Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th January 1829.
Reference Number: 18290115
Reference Number: f18290115-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., MAYOR.

SECOND SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 15th DAY OF JANUARY, 1829, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON)

By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY HENRY STOKES , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1829.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Vaughan , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir James Parke , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Perring , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Charles Flower , Bart.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; William Venables , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St . Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Henry Wollett ,

George H. Furlong ,

Henry Bye ,

John Edward Stokes

Thomas Williams ,

William J. Maynard ,

Henry Moss ,

William P. Nichol ,

Patrick Clear ,

John Simons ,

John Crooks ,

John Mc. Lean .

Second

William Langhorn ,

Charles Furlonger ,

Thurstian Dale ,

Alexander Simpson ,

James Thick ,

Peter, Mitchell ,

John Thompson ,

Robert Thurston ,

William Leftwich ,

John Read ,

Charles Shepherd ,

William Pocknell .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Charles Reader ,

Henry Barnett ,

Scipio Clint ,

Daniel Collins ,

William R. Burgess,

William Fenton ,

John Mattox ,

John Barber ,

William Barber ,

Lewis Cogan .

Thomas Davies .

Arthur Henn .

Second

William Hunt ,

George Fowler ,

William Molineaux ,

William Pitt ,

Samuel Rhodes ,

Thomas Griffith ,

Cuthbert Snell ,

John Baker Eland ,

George Bower ,

Henry Hetherington ,

Thomas Ingleton ,

Charles Marshall .

Third

James Hepburn ,

George Parker ,

Charles Winter ,

William Tierney ,

Daniel Williams ,

William Bass ,

Benjamin Stevens ,

John M. Langham ,

Thomas Packer ,

William Hinton ,

Manning Geo.Duke ,

John Cochrane .

Fourth

John Godding ,

Michael Earllake ,

William Elford ,

Christopher Fullmer ,

Thomas Greenham ,

James Hawkins ,

Robert Huntley ,

Thomas Jacques ,

Edward Jones ,

William Loate ,

William Clayton ,

George Bayley .

Fifth

Henry Harwer ,

George Bishop ,

Edwd. John Brasher ,

George Hull ,

James Hutton ,

Thomas Marshall ,

George Holding ,

John Smlth ,

William Payne ,

William Carr Reed ,

James Garrod ,

Edward Gorburt .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 15, 1829.

THOMPSON, MAYOR - SECOND SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18290115-1

FIRST DAY. THURSDAY, JANUARY 15.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

266. MARY RICE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 chain, value 2l.; 3 seals, value 1l., and 1 key, value 2s., the goods of William Squibb , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SQUIBB . I live in Princes-place, Westminster - nobody but my own family lives there. I gave six guineas for this watch four years ago, 25s. for the chain, and 50s. for the seals; they are gold.

ELIZABETH SQUIBB . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 6th of January I went into the yard in front of our house, about ten o'clock in the morning, and pulled the street-door too after me; I left this silver watch hanging at the head of the bed - I had seen it shortly before, and am certain it was there; I returned in ten minutes and found the street-door open and the watch gone - I had only pulled it too; I had not been out of the yard, but was not in sight of the door all the time - I saw the prisoner at the bottom of the court; there is a gate at the bottom of the court - I followed and charged her with stealing the watch; she said she bad not got it, and I saw her drop it on the ground - I held her till Hill took her.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. I live in Princes-place. I was standing at my father's door and saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's house; I saw her pull her cloak round her - I am sure she is the woman; I said nothing.

FRANCIS HILL . On the 6th of January I saw the prosecutrix holding the prisoner - I was at work opposite; I saw the watch in the kennel and my wife picked it up - the prosecutrix called Stop thief! I ran and stopped the prisoner.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square. -The prisoner was brought to the office, with the watch.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 43.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

Reference Number: t18290115-2

267. WILLIAM HOLMES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Templar , on the 15th of December , and stealing 21bs. of beef, value 3s.; 1 desk, value 3s.; 1 watch, value 12s.; 1 snuff-box, value 2d., and 5s. 1 1/2d. in copper monies , his property.

