Old Bailey Proceedings, 19th February 1829.
Reference Number: 18290219
Reference Number: f18290219-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., MAYOR.

THIRD SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 19th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1829, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY HENRY STOKES , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1829.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Stephen Gazelee , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Vaughan , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Richard Carr Glyn , Bart.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; and William Venables , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt., Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Edward Field ,

Thomas Elsworth ,

Charles T. Pearce ,

James Rickworth ,

John Robson ,

Daniel Gibson ,

Joseph Bull ,

David Rogers ,

William Dixon ,

Dagnal Ells ,

Stephen Sweet ,

Edward Bourn .

Second

John Ashby ,

George Pearce ,

John H. Spurling ,

Nehemiah S. Price ,

John Bourn ,

John Lockett ,

James Waterman ,

William Dossitor ,

Edward Moxey ,

William Wood ,

Allan Hay ,

Charles Crippen .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Thomas Collingnoge ,

James Ceasar ,

Daniel Culverhouse ,

John B. Cooper ,

John Davies ,

William Day ,

Edwin C. Davis ,

John Elder Duffield ,

Richard Dobson ,

Robert Danford ,

Joseph J. Dennison ,

George Dean ,

Second

Richard Edwards ,

Charles Erith ,

James Fordey ,

Joseph T. Fulham ,

Jonathan Faucet ,

Bernard Fletcher ,

Samuel Fisher ,

John Flint ,

James Flack ,

Thomas Flint ,

William K. Forster ,

William Gay .

Third

Henry Dunford ,

George Davis ,

John Darbyshire ,

John Delaney ,

John Daffron ,

John Davis .

George Durant ,

William Davies ,

George Duplex ,

William Door ,

John Dale ,

William Davies .

Fourth

James Blake ,

Jacob Nath. Barlin ,

John Brown ,

Daniel Geo. Brown ,

George Bromsby ,

Richard Bousfield ,

William Bailey ,

James Ballard ,

James Burton ,

Thomas Holg. Bull ,

Thomas Barr ,

Charles Beard .

Fifth

George J. Bisseger ,

William Barnes ,

William Collins ,

William Cruscorn ,

William Collyer ,

David Carpenter ,

William Catherwood ,

Thomas Chandler ,

James Cochrane ,

Thomas Clare ,

Henry Cecil ,

Joseph Course .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, FEBRUARY 19, 1829.

THOMPSON, MAYOR. - THIRD SESSION.

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

Reference Number: t18290219-1

526. WILLIAM CASS , TIMOTHY FLINN , and MICHAEL CANTWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 5 gallons of brandy, value 7l., and 1 cask, value 5s., the goods of Simeon Odwell , in his dwelling-house .

SIMEON ODWELL . I keep the King's Head public-house, Chelsea . On the 9th of February, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner Cass came to my house, and remained there till nine at night - he sat in the tap-room till about half-past eight, and then went down stairs into the kitchen, where the brandy is kept; he had been in the habit of sitting in my tap-room for the last fortnight, being out of employ - I sent the boy down after him; he came up about nine o'clock, and told me something - I immediately went down stairs, and found the door open; it opens into a court, which leads into the street - I missed a cask, containing five gallons and a half of brandy: I found Cass next morning, at half-past seven o'clock, at the Flask public-house, in Ebury-street, Chelsea, sitting by the tap-room fire - Sullivan, the officer, was with me: in my absence a pot was sent for - my boy went with it; he came back, and in consequence of what he said, I immediately went down into the field by Lord Grosvenor's canal, and found the cask and brandy; Cantwell had got it on his knee, and Flinn was pouring it out - several people were round them; I took hold of the brandy, and said, "I can swear this is my property;" Cantwell said if it was mine they would have nothing more to do with it - I sent my boy for an officer, who took the brandy and Flinn to the watch-house, which is about an eighth of a mile off, we then came back and took Cantwell; he had remained there till we came back, and was not in custody at all.

Q. When they first saw you coming to them, was there any thing done to the brandy? A. They were in the act of pouring it out - I staid there with it till the officer came; it was covered up with two coats before I got there: I had never seen Flinn or Cantwell at my house - the field was about an eighth of a mile from my house; the door below stairs was always kept locked, but the key was kept inside - any body within could open it and go out.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you been out of your house the day the brandy was taken? A. No, except just outside the door; I do not think above four or five persons had been to the house all day - only Cass was there in the evening: the side-door opens to a private back yard, where there is a privy, but there is another for the customers; I locked the door twice that afternoon, as I had been into the yard to look at some cottages; the pot and glass was borrowed of my house-keeper- I might have called her my wife before the Magistrate, but I do not recollect it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long was it before you returned and took Cantwell? A. In about ten minutes; he had seen the officer take Flinn away - about a gallon and a half of the brandy was gone; eight or ten persons were round - I gave 29s. 6d. a gallon for it.

WILLIAM BLACKFORD . I am servant to Mr. Odwell. On the 9th of February I saw the prisoner Cass at our house, about twelve o'clock - he staid till about nine at night, in the tap-room; about half-past eight o'clock, I saw him down in the passage; master sent me down to look for him - I had seen him go down stairs to the place where the privy was, about twenty minutes or half an hour before; I found him in the privy, and asked what he did there - he did not say any thing; I went up stairs, and he came up again to the tap-room, stopped there about half anhour, and then went down again; I went down about twenty minutes or half an hour after, and found the back door open, and Cass was gone (when I went down the first time it was locked;) I came up, and told master the door was open - he came down, looked about, and missed the brandy; he then went out - I went out, and looked about, but found nothing; I was sent out next morning, about seven o'clock, to watch, after the pot was borrowed, and saw the cask of brandy covered over (a person lives at the house as mistress;) I had seen the brandy safe that evening - nobody lives in the lower part of the house: I know Cantwell - I had not seen either him or Flinn near master's house that day.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where was the brandy kept? A. In the kitchen - the servant works there sometimes, but the victuals is not cooked there; I had not seen Cass drink any thing that day - I know nothing of his being sick; it is not a house of much

business. When I saw the brandy by the canal, Cantwell was with it, but not Cass.

COURT. Q. Had the customers any business in the kitchen? A. No - the servant is generally in the bar.

SIMEON ODWELL re-examined. I saw the brandy in the kitchen about half-past six or a quarter to seven o'clock that evening; the servant is generally in the taproom - we only use the kitchen to clean the things up in; I do not recollect Cass having any thing to drink that day- I did not hear him complain of being ill; it was about half-past eight or a quarter to nine o'clock when I missed the brandy; Cass had no lodging - he slept in some outhouse.

JOHN SOUTHERWOOD . I am an officer. Odwell came to me; I went with him, and found the brandy covered with two coats; there was a great many men at work in different barges - he pointed out Flinn and a man named Limbrick; I took them out of two different barges, to the house, and handcuffed them, and while I was in the watch-house Odwell, another person, and Selby, an officer, came in with Cass - Odwell said, in the presence of Flinn, that he was the man he thought had stolen it -I locked them up, returned to the barge, and found Cantwell; Odwell said that was the man he saw with the cask on his knee - he made no answer, and I took him; he went very quietly - the officer who took Cass is not here.

MR. PHILLIPS to SIMEON ODWELL . Q. How far is the Flask, where you took Cass? A. Three or four hundred yards from my house. I never let people out at that door - customers are never let out at it to my knowledge.

CASS' Defence. At twenty minutes to nine o'clock I went out at the front door; I was down in the privy four or five times, and between twelve and one the boy came and threw some water into my face in the privy; there were twelve or fourteen navigators in the house - he lets the people out at the side-door on Sundays.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

Reference Number: t18290219-2

527. BRIDGET SHERIDAN was indicted for stealing on the 5th of February , at St. James, Clerkenwell, 32 sovereigns and one 10l. Bank note, the property of John Effland , her master, in his dwelling-house .

SUSAN EFFLAND . I am the wife of John Effland , who keeps the Sun public-house, in Sutton-street, in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell . The prisoner lived in our service twice; she lived there eight or nine weeks the first time - we let our house, and took her back to accommodate the persons who succeeded us; she was with us six weeks, on the 5th of February, when this happened - the bar is a small room adjoining the parlour; there is nothing but a partition and a small door between them - we have a locker fixed to the wall in the corner of the bar - it has no lock to it; we keep money in it: on the 5th of February she brought five tea-spoons to the bar after tea - I had desired her to bring them into the bar-parlour, and place them on a small chest of drawers; I saw her come into the bar-parlour, but she never would put them there if I was there, but place them in the bar- she must go through the bar-parlour to get to the bar; I saw her go into the bar with the spoons - I was sitting in the bar-parlour with my husband and a little boy, about five years old; she passed through the parlour to go to the bar, and I distinctly heard the lid of the wooden locker fall as if let down - my husband asked me if I heard it; I told him to hold his tongue - she left the bar in about two minutes, and went through the parlour to the kitchen; I had examined the locker, and tied thirty-two sovereigns up in a bit of linen rag just before, and a 10l. Bank of England note - I tied them up together about a quarter past five o'clock, and left them safe in a purse in the locker; she went into the bar a few minutes after six with the spoons - nobody but myself had been in the bar in the intermediate time; they could not go without my seeing them, as they must go through the bar-parlour; there is another door, but it was fastened - she came through the parlour and across the passage into the kitchen, which is on the same floor; I immediately went to the locker before she could get to the kitchen, and observed a bag of silver there as I had left it, but the gold and note were gone - they were in a small purse; I immediately took my candle and went into the kitchen after her, and immediately she saw me she put her light out; I asked her to give me the purse which she had taken from the bar - her answer was "The devil a bit of purse have I got;" I told her she had got it in her bosom, for I saw it there - I saw part of it; I did not tell her I saw it, but told her she had it in her bosom - I asked her to give it me; she put her hand to her bosom, and I saw her move it from the front of her bosom, under her left arm; she then felt in her pocket, and took out some trifling things - I then told her she must go up stairs with me; she did not answer, but rushed behind me, and went back to the bar-parlour - I endeavoured to follow her, but she shut the door against me; she partly closed the door, and lay down against it to prevent my coming in -I could open it a little, and saw she was lying behind the door, but could not see what she was doing; I could only see her feet, and hear she was doing something; she kept there about two minutes, and then let me into the room; she got up and went up stairs with me - I asked her to take her clothes off - she took them off very deliberately, but I found no purse on her; she had five half-crowns and some shillings in her pocket, but I do not know whether I missed any silver that day - the silver bag had been turned on one side: I am certain no silver had been taken out of the bag that night, for I marked it- while I was up stairs with her, my husband went for an officer; Lee came in about half an hour - I expected she would give me the purse; the officers asked what she had done with it; I told them in her presence, I supposed she would give it me soon, but she denied knowing any thing of it; she continued to deny it - the officers and I searched in the kitchen where she had been standing, but found nothing; we went back to the bar-parlour - took her into custody, and the officers told me to search the parlour where she had been: I searched afterwards at the end of the chest of drawers which the door opens against - I saw some umbrellas had been pulled out from the end of the drawers, and in that space I found the purse with all the money in it, and my rag as I had left it; she had just gone out of the door in custody when I found it - the officer took the money to Hatton-garden; I myself did not take it up - I called

the officer to do it; it was opened in my presence - I found thirty-two sovereigns and a 10l. note in it; I know the note by the name of Weed on it, who I had received it from - I put his name on it myself, and I knew the linen rag.

ROBERT DUKE . I am an officer. I was sent for between eight and nine o'clock, and after Lee, the officer, took the prisoner away I remained in the house, questioning a man, who I understood to be acquainted with her; the landlord called me out of the tap-room into the parlour, and the prosecutrix pointed out the purse - I picked it up, opened it, and it contained thirty-two sovereigns, and a 10l note, which have been in my possession ever since, except twenty sovereigns which the Magistrate ordered me to give to the prosecutor.

JOHN EFFLAND . I keep the Sun. I was in the room with my wife, and saw the prisoner go through into the bar; I desired her to leave the spoons on the drawers in the parlour, but she took no notice, and went into the bar with them - she did not shut the bar-door; I could not see the locker, but I heard the flap go down, and nobody was there but her - nobody could go into the bar without my observing them; I swear nobody else went in - we had been sitting there some time - I know the Bank-note.

MRS. EFFLAND. This note (looking at it) is my husband's; I wrote the name of Weed on it; I know the rag also.

Prisoner's Defence. I used to take the spoons every morning and evening - I put them down with the tea-pot, and come out through the room they sat in: the child had some iron things and nails in a basket - I began to talk to the child; I always used to put out the candle before I came out of the kitchen, because she said it smelt so; she called me out of the kitchen and searched my bosom and pocket - I came into the room again to pick up the nails the child had taken out of the basket; she then called me up stairs and told me to strip; I did so, but she found nothing; I went into the tap-room and stopped till the officer came - he found nothing but my wages.

MRS. EFFLAND. I had not been out of the parlour after I made the money safe; nobody could have gone to the bar without my seeing them.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

A Jury of matrons being empannelled, found the prisoner quick with child.

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

Reference Number: t18290219-3

528. JOSEPH EVANS and PHILIP CRANAGH were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 2 beds, value 5l.; 1 coat, value 10s.; 5 shirts, value 10s.; 2 bed-curtains, value 1s.; 2 sheets, value 2s.; 5 handkerchiefs, value 3s., and 4 clock-weights, value 1s., the goods of William Hunt , in the dwelling-house of John Huskins .

WILLIAM HUNT . I am the only brother of John Hunt , who died on the 3d of January; he lodged at Chelsea , with Mr. Huskins - I came up to administer to his effects - I have not got the letters of administration, as I have not money to get them out; here is a copy of them - I have been at Huskins' house since my brother's death; Huskins had possession of the goods; he went with me, and saw me sworn administrator, and said he would deliver the goods up to me three days after that; I went, but he was not there, and I could not find him - I took possession of the goods on the 7th of February, that was after the robbery; Huskins is not here, he is not to be found - here is an inventory of what I administered to, I then lived at Sandwich, near Seven Oaks; I came to town a fortnight ago last Sunday, and on the Monday following I went to administer at Doctors'-commons, and was sworn there -I went there again last Saturday week to get the administration out, they wanted 4l. 13s. 6d. for it; it is ready for me at any time when I have got the money; Huskins told me on the Wednesday after I had been to the Commons, that he would give my brother's property up to me that afternoon, if I would come down about seven o'clock; I did not go down myself, but my son-in-law went - I have not seen Huskins since.

Q. Have you ever had possession of any part of your brother's property? A. Yes; I took what there was after the property was taken out of the house - I got possession of it on the Saturday before last: Huskins was not at home.

JOHN GROSE . I am the prosecutor's son-in-law. -When he informed me his brother was dead, I went with him to Doctors'-commons; Huskins was with us, and on Wednesday he came to my house, and said if I and Hunt would come down that evening at seven o'clock, he would deliver up all the things; I went down, there was nobody at home; I came home - I waited till next day, and as he did not call at my house that morning (I live about a stone's throw from his house) I went to his house again next day, Thursday - there was nobody in the house; the prosecutor took possession of some articles on Friday evening at Huskins' house; I went with him, that was after these things had been stolen - I saw the prisoners about half-past eight on Friday night and assisted in stopping them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Huskins has absconded? A. Yes - he is Cranagh's uncle; Cranagh said he was employed to carry the things, but he did not know the person. NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

Reference Number: t18290219-4

529. JAMES MOULTON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Alexander Rooney , on the 8th of December , and stealing 48 brushes, value 5l., and 33 bundles of bristles, value 15l., his property .

ROBERT ALEXANDER ROONEY . I am a brush-manufacturer , and live in Norton-falgate . On Monday night, the 8th of December, I left my doors all barred and bolted, and the windows secure; I have nobody but an apprentice in the house: I went to bed about twelve o'clock, got up about half-past six, and found the front door unlocked and unbolted - no violence had been used to that door; the key was left on the counter in the shop- I had left it in the door: my house was formerly a butcher's, and there is a slaughter-house at the back, from which there is a door and window looking into the shop - they first broke open the slaughter-house door, and had entered into the back parlour, through the slaughter-house window; a pane of glass was taken out of the window - they could then open the window, get

in and unbolt the shop-door; I missed a quantity of bristles, and about four or five dozen brushes - they were worth about 25l.; they were all safe the night before. -On the evening after the robbery two men called and asked me to come out, as they had something to communicate; I went out, and in consequence of what they said I went to the Police-office, and told what I had heard - an officer was sent with me and the two men; we went to a house in Charlotte-street, Curtain-road, where the prisoner lived - we saw him there, and found a basket of bristles on a table in a corner of the room; I identified them as part of my property - I knew some by the tie, and some by a process I had brought them through; the officer asked the prisoner how he came by them - he said two men called and left them there, and that he expected the price of a drink for allowing them to do so; the officer told him to say nothing to criminate himself, as what he said would be given in evidence against him - he then said two men called, and left them there; when we came to the office the other two men followed me for some money, for the information they had given - the prisoner was in the watch-house at that time; I had promised to reward them with 2l or 3l. if I obtained my property - I gave them into custody, and they were let out on bail; there names were Smith and Fletcher.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you learn from either of the men any thing about one Nathan? A. No, but he was in custody, and discharged on bail; I have not indicted him - the prisoner did not mention Nathan's name: the bristles laid on his table, in a clothes basket, covered with a black handkerchief; we found more in the room: I told the officer I suspected a man who lived behind my house, as he was in the trade, and the best bristles were selected - I have seen that man once or twice since; the prisoner described the two men to me, and I think they answered the description of the men who gave the information - they were in the crowd at the office, and the officer said, "Do you not know either of these two men;" he said he knew one, but he was not the man who brought the bristles.

COURT. Q. The men pointed out the house to you? A. Yes, and then they ran away; the prisoner did not see them then - when I came back I found them standing in an entry near his premises; I could not find the house after I had been for a coach, and they pointed it out to me; I have no reason to believe the prisoner knew I had received information from two men - I might have told him so, but I am not certain about it.

JAMES FITZPATRICK . I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 9th of December, about ten o'clock at night, Rooney took me, with the two persons who gave the information, to the prisoner's house, No. 25. Charlotte-street, Curtain-road; the men pointed out the door, and immediately ran away - I went in: I knew nothing of the two men before - the door opens into the lower room; the moment we got in Rooney went to a dresser, and saw some bristles, which be claimed - I then said I must take him to the office, and told him not to criminate himself; he then told me two young men had brought the bristles there about six o'clock, and that he, being very poor, wished to earn a shilling or two, and had allowed them to leave them there, and that they were to be called for that night or early the next morning; he gave me no description of them - I took him to the watch-house, and went to the office; when I came outside, observing the two young men had been following the coach to the watch-house and to the office, I secured them, having suspicion of them; there were eight examinations - they were remanded there or four weeks, and then ordered to find bail; they did not find bail, and were discharged last Session, by proclamation. On the following morning, as I was bringing the prisoner from Norton-falgate watch-house, he said, "Now I will tell you the truth, a man named Nathan came to me, and asked me if I would earn a shilling - I said Yes; he then desired me to bring my basket out of the house, which I did, and then Nathan left me, desiring me to follow two men who were waiting outside the house;" next morning he identified one of the two men as one of them - he picked him out from forty persons; that was Smith: he did not point out the other man, but denied knowing him - he said he followed them to a house in a street near Rosemary-lane, that one of them then took the basket from him, went in, and brought it out, with something in it, and desired him to carry it back near his house - he said he waited at the door while one or both of them went in (Rooney does not live near Rosemary-lane); he said when they got to his house they told him they could not get any money, but if he would let them have the basket they would return in a few minutes, and pay him - that they returned in a short time, and begged they might leave the basket there, and they would call and pay him that night or next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you inquired about the prisoner's character? A. I believe him to be very poor; I never knew a charge against him - this trial was postponed last Session, because his sister was in the family way; I never heard him say she had slept in the same room with him on the night of the robbery - I understand Nathan is a queer character: the prisoner is a pieman - I do not suppose he understands about bristles.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT ALEXANDER ROONEY . When the men called they wished to know what I would give them; I wished to defer it till morning, but they said they would be gone then - I said 2l. or 3l. - they said, "Come along, and we will shew you where it is."

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by Nathan to fetch the property from Prescott-street; he returned afterwards, and asked me to let him leave it till morning, when he would call and pay me 2s.

JANE MOULTON . I am the prisoner's sister, and lived with him in December; only he and his wife live there- we all slept in the same room: I could not come here last Session, as I was brought to bed six weeks ago. On the night of the 8th of December my brother went to bed about ten o'clock, and got up about seven next morning - my bed was by the side of his; he was out of employ. On the day he was apprehended I saw Nathan come to the house between five and six o'clock in the evening, ask my brother to go some where in Rosemary-lane, and fetch some things for him; he said Yes, if they were not too heavy - he went out with an empty basket, and asked

Nathan to go and shew him where; Nathan said two young men were waiting outside to go with him - my brother returned alone in about an hour and a half, without his basket, and said, "Nathan says he will bring the basket in half an hour, and pay me 2s." - Nathan returned in about an hour and a half, with the basket, and asked my brother to let it be there till the morning, when he would call and pay him. I am quite sure he slept at home on Monday, the 8th.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

Reference Number: t18290219-5

530. MARY EASDEN , MARGARET READER , and MARY ANN WHALING , were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Porter , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 5 microscopes, value 4l. the goods of George Carey and John Carey .

JAMES PORTER . I live in Marsh-place, Lambeth, and am an optician . On Monday, the 12th of January, as I passed a public-house, at the corner of Princes-street, Drury-lane , about two o'clock, a child came out, ran against me, and spilled some liquor; I went in and got the child some more liquor - I met a person there whom I had not seen for many years, and I continued there till near five o'clock; several persons were going in and out and several stopped all the while I was there - I had two or three glasses of liquor; the prisoners Easden and Whaling were in the house when I went in, and staid all the time - I did not know them before; Reader came in afterwards - she was in and out with them; I came out about five o'clock to go home, and when I had got a few yards, I was knocked or pushed down with violence - I fell over a stall into the kennel; I had a bundle, containing six microscopes, in my left hand, and did not notice any person in particular - they belonged to Messrs. George and John Carey, of the Strand; I am in their employ -I could not tell how it was I fell over the stall, it was from some force; I was pushed over by the back part of my neck, and while I laid there, the bundle was taken forcibly from me - several people were about me; I did not know any of them - I kept fast hold of the bundle, and saved the handkerchief and one microscope; I ran after two females, who I suspected had part of the property, but could not overtake them - I called Watch! several times, but the watchmen were not on; I then went home- next morning I went to Mr. Wilson's, the house I was at, and told him about it; I had left Easden and Whaling behind in the house - they came out close after me -I did not at that moment notice whether Reader was in the house; I got about six yards from there when I was pushed down and robbed, and when I got up, I saw them close in the mob - I pursued them, but did not overtake them - while I was talking to Wilson next morning, Easden came into the house, and directly behind her, came Whaling; I immediately recognized them both as having been in the house there the day before, and asked if they recollected me being there the day before - Easden said "Yes, very well;" I asked if she knew what became of my bundle; she said she knew nothing whatever of it; I then asked her if she did not recollect that I had a bundle while I was in her company; she said she recollected that I had one while I was there - I asked if she had seen the contents of it; she said she knew nothing more about it, and had not seen me afterwards - I then went in search of my property, and found two in pawn at Mr. Newby's, and on the Saturday following, I found two more in Russell-court; I had left Easden and Whaling in Wilson's house, and returned there again in the evening and found them both there - they denied all knowledge of them; I told them they had pawned two at Newby's, and from the description, I was sure it must be them; I asked them to come with me to the pawnbroker's - Easden at first said she would go, and then she said I was no officer, she would not go, and dared me to touch her; Wilson sent for an officer, and when he came, they were all three in company in the house, and I gave charge of them - they were taken to the watch-house; when I got up from the kennel, I observed eight or ten people about me, but not before I got up; it happened at the corner of Harford-place - I did not particularly notice whether they were all women; from the appearance and dress of the two I pursued, I believe them to be the same women as had been in the house with me - they had the same dress on in the morning; I was searching for my property all the next day, and told them I would be there at six or seven o'clock in the evening, and they agreed to meet me there to see if I had heard any thing of it, as they denied knowing any thing about it.

EASDEN. Q. Were you not very much in liquor? A. I was not in liquor.

READER. Q. Did you not drink four or five quarterns of rum? A. I did not; I was leaning against the door and slipped down, but stood up instantly.

COURT. Q. Did you sit down during the two hours you were there? A. No; I was standing all the time - I will not positively swear I did not slip down more than once.

JULIUS HOCKLEY . I live with Mr. Newby, No. 43, Drury-lane. On the 12th of January, a little after six o'clock in the evening, Easden came with two microscopes - she was in the habit of pawning things; she pawned them in the name of Ann Easden , No. 59, Drury-lane, for 3s. - I am no judge of the value.

MARY WEST . I am fourteen years old; I live with my father, an optician, in Russell-court. Easden brought two boxes on Tuesday, the 13th, in the morning; I do not know what time; my father was out - I took them to my mother, who was ill; she gave me leave to give 2s. for them - the prisoner wanted 3s.; I gave her 2s., and gave them to my mother - I put my initials on them when the officer had them; I am certain these are the same - we had no others of the same sort; my mother put them into the closet in my presence on Tuesday, and I saw them there on the Saturday; there were no others there.

WILLIAM KING . I am a constable. I was employed to take the prisoners on Tuesday evening, the 13th; Easden said, "I don't deny pledging two at Mr. Newby's, I picked them up in Drury-lane."(Property produced and sworn to.)

EASDEN'S Defence. On the 12th of January I went to Mr. Wilson's, and met the two prisoners, who asked me to have a pint of beer - the prosecutor was drinking with a man and a woman; they had three or four quarterns of rum with him - he was quite drunk, and fell down twice;

his friends told him to wait till they returned, but they did not come back - as we went out he reeled out after us; about half an hour after I was going to my sister-in-law, just by Harford-place, and picked up two boxes, which I pawned, but know nothing of the others.

READER'S Defence. I saw him at the house drunk - he was at the house next morning, and said he had lost his boxes; Easden said she had picked up two boxes, and had come there to tell him she had pawned them.

MARY WEST . I did not know Easden before - she was about ten minutes in the shop; I am certain of her.

EASDEN - GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Seven Years .

READER - NOT GUILTY .

WHALING - NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

Reference Number: t18290219-6

531. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 ring, value 2s.; 1 ribbon, value 2d., and 72 tooth-brushes, value 30s., the goods of Samuel Barnes , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH BARNES . I am the wife of Samuel Barnes , and live in Little North-street, Portland-green, Lisson-grove - he is a brush-maker ; the prisoner was employed as his journeyman , and worked there three days. I missed this watch on Saturday, the 5th of February, from a nail in the shop-window; the shop is a room behind the parlour - I saw it there at twenty minutes past twelve o'clock, and missed it about a quarter before two; the prisoner had left work about eleven o'clock, and returned about half-past one - he then staid there about a quarter of an hour; I thought he had come to work for the day - I do not know why he went away; I went to the office when I missed the watch, and on returning about half-past four o'clock, I missed half a gross of bone tooth-brushes, worth 5s. 6d. a dozen - I had seen them on the bench in the shop that morning; nobody but the prisoner had been in the shop or gone out from eleven o'clock till twelve, for I was at home all that time.

GEORGE MELLISH GRAHAM . I live with Mr. Baylis, a pawnbroker, in Hampstead-road. The prisoner pawned this silver watch, seal, and key on the 5th of February, between two and three o'clock - he wanted 2l. for it, and said he had pawned it before for 2l.: I offered him 37s., which he took, and gave his name John Burnett , No. 35, Middlesex-street, Somers-town - it was worth together about 3l. 10s.; he said it was his own.

EVELINA WALKER . I live in Bath-place, New-road, and am a perfumer. The prisoner came on the 5th of February, about two o'clock, and offered six dozen tooth-brushes for sale - I told him my husband was out, and I never bought goods myself; he asked 4s. 6d. a dozen - he asked what time my husband would be in; I said it was uncertain - he then said he would leave them till next morning; when he called between ten and eleven o'clock - the prosecutor and officer had called before ten, and I produced them - while he was in the shop they came and took him.

WILLIAM HOOKER . I am a Bow-street patrol. I produce the duplicate of a silver watch, and a pair of silver buckles, pawned for 1s., and 1l. 9s. 8d. in money, which I took from the prisoner's fob; I told him I took him on suspicion of stealing the watch and tooth-brushes - he said nothing; I was feeling for his trousers pockets, and he said he had no pockets there - I found they were torn out.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave my case in your Lordship's hands.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

Reference Number: t18290219-7

532. WILLIAM FOSSETT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Denman , and stealing 1 guinea; 40 sovereigns; 20 half-sovereigns, 40 half-crowns; 160 shillings; 80 sixpences; one 20l. Bank note, one 50l., and one 30l. promissory note, his property .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN DENMAN . I am a grocer , and live in Pleasant-row, Camden-town, St. Pancras . The prisoner came into my service on the 15th of November, and left a fortnight afterwards; on the 3d of January , in the night, my premises were broken open - it was before the shop was shut up, being Saturday night; my cash-box was carried away - it contained a 20l. Bank of England note, a guinea, about 70l. in gold and silver, two promissory notes, one for 50l. and the other for 30l.; I know the number of the note, and stopped it at the Bank - about three weeks after I saw it; the prisoner was taken up soon after; I have not found the gold or silver, or promissory notes - a guinea was found, but mine had no mark on it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you, on the 3d of January, know the number of the note? A. I did - I had it entered in my book, (which is not here) on the Friday night, when I wanted my money, and saw it there on Saturday night, about half-past ten o'clock, when I gave change; I missed it in about an hour - I had not seen the prisoner that day; I was busily engaged in the shop - my cash-box was in the back parlour adjoining the shop; the person must have come over the back premises.

COURT. Q. Where was the cash-box? A. In the parlour; a door from which leads into the wash-house, and then into the garden - both those doors were found open.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you married? A. Yes; my wife was sitting in the back parlour at ten o'clock, and about a quarter to eleven she went next door for some bread - I saw her go out; she returned in about ten minutes, and went into the back-parlour: my children were in bed- the servant was gone home; she does not sleep in the house: the back doors were fastened: my wife left the door leading from the parlour to the shop open - we missed the cash-box three-quarters of an hour after she returned; a person could come in at the back-door, and take the cash-box in her absence without my hearing them: the two doors were only on the latch - I had seen them latched at a quarter-past ten or a quarter to eleven o'clock; it must have been taken during the ten minutes my wife

was absent; I was in the shop all that time, but could not see the wash-house door, as it is rather on the left-hand side - the door leading to the shop is opposite to it, and was open, but I was behind the counter, which lays back, and I might have had ten or twelve customers to attend to; I do not know where the prisoner lived at the time - the same shopman lives with me now.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you seen the cash-box after the maid-servant went away for the night? A. Yes; when my wife came in, she found both doors open; when I went into the parlour I found the doors open, and missed the box.

JAMES STEWARD . I am clerk at the Secretary's office at the Bank; I know the prisoner - I remember his coming to change a 20l. note, on the 26th of January; (looking at it) this is it - it was presented for change, but not in my presence; the cashier to whom it was presented, brought the note to me, with the prisoner, and he said in the prisoner's presence, "This person has presented this note for change, and I find it is a stopped note;" the prisoner made no reply - I turned to the notices of stoppage, and found it had been stolen from Mr. Denman; I asked the prisoner if his name was William Fossett, and if he lived at No. 8, William-street Blackfriars-road - he answered in the affirmative; I then told him it was a lost note, and must be detained while we sent notice to the person who lost it, to give the loser an opportunity of invalidating, if possible, the title of the holder, and said of course he must know from whom he took a 20l. note - he said he did not; I asked how long it had been in his possession - he replied about three days; I asked in what way of business he was, and he replied not in any - I asked if he was a housekeeper - he said No, he lived with his mother, and then stated, for the first time, that the note was her's; I took him to the chief cashier's office - he repeated the statement there, and was informed that if he and his mother would come to the Bank next morning, and prove that they gave value for the note, it would be restored to them - I am quite certain he told me he lived at the address he stated.

Cross-examined. Q. You allowed him to go away? A. Yes; I could tell on what date the note was stopped, but my book is not here: I affix the notices against all notes that are stopped, and place the numbers on a card, which is put on each cashier's desk.

JAMES FOWLER . I am a Bow-street patrol. I apprehended the prisoner at a house in Lion-street, New Kent-road, on the 2d of February, and told him I wanted him for breaking open a house, or for robbing a gentleman at Camden-town; he said, "Oh, Mr. Fowler, for God's sake let me go, or I shall bring my poor mother's grey hairs with sorrow to the grave;" (I had cautioned him, in the first instance, not to say any thing unless he liked) I do not recollect his saying any thing else - I had been to No. 8, William-street, Blackfriars-road, and waited there nearly all night, on Sunday, the 1st, but he did not come home; I did not go into the house - I had heard that his mother lodged there, in the kitchen - I know she lodged there last summer; I looked through the bars of the area, and could see into the room, but he was not there. On the 2d, I disguised myself in a smock-frock, and went to Lion-street - I knocked, and asked if a woman named Tidmarsh lived there, but he was denied- I apprehended him there afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. It was last summer that you knew his mother lived in William-street? A. Yes - I had not been there since till the 1st of February, but have no reason to think she had left; I did not knock at the door, because if he had been there they might have told him I wanted him; I cannot swear he did not live there on the 26th.

JOHN TIDMARSH . I have seen the prisoner write a hundred times. (Looking at the note) this writing on it is his hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. How have you seen him write? A. He was an apprentice of mine, and I gave him up his indentures about eighteen months ago, as I went out of business - I was a stay-maker ; I gave him a good character up to the time he left.

JOHN DENMAN . This is the 20l. note I lost in the box.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you give notice at the Bank? A. On the 5th of January, Monday, at the Secretary's office, to Mr. Stewart; my wife was out about ten minutes - I came in in about half an hour; she told me the doors were open - I went into the parlour, and found them open; the robbery must have been committed while my wife was out - my garden wall is about four feet high; it is a corner house: there is a street on the side of the garden wall.

NOT GUILTY .

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18290219-8

533. JAMES WOOD was indicted for embezzling the sum of 60l., which he had received on account of John Poynder , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-9

534. WILLIAM EDMUNDS, alias BENNETT , was separately indicted for stealing, 1 time-piece, value 12s., the goods of William Warriner ; 1 coat, value 5l.: 1 shawl, value 20s., and 1 pair of gloves, value 6d., the goods of Joseph Baby ; 1 coat, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Judah Cohen ; 1 silver fork, value 18s., the goods of Charles Barham ; and 1 silver spoon, value 18s., the goods of Charles Barham .

To which indictments the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-10

535. JOHN TRAVWICKS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 1 wooden case, value 5s.; 12 account-books, value 10l.; 3 reams of blotting-paper, value 2l. 10s.; 2000 pieces of printed paper, value 4l., and 1 ream of writing-paper, value 30s., the goods of Robert Smith and another, the same being upon a certain quay, adjacent to the navigable River Thames .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH PAYNE . I am foreman to Mr. Robert Smith; he is in partnership with his son - they are wharfinger s, at Galley-quay . On the night of the 9th of December, in consequence of suspicion, I watched masters' premises- there was a box of account-books placed under some bags of wool; it was sent to be shipped to the West Indies - it was under No. 3 crane on the quay, and marked

B. L.; I saw the prisoner on the quay about half-past ten o'clock - he had no business there: I saw him remove this box from under the bags of wool - I then left the quay, and told Wood what I had seen; he came and relieved me from the watch - I went, and returned again almost immediately, with a constable; we all three watched - I saw the prisoner come back again: the case was where he had left it, which was about two feet from the spot where it had been; there was a gas-light opposite - when he returned he had got something, with which he attempted to open the chest, by shoving it under the lid; the constable immediately seized him, and a crowbar was thrown down just by me - I found it, but cannot swear it was the instrument he used: I had never seen it on the quay before - I gave it to the constable; I went to the case, and put it back again.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How large was the case? A. About two feet two inches wide; it was not very heavy, but more than he could carry away without being seen - it weighed about 1 1/2cwt.; he was not in masters' service - I have known him many years as a lighterman about the quays: the gate was half shut - he could not see us.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did he know the wharf and quay were Mr. Smith's? A. Yes; the case was opened next morning, and contained the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth above 18l.; there was B. L. in large letters on it.

JONATHAN WOOD . I am in the service of Messrs. Smith and Son. Payne came to me - I went and placed myself between two bags of wool, and could see the case, which had been moved about two feet; I saw the prisoner in about five or ten minutes, come and turn the case round - it was lying on the side; I saw him trying to wrench the lid, with something - he then walked away, came back again twice, and hit it with something each time, and coughed at the same time, he walked away, and went up the gateway; I watched him up the gateway -Payne and the constable came down; we went to the case, and there was a chisel sticking in it, between the head and the upper end - I went up into the crane-room- Payne and the constable concealed themselves, and in five minutes he returned to the case, and began to try to open it with something; the constable seized him, and I saw him throw down a small crow-bar - there was the print of the crow-bar on the case; I tried both that and the chisel next morning, and the marks corresponded.

Cross-examined. Q. Could not the box be easily carried away? A. I do not think he could carry it.

COURT. Q. Had a stranger any business on the wharf? A. If there had been craft laying there, but there was not then, to my knowledge.

BENJAMIN PAYNE . I am a constable. Payne gave me information; I went with him through the gateway to Galley-quay, and got by the wicket - we met the prisoner coming up; I spoke to him, knowing him well - I went down the quay; they shewed me the chest with a chisel sticking in it, standing on its end - we went and sat down on the wool bags, and in four or five minutes the prisoner returned, came to the same place again, and began knocking; I said, "Halloo," and heard a piece of iron fall - Wood picked up the crow-bar; I had then taken the prisoner into custody, seeing him attempt to open the case.

Cross-examined. Q. Does the quay belong exclusively to Mr. Smith? A. I believe he rents it; a number of craft come to it - I met nobody but the prisoner at the gate; I believe he is a married man, and has a large family - I have known him thirteen or fourteen years; he belonged to the Tender; I produce the chisel and crowbar.

JOSEPH PAYNE . I gave this chisel to Benjamin Payne. I found it near the case next morning - it has every appearance of the one which stuck in the case.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been employed near the prosecutors' for fourteen years, without suspicion; I had been out of regular employ, and only earned 5s. a week for my wife and three children - my goods have since been taken for rent, and my family gone to the work-house; I have served his Majesty some years - I trust you will take this into your serious consideration.

MR. SMITH. My son is my only partner.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290219-11

536. ELIZA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 shawl, value 14s. , the goods of William Kemp Hodges .

WILLIAM KEMP HODGES . I am a linen-draper , and live in the Minories . On the 6th of February, about half-past one o'clock in the day, this shawl was on the counter, near the door; the prisoner came into the shop about two, with another young woman, and asked to look at some prints for aprons - I showed her several, and opened them over the shawl; she wished to see more -I opened another piece on the counter, and missed the shawl - she asked for a yard of the last print, which I cut off, it came to 1s.; she put down 2s. to pay for it - I returned her 1s.; I put the print into paper, walked to the middle of the shop, and saw the shawl was gone - I then told her I missed a shawl, and she must have got it - I went round to see if she might have dropped it - I told them both I missed the shawl, and must search them; I took them to the end of the shop, and was taking them into the passage, when the prisoner dropped the shawl from under her gown - she must have taken it off the counter, it fell from under her clothes; I sent a neighbour for an officer - her companion went with her to the watch-house; she was taken before the Lord Mayor and discharged.

PETER BOSTON . I am a constable, and took the prisoner; she used very abusive language, and denied having taken the shawl.

Prisoner. Q. Was I sober or not? A. She was not sober; I think she could walk very well - I think she could distinguish right from wrong; she was not deprived of her senses - she had got two shawls which appeared new; she had no money, but her companion had 13s. - the prisoner asked me three hours after, what she was taken for.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I do not remember being in the shop, or know what I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-12

537. GEORGE HUMPHRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 sow, price 4l. , the property of Mark Langman .

MARK LANGMAN . I live at Deptford . This sow was kept at the back of my house; I have had it about a year and a half - I had seen it half an hour before I missed it; the front door was open, and it ran into the street - the last time I saw it it was in my back yard; it was missed on Friday, the 30th of January, at half-past seven o'clock in the morning - I immediately went to Smithfield, and just before eleven I saw it coming into the market; the prisoner and a little boy were with it, they were leading it with a string to its leg; I went to an officer, and then went and charged the prisoner with stealing it; he said he was hired by a drover to take it to the market and sell it for 4l.; he afterwards said the drover was to come to China Hall public-house, to meet him - the officer went to the China Hall with him, but no drover came; the boy was about fourteen years old - I know the boy very well, he bears a very good character.

JOHN FREE . I am a constable of Smithfield-market. The prosecutor came to me; I took the prisoner in charge with the sow, which he was leading with a string tied to the leg; the prisoner had hold of the string, and said the sow was given to him by a man on the Deptford-road, to bring to Smithfield-market, to sell for 3l., and he was to meet him at China Hall, Deptford-road; I took him there, and waited from half-past three o'clock till five, but no man appeared.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday morning, about half-past six o'clock, I was looking for work, and met a man in High-street, Deptford, who I knew by sight - he asked if I would earn 4s. by going to London for him; I said Yes - he said, "Take my sow to Smithfield-market, and sell it for 3l. 10s.;" I went home to breakfast - he said he would bring the sow to me after breakfast - he met me in Lower-street with the sow, which had a string tied to its leg; I could not get it on, and asked a boy to help me; the man gave me some bread and cheese - I left him at China Hall; I was to meet him there at four o'clock - I knew nothing of its being stolen; if the man had not known I was apprehended he would have met me; I did not say he was a drover, but that I asked a drover in the market where I was to take the pig - I said I only knew the man by the name of John; a gentleman at the house said a man of that description used to come there, but they had not seen him for two months.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-13

NEW COURT, First Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

538. THOMAS COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 carriage-harness bridle, without a bit, value 15s.; 1 carriage-harness bridle, value 20s., and 1 driving-rein, value 3s. , the goods of John Powell Bannister .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-14

539. WILLIAM MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 5 spoons, value 30s., and 1 fork, value 12s. , the goods of James Edward Mivart .

ROBERT BROADBENT . I am waiter at Mivart's hotel. On the 29th of January, I missed a table-spoon and a tea-spoon; the plate had been about in several rooms - the prisoner had been at our house several times to inquire about his sister, who lived in our service; I lost four table spoons, one tea-spoon, and one fork, between the 12th of November and the 28th of January.

STEPHEN SHEPPEY . I am a pawnbroker. This tablespoon was pawned with me by Schaaff, on the 6th of January.

THOMAS WEBB . I am a pawnbroker. Two of these spoons were pawned with me by Schaaff.

THOMAS SPRATT . I am a pawnbroker. This spoon was pawned with me by Schaaff.

HANNAH SCHAAFF . I pawned these spoons by the desire of the prisoner; he lodged with me, and was in great distress - I asked if he had no relation who could assist him; he said he had a sister - he went there as he said, and was there nearly all day; in the evening he brought a spoon, and said his sister lent it him to get a little relief - when that money was spent he went again and got another; I said "William, I hope you got them honestly;" he said I had no occasion to fear that.

GEORGE AVIS . I took the prisoner on the 30th of January; I found on him the duplicate given by Mr. Webb - he told me where the others were pawned, and said it was done through distress; I went to the lodging, and found this fork and these other duplicates there, which Schaaff gave me from a place where they had been concealed.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-15

540. JULIA KING was indicted for stealing on the 31st of August , 3 caps, value 2s.; 2 bonnets, value 1l.; 3 gowns, value 15s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 5 petticoats, value 8s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 1s. 6d.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 3s.; 2 pairs of stays, value 4s.; 3 shifts, value 3s., and I shawl, value 2s. , the goods of Elizabeth Johnson .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of various persons.

JOSEPH HOSKINS . I am superintendant of the Refuge for Destitute Females, in Hackney-road . The prisoner was admitted on the 26th of July, and being sick was in the infirmary: on the 31st of August, we went up stairs to prayers at six o'clock, leaving her and one more person below - when we came down about eight, they were both gone; a closet had been broken open, and the property was gone - I went over a wall to the adjoining premises, where I found a petticoat and a pair of stays; none of the other property has been found.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know how soon afterwards the prisoner was taken up? A. I believe five or six weeks ago; the other person is not taken - I saw the prisoner's lodging searched, but nothing was found; the woman who was there said the prisoner only came there, having no other place to be in - I cannot say where she was living, but the woman said she had given her leave to be there.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON . I am matron of the Refuge. On the 31st of August, we went up to prayers, leaving the prisoner and one other person below; when we came down the closet was broken open, and four bundles gone, containing all the articles stated; they were the property of persons who came into the institution - the closet was locked up that Sunday, but I cannot say when I had seen the articles.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the closet locked that day? A. Yes; the other girl might have taken them.

COURT. Q. Were more things taken than one person could carry? A. No.

ANN PREDDY . I was in the Refuge, and had given my things to the matron; they were taken away.

ELIZABETH HUMPHREYS . I had given my clothes to the matron - they were taken.

CHARLOTTE KENTISH . I had given my clothes to the matron; they were taken.

THOMAS EAGLES . I took the prisoner on the 12th of January, in Whitecross-street: she said she knew nothing about it - on going to the office, she asked if any one else was taken; I said No - she said "They must get another before they can do anything with me;" I told her not to say any thing more to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18290219-16

541. WILLIAM PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 1 coat, value 6s. , the goods of James Durrant .

JOHN ANTHONY OLIVER . I am a sawyer. On the 23d of January, I saw the prisoner in Mr. Durrant's yard, for whom I work; he had this coat in a bundle - I stopped him, and sent for an officer; he had come out of the stable with the coat.

JAMES DURRANT . This is my coat; it had been hanging on the side of the chariot beam in the stable - there is no lock to the door.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290219-17

542. ROBERT WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 cloak, value 3l. , the goods of Stephen Lewis and another.

JOHN HOLDER . I am servant to Mr. Eames. On the 10th of February, I was coming up Conduit-street, and saw the prisoner running with this cloak on his arm; we pursued him in a gig - he turned into another street; I got down, and asked him where he took it from - he said he did not know; I put him into a shop, and got the street-keeper.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I am the street-keeper. I took the prisoner, and have the cloak.

HENRY LIDDLE . I am shopman to Stephen Lewis and Co., silk-mercer s, in Regent-street . This is their cloak, and was taken from a door that enters into their shop - it was inside the house; it was safe at half-past three o'clock in the day.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going on an errand to Quebec-street; I got behind a coach, and a boy came and got up with the cloak - he saw this witness coming, then he got down and left the cloak behind; I got down and beckoned to him, but he did not come.

JOHN HOLDER re-examined. Q. How far was he from the prosecutors' when you saw him? A. Not many doors- I saw another boy running, who appeared to be in company with him, but he got away; the prisoner had the cloak all the while: the prisoner was on one side, and the other lad on the other - this other property was found in the prisoner's hat.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-18

543. RICHARD PENDEGRASS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 coat, value 8l. , the goods of John Powell .

JOHN POWELL . I am collector to a brewer at Chelsea. On the 6th of February I was at the Rising Sun public-house, Windmill-street , and left my great coat in my gig, in the care of a lad, who I thought belonged to the house - a man came in soon afterwards, and asked if I had missed any thing; I said I had left my gig and coat in care of a lad - I saw my coat again, but not the lad I left it with; I afterwards saw the prisoner at the watch-house.

RICHARD THROP . I am a shoemaker. I was passing on the 6th of February, and saw the gig and coat; a lad was minding it - I turned into another street, and soon after the prisoner overtook me, with the coat, and a pipe in his mouth; I followed him up Queen-street, and on to Golden-square - the lad who I had seen with the gig was following him: when they got into the square the other whistled - I then ran up to the prisoner, pushed him into a butter-shop, and had him secured; I asked where he got it - he said he had it given to him in Windmill-street - I collared him, and took him out; he ran away: I gave an alarm, and he was again taken.

Prisoner. He said at the office that he saw me take the coat out of the gig. Witness. No, I did not.

EDWARD HAINES . I am an officer, and have the coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was bound apprentice to my father; I had not left his house ten minutes, and was crossing the street, when I saw two young men, who asked if I would carry that parcel to the Green Man and Still - I said Yes, and a young man put it into my hand; I was going on to the corner of Golden-square, when this witness came up and asked where I got it - I said I had to take it to the Green Man and Still.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-19

544. MARGARET HOLLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , 1 silver fork, value 12s. , the goods of Francis Martin Trulock .

MARY TRULOCK . I am the wife of Francis Martin Trulock - we keep a lodging-house , in Duke-street, St. James' ; the prisoner lodged there for eleven weeks. On Sunday evening, the 18th of January, I missed this fork, which was inquired for, and the prisoner said she knew nothing of it - the servant had brought it down.

JAMES STOKEY . I live with a pawnbroker, in Brewer-

street, Golden-square. This fork was pawned by the prisoner, on the 19th of January.

HENRY GODDARD . I took the prisoner; she said she knew nothing of it, but at the office she said she took it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

545. MARGARET HOLLIS was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 7s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 3s. , the goods of William Isaac .

WILLIAM ISAAC . I am a partner in the firm of Swain and Co., and lodged in the house in Duke-street, St. James'; I had the parlour and one bed-room - the prisoner had the second-floor. About Christmas I missed a handkerchief, a pair of stockings, and several other things - I cannot say exactly the day; I have had some of my property returned by some other pawnbrokers, who could not identify the prisoner.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a pawnbroker, and live with Mr. Jones, in Tothill-street. This handkerchief and pair of silk stockings were pawned on the 27th of December, in the name of Mary Graham ; I cannot swear to the prisoner, but this is the duplicate which I gave.

MARY TRULOCK . This duplicate was found at a house, No. 2, Vauxhall-road, where the prisoner was detained till the officer came; she destroyed a great many, and threw them down the privy, but this, and two or three others were got up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

Reference Number: t18290219-20

546. GEORGE KILPATRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 gun, value 30s. , the goods of John Deary Faulkner .

HANNAH FAULKNER . I am the wife of John Deary Faulkner, who deals in miscellaneous articles . We had a gun in our shop on the 20th of January - I did not see any one take it, but I pursued a boy who was taking it away; he was like the prisoner: I afterwards saw this boy brought back, and I thought he was the same.

HANNAH FAULKNER JUN. I was at home, but did not see the gun taken; the prisoner came in, to ask his way to Paddington - I told him straight on: my mother was in the back parlour - he took the gun out, and walked outside the door, and then he ran; my mother came into the shop, and I told her - people pursued, and he was brought back in less than half an hour.

