near the Bankrupt Court, which is about one hundred yards from Mr. Price's - I saw the two prisoners walking together; I am quite sure of their persons, but I did not see them speak - it appeared to me that they were in company; I watched them - they went down Basinghall-street some distance, towards London-wall, and then returned together - I saw them together just by Church-passage, which is right opposite Mr. Price's; I then went and stood in a door-way for a minute or two, then looked out at the door, and only saw Pike, who was walking backwards and forwards, a short distance, opposite the prosecutors' door; I then got just into the doorway again, looked out immediately again, and saw Smith with this cloth on his shoulder, in the middle of the road, about three or four yards from Mr. Price's door; he went up Church-passage - I then walked up towards Pike, who was standing opposite Mr. Price's house, looking towards the door; I saw a person who I knew, and said, "Just lay hold of him;" he then ran away - he must have heard me tell the person to lay hold of him; I then went up Churchpassage and laid hold of Smith with the cloth on his shoulder - I saw Pike again in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; the person I desired to take him, brought him to the Justice-room where I had taken Smith - I am certain he is the person I had seen walking up and down; Mr. Price was sent for, and claimed the cloth.

Prisoner PIKE. He said at the office, that he and Mr. White had been watching us all the morning.

Witness. I had seen them for an hour, or an hour and a half together, but missed them part of the time.

MR. PRICE. This is our cloth - this is the paper it was in when taken; I know it by my own writing on the end of the paper, and here is the manufacturer's mark on it - I have not the least doubt of it.

MR. PRICE, JUN. I am not in partnership with my father - I attend to his business; the length of the piece is marked in my hand-writing, "Nineteen yards" - I have not the least doubt of its being my father's, and on the paper is the figure 3, in my writing.

SMITH's Defence (written). - I now stand charged with an offence I am as innocent of as a child unborn. I will endeavour to state the particulars as clearly as possible. About eleven o'clock I got leave from my master to take a walk, having nothing to do - I was to be at home by dinner-time. I went out, and wishing to see the new London-bridge, I went; and as I returned I stopped to look at a picture-shop. I remained there about five minutes; a respectable youth came up, and asked which way I was going - I said towards Long-lane. He then asked me to carry the parcel in question: not suspecting any thing wrong, I agreed to carry it, and he was to give me 1s. when I got to the end of Smithfield with it. I went up Church-passage, and was alarmed by the officer laying hold of me - I immediately told him how I got it; he said the less I said about it the better - he took me to Guildhall, and sent for a person who swore to the property. I hope you will consider it is a very serious case, as it affects my life.

PIKE's Defence. I was looking after a situation, and called at the prosecutors' to inquire for one; I came out, went as far as the pump to get some water, heard a cry of Stop thief, and ran with other people; the officer said lay hold of him, and I was taken.

JURY to HERDSFIELD. Q. At what time did you first see them together - was it some time before? A. I had seen them together before it happened, but I had left them for an hour; I saw them together about ten o'clock, coming up Wood-street, with a boy, and followed them into Cheapside, Watling-street, Friday-street, and down the back streets, in company with each other - I then lost them, and went to Guildhall, and as I came into Basinghall-street saw them go by the Bankrupt Court; I followed them below the White Bear public-house, and then they returned.

JURY to MR. PRICE. Q. At what time did Pike come into the warehouse? A. Near twelve o'clock - it might be half-past eleven.

One witness gave Smith a good character.

SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

PIKE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18290611-53

1052. FREDERICK GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 1 seal, value 2l. , the goods of Charles Gibson .

CHARLES GIBSON . I am a jeweller , and live in Bishopsgate-street Within . On the 16th of May the prisoner came into the shop, about five o'clock in the afternoon. and asked for a seal, about 28s.; I showed him a great many - he was alone; after looking at them he said he wanted one that was engraved - I told him I would get him one engraved, as I had none; he said he lived at Hampstead, and that his father was a hay-salesman, and he might not be in town for six months again - I said I was in the habit of riding through Hampstead every morning on coming to town, and I would get him one engraved, and leave it at his father's; he said nothing to that - I turned round, leaving the tray on the counter, and went to get another tray, and showed him more seals, none would suit, and he was going out, but my young man came round and accused him of taking one seal - he said he had got no seal, and appeared much hurt at the accusation, and said he should bring his father to clear his character; I said if he was an innocent lad he could not object to empty his pockets, and that he might have taken one by mistake - he objected to that; I said I should insist on it, if he did not do it quietly - he then took out both his pockets in a very singular way; I said I should come round and convince myself - I came round, felt his pockets, outside, and felt the seal, took it out of his pocket, and gave him in charge; it is gold, and worth 2l.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I had nothing belonging to you? A. Yes; I did not put the seal into your pocket.

SAMUEL FAULKENER . I am servant to Mr. Gibson. After the prisoner had been some time in the shop, I stood on the other side of the counter looking at him, and saw his hand glide from the counter on to the first tray of seals

while Mr. Gibson was looking for another tray - I saw him take a seal up; he looked at some more for about twenty minutes - he was going out, when I came round and asked what he had done with the seal he took from the counter; he said he had taken none but what he had restored to its place - I saw him searched, and observed he did not quite take out his right-hand pocket; Mr. Gibson wished to satisfy himself - put his hand to his pocket, felt something hard, and took out the seal.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I took him in charge. He told me his father lived in Heathcoat-court, Strand - I went, and found his father there; he is a book-binder.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The young man came round and said, "I think you have a seal;" I said I had not - he said, "I cannot tell whether you have one in your pocket or whether you put it down;" I pulled both my pockets out.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-54

1053. WILLIAM REED was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , 1 copper scale, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Burchfield .

THOMAS BURCHFIELD. I am a scale-beam maker . On the 28th of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw this scale safe in my shop, and a little after eight I was told it was gone - I ran out, saw the prisoner running, and one of my young men stopped him; I saw the scale taken from under his coat - he could reach it from the door; he appeared to be drunk or stupid.

JAMES WILKS . I am in the service of Mr. Burchfield. I stopped the prisoner, and found the scale under his coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-55

1054. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 2 printed bound books, value 12s., the goods of James Webb Southgate ; and that he had before been convicted of felony .

BENJAMIN GRIMSTON . I am in the employ of James Webb Southgate, of No. 22, Fleet-street , a book auctioneer , I saw these books on the 28th of April at five o'clock, when the sale was over, on the shelves in the sale-room; there was to be a sale next day - the book was called the"Diary of an Invalid," in two volumes; the selling price was about 25s. - I did not see the prisoner in the room; they were missed about two o'clock on the 29th by me, but they had been missed before - they were brought back about seven that evening.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am a bookseller. On the 29th of April, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and asked if I would buy the "Diary of an Invalid," which he had got in pawn for 6s.; I said I could not tell unless I saw the condition of it - he showed me no duplicate; he came back in about half an hour with the books, and I gave him 7s. 6d. for them - I had sent my boy to Southgate's sale, and when he came home, in consequence of what he said, I took the books down to Southgate, who claimed them - he came to my shop next day, and I took him to Southgate's.

Prisoner. Q.Did I not say a person, whom I knew, had fallen into difficulties and had them in pledge? A. I recollect he did say they were in pawn for a friend of his, or that he had pawned them - I know he said they were in pawn.

WILLIAM MARCH . I am an officer. On the 29th of April I took the prisoner in custody in the afternoon, at Mr. Southgate's, where he had been detained - he said nothing whatever to the charge in my presence.

BENJAMIN GRIMSTON . I was present when Ballard brought the prisoner to our house; he said nothing - these are the books; I know them by the binding, and from their general appearance.

JOHN HOLLAND. I am an officer of St. Andrew's, Holborn. I have a certificate of a former conviction, which I got from Mr. Shelton's office - I know the prisoner to be the person described therein - (the certificate of a former conviction was here read) - I was present when the prisoner pleaded guilty to the offence.

Prisoner's Defence. I admit the former conviction. I was in the habit of frequenting 'Change - a person informed me he had fallen into embarrassment, and proposed to me to buy some books which he had in pledge; I told him I would shew them to a person whom I thought would buy them - he accordingly got them out, and I took them to Ballard.

GUILTY . Aged 61.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-56

NEW COURT, Second Day.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1055. JOHN SIMMONS was indicted for stealing. on the 23d of April , 5 books, value 30s. , the goods of John Sykes .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-57

1056. MARY BROME was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 3 shirts, value 30s., the goods of Henry Kingsbury - also, for stealing, on the 4th of February , 1 table-cloth, value 5s., and I reading-glass, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Vickers .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-58

1057. JOHN PATCHING was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May . 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Nathaniel George Wilkins , from his person .

NATHANIEL GEORGE WILKINS. I am an attorney . On the 6th of May, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Regent-street ; I felt a pressure against my pocket, and missed my handkerchief; I looked round, and saw three boys standing close behind me - the prisoner was one; he ran off - I pursued him, and he was taken in my presence; I took him to the watch-house - my handkerchief has not been found; the other two got away.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I was in Regent-street, and saw the prisoner and two others follow a gentleman and two ladies; the prisoner took the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket - he ran, and I pursued him; he was taken, but the handkerchief was not found - I saw it in

his hand as he was running; I did not see him throw it away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home in a hurry; I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-59

1058. OWEN SWIFT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 1 hat, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Thurley .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-60

1059. WILLIAM SILVESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 4 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 6d. in copper monies, the monies of John Stevens , from his person .

JOHN STEVENS . I am a drover . I had been up to Paddington with fourteen sheep; I was returning, and met the prisoner in Oxford-street - I had then about 24s. in my pocket; there were some half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences - they were loose in my pocket; the prisoner pleaded poverty, and asked charity - he said he was a gardener and a nurseryman: I said would he do a day's work - he said Yes; I said I would give him one to-morrow - I then took and treated him with some liquor and beer, and filled his belly; I drank rather too much. went out into the street, and fell asleep by a dunghill, in a livery stable-yard; the prisoner was the last person whom I remember being with me - I was taken to the watchhouse, and found myself there the next morning, and missed all my money.

Prisoner. Q.Where did you meet with me? A. At the corner of Duke-street, about six o'clock in the evening - I do not remember giving you two half-crowns in the street.

WILLIAM MUMFORD . I am a butcher. I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor come into King-street, Golden-square, about half-past seven o'clock; the prosecutor was very drunk, and a number of boys were teasing him - he offered to fight them; he had two half-crowns in his hand - the prisoner ran up to him, and said, "I will hold your money;" one of the half-crowns fell on the ground - he then sat down; I went and touched him - he then went down the yard; we sat him on a dunghill, and he fell asleep - the prisoner was sitting by him; I saw him while I was cleaning my master's horse, feeling in his pockets - I saw him take out some half-crowns, shillings, sixpences, and coppers, and a very bright farthing; I went and fetched the officer - I do not think the prisoner was sober.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I went and saw the prosecutor sound asleep, and the prisoner sitting by his side; I asked what he had done with the money which he had taken from his pockets; he said, "I have taken none;" I said, "Don't say so, you have been seen to take it;" he then said, "I have put it back again;" I searched him, and found only sixpence farthing; he then clapped his hands to his side, and said again, "I have got nothing but a pair of trousers;" as he did that, the flap of the trousers fell open, and I saw this money; he then said it was his pension - he afterwards said it was Stevens' money, and that he took it to take care of - here are four crowns, two shillings, and a sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the public-house; there were some women with him; when they had eaten what they liked, they gave me the rest, and we went into the gin place, and had some rum, and then went to some other places, and had some more liquor: they had a dog with them; the prosecutor said he would match it against any dog in England; he then threw some money down; I took it up, and gave it him: when we went out, he fell down; we then went down by the wall, and there, so help me God Almighty, he gave me the two half-crowns - I took and laid him on the straw; I meant to give him the money again.

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-61

1060. NATHANIEL HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 15 lbs. weight of sugar, value 7s., the goods of John Clarkson , in a certain boat upon the navigable River Thames .

EDWARD FOWLER . I am in the employ of John Clarkson. a lighterman ; the prisoner was employed on board his lighter on the 4th of May; there were twenty-seven bags of sugar on board.

Prisoner. Q.How long have I worked for you? A. Many years, and bore a very good character.

JOHN McFUNN. I am a clerk at St. Katharine's Docks. I received two hundred bags of sugar from the ship Alexander, in the London Docks, by barges; they were landing on the 3d, the 4th, and the 6th of April; on the 14th I weighed one bag, No. 140, marked I. O. it was 188 lbs; it was piled away in the warehouse; that was the bag which was said to be plundered.

JEREMIAH COGHLAN . I am delivery foreman at St. Katharine's Docks. There were some bags in the warehouse, marked I. O. which had been landed from the Alexander; they remained some time; I then received an order for Lot 9, which contained twenty-seven bags of sugar; I delivered them, without weighing, to Clarkson's lug-boat, on the 2d of May; I got the receipt for them from John Gates , Mr. Clarkson's man.

JOHN GATES . I took down the boat, and received the twenty-seven bags of sugar from Coghlan; I did not notice the marks - I took them to the West India Docks in the Maria boat; the prisoner was not on board then, but I was unwell, and I got him to stop with them all night; I went at seven o'clock in the morning, and heard that he was in the guard-house; I went to the boat, and found the twenty-seven bags all right in number, and all sewed up as usual.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am marker at St. Katharine's Docks. I remember the twenty-seven bags being given out on the 2d of May; I marked this No. 140, and the 3 in a triangle; here is I.O. on it beside - I did not see them shipped.

JOHN BISHOP . I am a Thames Police constable. On the 4th of May, about four o'clock in the morning, I was coming out of the West India Export Dock, and saw the prisoner in the Maria lug-boat; I saw him lift up a tarpauling, which covered some bags of sugar; he remained for some minutes in a stooping position - I went and asked him if he had the charge of that; he said he had, that he was the watchman - I then went into the boat, and found that one of the bags had been

opened, plundered, and sewed up again; I asked if he had any sugar in his hat - he said No; I took off his hat and found this bag, which had had some sugar in it - I then searched his pockets, and I saw him take from his left hand pocket, this small hair case, which he threw into the water - I got it out; it contains a needle, and some twine, which corresponds with the twine, with which this bag has been sewn up; he then acknowledged that the bag had been plundered, but he did not do it - about eight o'clock, Gates came and asked what I did there; I told him one bag had been plundered- I took the bag, and weighed it - it weighed 1 cwt. 2qrs. 5lbs., which was 15lbs. less than it should be; I then took the prisoner to the office, and the Magistrate ordered the sugar to be taken out of this bag, that it might be shipped on board the Emmery - I have kept the bag ever since, which the sugar had been in; the sugar in the little bag appeared the same as was in the other - the prisoner said that when he saw me looking at him, he started the sugar overboard, from this bag.

JOHN FOY. The prisoner was brought to my office by Bishop - I desired him to take the bag out of the craft; it had been recently plundered, and mended with tar twine; I asked what he had done with the sugar from this little bag - he said, seeing the officer observe him, he had thrown it overboard; I then asked why he threw his needle-case overboard - he gave no answer.

Prisoner. Q.Did I not tell you I found this bag cut open, and I picked up the sugar? A. I asked where he got the sugar he threw overboard - he said he picked it up near the bag, in the craft.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Sunday evening I went and took a sculler to the West India Docks - I saw this craft made fast to a barge, loaded with bricks; I went on board and staid till one o'clock in the morning - I went and sat down in the brick barge cabin, and staid there till a little after four; I then went on board this craft again- I lifted up the tarpauling, and found the bag had been cut and some sugar scattered about; I did sew up the bag again with a needle and tar twine, which I always keep in my pocket to stop holes - I did take up about a - lb., and shake it over the boat's side; that is what I told the officer.

JOHN McFUNN . I believe this to be the bag that I weighed - the I. Q.is not very plain on it, but the 140 is.

JEREMIAH COGHLAN re-examined. Q.Can you prove that the bags were kept in the same state that they were in on the 14th of April? A.They were quite correct when I delivered them - if there had been any thing amiss I should have seen it, and I would have had them weighed again.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined Six Months .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

Reference Number: t18290611-62

1061. HENRY BELSHAW and JAMES DACEY were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Henry Jacobs , from his person .

HENRY JACOBS . I am an umbrella-maker . On the 31st of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I was in the Haymarket ; I felt a slight pull, turned round, and saw Belsham with my handkerchief, which he threw to Dacey - he then rair off, but a friend accured him; I took Dacey.

EDWARD HAINES. The prisoners were delivered to my charge.

BELSHAW'S Defence. I was walking down the Haymarket, and saw two boys pick the gentleman's pocket, but it was not me.

BELSHAW - GUILTY . Aged 13.

DACEY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-63

1062. JAMES McDOUGALL and EPHRAIM WHITING were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 1d.; 1 key, value 1d.; 1 watch-guard, value 1s.; 15 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Thomas Faulkes , from his person .

THOMAS FAULKES. I am a cordwainer and a watchman - the prisoners are privates in the 3d Foot Guards . I had seen McDougall about Christmas last, when he came upon my beat drunk and disorderly. On the 28th of April I went into the Star and Crown public-house, at Westminster, about half-past ten o'clock - the prisoners were there, murmuring one with another; McDougall said they should be too late for duty - I immediately said,"Don't let that get you into trouble, the first coach that comes by the door press it, and I will pay for it;" a coach came up, and we all got into it - I did it with a view of taking them to the barracks, and preventing them from getting into trouble; McDougall ordered the coach to stop at the Queen's Head public-house, where we all got out - they said they would not go into the barracks without a pot of beer; we had a pot of beer and a glass of gin and water - I had paid for the coach: I then laid down half a crown to pay the waiter; McDougall took up the half-crown, and went out with the waiter - I did not think he meant to take it away, and called out,"Come, my man. bring the half-crown back!" he made no answer - Whiting said, "Your half-crown is all right;" I was very heavy and sleepy, and sat down on the settle and fell asleep - I had five half-crowns, a shilling, and a sixpence in my pocket; I had a watch, seal and key, a guard to it, and a gilt brooch in my pocket - when I awoke the landlord said, "What has become of your watch?" I felt and it was gone, and so was my money and brooch; I was quite sober, but I had been up the whole night at work at shoemaking - I am sure the money was in my trousers pocket, the watch in my fob, and the guard round my neck; I went to the barracks, and told the serjeant: I saw McDougall in the ranks, and accused him of having my property - this was two or three hours after I lost it.

JOSEPH GUILTY. I am a serjeant in the 3d Regiment of Foot Guards. The witness came to me about five o'clock in the evening and stated what he has to-day - he appeared to me then as if he had been drinking, but from what I have seen of him since I believe it to be his manner; he pointed McDougall out in the ranks, and said he had robbed him of half a crown, which he could swear to - the serjeant ordered him into the guard-room, and I found upon him 2s. 3 1/2d; I asked who had been in company with him - he said Whiting; about ten o'clock at night Whiting returned to the guard-room - I found on him four or five penny pieces,

and two or three small pieces of glass, which appeared to be the glass of a watch; I said, "What have you done with the watch?" he said, "I had no watch" - the next morning he was taken before Captain Phipps, and said, "I know where the watch is, but I have not got it;" the adjutant said he would send a non-commissioned officer to get it, but he said he would send for it himself; I said again in the evening, "If you have the watch, why not give it up?" he then gave it me, and said, "Here it is, I have had it some time."

JAMES SELBY. I am an officer, and have the watch.

WHITING'S Defence. When we got into the coach he pulled his watch out, gave it into my hand, and said, "I have not money enough to keep up the spree, we will pawn this watch" - he said so a dozen times, but I would not have it; a soldier, named Barnett, gave it to me at six o'clock in the evening.

THOMAS FAULKES. There is no truth in this - the waiter saw it safe in my pocket; this is my watch.

WHITING - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

McDOUGALL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-64

1063. JAMES POWER and HENRY BARRINGTON were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May . 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Edward Payne , from his person .

EDWARD PAYNE . I was in Oxford-street on the evening of the 2d of May, about nine o'clock; I had my handkerchief in my coat pocket, and did not miss it till the officer told me of it, and produced it.

WILLIAM CRAIG. I was with Corwick, and saw the two prisoners in company for a few minutes; I saw them go up to the prosecutor - Barrington's took the handkerchief from his pocket, and ran into the road; I took him into custody with it - Power was walking along by his side at the time he took it, as if to cover him.

JAMES CORWICK . I was with Craig. and saw Power with his arm round Barrington's neck; what Craig has stated is correct - I saw Barrington with the handkerchief.

POWER'S Defence. I was going to receive my wages; I asked this boy what o'clock it was - he said between eight and nine: I said, "Good bye," and he said"Which way are you going?" we walked along together- I took no further notice of him; this gentleman came and took me.

BARRINGTON's Defence. I never saw this before the gentleman came and took me, and said I had taken a handkerchief.

BARRINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

POWER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-65

1064. ELLEN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 1 chain, value 3s.; 2 seals, value 20s., and 1 watch-key, value 6d., the goods of Richard Deyns , from his person .

RICHARD DEYNS . I am a tailor . On the 29th of May I was near St. Giles' church , about half-past ten o'clock at night; I was going home to Berwick-street - the prisoner accosted me, and asked me to treat her; I refused- she walked by my side to the corner of Bainbridge-street, when another girl came up; they whispered together - the other girl then made a snatch at my watch, got the chain and seals, and ran away; I attempted to follow her, but the prisoner caught hold of my hand, and struck me several times; I have quite lost my property - I gave the prisoner into custody.

CHARLES BENNIS . I am a watchman. The prosecutor was running through Bainbridge-street, crying Stop thief! I took the prisoner, and he gave charge of her for stopping him from taking a girl who had stolen his watch-chain.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by; the prosecutor was calling Watch! he took hold of me, and said I must have known the girl who had robbed him - I know nothing of the girl; I never saw her.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-66

1065. WILLIAM HEANEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 1 necklace, value 8s., the goods of George May , from the person of Sarah May .

ELIZA HOW . I am servant to Mr. George May, of Grafton-street - he has a daughter a year and a half old. I took her out on the 5th of May; she had a necklace round her neck, fastened with a snap; the witness saw the prisoner snatch it off her neck - I ran after him, but he got away, and was taken on the 8th of May; I lost sight of him in Torrington-square, but I am certain he is the person I pursued.

CHARLES TARDIN. I saw How with the child in her arms; the prisoner went to the child, snatched the necklace, and ran away with it - I am certain he is the person; I have known him for two years.

GEORGE MAY. My daughter's name is Sarah. This necklace was on her neck when she was taken out.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18290611-67

1066. JOHN ORCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Ralph Dodd , from his person .

RALPH DODD. I am a gentleman's servant , but am out of place. On the 27th of May I was in Oxford-street , about five o'clock in the afternoon; I was told by a boy that my handkerchief was taken from my pocket - he pointed out a boy who took it: I was going to pursue, but fell down - I cannot swear to the boy, but this is my handkerchief; I saw it on the ground.

MATTHEW WILSON . I live in Wardour-street. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor, I was going to tell him, and another boy who was with the prisoner struck me: the prisoner then put the handkerchief in again, and then he took it out again - they made me go away, and then he took it quite out: I am sure he is the boy - he was taken the same night.

Prisoner's Defence. I was only looking at the boy -I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-68

1067. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May . 7 sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Foskett , from his person .

THOMAS FOSKETT . I am a porter . The prisoner lodged in the same room with me, in Charles-street - he generally drew a truck about the streets for 4d. an hour- a blind man lodged in the same room. On the night of the 15th of May the prisoner and I went to bed nearly together - the blind man came in afterwards; I told him to bolt the door - he said No; I got up and bolted it - my waistcoat pocket had seven sovereigns in it; on the following morning, which was Tuesday, I got up, put on most of my clothes, and then saw that my waistcoat had been moved - I ran to it, and my money was gone; the prisoner was gone then: I have never had the money since - he was taken on the Friday, but he came to the house the same night, very drunk, and fell down twice in the room; on the Wednesday he was riding about in a cab all day, and left some sovereigns at the White Lion public-house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever know me to come home drunk before that? A.No, not in pension time; the door has certainly been found open when blind Joseph has come in drunk of a night, but nothing has been lost before.

JOHN STABLES . I keep the White Lion public-house, James-street. On the morning of the 17th, which I think was on Wednesday or Thursday, the prisoner came and asked for change for a sovereign, which I gave him; he opened a paper, and there were three sovereigns in it- I gave him change for one, and he asked me to take care of the other two; I took them, and gave them to the officer.

MARY ELLIOTT. I keep the house where these men lodged. On the Saturday before the prosecutor lost his money, the prisoner paid me 1s., and owed me 8s. 6d.; about a month before that I know he had been in constant work, and had had a guinea a week, but at this time I know he had not much money, for he borrowed the shilling of Thomas.

Prisoner. Q. Is Joseph quite blind? A. He can discern light from dark, but he cannot see any thing on the ground; he does sometimes get drunk on small beer.

GEORGE McGREGOR . I took the prisoner on the 15th of May, and found 5s. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. What money I was possessed of was partly from my own earnings, and what I had laid by at pension times.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-69

1067. JOHN NEEDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 2 quarts of oil, value 2s. , the goods of James Smethurst , his master.

THOMAS BRAMSTON. I am a porter - Mr. Smethurst keeps a large lamp shop , in Bond-street, and sells oil. On the 19th of May I saw the prisoner in Davies-street, carrying a cann; I watched him - a little girl came up to him: I then lost sight of him, but when I got to Grosvenor-square, I saw them again - the little girl had then got the cann; I followed her, and asked her several questions- I had never seen the prisoner before.

SIMON PATCHERS . About half-past twelve o'clock, on the 19th of May, I was at the corner of Davies-street; Bramston said that girl had got stolen property, and told me to take her - I found it was a cann of oil; I took her down to Mr. Smethurst's with it, and the foreman ordered the men all up, the prisoner was one - we asked him how he came by it; he said it was a little oil he had taken for his own use, he did not think there was so much.

Cross-examined. Q. What was said to him before he said this? A. The foreman asked how he came by it - he said he was sent with four gallons of oil to Square Thomas', and he took this little oil out; the foreman said he had better say how he came by it.

ROBERT DOUGLAS. I am foreman to Mr. James Smethurst; the prisoner was his porter for about a month. I measured the oil, and asked the prisoner how he came by it - he said he took it out of the cann at Mr. Thomas'; there had been such oil as this sent there - I believe this to be Mr. Smethurst's.

Cross-examined. Q. Except from what he said you cannot tell that that was Mr. Smethurst's? A. Certainly not; it is sperm oil - I did not say it would be better or worse for him to tell the truth; the last witness must have misunderstood me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-70

1068. THOMAS WALL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , 3 quarts of oil, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Smethurst .

ROBERT DOUGLAS . I am foreman to Mr. Smethurst; he contracts to light the lamps in Grovesnor-square - the prisoner was employed to trim and light them; the cellarman used to go out to give the oil to him once a week; but the cellarman has absconded. On the 20th of April I watched the prisoner and brought him back with this cann of oil - he ought to have six quarts and a pint in the cann; I measured it, and it contained tea quarts - he had got as far as Bond-street before I called him back.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Mr. Smethurst here? A. No - I measured the oil when it was brought back, but the prisoner was not present - I have had no quarrel with him; I have not got a friend of mine in his situation, nor a person whom I recommended, I am sure; Mr. Smethurst was not willing that the prisoner should be let go.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-71

1069. EDWARD AKERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 curtain, value 1s.; 1 silver-mounted cork, value 1s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 5s.; 1 nightcap, value 6d.; 1 box, value 6d.; 1 ladle, value 5s.; 2 wine-labels, value 3s.; 8 towels, value 8s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 1 ink-stand, value 3d.; 1 key, value 3d., and 1 punch-ladle, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Warrington , his master; 5 books, value 4s., and 1 napkin, value 1s. , the goods of John Duncan .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS WARRINGTON . I live in Doughty-street; the prisoner was in my service. On the morning of the 14th of April I gave all my servants notice to quit, and had all their trunks searched: the articles enumerated were in the prisoner's trunk, and some others - he had been about eleven months with me.

WILLIAM HALL. I am an officer. I found these things in the prisoner's trunk when I searched it; he was present- I asked if he had any thing in it, but what belonged to him; he said No, nothing but his own things - I said,"What do you say to these things?" he made no answer.

THOMAS WARRINGTON . These articles are mine; the wardrobe belonged to a lodger in my house - he had lost the key, and had another made; the key was found in the prisoner's box.

JOHN DUNCAN . These books are mine. I lodge in the house.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had taken the books for the purpose of reading them, and intended to return them as well as the articles of apparel, which he had only taken to wear.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-72

1070. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Grover , from his person .

JOHN GROVER . On the 24th of April, I was in the Haymarket , about twenty minutes after eight o'clock - I felt a pull at my pocket; I turned, and saw the prisoner putting my handkerchief into his breast - this is it.

GEORGE KNOX. I am an officer. I produce the handkerchief which I have had ever since; I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it merely out of distress; I had not laid on a bed for five nights - my master was here yesterday for whom I worked four years, but business called him away to day; my father works for Mr. Rolfe, but has been out of work sometime.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-73

1071. WILLIAM WANSELL was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE AVELING . I am an oilman , and live in Gloucester-street, Queen-square. The prisoner was my porter , I paid him weekly - he was employed to go to families and to receive monies for me, which he should bring home and give me or my shopman immediately.

CATHERINE ROBERTS. I paid the prisoner on the 23d of April 14s. 6d., on the 30th 4s., and on the 7th 1l. 15s. 7d., for Mr. Aveling - he receipted these different bills at the time I paid him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known him well? A. Yes; I had been in the habit of paying him bills these twelve months - here are dates to the bills; I saw the prisoner write the receipts on the kitchen table at Mr. Harrison's.

GEORGE AVELING. He never accounted to me for any of these sums; I sent to Mr. Harrison, and found that he had been paid - I then sent for a constable - and the prisoner said, before the constable and myself, that he had spent the money.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you tell him he had better tell you what he had done with it? A. No, nor did I say it would be worse for him; my wife never acts in the shop - I have a lad who receives money, but not bills; on the Saturday the prisoner was taken up he would have had 18s. due to him.

THOMAS BENTLEY . I was sent by my employer to know if this money had been paid - he never paid the money to me. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18290611-74

1072. WILLIAM WANSELL was again indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE AVELING . The prisoner was in my employ, and should account to me or my shopman for all he received. On the 30th of April he did not account to me for 9s. 11d.; I did not discover till after he was taken up that it had been paid.

SARAH LONG. I paid the prisoner 9s. 11d. on the 30th of April, for Mr. Aveling, at the house of a lady I live with, in Spring-gardens - he has receipted the bill.

GEORGE AVELING . I asked the prisoner about this money - he said he had spent it.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-75

1073. MARY CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , one watch, value 2l.; one coat, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s., and 1 latch-key, value 6d., the goods of John Nowland ; 2 watches, value 3l.; 3 seals, value 1l.; 1 gold pin, value 3s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s., and 1 hat, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Wisby ; CHARLES COOKE was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 gold pin, value 3s., part of the goods aforesaid; MARGARET CONROY was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s., and 1 latch-key, value 6d., part of the goods aforesaid; and MARY GRIFFEN was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 handkerchief, value 1s., part of the goods aforesaid, they well knowing them to have been stolen, & c.

JOHN NOWLAND. I am a tailor , and live in Foley-street, Fitzroy-square. On Saturday night, the 31st of May, or rather on the Sunday morning, I was in company with Robert Wisby ; between twelve and one o'clock at night, we met Connor in a street near Drury-lane, and Griffen, to the best of my knowledge, was with her, but I am not certain of her person - they accosted us, and we went with them and met Cook; we were not drunk - we had been drinking some half-and-half and some rum and water; we went to a street which I have seen since, and I think the name of it is Ivy-street, St. Giles' ; we four went into a lower room - Wisby and I staid there all night, what became of the girls I do not know; Wisby and I went to bed together in the same room, and left the girls doing up their hair, and we fell asleep; I did not awake till about seven o'clock in the morning - there was no person then in the room but Wisby - I cannot tell what time the girls left the room; when I awoke I missed my hat, coat, waistcoat, silk handkerchief, watch, seals, and what money I had; I had left it all on a chair in the room - I did not get up till between nine and ten o'clock; Wisby had his coat left - he went out to a friend's, and got me some clothes; I did not see any more of Connor till the Monday morning at the watch-house - and I can say nothing about Griffen, only, to to the best of my knowledge, she was with Connor; I gave information to Mr. Nicholas and Mr. Cole about this,

ROBERT WISBY . I am a footman, and was at that time out of place - I spent the evening with Nowland, at a friend of his; Connor was one of the girls we met, but I cannot swear to Griffen - we went home with them; I was not drunk - I went to bed first, and Nowland came after me; there was only one bed in the room; we went home with the girls because we were both locked out - I awoke in the morning and got up; I found the doorajar - Connor

and the other girl were in the room when we went to bed; it was a front room on the ground floor - we did not particularly ask them to go to bed; I saw no other persons in the house - I lost my waistcoat and trousers; my coat and my boots were left - I know nothing of the other prisoners,

JOSEPH COLE. I am a constable. I heard of this on the Sunday evening, from the prosecutors; they gave a description of Connor and Griffen as being the girls who had robbed them - I met Connor, Griffen, and Cooke together on the Monday morning, about half-past ten o'clock; I looked at them and passed them once or twice - I went to get assistance of one of our two constables, but they were not at home; I then called a young man to assist me - I saw one handkerchief on Griffen's neck, and one on Connor's; I did not say what I wanted them for, but said I wanted to speak to them, and took them to the watch-house; I sent for the prosecutors - while they were in the watch-house I saw something go down the steps; I picked it up, and it was this black handkerchief with this gold pin wrapped up in a bit of paper - I do not know from whose hand it came, but to the best of my belief it was from Cooke's; as I came back I found some pieces of black handkerchief on Cooke, all torn to pieces - they appeared the same as this; I found 18s. 8d. in Cooke's pocket - I then had the females searched by Mrs. Furzeman; this handkerchief was taken from Griffen; the one which I had seen on Connor had disappeared; I asked Connor where she lived; she said at No. 12, King-street, Drury-lane - I went there with Nicholas, but they denied all knowledge of her - I then asked Conroy, (whom I found there with a person, who I believe was her husband,) if they had any objection to my searching the place; they said No - I found a pair of gloves in a hat-box, in Conroy's room, and a latch key on the top of a cupboard, close to the ceiling; Conroy said that she had found that key in the coals that morning, and the gloves she said were her own, then she said they were her husband's, but he denied it; we said, if they were not right we would bring them back again - we went to the office and shewed them to Nowland, who identified them; we then went back and brought Conroy and the key - Nowland said he could not identify the key, but it was like one he lost; Conner told me at the office that the coat and other things were taken from Conroy's lodging that morning - I found this bag and black thread on Cooke.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Conroy told you she had a husband? A. Yes; she told me it was her husband.

MORRIS NICHOLAS. I am beadle of St. Giles'. I went with Cole; we found this pair of gloves - Nowland identified them; I searched Connor, and found this handkerchief tied round her thigh.

JOHN NOWLAND. These handkerchiefs are both mine, and are what I lost; this gold pin is mine, I have had it these four years - these gloves are mine, and this key to the best of my opinion; I know nothing of the black handkerchief - I lost some black thread.

CONNOR's Defence. I met the prosecutors in James-street, Covent-garden; they took me to have something to drink; and then they asked me to go home with them - I asked Sarah Wells to let me go to her room; she did, and we went there - Nowland said he had but a half-crown and that spotted handkerchief, which he gave me - before I went to bed he asked me to go and get an ounce of snuff; I went out and met Griffen; she said she had had nothing to eat all day, and I spent the half-crown with her.

COOKE's Defence. I met Griffen and Connor in Hatton-garden, and they asked me to give them something to drink - I was going to do it, and the officer took me -Griffen gave me the black handkerchief.

GRIFFEN's Defence. I met Connor, and she lent me the red handkerchief, the pin was stuck at the corner of it - she said it belonged to the person she was sleeping with; I was tucking it down my bosom.

CONNOR - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

COOKE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

CONROY - NOT GUILTY .

GRIFFEN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-76

1074. MARY ANN HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 2 Quilts, value 6s., and 2 sheets, value 6s., the goods of Elizabeth Newell ; 8 shirts, value 20s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 6s.; 3 waistcoats, value 6s.; 1 coat, value 5s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 2s., and 2 books, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Maddock .

ELIZABETH NEWELL. Mr. Maddock is a lodger of mine. On the 14th of April I was in the front attic, and opened the door on account of the smoke; I saw Maddock's room door open, which it never is, except he or I go in there - I spoke, supposing Maddock was there; he made no answer; I called again, and then the prisoner appeared, and said he was down stairs - I said, "Is he?" she said Yes - she returned into the room again, and came out in two or three minutes with a large bundle; I clapped my hands together, and said, "Good God!" she said, "You will not stop me?" I said I would; I went to take hold of her, but she was too powerful for me, threw down the bundle, and got down stairs - I called out, and she was stopped; there were two sheets and two old quilts of mine- the other property belonged to Maddock, it all came out of his room.

JOSEPH MADDOCK. I lodge at that house. I went out at eight o'clock in the morning, turned the key twice, and hung it up on the door-post; these trousers and other articles are mine - I knew nothing of the prisoner till I saw her at the office.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out on the 15th of April to fetch in some linen for a laundress - on going through Covent-garden I met a woman who had lived as a neighbour of mine; I asked what she was waiting for - she said for a woman named Lewis, who was going to get some things away, as her landlord was very spiteful against her for having a little drink; she asked me if I would go and fetch them - I refused; she went with me part of the way, and then sent me up stairs at this house, and told me to fetch the bundle off the bed, which I did; the prosecutrix said she would stop me - I said the woman I fetched them for was down stairs; I got from her, but a neighbour in the house stopped me, and asked for the description of the woman - I gave it her, but they sent for an officer.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-77

1075. HENRY SUTTON HOGGARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 2 pieces of linen, value 4l. 18s. , the goods of Elizabeth Emmett .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of James Tarling .

SARAH EVANS . I am the wife of Richard Evans, who is an ostler at Mr. James Tarling 's livery stables, in St. John's-street, Clerkenwell . A brown paper parcel was brought there on the 4th of May by Miss Emmett's servant - it was directed to Miss Browning, Newington-green, and was to go by Mr. James Browning 's chaise, which he keeps at that yard; I put the parcel into another chaise,(which stood at the foot of the stairs,) not Mr. Browning's- the prisoner is a coachman to a widow lady, and he puts his horses there to bait when he comes to town; on the 5th, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner came there, and went away rather before two o'clock - my husband was ordered out with a carriage at the same time; I then looked for the parcel, and it was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Have you seen the parcel since? A. I have seen the articles, but they were not packed up as I left them in the coach - the place was not locked; it is a private yard - there may be from twelve to fifteen or twenty carriages a day there; persons who come with horses have access to them - the parcel was in the coach-house; the door stands open all day - none but gentlemen's servants come there.

RICHARD EVANS . I am ostler in the yard. I saw the parcel on the 5th of May, it was directed to Miss Browning, to go to Newington-green; the chaise-washer took the chaise into the yard to wash, which had this parcel in it - I was going by at the time; I called him, and censured him for not placing it in the hinder chaise - I took it, and put it in the hinder chaise, and the prisoner, who was there, asked if I considered the parcel safe - I said,"Yes, if it were untold gold;" we then went and had a glass of ale - in about a quarter of an hour we returned into the yard; he went towards the coach-house, and I went about my own avocations - his time came near to go out with a carriage to drive a gentleman, and I went out about the same time to drive a gentleman; when I returned in the evening my wife told me the parcel was gone - I looked, and missed it; I went to the prisoner's mistress' son, and directed his fellow servants to watch him - I saw the parcel again on the 12th of May I think; it was Davis and myself went and took the prisoner in Long-acre on his mistress' carriage box - I jumped upon his box, and said, "You are my prisoner - I want the other piece of cloth which you took from the yard;" he said, "For God Almighty's sake don't hurt me; it is my first offence, and I have never been comfortable since," and he directly told the officer where to find the other piece of cloth - I went to Highgate, and found it in the body of a truss of straw.

BENJAMIN NICHOLLS. On the 11th of May I received information from a person in the lane; the prisoner afterwards told me that he had some cloth to send to town, and asked if the carriers were gone - I said Yes, he had better send it to-morrow; he said, "I shall not;" I said,"If you will leave it with me, I will send:" about half-past ten o'clock, on the 12th of May, he gave it me as he was going out with his coach - I said I was going to Clerkenwell, and would take it; he put on it a direction," Martha Gunter , Bishopsgate-street;" I gave it to Davis.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. The gardener came and gave me this parcel; I then went to Long-acre, and apprehended the prisoner - when he came down from his box, he said "Good God! how could this be found out?" I said the gardener had brought it all to light - he said,"It is the first thing I ever did in my life, and have never been happy since I did it;" I said, "As you have said that, will you tell me where the other piece of cloth is?" he said, "If you will go to Highgate you will find it in the centre of a truss of straw at the end of the straw loft."

Cross-examined. Q. Had you threatened or promised him any thing? A. No; he did not say whose the cloth was.

LUKE CURTIS. I am a linendraper. This cloth was bought at my master's, Mr. James Wilson , St. John-street; it has our mark upon it.

HELEN READING . I am in the employ of Miss Elizabeth Emmett . I had two pieces of linen to pack up, which I took to the stable, and gave to the ostler's wife.

SARAH EMMETT . I am daughter of Elizabeth Emmett. This cloth was delivered to me to take to the stable yard.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-78

1076. JANE LOW was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 pair of salt-cellars, value 2s., and 1 jug, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Edward Samson .