CHARLES TEMPLAR. I keep the Pied Horse public-house, in the parish of St. Luke's, Middlesex . On the morning of the 16th of December, (I believe) I got up about six o'clock, and found a large piece of beef, which I had cut, laid on the counter in the bar - I had left it in a small sitting-room adjoining the bar, and saw it between twelve and one o'clock the night before, when I retired to rest - I went to bed last. I found the till open, which I had locked previous to going to bed, and a false key in the lock - it was pulled out, and 8s. or 10s. in copper missing; I then went into the parlour and missed a large desk, which had a silver watch with a ribbon to it, locked up in it - it was safe the last thing at night; I found the tap-room window partly open - the sash had been thrown up; it was down just before I went to bed - there is no fastening to it, but it was closed; it is on the ground floor - I saw footmarks of dirty shoes on the seat inside the window; I then traced the footsteps across the paved yard, and over the wall into the yard of Mr. Alexander adjoining my house, over a shed and an out-house; I saw a pair of stockings lying in a cupboard adjoining the bar - the cupboard was a little open; the stockings were not mine - the prisoner lodged in my house for three weeks, and we expected that night that he had retired to bed before we did; we had seen him in the tap-room about half-past ten or eleven o'clock that night: the watch was worth about 12s.; I missed a snuff-box, which was found on the prisoner - I did not miss it at the time I missed the other things; I had shut the tap-room door when I went to bed.

WILLIAM SEERS . I lodged at the Pied Horse, but was not in the house at the time this happened; I was there on the Monday evening, but did not sleep there that night - Mr. Templar produced a pair of stockings to me; they were the prisoner's - I have seen him wearing them: I saw him between one and two o'clock on the 16th against Mr. Dixon's gateway, in Barbican; I asked him how he could be so sly as to do what he had at the Pied Horse; he asked what I meant - I asked if he had not heard of what had happened at the Pied Horse; he said No - he went with me to the Pied Horse, and we kept him there till he was taken into custody.

THOMAS SLATER . I was waiter at the Pied Horse, and was present when the prisoner was taken by the officer; I was in the tap-room and saw a pair of stockings taken off his feet - he was wearing them; they belonged to me and were marked with my initials - I do not know where be got them; I had seen them last on the Sunday before - they were in my room.

WILLIAM ATFIELD . I am a Police-officer. I was sent for to the Pied Horse, on the 16th of December, and took the prisoner into custody, about two o'clock; in his waist-coat pocket I found a watch-ribbon, which I produce - I then asked him where the watch was; he hesitated for a few seconds, and then pointed under the seat where he had been sitting, and said, "There it is;" I found it there, and the snuff-box was with it - I have a stocking and some farthings, which were given to me by some person in the tap-room: they had searched him before I came in: a key, which fitted the till, was given to me by the landlord.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am an officer. I have a pair of stockings, which I received on Tuesday morning, about ten o'clock, from the landlord; the prisoner owned them when he was in custody.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am an ostler to Mr. Alexander, whose premises join the Pied Horse. I found a desk in his yard about nine o'clock on the morning of the robbery, in one of the stalls of the stable, covered with straw - I carried it in directly; this is the desk: I saw footmarks on the cistern, close to the wall, which separates our yard from the prosecutor's.

CHARLES TEMPLAR . This is my desk, in which the watch was locked; the watch and other property is mine- I found the key, which I showed to the officer, in the desk.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of Stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

Reference Number: t18290115-3

268. WILLIAM RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Lawrence , about six o'clock in the night of the 19th of December , at St. James, Westminster, with intent feloniously and burglariously to steal the goods and chattels therein .

MARY ANN LAWRENCE . I am the daughter of William Lawrence , who lives at No. 10, Edward-street, in the parish of St. James, Westminster ; he occupies the first-floor and a stall under the window. On the 19th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I went out to buy a candle - it was dark: I left nobody in the room; I locked the door, and when I came back I had a candle - I got it lighted before I went into the room; when I got to the room-door I found it partly open, and saw the prisoner in the room - he told me some man had been into the room: I asked what business he had there - he immediately rushed by me, and ran down stairs; I followed him, and when he got to the street-door it was shut - he opened it: I followed close after him - he tried to shut the street-door, but I caught it in my hand; I went out to my father, who was in the stall under the window, in the street - it is a shoemaker's stall- I told him; the prisoner ran towards Wardour-street, and my father followed him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Who does your father hire the house of? A. Mr. Hammond, of Marlborough-street, who does not live in the house; he collects the rents himself - nobody belonging to the house lives in it; there are lodgers on the second-floor, and at the top of the house; there is a private and a shop-door- I locked the room-door, and took the key; I did not lock the street-door, but left it shut - my father and all the lodgers have a key of the street-door; my father does not pay taxes: I found no marks of violence on the door- it must have been opened with a key; I had lighted the candle at my father's stall, before I returned - when I ran down I spoke to my father immediately; he directly ran out after the prisoner - I could see him all the way he ran, but not till he was taken; I did not run after him: I did not lose sight of him for five minutes -I never saw him before; there are two gas-lights opposite the house - I had been gone about ten minutes for the candle. No property was missing.