HENRY GODDARD . I took the prisoner; he said his name was George Wilson , and he lived in Cleveland-street, Whitechapel; I told him it was not worth his while to send me all that way, if it were not true - he then said it was not true.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Whipped, and delivered to his mother .

Reference Number: t18290219-21

547. JOSEPH CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 tobacco-pipe, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of George Pope .

JOHN TAYLOR . About half-past two o'clock on the 5th of February, I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Pope's shop at Limehouse , take this pipe, and put it into his pocket; I asked if he had any thing that did not belong to him - he said he had not: I found this pipe in his coat pocket - I had not seen him till about an hour before.

GEORGE POPE . I keep the shop . This pipe is mine - it is worth half a crown; I was not in the shop at the time - my child was there, when the prisoner came and asked if we had a penny box.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had merely taken the pipe from the window, and placed it on the counter.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-22

548. CHARLES BUGBEE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 1 Jacket, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Stillwell .

THOMAS STILLWELL . I am a labourer to Mr. Cox, at Hillingdon . On the night of the 8th of January I left my great coat in a private watch-house on his premises, which I have to lock up at night, and unlock in the morning; I went the next morning, about half-past seven o'clock; the watch-house was broken open, and the coat gone - the prisoner lives about three miles off.

WILLIAM BULL . I am constable of Hillingdon. Late in the evening of the 31st of January, I found a hare or a rabbit fastened in a snare, but it was dark, and I could not see what it was; I got up early the next morning, and went to the place with two other men - soon afterwards the prisoner and another were coming into the cover; I took the prisoner - the prosecutor saw him the next morning, and accused him of having his jacket on his back; this is the jacket.

THOMAS STILLWELL . This is my jacket; I lost two or three other little things at the same time.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up as I was going to work, and my mother mended it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-23

549. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 fixture, (i. e.) 1 copper, value 10s., and 40lbs. weight of lead, value 2s., the goods of Edward Jones , and fixed to a certain building , against the Statute, & c.

ANN ROBSON . I have the care of a house, No. 7, Kingsland-crescent , which belongs to Mr. Edward Jones. On the 29th of January I was passing the door, and saw a man turning the lock, to go in - I did not see who he was, but in figure and dress he resembled the prisoner; I went and got Mr. White - we went to the house, and opened the door with my key, which I had with me; we went into the front kitchen, and found the prisoner standing, with his face towards the window; I asked him what he was doing - he said nothing: Mr. White then secured him - he was a stranger, and had no right there; we found this copper had been taken out of the brickwork, ready to carry away, and this lead, which had been over it - I had seen it safe in the brick-work two days before.

ALEXANDER WHITE . I went with Robson to the

house; she opened the street-door with her key, and I found the prisoner in the kitchen - I found the copper, and this lead, which had been removed; I believe we have employed the prisoner, but I am not certain.

EDWARD JONES . The house belonged to me; Robson had the care of it. This lead and copper are mine.

JOHN BURTON . I was sent for, and found the prisoner - he said his name was White, and he came from Bromley - that he saw the door open, and went in to see the house; I found these two keys on his person, and in a cupboard I found this picklock-key, which unlocked the street door.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by the house and saw a young man go out; I went in, and was taken in three minutes. GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-24

550. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 blanket, value 2s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 looking-glass, value 2s., and 1 flat-iron, value 6d. , the goods of Margaret Gregson , widow .

MARGARET GREGSON . I am a widow, and live in Cow-cross . The prisoner and her husband took a furnished room of me on the 29th of December; they continued about six weeks - they owed me two weeks' rent: I went up stairs for the broom, and the children were playing about; I missed the sheets: I found my property at the pawnbrokers' - these are my articles; I never allowed her to pawn them.

SAMUEL THOMAS LAMB . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket, pawned on the 15th of January, by the prisoner.

STEPHEN STEVENS . I am a pawnbroker, of Long-lane. I have a looking-glass and a flat-iron, pawned by the prisoner.

FREDERICK JAMES . I am a pawnbroker. I have two sheets, pawned by the prisoner, on the 6th and 8th of January.

JAMES TERRY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - she gave me the duplicates; I found her and the children in the greatest distress - her husband is keeping another woman: I believe she has been driven to this.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-25

551. JOHN BLAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 5 pairs of shoes, value 28s. , the goods of George Briscomb .

SAMUEL MORRISON . I know Mr. Briscomb, who keeps a sale-shop , in Grosvenor-row, Chelsea . On the 21st of January I saw the prisoner go to his door, and take a quantity of shoes; I pursued him - he threw down the shoes, which were tied in a lot together, and I took them up; a watchman caught him when he had got about one hundred and fifty yards.

GEORGE BRISCOMB . I know these shoes to be mine - they had been hanging on the door-post; I was not in the shop when they were taken.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-26

552. HENRY GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 14lbs. weight of beef, value 7s. , the goods of William Matthews .

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a butcher , and live in Lombard-court, Seven-dials ; the prisoner worked for me. On the 10th of February, a neighbour told me a person had gone out of my shop, with a round of beef, the night before; I went with Furzman to his lodging - Furzman asked what had become of the round of beef; the prisoner said he had none, but we looked about, and found the bone of the beef, and the fat inside it - he said he had bought that the night before, of a person in the Dials; I am positive it was my cut - the beef weighed 16lbs. or 17lbs.; he knew my premises well - he lived with me many years.

WILLIAM IVES . I saw the prisoner come out of the shop door the night before, between nine and ten o'clock, with a rump of beef; it was not covered over - I told my father, and he told the prosecutor.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . I went with the prosecutor, and we found the beef bone; I found the beef at a bake-house, but while we went to the office it was taken away.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought this rump-bone about nine o'clock that night, and put it on the shelf; the prosecutor came, found the rump-bone, and said he could swear to it.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . When he lived with me he was a very honest chap - my shop had been shut up that night, but one shutter was taken down.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 6 Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-27

553. CHARLES CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 1 table, value 23s. , the goods of James Ames .

JAMES AMES . I am an upholsterer , and live in Duke-street, Manchester-square . On the 28th of January, I missed a Pembroke-table; on the evening of the 29th, I believe the same party came again, but could not get any thing - on the 30th they came again; I think there were four of them - one of them took something in the shop, but he was disappointed; the prisoner, who was one of the party, then stepped about one yard into the shop, and took this table - I followed him; he dropped it, and fell into the drain; I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. The table was outside the shop - a man told me he would give me a shilling to carry it to North Audley-street. GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-28

554. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 5lbs. weight of mutton, value 2s. , the goods of James Hayes .

JAMES HAYES . I am a butcher . On the evening of the 4th of February, I lost about 5lbs. of mutton from my shop, in Ironmonger-row, St. Lukes' - I afterwards saw the prisoner in custody, and knew the meat to be mine.

WILLIAM CROUCH . I live with Mr. Hayes; I was in the shop, looking after my master's meat - another boy ran into the shop, while the prisoner ran away with this piece of meat; I ran after him, and caught him in Old-street - the window was open, and the mutton laid upon the board -I never saw the prisoner before.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290219-29

555. PATRICK MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 sovereign , the money of George Scott .

CAROLINE SCOTT . I am the wife of George Scott. The prisoner is a watchman , and was on duty on the 31st of January; while we were at supper my husband gave me a sovereign, it laid on the table in the lower room - the street opens into that room, there is no passage; I went out a little way, and took the key with me in case my husband should go to bed, which he did while I was out; when I came back the sovereign was there, and my husband was gone to bed - I went into the bed-room, to lay my child on the bed, and my husband said he thought he heard footsteps in the room; I went down, and the sovereign was gone - I had left the door open, and the prisoner was then outside the door, turning away; he said he had been to a friend's house for me, as he thought he heard my child cry; I thanked him, and he went away - I then went to clear the table, and missed my sovereign; no one had been there but him - I listened for him, he did not come at ten o'clock nor till a quarter to eleven; I called him, and asked if he had seen any one go out of my place - he began to abuse me, and said some very bad words; he said he had been there to see if I was there, and he owned he pushed the door to see if I was come back, as the child had been crying; I had no light in my room, neither fire nor candle - when I came back, I met him about twenty yards from my door, going out of the place; no one could go up the place without the prisoner seeing them, it is no thoroughfare - there was 3 1/2d. by the side of it, which was left.

GEORGE SCOTT . I am the prosecutrix's husband. I put down the sovereign on the table for her; she went out, and I told her to take the key - I went to bed and left the sovereign on the table; when she returned, she came up stairs to get the candle, and then she came up with the child - I asked her if she had left the door open, as I heard footsteps in the room; she went down and saw the watchman - I heard him say to her, "You are come home, I see;" she then bid him good night - I had been asleep, but I heard that a neighbour had sent the prisoner for my wife, as the child had cried; I afterwards heard my wife ask him if he had seen any one near the door, and he said there was no one nearer the door than himself - she said no one could have taken it but a person with a light; I got up and told the prisoner I would give him in charge - I followed him to Macclesfield-street, and on towards King-square, where he dropped some money; I caught him, and called another watchman, who came up, and we found 1s. 6d. which he had dropped - we took him to the watch-house, where 2s. 8d. was found on him; it was about half-past nine o'clock when I went up to bed, and I heard my wife talking to him at a quarter before eleven.

SARAH SPRING . My husband keeps the Macclesfield Arms public-house. About eight o'clock that evening, the prisoner came to our house with another watchman; the prisoner asked for half a pint of sixpenny gin; I said we did not keep it - he then asked if I would trust him 1d. -I said I would not, and they had a quartern and a half of sevenpenny, which was 5 1/4.; they then went away; about half-past ten he came in with another watchman, called for half a pint of gin, and put down a sovereign; he took the change in a great hurry, and said "Make haste" - he put it into his great coat pocket, and then went away.

PETER DOYLE . I am a watchman. I was with the prisoner about half-past eight or nine o'clock that night; about half-past ten I saw him with a large leg of mutton in his hand, which he said weighed 16lbs., and he had bought it for the Christening of a child; about twelve I was called to take him in charge - he said "What should I go with this man for - I will see him d-d first;" I persuaded him to go to the watch-house, and he was ordered to the lock-up place - he said that neither she nor her husband could see him going in or coming out, and they might do their best.

HENRY HARRINGTON . I am inspector of the watch. The prisoner was brought to me - he was searched, and 2s., 8 1/2d. found on him; he used some horrid expressions, and said "They can't hurt me; no one saw me go in or come out of the house" - he said a gentlemen had lent him the sovereign - we asked if he would swear that; he said No.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the sovereign towards baptizing a child.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-30

556. WILLIAM MATTHEWS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 70lbs. weight of butter, value 35s., and 1 cask, value 1s. , the goods of Eliza Fennings .

JOHN WHITEFOOT . I am private watchman to Mrs. Eliza Fennings, widow , who is a wharfinger , and lives at Irongate . On the 11th of February this cask of butter was delivered there, about half-past one o'clock in the day; I did not see the prisoner then, but I afterwards saw him go across the road with it on his shoulder - I told the foreman, who went and took him; he had been employed on the wharf, but not much.

FREDERICK HARMES . I am foreman of the wharf. -Whitefoot told me of this, and I overtook the prisoner at the end of Lower Thames-street, carrying the cask of butter; he said he was going to Gravel-lane, and a man employed him, but he could not tell who it was - I asked him to bring it back; he turned back about fourteen yards, and then said he would not carry it back; I got a lad to take it - it was to be shipped for Sheerness.

Prisoner's Defence. This witness' evidence differs from what he said before the Magistrate. I was employed by a man in the public-street; as I was walking between St. Katharine's Dock-bridge and Irongate, he asked if I wanted a job; I said Yes; he said, "I want this tub of butter carried to Gravel-lane".

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-31

557. ROBERT McKONE and EDWARD BULLOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 reticule, value 6d.; 1 pencil-case value, 6d., and 1 pocket-book, value 6d. , the goods of Maria Moore .

MARY ANN EDWARDS . I live in Ernest-street, near Regent's-park . On the 6th of February, about half-past ten o'clock, I saw a young man run out of my house - my servant had left the door open; I could not see who it was, but I saw a person go out - the parlour door opens into the passage; I was very much flurried: he ran out quick - I had only a glimpse of his coat.

MARIA MOORE . I lodge with Edwards and have the parlour. On the 6th of February I had a silk bag on the parlour table, lined with red; I was ill in bed in the next room - I left it on the table the night before: a pencil-case and pocket-book were in it.

JOHN ALDERWOOD . I am a butcher, and live opposite this house. I was standing at my door, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw a young man, who resembled Bullock, running up the street; I followed him - he turned round Little Albany-street; I went another way, and told some persons to follow him - I lost sight of him; when I turned into a mews I saw McKone standing - he did not appear as if he had been running; I said to him, "You must go with me;" some persons came up and said,"Where is the lad?" one of them said, "He is in that corner" - I went up and saw Bullock; I took him, and brought him back to McKone; I saw this pocket-book pass from Bullock to McKone - Bullock was out of breath, as if he had been running; whether they had been in company together, or not, I cannot say.

JAMES DORSET . I am a constable. This is the pocketbook - here are several cards, with the prosecutrix's address, inside it.

MckONE's Defence. I was going along - I did not know it was stolen.

BULLOCK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

McKONE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-32

558. WILLIAM MONTIER , GEORGE DUFF , WILLIAM BATESON , and JAMES SHERRICK were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 chest, value 2s., and 79lbs. weight of tea, value 20l., the goods of Thomas Dorsett .

JOSEPH FRYER . I am a Bow-street patrol. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 7th of January, I was in Shoreditch , and saw a close-bodied cart going along with a tail-board behind it - the driver was in the cart; I saw Montier jump up and look into the cart - I followed him, and saw him join three or four more persons, who appeared to be in company with him; the cart went on the corner of Kingsland-road, where it stopped - Montier and his companions waited altogether while the cart stopped; it then went on, the horse trotted, and they all ran after it - it stopped again at the turnpike to pay the toll; they waited behind the turnpike, at a little distance from it - I believe there were five of them in all; in their progress up the road I saw Sherrick, who was one of them, look back a great many times - I still kept following; I cannot speak to Duff and Bateson, but I can to Montier and Sherrick - I cannot say that Duff and Bateson were not two of them, as I had not an opportunity of seeing their faces; the cart then went on to a public-house near the bridge, and there it was very light from the gas - I saw the tail-board was down; I do not know who had let it down, but the prisoners had kept passing backwards and forwards across the road - I pushed on a little faster, and passed two of the party, but cannot say who they were, as when I passed them I stooped down and rubbed my leg, and said "How bad it is," by which means I passed them without their noticing me; I then saw Montier and another man carrying a chest of tea - I ran up to them, and they bowled it down a bank into a field; I said, "What are you doing with this?" they looked up, and ran away - I went down the bank, got up the tea, took it to a public-house, and soon after Robinson brought in Bateson and Sherrick; I identified Sherrick as one of the party: on the 12th Duff and Montier were taken, and I identified Montier- I have no doubt of the persons of Montier and Sherrick; I found the owner of the tea the same night - the carman went on with his cart; he did not miss it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it not rather a dark night? A. Yes; I do not know where Montier lived - it is a common sized cart; I think the carman was sitting on one of the chests; I think the chest that was taken was within a yard of him - Bateson was brought into the public-house in about five minutes; Robertson, Wintle, and a butcher, who is not here, were with me -I kept thirty or forty yards from them, but when the tea was taken I had ran up, and was within ten yards of them.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I am a headborough of Shoreditch. On the evening in question I saw Montier, Duff, and Bateson near Worship-street, in Shoreditch, and a fourth person in their company; I lost sight of them, and then met them again in Shoreditch, following a cart - supposing they knew me, I drew back; they passed Fryer, who was with me - there was a good light from a porkshop, and I looked well at them; I saw Montier cross the road, make a spring, and look in at the tail of the cart - he came back and joined his companions; the cart went on to the corner of Kingsland-road - the carman went into a grocer's shop; they all stopped in a body - there was a light in the grocer's shop, which enabled me to see them; I am not able to say whether there were more than four at that time - the cart went on to the toll-bar; the prisoners passed a little further, and waited - the cart went on, and they went on; I followed them, and then observed Sherrick - there were five persons then; Sherrick turned round two or three times - they kept crossing from one side to the other - the cart then began to trot, and they set out on a run; I and Fryer ran too - the cart suddenly stopped its pace, and Fryer came up with Bateson and another who is not in custody; Fryer said "Dear me, how lame I am;" I kept by the side of Bateson, and saw Montier and Duff go into the road, take hold of the chest, and carry it between them - Fryer and I ran towards them; they let go of the chest and ran off - he called Stop thief! and I made after Montier, who ran into Black Horse-field; it was dark and very muddy- I lost him in the field; I then returned, and met with Wintle, and as I came up I saw Sherrick, Bateson, and the person who is not in custody; I said "Here are some of the parties," and we made towards them - I heard Bateson say to the person who has absconded"How d-d lame he was, wasn't he, did you see him run?" I followed them with Wintle and another person, who had promised to assist him; I seized the man who has absconded, and Bateson at the same time - Bateson began to be obstreperous, and the other got away; Wintle then came up and took Sherrick: on the 12th I apprehended Montier and Duff, in Shoreditch - they were in company with a person who I believe was the person who got away on the 7th, but I could not swear

to him; as I took them to the watch-house, Montier said what did I want with them - I said "It is nothing but insulting a woman;" but when I got him to the watch-house I told him what it was for; I had seen them before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you? A. A hair-dresser; I have lived in Shoreditch twelve years - I suppose Bateson was about ten yards from me when the others took the tea; I was between him and them- I suppose Bateson was about thirty yards from them; I cannot say that I saw Bateson put his hand on the cart or the tea, but he passed and re-passed the cart frequently -I went after Montier in the field, and lost him; I came back to the road, and found Bateson on the other side of the way, nearly opposite the place where I left him - he was walking in conversation with the other two; I was in the field about a minute and a half - when I returned to the road I suppose thirty people had collected, from Fryers' having cried Stop thief! I collared him, and he took me by the neck with both arms - I knew Montier by following him on different evenings.

COURT. Q. When Montier was pursued, did they all run away? A. Yes; they ran towards Shoreditch - when I returned, they were coming from Shoreditch to the spot where the tea had been taken.

JOHN WILLIAM WINTLE . I am a headborough. Fryer called me from my own door - as soon as my wife came in I went; I heard the cry of Stop thief! came up, and took Sherrick and Bateson.

Cross-examined. Q. Had Robertson come out of the field when you saw him? A. He was just coming out; I had heard the cry of Stop thief! about five minutes before I came up - I had heard it two or three times; Bateson must have heard it - there was scarcely a soul about there, but there were some people further on; Bateson might have escaped if he chose, but there would have been a greater chance of his being taken.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am carman to Mr. Thomas Dorsett , of Tower Royal. I had three chests of tea in my cart; I went up Shoreditch, and stopped at a grocer's at the corner, to ask if they knew the person I was going to, as it might be a new shop - I stopped at the toll-bar and paid 6d.; I was looking at the different shops - I looked round and saw my tail-board was down, and one chest gone; I said to a little boy "Did you see any body near me?" Yes, said he - I said "It will not do for me to stop;" so I went on, and delivered the two chests at Kingsland - in coming back I met a boy, who said "Your chest is found;" this is the chest I will swear - it was going to Mr. Mather, at Kingsland.

THOMAS DORSETT . This is the chest that was stolen out of my cart - it contained 79lbs. weight of tea, and is worth about 20l.

MONTIER'S Defence. I was not on the spot at all.

DUFF'S Defence. I was at home at work at the time.

SHERRICK'S Defence. I was going up the road to meet a young woman to carry a box for her; I know no more of the robbery than you do.

MONTIER - GUILTY . Aged 33.

DUFF - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BATESON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SHERRICK - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-33

559. JONATHAN NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 3 bushels of coals, value 4s. , the goods of Joseph Copp Ashton .

JOSEPH COPP ASHTON . I am a coal-merchant . The prisoner was foreman to a Mr. Cutts, a coal-merchant; I desired him to take six sacks of coals for me, to No. 3, Queen-street, Poplar , to Mr. Burns' - he took them in his cart; I met the cart accidentally, about a hundred and fifty yards from the place where he ought to have delivered them; I asked why the other sack was not delivered - he said he was desired by Mr. Burns to leave it with a friend; I then went on - he was paid for them.

JOHN BURNS . I was to have had six sacks of coals; I was out when they came - I gave the prisoner no direction to take one to any friend of mine; there were only five sacks left with me.

JAMES BURNS . I was at home when the prisoner came, and delivered five sacks; there was one left in the cart - I asked him why he did not shoot that one; he said he was going to take it to a friend, and went away with it.

THOMAS GRIMSTONE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and asked where he had deposited the coals; he said he had taken them to a friend of his, in Poplar - he afterwards said he took them to his lodgings; there was nobody at home, and he put them into a back cupboard - I went and found them there.

Prisoner's Defence. I told Mr. Ashton when I came back that I had taken one sack to my own house, and I intended to pay for it.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290219-34

560. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , I live tame fowl, price 3s. , the property of Thomas Lock .

WILLIAM CRANFIELD . I am a constable. About half-past twelve o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner and two others pick up a fowl in a field, at the back of Johnson's Shades, Somer's-town; they put it into a bag which the prisoner carried - the fowl was running loose in the field with some others.

THOMAS LOCK . I live in Clarence-street, Somer's-town . This was my fowl - it was running about.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going out; two lads asked me to carry a fowl a little way - I took it, and put it down again.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-35

561. SARAH WISE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of January , 1 coat, value 70s.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 30s., the goods of Joseph Weston , and 1 cloak, value 17s., the goods of Maria Ratherbee .

JOSEPH WESTON . I am a clerk at Torrington's wharf, Battle-bridge. The prisoner was nurse to my late wife - when she died, I ordered a suit of mourning; the prisoner continued there: on the 15th, my suit of mourning was brought to the counting-house - I had not worn it at all.

FRANCIS PARKER . I am shopaman to a pawnbroker. A suit of mourning was pawned with me on the 15th of January, by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Weston , No. 24, Charlotte-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARIA RATHERBEE . On the morning the prisoner was to go to get the suit of clothes from the tailor, she said to me "I am very naked, will you lend me your cloak?" I said "I will for the morning, but I must have it in the afternoon;" she returned with my cloak and a basket, when she came in she dropped the basket, and said to me,"I am very much disappointed;" I said "Are not the clothes done?" she said "Yes, they are, but they are not come into my hands;" she then said "I will go and get my dinner; and then I will contrive a scheme to get these clothes yet:" she went out with my cloak, and I never saw her any more till she was at the office.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Weston gave these things out of his own hand; I was to pawn them.

JOSEPH WESTON . I never gave her these things - she came and took them off a desk in the counting-house.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-36

562. JAMES WALKINGSHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 plough-plane, value 12s. , the goods of James Calow .

JAMES CALOW . I am a carpenter . I lost my plough-plane from my employer's, in Gray's Inn-lane ; I had used it about half-past five o'clock, on the night of the 27th, and had shut up the shop - when I went in the morning, it was gone; the prisoner has been errand-boy there for some time.

EDWARD BULLWORTHY . I am a pawnbroker. This plane was pawned on the 28th, by the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? A. No; there were no other persons but him in the shop.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-37

563. JOHN WILLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 4 loaves of bread, value 2s. , the goods of John Trail .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a baker. On the 3d of February, I saw the prisoner in Mornington-place - he took four loaves out of a baker's-basket, and ran off; I pursued and secured him.

JOHN PORTEUS . I am a baker , and live with Mr. John Trail. I went into No. 11, Mornington-place - I came out in three or four minutes, and then missed four loaves from my basket.

Prisoner. This is the first crime I ever committed.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290219-38

564. ABRAHAM DANIELS , and WILLIAM MUNDON were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 2 stoves, value 10s.; 2 pairs of covings, value 5s., and 1 copper, value 10s., the goods of Jane Wye , being fixed to a certain building , against the Statute.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a watchman. About half-past four o'clock in the morning of the 29th of January, I was at the bottom of West-street, Mile-end, Old-town -I saw the two prisoners going up the street - they bid me good morning; I went to my box, and stopped till five o'clock - I then went round my beat, and was returning to my box, when I saw them with something; I darkened my lantern, and saw Daniels with a stove on his shoulder, and the other with a copper - as soon as they saw my light, they threw them down, and ran off; I sprung my rattle, and pursued down Dog-row, and I lost sight of them - I met another watchman, and told him to follow them; I returned, and took the property - the watchman came and said he had lost them; I then went and found the shutters off at an empty house, and these things had been taken from it: I cannot be positive as to the prisoners, but I speak from their height, appearance, and dress.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had never seen Mundon before? A. No; he is not an uncommon height - their backs were towards me after the first time; at Bethnal-green watch-house they had the same clothes on - Mundon's coat was black with soot, but I did not see it.

CHARLES JONES . I am a labourer to Mr. Dodd. About five o'clock that morning, I was feeding the cows, and heard these things fall down; I got on a wall, and saw a man run very fast - I got over, and ran after him into Northampton-street: he got into a field - I lost sight of him, and I did not go any further: Daniels, Mundon, and another person were taken to the watch-house - I was fetched, and I picked out Daniels; I had not seen his face, but his clothes and his stature were the same, and his shoes had the same sort of mire and dirt on them as the ground we ran over: I believe Daniels was the man, by his dress and his stature, and the dirt on his shoes.

Cross-examined. Q. How happens it that three men were taken? A. They were all in company.

THOMAS DALBY . I am a watchman. about twenty minutes after five o'clock, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I went into the brick-field, but saw no one - I then turned into Dog-row, and took the stove to the watch-house; in about a quarter of an hour I heard the prisoners were at the Black Dog public-house - I went and took them.

JOHN RADLEY . I am a watchman. My beat is at the bottom of the Black Dog: I was standing by a post, about twenty minutes before six o'clock, and the two prisoners came into the house - they were in a flurried state; I followed them, and saw Mundon's coat was black from shoulder to shoulder - I knew him, and asked him if he had been sweeping chimneis; he said No, it was grease - I went close to him, put my hand on his shoulder, and I found the black came off on my fingers; they went into the taproom - Mundon took off his coat, and exchanged it with another lad; I went to the watch-house, and stated what I had seen - our inspector pressed me and another to go down to the Black Dog; we went down, and saw but two persons, but on looking round, we saw Mundon concealed under the table - he said he had broken a button off his clothes, and was stooping to pick it up; I went to Mr. Christian, and we went to the place the property was taken from: Thompson swore to the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he had not seen their faces? A. Yes; I saw these men at the Black Dog, and then went to the watch-house; I had not left them in custody - I think I was not half an hour gone.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-39

565. HENRY GRIFFITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , I handkerchief, value 10s., the goods of Frederick Johnson , from his person .

MR. FREDERICK JOHNSON . I am an under-graduate at Cambridge . On a Monday, about the 26th of January, I was walking down Regent-street , about four o'clock in the afternoon - a gentleman touched me, and said my pocket had been picked; I turned round, and my handkerchief was gone - the gentleman ran across the road, and caught the prisoner; I have not seen the handkerchief since: I had been to my chambers in Furnival's Inn, and there I put my handkerchief into my pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not the prisoner on the opposite side of the way? A. Yes: he ran across the road - he gave the handkerchief to another person; there were three in the party.

JOHN CORFIELD . I am in the Army. I saw the prisoner and two other boy s following the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner put his hand into his pocket, and take the handkerchief out - I thought I saw him put it into his coat pocket, but I was not certain; I ran over, and touched the prosecutor; the prisoner ran away.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him before? -A. No: I thought he put the handkerchief into his pocket, but I found I was mistaken - I am certain he took it.

COURT. Q. There was more than one person concerned? A. Yes, three; I can swear to the prisoner's taking it - I did not take my eyes off him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-40

566. JAMES LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 gold seal, value 5s., and 1 key, value 3d., the goods of James Thurlwell Pearson , from his person .

JAMES THURLWELL PEARSON . On the 13th of February I was at the Turk's Head public-house, where I drank rather too much; I knew what I was about - I lost my watch, but I saw it again the next day.

JOHN BARKER . I am mate of a vessel. I was at the Turk's Head, New Gravel-lane, Shadwell, with the prosecutor; I was not exactly sober, but had all my senses about me - the prosecutor had a watch in his fob; I saw the appendages hanging out - I asked the prisoner to assist me to get the prosecutor home; I found him at the corner of Union-street : in a few minutes the prosecutor cried out "My watch is gone;" the prisoner ran off, and I pursued: the watchman came up with him in Bluegate-fields - I am sure he is one of the men who helped me with my friend; there was another with him, and they both ran off together - the watch was found on the opposite side of the way to where the prisoner was taken- I cannot say whether he had hold of the prosecutor's arm.

THOMAS BIRD . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner run, and pursued him into Shadwell High-street, and then into Bluegate-fields; I took him about half-way up, and in about half a minute the witness came up, and said, "What have you done with the watch you thieving rascal - have you thrown it away?" he said he had no watch; I took him to the watch-house - we then went back; when I came to the spot where I took the prisoner, Roberts, (another watchman, who was on the opposite side of the way,) found the watch and the case; the glass was broken.

RICHARD JOHN ROBERTS . I am a watchman. I went back, and found the watch and the case; it appeared to me to have been thrown away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was passing, and assisted a stranger to raise the prosecutor off the ground, and then ran on, it being late, but had never seen the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-41

567. MARY PROUTEN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 half-sovereign, 1 sixpence, 5 pence, and 1 farthing, the monies of John Ryan , from his person .

JOHN RYAN . On the 9th of February, I met with two shopmates, who persuaded me to go to a public-house in Crown-street, St. Giles'; when I was there I said I had but sixpence, as I wished to deny my half-sovereign - my shopmate said, "I will give you a toss which of us shall pawn our jacket," and so we did; he pawned his jacket for a shilling-we had some bread and cheese and beer; then my other shopmate said, "Take my rule, and you pawn your jacket;" he gave them to this prisoner to pawn - I said, "I can pawn them myself;" my shopmate said, "She can carry them under her cloak:" I afterwards went home to her lodgings, to have some tea, where I found another woman; when I got there she had got fish and potatoes - she said, "Come, send for some beer;" I gave the other woman a shilling, and she brought some beer and change - the prisoner made a grasp at the change; I did not like such behaviour, and said, "Come, give me the sixpence," and while I was grasping at the money in her hand, I found her other hand in my righthand pocket, where my half-sovereign was, which had been there safe while the other girl was gone for the beer- I let go of the halfpence to take hold of her hand; I had never quitted the room: I then came down, and found my shopmates waiting below - I told them to stop there; I went to the patrol, who said he did not like to come by himself; the officer afterwards came, and he took her.

JOEL SPENCER . I am a patrol. The witness came to me about half-past six o'clock, but we did not know whether we might go; I met the officer afterwards, and found the prisoner in bed with her clothes one - we took her to the watch-house, but found no money on her but sixpence and a few halfpence; the man appeared to have his senses - the prisoner said he wanted to go with her for 6d., that she would not let him, and he went down stairs.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to have half a pint of beer, and went to the fire to warm it; one of the men said,"Don't stand before the fire;" they then tossed, and the prosecutor had to pawn his waistcoat - another man who was there took a rule out of his pocket, and said, "This will make 3s., and got a bit of straw to rub it up, and he said, "This young woman will take it for you;" I said, "I will carry it under my clock;" we went down to a pawnbroker's in Holborn - I gave him the articles, and he went in with them; I heard him ask 2s. for them - he then came out, and said, "Come and let us have a drop of gin to

ourselves;" the two men had been watching us, and they came into the same public-house; the prosecutor then said"Make it up half a pint" - he then said, "I will go, out of aggravation, and have a pot or two of beer;" I said," I must go home:" the men then said, "We will go wherever she goes, and have a pot or two of beer;" they then all went to the White Bear public-house, and had two or three pots of beer - I said, "I shall go home;" the prosecutor then said to me, "Where do you live?" I said, "It is nothing to you" - I went home, and just as I got up stairs I saw him coming up the stairs; the other two men were at the bottom - I said, "I don't want you to follow me:" he sent a young woman for a pot of beer, and gave her a sixpence, which he said was all the money he had; he shewed a handfull of duplicates, and said he had parted with all these things that week: the girl brought in a pot of beer; the prosecutor then pretended to go to sleep - he said he should like to go to bed; I said, "You cannot, for I expect my husband home;" he said, "I will give you what you please to sleep with that young woman;" I said,"You cannot do any thing of that kind here" - he then shut the door, and said, "I will not go out to-night;" I called up the other men, and said, "I wish you would take this man away;" the prosecutor said, "If you will lend me a collar I will pawn my shirt, and get 3s. upon it;" he said, "I have a few halfpence, and I must have a drop of gin before I go;" he then took off his waistcoat, to take his shirt off - I said, "You shall not do any thing of the sort here;" he then swore he would make me suffer for it - he walked out, and had us taken up, but he did not come for near an hour, and we had laid down; I had had two or three drops of gin, and some beer - it had overcome me; I heard a knock at the door, and I got up - the officer said, "Here's a pretty concern here;" the beer still stood on the table, and I said, "Did you come back for your beer - here it is;" I then said, "Does he want his sixpence?" the officer said, "No, it is a half-sovereign:" the prosecutor then came in, and said, "Take that woman."

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18290219-42

568. JOHANNA HAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 gown, value 14s.; 1 sheet, value 4s., and 1 shirt, value 2s. , the goods of Alexander Pitt , her master.

HANNAH PITT . I am the wife of Alexander Pitt, of Tavistock-buildings . The prisoner was in my service two years; I missed a gown and sheet on the 20th of January - I had missed a shirt some time before; on the Saturday after I missed the gown and sheet; I gave her a shilling and a half-sovereign, which I thought was a sixpence, to go on an errand - when she returned I told her I had given her half a sovereign; she said she had not got it - I searched her, and found the money on her; I then charged her with the gown - she denied it.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner. I said I should search her box - she said I was quite welcome; she gave up the key - there were no articles there but what belonged to herself: I found these three duplicates of this property, with eleven others.

LAWRENCE NOTLEY . I am a pawnbroker. This gown was pawned on the 19th of January; I believe by the prisoner.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker. This sheet was pawned with me - I gave this duplicate for it.

JOHN SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. This shirt was pawned at my house, by a woman, but I did not take it in.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing the gown. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-43

569. JOHN SUMMERFIELD was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a baker , and live in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. The prisoner was in my employ, and was to receive money for me, which he was to give an account of when I booked his bread; he never brought me 4s. 10 1/2d. from Rebecca Yates . I asked him, on the 12th of January, if he had got any money for me - he said he had not; I said, "Don't tell me a story;" he again said he had not got any: I said I would go round with him to the customers - the first place I went to was Mrs. Yates'; I gave her the bill, and she said she had paid it - I asked the prisoner if she had; he said Yes, and he had spent the money - I then went to other places, and found he had had some there; he had been with me four or five months, and behaved well till the last month.

REBECCA YATES . I paid the prisoner 4s. 10 1/2d. on the 12th of January; he came again the next day, and I took a loaf of him - some time after his master called, and I said I had paid it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-44

570. JOHN BAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 2 pairs of window-sashes, value 2l., and 2 locks, value 4s., the goods of Anthony Pratt , and fixed to a certain building of his ; against the Statute.

EMANUEL PLAYER . I am a house-agent - I have a house at No. 31, Raven-street, Whitechapel . On the 6th of February, I heard some window-sashes had been found by the officer; on the Saturday morning after, I went to open the door of the house, and the sashes and the locks were gone - I went to where the sashes were; we brought them back and compared them; they fitted exactly: I can swear to them - the house belonged to Mr. Anthony Pratt, to whom I am agent; I had seen the sashes safe on the Thursday, and missed them on the Saturday.

JOHN VANN . I went, in consequence of information, to a house in Whitechapel on Friday morning - I found some sash-frames on a fire burning; an old woman was in the room - Current went up stairs, and brought down the prisoner; I searched him, and found two keys on him, and in a basket under some biscuits, I found these two locks and this square of glass - the prisoner said,"That is my basket, don't break the biscuits."

THOMAS CURRENT . I went with Vann to the house about half-past nine o'clock; I went up stairs, and found the prisoner coming out of a room - I forced him back into the room, and found a great many squares of glass on the floor which were broken; I brought him down -Vann found the key on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to call at that house- I asked the lady to let me leave the basket till the fol

lowing morning; I then went again, and saw the basket and some things in it - I said, "Where is the cloth?" she said, "Up stairs;" I went up to look for it - the officer came and took me on the first floor; he took me into the room, and there was a great many squares of glass and some sash-frames, but I knew nothing of them.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-45

571. HENRY BAGNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 copper, value 12s. , the goods of William Colton .

WILLIAM COLTON . I was moving from Battle-bridge to Islington ; this copper was taken out of the cart to go into the house - I saw it safe about three feet from the house; I can swear to it as mine by the mark inside.

SAMUEL CAVE . I had some workmen repairing my house - they told me three suspicious characters were walking up and down; I watched them, and saw the prisoner, (who was one of them) stop at the prosecutor's house - another went to a shop, and a third was standing at a window, as if to read something; I went in, and in two or three minutes my errand-boy told me a man had stolen a copper - I went out, and saw the prisoner running with it about a dozen yards from the prosecutor's; I ran after him, but he gained ground of me - I called Stop thief! he put down the copper, and ran faster; I called to a gentleman, who stopped him - I am certain he is the person I saw at the prosecutor's door, and when I was pursuing him he turned and looked at me several times; one of my workmen took up the copper.

JOHN MINTON . I ran out to assist Mr. Cave, and took up the copper, which the prisoner dropped.

WILLIAM BIRD . I saw the prisoner take the copper from the door.

THOMAS COPE . I was sent for, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-46

572. GEORGE BOLTER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 71 lbs. weight of mutton, value 2l. , the goods of Samuel Rootsey Ward .

WILLIAM HENRY JENNINGS . I am apprentice to Samuel Rootsey Ward , a butcher , of Great Mary-le-bone-street . On the 12th of February, at a quarter-past eight o'clock, I was called up, and told a man had run away with a carcase of mutton; I followed the prisoner, and overtook him in South-street, about one hundred yards from my master's - he had turned a corner; I knew it was my master's mutton, and my dressing.

Prisoner. Q. Do you mean to say I had the mutton when you came up? A. Yes, you had it on your shoulder, and threw it on a step.

COURT. Q. Are you sure the sheep that was missing was the same he was carrying? A. Yes, my Lord.

RICHARD PHILLIPS . I saw the prisoner take the sheep out of the shop - it hung to the ceiling; he put it on his shoulder, and carried it away - I gave an alarm to Mr. Ward, and saw Jennings go out.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear I am the person? A. Yes - you had a blue frock and an apron; there was a man with you, with a long brown coat on.

GEORGE BOWER . I am a patrol. I was within one hundred yards of the shop, and saw a man pass me with a carcase of a sheep on his shoulder; in a minute I heard the cry of Stop thief! and I went and took the prisoner, whom Jennings had hold of - the carcase of the sheep was about thirty yards from him.

Prisoner. If I am convicted I hope you will send me out of the country - I may do better there than here.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-47

573. EDWARD CHAPLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 pick-axe, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Edward Lawrence .

EDWARD LAWRENCE . I am a master bricklayer . The prisoner had once been in my employ - he called for a job about December, but there was nothing for him, and he went away; about a week after he was gone I missed this pick-axe - I had not seen it safe for about a week before; it might have been taken before, but on the 24th of January my shed was broken open in the night - I went to look for the tools, and found the pick-axe at Weaver's shop.

ELIZABETH WEAVER . I purchased a pick-axe of the prisoner - I think it was about seven weeks ago; I was ill in bed at the time, and did not see him, but knew his voice - he asked 1s. 6d. for it; I told my daughter to give him 1s., and she did - it hung at my door till the prosecutor claimed it.

CAROLINE WEAVER . I am the daughter of Elizabeth Weaver . I gave the prisoner 1s. for the axe.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner- he said he took the axe because Mr. Lawrence owed him 1s.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in his employ two years, and there was a difference between us of 1s. - I asked him for it several times, and he would not give it to me; I said I would have something for it, and when I went to his shed I took the pick-axe for the 1s.

EDWARD LAWRENCE . When he last worked for me he wanted 1s. more, but I would not pay him more than his work was worth - he came several times, but never asked for it; that was in May. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290219-48

574. WILLIAM CREMER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 1 ham, value 13s. , the goods of John King .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Ann King .

ANN KING . I am the wife of John King - he has left me these four years; I carry on the cheesemonger s business, and live in Wellington-street, Goswell-street-road . On the 21st of January, about half-past five o'clock, (my little boy had just come in, and was sitting by the fire,) I went into the room to get something off the fire-place- the prisoner came into the shop; I had lost a ham the day before, and had put a saw across this ham that they should not get it - the prisoner took off the saw, put it down, and took up the ham; I ran to him and said, "You had a ham yesterday, but you sha'nt have this to-day" - my little boy came up; he dropped the ham, and ran out of the shop - I pursued some distance, but was exhausted, and turned back; my little boy followed till he was taken- I had known him before.

WILLIAM BECKLEY . I was going down Brick-lane. I heard the little boy crying Stop thief! I cried Stop thief! and followed the prisoner; several persons attempted to stop him, but he threw every one that came near - I pursued, got hold of him, and kept him till my brother officer came up.

EDWARD HINDS . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, but did not know he had done any thing - the little boy came out of the shop, and cried Stop thief! I pursued - Beckley got hold of him, and the prosecutrix identified him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran after the thief; some person came and said I was the person.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-49

575. WILLIAM COOPER and ANN DOTKIN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 10 lbs. of feathers, value 10s., and 1 bolster-case, value 1s. , the goods of Hannah Wilson .

HANNAH WILSON . I live at Stamford-hill - Dotkin was in my service for about six months. On the 17th of January I missed a bolster-case and some feathers - they had been taken out of a bed, which had been ripped open, in the servant s' room; the bolster-case has my name marked on it - Cooper kept company with Dotkin.

JOHN SHEPHERD . I am a patrol. On the night of the 17th of January, I and Stringer met Cooper with a bag under him arm; I asked what he had got - he said some feathers which he had got from Mrs. Wilson's, at Stamford-hill; he was about three-quarters of a mile from her house - he said his wife lived cook there, and she gave him the feathers to take to his lodgings; I took him back - I found Dotkin there and Mrs. Wilson; Dotkin said the bag was her mistress', but the feathers her mother had given her - she then left the house, and went, as I understood, to her father's; the next day I and Stringer went and found her there - a bed had been cut open, and sewed up again.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe Mrs. Wilson said she did not wish her to be taken, but she herself would be answerable for her appearance? A. She did not positively say that, but she said she had no doubt of her appearance; Dotkin at once said the bolster was her mistress'.

MRS. WILSON. I told the officer I did not wish the young woman to be taken, but would be answerable for her appearance - I told him to that full extent.

JAMES STRINGER . I was with Shepherd. We met Cooper, about eight o'clock in the evening, with the bag of feathers - he said his wife lived cook at Mrs. Wilson's.

ELIZA PIGGOTT . I am in the service of the prosecutrix. Cooper used to come to see Dotkin - she told me her mistress had said that Cooper ought not to come; it was two or three weeks before this happened: on the night of the 17th of January, a bed had been opened, but I do not know how long, or whether any feathers had been taken from it - I had seen it before, but I do not know whether it was as full as it had been; it had been sewn up again - we used always to sleep on it, but on the Friday night we slept in another room; it was the under bed - I saw Dotkin's motherat my mistress' several times; she was there that Friday night, and they were talking about gowns and things, and had a parcel under her cloak, which appeared to me like a gown; I should not have missed any feathers from the bed, if the officers had not - Dotkin came to me in the kitchen, and I told her I was frightened to see the officers come in; she did not say any thing to me that night about what I was to say or was not to say - I mean to swear that; I am still in Mrs. Wilson's service.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the bed ever searched for feathers, while you were there? A. No. I had been there three months; I heard Dotkin ask her mother to send her some feathers two or three weeks before, and she promised to send her some to make a pillow; I am on good terms with my mistress; if I had seen this bed after the charge, I could not have perceived that any feathers had been taken out of it.

MRS. WILSON re-examined. Q. What sort of a bed was this? A. It was a common feather bed. I have not a doubt but that feathers had been taken out of it - I think it was quite obvious to any body; I do not know what quantity had been taken out - Dotkin said she intended to return the bolster-case; it being vacation time, we had changed the beds about, to keep them aired - I do not think Piggott slept on that bed again till the young ladies returned, but she had slept on it the night before; I do not know that the feathers are mine.

MR. PHILLIPS called -- DOTKIN. I am the prisoner Dotkin's mother; I had seen her about three weeks before this robbery, and taken tea with her; Piggott heard her ask me for some feathers; I told her I had made use of the feathers that were her's, but I would give her some others, and I took her some in a large coarse apron - I took the apron home and washed it; I could not say that these are the same feathers, but they look a great deal like those I took out of my bolster. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-50

576. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 14 yards of calico, value 5s. , the goods of George Trotter .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-51

577. MARY DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 3 printed books, value 10s. , the goods of George Clarke .

GEORGE MILLWARD . I am in the employ of Mr. George Clarke , bookseller , of Mount-street . On the 23d of January, I missed three books, which I had seen immediately before; I ran out and saw the prisoner turning the corner of Charles-street - I saw her, so as to know her again; I had not known her before - I went back and called a person down to mind the shop; I then pursued and took her in Thomas'-street - I told her to deliver up the books which she had got; she gave them me from under her shawl, these are them.

Prisoner. I went to buy a sheet of paper, a memorandum-book, and two wafers. Witness. Yes, she did, and while I was stooping to get the wafers, she must have taken the books from the counter.

THOMAS MOLSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband will not allow me any thing to live on. On the 18th of September, I was in

dicted for a nuisance, and the officers took 4l. worth of strawberries; they were kept in the watch-house till they were all spoiled, but I got the cause at Guildhall, and since then they have been trying to injure me.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-52

578. WILLIAM FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , 1 firkin, value 6d., and 80 lbs. weight of pipe-clay, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Stable .

JOHN DEVEY . I am carman to Mr. Joseph Stable ; I live in Green Harbour-court. On the 23d of January, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I received a cask of pipe-clay from my master, it had a card on it, for Mr. Goodhall, of Ledlington; I took it into my cart, with several other things, and was going to the White Horse public-house - the cask was safe going up St. John-street; I got out in Smithfield , and led the horse, but did not stop.

GEORGE FIELD . I am in the service of Mr. Joseph Stable , an oilman , who lives in Southwark, and has no partner. I wrote the direction, and gave it to the warehouseman to affix to the firkin, while the cart was at the door - this is the direction; it is for Mr. John Goodall, Ledlington - it was to go by a waggon.

HENRY SHELSTON . I live in Red Lion-alley, Cow-cross. On the evening of the 23d of January, I saw the prisoner and another man, coming down Greenwood-rents, with a cask - it was a middling-sized cask; I do not know which of them had it - but one of them put it in a corner; I said,"Here's the watchman coming," and they ran; I saw them together about two minutes - they came about thirty yards; the watchman caught the prisoner and took the cask from where they put it.

JAMES TERRY . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner in Red Lion-alley, about seven o'clock in the morning of the 23d of January; I heard Shelston say, "Here's the watchman coming" - I saw two men run down a flight of steps; I stopped the prisoner, who was one of them - this is the cask which I took from the corner.

Prisoner's Defence. A man came running by me, and in about five minutes the patrol came and took me; Shelston says he saw me for thirty yards, but he did not see me till I was at the top of the rents.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-53

579. GEORGE FOGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 2 saws, value 30s., and 1 crow-bar, value 7s. , the goods of William Ainge .

WILLIAM AINGE . I am a sawyer . I lost two saws and a crow-bar on the 21st of January, from a saw bed, in Old-street ; I had left them safe between five and six o'clock the evening before - I went in the morning to meet the prisoner and another, who were to work for me; I found them at the door - they told me the place was broken open, and they believed the saws were gone: the prisoner asked me to go and look after Dan, as they suspected he was the man who took the saws away - I sent for Dan, and he owned that he and the prisoner carried away the saws; the prisoner then owned to it; he cried very much, and seemed to be very sorry - I would take him into my service again.

HENRY HARRINGTON . I am inspector of the watch. Early in the morning of the 21st of January, I saw the prisoner and another man in Golden-lane, with the two saws and a crow-bar - I stopped them, but the prisoner said he had been at work till late, and their master had given them eighteenpence; I knew them to be sawyer s, and thought it might be right.

CHARLES RICHARDSON . The prisoner was let go; but I found the saws the next morning at the Duke of Gloucester public-house, and I apprehended him.

Prisoner. I was tipsy; the other man persuaded me to go and take them; I was very sorry for it in the morning - I had worked for my master seven years.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-54

580. ELIZABETH GURNEY was indicted for stealing on the 31st of January , 4 lbs. weight of bacon, value 2s. the goods of Sarah Jones .

ANN BRENT . I am in the service of Mr. Jarvis, and wait upon Sarah Jones , who rents the shop and parlour. On the 31st of January, about half-past eleven o'clock, I was called to shut up the shop; I went in for my bonnet - a person came and asked if we missed any thing out of the shop; I looked, and missed this bacon, which I had weighed for a lady about half an hour before, and it was too much for her.

BENJAMIN LILFORD . I am a watchman. I got this bacon from the prisoner in the New-road, Paddington , about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock, about fifty yards from the prosecutrix's shop; there were two other persons with her - I went and asked her if she had got it; they all denied it; I sprung my rattle - the prisoner turned from me, but I called her back; she dropped the bacon.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it; I was in company with two other girls, and one of them came and put the bacon into my hand.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290219-55

581. JOHN HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 1 picture, value 15s., and 1 picture-frame, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Andrew Nossotti .

ROBERT DANCER . I am in the employ of Charles Andrew Nossotti , a picture-frame maker , of Dean-street, Oxford-street . On the 20th of January, two men, (but neither of them the prisoner,) called and asked me to show them a pier glass, which I did; they said that was too large - I showed them another, which they said was too small; they went away without buying any thing; in about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, Mr. Emery brought this picture and frame over to me, which I know to be my master's - I saw the prisoner in company with the two men in Chapel-street.

EDWARD EMERY . My wife gave me this picture and frame, which had been left at my house while I was out- I took it over to the prosecutor's.

MARTHA EMERY . The prisoner came to my house with this picture and frame, and asked if Mr. Emery was at home; I said No, but he would he at home at one o'clock- my husband is a carver and gilder; our shop is about two minutes walk from the prosecutor's; he said he wanted to know the price of a pair of those pictures, that

he would leave that one and come again in the afternoon - I knew it directly, but did not say any thing.