JOHN FREDERICK SHRANN . I am in the employ of Thomas Edward Samson ; he deals in china and glass , and lives in Whitechapel . The prisoner came to his shop, on the 5th of June, with two other girls; they said they wanted a blue cup and saucer - I saw the prisoner go from the other two, about half a dozen yards; when I was giving change I heard the jugs rattle - on coming from the desk, I saw the prisoner going out - I accused her of having stolen something; she took out this salt-cellar, and held it up - I took hold of her, and this jug dropped down on her left side.

Prisoner's Defence I asked the price of one of these salts - the man came and said I wanted to steal, and took me as I was coming out of the door.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-79

1077. JAMES MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 3 saws, value 15s., the goods of William Harbert ; 1 saw, value 5s., the goods of Frederick Harbury ; and 1 saw, value 2s. , the goods of Henry James Bailey .

WILLIAM HARBERT . I am a pianoforte-key maker , and work at Messrs. Gunter and Haward's, Camden-town- the prisoner was a labourer there. I missed two saws on the 16th of May, which I afterwards found in Homer-street.

JOHN TUCKWOOD. I keep a sale shop in Homer-street. I bought two saws of the prisoner on the 16th of May; I have known him these six years.

FREDERICK HARBURY . I work at the same shop. I lost one saw; this is it.

HENRY JAMES BAILEY. I lost a saw - this is it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290611-80

1078. JAMES OSBORN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 3 shirts, value 30s. , the goods of William Gill .

WILLIAM GILL. I am a servant to Henry Parnell Hicks, Esq., No. 43, Gloucester-place ; the prisoner was footman and groom ; he had been there about ten days, and was turned away on account of losing a great coat. I missed three shirts from a drawer in the pantry; I had not an opportunity of speaking to him about them till he gave himself up to me, and told me two of them were at the pawnbroker's - he said he pawned the other shirt there, but the pawnbroker says he has not got it.

GEORGE LAW . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bowling-street. These two shirts were pawned at our shop, in the name of James Osborn , on the 21st and 23d of March.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18290611-81

1079. JAMES OSBORN was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , 3 coats, value 3l. , the goods of Henry Parnell Hicks .

WILLIAM GILL . I am a servant to Henry Parnell Hicks , Esq. He lost three coats when the prisoner had been eight days in his service; the prisoner came and gave himself up to me, and said he sold the three coats to a Jew for 30s.; they have never been found - they were kept in a back-room, where we brush the clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-82

1080. GEORGE McKENZIE , THOMAS EASOM , and JOHN MASON were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 1 saw, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Hurry .

GEORGE SUTHERLAND. I live at Newington . On the morning of the 8th of May, about seven o'clock, I was taking down our shutters, and saw the three prisoners about a dozen yards from Mr. James Hurry 's house - I saw two of them go forward to the front of the shop; Easom took the saw, put it under his coat, and went away with it; McKenzie was close to him, and Mason was up a passage by the side of the shop - it is a butcher's; they then all walked off together - I was going for water in about ten minutes, and asked Mrs. Hurry if they had taken a piece of beef; she said No; I then said, "Have they taken a saw?" she said, "Yes;" they were taken the same morning - I am certain of their persons.

SAMUEL CLEBEREY. I took the three prisoners together. I found this saw on McKenzie.(Property produced and sworn to.)

McKENZIE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

EASOM - GUILTY . Aged 19.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290611-83

1081. JAMES TAYLOR and JOHN DAMPBELL were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , 1 ream of paper, value 24s. , the goods of Francis Baister .

GEORGE BARRETT. I was going towards Tyburn-gate, on the 7th of May; I heard some one halloo, and saw Baister turn down Harewood-place - I saw the prisoners; one was carrying something - I believe it was Taylor, but I cannot exactly say which; I went on, and saw a watchman - I went up to Taylor, and took the property from him; they were twenty or thirty yards, I suppose, from the prosecutor's house when I saw them first - they then went on to Hanover-street, and then to Argyle-street; I secured them both.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You cannot say who had the parcel first? A. I did not see either of them in the prosecutor's shop.

JOSEPH SEALE . I saw the two prisoners in company as I was calling nine o'clock; Taylor was carrying a bundle - they were delivered into my custody; this is the bundle of paper, tied in this apron.

FRANCIS BAISTER . I live in Oxford-street , and am a stationer . This property was taken from the top of a pile of paper facing my door.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you made some inquiries about Taylor? A. Yes, and I have heard that he is of a good family: I had not sold any paper of this description that day - we seldom have paper in that form.

TAYLOR's Defence. I was walking down Oxford-street, and met this prisoner and another man dressed in blue; they asked if I would do a job; I said I would - we went on, and this prisoner gave me a bundle, told me to go on to Argyle-street, and he would follow me; I went there, and then missed them; I waited at the corner, and this gentleman came up and asked what I had got; I said I did not know, it belonged to a gentleman just behind.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-84

1082. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 20lbs. weight of feathers, value 20s.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 pillow, value 4s.; 2 sheets, value 4s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 coverlid, value 6d.; 2 curtains, value 1s.; 1 chamber-pot, value 6d.; 1 basin, value 6d.; 1 pitcher, value 6d.; 1 frying-pan, value 1s.; 2 candlesticks, value 2s., and 2 keys, value 1s. , the goods of John Cameron .

ANN CAMERON . I am the wife of John Cameron . I let a ready-furnished lodging to the prisoner for about four months; he left without giving notice - he owed me 1l. 5s.: I missed this property from his room, and have never got it since; he has a wife, I believe; they lived together, and went away together - they took the key, and left the room locked; I did not see him again till the 17th of April.

WILLIAM KING. I apprehended the prisoner, in contest with the prosecutor, for which he was tried yesterday, on another indictment; I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. My wife pawned the articles; the lady said I should make every thing good, and I promissed I would.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-85

1083. JOHN SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 1 pewter pot, value 1s. , the goods of Henry Burgman .

HENRY BURGMAN. I keep the Brown Bear public-house, in Upper East Smithfield . I saw the prisoner near my house, about two days before the 6th of June, and told him to go away. This pot is mine.

WILLIAM PULBROOK. I am an officer of Hackney. - about four o'clock last Sunday morning, I stopped the prisoner in Dalston, near the Tyson's Arms public-house he had something in a bag - I asked what it was; he said some grub; I felt it, and found it was this pewter pot - I took him, and this other pot was found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ, and met a man, who gave me this that was in the bag; I said,"Perhaps I shall be hauled up for it" - he said it would do for coffee for breakfast in the morning; that man turned off when he saw the watchman, and left me.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Three Months .

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18290611-86

1084. JAMES WARD was indicted for bigamy .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-87

1085. SAMUEL NESBITT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , 6 pairs of ear-rings, value 5l. , the goods of Montague Levyson .

ELIZABETH LEVYSON . I am the wife of Montague Levyson - we live in Broad-street-buildings, Finsbury. On the 18th of March I saw the prisoner at our house - he asked me to let him have some ear-rings to show a customer; when our traveller came home I sent some by him, telling him to bring back the money or the earrings - the prisoner had worked for us: he said the customer lived at the bottom of the street or place where he lived: he said they were to be under 22s. a pair - I sent six pairs; I think it was between three and four o'clock in the afternoon when I sent them - here is one pair with my marks on them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When did you see them again, before the Magistrate? A. About six weeks afterwards.

THOMAS BOOT . On the 18th of March Mrs. Levyson told me to take some ear-rings to the prisoner's house, in Europa-place, St. Luke's; I took them, and saw the prisoner, who told me he had got to show them to a lady at the west-end of the town - he wished me to leave them till the next day, when I was to have them or the money for those that were sold: I went the next day, and he said he had not got an answer from the parties - I went the next day, and he made a similar excuse; I called on the Saturday, and then he said his wife was going to have a party on the Sunday, and I should have them on the Monday - I went then, and they had left the premises; I never saw him again till he was taken: I was examined at the office on the 25th of April - I did not see the prisoner before that; I believe three pairs of ear-rings were produced - I left six pairs, and never got any back: one pair I can speak to - these are them.

Cross-examined. Q. How many times did you call for the money? A. Three times - I think it was on a Thursday, the 18th of March, that I left them; I gave him a memorandum of the prices, not a bill of parcels, for I wrote "On approbation" - if a thing is left on approbation it is not a bill of parcels; if his customers had approved of any of them they were sold, but the money was to be paid for them - he said he had not had an answer; I have no copy of the note I gave him - it is my duty to make an entry of the things I sell, but when on approbation I put "Approbation" on the bill, and in the book likewise; I believe the officer has the bill, which was left with the prisoner - when he had removed I made inquiry of several persons in the neighbourhood, but could not find where he was; I did not receive a card of his residence till after he was taken up - upon my oath I never saw this card; he never told me a word about his going to remove - this is the paper which I delivered to the prisoner when I left the ear-rings; I did receive a gilt chain from the prisoner on the 18th of March - not a, gold one; I sold it, and should have given him the money if he had not absconded - I was advised not to pay by the officer, till this matter was settled; that was on the day he was taken; he said, "I have a chain, if you can sell it for me," but there was no specific time to pay the money - I should have paid if I could have found him; there was a small pin besides - I sold the pin to one of my customers, and the chain at a shop; I do not know the person's name, upon my oath - I sold it where I never sold an article before; I am allowed to do a little on commission - I sold them about a fortnight afterwards; I made a minute of them, but my book is not here - I was not desired not to part with them for less than 12s.; I was to give the prisoner 6s. for them - I do not know of the prosecutor having been summoned by the prisoner; he might not tell me of every transaction - this transaction of the chain and pin was the only one I ever had with the prisoner.

COURT. Q. What was the price you got for the chain and pin? A. I sold the two for 7s. 6d. - I was to give him 6s.; the value of the ear-rings was between 5l. and 6l. - I did not see a person named Davis at the prisoner's house.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD. I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of ear-rings, which were pawned with me by the prisoner on the 27th of March, in the name of John Smith.

CHARLES WORLEY. I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of ear-rings, pawned with me on the 28th of March by the prisoner, in the name of Nugent - I have known him some time, and thought him a very respectable man; he does not go by the name of Nugent, but I thought this might be an error - this is the duplicate which I wrote, but I might not have recollected his name at that moment: I did not recollect his name, I will swear - he lived in John's-row, Europa-place; he gave me a card in the name of Nugent.

WILLIAM HALL. I am a constable. I took up the prisoner on the 20th of April - I found in his back room drawer two duplicates, which relate to these ear-rings; I told him I wanted him about Mr. Levyson's ear-rings he at first said it was all right, he had left them with a gentleman at the west-end of the town; I said I had found the duplicates - he then said, "Yes, two pair I sold,

three pair I pawned, and one pair a master builder has;" I found him in a room, at No. 7, Albemarle-street, Clerkenwell - Boot had applied to me for a warrant on the 18th of April; Mr. Levyson and Mr. Boot went and pointed out the house to me - the prisoner gave up this note at the office, which Boot says is what he gave him; he went by the name of Samuel Nesbitt.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever advise the witness not to pay the prisoner this money? A. I met Boot at the west-end of the town, about three weeks after the prisoner had been in custody; he then said he owed him for a chain and pin - I told him I knew nothing about it, but I thought he had better not give it to the prisoner; the prisoner might have said he was in distress.

COURT to THOMAS BOOT . Q. When did you first know the prisoner was to be found in Albemarle-street? A. When Mr. Levyson found out where he was.

Cross-examined. Q. Is this the bill you left? A. Yes- it is not such a bill as I should have left with any other customer without the receipt; I have put "Approbation" on it - I did not know where to find the prisoner till Mr. Levyson told me of it; I will swear that I had not had this card in my hand for days before, nor one like it - I did see Davis, and asked him where the prisoner was gone - he said he did not know; I swear that I did not know where he lived till Mr. Levyson found it out, which I believe was the day before he took out the warrant.

COURT. Q. Then you mean that Davis had not given you a card, or told you where the prisoner lived? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the goods in question as I usually buy other goods - there is the bill of parcels; I bought them at three months credit, and a three months bill - Boot said, "As this is the first dealing we have had together, we will have a drop of something to drink;" I sent my daughter for some - I said three pairs of earrings would be sufficient, but he would leave the six pairs - he called the day after, and I said they were out, which they were, for people to look at; it appears this has been through treachery, because I summoned Mr. Levyson - Boot sent a message to me to say, that the warrant would be issued; I produced the bill of parcels, and I said to the young man, "Where can I see Mr. Boot?" he said, "I don't know, but I shall see him tomorrow night" - I said, "Give him this card, I wish to see him, as there is a balance between us;" I had no idea of any thing improper, but on that Saturday night I was in distress - I wanted 15s., and I pawned them; Mr. Levyson called at my house on the Thursday or Friday previous to taking out the warrant - I was busy, and had a gold chain in the fire, and sent my lad down to say I should be down in a few minutes; when I came down he was gone - he said to my wife, "It is of no consequence, I will call as I come back," and then he went and got the warrant.

MRS. LEVYSON re-examined. Q. When did you first know the prisoner lived in Albemarle-street? A. The day before the warrant was taken; I had sent Boot several times to make inquiries, and he could hear nothing about him -I think he had summoned Mr. Levyson about a month before - it was for work; the prisoner did not purchase the things on credit; I told Boot he should wait till the goods were sold, and bring them back or the money; I asked Nesbitt where the customer lived, in order that I might know the distance he would have to go.

MR. CLARKSON to MR. LEVYSON. Q. Had you any transactions with the prisoner? A. He had worked for me; I was summoned by him for 17s. and he took 12s. 6d. for it; I have no recollection of having refused to pay him more than 6s., but I know the charge was considered exorbitant - I think the summons was not for 12s. 6d. - I think I can swear it was not; I think it was more according to my receipts - I certainly paid him 12s. 6d. after Boot had made this delivery; I called at the prisoner's former residence and found he had left - I inquired of his neighbours, but they did not know where he was gone to; I had called at his residence before he was apprehended, as I wished to know whether he lived there, but I had then received information, as I called at Davis', who is another workman, and got this paper; Davis had some work of mine which he kept longer than he should have done - I paid him for the work he had done - this was ten or twelve days before the prisoner was apprehended; I do not know when I told Boot of it; I have no doubt I did mention it four or five days after.

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a working jeweller, and live in Willow-walk, Old-street-road. I worked for the prisoner and for Mr. Levyson - I did not take notice of the day of the month, but Mr. Levyson called upon me; I had charged him for some work which I had done, and he would not pay me - he called that day and paid me, and then I gave him this card, which the prisoner had left in my shop to give to him or to any body else who inquired for him; I think that was four or five days after the prisoner had removed; I saw Boot, he asked where the prisoner lived - I said, "I have not got a card, but I will give you a direction;" I gave him this, "T. Nesbitt, No. 7, Albemarle-street."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-88

1086. JOHN RATCLIFFE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of William West .

SARAH ELIZABETH WEST . I am the wife of William West , a tailor , of Parliament-street, near Golden-square . On the 9th of June I met the prisoner about a yard or a yard and a half from our door with this coat - I stopped him; he went in with me and threw it upon the chair, where I had seen it just before.

EZEKIEL PAGE . I was called in to assist, and suggested sending for a constable - it was about eleven o'clock in the forenoon; the prisoner fell on his knees, and begged I would not till Mr. West came home.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was out on the Monday and purchased a coat; I got intoxicated, and happened to sell the coat which I had on at the fair - I then went to this house, and thought this was a coat I had left there.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-89

1087. ANDREW SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 1 ring, value 12s., 1 purse, value 2s., and 3 shillings , the property of Thomas Gallivan .

MARY GALLIVAN . I am the wife of Thomas Gallivan ; we live in Charles-street, Drury-lane . The prisoner lodged and slept in the same room with me and my husband; I had put a gold ring, a duplicate, and some money in a little leather purse in a box near the foot of the bed - I missed it on the Saturday evening between eight and nine o'clock.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come home that Saturday night, and go with you to the Grapes public-house, in Holborn, and have a glass of something to drink? A. Yes; you paid me out of your week's wages 9s. 6d. when we got home - I went out of the room to pay some money; my husband and the prisoner were out all night - the prisoner went to sleep, and I saw my articles fall out of his pocket; I said to my husband's sister, "I am sure of my ring again;" and I put them back again into his pocket.

JOHN HOMER . I am a pawnbroker. This ring was pawned with me by a woman, and I gave her this duplicate.

JOSEPH COLE. I am an officer. I took the prisoner at a cookshop on Sunday afternoon; the prosecutrix gave me this purse two or three days afterwards, and said she found it behind some books in the room; she gave me this bit of paper, and I found there had been a ring pawned in the name of John Carty .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-90

1088. JAMES SAVAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 7 glass castors, value 15s., and 1 castorstand, value 1s. , the goods of William Wetters .

HEPZIBAH GREENAWAY. I live with my uncle William Wetters , who keeps a broker's-shop , near Foley-place . On the 8th of May, about ten o'clock in the morning, I missed a set of seven cut glass castors and a plated stand - I had put them out about half an hour before.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner with these castors in the street, about half a mile from Mr. Wetter's, between ten and eleven o'clock - he first said that he got them from his mother; he then said a man gave him a shilling to carry them from Coventry-street.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave me a shilling to carry them.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-91

1089. WILLIAM COULSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 hat, value 6s. , the goods of Matthew Coffee .

MATTHEW COFFEE. I am a hat manufacturer . On the 27th of May, between three and four o'clock, a young man called out, "There is a hat taken from the window;" I went out, and saw the prisoner running with it in his hand - I overtook him without losing sight of him; he dropped it, and I picked it up.

RICHARD PRESCOTT. I am apprenticed to Coffee. I saw the prisoner take the hat down.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-92

1090. HENRY DACON , DAVID JACKSON , and CHARLES DEAN were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Margaret Gibbons .

SAMUEL GIBBONS. I am the son of Margaret Gibbons - she keeps a shoe a warehouse in Shoreditch . On the 16th of April a pair of shoes were stolen, about half-past three o'clock - I was out, but had seen them safe about eight in the morning.

THOMAS CURRANT . I am an officer. I saw the three prisoners together, and watched them some time - they went to this shop together; Dacon took a knife from his pocket, cut the string of the shoes, and gave them to Jackson - they all went up New-inn-yard; Jackson went down a turning, and the other two went on towards the Curtain-road - I took Jackson in about half an hour; and took Dacon in Hackney-road gambling with some other boys -Dean was taken the next day.

JOHN VANN. I took Dean by the description Currant gave me the next day.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DEAN's Defence. I had been out of work for three months.

The prisoners received a good character.

DACON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Fourteen Days and Whipped .

JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

DEAN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-93

1091. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 4oz, weight of cigars, value 3s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

GEORGE BOWDEN . I am a Revenue officer. I was acting as gate-keeper at the London-docks , and took the prisoner coming out of the King's warehouse - I found cigars in the collar of his shirt, and some in his pockets; he said he picked them up in the warehouse - he was in the habit of going in and out of that warehouse, and cigars of this kind are kept there.

THOMAS POCOCK . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner stopped; he made some resistance - he works in that warehouse, and said he picked them up; he had been employed in the Dock four or five years, and earned half-a-crown a day.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-94

1092. WILLIAM ELLIOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., 3 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the property of Thomas Brockman ; and 10 biscuits, value 3d. , the goods of Archibald Henry .

THOMAS BROCKMAN. I was cabin-boy on board a vessel in the London-docks - the prisoner was working there. On the 11th of May I had three shillings, two sixpences, and a black silk handkerchief in my waistcoat, which was in a drawer in the cabin - I saw them safe at eight o'clock in the morning; I went on shore to get some meat, and when I came back the prisoner asked me to take him on shore - I took him, then came back, and missed the things; it was then about half-past ten - the vessel is the Rosa schooner, and the master is Archibald Henry.

JOSEPH WALDEN . I am an officer of the Customs. I have twelve ounces of biscuits and a black silk handkerchief, which I took from the prisoner at the London-dock gate about half-past eleven o'clock on the 11th of May -I saw he had something in his hat; I made him take it off,

and found, part of this in his hat and part in his pocket; he said it belonged to the ship Eagle, and he knew he had done wrong - I asked him who was on board the ship; he said nobody but a boy - I then sent, and fetched this witness, who came with Mr. Henry, the owner of the vessel, who brought a sample of their biscuits; he said these were his biscuits - the prisoner then said he had taken them from the captain; the lad said, "This is my handkerchief, and I lost 3s." - the prisoner put his right hand in his pocket and said to him, "My little man here's the money, forgive me;" the boy gave the money to the police and said, "I can't forgive you."

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a police officer. I took the prisoner, and he gave three shillings and two sixpences to the lad.

Prisoner's Defence. I was cleaning out the cabin and found this money - when the lad put me on shore I said I had found some money; he said nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-95

1093. ROBERT NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 10 ounces weight of tobacco, value 2s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

ROBERT ROBEY. I am the custom-house gate-keeper in the tobacco-warehouse, London Ducks . On the 25th of April, I was rubbing down the labourers, at four o'clock, and found some tobacco in the prisoner's pocket, and gave him over to my brother officer to search him; this is what I took from the prisoner - I have sealed it up, and kept it ever since.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.You cannot say where it came from? A. The King's warehouse; he was leaving that warehouse - there are no merchants deposit in that warehouse; it all belongs to the King: he had been in the Docks thirteen years, on and off; he has borne an excellent character, and the Company did not wish to prosecute him.

JOSEPH WALDEN. Robey gave the prisoner to me - I searched him, and found a little tobacco in his pockets - I told him to open his trousers, which he did, and I found a hard lump of tobacco tied up with yarn; he said he had been sampling tobacco in the warehouse, and that he took that off the hogshead.

Cross-examined. Q.Did he say he took it for his own purposes? A. He said he took that little bit, and thought it no harm - he bears a very good character; this tobacco itself is worth 1 1/2d. - the duty upon it will be 1s. 10 1/2d.; men are not allowed to eat any.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290611-96

1094. THOMAS FLOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 spade, value 3s., and 3 live tame fowls, price 4s. , the property of Edward Nicholas Ladd .

EDWARD NICHOLAS LADD. I am a coal dealer , and live at Edmonton . I lost three fowls on the 17th of May, which I had seen safe the day before; in the morning, my servant brought up two of their heads to the bed-room, about half-past seven o'clock; and I got up, went to the coop, and missed three fowls; I have no hesitation in swearing they were mine.

ROBERT SMITH. I am a gardener. On the 16th of May, I had information that my masters pond was about to be robbed - I was on watch, and saw the prisoner enter Mr. Pike's premises, which join the prosecutor's; I went in, and secreted myself under a tree - the prisoner came by me with a spade under his arm, between twelve and one o'clock; I had a gun - I presented it to him, and told him to stop; he refused at first, and said he had as much right there as I had, and at last he went with me a little distance; he then seized hold of the gun, and said he would go no further; we had a struggle - I got the gun from him, and he ran to the gate; I pursued, threw him upon a bush, and kept him there till the constable came.

MARTHA BAGBAY. I live with Mr. Pike - I picked up the fowls in a bush near the gate, about seven o'clock the next morning.

GEORGE FREDERICK MILES. I am a constable. I was on the premises watching; I was talking to Mr. Snell, and heard the gardener call - I ran to him, and found him struggling with the prisoner, whom I secured; the night was dark, which I suppose was the reason we could not see the fowls - they were found in the same bush the next morning; the spade was found near the place where they struggled first: I then went to the cage again, and found some feathers in the prisoner's pockets.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at the Bell public-house with some friends, and we stopped there till eleven o'clock; they agreed to take half a gallon of beer home - we went and sat down in a lane, and drank that beer - then I went close to Mr. Pike's; the gardener came out, and said, "You are my prisoner;" I said, "What for?" - he struck me two or three blows, and I struck him, and got away; he caught me again, and threw me down - he came down to the cage, and found about four white feathers in my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor on account of his youth.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-97

1095. JAMES GRANFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 apron, value 1s., and 2 pairs of trousers, value 19s. , the goods of Vincent Rose .

VINCENT ROSE . I live in Little Guildford-street, Russell-square , and take in clothes to clean : the prisoner was in my employ. On the 25th of April, he had been working for me, and left me about five o'clock without notice - we missed two pairs of trousers and one apron which had been hanging in the same room - I had seen them within an hour.

JOHN ADNUM. I am a pawnbroker. I produce the two pairs of trousers pawned with me on the 25th of April, by the prisoner, in the name of Ward, and this apron likewise.

PETER DODDY. I am a watchman. I took up the prisoner on the 27th of April, about nine o'clock at night; he said they were pawned.

Prisoner's Defence. The fact is, he and I were drinking at the Red Lion public-house, and were both drunk; he asked me to go and help him work - then we returned to the Red Lion; he sent me to fetch the trousers, and pawn them - I do not know what became of the money, I was so stupid.

PETER DODDY . He did not tell me this before he got to the watch-house; the prosecutor told the watch-housekeeper the charge, and the prisoner said he had pawned them in Leather-lane.

VINCENT ROSE re-examined. Q.Were you at a public-house with him on the 25th? A. Yes: at the Red Lion, about two o'clock - we might he there an hour or an hour and a half; I did not get a little fresh - we went home, but I did not go to work; I went out with some messages - I returned about seven o'clock; I was next door at five o'clock - my wife came in, and then I went home, and found the things were missing; I had not worked with the prisoner that afternoon - I paid for what was drank; I did not know he had any money in his pocket. GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290611-98

1096. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 hat, value 18s.; 1 jacket, value 1s., and 3 handkerchiefs, value 3s. , the goods of William Randall .

WILLIAM RANDALL . I am a carpenter . On the 27th of May I went out to buy a fowl - I returned in a few minutes, and went to sharpen a saw; I returned about twelve o'clock, and the house was fastened inside; I went round. got in, and missed these articles.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I was crossing Gray's-inn-lane about ten minutes before twelve o'clock, and saw the prisoner with the hat in his hand, two handkerchiefs hanging out of his pocket, and this jacket under his arm; I stopped him and asked what he was going to do with the hat; he said, to take it to his mate - I took him to the office, and found the owner next day.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in a public-house, and gave 7s. for them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-99

1097. MARY HINCHCLIFF was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , 26 yards of linen cloth, value 18s. , the goods of James Veitch .

JAMES VEITCH. I keep a linen-draper's shop , in Ratcliff-highway . On the 2d of June the prisoner came in, between six and seven o'clock in the evening; she asked me to show her some cloth for trousers, which I did - she asked me for a pattern, and I cut it for her; I turned to get something else, and she went away; I saw my young man stop her at the door; I heard something drop at the same time, but did not see from whence it came -I saw it lie on the threshold, and found it was a piece of Irish linen.

MARTHA BATSON. I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner take the piece of cloth from the counter - she walked towards the door; the young man went and took her - I heard it drop at the door.

THOMAS GULLEN. I am in the employ of the prosecutor. The prisoner came into the shop and asked for some trousers - my master showed her some cloth to make some; I saw her take the piece of cloth and put it under her apron - she went to the door; I followed and brought her back - she dropped it.

Prisoner's Defence. I wanted some duck ones; he had none - I asked for a pattern of some duck to make some if there was time; the young man then came and said I had something belonging to his master - he took up the cloth, but I had not seen it; whether it was knocked down or not I cannot tell; I had a basket in my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-100

1098. ANN HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , 6 handkerchiefs, value 5s. , the goods of James Veitch .

JAMES VEITCH. On the 15th of May, about one o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop and bought a small quantity of calico for 1s.; she paid for it, and asked me to show her something else - I turned round to look for it, and missed a piece of handkerchiefs from the counter; she had then got to the door; I ran and pulled her back - I found the piece of handkerchiefs under her apron; she said she hand nothing but a piece of beef.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not gone from the counter, only to ask for something else for an apron.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-101

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JUNE 13.

Second Middlesex Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1099. SUSANNAH GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , at St. James, Westminster, 1 ring, value 8l.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 2 yards of ribbon, value 6d.; 2 boxes, value 3d., 1 yard of lace, value 6d.; and 1 book, value 6d., the goods of Samuel Delves , her master in his dwelling-house .

LOUISA DELVES. I am the wife of Samuel Delves , and live at No. 17, Broad-street Golden-square, in the parish, of St. James, Westminster ; he is a jeweller : the prisoner lived about six weeks with us as servant of all-work; I discharged her, but not on account of any suspicion - she left on the 14th of April; I did not miss this property till the officer came on the 16th.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.She subsequently made a full confession to you? A.She did; I had a very excellent character with her from her former situation - my only complaint was her not being strong enough.

HERBERT JOHN CLARKE . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker, of Wardour-street. The prisoner came on the 16th of April, and offered a diamond ring in pawn for 6s. - it was worth about 8l.; I immediately went for Clements, and gave her in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. I presume she could not know its value, as she offered it for 6s.? A. She could not.

THOMAS CLEMENTS. I am an officer. I was sent for. and took the prisoner and the diamond ring; on our way to the office I said, "Where did you take this ring from?" she said, "I took it from my mistress's drawer:" I said,"How did you take it?" she said, "I found the keys on mistress's bed, and took it;" I said, "When?" she said,"The day I left my place." I found a key on her, which

she said was the key of her mother's lodging, in Catherine-wheel-yard, and there I found these other things.

Cross-examined. Q.Was she not told it would be better to tell the truth? A.Certainly not; Mr. Harrison said,"The unfortunate girl has stolen it; she has said as much to me;" I do not believe any promise was made to her.

SAMUEL DELVES . This is my ring, and all this is my property; there is nothing of value except the ring - I made her no promise; I believe she bore a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy, in consequence of her youth, by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Reference Number: t18290611-102

1100. MARY ANN BACON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , at St. Leonard Shoreditch, 14 sovereigns, 1 half sovereign, 8 crowns, 16 half-crowns, 40 shillings, and 6 sixpences, the monies of Edward Fordham , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD FORDHAM. I keep the Queen's Head public-house, Hoxton, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; the prisoner has lived nine months with me as pot-girl -I had the dropsy, and was confined to my arm-chair, up stairs in the sitting-room, on the first floor; I kept my money in a bag, in my chair, under the cushion - I used to receive and give change out of the bag; she used to come backwards and forwards, and bring the money up to me which she received from customers; she knew where I kept the money. On the 13th of April I had 26l. 9s. in the bag - there were fourteen sovereigns and a half among it; I had one bag in another - one contained the silver, and the other the gold; I lost them both; my niece used to come every night and sit with me - she left me at half-past nine o'clock in the evening, on the 13th of April; I know at that time my bag of money was secure: after my niece was gone, the prisoner came up without my ringing for her - she said, "Master, do you want any thing?" I said, "Yes, push me nearer the fire, that I may warm my legs, and then I will go to bed;" I know my money was safe then; she pushed me nearer the fire - I sat there about ten minutes, and rang for the boy to put me to bed; when she pushed me to the fire, she could have taken the bag - it was safe when she came into the room; when I rang the bell to go to bed, I felt for my bag to take it to bed, and missed it - I called her up, and said, "Ann, you have robbed me, and shall not go out of the room till I have an officer to search you;" no person had come into the room from the moment she left me till I missed the bag - she denied all knowledge of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She was searched? A. Yes; her bed, and every thing was searched; the boy always helps me to bed - he was not searched; I never undress till I get into my bed-room; I had a good character with the prisoner, from her sister, but I believe it was false - I missed the money before the boy came up, for when I rang the bell she came up instead of him; I told her to go and tell the boy to put me to bed, and then I missed the bag - there was a 5l. note, and 7l. 9s. in silver, in shillings, sixpences, and half-crowns; I felt it safe when my niece went away - she always made me see that it was right; I did not see the bag, but felt it - my niece puts down what I have paid away in the course of the day; I knew the bag was there, for I laid on it, and could feel it - it has not been found.

COURT. Q. It was quite safe behind you when the prisoner came into the room, and after she put you to the fire you missed it, and nobody but her had been in the room for those ten minutes? A.Nobody; I missed my money about half-past nine o'clock.

ELIZABETH FORDHAM . I am the prosecutor's niece. On the night in question I was with him from five till after nine o'clock, and saw the bag safe - one bag was in the other; he gave me a 10l. note out of the bag to pay away, and I saw him place the bag in the chair, and from that time I have never seen it; I left the room at a quarter or twenty minutes past nine o'clock, and left the house immediately.

MARIA BRIDGMAN . I am servant to Mr. Fordham. On the 13th of April I remember Mrs. Fordham going away, about half-past nine o'clock; the prisoner was then in the tap-room - she came to the bar for some porter, I said, "Mary, Mrs. Fordham is gone, and you need not go up-stairs till the bell rings, for she has brought down all the glasses and the waiter, so you need not go up;" the prisoner took the porter - I afterwards saw her talking to a person in the tap-room; she then pulled the door open, and ran up-stairs very quick, without the bell ringing; the person she spoke to is Wright, a sweetheart of her's -I have not seen him since; she ran up-stairs suddenly, returned in five or ten minutes, and after that she came to the bar; I said, "Did the bell ring?" she said No; I said, "Have you been up-stairs?" she said, Yes; I said, "Why did you go - I told you not to go without the bell ringing;" she said, "I only went up to put master to the fire, and put down an apple to roast;" I do not know what became of the young man after that - I did not see him go out.

Q.You had seen her talking to the young man; now, before your master's bell rang, had you seen that young man in the room? A. yes, he was sitting in the room - I was minding the customers; he might have gone out without my noticing him, and she might have spoken to him without my knowledge - he has not been to the house since; when master's bell rang, the prisoner went up stairs, came down very quick, and said, "You must go up-stairs immediately, ma'am;" I said I could not, she must go; she said, Master said I must come up immediately - I went up, and she went with me; he told me what had happened, and an officer was sent for.

Cross-examined. Q. She went up with you? A.We both went up together - I did not go up at first, because the till was open, and I could not leave the bar - I told her to go up; she came down, and said I must go, and we both went up - I had seen her speaking to Wright by the fire before she first went up; there was no concealment about their conversation that I knew of - I did not see her speak to him after the bell rang.

Q. Did you see her after she said she had put her master to the fire? A. No, not in the tap-room; I saw her, but did not see her speak to Wright, or give any thing to him, but I was busy; the bar is not above a yard from the tap-room; the door opens when people go in or out, and I can then see into the tap-room - I do not know how long

Wright staid there; when the prisoner came down, she sat on the stairs; she went into the tap-room, came out again, and sat on the stairs - she knew the young man, and used to call him her sweetheart.

ROBERT JORDAN . I am pot-boy to Mr. Fordham. I remember the evening he lost his money; I had seen Wright in the house in the morning, and had seen him there before - he used to come to the house almost two or three times every day - he would come in as a customer; I have seen him speak to the prisoner; I did not see him speak to her that morning; I saw him speaking to her in the evening before the bell rang - I could not hear what they were saying; I do not recollect her going up before the bell rang - I saw them speaking together about nine o'clock in the evening, in the tap-room - I saw him go out about a quarter of an hour before the bell rang; I am sure of that.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure he went away a quarter of an hour before the bell rang? A. As near as I can say; I cannot say whether master's neice was gone then, as I did not see her go - Wright went out about a quarter before nine o'clock, I think; if she went at twenty minutes past nine, he must have gone before her - I cannot say whether he went before nine, but to the best of my knowledge it was; he was often at the house - there was no concealment about their manner; I take the liquor into the tap-room; whether I was there much that evening I do not know - there might be twelve other people there when she and Wright were there; they were all men - one was sitting on the same bench, about a yard from them.

COURT. Q.Were you attending to your business? A. Yes.

JURY. Q. Did you take any beer out at nine o'clock? A. I was in and out; we do not take much beer out-only a pot or so.

GEORGE WILMOT . I am an officer. I was sent for, and searched the prisoner; I found nothing on her, nor in her trunk - a young man was described to me; I knew him very well; I have been looking for him ever since, but I have not been able to find him.

Cross-examined. Q.Were you present when her bed was searched? A. Yes; she offered every facility, and said I might search every where, I should not find it.

Prisoner's Defence. I put a roasted apple to the fire, but took nothing,

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of her character.

Reference Number: t18290611-103

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1101. THOMAS WORTS was indicted for that he, on the 16th of May , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows:

No. 2057. Thursday, London, the 14th May, 1829.

To the Cashiers of the Bank of England. Pay to Mr. Ridgeway, or bearer, the sum of four pounds thirteen shillings and seven-peace.

£4. 13. 7. PARRONTIN AND SON. with intend to defraud Joseph Parrinton , the elder, and Joseph Parrinton the younger; against the Statute.

2d COUNT, for feloniously disposing of and putting away, on the same day, at the same parish, a certain false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money(setting it out as before), with intent to defraud the said Joseph Parrinton, the elder, and Joseph Parrinton , the younger at the time of his disposing of and putting away the siad false, forged, and counterfeited order, well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited.

3d COUNT, for feloniously offering to one William Obadiah Wheeler, on the same day, at the same parish, a certain false, forged, and counterfeited order, for payment of money (setting it out as before), with intent to defraud the said Joseph Parrinton , the elder, and Joseph Parrinton, the younger; he at the time he so offered the said false, forged, and counterfeited order, well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited.

4th, 5th, and 6th COUNTS like the 1st, 2d, and 3d, only charging it to be with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM OBADIAH WHEELER . I am a clerk in the drawing-office of the Bank of England; the Bank keep cash the same as private bankers. The prisoner came to the drawing-office on a Saturday in May, and presented me a cheque for 4l. 13s. 7d.; this is it (looking at it); it purports to be drawn by Parrinton and Son - the Bank have no account with that house; I asked him if his name was Ridgeway, being the name in the body of it; he said it was not; I said, "For whom do you receive it?" he said,"For Mr. Ridgeway;" I asked him in what way he would receive it; he said "Cash" - I handed it over to Mr. George Griffith, and said that gentleman would pay him; Griffith immediately left the office for an officer; the prisoner staid before me, expecting to receive the cash - an officer was brought, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who are the firm that cash at the Bank? A.Parrinton and Son; the signature in the cheque bears very little resemblance to theirs - it is spelt Parrontin; we do not pay cheques under 5l.; they are drawn at times, but we invariably refuse them, except in special cases - if a person drew for a balance under 5l. it would be paid, but not under any other circumstance. I never knew the prisoner before.

Q. The Bank could not be defrauded by that cheque, as it never would have been paid? A. I cannot say it would not have been paid; I should not have paid it unless under special circumstances - I did not examine their account, to see if it was the balance.

GEORGE GRIFFITH. I am a principal in the Drawing-office at the Bank. I received this cheque from Wheeler on the 16th of May, and marked it before I parted with it - the prisoner was detained when Leadbetter, the officer, came.

Cross-examined. Q. He staid of his own accord till the officer came? A. Yes - I went for the officer myself; I had not the slightest hesitation of the cheque being forged.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Did the prisoner know you were going for an officer? A. I should think not - I was not gone many minutes.

CHARLOTTE CURTIS . I live with Mr. Strickland, who keeps a coffee-house in Little Queen-street, Holborn. - The prisoner came there one evening - I do not recollect the date, or the day of the week; I found him there when I came home - he slept there: he went out next morning and I went into his room - nothing attracted my attention that morning he remained there; a few mornings after I was sweeping his room, and saw a bundle under the bed; I lifted it up, and some sand came out of it - it was his bundle; I had seen him bring it in, and nobody else slept there - on seeing the sand come out, I opened the bundle, and found several printed papers; I called my cousin, showed him one, and he looked at the others; an officer came, and apprehended the prisoner afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Was his bundle in a handkerchief, or what? A. In a handkerchief; I am sure I had seen him bring that bundle into the house - I was not at home when he first came, but he took the lodging for a month, after the first night, and I saw him bring the bundle in - nobody but him used the room; the last tenant had been gone a fortnight.

RICHARD STRICKLAND. I keep a coffee-house, No. 38, Little Queen-street. The prisoner came there on Thursday, the 7th of May - I did not see him bring the bundle in; he asked for a lodging for the night, which I let him have, and next day he engaged the lodging for a month - he remained there till he was apprehended: Curtis showed me the papers in his bed-room - I took one of them into my custody, and took it to the Bank, but the Bank was closed, and I gave it to Collins to take there the next day.

MICHAEL COLLINS. I am Strickland's uncle - he brought a sheet of blank cheques to me, containing four, and at his request I took them to the Bank of England -I gave them to Mr. Griffith; I did not lose sight of them while in my possession.

GEORGE GRIFFITH . I received a paper from Collins; this is it - it is four blank cheques from the Bank; a sheet usually contains five - one has been torn from this: I compared it with this cheque - (looking at it), which has been paid at the Bank, with the name of Parrinton and Co. on it; it is the first cheque off the sheet, and tallies with it- it is No 2051, and the next on the paper is 2052; they go down to 2055 - the first cheque is for 7l.; it is dated the 7th of May, and was paid at the Bank - here is the counterpart from which the blank cheques were cut, and here is a receipt, which we take for them - it is signed for parrinton and Son, E. Hallam; I believe a person of that name was in their employ.

HENRY DIXON. I am a clerk in the drawing-office in the Bank. This cheque of 7l. was paid by me; I cannot say who to.

GEORGE LEADBETTER . I belong to Bow-street, Police-office. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday, the 16th of May, in the drawing-office at the Bank; I took him into a private room, and asked him where he had received the cheque which was in the possession of the cashier - he said he had found it on the Thursday preceding, on Snow-hill; I asked if he was in a situation - he said he was not - I asked if he had been living with Parrinton and Son; I believe he said he had - I searched him, but found nothing - he said he had found the cheque, and would not have presented it had it been advertised - that he had looked in the paper, and it was not advertised, and he thought he had a right to present it; I asked him if any person came to the Bank with him - he said there was a young man, who I saw; I asked where he had been lodging - he said at a coffee-shop in Little Queen-street; I went there, and searched the room which Strickland showed me, and I found eight sheets of cheques, and part of a sheet with three cheques on it - I produce them; this cheque tallies with one of them: it is No. 2057 - the first number on the sheet is 2058; this is the sheet containing the three cheques.