EDWARD LAWRENCE. I am thirteen years old - William Lawrence is my father. On the night in question I was playing at marbles before my father's door, and saw the prisoner come out of the house; he ran towards Wardour-street - my sister went to my father, and said there had been a thief in the room; my father followed him - I ran to the corner of St. Ann's-court, and saw the prisoner coming towards Wardour-street again, running fast; I laid hold of him by the tail of his coat, but could not stop him - I fell down, and called Stop thief! St. Ann's-court is in the way from our house to Wardour-street: I had been playing at the door about a quarter of an hour, but did not see my sister go out, or any body go in - I saw the prisoner stopped in Chapel-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen your sister go out? A. No, I was over on the other side of the street once, and came over again; I was not near my father's door -I could see the door on the other side; Chapel-street is about five minutes' walk from our house - I caught hold of the man by the tail of his coat, and fell down; I got up and followed in a minute and a half, but had not lost sight of him - he ran across the road, and then kept going along Wardour-street; I kept him in sight till he was taken - I lost sight of him for about a minute, while I was down; a good many people ran when I cried out, but he was the first of them - he is lame, and cannot run very fast; he kept before the people who followed: I went before the Justice the same evening, and told all this, and was examined again next day - nobody told me what to say; my father told me to say what I had seen, but did not tell me what.

ANTHONY JAMES FOREMAN . I am thirteen years old, and go to school with Lawrence. I was playing at marbles with him on this night, for about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, opposite his father's stall, about half-past six o'clock in the evening; I saw the prisoner come out of the house - I did not know him before- he was running; Mary Ann Lawrence was following him: I heard her tell her father there had been a thief in the room, and her father followed him - he ran towards Wardour-street.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you saw the man go into the house? A. No, I only saw him come out - he

could have gone in without my seeing him, as we kept turning round towards the other way - I had never seen him before; he did not run very fast: I noticed as he ran that he was bow-kneed.

COURT. Q. You were sometimes on one side of the street and sometimes on another? A. Yes.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am the father of the witnesses. I keep two rooms on the first-floor at No. 10, Edward-street, in the parish of St. James, Westminster; Mr. Hammond, the landlord, does not occupy any part of the house - it is all let out to lodgers; I have a key of my rooms, and a latch-key of the street-door - I have also a stall under the window. On the 19th of December my daughter came out of the door, and gave me information- I followed the man, whom she pointed out, towards Wardour-street, across the street, into Ship-yard; I ran round into St. Ann's-court, and then into Wardour-street again - I did not see him taken: I afterwards went home, and examined my room; the lock of the front door appeared to have been picked - it was not forced open, as there was no mark of violence; the bolt of the lock was back - I examined a drawer in the room, and found it had been cut open; the wood-work, where the bolt of the lock goes, was cut out: there was wearing-apparel in the drawer, but nothing was taken away; I had another drawer in the room, with money in it - that was partly cut open; others were cut, but not sufficient to open- nothing was taken; it was about half-past six o'clock: there are two gas-lights opposite the house, which enabled the boys to play at marbles.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in your stall all the time? A. Yes, at work - I saw nobody go in or out; the prisoner was searched, but no instrument was found on him: the drawers appeared to have been cut with a chisel- the door appeared as it would have been if my daughter had left it open. I saw the prisoner running when my girl alarmed me. almost directly he ran out of my door; I did not see him leave the house - other people were running.

CHARLES WILLIAM GREEN. I live near Edward-street. I heard a cry of Stop thief! I was in my house at the end of Little Chapel-street, Soho - I ran out, and stopped the prisoner; a gentleman ran over at the same time - he was running up Little Chapel-street, which runs into Wardour-street; there were many persons running, but he was at the head of them - I took him to Edward-street, and Mary Ann Lawrence identified him as being the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he searched? A. I searched him, but found nothing on him which could cut the drawers; I took him about twenty minutes to seven o'clock.

The prisoner made no Defence, but one witness gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18290115-4

269. ROBERT SANSOME was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Sansome , on the 5th of December , and stealing 2 coats, value 70s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 20s.; 2 waistcoats, value 15s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 7s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 watch-key, value 7s.; 1 pin, value 7s., and 1 mathematical instrument, value 4s. , his property.

WILLIAM SANSOME. I live in Vincent-square, Westminster ; I only occupy two rooms - the house belongs to Mr. Nutall: he does not live there; there are eight rooms, but nobody lives there but myself and family - I have seven children. On Friday, the 5th of December I went to my employ, as usual, between twelve and one o'clock; I am a carpenter - I left the house in the care of my daughter Julia, who is about twelve years old, leaving my wearing-apparel safe: I was fetched by her between three and four o'clock, and found the bed-room door broken open. The prisoner, I am sorry to say, is my son; I found several persons round the door, in consequence of the alarm - I found my son next morning, between nine and ten o'clock, at his lodging in Duke-street, St. George's-fields; he is a painter and glazier: I took him immediately to the office in Queen-square, and a pair of black ribbed worsted stockings, quite new, were found on him: I knew them by a peculiar mark on them, which I observed when my wife brought them home, and I objected to them, as I thought it was a defect: I am quite sure they were in my box between eleven and twelve o'clock.