ANGELIOUS BETRAUN . I took the prisoner and the picture, which he said he had bought of two men in Dean-street, for 12s.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Dean-street, and bought it of two men for 12s.; I took it to Mr. Emery's, to know if I had bought it too dear.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-56

582. WILLIAM HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 1 half-crown, 4 shillings, and 5 sixpences , the monies of Henrietta Anstiss , spinster .

HENRIETTA ANSTISS . I am single, and keep a shop in Mary-le-bone . On the 3d of February, I was in the parlour, heard a noise, came into the shop, and saw the prisoner; the till was shut then, but all the silver had been taken out except sixpence - I had seen it in the till all right about twenty minutes before; I locked the door, and sent for an officer - the prisoner threw down the silver, and I picked it up.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I produce the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into that shop to buy a penny loaf: I knocked at the counter, and the penny fell from my hand - I was stooping to pick it up; the woman came out, and split my head open - the watchman said she must not take the law into her own hands; she then accused me of this.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-57

583. MARY ANN KING , PHOEBE DOUGLAS , and ANN NORRIS , were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 30 yards of printed cotton, value 19s. , the goods of James Compigne .

MARY COMPIGNE . I am the wife of James Compigne , a linen-draper , of Mile-end-road . About four o'clock on the 9th of February, King came and wished to look at some prints; I shewed her several - she said they were not genteel enough - I shewed her some others, and then she asked for some more; she offered me 1s. 4d. a yard for one which I asked 1s. 10d. for: after she had detained me about eight or ten minutes, the other two prisoners came in together, and wished to look at a print in the window, which was very difficult to get at; I asked them to take a seat, but King detained me so long that I went and gave them the gown-piece out of the window -I was there, perhaps, about three minutes; I then returned to King, and she said I knew her terms - I said I could not take it; she went out rather fast, and I went to the other two; they said the print I had shown them was not dark enough - Douglas said she was a poor servant, and had seven children, and hoped I would take as little as I could for two dresses - I offered to take off half-a-crown; she had a child which was very troublesome -Norris walked towards the door with it, and they went away; I then stood a bit, went into the parlour, and said I had lost something, I was sure I had, but I did not miss them till Brown, the officer, brought these prints the next day - they are the prints which I had shewn them; this is one which King said was not genteel enough - this one she said was only fit for children's frocks; this she did not like, and this was not enough to make a dress: the prisoners did not speak to each other to my knowledge, and none of them made any purchase.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. On the 9th of February, I saw Douglas and Norris, about ten minutes before five o'clock, on the opposite side of the street, and King was on the same side as I was, with a bundle: I and Waters stopped her at the corner of Church-street, Bethnal-green, and took her into the Adam and Eve public-house - we found all these articles on her, which she said she had bought of a tallyman, who came to her house; I asked if she could tell where he lived, and she said No; we then searched her, and she had no money - we brought her out again, crossed over, and took the other prisoners, and took them all into another public-house; King then said,

"Phoebe, have you been with me to-day?" Douglas said, "No, Nance, have you been with me to-day?" Norris said No; we took King, but let the other two go: but from further information we went again, and took them: last Saturday, as I was going up stairs at the office, I heard Douglas, whose voice I knew, call to a man in the lock-up place, and say, "George, it's all up," for the fatements were on them; he said, "Why did you not go in somewhere, and take them off?" she said, "We had not a bl-y farthing among us:" we took the prisoners about three-quarters of a mile from the prosecutor's.

THOMAS WATERS . I was with Brown, and saw Douglas and Norris on the opposite side of the way; I called Brown's attention to them, and at that moment we saw King with the bundle; we took her into the house, and found these things; I then went out, and overtook the other two about one hundred yards off - we found nothing on them, and let them go; but on the Thursday morning we went and took them again - we asked them if they had been in any shop with King: they said No.

KING'S Defence. I never was in the prosecutor's shop- I know nothing of these other women; the things were given me by a tallyman.

DUGLAS'S Defence. I never saw this lady before I was at Worship-street: what the officers have stated is false- they knew me for some time.

NORRIS' Defence. I was not on the same side of the way with King; the time I was first taken I had half a crown in my hand - I had been no higher than Bethnal-green school that day; I had not been in the road at all; on the Tuesday Waters met a lad in the Bethnal-green-road, he asked where I lived, and gave him brandy, and said if he told me of it he would police him.

KING - GUILTY . Aged 22.

DOUGLAS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

NORRIS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-58

584. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 16 lbs. weight of bacon, value 12s. , the goods of Moses Miles .

MOSES MILES . I am a cheesemonger . On the 20th of January I was standing in a passage between my shop and parlour, and saw the prisoner come in with two aprons on; he took off one, put a piece of bacon into it, and took it out - he went out of the shop, and dropped it in the street, when he saw me following him; I took him back.

THOMAS LANGHAM . My mother lodges with the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner go out with the bacon, and drop it.

FRANCIS BENNETT . I am a watchman, and took the prisoner; this is a part of the bacon.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-59

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20.

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

584. MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 6 frocks, value 2l.: 1 dress, value 1l.; 1 pelisse, value 1l.; 1 bonnet, value 10s.; 2 shawls, value 15s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 6s.; 1 neck-chain, value 10s.; 1 veil, value 6s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 4 shifts, value 12s.; 1 bed-gown, value 1s. 6d.; 1 collar, value 1s.; 1 3/4 yard of lace, value 1s. 6d.; 2 towels, value 1s.; 2 slips, value 3s.; 1 pair of stays, value 9s.; 9 pairs of stockings, value 8s.; 2 petticoats, value 3s.; 1 purse, value 3d.; 1 half-sovereign, 1 crown, and 4 half-crowns, the property of Lydia Perry , in her dwelling-house .

LYDIA PERRY . I am single. On the 12th of December I lodged at the house of Mary Ann Ford , in Lower Crown-street, Westminster - she lived in the house; the prisoner lodged on the second floor, and had been there about two months. About half-past six o'clock in the evening I went to the Theatre, leaving the prisoner in my apartments, to take care of them; I lodge in the two parlours - I left all the property stated in the indictment perfectly secure; my caddy contained a Morocco purse, with the half-sovereign and the other money in it - when I came home, about half-past eleven o'clock, I found the caddy broken open, and the money gone; I missed also the articles stated in the indictment - the prisoner was gone: I went for an officer next morning; I was with him on the 3d of February, when he apprehended the prisoner in Rupert-street - I gave her in charge for stealing all this property; she said,

"Here are your things," and she delivered up twenty-two duplicates: the things she had on were mine - she has them on now; four of the pawnbrokers have given the property up.

JAMES STEWARD WALLIS . I am servant to Mr. Aldous, of Berwick-street, Soho. I have a silk pelisse, pawned on the 9th of January, a gown for 3s., on the 13th of January, and a veil and handkerchief for 2s., on the 30th of January; they were all pawned by the prisoner.

JOHN WILDMAN PAYNE . I am a Bow-street patrol. -On the 3d of February, in consequence of information, I went to Rupert-street with the prosecutrix, and found the prisoner coming up stairs from the kitchen; the prosecutrix said she was the woman - I took her in charge, and on going down stairs she threw out of her hand a neck-chain, into the back kitchen, which I picked up; the prosecutrix identified it, and I found this purse on her, and twenty-two duplicates - most of the property has been given up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 20s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-60

585. WILLIAM BEAUMONT and CHARLES EDWARDS were indicted for breaking and entering the warehouse of William Juxson , on the 10th of February , and stealing 1 table-top, value 4s.; 4 weights, value 7s., and 1 cart-tilt, value 6s., his property .

WILLIAM JUXSON . I am a broker . My warehouse is next door to my dwelling-house, in Dog-row, Bethnal-green . On Friday, the 10th of February, about nine o'clock, I left the warehouse padlocked; I went next morning, about eight o'clock, and found the locks broken to pieces - I missed these things; Brown found a crow-bar, which tallied exactly with the marks on the door. I have seen the prisoners about the neighbourhood.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. On the 22d of January I and Eagles went to the house of Beaumont, and while there, Edwards came in - in the room I saw two table. On the Tuesday after this the prosecutor came to the office, stated that he had been robbed, and described the table.

WILLIAM JUXSON . I do not know when I lost my table; it must have been in January, but my warehouse had been broken open several times.

JAMES BROWN . We took both the prisoners into custody when we went to the house; I found these skeleton-keys in a knife-box, and two more under a brick - in the knife-box I found this crow-bar also; when I heard of this robbery I took the crow-bar, and fitted it to the door-post, where the impression was made - it fitted as if it were cast in a mould; I took the prosecutor to Beaumont's house, and directly he entered the room he claimed the table; I found a skeleton-key and a phosphorus-box in Beaumont's house.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-61

586. WILLIAM BEAUMONT and CHARLES EDWARDS were again indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 2 milk-pails, value 1s.; 1 yoke, value 1s., and half a pint measure, value 4d. , the goods of Matthew Younge .

CATHERINE HUWLEY . I am servant to Matthew Younge , a milkman . About a month ago I was in the Mile-end-road , near the turnpike; I put my pails under a window, and went to serve some customers - when I came back they were gone.

SARAH BERDOLE . I am a broker. I bought a yoke of Edwards, on Tuesday afternoon, the 20th of January; they both came together to me, but Beaumont did not speak - Edwards asked me 1s. for it, and I gave him 9d.; I asked him if it were his own - he said it was.

JAMES BROWN . I am a constable. On the night of the 22d of January I went to Beaumont's; Eagles took him, and I took Edwards, in his house - I found a milkpail in his house, and in Edwards' house I found another pail.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BEAUMONT'S Defence. I was going down Petticoat-lane, and bought the pails and things for 3s.; being in the milk business, I thought they would be useful - I sold Edwards one of them; we were both together when I bought them.

BEAUMONT - GUILTY . Aged 22.

EDWARDS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

Reference Number: t18290219-62

587. HARRIET FARRELL was charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition, with the wilful murder of her bastard child .

JONATHAN COOK . I live at Isleworth , and am a trunk-maker. The prisoner came into our service on the 15th of July - I believe she is single. On Saturday morning, the 3d of January, at half-past eight o'clock, when I came down she was sitting on a chair in the kitchen; I said,"Harriet, have you not opened the house?" she said No, she had been so bad in her inside all night, she could not- I went out to open the shutters, and when I came in she had gone up stairs; a few minutes after Mrs. Cook came down - I saw some marks of blood on a table and chair; I then went into the yard, and saw a stick covered with night soil: I afterwards put a small garden hoe down the privy, and drew it up, when the neck and shoulders of a child presented itself to my view; I did not draw it out - I called my wife, left it there, and went for a constable; I found the child exactly as I had left it: I then went to Isleworth, and brought Mr. Syers - when I returned with him the child had been taken out, washed, and laid on a table- the prisoner had lived thirteen or fourteen months with my sister.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever see any thing cruel in her conduct? A. Never; about four months after she came to us, we suspected she was in the family way - my sister is married; I did not know where the prisoner's father lived.

MARY COOK . I am the wife of the last witness. When the prisoner had been five or six weeks with us, I charged her with being in the family way; she said No, she had only caught a cold - I got her some medicine to make her comfortable, and she said she was very well after that; I had agreed for her to leave us at Christmas: I asked her again a few days before Christmas, if she were not in the family way - she said she was not, so help her God; I said the parish-officers would come, she must tell me the truth, and I would be a friend to her; she said I spoke like a mother to her, and she would tell the truth, so help her God it was not so - I then agreed for her to stop longer. On the 3d of January, after my husband bad got up, she came up to me, and said she had been very ill in her inside all night: I said,

"I heard you go down after four o'clock, but what is the matter?" I put the curtain aside, and said, "Why, Harriet, you have deceived me;" she said she had not: I said, "Why, you have miscarried - go up to bed;" she said,"I have not;" I went down stairs - every thing seemed in confusion; my husband shewed me marks on the work-table, on a chair, and the boxes. I carried her up some tea, and told her she had miscarried - she said, what would I say of her next; I went down, took her up another cup of tea, and asked what she had put in the privy - she said nothing, what would I say of her next, it was no such thing; we then went to seek for the child - my husband put a hoe down the privy; he called me, and I saw a full grown child there - he pulled it a few inches above the soil, on the hoe; when the constable came he got it up - it was washed, and laid on a table, for the medical gentleman to inspect; the *** had not been tied, but I tied it - the child was quite dead, and must have been there some time; she must have been delivered in the kitchen, on a brick floor - after this I said to her, "I know you have miscarried;" she said she had not - I said,

"I know you have, for the child is found;" she said no more then.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not tell the Coroner that she said the child did not cry, and she did not perceive that it had fetched breath? A. She said so to the doctor, admitted she had been delivered, and said she sat down in a chair, and almost fainted.

MR. JOHN SYERS, surgeon, of Isleworth, deposed that he had minutely examined the child - that there were no external marks of violence - that the lungs appeared to have performed the function of respiration, and floated freely in water; they had a florid appearance, and assumed the texture which they would, having performed that function; but he could not say it was alive when entirely delivered; if it had fallen on the brick floor it might have been suffocated: he considered it decidedly a case of infanticide, by omission.

NOT GUILTY, of murder, but GUILTY of concealing the birth . Aged 17. - Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

Reference Number: t18290219-63

588. FRANCES HALL was indicted for feloniously forging a certain paper writing, purporting to be the last will and testament of Anthony Bond , deceased, with intent to defraud John Baines Bond .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering the same, knowing it to be forged.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, for forging a codicil to the said will, and for uttering the same.

FIVE OTHER COUNTS, varying the charge.

MESSRS. CURWOOD, BODKIN, and BARRY conducted the prosecution.

JOHN BEAMS . I am a clerk in the Prerogative office, Doctors'-commons. I produce a will and codicil of Anthony Bond , deceased.

JOHN BAINES BOND. My father's name was Anthony Bond ; he lived at the Rising Sun public-house, Windmill-street, Westminster . The prisoner lived with my father, as his housekeeper , he having no wife - she is his sister; my father died on the 12th of July, 1828 - I never saw him while he was ill, nor did I receive any message to attend him while he was ill, nor hear that he was ill; I attended his funeral on the Wednesday after his death: I first heard of his death, on the Sunday before that Wednesday, and went to his house; my cousin came that Sunday, and told me he was ill - I went to his house, and found him dead in his coffin that same day, Sunday: after I came from the funeral, the prisoner came into the room, and said "John, you will not be satisfied, I suppose, until you hear the will read?" I had said nothing to her about the will before - I said certainly I should not; she said "Mr. Hyatt, you have the keys;" Hyatt was a man my father had lent some money to - he was a friend of my father's; she went out of the room with Hyatt, and brought in a person named Silcock, who is a stranger to me - Silcock came to the further end of the room, and read what she called the will; it seems it was the codicil - I should know it again if I saw it; after it was read, I asked her to allow me to read it myself, but she snatched it out of Silcock's hands, and said I should not - I then asked her if she would allow me to see the signature; she just opened it to show me the signature, closed it directly, and took it out of the room - I saw the signature sufficiently to be satisfied it was not my fa

ther's hand-writing; she came into the room again, and asked me if I was satisfied - I said certainly I was not, and thought it a hard case that my father should die, and I not know any thing of his death - that he should die, and cut me off without a farthing: I do not know in what circumstances my father died - I did not know any thing about his property; he was a very close man - I have been living away from him for four or five years, carrying on business as a shoe-maker , at No. 8, James-street, Manchester-square; I was on very good terms with him - he often used to come and see me, and I went to see him at times; the reason he assigned for my not going to see him oftener, I can relate: I am twenty-five years old.

Q. Look at this paper - do you know it again? A. Yes, this is the paper - I do not believe the signature to be my father's hand-writing.

EDWARD WADESON . I am a proctor. I know the prisoner; I recollect her calling at my office, in July, 1828- she brought a paper with her; (looking at the codicil) this is it - she left it with me; I have marked it - it was left with me for the purpose of being proved at the Commons.

The codicil was here read: it bequeathed to Frances Hall , all his right, benefit, and interest in the Rising Sun public-house, together with all stock, goods, furniturs, plate, linen, &c, and monies either in the house or in the Bank of England, and all securities or monies due; in trust for herself and two children, &c.

MR. WADESON. This is a codicil referring to a former will; I desired her to bring me that will - she afterwards brought me a paper, purporting to be it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where was the codicil produced to you? A. In Great Ryder-street, in the City.

MR. ADOLPHUS to JOHN BAINES BOND . Q. The prisoner is your aunt? A. Yes; she lived at Reading before she went to live with my father - he had this house about two years and a half I believe; he told me the prisoner lived with him as housekeeper - she came at his desire, and brought her three children with her, and carried on his business; the house is frequented by boxing men: I was there a fortnight before he died, and asked her if he were at home; she said he had not been very well, and was gone into the country, but I saw him just as I was going out at the door, but did not speak to him, as I did not know he was in the house till I was going out; I dare say I had not spoken to him for two months before he died, as he had been down to Bradford, Wilts, and I did not know he was in town: I was on good terms with him - he never turned me out of the house; I am now in possession of the house- there is now a suit pending in Chancery; I have indicted her for a conspiracy, with three others, upon this transaction.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. Though you have got possession of the house, have you got the other parts of your father's property? A. Nothing but a few things; the cellar was emptied of every thing - I cannot say whether the prisoner knew where I lived, but my father often called on me.

MARY BAKER . I attended the deceased as nurse, from the 5th of July till the 12th, when he died; he repeatedly asked for his son during that time - he asked for him more on the Thursday than any other day; I never heard him say any thing to the prisoner about his son - he said to his nephew

"Where is my Jack, I want to see my Jack;" the prisoner was not present, but I went down and told her, and asked if she could not tell where to find him - she said

"I do not know where he is - I wonder he has not been here before now;" I first told her of it on the Thursday night - I told his cousin, and he went down to tell the prisoner; I went down to her myself, on the Tuesday or Wednesday, and every day I mentioned it, and said if she would tell me where he was to be found, my husband would go for him - she said she thought it strange he had not been there before, and would endeavour to try and send for him; she was always busy, and I cannot tell what answer she made when I offered to send my husband - I never heard Mr. Bond ask for him while she was in the room, I generally went down stairs, and left them; he died about three o'clock on the Saturday - the prisoner was there, after he had been dead some time - she took every thing out of his box; there was a large ledger, a silver tankard, and different things - she took them all up into her bed-room in her apron; there was some paper: on the Thursday I found two bills in his bed, and there were two 500l. notes under the bolster - I put them into the tankard, and they went up in her apron.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you look at the two 500l. notes? A. Yes; it was on the Thursday night before he died - he must have fetched them out of his box in the afternoon while I was down making some tea; I had left a boy with him - I had made his bed in the morning; they were not there then - I swear they were Bank of England notes, notes, not hair-dressers' flash notes; I never saw a flash note - they were exactly as Bank notes; it said 500l., and they were much worn, where they were doubled up; he was insensible when I took them from under the pillow - he had a fit almost every minute, and would not keep in bed ten minutes together, but was taking all his clothes out of the drawers, and routing about; I told nobody about these notes, not even my husband - in my opinion the deceased's mind was broken ever since the Wednesday when he had a convulsive fit, but at times he answered me correctly: I did not then tell him I had taken the notes from under his pillow - I thought his mind broken, and it was useless to disturb him: he had two strong fits on Wednesday, and then the doctor said he was dying; he would at times answer me, Yes, or No, but he had no knowledge whatever after the fits: the box was usually kept locked, but the key remained in it from the Tuesday till he died - I was never out of the room till he died, and am certain the notes were there; nobody could have gone to the box without my knowledge: I asked him where his son lived - he said in a street in Oxford-street, and at that time somebody came into the room; Mrs. Hall was not present: (looking at two flash notes) these are not the notes I saw under the pillow - they were blacker and dirtier than these, and more worn, but not worn as these are - they were more worn in the fold, but not torn at all.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did you ever hear the prisoner ask the deceased where his son lived? A. No, I never heard her have any conversation with him.

MARY HALL . I am the deceased's sister, and know his hand-writing; I do not believe this signature

"A. Bond" to be his hand-writing - I very often saw him write.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you married? A. Yes, and have been a widow; my first hus

band's name was James Wicks - I parted with him at Nailsworth, seventeen years ago, and heard that he died fourteen years ago in America; my present husband is the deceased's brother - he is a painter; my first husband was transported eighteen years ago - I was with him after that; he was sent from Nailsworth to Woolwich, to go to America - I believe he got his sentence remitted; I was married to Mr. Hall twelve years ago, at St. Giles in the Fields - I did not visit my brother much at the Rising Sun; I saw him when he was ill in March - we were on very good terms then; he never forbid me his house - the first time I saw him was in London, in 1815; I have seen him write his name many times, not in sickness: I have not seen him write these two years, or more - I saw him write in Cross-street, in 1824; I can read writing - this is not like his hand-writing; I received letters from him sixteen or seventeen years ago.

EDWARD DIXON . I am a surgeon, and attended the deceased in his last illness. The prisoner asked me to present him with the codicil of a will - that produced appears to be the same; I think it was on Wednesday, the 9th of July - there was no signature to it then; the prisoner placed it in my hands, requested me to read it to him, and to ask if he would sign it - I took it up stairs, and finding him in a tranquil state, I told him his sister had presented me with a codicil of a will, to ask him to sign - he said he was already acquainted with the contents, I then said, "Do you approve of it?" he said he did; I said, "Will you sign the document?" - he said No, he would not; I then withdrew, took the codicil back to the prisoner, and told her he would not sign it -I did not read it to him, as he said he was already acquainted with the contents; I did not tell him the contents, concluding, from his answer, that he had seen it before - in fact, to the best of my recollection, he told me he had read it; he did not take it into his hand.

COURT. Q. You would not have presented it to him, unless you thought him sufficiently tranquil to sign it? A. Certainly not.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he give you any reason why he would not sign it? A. No - I do not recollect his ever telling me, it was because he thought if he recovered he should lose all controul over his property; I will not swear he did not say so, but, to the best of my recollection, he made no observation, except that he would not sign it; I saw him about three times a day - at times he was not in a state to judge for himself, at other times he was in a state of delusion, but, to the best of my judgment, he was at times in a state to judge for himself; on the Thursday and on the Friday there were intervals when he was perfectly sensible - I never introduced the subject to him again.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am a clerk to an attorney, and knew the deceased. I saw him execute an assignment of the lease of a house, and saw him sign his name four or five times; I believe I have sufficient knowledge of his writing to form a judgment of it - the signature to this codicil is not his writing; it is nothing like it - it purports to be attested by Daniel Malcolm Silcock , who is in Court.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been concerned in this prosecution? A. Since I have been in Mr. Wright's office - it is not my business; I felt compassion for the prosecutor, and introduced him to Mr. Wright, whose employ I entered in September last - I had nothing to do with the will, but with the Chancery suit; I was clerk to Mr. Hughes, of Clifford's Inn, for five years - there is an indictment against the prisoner, Silcock, and two others, for a conspiracy; the deed which Bond executed is here - I think he makes a long A, but do not remember; the A to the codicil is a round one; he makes a round B, not like this one, which has the first stroke straight - whether he turned his d round at the end I do not know; the character of this hand-writing is different altogether - I used to go to his house for Mr. Hughes on business: I do not go there now, except on business - I might look in when I am passing; the Chancery suit is undetermined - the prisoner is in contempt for not putting in her answer; we obtained an injunction which would have shut up the house - she withdrew her caviat since this indictment has been found, which was in December; she has been out of the way ever since till five weeks ago.

DANIEL MALCOLM SILCOCK . The name Daniel Malcolm Silcock to this codicil is my writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you believe the name, "A. Bond," there to be his hand-writing? A. I am sure it is not; I am a surgeon, and practice where occasion requires, in London and in other places; I practised this morning - my shop hitherto has been in Clerkenwell prison, as I am indicted for a conspiracy.

COURT. Q. Do you know of any authority being given to any body to sign that name? A. No.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long ago were you taken up? A. On the 23d of November: if I thought right I dare say I could procure bail, but I remain in prison for my own personal safety - my shop was in Tottenham-court-road; the prosecutor does not bring me here - I have come of my own accord to vindicate myself; I have come by order of the Court. I suppose - I know the Marlborough Arms public-house, Blenheim-steps; I never told any body that if the prisoner gave me 100l. I would swear any thing, but if not I would turn round to John Bond's side, nor any thing of the kind.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. You have said that signature is not Anthony Bond's writing; you may decline answering, but do you know whose writing it is? A. Mrs. Halls - she did it the day after his death, in the afternoon, at the Rising Sun; I disclosed that fact voluntarily.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you write to the attorney for this prosecution, that if he would let you off the indictment for conspiracy, you would come forward on this prosecution? A. Never, nor to that effect - I decline stating whether I made any affidavit in the case.

MR. ADOLPHUS to RICHARD DAVIS . Q. Is this the assignment you saw Bond make? A. Yes - he went by the name of James Blatchley Bond on that occasion - why, I do not know; he went by that name at times, but his real name was Anthony - he told me so, but whether it was before I saw him execute the deed, or after, I cannot say.

MARY HALL . My brother's name was Anthony, but he often signed "J. B. Bond" - the last letter I received from him was twelve years ago; he went by the name of Blatchley then.

The following witnesses were called for the prisoner -

FREDERICK CANNON . I am a private teacher, and live in Adam-street, Adelphi. I was intimately acquainted with the deceased for about four years before his death -I knew him in Windmill-street, and when he lived at Reading with the prisoner; her husband lived with them there for a year and a half or two years - our acquaintance was renewed when he came to town, for about a year and a half before he died; I remember his being very ill at Christmas, 1827 - the signature to this codicil I believe to be his writing; it resembles it: I have seen his signature, but never saw him write.

COURT. Q. Have you ever corresponded with him? A. No, but I have seen his signature on different instruments - he told me they were his; I believe this to be his writing.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. Do you think yourself so good a judge as those who frequently saw him write? A. Certainly not.

BENJAMIN HYATT . I keep a coffee-house in Grafton-street, Soho, and was acquainted with Bond from 1819- I have seen him write ten times; this looks like his signature, but I cannot swear to it.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. Silcock is the subscribing witness to that? A. His name is to it; I do not think that Bond ever signed two signatures alike exactly - I am named as executor to this will; I call mine a coffee-house: I am the person who was called on to read the will to the prosecutor.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a veterinary surgeon, and live in Marlborough-mews. I had known the deceased two or three years, and used his house about once a week - I have seen him write two or three times, and believe this signature to be his writing, but cannot swear to it; I would not believe Silcock on his oath,

MR. CURWOOD. Q. What was he writing? A. Letters - I may have seen his signature twice.

HUGH HARDING . I live in Newman-street, Oxford-street. I have lived on my property for the last four or five years - I know Silcock, and would not believe him on his oath; I was in his company at the Marlborough Arms about November and after - I heard him say if Frances Hall would give him 100l. he would swear any thing, but if not, he would turn round to John Bond 's side; it was a few days before he was apprehended.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. How long have you known Silcock? A. Five or six years; I often met him at the Marlborough Arms, and other places where I go - I drive to Finchley, Epsom and Ascott; I always go there, but as a gentleman - I was robbed of a diamond pin by Silcock two years ago, but on account of his family I would not do any thing; I had left the pin with Mr. Sales, who kept the house - I was going to Margate, an gotd it from him; I put it into my bosom, when who should come in but Silcock, another man, and his brother-in-law; he began sparring at me - I said he never knew me guilty of any thing of that sort; he touched me under the chin, but I did not miss the pin for a quarter of an hour - he was often at Bond's house; the very handkerchief I have in my pocket he took from me one night at the same house. I made an affidavit at Westminster-hall in November - I always thought the prisoner lived on very good terms with the deceased; she managed his business, and the greatest harmony prevailed between them - I never heard he had a son till this happened.

WILLIAM CANNON . I am an attorney, and live in Adam-street, Adelphi. I have known the prisoner two years and a half - she and the deceased lived on the best possible terms; she managed his business - I never knew he had a son till after his death.

WILLIAM FRY . I am a clerk to Mr. Harmer. He was first employed by the prisoner about October last - she was then in possession of the Rising Sun; she has delivered some property up to the prosecutor, by my advice - the house is leasehold; Mr. Harmer confided this case entirely to me - it was long since this indictment was preferred, but not in consequence of any fear of this indictment.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. If this will be a good one, she is entitled to all this property? A. In trust for her children, but she stated to me, what I believe to be true, that she is a large creditor under her brother's estate; the proceeds of the business she carried on at Reading were paid to her brother, who bought the lease of the Rising Sun with it, she furnished him with other money, which was confirmed by the attorney, and I advised her to give up the property, as she could establish her claim as a creditor and obtain it back in that way; I felt confident this indictment never would be prosecuted, except for costs - the valuation of the house and property is under 400l. - she was to administer under 450l.

NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18290219-64

588. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 13 cigars, value 6s. 6d. , the goods of John Micklam .

THOMAS MICKLAM . I am the son of John Micklam , a tobacconist , of Fleet-street . On the 29th of January, about twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop - Fisher was serving; I was coming down stairs, and saw him striking at Fisher across the counter - as soon as I got to the bottom of the stairs Fisher cried out, "Stop him;" I went after him, and laid hold of him just outside the door - I brought him back, and went for a watchman, as Fisher said he had stolen some cigars - he denied it; before the constable came I saw him throw ten cigars out of his pocket - he was taken to the watch-house, and three more found on him; he told the constable of the night to put those by themselves, for he could prove where he got them- he said nothing about the ten thrown away; he wished to make me a recompense, which I refused.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me throw any cigars at the boy? A. No, he threw them across the counter - he was intoxicated, but I think knew what he was about.

WILLIAM FISHER . I am servant to Mr. Micklam. The prisoner came to the shop to buy half an ounce of tobacco- he gave me 2d. for it; he did not ask for any thing else; the cigars were on the counter - while I was weighing the tobacco he put his hand into the box, took two handsful of cigars, and put them into his pocket; when he was going out he held out a farthing, and said he should make a sovereign of it - I caught hold of his hand, and he struck me across the counter; Mr. Thomas Micklam came down,

ran after him, and caught him - he was a little in liquor; I had given him a farthing in change - when he was brought back he pulled his hand out of his pocket, and threw some cigars on the counter.

Prisoner. Q. Do you know your catechism? A. Yes. You were walking backwards, when I laid hold of you; he fell when Mr. Micklam pulled him down - that was not from drunkeness.

GEORGE IRWIN . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I searched him, and found three cigars on him; he was very obstinate, and I could hardly get his hand out of his pocket; he said I was to wrap them up by themselves, and he could prove where he got them - ten more were given to me.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you next day what I had done? A. Yes, and if it could be settled; I said it could not; I never said, "You must come something very handsome."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was so intoxicated, I did not know what I had done; I have fractured my skull, and when in liquor am not in my senses - I had plenty of cigars in my pocket a few days before: whether these are his I do not know.

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290219-65

589. GEORGE IVERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 boot, value 4s. , the goods of Alexander Wilson .

ALEXANDER WILSON . I am a boot-maker - my father, Alexander Wilson, keeps a shop , on Holborn-hill . On the 12th of February this boot hung on the door-post; I saw it safe five minutes before it was taken - a little girl came in and gave information, between six and seven o'clock; I sent one of our men out, and the prisoner was brought back by Holland, who produced the boot, which I am certain was my father's.

JOHN HOLLAND . I am a constable. I took the prisoner at the corner of Field-lane; I had been watching him for an hour, and saw him take this boot from the door-post - I laid hold of him, and took it from under his coat, with the shop-ticket on it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He felt my trousers down, to see if I had it, and if he saw me take it he would know where to find it; I kicked against it on Holborn-hill, and picked it up, looked round, and could see nobody to own it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-66

590. JOHN WOOLF and GEORGE FOWLER were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of George Allen Aylwin , from his person .

GEORGE ALLEN AYLWIN . I am a merchant , and live in Lower Thames-street, on Saturday afternoon, the 7th of February, between six and seven o'clock, I was entering Fleet-street , coming towards home; my handkerchief was in my outside coat pocket; I received information, and missed it - I stepped across the road, and saw it in the hand of a man, who had the two prisoners in custody.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a painter, and live in Bow-street. I first saw Mr. Aylwin in the Strand, and saw three persons following him - the prisoners are two of them: I first saw them in Regent-street, following persons about -I saw the prosecutor about Exeter 'Change; the prisoners were then following him; I watched them to the corner of Devereaux-court, by Messrs. Twining's, and there saw Woolf make an attempt to pick Mr. Aylwin's pocket - he did not succeed, but just as they got through Temple-bar, Murray said they had got the handkerchief out; they ran across towards us - I seized Woolf, and saw Murray take a handkerchief from under Fowler's arm; I went after the prosecutor, who gave me his card.

BENJAMIN MURRAY . I am a letter-cutter. I saw the prisoners, in company with another, following the prosecutor near the Adelphi; I saw Woolf take the handkerchief a little out of the pocket by Twining's - they continued to follow; I got through Templebar, and saw Fowler take the handkerchief quite out, on the City side of Templebar; on taking hold of the prisoners, the third ran away -I should know him again (I have had him in custody before when I was a constable); I took the handkerchief from under Fowler's arm.

Prisoner FOWLER. He said he saw me in Regent-street, pick a gentleman's pocket of a beautiful silk handkerchief, and go and sell it to Mr. Levy that afternoon, and if so, why did he not take me? Witness. I did not say that; I said a person now in Court told me of that.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BETTERTON . The prisoners were given into my charge with the handkerchief.

FOWLER'S Defence. The handkerchief was thrown into my face; I saw no owner, and put it under my jacket.

WOOLF'S Defence. I was going to Salisbury-court, after a place, and was seized by Temple-bar.

WOOLF - GUILTY . Aged 15.

FOWLER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290219-67

591. SAMUEL STUDD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 purse, value 1d.; 12 shillings, and 16 sixpences , the property of Benjamin Christopher Wenlock , his master.

BENJAMIN CHRISTOPHER WENLOCK . I live in Essex, and am a fisherman ; the prisoner was in my employ. I was on board my ship at Billingsgate , on the 16th of January, asleep in the cabin; the watch and trousers laid in a cupboard in the cabin - I went to bed about ten o'clock; the prisoner was not on board then: I was to sail at one o'clock that morning, and the prisoner was to come on board before that - I awoke at twelve o'clock, when the high-water bell rang; the prisoner was not on board, as I expected - I found he had taken away his clothes from his bed-cabin; I went ashore to inquire after him, not having missed my property then - I could not find him, and on returning this property was missed from the cupboard; the purse and money was in my trousers' pocket - I sailed to Grays, and gave a description of him; I found him about a fortnight afterwards, in custody; my watch was produced at the Thames Police-office - I saw the trousers, but I was not positive of them; I had about 20s. in my purse: he had lived with me about a year.

THOMAS CRIBB . I am constable of Grays. The prosecutor gave me information on the 17th of January, and on the 19th I took the prisoner at Grays - he was known there by the name of Bocking; he confessed to stealing the watch, and said he had pawned it at Fillmer's, Kent-road - I found the duplicate on him; I found a pair of trousers on him at the office, but they were not the trousers I apprehended him in; he had an old pair in a bag - I found half a crown, four shillings, and seven sixpences on him.

MATTHEW FILLMER . I live in the Kent-road, and am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of January, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, I took this watch in pawn of the prisoner, for 16s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-68

592. JOHN HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 pewter-pot, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Hormen .

THOMAS HORMEN . I keep a chandler's-shop, and sell beer , in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street . On the 31st of January, about a quarter-past nine o'clock at night, the prisoner came for 1d. worth of tobacco; this pint pot stood at one end of the counter - my wife put it there while she served him; he put his penny down by the pot, and while my wife turned to reach a piece of paper, he must have taken it; there was nobody else in the shop - he went out, and I missed the pot; my daughter followed him, and I after her; he turned up Harp-alley, towards Shoe-lane - my daughter asked him for the pint pot; he said he had no pot- I collared him; he had got his hand down, with the pot, behind him - my daughter took it from him; his hat fell off in the scuffle, and there were three pots doubled up in it, so I gave charge of him.

ELIZA MARY PHILLIPS . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I saw the prisoner in the shop, and missed the pot the moment he left; I went after him, not three doors off, and when my father took him, I took it out of his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Reference Number: t18290219-69

593. RIVERS ALLPRESS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 2 cases of surgical instruments, value 5l. , the goods of Thomas Greenwood .

THOMAS GREENWOOD . I am a surgeon , and live at the corner of Jewry-street, Aldgate . The prisoner came to consult me on the 31st of January, and was shewn into the surgery; this case laid on the shelf, within his reach - he staid there five or ten minutes: I went to tell my young man what to make up for him, and he followed me out of the surgery into the shop - he said he wasted to go over the way, and would return in a few minutes for the medicine; he went out, and in five or six minutes I missed the case - nobody else had been in the surgery: he did not come back - I saw him again in about a week or ten days, in custody: I had applied to an officer, and described him- I found my instruments at Mr. Farrow's, a salesman, in Fleet-market, on the Wednesday after the robbery.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you made inquiry about him? A. Yes, and find he was in a most abject state of distress; I believe he really wanted my advice.

CHARLES TAYLOR . I am assistant to David Farrow . -On Saturday, the 31st of January, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came, and produced two cases of surgical instruments, for sale for 30s.; I had suspicion of him, and detained him till I went to Mr. Farrow's other house, in Holborn, and told some persons who had lost instruments - nobody came to detain him; I went with him to his address, in John-street, Tottenham-court-road - he was to return on Monday for the money, but did not.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of February, in Grove-terrace, Paddington: he said he was guilty: I found he was in very great distress - he has a wife and child.

Cross-examined. Q. What age is the child? A. Six months - they were laying on straw; I found nothing there but duplicates of necessary clothing: they had but 5d. - he must have been in great distress.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Strongly recommended to Mercy .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-70

594. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 wooden firkin, value 6d., and 1 bushel of sprats, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Elliott .

JOHN ELLIOTT . I am a carrier , and live at Aylesbury. I go from there to Thame, in Oxfordshire. This firkin of sparts was in George-yard, Snow-hill - I saw them safe on the 7th of February, about eleven o'clock in the morning; I was going to take them home - I had put my name on the firkin, in chalk: between one and two o'clock I heard it was gone, and in five minutes I saw it again in Georgeyard: the prisoner was in custody - the chalk mark remained on the firkin, but the head was broken out, by falling down.

JOHN FRANKLIN . I am a stationer, and live in George-yard, Snow-hill. On the 7th of February, between one and two o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another in the yard, watching about; four firkins and a chest of oranges stood ready to be loaded - I saw the prisoner take this firkin on his shoulder: the other person run away - he had been watching the booking-office while the prisoner stood at the cart; they hallooed after them - the prisoner threw the firkin down, which burst the lid out; he ran away, and was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not the other man of more respectable appearance than the prisoner? A. No; they were about the same - he said a gentleman employed him to take it; I believe he got away from the officer, and struck him.

WILLIAM HENRY HOOKER . I am a constable. About two o'clock I was under the gateway of the George inn, and heard something very heavy fall - I turned round, and saw the firkin lying down; a man called out Stop him! the prisoner ran towards me, and as he came near me he put his fists together, and fought his way by me, but I struggled with him about two minutes, and secured him, with assistance; when I got to the end of the yard, and turned my head to beckon to a man to assist me, he slip

ped out of my hand, and ran off; he dropped a handkerchief, which I suppose was meant to detain me: I did not stoop to pick it up, but ran and took him - I only lost sight of him as he turned the corner; I tore his jacket in the struggle, and found it still torn.

Cross-examined. Q. You lost sight of him? A. For one minute; when I attempted to take him he shewed resistance.

JAMES BRITAIN . I was on the near side of the cart when the prisoner was on the off side; I did not see him take the firkin, but saw him come from the cart with it, and I called after him; I saw him throw it down, and called Stop him! I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. He was not long in sight? A. I did not lose sight of him - they brought him back.(Firkin produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through George-yard, and a gentleman asked me to take a cask for him over Blackfriars-bridge; he said, "Come this way, and take that up;" I immediately took it up, and had not gone for before I heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned round, a man collared me, and the cask fell down.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-71

NEW COURT, Second Day.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

595. JAMES TURVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 2 lbs. 4 ozs. of vermillion, value 15s. , the goods of James Gibbins .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN MILLSON . I am in the employ of Mr. James Gibbins , colour manufacturer , of Mile-end-road . The prisoner has been one of his labourer s for about twelve months - the vermillion is kept in a box in the inner store-room. On the evening of the 5th of February I and another person examined that box - there were nine packages of vermillion in it, to which I had affixed my initials some time before; I locked the room, and had the key in my possession till between ten and eleven o'clock the next morning, when I opened it again, but I did not look at the vermillion at that time - the labourers are not permitted to go to the inner store-room, except by permission of Mr. Clutton or me; that is a well-understood rule in the factory, and applies to all the persons there - on that day the prisoner was sent to that room by Mr. Clutton, in my presence, for some nails; I was busy, and did not particularly notice the time he was gone - about half-past five o'clock, on the same day, I went to look at the vermillion, and there were only six packages - these three were gone; I went to Mr. Gibbins' house, which is about three-quarters of a mile off -I then came back, and in consequence of what Mr. Cluttion said, I went to the privy with a light, and found Turvey sitting on the seat; I said I wanted him - he said,"Very well;" he waited a few minutes with the door open - he then got up, and began to button his clothes: he then said he had a bowel complaint, sat down, and pulled the door too - he staid a few minutes, then followed me into the factory, and from thence into the kitchen, where Mr. Gibbins and the officer were; I went into the privy again, and saw these three packages of vermillion on a beam which runs through the privy, near the top of it - it is a broad stay-beam, of the factory; the prisoner could reach that beam, but a person an inch shorter, I should think, could not - these packages are three which I had marked; I then went to the kitchen, and called the officer - he went with me, and I saw him take the packages down; I examined them directly; the privy is near the bottom of the stairs, on the ground floor, not in any yard - there were four labourers employed on the premises that day, besides Mr. Clutton and myself; I should think no person could have gone to the privy without attracting the attention of some of those persons - there was no opportunity of concealing these packages, unless by putting them into the soil; from the front of the warehouse I think you go twenty-five yards to the steps, then up a flight of steps to the store-room.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. A man an inch lower than the prisoner could not have reached the beam? A. I think not - we had measured his height a few days before; he is five feet nine inches - I have had no quarrel with him; persons come to the factory to bargain for articles, but no one came that day - I was there all day; no one could come without my knowing it - I believe Mr. Gibbins has seven children, four maid-servants, and one man; I opened the store-room door in the morning, and did not lock it again - I left the key in the door; I cannot swear whether any body in the warehouse might have gone into that room - the prisoner went there about one o'clock; I was very busy, and did not go into the room for four hours and a half afterwards - I went to the prisoner in the privy, and do not know whether I disturbed him - the door was open, so that any one might have seen what he was doing; after he had shut the door he might have thrown it down the privy, but the soil was too stiff to conceal it, and he had nothing to push it in with; I had not seen Mitchell in the privy just before him - the prisoner lived near the factory; the men go to dinner at one o'clock - it was just before dinner that he was sent to the store-room; he went home, and had an opportunity of leaving it at home - we rub down the men before they go; I rubbed the prisoner down that day; I did not tell the Magistrate I neglected to rub him down at one o'clock- it was neglected when he went out at half-past seven in the evening with the horses; he had a coat on, but had no pockets in the tail of it that he could have carried the vermillion in; I have seen the coat, and he has told me so many times - he certainly might have put a package in the hind part of his breeches; I had gone into the room several times - I do not know of any other person going in but the prisoner; other persons might have gone - Mr. Clutton sent Turvey to the room.

Re-examined. Q. Do Mr. Gibbins' servants live in the factory? A. No - they live at his house, which is three quarter of a mile from there; it is known that the men are rubbed down - the prisoner has told me he had no pockets in his coat, and I think he could not have had any packages without my knowing it.

COURT. Q. Whereabouts is the privy? A. I should think about twenty yards from the stairs, where you go up to the upper factory, and to the store-room - I did not

look at the packages when I opened the door about eleven o'clock in the morning.

BALLANTYNE CLUTTON . I am foreman to Mr. Gibbins. On the 7th of February, about one o'clock, I desired the prisoner to go into the inner store-room for some nails; I thought him gone rather longer than there was occasion for - I and Millson are the persons authorised to give permission to go into the room; I did not desire or give permission to any one else to go that day; about half-past five o'clock three packages of Chinese vermillion were missed; I consulted with Millson, and he went to inform Mr. Gibbins - I remained in the factory; while he was gone I kept a watch upon the prisoner, but endeavoured to conceal from him that I was watching him till Millson's return; Millson rang the bell, which adjoins the factory where I reside; I went into the factory with him - I do not recollect that the prisoner said any thing while Millson was gone; after his return he expressed himself as violently affected with the bowel complaint; but before that he had asked me whether he should not go and fetch in some tiles; I said No, as the following day would be Sunday, and there would be time for the truck to get dry- his going to get the tiles would have afforded him an opportunity of going off the premises to the front court: he also mentioned about going to fasten some doors, and I said I had seen to that - I think it was about a quarter before eight o'clock when he mentioned about this affection of his bowels; he repeated it soon after, and went to the privy - he did not take a light: I believe the lights were standing where we were, and where he had been at work - I did not go to the privy in consequence of what Millson said till after the men were gone; articles of this sort could not have been concealed under the soil without being hardly pushed down, for during the hard frost we had been very short of water, and had not let down more than was just sufficient to clear the pipe, and had not let the boy stir it up as usual, by that means the top had become hard.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take the trouble of measuring the soil in that privy? A. Yes; it was ten inches deep; all the workmen had access to that privy - the soil had not been frozen, but it was stiff; I suppose the storeroom is about twenty yards from where I was - I had only that distance to have gone if I had chosen to go, but we were busy, as we were fearful a load of goods would not be in time for the docks; the vermillion had been marked by Million, by Mr. Gibbins' orders; Millson was heading up a tierce - I believe the prisoner has been about twelve months in Mr. Gibbins' employ; persons do come to the factory - I do not know whether any person came there that day; Millson does sometimes rub the men down, and I do sometimes - I will not say I rubbed the prisoner down that day; I believe I rubbed one man down.

Re-examined. Q. Is there not a particular hour of the docks at which goods are taken in? A. Yes; they object to taking in goods after three o'clock; I was on the premises when the men went to dinner, and at two o'clock I returned to the factory - I was in the store-room the greater part of the time after that; I did not observe any one go into the store-room till Millson came in - the other men were in the factory at half-past seven o'clock; they leave at eight.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If you were in the room, what is the reason you did not look at the vermillion? A. I was busy; I could have done it, but I did not.

JAMES KITCHEN . I am carman to Mr. Gibbins. I did not go into the store-room on the 7th of February.

Cross-examined. Q. Upon your oath, if you had gone would you have confessed it? A. Yes.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am a labourer at Mr. Gibbins'. On the day these things were missed I was sent to the warehouse over the way, to pack two casks - the prisoner was with me; he asked me which was the dearest colour I ever knew; I said I believed crimson lake, and I thought it was about five sovereigns a pound; he then asked what vermillion was a pound; I said about eight shillings - I did not go that day into the inner store-room for any purpose; I went to the privy about ten minutes before eight o'clock, I believe - the prisoner came down soon after, and said he wanted to go down very bad, as he had had a pain in his inside all day; he said to me, "Make all the haste you can, as I want to go there very bad;" I went, and when I came back I met him going down - I know the beam which runs across the privy; it forms a sort of shelf- I did not observe any thing on that beam while I was there.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you particularly observe the beam? A. No; if the prisoner had chosen, he might have waited till I went away, and then I should not have seen him; I cannot exactly say how high the beam is, but I do not suppose the prisoner could have reached it without standing on something - a person much less than him could have reached it by standing on the seat; all the most valuable colours are kept in the store-room - I do not know that we had any crimson lake; Chinese vermillion is the most valuable colour we have there.

JOHN - . I am a labourer to Mr. Gibbins. I did not go to the store-room that day for any purpose whatever; I had been in the privy about nine o'clock in the morning.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you could have reached the beam? A. Not without standing on the seat.

EDWARD KITCHEN . I was in the employ of Mr. Gibbins, and worked in the factory. I know the store-room where the colours are kept, but I did not go there that day for any purpose; I had been to the privy in the morning.

EDWARD ABRAHAMS . I am clerk to Mr. Gibbins. On the 7th of February I was out collecting nearly the whole day; I had not been to the store-room that day, nor the day before; about seven o'clock that evening I was outside the factory, and saw the prisoner's wife passing the place several times - sometimes on one side of the way, and sometimes on the other; she sometimes held up her umbrella, though it did not rain - she did not come in; I was down stairs when the prisoner was taken - he was searched very willingly; he took off his things, and nothing was found on him - he said he would willingly come to work on the Monday morning, and he hoped Mr. Gibbins would not lock him up, as it was a hard case for a man to be locked up all day on Sunday.

Cross-examined. Q. Were there any marks of paint on him? A. Yes, but not more than the occupations of the factory would have obliged him to have; his wife had

been in the habit of calling occasionally, and bringing his tea - it had been raining that day.

GEORGE HENFREY . I am an officer. I went and took the prisoner, who was charged with this offence; he said he did not know any thing about it - I searched him, and found nothing on him; in the meantime Millson came in, and said he had been to the privy, and found the three packages of vermillion, which the night officer has got -I searched the prisoner; he had no pockets to his coat -I found a handkerchief in his waistcoat pocket.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am the night officer. I produce three packages of vermillion, which were delivered to me by Henfrey.

JOHN MILLSON . These are the packages I marked.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-72

596. ANN ROBINS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 5 handkerchiefs, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Bellamy Clark , and another.

THOMAS BELLAMY CLARK . I am a linen-draper , and live at Hammersmith . I lost a parcel of fourteen of fifteen shawls, about the 21st of December, I believe, but we did not miss it till Christmas-day; I had seen it safe the week before - I have seen the prisoner frequently, as a customer; five of the handkerchiefs have been found, some of which have my mark upon them - I had a partner at that time.

JOHN SOMERSET . I am a constable of Hammersmith. The prosecutor told me he had been robbed of some shawls, and a girl, named Wheeler, had pawned some; I went and got these five.

SARAH WHEELER . I pawned two of these handkerchiefs at Mr. Gold's, at Hammersmith; the prisoner gave them to me on the 21st of December - she said she would give me a penny to take them to pawn; I gave her a shilling, and the ticket - she did not say how she came by them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I hope the gentleman will pardon me; I have two children, and I am troubled with fits - I did not know what I was about at the time.