Cross-examined. Q. He voluntarily told you where he lodged? A. Yes; I found only a halfpenny on him.

MATTHEW BLISTO. I am a clerk in the Bank. I numbered these sheets of cheques all in following numbers at the Bank, before they were issued; (looking at them) these are all my numbering, and so is this sheet, with four on it.

EDWARD HALLAM . I was in the service of the prosecutors in May, and am so now. I never sent to the Bank for these cheques; the signature to this receipt is not my writing.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know whose writing it is? A. No.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Is it Mr. Parrinton's? A. No - the signature to this cheque of 4l. 17s. is not Parrinton and Son's writing, nor is this one for 7l.; they are not the signatures of either of the partners.

JOSEPH PARRINTON , JUN. I am in partnership with my father, in King-street, Cheapside; our firm is Parrinton and Son - we keep an account at the Bank: neither of these cheques are signed by me, nor by any body authorised to sign for our house.

Cross-examined. Q.Why, your name is not to them? A. The one for 4l. 17s. is spelt tin and Paro, as well as I can tell, but here is a blot - the prisoner was in our employ at one time.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Was he in your employ? A. We employed him as a porter occasionally - nobody signs cheques but me; my father never signs them - it is not his writing: the prisoner was never employed to obtain cheques from the Bank; we draw on this description of cheques.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He of course knew your names perfectly well? A. He did; he bore a good character in our service, and has left us six weeks or two months, only a few weeks before the cheque is dated.

MR. GRIFFITH. There is no Parrontin and Son keep cash at the Bank, nor any name like it, except the prosecutors; these cheques were applied for for Parrinton and Son, and the cheques presented are drawn on cheques furnished by that application.

Cross-examined. Q.Who writes the receipt for them? A. The person applying for them - we only insert the figures - the receipt is spelt correctly.

A JUROR. Q. Do not you take a receipt in a book as well as on the counterpart of the cheques? A. Yes - we make a memorandum in the pass-book, but that was not in my possession at the time; it used to be customary not to deliver out cheques unless we had the pass-book, but for the last year that has been discontinued.

Q. I think within the last year I have been refused cheques for not having my pass-book? A. I think you

must be mistaken - it is always the practice to produce the pass-book or a note from the person sending for the cheques.

RAYNES KELLY. I delivered out these cheques in the usual way: to the best of my belief the person produced a written order, which is usual; I then make a memorandum of the numbers of the cheques delivered, and the party signs it - if the pass-book is brought we enter them there, but if it is a written order we make no further memorandum - I delivered these to a written order, which has been destroyed; we do not keep them: it comes from the party themselves - I should not deliver cheques without an order or the pass-book.(The cheque was here put in and read.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth, inexperience, and good character.

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18290611-104

1102. GEORGE SKELTON was indicted for feloniously forging a certain bill of exchange for payment of £200, purporting to be drawn by Smith and Co. on Cropper and Thomas, of Liverpool, with intent to defraud Frederick Roope , and another.

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true.

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, for uttering and publishing as true, an acceptance and cetain endorsements on the said bill, with a like intent.

MESSRS. BRODRICK, and LAW conducted the prosecution.

FREDERICK ROOPE . I live in Lombard-street, and am in partnership with John Dennis Roope; we are agents for the sale of tin , and discount bills for Dennis, Brothers, and Co. On the afternoon of the 27th of April, the prisoner called at our counting-house, and gave me a letter; this is it - I knew the name of Edward Pillin ; he is a hop-merchant, and lives in the Borough - on reading the letter I said to the prisoner "You have some bills to discount, it appears" he said he had one at present, and he should have some more; (looking at a bill) he produced this bill - I desired him to call again in half an hour, which he did; I had caused inquiry to be made, and he was detained - he stated in answer to my inquiries, that he was from Norwich, and in the cloth trade; he said he had received the bill at Barnsley himself, from Beckett and Co., and had given cash and notes for it six weeks before - he was asked by Mr. Gates, if he had offered that bill to me, and asked if the endorsement, pointing to the name of George Skelton on the back, was his name; he said it was; it was proposed to send for Mr. Cope to take him into custody, and he requested to speak to Mr. Gates in private - Mr. Gates replied that he could hear nothing, but in my presence; we retired into a private room, and he said that his previous statements were not true, that he had never seen the bill till that afternoon, and that it had been given to him by Edward Pillin, the writer of the letter - I asked him some time after if Skelton was his right name; he said it was, and asked me if he had done wrong in putting it -I replied that he had not done wrong in putting his own name, if there was any thing wrong, it was in the ficticious names; I believed nothing further passed.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.You knew Pillin? A. Yes, for two or three years - I find he has absconded; he is under thirty years of age, and a man used to business.

JURY. Q. Do you believe the letter to be Pillin's hand-writing? A. I do. (Letter read.)

No. 8, Counter-street.

Gentlemen, - A friend of mine, Mr. Skelton, wishes to have a few bills discounted; I take the liberty of recommending him to you, knowing him to be a most respectable country gentleman. EDWARD PILLIN .

If necessary you will have the liberty of endorsing my name.

MR. WILLIAM WADHAM COPE. I am a marshal. I took the prisoner into custody, searched him, and found this paper on him and this letter (read).

This letter was in the same words as the former, but addressed to Messrs. Knapton and Co., Nicholas-lane - the paper was as follows: "You received the bill from Beckett, Birks and Co., at the bankers, at Barnsley, for their local notes; Mr. Pillin you well know is a hop-merchant."

MR. ROOPE. I also believe that letter to be Pillin's writing; John Pillin is in the King's Bench - the paper bears a faint resemblance to his writing; I think the name Pillin is written by him - it is in pencil.

GEORGE WOODCOCK . I am a clerk to Beckett and Co., bankers, Barnsley, in Yorkshire; Joseph Beckett is a partner in the firm - he has other partners; Glyn and Co., of Lombard-street, are their town agents. The signature, "Beckett, Butiss and Co." On the back of this bill, and the words, "If needful, apply to Glyn and Co., B.B. and Co.," I believe not to be in the hand-writing of any of those persons - I know of no persons employed by them whose hand-writing resembles this; I know the hand-writing of all the partners-Sturges, Pailey and Co. have an account with them; Jackson is foreman of their works - he signs bills by their procuration, but this endorsement is not in his hand-writing; nobody else signs by their procuration, to my knowledge - I believe it is not his hand-writing; he has authority to sign by procuration for them, both in drawing and accepting bills. and endorsing them - we are in the habit of paying bills, signed by William Jackson - I do not know the prisoner.

HENRY WELLINGTON . I am a clerk to Messrs. Glyn and Co. - there are other partners; Grundy and Wood, bankers, of Bury, Lancashire, have an account at our house, so have Beckett, Birks and Co. - we are town agents to both of them; we pay bills bearing their signatures, at our house - the endorsement "Grundy and Wood," on this bill, I do not believe to be their hand-writing; I should not have paid a bill with that hand-writing on it - I do not believe the endorsement to be their hand-writing.

WILLIAM BROWN. I am a clerk to Masterman and Co., bankers, Nicholas-lane; John William Cropper and Co., have no account at our house, nor have Cropper and Thomas - no such firm is known at our house.

COURT to FREDERICK ROOPE . Q.Did the prisoner admit he had offered the bill to you? A. Yes, and said that the name, G. Skelton, was his writing.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You had no knowledge of him? A. I never saw him before - I should not have discounted it on his credit, nor on Pillin's credit, but on the credit of the bankers.

The prisoner, in a long address, stated, that he was about to

commence business as a tailor, and had accidentally met Pillin at the Horse and Groom public-house, Westminster-road; he represented himself as a man of property, and they became acquainted; that in a few months Pillin represented himself to be under a temporary embarrassment through assisting a brother, who was in the King's Bench, and desired him to go with the letter and bill to the prosecutors to get it discounted, as he was fearful of going into the City himself, at the same time telling him he could not obtain the cash without endorsing his own name.

PHILIP MILLER . I am a coach-trimmer, and live in Carlisle-place, Lambeth. On the 27th of April I was at the Horse and Groom with Green, a butcher - Pillin and the prisoner were there; Pillin asked me to step over to his lodgings in Hercules-buildings, and ask his brother for a black pocket-book, as he was rather lame; I fetched it and gave it to him - I saw him produce something to Green. but I was reading the newspaper and paid no attention to it; I heard him ask the prisoner to go somewhere into the City, but I do not know where; I saw him give him two bits of paper like small letters - the prisoner then left; I only knew Pillin by seeing him there a few times - I think this was between three and four o'clock.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. What were you doing there? A. Having a glass of ale after dinner; I dine at one o'clock -I went there about a quarter to two; Pillin was sitting there drinking ale - the prisoner came in some time after I had been there - they seemed acquainted; I work for Mr. Lear, of Bridge-road - I got into conversation with Pillin, and found it was too late to go to work again.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If you did not go to work whose loss is it? A. My own - I am paid by the piece.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a butcher, and live in Herculesbuildings, Lambeth, about fifty yards from the Horse and Groom public-house. I was there on the 27th of April, and heard Pilling ask the prisoner to go into the City, and present a bill for him to get cashed - the prisoner of course refused at first, not knowing the nature of the bill; he said he did not like to present it at all, as it was not due - I then saw Pillin write two notes, and give them both to the prisoner; one I think was a letter for Masterman's of Nicholas-lane, and if he was refused payment of the bill there, he wrote another for him to Dennis and Brothers, and there he was sure not to be refused; the prisoner went out with them - Miller was there; Pillin before that, gave the bill into my hands, and asked me to give him the cash for it, and take for some steaks, which I had sent, out of it - I said I would have nothing to do with it; this is the bill.

MR. BRODRICK. Q.Were both the notes written with pen and ink? A. Yes; I saw them written; I heard the directions read, but did not read them.

BENJAMIN HURD. I live at the Horse and Groom public-house, which is kept by my mother. On the 27th of April I saw Pillin, the prisoner, Green, and Miller at the house but not together; I was not present at the transaction - I saw Pillin writing with a pencil on a piece of paper on our fire screen in the kitchen.

MR. BRODRICK. Q.How long were they in your presence? A.About five minutes, in the kitchen. I am an attorney. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-105

1103. GEORGE SKELTON was again indicted for a like offence, in uttering a forged bill for 204l. 7s. with intent to defraud John Underwood and others.

NINE OTHER COUNTS, varying the charge.

JOHN ALFRED CHALK . I am in partnership with John Underwood, bill-broker , of Change-alley. On the 23d of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at our counting-house - he produced this letter to me - I think it was wafered; I took this bill out of the letter, asked him to leave the bill, and call again in a quarter or half an hour - I saw him about that time, and told him it was too late in the day to do any thing with the bill, but if he would bring it in the morning, I would see what could be done - he came next morning (there were two bills in the letter), and I asked him to leave the bills; when he came the next morning, he was asked who Pinder was - he said he was a seedsman, and at first said he lived where the letter was dated from; I asked if he had not a place in the City - he said, Yes, in the Borough; I asked if that was Mr. Pinder's writing, and he said it was, and said he was his clerk, or in his employ, and that he came from Mr. Pinder - he called two or three times in the course of that day, and in consequence of inquiry I made, the last time he came for an answer I called him into a private room, and told him I should detain the bills till Mr. Pinder came to fetch them - this is one of the bills that was enclosed in the letter - I wrote the word "forged" on it - the name of Pinder is not on it; this is the other bill that came in the letter: I did not see him again till he was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was it after he was in custody that you wrote "forged" on the bill? A. No, before - it was on the return of post; I knew nothing of the prisoner before.

MR. LAW. Q.What do you mean by return of post? A. I wrote to Yorkshire about the bills, and in consequence of the answer, I wrote "forged." (Letter read.)

Gentlemen, - I called on Mr. Williams for the purpose of getting the enclosed bills cashed; he has recommended me to you: I should feel obliged if you will get the same cashed for me,

Your obliged servant, JOHN PINDER, York Place.

To Messrs. Underwood and Chalk, No. 16, Change Alley.

JOHN PINDER . I am a hop-merchant and seed-factor, at No. 54, High-street, Borough: my private residence is York-gate, Regent's-park. The letter produced is not my writing - I know nothing whatever of it; this bill for 204l. is not endorsed by me, nor written by any one by my authority; the " John Pinder " on this other bill is not my hand-writing; the prisoner was never my clerk, or in my employment - I do not know that I ever saw him before; I know Pillin, Sen., who was in the Bench - he was my clerk about seven years ago; there is no other Mr. Pinder living at York-gate.

GEORGE WOODCOCK . I am a clerk to Beckett, Birks, and Co. Bankers, of Barnsley, Yorkshire. The signature of Beckett, Butiss, and Co. is not the hand-writing of the partners, nor any body in their employ, nor are the words"If needful at Glyn & Co. B. B.;" Sturges, Paley, and Mason have an account with my employers, and I know William Jackson 's hand-writing; the endorsement "Sturges, Paley, & Co. by procuration, William Jackson ," is not his hand-writing.

The prisoner in his Defence, stated that he had met Pillin on the day in question, who stated that a Mr. Pinder had recommended him to Underwood and Co. to get some bills discounted,

and as it was inconvenient for him to go, he got the prisoner to take the letter, telling him, if he was asked any questions, to say he was Pinder's clerk, as he had written the letter in his name; that he saw Pillin from time to time, and called on Messrs. Underwood and Co., by his desire, the next day.

MR. ROOPE. This letter does not strike me as being Pillin's writing; I cannot say whether the signature to the bill is his writing or not.

MR. CHALK. I wrote to the country on the 23d, and received an answer on the 27th; I did not at all intimate to the prisoner that I thought it was forged; I got him to leave it, that I might make inquiry of the bankers in town.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18290611-106

1104. CHARLES JONES was indicted for that he, on the 18th of April , at St. James, Clerkenwell , feloniously did dispose of, and put away, a certain forged and counterfeited Bank note, as follows, (setting it out No. 2717, 5l., dated 14th of February, 1829, signed J. Vautin). with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he at the time of his so disposing of and putting away the said forged and counterfeited Bank note, well knowing such note to be forged and counterfeited; against the Statute .

2d COUNT, the same, only calling it a promissory note instead of a Bank note.

3d COUNT, like the first, only stating the intent to be to defraud John Leeming .

4th COUNT, like the 2d, only stating the intent as in the 3d Count.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET and MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LEEMING . I am a boot and shoemaker , and live at No. 51, Broad-street, Ratcliff-cross, Middlesex . The prisoner came to my shop on Saturday, the 18th of April, between six and seven o'clock; accompained by a woman, with a child in her arms; the prisoner asked if I had a pair of shoes that would fit him; I desired him to take a seat; he did so: the woman took a seat, and said she wished to have a pair - I fitted them both; the woman then asked if I had a pair of small boots to fit the child; I showed her some - she said there was none that would do; the prisoner then said he should like a lighter pair of shoes himself, put down a 5l. note, and asked me if I could change it; I said I could - I then tried to fit him with a pair: he said he thought the pair he had on were rather tight, and he would rather I would make him a pair - I told him I had plenty that would fit him, and I fitted him with a pair, which he said would do; he bought two pairs for himself, and one pair for the woman - he said he should like to have the shoes he had on soled and heeled, and asked what I would charge for it; I said 3s. 6d.; he said that was too much - the woman said it could not be done for less; it was agreed that I should do them - I said they would be done on Monday evening, and the woman said, "You can't call for them on Monday evening, say Wednesday;" the woman then took a 5l. note out of a bit of paper in her pocket, and gave it to me - they asked what the shoes came to, I said, "1l. 1s. 6d.;" I then asked for his address, and the woman said, "James Wilcox, No. 17, James-street, Commercial-road;" I looked at the note, and was rather suspicious of it - I wrote the address on the back of it, and then said, "I do not know James-street;" the prisoner said, "No, Jane-street, just through the turnpike;" this is the note (looking at it); I have written James Wilcox , No. 17, James-street, Commercial road; then have erased James, and put Jane over the top, 4-18-29: I gave him 4 sovereigns; he gave me 2s. and I gave him 6d.: after he was gone I suspected the note was not good, and followed him, intending to get my money and shoes back again, but seeing a neighbour in his parlour, I went and asked him what he thought of it; I afterwards went to No. 17, Jane-street, and to several houses there, but could hear no tidings whatever of him; in the course of the evening I went to James-street, Cannon-street-road, and inquired at various houses there, but could find no No. 17; I could not find him: a few days afterwards I saw something in the newspaper, went to Lambeth-street, and saw him in the cells - I had his shoes taken off, and believe them to be the pair I sold him that day.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. It was the woman who produced the note, and gave it to you? A. Yes, and she gave me the address in James-street - I knew there was no such street, and the prisoner said Jane-street; I believe that was all he said: when I gave him the sovereigns, he rang them on the counter, and I believe put them into his pocket; he did not give them to the woman in my sight - he put them into his pocket, I am sure; I have inquired after the woman, but have not been able to find her - I could have pointed the prisoner out in any part of London, without his having my shoes on.

THOMAS WELDIN TAUNTON . I live at No. 17, Jane-street, Commercial-road. I do not know the prisoner - he does not live there; nobody named Wilcox lived there on the 18th of April.

MARY BROUGHTON . I live at No. 17, Jane-street, Commercial-road; there are two Nos. 17, opposite each other; I do not know the prisoner, nor any person named Wilcox; no such person lived there on the 18th of April.

SARAH SOLOMON. I am the wife of John Solomon; we live at No. 9, Little Prescott-street, Goodman's-fields; he is a general dealer. Two 5l. notes were given to me by a female on Easter-eve, the 18th of April, between eight and nine o'clock; I suspected them to be forged, and detained them, in consequence of which, three men called between ten and eleven the same evening - I cannot say whether the prisoner was one of them, I was so agitated; on the Monday, at two o'clock, three men came again together - the prisoner was one of those; they said, "We want the 5l. note you have detained;" I said, "I told you on Saturday night I could not give it you, for I have not got it;" (I had delivered one 5l. note up on the Saturday evening to them, and one to the officer) they said, "Oh, you only want to rob us of the note; we shall have the note:" I said, "I really have not got it; it is at Lambeth-street office;" the prisoner said, "Well, then, if it is there, I will go and demand it at the office;" I did not wish to go, but he forced me to go with him - we came to the office door; Healey said, "Is this the man who has come for the note?" I said, "yes, here they are;" the prisoner said, "I have come for the note, and will have it;" Healey said, "Then

come in before the Magistrate;" the prisoner went in, but the other two did not - I saw the note I had delivered to the officer - it was one of the same I received from the woman; I had delivered the other to the three men.

Cross-examined. Q.You cannot say the prisoner was one of those who came on Saturday? A. No; he insisted on my going to Lambeth-street.

JOHN SOLOMON . I am husband of the last witness. I received from my wife a 5l. note, which I gave to Healey - I put a mark on it; this is it - (looking at it.)

WILLIAM TUCKER. I live in Little Prescott-street, Goodman's-fields. I was at Solomon's on the evening of the 18th of April, and saw three men there; the prisoner was one of them - there was a great disturbance about two notes having been left; Mrs. Solomon said they had been left by a woman who was a prostitute - the prisoner said the woman was no prostitute, that she was his wife; that the notes were his property, and he would have them; she said it was impossible, for she had given one to the officer; after some time she agreed to show him one - he snatched it out of her hand, and put it into his pocket; I went away, and saw no more of it - I am a hatter.

DAVID HEALEY . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On Saturday, the 18th of April, I received a note from Solomon, which he marked - this is the note (looking at it) - on the Monday following I was in Lambeth-street; the prisoner and two others came up the street with Mrs. Solomon who said, "This is the person who wants the note you have got;" I immediately took them all three into custody.

WILLIAM LAVENDER . I am the son of John Lavender , of Upper East Smithfield, a tailor. I saw the prisoner at my father's shop about the 1st of April, and on the 9th or 10th; he bought a jacket the first time, paid in gold, and I gave him change; the second time he bought a jacket and waistcoat which came to 1l. 16s., for which he tendered a 5l. note - I took it, and asked his address; he said, "William Johnson, No. 23, Lant-street, Borough;" this is it - this is my hand-writing on it; I gave him the change - he took the clothes away and ordered a pair of trousers, which he agreed to pay me for; he was to call for them on the Friday - they were made for him, but he never called.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you know him before you had these dealings? A. I never saw him before; I saw him yesterday in Newgate, and did not recognize him; he was produced to me in the yard among the rest of the prisoners.

MR. SERJEANT BOSANQUET. Q.Had you an opportunity of seeing him? A. They said he was among the rest, but I did not recognize him; he was twenty or twenty-five minutes in my shop the second time - I have not the least doubt of him; whether he was among the persons in Newgate, I cannot tell - there might be forty prisoners or more.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of Bank notes at the Bank. This is a forged note in every respect; it is not the hand-writing of Vautin, whose signature it bears - (looking at the other notes) - these are forged in all respects; paper and every thing, and are from the same plate as the other.

JAMES VAUTIN . I was employed by the Bank to sign 1l. and 2l. Bank notes, but since they have ceased I have not signed any others - the note uttered to the prosecutor is not my hand-writing - (read).

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

CHRISTOPHER CLARK . I am a turnkey of Newgate, and was present about a fortnight ago when Lavender came and asked to see Charles Jones - he was in the yard at the time; it was in the middle of the day - there might be upwards of twenty prisoners in the yard; the prisoner was walking up and down with the rest, for Lavender to point him out if he could - Lavender was looking through a window, and had full view of all the prisoners in the yard; the prisoner did not come up to the window - he came towards the rails in front; they all walked up and down the yard several times - no means were used by me to conceal him, but I understand he had a different hat on to what he wore before; he did not come on any other day to my knowledge - I had told the prisoner a person was coming to identify him. and, I believe, he changed his coat after I told him so - we always tell them when any body is coming to look at them.

MR. BOLLAND. Q.You told him somebody was coming to look at him, and he changed his dress? A. Yes; the window is grated: it is a good square place - the men walked up and down the middle of the yard in front.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you many people recognized through the window? A. Yes; as he could not identify him through the window, I opened the gate and let him go close up to the rails to see better.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18290611-107

1105. JAMES HASTINGS and JOHN SLATER were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Spurling , on the 8th of May , and stealing 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s., and 1 waistcoat, value 3s. , his property.

THOMAS SPURLING . I live at Bedfont , and am a baker . On the 8th of May I went to bed about eight or nine o'clock and my house was all fast then - I was ill, and sat up in bed about three o'clock in the morning; it was getting day-light - I heard a great noise at the barn-door, listened, and presently heard the lip go down - I live quite alone; I heard somebody on the top of the oven, and then I heard them breaking the oven door open - they then came to an empty room next to my chamber, and there they pushed twice against the chamber door, which was locked, and the third time the staple flew out, and in they came two by two - there were four of them; I was sitting up in bed, and Hastings, when he saw me, drew back - I knew him before - he had carried my rolls about for a long time; I have known him all his life; then Slater came in - I have known him a long time, his friends live in London - but he knew my house, and was in it the day before; I did not know the other two persons - Slater caught hold of me by the throat, held me down, and said, "Lay there, or it will be the worse for you;" he then said, "Where is your money?" I told him I had got none; he said he knew I had - (I had none in the house) - he then said, "Where is your watch?" I told him it was at Hounslow, I had left it at the watch-maker's; he then asked where my breeches were - I told him under the pillow; they took my breeches from under the pillow and searched them, but there was no money in them; he then took the breeches, threw them

down in the room, and went to a corner cupboard, and said,"What is here?" I said there was nothing but a few old receipts which were of no use - he searched all the crockery, there was no money there; he then came to my chest - there has been no lock to that chest ever since I was robbed before; he opened it, and took up a patched coverlid, looked at it, and threw it down - then he took up a plain sheet, he looked at that, and threw it down; he then took and pulled four little drawers out of the chest - I said,"There is nothing there but old receipts;" after they had looked at the other end of the chest, they took out a pair of white cotton stockings, and threw them on the landing-place to the other three; they came in with a candle burning, but it was as light as day - then he took out a clean flowered waistcoat, and threw that to the other three, who stood against another room on the landing-place; I did not see him take any thing more: he then came, caught me by the throat again, and said I should show him where my money was - he pulled me out of bed - he said, "Follow me;" I followed him half way down stairs - the other three were down stairs then; I heard them say, "Don't let Spurling come down here;" Slater hallooed then, and said,"Don't you come down here or it will be the worse for you - go back;" I then went back into my room; I saw them leave the premises by the barn-door - I am sure the prisoners are two of them, for I saw them come in; I was sober - I had only drank a little beer; they remained in the house ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before they left. I at one time used to keep money in the house, sometimes 100l. - Hastings knew that; I was going to have them taken directly, but I took the opinion of a gentleman, who advised me to let it rest; Hastings came, blowed me up, and said he would know my liver out; the patrols took him up last Friday week - when I got up I found my shoes gone as well as the other things; I got up directly they went away, and shut the barn door - I did not go before the Justice of the Peace, as Mr. Sherbon advised me to let it rest - but I told my daughter of it; I was not before the Justice till Friday week - Hastings was in custody then; he lives at Hanworth - Slater was in custody last Tuesday; I spoke positively to their being the men.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.You have never been charged with doing any thing yourself? A. No; I knew Slater, but had not seen him lately, till he came into the house and sat down - there was no disguise about them.

Q. On your oath did he not come to your house to pay you a visit, and drink with you? A. He came to the door next day, and said will you be any thing towards beer; I said No. I had no money - he said I should have some, and fetched a pot; I tasted it once - his wife was with him; I did not show them over my house - I knew him very well, and should have taken him, but I was advised to let it rest, for they would burst themselves, and bring all the blackguards in the world to swear against me; I did not take him up for a month, as Mr. Sherbon, who is the biggest man in the place, said let it rest - when Slater came next day, I did not ask where he lived in London, but I heard as he had told Mrs. Prior; I told him not to send for the beer - he might have stopped there ten minutes: it was about ten or eleven o'clock; I did not charge him with robbing me, or go before a Magistrate - Slater had also been visiting me the day before the robbery, and drank with me, but I did not know where he slept at Bedfont; the constable lives about half a mile from me - I knew Hastings lived at Hanworth; I am not in the habit of drinking, nor have I been wrong in my head - I have never found my property; I am seventy-six years old - Slater might have told me where he lived in London, but I took no account of it, if he did; my son found him out.

THOMAS FORD. I am gaoler of Bow-street office. On Friday, the 5th of June, Hastings was brought to the office in custody on this charge; he was remanded, and when he came out I locked him up: in consequence of information I went and took Slater, at his own house, No. 10, Lambeth-marsh; it was a boot and shoemaker's shop - I understand he lived there; he was at work in the shop - I told him I took him for a burglary at Bedfont, at Spurling's house; he said he knew nothing about it - he came very quietly with me; I have known him these two years.

Cross-examined. Q.What is he? A. A shoemaker; Spurling's son told me where I should find him.

HASTINGS' Defence. I work at Hanworth. About three o'clock in the afternoon of the 7th of May a man came from Bedfont, and said there was a man from London whom I had not seen for fourteen years, and he wished to see all his friends before he left - I went to the Black Dog public-house, where Slater was and was with him till six; I went from there to the Duke's Head public-house, left about half-past nine, and got home as the clock struck eleven, and can prove I was at home till six in the morning.

SLATER's Defence. I was brought up at Bedfont - I came to town at sixteen years old, and went down there when I was twenty-nine, to see my friends; the first person I saw was Spurling - I sent for a pot of beer, and sat drinking and talking with him; he made me promise to call next morning before I went away - I went to Smith's and slept at his house; he called me next morning - I got up and called on Spurling again - we had two pots of beer, and talked together a long time; he gave me the address of his daughter, who lived in town.

JANE PAINTER. I live at Isleworth. My husband is a horse-keeper - I first saw Hastings at the Bell public-house, kept by Smith; it was on the 7th of May - I went there with his wife; he was lying by the fire quite tipsy - we went with him to Hanworth, where he lives, and got there at twelve o'clock at night; it is about four miles from Hanworth - it was Bedfont fair time - it was on the 7th, the Thursday of the fair; I had been to the fair - I do not know what month it was; it was January - I am sure of that.

THOMAS HASTINGS . I am the prisoner's brother, and live at Bedfont. I was with him at the Black Dog, at Bedfont, about seven o'clock in the evening - I left him in the town about half-past seven, and did not see him again; I was going to the Duke's Head - he lives at Hanworth.

THOMAS SMITH . I live at Bedfont - I am a gardener, and have known Slater from a Child; he went to London when he was sixteen years old - he and his wife came to Bedfont in May; they lodged with me, and staid two days

and one night; he slept at my house on the 7th, and went to bed about; half-past eleven o'clock - I went into his bed-room with him, for he was very tipsy and unable to undress; I saw him and his wife at breakfast at eight o'clock - he did not appear as if he had been up all night.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect what day the 7th was? A. It was Bedfont fair, and Thursday; I saw spurling the next day, drinking at the Black Dog - he made no complaint of being robbed; I have known him many years.

MARTHA MOODY . I am Smith's mother-in-law; Slater and his wife were at his house on the day of Bedfont fair, and slept there - I called them between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and they were both there, for they answered; I breakfasted with them about eight.

THOMAS FORD re-examined. When I apprehended Slater he asked leave to change his dress, and put on the clothes he has now.

THOMAS SMITH . Slater wore the dress he has on at Bedfont.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-108

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

1106. THOMAS CROUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 1 table spoon, value 8s. , the goods of William Theobald , his master.

MR. WILLIAM THEOBALD . I live in Chatham-place, Bridge-street . The prisoner was in my employ for about six months as an occasional servant , at a certain sum per week. On the 13th of April the servant, before she went to bed, missed a spoon, and informed her mistress - the prisoner had been employed in the house that day, but had no business in the room the plate was kept in: his business was to clean the shoes and knives - he came next morning as usual, and in consequence of what the servant said, I went down stairs and charged him with stealing a spoon; he denied it - I spoke sharply to him, but made him no promise or threat; he then took me into the shoe-house, went to his coat pocket, and delivered me; up a silver table-spoon - I then asked him about the spoon missed the day before; he denied having taken that - I gave him in charge.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am an officer. I took him in charge; Mr. Theohald kept the spoon himself.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated at the time; I took them with intent to return them again.

MR. THEOBALD. It was about eight o'clock in the morning - he did not appear intoxicated.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Where were the spoons kept? A. In the servant's pantry: it is not kept locked - I have known him eight or nine years; I never knew him to be fighty or subject to fits.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Reference Number: t18290611-109

1107. THOMAS CROUCH was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , 1 table-spoon, value 8s. , the goods of William Theobald , his master.

WILLIAM THEOBALD . On the 13th of april this spoon was lost.

Cross-examiend by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Who informed you about the other spoon? A. The female servant.

WILLIAM COOMBES . I live with Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, of Fleet-market. The prisoner came on the 13th of April, towards the evening, and produced a silver tablespoon; he asked 6s. on it - I had suspicion, but advanced it; next day I heard he was in custody, and saw him: I am certain of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say any thing to him? A. I pointed out the crest, but he said he was a dealer in these things - he was dressed as he is now; I thought him a Jew dealer: some poor men deal in silver goods; he said he was a housekeeper, and lived at No. 5, Chancery-lane.

JOSEPH POTTER . I took him in charge, and asked what he had done with the other spoon; he said he had it on him - I could find nothing of the kind, and said,"Have you pledged it?" he said, "Stop, and I will see"- he put his hand into his pocket, and produced a bag of duplicates, among which was this.

WILLIAM COOMBES . This is the duplicate I gave him.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Reference Number: t18290611-110

1108. THOMAS CROUCH was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 1 printed bound book, value 3s. , the goods of William Morgan , Esq.

WILLIAM MORGAN , ESQ. I am a barrister , of Lincoln's Inn. The prisoner was employed to clean to my shoes - his wife was my laundress; I had a book called the "Modern Universal History." When the prisoner was apprehended the officer produced a duplicate; I found the book at the pawnbroker's; I think I had seen it within three or four months.

JOSEPH POTTER . I found a duplicate in the bag on the prisoner, and went to Fleming's, in Fleet-market, and found this book.

WILLIAM COOMBERS . I produce a book which was pawned at my master's, on the 16th of February; this is the duplicate I gave for it - 1s. 6d. was advanced on it: it was pawned in the name of Thomas, Fetter-lane - I did not take it in.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-111

1109. SAMUEL DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 1 clock, value 12s. , the goods of Ann Merrell .

ANN MERRELL . I am single , and live in Clement's-lane , with my uncle. On the 6th of May I lost a clock off the bench on the first floor; I saw it safe half an hour before it was gone - the street door is kept open, but there is an inner glass door, which we keep on the latch- I saw the clock at the Mansion-house next day.

JOHN HUTCHINSON . I am a tailor. I knew the prisoner by working for my master, Mr. Merrell, a tailor - he came there on the 6th of May, about twelve or one o'clock, and asked for work; he was told Mr. Merrell was not at home - he came up stairs into the workshop, up three pairs of stairs, and must have passed the clock; he staid there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then went away - I did not see him again; he said he should go and get a pot of beer over at the Red Lion public-house, and as he went out I looked out of the window, and saw him with the clock under his arm - that was at

one o'clock; I followed him, and took him in Whitechapel, with it under his arm - I asked him to go back with me; he refused, and began kicking and fighting, and I lodged him in the watch-house.

Prisoner. Q. Was not another person with me when you saw me with the cloak? A. Yes; I never saw that person with the cloak, but when I took it from you I gave it to a boy to carry it; the man who was with the prisoner snatched the cloak from the boy - we got it from him, but could not secure the man; that man did not interfere before that. The prisoenr had got to Whitechapel before I stopped him.

THOMAS DYER . I am a constable. The prisoner and cloak were delivered to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went there with another person, to ask for work; on coming out of Mr. Merrell's, and joining the man, he put the cloak into my hand, and I, being intoxicated, carried it; the man accompanied me, and he endeavoured to take it from the boy.

JOHN HUTCHINSON . I saw nobody with him when he came - he said nothing when he was stopped, except that he was very sorry; he did appear rather intoxicatd - I saw nobody running with him.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18290611-112

NEW COURT, Third Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1110. JAMES HOLLINGTON and JOSEPH BREELING were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May, 4 fixtures, (i.e.) 4 glazed sashes, value 60s., the goods of William Gray , and fixed to a certain building of his .

WILLIAM GRAY . I have two houses, Nos. 9 and 10. Frederick-street, Stepney ; I know nothing of the robbery.

THOMAS STIMSON . I am an officer. On the morning of the 19th of May I saw the two prisoners a quarter of a mile from Frederick-place; I followed them - two persons stopped them, and gave them into my care; I found some covings belonging to a stove, which I produce, but I found no glass - the prisoners were taken into the George public-house; I found nothing on them but this rule: I have fitted these covings to the house, and they fit exactly.

EDWARD JAMES GUY . My attention was attracted by seeing the sashes cut from the prosecutor's houses; they had been safe the night before, when some persons had been removing out; I went to give an alarm, and Hollington passed me within fifty yards of the house, with a bundle in; his arms; a woman gave me information, and I ran after him - when he got near the Geroge these covings were on the ground; I saw the back of some other man which him, but I cannot say who it was; they were then taken to the public-house; Hollington ran full a quarter of a mile - I kept him in sight except when he turned the corners.

Prisoner HOLLINGTON. Q. Did you see me drop any thing? A. No; I saw you carrying something.

ELIZABETH MONK . I was at my window, and saw Hollington go over the wall of Mr. Gray's premises about twenty minutes after six o'clock; he came back in about ten minutes with something under his apron - I saw another man who had a long blue coat on - he was on the other side of the way; I could not swear to his person.

JOHN STEVENSON . I was going to my work that morning, between five and six o'clock. down Jubilee-place; I saw the two prisoners coming up a turing-Guy was pursuing them, crying Stop thief! I pursued, and nearly stopped one, and then I ran after the other; a man came out of a door and stopped Breeling, and Hillman caught him; no glass has been found.

Prisoner BREELING. Q. Which had the covings? A. I cannot exactly say, but they were dropped between them; I think Breeling had them.

HOLLINGTON'S Defence. I saw these two pieces of iron lying, and put them in my lap; I heard a cry of Stop thief! when I had got about a hundred yards.

BREELING'S Defence. This young man passed me; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and went up, as another might do.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-113

1111. JAMES HOLLINGTON and JOSEPH BREELING were again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , 7 fixtures, i.e. 4 glazed sashes, value 3l.; I stove, value 10s.; and 2 stove covings, value 3s., the goods of William Gray , and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute, &c .

ELIZABETH MONK . I live opposite Mr. Gray's houses- I saw Hollington going over the wall twenty minutes after six o'clock; he came back with something under his apron - there was another man outside, near one of the other houses; they joined in company - I told Guy of it, and went to find Mr. Gray; Guy pursued the men- I cannot say whether the other was Breeling or not.

EDWARD JAMES GUY . In consequence of what Monk said, I pursued two men who ran away; I saw they had a bundle, which was thrown down in Jubilee-place; it was these covings; I saw the two prisoners taken to the public-house.

Prisoner BREELING. Q. Did you see me with this prisoner? A. Not when you passed me - when they were taken they were both together; I called out, "Stop him in the white jacket."

COURT. Q. When Mr. Monk told you, did you see two men running? A. No; only Hollington, who had a white jacket on then - I afterwards saw another man join him.

JOHN STEVENSON. I saw the prisoner; I stopped Hollington myself, and saw the other stopped - I saw them coming up the street, with a parcel between them.

THOMAS STIMSON . I saw Hollington stopped; Breeling was taken into the half-way house before I got in -I have seen Hollington before about the field; I have compared these irons to Mr. William Gray's place-they fit exactly.

HOLLINGTON'S Defence. I got up to go to work; I saw the pales broken down, and these pieces of iron lying there - I took them, and heard the cry of Stop thief!

BREELING'S Defence. I was going to work; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and they took me.

HOLLINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

BREELING - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-114

1112. FREDRICK HAASE was indicted for embezzlement .

MARY LOGAN . I am the wife of Thomas Logan . I paid the prisoner 5s. on the 10th of May, for Mr. Nicholls; on the 17th of May, 5s., and on the 24th of May, 5s.

EDWARD NICHOLLS . The prisoner was in my service from Christmas till he was taken; up - he was to receive money, and to give an account of it was as soon as he came home. On the 24th of May I asked if he had received any money from Logan, and he said they owned me nothing - he had not accounted to me for what was paid on the 10th or the 17th.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable. I took the prisoner: I asked him why he had not paid his master the 5s. he had received on that Sunday - he said that was not all, he had to account for 2l. he owed his master.

MR. NICHOLLS. I did not allow him to owe me any money - he should account every night, and we took what money we could get of him - sometimes we could not get any.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor was in the habit of debiting him for all beer he carried out, and deducting the amount from his wages, as he frequently gave the customers credit.

MR. NICHOLLS re-examined. Q. Did you stop his wages? A. I never had an opportunity of doing it - he sold beer, and took the money: some nights we could not get above 3s. or 4s. of him - I was to have given him 4s. a week, but he never applied for it; he was to sell beer on my account.

JURY. Q. Had you dealt with the witness before the prisoner came into your service? A. No; she had not been in the neighbourhood: I knew the prisoner owned me money, and he was scolded for not bringing in his money - we knew he had taken more money every week, and said there were no wages due to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-115

1113. ANN COX , alias ANN DORAN , was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 2 shirts, value 6s., and 1 waistcoat, value 2s., the goods of John Fleming ; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

SOPHIA FLEMING . I am the wife of John Fleming , a last-maker. On the 16th of May, this shirt belonging to my husband, and a shirt and waistcoat belonging to my master, hung on a horse to air; the prisoner came and took me out to a public-house, while she went back to my lodgings - she said she would return in a few minutes, but did not; I went back at eight o'clock, and they were gone.

Prisoner. She invited me several times to go and see her; I went, and we had three half-quarterns of rum. witness. I had only seen her twice for four years.

JULIA M'CARTY. I live at this house. There was only one quartern of rum which she sent me for, and when she came for the things I was in the room; she said she was sent for them by Mrs. Fleming - she took two shirts and one waistcoat.

SOPHIA FLEMING. I did not send her for them, and did not see her again till she was in custody.

JOHN FLEMING. I went in search of the prisoner, and found her.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicates on her.

GEROGE KNAPP. I am a pawnbroker. I took in two shirts and a waistcoat, on the 16th of May, from a woman, to whom I gave this duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She sent me for the things; we were both intoxicated.

JOSEPH CADBY . I produce a record of a former conviction of the prisoner, which I got from Mr. Shelton's office; I was present at the trial, and know she is the person. - (read.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18290611-116

1114. FRANCIS WRIGHT was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS MASON . I am a broker , and live in Seymour-street, Euston-square; the prisoner was in my service, and was to receive money on my account, which he was to account for on his return. On the 29th of April he stopped out all night, and sent another lad to do his work. I asked the prisoner if he had received this money; he owned it, and said he had been with a girl, and spent it.

WILLIAM PUGH . I paid the prisoner 12s. 5d. for his master, on the 29th of April, and have his receipt for it.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor had offered to give up the prosecution, and take the amount by instalments.

THOMAS MASON . I offered to take the money if he would pay it, or if any respectable person would be responsible for it; I only owed him sixpence, as he had drawn money almost every day.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290611-117

1115. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 2 fan-lights, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of James Woodward Turner ; and that he at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate for the Country of Middlesex, at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, on the 5th day of April, in the 8th year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord the King, was convicted of Felony.