ANN MARIA TAYLOR . I live at Hammersmith, and have known the prisoner from her infancy; she always had a good character - she is subject to fits, and has seven or eight in a day.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290219-73

597. PETER WELSH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 sheet, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s.; 1 towel, value 6d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 6d; 1 cap, value 6d., and 1 shirt, vlaue 6d., the goods of William Jenner Blandford ; and 1 frock, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Maria Westlick .

WILLIAM JENNER BLANDFORD . I am a licensed victualler . On the 13th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, my little girl missed these articles; I then looked, and they were gone; on the evening of the 12th, while I was in the bar, the prisoner went up stairs, and I told my servant to ask who he wanted; she asked him if he wanted Mr. Mack, who was a lodger: he said, "I am going to call on Mr. Mack;" he staid some time, and came down, but we did not see that he had any thing with him; the next morning we missed these things, which had been kept in the servant's bed-room, on the second floor.

MARIA WESTLICK . I am servant to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner going up stairs that evening; I went and asked him if he were going to Mr. Mack; he said Yes- these articles are my master's, and these are mine: they were in my box - the room door had been left open on account of the child being asleep.

EDWARD ALLEN . I met the prisoner in Tothill-street , about a quarter before twelve o'clock on the night of the 12th of February, with these things, which he said were his wife's, and he had taken them out of pawn at Maidstone - he said there was a frock and a sheet; I looked at his shoes, and they were very clean - he was not above fifty yards from the prosecutor's; there was another person with him, who said, "Don't go that way - we are touted," that excited my suspicion.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I left my wife and family to go to look for work; my things were taken for rent: I walked some miles, and went into that public-house - the young man, whom the officer saw with me, gave me some bread, cheese, and beer; a girl there said, "Mr. Mack, a tailor, lives up stairs, perhaps you may get a job of him;" I went up, but they were in bed, and I did not stay two minutes - that young man then came out, and gave me another pint or two of beer, and I got a little hearty: he gave me these things to carry, and said, "If any one says any thing to you, say you got them from Maidstone."

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-74

598. THOMAS SINFIELD was indicted for feloniously entering, on the 3d of February , a certain building, within the curtilege of the dwelling-house of William Dean , and occupied therewith, but not being part thereof; against the Statute, and stealing therein 21 fowls, value 40s., his property .

WILLIAM DEAN . I live at Hendon , and am a farmer . I have a court-yard, which joins my house, in which there is a building. On the night of the 2d of February I fed my fowls at six o'clock; they were then all right - I locked their house up then, and at seven the next morning I found the locks had been forced off, and all the fowls were gone but three - twenty fowls and one guinea-fowl had been taken away: I saw them altogether afterwards, and can swear to them - I had seen the prisoner on the Monday morning, as I was looking at the men; he spoke to one of my men, and said he was going where he was last.

RICHARD DEYKIN . I am an officer of Kentish-town. On the morning of the 3d of February I was going from the watch-house, and saw the prisoner carrying three bags; I followed, and stopped him, about two hundred and fifty yards off; I asked what he had got - he said he believed fowls: I said, "Let us look" - he put the bags down, and while I was untying one of them he started; Bauldon, who was with me, followed, and took him - they were struggling, and I went up; the prisoner was resolute, and I drew my pistol - I asked where he got them from;

he said from the other side of St. Alban's, but he did not know from whom, and he was going to take them to Battle-bridge - as we were going along I saw his right hand going towards his pocket; I seized his hand, felt his pocket, and this knife was in it; I shewed the same fowls to Mr. Dean, who owned them - this lock was found on the prisoner, and there was a crow-bar at the back of his jacket, which fitted the marks exactly, but I have lost it.

WILLIAM BAULDON . I was with Deykin. We followed the prisoner; he was then stopped, and went off - I followed, and seized him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in bed and asleep that night, at a neighbour's, on Finchley-common, who I expected here, but he has not come; a man asked me to carry these bags to Battle-bridge - he said he would satisfy me, and I was willing to get a shilling if I could; if they had found a crow-bar, why did they not bring it forward?

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-75

599. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 1 weighing-machine, value 4s. , the goods of William Welch .

CHARLES TAPPLIN . I am servant to William Welch , a milkman , of Queen-street, Golden-square . On the 22d of January, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I met the prisoner with this weighing-machine, about half-way down the street; I went and told the watchman - I had seen it safe about a quarter of an hour before.

JACOB TOWNSEND . Tapplin told me, and I took the prisoner; he dropped the machine, and ran - I pursued, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It was given me to take into Windmill-street.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-76

600. JOHN MAY and WILLIAM BEAUMONT were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , 1 washing-tub, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pail, value 9d.; 1 saucepan, value 2d.; 1 frying-pan, value 1d.; 3 coal-measures, value 10s.; 1 broom, value 2d., and 3 live pigs, value 28s. , the goods of Robert Bone .

ELIZABETH MARY BONE . I am the wife of Robert Bone - we live at Bethnal-green . On the 22d of January we lost this property; we missed the pigs as soon as we got up - I had seen them safe in the sty the night before, at half-past eleven o'clock; about nine that morning Beaumont came for half a peck of coals - then the measures were all gone; I then looked, and missed the other things- I have found the washing-tub and pail, which were kept in the coal-shed; I have not found the pigs: all the things had been in the shed except the frying-pan - when Beaumont came I said to him, "The measures are gone with the rest;" he said, "It is a bad job - when did it happen?" I made him no answer.

WILLIAM BONE . I am the prosecutor's son. On the afternoon of the 21st of January, Beaumont and a man named Edwards came for half a peck of coals, and during that time they looked out at the back yard, and said, "You have got three pretty pigs here - what are they worth?" the next morning the pigs were gone.

GEORGE SWATTON . I live in Artillery-passage. About nine o'clock in the morning of the 22d of January, May came into the shop, and offered me the pail, tub, frying-pan, and saucepan - I looked at them, and May said, "What are you looking at? you don't think I stole them, do you?" I asked where he lived - he said in Union-court, Fashion-street, and his name was Richard Richards - he wanted 3s. for the articles, but I gave him 2s.; as he was going out, Beaumont went by and whistled; they went off together.

Prisoner BEAUMONT. Q. Was I not twenty yards from your door? A. No, close to my door.

JAMES BROWN . I am a constable. I took up May on the 22d of January.

THOMAS EAGLES . I am an officer. I took up Beaumont, at his own door, the same evening.

MAY'S Defence. I was going down Fashion-street, and met a man with the things; he asked me to buy them - I bade him 1s. 6d.; he called me back, and took it: I then went to a broker's in Artillery-passage, and sold them - Beaumont came by while I was selling them; I beckoned to him to stop, which he did, about twenty yards from the place. MAY - GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

BEAUMONT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-77

601. ELIZABETH MICHAEL and CATHERINE HORWELL were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 2 blankets, value 9s.; 3 sheets, value 12s.; 1 looking-glass, value 5s.; 1 bolster, value 5s.; 1 quilt, value 5s.; 2 pillows, value 4s.; 1 carpet, value 2s.; 1 table-cloth, value 2s., and 2 flat-irons, value 1s. , the goods of Elizabeth Stevens .

ELIZABETH STEVENS . I am a widow , and live in Marshall-street . The prisoners lodged with me nearly a month- I had suspicion, and asked them to allow me to go into their room, to see if any thing was missing; they said they had not got the key: I called the watchman, and broke the door open - I then missed these articles, which had all been in the room when I let it to them.

HENRY JARVIS . I am a constable. I was at the watch-house on the 14th of February, and the prisoners were broughtt here; I found some of these duplicates on Michael - Horwell said, she had nothing about her, and I took her word.

JOHN ROBINSON JACKSON. I am shopman to Mr. Harris, a pawnbroker. This bolster, blanket, table-cloth, and two flat-irons, were pawned with me, by each of the prisoners, at different times.

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . I live with Mr. Sowerby, in Long-acre. I have a pillow, pawned by Michael.

GEORGE WEBB . I live with Messrs Bird and Haslock, pawnbrokers. Part of these things were pawned with me, by Michael.

The prisoners put in a written Defence, pleading poverty, and stating their intention to have replaced the goods.

MICHAEL - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Two Months .

HORWELL - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-78

602. JOSEPH FROUD and FREDERICK ROBINSON were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January ,

4 pieces of calf-skin leather, value 8s.; 10 pairs of upper leathers, value 5s.; 40 pieces of sole leather, value 7s., and 4 pieces of welts, value 3d. , the goods of George Groombridge ; and MARY ANN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously receiving part of the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

SARAH GROOMBRIDGE . I am the wife of George Groom-bridge, shoemaker , of York-street ; the two male prisoners are his apprentice s. On the Saturday a basket of linen came from the mangler's, I did not look at it till Monday, the 19th, and then missed a shirt - I then looked into the prisoners' box, and there I found the pieces of leather; they had but one box between them; I sent Froud out on an errand, and sent my little girl up stairs to see if she could see any thing of the shirt; she found the leather and told me - I went and found it there; I took it up to my husband, who was ill in bed, and asked if he knew any thing about it; when Froud came home he brought the money from the place where we sent him to, and went up to his master - and when he came down I asked him if he knew any thing of the leather in the box; he said "No; I know nothing of that in the box, I know of that behind the box," where I had found some pieces, and nearly a whole calf-skin; he said he had put them there; I asked if he had ever done any thing of the kind before; he said Yes - that he took a pair of soles and a pair of half soles down to his father's, and Robinson took a pair of soles and a pair of half soles to his mother; Robinson was not at home, but he came home about half-past nine o'clock; my husband asked him if he knew of things being put there- he said No, then he said "Yes, I did; and I took the calf-skin for a patch for my shoe;" my husband said, "Did you take a pair of soles to your mother's?" he then fell down - I went to his mother's residence at Merton, where we found seven pairs of soles, seven pairs of upper-leathers, and some other things - these are the articles, and these are what I got at Froud's father's; Robinson used to come to see her son, and I treated her like my own mother.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Robinson only said he took the bit for a patch for his shoe? A. Yes - we were not speaking of a whole skin; the calf-skin was not there then - the officer was present; it was a whole calf-skin except three quarters which had been cut out of it; they are all my cutting and my marking - the box was not locked - I would never allow them the key.

DIANA STYLES . My mistress sent me up on the 19th, and I saw these pieces of leather in the box.

WILLIAM HALL . I apprehended Mary Ann Robinson .

JOHN GROOMBRIDGE . I went with Rumsby to Robinson's house at Merton, and found this leather; she said,"Good God! what has brought you down at this time of night?"

THOMAS WALKER . I am a constable. On the evening of the 19th I was sent for, and took the two lads at the prosecutor's house.

WILLIAM HENRY RUMSBY . I am a shoemaker. On the 20th of January I and Groombridge went to Mrs. Robinson's house at Merton; I said, "I believe your name is Robinson?" she said Yes - I said, "Do you know Mr. Groombridge, I believe your son is apprentice there?" she said Yes; I said I believed there was some leather there; she said, "So help me God there is nothing here;" I said,"He has good grounds to think so - if you will let us search that will settle all;" she went into the other room -I pushed the door open, and saw her go to some drawers and pocket something, but I could not see what it was - I asked for a candle, and she said there was none in the house - I sent Mrs. Groombridge for one; Robinson tried to get out, but I detained her - I then looked and found a candle; when Mrs. Groombridge came back, I told her to see what was in Robinson's pockets - she struggled away, went behind the bed, and threw something out of her pocket - I stooped down, and found this parcel of upper-leathers; I said she had some more - her pocket was searched, and I found two pairs more in it; I then went into the other room, she said there was nothing there, but I went in and saw a bedstead case, I pulled it round, there was no bedstead in it, but in it I found this bundle of upper-leathers, which have Mr. Groombridge's mark on them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She said she did not know of any of Mr. Groombridge's property there? A. I asked for his property, and she said she had no leather of his - I know this leather to be Mr. Groombridge's, because I am in his employ.

FREDERICK ROBINSON 's Defence. My mother is innocent.

MARY ANN ROBINSON 's Defence. I was out at my employ, and did not know it was there.

Mary Ann Robinson received a good character.

FREDERICK ROBINSON - GUILTY. Aged 18.

JOSEPH FROUD - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Three Months .

MARY ANN ROBINSON - GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-79

603. HENRY PULLEN and JOHN BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of William Aberdeen .

WILLIAM ABERDEEN . I am a haberdasher , and live in Kingsland-road . On the 11th of February the officer brought Pullen into my shop with a pair of shoes, which I believe to be mine, but I have no mark on them - I had put six pairs at my door, and then there were but five.

THOMAS JAMES FRANCIS. I was going down Kingsland-road, and saw six or eight lads in company - one of them said to a little boy, "If you cannot draw the handkerchiefs, cut the string of the shoes, for they will wedge well; "I followed him - he went to the shop and cut the string; the prisoners stood at the door with an apron, and took the shoes from the child - the little one who cut them ran away; I had seen Brown at the corner of Wellington-street, but did not see him do any thing.

JOHN WILLIAM WINTLE. I am an officer. I took up Pullen - and from what the witness stated that Brown and his companions had said to the boy, I went and took Brown.

BROWN'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

PULLEN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

BROWN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-80

604. MARGARET ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 11 handkerchiefs, value 11s. , the goods of Joseph Sander .

LEWIS GODFREY ROHSS . I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Sander , of Little Pulteney-street . About half-past seven o'clock in the evening of the 10th of February, a female ran into the shop, and said something about some handkerchiefs - I ran out, and took the prisoner with these handkerchiefs, which she was throwing away; she was just by one of our doors as I went out at the other; I had seen them safe in the morning.

JAMES COX . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated, and knew no more what happened than a child unborn.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-81

605. THOMAS SHEEHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 3 brass boxes, value 1s. 6d.; 1 brass washer, value 1s. 3d., and 1 brass screw, value 3d. , the goods of John Hopkins .

JOHN HOPKINS . I live in Little St. Thomas Apostle. I lost these brass works from a machine, at No. 241, Thames-street ; I do not recollect when I had seen them - I did not miss them till the prisoner and another lad were taken.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner and another boy at a marine-store dealer's - the prisoner went in and offered something for sale, the other boy stood outside; I went in and saw the prisoner with these brass works, which he said his brother had given him; I fetched the other boy in, and then the prisoner said he found them in his mother's kitchen.

RICHARD MILLAR . I am an officer, and assisted in taking these lads.

Prisoner's Defence. The other boy gave them to me, and said he found them in a cellar belonging to Mr. Hopkins.

JOHN HOPKINS re-examined. I have no doubt these things were there on the 13th; the prisoner and the lad both worked in that factory - the other boy's name was Stanton; he is fifteen or sixteen years old - I think the prisoner could scarcely have broken the machine - I think he was led into it.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-82

606. RICHARD THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 13 live tame fowls, price 26s. , the property of Richard Leigh .

MR. RICHARD LEIGH . I live in Cloudesley-terrace, Islington , and keep fowls . On the 12th of February I saw them all safe, and the next morning I missed some of them; there is one of them here which I can particularly swear to, as it has more claws on one foot than the other; I know all the fowls to be mine - they had been in an out-house, and the boards were broken down.

AUGUSTUS FREEMAN . I am a watchman of Islington. I was standing at the corner of Chapman-street, and saw the prisoner cross from the Wesleyan chapel with a bag on his shoulder, he was turning up the terrace - I followed him, and cried six o'clock; just before he got to the top I stopped him, and asked what he had in the bag - he said,"Some fowls;" I said, "Have you not been stopped?" he said No; I asked where he was going - he said, "To Clerkenwell;" I said, "You must go with me to the watch-house;" which he did; I found thirteen fowls in the bag, two of them were dead - we have only brought this one fowl, but Mr. Leight swore to them all at the office.

ROBERT BROWN . I received the bag and fowls from the prisoner at the watch-house.

Prisoner. I hope you will have mercy on me - I have a wife and two children; I was out of work.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290219-83

607. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , 19 yards of carpet, value 4l. , the goods of George Stovell .

GEORGE STOVELL , JUN. I am the son of George Stovell , an upholsterer . Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon of the 16th of February, I was at the back of the premises, and saw the prisoner doing something under a table - I at first thought he was our porter , and did not interfere - but when he stood up I saw he was not so tall as out porter - he then walked out with this carpet; I followed him to Bend-street and took him; he gave this carpet to Ann Eagles - it has our private mark upon it.

ANN EAGLES . I went after the prisoner and took this carpet from him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-84

608. RICHARD WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of January , 24 yards of flannel, value 22s. , the goods of Abraham Landin .

ABRAHAM LANDIN . I am a linen-draper , and live in Oxford-street . On the 21st of January I missed a piece of flannel from the door, about seven o'clock in the evening - I had seen it safe about six; this is it, it has my mark on it.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am an officer. I bring the flannel which was brought to our office by Hampton.

JOHN HAMPTON . I am a carver and gilder. I was crossing Cavendish-square, on the 21st of January, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - I saw the prisoner running in that direction, and stopped him; he had nothing with him - but I afterwards saw this flannel at a step of a door, I suppose half a quarter of a mile from where I stopped him; he said it was a mistake - he was not the person.

JAMES KENALEY . I saw the prisoner running behind a hackney-coach, near Holles-street, with this flannel under his arm; there was another person behind him - the prisoner dropped the flannel, picked it up again, and ran up Holles-street, and the other after him; I pursued, and cried Stop thief! he threw it down, and I thought down an area; I caught him by the collar - the other came up and knocked me down on some stones; I got up, and the prisoner ran round Cavendish-square - I pursued, and Hampton stopped him, in my presence; I went back, and found the flannel at the step of the door - this was about half-past six o'clock; I am quite sure the prisoner is the person who had it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say it was thrown down an area? A. I thought so - you turned your back towards me, and then I collared you; I did not walk up the street and look down several areas - no person came up

and said you were not the person that had the flannel; it was found at the step of a door - there were some men standing at the door, but it was not in their possession.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Holles-street; I heard something fall, and a person came rushing by - I turned round, and was going to a shop: this young man came up and asked what I had done with the flannel -I said, "What flannel?" I turned, and looked down some areas with him; he said, "You have thrown it down some of these areas" - I said, "I do not know what you mean;" he then collared me, and I certainly did run from him - he fell down; a person came up, who said I was not the person.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-85

609. THOMAS KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 9 silver spoons, value 2l., and 4 silver forks, value 1l. , the goods of Thomas Simpson Cook , his master.

ELIZABETH SLOMAN . I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Simpson Cook , of Cecil-street . The prisoner was in his service, as footman , for a month, and left on the 10th of February; the officer came into our house after he was gone, and produced this spoon and fork, which I know to be my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is Mr. Cook's second Christain name? A. Simpson - he told me so yesterday; he had a very good character with this young man, except about drinking - he was so drunk that day that when he was asked for a glass of wine at dinner, he brought beer, and when he was asked for beer he brought cheese; he was always a very good servant - he left all his things behind him, and did not have his wages.

MOSES SOLOMON . I am a silversmith. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 10th of February, the prisoner brought these spoons to me, and asked what I would give for them - I think he was about half-and-half; I asked him what he wanted for them - he said 1l., and I took him to Bow-street.

Cross-examined. Q. What are they worth? A. I suppose they cost about 8l.; I would have given 6l. for them.

Prisoner. I was left very young an orphan, and this is the first disgraceful act I ever committed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-86

610. HENRY MOTH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 sovereign , the money of John Beer , his master.

JOHN BEER. I am a carpenter , and live near the Middlesex-hospital - the prisoner was my apprentice . On the 13th of February I gave him a sovereign to get change - he did not come back, but on the Monday evening his brother and a friend brought him to me; I asked what he had done with the sovereign - he said he had spent it.

Prisoner. Two boys enticed me away.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-87

611. MARY CULLENS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 3 sheets, value 9s.; 2 blankets, value 4s.; 2 table-cloths, value 6s., and 1 shirt, value 6s., the goods of Joseph Ayre , her master; and 1 shirt, value 3s., the goods of Mark Watson Manby .

MR. JOSEPH AYRE . I live in Somerset-street - the prisoner was in my service. On the 30th of January I received information; I looked, and missed these sheets, blankets, and other articles - I went down to the kitchen, and asked her where they were; she said they were washing: I said, I must insist upon her having them delivered up - she said she would go and get them; I then told her my suspicions - she asked if I would go into a separate room; I then took her into the library, where there was a gentleman, and she would not tell me - she then went down; I followed her: she then confessed she had pawned them; I asked her where the duplicates were - she said her husband had them, and she would go and get them; I said I would send the servant with her, but she would not allow that; I then sent for an officer - her husband had been in my service, but had left.

MARK WATSON MANBY . I was living with Dr . Ayre. This shirt is mine - I had missed it.

CHARLES PRICE . I am an assistant to a pawnbroker, I have a table-cloth, sheet, blanket, and shirt, pawned at our house, at different times, by a female, but I cannot say by whom; I gave these duplicates to the person.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I went to Dr. Ayre's house, and took the prisoner; I went again, and found the duplicates of these articles near the kitchen.

Prisoner's Defence. I brought a good character to Dr. Ayre's house; the wages were very low, and I did it through distress - I did not intend to steal them.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-88

612. WILLIAM BEST , JAMES BEST , and THOMAS BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 40 bushels of potatoes, value 4l. , the goods of Matthew Newman , the younger.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MATTHEW NEWMAN , JUN. I live at Harlington, about three miles from Hounslow, in Middlesex . I know the prisoners - two of them had been in the habit of selling potatoes about our place, at a very cheap rate. On the night of the 16th of December I lost about fourteen sacks of potatoes out of a barn; I have not seen any of them since: I was examined at the time these men were committed - I heard William Best examined; what he said was taken down in writing, and read over to him and the Magistrate signed it; I think Cordery had not been examined, in their presence, before that.

WILLIAM FLETCHER . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I was at work in his barn on the 16th of December; James Best , Joseph Cordery , and Wooldridge came in together - James Best said, "This used to be the potato barn - are there any here now?" I said Yes, and pointed to where they were; there were twenty-six or twenty-seven sacks: they did not say any thing more, but went away - the next morning I went to work about six o'clock; I got the key from the farm, and went to the barn: I opened the front door - when I got in, the barley was all scattered about the place; I got a light, and then missed about fourteen sacks of potatoes: I found the back door of the barn had been broken off the hinges.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know

James Best? A. Yes; he had lived two years with Mr. Shackle.

GEORGE WOOLDRIDGE . I am a labourer, and live at Harlington. On the 16th of December I went with James Best and Cordery to the prosecutor's barn, and saw Fletcher there; Best said, "This used to be the potato barn," and Fletcher pointed out where the potatoes were; we went away together, and Best said, "Some of those potatoes are mine to-night, I'll he d - d if they arn't," - he asked if I would go with him, and help him get them out at night - I said I would have nothing to do with it; he offered me 3s. 6d., and plenty to eat and drink if I would. I passed that barn the next morning, between eight and nine o'clock, and the door was off the hinges, but it stood up; Cordery and James Best were with me - I said, "Halloo, Mr. Best, then you have been there;" he made no answer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the owner of these potatoes? A. Yes - I did not go to tell him: I did not like to make a disturbance; I had no other reason - I am a farmer's man; I told my father the next morning - he was at work just by the barn. I was never in any thing of this kind before - I told my father, and he told another person.

JOSEPH CORDERY . I am a labourer, and live at Harlington. On the 16th of December I went to the prosecutor's barn, with Wooldridge and James Best ; Best said to Fletcher, "This was the potato barn - are there any here now?" Fletcher said, "Yes, there are a few;" when we came away Best said he would give us 3s. 6d. a piece, and plenty to eat and drink, if we would go with him that night - Wooldridge said, "I never did the like yet, and I will not;" I said I did not like to go, but he said I had better, I was sure not to get caught; I went at twelve o'clock at night, with William Best and the other prisoners- they hoisted the door off its hinges, and I stood by; William Best 's horse and cart, and James Best 's donkey and cart were there; I went and helped to pick up the potatoes, and put them into a basket - that was all I did; they shot them into sacks - there were fourteen sacks filled: they put them into the carts, and went off; I got the 3s. 6d. about a week afterwards. I was apprehended, and taken before the Magistrate at Uxbridge - I stated what I have to-day; I have been five weeks at the House of Correction, and came from there to-day.

Cross-examined. Q. These people paid you very badly- I suppose you were vexed at that? A. Yes, but I took the money; I never did the like before - I thought there was harm in it; Wooldridge was present when James Best asked me to help him - Mr. Newman came and said he would forgive me if I would tell him, and I told him. I swear I never was tried for stealing ducks, nor accused of it.

WILLIAM FLETCHER re-examined. Q. You missed this quantity of potatoes the next morning? A. Yes - it was in the wet weather; I did not see any marks of wheels- it is a gravelly soil.

MR. PHILLIPS to GEORGE WOOLDRIDGE . Q. Were you never in any thing of this kind before? A. No; I was in service, and drove a team of horses over three ducks; the woman went and got a warrant for me - I asked her if she would make it up; she said she would if I paid for them - I said if I paid for them I should like to have them, and I took them; I was not tried for stealing them.

JAMES BEST - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM BEST - NOT GUILTY .

BROWN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-89

613. CHARLES DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Henry Roper , from his person .

HENRY ROPER . On the 28th of January I was in Oxford-street , and near Orchard-street I felt my handkerchief go from my pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner with it - he ran down Orchard-street, as far as Somerset-street, with it in his hand; he then put it into his hat, and ran on - I followed, crying Stop thief! a baker's boy ran with me; when I got on to Bird-street I heard some person say "They have got him;" when I got on to Gee's-court I saw some persons round a house, and they said,"He is in there:" the officer came up, and we went in together; we found the prisoner at the top of one of the flight of stairs - I do not know what bacame of my handkerchief; it was a red one, with a narrow yellow border, and four pine apples in the centre.

JAMES INGLIS . I saw the prisoner running in Oxford-street, with a red handkerchief; he threw it into his hat, and put it on his head - I saw the prosecutor and several others running after him.

WILLIAM IRODD . I am a street-keeper. I heard the cry of Stop thief! between one and two o'clock; I saw the prisoner running, and a great many persons after him; I went up to Gee's-court, and took him in a house: Mr. Roper identified him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-90

614. ISAAC PALMER and ISABELLA ROBINSON were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 3d of February , 1 writing-desk, value 5s., the goods of Rosamond Stelfox , of a certain evil-disposed person, which said writing-desk had lately before been stolen, they well knowing the same .

ROSAMOND STELFOX . I am a widow . In December my servant missed a writing-desk from my parlour - I know nothing of the prisoners.

WILLIAM IRVING . I am an officer. I went to execute a search-warrant at the prisoners' lodging, and found this desk under the bed; Robinson said it was given to her by the lady she lived with a Mrs. Ogilby; I do not know whether there is such a person.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-91

615. BENJAMIN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 24 ozs. of snuff, value 9s., and 1 jar, value 1s. , the goods of Mark Anthony Orme .

MARK ANTHONY ORME . I am a tobacconist . On the 13th of February this jar of snuff was on the counter; I had been serving out of it at half-past eleven o'clock; about twelve I wanted it again, and it was gone - this is it.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner with this jar in his apron, in Petticoat-lane, about

three hundred yards from the prosecutor's shop; I locked him up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-92

616. WILLIAM HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 100 bricks, value 2s. , the goods of John Owen .

JOHN OWEN . I am a publican , and live in Chiswell-street - I have fifteen houses in Blisset-street, Bethnal-green .

JOHN MAHONEY . I live in Blisset-street, and have the care of Mr. Owen's houses. I went to No. 37, and saw the prisoner collecting bricks and bats, and putting them into his basket; I asked what brought him there - he said he was only collecting a few bricks and bats; I said I had the care of those houses, and I should give him into custody - he began to give me some very ill language; the bricks had been lying about the yard and on the wall - he had a cart and donkey with him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you brought the bricks here? A. No - I did not think there was any occasion; it was not because I did not wish the Jury to see what they were - I went for an officer; he drove his cart, and I went with him - the officer did not tell me, now I had got the bricks to let the man alone; he picked up from sixteen to twenty bats in my presence - it was day-light.

JURY. Q. What is the value of twenty bats? A. Threepence or fourpence.

COURT. Q. How many bricks did you see him take? A. We were ordered to count them, and there were about a hundred.

CHRISTOPHER WALTON . I am a labourer in the East India Company's service - I saw the prisoner behind these premises, picking up bats, putting them into a basket, and then into a cart; I went to Mahoney, and told him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was this in broad day-light? A. Yes, it was a quarter-past four o'clock - you might call it rubbish, but it was what I call of value; they were bats- I did not see him take one brick; I believe there were no bricks there - there were bricks on the wall, which were loose from its being knocked about.

SAMUEL MANNING . On Friday, the 30th of January, I was in my garden, which is some distance from Mr. Owen's yard - I heard a noise at the back of my garden, opened the yard door, and saw the prisoner picking up some pieces of old bricks; I said, "What are you going to do with them?" he said, "To make a floor;" I said,"They are not fit for that" - he said, "I shall lay some boards over them, and they will make a good floor;" I said,"Very well, you may take off the whole if you like, and I will give you 1s." - what he had of me were much better than those he got at Blisset-street; I went to look at them - they were nothing but rubbish; I never saw such a delapidated place in my life.

JAMES ESSEX . I took the prisoner into custody. Mahoney said he had seen him taking some property off the premises of Mr. Owen, and he insisted upon my taking him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-93

617. RICHARD HOLLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 7 iron-tiles, value 7s. , the goods of James Jolley .

JAMES JOLLEY . I am a bricklayer . I had some iron-tiles on my premises, in Green-street, Rathbone-place -I saw them safe at one o'clock, on the 14th of February; the officer afterwards found some of them on the prisoner- I know them to be mine; these are them - the prisoner has worked for me.

DANIEL RIERDON . I was on duty about half-past five o'clock, and stopped the prisoner in High-street, St. Giles, with something in a bag; I asked what he had got- he said what was that to me; I took him to the watchman, and then he said his master told him to take them to do a cow-house.

WILLIAM WHEATLEY . I was with Rierdon - while he was gone to enquire for his master, the prisoner said his master had allowed him to take them in part of wages.

Prisoner's Defence. He owes me for the last week's wages, and 1l. 17s. before.

JAMES JOLLEY . I settled with him on the Saturday morning, and he had a suit of clothes of me for the money I owed him - not one farthing do I owe him.

GUILTY. Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-94

618. MARY JONES and MARY HASEY were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 16 yards of ribbon, value 13s. , the goods of John Williams .

JOHN GREAVES . I am in the employ of John Williams, a haberdasher . On the 7th of February the two prisoners came in to look at some gauze ribbons - being suspicious of them I watched, and while the person who was serving them turned his back, Jones took a piece and put it under her shawl; I let them stop till they were served, and told Gibbon, who asked them to walk up to the end of the shop, and in going along one of them dropped the ribbon- they had bought two yards and a half, and paid 2s. 6d, for it; I did not see the ribbon fall, but I saw it on the floor, and saw it taken about five minutes before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far were you from the woman? A. About four yards; Heath served them, but he turned his back to get some more ribbon; I think there were four other young men in the shop, the rest were gone to their tea - there might be ten customers; we were not busy: when I saw them take the ribbon I went to speak to Gibbon, and they were still being served - I saw them put the money on the counter; I could not see who dropped it, but it was on the floor - it could not have fallen by accident; I did not tell the Magistrate she put it under her cloak - they were taken into the parlour in about three minutes; I went and told Gibbon, and followed about five or ten yards behind them.

JURY. Q. Are you sure that the ribbon that was on the ground was the same you saw them take from the counter? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Whereabouts in the shop did it fall? A. About half-way up the shop - Mr. Williams himself was between me and the prisoners when it fell.

THOMAS GIBBON . Greaves gave me information while I was at tea; I came into the shop, and saw the pri

soners and a young man serving them - after they had paid him, and the ribbon they bought had been put in paper, they were going away; I asked them to walk up the shop - they said they would; I walked a little behind them, the shop being narrow, and about the middle of the shop I saw this piece of ribbon fall down, but could not say who it fell from - I went to the other end of the shop with the prisoners and spoke to them, and then went and fetched the ribbon.

Cross-examined. Q. Greaves came and spoke to you? A. Yes - I did not leave them to go and call the prosecutor; it is a narrow shop, but one hundred and ten feet long - the ribbon could not fall off the counter; there was none on the part of the counter where this fell - no one was nearer to them than I was, when the ribbon fell.

Prisoner HASEY. This witness went to call Mr. Williams, then picked up the ribbon, and said it was of no consequence, the ribbon was found. Witness. I called Mr. Williams to me when I went to pick up the ribbon -I did not say it was of no consequence.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I was sent for, and received this ribbon from the witness - the two females were given into my custody; I found twenty duplicates on Jones, and on Hasey 7s.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not go to the house of one of them? A. Yes, but I found nothing; they refused to give an account of themselves, but I knew where they lived.

HASEY'S Defence. I frequently go to the shop - I was going out, Gibbon touched Jones on the shoulder, and told her to go to the end of the shop; he went down the shop to call Mr. Williams - in coming back he picked up the ribbon.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

HASEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-95

619. ISAAC PALMER and ISABELLA ROBINSON were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 3d of February , I copper coal-scuttle, value 25s., the goods of Matthew Burt and James Burt , knowing them lately before to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

JAMES BURT . I am in the employ of Matthew and James Burt - they are smiths and ironmongers , and live in York-street, Westminster . On the 11th of January this coal-scuttle was stolen from their shop; I did not see it taken.

JOSEPH COOPER . This coal-scuttle was found at No. 43, Duck-lane, where the two prisoners live - it was in a back bed-room, on the ground floor; we went to execute a search-warrant there on the 3d, and saw it, but did not take it away till the 10th - the prisoners were there on but not on the 10th.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-96

620. THOMAS LAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 2 bushels of potatoes, value 5s. , the goods of Robert Green .

ROBERT GREEN . I sell potatoes , and live at Turnham-green ; the prisoner was in my service. Last Tuesday morning I saw him go into the potato-room with a sack, and take it out partly full, to a cart of mine, which was loading for him to go to London; I followed and took him - he said he was caught, and supposed he must suffer; he told me an ostler had received some of him.

BENJAMIN HAMMETT . I was going by - Mr. Green called me to go and get up the potatoes, which the prisoner had thrown into a hay-crib.

Prisoner. I have a large family, and took a few potatoes to take home.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-97

621. ELIZABETH NEYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 1 watch, value 20s., and 1 seal, value 5s. , the goods of John Prior .

REBECCA PRIOR . I am the wife of John Prior - we live in Tenter-street , White's-row. On the 12th of January, I went out and left my house in care of my niece - she is but eight years old; I left the watch hanging on a nail - I returned in about half an hour and it was gone; I have known the prisoner for years as a respectable person.

HENRY HAYES . I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned with me by the prisoner's daughter, in the afternoon of the 12th of January; I gave her this duplicate.

THOMAS VANN . I was applied to on the 18th, and took the prisoner; she was in a good deal of trouble, has four small children, and her husband is in Whitecross-street- it was the most distressing scene I ever saw; the children are all gone to the workhouse.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18290219-98

622. GEORGE EDWARD NOON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 bolster, value 2s.; 1 quilt, value 2s.; 2 sheets, value 4s., and 1 blanket, value 2s. , the goods of James Crawshaw .

SARAH CRAWSHAW . I am the wife of James Crawshaw, a bell-hanger - we live at St. Andrew's, Holborn - the prisoner lodged with me; I missed these articles on the 2d of February: I asked him about them, and wanted the duplicates - he said he would get them out; I then sent for the officer.

Prisoner. Q. Do you think it was my intention to rob you of them? A. I do not know - I asked you for the tickets, and you would not give them me; I think you were in distress.

WILLIAM HALL . I took the prisoner on the 2d - he handed over these duplicates, and said it was distress that drove him to it; they appeared in distress - his wife had no shoes on.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket, two sheets, and a quilt, all pawned by the prisoner, at different dates.

WILLIAM CREE . I am a pawnbroker, and have a bolster pawned by the prisoner on the 20th of January.

The prisoner pleaded distress, and stated that he intended to redeem the articles.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290219-99

623. GEORGE PAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 chair, value 8s. , the goods of William Vann .

ELIZABETH VANN . I am the wife of William Vann , a wheelwright , of Old-street . On the 9th of February I had a chair taken away from the door - I had put it there half an hour before; a boy came to tell me of it, and the officer afterwards brought it.

JAMES FORDHAM . My son stopped the prisoner, and gave me information - I took him to the watch-house; he said he came from his master's, in Waterloo-street, and was going to take the chair to Fore-street; I said I would go to his master, and then he said he had it from a boy, named Edwards, and that it had been taken from a broker's shop, between the Merry Carpenters public-house and Bunhill-row.

JAMES FORDHAM , JUN. I saw the prisoner and another between six and seven o'clock; the prisoner had this chair on his head - I went and told my father; he went and stopped him going up, Bell-yard - he said he brought it from No. 12, Waterloo-street, and then that a boy named Edwards took it from a broker's shop, and gave it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. That lad entices boys to steal handkerchiefs, and buys them of them - if they do not take his price he goes and tells his father, and has them taken up.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, one of whom said he would take him into his employ.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-100

624. ANDREW ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 weighing-machine, value 30s.; six iron weights, value 13s., and 1 lamp, value 2s. , the goods of James Peterkin ,

JAMES PETERKIN . I lost a machine on the 16th of December, from No. 7, Arlington-place, St. George's in the East - I also lost a lamp, and some iron weights; it had been in my shop, and I wanted to let it - I went down to see it, and the articles were gone.

Prisoner. Q. How could I come by the key of the premises? A. From my wife - I employed Mr. Walbancke, who employed the prisoner; he said he had got a customer for the shop.

JOHN KING . I am a baker. I bought this machine of the prisoner, about the 16th of December, for 50s.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go with me to look at the shop, to take it? A. Yes, but it did not suit me.

JOHN ALLSOP . I live in the adjoining premises to this shop. I was coming out, and saw two weights standing on the steps - I inquired what they were doing, and a person, who was with the prisoner, said the machine was to be taken to Seven-dials, and the house was let; he took out a draft, or something, said it was let, and a person was coming down in the course of the day to pay me the rent - I went to Mr. Peterkin.

WILLIAM WALBANCKE . I was employed to let the premises - the prisoner was with me. I went to take an inventory of the effects, but neither he, nor any of us, had authority to sell any thing.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not out of town when the key was given to me? A. I had to go down to Maidstone on the 12th - I came back on the 16th, and then heard that these things had been sold.

Prisoner. I let the premises for 20l. to Mr. Allsop.

MR. ALLSOP. I took the premises back from Mr. Peterkin, but I had nothing to do with the prisoner - I took the premises to repair them, and gave him 5l.

JAMES PETERKIN . He never paid me the 5l.

WILLIAM SMITHE . I had orders to apprehend the prisoner, and on the 7th of February I met him in Golden-square - he said he expected a note from Mr. King.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to let the house - the prosecutor gave me the key himself in the first instance, and his wife in the second; I let the house, and sold the machine to Mr. King, but it was for the prosecutor's use - I intended to have given him the money, and he promised me a handsome remuneration.

MR. PETERKIN. He went away with the money and the key - I have never got the key yet.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-101

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

625. CHARLES JAMES REDHEAD and DANIEL ELDON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of William Wood .

GEORGE BENTON . I am a currier. I was in St. John-street, on the 16th of January; I saw Redhead take this coat off a cart, and give it to Eldon - I gave information; they were followed, and taken with it in Three Fox-court- Eldon then had it on, and was by Redhead's side when he took it.

WILLIAM WOOD . On the 16th of January, my cart was at Mr. Dobell's, in St. John-street : I went into the house - on my return, I heard my coat had been taken; this is it: there are some bills in the pocket, with my name on them.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am an officer, and have the coat.

ELDON'S Defence. I was standing in Charterhouse-lane; a young man came and asked me to hold it - he was gone some time; I put it on, and went after him down the court, where he went; they came and took me.

REDHEAD'S Defence. I was going up Long-lane - two young men came and said Mr. Dobell wanted me; they took me into a public-house, and a young man said I took it.

REDHEAD - GUILTY . Aged 22.

ELDON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-102

626. HENRY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 1 brass cock, value 1s., and 9 feet of leaden pipe, value 4s. 6d., the goods of John Sanders , the younger, fixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a Bow-street officer. I met the prisoner on the 17th of January, in Kingsland-road, with this lead tied up in an apron; I asked what he had got - he said some lead, which he had brought from Mr. Jones, at Kingsland , and was going to sell it; I said I should take him back - he acknowledged to Waller that he took it from a cottage over the way, meaning Mr. Sanders'; I

measured the place, and the pipe fitted exactly - there was about four feet which ran under some bricks; this cock was to it.

CHARLES WALLER . I was with Davis; what he has stated is correct.

JOHN SANDERS , SEN. This is an empty house, which belongs to my son, John; I had seen the lead all right the day before: they must have got in at the back of the premises, and walked up the yard, where the pipe was nailed against the wall.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Kingsland, and saw this parcel rolled up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-103

627. ELEANOR McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 watch, value 30s.; 3 seals, value 2s., and 1 watch-key, value 2d., the goods of Peter Ernst , from his person .

PETER ERNST . I am a seaman . On the 5th of February, I was up stairs at a public-house, where I live; the prisoner and plenty of other women were there - there is dancing there sometimes; the prisoner took my watch, and hove it under the table - I ran after her, and took her.

JOHN SANDERS . I am a sailor, and lodged in this house. There was no dance at this time - there was a fiddler; the prisoner took the watch out of the prosecutor's pocket, and hove it under the table; I did not see that she had been playing with him - she ran a little way, and he took her; there were twelve or fourteen persons in the room: I did not see any lark.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-104

628. HENRY WILLIAMS and GEORGE WESTON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 13 lbs. weight of ham, value 9s. , the goods of John Tate .

THOMAS ROBERTS . On the evening of the 6th of February, I saw the two prisoners in Holborn, and watched them on to Mr. Tates' shop, No. 3, Oxford-street ; I saw Weston put his foot in, take the ham off some cheeses, and give it to Williams - a coach came by, and I lost sight of Weston, but took Williams.

DAVID BYATT . I am in the employ of John Tate . We lost a ham from the door - it was safe ten minutes before.

WESTON'S Defence. My mother sent me on an errand, and as I was returning, these officers caught me, and said I had stolen a ham on the Friday before - I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

WESTON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-105

629. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , 1 coat, value 20s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Faris .

ANN FARIS . I am the wife of Henry Faris ; we have apartments on a first floor, at Great Harford-street . About twelve o'clock, on the 27th of January, I had been down in the kitchen, and on going up I met the prisoner just coming out of my room door; she asked if a mistress somebody who she mentioned, lived there; I said No; I saw a bundle under her shawl, and asked if she had been into my room - she said No; I said, "I can't let you go till I have seen what you have got:" she said she had nothing, but when she found I would not let her go, she turned back, and put the bundle down in a chair - it contained the coat and trousers, which are my husband's; I called my landlord.

THOMAS DOWLING . I am the landlord. Faris called me up - I went for the officer, leaving one of my men to mind the prisoner - she was a stranger, and had no right there.

JAMES BUCKLE . I am the officer. I produce the property; the prisoner said, "Oh, Lord! I shall be transported."

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor distressed widow, with four children.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-106

630. DAVID PULLENGER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , 3 sovereigns, and 5 shillings , the monies of Thomas Bruce Garland .

THOMAS BRUCE GARLAND . I am a saddler and harness maker ; the prisoner was employed about four years ago to go on errands for me - I lived then in Shouldham-street, Brunswick-square. On the 5th of May, 1825, I gave him three sovereigns and five shillings, to go and get a coat from a tailor at Wapping-wall; I never saw him again till about three weeks ago, when I met him near the Yorkshire Stingo - he did not know me, but I knew him; I had employed him near three or four months because he was out of work - I am sure of his person.

THOMAS PERRING . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; the prosecutor charged him with stealing three sovereigns and upwards; as we were going to the office I asked if he knew any thing about it; he said he was not going to run away, he did not know any thing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the money to go for a coat; I went to a public-house - a female came in, and offered me a glass of rum; I got intoxicated, and did not know where I was - I went home with her, and in the morning my small clothes had been cut, and the money gone.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-107

631. HANNAH LONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 1 pair of breeches, value 4s. , the goods of James Casey .

JAMES CASEY . I live in Three Swan-court, Mansell-street . On the 12th of February I lost a pair of breeches from a line opposite my door; a lad told me he saw a woman go down the court; we went in search of her, and met the prisoner with them under her arm - the boy said,"I think that is her," and I ran and took her.

THOMAS OSBORNE . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was selling sprats; a man asked me to hold these while he went to get a sheet of paper.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-108

632. ROBERT CATHOLIC was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , 3 window-shutters, value 20s. , the goods of William Lee .

WILLIAM LEE . I live in Fetter-lane . On the 27th of January I missed three window shutters from my passage, by the side of my house, when I came to shut up, at ten o'clock at night.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner in your life? A. Not to my knowledge; I believe he said a person named Green, gave them him to sell - a person of that name was taken, but the prisoner said it was not him.

FRANCIS SMART . I am a broker, and live on Saffron-hill. I bought these shutters, on the 27th of January, of the prisoner; I asked him how he came by them; he said his father was a dealer in marine-stores - he had these by him, and wanted to dispose of them, as he was in want of money.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A dealer in building materials ; I knew the prisoner by buying three other shutters the day before - that was the first time; I gave him 2s. for these; I asked where he lived, but had not been to the place to inquire.

COURT. Q. The shutters were sold to you on the 27th? A. Yes, for 2s.; I had bought three small shutters of him the day before - I did not ask him then what his father was; we bought nineteen shutters in all of him - my brother bought the others; on the 3d of February he brought five more shutters, and I took him.

WILLIAM LEE . These are my shutters; I could not replace them for 30s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-109

633. JOHN BRISCOE and ISAAC HOARE were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 2 live tame fowls, price 4s. , the property of Mary Susannah Berry , widow .

JOHN ARGUST . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 10th of February, at half-past three o'clock in the morning, I was at the end of Kensal-green-lane, on the Harrow-road, about three miles from Wilsden: we heard footsteps coming down the lane - my partner went out and took Briscoe; I seized another person, and said, "What have you got here?" he ran across the road - I pursued, and took him; he dropped a bag with these two fowls in it - he got away, and run off; I returned to my partner, and took Hoare - the two prisoners and the other man were together; Briscoe said if the other man had stood as firm as he did, we should not have taken them; I shewed two of the fowls that were in the bag to Mrs. Berry, and she claimed them.

RICHARD PURSELL . I was with Argust - we heard footsteps, and saw three men coming down the lane following each other close - I went up to Briscoe, and asked what was in his bag - he said linen, and he was going to Paddington to work - I put my hand to the bag, and found it was bloody; I took hold of him - Hoare was by his side, but did not offer to go away; he kept sideling about till my partner took him.

MARY SUSANNAH BERRY . I am a widow, and live at Kilburn . The officer shewed the fowls to me, two of them are mine - I know them; the thieves had got through a cow-house and then to the fowl-house - they had taken the cow-house door off the hinges; I do not know that I had seen the prisoners before; I had seen my fowls all safe on the afternoon of the 9th of February about four o'clock - Mrs. Medwin lives about half a mile from me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOARE'S Defence. I was coming down the road with these men, a man overtook us, and asked this man to carry a bundle; the officer met us, and asked what he had got - he said clothes, he supposed.

BRISCOE'S Defence. I said the rogue had run away who asked me to carry them.

BRISCOE - GUILTY . Aged 38.

HOARE - GUILTY . Aged 29.

634. JOHN BRISCOE and ISAAC HOARE were again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 6 live tame fowls, price 12s. , the property of Rebecca Medwin .

JOHN ARGUST . I stopped the prisoners on the 10th of February - they were in company with another person; Briscoe had a bag with these six fowls in it - the two were dropped by the man who got away; as we were taking them, Briscoe said if the other had stood as firm as they did there would have been bloodshed before we should have taken them.

RICHARD PURSELL . I was with Argust; what he has stated is correct; Hoare said if he had got his liberty as the other did, he would have had a dozen to rescue them before we got to Paddington.

REBECCA MEDWIN . I am single , and live at Kilburn, about half a mile farther from London than Berry. The officers shewed me these six fowls, which I know to be mine; they had been taken from Mr. Frogget's hen-house - I had locked them up at six o'clock in the evening, and the next morning they were gone; the lock of the hen-house had been forced from the door; I heard the cock crow between eight and nine o'clock at night - they must have been taken after that.

BRISCOE - GUILTY . Aged 38.

HOARE - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

Reference Number: t18290219-110

635. WILLIAM BATES and WILLIAM PICKETT were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 watch, value 2l., and 1 time-piece stand, value 7s. , the goods of John Freeman .

JOHN FREEMAN . I am a baker , and live at Lisson-green . I missed a watch and a stand on the 4th of January, about eight o'clock in the morning, from the mantel-piece in my parlour - it had been safe at twelve o'clock when we went to bed; they had gone through my shop and took them; I know nothing of the prisoners.

SAMUEL HOLLAND . I am a watchman. I moved into a new house in Salisbury-street the night before, and on that Sunday morning I went round the premises - I heard a noise at the back of the premises, and got up to the first-floor of an unfinished house; I saw the two prisoners in the act of breaking up the time-piece case - they then stuck clay to the pieces and sunk them in a cesspool; when they had done that, Pickett said, "Now we will go;" Bates said, "No, I will look at it first;" he put his hand into his pocket, drew out a silver watch, and said, "It is a prime watch;" they then ran away; I got down after some time but could not see them - I asked several persons but

they had not seen them; I then found a letter on the top of the cesspool, which was directed to the prosecutor - I took it down to Mary-le-bone watch-house, and Wall afterwards took the prisoners - I am quite sure they are the two boys; the watch has not been found.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer. I have the pieces of the stand which were got up from the cesspool.

JOHN FREEMAN re-examined. Q. How did the boys get into your house? A. My wife opened the door, left it on the latch, and went up stairs; we had no servant.

BATES' Defence. My friends could have brought evidence that I was at home, but they did not think that I should be brought up so soon.

BATES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

PICKETT - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-111

636. JOHN WELLER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 10lbs. weight of beef, value 5s. , the goods of Daniel Fielding .

DANIEL FIELDING . I am a butcher , and live in Rosamond-street, Clerkenwell ; I was in my shop on the evening of the 17th of January - this beef was on the corner of the board; I went in for some more meat, and when I returned the beef was gone - I went after the prisoner, and found him a hundred yards off with it; I never saw him before.