JOHN SULLIVAN. I am a watchman. On the 1st of May, at a quarter-past ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner pass my beat with these fan-lights on his shoulder, near Bainbridge-street - I followed, and told him to put them down; I asked him where he got them - he said at his master's, and he was going to Ely-place, Holborn - I wanted him to tell me where his master lived; he put them down, and ran away; I pursued, and took him, without losing sight of him.

WILLIAM ANSTED . I am in the employ of James Woodward Turner - he lives in Well-street, Oxford-street, about a quarter of a mile from Bainbridge-street. These fan-lights were taken from a building of his in George-

street, Hampstead-road - they are his property; two doors had been taken, which have not been found since - Mr. Turner had seen them safe the night before; I had seen them about a week before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of a lodging-house and the watchman took me to the watch-house, he then brought the fan-lights there - I know nothing about them.

GEORGE AVIS . I produce a copy of the conviction of the prisoner, which I got at Mr. Shelton's office - (read) -I was at the trial, and know he is the same man.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-118

1116. DAVID LANGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 1 screw-cap, value 25s. , the goods of William Thomas Smallwood .

JOHN CUTHBERT . On the 1st of May I was standing at my door, and saw the prisoner coming towards me - when he got past he ran, and dropped this screw-cap; I took him and the screw-cap to Mr. Smallwood.

WILLIAM THOMAS SMALLWOOD. I am a brass-founder , and live in York-terrace . This brass cap is mine; it was cast from a pattern which I have in my hand - it was taken from my window that morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not see any thing of it till that gentleman caught me; two young men passed, and I suppose they dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-119

1117. THOMAS LUCAS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 lb. weight of tea, value 6s. , the goods of John Chaffer Moysey .

DAVID CALDER . I am shopman to John Chaffer Moysey , of Tottenham-court-road , a grocer . On the 15th of April the prisoner came and asked for two separate - 1 bs. of tea; we were busy getting in some goods, but a gentleman served him with one - lb., and then he asked for another- I went and wrapped that up; the other person, who first served him, went away - he then asked for some pepper and spices, which I laid down to him; he took up the teas and said, "I am going to give these to my man at the door' - I was a little surprised, but he went out and said,"Tom, take this;" I looked out at the window, and saw him crossing the street running - I pursued, and called Stop thief! to the watchman; he slackened his pace, and before I seized him he made a full stop at an area - the officer came, and took him; I knocked at the door, and got the teas from the area - these are them; I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking from Tottenham-street, on the east side of Tottenham-court-road - I was stopped by an officer and this gentleman, but I know nothing of this transaction.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-120

1118. JOHN HART was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 1 1/2 oz. weight of silk twist, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL , JUN. I am the son of William Hall, a haberdasher and linen-draper , of Marshall-street, Goldensquare . On the 9th of May the prisoner came for a yard of silk-twist to match a piece of dark cloth he had in his hand; he took up one or two, and asked if that colour would do - I said, "No, we have not got it;" he then went out with one ball in his hand, and as my father was not in the shop I did not like to tell him of it; but when he was gone I told my mother - he had laid the piece of cloth over the drawer, while he took the twist with his left hand- I followed him out till he had got two or three doors off; I then told him to come back as he had got a ball of twist - he said he had not; I brought him back, and called my father - he told me to go to Mr. Avis, who came and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you see him take the ball of twist? A. Yes, but I could not see the colour of it - it could not have been swept off the counter; he did not put his hand on the counter - it was about ten o'clock in the morning; he came very readily back - he emptied one of his pockets while I was gone; he put his left hand under the cloth and took it.

GEORGE AVIS . I am the officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; Catherine Hall delivered me a ball of twist, which she said she saw the prisoner take from his pocket - the prisoner said he would sooner pay for it than have any piece of work, or be exposed; I found 2s. 7 1/2 d. on the prisoner, also a latch-key, and a skeleton key.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say he was not guilty? A. Yes.

CATHERINE MARY HALL . I was at home when the prisoner was brought back - I saw him throw the ball of twist out of his left trousers pocket, behind a box near the shop door; I saw, I think, half a crown, and he said he would rather pay than be grought to disgrace.

Cross-examined. Q. This is rather a lively sort of colour, is it not? A. Yes; a person could not see the colour if a cloth were laid over it - I was not in the shop when he first came in; I saw him come in and throw it down - he turned out his right hand pocket, and this was in his left; I was near the door.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-121

1119. HENRY HUGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 1 pair of saddle-bags, value 3l.; 1 umbrella, value 1l., and 1 coat, value 4l. , the goods of George Carmichael Smyth .

CAPTAIN GEORGE CARMICHAL SMYTH . The prisoner was my groom ; these articles were in his possession. I missed them on his absconding; he had been with me nine or ten months - I went to Bow-street, and gave information; an officer took him.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Where were these articles? A. At a livery-stable; the coat was his box-coat, the umbrella was a large Stanhope one - he conducted himself very well, and came with a very good character.

COURT. Q. How do you give your coats? A. I give two suits of livery every year, and great coats when they are wanted.

DANIEL MANSFIELD . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Green-street, Leicester-square. I have a pair of saddle-bags, an umbrella, and a coat pawned on the 7th of April,

he 29th of April, and the 1st of May, in the name of Huggett, No. 21, Pall-mall, all by the prisoner.

THOMAS SMEE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; he told me he had been to Captain Smyth to try to make it up, but he could not see him.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you said it would be better or worse for him? A. No; he was very much intoxicated, he could hardly stand.

CAPTAIN SMYTH. I believe these are my articles, but I cannot swear to them; I lost similar things.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

The prisoner received a good character, and was recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-122

1120. ANN FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 22 pairs of shoes, value 4l., and 3 pairs of boots, value 6s. , the goods of John Walter Shields .

JOHN WALTER SHIELDS . The prisoner is a relation of my wife's; I am a shoemaker . She came to my shop on the 29th of May, and said that her mother could not come to clean the house till the afternoon; when she was gone, I missed a pair of shoes, and sent my boy for her - she said she knew nothing about them.

CHARLES WILLIAMSON . I am a pawnbroker. I have six pairs of shoes, pawned by the prisoner, at different times; the last was on the 30th of May.

PHILEMON HARVEY. I am a pawnbroker. I have nine pairs of shoes; four pairs were pledged by the prisoner - the others I did not take in.

JOSEPH MACKLESFIELD . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of men's shoes and two pairs of girl's boots pawned by a female, in the name of Mary Ward - I am not certain it was the prisoner.

ROBERT MASTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, who said she had taken some shoes, but not so many; that sho had pawned them at all the pawnbrokers in the highway, and torn the duplicates to pieces.

JOSEPH HAMES . I am a pawnbroker. I have three pairs of shoes, pawned by a female about the prisoner's size.

EDWARD EDMOND CHILD . I am a pawnbroker. I have three pairs of shoes, pawned by the prisoner, to the best of my belief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-123

1121. ELIZABETH DYER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 coat, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Field .

THOMAS FIELD . I am a coach-smith , and live in Court-street, Long-acre . The prisoner came to my house to see a lady on the first-floor, on the 12th of May - my coat was then in the kitchen; I missed it about eight o'clock in the evening - I was out when she came.

GEORGE LEDGER . I live in High-street, Bloomsbury, and am a pawnbroker. I have a coat pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of May, about dinner-time; she said she pawned it for her mother, and her mother has since had an affidavit of it.

GEORGE AVIS . I took her into custody.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-124

1122. ELIZABETH CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; 7 pairs of stockings, value 7s.; 2 night gowns, value 2s.; 1 habit shirt, value 1s., and 1 shawl, value 10s. , the goods of Ann William , widow.

ANN WILLIAMS . I am a widow , and live in West-street . The prisoner lived in the same room with me; I missed some things a great while ago - I missed some on the 3d of April - Riley was sent for, and took the prisoner.

PHILIP RILEY . I am a beadle. I was sent for by Mrs. McCloud, and took the prisoner - she gave me the duplicates, which she had taken from the prisoner.

SARAH McCLOUD . I wait upon the prosecutrix, who is blind; I know these articles to be hers - they had been in her room; the prisoner had been there about three days before we missed some of the property - I said I would get an officer to examine the place; the prisoner came and knocked at my door, and gave me the duplicate - she said she intended to get them out of pawn again.

RICHARD ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of stockings, a shift, and a table-cloth, pawned, I believe, by the prisoner; I gave this duplicate for them.

SARAH McCLOUD. These are Mrs. Williams, I can be upon my oath; a great deal more was lost: the prisoner worked at the army clothing making.

Prisoner. It is my first offence, and I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-125

1123. SAMUEL BONNIER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 97 lbs. weight of yarn, value 5l. , the goods of Stephen Noden .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HENRY HINDLEY . I am a hearth-rug manufacturer, and live in Wenlock cottages, City-road. The prisoner came to me on Saturday, the 30th of May, about six o'clock in the evening; he had a sample of worsted and woollen yarn - he said he had about 60lbs. of the worsted, and about 30lbs. or 35lbs, of the yarn, which he wished to dispose of - I asked the price - he said 10d., for the yarn, and 1s. for the worsted; he said he had the yarn from a man named Masterman, in Ratcliff-highway, a rug-manufacturer - that he had taken it for a bad debt, and I understood him six months before; I asked if he hand obtained it correctly; he said he had - I showed the samples to my brother, and purchased the yarn of him at 8d., and the worsted at 1s.; I have his receipt for it - I asked his name, which he gave me correctly, and said he lived in Hackney-road, which was correct; I went with him to Hackney-road, in my cart - he there produced the articles, which I took in the cart: he went back with me to my house, and my brother paid him 3l. 17s. - I afterwards received information, and went to his house; he was not at home - I left a message, and he called the same night; I told him, from information I had received from his uncle and brother, I had reason to believe that it was Mr. Noden's yarn, as I heard he was

intimate with Cleenes, Mr. Noden's man - he said he would take it away if I was dissatisfied; I said No, I must see Mr. Noden, and had written to him; he said he had known Cleenes for many years, but the yarn was not Mr. Noden's, he had bought it of Mr. Masterman.

COURT. Q. Did you give a fair market price? A. Yes, for jobs.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He gave you a proper name and address? A. Yes; I left a message with his wife, that I was dissatisfied with the worsted - he came to my house, and I told him I was dissatisfied; he said he would call on me at any time, and that he came as soon as he could - Cleenes was taken up and discharged - he asked me 2d. a lb. more than I gave him for the woollen yarn; I kept the articles, and delivered them to Brown.

STEPHEN NODEN . I live in Kirby-street, Hatton-garden. I am a dyer, and deal in woollen yarn ; I believe this to be my property; I have lost property like it; Cleenes was in my service, he is not there now - I had him taken into custody but he was discharged; I saw this property on the Sunday after Mr. Hindley had purchased it; on the Saturday I received a communication from him, and went to his house - the 62lbs. of woollen yarn cost me about 5l. - I gave 1s. a lb. for the woollen yarn, and 1s. 4d. for the worsted; 8d. a lb. is not an uncommon price there are so many jobs about - I sometimes meet with them.

Cross-examined. Q. You have a large stock? A. Yes; I did not miss any; but when I saw it I knew it to be mine; I had some of the same description; I have sold some of the same dye, but not to Masterman.

COURT. Q. When your attention was called to it did you look over your stock? A. Yes; and ascertained the weight I dyed of that colour; I sold some to a woman who used all she had - that, and what was found at Hindley's, made up the weight I dyed; this particular dye I can speak positively to - as to the others I have no doubt of.

HARRIET CURTIS . I live in Brompton-row, and am in the fringe business. 1 buy all my worsted yarn of Mr. Noden; I bought between 4lbs. and 5lbs. of this colour of him about a month ago - it was the same dye as this.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you have seen a great variety? A. This is a particular dye; I had a pattern of it which I took to Mr. Noden - the person who gave me the pattern must have had the same dye; there may be a great deal of it in London.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. What did you take for a pattern? A. A bit of twine - what I bought I made up into fringe and sold.

DAVID NODEN . I am the prosecutor's son. This is his dye, it is a particular colour; he dyed between 12lbs. and 13lbs, of it - we have about 7 1/2 lbs. at home, 4lbs. were sold, and a - lb. was found at Mr. Hindley's; Cleenes was taken up and discharged - he was an acquaintance of the prisoners - I had seen them together about a fortnight before we missed the yarn.

Cross-examined. Q. Had not you an acquaintance with the prisoner? A. No; I never spoke to him, only in company with Cleenes - I will swear I have not been more than four times in his company; I have played at cards with him twice in the parlour at a public-house - Cleenes led me into it - I believe it was the Rose and Crown - I do not know the street; I went to no other public-house; the last time I went out, the prisoner offered to treat me, and as I was with them I took part of what they had - I cannot say whether I owe him any money, he never lent me any - he lent Cleenes money.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. On Monday, the 1st of June, I went with Mr. Noden to Hindley's, and then to the prisoner's house - we waited till he came in; I asked where he got the worsted he sold to Mr. Hindley - he said he had it of Masterman six months ago; I asked who Masterman was - he said he was a rug-maker, and lived in Ratcliff-highway; I told him I must apprehend him, as I had had information that it was stolen form a person in Hatton-garden, and I asked if he knew any body that worked for a person in Hatton-garden - he said he did; I then asked where Masterman lived - he said he did not know, or any thing at all about him; I have not been to Ratchliff-highway; the prisoner was remanded to try to bring that person forward - I took Cleenes the same day.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not tell you that Masterman had removed, and he did not know where he was gone? A. No; he said he himself had removed - that he had lived in Ratcliff-highway.

STEPHEN NODEN . That dye was not in existence six months ago - it could not have been bought at Masterman's six months ago.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean to swear that there was no such dye in existence six months ago in London? A. Yes; I can swear that - I will not say it is impossible, it is very improbable. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-126

1124. WILLIAM CASTEL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , 1 live tame fowl, price 10s. , the property of Robert Spring Snell .

ROBERT SPRING SNELL . I live in Essex-street, Whitechapel . On the 2d of June, about two o'clock in the morning, the watchman called me out of bed, and said he caught the man getting over the wall with this fowl - I know it to be mine; it roosted in the yard: I have known the prisoner about the neighbourhood - I have lost twentytwo fowls in the course of the last winter.

JOHN POWELL . I am a watchman. About half-past two o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner on the wall with a fowl in his hand; I took him - he was searched at the watch-house, and five skeleton keys found on him - some of them sit Mr. Snell's house.

Prisoner. Q. Where were you when you apprehended me? A. In Greig's-court.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking, and had been up that court in conversation with a young woman; as I was coming out, the watchman caught me, and two young men passed me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-127

1125. CHARLOTTE BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 1 watch, value 7l.; 1 breast-pin, value 12s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 7s.; and 2 shillings , the property of Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH . I am mariner of a ship which came

from Bombay; it lay in the export West India dock. On the 9th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was in Wentworth-street, and met the prisoner; she asked me to go home with her - I went to a room up one-pairs of stairs, in a house in Crow-court ; I gave her 5s.; I was quite sober - I had not tasted a glass of spirits for fourteen months: I took a pin from my breast, and was going to put it on the mantle-piece - she asked me for it, to put it into a small trinket-box, to take care of it till the morning, and my watch too; she put them into a small box on the table, locked the door, and left the key in it; she then came to bed: in the morning, between three and four o'clock, she awoke me going out of the room - I got up, looked for my property, and it was gone; I went down, told the landlady, and she desired me to get the watchman, which I did: she was taken the following night - none of my property has been found; I lost three handkerchiefs, a watch, and a pin - I am quite certain she is the girl.

MARY HARRISON . I live in that house; the prisoner rented a room of my mistress, at 4s. a week. She came home with the prosecutor; in the morning the man came down; he saw my mistress, and told her what he had lost- the prisoner came there at seven o'clock the same morning.

JOHN POWELL . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave me information: I knew the person he described, and took her at No. 10, Rose-lane.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that the prosecutor, who was intoxicated, went home with her, and on his informing her he had no money, she left him in the room, and had not seen his property.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-128

1126. CATHERINE WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , 8 yards of printed cotton, value 16s. , the goods of William Allen .

SAMUEL NEWSOM . I am a cabinet-maker. On the 26th of May I saw the prisoner, about eleven o'clock in the morning; I saw her go up to Mr. Allen's shop, pull aside a piece, of handkerchiefs, thrust in her arm, take out a gown-piece, and secrete it under her shawl; she then walked into the shop, and asked the price of different things - I went and told the lad of it, and she was taken as she was going away.

WILLIAM PENN . I am shopman to Mr. William Allen , linendraper , of High-street, Marylebone . The prisoner came to the shop, and asked the price of some dresses; she said she did not want one then; this witness came, and said she had got something of ours under her shawl - I went out, and brought her back; I found this print under her shawl - she dropped it behind her in the shop; it is my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not left the shop.

Witness. Yes, you were outside.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 6 Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290611-129

1127. THOMAS MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of James Thomas Hay , from his person .

MR. JAMES THOMAS HAY . I am of no profession. I was in Pall-mall on the 30th of April, between three and half-past three o'clock in the day, at the Drawing-room; I lost my handkerchief, which I saw in the officer's hands.

MATTHEW GLOVER . I was on duty at the Palace. A. gentleman told me a person was picking a pocket; I pursued, and took the prisoner; he resisted a great deal-I got assistance, and secured him: I found six handkerchiefs, a snuff-box, and a ring upon him - the prosecutor's handkerchief was one: there was a witness who resembled the prisoner very much in the face, who gave his address at Chelsea; I went there, and it was false.

Prisoner's Defence. I felt something against my heel, and found it was these handkerchiefs; I took them up, and put them in my hat, but it was too heavy, and I took them out again. GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-130

1128. HENRY WINGFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April , 1 sovereign , the money of Henry Baldwin , his master.

HENRY BALDWIN . The prisoner is my apprentice ; I live at Ryslip , and am a smith . On the 4th of April this sovereign was put in a box in our sleeping-room, and was there till the 8th.

ELIZABETH BALDWIN . I am the prosecutor's wife. We had a sovereign in a box, in a little drawer, in a chest of drawers in the bed-room - I put it in between seven and eight o'clock on the evening of the 4th of April, and never saw it any more; I missed it on the 8th, and expected that my husband had taken it - he accused the prisoner of stealing it, and the prisoner went and found the box over the oven.

MARY GREGORY . I keep a public-house at Ryslip. The prisoner came to me about the 7th or 8th of April, and asked me to change him a sovereign.

HENRY BALDWIN . My wife said the box was gone - I asked the prisoner about it; he said he had not been into our chamber, but at length he began to cry - he told me where the box was, and went and fetched it from the oven.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not say you would forgive him? A. Yes; I did chastise him - I did not like to take him on again, and I took him before the Magistrate; I received 22l. with him.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-131

1129. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of George Howard , from his person .

GEORGE HOWARD . I am in the service of Lord Wallace . On the 27th of May, about twelve o'clock, I was in Hyde-park , looking at an inspection of the soldiers; I had a handkerchief in my right-hand pocket; Dorrell gave me information, and I saw him take the handkerchief from the prisoner, who was close to me.

GEORGE DORRELL . I am a brush-maker. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into the flap of his trousers - I took hold of him, and took it from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: t18290611-132

1130. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , 1 coat, value 50s. , the goods of James Gale .

JAMES GALE . I am a draper and tailor , and live in Holborn . This coat is mine.

ANN GALE . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw the prisoner take the coat from the middle of the window, on the 23d of April - he came into the shop as I was sitting in the room adjoining; he drew it across the counter - I gave an alarm, and he was taken.

HENRY SAUNDERS . I stopped the prisoner running from the shop - he dropped the coat at my feet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and this gentleman took me - he said he did not know what it is for. GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-133

1131. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , 9 yards of cotton, value 10s. , the goods of Frederick Head .

HENRY ALLISON . I am in the employ of Mr. Frederick Head , linen-draper , of Oxford-street . On the 3d of April, I saw the prisoner come to our door, and look at some prints - she took one, and put it under her shawl; I went and took her - she dropped it, and I took it up; I had seen her once before - she said she was going to bring it into the shop. GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290611-134

1132. JOHN RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st for April , 8 rings, value 21s. , the goods of Henry Faiers .

HENRY FAIERS . I am a hair-dresser and jeweller . On the 21st of April, between seven and eight o'clock, I was engaged in a room behind the shop; I was just coming into the shop when my niece screamed out, and said a man had run out off the shop with some rings - I pursued the prisoner with some other persons, and saw him taken - a person said he had thrown the property down in the street; I took up part of it, and part was down an area.

MARY ANN HAWDON . I am the prosecutor's niece. A lady had been into the shop, and bought a gold ring- she had hardly got two steps out, when the prisoner came in, and asked for Mr. Johnson; I said I could not tell about any such person - I had my hand on the tray of rings - he snatched it up, and ran out; I saw him brought back, and am certain he is the man.

WILLIAM TYRRELL . I saw the prisoner coming out of this shop, and heard Hawdon scream - I pursued, and took him - I did not see him throw any thing away.

CELIA WELCH . I was standing at our door, and some person said the prisoner had thrown some rings down an area - I went there, and found four rings, which I gave the officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a street two or three turnings out of the City-road; I had nothing about me - I was pushed down by three or four people, and was just getting up - I had been out of employ for ten months.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-135

1133. JAMES PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 12 pieces of veneer, value 2s.; 1 glue-pot, value 4d.; and 1 brush, value 2d. ; the goods of John Fores .

JOHN FORES . I am a cabinet-maker and upholsterer : my workshop is at the back of King's-terrace, Commercial-road. The prisoner had worked for me, but I had discharged him three weeks before; this wood is mine-it cannot be bought in London.

BENJAMIN BLABY. I am an officer. I received this property from the landlady of a house where this prisoner lives.

MARGARET SKINNER . I am the landlady. I found this wood in a cupboard at the back of the prisoner's bedstead - there are twelve pieces of veneer, a glue pot, and a brush.

Prisoner's Defence. The glue-pot I took to use for a job I had to do at home - the wood is my own; I have worked with it there; it is what they call rose-wood.

MARGARET SKINNER. I have see him have bits of wood about his box, measuring them and looking at them, he never hand any tools: I have seen him boil the glue pot.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-136

1134. HENRY OSMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 6s.; 1 key, value 2s., 8 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the property of Stephen Hemmings .

STEPHEN HEMMINGS . I am a mason . On the 2d of May I was in Hyde-park, about eleven o'clock; I came form Somersetshire, and had only been in London two days - I was looking at the soldiers, and hearing the music, and on turning my head, I saw what appeared to me to be a gold watch lying under one of the trees; I took it up, and put it into my pocket - the prisoner came up; he was dressed as a shepherd, in a smock frock - he represented himself as the shepherd of the sheep in the park, and said that he took a great deal of pains with the sheep at this time of year; he then said "I saw you pick up a gold watch;" I said, "How do you know it is a gold watch?" he said,"Oh, I saw you put it into your pocket - come, come, young man, I must have half of that;" I took it out of my pocket, and he said, "D - n my eyes, if that is not worth twenty guineas - it is a stop-watch - you could go to any part of the town, and pawn that for ten guineas;" he took it into his hand, looked at it, and said he never saw a bigger beauty in all his life - he returned it to me, and asked what o'clock it was by my watch; I took out my watch, and he took hold of it, and said, "This won't pay me for half the value of that watch - come, come, young man, if you don't give me half I will give you in charge to the guards, and then we shall neither of us have it - I know you have got some money;" I said I had very little money in my pocket, and I had no friends in London that I could go to: he struck at my pocket, and said, "How much have you got - I can't go out of the park, I am the shepherd of the park;" I pulled out three half-crowns and two sixpences - he said,"This is not worth half the gold watch;" he then asked me what my watch was worth - I said it was worth 3l., beside the gold appendages of it; he then said he would go out of the park - we went to the Running Horse public-house in Piccadilly , and called for a pint of porter -

while we were there he got up and ran away; I have never seen my watch, nor my half-crowns and sixpences since - I afterwards saw the prisoner at the Lemon Tree public-house, and had him taken.

JANE STANDEN . My husband keeps the Running Horse in Piccadilly. The prosecutor came to our house with another man, and had a pint of beer; I think it was the prisoner, but he was not dressed as he is now - he looked like a shepherd, and had a brown smock frock on.

JOSEPH OSTELL. I am an officer. The prosecutor gave the prisoner into my custody; when I came up he threatened to knock the prosecutor down - I found this ribbon in the inside pocket of his trousers, which the prosecutor says was attached to his watch; I asked how he came by it - he said it did not affect this case, and he would not tell me.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw him till he had me taken into custody; what he has said is false - I never was a shepherd. I am a hard-working man; I thought it was very hard for a man to accuse me of a thing I never did - I never was baffled or hauled up for such a thing as this; I get my bread honest, not as many of them do-I have a right to speak out; I think I stand in a very queer state - it is an astonishing thing that a man like me should lay in such a dark place as this, I only wish him to share the same fate.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-137

1135. CHARLES LONDON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 seal, value 5s.; 1 watch-key, value 3s.; 1 ring, value 2s., and 1 ribbon, value 1s. , the goods of William Kerfoot .

WILLIAM KERFOOT . I am porter to Messrs. Pugh and Co., near Covent-garden - the prisoner was a copying clerk there. On the 29th of May, I hung up my watch, at six o'clock in the evening, and missed it at nine- I saw the prisoner come in about a quarter before eight, while I was engage wath another clerk tying up some paper; I went to Bow-street, and the prisoner was taken up for the misdemeanor.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. From what you know of the circumstances of the prisoner, do you think he meant to steal it? A. I believe he did not; he behaved most prudently while he was in the office.

HENRY POWELL . I am an assistant to Mr. Cameron, a pawnbroker, in the Strand. I have a watch, seal and key pawned by the prisoner on the 29th of May, about half-past eight o'clock, in the name of John London , Fleet-street.

Cross-examined. Q. What state was he in? A. He was not drunk that I could see - he appeared collected; he said nothing - I saw nothing to shew that he was drunk - I will not venture to swear either way.

WILLIAM KERFOOT . This is my watch - he never pawned any thing of mine before; he had not asked for to borrow money on - I think he was drunk; he had been drinking all day.

Prisoner's Defence. I admit taking the watch, but with no felonious intention. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-138

Fifth Middlesex Jury-Before Mr. Common Sergent.

1136. JAMES GLEESON , MARY CAYWORTH , ANN WEBSTER , HENRY JOHNSON and TAMER TILLING were indicted for feloniously receiving sundry articles of wearing apparel, stolen by a certain evil disposed person, they well knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence against the prisoner but an accomplice, who did not understand the obligation of an oath, the case was not proceeded with.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-139

1137. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 1 skittle-ball, value 4s. , the goods of William Frazer .

WILLIAM FRAZER . I keep the Seven Stars public-house, Brick-lane, Spitalfields . I saw the prisoner, on the night of the 5th of May, passing my bar to go out, about half-past eight o'clock; I had seen him a few minutes before - he had a great coat on; my servant came and said she suspected the person who had gone out had taken a skittle-ball, and she called her fellow-servant to bring him back - I rubbed him down, and finding the ball into his pocket, I put him into the parlour, and sent for the officer.

Prisoner. Q. How can you swear to it? A. By having it so many times in my hand.

CHARLOTTE MASSINGHAM. The prisoner came to the room I was in, and asked if any one was in the skittleground - I said No; he went into the skittle-ground, and when he came out I saw something heavy in his pocket- he went out, and I called my fellow-servant to bring him back, which he did; I saw this ball taken from his left-hand pocket - it has three holes in it.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a watchman. I went to the Seven Stars, and found the ball in the prisoner's left pocket - I gave it to the officer.

THOMAS COX . I am the officer. I took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-140

1138. WILLIAM WARREN was indicted for feloniously receiving 4 fowls, value 12s., the goods of William Hester Wiggins , well knowing the same to have been stolen .

The same evidence was produced as in the former case, (see page 497.) NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-141

1139. RICHARD CERINO and EDWARD WILSON were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , 76 lbs. weight of lead, value 12s., the goods of William Cleave , and fixed to a building .

BARNARD DRYDEN . I live in St. Pancras, with my parents. On the 2d of May I and Ingersoll were in Plummer-street , between four and five o'clock - we saw the two prisoners, whom I knew before; they knocked up against me, then went into the area of a house, and into the kitchen, and from there to the next house - I watched and saw Cerino take a piece of lead; Wilson stood at the door, as if to watch - I went through the house; they threatened if I did not go away that they would throw stones at me - Cerino came out and tried to strike me; he then went back, and Wilson threw a piece of stick at me - when they were gone Ingersoll went into the house, and found several pieces of lead; I did not see the prisoner on the top of the house.

FREDERICK INGERSOLL. I was with Dryden. I saw the prisoner go down the area, and into the kitchen - I saw Cerino placing some lead under the boards near the hearth; Wilson stood within sight of him, as if to watch- I went afterwards, and found some loose pieces of lead there.

JOSEPH SHEPHERD . I am a chandler, and live in Drummond-crescent. I went to the house, and found some lead under the boards in the back kitchen; I carried it to the top of the house, and it fitted exactly to the gutter- it is the property of Mr. William, Cleave; there were 76lbs. - I had seen it all right in the house two or three days before.

WILLIAM BATTEN . I am a Bow-street constable. I went and took the prisoners the same evening - I found a knife on Cerino, and a piece of wood, which I suppose had been used to drive the knife through the lead.

WILLIAM SIDNEY SMITH . I am a constable. I went on the roof on the evening of the 2d of May - the lead found exactly fitted.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-142

1140. JAMES BAGLEY and GEORGE RIDER were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 1 cap, value 9s., the goods of John Morton , from the person of William Morton .

JOHN MORTON . I am the father of William Morton . On the 30th of May he was playing near the new church, Bethnal-green ; a little boy came to tell me he had lost his cap; I went out, and saw Bagley in the possession of my son Thomas.

WILLIAM MORTON . I am ten years old. I went out with a cap on, on the 30th of May - Bagley took it off, and threw it to Rider, who ran away with it; Bagley stopped me from running after him - I am sure they are the two boys; about a quarter of an hour after Bagley left me I saw him in the custody of my brother.

THOMAS MORTON . On the 30th of May I saw Bagley running away - my brother said he was the boy, and I took him; I said, "Did you take my brother's cap?" he said Yes - we have not got the cap since.

CHARLES TOPPER . I am a Bow-street officer. Mr. Morton gave Bagley in charge; I took him down Bethnalgreen-road, and asked if he had got the cap-he said No; he took it off the boy's head, and threw it to Rider - I took Rider, who said he sold it to a Jew for 1s. 6d.

RIDER'S Defence. Bagley threw it to another boy, and he to me - I ran away with it.

The prisoners received good characters.

BAGLEY - GUILTY . Aged 16.

RIDER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy. - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-143

1141. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 2 saws, value 10s. , the goods of William Hughes .

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a carpenter . I was working at a new; house in Gilbert-street, Grosvenor-square ; I left two saws there about four o'clock, on the 8th of May, when I went to tea - when I returned they were gone.

PATRICK LEE . I saw the prisoner coming out of the house with these two saws - I followed, and took them from under his coat.

JOHN LACEY . I received the prisoner in charge; he said it was through distress, which I believe was the case- he had not a farthing about him.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18290611-144

1142. MARY SULLIVAN and MARY HOWITT were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 pair of stays, value 6s., and 8 yards of lace, value 4s. , the goods of John Pike .

JOHN PIKE . I keep a hosier's shop , at Islington . On the 15th of April I was in the parlour behind the shop- the two prisoners came in between eight and nine o'clock: the lad rang the bell, and said they wanted stays, which it is customary for a female to show - I went and saw them near the counter; I saw Sullivan take something off the counter - I went behind them, and saw something under each of their arms, but could not see what it was; a customer came in, whom I told my lad to attend to, and I would attend to the prisoners - they then asked for some caps, which I showed them; they did not like them, but said they would call another day - when they had left the shop I missed some lace, and sent the boy after them; he brought back Sullivan, and I told her what I suspected; she said I was wrong - she had done nothing: I sent my lad for Howitt - she came back, and I charged her with it- while I was talking with her she dropped a card of lace into a chair; I sent for an officer: before he came Sullivan begged me to forgive them - I said I could not, and took them into the room; when the officer came he found a pair of stays in Howitt's hand, and two pairs of French gloves, which they said they had bought in the City; the stays were not mine - they belonged to a person named Lee; the lace was mine.

JOHN WARD . I am in the prosecutor's service. I was in the shop. but did not see the prisoners take any thing; my master ordered me to go after them - I brought back Sullivan, and then the other; I did not see the lace fall.

JOHN WYLES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner-Sullivan said to Howitt, "For God's sake, don't bring me into it - you know I know nothing about it."

SULLIVAN'S Defence. I am innocent.

Prisoner HOWITT. She is innocent, and it is my first offence.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HOWITT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-145

1143. MARY ANN LUXTON and ELIZABETH SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 watch-chain, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 1l.; 1 watch-key, value 4s.; 4 sovereigns and 18 shillings, the property of Charles Berry , from his person .

CHARLES BERRY . I was in the street on the 22d of May, at ten o'clock at night; I met Luxton, we went to a public-house, and had something to drink - I then went to the house where she lived, and had some supper; I undressed, and went to bed - I had four sovereigns and 18s. in silver in my trousers pocket, and a watch, chain, seal, and key; I rolled up my trousers in the braces, and put them under my pillow; Luxton saw me do that - I fell asleep before she came to bed; when I awoke in the morning the house was empty - I found my trousers behind the

door; the watch and money were gone - I gave information, but have never seen them; I was quite sober, but I fell asleep in about a quarter of an hour - I do not think she came to bed at all.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS. I am an officer. I took the two prisoners in the New-cut, at Lambeth on the 26th of May, about half-past four o'clock - I found none of the property.

LUXTON'S Defence. I did not take his trousers - he pulled them out, and gave me his watch to keep till the morning; he saw me go out of the room.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS. They said they had sold the watch to a Jew in Petticoat-lane for 35s., and the money they had laid out in clothes - they had new shawls, new bonnets, and new gowns on; I found nothing belonging to the prosecutor - it was done in a very low house in Glass-house-yard, Rosemary-lane.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-146

1144. THOMAS KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , 1 watch, value 3l. 10s.; 1 chain, value 2s.; 2 keys, value 1s., and 2 small pieces of silver, value 6d. , the goods of John Groves .

JOHN GROVES . I live in Croydon-street . On the 10th of January I was gone out of my room for a halfpenny worth of milk, and left the prisoner there - he had slept with me the night before - when I returned he was gone, and I missed my watch; it was a large silver one, with a chain and two small pieces of silver attached to it - I wiped the dust off it just before I went out.

JOHN HINGE . I saw Groves go out - the prisoner went out directly afterwards; I did not see whether they went the same way.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL. I received information on the 10th of January, and took the prisoner in a skittleground in the Five-fields, in April - as soon as he saw the prosecutor he called him Coachman, and seemed to know him; I told him I took him on suspicion of stealing Groves' watch - he said, "If I have robbed him of a watch, I will go with you;" I found 18s. and some copper on him - he never denied it, nor confessed it; the watch has never been found.

JOHN GROVES . There was no other person in the room while he was there - when he was brought back he said,"I suppose you say I stole your watch?" I said, "That is true."

Prisoner's Defence. I did deny it, but I said I would go any where with them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-147

1145. GEORGE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 1 cloak, value 8s. , the goods of Francis Lawrence .

FRANCIS LAWRENCE , I was coming to London with my wife on the 30th of May, about nine o'clock in the morning - we got through Mile-end turnpike, and turned to go to Bedford-square; we went up a wrong turning, and found there was a tier of posts - I got down, tied my mare to a post, and went with my wife to her sister's; I did not stop above five minutes - when I returned my cloak was gone out of my cart.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS. I apprehended the prisoner with the cloak about ten o'clock the same morning; he was in the midst of three or four men, very had characters - when he saw me he dropped the cloak and a sack, and went away; I followed, called Stop thief! and he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it near the London Hospital - a man came into the Tenter-ground, and said there were officers coming, and I went away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-148

1146. WILLIAM GRAINGER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , 7 cruets, value 14s., and 1 cruet frame, value 16s. , the goods of Thomas Robinson .

THOMAS ROBINSON . I lost these cruets and stand from my shop; I was out and came home about half-past twelve o'clock - I then missed them; I am a broker .

CHARLES BONDWICK . I was at No. 48., Silver-street, Stepney, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran out, and saw Grainger going along - he pulled off his jacket, and threw it on the pavement: I followed him till he came to a black ditch - he could not get over, and I stopped him; he said, "Be as easy as you can with me" - he threw one of these cruets out of his pocket while I had hold of him.

Prisoner. A little boy brought one of these cruets - he asked the gentleman whether he had any thing to say against me; the gentleman said No, I was the wrong person. Witness. No; a gentleman picked up the stand, and told me he saw the prisoner throw it away.

JAMES WOODMAN. I was at the side of my master's house. painting, and saw the prisoner run round the corner with this stand on his finger - it was not more than five doors from the prosecutor's house - there was another person with him; I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from his pocket, and cover it over.

THOMAS BROWN . I was getting my dinner in Silver-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I came out, and saw the prisoner pursued by other people, but no one before him - I pursued, and saw him go over a bank, and on to another bank of a ditch, where he was secured; I saw him take one of these castors from his pocket, and throw it down.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-149

1147. STEPHEN COMTE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 2 fixtures, (i.e.) 2 locks, value 2s., the goods of James Percival , and fixed to a building .

HENRY PERCIVAL . I am the son of James Percival: he lost two locks on the 31st of May, affixed to a house of his - they were safe the night before; one was on the front door, and one below in the kitchen: we received information that the door was found open the next morning, at nine o'clock - I believe these to be my father's locks; there were such missing from his doors - there is no mark upon them.

JOHN GASKIN . I am a Thames police-surveyor. At five o'clock in the morning, on the 31st of May, I saw the prisoner coming from the house, putting something under his coat - there was another person with him taller

than himself; I caught the prisoner, and the other ran away; I said, "What have you got here?" he said, two locks which he had bought at an iron stall in Whitechapel, and he was going to take them to Homerton - I searched him, and found two keys, some picklock-keys, and a knife ground down to imitate a screw-driver: I put him into custody, and went after the other, but could not get him.

SOPHIA WELLS . I was walking out about five o'clock in the morning, and saw two young men before me - I went on to Dog-row; on turning back, I saw the door of the prosecutor's house open - the officer came and asked if I had seen a door open; I said, Yes, and took him to the house.

JAMES FOGG. I took the locks from Gaskin, and fitted them to the doors - they fitted them exactly; one of the four skeleton-keys opened this lock - the two screws which were found upon him came from this lock.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 29th of May I bought these two locks at an iron stall in Whitechapel for my brother's door, at Homerton; I got up at five o'clock in the morning to go down to him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-150

1148. JOHN CHEEK (THE ELDER) was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 10 umbrellas, value 10l. , the goods of John Cheek the younger.

JOHN CHEEK , JUN. The prisoner is my father: I deal in umbrellas , and live in King's-road. On the 25th of May, I lost some umbrellas from my shop in Burlington-arcade , but did not see them taken.

CHARLES WOODCOCK . On the 25th of May, the prisoner came to the shop in Burlington-arcade, and said he wanted some umbrellas to shew to Lord Morton - he took some fine "Foot's, "wrapped them up in an old case, and said, "Here is a good choice now."

HENRY CHEEK . I met my father in Burlington-arcade, and told him there was a warrant out against him, he had better give himself up, which he did - that was last Monday: he had pawned them, and sold the duplicates for 16s.

Prisoner' Defence. I was in great distress, and made away with them: I have lived in the parish of St. Andrew twenty years, and I had not home to go to - I could say a good deal, but I do not like to expose family affairs.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-151

1149. BENJAMIN ANDERSON and EDMUND TOMS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 1 shawl, value 10s. the goods of Robert Smith .

ROBERT SMITH. I am a merchant , and live at Kensington - my business is in the City; there is a business carried on at Kensington by another person, in his name, but it is my business. On the day previous to this transaction I had occasion to discharge the person who carried on the business, and was compelled to attend to it myself. On the 20th of May these two boys came into the shop about twelve o'clock, and I sold them a handkerchief for 6d., and they went away - in the course of the afternoon the officer came and asked if I had lost a shawl; I said, "I believe not;" but he produced this; I looked at it, and said, "I had two persons in my employ, and it bears the marks of each of those persons but I had not missed it.

ROBERT WALLIS . I am a shoemaker. The two prisoners came and looked in at my window for some time, and I suspected they were about robbing the place; I went to the door, and one asked me if I wanted to buy a handkerchief; I said, "What do you want for it?" he said 1s. - I said it was too much. and then one of them said I should have it for 9d. - I said I did not want it; the wind blew Anderson's coat aside, and I saw a shawl under it - I asked what he wanted for that - he said 7s.; I said I had not the money with me, and asked him to come in; Arderson then asked me if I kept a fence - I said I did not know what he meant; he said, "To receive stolen goods;" I asked what they had got, and they said jewellery, and they could let me have some in an hour; I detained them, and sent for an officer who secured them; this is the shawl.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am an officer. I went to the place on the 20th and saw the two prisoners; the shawl and handkerchief were lying on the counter - I took them to Mr. Smith, and asked if they were the boys who bought the handkerchief; he said Yes, and owned the shawl - I searched them, and found 4 1/2d. and a bit of paper - they both said they picked up the shawl in the shop.

ANDERSON'S Defence. We went to buy a 6d. handkerchief, and picked up the shawl just within the door - we were going towards Kensington; the witness came out and said, "Have you got a handkerchief to sell?" we said Yes; he said, "What is that handkerchief?" I said 1s. - he said, "That is too much, we can get them for 6d. in the shops;" he said, "Will you sell that shawl?" I said No; he said, "You had better sell it;" I said, "What will you give?" he said 7s.; he kept us till he saw a gentleman coming across and sent for an officer.

ANDERSON - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

TOMS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-152

1150. MARY ANN PROSSER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 2 sovereigns, and 3 half-sovereigns , the monies of Sarah Ann Salt , widow .

SARAH ANN SALT . I am a widow. On Thursday, the 24th of May, I left my money locked in a box in a lower room - the prisoner's room is up is up stairs; I missed it on the Sunday - I have never seen it since; the officer came, and then the prisoner owned she had taken it - she said if I would forgive her it should be made up the next day; the officer said I must not do it - he took 5s. from her person, and a necklace and ear-rings, which she said she bought with my money; she had the ear-rings in her ears on the Sunday.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner; I took this new bonnet from her, also 5s., and a purse; I did not hear her say she bought them with the prosecutrix's money.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had been entrapped by an old woman and taken to the house in question, where a gentleman had been introduced to her, and her person violated; she was detained there against her will, and when she was determined to leave, she was given in charge.

WILLIAM LEE . She did not say so at the time; she stated the box was open; it is a miserable place - no gentleman would go to such a place.

SARAH ANN SALT re-examined. Q. What are you? A. I go out washing and cleaning, and when at home I bind shoes - the prisoner took a furnished room, and said she was a dress-maker, and that she was married; she brought a person to give her a character.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-153

1151. FRANCIS METCALFE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 2 gowns, value 1l.; 1 cap, value 2s., and 1 napkin, value 1s., the goods of Emma Lane ; and 1 shawl, value 10s. , the goods of Sarah Metcalfe .

SARAH METCALFE . The prisoner is my brother. On the 26th of May, Emma Lane was going out for the day, and left a parcel for me; I laid it on a chair - my brother being out of place, and having no means of procuring a lodging, my sister gave him leave to stay with us; at five o'clock the next morning I heard him walking about, and at six he went out - I got up, and saw that he had a bundle; I asked what it was; he said a jacket, which he had borrowed; I then got up, found that he had left the jacket, and I immediately missed the bundle and a shawl, which I had worn the day before - I thought it was probable he would go to the workhouse, to see a girl whom he visited; I went there with the officer; he came - the officer stopped him, and found on him a duplicate for Emma Lane's dress, and one for the shawl.

EMMA LANE . I left two dresses and a cap, tied up in a napkin, to be washed.

HERBERT JOHN CLARK . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a shawl, pawned on the 27th of May; I cannot say by whom - I gave this duplicate for it.

JOHN WILLIAM ADLINGTON . I have two gowns pawned with me; I believe by the prisoner - I gave this duplicate for them.

THOMAS MASON . I took the prisoner. I found the duplicates of these articles on him, and this napkin, which was owned by Lane.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-154

1152. DAVID MANDISON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 21 lbs. weight of bacon, value 12s. , the goods of John Edwards .

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a cheesemonger . On the 29th of April, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, two witnesses brought the prisoner back with this bacon, which I had seen safe within five minutes in my shop.

JOHN HENRY PRICE . I saw the prisoner take the bacon from Mr. Edwards'.

JOHN NICHOLLS . I saw the prisoner take the bacon - I went and took him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-155

1153. ARTHUR MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 1 book, value 4s. , the goods of John Branch .

JOHN BRANCH . I am a bookseller , and live in Old-street . On the 20th of May, when I came home, I was informed that this book, which is mine, had been offered for sale to Mr. Daniel - it had been taken from my window while I was out.

EDWARD DANIEL . The prisoner offered this book to me for sale, on the 20th of May; I refused to purchase it, but detained him.

THOMAS WALKER . I took the prisoner into custody, and bring the book.

JOHN BRANCH . This is my book.

Prisoner's Defence. My mother died three months ago, and left me this and some more books; I being out of work, went to sell it, and was sent to the watch-house; the officer asked if he could swear to it; he said there was no mark on it, but he bought it with some more books.

JOHN BRANCH . I only bought the book that morning, and gave 4s. for it; I saw that the litle page of it had been mended - the prisoner asked me, in Mr. Daniel's shop, to pardon him, and said he knew he should he transported.

Prisoner. No, I did not; you said you had had two people transported before.

EDWARD DANIEL . I heard him ask Branch to pardon him; it was against the prosecutor's wish that he was taken, but having had losses myself, I felt it my duty to detain him; when he first brought the book, he said as he does now, but I felt suspicious.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-156

OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JUNE 15.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1154. JOHN WATKINS was indicted for that heretofore, to wit, at the Delivery of the Gaol of our Lord the King, in and for the County of Buckingham, holden at Aylesbury, in and for the County aforesaid, on Saturday the 9th of March, in the Third Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, he, by the name and description of John Watkins, late of the parish of Chepping Wycomb, in the County of Buckingham, labourer, was in due form of law convicted, upon his own confession, on a certain indictment against him, for that he, on the 14th of January, in the second year aforesaid, with force and arms, at the parish of Chepping Wycomb aforesaid, in the County aforesaid, one piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of a piece of good lawful and current money and silver coin of this realm, called a shilling, as and for a good one, unlawfully, &c. did utter to one Elizabeth, the wife of Matthew Ball , he the said John Watkins, at the time he so uttered the same, well knowing it to be false and counterfeited; and that he afterwards, on the said 14th of January, at Chepping Wycomb aforesaid, one other piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness, &c. of a shilling, as and for a good one, unlawfully, &c. did utter to Ann, the wife of Aaron Worster, he the said John Watkins well knowing, &c.: against the Statute, &c.; and that he afterwards, on the said 14th day of January, at Chepping Wycomb aforesaid, one piece of counterfeited money, made to the likeness, &c. of a shilling, as and for a good one, unlawfully, &c. did utter, &c. to Ann, the wife of Aaron Worster , he the said John Watkins well knowing, &c., against the Statute; and thereupon it was considered that he should be imprisoned in the common gaol of the said County for one year, and that he

should find sureties for his good behaviour for two years more, to be commited from the end of the said year, as by the record thereof doth more fully appear; and that he having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards, on the 29th of May , in the Tenth Year of the Reign aforesaid, at Hillingdon, in the County of Middlesex, one piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a piece of good lawful and current money and silver coin of this realm, called a half-crown, as and for a good one, unlawfully, deceitfully, and feloniously did utter to one George Drinkwater , he the said John Watkins , when he so uttered the same, well knowing it to be false and counterfeited; against the Statute, &c .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH .

Reference Number: t18290611-157

1153. MICHAEL KEARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Walker Skirrow , Esq. from his person .

WALKER SKIRRON , ESQ. I am a barrister . On Tuesday, the 5th of May, I was passing through Great Ormond-street ; I heard a person call out, "Sir, your pocket is picked;" I felt, and missed my handkerchief - two boys immediately ran by; they were pursued; in a few minutes afterwards they were stopped - I took a handkerchief off the pavement, which I believe is mine, and gave it to the constable - I cannot swear whether the prisoner was one of the boys; I had two friends with me.

CHARLES SIZMUR . I am a gentleman's servant. My attention was attracted by two boys, the prisoner and another, behind three gentlemen, in Great Ormond-street; the prisoner attempted to pick one of the gentlemen's pockets two or three times; I watched them up to the top of Great Ormond-street, and then I saw the gentlemen run - I got off the carriage, ran after them, and caught the prisoner; I had seen his hands about the gentleman's pocket - I am certain he is the boy.

HENRY BATH . I saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief - the other boy escaped.

HENRY CARD . I saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I was going along Queen-square, in company with another boy; we turned round the corner, and went down Great Ormond-street; my companion then began to run; I not having done any thing wrong, and not thinking any harm, ran also; presently a cry of "Stop thief!" was heard - I was stopped about half way down Ormond-street; they never attempted to stop the other boy - the prosecutor came up, and taking me by the collar, said to me, "Where is my handkerchief?" I told him I did not know; he then asked me where the other boy was; I told him I did not know; he then let go my collar - I could not tell him where to find the other boy, and he collared me again

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-158

1156. THOMAS DEVINE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , at St. Marylebone, 1 pair of gloves, value 2s.: 16 sovereigns, and 8 half sovereigns, the property of Charles Green and John Green , his masters, in their dwelling-house .

CHARLES GREEN . I am in partnership with John Green; we have no other partners - we live in Baker-street, Portman-square, St. Marylebone ; it is our joint dwelling-house - the prisoner had been rather more than twelve months in our employ, as porter, or errand-boy - we are silk-mercers and linendrapers . On Saturday, the 23d of May, we sent for a constable, and had his box searched -I knew it to be his box; I saw a pair of gloves found there, and two collars, but nothing else that I could recognise as ours - there were two sovereigns and three shillings; we did not pay him any wages - we found him in clothes: I keep my cash-box in a desk in my shop, and at night I take it up into my bed-room - I invariably keep it locked; I have missed various sums out of it from time to time - upwards of 20l. altogether; I had two keys to my cash-box, and lost one about a month ago; I missed it out of my pocket - he used to come up to my room every morning to fetch the boots to clean; I was sometimes out of my bed-room - any body who had the key could open the box.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I was sent for, searched the prisoner's box, and found a pair of gloves, two collars, and 2l. 3s.; I took him to the watch-house -I neither threatened nor promised any thing - I went to the watch-house on Sunday to take him some dinner, and asked how he came to rob his master of his cash; he said he had got acquainted with a girl, and got into bad company - I asked what had been the amount of the most money he had taken: he said the first time was 2l., the second time 3l., and the third time 6l.; I asked him if he recollected what he had taken at any time - he said he could not, but he thought he had taken from time to time from 20l. to 24l.; I asked him if this was not the key, he had opened the box with - he said it was part of it - I had found this part of the key on him; he said it was part of the key, and he had thrown the other part of it away; I tried it to the lock, and it corresponded exactly with the wards.

Prisoner. I never told him I had taken 6l. at one time. Witness. He did - I made a minute of it at the time.

MR. GREEN. This key fitted my cash-box - I believe it to be part of my key.

Prisoner's Defence. My master locked me up in the warehouse two days and a half, to make me confess, and promised to forgive me if I told the truth.

MR. GREEN. It is not correct. I detained him on Friday evening while I sent for his father; that was before I sent for the officer - I did not threaten or promise him at all; I sent to his father to know if he had given him some things, which were in his box - these gloves are ours, and have our private mark on them; the shirt collars have my initials on them.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character,

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth; and by the Prosecutor, he having restored all the property purchased with the money.

Reference Number: t18290611-159

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

1157. CATHERINE FERRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 bag, value 1d., and 50 dollars, value 11l. 4s., the property of John Macartney , in the

dwelling-house of Stephen Bath ; and ELEANOR BATH was indicted for feloniously receiving 16 of the said dollars knowing, them to be stolen .

JOHN MACARTNEY . I was serjeant-major of the 27th East India regiment. I came home on Friday week, and last Saturday week, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming from the India House and going home with Edward Britten - I met the prisoner Ferris and another in the street - I did not know either of them before; I went with them down to Bath's house and saw her there; I remained in the room I first went into - the two girls, Britten, and I were in one room - Bath came up and brought half a pint of gin which the girls had ordered after we went into the room; Britten gave the money for it - I do not know who he gave it to; I knew Britten at Calcutta - he had come over in the same ship that I did; he went away with the other girl; Ferris stopped with me; I had fifty-six silver Spanish dollars in a bag in my breeches pocket, and I had some other money in my waistcoatpocket - I put the bag on the pillow - I was on the bed with the girl; I put my purse on the pillow before I got on the bed - she saw me put it there, and told me it would be more safe in my hat; I then put it into my hat, which I put on a chair near the head of the bed; I drew the chair quite close to the bed on my right side; I was on the bed for six or eight minutes, and somebody from below stairs called her by some name - she was on the bed - she jumped up and went down stairs - I got up as quick as possible after her, looked for my money, and it was gone; I had not seen her take it - she went out of the room very hastily; I got off the bed instantly - my hat was not taken; I was perfectly sober, and neither saw nor heard any one come into the room; when she was called, she said, "I am called, and must go down and see what is wanted;" I do not know whether she said she would return - I went down stairs instantly and saw Bath, and asked where she was; she said she was gone away, and that Britten's girl was gone with her; I asked where Britten was - she said he was up stairs, and I told her of my loss - I told Britten when he came down stairs, and told him to go for a watchman; he brought a man in - I told him what had happened; I sent Britten to the office - I staid there till he came back; while he was gone, Bath told me I should not get the money; an officer came and made a search, but did not find any money at the first search -Bath had gone out - she came in in about half an hour; a young man and another old woman had been left in the house with me; when Bath came back, she came in at the back door, and went up stairs; she came down in about a minute, and told me and the officer to go and search about the bed for the money - we went up stairs; I had taken my hat with me when I went down stairs, and had it on; I am quite sure my money was not in my hat then; I and the officer went up and searched the bed, and Bath pulled sixteen dollars out from the bed in my bag; I cannot tell what part of the bed she took it from, but am sure I did not put it there; no more was found; when I put them into my bag there were about fifty-eight dollars in it; I had counted them that morning, and am quite sure there were fifty-six; I did not see either of the girls for two days after; I know Ferris, and am certain she is the woman.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you drink any of the gin? A. No; I know I lost fifty-six dollars; I had fifty-eight or fifty-nine in the morning, it was all stolen; I was sober - I do not recollect whether the window curtains were drawn; the bed was not opposite the window, the side was to the wall; she got up once before the voice called, and somebody came to the door - the door was fastened with a chair; the room was quite light - I had given Ferris 2s. from my waistcoat pocket; she got off the bed at the side, getting over me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you been drinking with the women before you went to the house? A. Yes; directly I went down Bath told me the girls were both gone - she said she had not got the money; I waited in the kitchen while she was absent, with two persons -I had seen nobody else in the house; the officer had searched the bed and could not find the money - Bath produced it from between the bed and the sacking.

COURT. Q. Some things were found down stairs? A. Yes; two bonnets and two shawls, which I think were the bonnets they wore when I met them - Bath was out when the officer came and searched the bed; she came in, went up stairs, then came down, and said "Let us go up and search the bed:" we went up - the officer had searched the place in which she found the money; if it had been there then he must have found it - it was my bag, and only sixteen dollars in it.

DAVID HEALEY . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I was sent for a little before five o'clock, and went with Britten to the house of Bath; I had never been in the house before - I knew she lived there; she was not within - the prosecutor, a young man and woman, were there; the prosecutor told me he had been robbed of fifty-six dollar - I searched the lower part of the house, and in the cupboard I found these bonnets and two shawls - I went up stairs before Bath came in; the prosecutor showed me the bed he had been lying on - I searched it, and every part of the room; I took off the clothes and stripped the bed - if this bag of money had been there I must have found it; I went down stairs to wait till Bath returned - she came in hastily at the back door, and went up stairs very fast, without coming into the room where I was; it is a corner house - I was going to follow her, but she came down immediately, and I met her; I told her a robbery had taken place in her place - she said, "If you go up stairs I think you will find some of the property now;" I had not told her. I had been searching - I went up stairs with her and the prosecutor; she took off the bed, took up this bag, and said"Here it is;" it was about the centre of the bed, between the bed and the mattress - I had searched there before, and it could not have been there without my finding it; I said it was a very strange thing that it should be there then - she said Kit had given it her at the bottom of the street; I said, "What Kit?" she said Kit Ferris - we went down stairs again; I showed her the bonnets, and said, "Who do these belong to?" she said, to the two girls who came in with them; she told me she put the money into the bed herself, when she ran up stairs - I knew Ferris before, and knew who she meant by Kit; Miller afterwards apprehended her on the 8th - there are sixteen dollars in the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Bath at first deny all knowledge of the transaction? A. No; she said Ferris

gave it to her - she is a married woman, and keeps the house; I do not think there was a key to the door.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. When you arrived all three women were absent? A. Yes; Bath said Ferris gave her the money at the bottom of the street - she described the other woman.

JOHN MACARTNEY . This is my bag; I brought it from Calcutta; the dollars are all marked - I saw a man mark them at Calcutta.

SAMUEL PRENDERGRASS . I am an officer. I went with Healey and took Bath; she told me about two girls, Kit Creole and Bett - Ferris is called Creole by having formerly lived with one; she then stated that a person came for the bonnets and shawls - that she went down with that person, and saw Ferris at a house at the bottom of Glasshouse-street, and Ferris gave her the bag with sixteen dollars in it - that she heard the officers were in the house, she went up and put them in the bed.

DAVID HEALEY . I searched while she was out, and found the bonnets and shawls; she did not know I had found them till she returned - nobody came for them while I was there.

FERRIS' Defence. I saw him with many more dollars, but they were never in my hands; I got out at the foot of the bed, and never meddled with his hat - I certainly stopped away to save myself from prostitution; I never gave Bath any money - there is no fastening to the door.

BATH put in a written Defence, admitting that she had placed the bag in the bed, but not with intent to withhold it from the owner, thinking it the most adviseable way to return it - that Ferris had given it to her, and assured her all the money was in it.

FERRIS - GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

BATH - GUILTY Aged 61.

Confined Two Years .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

Reference Number: t18290611-160

1159. GEORGE BROOKERY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 43 yards of wollen cloth, value 30l., and 1 coat, value 30s., the goods of Samuel Bulmer , in the dwelling-house of Richard Lambert .

CHARLES ARTHUR . I am an upholsterer, and lodge in Nassau-street , in the front room first floor - Mr. Bulmer occupied the front room ground floor at the time in question. On the 11th of May, a little after three o'clock, I was going to the house, and saw the prisoner come out -I had never seen him before; I am positive it was him, because I looked at him very stedfastly - he had some cloth; he appeared to be in the act of adjusting it on his shoulder - it was in the folds, but was not tied up; I went into the house, and made inquiry; I went after him - I turned the corner of Nassau-street into Union-street, and saw him running along Union-street, with the cloth in his possession; he saw me coming after him, and increased his speed, and turned the corner into Well-street, where I lost sight of him - I soon turned the corner after him, and saw the cloth lying against a shoemaker's door in Well-street; he was then running down Well-street - he turned into Mortimer-street, and I lost sight of him at the moment, but soon regained the view of him, and saw him turn into Titchfield-street; I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Where is Bulmer now? A. He left a fortnight or three weeks after; he was a mercer, and I believe has failed - he had been there two or three months; I cannot say he did not employ the prisoner to carry the cloth.

JAMES DUNT . I live in Rebecca-court, Well-street, and keep a shoemaker's shop, at No. 49, Well-street. On the 11th of May, as I was at work, I heard the cry of Stop thief! in Unicorn-street, and saw the prisoner coming along with two rolls of cloth on his shoulder; when he got opposite the shop-door I saw him full in the face - he threw the cloth right in my face and ran down Well-street with his hat in his hand - I took it up, and kept it till he was brought back, which was in about five minutes, by Morrish and the last witness; this is the cloth - I carried it after the prisoner, and laid it on the table of the Sir Isaac Newton public-house, and left it in the care of Wall, the officer.

CHARLES MORRISH . I am a printer, and live in Westmorland-buildings, Aldersgate-street. On the 11th of May I was in Mortimer-street - on crossing Well-street I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running down Well-street; he turned round into Mortimer-street, and into Titchfield-street - a young man laid hold of him, who was in front of him; I came up immediately, and took hold of him on the other side - he asked me to let him go, as he had done nothing; Arthur came up, and asked me to bring him back; and on bringing him back he asked me to beg of the gentleman to let him go as he knew he had done very wrong, he had been brought into it by others - that there were two men with him at the time, and they saw the cloth through the parlour window, and told him if he would go and get it they would give him some money - I took him to the Sir Isaac Newton public-house, and fetched Wall.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know Bulmer? A. No: I saw him at the office on the 13th - I have not seen him since; I find he uses the Swan public-house, in St. Andrew's-street, which is the house the prisoner said he came from, with the two men - he said one man was Brown, a blacksmith, and the other was a stranger to him.

RICHARD LAMBERT . I live in Nassan-street; I keep the house; Mr. Bulmer had lived with me about two months; he called himself a woollen-draper, and said that was his place of business - I have seen cloth in his room, which was the front parlour; I have seen different coloured cloths there - I believe he used to take some out, but I never saw him; I never saw the prisoner before -I never knew that Bulmer frequented the Swan: he left my house a fortnight ago last Friday - he told me he was a married man; I never saw his wife - he left every thing behind him, I believe, except what he had on his back, which was very trifling - I have not seen him since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he owe you any rent? A. I believe one week was due the week before the cloth was taken: I seldom saw him in the day time - the property left behind is not worth 5s,

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer of Mary-lebone. On the 11th of May I went to the Sir Isaac Newton public-house, at the corner of Union-street; the prisoner was given in charge - this cloth was on the table; I took it into my possession; the constable said that was the cloth - they were gone to look for the prosecutor; this is the cloth - one piece is blue, and the other olive.

RICHARD LAMBERT re-examined. None of my lodgers deal in cloth except Bulmer, to my knowledge: I am a plasterer; I had no cloth in the house - I have seen black, olive, and blue cloth in Bulmer's room; the olive was about this colour.

Cross-examined. Q. Would you have suffered the cloth to go out unless the rent was paid? A. I should not think of stopping it for such a trifle.

Prisoner's Defence. I have known Bulmer for a long time. On the day in question he asked me to get some things from his lodgings, as he was afraid it would be seized for rent; I went with him - he gave me this cloth, and took some himself; he said, "Wait a few minutes till I get to the top of the street, and then follow me:" I heard a cry of Stop thief! and threw it down.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18290611-161

1160. WILLIAM HUMPHRIES , JANE HUMPHRIES , and HENRY PHILLIPS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Willetts , on the 9th of May , at St. Marylehone , and stealing therein 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, value 12s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 12s.; 1 gown, value 9s.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.: 2 shifts, value 3s.; 1 sheet, value 2s; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; and 1 shawl, value 5s. , his property.

SARAH WILLETTS . I am the wife of Joseph Willetts; we live in the parish of St. Marylebone: - Mary Broadfield lives in the house - we are both lodgers; Joseph Bently is the landlord - he does not live in the house; we have only one room each - our room is up stairs; the landlord lives at Paddington - there are only two rooms in the house; Thomas Porter, my cousin, lives in Little Jamesstreet - I went to his house on the 8th of May, about eight o'clock - I went home. and went out again between ten and eleven, and left all safe - I locked my room door; I had left my husband at my cousin's, and found him there; I know all the prisoners very well by sight - they live in the next street - Jane is the wife of William Humphries : I knew them all as neighbours, and used to speak to them when I saw them; I saw them that night drinking some beer at my cousin's with my husband: I took a drop of beer with them - my husband and my cousin paid for it; I went and fetched some more beer - I think we had three pots while I was there; I only went with the woman who fetched it - it was all brought together - I staid till it was all drank; my two cousins and my husband paid for it; the prisoners did not pay any thing - they drank; we came out together, the prisoners. my husband, and I; Humphries asked my husband to give him a share of a pot of beer - my husband went to the sun public-house, and gave him a pot - I went with them; the Sun is in Lisson-street - all the three prisoners went and tasted the beer - they did not stay long, for the house was being shut up; they went away, leaving me and my husband talking to a person; I and my husband went back to my cousin's again, and staid about half an hour - we had no more drink - we left to come home about half-past eleven or a quarter to twelve o'clock; I had left a candle on the table, as I usually do when I do not mean to stop long; I found the candle was burning - it was taken off the table where I had left it, and put by the side of my box; it stood on the floor - one box had been taken off another - neither of them had been locked; I had locked the room door when I went away - I cannot say whether I unlocked it or no when I went in, for I looked through the key hole, and finding the candle moved, I was confused, but am certain I locked it when I went out, and had the key in my pocket; I left the window shut - I found it wide open, put up; I had merely pulled it down- there was no fastening to it; I am sure I put it down when I went out - it was open sufficient for a man to get in and out - any man could reach the window with his hand from the ground outside, but could not put it up unless he stood on the window-shutter below; I saw nothing touched in the room except missing out of the boxes my husband's coat, a waistcoat, a pair of breeches, a gown, a petticoat, two shifts, two handkerchiefs, and a shawl; I had been to a club that evening, and took a shawl out of the box, and every thing was safe then - the things are worth above 2l.; I had been to my cousin's twice before on that evening, and saw the prisoners there each time I went - Jane Humphries went home with me that evening to get some halfpence out of the box to pay for a pot of beer - she went into the room with me - we did not stay there long, only while I got the money; I did not go home after that - I have seen none of the property.

MARY BROADFIELD. I live in part of the same house as the prosecutor, on the ground-floor. I know William and Jane Humphries by sight - I have know them two years; I know Phillips by sight - Humphries and his wife lived in the next street; I remember Willetts going out on the 8th of May - Jane Humphries came in with her about ten o'clock, and they went away together; I never saw nor heard any thing of them till half-past eleven, when I was in bed, and heard a very great noise of two persons, as I thought, going up stairs - I heard a very great noise up at their door; I called out three times,"Who is there?" but they did not answer me, and then I heard them come down stairs; I opened my door, looked out, and saw Jane Humphries going out of the passage into the street, and turn towards Willetts' window - the stairs lead to no place except Willetts' room; I am sure it was Jane Humphries - she had no bonnet on; I knew her perfectly well - I had seen her before with Willetts; I was in my own room, and Willetts came in to get a light of me; when I called out to know who was there, they mumbled something, and I heard somebody say they are not at home; I did not know whose voice it was - I did not see Mrs. Humphries after I saw her go out; soon after that. Willetts and her husband came home - I heard them going up a airs; I went no further than the step of the door, and saw nobody but Jane Humphries, but am certain there were two persons, if not more.

Prisoner JANE HUMPHRIES. Q. Did you see me with Willetts? A. Yes, at ten o'clock, and I saw her going out of the passage, when I was alarmed.

THOMAS DEE . I am a labouring man, and live at No. 4, Pomona-steps, about forty yards from Willett's. On the 8th of May, at a quarter past eleven o'clock. I went home; I brought out my blankets to shake in the street,

and I saw William Humphries and another man who I did not know; I have know Humphries these eight years- they passed me about twelve yards off; I am quite certain of him - I knew him well; I heard no conversation between them - they went up James-street, coming in a direction from Willetts' house. and while I was still shaking my blankets, the female prisoner came up: she had no bonnet on, but had a bundle in her apron - I spoke to her- she was passing the door; I said, "Jane, what makes you out so late;" she made no answer, but said, hem - she made a dead stop, but gave me no answer; I have known her a good while, and am certain it was her; I had my dog by my side - he growled, and I had a hard matter to keep him from biting her; she went on - I went in and went to bed; I am sure of both the Humphries - I have said I did not know them, because a good many threatened me before I went to the Magistrate, and said they would pay me out for it, and give me something for myself; a parcel of chaps said so about that neighbourhood - I am quite sure of them both.

Prisoner WILLIAM HUMPHRIES . Q. Has any body who knew me threatened you? A. I do not know whether they know you - I did not say at the office that I did not see you - I said I saw you on the top of the steps, which is in the next street; I know nothing about your drinking at a public-house - I told the Magistrate at first that I did not know either of them - that was because I was threatened at the office that they would pay me out when I came out.

CHARLES WILSDEN . I live at No. 25, Little James-street, about one hundred and twenty yards from Willetts'; I keep a horse and cart. On the 8th of May, about ten minutes before eleven o'clock, I was smoking my pipe over my half-hatch door - I have known Humphries from a child and his wife, and I knew Phillips - I saw Mr. and Mrs. Willetts and the three prisoners all go up the street towards the Sun public-house; I did not see them go in, and in the course of four or five minutes I saw Humphries and Phillips come running back again as hard as they could towards Willetts' house, which is in Lisson-place - they turned down Lisson-place; I continued at the door, and saw them come back a few minutes after, walking; Phillips walked first - they were about three feet from me; I heard Humphries say to Phillips "D - n your bl - y eyes, it won't do: old mother Broadfield is up;" Phillips answered, "Come on, you b - r, what are you afraid of;" they were then coming in a direction from the house - they went towards the public-house, and I saw no more of them; I am sure they are the persons, but I did not see the woman.

Prisoner WILLIAM HUMPHRIES. He swore at the office he was inside his house with his door shut? Witness. So I was, leaning over the half-hatch, which was shut.

MARY FAULKENER. I live at No. 17, Lisson-place, about twenty yards from Willetts' house. On the night of the 8th of May, I came out at half-past eleven o'clock to throw some water away at the garden gate; the watchman was calling half-past eleven - my husband was out at the time; I heard Willetts and her husband come home, and they went out again - I came out of the garden-gate again to throw more water away, and saw the two men some down the steps out of James-street, down into Lisson-place - I cannot swear it was the prisoners; I know them by sight, but cannot say whether it was them - they stopped at Willetts' window for five minutes; I staid with the pail in my hand, and saw one lift the other one up to the window - I then went into my own garden, and saw no more, because my child was crying; the man lifted the other up by his two legs - I did not remain there; I have not said I staid there till he was let down again; he might he up at the window for five minutes, and then I went back - he did not go in at the window while I was there.

JOHN UNDERWOOD. I am a watchman; my beat is in Lisson-street and Great James-street - I pass Lisson-place, but do not go into it. On the 8th of May, at ten minutes before eleven o'clock, I saw the three prisoners together, at the corner of Lisson-street - the Humphries were having very high words about a pint of beer; I interfered, and spoke to them - they abused me; Phillips and Humphries went down into James-street - the female went into the corner shop, pulled her bonnet off, and left it there (it was on a Friday) - she then followed the two men down Little James-street, and as I was crying the hour of eleven down my beat, I saw the prisoners drinking at No. 11. James-street, and the female was standing at the door - I went round my beat at half-past eleven o'clock, and saw the two Humphries come running up James-street; I have known them these twelve months - they were going from Lissonplace; I was about eighty yards from them, and could not tell whether they had any thing with them - the man had his hat holding it over his arm.

Prisoner WILLIAM HUMPHRIES . Q. Were we not going towards the street we lived in? A. Yes; your wife had threatened to put you in the watch-house for ill using her, when you were quarrelling; she followed you down the street.

Q. Did she not leave her bonnet in the shop, because I threatened to tear it? A. I do not know; those words were mentioned; but when I came down after that you was at a house drinking, and she stood there very quiet.

Prisoner PHILLIPS. Q. Did I not bid them good night at ten minutes to eleven o'clock? A. No.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer of Maryle-bone. On the morning of the 9th of May, the female prisoner was brought into the yard, charged with robbing the prosecutor - the prosecutor named the two male prisoners to me, and in a short time they came to the gate; as soon as I laid my hands on Humphries, they said there was no occasion to do that, for as she was taken they had come to deliver themselves up - I then went for the prosecutor and his wife, and they identified them; I locked them up, and on Humphries I found a pen-knife - I went to his lodging in Charles-street, Lisson-grove, and in a box found some duplicates - Humphries admitted that they were his lodgings; I found this box, containing the certificate of their marriage, and several other duplicates not relating to this property.

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES ' Defence. Willetts asked me to go and drink - I went and stopped there from eight till half-past ten o'clock: a gipsy-man came in - Willetts did not approve of him, and asked us all to come out; we came out - he put his ear to the shutter to listen if they were talking about him; his wife asked mine to go with her to fetch some money to pay for beer - when they

came back we all went up to the Sun; she asked my wife to have some gin, which she refused, and gave it to a girl - my wife and I had some words; Mrs. Willetts and her husband went down the street - I saw no more of them, and was not near their place.

PHILLIPS' Defence. Humphries and his wife had a few words at the Sun - the watchman sent them away; I walked down James-street for a necessary purpose, came home and went to bed at three minutes past eleven o'clock - on Monday I heard I was charged with the robbery, and gave myself up.

W. HUMPHRIES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

JANE HUMPHRIES - NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18290611-162

1161. ANN (THE WIFE OF WILLIAM) CHAPMAN was indicted for that she, on the 3d of June , at Acton, unlawfully, Maliciously, and feloniously did attempt to strangle one Elizabeth Chapman , a child of tender age, to wit; about the age of three weeks, by tieing, fixing and fastening a certain string about the neck of the said Elizabeth Chapman, with intent to murder her; against the Statute, &c.

2d COUNT. that she, on the same day, at the same parish, unlawfully, maliciously and feloniously did attempt to strangle the said Elizabeth Chapman, with intent to murder her; against the Statute, &c.

3d COUNT, that she, on the same day, at the same parish, unlawfully, maliciously and feloniously did attempt to suffocate the said Elizabeth Chapman , by then and there putting, placing and leaving the said Elizabeth Chapman, being such child of tender age, as aforesaid, in a certain ditch there, and covering her over in the said ditch with grass and other things, with intent to murder her; against the Statute, &c.

4th COUNT, that she, on the same day, at the same parish, unlawfully, maliciously and feloniously did attempt to suffocate the said Elizabeth Chapman , with intent to murder her; against the Statute, &c.

THOMAS NELHAMS. I am a farmer's man, and live at Acton. On the evening of the 3d of June, about a quarter before seven o'clock, I was in Turnham-green-fields with another young man, going to cut some tares; I heard a queer sort of a noise, which I thought was a lamb crying - I went a little further and looked in the ditch, and could just see a little flannel under some cooch grass; I thought it was a child, and found it was one - it was lying on its back, with a little white bed-gown on and a flannel pilch; it was very black in the face, which proceeded from its being strangled, not from dirt - I did not see what was about its neck; its mouth and eyes were full of dirt from the cooch grass - I left the young man George in care of it; I could see nobody near - I went for Williamson, the constable of Acton; he came as quick as he could, took the child out of the ditch, and took it home - what became of it afterwards I cannot tell.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. It was perfectly day-light? A. Yes; I saw no person near - I was not more than ten minutes gone for the constable; the child is now alive, and appears in very good health - it is a very fine child.

JOHN WILLIAMSON . I am a constable of Acton. On the 3d of June, a little before seven o'clock, Nelhams came to me in a very agitated state - I went with him, and found the child lying on its back in a deep ditch in the field; there is a footpath through the middle of the field, but it was full three hundred yards from that, quite out of the way of passengers - it would be a trespass to go there; the ditch was very much grown over with stinging-nettles and brambles - I could not get the child out without tearing a large hole in its cap; it was as black in the face as my hat- I thought it was a black child; its face and finger ends were quite black, but those appearances turned out to be the effect of violence - its mouth and eyes were covered with dirt; it had shed tears, which had softened the mould about its eyes - I think the dirt had been put about its eyes; I do not think it was from the grass - it did not appear dirt which had got on it by being put into the ditch. but as having been put there on purpose; the child was barely alive - its eyes protruded quite out from the sockets; I ran across the fields as fast as I could to my own house -I got a woman to put it in warm water; we tore the clothes off as fast as we could - it had an old white bed-gown and a common baby's blanket, which children usually wear: it was washed immediately, and as the woman laid it across her lap she screamed out - I looked down, and saw a piece of black ribbon round its neck, which I produce; it was tied round very tight, so much so that the flesh had swollen above it - I did not observe it till the child was laid back.

Q. In your judgment, were the appearances the child exhibited in its face and finger ends the result of that being tied? A. It was; for the moment I cut it the child fetched its breath and resumed its natural colour very shortly - I have no doubt the colour was the cause of this being round its neck; I had to cut it in two or three places, it was so tight, and was twisted in the child's cap-string - it got better immediately, and in the course of two hours resumed its colour quite; it was twisted round twice, if not three times - I know I cut it a second time, if not a third, to get it off; I was very much agitated, and cannot say which - it is quite well now, and in Court; I should think it was about three weeks old - I took the prisoner in custody on this charge; I had known her by sight about a year ago - I saw her on the Saturday following, (the 6th,) in the neighbourhood of Hammersmith, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, in company with a young man; I stopped her and said, "I want you: I have been looking for you a good while; your name is Ann Chapman " - she said, "It is, and what of it?" - I said I had a warrant against her for attempting to murder her child, and leaving it in a ditch in the parish of Acton; she said I was very much mistaken, for she was not the woman, for her child was dead and buried - I asked her if she was not at the Red Lion public-house at Acton on the Wednesday - she said No; she had not been at Acton, nor near Acton, for a long time, not nearer than she was then, which was two or three miles off - I took her to Acton; the man with her was Matthew Varney - I told him he must accompany me to Acton, and he went; I took her to the George, at Acton, into a private room, and sent to Hannah Dunford - she came, and immediately identified her as having seen her at Acton on the Wednesday with two children - I then sent for Joseph Shepherd, who iden

tified her also; she denied it, and said they were all mistaken - she declared she was not the woman, and they had never seen her; they both said they had seen her at Acton; Shepherd said he had seen her in the field - she positively denied it; I then took her to the cage; she went into very strong hysterical fits - I was obliged to get two persons to sit up to take care of her - the young man was put into the cage also; when I searched him I found a key of a room door, and he told me where they lived together - I went to the lodging, and found another child in bed; she did not know I was going there, it was him that told me where they lived; I do not know whether she heard him - I do not think either of them knew I was going to their lodging - it was at Starch-green, not quite two miles from Acton; I searched the room there - I got in with the key which I found on the man; the door was locked - it was two ready furnished rooms, one room communicated with the other: I had the key of the outer door - I found in a cupboard, tied up in a bundle, two bed-gowns, two night-caps, and two new little shirts; I found a child in bed there about two years old - the child's clothes which I found at the lodging were quite clean; I took them their breakfast in the morning - the prisoner then said she was better; I did not go to her again till about half-past twelve o'clock, when I was sent for, as the male prisoner wanted to speak with me; he said something, I cannot say whether she heard it - she was in the passage; he said she wanted to speak to me - I went to her; I did not say it would be better or worse for her to confess - what she said was quite voluntarily; she said she wanted to speak to me; I said, "Speak on - what have you to say?" she said it was concerning her poor baby; I said if she was going to mention any thing against herself to recollect I should have to repeat it, and it might operate against her, and I would not hear it unless Varney was present, and I called him to my side; she then said, "Now, I will tell you the truth -I did leave my child in the ditch;" I asked her what could induce her to leave it in such a place in such a cruel manner - she said she thought somebody would find it who would take better care of it than she could, as she had another small child; I then told her that could not be the truth, or she would not have put it in such a place and tied a string round it to strangle it - she said she did not tie the string to strangle it, but either to hide a sore or cure a sore - I am not certain which; she said, "Now I have told you the truth, I hope you will let me see my poor baby;" I said, "I must consult the officers about that, "and did not let her see it till next morning, when we were coming off by the coach for London - she said she would not get on the coach till she had kissed her poor baby; I got the wetnurse which I had provided, and she kissed it very affectionately, and went off into strong hysterics; I saw her on Sunday evening in company with Varney's brother - he was questioning her about how she could do so; she said Varney had come to see her while she was in the workhouse, and said to her, "Nance, this is not my child, it is not like me, I think I shall cut it; "and she said if he had not made use of those words she should not have done it, or it never would have happened, I do not know which; Varney said to her at the same time, "You know I am innocent of it;"(he was there also) - and she said, "That you are."

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. She applied to you to let her see her baby? A. She said, "I hope you will let me see my poor baby" - she expressed great desire to see it, and previously to getting on the coach, said she would not get on it till she had seen it; she kissed it affectionately: I have learned at St. George's workhouse that she had lain in there - she said she was the wife of William Chapman , a very bad man, who had used her very ill, and they had separated; I asked if the child was baptized before she left the house - she said she was churched, and the baby baptized by the name of Elizabeth the morning before she left; every thing she stated to me I found to be correct; the young man told me in her presence that she was subject to fits; I have had no opportunity of inquiring about that.

JOHN SALTER . I am a surgeon, and live at Acton. I was called in about seven o'clock that evening - I went and found the child as the officer has described - it was perfectly black in the face, and at the ends of its fingers, which arose from the pressure of the ribbon round the neck; it had the appearance of a child nearly dying from strangulation; the ribbon had been removed before I got there - in my opinion, when the child was put into the ditch it was apparently dead, but having been there some time, and received a current of air, it had revived; strangulation had certainly commenced - its eyes had nearly started out of the sockets.

Q. Do you think if it had not been found it could have survived? A. I think it impossible the child could have survived long if it had not been relieved - sufficient air could not have been admitted into the lungs to carry on life - at what precise period death would have taken place it is impossible to say.

JOSEPH SHEPHERD . I saw the prisoner on the 3d of June last, between one and two o'clock - she came up the Green-lane, Acton; I knew her before for two or three years, and have no doubt of her - she had got two children with her then, both in her arms; she went up the Green-lane, between Acton and Ealing; I saw her go into a large wheat field - I was about a hundred yards from her; she went down to the bottom of the wheat field, sat down on the ground, and in a few minutes she got up and pulled a black whittle which she had, round her shoulders, and which the little child was covered up in - she looked all round to see if she could see any body, and she saw me looking through the hedge.

Q. How do you know she saw you? A. Because she sat herself down directly, and I saw her eyes fixed towards me - she sat down as quick as possible, took the black whittle, and tore it over the child again as quick as she could; the little child was in her arms when she looked towards me, and the other sat on the bare ground - I immediately got over the gate, and went down to her, and said, "Halloo, Nance, what do you do here?" she said she was tired, and had sat down to rest; I said, "What, have you got another young one?" and she said "No, it is not mine;" I knew she had had two children before that one - she said, "Do you think if it were mine I should disown it; I said, "I don't know, I am sure, Nance;" she said it belonged to a young woman who was gone to Mr. Goddard's for work; I staid talking to her a little while longer, and asked if she was going down the lane; she said Yes, and asked me to carry the biggest child,

and lift it over the gate for her, out into the lane - as soon as she got out into the lane she sat herself down; I asked if she was not going any further, and she said No; I immediately went down the lane - she said she was to wait there for the woman, because the woman promised to meet her there: I left her; it was then between three and four o'clock - I have seen the child since, and knew it by its having the same dress on; it appeared in very good health then - it had an old white bed-gown on and an old white night-cap; it did not cry at all.