Prisoner's Defence. When he took me he scratched my face.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-112

637. MARY MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 blanket, value 10s. , the goods of John Cruse .

MARGARET CRUSE . I am the wife of John Cruse; we live in Fountain-court, Drury-lane . I missed a blanket from my garret on the 8th of February - the prisoner did not lodge there, and had no business on my premises, but she used to visit a lodger of mine on the first floor; I did not see her there on the 7th or 8th of February.

ELIZABETH JOSEPHS . I keep a second-hand clothes-shop in Playhouse-yard - this blanket was sold in my shop by the prisoner - I was present; she asked 1s. 6d. for it - my woman bid her 1s.; I asked if it was her own - she said Yes; I said I did not like to buy it, as they were very often taken from furnished lodgings; she pleaded great distress - I cut it in two pieces.

CHARLES RICHARDSON . I took the prisoner, and have the blanket - it is in two pieces.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Playhouse-yard, and met a woman who asked me to go and sell the blanket; I took it, and asked 2s. for it - the woman said half the money was plenty; I turned out, and told the woman, who told me to take it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-113

638. GEORGE GUNNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 6lbs. weight of cheese, value 4s. , the goods of John Wheeler .

MARY ANN STREET . John Wheeler keeps a small chandler's shop . On the 8th of February, about three o'clock, I saw the prisoner go and take a piece of cheese from the window - I was in my own shop opposite; I gave the alarm and he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there no one in this shop? A. I do not know - the cheese was exposed, and might tempt a hungry boy.

WILLIAM KIDD . On the 8th of February, at a quarter past three o'clock, I met the prisoner, and I took him with the cheese under his coat.

EMMA WHEEEER . I am the daughter of John Wheeler. This is my father's cheese.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-114

639. JAMES LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of February , 5 yards of cloth, value 4l. , the goods of John Hopkins .

JOHN WALLINGTON . I am in the employ of Mr. John Hopkins , a draper . This cloth was near his shop door about six o'clock in the evening of the 4th of February; the prisoner put in his arm, and reached it out - I went and took him with it on his arm, about twenty yards off; he said a man gave him 6d. to carry it.

BARNARD JEFFRIES . I am an inspector of the watch. Here is the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The place he says it was is seven feet high - is it possible I could get it down? my wife and child were starving; the parish would not take us in.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-115

640. JOHN HOWARD and JAMES WAKEFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 50 yards of baize, value 30s., and 1 table-cover, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Twell .

JAMES WELLS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 17th of February I was near Mr. Twell's house, opposite Red Lion-street, Holborn ; I saw Wakefield go into his shop, and take the green baize and table-cover, put them under his arm, and go away; there were two others with him -I cannot swear to Howard.

JOSEPH NEWSOM . I am an officer. I was with Wells, and saw the two prisoners at the door, with another person- Wakefield went into the shop; I took Howard crossing the road: they had been in company for ten minutes before.

EDWARD TWELL . I keep the shop, and this is my property.

WAKEFIELD'S Defence. I am an apprentice ; I left my shop at seven o'clock, and coming up Holborn-hill I fell in company with two young men - one said, "Will you go into that shop, and bring out that cloth;" I said No, for I never was in any bad company: we went on further, and they asked me again - when we got to this shop they forced me in, they said they knew the gentleman, and if I brought it out it would be all right.

EDWARD HUGKELSTON . I am an officer, and was with the witnesses; I saw both the prisoners together for some time - they mounted a cart, and then went on to the pro

secutor's shop; Howard went in, came out, and whispered to the other - then Wakefield went in and took the property.

HOWARD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

WAKEFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-116

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

641. HENRY DOWNER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of January , 800 sovereigns, 600 half-sovereigns, 100 crowns, 200 half-crowns, 500 shillings, and 200 sixpences, the monies of Robert Davies , his master, in his dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. ROBERT DAVIES . I am a merchant and banker , at No. 190, Shoreditch . The prisoner had been in my employ since 1825, as clerk , and in September, 1828, I made him my cash-keeper. On Monday, the 19th of January, when I came to town, he was not at the desk, as he ought to have been, and on making inquiry I found he had absconded; I immediately looked at the cash-book, and found there should have been 1584l. odd in the cash-box; we found 1290l. 17s. 2d. difficient - 324l. was all that was left: I had not counted my cash for some time before; I depended on him - the amount of cash in hand changes every five minutes; I cannot say whether it was taken at various times or not.

SAMUEL HERCULES TAUNTON . I am a Bow-street officer. I was employed to go in search of the prisoner - I went to Mr. Needham, of Liverpool, and apprehended the prisoner at No. 5, Union-street; I searched him, and found about him a green purse, containing five sovereigns, three half-sovereigns, and 31s., and in a carpet bag I found 7l. 12s. 6d. in silver, and on his wife, who was with him, 2l. 18s.; I was surprised to find so little, and said, "Where is the rest?" Mr. Davies told me there was 1200l.; he said, "I assure you I had no more than what you have found, and what Mr. Needham has got - I have been squandering the remainder away for the last two years;" Needham had a bag of money, which I did not see found.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-117

642. GEORGE DENSHIRE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , 2 books, value 10s. , the goods of the Royal Institution of Great Britian .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Samuel Weller Singer .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

643. GEORGE DENSHIRE was again indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 cloak, value 8l., the goods of John Wade , in the dwelling-house of the Royal Institution of Great Britian .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Friday, the 13th of February, in consequence of a plan arranged at the office; I was directed to be at the Royal Institution at ten o'clock in the morning; I got there, directed a boy to come to me, and a little before seven o'clock in the evening, a boy came to the Institution, and presented me with a small bit of paper, stating that the letter and money left for the cloak, was to be sent by him - I directed the boy to give the man a letter, which five farthings were put into, and sent my boy to watch where he went; I saw him give the prisoner the letter with the farthings in it, in Stafford-street - I immediately ran up, and took the prisoner, with the letter in one hand, and his other hand in his breeches pocket; the farthings had not then been taken out. I took him back to the Institution, and asked his name - he pointed to the letter, and said that was his name - that he lived at No. 134, Mary-le-bone-street; I said there was no such number - he said, "What if I tell the truth;" I said, "I can say nothing to that - where is the cloak?" he said, "What will the gentleman say if I tell the whole truth?" I said I could say nothing about that; he said, "I will tell the whole truth, it is pawned:" I said, "Where?" he said, "In Wardour-street;" I said,"At Harris'?" he said, Yes, for 30s. - I found it there: he got into dreadful agony, and said he felt not for himself, but his friends - he is very respectably connected.

ROBERT JOHN CLARK . I am shopman to Mr. Harris. The prisoner pawned this cloak.

ELEANOR BATES . I am housekeeper to Mr. John Wade - this is his cloak.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years, to commence from the expiration of the former term .

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

Reference Number: t18290219-118

644. CHARLES GOODLAD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of February , at St. George, Hanover-square, 4 sauce-ladles, value 5l.; 42 forks, value 50l., and 48 spoons, value 55l., the goods of Arthur Geddes , his master, in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ARTHUR GEDDES . I am a merchant , and live at No. 6, Stafford-row, Buckingham-gate, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . The prisoner was in my service, as footman ; he came into my service on the 19th of November, and left me on Monday, the 22d of December, without any notice - I was not at home at the time of his leaving; I never saw him again till he was in custody, at the latter end of January; when he left we missed four sauce-ladles, twenty-four table-forks, twenty-four table-spoons, eighteen dessert-forks, eighteen dessert-spoons, and six tea-spoons, which cost me 170l. - they were worth 100l.; I left home at nine o'clock in the morning - I was sent for, and missed the plate.

MRS. CHARLOTTE GEDDES . I am the wife of Arthur Geddes . On the 22d of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner - he had most of the plate in his custody; I saw it safe very near twelve o'clock, on a table in the pantry - I have not seen it since; I did not send the prisoner out on any message that morning: I received a communication from one of the maid-servants, and then missed him and the plate.

COURT. Q. Was all the plate which was lost in the prisoner's possession? A. Yes, and some more; I saw the the whole of it safe at twelve o'clock that day.

Prisoner. Q. At the office you said you saw the plate at half-past ten o'clock? A. I did not, I said at twelve; the housemaid came to me about two, and the prisoner was missing.

COURT. Q. You saw the prisoner at twelve o'clock? A. Yes - he stood at the table; I told him to put away as much of the plate as he could till Christmas-day, as I expected a large party, and I found fault with him for being drunk the night before - he denied it.

ANN HUGHES . I am servant to Mr. Geddes. I saw the plate on the pantry table, about eleven o'clock on the 22d of December, the day the prisoner left the house; I missed him about two o'clock - it was his duty to lay the cloth for dinner at two o'clock; he did not return to the house; I did not see him again till he was at the office: the plate was on the table in the pantry at eleven o'clock - the prisoner was not in the pantry at that time; I never saw the plate after that - I saw him about one o'clock, standing by the kitchen fire, asking the cook what time the lunch would be ready; I then went up stairs, and did not see him go out - I, the cook, and the prisoner were the only servants; I came down stairs again near two o'clock, and then the prisoner was gone.

RUTH SMITH . I am cook to Mr. Geddes. I remember the 22d of December, when the prisoner left the house - I saw the plate safe in the pantry, about half-past eleven o'clock that day; the prisoner came to me at one o'clock, and asked what there was for lunch - he went into his pantry, and about half-past one he came into the kitchen, and asked me if I wanted any water; I said No: I never saw him after that, till he was at Bow-street; at two o'clock the housemaid came down stairs, and she missed the plate. After I told the prisoner I did not want any water, I heard the street door shut - I did not see him go out, but after that I never saw him; no living creature came within the doors from that time till the plate was missing; the pantry windows were both fastened, and quite secure, and I found them secure when the plate was missed; every thing portable was taken, but the plate that was large was left behind.

COURT. Q. Which is the way to get out of the house from the pantry? A. He had to come along a passage, and up stairs; there is a lower door: a person must pass the kitchen door to go out at either door; I was in the kitchen all the time - I know he went for water when I heard the street door shut, for he took the pitcher with him; I had told him I did not want any water - I did not see him with the pitcher, but it was gone; he used to fetch water every day, for drink for the parlour.

Q. How soon after he asked if you wanted water, did you hear the door shut? A. Directly - he went up stairs directly.

Prisoner. Q. Were there any screws or fastenings to the pantry window? A. There are both, and they were fastened.

Q. Was not one window always open in the pantry, to see when anybody came to the front door? A. Occasionally we opened it to look out, but it was never kept open.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you went into the pantry, after missing the plate, was the window open? A. Both the windows were fastened quite safe; the pantry window looks into the area; there are no steps to the area - it is a high area; there is neither door nor steps to it.

COURT. Q. Are there not two ways out of the house? A. There is an area, but no door to it; the windows look into the area - they are not so high as the street: there is no way out of the house except at the street door; the prisoner took all his clothes with him, except an old shirt, some old stockings, and two or three collars; all he had was a suit of old clothes, and his livery, which he had on, and that he took with him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take the clothes? A. No - I did not see you go out.

ANN HUGHES re-examined. I was the first person who missed the plate; the pantry windows were both shut down, and the screws in them.

JURY. Q. Which of the servants were in the habit of opening the street door? A. Both of us, whoever was down stairs - both I and the cook; the prisoner always opened the door when he was in doors.

Q. Did any person come in or go out from the time you saw the plate till it was missed? A. No, no one - I went up stairs at one o'clock; I let nobody in: I left the cook below.

RUTH SMITH re-examined. I was down stairs all the morning; I saw the plate about half-past eleven o'clock - nobody came in after that till the prisoner went out, except one lady, a Mrs. Broadfoot; I had been out on an errand, and when I came in the lady was knocking at the door - I let her in, having the key of the door with me; I had only been out a few minutes - she stopped about an hour; the bell rang for the prisoner to let her out - he was not present, and I believe she let herself out; I always take the key out with me, when I am going a short way - I only went to the baker's, which is about five minutes walk.

COURT. Q. Would your having the key prevent anybody being let out? A. No.

MRS. GEDDES. Mrs. Broadfoot came to see me that day; I let nobody in or out myself - when she went away I rang the bell for the prisoner to open the door; I walked down from the drawing-room, expecting the prisoner to open the door, but Hughes opened it - it was near two o'clock; there are two centinals placed nearly opposite our house, who must see anybody go in or out.

ANN HUGHES . I let Mrs. Broadfoot out as I was coming down stairs just at that time: after I let her out the cook asked me to tell the prisoner the lunch was ready; I went to the parlour, and he was absent.

WILLIAM EVANS . I sweep the crossing at Buckingham-gate. On the Monday before Christmas-day I saw the prisoner, between one and two o'clock, with the water-pitcher in his hand; he put it at the right-hand entrance at the gate - I told him he had set the pitcher in an awkward situation: he made me no answer, but made all the haste he could into the Park, going in a direction from Stafford-row; he walked fast, and left the pitcher behind him - I took it from the gateway, and put it under the paling of the gateway, for security; it was afterwards taken to Mr. Geddes' - the place he used to get the water from, is down the stable yard, by the gate; he left it not many yards from the pump - the prosecutor's house is only five or six doors from the gate; I did not observe that he had any thing else.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me go through Buckingham-gate, or did I go the other way? A. I saw him go through Buckingham-gate.

Prisoner. I never crossed the way to go into the Park at all. Witness. He crossed along my crossing, and went into the park.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am a Bow-street officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Southwell, Nottinghamshire, on the 2d of February; I asked him what made him leave Mr. Geddes' situation - he made no reply; I asked him who gave him a character to get Mr. Geddes' situation - he replied that he got acquainted with some person in London, who persuaded him to get a written character, which he sent to his mother at Haverill, near Chesterfield (I neither threatened nor promised him), and his mother sent to Mr. Geddes; I asked what he had done with the clothes he took away from Mr. Geddes' house - he replied that he had sold them; he said he thought he should be hanged if he were taken up for this robbery (there is a charge of horse stealing against him) - he afterwards said, as he came along on the coach, that he should be twisted; a horse was found in his possession, which he acknowledged he had stolen, that he might not be tried for this robbery, for if he were tried for this robbery he should certainly be hanged.

COURT. Q. At the time you took him at Southwell, did you find a horse in his possession? A. No - he had been detained there through a letter which I had sent down there: I brought him to town afterwards.

Prisoner. Q. Did I tell you I had a written character from my mother? A. Yes, you did.

Q. Did I tell you I had stolen a horse, to save me from coming to be tried in London? A. He told me he acknowledged to stealing a horse, that he should not be tried for Mr. Geddes' robbery, for if he were he should certainly be hung - he did not say he had stolen it, but that he had acknowledged to stealing it; I told him what I took him for.

COURT. Q. What did he mean by his saying he thought he should be hung if he were taken for this robbery? A. He had been detained at Southwell, and a horse found in his possession; I found him in prison, and brought him to town - I am quite sure I did not make him any threat or promise; I told him not to say any thing to criminate himself.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - on the 22d of December I received a letter from Nottingham, stating my wife was dangerously ill, and I must come down immediately, if I wished to see her; Mrs. Geddes had charged me with being intoxicated the day before, and told me I might look out for another situation as soon as I had cleaned myself - I cleaned myself, and left the house about a quarter-past one o'clock; I took out the pitcher for water, and put it down at the corner of the yard where I usually fetched water from; I went to a friend, and told him I was going down to my wife, and I intended to go back to Mr. Geddes', but my friend advised me to go down to Nottingham immediately, which I did.

MRS. GEDDES. I did not discharge him; I told him I did not discharge him, but I thought it likely Mr. Geddes would, as, with a drunken servant, we were so very much afraid of fire, and I said, "If you behave well in our house I will do the best I can for you," to which he added, "I shall behave, no ways ill;" I did not specify any time for his going.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not order me to go out as soon as I was cleaned, to look for a situation, and that you would do the same, as you were going round to the shops to order them to send you a servant? A. I did not; he distinctly told me he was not married.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of the great aversion he had to take away human life, except for murder and treason - and believing, from inquiries he had made, that the prisoner had very bad parents .

Reference Number: t18290219-119

645. WILLIAM VERYWELL and THOMAS GOODCHEAP were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wilson , with intent to steal .

FRANCIS PARKER . I am a watchman. On the 9th of February, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Wilmington-square, Clerkenwell - my attention was drawn to the house of Mr. Wilson, No. 12, in the square; I heard a strange noise, like the crack of a piece of wood, which made me turn back - I had passed the house, and got to the next house; I turned back, looked down the area, and saw Verywell lying down by the kitchen door, which opens into the area - I observed Goodcheap, who had a white coat on, fly from the edge of the door into the vault, which was under the pavement; I asked Verywell what he was doing - I spoke several times; he would not give me any answer - I then said,"Here goes!" and sprung my rattle; he then turned round, and looked at me - my light went out; Mr. Wilson opened his window up stairs, and asked what was the matter - I remained there till Peddington, the watchman, and several others came; he got over the railing, and went down the area - Wilson's servant came down, opened the street door, and let us into the house; we went down the kitchen stairs, through the kitchen, into the area, and found the two prisoners sitting together in the vault - we took them into custody; the door leading from the kitchen to the area had a hole cut in the pannel - a piece was cut out of the pannel; it is a strip, about an inch wide - no other injury was done to the door; there was not sufficient space to enable a man to get in at that time - the door was still fast bolted and barred; I suppose the noise I heard was the door splitting - I found nothing; I apprehended one of the prisoners myself; the man who was lying down by the door was moving his hands, but I cannot say whether he put his hand to the door.

JAMES PEDDINGTON . I am a watchman. I heard a rattle spring, and went to Mr. Wilson's; I got over into the area, and found the two prisoners sitting on a cask in one of the vaults - I looked, and found a piece cut out of the pannel of the door; I found this knife by the hole in the door, and also a candle - the knife was outside the door, close by the piece which was cut out; I went into the vault, and found a hammer and wrench, which fits into the place which was forced out; after the prisoners were taken to the watch-house, we searched again, and I saw my fellow-watchman find a phosphorous-box, with a few matches, behind where they sat - the door was not open till Bates opened it; a man could not have entered

at that hole - the door opens into a pantry, and then a door on the right leads into the kitchen.

SAMUEL AXAM . I am a servant to Mr. Wilson. I fastened the house up at night - the pantry-door I fastened at eight o'clock; I came down, and let the watchmen in- I found part of the pannel broken, but not enough to admit the body of a man - nobody could have got inside.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-120

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

646. RICHARD KENNY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas George Kealing , on the King's highway, on the 18th of February , at St. Paul, Covent-garden , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch-chain, value 5s.; 2 seals, value 5s., and 3 watch-keys, value 6d., his property .

THOMAS GEORGE KEALING . I am servant to Mr. Woodhouse, of No. 56, Torrington-square. On the 19th of February, I was going through Little Russell-street , towards home, about half-past one o'clock in the morning; I had been out with a few friends, by my master's permission - I was met by the prisoner and two others; one of them said something to me, about treating them with beer, which I did not consent to - two of them laid hold of my arms, one on each side, and dragged me up a little court, knocked me down, and took my watch-chain and two seals; I cannot say which took them, as one of them put a hand before my face, and I could not see - whether the third man came down the court I do not know.

Q. You said before the Magistrate that you met the prisoner and another man? A. Yes - there were three, but I do not think the third was one of the party; only two laid hold of me: I cannot tell what became of the third -I endeavoured to call Watch! and got my face scratched; they put a hand on my mouth: they took my watch-chain and seals, by force - the watch remained, as the rivet in the ring broke, or they would have had the watch, but the guard prevented it; I did not feel my property taken: I did not feel the chain break - I missed it directly: the watchman came up, and took the prisoner off me - I was on my face and hands, and the two men were on the top of me; he took them off, but was obliged to let one go.

Q. What sort of a blow did they knock you down with? A. One of them gave me a blow on the forehead, which made it bleed; it did not prevent my knowing what was going on - I have not found my property at all: I am certain my chain and seals were safe when they laid hold of me - I had buttoned my coat round at the top a few minutes before, and saw my seals; they were petit-ore: the watchman took the prisoner to the watch-house - the other made his escape; I had not power to help the watchman - they had escaped before I was up: I am positive the prisoner is one of the men who dragged me up the court - he was in my sight till I was knocked down, and when the watchman came up he was on the top of me, which was not quite five minutes; I had spent the evening at the corner of Little Wild-street, not at a public-house; I had drank a little: there was only I and two young men - I parted with them about half-past one o'clock.

Q. What had you been doing for the half hour? A. I do not know that it was half an hour; I parted with them in Wild-street - I left them in the house: I went straight to Russell-street, but I met a young man whom I knew, and I just stopped to speak to him; I cannot positively say how much I drank - I was in a sufficient state to identify the prisoner as one of them; I suppose I was the worse for liquor, but quite sufficiently collected to identify him.

JOHN SULLIVAN . I live in St. Giles', and am a watchman. On Saturday morning, at half-past one o'clock, I was crying the hour, and as I came along I heard a screaming, and ran into this passage; the prisoner and two more were on the top of the prosecutor, who was on his face and hands - his face was downwards: I collared the prisoner and another, and fearing they would serve me out. I was obliged to let one go, to spring my rattle, and kept the prisoner; I took him to the watch-house- his hat and the prosecutor's were in the court; I sent another watchman for them: the prosecutor came out of the court when I brought the prisoner out - he made the charge against him, of robbing him of his seals and chain, in his presence; the prisoner said some of them dragged the prosecutor in, and he went into the court to see - but he was the man who was on the top of the prosecutor when I went in, and I detained him; the prosecutor appeared against him next morning: I looked about when I got on my beat, in about ten minutes, but found none of the property; the prisoner had no hat on - he claimed one of those found in the court; the other two had their hats on - I did not see the hats found in the court myself: the prosecutor was very sober - there was no sign of liquor; I do not know the prisoner - he was sober also.

JURY to THOMAS GEORGE KEALING . Q. Are you quite sure the prisoner is one of the persons who met you in the street? A. I am certain he is one of those who laid hold of me before I went into the court; he assisted in dragging me into the court.

Prisoner's Defence. About the time in question I was on the other side of Russell-street, and heard the prosecutor cry Murder! and Watch! I ran over to see what was the matter, and stumbled over him; two men ran away - the watchman came up directly, took me, and said I was one of them; I said "If so I should have run away:" the prosecutor did not charge me with robbing him at the watch-house, but with an assault - he was very tipsy.

THOMAS GEORGE KEALING . I stated at the watch-house that I was robbed, and he was one of the party: the ring of the chain was broken - I had a guard, which kept my watch.

JOHN SULLIVAN . The prosecutor said he was robbed of his seals and chain, by being dragged into the court by this man.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18290219-121

647. THOMAS BIRMINGHAM , JOSEPH REDGARD , THOMAS LANGHAM , and WILLIAM KELLY were indicted for feloniously assaulting George Munro , on the King's highway, on the 18th of January , at St. Andrew, Holborn , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 40l.; 1 chain, value 6l.; 2 seals, value 3l., and 1 key, value 1l., his property .

GEORGE MUNRO . I am a gentleman , and have been in the Army - I live at No. 45, Kirby-street, Hatton-garden. On the night of the 18th of January, about half-

past twelve, or one o'clock I was coming home from the King's Arms public-house, Leadenhall-street, where I had been with some friends - I had dined about five or six o'clock, with two friends; we had probably taken about two tumblers of punch each - I was perfectly capable of conducting myself along Holborn-bridge; five men followed me when I got nearly opposite Fleet-market - the prisoners are four of the five men, I am positively sure; I have no doubt of them whatever - on turning round Hatton-garden , to go to my lodging, one, or more of them, laid hold of my arm; they affected to be in liquor more than I was - two or three of them then crossed Hatton-garden, about half-way to Charles-street; when I had got to No. 7, 8, or 9, two or three of them crossed the street, and wished me a good night, leaving two, I presume, with me; one laid hold of my arm, I presume; two or three walked behind me, and crossed in Hatton-garden, leaving two remaining with me; I proceeded along, till I came to Charles-street - after the other two or three had crossed the street, the others walked alongside of me; one on each side, and one of them had hold of my arm - on coming to Charles-street, the three men re-crossed, and re-joined me, and they followed me down to No. 45, Kirby-street, where I lodge, and there I was surrounded and robbed; I had no occasion to cross over, to get to Kirby-street - I walked down Charles-street, and on coming opposite my lodging, No. 45, Kirby-street, when I turned round the corner of Kirby-street, I was surrounded by all five.

COURT. Q. Were you beaten, or thrown down? A. I do not wish to say any thing to injure them; I was knocked down by a blow on my chest, from a hand - perhaps I might receive more than one blow; I am not quite certain, I believe I was protected from a blow at my head, by my hat - I received a blow on the back of my head, and a blow on my breast; I came on the ground from the effect of the blow - I was kept down by my shoulders and arms, and my watch taken out of my pocket; I saw one of the party that stood over me take the watch out of my pocket, and hand it over to another of the party - I saw the watch plainly; they all left me - I was stunned with the fall, and cannot say which way they went; my watch was a very valuable gold chronometer, for which I paid forty guineas; the chain cost nine guineas - one seal cost three guineas and a half, and the other two guineas and a half; the key, one guinea and a half - I have never seen the watch since.

Q. Did they say any thing to you during the time they were with you? under what pretence did they join you? A. I was not particularly in liquor, but they supposed I was in liquor; I had only two tumblers of punch, and some ale.

Q. If you were not in liquor, how did you allow them to take your arm? A. One of them, I presume, pretended to be in liquor, and wanted my assistance; it is impossible for me to say why I allowed them to walk with me; I did not wish them to walk with me, but they wanted to assist me home - I do not recollect what they said; I never asked their assistance - I have no doubt but they asked me where I lived; I do not recollect it - I might have said I was going to No. 45, Kirby-street; I perfectly recollect telling them I was going to my lodging, No. 45, Kirby-street.

Q. What became of you when you got up? A. I went to the corner of Kirby-street, and told the patrol, or watchman, I do not recollect which; the watchman came up, having Langham in custody - he was the one who had hold of my arm.

Q. As soon as you saw him, did you know him to be the man who had hold of your arm? A. I was considerably stunned and alarmed at the time; I said at the watch-house he was one of the men.

Q. When you first saw him, did not the watchman ask if he were one of the men? A. Being knocked down in that way, and I was so trampled upon, your Lordship may suppose I was confused; I did not say he was one of them, till I got to the watch-house - I told the watchman I had been knocked down, and robbed of my watch.

Q. Did you say, "That man you have got hold of is one of the men?" A. I was not asked the question: I was called upon to give charge against the man at the watch-house, and I gave the charge - nothing passed till we went to the watch-house.

Q. Can you positively swear these are four of the five men who ill-treated you on that night? A. I am positive of it; it was a very clear, moon-light night, nearly as light as day - I am certain they are all the men.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What are you now? A. I am in no business; I am merely a man - a gentleman; if you had been in the House of Lords on the 25th of July, you would have heard a case of mine decided; I had never seen the prisoners before - I dined between five and six o'clock; we dined at the Union public-house, Bucklersbury, then went to the King's Arms, till, probably, seven o'clock - then, having business to do, we went to the Fleece public-house, Threadneedle-street, and remained in conversation till after eleven o'clock; people are in the habit of going there - they make a particular sort of punch; it is not very strong - it is a small quantity of genuine brandy, and acid; we went to talk on important business regarding me - we remained there till twelve o'clock or half-past; then one of my friends was going towards the Tower - we went to the King's Arms, and had a bit of cheese, and certainly not exceeding three pints or two quarts of ale; I think there were six tumblers between us three, at the Fleece - I will swear we did not drink twelve glasses; it might be about ten - it is impossible exactly to tell how much I drank; as far as my recollection serves me, we did not drink twelve, or ten, glasses of punch - when we left the Fleece, we were perfectly sober and collected; as far as I recollect, I paid about 3s. 6d. - I might pay 5s.; I cannot recollect what I paid there, or at the King's Arms; I do not think I paid any thing there - we had clubbed together

Q. Do you mean to represent you were not very much in liquor when you say this violence was used? A. I might be; of course I was rather in liquor, but I had my recollection - I am positive I told the watchman I was robbed of my watch, when he came up to me, at the corner of Charles-street; I do not recollect whether, when I got to the watch-house, the constable of the night asked me whether I had lost any property - I told him I had been robbed: I have no recollection of saying I had lost my watch three hours ago - I am certain I was

robbed when I was lying down; I am perfectly certain of that - I went to the watch-house about twelve o'clock next day, and asked for the man who had been locked up; I was not then aware that the other party had been taken; I might ask if any more were taken.

COURT. Q. How soon did you hear of any more being taken? A. In the course of the Sunday, but I did not know how many.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When you were told three were taken, did you not say, "What, are there four of you then?" A. I have no recollection of it; I think two were presented to me - I was not told till next day that four were taken; I have been to a public-house this morning, in the Old Bailey, and merely had one glass of peppermint - nothing else; perhaps I might have two glasses of peppermint - nothing else.

COURT. Q. Is your memory so imperfect, you cannot recollect what happened a few minutes ago? A. I merely drank two glasses; I have had nothing else since ten o'clock this morning, to my recollection - one of the patrols was with me, but he would not drink; I merely called for two glasses of peppermint - I paid 4d.; I offered to treat the patrol with a glass of porter, but he declined.

MARY ANN O'HARA . I live at No. 7, Hatton-garden. On Saturday night, the 18th of January, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was at my mother's door; she is housekeeper at the Sewers' office - my mother was up cleaning - she went over the way to get some beer; I and my brother stood at the door till she returned: while I staid at the door, I saw Mr. Munro, and five men coming up the street with him - there were five besides him; they came up from the corner of Holborn - Mr. Munro was a little in liquor, for he talked to the men rather too freely; he walked very steady - the prisoners Birmingham and Redgard had hold of his arms; they had hold of him, and Langham walked first - Kelly, and the one who is not caught, walked behind; when they passed our door, they stood at Mrs. Jones's, next door, No. 8, and then Birmingham put his hand into Mr. Munro's pocket, behind, and took out a handkerchief, which he returned again - it was a cotton handkerchief, I think, by what I saw; Birmingham, and the man who is not caught, then bid Mr. Munro good night, crossed the road, and went up Holborn, in a different way to what the rest went: Langham then took hold of Mr. Munro's arm, and went up Hatton-garden, towards Kirby-street - I know nothing more; I lost sight of them - my brother left me, and followed them.

Cross-examined. Q. What kind of a morning was it? A. Very fine; I am not usually up so late - I was not afraid, as my mother had only gone a little way.

Q. Was not a cap put on Birmingham's head at the office, before you swore to him? A. Yes, there was; it was put on after I went there - he wore the cap on the night of the robbery; I swore to him by the cap, and by his dark clothes: I did not identify him till the cap was put on; I said I knew the cap, because there was a little hair off the front of it - I saw Kelly put the cap on Birmingham's head; I had no opportunity of seeing his face, and should not have known him, except from the cap and dress.

Q. Mr. Munro appeared in liquor, because he was talking so freely to the men? A. Yes; they were at the next door - he was bidding them good night; he shook hands with one of them; I do not know which - it was the one who is not taken: I heard nothing else; he did not mention his name when he bid him good night - I did not know any of them till their hats were put on; it was not by their faces that I knew them: it was a beautiful moon-light night.

COURT. Q. You would not have been able to swear to them, but from their dress? A. No; Birmingham wore a cap, and Kelly a hat, on that night - Redgard had a leather apron, a fustian coat, and a hat; the other had a white flannel jacket, and a hat - I have no doubt of their being the men.

FRANCIS O'HARA . I am brother to the last witness. I was at my mother's door with her, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning of the 19th of January; I saw five men coming up Hatton-garden - Mr. Munro was with them; the man with one eye (Birmingham) had hold of his arm - I observed at that time he had only one eye; I could not tell what colour his dress was - he had a cap on; I am quite sure he is one of the men who had hold of Mr. Munro's arm: I observed Langham behind Mr. Munro; he had a white flannel jacket on, as he has now - I did not see his face; I knew him by his jacket: he had a hat on, and was walking behind Mr. Munro, when I first saw him - I saw Redgard, and one who is not here, (he had light trousers on) walking in front; and Kelly was walking in front: they kept in this position all the time, till Birmingham and the other, who is not caught, wished him good night, and both crossed over the street: Langham then laid hold of the gentleman's arm, and they went on till they came to Charles-street - then they went to Kirby-street; then Birmingham, and the one not taken, met them again, joined them, and then they all surrounded Mr. Munro, and all got round him; Langham then went over the road, to see what number he lived at, and before he got half-way over the road, the others knocked Mr. Munro down: I could not see which, for they were all round him; I did not see any blow given - I saw him lying on the ground, and before he was on the ground, I saw his arms pinned back; then he was knocked down, and some man swung a watch round to another man - then Langham crossed over the road, and seeing him lying in the road, he went up Kirby-street; I followed him, saw a watchman, and told him to take him - the others ran down Union-court.

Q. How soon after they swung the watch round, did they run away? A. About five minutes; they went down Union-court, which is not far from Kirby-street, before Langham came back - they all ran, and one of them fell down; Langham walked because he saw me - he crossed over to see the number, and was not there when the watch was taken; I told the watchman, and he took Langham; the others got out of sight - before the robbery took place, Birmingham asked me twice what I wanted; I said, Nothing - I was then following them, where they were crossing over.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Birmingham near the prosecutor, when he asked you what you wanted? A. Yes, and so was I; I did not state about his having only one

eye before the Magistrate - what I said was read over to me; nothing was read about his having one eye - I have talked to my sister about this, but not very often; I learnt the names of the prisoners at the office - they were pointed out, and their names told me, by a gentleman; he did not point out that Birmingham had only one eye: I did not mention about his having only one eye, at the office, nor till now, but I observed it that night, and knew him by that - the Magistrate did not ask how I knew him; I saw both Mr. Munro's arms pinioned - I was across the raod, and did not like to go up, as they asked me what I wanted, but I saw them behind him, with his arms pinioned; it was while he was standing up that I saw the watch swung, and when his hands were pinioned - the watch was swung round, just as he was knocked down, and then they ran; I cannot tell whether he was on his legs when I saw the watch swung - I am certain two of them bid him good night; they were then next door - I do not know whether my sister had gone in then; I did not see either of them do any thing then.

COURT. Q. He had hold of his arm when he bid him good night? A. No, Langham took his arm then; I was about six yards from them when they bid him good night - neither of them shook hands with him, that I saw; I am going on for thirteen years old - I was not sleepy; I generally go to bed about eleven o'clock, but my mother was up washing.

JOHN LOGAN . I am a watchman. I saw Francis O'Hara, as I was crying one o'clock; Langham passed me, walking, and O'Hars stood at the end of Kirby-street, when he heard me calling the time, he hallooed out to me, "Stop that man watchman!" I said,"What has he done?" he said, "He, and four more, knocked down a gentleman in Kirby-street;" Langham was near enough to hear it - I said, "Where is the rest of them?" he said, "They are gone down Union-court;" I turned back - followed Langham, and brought him back - he never offered to run, or any thing; I brought him back to Mr. Munro, and asked if he knew any thing of that man - he said, at first, that he did not; he was standing up, with his back to a post, when I got up - I said, "Come to the watch-house;" Langham was searched there, and nothing found on him - Mr. Munro, when we got to the watch-house, said he was one of the party, and we locked him up; Langham said he knew nothing about it.

Cross-examined. Q. He could hear the boy tell you he was one of the five who knocked a man down? A. Yes - I was not within ten yards of him; he kept walking on, till I laid hold of him, and did not attempt to run away - the constable of the night asked Mr. Munro if he had lost any property; he said he had lost a watch, value 40l., besides the seals and chain - I did not hear him say it was three hours ago; he might say so, without my hearing him - he was rather in liquor.

ROGERS. I am a watchman of Saffron-hill. On Saturday night, about half-past eleven o'clock, I saw Birmingham and Kelly at the bottom of Saffron-hill, they spoke to me; at that time Birmingham had a cap on and Kelly a bat; I saw them again about a quarter or half-past twelve nearly on the same spot, and then Redgard was with them; he was dressed as he is now - Birmingham spoke to me then - they went down Field-lane together; at that time Birmingham had the cap on and Kelly the hat - they went down Field-lane together, I saw no more of them till a quarter-past one o'clock, when I saw Birmingham and Kelly in West-street; at that time Birmingham had the cap on and Kelly the hat - they passed me, and in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, I received information that a robbery had been committed in Kirby-street, and the little boy described the prisoners to me - I said I knew them by the description, and in consequence of that description I apprehended Birmingham, Redgard, and Kelly, with the assistance of another watchman - Kelly had then got the cap on and Birmingham the hat.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Mr. Munro before? A. No.

JAMES RILEY . I am a patrol. I assisted in taking Birmingham, Redgard, and Kelly, from the description given by the boy - we took them in West-street; there was another man with them who got away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prosecutor? A. Not before; he went into a wine-vaults in the Old Bailey this morning, alone; I followed him in; he had a small glass of gin and peppermint, there was very little gin in it; I only saw him have one glass - I remained there till he went out; he only had one glass, he wanted another, but I persuaded him not; I said, "We must go over;" he said, "I am very faint, it won't hurt me;" I told him the trial was near coming on, and we must go over; I think he paid three halfpence - a friend who was with him had a glass which made it 4d., but what he drank did not come to 4d.

Prisoner BIRMINGHAM. I should like to ask whether the boy told the watchman I had but one eye, because the watchman came to me and told me he did not think he knew me - and he told the watch-house-keeper he did not think I was one of the men.

- ROGERS. I do not recollect the boy mentioning to me that one of them had one eye; I told the watch-house-keeper I had seen him twice that night at a quarter-past twelve o'clock, but the robbery was at a quarter-past one, and I could not tell what he had done in that time.

Prisoner BIRMINGHAM. Q. When you heard of the robbery you never offered to take me into custody when the other two prisoners passed you? Witness. They all three came down the street together, and another who is not taken - they all came out of Black Boy-alley, West-street; that is some distance from Union-court.

REDGARD's Defence. On the 18th of January, having taken home some goods to Monument-yard, I went back to my father's, and stopped till about ten o'clock, and went to bed - my wife was taken very ill: I was obliged to get up - I got up about half-past eleven, and put on my clothes, without tying my shoes or stockings; I saw Birmingham and Kelly walking down West-street - I came out of Black Boy - alley, where I live, to go and get a quartern of brandy for my wife, and I was taken; I asked what for; and was told a gentleman had been robbed in Hattongarden; I was in bed at the time of the robbery.

LANGHAM's Defence. When the watchman took me I could have got away if I wanted - I know no more about it than the child unborn; the gentleman said I was not

the man, and when he got to the watch-house, he said he had lost his watch two or three hours ago.

KELLY's Defence. At the first or second examination we had, the boy said he did not know me; when the girl came at the third examination she swore to me.

FRANCIS O'HARA . I said I would not be sure of him at the first examination, but when I saw him with his hat on, I knew it was him; they had changed their caps - that was a week after; I was then satisfied he was the man - I described him before he was taken, as having a black coat and hat; the man who had but one eye had a cap.

Prisoner BIRMINGHAM. Q. Did you tell the watchman at that time I had but one eye? A. No.

Prisoner KELLY. On the morning when the girl came to Hatton-garden, she swore she saw me take a cotton handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, and it was a beautiful moonlight night; she was asked what the colour of the handkerchief was - she did not know; and when the cap on my head was put on Birmingham's head, she said it was him.

MARY ANN O'HARA . I did not say any thing about the colour - it was a cross barred handkerchief; I knew it was a light colour - there was white in it; I said so at the time.

Prisoner REDGARD. When we went to the Magistrate, the boy said he did not recollect us - and at the next examination they brought the girl up.

Two witnesses deposed to Kelly's good character, four to that of Birmingham, and one for Redgard.

BIRMINGHAM - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

REDGARD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

KELLY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

LANGHAM - NOT GUILTY .

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18290219-122

648. THOMAS HODGETTS , THE YOUNGER, was indicted for embezzling the sum of 156l. 13s., received on account of Frederick Freshfield , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-123

649. FANNY GOUGH and SUSANNAH GOUGH were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 1 bottle, value 4d.; 1 1/2 pint of ale, value 4d.; 8 ozs. of pork chops, value 4 1/2d.; 1 peck of coals, value 4d., and 3lbs. of potatoes, value 2d. , the goods of Thomas Strutt , the master of the said Fanny Gough .

THOMAS STRUTT . I live at No. 2, Queen-street, Cheapside , and am clerk to a tailor and draper . The prisoner Fanny had lived about seven months in my service - the other prisoner visited her sometimes: on the 1st of February I went to a place of worship as usual, with my wife, about half-past ten o'clock - returned about half-past one, and when dinner was brought up, we thought the meat very much shrunk; while we were at dinner, Aldred, the officer, came with Susan Gough in custody; I gave Fanny Gough in charge - he produced the articles stated in the indictment; I knew the bottle of ale by a quantity of spots of white lime on it in a particular manner - it was done when I was in the wine trade, when the vaults were washed with lime; I can swear to the chops, because the kidney was divided, and I had the rest of it for my dinner - one was raw, and the other roasted; I could not identify the coals - the potatoes were raw; I have some of the same sort at home - I could not say that I missed any.

BENJAMIN ALDRED . I am an officer of the City. On Sunday, the 1st of February, about a quarter-past one o'clock, I saw the prisoner Susan coming down Fish-street-hill, with a bundle; I asked what she had got - she said"What is it to you?" she said she was going to her mother's - that she was no thief; she had brought them from up the hill - I said "What, from Fish-street-hill?" she said "No, from Stamford-hill:" I found she had got these coals and potatoes, a bottle nearly full of ale, and two porkchops undressed - they were pinned up in a knife-cloth; I took her to the watch-house - she then said her sister had given them to her, and she lived in Queen-street; I went to Mr. Strutt's - he gave the sister in charge; I took them both to the Compter.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. This was at a quarter-past one o'clock, when most people were coming out of church? A. Yes.

THOMAS STRUTT . I cannot swear to the potatoes or coals - I can swear to the pork, because there was part of the kidney there; I saw it in the morning before it was cooked - I had bought the whole loin; I could swear to the ale then, and am certain of the bottle.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-124

650. JOHN WILSON, alias BLANCHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 20 yards of printed cotton. value 18s. , the goods of Thomas Hilson Giles .

THOMAS HILSON GILES . I live on Snow-hill, and am an innholder . I was driving a chaise in Redcross-street , on the 30th of January, between six and seven o'clock in the afternoon; a parcel containing two gown pieces laid back at the head of the chaise - I did not see it taken; the moment I missed it, I stopped my horse, looked back, and saw a person run from behind the chaise with a parcel under his arm - he ran up a court opposite; I cried out Stop thief! an officer who happened to be on the spot, ran and brought the prisoner back in less than five minutes; I cannot swear he is the man who I saw running away; the parcel was brought up immediately by another person.

ANTHONY REPTON . I am a patrol of Cripplegate. I saw the prosecutor driving his chaise in Redcross-street, opposite Paul's-alley; I saw the prisoner run from the back of the chaise, in the road, and up Paul's-alley - I saw Mr. Giles rise up, and call out Stop thief! Stop him! I then went after him, and got sight of him in the alley - he was running; I then observed a parcel in his right hand, which I had not observed before, as I was on his left side: I stopped him three or four hundred yards off - he had not got the parcel then; I had not seen him part with it - the moment I collared him, he collared me; I said "I will never loose you;" he said "What do you want me for?" I said "You know perfectly well:" he would not go back- another man came, and with his assistance, I got him to the watch-house, and the parcel was produced after I got there; it was claimed by Mrs. Giles, who was in the chaise.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not he coming towards you when you took him? A. No; I was not above three yards from him when he first started: I never lost sight of him at all - he ran about three hundred and fifty yards; I met nobody while I was running - Paul's

alley is no thoroughfare; I did not search him, as he said he had got nothing: there are four gas-lights in the court: I was about two yards and a half from him when I saw the parcel under his arm - he was never further from me than that.

WILLIAM HAYWARD . I am a painter, and live in Bunhill-row. I was coming out of Jackson's-court, which leads into Paul's-alley, and something was thrown before me - some papers flew about, and I thought it might be jewellery - I immediately got a light from a neighbour, looked about, picked up this bundle, and took it to the watch-house; I had heard the cry of Stop thief! about a minute before - the parcel contained two gown pieces; I saw Mr. Giles in his chaise, but did not see the prisoner till he was at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you pick it up? A. In Jackson's-buildings - I suppose I was twenty yards from the cry; the bundle was thrown against my legs, as the person ran by the buildings which lead into Paul's-alley, and almost immediately a person went by after him - he was about twenty yards behind him; it is a dark alley - a person might lose sight of him; I do not think I could distinguish a person twenty yards off, not to swear to him - the alley is one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards long, and Jackson's-buildings about eighty yards up - there are a great many turnings in the direction he went, which I should think would intercept a person's view; there are gas-lights there, but he must be lost sight of in going down the alley; I heard of the prisoner's being taken in about five minutes; I took the parcel to the watch-house.

JURY. Q. Did you see any body in the court except the man running, and the man in pursuit? A. Several were running in pursuit.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to see a friend in Bethnal-green; on going through Hare-court, leading to this alley, as I turned round by the chapel, a man ran by me, and immediately after the officer ran against me, and knocked me down - I told him a man had run by me, but he took no notice of it; the constable swore at Guildhall that he saw me throw the parcel away into the court on the right-hand side of Paul's-alley.

WILLIAM HAYWARD re-examined. I cannot tell how far the constable was from him; I saw one person run by, and it was some time before I saw the other, I should think twenty yards behind him - I should think a person twenty yards off must lose sight of the man from the darkness of the alley; a parcel could not be seen under his arm at that distance - I cannot swear the same parcel was picked up as was thrown into the court.

COURT to ANTHONY REPTON . Q. Did you lose sight of the person you pursued till you stopped it? A. Never; there are four different courts leading out of the alley, but not turnings.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-125

651. WILLIAM SWEENEY and MARY (HIS WIFE ) were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Bucknell .

ROBERT BUCKNELL . I live in Rutland-street, Bedford-square, and am shopman to a cork-cutter. These shoes were in Mr. Stockwell's, a chandler's shop, in Field-lane ; I was talking with Stockwell, and the shoes were on the counter between nine and ten o'clock at night; the prisoners came into the shop together, and staid about five minutes - they bought a pig's cheek; the woman left the shop, and when the man got to the door, I missed my shoes - Stockwell gave the man in charge; I went with the watchman, and found the shoes at No. 4, Peter-street, Saffron-hill - the man declared he knew nothing about it, and when the woman was taken she denied it; there was a young man in the shop with the prisoners, and he was given in charge, but discharged.

JAMES STOCKWELL . I keep a chandler's shop. Bucknell came in, and put these shoes on the counter: I did not see them taken - when he missed them I charged the man with taking them; the woman had gone - nobody but the prisoners or the young man could have taken them.

JOHN PROUSE . I am a watchman. I took charge of the prisoners on suspicion of stealing the shoes - when I came to take the woman in Turnmill-street, she denied the charge; I went to a shop in Peter-street, and found the shoes - the female prisoner took me there; I had told her if she did not give up the shoes her husband would be taken to the Old Bailey; she ran away - I followed her to Peter-street, Saffron-hill; she fetched the shoes out, and gave them to me - I took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM SWEENEY's Defence. I bought a pair of second-hand shoes in St. John-street - we went and had a glass of gin: I met Ann Sullivan , who was going home, and told her to take the shoes home for me - I stopped at this man's door to buy a pig's cheek; I paid for it, and was going out when he charged me with stealing the shoes.

MARY SWEENEY 's Defence. He bought a pair of shoes, and I thought these were them, and took them by mistake, as I found them on the counter; I put them into a shop in Peter-street till I went home, as I had a child and some potatoes to carry.

MARY SWEENEY - GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Week .

WILLIAM SWEENEY - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-126

Second London Jury.

652. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of January , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Henry Simpson , from his person .

HENRY SIMPSON . I live in Charlotte-row, Mansion-house, and am clerk to a merchant . On the 29th of January, between three and four o'clock, I was in Ludgate-street , returning home, and had my handkerchief safe in my pocket shortly before I was informed it was gone; Leary produced it to me - he had hold of the prisoner at the time, and said he had taken it.

JOHN LEARY . I am a servant out of place. I saw Mr. Simpson in Ludgate-street, and saw the prisoner's hand in his pocket: as I laid hold of him he had got the handkerchief out, and was concealing it; when I took him he dropped it: I took him on to Mr. Simpson, who claimed it.

Prisoner. Q. You was on the other side of the way? A. Yes; just by the church; I went right across to him - there was another lad with him.

Prisoner. The other lad threw it down by my side, and ran away. Witness. The prisoner threw it down; the other lad ran away when I crossed; the prisoner is the one who took it and dropped it.

THOMAS DAVIS. I am a constable, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290219-127

653. CAROLINE PURCELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 5 gowns, value 1l. 10s,; 3 shifts, value 15s.; 15 towels, value 15s.; 9 handkerchiefs, value 15s.; 8 1/2 yards of calico, value 6s.; 9 aprons, value 11s.; 2 yards of jean, value 4s. 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s.; 5 pairs of stockings, value 10s.; 1 quilt, value 5s.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 1 silk bag, value 6d.; 1 comb, value 8s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 7s.; 3 boxes, value 2s. 6d.; 2 brooches, value 2s. 6d.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 12s.; 1 watch-chain, value 5s.; 3 rings, value 12s.; 1 silver pencil-case, value 1s. 6d.; 4 seals, value 2s.; 1 shirt pin, value 10s.; 1 pair of clasps, value 2s.; 1 buckle, value 3s.; 2 table-cloths, value 2s. 6d.; 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 scent-bottle, value 1s.; 2 petticoats, value 4s.; 5 shillings, and 4 sixpences, the goods of Mary King , in her dwelling-house .