Cross-examined. Q.How long were you in her company? A. I think about half an hour - I observed the child's features; I saw it again three or four hours after I left her - I have known her three or four years; she used to work at Mr. Young's, at East Acton, every summer - I have seen her husband; they are separated - I cannot say whether she was subject to fits.

HANNAH DUNFORD. I live at the Red Lion, at Acton - I know the prisoner. I remember seeing her on the 3d of June, at the Red Lion, a little before five o'clock in the afternoon; she had two children with her, one about two years old - she was doing nothing there; she sat with the children in the tap room; I believe she had some beer, but I do not know that - I served her with a glass of peppermint, and she offered it to both the children; I did not see them take it - I never saw her before; I am certain of her person; I did not see her go away - she left a little after five o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she treat the children with apparent affection? A. She treated them very kind in my presence - I saw her for about ten minutes.

ROBERT GAY. I live in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square, at the workhouse of St. George, Hanover-square.- the prisoner was there last Tuesday week, the 2d of June. I took her biggest child with one arm, and her bundle in the other - I was ordered to assist her to take care of her children; I carried it as far as the Swan public-house, at Bayswater, where we had a drop of porter - we walked on to Notting-hill, and she said she was not going any farther, for her brother was coming to meet her at nine or half-past nine o'clock, and I left her there at thirty-five minutes past eight; she said her brother was sure to be there at nine, or half-past, and I need not stop any longer.

Prisoner's Defence. If I left the baby there, I was not sensible of it, and did not mean to do it; I tied the ribbon round its neck because the neck was swollen, and the nurse knows it.

ELIZABETH TYLER. I am a nurse of the lying-in ward at St. George's workhouse. The child was born on the 13th of May - I had the care of it till the 2d of June, when it was discharged; I have seen it here to-day - it is the same child; it was baptized by the name of Elizabeth Chapman, and was called by that name afterwards, when it went away with the prisoner and Gay - it is a female; I held it while it was baptized.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner says there was something the matter with its neck? A. It was a very fat child, and that might arise from its not being well washed, which would chaff the neck.

Q.In a case of that sort, it is necessary to put a binding? A. A little bit of wet rag, or powder - we never put a ribbon round a child's neck; I never heard of that as a process to make the milk stay on the stomach.

COURT. Q. Would tying a piece of ribbon round its neck be of any use if the neck were bad? A. No. I never heard of that - a piece of wet rag to dab it with would, but not tied round the neck.

MATTHEW VARNEY . I generally work as a gardener or labourer. I have known the prisoner since August - I was living with her; I believe she has had eight children: she conducted herself to her children with a kind and material affection during the time I lived with her.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of the infant's life being spared, and the suffering she had since undergone.

Reference Number: t18290611-163

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1162. PHILIP DIGNUM was indicted for embezzling the sum of 13l. 9s. 6d., also for stealing goods, value 23l. 7s. 3d., 8l., and 18l. 13s. 9d. , the property of William Cook , and another, his masters.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

There were three other indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18290611-164

1163. THOMAS HARLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 2 reams of paper, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of Joseph Bonsor .

HENRY LAMB . I am the nephew of Joseph Bonsor, a stationer , in Salisbury-square . On the 15th of April I went from the top of the warehouse to the counting-house, about three o'clock in the afternoon; when I returned into the warehouse, I had information from one of our porters; I looked round, and immediately missed a bundle, containing two reams of demy paper - I immediately went out into St. Brides'-passage, and saw the prisoner in the custody of Denny, with the paper in his possession - he gave no account of it; I knew it by the Excise mark - I took him into the warehouse, where he said he had been in bad company, and got intoxicated - he seemed so, but the paper weighed 50 lbs., and he ran away with it.

PETER DENNY. I was formerly in Mr. Bonsor's employ for twenty-one years; I saw the prisoner with a slip of paper in his hand, and looking up as if to find a house; he came round opposite Mr. Bonsor's, then turned his back to the shop, and looked through the shop windows several times - he waited a considerable time, and at last went in, and brought this bundle of paper out in half a minute; I followed him down into St. Bride's passage, and the paper fell off his shoulder - I was picking it up, and the slip of paper fell out of his hand; Mr. Lamb came and laid hold of him.

HENRY STEVENS . I received him in charge with the paper.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in Thames-street, who asked if he had not seen me before; I said No - he walked by my side, took me into a public-house, and gave me some porter and three or four glasses of spirits; I told him I was out of employ - he said he worked for Mr. Bonsor; that he had been to dinner and forgot this parcel, and that there was nobody in the shop to notice me if I would fetch it; I

was intoxicated or I should not have fallen into the error.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-165

1164. THOMAS SQUIRES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Jacob Mortimer Morgan , from his person .

JACOB MORTIMER MORGAN . I live on Ludgate-bill, and am a woollen-draper . On the 12th of May I was at the corner of Wood-street, Cheapside , about nine o'clock - I was returning home - I felt a hand at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner close to me, alone; I walked on a few yards, then felt and missed my handkerchief -I returned and saw the prisoner walking out of the crowd; there is a print-shop there, and I had been stopping to look at it - I went and asked him for my handkerchief; he said he had not got it - I told him I would take him to an officer and search him; he said he would come - I took him a short way on, when Mr. Hellaby called after me, and said he had thrown the handkerchief from his person into a passage - I took him back to the passage and found it there; I knew it to be mine by the pattern and appearance.

RICHARD HELLABY . I am a silk-manufacterer, and live at No. 10, Goldsmith-street. On the 12th of May I saw the prisoner and Mr. Morgan coming from Wood-street towards Gutter-lane; I saw the prisoner stop and turn himself towards the passage No. 13, and throw the handkerchief behind him - I ran, and called them back to show them where it was; he was secured - I laid hold hold of him, and a scuffle ensued.

THOMAS KIRBY. I received him in charge; he said nothing.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-166

1165. HENRY HYLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , 58 printed bound books, value 12l. 16s. 8d., and 86 pamphlets, value 2l. 19s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Bonsor and others, his masters, in their dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of William Sherwood and others.

THOMAS BOWYER . I am in the employ of Joseph Bonsor, one of the assignees to the estate of Sherwood and Co., booksellers - there are three assignees; they have been bankrupts about fourteen months - the books belonging to the estate were at No. 21, Paternoster-row . On the 20th of May, I was sent for by Mr. Sherwood, who carries on business at No. 23, Paternoster-row - I saw him, and Mr. Ibbett; Mr. Sherwood gave me information, and I saw two bound books in Ibbett's possession at Mr. Sherwood's - they were "Neal's Views of Gentlemen's Seats;" they were in a wrapper, and had on it the writing of one of the partners of our house - I had been in the employ of the bankrupts; the prisoner was in the employ of the assignees - none of the assigeees resided on the premises; I believe these books to be part of their stock - I then went to Ibbett's, Maidenhead-court, Aldersgate-street, and saw some other books, which I have no doubt belong to the estate; the prisoner had been nearly three months in the assignees' employ, and could take the books one by one - I found thirty-seven parts of " Percy Anecdotes ," and five volumes of "Platt's Chronological Biography," bound, which I believe to be part of the stock; Ibbett is a dealer in books; I received a description of the person who brought them - I took him to our counting-house, called the prisoner, and charged him with it; he said he was sorry for it, and would have them restored-the works were worth 13l; I gave him in charge, and asked where he lodged - he said, in Blackhorse-court, London-wall: I went there with the constable, and found a large quantity of books, which I believe to belong to the estate, and are worth 3l. - I had asked if he had any there - he said he had only "Hawker's Commentary;" I did not find that there.

Cross-examined by MR. RYLAND. Q. You lived at Sherwood's before the bankruptcy? A. Yes; the stock was very extensive - I frequently went over the catalogues, and knew what the stock consisted of; these works are to be had at low prices, except a set of "Neal's Seats," which are 10l. a set - I had not missed these; I called the prisoner into the counting-house, where the constable and Ibbett were; I do not think he knew the constable was present - I said he had been taking books, and I should be obliged to give him in charge; I did not say unless he gave an account of them, I would give him in charge; he said, "I am very sorry, Sir, I will have the books restored:" I can swear to one of these books - it is the two volumes of "Mavor's Greece" - it stood in a glass case opposite my desk, by which I noticed it: I told the Alderman I could not positively swear to the books - the reason was I had not then examined them, and had not seen this individual book.

COURT. Q. Have you examined them since? A. Yes; they are such books as were in the stock, but I can only identify two volumes - the stock is very extensive, and not yet properly arranged.

ROBERT IBBETT. I am a bookseller, and live in Maidenhead-court, Aldersgate-street. On Monday, the 18th of May, the prisoner came to me with "Platt's Biography," in five volumes, for which I gave him 10s., it being an imperfect copy; I had before bought some small books of him, at about 2s. 6d. each - he stated himself to be a bookbinder; on the 20th of May, he called again with a copy of "Neal's Views," in ten volumes - he stated that he had more books at home, among which were thirty-seven parts of the " Percy Anecdotes" - he left "Neal's Views" in my possession, and went to fetch them; in the interim, having suspicion, I went to Sherwood, the publisher: the ten volumes are published at 25l.: I saw Mr. Sherwood, and related what had passed - they sent for Bowyer, who came to my house with me; I showed him what the prisoner had brought, and found the " Percy Anecdotes " had been left in my absence - he had asked 35s. for "Neal's Views;" I afterwards went to Sherwood's premises, and saw the prisoner; I was quite certain of him; the constable was there, I believe; the conversation Bowyer has stated passed, and he was given in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know whether the constable was there? A. I believe he was, but I did not notice him; I never knew "Neal's Views" sold at such a price, or near it; there are seventy-two plates, executed by the best masters - I never knew

a book published so high sold for 35s. - there are books with 1l. printed on the label, sold for 10s.

HENRY HONEY. I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner - I did not distinctly hear what passed; the books were given to me - I went to his lodging, and found more.

Cross-examined. Q. You were present in the counting-house? A. Yes: we were all together.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-167

1166. HENRY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , 2 tumblers, value 2s. 6d., and 2 glass salt-cellars, value 2s. , the goods of John Leech and another, his masters.

THOMAS GRAINGER . I am a waiter at the London coffee-house , which is kept by John Leech, who has a partner- the prisoner was employed as an extra waiter for many years. On the 16th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night. I went round the rooms, to see if all the plate was put by, and saw several of the men's bundles - I went into another room, and as I came back I missed a bundle, which appeared larger than the rest: the prisoner was gone - I went out after him; he had not gone more than four minutes: I called after him near Ave Maria-lane- he was stopped, and asked what I wanted; I told him to come back, which he did - I told him to open his bundle- he untied it, and in it I found two tumblers, rolled up in his apron; I called to Mr. Leech, and the watchman was sent for - he was taken to the watch-house; there was some broken victuals in his bundle, which was his perquisites; I knew the tumblers by the pattern, and being very large and strong - they were quite plain.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were not all the occasional waiters' bundles in one room? A. Yes; I should not think this was a joke played by some other waiter; he could certainly have taken articles of more value - he had 3s. a day: Mr. Leech had a good opinion of him.

HENRY WAKE. I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged with stealing two rummers - I sent him to the Compter; I searched him there, and found a pair of glass salts, one in each of his coat pockets - he said nothing to it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-168

1167. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 1 boot, value 6s. , the goods of James Williams .

HENRY SMITH. I am servant to James Williams , a bootmaker , at the corner of Fetter-lane, Holborn . On the 12th of May this boot hung inside of the door; I was behind the counter, and saw a person reach his hand in and take it - I went out, and took the prisoner about twelve yards off, with it; he had taken the ticket off, and thrown it away; he had an iron punch, and threatened to punch my eyes out - he was rather in liquor.

JOHN HOLLAND . I am a street-keeper. The prisoner was delivered into my custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to it.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18290611-169

1168. FREDERICK BLANCO alias WHITE was indicted for stealing on the 25th of April , 8 towels, value 12s.; 2 neckerchiefs, value 3s.; 2 sheets, value 5s. 6d; 2 napkins, value 2s.; 2 dusters, value 1s.; 3 knife cloths, value 1s, and 1 curtain, value 1s. the goods of Henry Scale English .

SARAH ENGLISH . I am the wife of Henry Scale English, of St. Paul's-church-yard - he is a solicitor ; the prisoner is a perfect stranger. On the 25th of April, these things were in my sitting-room, on the second floor - they had come from the wash about seven o'clock, and were lying on the sofa; the street door was kept open, but there is a heavy glass door which shuts itself, but was not kept locked - I was gone to the top of the house to call my servant, about half-past seven o'clock, and on coming down stairs, I saw the prisoner coming out of my sitting-room with a large bundle under his arm; I asked who he wanted, he said Mr. Norwich - there is "Norwich shawl warehouse" on the street door - I told him there was no such person, and that he had got my property: I laid hold of the bundle, and gave an alarm - he ran down stairs with the bundle, as I could not get it from him, having a child in one arm; he was stopped before he got out of the house, and I found the bundle contained these article.

PRINCE HOARE. I am assistant at the shawl warehouse; I heard Mrs. English call for assistance - I walked to the warehouse door, and saw the prisoner running down stairs; he ran by me, and threw down the linen - I pursued him down the stairs, he fell down, and I laid hold of him; Davis was sent for - I saw the things in his possession, and he threw them down.

THOMAS DAVIS. I am a constable. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner and bundle; he said he did not take them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the property in my possession; a young man who I formerly lived with, as a porter, in Watling-street, told me they wanted a porter at the warehouse at the corner of St. Paul's church-yard; seeing "Shawl warehouse" on this door, I went up, but saw nobody; I heard an altercation on the stairs - a man threw some things at me, and ran down, the prosecutrix called out something - I ran down, and the witness caught hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-170

1169. CHARLES BANKS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Stephen Wilson , and others, on the 15th of May , at St. Peter Westcheap. and stealing therein 93 yards of silk, called gros de Naples, value 12l., and 1 wooden roller, value 1d. , their property; and that at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden for Middlesex, on the 11th of September, in the ninth year of the reign of His present Majesty, he was in due form of law convicted of felony.

EDWARD WILSON . I am the son of Stephen Wilson , and in partnership with him and another person, we are silk manufacturers ; the dwelling-house is kept by the partnership, and the rent paid out of the partnership funds; the other partners contribute towards

the wages of the servants - it is entirely a partnership concern; the house is No. 124, Wood-street, in the parish St. Peter Westcheap - I know nothing of the circumstances.

HENRY COLE . I am porter to Messrs. Wilson and Co. On the 15th of May, I was in the warehouse, which is under the same roof as the dwelling-house; I had seen this silk about five minutes before it was taken - the door was kept on the latch: the goods lay on a pile on the counter, about a yard or a yard and a half from the street-door - I was gone into the back warehouse and heard the door open: I immediatly ran forward, and saw the prisoner inside the warehouse, in the act of putting something under his coat - he immediatly ran out and shut the door after him; I ran after him, and caught sight of him within ten steps - I saw he had something under his coat, and did not lose sight of him; he was stopped within twenty yards, as I cried Stop thief! - he had got out of my sight before that, but not before he dropped the goods - when he found me so near him, I saw him drop the goods, and he was stopped not more than three minutes after that; I am quite positive he is the person who dropped the goods - I had turned back with the goods; he was brought back by Gibson, and I was quite confident of him, and of the goods (only one person came into the warehouse) the silk was above ninety yards of gros de Naples, worth 3s. or 3s. 6d. a yard - I am confident the door was shut when he came in - I heard the latch go.

EBENEZER GIBSON . I am a ticket-porter, and live at Mile-end; my business is in Honey-lane-market. I was in the market when the prisoner was crossing Milk-street; I heard a cry of Stop thief! which drew my attention to Milk-street, and saw him running into the market - several people were behind him, at a distance, pursuing him; I stopped him - he had nothing then; I took him back to Mr. Wilson's house, as the people in pursuit, said he had come from there - Cole spoke positivly to him; he said distress drove him to do it.

JOHN SALTER . I am a City officer. I took the prisoner into custody, searched him, and found 2 1/2d. and a knife on him.

HENRY COLE . This is the silk; it has the warehouse mark on it - I put the roller on myself.

JOHN DUNGATE I am watch-house keeper of Whitechapel. I know the prisoner's person; I have two papers, one of which I got from Mr. Shelton's office - I was present when the prisoner was tried last September; he was the person tried on the charge, to which this paper relates - I have not the least doubt of him.

The certificate of the prisoner's conviction for felony, in September last, and his having been sentenced to six months' imprisonment was here read.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court,

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18290611-171

NEW COURT, Fourth Day.

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1170. JOSEPH YEARTS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , 1 coat, value 3l., the goods of Henry Dart - also for stealing, on the 7th of June, 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of James Richards , his master.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-172

1171. SARAH FORRESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of David Cannon , from his person .

DAVID CANNON. I am a druggist . On the 29th of April I was in Pall-mall , between one and two o'clock in the day; the officer detected the prisoner in the act of taking my handkerchief.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I saw the prisoner put her hand into Mr. Cannon's pocket - she took out this handkerchief, and I seized her; the prosecutor's name is in full on it.

JOSEPH WILLIAM HADDOCK . I was at the corner of St. James'-street, Pall-mall, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-173

1172. WILLIAM DICKENSON and GEORGE HAYCOCK , were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , 1 necklace, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Lough , from the person of Eliza Lough .

JOSEPH LOUGH. My daughter Eliza is sixteen months old; James Wright used to take her out; on the 18th of April she was brought to my shop with Dickenson, who had the beads round his finger - Moore said Dickenson had taken the beads off the child's neck; he said he had taken them off the neck, but was going to give them to the child or the lad; I had seen them that morning - I do not know the number of beads, but the string has four knots in it; I had tied two of them myself.

JOHN MOORE . I was in Hoywell-street on the 18th of April, about half-past nine o'clock; I saw the two prisoners and another person - I saw one of them go behind the child, which was in Wright's arms, and turn down its pelisse, to look at the back of its neck; he put up his hands and unsnapped the heads - he then went and said something to the prisoners; Haycock went and made a snatch at the beads, but did not get them entirely off, they laid on the pelisse; Dickenson then went and took them off, and put them round his finger - I took hold of him, and took him into a baker's shop; I sent for Mr. Lough, but he was not at home - we then took the child and Dickenson to his shop.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known Haycock before? A. No: I took notice of his person; I never said he wore a fustian jacket - I never told Vann so; I said it was the taller one who is not in custody.

JAMES WRIGHT . I took Eliza Lough into the street - she had a necklace on; I was looking into a shop; Moore came and took Dickenson into a shop, and said he had taken the beads - I then missed them; the prisoners had all pushed up against me when I stopped at the shop - I had seen Haycock before, but not the other; I asked him what he pushed against me for, and then the big one said he

could not help it; I said he could help it; he said I was a liar - this was two or three minutes before Mr. Moore came up; he had hold of Dickenson's collar, and the hand which held the beads.

THOMAS HAYCOCK . I received charge of Dickenson, and have had the beads ever since.

THOMAS VANN. I took Haycock from the description Wright gave me.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask his father whether he wore a fustian jacket? A. No - I did not ask where the fustian jacket and trousers were which he wore that day; he denied having been in Shoreditch at all that day.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DICKENSON'S Defence The boy was going along with the child, and the heads nearly hanging off the child's neck - I went to take them to give them to the boy - the man came and said I was going to steal them - I never saw Haycock before.

Haycock put in a written defence, declaring his innocence.

DICKENSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

HAYCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-174

1173. JOHN PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 5lbs. weight of ham, value 3s. , the goods of Michael Maidwell .

MICHAEL MAIDWELL. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Tabernacle-walk . On the 27th of May I was in the room behind the shop, dozing, and was awoke by footsteps in the shop - I looked and saw no one, but missed half a ham from my window, which I had seen safe about five minutes before - I went out and saw the prisoner with something in his apron; I cried Stop thief! he threw down the apron, and my ham was in it - I took it up, pursued, and took him, without losing sight of him.

THOMAS BRIGHT . I heard the alarm, and saw the prisoner running; I took him, but he resisted, and got from me - I pursued, and took him again, without losing sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. A man came and asked if I would have this - he threw it into my apron; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-175

1174. ALFRED SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May . 13 books, value 15s.; 13 lbs. weight of paper, value 4s. 6d., and 30 newspapers, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Ridgway , his master.

JAMES CARRINGTON RIDGWAY. I am the son of James Ridgway , a bookseller , of Piccadilly: the prisoner was in his employ for two years, and was turned away on the 13th of May; these books and papers are my father's, and these are letters which the prisoner was entrusted to deliver.

THOMAS SHEPHERD. I am a cheesemonger. This paper was brought to me for sale by a woman, on the 19th of May; I asked her where she got it, and whether it was right; she said it was quite right, and gave me the direction of the person she got it from; I kept the paper, and said I would inquire about it - I went to Piccadilly, and inquired at a shop where they published that work; I went to Mr. Ridgway, told them where I got it, and went with Mr. Ridgway to Cooper's-court, but we could not find the prisoner there; I was then going home, when the prisoner called after me in the street, and asked if I had been to Cooper's-court; I said Yes; he said, "It is quite right:" I caught hold of him, and took him to Mr. Ridgway's.

THOMAS GOOK. I am an officer. I took the prisoner; I found on him a key, and went to his apartments; I found thirteen or fourteen books under the bed, and these other papers - some of these newspapers should have been on their way to Bombay, and other places; some should have been there.

ELEANOR ELLISON . I was going up Archer-street, and met the prisoner; he said, "I have some waste-paper, where can I sell it?" I said the butter shops were the best places; he asked me to take it, and I took it to the gentleman's shop; he asked me whose it was; I said it belonged to Mr. Smith, in Cooper's court - I went out, and saw the prisoner; I told him the gentleman was coming to know if it was right - he said, "It is all right," and I left him.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month and Whipped.

Reference Number: t18290611-176

1175. WILLIAM CROCKFORD , WILLIAM PEARCE , and JOHN BATEMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , 15 window-sashes, value 8l., the goods of Andrew Jameson , and fixed to a certain building of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating that the said William Pearce , at the Delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, on the 29th of May, in the 9th year of His present Majesty's reign, was convicted of felony.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

ANDREW JAMESON. I am a builder , and live in Green-street, Bethnal-green. I was building some houses in William-street, Bethnal-green ; three of them were nearly finished on the 12th of May - all the window-sashes were glazed and fixed; I saw them safe that night, about six o'clock - I returned next morning, at six o'clock, and fifteen pairs of sashes were gone; I think I have seen them all, but not all the glass - the sashes were broken all to bits; there were some little bits of glass about the frames - the value of the sashes was not less than 20l.; I had some glass shown to me in the watch-house on the 13th -I have examined it carefully, and fitted it to the sashes; I am confident it came from them - it fits the bedding of the putty.

GEORGE CORNER. I am a watchman of Bethnal-green. On the morning of the 13th, about a quarter before four o'clock, I saw three men enter the field near my box, in Three Colt-lane, Dog-row; they each had baskets - I did not then know them, but I imagined they were going to Whitechapel, they were coming in a direction from the prosecutor's premises; I had suspicion, and went up to Crockford, who was behind the other two - I asked what he had in the basket; he said nothing - I caught hold of it, and discovered it was glass; I caught hold of him, and he caught hold of me - we had a scuffle, and I fell; he called to the others to assist him - Pearce looked back twice, but did not return; he got quite away from me, with his basket -I sprung my rattle, and the other two were taken afterwards by some Whitechapel watchmen; I saw them in the

watch-house, and knew them to be the persons I had seen with Crockford that morning - I knew Bateman by his being nearest to Crockford: I had seen him in Whitechapel several times - I had not so good a knowledge of Pearce, and cannot speak positively to him; I said he had a long coat on, and Bateman a flannel jacket; their dress corresponded with the description I gave - before I went to the watch-house I went with two of the Whitechapel watchmen to the field, and found the sashes; this was about half-past six o'clock - it was a quarter of a mile from where I saw the three men, and about one hundred and fifty yards from the prosecutor's premises: the glass had been removed from the sashes - I am certain Crockford is the person I had the scuffle with; I found a basket in the field, which I think had been dropped by Pearce - it was a small basket, with one handle off; I saw Crockford outside the door of Lambeth-street office, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q.Can you speak to Bateman as being one of the parties? A. Yes.

JOHN HOWARD. I am a watchman of Whitechapel-road. On the morning of the 13th of May, at a quarter before four o'clock. I heard a rattle spring; I made towards it, and in Wellington-street I met Bateman and Pearce running - I saw Bateman drop a basket, containing glass; I met them between these houses and Whitechapel - I took up the basket; I afterwards took Pearce, and Kettle took Bateman, in North-street, by their own doors.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw nothing of Crockford then? A. No.

MARTIN KETTLE. I am a watchman. I heard the rattle spring, and saw Howard with a basket in his hand, with some glass in it; I saw nothing of the prisoners then, but we afterwards took Pearce and Bateman at their doors- Corner saw them at the watch-house, and spoke to them as the persons he saw in the field; they did not say they were not there, but said they were going their own way.

ROBERT BLAKE. I am a watchman of Whitechapel. I heard the rattle, and ran nearly two hundred yards; when I got to Wellington-street. I saw Bateman drop this basket, with glass in it - I described his person; he was afterwards taken: he had a flannel jacket and white stockings- I knew him. but did not know the other.

Prisoner BATEMAN. Q.Where is your beat? A.Down by the horse-boilers - I was close by you, and could describe you.

JOHN HEALING. I am a watchman, I was in Wellington-street, and saw Bateman drop the basket - there were two other persons there.

THOMAS DALBY . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 13th of May I saw a man with a basket of glass on his shoulder, but he got round the corner of Duke-street, into Wellington-street; I went with Corner and Howard, and found the frames about two hundred yards from Mr. Jameson's.

Prisoner BATEMAN. Q. Did not you see me the evening before? A. Yes, about eleven o'clock - you and Pearce passed by me, in the same line that the goods came next morning; I saw nothing of Crockford - about half an hour after the glass was taken we had lost sight of you, and we saw you again; I have seen you with roots, and other things, early of a morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CROCKFORD'S Defence. I was merely standing opposite the office, and was taken.

BATEMAN'S Defence. This watchman saw me at half-past eleven o'clock at night; I stop as late as I can to take what money I can to go to market in the morning - when they were taken the frames were all bloody; our hands were not bloody.

BENJAMIN HARPER . I am a news-agent and bookseller. I live at No. 11, Brace's-buildings, Newmarket-street. East Smithfield. I have known Crockford one year and a half, and lodged with him. On the night of the 13th of May, I let him in at twelve o'clock, and he was in bed with me till seven in the morning; I went out and left him in bed, and when I returned at nine he was not up.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How do you know it was the 13th? A. His father came the same day, and said his son was charged with a robbery - I went up to the Magistrate, but I was ordered out; I offered to state the fact - I am in the habit of sleeping with him, as he has a sister out of place and she sleeps in my apartment. I do not keep any shop -I have bought books of Piper, late Sherwood, Neely, and Sons, Cowie and Strange, and others; I have not been supoenaed here to day - Crockford is a sawyer, and was out of work at that time - he had been at work the week before, but I do not know for whom; his sister slept in the house that night - I let him in at twelve o'clock, and we went to bed together; his sister had gone into her apartment at half-past eleven - she did not see him that night, but she bade him good night as he passed the door; his father slept in the same room with us, and had not gone to bed when he came home - his father and sister went to the Police officer, and a person named Mayne who had been in company with him from twelve at noon till near twelve o'clock at night; he is here to-day - I never saw Pearce till I was at Lambeth-street; I never saw Crockford in company with him, nor with any persons but those whom I believe to be sawyers.

SAMUEL CROCKFORD . The prisoner is my son. On the night of the 12th of May I will take my oath he was in bed with me - it might be twelve o'clock, or a little before, when he came in, and I called him the morning between four and five o'clock; he said it was no use for him to get up - he never got up till nine o'clock; he could not have gone out without my knowing it - he did not go out, so help me God - he was at home all night.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Was he taken up the same day? A. Yes, he went out - Pearce's father came to let me know he was taken; I had never seen him before; my son sent word by him where he was; I went to the office, but they would not let me in - they said they wanted no witnesses there; I have a trifle allowed me by the parish, and have been dependent on my son; he had been on the 12th to Hackney, with Mayne, to see if he could get any work - Bethnal-green is the nearest way to Hackney; I do not know the prosecutor's houses - I cannot say whether he had any supper or not; I think I was in bed when he came home - Harper was getting into bed, and when my son came home he let him in; there was a candle - my daughter was gone to bed, perhaps half an hour; she bade him good night - the door was not open, but I heard that through the wainscoat; I cannot tell whether I had any

supper - I frequently go to bed without supper; I had cocoa at tea time, with my daughter - I cannot say whether Harper was there then; twelve o'clock is rather a late hour to go to bed, but I have nothing to do - he did not dine at home on the 12th; he had been to look for his mate, and he could not find him - he went out in the morning, and did not come home till twelve o'clock at night; he had been to Hackney to see for work, and got with a shopmate or two - he had nothing to do at the office the next day, but he went by as I am told.

COURT. Q.What made him stay at home so long as nine o'clock that morning? A. He was very slack of work, and said it would be time enough for his mate; I cannot say what time I got up, but I was partly dressed when the news came that my son was confined - I am lame, it takes me an hour to dress.

JANE CROCKFORD. On the 12th of May, I heard my brother come home about twelve o'clock; he bade me good night.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.What time did you go to bed? A. About half-past eleven, or a little before twelve o'clock- I did not know Pearce till I saw him at Lambeth-street; I did not know Bateman - my father is old, and gets up late - sometimes at ten or eleven o'clock, sometimes twelve; I cannot say what time he got up on the 12th. I am a glove-maker, and work for Mr. Butts, in Leadenhall-street- I cannot exactly say whether my father had dined at home that day, or whether I was at home at tea; I had been to Leadenhall-street on the 10th, but I do not think I went on the 13th - I cannot say whether my father and I drank tea together - we generally have cocoa for tea; my brother went out at half-past nine or a little before ten o'clock that morning - he was in bed at eight, when I got up; I have one key of the street-door, and Mr. Harper has another - Harper went out, I believe, about seven o'clock.

COURT. Q. Did he dine at home? A. No.

THOMAS MAYNE. I am a sawyer, and live at No. 7. Gower-place, Mill-yard, Cable-street - I know Crockford- I have been a mate of his. On the 12th of May I was with him (but not at work) from half-past twelve o'clock at noon till a quarter before twelve o'clock at night.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.What were you doing? A. I met him opposite Mr. Richmond's, in Old-street-road - I did not go in there: we went and had two pints of beer at a public-house at the back of the Vinegar-yard - we then went to Cambridge-heath, stood on the bridge for half an hour, and saw a young fellow who is waiter at the Rose and Crown public-house; we went into the Hare public-house, and had a game at skittles; this was about five o'clock - we had passed some time at the other house, where we went to have some beer; I do not know where the prosecutor's buildings are - there are new buildings in many parts about there; I was with Crockford till a quarter before twelve at night, I then went home and went to bed.

- PEARCE. I am Pearce's father. He was at home on the night before, and the watchman came and took him against my house - he said there were two more in it - I went to speak for my son; Kettle came out, and said,"You may go home, and make yourself comfortable, not one of us can swear to him;" when the two lads were taken, they wanted to lay it to my son, and then Howard said it was Bateman.

MARTIN KETTLE . He came to me in the evening, and said, "You are a pretty fellow to take my son;" I said I could not swear to him.

JOHN HOWARD. I never said that it was Pearce had the basket, and then said it was Bateman.

ROBERT BLAKE. I was there about ten minutes before four o'clock I saw Bateman and another; it was Bateman dropped the basket, and Howard took it.

GEORGE CORNER . I saw three persons, and Crockford was one - I seized him, was knocked down, and he got away; I saw him again at the office: I had not known him before, but I am positive he is the man - I saw him two or three seconds in the scuffle, and I saw him when they entered the field.

WILLIAM MICHELL. I produce a certificate of the conviction of Pearce for felony, on the 29th of May - I was present at his trial, and know he is the man (read).

PEARCE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

BATEMAN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

CROCKFORD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-177

1176. CHARLES CHURCHILL OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 1 reticule bag, value 3s.; 1 piece of ribbon, value 4s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 purse, value 1s., and 2 sixpences, the property of Eliza Marshall , from her person .

ELIZA MARSHALL . I am single . On the 1st of May I was walking in Oxford-street , with my reticule on my arm, between four and five o'clock - the prisoner made a pull at it; I turned, and saw him - there was no one but him who could have taken it - he had quite got it; he tried to run away, but my mamma caught him; a young man came up and took him.

ELIZABETH MARSHALL. I was with my daughter; she lost her bag - I looked round, and the prisoner was quite close; I did not see any other person; a female picked up the bag - two men came up, and secured the prisoner.

JOHN FULLER. I was going up Oxford-street: the young lady shrieked out Mother! I saw the prisoner drop a black velvet bag close behind her - I took bold of him.

ROBERT CRAIG. I took the prisoner; I did not see who took up the bag - it was given me by a woman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was close to her, but did not take it. GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Four Months .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18290611-178

1177. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , 1 sovereign , the money of Adolphus Bronkhurst , his master.

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

ADOLPHUS BRONKHURST . I keep the Wellington wine-vaults, Wellington-place, Goswell-road ; the prisoner had been in my employ for about nine months -I had a female servant, whom he married, and went to live with a brewer, a relation of mine: I had some conversation with one of my friends, and had the prisoner taken up; I remember having a sovereign marked in a particular manner. On the 21st of April I had been out, and when I returned, I put out my money on the table; I saw

one of the sovereigns, which a child of mine had made a mark on - I had some altercation with him about it; it was thrown into the till by itself - I know this is it; I should know it if it was among thousands; the prisoner had 4s. a week, and board and lodging - he was with me on the 21st of April.

ANN BRONKHURST. I am the prosecutor's wife; the The prisoner came to me and attacked me on the Thursday in the Easter week; he said I had been injuring his character, and accused him of having a great deal of money in his possession; I said my servants had said so, and he dared me to call them - I did call them; he brow-beat them a great deal, and flatly denied it - he was taken a few days afterwards; I remember my husband taking this sovereign out of his pocket - it was marked in a peculiar way; I put it into the till on the Saturday night, and missed it the next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q.What day was the prisoner discharged? A. On the Wednesday.

CHARLES TAYLOR . I have known the prisoner eight or nine months in the prosecutor's employ; I have seen him with nine or ten sovereigns in his hand - I took 16s. one week, and 4s., then 3s., and then 5s. to pay off an alescore for him.

JOHN ROBINSON. I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found on him thirty-one sovereigns and 11s. 7d.; I asked him what he had got - he said a little money, 7s. or 8s., and twenty sovereigns; here is the marked sovereign among them.

ADOLPHUS BRONKHURST. This is the sovereign - it has a spot of quicksilver on it; I saw it put into the till, and it was missed next morning.

MR. DOWLING. Q.What is you second Christian name? A. My names are Adolphus Frederick Philip , but I generally sign Adolphus only; my licence is Adolphus only: my son put some quicksilver on the sovereign as it laid on the table - the prisoner left me on the 22d of May; I think he was taken on the 25th - he was my pot-boy.

COURT. Q. Was the mark on the sovereign accidentally made? A. Yes.

GEORGE HARDY . I am the son of Mrs. Bronkhurst, by a former husband. I recollect marking a sovereign one Saturday night, with quicksilver; I never marked one before or since - I have marked shillings; this is the sovereign.

ANN BRONKHURST. The two children were sitting by me, and one said, "See what George has done," and he said he should soon take the nose off; I put the sovereign into the till, and missed it in the morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Sometimes the prisoner has bought things for you? A. Yes - he bought bread, butter, and other things - it was generally out of the money he took in the day; I had the highest opinion of him.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor has been in the habit of giving me money to get change; they gave me two sovereigns one night, and I could not get change - I gave my mistress 1l. 19s. 6d., and said I would owe her 6d. till the morning; I have sold them a great deal of earthenware - what money I got I took care of: I have sold a great deal to the neighbours.

ANN BRONKHURST . We have two tills in the bar, which is locked every night, but the tills are not locked - I take the key of the bar up to bed; I do not think I have omitted doing so for three nights, except I have been ill - no person could have got in but with a false key.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-179

1178. ROBERT WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , 2 silk dresses, value 5l.; 1 tippet, value 3s.; 2 night-gowns, value 5s.; 1 cotton dress, value 7s.; 2 aprons, value 2s.; 1 crape neck-handkerchief, value 2s.; 11 pairs of stockings, value 20s.; 1 book, value 3s.; 2 bracelets, value 5s.; 1 locket, value 5s.; 3 necklaces, value 7s.; 2 gold pins, value 2s.; 1 steel buckle, value 1s.; 2 gold ear-rings, value 7s.; 2 dressing-cases, value 7s.; 3 collars, value 3s.; 10 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 1 scarf, value 4s.; 1 bag, value 1s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 5s; 5 towels, value 5s., and 1 habit-shirt, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Evans .

ROBERT EVANS. I live in Prospect-place, Maida-hill , and carry on business in Oxford-street. On the 4th of May I sent one of my servants to the Hero public-house, at Maida-hill, to inquire for a person to carry a basket to a coach-office; the prisoner came to my gate, and I delivered him a basket, containing the articles stated, with a direction to take it to Charing-cross - I paid him a shilling; he was quite a stranger to me: this was about a quarter-past eight o'clock in the morning - I went to Charing-cross soon after, and neither he nor the parcel had arrived; it was to have gone by the Bromley coach: he was to have waited there for me - I went to Bromley without it, and when I came back in the evening he was in custody; I have seen the basket and a great part of the property since, at Mary-lebone Office - it had been opened, and a great part of it was gone; a parcel which had been tied at the top had been opened.

Cross-examined by MR. DOWLING. Q. How do you know the prisoner had not sent it? A. Because I went by the same coach; this is the basket that I sent with him.

COURT. Q. At what time did you arrive at Charing-cross? A. I believe about half-past nine o'clock, and I waited there till near ten - I detained the coachman, expecting every moment the basket would arrive: I ran to every coach-office about there to look for him.

ELLEN EVANS . I know this basket, in which I had packed up my child's property; the prisoner took it away.

WILLIAM TRAIL . I am a pawnbroker, of Chapel-street, Edgware-road. On that Monday a witness and another young man came to my house; they had not got the basket- they brought some silk dresses, cotton dresses, shoes, and other things, and wanted 12s. for them; they said they belonged to a man named Wilson, who was outside the door- I went out and asked him whose it was; he at first said it was his own, and then that it belonged to Mr. Evans, No.11, Prospect-place: I said I should not advance any money until I had made inquiries - they said they would call again, and went away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE OBEY. I am learning to be a bricklayer. I was in Lisson-street; the prisoner called me and another young lad, and asked us to take these things to pawn for 12s. - he said they were his own, and that his name was Wilson.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever see him before?

A. No; I suspected it was not right, and told Mr. Trail of it - he was a little intoxicated; I believe he has a wife and child.

Prisoner's Defence. I met that witness and two others tossing in the street; I was a little intoxicated, and set down the basket; he came and said, "What are you going to do with this, old chap - are you going to pawn it, or shall I;" I don't know what I said, but he took the property, which was not in the basket, and endeavoured to get 12s. on it - I do not know what happened between Mr. Trail and me; I returned to the witness - there was some conversation about selling it to a Jew; I was decoyed out of my road into a field - I sat myself down, and during the time the officer came and took me; I accidentally went to get a glass of gin, and the servant came into the public-house, to ask for a person to take the parcel - I met with those three idle chaps, and they decoyed me away.

WILLIAM TRAIL re-examined. Q. Is your shop in the direct road to Charing-cross? A. No, it is down a street; he should have gone straight on.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-180

1179. JOHN CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 107 articles of hardware, value 16l. 9s. 8d. , the goods of William Howard and William Quincey , his masters.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HOWARD . I live at No. 115, Old-street, and am in partnership with William Quincey , Jun. The prisoner was in our service, and he was inspector of workmen in our warehouse.

ALEXANDER JAMES BURGESS. I am foreman to Mr. Attenborough, a pawnbroker, in Crown-street, Finsbury. On the 15th of March the prisoner came to pawn a pair of snuffers and a tray, in the name of James Cane , No. 10, Wilson-street: on the 12th of April he came again, about eight or half-past eight o'clock in the evening - he offered this pair of snuffers and tray; I asked whose they were - he said his own, that he bought them at some place, (but I forget where,) to use at Christmas; I think he said he gave half a guinea for them - he said his name was Thomas James , and he lived at No. 3, Leonard-street; I said he must have told me what was wrong, as he had brought me another pair, and given another address - he said it must be a mistake, as he had never been there before; I again asked his addres, and he said, "Thomas James, No. 10, Leonard-street;" I then sent a young man up for the former pair - he said it must be altogether wrong, as he never saw that pair before; I wrote down the last address, which he gave me, and said, "Is that right?" he said,"Yes, it is; I made a mistake when I said No. 3;" I asked whose employ he was in - he said he was in the employ of a Mr. Coward, a Manchester warehouse, in Watling-street- he was in one of our boxes; I went on the other side, fastened the door, and sent for Mr. Attfield - I thought I observed some motion of his hand, between himself and the counter, and when the officer came we searched the box, and found this other pair of snuffers and tray on the floor in the box - they are very nearly similar to those he offered to pawn; I cannot swear they had not been in the box before, but I do not think they had - I saw him searched, and this mustard-pot and pepper-box were found on him; he then said, "It is of no use, I will tell you the truth; I took them from my master, Mr. Howard, in Old-street-road:" I had not threatened or promised him any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The first and second pair are not alike? A. No, not alike in pattern, but are in materials - they are paper-mache; I am positive I am not mistaken in his person - he did not confess that he was the person who pawned on the 15th of March, in my presence; I cannot say what time of day it was on the 15th of March when he came - I enter the days in the book.

COURT. Q.Were all the three articles in view when he said he took them from Mr. Howard's? A. Yes.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD. I am an officer of Worship-street. I took the prisoner - this pair of snuffers and stand were found in the box, wrapped up in a bit of paper; I found on him this mustard-pot and pepper-castor, in the same paper as they are now - I found a half-soveriegn, four half-crowns, two shillings, and two sixpences on him; when I found these I asked him how he came by them - he said, "It is of no use, I will tell you the truth - I brought them from my master's, Mr. Howard, No. 115, Old-street;" he then told me that the address he gave Burgess was false, that he lived at No. 30, Bacon-street, Bethnal-green, and he did not care so much for himself as he did for his dear wife and family; I took him to the office, and then went to the place, which he pointed out, and took the money I found on him to his wife, whom I found at home: I found in the shop or front room, in the back room, and in a loft over the wash-house, five hundred and twenty-two articles of tin japanned ware; out of them twenty-four had been identified and marked by Mr. Howard.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you happen to know that the prisoner was a dealer by commission in these very articles? A. I did not know that he dealt at all, except that he bought two or three articles of his master, what had been entered by the clerk in the book.

THOMAS GARTON . I am head constable of Worship-street. I went with Attfield to the house, and found these articles, which I deposited at the Crown public-house, in the afternoon: at the office he gave me a paper, which I handed to the Magistrate, who gave it to Mr. Howard.

MR. HOWARD. This is the paper; I have not seen the prisoner write, but this is the paper he handed to the officer, and which I received from the Magistrate; he avowed it to be his in the office, and persisted in delivering it, in spite of remonstrances - (read.)

To Messrs. Howard and Quincey, No. 115, Old-street.

HONOURED GENTLEMEN, - I am extremely sorry for having robbed you, but if I had been spared on this occasion, I am perfectly sure you would have been no losers, but rather great gainers; I was truly resolved to be more strict in my duty, and never suffer you to be injured by any one in my sight - my reason for taking what I did on Saturday night, was to have redeemed two pairs of sheets, and then I should have been satisfied.

Unworthy, JOHN CARE .

Clerkenwell Prison, March 20, 1829.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.What was the prisoner? A. Inspector of the work as it came in, and he was besides in the India-house; I never gave him liberty to deal by commission in my warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Although you yourself never gave him the privilege of dealing by commission, do not you believe he has been in the habit of doing it? A. I believe he has in several instances; I believe there is in my books one instance of his having bought some things.

SAMUEL WARNER . I am clerk to the prosecutors; it is my duty to enter all articles bought and paid for by all persons. On the 5th of November, 1828, I find by the book, which I have here, that the prisoner bought some article to the amount of 1s. 8d. - I do not know what it was.

Cross-examined. Q.Was there no other dealings between the prisoner and his master? A. Since the 1st of June, 1828, I have received 1l. 8s. 11 1/2d. of him at different payments - the last was on the 5th of November; I have been there ten years and six months - I have kept the books about two years and a half - I believe there had been dealings between the prisoner and his master before I kept the books; I believe he had been a retail dealer in these articles - I do not know whether Mr. Howard knew that; these twenty-four articles which have been identified have been missed since the 17th of February - I cannot say whether there are any more that can be identified - none of these have been paid for to me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Does any other person receive money for goods? A. Only when I am at my meals - when I return it is accounted for to me: these things could not have been had and paid for without my knowing it - my knowledge of these articles does not depend upon private marks, which may be removed.

The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring that he had become possessed of the goods honestly, and that he was so overcome at the time of his apprehension, he was unconscious of what he either said or wrote.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-181

1180. RICHARD HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , 45 articles of hardware, value 6l. 18s. 5d. , the goods of William Howard and William Quincey , his masters.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HARCOURT QUINCEY . I am the brother of William Quincey - their firm is William Howard and William Quincey, Jun. The prisoner was employed by that firm as private watchman , and has been so between nine and ten months - he used to attend from seven o'clock in the evening till five in the morning; these were one hundred and fifty persons in their employ - they generally leave work about seven o'clock, and when they left it was his duty to see that nothing improper went away, and to see that the fires were all put out; he had access to the workshops, where there were a number of japanned articles which are taken to the warehouse - the prisoner bad a key of the workshops. On Monday, the 13th of April, in consequence of something we heard, I went to his dwelling-house in Long's-buildings about one o'clock in the day; I found him in bed - I saw a number of japanned and tin wares about, and questioned him about them; he said he had purchased some at stalls in the street, and some of persons who brought them about - Attfield, who was with me, opened a door, where we found a number of articles, and among the rest was a patent kitchen raise; it is a particular kind of dish-cover, which Mr. Howard has got the patent for - I said, "You did not purchase this, this is our manufacture;" he said, "No, Groom gave me that," meaning one of our workmen - a number of these articles were found in a box; he requested several times to see Mr. Howard - I left the officer with him, while I went to see for Mr. Howard; here is an oil bottle, which is marked with the initials of one of our customers, who lives in Lincoln's Inn-fields - we keep it full of oil for them; I know of no order ever being given to Groom to dispose of any of these articles.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Are you any partner there? A. No. I am only clerk; this oil bottle and raise I can speak more particularly to; two or three persons, of the name of Groom, work in that establishment, and he did not say which it was - there are many articles here which I know, but I cannot point them out as not having been sold.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodgings to make the search; I found him in bed - I told him his master suspected he had been robbing him, and asked whether he had any property, and whether he would allow us to search; as we had no warrant - he said he had no objection; I searched the room all over, and found one hundred and five different articles, the greater part of which were in a box on the left-hand side, closely packed up in paper - there were some things hanging about the room, some over the mantel-piece, some in a cupboard, and some in a drawer; I saw his wife go in great haste towards a dresser drawer at the further end of the room, and take hold of something - I said I thought she had something there she should not have; I took hold of her hand, and found several duplicates, which I produce - I found several other duplicates in the drawer, thirteen in all; they all relate to articles of this description - while I was searching, I heard Mr. Quincey say, "He is gone out;" I looked, and missed the prisoner - I ran down stairs, and saw him running up the court; before he got into Whitecross-street I overtook him and brought him back - he said he was only going to Mr. Howard's; I then sent for Garton- I heard the prisoner say he was very sorry for what he had done in taking these things from his master; that at Christmas last there were a number of articles packed up to be sent to a customer, and he took them out of that parcel; when he was before the Magistrate he acknowledged he had taken them, but at different times - when we first went in, his wife said they had bought some of people who sit in the streets, and some of persons who go about hawking them.

LEONARD MATTHEWS. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Whitecross-street. I have a tea-pot, pawned by a woman in the name of Ann Hall, on the 16th of January - she has since turned out to be the prisoner's wife; I have also a tea-kettle, a flat iron, and three drinking borns, pawned at different times up to the 31st of March - I gave these duplicates to the person who pawned them.

THOMAS CORDWELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Exmouth-street. I have a tea-pot and a lantern, for which I gave this duplicate - they were pawned in the name of Elizabeth Ward by the woman I afterwards saw at Worship-street.

JOSEPH SLADE . I am foreman to the prosecutors - I have looked at nine of these articles, which I can identify by the letters, which I gave the men on the 17th of February to mark the goods with; I can swear they were made in our manufactory - here are the private marks on them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Can you swear that they had not been sold? A. No.

SAMUEL WARNER. I am a clerk in the house, and receive money for articles sold - the prisoner paid me 3s. 10d. for goods, and that is all.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any article here which you can swear has not been sold? A. Yes; this raise was made for a house we do business for - it is not finished.

Prisoner's Defence. I had these things of a man on the Saturday after Christmas-day; he said he was one of Mr. Howard's customers, and used to attend to the factory; he asked me to let him leave them while he went for some stockings and other things, and I did it innocently.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-182

1181. ELIZABETH WAVING was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 1 counterpane, value 15s. , the goods of George Heather .

MARIA HEATHER . I am the wife of George Heather - we live in Francis-street, Tottenham-court-road . The prisoner used to come from a laundress to fetch the clothes; she came on the 5th of May, and I gave her, amongst other things, a counterpane to be washed.

SARAH ARDIN . I am a laundress, and wash for this lady. I sent the prisoner for her clothes on the 5th of May - she brought some articles but not the counterpane; I never gave her authority to pawn any articles.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. I took in this counterpane on the 6th of May from the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Reference Number: t18290611-183

1182. ELIZABETH WAVING was again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , 4 shirts, value 24s.; 1 pair of sleeves, value 1s.; 3 aprons, value 6s.; 2 collars, value 2s., and 2 cravats, value 4s. , the goods of Rue Langley .

RUE LANGLEY. The articles stated in this indictment are mine; the prisoner came to take them to Mrs. Ardin's to be washed - these are some of them.

SARAH ARDIN. I wash for Mrs. Langley; I sent the prisoner there on the 22d of April - when I asked her she said she had not been there.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I have three shirts, an apron, and some cravats which were pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-184

1183. ANN NOLES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 2 seals, value 8s., and 1 key, value 6d., the goods of John Hull , from his person .

JOHN HULL . I am a journeyman bricklayer . I was in Thomas-street, Whitechapel , on the 15th of April, about eleven o'clock at night; I was sober - the prisoner came begging into a public-house where I was, said she had come out of the country, she had been three days and had nothing to eat, and no money to get a lodging - I gave her 2d. - she went to the bar and stood talking to the landlady; I went up to her with a young man, who said to her, "You are nothing but a hypocrite;" she said she wanted victuals; she then went out, and in about ten minutes I went out and found her standing outside; I said,"You are not gone - where did you come from?" she said, "I came from Wales;" that she had come through Leicestershire, and had been through Coventry; the watchman passed us - as soon as he was gone, she caught hold of me, and said, "Will you go along with me;" I pushed her from me, and said, "You be d-d;" I went on to the corner of Greyhound-lane and heard the clock strike; I felt for my watch, to see if it was right, and missed it; I called the watchman, and gave the prisoner in charge - he found it in her hand.

THOMAS WOODHAM. The prosecutor called me - I took the prisoner, and found the watch in a handkerchief which she had in her hand, with some potatoes in it; she denied having it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the watch - it was lying in the kennel, where he was fast asleep.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-185

1184. MATTHEW BUNCE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 36 trusses of hay, value 3l. , the goods of Henry Child , his master.

HENRY CHILD . I am a farmer , and live at Edgware. The prisoner drove my team on the 22d of June - he had been with me only a fortnight; I sent him up with thirty-six trusses of hay; when it got to town it was not according to the sample, and it would not do; he had no right to sell it; a boy found my horses at Stanmore, two miles further, and brought them home.

JOHN BRINDLEY . I am an officer. On Friday last I received information that the prisoner was at work, and I went and found him at Harrow; I said, "I want you;" he said, "For what?" I said, "I dare say you know about Mr. Bunce's hay;" he said, "I thought so;" he said he had lost the money, and was afraid to go to his master; that he had gone to work at haymaking for some time, and then went to the workhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost the money, and was afraid to go home; his son told me to sell it if I could.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-186

1185. JOHN SWANKENBERG was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 4 ducks, value 8s., and 6 rabbits, value 10s. , the goods of Islip Odell .

THOMAS TITFORD. I am a patrol of Hackney parish. About six o'clock in the morning of the 1st of May, I stopped the prisoner in Bonner's-hall-field, Bethnal-green: he had this bag over his shoulder, containing the rabbits; I asked what he had got, and he questioned my authority;

Reader took charge of him; I pursued another man who ran away, but dropped the bag, in which I found this other part of the property - here are the rabbits.

JOHN READER . I was with Titford; I took charge of the prisoner while he ran after the other man.

ISLIP ODELL. I am a clerk to Messrs. Rhodes, of Clapton. I have a hen-house in my yard which is inclosed; I locked it, and saw it secure on the Saturday evening - next morning I found the door broken open and my rabbits and ducks gone: these are a part of my rabbits, the others are at home; the ducks were all killed; I saw them at Worship-street and knew them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-187

1186. JOHN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 12 pieces of quartering, value 15s., and 1 pair of window-sashes, value 4s., the goods of James Wood , and fixed to a certain building of his .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-188

1187. DANIEL BABER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 2 shawls, value 8s.; 2 shifts, value 4s.; 2 gowns, value 9s.; 1 pair of stays, value 3s.; 2 night gowns, value 4s.; 1 shirt, value 1s., and 1 frock, value 1s. the goods of Frances Wood .

HENRY TURNER . I am a watchman. I met the prisoner on the 28th of May, at half-past four o'clock in the morning, with a bundle of women's clothes, in Great Ormond-street, Queen-square - I stopped him and asked how he came by them; he said he brought them from his mother's in Monmouth-street, and was going to take them to Finsbury-square.

FRANCES WOOD . My mother is a widow, and lives in Monmouth-street . I left my situation on the 1st of May, and lived with my mother; the prisoner is my brother - he came there on the 28th of May, and my mother made him a convenience to sleep under the same roof; he went away without giving us notice - I missed the articles stated; I am a widow.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-189

1188. GEORGE TOOKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May, 1 dressing-gown, value 7s. , the goods of Robert Williamson .

ELIZABETH MARK. The prisoner came to Mr. Robert Williamson 's, with whom I live, on the 25th of May, and I gave him this coat or dressing-gown; he said he came from Mr. Simpson's for it - I had seen him before, and I asked my mistress, who told me to inquire of him whether it was one to mend or one to alter; I am sure he is the person.

CHARLES LITTLEWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned them with me.

DANIEL SMITH. I am in partnership with Mr. Simpson; we live in the Quadrant, Regent-street. The prisoner resided with us three months, and then he went to several of our customers and got articles from them - this is one of the cases.

NOT GUILTY .

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18290611-190

1189. GEORGE WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 1 bushel of oats, value 3s. , the goods of Edward Harrison .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously receiving the same.

MR. DOWLING conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD HARRISON . I live at White Webbs, Enfield. On the morning of the 1st of May I was called up, between six and seven o'clock, and went to my granary; I missed about three quarters and a half of black and white oats from a bin, in which seven quarters had been shot a day or two before - on the 13th of May some oats were sent to me; I compared them with those in the bin - they corresponded exactly.

ELIZABETH HARRISON . I am the prosecutor's niece. On the 30th of April I was the last person in the granary, and locked it up between seven and eight o'clock - there were a quantity of black and white oats there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you accustomed to see different kinds of oats? A. Yes; but I only know I was the last person in the granary.

JOHN WILSON . I went to the prisoner's premises on the 12th of May with a search-warrant, but not for these oats; I found a quantity of black and white oats there, and took a sample of them to Mead - I did not ask the prisoner any question about them at that time; there was about a sack of them - I searched again on the 14th, and then there were about five pecks.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the prisoner when you searched first? A. Yes; what I took I gave to Sanders.

EDWARD SANDERS . I received these oats from Wilson.

EDWARD HARRISON . I can swear to them, as they are very remarkable; no person has grown them besides myself - there are some of them growing this year, but they are not come to perfection.

Cross-examined. Q. There is straw chopped among it, and some chaff? A. Yes, that has been put with them since I lost them - there may be some in the country like these, but I brought this sort into the parish.

JOHN GRANT . I am a jobber, and live at Enfield-highway. On the morning of the 1st of May, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner near the shed where I live; he asked whether I was going down into the country, and how long I should be - he asked whether I wanted any corn; I said I did not want any - he said I could put it into the barn if I liked; I said No - he said he had three quarters of corn; a cart came down the street - Warren said some thing, but I cannot recollect what it was - the cart did make a bit of a pause, but he did not to say "Stop" - the prisoner went after it; as he was going out he said I might have it - I said I would not; I understood it to be corn - I said I would not have any thing to do with it; he asked how long I should be - I said twenty minutes, or half an hour; he came up again before the half hour was expired - just as I put the horse in the shaft he asked if I would go down the street and have a cup of coffee; I said Yes; I went to his house, and had the coffee - I saw about a bushel, or a bushel and a half of black and white oats in a tub.

COURT. Q.What did he say about the oats? A. He asked if I was a mind to have any oats or corn, I cannot say which he said - I said No; he asked me to go to the

stable, and I saw a bag tied up; I saw some chaff and oats round the edge of the copper, but I was not near enough to see what colour it was.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure the oats you saw had chaff with them? A. Yes; I am acquainted with the prisoner.

JOHN WILSON . The prisoner lived about two miles and a half from the prosecutor's; he is not married - he is a straw carter; I had not heard of Mr. Harrison losing oats when I searched the first time - on the 14th I asked how he came by the oats, or where he got them; he said he did not know, he could not tell, and he should not tell.

Prisoner's Defence. That man speaks very false; I gave my horse one peck the over night, and one peck the next morning - when I spoke to John Grant , it was not my cart that went down the street; I went into the country with Grant, and came back with him.

SARAH ROBINSON . The prisoner was in bed about eight o'clock at night, and on the 1st of May I called him up a quarter before three; he went and called Grant to go into the country with him - Peffey has been here, but he is not here to day; Peffey sells straw, oats, and hay, and was in the habit of selling oats to the prisoner, who lives in my house - before the 1st of May I saw black and white oats in his place - they are a common kind of oats in the country; I know he had bought oats of Peffey a short time before.

MR. DOWLING. Q. Did you see any black and white oats on his premises before the 1st of May? A. Yes, that I will swear - my house has been searched two or three times, but I am not always at home - I am a nurse; I will not swear that it has not been searched oftener - I called him about a quarter before three o'clock that morning; they had breakfast, and he started a little before four to go into the country with Grant - my husband lives at Enfield; I do not live with him - he has one room, which he could not give up, and he lives there about two miles from me; we did part in rather an unfriendly manner, but we are friendly now - he is not starving.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.When did you see your husband? A. Yesterday - we have been parted almost two years.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to live with your husband? A. Yes, at Michaelmas when the room is given up; he has not slept there for the last two years, but I have been to his room - he rents the house that I live in; there are four bed-rooms - the prisoner lives there; also John Murrell, Bill Grant , and his wife.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-191

1190. ANTONIO RODRIGUE was indicted for stealing on the 25th of May , 1 cloak, value 15s., and 1 umbrella, value 5s. , the goods of William Soffe .

WILLIAM SOFFE. I am printseller . On the 25th of May, about one o'clock, I was in my shop, at the corner of Southampton-street ; I saw the prisoner pass by with a cloak on his arm, and an umbrella in his hand - I thought they were mine; I went up stairs and missed mine, which I had seen not a half an hour before; I came down and followed him down the Strand - I saw him crossing Adam-street with the cloak on, and the umbrella in his hand; I stopped him and said, "You rascal, you know what I have taken you for" - he merely shrugged up his shoulders; I took the umbrella from him, and led him to Bow-street, with the cloak on.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I received charge of the prisoner.

The prisoner stated through an interpreter. that he was one of the Spanish Refugees, and was in great distress.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-192

1191. CHARLES PETTIT was indicted for stealing on the 5th of June , 7 lasts, value 22d. , the goods of Joseph Myers .

JOSEPH MYERS. I am a boot-maker , and live in Wentworth-street. On the 5th of June, I sent my apprentice to the prisoner's house to buy a last; he came back and gave me information - I sent my second apprentice to see if it was true; he came back and fetched me - I found six lasts, which I told the prisoner were mine; he said,"If they are take them," but his wife would not allow me without a search-warrant - I went away, and was obliged to attend the Westminster Sessions, and could not go till the Friday; I went to him again on the Saturday, with an officer, but while I was away, on the Friday, one pair of lasts were sent to my house - when I got to the prisoner's house, I found the lasts in the yard, and he said he could bring a man whom he bought them of; the officer told him to fetch him, which he did - we asked him if he had sold the prisoner any lasts; he said Yes, hundreds, and he could swear to every last he sold him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What took you to the Westminster Sessions? A. I went to give a man a character - he told me that Lawrence had sold him hundreds of lasts; there was no mark on these, but there is an old one here I know, which I would not take a hundred new ones for.

HART LEVY. I am apprentice to Mr. Myers. On the 5th of June, I went to buy a last, and found some of my master's there - I saw one pair lying on the shelf, and went and told my master.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You have been in that shop often, buying things? A. Yes; I have told him I came from Mr. Myers - I bought one pair for three half-pence.

HENRY JONES . I am apprentice to Mr. Myers. I went to the prisoner's after hearing what Levy said; I saw some lasts - this pair was brought to my master's the day after.

Cross-examined. Q.What are they worth 10d. or 1s? A. If I had a shop, I should give about 9d. for them.

THOMAS EAGLES . I am an officer. I went with a warrant to the prisoner's house; Myers asked where the two pairs of lasts were - he took me to the back yard, and showed them to me, quite away from the others; he said he bought them of Lawrence, who had sold him a great many - his wife went and fetched Lawrence; I would not let him see the lasts, till we got before a Magistrate.

GEORGE LAWRENCE. I have sold a great many lasts to the prisoner, but I never sold him these - he keeps a grinder's shop; he sells a great many lasts - I would not give more than 6d. for these; I should not wonder if there were half a cart load of lasts in his shop.

JOSEPH MYERS . The prisoner was never in my shop to my knowledge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-193

1192. WILLIAM OAKES and CHARLES THOMAS were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 64lbs. weight of bacon, value 2l. , the goods of Thomas Stock ; and that the said William Oakes , on the 23d of October, in the 9th year of his Majesty's reign, &c. was convicted of felony.

THOMAS STOCK. I am a yeast-dealer , and live at No. 4, Little Camden-street, Camden-stown . I had a side of bacon, which I hung at my door on the 21st of May; I went out, and while I was at the Fox publichouse, at Highgate, my wife came and said it was gone; I thought it was a joke, but when I came home I found it was gone - it was my own killing and cutting up.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It has been killed a long time? A. About three weeks; I did not breed the pig - I know the cutting of this, it is different to any other.

CHARLOTTE STOCK . I am the prosecutor's wife. This bacon hung at our door at three o'clock - in ten minutes it was taken - I went and told my husband.

Cross-examined. Q. Could one person carry it? A. Yes; one man.

GEORGE WADDINGTON. I am an officer. I met the two prisoners and a third person; Oakes was carrying this bacon on his head - Thomas was carrying a bat in his hand; I followed them down to Clerkenwell workhouse, to see if they spoke to one another, but they did not - they were close together sometimes; I then went up and asked Oakes who gave him the bacon - he said it was given him by a person near the prison to carry for him; I secured the third one, and took hold of Thomas; Oakes threw the bacon at me and ran off - he was brought back: he took up the hat, which laid at my feet, and said"Give us my hat."

Cross-examined. Q.Where did you meet them? A. At the corner of Coppice-row, that is two miles from Camden-town; these two men might have met the other; Thomas threw down the bat when I took hold of him - it was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; Thomas got away, and was taken the next day - the third person was discharged.

GEORGE ROGERS . I am a watchman. I took Thomas on the 7th of June.

THOMAS CLARK . I was watching when Oakes and Thomas were stopped; I saw Oakes with the bacon, which he threw down - another person was carrying the hat; I do not know who it was - I did not see them talk together.(Property produced and sworn to.)

OAKES' Defence. I met a young man in black, who asked me to carry this bacon; the officer asked me who gave it me - I showed him the young man; I thought it was Thomas, but it was not.

THOMAS' Defence. I know nothing of this young man; I never saw him before.

MATTHIAS WELDHEN. I produce a certificate of the conviction of Oakes - I was present at the trial, and know he is the man. (read.)

OAKES - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-194

1193. MARY JONES , alias ANN GASS , was indicted for that she, on the 29th April , feloniously and maliciously by force, did take and lead away Ellen Goddard , spinster, an infant child, under the age of ten years, to wit, about the age of three years, with intent to steal and carry away certain articles upon and about the person of the said child, (i.e.) I bonnet, value 10s.; 1 pelisse, value 12s.; 1 frock, value 3s.; I petticoat, value 6d.; 1 pair of stays, value 6d.; 1 shift, value 1s., and 1 tippet, value 4s., the goods of John Goddard : against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same as the first, only for maliciously decoying and enticing away the said Ellen Goddard ; and that the prisoner, at the Delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the Country of Middlesex, on the 15th day of January, in the 9th year of the reign of his present Majesty, was convicted of felony, by the name of Ann Gass.

ELLEN GODDARD . I am the wife of John Goddard - my daughter's name is Ellen. I was in Mr. Langstaff's shop, and missed my child from the door; the shopman ran out of the shop - I went after him, and saw the prisoner and child.

PHILIP REYNOLDS BISHOPS. I live at Mr. Langstaff's. I saw this lady in the shop, with the child at the door - I saw the prisoner pass the shop two or three times; the last time she passed she took hold of the child with one hand, and put her other hand to the child's back - she went round the corner; I rather suspected she was going to do something with it - she crossed behind a coal waggon, with the child in her arms; I came back to the shop, and found Mrs. Goddard had missed the child - I then ran out again, and Mrs. Goddard after me; I ran on; we saw the prisoner, with the child, in Earl's-court - I heard the child say to her, "What are you going to do with me? I don't belong to you;" I took the woman, and Mrs. Goddard took the child.

FRANCIS MACE . I received the prisoner at the watch-house; she appeared sober; and at Marlborough-street she said she did not know what possessed her to take the child.

Prisoner's Defence. I never said any such thing. I had been to Westminster, and was coming back; my father and mother lived at No. 4, King-street, close in that neighbourhood; I saw this child near the coal waggon, took it up, and said, "Where do you live?" I thought she lived at some house in the court, and I had not time to inquire before the man came, and took me - I walked back; I am innocent of stealing any thing - I had the misfortune to be here once; the man who stands there took me - he could speak of my bad qualities, but he would not speak of his own.

JOHN GROOM . I produce a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner on the 15th of January last - she was convicted in the name of Ann Gass ; I was present, and know she is the same person (read).

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-195

1194. EDWARD COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 2 doors, value 2l., and 2 glazed sashframes, value 2l. , the goods of William Sparks .

WILLIAM SPARKS. I am a carpenter . On the 8th of

May I missed from some houses in Copenhagen-street two glazed frames and two doors, which I had seen safe three days before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was the prisoner in your employ? A. Yes; I build on speculation -I have sometimes two or three men, sometimes twenty or thirty; I had at this time four or five men - I generally paid them in money; never with any thing else - I may have paid them a few shillings short on the Saturday night, but never paid them in goods, to the best of my knowledge, for the last twenty years, nor ever authorised any one to pay them in goods; if a man wanted a board, I let him have it at market price; if so I outset it, but I never let them have goods when I had no money to give them, that I will swear; there was an execution against me in the Forty-Shillings Court, but I did not keep out of the way on that account; I was pulling down some houses in the Strand - I was not out of the way for fear of being arrested; I do not owe 20l. in the world - I was not indebted to some others of my workmen to the amount of 15l. or 20l. - the prisoner was in my employ; they drew their wages weekly; upon my solemn oath, I have not given some of the men materials with the view of paying them their wages, nor allowed them to take materials; I had a labourer named Horsley - I cannot say what I owed him, because his work was not finished; I did not allow him to take any thing by way of paying himself - I do not consider that I have paid him for all that he has done; I did not desire the prisoner to take four long joists from Mr. Sutton - they did do it, and I have had them to replace; these four long joists were employed on my premises without my knowledge - I never knew a word about it till after the surveyor called upon me.

GEORGE BARWICK. I took the prisoner on the 9th of May.

RICHARD BRAIN. I keep a shop in Somers'-town. On the 8th of May I was gone to an auction-room; the prisoner and another man came to me there, and asked if I would buy a couple of doors; I said, "What sort of doors are they?" they said, "New ones, and they are all fair and square - we have got them to sell instead of getting money from our master:" when I returned home, they brought them down, and left them; I gave them 6s. 6d. on the doors - they said they had got two pairs of sashes and frames, would I purchase them; I said, "I don't know - they are things very dangerous - they may be broken, perhaps, in my place;" they said, "We will chance that; if you will have them, we will bring them:" the chief of this discourse was from the other person - they brought down the sashes, and left them there.

Cross-examined. Q.These men came in broad daylight? A. Yes; they told me to expose them for sale - they said they were not afraid of them; they said their master owed them from 15l. to 20l.

JURY. Q. Did they tell you their master's name? A. No; I did not ask.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a witness.

WILLIAM TRUSS. I am a carpenter. I know Mr. Sparks; I worked for him at the time the prisoner did -Mr. Sparks owed me some wages, and I was obliged to go, and kick up a noise before I could get any to support my wife - we were to draw money for the work every week, but on the very first Saturday night he left us without a copper; some went to Kennington, to Mr. Sutton's, to try and get the money - he knew of our taking these joists, but he denied it before me - Mr. Sutton, his brother-in-law, who is the foreman, told us to go and take the joists, which we did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-196

1195. JAMES PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , 23 feet of oil-cloth , the goods of Joseph Shepperd .

SAMUEL COBHAM. Joseph Shepperd is a broker , and lives in Norfolk-street, Middlesex Hospital . On the 26th of May I saw the prisoner and another man go up to a piece of floor-cloth at his door - they both handled it; the prisoner then came across to my door, and when a favourable opportunity occurred, he held up his hand, and said,"Now then;" the other man took the cloth, and ran down Cumberland-street; I sent my boy after him - the prisoner ran down Charlotte-street - I pursued, and took him; the other man got off with the floor-cloth.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290611-197

1196. EDWARD MATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of William Sempele Blake .

WILLIAM SEMPELE BLAKE . I keep a shoe-shop in High-street, Stoke Newington ; the prisoner came for work on the evening of the 11th of May, about eight o'clock; I told him to take a seat while I got a light - and when I returned, a person told me that he had taken a pair of shoes from the window, and put them into his bosom; he denied it, but we laid him down and took them from his bosom: he went to his master's - I put on my boots and went after him; his master desired me not to take him that night, and I did not.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you owe any thing to his master? A. I believe there was 1s. 8d. left on the Saturday, that we could not agree about; he came to ask for that money, but he did not receive it - he said at the office that his master had desired him to take some goods if he could not get the money; he said, at the office too, that I owed his master 6d., but his master denied that; he had asked for 1s. 8d., and what work there was for him to do; I should have given him the 1s. 8d. if he had not robbed me; nothing passed upon the subject of transportation between me and the master at any time - the prisoner has a mother - his being taken was not made known to her till after the hearing; she came and gave me her address - that was how I knew where to find her.

SAMUEL LEE . I was left in the shop, and saw the prisoner take the shoes out of the window and put them in his shirt - I was behind him.

Cross-examined. Q. Could you help seeing him, and what he took? A. No; I do not think he saw me - it was near nine o'clock; there was a glass door between us - I was about a yard from him; I am a butcher - I was standing in my shop, and the prosecutor said to me, "Just look into my shop while I get a light; "the prisoner did not hear that - I live next door: I could go into the shop without his seeing me - it was all done in a minute.

ANDREW LLOYD. I am a constable, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I said to Mr. Lee, "My master told me to take a pair of shoes instead of a 6d.;" he said,"You should have said so to Mr. Blake;" I said, "I have said it to you - I hope you will not tell Mr. Blake, and I will not do it again."

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290611-198

1197. RICHARD ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of John Aaron .

THOMAS CAPPS . I am in the employ of John Aaron, a pawnbroker . On the 22d of May I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner take the shoes; I went out and secured him; they had been hanging at the door - he dropped them; some person took them up and brought them in -I never lost sight of him.

FRANCIS KEYS. I took the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-199

1198. WILLIAM PILBEAM was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , one 10l. Bank note , the property of Charles Smith .

ELIZABETH SMITH. I am the wife of Charles Smith. The prisoner was in my employ; I gave him a 10l. note between twelve and one o'clock on the 4th of April, to get change; my husband is a bookbinder , and I keep a lodging-house - he was employed to clean knives and shoes, and to go on errands; he never came back with the note nor change - I bad sent for it to pay a small debt; I did not owe him any wages.

ELIZABETH SMITH , JUN. I saw my mother give him the note; he had been two months with us.

CHARLES SMITH. The prisoner was in my employ; I met him in the City, very gaily dressed, on Easter Tuesday- I hardly knew him; he begged I would not take him before Mrs. Smith, as he was quite ashamed to see her.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290611-200

1199. WILLIAM LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , 14 thimbles, value 28s. , the goods of William Bell .

WILLIAM BELL . I am a jeweller , and live at Hackney . On the 21st of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the back room behind my shop, and some person came in; my wife went to serve him - I went into the shop, and saw it was the prisoner, whom I had known well before; he used to live at Hackney; before I came out of the parlour I heard him say he wanted five such thimbles as he had bought three of, of Mr. Bell a few days before: when I got into the shop, he said, "I want five such thimbles as my daughter had of you;" he bought nothing - as soon as he was gone I went to my other shop at Stoke Newington, and found him there; I told him I would detain him- he said I should not; I said I would, and took hold of him: we had a scuffle - he then said, had I a back room, and he would go there - I took him into the back room, and he began to cry; he said he had a wife and nine children, and he hoped I would not be hard with him; the officer came, and found this property, which I identified as mine - I believe it had been chiefly taken from my shop at Newington; there are four that I can identify particularly.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me look at any property at Hackney? A. I have not said I did; I followed him to my shop at Newington - he had purchased a thimble at Newington, and paid for it; he did not mention about his wife being in the family-way - he lived about five years within fifty yards of me; when he put the property on the table he said, "You don't swear to that?" my answer was"That remains to be proved;" I only deal with one manufacturer for this sort of thimbles - we had but half a dozen of them; they were sent to Newington from my shop at Hackney, some weeks before, but it so happened that none of them had been sold; after he had been in the shop there were only two of them left.

MARIA MORLEY . I am sister to Mr. Bell, and keep his shop at Newington. On the 21st of April I saw the prisoner there, between six and seven o'clock in the evening - there was no one there from two o'clock till he came in; I was giving him change - Mr. Bell came in, while the prisoner was there, under the pretence of getting a thimble of a particular size, to send to the East Indies - he was continually trying thimbles on his finger, and putting his hand into his pocket again - he almost tired my patience.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you for a thimble with a particular motto "Remember me," on it? A. Yes, and I repeated the mottos I had, and gave you one "From a friend;" you said you would have one of them, but you repeatedly put your hands into the tray, and put them into your pocket again; when I saw them on the table, I could be upon my oath, those four had been in the tray - here is one I have worked with myself; it has a small bit of rust on it: I was in the shop when the officer searched him, but I went into the parlour just as the officer had taken them from him; he made no resistance to the officer, but he did to my brother - I went and locked to the door; I believe he got on the step of the door, but he did not get away.

JAMES OFFORD. I was in Mr. Bell's service. I saw the prisoner come into the shop, at Newington, and opened the door for him; I heard him ask for some silver thimbles - I saw him put his hand into the tray, and then put his hand into his pocket, and make an excuse that he had the size somewhere.

Prisoner. Q.Who told you to say this? A. No one.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer, and took the prisoner- I found these fourteen thimbles on him, in his right-hand trousers pocket.

MR. BELL. From the appearance of those thimbles, I believe, conscientously, that these four are my property.

Prisoner. The Magistrate asked him if he had any mark on them, and he said No; the Magistrate then asked him if he could not buy them in every shop, and he said Yes. Witness. No, I said they could not be bought in Hackney.

MARIA MORLEY . This is the thimble I spoke of; I used it, and there is a little rust on it, which I could not remove - I can swear to it.

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, stated that his character had been hitherto unimpeached - that he dealt in thimbles, and that these were of too common a description to be identified.

GUILTY. Aged 42.

Judgment Respited . (See page 507.)

Reference Number: t18290611-201

OLD COURT.

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JUNE 16.

First Middlesex Jury. Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1200. WILLIAM DIMMITT. alias LONG , was indicted for that, at the General Session of the Delivery of the Gaol of our Lord the King, of the County of Surrey, holden at Kingston-upon - Thames, on Thursday, the 23d of March, in the first year of the reign of George the 4th, he, by the name of William Dimmitt, late of the parish of St. Saviour, within the Borough of Southwark. in the County of Surrey, labourer, was in due form of law tried on a certain indictment against him, for that he, on the 18th of January, in the 60th year of the reign of George the 3d, about the hour of seven in the night of the same day, with force of arms, at the parish aforesaid. in the County aforesaid, the dwelling-house of Sarah Cousins , there situate, feloniously and burglariously did break and enter, with intent the goods and chattels, in the same dwelling-house then and there being, feloniously and burglariously to steal, take, and carry away, and I umbrella, value 7s.; 1 flute, value 7s. 6d.; 1 gold watch, value 20l.; 1 key, value 10s. 6d.; 4 silver table-spoons, value 3l. 6s.; 6 silver tea-spoons, value 1l. 10s.; 1 pair of silver tea-tongs, value 16s.; 2 counterpanes, value 3l.; 1 quilt, value 10s.; 5 sheets, value 2l. 10s.; 3 blankets, value 15s.; 11 gowns, value 9l. 9s.; 5 petticoats, value 1l.; 3 table-cloths, value 2l. 2s.; 8 printed bound books, value 10l. 10s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 1l.; 1 pair of stays, value 10s.; 1 silk shawl, value 10s.; 1 cloth pelisse, value 3l.; 5 pairs of stockings, value 1l. 1s.; 4 pillow-cases, value 10s., and 5 habit shirts, value 5s., the goods of the said Sarah Cousins , in the same dwelling-house then and there being found, then and there feloniously and burglariously did steal, take, and carry away, against the peace, &c. and was thereupon convicted of feloniously stealing goods and chattels, in the indictment mentioned, in the dwelling-house of the said Sarah Cousins, to the value of 50s., and acquitted of burglariously breaking and entering the said dwelling-house in the night-time, and was ordered to be hanged by the neck until he should be dead, but his present Majesty having been graciously pleased to extend the Royal Mercy to him. on condition of his being transported to the coast of New South Wales, or some one or other of the islands adjacent, for the term of his natural life, which being in due manner signified.&c. he was ordered to be transported accordingly; and that he afterwards, on the 16th of April , in the 10th year of the reign of his present Majesty. feloniously was at large, without any lawful cause, within his Majesty's dominions, to wit, at St. James, Clerkenwell , before the expiration of the term for which he was so ordered to be transported, as aforesaid; against the Statute .

SECOND COUNT, that at the General Session of the Delivery of the Gaol of our Lord the King, holden for the County of Surrey, at Kingston-upon-Thames, on Thursday, the 23d of March, in the 1st year of the reign of his present Majesty, he was ordered to be transported to the coast of New South Wales, or some one or other of the islands adjacent, for the term of his natural life, pursuant to the Statute; and that afterwards. on the 16th of April, in the 10th year of the reign of His present Majesty, feloniously was at large within his Majesty's dominions, to wit, at St. James, Clerkenwell, without any lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term for which he had been ordered to be transported; against the Statute.

JOHN VANN. I produce the certificate of the prisoner's conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark, Clerk of the Arraigns for the Home Circuit - I saw him sign it (read, see indictment.)

GEORGE GOFF. I am a constable of Surrey. I was at the Spring Assizes, Kingston, in 1820; I saw the prisoner tried there - I knew him before, and am certain he is the man; I knew him, as being called Dundy Bill, the Barber - I am certain he is the man who was tried for a burglary at Mrs. Cousins.

FRANCIS KEVS. I am a day patrol, of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner as he came out of Clerkenwell prison, Middlesex, on the 16th of April.

Prisoner's Defence. In January last I was apprehended on the same charge, and the prosecutor of Dimmitt swore I was not the man; the Governor of Brixton gaol also swore so, and the chief constable of Union-hall- those persons had Dimmitt in their custody for months after he was tried, and this man now swears to me for nothing but the purpose of getting the reward; I had three examinations in January.

GEORGE GOFF . I was present at his trial - Mr. Baron Garrow tried him; I was not a witness in the case - I had apprehended him, but found nothing on him; I knew him before, and am confident he is the man.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18290611-202

1201. JOHN HAMSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Reed , on the 18th of April , at Hendon, and stealing therein 15 shirts, value 15l.; 1 table-cloth, value 30s.; 5 waistcoats, value 30s.; 1 shift, value 7s.; 3 napkins, value 7s.; 1 shawl, value 4s.; 3 caps, value 4s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., and 1 bag, value 6d. , his property.

SARAH REED . I am the wife of John Reed , a labouring man - we live in the parish of Hendon ; I take in washing. On the 17th of April, when I went to bed, the house was all fastened; I got up in the morning and found the ground-floor windows opened; one pane of glass was taken out - by which means they could put in their hands and unfasten the window; I missed the property stated in the indictment, which was worth about 20l. - it was all safe at half-past eleven o'clock at night; the prisoner lived with his uncle, about twenty yards from our house, about four years ago - his uncle keeps a public-house; I have not seen him for these four years.

OLIVER PETT . I am a constable of the Borough. On the 17th of April I was looking for the prisoner for another robbery - I went into a house, and he got away from me; next morning I had information, and followed a girl into Fleet-market - I found him in the tap-room of the Angel public-house there; that was on the morning of the 18th, a little after ten o'clock; I told him I wanted him - he said, "Oh. do you Mr. Pett;" I said, "Yes, you must go with me," and I took him in custody - he had a bag there; I asked if it belonged to him - he said it did; I have had the bag ever since - the prosecutrix claimed the contents.