MARY KING . I live in Great Bell-alley, but at the time in question I lived in Carr-square, St. Giles, Cripplegate , and kept the house - the prisoner's brother and sister lodged on the second floor; they told me she was out of a situation - they had been a month in the house, and she had been all that time with them. I went out on Saturday, the 18th of December, about one o'clock, and left nobody in the house but the prisoner, her brother, and sister; I had two young men lodgers, but they were not in the house - I came home about four o'clock; I had left this property locked up in a drawer on the first floor, where the two young men sleep; I live on the ground floor - the key was in the bottom drawer, which was empty; all the property stated in the indictment was in the drawers - I had seen them safe about nine days before; the young men lodgers were not away all that time - when I came home the prisoner came down stairs and said, "How soon you have come back - my sister is up stairs very ill in bed;" I had left her to mind my child on the ground floor room - I desired her to wait, and have a cup of tea with me, for taking care of my child; she said she would go and get her sister's fire ready - she came down, drank tea, and asked me to lend her a shawl to go out and look for a situation; she went up stairs, came down, and said Mr. Long had sent for me while I was out - this was between five and six o'clock; I work for Mr. Long, and went out to him - she went out at the door at the same time, and said she was going to look for a day's work; I went to Mr. Long, who lives in Cloth-fair, about a quarter of an hour's walk - on returning, the prisoner was not in the house; I did not see her again till she was taken up, which was about a week after - I had no occasion to go up stairs till ten o'clock at night; one young man returned then, and asked me for the key - I said the door was not locked, for I had left the key in the door, but I found then that the door was locked, and the key taken away; I found a box in the room broken open, which I had left safe before I went out - nothing was taken out of it; I searched the prisoner at Lambeth-street Office - a gown of mine was found on her, and a pair of shoes; I had seen them safe when I went to the drawers nine days before - a handkerchief of mine was found, but nothing else; the vlaue of the whole is 9l. 15s.; when I found the things on her she begged me not to take them away, or I should leave her without any thing on: Charlotte Rawson is my sister - they are her property, but were in my house and in my care.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 27th of January I apprehended the prisoner at a house in a court in Whitechapel; when I went up stairs she crept under the bedstead - I pulled her out, and told her the charge; she made no reply: I asked her where the property was - she said I should have no blood-money out of her; I found this handkerchief under the bed, and found a pair of shoes on her; Mrs. King claimed this gown and petticoat, which she had on at the office.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought these shoes myself out of a shop - I bought the things; I could have stripped them off at the first examination, but I wore them, as I had bought them - I kept away, because I had a few words with my brother; I went out, got intoxicated, and staid away - I was ashamed to take the shawl back; I got under the bed when they came for me, as my, as my brother was with them, and he is a very severe man.

CHARLOTTE RAWSON . I am certain these are my shoes - the other property is mine.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-128

NEW COURT, Third Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

654. ELIZABETH BUCKLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Adolphus , Esq ., and 1 tablecloth, value 2s., the goods of John Leycester Adolphus , Esq .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-129

655. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown, from his person .

JAMES TERRY . I am an officer of St. Sepulchre's. On the 2d of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in St. John-street, Clerkenwell - I saw the prisoner and two more following a gentleman; I watched them for about five minutes - I crossed the way, then crossed again, and saw them at the corner of sutton-street - I saw the prisoner take a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket - the other two were covering him; he ran up Sutton-street, and I followed him - the gentleman went straight on in St. John-street; I never found him: the prisoner was stopped by another officer, and I knew him again; he dropped the handkerchief about two minutes before he was stopped - this is it.

SAMUEL MOUNTSTEPHENS . I was in Sutton-street - heard Stop thief! called, ran to Goswell-street, and

stopped the prisoner - Terry came up, and told me what he had done; the prisoner stated that he was in great distress - that his family were starving.

Prisoner's Defence. I must confess I am guilty, but distress drove me to it; I tried every way to get employment.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-130

656. JOHN EDMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , part of an iron stove, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of George Smith .

GEORGE POND . I am a private street-keeper of Holborn. On the 3d of February I was walking at the end of Drury-lane, in Broad-street; I met the prisoner with this part of a stove on his back, and knowing that it belonged to where the fire had been at the Six Canns, I stopped him; I had seen it lying in the ruins for three weeks- he had got about two hundred yards from the place with it; I said he must go back - he said he was going to take it further; as I was taking him back, he said some man employed him to take it to Monmouth-street, and was to give him 6d.

Prisoner. I said if you would accompany me to Monmouth-street, I would show you the person. Witness. No, you only said then you were going further; it was not till afterwards that you said you were going to take it there.

GEORGE SMITH . I was the occupier of the Six Canns; this stove belonged to me - my premises were burned down, and this lay in the ruins.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a stranger had employed him to carry the stove to the corner of Monmouth-street.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-131

657. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 opera-glass, value 9s.; 1 perspective-glass, value 1s. 6d., and 1 instrument-case, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Baylis .

JAMES FORDHAM . I am an officer. On the 14th of January, I stopped the prisoner, and found on him this case and two glasses - he said they belonged to his father, who was in that line, and he had got them from the finisher - I went to his father, who said he knew nothing about them.

WILLIAM BAYLIS . I am a mathematical-instrument and rule maker, and keep a stationer's shop at Islington . I did not miss these articles till the officer brought them on the 15th of January; I had seen them safe about a week before; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long before had you seen them? A. About a week; I have a lad who occasionally serves: I had no more of this colour in my shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-132

658. DAVID CONNOR and MAURICE HERRING were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a certain man whose name is unknown, from his person .

ROBERT DURANT . I am a mariner. On the 2d of February, I was in Holborn about a quarter-past four o'clock; I saw Connor first, and in about a minute I saw Herring close by him: Connor walked after a gentleman, and took a handkerchief from his pocket - Herring was close behind him; Connor put the handkerchief into his pocket - I collared him, and charged him with stealing it; I called the gentleman, but could not make him hear; Connor struggled to get away - Herring came up, and tried to pull me away; Connor said to him "Knock him down;" and used very bad language - I struggled with him for eight or ten minutes; Connor struck me, but the officer came, and took charge of him: Herring walked across the road, and went away, but I gave a description of him; the officer and a gentleman went and took him; he was brought before Mr. Halls, and I knew he was the man.

Prisoner CONNOR. Q. Where did I have the handkerchief? A. You took it out of the gentleman's pocket, and put it into your own.

ROBERT CRAIG . I am an officer. I was passing about four o'clock, and saw Durant struggling with Connor- his hand was behind him, and this handkerchief in it; Herring had got away, but Durant described him; I knew him, and took him the same evening; this is the handkerchief.

CONNOR's Defence. I had a bad hand, and my handkerchief was wrapped round it; I did not try to get away - I knew my innocence; on going to Bow-street, I took my hand out of the handcuff, and said "I am innocent;" Herring was not with me - he was merely passing by as a stranger.

HERRING's Defence. I am quite innocent.

CONNOR - GUILTY . Aged 23.

HERRING - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-133

659. JAMES BOTRIGHT and DAVID SHERMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 7 chisels, value 3s.; 1 saw, value 6d.; 1 pair of compasses, value 3d., and 1 mallet, value 9d., the goods of George Grundy ; and 1 rasp, value 8d.; 1 chisel, value 6d., and 1 gouge, value 4d., the goods of Robert Thompson .

ROBERT SOUTHERN . I was watchman at Mr. Irving's Scotch church . At half-past twelve o'clock on the 14th of February, when the men were gone to dinner, I saw Botright come from the back of the premises, and give a saw to Sherman - I went after them till I went for an officer; he was not at home, but his son went with me: we took them, and sent for another officer; Botright had a leaden mallet, some plumb-bobs, and nine chisels - Sherman had the saw and some other tools; Botright said at the office "If I had thought of it, I would have given you a smack on the head with this - you should not have taken me."

ROBERT THOMPSON . I am a mason . These chisels and this rasp are mine; I had left them in the workshop while I went to dinner.

GEORGE GRUNDY . I am a stonemason. This saw, the chisels, compasses, and leaden mallet, are mine.

SHERMAN's Defence. I met this young man, who gave me the saw to carry for him.

BOTRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SHERMAN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-134

660. DAVID MICHIE was indicted for embezzlement .

HENRY SMITHER . I am in partnership with my son, Henry Smither - we are carmen at the London-docks . The prisoner used to collect money for me, for which he was to account to me every night - he used to keep all my books; I gave him weekly wages, but never allowed him to pay himself - I was obliged to discharged him: Mr. Warriner owed me some money.

WILLIAM WARRINER . I keep the George and Vulture Tavern. I owed 5s. 6d. to Mr. Smither - I paid it to a man on the 16th of December - he gave me a receipt, but I cannot say whether it was the prisoner.

HENRY SMITHER . This is the prisoner's writing - I never received this 5s. 6d. - he never accounted for it in any way; I had discharged him about the 19th of December, and paid him what was due; we settled our accounts; he gave no account of this 5s. 6d. - I discovered it on the 23d of January.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has not he sometimes detected errors in the accounts, and told you of them? A. Yes he has; I have no recollection of his paying over to me different sums, amounting to 13l. 14s., which were not entered - I had not taken money from him in the street without an acknowledgement, to the best of my knowledge; I should think it could not have happened without my recollecting it; my son receives money of him; I am confident my son did not receive this money of him, because I asked him; he always receives money of him, he is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-135

661. THOMAS WEEDON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 2 pewter pots, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Steners .

RICHARD POWELL . I saw the prisoner, with these pots in his hand, on the 13th of February, in Burton-street; Mr. Steners and his servant told me they had lost two pots of beer - I told them what I had seen; I knew him before he had lived with Mr. Steners.

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I was going down the mews that evening, Mr. Steners told me he had lost two pots of beer, and suspected his former servant - I went to James-street, Oxford-street, and found the prisoner sitting on a table - I asked if he had any of Mr. Steners' property; he said he had not; but I found these two pots under the bed three-parts full of beer.

CHARLES STENERS . I am a publican , and live in Bruton-mews . These pots are mine - the prisoner had left me about a fortnight; I cannot say when the pots of beer had been taken; the boy was out with the tray of beer about nine o'clock, and they were taken from the tray - the boy is not here; I do not know that he had not sold them to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18290219-136

662. SARAH LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 2 coats, value 5s.; 2 waistcoats, value 4s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 6s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 2s.; 2 caps, value 6d., and 2 bags, value 6d. , the goods of Sarah Lewis , widow .

SARAH LEWIS . I am a widow, and live in Laystall-street, Clerkenwell . This property was in my bed-room; I saw the prisoner going out of the door - my little boy came and told me a woman had got the two bags - I followed and took them from her - she had just turned the corner - they contained these articles; she said two boys had given her a penny a piece to get them, and shewed me two penny-pieces in her hand; I had seen the articles safe five minutes before, in the adjoining room.

CHARLES LEWIS . This bag and articles are mine - I saw the prisoner coming out of the bed-room with the bags, and told my mother.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; she said it served her right for being such a flat.

Prisoner's Defence. It was entirely distress - I had not been in bed for a whole week.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290219-137

663. JOHN JOHNSON and JOSEPH JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 habit-shirt, value 6d.; 2 stockings, value 6d.; 2 pieces of dimity, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 napkin, value 1s.; 2 gloves, value 6d.; 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 pelisse, value 6s.; 2 gowns, value 6s.; 1 cloak, value 6s.; 2 aprons, value 4s.; I cap, value 1s.; 1 pair of pockets, value 6d., and 1 pocket-book, value 1s. , the goods of John Gransden .

JOHN GRANSDEN . I am an officer in the Navy , and live at Deptford. On the 9th of February we were going from London in a light cart, and had a trunk with us, containing all the things here enumerated; I put the trunk into the cart; I did not miss it till I got to my own house, which was in about an hour; we set off about five o'clock in the evening.

JANE ANN GRANSDEN . I am the prosecutor's wife - I packed up the trunk - some of the articles are here, and I can swear to them; they are my husband's, and had belonged to my late mother - I was in the cart, but did not miss the trunk out of it.

JOSEPH PALMER . I live with my father at Walworth. On Monday week last I was at my father's till about one o'clock in the day - I afterwards went to the Bricklayers' Arms - I saw the two prisoners there, whom I knew, and I joined them; we saw a cart, which belonged to John Chapple , of Deptford, going down the Bermondsey New-road ; I knew Charles Sims , the driver, and spoke to him: the prisoners were with me; Jones said it was a good speck if I would like to go; Johnson was present; we followed the cart, and Johnson cut the cord which had tired this box on the tail-board - I lifted the box off just beyond the St. Helena turnpike , and set it down in the road - Jones was just behind me, and Johnson just behind him I believe; I am sure he was present; Jones picked the box up, and

set it down in a ditch to conceal it; in a short time I came up and got it out - Johnson was not present then - but after Jones and I had carried it a short distance we saw him, and gave him the box; he carried it about half the distance from there to the Docks, and then Jones and I carried it; we took it down into some mud at the back of the canal-bridge and took out these articles, which we put about the waistbands of our breeches, and in different parts; Jones said we were to take them to Lewis', in Rosemary-lane - we all went there; Jones went into Lewis' house -Lewis' boy then came and called me in; I took the things off my person and left them there; Lewis was present - it was in a back room adjoining the shop; I then went out and sent Johnson in; they were there a long time; Lewis' boy came and beckoned me in again, and Johnson came out- Lewis said they were worth nothing to him, they did not suit him, he had no call in the country for such things as these - they were almost all female appared; we packed the things about our persons again; either Lewis or his boy called Johnson in again, and he packed some things about his person and some in a bag; Lewis then went to the door, and said the officers were looking about - they were larafied, or some such word; he said the officers were gone, and we had better make the best of our way up Lion-street; Johnson went out first, I went next, and Jones a little time after; Lewis said we had better go out together; Jones said to Lewis, "Are the things not worth any thing?" and said they came a long way from there.

Prisoner JONES. He came to us, and said he knew the boy belonging to the cart; and he knew he could steal the things from the cart if I would go with him. Witness. No such thing.

THOMAS FOGG . I am an officer. On Monday week I saw the prisoners coming out of Lewis' shop in Rosemary-lane; I stopped Jones and Johnson, Till stopped Palmer; I found in a bag on Johnson some of these things - my brother searched Jones; I was going by, and Lewis said he had three chaps in there with something that was not right.

JAMES FOGG . I was in the lane at the time; I searched Jones, and found some of these articles on him, inside his waistcoat and trousers, and some in his cap; I afterwards found a pair of gloves in Palmer's pocket; they said they had found the things in a field just beyond Whitechapel turnpike; Palmer said he knew where, but it was best known to himself; Lewis told us he thought they came from over the water.

JAMES TILL . I searched Palmer, and found a silk cloak, two aprons, and some other articles marked R. B.; this was about eight o'clock in the evening.

JANE ANN GRANSDEN . These things are my husband's; the letters R. B. are my mother's initials.

Johnson put in a written defence, stating that Palmer had induced him to commit the robbery, and threatened to injure him if he did not cut the string of the box.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 13.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-138

664. FRANCIS WHEDDON was indicted for embezzlement .

FREDERICK PURSSORD . I live at Newington, and am a cheesemonger : the prisoner had been in my service about two years - he used to deliver goods and receive money about the country; it was his duty to account for it when he came home.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had he been with you? A. A year and a half, or two years; my receipts did not increase from the time he came into my employ - I did receive a pig from the prisoner's family, but it was not in part of payment or composition of this felony; and I received 1l., but that was on a former account - he was indebted to me 230l. previous to this, and I had forgiven him three times; that was in part of payment of some money he had embezzled previous to this - I cannot recollect the day, but it was in February, and before I had him taken up; I did not send a witness to tell him to abscond - I did not send Tomlin to him; I sent to inform him an officer had instructions to take him, and I told him to get out of the way till the morning, as the officer was not to call on me till the morning; I received the money a day or two before I had him taken -I think it was yesterday week that he was taken; it was from a feeling towards his wife that I sent him word - I know he slept at his own house that night, and was taken up going from that house, about half-past six o'clock in the morning; I sold the pig that was sent me for 28s. - the trough I have still by me; I should be glad to sell that for 4s. - I never said it was worth 12s.; I did receive 1l. besides - I did not tell the prisoner's brother, or his sister, that I would receive 3s. a week from him, nor that I did not wish to injure him, and if he gave me 2s. or 3s. I should be satisfied; his brother had agreed to give me 2l. two or three days previous to my taking him - it might be a week before; I got 1l. from him - I did not blame him for not bringing the other pound, nor appoint to meet the prisoner myself, or send for him; I did not say if he gave me 3s. a week, I would give him a character to another place - I would not do such a thing; I have forgiven him three times before to a considerable amount -I did afterwards take the pound; I sent him word to keep out of the way, as I did not wish to have him taken till the morning.

COURT. Q. When was the first examination? A. I think on Friday week; I repeat the reason I first assigned for sending to him, that I did not wish to lock him up a night longer than was necessary.

ANN HARWOOD . I keep a chandler's shop. I owed, I believe, 40l. to the prosecutor; I paid the prisoner 2l. 8s. on the 2d of February - there were two sovereigns, and the rest in silver; he put 3l. on my bill - I was to pay the 12s. on the Thursday, but he did not come.

FREDERICK PURSSORD . He paid me the 2l., but not the 8s.; he never paid me any money on Gibson's account.

JANE GIBSON . I am a customer to the prosecutor; my mother owed him 18s. 9 1/2d. which I paid him on the 26th of February, and he gave me a receipt in the book.

SARAH SMITH . I paid the prisoner 6l. 3s. 10d.; I paid 4l. in January, but I cannot tell the date - I paid 2l. 3s 10d. in the week following.

FREDERICK PURSSORD . I received 4l. 9s. 6d. all at once, on the 11th of January; that balanced a tub of butter which Smith had had - she had had some cheese, which was not then paid for.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-139

665. WILLIAM LEET was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 cap, value 5s., the goods of James Rexworthy , from the person of John Rexworthy .

JOHN REXWORTHY . I am the son of James Rexworthy . The prisoner took the cap off my head, in Queen-street, Drury-lane , between five and six o'clock at night, on the 10th of February; he threw it to another boy , who ran away with it; I stopped him.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am an officer. I was close by and took the prisoner; I did not see the transaction - I have known the prisoner these five years, and never knew any thing against him.

Prisoner's Defence. I took it off his head, and threw it at his feet.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-140

666. JOHN GILPIN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 coat, value1l. , the goods of William Wood .

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a post-boy . I lost my coat last Wednesday, about two o'clock in the afternoon, from the dickey of a chaise which I was driving post, just on this side Hammersmith-gate ; a gentleman inside told me it was gone - I got down; a post-boy came galloping after me - he said my coat was safe, and the prisoner was taken.

ABRAHAM GILES . I am a private watchman of Hammersmith. I saw Wood riding post; the prisoner was told to get off the step of the carriage at the turnpike-gate - he retook his place again, and rode about a hundred or a hundred and twenty yards, then put his hand to the dickey, and took the coat; the other post-boy saw him do it - I got behind the other chaise, pursued, and took him with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather tired, and got behind this carriage; I saw this coat on the place - it was on the point of falling off, and I took hold of it, thinking a person had got up, and left that behind them, as I did a bundle myself once.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-141

667. WILLIAM GRIZLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 2 live tame ducks, price 4s. , the property of William Mean .

WILLIAM MEAN . I live in Hackney-road. I lost two ducks on the 16th of January - I had eight; I saw them all safe about ten o'clock; about twenty minutes after a little boy came, and told me they were gone out of the gate into the street; I went and brought six of them back- two of them had been taken.

JOHN DAVIS . I saw the prisoner take up the two ducks from Hans-place, Hackney-road ; I went and told Mr. Mean: I am sure the prisoner is the man.

GEORGE DAVIS . I am an officer, and the father of the last witness. I have two ducks which I got from William Cole - my son told me what he had seen, and I pursued the man, but he got out of my sight; I saw him put something out of his apron into a bag.

WILLIAM COLE . I stopped the prisoner, and gave these ducks and the bag to Mr. Davis; I first saw the prisoner in Hans-place, and Mr. Davis running after him- I pursued, and lost sight of him, but overtook him with these ducks in a bag under his arm.

SARAH ESSEX . The prisoner came to my father's house, and waited some time; Cole then let him go - this was on the Friday; my father is an officer, but he was not at home; on the Monday the prisoner was taken up again.

JAMES ESSEX . I took the prisoner into custody on the Monday; the lad told me he was the man - he said he was very much distressed.

JOHN DAVIS . These are the ducks; I only saw him pick up the drake; he had the apron about him at the time, but had nothing in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along the street with my wife and child, and as I was going to a pawnbroker's, a lad took me, but I am quite innocent; Cole has been a prisoner, and has been transported.

WILLIAM COLE re-examined. I let him go, because there was no officer there; I took him to Mr. Essex's, but he was not at home.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 7 Days .

Reference Number: t18290219-142

668. HENRY DUST was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 2 pieces of handkerchiefs, containing 10 handkerchiefs, value 2l. 10s., and 1 piece of ribbon, containing 36 yards, value 3s. , the goods of Job Townsend and others.

BENJAMIN COX . I am shopman to Mr. Job Townsend and others. On the 10th of February the prisoner came in with another young man, and asked to look at some gloves and handkerchiefs; I left the box of handkerchiefs before them, and went to get the gloves: the prisoner put one piece of handkerchiefs into his pocket - he bought one handkerchief and one pair of gloves; he paid me 5s., and I gave him 3d. change; I then desired him to walk into the back warehouse, and take the piece of handkerchiefs out of his pocket: he denied having it, and I took them out myself; he begged we would let him go and speak to Mr. Townsend - his companion exclaimed that it was a d-d bad job, and went off directly.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. In what position were you when you saw him take them? A. Only getting the gloves - my face was towards him; he did not say he had taken them by mistake.

WILLIAM FORD . I am Mr. Townsend's warehouseman. The prisoner denied having the handkerchiefs, but they were taken from him there; he requested we would not send for an officer, but said he would pay for the handkerchiefs - when the officer came, he took the candle, and found behind where the prisoner was sitting three handkerchiefs and a piece of ribbon, containing thirty-six yards; the prisoner said nothing about that.

Cross-examined. Q. This was in the warehouse? A. Yes; such articles are not kept there.

JAMES DUPENNY . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290219-143

669. THOMAS WILLIAM BREWER was indicted for unlawfully, knowingly, and feloniously sending a cer

tain letter to John Finch , demanding, with menaces, his monies, without any lawful cause .

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FINCH . I live at No. 31, Dean-street, Soho , and am an attorney at law . In 1822 or 1823 the prisoner came into my employ, to attend in the office and go on messages - he left me in October, 1826, I think; he can write but very indifferently - I do not know his hand-writing; in consequence of some communication I received, I gave information at Bow-street, and under the direction of Ruthven, the officer, I wrote this letter, (No. 1); I had previously received this other letter on the 6th, (No. 2); I took my letter myself to King-street, Long-acre, and gave a boy 2d. to take it into No. 31 - I saw him taken it in there; in consequence of receiving one letter, and writing another, I went to the corner of James-street at six o'clock in the evening of the 7th of January; I saw the prisoner there- I went up to him, and said, "Brewer, I have brought you the 10s. you wrote for;" he said, "I will not take it in the presence of a third person:" a young man named Handeside went with me from my office; the prisoner said,"Come round the corner," and I followed him round into Long-acre; I then said to him, "Brewer, how could you send me that letter;" he said, "I am in great distress, but I do not wish to injure you;" I said, "Here are the 10s." - they were in four half-crowns, and he took them from me; in consequence of an arrangement, I then gave a signal to Ruthven, who was immediately on the other side of the way by moving my hat; Ruthven came up, and took the prisoner - he did not take any thing from him in my presence.

The prosecutor was cross-examined by the prisoner at considerable length, a minute statement of the particulars would be indelicate; he denied having gone with him to Hyde-park and other places, for any purpose; when witness was seriously ill, the prisoner had made tea for him, and he believed had eaten at his table; his wages were 1l. a week - witness had given him a coat, he had attended him at Brighton, when witness had a dislocated arm - witness had never written any letters for the prisoner. When the prisoner was in Clerkenwell prison, for assaulting two boys in Kensington-gardens, witness did not write to him, and knew nothing of three letters produced by the prisoner - he did not allow him 1l. a month while in prison, but had given a Mrs. Sherritt what wages were due at the time he was sent there - he did not know the prisoner had been in the Guards till he had lived some time with him; the prisoner never dined at his house with one Stevens - does not know Captain Hunter, but might have seen him, and never said he was afraid of him; the prisoner might have taken tea with witness when he was laid up; was never at a Police-office, nor ever had a warrant against him; the prisoner had frequently applied to him for money, for relief, and a character; and in consequence of a letter he received he paid 5s. per week for rent for about a month or five weeks, and had given him old clothes once or twice - he never took the prisoner's trunks from his lodging to the French Horn public-house; he never took a double bedded room at the George and Blue Boar inn, nor had the prisoner come into his apartments in Dean-street, or introduce him as Captain Doyle; did not know a person in the regiment, nor any private soldier whatever - had not slept at the George and Blue Bear this ten years.

GEORGE RUTHVEN . I am an officer of Bow-street. Mr. Finch called there on the 7th of January, and made a representation, and had some advice given him - I believe this letter was written in consequence of that advice - he was advised to write a note; I marked four half-crowns, and returned them to him, and met him that evening in Long-acre about six o'clock; I agreed with him that he should give me a signal with his hat - I got there just before he came; I saw the prisoner in James-street -Mr. Finch and a person with him walked by - I believe Mr. Finch spoke to him, but the prisoner sheered off, and turned into Long-acre, followed by Mr. Finch - I was on the opposite side - a signal was given; I immediately crossed, laid hold of the prisoner, and put him in the passage of a house - he put his hand into his pocket, and said, "Here are the 10s.," giving me the four half-crowns, which I have no doubt are the four I marked; on the way to the office, the prisoner observed "This ought to have come out long ago;" this letter was in the prisoner's hand or pocket; I rather think he took it out of his pocket with his hand, and said he would not part with this letter but with his life - it might save his life.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not catch me by the hand, and this hand was in my pocket? A. The money he took out of his pocket, with which hand I cannot say - I generally lay hold of people by their right hand.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is this the letter you sent him? A. Yes; (letters read.)(No. 1,) To J. W. Stevens, No. 31, King-street, Long-acre.

WILLIAM BREWER , - I have received your letter last night, and am surprised at its contents - meet me on my way to Covent Garden Theatre , this evening at six o'clock, at the corner of James-street, Long-acre, when I will give it you, but it must be for the last time, although your threats I despise. Wednesday.(No 2.) No 31, King-street, Long-acre.

SIR, - I write mrely to express my surprise at not receiving from you what you promised to send me once a forghnight - I have resrved your note, where you say I might expect to receive it till after Christmas, some weeks; you will have the goodness to send me, by return of post, what you promised, or I shall take those steps that will be very unpleasant to you; it is not my wish to make you uncomfortable - recollect it is your conduct to me that compells me to expose you; you tell me I have no claim on you - the first person I will appeal to is your mother, and after that to the public; you must suppose, sutuated as I am, wanting common necessaries of life, and being turned adrift by you, I am ripe for every thing - it is of no consequence to me; if you can concienessly take steps to injure a man who never injured you, do it as soon as you think proper, and if you do a heavy curse will fall on you: reflect for a moment what has passed betwixt you and me; it was not a day or a month, but for years, and now tell me I have no claim on you, and sey me to even wdnt a meal yesterday - I was without foad the whole of the day - the same to-day; I have nothing to pledge, or I would not have troubled you for the money to pay the doctr; the 10s. did not pay the doctr; if I do not receive the 10s. to-morrow, the ill able, I will walk to your mother's, and will explain every thing to her; it is in your power to prevent it, by sending me what you promised me once a forghtnight - I have your note to prove my assertion; I shall expect an answer to-morrow. I am your's. &c., J. W. STEVENS.

Mr. Finch, Sollicittor, No. 31, Dean-street, Soho.

MR. ADOLPHUS to MR. FINCH. Q. Had you seen the prisoner between the time of his being committed to pri

son, and the receipt of this letter? A. Yes, several times; I certainly never promised to send him any thing: I understood by his threatening to expose what had passed between him and me, that he meant to accuse me of an unnatural crime; I had had him to attend me when I had a fistula, and could not have a female.

JURY. Q. What was due to the prisoner? A. Near 20l.; I think it was 18l. odd - the greater part he brought me himself, 5l. at a time.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the letter that was sent to Mr. Finch; I cannot read nor write: I have been in his service, but not as a regular servant, nor regularly employed - I have not been there for three days together in a week; the letter sent to me was brought by a boy; I was obliged to go out to get a person to read it; I did not know who it was from, or what was its contents - I went out, and the first person that accosted me was Mr. Finch; he said, "Do you want me?" I said, "No, Sir, unless you want me;" he said, "Yes; you want the 10s. to pay your rent: "I walked from him - he put the money into my hands; it was taken and produced at the office before the Magistrate: I certainly did make use of the observation that it ought to have been out years ago; I have no witnesses, and I hope you will be merciful to me.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290219-144

670. JOHN WILDEY and JOHN CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 2 caps, value 10s., and 1 pellerine, value 7s. , the goods of Mary Ann Clark .

SUSAN BOWYER . Miss Mary Ann Clark was visiting at my master's, Mr. Child, Grove-lodge, Clapham. These caps are hers - I saw them in her possession on the 9th of February, about an hour before they were taken; they were in a hand-box, and were to go to Tottenham, with the young ladies.

JOSEPH ORTON . I am footman to Mr. Child. On the 9th of February Miss Clark was in the four-wheel chaise, and I drove her to Fitzroy-square - the hand-box was in the hind part of the chaise; I saw it there when the ladies got out, between two and three o'clock: the box was stolen in Tottenham-court-road ; when I got to the liverystable I missed it - I went in pursuit, and found the officer with the prisoner Clark and the box.

Prisoner WILDEY. I met this young man, and told him a man had gone up the court with it. Witness. I did ask some person about it, and he sent me up the court; I cannot be certain that it was not him.

WILLIAM TREVERSH . I am a carrier. I was going home with my cart, between two and three o'clock, and saw the prisoners in Tottenham-court-road; one had the hand-box, and the other was walking by his side - they went together down a gateway, and I told Orton; they were close to the chaise when I saw them with the box- another genteel dressed man was with them - I cannot say which one had the box.

JAMES BOND . I was near the top of Tottenham-court-road, and saw the two prisoners together; Clark was carrying this band-box - I suspected it did not belong to them, and followed them: I said, "Tossy, what have you got here?" he dropped the box, and ran off; I followed' and took him - Wildey got away, and was out of the way for about a week.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer. I took Wildey in Fitzroy-market, on the 13th; he denied the charge - I only found a key and a knife upon him.

WILDEY'S Defence. I had just come from dinner, and met Clark; I saw this young man, and told him I had seen the man with a box.

CLARK'S Defence. I was very tipsy; a genteel man came and asked me to carry the box, and he would give me sixpence - I took it, and the man ran away.

WILDEY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18290219-145

671. WILLIAM SHEEN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Elisha West , from his person .

ELISHA WEST . I was in Bloomsbury-square on the 8th of February, and lost my handkerchief - I did not see it taken, nor miss it, till I was told of it by the officer, who took it; I then felt, and missed my handkerchief - I turned round, and saw a female, who informed me that my handkerchief was taken from my pocket; I saw the prisoner behind; he stooped, and took the handkerchief from the rails of the square, and gave it to me; I cannot swear it was not there when I turned round - I only saw the prisoner go and get it: he said it was his first offence, and he hoped I would forgive him.

JOHN WRIGHT . I was coming up from church, and saw the people running, and this lad with this handkerchief, which he got from the rails; the prosecutor gave it to me. The prisoner said it was his first offence.

Prisoner's Defence. He cried out Stop thief! and a man stopped me; I got the handkerchief, and gave it to the gentleman.

GUILTY. Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-146

672. PHILIP NEIL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 wheelbarrow, value 10s. , the goods of George Tebbutt .

GEORGE TEBBUTT . I am a gardener . I was planting in Myddleton-square on the 7th of February, and left a wheelbarrow within the rails; I received information that a person was taken with it - I went to Worship-street, and saw it.

GEORGE HILL . I am a carpenter, and live at Hoxton. I look after a house in Black Horse-fields; I was there on the Sunday, and saw the prisoner with a wheelbarrow, which he took from an unfinished house, and put into another house - I asked where he was going, and he said it was all right; I thought it was not all right, took it away, and locked it up - the prisoner went away, but was afterwards taken.

GEORGE SMITH . I received charge of the prisoner; he said he only took it for an hour or two, and meant to bring it back next morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I had got two stoves to put in,

and I took the barrow, thinking I could return it before breakfast.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290219-147

673. SARAH LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 27th of January , 6lbs. weight of pork, the goods of Esther Roberts , widow , she well knowing the same to have been stolen .

ESTHER ROBERTS . I am a widow, and live at Enfield . On the 27th of January my house was broken open at night, and I lost about two stones of pork; the constable found part of it on the Tuesday - I saw it, and can swear to one piece; there was a notch on one part of it, where I had cut it, because it would not go into my pan.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it not pickled pork? A. Yes, and well salted.

JOHN WILSON . I am a constable of Enfield. A man named John Dearman lived with the prisoner, about a mile or a mile and a half from the prosecutrix's; I went to the prisoner's house about nine o'clock in the morning, and found about 16lbs. or 18lbs. of pork, in a box; it was not locked - I asked how she got it; she said it was bought at Waltham-market: I was not looking for that, and left it- the prosecutrix afterwards came to me, and said there was some pork, but I did not know it was her's; we then went to the house again, and found three pieces of pork in a box - the prosecutrix said she could swear to one of them- I heard the prisoner examined before the Magistrate- she put her mark upon this deposition. (Deposition read.)

The Prisoner, being cautioned not to say any thing to her disadvantage, says, "On Monday night James and John Dearman left the room which John Dearman and I live in, about eleven o'clock; they returned next morning, about five, and brought home the pork in question, cut it into smaller pieces, put it into a pan, and then into the chest where it was first found; I took the greated part of it soon after the constable first saw it, cooked some, and buried the rest in Edward Ballard 's garden - the pork now produced is part of that brought in by Dearman."

Cross-examined. Q. Was not this woman ill in bed? A. She was sitting on the bed, and was not up; she afterwards complained of having the head-ache - I cannot say she knew whether Dearman had got the pork in the market or not; the pork has not been eat.

COURT. Q. Did you find any in Ballard's garden? A. Yes, one small piece.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she was confined to her bed, and did not know how the pork had got into the box.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290219-148

674. GEORGE EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 3lbs, weight of beef, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Pluckrose .

JAMES PLUCKROSE . I am the brother of Henry Pluckrose , a butcher , of Bethnal-green . I was in his shop last Thursday, at half-past nine o'clock, and saw the prisoner take this beef off his stall-board; he ran off - I pursued, but could not catch him: he came back again by the shop, and I took him - I am quite positive I saw him take it.

JOSEPH ROBINSON . The prisoner was given to me; the prosecutor said he had forgiven him three times before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near the shop; a boy gave me the meat in Spicer-street.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-149

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

675. JAMES DOCKERY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , 2 saws, value 10s., the goods of William Oxley ; and 1 plane, value 9d., the goods of John Lethbridge .

JOHN LETHBRIDGE . I am a carpenter . I lost a plane from a building at the back of Chandos-street, on the 1st of February; I have known the prisoner for about three months - he knew the shop where we kept our tools.

JOHN BLAKE . I am a bricklayer and plasterer. I saw the prisoner with the two saws and plane in his hand.

WILLIAM OXLEY . I employed the two last witnesses to prop up a house, which was very dangerous - the prisoner was a labourer , and the witnesses sent home their plane and saws by him, but he never brought them to my shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to a public-house to have a pint of beer; I went out, and in a quarter of an hour I thought of the saws - I went back, but they were gone.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-150

676. WILLIAM ANDERSON and JOHN SIMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 inkstand, value 3l. , the goods of Adolphus Parker and Harriet Martha Parker .

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I am a carpenter. On the 19th of February I was in Warwick-street , about eleven o'clock in the day; I saw the two prisoners in company, for about five minutes - Anderson went into Mr. Parker's shop, and Simpson stood outside, close to the door; Anderson brought out the ink-stand, and ran away - Simpson followed him: I passed Simpson, took Anderson, and took the ink-stand from him - he said he would come back quietly, which he did; I pointed Simpson out to the street-keeper, who took him.

ADOLPHUS PARKER . I am in partner ship with Harriet Martha Parker . This is our ink-stand. I know nothing of the prisoners.

SIMPSON'S Defence. I was walking up King-street, after a situation, and this gentleman came and took me; this prisoner I never saw before - I may have gone into the shop to inquire for a situation.

ANDERSON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

SIMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-151

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

677. EDWARD WELCH and JOHN MARTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 12 pieces of wood, value 7s. , the goods of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of the Right Honourable William Lowther , commonly called Lord Viscount Lowther, William Dacres Adams , Esq ., and Henry Dawkins , Esq .

THIRD COUNT, stating them to be the property of William Oxley .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM OXLEY . I am a carpenter , in the employ of

the Commissioners of Woods and Forests. I have an unoccupied house near the Strand , allowed me to put timber in. On the 28th of January I lost about 20l. worth of timber from there; on the 29th some more timber was put there, and the house was watched: on the 30th I saw Martin come out with a load of seven pieces of timber - I did not see Welch come out, but I saw him just turning out of the court in which the house is, with a load of quarterings, six or seven feet long; I secured Martin, and left him with Agar, whilst I went and overtook Welch, in St. Martin's-lane; he threw the timber off his shoulder, and ran away; the prisoners had no business in that house - the timber is entrusted to me.

SARAH WINSTANLEY . I live in Old Round-court. On this afternoon I heard a pane of glass break in this house, and went out - I saw two men coming out of the house; one bad a load on his shoulder - I said to him, "Are you going to take away the wood?" as Mr. Oxley had been there to tell us not to let it go; I sent two boys to Mr. Oxley - he came directly, and stopped the two men coming out of the house; the first man turned to the right, and turned down the passage - Mr. Oxley afterwards followed him.

JURY. Q. Are you certain these are the men? A. No- I really did not look at them.

PETER AGAR . I was coming into the Strand, and met Welch with a load of wood on his shoulder; I saw him turn out of the court - I did not know where he got it from, and suffered him to pass on; I went on to the corner, just as Martin was throwing the wood off his shoulder; Mr. Oxley gave him into my charge - he followed Welch, and brought him back.

WELCH's Defence. I was going along, and a cart loaded with wood broke down; I helped to load it, and a men gave me a few pieces for my fire.

WELCH's - GUILTY . Aged 46.

MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-152

678. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 7 books, value 7s. , the goods of James Drysdale .

JAMES DRYSDALE . I am a bookseller , and live in Goswell-street . These books were on a stall-board at my window on the 14th of February; I did not see them taken nor miss them - they are the fellow books to those which I have brought; I am the publisher - it is the "Pocket-Magazine," and there are thirteen volumes of it; I cannot swear to them.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. On the 14th of February, about half-past four or five o'clock, I was in Goswell-street, and saw the prisoner and another - I heard one of them say, "We must look out;" I then looked out myself - I saw them go to the shop; one stood there some time and then the other - at last I saw the prisoner take these books from the stall-board, and put them into his apron; I followed him, and took them from him; he said they had been given to him - here are seven of them, and the six produced by the prosecutor make up the thirteen volumes.

Prisoner's Defence. This young man asked me to hold the books; I took them, and waited not more than ten yards from the house.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290219-153

679. JOHN BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1375 brushes, value 68l.; 400 brushboards, value 30s.; 400 brush-veneers, value 12l.; 80lbs. of bristles, value 20l; and 21 tooth-brush stocks, value 20s. , the goods of William Bracey Kent , his master.

GEORGE NICKIN HICKMAN . I am in the employ of William Bracy Kent , brush-maker , of Great Marlborough-street. The prisoner was in his service, and used to fetch the work to finish at his own house; he only took them when they were in a certain state of preparation; we received information, and went to his house, No. 18, Great Smith-street, Westminster , one Monday in this month, but I do not recollect the date; I went into the workshop, and found a large number of veneers - veneers are sometimes delivered to him from time to time with the brushes, but no more than he has occasion for; we then looked into a loft over the workshop, and found as many as twelve gross more of veneers; I remained in the workshop - the officer and Mr. Kent went up stairs to a room on the second floor; they then called me up, and pointed out a large number of brushes which had been found; I went with an officer to the back kitchen, and opened the drawers, in every drawer but one there were brushes, some in a finished and some in and unfinished state - we removed the drawers and found a quantity behind them thrown down indiscriminately - and among some candlesticks in the cupboard we found some more brushes; and on the landing near the garret we found a box filled with veneers; then a second box filled with veneers, which we brought away; I did not find any veneers different to those he would have delivered to him to work upon; but it is utterly impossible that he should have had forty gross of veneers delivered to him more than he had brushes - they are for the backs of brushes; we have missed a large quantity at different times, and particularly of one sort, of which we found a great number at the prisoner's; we took stock about eighteen months ago, and then had a considerable quantity of black veneers, of which we lost a great many afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Is Mr. Kent here? A. No; he was before the Magistrate, but was not asked any questions; some of these were in a cupboard - some pieces of paper, pieces of string, candlesticks, and other things, were before them - there were shelves in the cupboard; we found brushes in nearly every drawer, and things upon them - many of the brushes we found in his house were not in a state in which he ought to have received them, or to have returned them - they were what we call French polished, and that is done by another man after him; he has a workshop and materials there - I believe journeymen do work for themselves; I have known a man take work from two masters.

COURT. Q. Does your master ever give out 1375 to work at one time? A. No; I should think the extreme number that is ever delivered out to one man is two gross; we have missed a great deal of property.

HENRY ROBERTS . I received four boards to draw from

a person who was to do them for the prisoner; I knew them to be Mr. Kent's property - I took them to Mr. Kent, and he got a warrant.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you leave Mr. Kent? A. Yes; I left him of my own accord - I have worked for him; a person of the name of Church entrusted me with 30s. worth of brushes, and they were lost by my lad; I told Mr. Church of it, and he said he was very sorry, and would give me work to work it out; I never sold them to any person in Fleet-market.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I went and searched the prisoner's house on Monday the 9th of February - we found the prisoner in the kitchen, and took some hair from there - we then went to the second floor, saw a closet on the left hand, which I requested him to open; he hesitated a good deal - but when I said I should break it open, he took the key from his pocket and unlocked it; he said there was no property there belonging to Mr. Kent, and repeated it - I saw it was an immense large cupboard, and there were a great number of packages; I took some out - some of them contained twelve, and some six brushes; Mr. Kent observed some writing on the papers, and said, "This is my property, and the writing I know;" the prisoner said it was his own writing - that the brushes were his own making for an East India order, and the whole of the stamps were his own stamp; I believe I took about five hundred packages out of that closet; the greater part were identified by Mr. Kent and Hickman; I then went into the kitchen, and saw the property found in the bureau, and under a sofa-bedstead I found a box of hair which Mr. Kent identified.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I was with Schofield when the search was made - what he has stated is correct, I produce twenty-one ivory handles, which I found in one of the drawers in a middle room - only a part of the property is here; there were a great many things - a van load full.

MR. HICKMAN. I could not identify these handles, but I know some of these brushes, they have Mr. Kent's name on them - I have no doubt they are his; some of them had French polish on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not this one quite finished, and in a fit state for sale? A. Yes; Mr. Kent sells a great many; I cannot swear that he has not sold this one; here are some unfinished, which I can positively swear were never sold in that state; they ought to have been returned by him to Mr. Kent - these might have been delivered to him.

HENRY ROBERTS . These ivory handles were not delivered to the prisoner - it was a suggestion of Mr. Kent's to have six brushes to one handle - other manufacturers might have had such; this one brush has my writing on it - it was for an Irish order, and we had to make some others to complete the order; I will undertake to swear that these were never delivered to the prisoner; I was the borer of them, and this has my writing on it.

MR. HICKMAN. These brush-boards were never delivered to the prisoner for any purpose whatever; there are persons who make them on their own account, but it is not the prisoner's trade.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the reason why Mr. Kent is not here? A. He is unwell - he has sent his books here, because he wished the prisoner to have every assistance in his power - I do not know that the prisoner is charged with stealing any super satin brushes - are two horse brushes which were never delivered to him, they are out of his line; the prisoner stated they were all his own, and that he made the patterns himself, and they were bored by a man named Griffiths.

MR. CHURCHILL called -

MR. CHURCH. I employed Roberts six or eight months ago; I have had an opportunity of forming an opinion of his character; I would not believe him upon his oath.

COURT. Q. Why? A. Because he has sold my property and never returned me the money for it; he worked for me, and said he could sell brushes, and I let him have 30s. or 2l. worth, which he sold, and brought the money; I afterwards let him have 4l. worth, he sent me 15s. by his son, and the rest he said his son had lost - that was in June; I did not prefer a hill against him on account of his family, and it is a great deal of trouble and expense.

MR. CLARK. I am a brush boarder. These boards are nothing mysterious - I can observe nothing particular at all in them except bad workmanship; I do not think any man can swear to them without a private mark on them - I have been in business three years - we cannot distinguish one man's work from another except they are marked - I have known the prisoner about four months - it is not an unusual thing for a brush-maker to make an entire brush on his own account; I should not have been surprised to have found such boards at any brush-maker's shop; it is not uncommon for a journeyman to work for two masters.

COURT. Q. Do you know what part of the trade the prisoner's business is? A. I have understood he is a brush inlayer and finisher - there is no hair in these boards; it is not common for a journeyman to have near fourteen hundred brushes, or to keep them in cupboards or drawers; that is not the way I do.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been employed by Mr. Kent about fourteen years; I worked for him for the first four years, and was than discharged for about six months; Mr. Kent sent for me again, and I have worked upwards of nine years for him; about four years ago I was employed by Mr. Barnes for an order for the East ladies for 100l.; Mr. Hutchinson and Mr. Leigh saw the brushes when they were manufactured; I have since then worked for Mr. Robinson, of Burton; I manufactured brushes out of my old stock, and a great many new ones I bought of Mr. Kent; I had a large stock in hand, and did expect that in a short time I should have started for myself and got rid of it: in the meantime I had been particularly careful in making up accounts at the ware-house; the work was delivered to me before three or four witnesses - I never had an opportunity of purloining one single brush, and every Saturday night or every fortnight I made a clearance of the books; there was not one out against me; I have sent in brushes of my own to make up Mr. Kent's number; I am capable of making brushes of any sort: Griffiths has been in my employ; I invented a machine which he bored with - it was impossible for any one to purloin a single brush out of the prosecutor's premises; I was only admitted there once a week.

JURY to GEORGE NICKEN HICKMAN . Q. Did the prisoner come backwards and forwards to the warehouse for

work? A. Yes, once or twice a week, and used to take it away in his bag.

GUILTY . Aged 58.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-154

680. HENRY KUSICK was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of John Widdy .

JOHN WIDDY . I am a pauper . I lost a black coat out of my box.

HENRY STRATFORD . About two o'clock in the morning of the 13th of February, I heard a disturbance in the lobby of the poorhouse of St. George's in the East ; I went out, and saw several things on the floor - the prisoner's coat laid on the floor, and a book by the side of it: I heard several persons say they had lost something; I went on the roof of the building, and found the prisoner there with a bundle by his side - I brought him down into the ward; Widdy owned the coat which the prisoner had on his back - the prisoner has been a pauper in the house about six months; he had made his escape over the roof before.

FRANCIS JACKSON . The prosecutor and prisoner were both in the workhouse; I have the coat which was taken from the prisoner's back.(Property produced and sowrn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I should not have done it if I had not been enticed by two lads.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290219-155

681. FRANCIS WHEDDON was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. BARRY Conducted the prosecution.

HENRY JOHNSON . I was clerk to Mr. Frederick Parssord . On the 2d of February the prisoner was in his employ - he took out some cheeses and other articles, but I did not book them; he took out one cheese which weighed 51lbs. 8 3/4 ozs. - it was marked; he returned in the evening: it was common for him to render an account either to Mr. Purssord or his wife, whoever was in the way.

BENJAMIN DYMANT . I keep the Bell and Crown public-house at Edmonton . I bought a cheese of the prisoner on the 2d of February, and gave him 1l. 16s. 4d. for it; I shewed the same cheese to Mr. Purssord, and to Johnson- they identified it.

FREDERICK PURSSORD . I am a cheesmonger , and live at Newington. If the prisoner sold any articles it was his duty to account for the payment of them in a book which he took out - he took out this cheese on the 2d of February - he did not account for the money, but booked it to a credit-customer, Haslen, of Enfield; I had an order from Haslen's for cheese and butter; when I went down, I found they had not had the cheese.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You gave instructions to a constable to take this may up? A. Yes; I did send him word to keep out of the way till the morning, but not in hopes he would abscond - it was as much for my own convenience as his; if I had wanted to have arrested him I could have done it long before - my wife received his money but she is not here.

COURT. Q. Was this cheese destined for Mr. Haslen? A. No; he took out three or four - his money was to be handed in every night; it was about a week after that I found this out.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a constable. I was employed to apprehend the prisoner on the Friday morning; I said I took him on Mr. Purssord's account; he said, "How can that he when he sent a man to tell me to keep out of the way."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-156

682. EDWARD ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , I bag, value 1d, and 19s. 6d. , the property of William Goodrich .

WILLIAM GOODRICH . I am a baker , and live in Great Ormond-street ; I had had my till attempted on Monday night, and last night I saw the prisoner go out of my shop- I ran after him, and took him with this 19s. 6d. - I had seen my till all right a few minutes before; no one else could have taken it - he must have crawled into the shop on his hands and knees.

AARON ORME . I am a watchman. I was going by, and saw the prisoner behind the counter with his hand in the till - I did not know he was doing wrong till I heard the prosecutor call Stop thief! he ran out, jumped over the prisoner, and I took him - I found the greater part of the silver in this bag.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-157

683. WILLIAM BURN and JOHN BELL were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 fixture, that is to say, 1 window-sash and 6 panes of glass, value 14s., the goods of George Cooper and others, and fixed to a certain building ; against the Statute.

JAMES KINGHAM . I am a labourer, and live at Hoxton- Mr. Cooper's house is in the New North-road . About half-past seven o'clock in the morning of the 19th of February. I saw a light in the house - I did not make any alarm, but went to get assistance; I placed some persons at the back of the house: I called the patrol; I went into the back kitchen, and found the two prisoners and these sashes there - they opened the window, and both tumbled out together; the patrol and another person caught them- I never lost sight of either of them; I saw the house all right the day before.

WILLIAM LONG . I am one of the patrols. I waited in front of the house; the two prisoners came out together: I caught hold of Burn, getting over the railing.

GEORGE COOPER . This house belongs to the creditors of George Pound : I am one of the assignee s. I had seen the house all secure on Tuesday - the sashes were all right.

Prisoner BELL. I am sorry to say I did it out of distress more than any thing else.

BURN - GUILTY . Aged 26.

BELL - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-158

OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23.

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

684. TIMOTHY DONOVAN and JUDITH DONOVAN were indicted for felonlously assaulting Jeremiah Conner , on the 18th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 5 half-crowns, 38 shillings, and 23 sixpences, his monies .