Prisoner. I sat there ten minutes - then you asked if the bundle on the table was mine; I said it was not, but it was in my possession, and I expected the young man in every moment. Witness. No, he did not say a young man had left it - he said it belonged to him.

MRS. REED. I know all this property - here is a shirt, and I believe all the rest to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I came up to London in search of employment - I had not been in town more than two months; I had appointed to meet a young man at the Bolt-in-Tun, as he knew of a situation which he thought would suit me - while I was there a well-dressed person, in appearance a gentleman, came into the house, and asked if there was any one there willing to earn a 1s.; having nothing to do I gladly accepted the offer, and asked him what it might be - his answer was, "To carry this bundle for me;" the bundle now before you is the same one which the aforesaid person gave into my possession to carry - I put it on my shoulder, and went along with him until we reached the Angel public-house; opposite the door he stopped and said, "Young man, I wish you to stop here a few minutes - you can go into the tap-room and sit down - here is 2 1/2d, get a pint of porter; I have to call upon a friend, who is going to Tring with me, and shall not be more than ten minutes, and mind take great care of the bundle" - I went and sat down, and had been upwards of ten minutes there when the officer came in and said,"I want you;" I, not knowing what he wanted, and fearing that it was some trick to get the bundle from me, felt rather reluctant to go with him - he asked me if that was my bundle; I answered in the negative, but that a person, whom I described to him, had left them in my possession and in my care - we waited about ten minutes more, and the aforesaid person did not come; the officer then sent for a coach, and gave orders to the coachman to drive us to Union-hall - judge then my amazement in being taken before the Magistrate, and charged with having those things in my possession, and not being able to give an account of them; I never having been in trouble before, was so agitated that I could scarcely speak - however, I told the Magistrate the whole of the business; I declare solemnly, and in the presence of that Supreme God who created me, that I am innocent of the crime imputed to me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

Reference Number: t18290611-203

1202. GEORGE HAINES was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tindal.

Reference Number: t18290611-204

1203. RICHARD ELLIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Griffith Foulkes , on the 20th of May , at St. Martin-in-the-Fields, and stealing therein 12 pieces of silk, containing in length 460 yards, value 50l., and 8 pieces of wood, value 2s. , his property.

RICHARD FOULKES. I live at Nos. 2 and 3, Little Russell-street, Covent-garden, in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields , with my father, whose name is Griffith; it is two or three houses connected together in one - they were originally numbered 2 and 3; my father is a linen-draper and silk-mercer . On the 20th of May I came into the shop first to let the young men in, about seven o'clock - I sleep in the house myself; I observed a ladder on the counter, against the sky-light above, and observed the skylight window was broken - I found two squares had been taken out, and the bar of the window broken - the skylight slants - a small man might have got through; but there was a latch by which the window might have been opened; it was closed then; I had not been in the shop over night - I looked upon all the shelves, and discovered that many pieces of silk were taken away; I missed eight or nine rolls of silk, but am not certain of the exact number - the young men were with me; I missed a piece of calico, used as a wrapper, from near where the silks were taken; it was used to keep the dust from some muslins - the silks were on blocks of wood, which were also missing.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you sure the house is in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields? A. Certainly; my father is the churchwarden - I am not in partnership with him; he has no partner: I was the first person in the shop in the morning - the maid servants might have been up before me; I was up before any of the male servants, for I called them all up: I sleep on the second floor - my room looks down about twelve feet from the sky-light; I think the prisoner might get through the hole in the sky-light; a small man could have got through easily - the latch is immediately under the hole; I cannot say whether it had been raised; my father has a very large stock of silks - it is a large establishment; I buy every piece of silk myself: I cannot say how many pieces were in the house - I missed the property, and will swear it was there in the evening, but I was at the theatre that night - I know the wrapper ought to have been on the muslins.

ELIZABETH HOLDSTOOK. I live at No. 81 1/2, Drury-lane; I do not know the prisoner personally - I know him, when I see him, by his lodging in that house where I now live; he came there first on Thursday morning, the 21st of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I think; I am only a lodger - before he came, a porter brought a box to the top of the house - this is the box (looking at it); the prisoner followed the porter up; he came at the same time in company with the porter - I was outside my room door, and the porter asked me where the box was to go to - the prisoner was close to him on the stairs; this was on the third floor; I did not know the room was let, and asked the porter who he wanted; he said the box belonged to a gentleman behind - I asked if he wanted the empty room; he said he did; I pointed to the empty room, which was on the same floor; he went in, took the box into the room, and the prisoner followed - the porter left the box in the room, and the prisoner asked me if he could lock or fasten the door; I cannot exactly say which - I told him I knew nothing about fastening the door, but I would take care nobody went in till the landlady came up: the prisoner went away, and left the door just on the latch - it is a kind of a spring latch; the landlady came up soon after, and I left - I did not hear of the robbery till the evening; I did not see the prisoner again that day myself.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure you heard of the robbery that day? A. That evening - it was Thursday; Mr. Foulkes' son told me of it: I am a widow, and a stock and collar maker - I work for Mr. Foulkes and live five or six hundred yards from him, I should think; it is on the opposite side of the way; I was not present when the prisoner took the lodging; the man who brought the box wore a porter's jacket and an apron - I cannot say whether

the prisoner paid him; I did not see the contents of the box till afterwards.

ROBERT TYRRELL. I belong to Bow-street office. I went, on the 11th of June, about twelve o'clock. to the prisoner's lodging, No. 81 1/2, Drury-lane, at the top of the house, with a search warrant, in company with Ellis, the principal officer of Bow-street, and Mr. Foulkes, Jun.; we went into a back-room, where the prisoner was in bed - the door was open; we told him we had suspicion there was stolen property in the room, and had got a warrant to search the room - he made no answer; I commenced searching, and in a dark corner, close to his bed, I found this box; it was nailed down all round - there were no binges; all the sides seemed alike; it is like a packing-case: I asked him what it contained - he made me no answer; I then broke it open, and found it contained silk: Mr. Foulkes looked at it, and said it was his property - it contained eight pieces of silk, and ten rollers; the silk was off the rollers, which were at the bottom of the box - I then searched his clothes, and in a coat which laid near the bed I found this pocket-book in one of the pockets, and in the leaf of the pocket-book I found eight pieces of remnants of the pieces of silk in the box, and each having the number of yards contained in each piece on them - I also found four duplicates in the book for four pieces of silk, pawned for 1l., 2l., 30s., and 20s.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time was this? A. About noon: I cannot say whether he had been asleep - he was awake when I went in; this was about three weeks after the robbery, which had made a great noise in the neighbourhood: a complaint had been made at Bow-street, and it had been stated in all the newspapers - I asked the prisoner what he was; he said he had formerly kept a linendraper's shop at Brighton.

JOSEPH EVANS. I am shopman to Mr. Gray, a pawnbroker, of Fleet-street. I have some recollection of the prisoner - I saw him on the 1st of June, in my employer's shop; he pawned about thirty-two yards of silk; I lent him 2l. 10s. on it - this is the silk; I have brought it from our shop - to the best of my belief he is the man, but I cannot speak positively to him: I gave him a duplicate - this is the one I gave him.

Cross-examined. Q. He was a stranger to you? A. He was.

WILLIAM WESTON. I am shopman to George Benton, a pawnbroker, of High Holborn. To the best of my knowledge the prisoner is the man who pawned this piece of silk on the 6th of June; I think it was in the evening, just before candles were lighted - I asked if it was his own; he said Yes, and gave the name of James Smith - I lent him 1l. on it; the duplicate I gave him is among these produced.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not certain of the time of day? A. No, I believe him to be the man; that belief is not strengthened by the duplicate being found - it is not uncommon for persons to pawn in fictitious names.

GEORGE LAMAN. I am a shopman to Young and Luxmore, pawnbrokers, of St. Martin's-lane. To the best of my recollection the prisoner is the person who pawned this piece of silk on the 10th of June for 1l.: this is the duplicate I gave him - I think it was about six o'clock in the evening.

FRANCIS GREEN. I live at No. 81 1/2, Drury-lane, and am landlord of the house. The prisoner came to me on the 21st of May to ask for a lodging; I had a bill up to let a room - I told him I had a room to let, and I could put a bed and bedstead into it; he asked what I should charge a week - I said I could not charge less than 2s. 6d. a week; he agreed to take it - I then asked him what he was; he said a linen-draper, and that he had burt his leg - he walked lame at the time; this was between eight and ten o'clock in the morning - he went away, and before twelve he and a porter came together; the porter had a box on his knot - the prisoner rather came before him to the door, and went up stairs behind him; the box produced is what he brought - I told the porter he had better take the box off his knot, or he would break the wall; he said, "No, I can carry it best on the knot," and the prisoner followed him up stairs with it.

Cross-examined. Q. You heard of this robbery, I suppose? A. I heard a rumour of it, but not on the day it happened - I am not much acquainted with Holdstock; the prisoner was three weeks at the lodging - he was in and out, sometimes he laid in bed all day, and sometimes used not to get up till one o'clock; he slept at home every night but one.

MR. FOULKES. I can swear to all these silks by having my own private marks on them - here is one piece; the other end of it is marked with a private mark: it has not been cut - I put them on the rolls myself since they have been found; I have examined them all - there are eight pieces; there is no private mark on the remnants, but they correspond with the pieces; and the silk produced by the pawnbrokers are my father's, and have my hand-writing on the end of some of the rollers, and I know the handwriting of our shopman on the others; I have not the least doubt of the silk being my father's property - I value them at about 70l. or 80l.; the wrapper is here - here are part of some letters on it, which were made by our stamps; the word is "white," it is partly torn.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you leave the house? A. At seven o'clock; the performance had commenced when I got to the theatre - none of our shopmen are here; we shut up at ten o'clock - it is not at all likely these silks could be sold that night; it is a large quantity: we have had an order for five thousand yards - a little boy at our desk receives money for goods; the people in the shop keep the order-book - we do not often sell whole pieces in the shop, and when we do we invariably take the rollers off; if we sell a large quantity we have them direct from the manufacturer, and then often do not block them - I went to bed directly I came home; I had no supper - I went into the drawing-room; people going out to sell silk often take a pattern with the length on it.

COURT. Q. You receive silk from the manufacturer without rollers? A. Some of them; this wrapper would not have been sent away with silk - if silk is sold we pack it in paper.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the silks, and paid a very fair price for them. I went into Rowbottom's, in James-street, Covent-garden, to take refreshment; I entered into conversation with two or three young men, one of whom I had been in company with several times; he asked if I would buy a quantity of silks - I said if they were cheap I had no objection; he showed me the samples, and

after a time I agreed to give him 30l. for the lot - I told him I would pay him 22l., and the rest when I had disposed of the goods, which he agreed to - two of the party left the house, returned in about half an hour, (which was about half-past seven o'clock) and brought the silks - I paid the 22l., and they agreed to take the rest when I had sold them - I know nothing whatever of the robbery, and never had a charge of the kind against me in my life.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Reference Number: t18290611-205

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1204. EDWARD TURNER , THOMAS CROWTHER , and MARY STEPHENS , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Davis , on the King's highway, on the 6th of May , at St. Marylebone, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 15s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 silver pen and pencil-case, value 6s.; 1 ring, value 5s.; 3 knives, value 3s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 1s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; 1 ring and keys, value 1s.; 1 sovereign, and 1 half-sovereign , his property.

THOMAS DAVIS. I am a linen-draper . and live in Seymour-place. On Wednesday night, the 6th of May. I was in a street in Lisson-grove, about eleven o'clock; I had left home to take a walk, between nine and ten - I do not know the name of the street; the prisoner Stephens came to me, and asked me to go with her; I had never seen her before - whether she met or overtook me I do not know; she asked me to go for a walk with her - I went; she said she would take me home, and after taking me through several streets, she wanted me to go to a house to dance with her - I told her I would not; she did not point out the house - she persuaded me, saying she would dance, and at last I consented, and went; I do not know where it was - it was a public-house; we went into a room - there was a fiddler there; she told him to strike up - I took a seat, and she danced with several men; there were seven or eight men there, but no woman but her; she danced with several men; I staid there some time, and after dancing she came to me, and asked if I was ready to go - two or three men left the room just before that, and I think the prisoners were two of them, but I had not much noticed the men there - they left two or three minutes before us; we then left - she had hold of my arm; she took me through several streets, and in North-street I asked how much further she was going to take me; she said, "Not far, only just round the corner;" after that we turned the corner, which took us to the end of the building - it was not a street, but open ground; we stood there a minute in the open air - she then made a sort of cough, and I was instantly knocked down by four or five men; some of them came from the end of the building.

Q. Did she cough designedly? A. It was a sort of cough, and they came up instantly from the side of the building; I did not know where they came from - there was no lamp very near; they knocked me down, and two of them, whom I believe to be the prisoners, held my throat and mouth - they were both doing that; they kept me so a few minutes, and pressed me very hard, which prevented me crying out - one man knelt over me with a large knife; the faces of the two who held me were towards me only part of the time; I could not clearly distinguish their features - I saw their dresses, and believe the two male prisoners to be the two who held my mouth and throat; I did not know any of them before - I believe them to be the two, and I think by their dress they were in the dancing-room; their dress corresponded with the dress of two men in the dancing-room; I speak to them from their face and their dress both - they left the room before I did: while they held me, one man held a long knife over my breast, while the others robbed me - the knife somewhat resembled a carving knife; he held it over my breast, but said nothing; I once got their hands off my mouth, and told them not to hurt me, and I would give them all I had; one of them said, "Stop him, stop him! stifle him!" they took my hat, my pocket handkerchief, and gloves, which were in my pocket, and a sovereign and a half, which were loose in my trousers pocket; I do not know whether they were in the right or left pocket - I had a little silver, but do not know how much, and cannot say whether they took any; they took a metal watch from my waistcoat pocket, three knives, a pair of scissars, a gold watch ring, and a bunch of keys - they were on me a few minutes, when I heard a little noise, a sort of grating noise, like a window opening, and then the prisoners jumped up.

Q. You have spoken of four or five men? A. Yes; two were rifling my pockets, while two held me, and the other stood over me with a knife; they all jumped up - the one who held the knife stopped longer than the rest, and kicked me on the head very violently, while I was on the ground; I had heard them say nothing but "Stifle him!" the kick made a large cut on the side of my head, it was with his shoe - it bled a great deal, and I believe, if they had not been disturbed. I should have been murdered.

Q. When these persons came up to you where was the female prisoner? A. With me; she disappeared when they came up - I saw no more of her; I got up and walked round the corner which they turned before, with my head bleeding; when the witness, Mrs. Raim, looked out of a window above, and asked what was the matter; I told her - John Raim opened the door, and told me to wait till he came back; I had not told him which way they had run; I waited on the pavement - he returned in ten or fifteen minutes, and in consequence of what he said I went with him and saw the two male prisoners in custody, and believed them to be the men who had attacked me; I accompanied them to the watch-house, and saw them searched by one of the watchmen; nothing belonging to me was found on them; I have not seen any of my property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.What was found on them? A. Two or three knives; I had never seen either of them before - I was much alarmed; I cough myself at times - I do not swear to the men; I do not know what street the dance was in, but the name of the house is the Grand Junction - there were seven or eight men in the room, but no women except Stephens; I do not think there was a dozen men there - certainly not more; I did not dance; I am a single man; I had been with a friend, and was quite sober; I had been to a house with my friends, but do not know what house or the street it was in; my friend's name is Woodhead - it was only one friend; I went into a public-house with him; I do not know the sign or the street; I afterwards went to a private house - I had

only been nine or ten days in London, and am quite a stranger; I had drank some ale, but am not certain whether I took any spirits, it is so long since - I paid for part, but do not know how much; it was not more than 1s. or 1s. 6d. - that was for drink and biscuits; I might drink some gin, but am not certain; I do not know what street the private house was in - I drank porter and gin there with Woodhead; I believe the person who kept the house was a friend of his; I did not know them; I might be half an hour or three-quarters of an hour in the public-house, and a quarter of an hour in the private house - I cannot say what quantity I drank there; I will swear I did not drink more than three or four galsses, and not a pint of porter; I had been drinking before that at the inn, the Yorkshire Stingo. that is the public-house we were at.

Q. Did you not say you did not know the name of the house? A. I have found it out since; I was drinking at another house about four or five o'clock - I do not know the name of it; I had been into the City that morning, and cannot say where I dined; I think I did dine on that day, but do not know - I took a glass with Woodhead about four or five o'clock - I cannot say whether it was ale or spirits, or what quantity; I was in no other public-house to my recollection; I do no know what houses I might have been in in the City in the morning; I did not drink where the dance was, nor send for any thing - I swear I was perfectly sober; I never said I was tipsy - there are two or three lamps in sight of the spot, but I took no notice of the distance they were placed.

COURT. Q. You do not swear to the prisoners? A. To the woman I can - I am quite sure she is the woman; I am not so certain of the men, but believe them to be the men; to the best of my belief they are the men who held me down; I am quite sure I was sober.

JOHN RAIM . I live at No. 25, North-street, Lissongrove, and am a bricklayer. On the 6th of May I had been out with my wife, about half-past six o'clock, to her sister's, in High-street; we got back about eleven o'clock- the watchman was calling "Past eleven," as we came down North-street; when we got to the door, and while I unlocked it, I heard a whistle; we both went into the house - my wife opened the window, and looked out; I saw the prosecutor under the window, and a girl with him- there was no lamp very near the window, but it was a very light evening; we both looked out of the window - I am sure the man who I afterwards saw is the one who was with the woman; I heard him say, "Where are you going to take me down this way;" I cannot swear the female prisoner is the woman - they continued there about a minute, and then went to the corner, about two yards further; they did not quite turn the corner - they stopped quite at the corner, and immediately they got to the corner two men came directly under my window; it was the two male prisoners - I cannot say whether they came out of the carcases of the houses; the prosecutor had then got round the corner - I knew it was the prisoners, for they came and looked me full in the face under the window; I had no light in my room, and one of them said to the other,"There are some people at the window;" "Nonsence" said one of them, and both came back, and the one in the light jacket (Crowther) came and looked me full in the face, in the window - my window is between eight and nine feet from the ground; I am certain he is the man - I have seen him about, but did not know his name; Turner was the first one who looked up - I could distinguish his face; it was he who called there was somebody at the window -I am certain they are the two men who passed the window; I have seen Turner about before also - when Crowther looked me full in the face, I pulled the windown down - I pulled the blind on one side, and saw these two run towards the corner immediately, and I immediately saw a girl running from the corner. up North-street away from them; she ran quite away, as far as I could see her, she did not cry out at all - I lost sight of her; just as the prosecutor got to the corner, I heard a sort of cough, and these men immediatly came running under the window - I lifted my window up again, and saw four or five men run away with a hat - I was lifting up the window gradually, and my wife came and pushed it up hastily; it made a noise, which they, I believe, heard, for they came running away instantly; there was either four or five of them - I could distinguish the two men who had looked up at the window among them: they went right straight across the way, but near enough for me to be certain the prisoners were two of them, I have not a doubt about it.

Q. Can you say that from their dress, or how; you could not see their faces at that time? A. I speak by their dress - Turner had a dark-coloured dress, and Crowther a light one; I immediately ran down stairs, and followed them - the prosecutor came up as I came to the door, with the blood streaming from his head; I told him to stop there till I came back - I followed some little distance behind them to Nightingale-street, and I lost them for some little time; I saw them in that street, and saw them go into a house; I saw two watchmen a little distance off - I went up, and told them what had happened; I could not tell exactly which door they went in at: I walked up and down the street about ten minutes, and saw Turner and Crowther come out - they were the only two that came out; I said,

"Come, you are just the young men I have been looking for" - they answered, and said,"Looking for we! you can't want neither of we;" they still kept walking backwards further from me - I was standing still; I said, "If you don't came to-night by fair means you shall to-morrow by foul; I know you both well" - the watchman was a little distance from me, and I gave them in charge, and they were apprehended - I left, and told them to bring them up to the prosecutor, at my house, which they did; I found the prosecutor ther; he said they were the two men that tried to strangle him - their shoes were daubed all over with the soft clay they had run across; the streets are not completed, and it had been wet - Turner's knees were all daubed over with the same sort of clay, very wet indeed; it was dirty round the corner, but not so dirty as in the middle of the road - it was very muddy there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prosecutor speak positively to them? A. He said "Those are the two men, I give them in charge;" he said before the Magistrate he positively believed them to be the men; I cannot say whether the dark coat was blue or black; they had hats on - I will not swear that; I never had a prosecution here - I cannot write; I had once a person committed

for trial at Clerkenwell - I committed a person named Ann Smith , to be tried here, and no bill was found against her; I cannot say why that was.

Q. Look at this paper (producing one) and tell me whether you do not know why the bill was not found? A. I cannot read; I never saw this paper before to the best of my knowledge, but I cannot tell - at the time the prosecution was going on at Clerkenwell, a young man called me out one night; there were two or three of them - they said, "Will you come and have something to drink;" I said "I have no objection" - he said, "I understand you have taken up an old sweetheart of mine;" I said," I don't know about that - I have taken one up for robbing me of a sovereign and a shilling;" he said, "Well, I should be very sorry you should lose by her; here, I will give you a sovereign, he as favourable as you can" - I said it was not left with me to be favourable - he said, "Well, take the sovereign, you won't lose much by her;" I took 20s. worth of silver - he said, "Just make a cross here, and I can show her when she comes out of prison, that I gave you a sovereign;" they got me to put my mark to it - I went before the Grand Jury, I believe it was the same day, or it was after he gave me the money - I did not agree not to prosecute her in consideration of having the sovereign; there were a great many people in the place.

Q. Did not two persons sign the paper as witnesses that you should not appear or prosecute - mind, they are here? A. The words were not mentioned - I put my mark without having the paper read. I was on the first floor when I saw the prisoners - the nearest lamp may be twenty or thirty yards off - I do not know the distance - it was a very light night; I told the Magistrate I had seen the prisoners before; what I said was taken down and read over to me.

COURT. Q. How long ago is it since the transaction occurred about Smith? A. I should think eighteen months, but am unable to say - she had picked my pocket of a sovereign and a shilling; I went before the Grand Jury and the watchman was examined - I put my mark to a paper, but what it was I do not know: the young man who gave me the 1l. wrote it - I know him when I see him, he is a coachman - I do not know his name; I stated to the Grand Jury just the same about Smith, as I stated to the Magistrate; no paper was produced to them to my knowledge.

AMELIA RAIM. I remember going home with my husband on the night of the 6th of May; the watchman was going past eleven o'clock: while my husband was opening the door I heard a whistle, and when I got in I lifted up the sash, looked out, and saw a man and woman- I did not know either of them; they were standing underneath the window - a man afterwards came to our house with his head cut - he was the same man as I had seen under the window; I did not see the woman's face, and do not know her; they went round the corner of the unfinished house. and I saw two men come under the window almost instantly - they passed the window, and went towards the corner, where the man and woman had gone- I and my husband were looking out at the window; one of them said there were persons looking out at that window, and he stopped and looked up at a window; the other man said,

"No, no;" one of them came back quite to the window, looked us in the face, and the other stood two or three steps off - I looked at the one opposite the window in the face for a minute or two; the one in the light jacket(Crowther) is the one who came back close to the window, and looked us in the face - I am positive of him; I had never seen him before to my knowledge - the other is the man who stood two or three paces off the window; I am positive of him; I never saw him before to my knowledge - I have no doubt of them at all: the first lamp, I believe, is about fifty yards off, but I cannot say; it may be more or less.

Q. How many lamps are there within sight of your house? A. I do not know; I never counted them - I believe they are gas lamps; the window was put down; my husband opened it again a little way, very gently, and in a minute or two I thought I heard a noise, and threw it up violently; I cannot exactly tell what the noise was, but something frightened me - my throwing the window up made a great noise, as it was a very loose sash; it went up freely, and made a great noise against the top - I looked out, and saw some men running along - I believe there were five, but did not count them; two of them I knew to be the two men I had seen under the window; they were not far from me, and as they were running they looked back again, and looked at the window - I saw them sufficient to know they were the same men; I have no doubt of it: I saw the prosecutor almost instantly; he was half bent, and his head streaming with blood - he came from round the corner: my husband went out; I saw the two prisoners again the same night, in custody of the watchman, and instantly recognised them as the two persons I had seen under the window - they are the two men: I was married in January.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you were rather frightened? A. Yes: not so much when I saw them run as when I saw the man bleeding: it is rather a lonely place - my husband had told me he had taken two of the men before I went to the watch-house.

Q. How long was it after you saw the prosecutor till you saw him bleeding? A. It might be five minutes - I cannot exactly say; it appeared so to me waiting: I dare say the men staid a minute under the window - it was all done in a very short time; I told the Magistrate I could recognise them by their faces - I am almost positive I mentioned their faces; they had hats on - I do not believe that either of them had a cap on under the window; they wore hats, to the best of my recollection; I cannot be certain whether one might not have a cap, but the rest of their dress I particularly noticed; I believe they wore hats - I only guess the distance of the lamp.

JAMES HORNE. I am a watchman. I was applied to by Raim, and took up the two male prisoners; they said nothing to me - Turner's trousers were both wet and dirty at the knees, as if he had been down in the dirt on his knees; I took them to the watch-house; I did not know either of them before - I had not seen either of them that night.

ANDREW FISHER . I am a watchman, of Great North-street and Grove-road. On the evening of the 6th of May, a little before eleven o'clock. I was standing at the corner of Great North-street, Marylebone, about ten minutes to

eleven o'clock; I observed five men come in a direction from St. John's-wood; I have seen the whole five ofter before - I could tell the names of two of those who are absent, and am certain the prisoners are two of those five -I have frequently seen them passing up and down the grove of a night, but did not know their names; I am certain they are two of the five, for I followed them down North-street to observe what they were about: I know where Raim lived in Great North-street; they were going in a direction towards his house, but they turned off towards Little North-street; the extent of my beat is at the end of Great North-street - I did not follow them further; they were then seventy-two paces from where the robbery was done; I have measured it: though I stated it to the Magistrate to be about one hundred and fifty yards, I measured it, and it is seventy-two paces of my own steps.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you measure the distance of the nearest lamp to Raim's house? A. It is about fifty paces; I call one of my paces a yard - her window is a height that I think a person might be identified from.

NATHANIEL BIRNIE . I am one of the serjeants of Mary-lebone watch. About twenty-five minutes past eleven o'clock, I was coming along Church-street, Lisson-grove, and saw some of the watchmen's lights in an open place; I ran across, and saw the two male prisoners in custody; Davis came up, and said, in their presence, "That is the man who held my mouth;" (pointing to Turner) Turner heard that - they made no reply in my hearing; Davis identified them both - he said he believed them both to be the men who held him down, and held his mouth; and he said if it was so, the knees of their trousers must be dirty- I turned a watchman's lantern towards Turner, and both the knees of his trousers were dirty and wet; I examined Crowther - there were no marks on his knees - I examined their shoes; they were dirty - I took them to the watch-house, and next morning I went to the spot where the robbery was committed, and saw a quantity of blood there, and footmarks, as if a struggle had taken place, and the impressions of shoes - it is a yellow brick clay soil; I went with Webster, the officer, to the watch-house, about half-past five o'clock that morning; Webster took off Turner's shoes, and Crowther pulled his off himself - I tried one pair at the place, and Webster the other; we compared them with the marks, and they exactly fitted, even the nails, and every thing - I am perfectly certain that those shoes had made the marks on that ground - that is my judgment; there were more marks than had been made by these two pairs of shoes - the tip of the heel of one pair had been worn off; this is it, and there were marks fitting it, and other marks of the very same number of nails in - the tips of both pairs fitted some of the marks.

Q.Was there any thing out of the common way in the shoe, did you find marks that exactly fitted it? A. I did; here are Crowther's shoes - they were also very plain to be seen; these nails in the too were very plain; I have no doubt these shoes must have been on the feet of the individuals who were on the spot.

Cross-examined. Q. Did they not appear to be the marks of persons who had been struggling about? A. No; there did not appear to have been struggling where the footmarks were - they are ordinary shoes; Davis did not express a doubt about the men in my hearing - he was quite certain of them; he believed them both to be the men.

Q. Did he not say the two men had knelt over him? A. No, not exactly; he said Turner was the man who knelt over him, and he believed the other to be the man who held his mouth - he did not say I should find the knees of both of them dirty, but I examined both; I found no large carving-knife - I found three knives; Davis said some person in a blue coat held a carving-knive over his breast - it had not rained in the night.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I belong to the Police-office, of Marylebone. I went with Birnie to the watch-house, and took the shoes off the prisoners - I accompanied him to the spot where the robbery was committed, and compared the shoes with the footmarks very carefully, and am convinced these shoes had been there before; I was perfectly satisfied as to Turner's shoes by the length, the width, and the tip to the heel, and the nails in the heel, all correspond with the marks - we measured them; I have no doubt whatever of Turner's shoes having been there before, also by the colour of the clay on them - I compared Crowther's shoes with some marks, and was not so satisfied in my own mind as to his as Turner's; I apprehended the female prisoner from the description that was given of her, and knowing she was acquainted with Turner - I went down to the New Prison thinking she would be bringing him refreshment; I saw her there, took her, and told her it was on suspicion of having been with Davis that night - she denied it.

Cross-examined. Q. She knew Turner was in prison? A. Yes, because she went there to him - Crowther took off his shoes, picked them up, looked at them, and said, "You cannot match mine," I have not satisfied myself about his.

CROWTHER'S Defence. I and Turner went to Kilburn, and came across the place twice where the robbery was - and I went to case myself upon that very place where the shoemarks were.

THOMAS WORLEY . I have known Crowther about seven years, and Turner one - they bore good characters; they came to me when I was at work at Mr. Watkin's brickfield, Portland-town, to ask if I could tell them of a job of work - there is loose clay and earth in that field; they wheeled up some dirt - it was on Wednesday the 6th of May.

Four witnesses gave Turner and Crowther good characters.

CROWTHER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

TURNER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor on account of the respectability of their friends.

STEPHENS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-206

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1205. BRYAN KENNEDY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Horatio Charles Anthony Hardy , from his person .

CHARLES HORATIO ANTHONY HARDY . I live at Stoke Newington. On the 25th of April, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking from Cornhill to the East India-house , and near Angel's, the pastry-cook's shop, I perceived my handkerchief was gone, on feeling for it; I am certain it was safe when I was in the Jerusalem coffee-house; on my return from the India-house, where I had

staid a very short time - I met Gordon who informed me he had taken up a boy; I found the prisoner in custody at the Mansion-house with my handkerchief, which had my name in full length on it.

JAMES BLAKE GORDON. I am a cooper and shipowner. I saw Mr. Hardy on his return from the India-house - about twenty minutes before that, I had seen the prisoner and given charge of him to an officer in Cornhill, for taking a handkerchief from a pocket; I took the handkerchief from the prisoner's hand myself, and saw the prosecutor's name on it - I knew him on seeing him; I asked if it was his - the prisoner was in custody with two others; I saw him take the handkerchief from a pocket, but did not know it was the prosecutor then; the other two went away immediately as I laid hold of the prisoner - one of them was older than him.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 25th of April Mr. Gordon delivered this handkerchief to me; he brought the prisoner into the Mansion-house, and charged him with stealing it - he said something about another boy having given it him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the ground in Rosemary-lane and took it up.

MR. GORDON. I am sure I saw him take it out of a gentleman's pocket - he was before the other two.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-207

1206. MARGARET LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , 1 watch, value 38s.; 1 chain, value 1s., and 2 keys, value 1s., the goods of William Wooding , from his person .

WILLIAM WOODING . I am ostler at the Ship inn, Fulham. On the 12th of March I was in London; I was at the Ship public-house, in Ivy-lane , early in the morning; I treated the watchman with a glass of gin, and had one myself - I was quite sober; I saw the prisoner in the taproom, and sat in the same box with her, on the same side of the table - I did not enter into coversation with her; I remained in that box with her from half-past five till half-past seven o'clock, and then she was gone; she asked me to treat her with gin - I refused: it was about an hour before she left - she left about half-past seven o'clock; before that she was very pressing for me to accompany her as a woman of the town; she wanted me to go out with her - I refused: I got up to go away about ten minutes after she was gone - I was going to see what time it was, and my watch was gone; one more woman had been in the same box, one on my right side, and the other on my left: the prisoner left first - the other stopped till after the officer came: she seemed the same description of woman - she was searched, but nothing found on her; she was taken to Guildhall, and then discharged; I have not found my watch - there were several persons in the tap-room at first, but for the last half hour there were only these two women in the same box; I sat down as soon as I got in - the prisoner came and sat by me: I moved to the other side, and she came and sat by me again - I felt my watch safe about half-past six o'clock, and looked at it, and am certain nobody was near me after that, except the prisoner and the other woman; nobody sat opposite to me - the taproom was partly full when I first went in; neither of them left the box till the prisoner went away - they had not stirred.

Prisoner. Q. Do you mean to say I was there at seven o'clock? A. Yes.

JOSEPH BATES . I am an officer. I was sent for to the Ship about twenty minutes to eight o'clock - the prisoner was not there; I had seen her there about half-past six o'clock, endeavouring to scrape company with the prosecutor - another girl was there, and five or six men in the house: I stopped about five minutes, looking at the prosecutor - he shunned her, and shifted his seat; I went there again about half-past seven o'clock - she was then sitting very near him, in the same box; the other girl was fast asleep - directly I went in, the prisoner got up and left the tap-room, and in about twenty minutes he missed his watch- I went after her, but did not see her again for a month afterwards; I am sure she was there at half-past seven o'clock.

HEZEKIAH WILMER. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and found nothing on her - she said, "I know what you want me for - it is about the watch;" I was at the Ship at half-past seven o'clock, and saw her leave the house - the prosecutor missed his watch within ten minutes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was there, and asked him for drink, having come a long journey, but I was at home before seven o'clock.

ANN HANDS . I am the prisoner's sister - she lived with me in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street, and works at the umbrella trade - I heard of this watch being stolen, and that it was said she was in the prosecutor's company; she had come in between six and seven o'clock on the morning of the robbery, and had not a farthing.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-208

1207. JOHN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 95lbs. of lead, value 10s., the goods of James Chadwick and others, and fixed to a certain building of his .

WILLIAM HUNT . I am in the employ of Mr. James Chadwick - the premises in question were not in his possession on the 3d of June, but he was proprietor of the fixtures, which remained there to be taken by the next tenant- his right to the fixtures was gone; he had no right to the occupation of the house at that time: Mrs. E. Ballard was the proprietor.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290611-209

1208. THOMAS RANGER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Abraham George Favenc , from his person .

ABRAHAM GEORGE FAVENC. I am a warehouseman , and live in Cheapside. On Tuesday, the 2d of June, I was by the Bank , returning home, and had used my handkerchief in Bishopsgate-street; it was about a quarter to ten o'clock at night - I observed the prisoner, with two more, by the Royal Exchange - I crossed over from them by the Bank, and near the end of the Bank I missed my handkerchief; on turning round I observed the prisoner about three yards from me - when I went towards him the other two persons passed me; I went towards the prisoner and saw him throw my handkerchief away - he attempted to run: I caught hold of him, and accused him of stealing my handkerchief - the others ran away; Garton came up,

and took charge of him - I picked up the handkerchief: he begged of me to forgive him, and promised if I would let him go he would not do so again.

JOHN GARTON . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner following the prosecutor; the other two were about ten yards behind him - I knew them by sight: I did not see the handkerchief taken; the prisoner went right under the Piazza - the others dodged about, and met at the other end- he spoke to them, and went on towards the Bank, and just before they came down to princes-street, I saw the prisoner turn round; the prosecutor turned round immediately, and I saw the prisoner throw the handkerchief on the railing of the Bank; the other two went on, and took not the least notice.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290611-210

1209. CHARLES CALLAN was indicted for embezzling the sum of 13l. 7s. 10d., which he had received on account of Henry Taylor , his master , he having been before convicted of felony.

HENRY TAYLOR . I am a Custom-house agent . The prisoner had been my clerk for about seven months - I entrusted him to receive money on my account and to pay it; Mrs. Thacker owed me 13l. 7s. 10d. - I never sent him for that money; it had been due to me about two months; she lived in Hertfordshire; I never inquired of the prisoner respecting it; I wrote to Mrs. Thacker for the amount - the prisoner had left my employ about a fortnight before that; he never said any thing to me about this money - I settled all accounts with him at the time he left me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You of course paid him all you owed him, and there was a balance struck? A. He owes me something now; he left a cage and two birds at my counting-house, and wished me to buy them for 12s., but I refused; I had a dispute with him, and discharged him, but he said he was in distress, and should feel obliged if I would give him a few days employ, and I sent him on messages; I cannot swear how long I kept him; at the time he brought the cage a captain was there who had paid him money which he had not handed to me, and I told him to leave the counting-house and never come again; I do not think he remained with me a single day after that - a gentleman once gave him an old sofa for his attention to him at the docks; I cannot now recollect whether that ever came into my possession, so many things pass in the course of a twelvemonth - if I did, I gave it to one of the men, at the docks - but it is a trifling circumstance, and I cannot say whether I had it or not; I only say, if it was given to the prisoner, it was given away again to some of the men, and I must have given him a compensation for it; I have had many such things in my possession; I do recollect something about one, but what it was I do not know; it was not worth 5s. - it was an Indian couch, they are sold at 10s. new; I remember one was given to him, but whether I ever had it I cannot say; I did not authorise him to receive money generally, but I have sent him for money, and if any was brought to the counting-house he received it; I cannot say whether I told the Magistrate he was not authorised; he did receive small sums such as 1l. or 2l.; I know Captain Liddel , he was not on board the Wellington; I have a hundred small accounts, and cannot recollect them all; I have no recollection of desiring him to borrow money on my account for dock charges - but it is common with us, if we want to ship goods in a hurry, to borrow money till the morning to pay the dock charges.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner ever demand any thing as due by you to him? A.Never; I made this charge about a week or a fortnight after he left.

MARY ANN WEBBER. I live at No. 48, Chiswell-street, Finsbury. I carried a letter, containing money, to the prisoner; the letter appeared to me to contain money - I felt money in it: I staid while it was opened; it was from Mrs. Thacker, directed to Mr. Taylor - I took it to the East India Chambers, Leadenhall-street, which was Mr. Taylor's counting-house; I delivered the letter to the prisoner, and was in the counting-house when it was opened: I did not positively see him open it- I said I had brought that letter for Mr. Taylor, and I was to take a receipt back for it; he said Mr. Taylor was not there, but my paying it to him would be quite right, the same as if I paid it to Mr. Taylor - he gave me a stamped receipt; I brought it home, and gave it to the lady who gave me the letter - she was in town then; it was Mrs. Thacker's mother; I never read it myself; I did not know what the sum was - I am sure I gave Mrs. Thacker's mother the same paper I received from the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. He might have passed off as Mr. Taylor to you, if he had chosen? A. yes; I felt something like money in the letter and heard it jink - I knew it was money; I am sure he is the person to whom I gave it, and who gave me the receipt.

JANE MANSON. I am Mrs. Thacker's mother. I myself brought the money down to my daughter to put into the letter; I do not know whether I saw her put it in -I was in the room when she wrote the letter; I brought it to London, delivered it to Webber, and told her to take it to the East India chambers, Leadenhall-street -I know it contained money; Webber took it out, returned, and gave me a paper, which Mr. Taylor has got(looking at it); this is the man's receipt for it - I am certain it is the paper Webber brought me (read).

August 1, 1828. Received of Mrs. Thacker the sum of 13l. 7s. 10d. amount of bill delivered for H. Taylor.

CHARLES CALLAN.

MR. TAYLOR. The whole of this receipt is the prisoner's hand-writing; he never accounted to me for this sum - I never knew it had been in his possession till this was discovered.

GORDON CLARK . I am a watchman of St. James' parish. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Shelton's office - I know the prisoner; he is the person described therein (reads) - I was present when he pleaded guilty to the charge, and am sure he is the person.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that his salary was 1l. a week, but he at times received but 5s. which was an inducement to commit crime; that he had been in possession of the prosecutor's monies for a considerable time, but always accounted for them when called upon to do so; that he had not taken money with the intention of embezzlement, for a sum was

due to him as salary, and that the prosecutor had offered to drop the prosecution for 35l.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen years .

Reference Number: t18290611-211

1210. JAMES SWEENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 1 poker drawing, in a frame, value 21s. , the goods of Charles Sweet and another.

CHARLES SWEET . I lived at No. 38, Chancery-lane - I have one partner, and am a looking-glass manufacturer . This poker drawing was in my window; I was not up when it was taken - my house is in the City.

JOHN LEACH. I am in the employ of Mr. Sweet. On the 8th of May, in the morning, this drawing was in the window, which was closed; the shop door was open; I was opening the shop, and just as I took the shutter in I saw the prisoner come in and take the picture; he went out with it; I went after him directly - I lost sight of him and overtook him in Fetter-lane with it, under his arm - I met a gentleman, and got him to lay hold of him, which he did; I took the picture; he said nothing.

THOMAS LIGHFTOOT. I am a constable. I received him in charge about eight o'clock in the morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. A lad came up, and asked me to carry it; he ran away when the gentleman came up.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290611-212

NEW COURT, Fifth Day.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1211. THOMAS PAGE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 61 handkerchiefs, value 8l. , the goods of William Venables and Thomas Venables , his masters.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290611-213

1212. JOHN ROBERTSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April, 1 saw, value 3s. , the goods of James Predex .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290611-214

1213.