JEREMIAH CONNOR . I live in George-yard, Whitechapel , and sell live fowls ; the prisoners lived next door; this happened between six and seven o'clock, on Sunday night, the 18th of January: we knew each other very well as neighbours for five or six years; I have lived there four years - they had not lived there so long; I was coming towards my own door; Timothy Donovan met me in the passage between his own door and mine - he knocked me down with a piece of timber, and cut me in the head; he took me into his own house, and robbed me of this money; I cried out, but nobody was there but his own people; he pulled me into his own room on the ground-floor, and robbed me-it was of no use to cry out to my enemy; I saw him give my money to his sister - I could not cry out before he dragged me into his house; he dragged me in with his hands - I was on the ground, whether on my back or belly I cannot say; he let me out directly he got the money, and I went for an officer - he knew that I could find him at any time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you ever tried for stealing a crow-bar? A. Yes, and acquitted -I never said I preferred this charge entirely out of aggravation, and that he had not robbed me; they took and made me drunk, and gave me 15s.; I did not sign any paper, or put my mark to it.

Q. Look at this? A. I know nothing about it; his sister was taken, and he came forward to clear her.

COURT. Q. How did you get out of the house? A. When he robbed me he let go of me, and I ran out - he and his friends remained there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-159

685. JAMES SLY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Keys .

CHARLES KEYS . I am a sawyer , and live in Ashley-street . On the 20th of December I went to work at eight o'clock in the morning, leaving this coat in my room- I returned at ten at night, and missed it; I had fastened my door, and put the key on the mantel-piece in the parlour - the prisoner lived in the back room, and I in the front; I found it upon his back on the 16th of February- he had left the house on the day it was taken without giving notice.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner; the prosecutor had stopped him in the New-road - the prosecutor pointed out a place in the elbow where the coat had been mended; the prisoner had it on at the watch-house, and tore the elbow out.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES KEYS . I know the coat by a place which I had sewed up myself, and when I found him I said I knew it by another place in the elbow, which he has since torn out.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a witness who can prove I bought the coat three days before he lost it; I and my wife lived in the next room; the landlord had given me warning, as I could not pay the rent, and I left.

CHARLES KEYS . When I met the prisoner, he said the coat was not mine, but I am certain of it; I bought it second-hand, and have had it two years - there is a darn in it of my own work; I let him wear it at the watch-house, and he torn out the place in the elbow, which I had spoken of.

JOHN VAUGHAN . I am horse-keeper to Mr. Gray. I was with the prisoner three months ago; I went to take a pair of shoes to him to mend - we settled our business, and came out to have a drop of beer; we passed a Jew in Tottenham-court-road, with a coat in his arm - he asked what he wanted for it; the Jew asked 4s., and took 3s. - it was between twelve and one o'clock in the day; I have often seen him wear it - I never examined it; I heard he was taken up, but could not go to the office to state this - I do not know what became of him after he left Ashley-street; I cannot swear to the coat - it appears to be the same.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

Reference Number: t18290219-160

686. JAMES WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , four 10l. and five 5l. promissory notes , the property of Charles Wooldridge .

2d COUNT, stating them to be the property of John Patten .

3d COUNT, stating them to be the property of John Patten .

MESSRS. GURNEY, BOLLAND, and SHEPHERD conducted the prosecution.

MARY PATTEN . I am sub-distributor of stamps at Alton, Somersetshire. I had occasion to send 85l. on the 29th of December to Mr. Wooldridge - here is a minute made by me at the time; I enclosed in a letter to him two 5l. Farnham notes, Nos. 1787. and 1819, dated the 1st of February; four of 10l., No. 5149, dated the 21st of January; No. 6532, dated the 11th of June; No. 5453, dated the 2d of June; and 5767, dated the 21st of January, all dated 1828; - one 5l. Guilford note. No. 8904, dated the 20th of February, 1821; one 5l. Uxbridge note, dated the 29th of March, 1827: and one 5l. Winchester note, dated the 4th of February, 1828; with a cheque of Messrs. Glyn & Co. for 20l.: I directed the letter to Charles Wooldridge , Esq., solicitor , Winchester, sealed it, and delivered it to my servant, with 1d. to pay for putting it in after time; I gave her the letter between nine and ten o'clock at night - my husband's name is John Patten .

SARAH JENKINS . I am servant to Mrs. Patten. I received a letter from her on Monday, the 29th of December, to take to the post-office - I did not notice the address - she gave me 1d. to pay for it, being after time; I took it to the post-office, and gave it into Miss Camplin's hand.

CAROLINE CAMPLIN . I am daughter of the post-mistress of Alton; Jenkins brought me a letter between nine and ten o'clock on the 29th of December - I stamped it, and charged it; the servant told me it contained money: it was addressed to Charles Wooldridge , Esq. Winchester

- it was a very large letter, and weighed two ounces; I put it into the Winchester bag, and closed it myself: it was strapped on to the other bags; I tied the bag with a string, sealed it, and delivered it to the guard myself at two o'clock - his name is Sweatman.

WILLIAM SWEATMAN . I was guard of the Southampton mail coach in December - it passes through Alton. On Tuesday, the 30th of December, about two o'clock in the morning when it passed through Alton, I received the seven mail bags from Miss Camplin - they were on two different straps, but these two straps strapped together; one strap had the Alton and Alresford, Alton and Winchester, Alton and Southampton bags on it - the other strap contained four bags, which were to go below Southampton- when I got on the coach I unstrapped the two straps, and put the three bags which I have named on one strap, and buckled them with twelve other bags; after changing horses at Bishop Sutton, a mile before I got to Alresford, I strapped the bags in three different lots - the Alton and Winchester on the Honnslow and Winchester strap, with the other bags which I had taken up before for Winchester; I had to leave five bags at Alresford, and I took these five bags off at Bishop Sutton, and one of those was the Alton and Alresford; I should have had to leave six bags at Winchester, and those I put together before-between Bishop Sutton and Alresford, I put five of the bags together which I had to leave at Winchester, and the one I had taken up at Alton - I am quite sure I had it in my hand just before I entered the town of Alresford- I mean the bag from Alton to Winchester; I am quite certain of it, for I took it off the strap, and added it to the Winchester strap, and the Southampton bag from Hounslow; I strapped it to four others - as I strapped it, I remembered having only one ring to the bag, and tried with my finger to see if that ring remained safe, and found it was so- the mail reached Winchester about five minutes past four o'clock; I delivered the bags to the post-mistress' son.

Q. After feeling the ring safe, had you to alter the bags? A. After taking up the Alresford bag, I had to unstrap the Winchester strap on which the Alton and Winchester bag was, in order to put a fresh bag on it - the mail arrived at Winchester about four o'clock, and I delivered the bags to the post-mistress' son, and at that time I believed that the Alton bag was among the number; on my return I understood that the Alton bag was missing; I could not tell where I had dropped it, but suppose it must have been at Alresford in unbuckling the strap, in order to add a fresh bag; Alresford is fifty-eight miles from London.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Whether you dropped it at Alresford, or between that and Winchester. you cannot say? A. No; I am certain I had it at Alresford - it is usual to have two rings to a bag.

HENRY FLIGHT. I am the post-mistress' son at Winchester. On the 30th of December, I received the bags from Sweatman about four o'clock in the morning - I sorted them when they come in, and on looking them over I missed the Alton and Winchester bag - that was about a quarter of an hour after I received them.

CHARLES WOOLDRIDGE . I live at Winchester. I received no letter or remittance from Mrs. Patten, in December last - the letter never came to my hand.

JOSEPH FRENCH . I live at No. 4, Charles-street, Hampstead-rood, and am a watchman, in the employ of the Commissioners of Woods and Forests; I watch in the Regent's-park. On the morning of Wednesday, the 31st of December, I came off duty at seven o'clock, and went home to breakfast - I then went to bed, and was called up between nine and ten; I found the prisoner and my wife's son by a former husband there; the prisoner is my wife's brother-in-law: Ward lived at Alresford - I believe he is a shoemaker; I had never seen him before that time; my wife's son's name is Henry Mason - the prisoner asked me to go out with him; we went to the Regalia public-house, in Augustus-street, (Mr. Morrison's;) while we were there a pedlar came in; Mason was stopping at home with his mother and sister; the prisoner made a purchase of the pedlar, and offered him a 5l. country note - I asked Morrison to change it, which he did, and after that we returned to my lodging to dinner; we went out together after dinner along Tottenham-court-road to Monmouth-street, and he bought me a frock-coat, waistcoat, and trousers, which he paid for with a note, but what note I cannot say; he had some change - we went from there to Covent-garden market; he went into a lines-draper's shop near Drury-lane, and bought something, but what I did not see, for I did not go in - we took the things we had bought to my lodgings, and he told me to send them down to Alresford to him on the Monday; he only went into three shops while he was with me - he bought some shoes at the third shop; and paid for them with a 5l. Bank of England note- he was in my company all day, until he went away next morning; I did not go to Crawford - street with him - when he came to me in the morning he had a bundle with him, and left that to be forwarded with the other things on the Monday - he stopped and slept at my lodgings that night, and went off next morning with Mason to Alresford; the officer came to me the same afternoon to make inquiry.

Cross-examined. Q. He desired you to send him the things on Monday? A. Yes; that was the day the waggon went; Mason is his nephew - he has been brought up under the prisoner's care; he was taken up, and afterwards liberated.

ASCOTT NORTHEY . I am shopman to Mr. Dent, of Crawford-street. On the 31st of December, the prisoner came to my master's shop; I think it was between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; he bought some broad cloth, some fustian, and calico - he laid out 2l. 9s., and gave me a 10l. Farnham note in payment, (looking at it) - this is it; I asked his name and address - he wrote on the back of it " James Davis , No. 14, Charles-street, Hampstead-road" - it is No. 5453, dated the 2d of June, 1828: I gave him the change, and he took the things away; they were produced again to me before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him write his name on the note? A. I did; I went to Charles-street, and found no James Davis there.

WALTER MORRISON . I keep the Regalia, Augusta-street, Regent's-park. On the 31st of December, French and the prisoner came to my house - I changed this 5l. note, (looking at it) - I put French's name on it at the time, as I knew him; I saw him hand the change over to

the prisoner - I saw him lay out 28s. with the pedlar - it is a Farnham note, No. 1787, dated the 1st of February, 1828.

ROBERT BANKS . I am a baker, and live at No. 14, Charles-street, Hampstead-rood; nobody named James Davis lodged with me, on the 31st of December; French lived with me, and one Barnes, on the first floor - the prisoner did not lodge with me.

JOHN DUNCAN . I am a clothier, and live in Monmouth-street. The prisoner came to my shop on the 31st of December, about half-past three o'clock, and bought a fustian shooting coat and a pair of trousers; French was with him- he bought two waistcoats, after I gave him change - he paid me a 10l. Farnham note; (looking at one) this is it; it is No. 6532, dated the 11th of June, 1828 - I wrote the address he gave me, " John Davis , No. 12, John-street, Hampstead-road;" I gave him eight sovereigns, and 12s. in change, and then he bought two waistcoats.

GRIFFITH FOLKES . I am a draper, and live in Little Russell-street, Drury-lane. On the 31st of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, alone; he bought some things, but not in my presence - I did not serve him, but Adams called me forward, and said he had brought a 10l. Farnham note; I told the prisoner it was a late hour to pass so large a note, he being a countryman - he said,

"If you don't like to change it I can't have the goods which I want - I want to buy a gown for my wife;" I called one of my shopmen forward to serve him; I made inquiry about it, and agreed to Adams' taking it.

JONATHAN ADAMS . In December last I lived with Mr. Folkes. I saw the prisoner there on the 31st; he came for some goods, and said he could not have them unless I could change him a 10l. note - I think he had a shawl, some stockings, and a silk handkerchief; he gave me this note(looking at it;) I shewed it to Mr. Folkes, and asked where he lived: I stood by the prisoner while he wrote this address on it, " James Davis , No. 12, John-street. Hampstead-road;" the number of the note is 5149, 101. Farnham Bank, dated 21st of January, 1828.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am a Bow-street officer. I went to inquire at No. 12, John-street, Hampstead-road, for Davis; I could find no such street in Hampstead - there is John-street, Tottenham-court-road, but no such person lived there.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. On the 1st of January I found French out, and went to his lodgings - he delivered me a quantity of goods, which I produce; I produced them all at the prisoner's examination, and the tradesmen saw them; I went to Alresford, and apprehended the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. At what hour did you take him? A. Six o'clock on the evening of Friday, the 2d of February - he is married; Mason was living with him: he seemed a poorish sort of man - I do not recollect his giving any account before the Magistrate.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am one of the firm of the Farnham Bank. We never issue two notes of the same number, date, and amount; these are notes of our house, and were in circulation at the time.

ASCOTT NORTHEY. Here is the cloth and fustian which I sold to the prisoner.

JOHN DUNCAN . The cloth I sold to the prisoner is here.

JONATHAN ADAMS . The things I sold to the prisoner are here.

JOSEPH FRENCH . The goods remained at my house till they were delivered to the officer.

MRS. PATTEN. These are four of the notes I enclosed in the letter; they correspond in numbers, amount, and date.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 29th of December my nephew had occasion to go out to gather a load of dung - he generally goes out in the morning to gather it, and on his return, at a quarter to eight o'clock, he called me up - I did not arise, and he called me again: when I came down, he said he had found a pocket-book containing some notes, as he thought - I asked how he came by it; he told me he picked them up in the road; I asked where and he said opposite the aspine-trees; I looked into it, run it over, and saw it was notes - he proposed coming to town, to see his mother, it being New-year's time; he asked if I would go with him - he asked me to change the money for him, and he would give me something for my family; I bought the articles which are in Court. and the whole of the change I gave him in his mother's house.

HENRY MASON . I am the prisoner's nephew, and have been out of Court during this trial; I lived with him till I was apprehended; I get up at three or four o'clock in the morning: he is a poor man, with a small family - I go out early in the morning, to find dung in the turnpike-road, and one morning, three or four days before I was taken, I got up at half-past three o'clock - Sarah Nash called me; I went up the road for Winchester, and over-right the second aspine-tree, I found a small pocket-book; it was a dark red colour - I opened it; there was some money in it, but being no scholar, I cannot tell what; I cannot write or read, but I have seen notes, and knew they were notes - I turned back, and went home; this was about seven o'clock- I got home a little before eight, or a little after; I do not know whether I found it a mile or half a mile from my uncle's - he was in bed when I got home; I called him, and told him I had found something, but did not know what it was hardly; I asked him if he would come to town to buy some things, and then he should buy his children something- he never told me whether it was money or not; I said I thought it was money; he opened it, looked at it, shut it up, and put it into his pocket - he afterwards gave me the pocket-book, and I gave it up at the Mansion-house; I am sure it was the same as the one I found: I came to London the same evening, and did not see my uncle change any of the notes - he left me at French's; when he returned he gave me the change and the pocket-book - I was taken up at the same time as my uncle; I did not tell the officer how I came by the pocket-book, nor did my uncle, in my hearing; I gave the pocket-book up before the Lord Mayor, when I heard what it was for - I did not tell the Lord Mayor how I got it; he never asked me, that I know of; I believe, when I gave it up, I told the officer how I became possessed of it, but I cannot be sure - (looking at a pocket-book) I do not know whether this is it; it is very much like it.

MR. GURNEY. Q. When Herdsfield came down to Alresford to you, did you not tell him, on his questioning you, that you had not found any thing whatever? A. Not

that I know of; I was questioned by Mr. Peacock, the solicitor, about it, in London; he told me to take care what I said, and to speak the truth; I cannot say whether I denied to him that I had picked up any notes.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were you in custody when these questions were put? A. I do not know - I was not at liberty; I do not remember Mr. Peacock asking me any questions - I believe I was taken to the Post-office: I believe I was questioned, but I do not recollect it.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . When I first apprehended Ward I told him it was on suspicion of having found the mail - bag: I told him some letters were gone, and some money- I did not tell him what sort of money; He at first said he was innocent, he knew nothing at all about it: I then searched him, and found one sovereign on him; he said he had got no more, and that he was going to pay away that night - I then told him he must go with me.

Q. Did you put any question to Mason at that time? A. I charged him likewise with finding the mail-bag, both in and out of Ward's presence; he said he did not know any thing at all about it, he had found nothing - he said, both in and out of Ward's presence, that he had found nothing; I brought them both to London - they had no opportunity of talking together till they got to prison, which was before they were examined; I took them to the Compter, and then took them to the Post-office, before they were taken to the Mansion-house; they were together in the Compter, with many other prisoners - I left them with the turnkey, to put them where he thought proper: I do not know whether they had an opportunity of being alone.

MARK BEACHAM PEACOCK , Esq. I am solictor of the Post-office. When the prisoners came to town they were brought to me at the Post-office; I saw Ward first, separately from Mason - Ward stated that Mason had picked the notes up in a pocket-book; I put Ward aside, and questioned Mason - I told him he was in custody on suspicion of having found a mail-bag, and having taken some notes out of it - he denied that he had found any bag or notes whatever; I did not ask if he had found any pocketbook, that I recollect - I might have asked it: he admitted that he had come to town with his uncle, but said he did not know what for.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did the boy appear a good deal frightened? A. It did not strike me so - he does not appear one of the brightest; I cautioned him, and said he was at liberty to say any thing or not, and whatever he said might be given in evidence against him.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . Mason gave me up this pocket-book about the third hearing he had at the Mansion-house - it was several days after this conversation with Mr. Peacock; he had never before told me any thing about finding the pocket-book.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did he give any account of it before the Magistrate, at the first examination? A. Nothing whatever - he denied all knowledge of it till the third hearing, when he held up the pocket-book, and said "This is the pocket-book I found the notes in;" I heard Ward examined at the Post-office, and I believe he said Mason had given the notes to him; he did not say that to the Magistrate till, I believe, the second examination: I did not tell the Magistrate what he had said, nor did Mr. Peacock, in my hearing; I know Mason denied all knowledge of the notes to Mr. Peacock and me, till the third or fourth examination, and he said nothing to the Magistrate about finding them till then - that might be the first time he was asked about them; I cannot say Ward ever gave me any account of the notes, except having them from Mason.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Did he, in the country, say one word to you about having any notes? A. No, neither of them; Ward said he knew nothing of any notes at all; he did not speak twenty words from there to town.

WALTER MORRISON . I went with the officer to Alresford; the prisoner lives about half a mile out of the town, towards Winchester - it is the suburbs of Alresford.

GUILTY .

Being of opinion that Mason found them, and gave them to the prisoner, who had the means of finding the owner.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-161

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

687. JOHN CLARE EUSTACE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 1 portmanteau, value 10s.; 1 razor, value 3s.; 3 pairs of trousers, value 45s.; 2 cravats, value 8s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 12s.; 7 shirts, value 4l.; 3 waistcoats, value 3l.; 36 pairs of socks, value 30s.; 7 pairs of stockings, value 20s., and 8 keys, value 4s., the goods of George Hamilton Gordon , in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

EDWIN SAWTELL . I am a servant to Colonel George Hamilton Gordon, who lodged in the house of the prisoner's mother. On the 14th of January, I walked out in the evening with my master, who is infirm - I went out about half-past five o'clock, and returned about half-past seven; I had locked my own bed-room door, and left his portmanteau there - it contained some handkerchiefs, a razor, a bunch of keys and a variety of other property, worth from 20l. to 30l.; on returning at seven o'clock in the evening I came through the garden, and found a pair of boots - I found the bed-room door open, with a strange key in the lock; I had observed the prisoner with a particular sword-stick in his possession when he was in the house - I have since seen some of the property, and was with the officer when it was found; I have since seen the keys which were left in the portmanteau, also the razors and two handkerchiefs.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the portmanteau contain any one article worth 5l.? A. Certainly not - they were all safe in the portmanteau at five o'clock, and gone at seven.

HENRY TODD . I keep the St. John's coffee-house, Little Queen-street, Holborn. I know the prisoner - on Tuesday, the 20th of January, he breakfasted at my house; I saw him with a brown handkerchief - (looking at one) this is it; he produced it to my wife, and said it was too large for his purpose - he wished it to be made into two, and gave it to my wife to get it done for him; he said there was some initials on it, which he had endeavoured to take out, but could not; they were the initials of a near or dear friend, and it was of no importance - they might as well remain; that on a voyage from Bombay a brother officer's effects was sold, and this was part of them - he borrowed a portmanteau of me, and promised to give me a razor on the same day; he said he had two at home - on the 21st, when I went up stairs, I saw a

razor there, and he said, "Mr. Todd, here is the razor I promised you yesterday," giving it to me - this is it.

ANN GALE . I am the wife of John Gale , a hosier, of High Holborn. On the 21st of January the prisoner left at our house a cost, a cap, two pairs of gloves, and a blue silk handkerchief; this is the handkerchief - I afterwards gave it to the officer.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer. Melina cottage, where Colonel Gordon lives, is in the parish of Mary-le-bone: on the 15th of January I was fetched there, and while I was talking to the prisoner's mother I found a sword-stick in the trees at the cottage; I observed foot-marks on the border of the garden - there is a wall to the garden; the foot-marks were near the wall, and just near to the trees where I found the stick. On the 22d of January I went to John's coffee-house, at half-past one o'clock, and saw the prisoner; I said,"Good morning to you, Mr. Barton" - one of Colonel Gordon's attendants was in the room; the prisoner went up to him, and said, "Are you Mr. Barton" - he said,"I am;" they shook hands, and the prisoner said, "Do you want me?" Barton said, "No, that gentleman does," pointing to me - I said I apprehended him on suspicion of the robbery at Melina cottage, and that I was an officer; Todd was present, and said, "You must make a mistake, he is a gentleman" - I told him I had made no mistake, he was the man; I then proceeded to search him, and in his right-hand coat pocket I found this bunch of keys, and in his other coat pocket a pocket-book-after I told him he must go with me he said, "You may hang me, or transport me, I am quite tired - I know it is all up;" before that he said he knew he had done wrong towards his mother at the time he left Melina cottage, by taking money from her; when I told him of Colonel Gordon's robbery, and that he must go with me, he said,"Must I walk through the streets with you?" I said Yes- I took a pair of boots off his feet at the office, went to the cottage garden, fitted the boots to the marks in the garden, and near the tree, they corresponded with the marks which were not disturbed at all; I had noticed them on the 15th - I have the key which was in the door, but which did not belong to it; it will unlock, but not lock it.

EDWIN SAWTELL re-examined. This is the swordstick - the prisoner was in the habit of walking out with it; I have known it a year and a half to belong to his father, but he used it - these keys are what I left in the portmanteau; part of them belong to Colonel Gordon - these two handkerchiefs are Colonel Gordon's; they were in the portmanteau that night - this one has the Colonel's initials partly on it, and his initials are wholly on the other; this razor is Colonel Gordon's, and was left in the portmanteau.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope as the witness, cannot prove them all taken at one time, it will be in my favour as to the capital punishment; the dwelling-house is my mother's - Colonel Gordon is only a lodger.

EDWIN SAWTELL . The Colonel had four rooms - we were going to move out that night; I had packed up the things and locked the portmanteau; I was absent about an hour and a half - I had locked my room, and put the key of that room on a chair in my sitting-room; the prisoner's mother occupied the ground floor only - the Colonel was only a lodger.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-162

688. WILLIAM RITCHIE, alias JOHN SMITH , was indicted for that, at the General Session of the Delivery of the Gaol of Newgate, holden for the City of London, on Thursday, the 15th of July, in the 5th year of the present King, he (by the name of William Ritchie ) was in due form of law convicted for unlawfully, &c., on the 19th of June, in the 5th year aforesaid, at St. Gregory by St. Paul, obtaining by a false pretence from one John Woolfit , 1 tea chest, value 3l., with intent to cheat and defraud him thereof; against the Statute; and was thereupon ordered to be Transported heyond the seas for the term of Seven Years,&c.; and that he, afterwards, on the 16th of February, in the 10th year, &c., at St. Luke, feloniously was at large, without any lawful cause, within His Majesty's dominions to wit, at the said parish of St. Luke, before the expiration of the term for which he had been so ordered to be transported ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, that at the Delivery of the Gaol of Newgate, holden for the City of London, on Thursday, the 15th of July, in the 5th year aforesaid, the said William Ritchie , alias John Smith , was ordered by the said Court to be Transported beyond the seas for the term of Seven Years, and that he, afterwards, on the said 16th of February, feloniously was at large in His Majesty's dominions, that is to say, at St. Luke, without any lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term for which he was so ordered to be transported; against the Statue, &c.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18290219-163

689. WILLIAM RITCHIE, alias JOHN SMITH , was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , 1 watch, value 1l., and 1 silver spoon, value 3s. , the goods of Daniel Hobbs ; and JANE SMITH was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen ; against the Statute.

DANIEL HOBBS . I live in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's , and am a carman ; I have known the prisoner fourteen years - it was my employer who got him transported; I first saw him after that about the 5th of February - he was at my house on Sunday, the 15th; I invited him to come and have dinner - he dined with me about a quarter-past one o'clock, and after dinner he said he had not had such a dinner for four years. About four o'clock I got up, and called him out of the back room into my front to look at the room - he said he would live in there if he were me; my wife said she liked to keep one room decent - he then turned from the room, and I heard him go down stairs; I directly went to look for my tea-spoon, and heard him go out of the front-door - I missed it directly off a box in the corner of the back room, with some tea-things; his hat, which had laid on the box by the side of it, was gone, as well as the spoon - I looked on the mantel-piece, and missed my watch from the same room; it hung on the nail when I went into the front room - I lost nothing else; I went directly to Buckle, the officer, and on the Tuesday my watch was found - I only know the other prisoner by seeing her walk about the

streets; I do not know her surname; I have seen her about the streets before he left the country; she was not at my house that day - I cannot say whether she is his wife; they used to be together - I have seen them together once since his return, and I believe they lived together; she has a child by him - his name was Ritchie before he was transported; I never knew him by the name of Smith.

WILLIAM FOLKARD . I am a pawnbroker. I have known the female prisoner a considerable time; last Monday, about eleven o'clock in the morning, she pawned this watch for 6s., in the name of Mrs. Collard, who I know very well - I do not know the prisoner's name; she lives in Golden-lane - I only know her as servant to Collard; she had come to my shop in that character, always bringing property from Mrs. Collard, and I know Mrs. Collard was in the habit of sending her - the watch is worth 10s.

JAMES BUCKLE . I am an officer. On Sunday afternoon, I was looking for the prisoner about the former indictment, when the prosecutor gave me information, and on Monday evening, about eight o'clock, I saw him and the female prisoner in Golden-lane - he turned into Charity-alley, and I apprehended him; he asked what I wanted him for - I told him I should tell him by and by; when I got into Old-street the female prisoner followed us, and the man attempted to escape - I saw Fordham, and called him to my assistance; I then asked where he had dined yesterday - he then made a violent attempt to get away; I was compelled to carry him to the watch-house - I searched him, and found nothing on him; the female prisoner came to the watch-house, and I took her- I told the watch-house-keeper's wife to search her, and she produced to me a small purse, containing several duplicates - one for the watch pawned that day: she said at the office that she was married to the prisoner - she did not say how she came by the watch; the man gave his name as John Smith.

JAMES FORDHAM , JUN. I assisted in securing the man. ELIZABETH WALKER . My husband is watch-house-keeper. I searched the female prisoner, but found nothing; after that I thought I saw her hand go towards the ground - I pushed her aside, and on the ground was a leather purse, with some duplicates in it; when I picked them up she said, "That is my property" - I said, "If it is, the officer will give it to you," and there was the duplicate of the watch.

Prisoner RITCHIE. The female is entirely innocent -I gave her the watch, telling her it was my own, and that I bought it for 5s; she did not know where I got it.

RITCHIE - GUILTY . Aged 25.

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-164

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

690. DAVID DANIELS was indicted for that he, on the 27th of January , at St. Giles in the Fields, being in the dwelling-house of Robert Tarr , feloniously did steal, in the said dwelling-house, 1 lb. of sugar, value 7d.; 3 lbs. of cheese, value 2s.; 2 crowns, 8 half-crowns, 25 shillings, 10 sixpences, and the sum of 10s. in copper monies, numbered, the property of the said Robert Tarr ; and having committed the felony aforesaid, afterwards, about three o'clock in the night of the same day, the same dwelling-house feloniously and burglariously did break to get out of the same, and feloniously and burglariously did get out of the same ; against the Statute, &c.

ROBERT TARR . I live at No. 43, Broad-street, St. Giles' , and am a chandler . On Tuesday evening, the 27th of January, at a quarter before eleven o'clock, I was shutting up my shop, and let the prisoner in at the door - he went up to the front-garret to go up to a lodger of mine, named Couchman: he asked me to let him go up to Couchman on business - he went up, and I immediately fastened my street-door, bolted and chained it; I was the last person up, and the first who came down in the morning, which was at a quarter before seven o'clock - I found the streetdoor unbolted and unchained, but it was then shut - the passage-door leading from the staircase, into the shop was broken open: I had locked it, and had the key in my own room; I have a wife, but no child - I have another lodger, named Walker - they were gone to bed before me, and had not come down in the morning: I missed 3l. 10s. in silver and copper from the till in my shop, also 3lbs. of cheese, and 1 lb. of sugar; I am sure the prisoner is the person I let in at night: I thought he was going to remain there all night with Couchman; I had known him for a few weeks - I had only lived there myself a few weeks; I have not found my property.

WILLIAM COUCHMAN . I lodged in the prosecutor's house on the 22d of January; I went to bed at a quarter-past nine o'clock, and had not seen the prisoner that night; I did not get up till the landlord awoke me in the morning, at half-past seven.

ABRAHAM WALKER . I lodged at Tarr's, in the first-floor back-room: I went to bed about nine o'clock, and got up soon after Tarr, who came and said he had been robbed; I had seen nothing of the prisoner - I was awake at one o'clock in the morning, and heard a terrible racketing down stairs, which continued till after two, when I got out of bed, and looked out of the window, but could see nobody.

ROBERT TARR . The watchman is not here; he did not wake me in the night; he told me in the morning he had found the street door open at half-past three o'clock - it was just getting light when I came down - it was hardly light; I heard no noise in the night; it was a little before seven o'clock when I came down stairs; I let the prisoner in at the front door, which is a private door - there is a side door from that into the shop, and that door I found broken open in the morning - it was shut when I let the prisoner in; I opened it to let him through to go to Couchman; he had knocked at the street-door, but I let him in at the private door - he did not come into the shop, but into the passage; there is a door communicating from the passage to the shop; I counted the money in the till just before I shut up: my wife came down after me in the morning; the lock of the door seemed to be cut out by some instrument - it is a double lock; the woodwork of the door-post which the bolt goes into was cut out - no instrument was found there; the private door was put too when I came down.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his previous good character and youth .

Before Mr. Justice Gazelee.

Reference Number: t18290219-165

691. THOMAS FITZGIBBON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , 1 muff, value 2s.; 2 petticoats, value 2s.; 1 pair of stays, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d., and 1 shift, value 1s. , the goods of Eliza Williams .

ELIZA WILLIAMS . I live in Turnmill-street, and am a dress-maker . On the 14th of February I met the prisoner in Euston-square - he asked where I was going; I said,"Towards home;" he said where did I live - I said I could not tell him; he wished me to drink with him - I refused; he said I had better, and in order to get rid of him, I drank with him at the Plasterers' Arms public-house; I came out; he left me for about ten minutes, and then accosted me in the New-road ; I crossed over and turned to the back of the church; he stood and talked to me for a few minutes, and wished me to go with him - I declined; he took my muff out of my hand - these things were in it; I did not resist his taking it - he was round the corner before I could call out; I did not see my things again till they were at Hatton-garden; he was about a quarter of an hour with me; I saw him in custody afterwards.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask me to give you some gin? A. No; I had some gin and water with you - I did not take 2s. 1 1/2d. out of your hand; he left me at a quarter-past ten o'clock,

JOHN NEWITT . I am a watchman. On the 15th of February, about a quarter to one o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming along Compton-street, with a bundle under his coat - I was at the end of Compton-street; I asked what he had got - he said, Nothing; I opened his coat and saw the muff; he said a lady had given him 2s. 6d. to carry it to Margaret-row; I took him to the watch-house; he then said his wife and he had had a few words, and he had brought it out of his own room; I asked what was in the muff - he said, Nothing; some things rolled out on the pavement - I insisted on taking him along; he said I was only hindering him - he then said he had taken it from a woman in the street, who had robbed him of half a crown; I took him to the watch-house.

JOHN BROWN . I am a watchman. I received the prisoner from Newitt, and have the articles here.

ELIZA WILLIAMS . These are mine - I did not take any money from him at all; he changed a half-crown for the drink, took his change, and left the house - I believe he had some silver about him at the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I met her in Euston-square; she asked me for gin; I treated her with two quarterns; she came back, and wanted me to go with her behind the church; I took out 2s. 1 1/2d. and said it was all I had - she snatched it out of my hand; I took her muff, and said I would not give it to her till she gave me my money - I walked away and was looking about, expecting to fall in with her again.

JOHN BROWN. He had 1s. in his pocket at the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18290219-166

692. JAMES GALLAWIN, alias GALLOWAY , and GEORGE SEWELL, alias GREENWOOD, alias SEYMOUR , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of Edward Sherman , on the 3d of September , and stealing therein 1 quire of paper, value 2s.; 24 pieces of paper, value 26s., each of the said pieces of paper being stamped with a stamp of 1s.; 20 quires of paper value 2l.; 280 pieces of paper, value 62l., each being stamped with a stamp of 2s. 6d.; 2 quires of paper, value 2s.; 48 pieces of paper, value 36l. 4s., each being stamped with a stamp of 15s.; 9 quires of paper, value 18s.; 216 pieces of paper, value 216l., each being stamped with a stamp of 1l.; 300 pieces of parchment, value 333l. 15s., each being stamped with a stamp of 1l.; 300 pieces of parchment, value 408l. 15s., each being stamped with a stamp of 1l. 5s.; 120 pieces of paper, value 108l. 10s., each being stamped with a stamp of 1l. 10s.; 50 pieces of parchment, value 92l. 1s. 8d., each being stamped with a stamp of 1l. 15s.; 50 pieces of parchment, value 96l. 5s., each being stamped with a stamp of 1l. 15s.; 48 pieces of paper, value 96l. 4s., each being stamped with a stamp of 2l.; 24 printed pieces of paper, value 4l. 8s. 3d., each being stamped with a stamp of 2l.; 5 pieces of parchment, value 17s. 6d.; 5 pieces of parchment, value 15l., each being stamped with a stamp of 3l.; 24 pieces of paper, value 14l. 4s. 4d., each being stamped with a stamp of 3l.; 25 pieces of parchment value 154l. 7s. 6d., each being stamped with a stamp of 6l.; 50 pieces of parchment, value 608l. 15s., each being stamped with a stamp of 12l.; 12 pieces of paper, value 144l. 1s., each being stamped with a stamp of 12l.; 25 pieces of parchment, value 629l. 7s. 6d., each being stamped with a stamp of 25l.; 120 pieces of paper, value 48l. 10s., each bearing a stamp of 1s.; 360 pieces of paper, value 721l. 10s., each being stamped with a stamp of 5s.; 240 pieces of paper, value 577l., each being stamped with a stamp of 6s.; 240 pieces of paper, value 817l., each being stamped with a stamp of 8s. 6d.; 480 pieces of paper, value 32l., each being stamped with a stamp of 2d.; 240 pieces of paper, value 48l., each being stamped with a stamp of 6d., and 72 pieces of paper, value 72l., each being stamped with a stamp of 2s. 6d. , the property of His Majesty our Sovereign Lord the King ; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the goods aforesaid, the property of his Majesty our Sovereign Lord the King, of a certain evil-disposed person, which had been then lately before stolen by the said evil-disposed person, they well knowing the same to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

MESSRS. GURNEY, BOLLAND, and BRODRICK, conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS ALLEN . I am warehouse-keeper of the goods at Somerset-house . On the 3d of September last, eight parcels of different denominations of stamps, were made up and directed for Isaac Blackburn , Esq., Stamp-office, Manchester - the value of the whole was about 10,000l.; Salmon, one of the packers, assisted me - they were delivered to Thomas Ranger , a porter, in the employ of Mr, Sherman, of the Bull and Mouth inn - there were two invoices sent with them, which were signed by myself; the

next day I heard of the loss of some of the parcels - I sent Thomas Salmon to the Bull and Mouth for the remainder, and he brought back five parcels; I then ascertained, that the amount of those which were lost was 5,613l. 1s. 8d.; I went to a police-office on the 24th of December (I think), and saw the parcels which I had packed up on the 3d of September; I am sure they were the same; I took them to the Stamp-office, and they have been in my custody-these are them; they were in brown paper, which had been taken off, but they do not appear to have been opened.

THOMAS RANGER . I am porter at the Bull and Mouth. On the 3d of September I took some parcels from the Stamp-office to the Bull and Mouth - I do not know how many - there were some for Lombard-street; I delivered at the Bull and Mouth all which were to go there - they were for Manchester - I did not see how they were directed.

JOHN BLISSET . I am a book-keeper at the Bull and Mouth; Mr. Edward Sherman is the proprietor of the office. On the 3d of September, about five o'clock in the evening, I received eight parcels from Ranger to go to Manchester, and placed them under the desk in the office, where goods to go by all the coaches are placed; they were directed to Isaac Blackburn, Esq., Manchester, and were to have gone that evening, but were not in time - they would have gone the next evening at five o'clock; I left at eight o'clock that evening, and went next morning at ten minutes before five; I saw a parcel on the floor in the office, I stopped down and saw it was directed Blackburn, Manchester; I saw a hole in the office floor, and picked up an iron crow-bar close to the hole; the floor of the office is over a stable below; a person could get from the stable to the office through that hole in the floor; it was large enough for me to have got through - I found a hand-book, a dog-iron, and a broken gimblet; I then missed three out of the eight parcels; they were nearly of the same size - there was one smaller parcel which was not taken; the entrance to the office is from the yard, but the entrance to the stable is from Bull and Mouth-street - there is no communication from the yard to the stable, they must go round to the street; I did not go into the stable that morning - no person could have got from the stable into the office but through that hole.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure there was no access but through that hole? A. Yes; the office joins the inn - there is no communication between the inn and the office but through the yard - it is a large concern; Mr. Edward Sherman is the sole proprietor of the inn, and of all the coaches.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Do you know what parish it is in? A. It is St. Ann and St. Agnes - the coach office is the place where parcels are deposited.

JAMES JEFFERY . I am a book-keeper at the Bull and Mouth. On the 3d of September I had eight Stamp-office parcels under my care; I locked up the office at ten o'clock - the parcels were then safe under the desk.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am guard of the Worcester coach. On the morning of the 4th of September, I went to the Bull and Mouth at a quarter before five o'clock - I saw the floor had been broken, and went into the stable - I found the gas smelt very strong; the stable door was unlocked, and the corn-bin had been removed into the centre of the stable, just under the hole in the floor; a person by the help of the corn-bin could have made that hole; I found in the stable a silk handkerchief and a gimblet - there was a saw found, but I did not find it; I observed something, which proved to be a bag, against the window - it was just break of day.

- GARNON. I am parish clerk of St. Ann and St. Agnes. The Bull and Mouth coach-office is in the parish of St. Ann and St. Agnes; I do not know the stable.

STEPHEN DAVIES . I am a working jeweller, and live in Great Sutton-street, Clerkenwell. I have known Gallawin five or six years; he has carried jewellery about the country for sale - he used to employ me in his trade; on the evening of the 3d of September he called at my house while I was at work - he asked me to write a letter for him; I said, certainly; I had before written on notes for him; I never knew that he could write; I went into my house, and got pen, ink, and paper for him - he pulled out his watch, and said he had a friend to meet at the Bull and Mouth, and asked if I would go there with him and write the letter there - I took some brown paper from home, and got a sheet of white going along; I went to the Bull and Mouth and found the prisoner, who had got there first - we went into the coffee-room, where I wrote a letter according to his dictation; I folded it up - I believe he folded up the parcel, and tied it and sealed it; I directed it to"Mr. Dalrymple, Star and Garter, Worcester, by the Sovereign, carriage paid;" it was dated the 4th of September, 1828, - this is the letter I wrote - (read).

DEAR SIR - I received your parcel, and sorry I cannot give you the price you ask: the market price is much lower than when I dealt with you before: if you will take off 7 1/2 per cent. I can take the whole lot. your's, Sir, truly, JAMES McKENZIE .

Please to return an answer as soon as possible, the market price may be yet lower.

Q. How long do you thing you were in the coffee-room? A. I should think from half to three-quarters of an hour - during which time Gallawin went out once or twice; once he went to buy some string, as the waiter had not any - but he did not bring any; after the parcel was sealed and directed, he put it into his pocket; I did not see it again; he told me he was going to take it into the coach-office to book it; I waited at the coffee-room door while he went into the booking-office, and then we went to Williams' coffee-house in St. Martin's-le-grand.

COURT. Q. Is the door of the coffee-room near the booking-office? A. It is on the right-hand side, and the other is on the left - you can see the door of one from the other; I saw him go in, and that was the only time I saw him go in there; he was absent a few minutes at the time he said he went to buy some string - I think four or five minutes.

Re-examined. Q. I believe you shortly after parted? A. Yes; he gave me a blue bag, and asked me to take it home - I took it to my own house; I saw him again on the Monday following - as near as I can recollect, he said he had a particular favour to ask me; I told him I would serve him in any thing I could - he said he had been making some speculations in business, he was afraid if they proved unfortunate he should lose his little all, and would I be kind enough to take care of two trunks for him - I told him he might put them in the workshop;

he said it was not a safe place, as the trunks were valuable, and the workshop was in the yard; he asked if I had a friend a little way from home - I said I had a sister - he had heard me speak of her, no doubt; her name is Haskins - she lives at Shepherd's-bush, and is the wife of Mr. Haskins a jeweller, of Regent-street; he asked me to go down the next day, and ask my sister's leave, which I did; he came the next day for an answer - I got my sister's permission, and told him so; he appointed me to meet him the next morning, which was Wednesday - he called at my house about ten o'clock, and we went as far as Newport-market; I was talking to a person whom I knew in the market, and he said "I will go on to the coffee-shop;" I rather think he said he had had no breakfast; I got to the coffee-shop in about half an hour - it is opposite the coach-stand in the Surrey-road, near the Rev. Rowland Hill's chapel; I found Galloway there - we then went in search of a carter to take away the trunks; we got a cart, after many inquiries, in Tower-street, Westminster-road, of one watling, I think; he did not tell me where the trunks were till after we had got the cart; he then pulled a piece of paper and a pencil out of his pocket, and told me to write down "No. 21, Richardson-street, Long-lane, Bermondsey;" he ran on first, and I and the carter went in the cart together - we overtook him just as we got up to Richardson-street; we saw him tying up his shoe; there is no thoroughfare in the street, and just as we were turning the cart round, I saw him knocking at the door - I saw a man and a tall woman, his wife - I now know that man's name is Garratt; I saw Gallawin. but I do not recollect seeing any other person; he and the carter brought out a small trunk first: the carter said to me, "You must assist with this other," and we all three assisted, and got the large one into the cart; Gallawin gave me a sovereign to pay the expenses on the road - he then went in, and we went away; the trunks were never brought on my premises - the carter and I took them to my sister's, at Shepherd's-bush, and left them there; Gallawin did not go with me; he called in the evening at my house; I told him what expenses I had been at on the road: I think he was waiting at my house when I came back - he then said he should be able to serve me or pay me for my trouble some time; I said I was perfectly satisfied with the way in which he had assisted me in my business: he had been a good customer. I called at Mrs. Haskin's towards the latter end of the month, and she told me she was going to remove further down into the country; I did not tell Gallawin of this. but the trunks remained with my sister till the 26th of september - I then took them to Kensington-square, to the house of Mr. Jonathan Smith Hamston - I frequently saw the prisoner the same as usual; he came to my house in December, and I told him my friend wanted the room in which the trunks were; he begged me to let them remain a week longer, as he did not know what he should do with them; on Sunday evening, the 21st of December, he called again, and said he had engaged with a man to take them away the next morning, and had got a friend who would take them; he appointed to come to me with a horse and cart on Monday morning at ten o'clock - he came into my shop, and went with me to the horse and cart in Goswell-street; one Lloyd was the driver - I had never seen him before; I got into the cart with Lloyd; Gallawin said to him, "Drive on fast Tom, and do as this gentleman directs;" Gallawin did not go with us - I took Lloyd and the cart to the Rose and Crown public-house, just through Knightsbridge turnpike; I left Lloyd there, and went on to Kensington-square; I met my brother there by appointment - I got the trunks from Hamston's; I then came back to the Rose and Crown, at Knightsbridge, where I gave the cart and the trunks in it to Lloyd; I went back, and my brother followed the cart - this was on the 22d of December; I gave Lloyd no direction, for I did not know where he was to take them to: Gallawin had given me no further direction, but to give them to Lloyd - in the evening, Gallawin came to my house much agitated; he said, "Where did you leave that fellow?" meaning the carman with the cart; I told him I had left the man and the cart just beyond Knightsbridge; he said, "At Mr. Davies'? I hope you have not deceived me;" he only sat down a minute; he said, "I am in a great burry - I will take a cabriolet, and see if I can find him;" he said he had somebody with him, but I saw no one - he came again the next evening, which was the 23d, and said, "Mr. Davies, have you heard the news?" meaning the loss of his trunks; I said, Yes, I had seen the account in the newspapers about the trunks being taken; he said, "Oh, it will be my ruin, and it will break my wife's heart;" he said he had eaten nothing all day; he called again in February, a few days before he was taken - it was before the February Session, and on a Monday; he said he was very poor, and wanted money, as they expected him over the water to pay Lloyd for loss of time and expenses.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have thought a great deal about this; does it not occur to you that it is the strangest story that ever was heard? A. No, it does not. I knew his family, and he knew mine; he represented this as his own business; I did not know of any speculation - I wrote as he directed; I thought nothing particular of writing a letter in another man's name; I did not know but it was his friend's name - I parted with him that night about eight o'clock; I may have been in the office at the Bull and Mouth to take a parcel or two - I recollect going there many years ago, and only that once that I recollect; it was to take a place in the Union coach to go to Ireland; it must be twenty years ago - it was on the 7th or 8th that he called on me and told me of these two trunks - I had not seen any thing in the newspaper about large property having been taken from the Bull and Mouth; I seldom see a paper - I knew nothing of it; Gallawin represented himself as a jeweller, and I worked for him as such; I knew nothing of his business, but he said he had made a speculation, and must have the trunks put somewhere; I had no supposition as to whether trunks of this size were full of jewellery - I do not know how he traded; it did not strike me as at all strange; I did it to serve him, and to give his trunks house room; my wife saw him at my house, and there was a gentleman named Boyle at my house, who lodged with me - he is gone to America, I believe: he has been gone this four months; if I had been aware, I could tell you exactly the date; I do not know that the prisoner went to Shepherd's-bush while they were there - I went

two or three times, but I did not see the trunks; I went with my brother to fetch them; the prisoner did not go - he trusted all to me; the people at Kensington-square and at my sister's, never saw the prisoner; he hired the cart of Lloyd - I told Lloyd nothing, but to wait while I went to fetch the trunks; I went from Knightsbridge to Kensington-square - the cart could have driven right up to the door, but I left it there; I had no suspicion of any thing wrong - I had no occasion to suspect him; on the 23d of December he came again - I had the good fortune to read the newspaper that day: I did not go to the Stamp-office to tell them all about it; my brother communicated it: I told my brother the dilemma I had got into at that time - that was a few days before they were stopped in the cart; I did not know they were stamps - the dilemma I was in was being acquainted with the prisoner, and having these trunks in my possession; I had no notion of what they contained, but I told my brother I suspected there was something wrong, and advised with him how to act - he said "Leave it to me, and I will act in the best way I can:" I did not know any thing about stamps till they were taken from Lloyd; I dare say my brother made a communication at that time, but I did not; I did know of the robbery at the Bull and Mouth, but not till December; I was living all the time in Sutton-street: I have told the truth as far as I can judge - it was a little time before Christmas, perhaps about the 20th; it was just before Lloyd was taken: a friend of the prisoner's (for whom I had done business) called and told me - I do not know his name, he is a man the prisoner introduced to me; I then told my brother about the dilemma I was in; I proceeded to remove the stamps with the help of the cart, on the 22d of December - I never told a police-officer or a solicitor; I told my brother I received these trunks, and I understood they contained some valuable property belonging to the Stamp-office; that was before I assisted to remove them with Lloyd; I was first spoken to, to tell what I knew, a short time before Gallawin was taken - it must have been the beginning of January.

Mr. GURNEY. Q. How long before he was taken up did he call on you? A. Four or five days - the person who gave me information was a person who he had introduced to me; he came once or twice, and said if I would give up the property I had in my possession belonging to Gallawin, he should be able to give me a sum of money and at last he said they were stamps belonging to Government, and if I would give them up to him he would give me 500l.; I refused it, and made the communication to my brother - he desired me to leave it to him, and he would do the best the could to get me out of the dreadful scrape I had got into.

COURT. Q. How many conversations had you with this person? A. He came first with a diamond pin to repair, and again two or three days following - that was before he told me the contents; I did not ask his name, and he did not tell me.

THOMAS DAVIFS. I am brother to Stephen Davies and am a mariner. I assisted my brother in removing some trunks from Haskins' to Hamston's, on a Saturday, I think the 26th of September; on the 22d of December I was at Kensington-square before he arrived - he and I put the trunks into a cart; there was no one in the cart then - I saw him go on the road to Knightsbridge; before that time my brother had told me what he had been informed was in the trunks - in consequence of which I went to the Stamp-office, and gave information to a police-officer; I saw my brother get out of the cart at Knightsbridge, and a man got in - I never lost sight of it till it was stopped.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You call yourself a mariner, what do you mean by that? A. I mean, the last situation I held was captain's-steward, on board an Indiaman - I went to India; that is three years ago -I have followed ivory-turning, to which I was an apprentice; I was with a brother-in-law, my sister's husband, who had a coffee and smoking room in King-street, Covent-garden - I was a servant or waiter at that Divan, because I had seen hooker smoking abroad, and could put him in the way of it; I had no wages, but perquisites - I have made two voyages to India, both in the capacity of captain's under-steward; I went with Captain Stevens, of the Coldstream Guards, and Captain Drummond, of the Castle Huntley - I had property of my own after my father's decease, to support me since I left my brother; my brother asked me to accompany him to Kensington, and I did - he said what he had to remove was very weighty, and he could not do it himself; I went to see my sister also - I have been in the habit of reading the newspapers frequently, and walking the streets daily - upon my oath I never read or saw any account of the loss of these stamps from the Bull and Mouth till after he asked me to go and remove the trunks; I think it was in the middle of November I saw it in the Morning Advertiser - I never heard of it, or read it before, on my oath; I did not speak to my brother about it when I read it in the Morning Advertiser, to the best of my knowledge -I might in general conversation; I never did, in the month of November, to the best of my knowledge, except in the course of conversation - I never remember saying any thing to him about it; it would not have struck me at all - I mentioned to my brother that I read it in the Morning Advertiser, but not at that time, I am confident; it was not till the stamps were seized at the turnpike - I did not then know what they were, only by information; I never knew what they were: my brother informed me that the boxes were not the property of the party who placed them there.

Q. Now, do you swear that in that sentence you have given the whole sum and substance of that conversation? A. He told me he had information that the property in those trunks was not the property of the person who placed them there; I give that, upon due deliberation, as the conversation, to the best of my recollection - I had given the information at Somerset-house previous to this; from information received in the first instance from my brother - I had no information from my brother that they were stamps; I did not hear his evidence.

Q. Then if he has sworn that before the stamps were stopped at Knightsbridge, he had told you the trunks contained property belonging to the Stamp-office, is that true? A. I received information in his presence - he told me he suspected the property in them did not belong to the party who left them.

Q. Did your brother tell you himself that the property belonged, as he was told, to the Stamp-office, before the

stamps were stopped at Knightsbridge? A. My brother told me that he had information that the property in these boxes was the property of the Stamp-office - there was no other person present when he told me so.

Q. Who was the third person whom you said was present that gave you the information? A. I never saw him - I was hidden while he was giving information to my brother: I think my brother told me that he supposed this property belonged to the Stamp-office, the day before the person gave him the information in my presence - it was the latter end of November, or beginning of December; it must be in December; not a week - not many days before they were stopped; my brother first told me he suspected the property contained in the trunks did not belong to the person who placed them there, and he should be told by the person what they were; he said that person was a friend of Gallawin's, and he had done several jobs for him, being introduced by Gallawin - I do not recollect that he told me how long he had known him; I told my brother I considered he had got into the hands of villains, who would try to make a dupe of him, but I would secrete myself, and get what information I could from him - my brother knew I was hiding; my brother asked him first what he supposed the property to be, and he said he would give him a sum for it; my brother asked what he supposed them to be - he said Gallawin was a rogue, and he would make a dupe of him, and the sooner he got rid of those things that he had in his possession the better - my brother said, "What property is it? - you must know, as you seem to have such a wish for it;" he then said, "I will not keep you longer in suspence," or words to that effect, "They are stamps belonging to the Stamp-office," and he would give him 500l. if he would place them in his possession; my brother then said, "It is a serious thing - I little expected any thing of this sort; I cannot give you an answer now, I will see you to-morrow" - I do not recollect any other conversation; he went away; I do not recollect his expressing his surprise at the robbery at the Stamp-office; I do not think he did - if he asked him what stamps they were, it has escaped my memory; this was about a week before the stamps were stopped at Knightsbridge - I did not know from my brother that it was not till after the stamps were stopped, that he read in the newspapers what they contained; I asked this person's name, and he told me he did not know his name - my brother did not ask him his name at that time - I never was in his presence but that once, to my knowledge; I never knew my brother any thing but a jeweller - situated as I was, I did not know how to act; this took place in my brother's work-shop - I could have seized the man; when my brother told me he was to meet him the next day, I said, "Let me he present, and if you will leave it to me I will consider how best to act" - I therefore thought it would be better not to take the parties, but give information at the Stamp-office; I knew my brother had two trunks, and what this man had said, but I did not then know what was in the trunks.

MR. GURNEY. Q. But you watched them till the officer took them? A. Yes.

HELEN DAVIES . I am the wife of Stephen Davies . I have known Gallawin between five and six years - he came to my husband on the 3d of September; they went out together: before my husband went out, he asked me for some paper - I had not heard any particular request which the prisoner made to him, only he asked him to bring him some paper; when my husband came home that night he brought a bag, with a great coat in it - in a day or two after the prisoner called, asked for Mr. Davies, and asked me for the bag that he gave Mr. Davies; I gave it him, with the great coat in it - I frequently saw him at my husband's, between that time and the 21st of December; on the evening of the 21st of December I saw him at the door, and they had some conversation, but I do not know what it was - next morning, the 22d, I saw him again; he and my husband went out together - he came back the same evening, and appeared much agitated; he came in very quick, and said, "Mr. Davies, that fellow has not come back yet - I have been waiting all day for him, where did you leave him?" my husband said"Opposite the Rose and Crown, below Knightsbridge, about one o'clock, with the horse, cart and trunks, quite safe;" he said he would go down the road, and see if he could hear or see any thing of him - this was about six o'clock in the evening; he then went away, and I saw him the next evening - he came and asked Mr. Davies if he had heard the news; he said, "Yes, I have seen it in the newspaper."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you any memorandum-book in which you minuted down all these things? A. No, only from circumstances; it was at Bartholomew-fair time - I cannot tell who called on the 2d, or who called on the 4th, particularly; we have a great many call on business - I remember all these days that have been mentioned, and I could state some others if it were required; the prisoner did not call on other days I did not go to my sister's while the trunks were there, nor to the house in Kensington-square - I never heard of the robbery of the stamps; my husband never talked to me about it - I did not know of his having these trunks at my sister's while they were there - he never told me that he had such a thing in his care; after he had moved them he said he had two trunks in his care - I forget just now what day he told me; it was before Christmas - this story had been known at the police-office a long time before.

JAMES GARRATT . I am a painter, and live at No. 21, Richardson-street, Long-lane, Bermondsey. I know Sewell ever since I was at school - we are no relations that I know of, but I have known him nearly thirty years; he called upon me in September last, I think, but I cannot be quite certain - he said a friend of his, or a person he knew, wanted to save a few things, and would I take care of them, or allow them to be brought to my house; I assented to it, and wanted to know when they would come; he did not seem rightly to know - I think they came the following morning, about eight o'clock, as near as I can recollect; he was at the door when I opened it - there was a vehicle, whether a cart or a chaise-cart I cannot say; it was drawn by one horse - there were two other persons with Sewell; I do not know whether there were any more - I did not know those persons then; I was not dressed; having opened the door, I ran back to my room, took the key, opened the front door, and

pushed it open for them to put whatever they brought in- I slept in the back room: I did not at that time see what they brought in; I went to dress myself - when I returned I saw Sewell, and either be or one of the other parties said something to me - I cannot say positively who it was; I afterwards went into the room, and saw there were three largish parcels - they might be the size of this parcel, or smaller; they were not larger - they were in what I should call a sack, as if you took a sack and wrapped them up; one stood on the other two, on the top of my little drawers, and the size of this one makes me think that they would not have lain very comfortably on my drawers, as they are but small ones - I saw the parcels again the week following; a person then came to my door, and when I opened it, I recollected him to be one of the persons who came when the things were brought; in consequence of what he said I expected something to be brought, and a large trunk came, which was taken into the front room; I did not see any thing done with it, but when I came into the room again there were two trunks, and from the disappearance of the parcels I supposed they were put into them; Sewell came afterwards, and I told him that these things were going to be removed, or something to that purpose - I took him to the front room, and, to the best of my recollection, the person who came first was then cording the trunks; he went away, and Sewell remained with me; after that a cart came to the door - the person had been gone but a very short time; I thought he went for some persons, or for a vehicle, but he did not come with the cart; three persons came - I cannot swear whether Gallawin was one; my belief is that he was a young man - I cannot swear that he was the man- I did not know either of the other men: there are two men who say they are the men - I now know Stephen Davies, but if he had not told me he was one, I should not have known him; these things were put into the cart by the carter and Stephen Davies - the cart was driven away; one of the men remained a few moments, and took a lunch with us - whether one or two lunched, I cannot be certain; I was going out, and there was a bit of lunch on the table.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you been a painter? A. Fifteen years, ever since I was first apprenticed - I never was a tailor, nor represented myself as such; I could not recollect at first whether this might not be in October - I now think it must be September, but am not certain: I think it is within this fortnight that I first told of Sewell calling on me; I went to the Stamp-office, but it was not there I told it- I told it to a gentleman, whose name I believe is Mr. Tebbs; I was sent for by an officer of Queen-square - I remember Maltwood and Woodberry being examined; I was asked to put my hat on, and I did - I did not know Maltwood before that morning, when we passed him with the officers, and they spoke to him; I have bought a trunk of Maltwood - I once lived at No. 12, Kennington-lane; I have been at Bow-street - I was at Bow-street once on a charge; I will swear I have not been there half a dozen times - it is a long time ago; I do not recollect having been there since, not lately - if it was a long time back I should recollect it the better.

Q. Have you ever been at Union-hall on your own account? A. I do not recollect; I do not recollect ever being charged with uttering bad money at Union-hall; I have been in Horsemonger-lane, but not as a prisoner, only as a visitor - I do not think I ever was within the gates of Cold Bath-fields prison; I never was there for six months.

Q. Are you the person who goes by the name of Jem Green, or Tom Wood ? A. Yes; I have been in custody for a few hours at Bow-street - I hardly know what the charge was myself; I did not expect to be asked the question - I was placed at the bar; I believe there were more offences than one, but what they were I cannot recollect - I believe it was about notes.

Q. Was there one John Smith there? A. Yes; he was hung.

Q. Well, that was one occurrence; were you ever at Bow-street alone, or without John Smith? A. I recollect once, but I was discharged; somebody had lost a pocket-book - that was about the same time as the other; I do not recollect when the third charge was - I was there another time, but I was not put to the bar; I do not recollect any more - I believe that was the last; it may be half a dozen years ago - it is more than two years - I do not think I have been in Bow-street office these two years; the last time I went with a woman, but I was not put to the bar, nor any charge made against me - I was taken there with a person I was in company with; I was not examined as a witness - they seemed as if they did not want me, and I went away again; they merely told me I must go along with them - the woman was charged with stealing a watch; I still mean to swear I never was charged at Union-hall.

Q. Were you ever charged there as an utterer of bad money? A. I cannot recollect that I have; I do not recollect going to Worship-street; I have gone by the names of Jem Green , Jem Wood , Seymour, and Garratt -I do not recollect any other; I should not have recollected Wood if you had not mentioned it - I was charged with stealing silver spoons and silver watches, but I never saw them, and there is the man that charged me with it - it was in his dining-room; he was my master - I went away shortly after; I knew a man named Dudfield, who is now dead - I understood he died in this country; I mean Dudfield who used to live in Shire-lane, and was afterwards transported; I did not see him transported - I lodged in his house; I recollect a person named Lynch, but I do not recollect what has become of him - I did not see him transported; I know Long Tom, alias John Smith - that is the man you mentioned before; I do not know Mrs. Waddle, who kept a colour-shop in Long-acre- I recollect a person in Long-acre telling me I had given a note that was not good, and I gave the money for it; I gave a bad note to Mr. Evans, a tailor, but I paid it.

Q. Have you since that time been a dealer in dead bodies? A. No, I never have to my knowledge; I may have been to St. Bartholomew's-hospital with persons who died afterwards - I have been there, and at other hospitals, and there might have been dead bodies there.

Q. But were you not there selling them? A. I do not suppose I am the same person you mean; I may have had the money produced from such things, but I never sold

them - I cannot exactly say how often I have sold such a thing myself.

Q. But may you not twenty times have had the money for it? A. I may have had part of it; I was at Brixton a very short time, but not as a prisoner - I cannot say I never was inside the walls.

MARIA GARRATT . I am the wife of the last witness. -In September last I remember three parcels coming to my house - I saw them in the evening; they were similar to this, but I think not quite so large - they were all the same size, within a little: I know the person who calls himself Sewell - his name is Greenwood; I have known him twenty years, I believe. I saw the three parcels on a small chest of drawers behind the door: they were there till some time in the next week - I remember a sort of square box or trunk coming while they were there - I was not at my own door when it was taken in; I went in while it was there, with a small latch-key, and went to the other room - I saw the trunk when the persons came to the door; I only saw one, but when they were ready there were two: I did not see Mr. Sewell that day till they were ready to go - there were three men with the cart; Mr. Davies was one of them, as I have heard, but I did not know him: I opened the door to a young man, but cannot say whether it was Gallawin - I cannot recollect him; I have been shewn him before, but it seemed to me to be a younger man - I cannot swear that it was not him; the trunks went away directly, in the cart, Mr. Davies (as they call him) and the carter went away; the young man put on his hat, and he and Greenwood went away - they did step into the back room, to a bit of lunch; they did not sit down - one, if not both, took a bit after the trunks were gone; I did not see any more of the young man - I did not see Greenwood again till I saw him at Queen-square.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. They were smaller parcels than that one? A. I think so, and I think the man was younger than that prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you the wife of James Garratt ? A. Yes; I have been married to him seven years next June - he has never been in trouble since then, to my knowledge; his only name is James Garratt: I never knew him by the name of Jem Wood, or Jem Green, or Seymour - I do not know who may have called him so; I never heard it: I do not remember any thing about a 10l. note - I do not know such a name as John Smith or Long Tom - I never was in a Police-office, or in a Court; I never was in custody about a watch - I never heard of the name of Dudfield; my husband has not lodged with him since I have been married; we have lived in the neighbourhood of Bermondsey in four places - I never was taken with my husband, and discharged with him, about a watch; I do not know Mrs. Waddle, in Long-acre, nor Mr. Appleby, nor Mr. Tait, the jeweller: my husband has not been in the habit of frequenting the hospitals, to my knowledge, since I have been married; there is a coal-hole in our house -I do not make any use of it; my husband puts his own things there, which he wishes to be out of the way - I never see inside, and do not know what is in it; I never saw a corpse in it, or taken out of it, or sacks - I do not know of my husband dealing in bodies, on my oath; he gets his living as a painter - Mr. Pearse, in King-street, is one person he works for; he has worked for him within these two months: he does his heraldry and ornamental work.

MR. CLARKSON to JAMES GARRATT . Q. Did you ever say that the boxes or trunks were brought by a person named Williams? A. Yes, and by a person named Robinson.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 22d of December I went with Woodberry and Forder to Knightsbridge-gate; we stopped a cart, containing two large trunks, which contained three packages, in wrappers - these are them.

WILLIAM MALTWOOD . I am a trunk-maker, and live in Bridge-road, Lambeth. I certainly made these trunks and sold them; I find by my books, which I have here, that I sold two trunks together, corresponding with these, on the 10th of September - they were taken from my shop by a man: I always paste a bill in this part - there has been a bill here, but it has been torn out; I cannot say whether either of the prisoners is the person who came for the trunks - he was a short man, but certainly had no mustachios; they were packed one in another, and helped on the man's head.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you believe Garratt to be the man? A. I cannot say he is - the man who bought them was very like him in stature; he put on his hat, and I said he was about the stature of the man.

JOHN WATLING . I live at No.3, Tower-street, Westminster; I am a greengrocer, and keep a horse and cart. On the 10th of September I was out with it, and when I came home I was told there had been some persons about moving some trunks; I went over the way, and saw Gallawin and Davies - I think, to the best of my recollection Davies asked me if I could move some trunks. but the other was with him, and I said I could - I think Davies said I must go immediately, as they had got two trunks, and wished to meet a gig at Tyburn - I think Gallawin asked me the price; I could not say any thing to that till I saw the trunks: I was ordered to put too immediately, which I did, and when I had put too. Davies got in - he had in his hand a piece of paper, with No.21, Richardson-street on it - whether Bermondsey was on it or not I cannot say; I did not know where Richardson-street was, and Davies did not appear to know; we stopped, and inquired at a butcher's-shop - we went to No. 21. Richardson-street, Long-lane, Bermondsey; we saw Gallawin just outside, stooping tying up his shoe, or something - when we got to No.21, I saw Gallawin in the passage of the house; I cannot be positive whether Davies had then got out or not- when I let down the tail-board Davies told me they were the trunks I was to take; Gallawin was at that time in the house - Davies was not and I saw a female there: I do not know her only by what she says, and I saw Mr. Garratt; Gallawin and I got the small trunk into the cart first- it was partly in the passage: I went into the parlour, and found the other trunk was heavy; I called Davies to help me, and Gallawin - we all helped it in, and I think Garratt helped, but I am not certain; I put the tail-board up, and Davies got in - I drove off to Shepherd's-bush, where we left the trunks, at a cottage: these trunks which are here resemble those I took.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. As far as you

have related, Davies was the spokesman all through? A. Yes, except respecting the charge; I am not certain whether Garratt assisted.

KESIAH WATLING . I am the wife of John Watling, and live at No. 3, Tower-street. I remember Gallawin coming to my husband's house, and Davies with him; to the best of my recollection it was on the 10th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock; they inquired whether my husband removed boxes or trunks; I said, Yes - I do not know which of them spoke: he was not at home, and they said they would go over the way. and wait for him - he afterwards came, and I told him some gentlemen wanted him; I saw them coming across; they met my husband - they were then three or four yards from my door; Gallawin went away, and Davies remained; I did not see any more.

REBECCA HASKINS . I am the wife of William Haskins , a jeweller, of Regent-street. I am sister to Stephen Davies - we had a cottage at Shepherd's-bush; I had two trunks brought there in September last - my brother had spoken to me about them before; I think on the 8th or 9th he asked if I would have two trunks brought there, and they came on the 10th; I was not at home, and did not see them come, but I came home before they were taken out of the cart - my brother and a man who I think was Watling was with him; they remained in the same state till the 27th, I think, when they were taken away by Stephen and Thomas Davies.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Which of your brothers asked you to take charge of them? A. Stephen - he said they were for a friend of his; he did not say any thing about their containing valuable property - they were placed in a public room: he did not tell me they contained the all of a dear friend - they were in the room where my servant slept, and no particular care taken of them.

JONATHAN SMITH HAMSTON . I am a stonemason, and live in Kensington-square; I know Stephen Davies - one Saturday in September he requested my permission to put two trunks in my house - they remained there till the 22d of December, when they were fetched away by Stephen and Thomas Davies - they stood in my drawing-room.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you known Davies long? A. About thirty years: Stephen said they belonged to a friend of his, and asked me to let them be there; he did not say they were valuable, nor tell me to put them in any particular safe place.

COURT. Q. Did you see if any person was with the cart but the two Davies, when they took them away? A. There was no one.

FREDERICK JONES . I am a working jeweller, and live at No. 31, City Garden-place, City-road. I know Stephen Davies and the prisoner Gallawin - I have frequently seen him at Davies' house; I believe Gallawin is a travelling jeweller; I have always considered him as such; I have seen him at Davies on that business; I saw Gallawin at Davies' on the Monday before Christmas day, about ten o'clock in the morning: Stephen Davies was in the shop when Gallawin came in; they both went from the shop with me into the house, staid a few minutes, then returned into the yard, and were in conversation there; Gallawin then came into the shop, and Davies went into the house; he was absent a little while, and then came again with his coat off into the shop; he brought some work into the shop; Gallawin told him to make haste, or they should be too late- Davies then went into the house, returned in a few minutes, and they both went away together.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When were you first asked about all this? A. About three weeks ago, I was sent for - I have a house of my own, and work for Davies sometimes; I recollected the time, because there was a silver dessert spoon lying on the place - Gallawin took it up, and asked me if it was not a good one.

PETER RUTTER . I was a book-keeper at the Bull and Mouth in September last; I believe this parcel was brought to the office - my book is here; I have not the least recollection who brought it, or whether there were one or two persons - it went as directed.

JOHN JONES . I am the landlord of the Star and Garter, at Worcester. This parcel came to my inn directed as it is, for "Mr. Dalrymple, Star and Garter, Worcester - carriage paid;" I did not know such a person - it was there three or four months; I made inquiries about such a person, then opened it, and sent it up to London.

GEORGE GOUGH . I am a constable of Lambeth. I know Thomas Adams - he is a horse dealer, and lives in Providence-place, Surrey-square, Kent-road; Thomas Lloyd is his servant - Lloyd is the person who was taken with the cart; I saw him at Queen-square: I know the prisoner Gallawin: I saw him on Sunday, the 21st of December last, go to Adams' house.

WILLIAM WOODBERRY . I was with Forder and Handley when these things were stopped in the cart which Lloyd was driving; he was taken to Queen-square - I do not know whether Gough saw him there.

RICHARD FORDER . I am an officer. I was with the other officers when we stopped the cart which Lloyd was driving - he drove to Queen-square himself.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I went to Manchester, and took Sewell or Seymour there; I first saw him on Friday week last - I brought him away on the Saturday morning: I did not hold out any promise or threat to him; I asked if he knew a Mr. Garratt in London, near Bermondsey - he said he knew such a person - I said I came to apprehend him respecting some stamps which were stolen sometime ago at the Bull and Mouth - Lavender, a constable, of Manchester, was with me; the prisoner said he should soon get over that; Lavender said " George Miles ' boy has been at work;" I heard him reply to Lavender "I may as well be lugged now as any other time:" those are the words he uttered as near as possible.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I suppose you told all this to the Magistrates in town? A. No; I was not examined - I went to Somerset-house; I was told to go to Somerset-house the next day; I believe that was on Wednesday week; I never heard of a 1,000l. reward having been offered: I suppose I had information of it ten weeks ago, for bills came to our office; I did not go before the Grand Jury - I was at the door; I have been an officer nine years - Lavender is not in town; he did not come to London - he is the chief constable of Manchester.

COURT. Q. Are you quite sure you heard his language to Lavender distinctly? A. Yes; lagged means to be transported.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did the prisoner tell you he knew Garratt to be a thief and a body-stealer? A. No.

MR. ALLEN. These are the stamps I packed up; they

are all stamped except the legacy forms - here are the invoices which I sent with them.

MR. PHILLIPS to STEPHEN DAVIES . Q. Had you not heard of a reward of 1,000l. or 500l. being offered by the Stamp-office? A. I never knew there was a reward offered till after Lloyd was taken; I do not recollect at this moment when I first heard it; I saw a reward advertised in the newspaper long before I knew I was in possession of the stamps.

JAMES WINTLE . I am an inspector of stamps. I made inquiries. but could not find any person of the name of Dalrymple.

SEWELL'S Defence. I am innocent. Garratt is the only person who attempts to accuse me. I was two hundred miles off at the time - there was another person with me, and Lavender said, "Old chap you will be lagged again" - he has been transported before; he said, "I may as well be lagged as to be here" - he is an old man now; it was in the papers the next day; I did not say it.

GALLAWIN - GUILTY. Aged 33.

Of receiving the goods. - Judgment Respited .

SEWELL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-167

NEW COURT, FOURTH DAY.

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

693. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-168

694. MARY PALMER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I live in Maiden-lane , and am a fishmonger . On the 24th of January the prisoner came to my shop, a little before seven o'clock, and purchased two herrings, for which she gave me one shilling; she had been at the shop about five weeks before, and purchased one in the same way for 1 1/2d. - she did not pay at the time, but called afterwards and paid for it with a bad half-crown, which I had marked, and put by to give her; I mentioned it to her on this occasion, but before I mentioned it she had given me a good half-crown in exchange for the shilling which I had objected to, and when I mentioned about the other half-crown, she said if she had given me a bad one it was unknown to her, and she was willing to exchange it; I saw a purse in her hand, with six or seven good half-crowns in it - she afterwards produced 2 1/2d. or 3d., which she laid on the counter; the patrol was passing, and I gave her in charge - she said if I would let her go she would give me 5s.; I marked the shilling and half-crown, and gave them to the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you give her into custody before you got the good half-crown for the bad one? A. No - she gave me the good half-crown for the shilling that I said was bad; I did not see her searched; I afterwards saw the money that was in the purse - I think there were seven good half-crowns; she had a basket, and told where she bought the articles that were in it - I went with the officer, I think, to four places; I found a bad shilling at Brown's, in Cheapside - on going from the watch-house to the Compter she threw away a paper, which I picked up.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What was that? A. A small bottle of some sort of scent, and from that I went to Mr. Brown's.

MARY ANN SMITH . I am the wife of George Smith , a butcher, of Honey-lane-market. The prisoner came on Saturday evening, the 24th, about seven o'clock, I served her with a pig's head - she gave me a shilling, a sixpence, and 3d.; I laid the money on a ledge by itself - on looking at afterwards I discovered the shilling was bad; the officer called the same evening, and I gave it to him, after marking it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the sixpence good? A. Yes.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a constable, of London-wall. I apprehended the prisoner, and found in her basket a pig's head, a paper of ribbon, and 1 lb. of butter; I asked where she got the pig's head - she said in Honey-lane-market, but could not say where; I went to Mr. Smith, and got this shilling.

Cross-examined. There is but one pig's head shop in Honey-lane-market, I believe; every butcher sells pig's heads - I found this at the first shop; I went to the other shops she had been to - she told me she had bought the butter at Gainsford's.

JAMES TOMKINS . I am a patrol. I apprehended the prisoner - she turned her pockets out at Mr. Jackson's; she had a purse in her hand, in which were six half-crowns and a few halfpence in her hand - I received this half-crown and one shilling from Jackson.

Cross-examined. Q. You found some money on her? A. Yes, but none in her pockets - there were six good half-crowns, and one which I got from Mr. Jackson; there was a bottle of some sort of stuff at her lodgings.

JOHN FIELD . This half-crown is counterfeit, and these two shillings - they are all of the same metal; the two shillings appear to be from the same impression, and from the same plaster of Paris mould - they are certainly not from a die, for here are the marks of the air-bubbles, which prove they are not from a die.

COURT. Q. Are you sure that it is not from a die? A. Yes - they are made of what is generally called Queen's metal.

MR. LAW. Q. How long have you been in your capacity? A. Almost all my life - it is necessary to state, that the impression on the moulds, from which these are made, is from a good shilling.

COURT. Q. So far, the mould would furnish a better impression than a die? A. Yes.

JURY to MR. JACKSON. Q. Had the prisoner enough to pay for the herring without exchanging the shilling? A. Yes; she laid the first bad half-crown down to me, and I slipped it along - my wife gave her 2s. 4 1/2d; I had marked the half-crown, and kept it for her.

JAMES TOMKINS . She had 2 1/2d. or 3d. in her left hand, which was given her back again; I did not take them in my hand at all - they lay on the counter, and she took them up with her left hand. GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties .

Reference Number: t18290219-169

695. ELIZABETH OWEN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. SERGEANT LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HUGHES . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Fetter-lane . On the 15th of January , about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came for 1 lb. of butter, and 6d. worth of eggs - she offered me a sovereign, which I looked at, and found it was bad; I sent for Lightfoot, and gave it to him.

HENRY SIMMONS . I am son of John Simmons , a cheesemonger, of Fetter-lane. On the 26th of January the prisoner came to our shop, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning - she had some bacon and butter; she offered me a half-crown - I told her it was a bad one; I told my father, and went for the officer - my father and I both marked the half-crown, and it was given to the officer.

JOHN SIMMONS . I received the half-crown from my son, and put it on the counter; the prisoner said she lived at No. 4, Shoe-lane - I marked the half-crown, and gave it to the officer.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 15th of January - I found on her two halfpence only; I received the sovereign, and gave it to Mr. Field on the 26th.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. This half-crown and this sovereign are bad - I received them from Lightfoot at the Justice-room; the half-crown is cast - the sovereign is copper gilt, and then struck in a die.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months , and to find Sureties .

Reference Number: t18290219-170

696. JAMES HALLAM was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , 1 gold watch value 12l. 12s.; part of a watch, value 2l.; 1 plate of a watch, value 6d., and 48 watch-glasses, value 5s., the goods of William Cozens and another, from the person of Henry Harding .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

JEREMIAH COZENS . I am in partnership with my father, William Cozens ; we are watch-manufacturer s, and live in Bunhill-row. On the 6th of February, about six o'clock, we sent Henry Harding to Mr. Beaks, in Queen-square, with a parcel, containing the articles stated in the indictment; about twenty-five minutes past six o'clock he came back, and gave us information; I sent to Worship-street - Mr. Took is in our employ; he is my father-in-law; I have no knowledge of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This boy was robbed of the watch and articles? A. Yes; he said he thought the person who robbed him was marked with the small-pox.

HENRY HARDING . I am errand-boy to Mr. Cozens. On the 6th of February, at five or ten minutes past six o'clock, I was sent out with a parcel to go to Mr. Beaks', in Queen-square; I was near Redcross-street , and saw the prisoner; he asked whether I came from Mr. Cozens' - I said Yes; he said, "You are going to an inn;" I said Yes; and then, recollecting myself, I said "No, I am going to Mr. Beaks;" he said, "You are to give me the parcel, and go to take another to the Green Dragon:" I gave it to him - he said,"It is all right," and ran off - I ran after him, but did not overtake him; I went the next evening with Eagles and Brown to the Merry Carpenters public-house; I saw the prisoner there, and said he was like the man - I had before described him to the officer; I am certain he is the man- I had not seen him before to my recollection, but I had an opportunity of seeing him while I pulled the parcel out of the bag, as there were four strong gas lights; I looked him in the face.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not describe him as marked with the small-pox? A. I said I thought he was; there is not a single mark on the prisoner - he was two or three minutes with me; when I saw him in the public-house, I said I thought he was the man, and then I said I was certain - I could tell by the look of his face and his clothes.

COURT. Q. What did you say to the officer to make him know the man? A. I said he had a black suit on, and a hat; I did not describe his eyes, heard, or whiskers - we went to some public-houses, and did not find any body like him, but at the Merry Carpenters I said, "This is like the man," and said he was the man when he stood up; I told the Magistrate I thought I had seen him before at my master's - the parcel and a book were in the bag- the prisoner asked whether I had the book to sign it, but that was not the book to sign; it happened against Franks', in Beech-street - the prisoner overtook me; I received the parcel in my master's shop, not far from the door, and I was then told to take it to Mr. Beaks - my master's is a private house.

THOMAS EAGLES . I am a police-officer. I went on Saturday evening, the 7th of February, to several public-houses which had characters use; we saw the prisoner sitting in the Merry Carpenters; the boy said "This looks very much like the man;" he was then desired to stand up, and the boy said, "I am sure he is the man;" he had before told me the man was dressed in black, and he thought he was marked a little with the small-pox.

COURT. Q. Had you seen the prisoner before? A. No; we have not found the property.

JOHN PARKER . I live at No. 15, Old-street-road, and am a watch-finisher: I work for Mr. Cozens - I have worked with the prisoner's uncle, who is a watch-finisher, but I do not know that he has any dealings with Mr. Cozens; a person named Took worked for the prosecutor.

JAMES DUNKLEY . I have worked for Cozens almost all my life; the prisoner was in his employ in 1817, or beginning of 1818 - Took was not in his employ then.

Q. Was Took connected with the family then? A. Yes, I believe for years before.

RICHARD CATES . I picked up a watch-plate on Saturday morning, the 7th, between Redcross-street and Houndsditch; I should think half a mile from Redcross-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-171

697. JAMES MAIDMAN and JAMES COSTER, alias WEDDICK , were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 reticule, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 1s. 6d., and 1 sixpence, the property of Emma Sarah Forrester , from her person .

EMMA SARAH FORRESTER . I live with my father, who is out of business, at No. 1, St. Andrew's-hill, Doctors' - commons . On Wednesday night I had been to the Cobourg Theatre, and returned with some friends about half-past eleven or nearer to twelve o'clock - I parted with them at Mr. Saunders' steps, the first door on the hill - my father's

house is the corner on the right; when I got very near to my father's door I met these two men - I turned back; Maidman followed and took hold of me; I stretched out my left hand, he snatched my reticule, and ran up Carter-lane; I saw the watchman and called him; he knocked Maidman down, and I picked up my reticule off the pavement; I had not lost sight of him - there were three men together; I believe Coster was one of them, but I could not swear to him; the other man ran after me when I pursued Maidman.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Coster did nothing to you.? A. No.

MATTHEW FRY . I am a watchman. I saw the prosecutrix on the night of the 18th of February running along Great Carter-lane after Maidman: I knocked him down - he dropped a reticule and she took it up; Coster was closely following her, but he did not say or do any thing till I got near Dean's-court - he then came up, d-d my eyes, and swore that Maidman should not go to the watch-house as he had robbed nobody; he attempted to strike me two or three times; I knocked down his arm with my stick, and struck him on the head - I called another watchman, who assisted in getting him to the watch-house; he was the worse for liquor.

LEWIS FACHE . I am a constable. The prisoners were brought to the watch-house - Coster was in liquor.

COSTER's Defence. I was coming home, and happened to see this young man; I did not say any thing to him, but followed him, when the watchman took him away.

MAIDMAN - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

COSTER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-172

698. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of January , 1 patent lock, value 15s., and 2 keys, value 3s. , the goods of Charles Chubb , his master.

CHARLES CHUBB . I am a patent detector lock manufacturer . On the 31st of January the prisoner, who was in my employ, came to me and said, "Sir, I have done something that is wrong, and I hope you will forgive me;" I asked what it was - he said a person in Aldersgate-street had asked him to bring a lock to look at the works of it; I said, "Have you taken one?" he said Yes; I said,"By whose authority?" he said he had no authority, and the person had detained it; I asked what he said; he said he told them his master sold them for 18s. but he should have it for 8s. I told him to go to work - which he did; Mr. Pullen came and asked me about it.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. How long had he been with you? A. About fifteen months; I placed unlimited confidence in him; he has no father or mother; he did not attempt to escape.

JOSEPH PULLEN . The prisoner brought me a lock on the 31st of January, about a quarter or half-past one o'clock; he asked if I wanted to buy a good box lock - I said No; he said he was very poor and would sell it cheap; he left it, and said he would call again as he was going further; when he was gone, I looked and saw it was one of Mr. Chubb's patent locks; I had known him as Mr. Chubb's porter ; and when he came back, I asked what he wanted for it; he said they sold them for 18s. but I should have it for 8s. - I told him I thought it was stolen; he said he did not come by it as Mr. Chubb did, it was his own lock; I went to Mr. Chubb with it - he begged me not to go to his master, as he should have a noise.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I asked if he thought it was worth 8s. - I did not say I would take 8s.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-173

699. WILLIAM WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 watch, value 2l., and 1 key, value 1d. , the goods of William Bedford .

WILLIAM BEDFORD . I am a poulterer in Newgate-market. I left a watch at my house in Warwick-lane on the 7th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening - I returned at nine o'clock and it was gone - it has not been found; the prisoner had been in my employ five months, and left me in November; he was at my house that day when I left, and in the same room as the watch; he had looked in, and wished me to meet him at a house in Stationers'-court in about a quarter of an hour, under a pretence that he was going to take some money the next day, and he would pay me what he owed me: I had lent him some silver; I went to the house but he did not come.

ELIZABETH SUTTLE . I am housekeeper to Mr. Bedford. I saw the prisoner at his house on the evening of the 7th of January - Mr. Bedford went out; he waited about half an hour, and went away a quarter to eight o'clock; he asked me to do him a favour - I said I would if I could: he said it was to take a note to get some money for him -I said we had no ink, and he gave the little boy a halfpenny to get some; he was gone some time - the prisoner said he could not wait; I said if he would mind the place I would go and look for the boy; I went, and was absent two or three minutes; when I returned the door was open, the prisoner and the watch were gone - it was there when I went out.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not requested me to watch the place before? A. No; I never said the boy was dishonest and had robbed his parents; I have said he was a bad little boy for stopping on his errands - I never said I could not trust him to bring home money; I have found him deficient in a halfpenny or so; but I never said so to the prisoner.

JOHN LEWIS . I took the prisoner on the Thursday week after the robbery - I found nothing on him; I asked him how he came to do such a thing; he said what was a poor fellow to do who was in distress.

Prisoner's Defence. I have gone home and found two or three persons there; Mrs. Suttle and I have had a bit of talk, and sometimes had a drop of gin together; she has left me to mind the keys; this is the first time I ever was in my present situation - I am innocent; Mrs. Suttle soon after sent the boy for a halfpenny worth of ink, and she went after him - I was obliged to go to meet a young man who is now at Chelmsford - and when I went, on my oath, the watch was there.

JURY to ELIZABETH SUTTLE . Q. Did you find the boy? A. Yes; he came back with me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-174

700. THOMAS HATCH was indicted for stealing, on

the 11th of February . 1 cap, value 4s., the goods of James Harvey Davies , from his person .

SECOND COUNT. calling it the property Ann Davies .

JAMES HARVEY DAVIES . On the 11th of February, at half-past three o'clock, I was in White-street, Hounds-ditch ; the prisoner came and took my cap off my head; he gave it to another boy, who ran away with it: I asked the prisoner for it and he gave me an old one; I laid hold of the prisoner's collar; my mother's name is Ann Davies , she is a widow.

MARY KITCHENOR . I saw the prisoner take the cap off the lad's head, but did not see what was done with it - he gave him another; I said, "That is not the cap you took from the young gentleman's head."

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; I saw a boy run through the mob, and people told me a boy had ran away with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Petticoat-lane; I put my elbow on the boy's cap and it came off.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Publicly Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-175

701. JAMES BRANGWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 18 yards of printed cotton, value 8s. , the goods of William Shepherd Love .

WILLIAM SHEPHERD LOVE . I live in Bishopsgate-street , and am a draper . This print was in my shop, just within the door, on the 19th of February, just at dark - I did not see it taken.

SAMUEL YOULDEN . I was in Bishopsgate-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned, and saw the prisoner running, with this print on his arm; a lad was running after him - I pursued, and he dropped the print in the road; I never lost sight of him till I stopped him, in Norton-falgate.

WILLIAM RICKABY . I was standing in the prosecutor's shop, and saw somebody pull the print from the door; I ran out, and saw a man running with it - he dropped it; I took it up, and took it back to the shop: I did not observe his person - he ran towards Norton-falgate.

JAMES GAMMON . I am an officer. I was standing by my own door - the prisoner came by, and I saw him taken by Youlden; I asked how he came to take the print - he said he had done no such thing, and begged of me to let him go.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-176

702. JAMES WALTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , I pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Edward John Scott .

EDWARD JOHN SCOTT . I am a shoemaker , and live on Holborn-hill . On the 19th of February, about five o'clock, I was just going to take the things in from the door, and saw a boy 's hand under my shoes, inside the door; he snatched a pair down, and I took him before he passed the window - he dropped them.

SAMUEL JONES . I saw the prisoner take the shoes and put them under his coat.

SAMUEL HENISON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up; a lady came up, and said, "That is not the boy that took the shoes - there he goes."

MR. SCOTT. A woman said so, but I saw him with them; it was the circumstance of a moment - I saw his face: he put them under his coat, and I took hold of him.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18290219-177

703. JAMES HOPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 hat, value 4s., and 2 pairs of gloves, value 1s. , the goods of David William Godfrey .

DAVID WILIAM GODFREY . I am a clerk . On the 4th of February my hat and two pairs of gloves were on a peg in the counting-house, in Freeman's-court, Cornhill ; the prisoner came in, and asked if any composition for taking grease out of clothes was wanted; we told him No - he went out, and in about five minutes he was stopped with my hat and gloves.

JOSEPH WILLIAMS . I met the prisoner in Freeman's-court, with a hat on his head, and another under his arm; I followed him to Birchin-lane, and asked if he had been up Freeman's-court; he said No - I knew he had: I looked into the hat, and saw the initials of Mr. Godfrey, whom I knew, and brought him back.

Prisoner. Q. Was I tipsy? A. Quite so.

JOHN DIXON SMITH. I am an officer, and was sent for - I searched the prisoner, and found on him 4s. or 5s.; he promised to go quietly, but when I got him to Sweeting's-alley he ran off as fast as he could - I called out, and he was stopped.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the London-docks to sell those articles, and took a good deal of money; I met a Jew with five hats - I bought one for a young man in my house; I went to several places, and it appears I had mislaid this hat; I then went to the office, and asked if they wanted these articles - I saw this hat, and thought it was my own; I was so tipsy I never saw the gloves or any thing in it. GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290219-178

704. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 1 rush-basket, value 6d.; 2 gowns, value 6s.; I petticoat, value 3s.; 1 pelisse, value 30s., and I cake of gingerbread, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Clark .

HENRY LARKINS . I am a carrier. I received this basket at Richmond, on the 20th of February, and had it safe in my cart when I stopped at Messrs. Gilman and Co., in Newgate-street ; I did not know the contents till it was opened at Guildhall.

JOHN HOLLAND . About three o'clock on the 20th of February, I was on duty in Holborn; a gentleman said,"Look after that man - he is a cart robber;" I saw a narrow wheeled cart, and the prisoner following it for some distance; I went to another place, and met him again, in Skinner-street; I followed him up Newgate-street; I saw the prosecutor's cart - the prisoner got in, and took this basket out; he was walking away, and I took hold of him, within three yards of the cart; he dropped the parcel, run against a gentleman, and was stopped.

Prisoner's Defence. The parcel was given me to take

to the Goose and Gridiron public-house, by a man in the cart - I did not drop it, but gave it to him, and said it was given to me by a man - he said it was no such thing.

JOHN HOLLAND . He did say it was given to him by another man, but there was no man in the cart; he did drop it, and here is some mud on it now - he tried to run away. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18290219-179

705. JOSEPH CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 1 gelding, price 7l. , the property of Joseph Ives .

JOSHUA IVES . I live with Joseph Ives , my father, at Napwell-common, near High Wycomb . We had a gelding; I saw it put into the stable about five o'clock last Thursday evening, and missed it about seven o'clock - the prisoner has lived there till within the last five or six months; my father searched about, as we thought the door might have blown open; we could not find the gelding - we made diligent search the next morning; we searched about the common, but could not find it - we found it in Smithfield the next day; a man had it for sale, who told me his name was Moss; the prisoner came afterwards - I asked him if it was his horse; he said it was: I said again, "Is this your horse?" - he said, Yes: I said,"You know it is my father's;" he looked at it, and said "I see it is your father's;" Moss asked him for the shilling which he said he would give him: he told him he would give it to him when he found the man he bought the horse of; we went to several places where he thought he could find the man, but could not, and the officer took him; the last time I saw the prisoner at High Wycomb was six days ago; the bridle and saddle on the horse were not our's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far do you live from High Wycomb? A. About three miles, or it may be four - the prisoner and his father are horse dealers; he said he had bought the horse, and seemed anxious to find the man; no one had hold of him for half an hour - he did not attempt to escape; he said he bought it of a tall man in a straw hat, and had seen him in the market that day.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; he told me he had bought the horse at Beaconsfield of a man whom he did not know; I asked if he went to any house - he said, No, that he brought the saddle and bridle from Wycomb, intending to purchase something.

Prisoner's Defence. He was a tall man with a smock frock on, a striped waistcoat, corduroy breeches, and high shoes; I was at home when the horse was stolen.

JAMES GREEN . I am a labourer, and live at Wycomb-marsh, about six miles from Napwell; I have known the prisoner about four months - he lived at my house: last Thursday evening, he came home about eight o'clock, and went to bed about nine; he had his bridle and saddle in his hand - that was a common thing: he has had them ever since he has been at my house, which was a fortnight last Monday: I am sure he slept in my house that night, and got up the next morning about four o'clock, I expect, but I cannot tell exactly. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-180

706. MICHAEL CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , 1 gold watch, value 10l.; 1 chain, value 4l.; 1 key, value 1l.; 1 seal, value 20s.; 1 other watch, value 20s.: 1 diamond ring, value 5l.; 1 medicine-chest, value 2l.; 1 dressing-case, value 20s., and one 20l. Bank-note, the property of Joseph Gandolfe , his master, in his dwelling-house .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I was sent for on Wednesday, the 28th of July, to Mr. Gandolfe's, in Throgmorton-street ; he and Mr. Davis wished me to go with the prisoner to his lodgings, as he suspected he was being robbed - I went with him to Thomas-street, Mile-end; he said he had taken a dressing-case out of a box, and he wished me to search his lodgings - Mr. Gandolfe had found the case, and handed it over to me; the prisoner was very willing to go with me; we went to his lodging, where his mother lived - there was no property belonging to Mr. Gandolfe there - one of the clerks was with me - I then searched the prisoner's person, and found this watch, a chain, and seals, which Mr. Gandolfe claimed- he said to the prisoner "You have got my seal and chain;" the prisoner said, "It is your's, Sir:" there was no threat or promise made to him; Mr. Gandolfe then shewed him a metal watch, and that he acknowledged to taking- his master said, "There is a French gold repeater gone," and that he said he had; he then asked him about a diamond ring; he said he had sold that to Mr. Foster, a jeweller, of Aldgate - I went there, but he had gone away two days before; the prisoner said he had taken a 20l. note, and changed it at Messrs. Curtis' - he said something about some sovereigns - he was then taken into custody.

COURT. Q. When you came back, was any thing said about the dressing-case? A. His master said, "You took this out of a box, and a medicine-chest," he denied taking the medicine-chest, but this be owned; he was footman there. I believe - I took this watch from his fob - the chain was tucked in.

MR. JOSEPH THOMAS GANDOLFE . I am a merchant , and live in Throgmorton-street; the prisoner had been in my service about two years - I discharged him six weeks or two months ago; I afterwards missed a French gold repeater, with a gold chain and key attached to it; a diamond ring, a child's coral, a metal watch, a 20l. note, and some sovereigns - I had the prisoner taken into custody, and charged him with having robbed me of the dressing-case, which I got from his bed-room before be left my service, and a medicine-chest, and some other things; I was called in after he had been searched by the officer, and I claimed this chain and key attached to this watch - I cannot say where the Bank-note and sovereigns had been placed; I charged him with having stolen them from my private desk - when he came back he began he began to confess; I said "I will make you no promise - if you have robbed me, it is your duty to confess it."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Might you not have said it would go harder with him? A. I do not know; a gentleman and the officer were present - I had had some conversation with him before they came; I did not tell him it would be worse for him if he did not confess.

MR. BARRY. Q. Whatever statement he made, was it when he was brought back to your counting-house? A. Yes; I said, "You have taken from that desk a 20l. note;" he said, "I did;" I said, "You have taken from that desk some sovereigns:" his answer was, "A few;" I said, "You took also a diamond ring;" he said he did, and took it to a watchmaker, named Foster, who broke it up, and allowed him 30s. for it, and that he changed the note at Curtis', and

returned a 10l. note; we keep a cash account at Messrs. Curtis'.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am principal clerk to Mr. Gandolfe. The prisoner was in our counting-house; I had sent for him twice, because Mr. Gandolfe had mentioned what he had lost; I asked him to let me look at a watch, which he had shown me before - he said he had not got it; it was at home: I requested him to go and fetch it, as Mr. Gandolfe was in town, and wished to see it - he said he could not, he was going after a situation; I said it was of great consequence, and as he would not I sent for the officer - the officer went with him, and brought him back with the watch, the chain, and seal; the prisoner said he had bought the watch of a school-fellow: I said it was Mr. Gandolfe's chain and seal, which he had exchanged in Whitechapel; he denied it, but afterwards admitted it; I charged him with taking the other things; he denied that, but afterwards admitted it.

COURT. Q. Was that with respect to the whole of them? A. Yes; he said he had got them out of a writing-desk, with a key, which he had lost.

Cross-examined. Q. You have stated that he several times denied it? A. Yes; I said, "Tell me the truth, the truth will always support you, and carry you through;" I said, in the first instance, with regard to the dressing-case, that he had better tell the truth - that was before he had made any confession to Mr. Gandolfe; Mr. Gandolfe had discovered the case in his room, and I told him he had better tell the truth; I said, "I will intercede with Mr. Gandolfe, and I dare say he will not take any measures with you - tell me the truth." I said nothing in referrence to any other article.

Q. After he had been dismissed did you see him again? A. Yes. before he made any confession; I told him a watch and various things were missing - nothing but the dressingcase had been found then; I said, "With regard to the watch, tell me the truth - have you had that watch, or do you know any thing about it or the medicine-chest?" he said he did not; I will swear I said nothing to him but charging him to tell the truth, and not to give me trouble by telling me falsehoods; I am certain I did not hold out a promise, perhaps I might have said it would be better.

MR. GANDOLFE re-examined. Q. Had you missed the watch while he was in your service? A. Yes.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290219-181

707. WILLIAM FOSSETT was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 26th of January , one 20l. Bank-note, the property of John Denman , which said note had been lately stolen, he well knowing the same to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

The particulars of this case are stated in the prisoner's former trial (see page 248), except that the witness Fowler, in addition to his former evidence, deposed that the prisoner said, "Well, they cannot hang me," and on the following morning he asked something about Botany-bay, said he hoped they would hang him, and that the Lord would have mercy on his poor soul, and that he had been unhappy ever since.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-182

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

708. JAMES PIKE was indicted for feloniously receiving 2 casks, value 35s., and 50 gallons of ale, value 70s., the goods of John Ramsbottom and another, of a certain evil-disposed person, knowing the same to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS (on behalf of the prosecution) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290219-183

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21.

First London Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

709. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT UPSELL . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Barbican ; I have known the prisoner three years - he frequently pawned with me. On the 17th of January, 1828 , he came to my shop to pawn a piece of silver, as he called it; I asked him whether it was silver, and he again told me it was sterling silver - this is it; he wanted 1l. on it, which I lent him, and gave him a duplicate, specifying silver on it - on the 2d of February he came, and brought this other piece of metal to my shop; I asked him if it was silver - he said Yes, and I advanced him 1l. on this; on the 24th of December he pawned one piece for 1l., and one piece for 1l. 8s. - my young man took it in, but I was there; he said it was silver: on the 30th of December he made application with another piece - I asked him distinctly if it was silver; he said it was sterling silver, and all that I had in my house was sterling silver, the same as those snuffers were which I had in my house, and which he was going to redeem, and they could use no other - I took that in, and he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was what he brought wrapped up in paper? A. Yes - I had confidence in him; I opened the paper on the 17th of January - I did not try it by any test; he is a working silversmith - he makes snuffers and other things, and I believe he is a very good workman; he seemed to have plenty of work, and always said so - he has frequently redeemed some of those pledges; he has pawned pieces of metal with me before the 17th of January - the goods always bore the hall mark; he has redeemed several of them, but it was to throw four or five pieces a week into my stock.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Had you ever had those other pieces that he redeemed examined by an assayer? A. No.

COURT. Q. How long have you been a pawnbroker? A. Twenty years - it is part of my business to know silver from metal; I opened the papers - there was no stamp on the metal to indicate that it was silver; I could have discovered it in the first instance - I was deceived in it; he stated it was silver.

JURY. Q. Is it not the practice of your trade to keep aquafortis? A. Yes, and I have tried some pieces, but pewter will have the appearance of silver when tried with it.

GEORGE JOHNSON . I have assayed this metal - they are principally tin, alloyed with a little lead.

GUILTY.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18290219-184

710. ELIZABETH ROEBUCK was indicted for perjury . NOT GUILTY .


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