JULIA SANSOME . I am the prosecutor's daughter. -On Friday, the 5th of December, between twelve and one o'clock, he left me at home; the prisoner came and brought a message that I was to go to my aunt's to tea- she lives at Lambeth: I said my father's orders were that I was not to leave the place - he said, "You had better go;" I said No, I could not; I did not go - he went up stairs, washed his hands, and then went down and filled the pitcher; I went out about half-past two o'clock, for some bread, and he went out with me - I locked both the room doors; when I got into Rochester-row I saw two girls, and left him talking to them - I was out about half an hour; I went to Strutton-ground, about half a mile from my father's house, and when I came back I found the bed-room door broken open - the lock was broken; my father's box was broken open, and all the things taken out: I saw nothing more of the prisoner that night.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a constable of St. Margaret's, Westminster. The prosecutor delivered the prisoner to me; I searched him, and found this pair of black stockings in his bat.

WILLIAM SANSOME . I am quite certain these are my stockings; they are quite new: I lost all the articles stated in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. The stockings I bought for 2s., at Mr. James', in Blackfriars'-road; my father turned me out of doors because I was out of work - I got a job, and got a shilling or two; I went to my sister, and told her I wanted a pair of stockings - she gave me the money the day before the robbery; I went next day, after my sister's box, as she was going to a situation - I was told the box was not there; my sister said she was going out for bread - I asked her to let me wash myself: I fetched the water there, and fastened the door after me; I went out with her, and left her in Rochester-row - next day my father came to my lodging; he said somebody had robbed him, and was it me; I said No: he said he suspected me - I went with him to Queen-square, to clear

myself; I sent to James - he said he could not swear to my buying the stockings. as he had sold so many pairs.

JOHN HARRIS re-examined. The stockings were in his hat - his father said they were his directly they were found, and pointed out the marks; nothing was then said about James; the prisoner said they were given to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-5

270. ROBERT SANSOME was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 coat, value 5s. the goods of Elizabeth Nutall .

ELIZABETH NUTALL . I live near Vincent-square . Westminster. About the beginning of December, I missed a blue butcher's frock-coat and flannel waistcoat which hung in my yard to dry - I think it was on a Wednesday; I spoke to Harris, the officer, about it - they had been my husband's: I am a widow - I missed them after dark, before they could be dry.

WILLIAM ROSE . I live in Duke-street, Waterloo-road- I know the prisoner. A boy, named Brown, brought me a butcher's blue frock to dispose of.

JOHN BROWN. I live in Duke-street. I know the prisoner - he came to my father the beginning of December- he had once lodged at my father's; he brought a frockcoat and a flannel waistcoat, and asked my father to let him hang it on the line to dry, as it was wet - he afterwards asked me to go and sell them at Mr. Rose's, down the street; he said he would give me 3d., and if Rose should ask me where I got them from, I was to say an uncle of his had died and left them to him: I took it to Rose's - he told me to ask 2s. 6d. on it, but Rose was not at home and I left it there.

JOHN HARRIS . I produce the coat which I got from Rose's house, and a flannel waistcoat which I found at Brown's.

WILLIAM ROSE . This is the coat: when I came home I found it at my house - I went to Brown's and saw him on the stairs; I asked him who the coat belonged to - he said to his uncle; I asked where his uncle was - he knocked at the door and the prisoner came out; he asked me half a crown for it, and I gave him 1s. 6d. - I kept it till the constable got it from me.

HENRY SANSOME . I am the prisoner's brother - Brown is my wife's son; my brother brought a coat to my lodging the first Wednesday in December - it was wet; he asked me to allow him to hang it on the line, which I did- he came and breakfasted with me next morning; he dried the coat, folded it up and said he should go to Westminster to get a customer for it; I went over the bridge with him as I was going that way - when he was drying the coat he shewed me this flannel waistcoat; I asked him to give it to me, and he did so.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice James Parke.

Reference Number: t18290115-6

271. JOHN HUNTER was indicted for that he, having in his custody and possession, a certain bill of exchange, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain acceptance of the same , with intent to defraud Isaac Morley .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same, as true, with a like intention.

ISAAC MORLEY . I keep a grocer's shop in Sidmouth-street, Gray's Inn-lane. I have known the prisoner many years; about the 3d or 4th of November he called on me, and asked if I could tell him of a house and shop to let in the general line; I told him I thought he did not want a shop as he had before called on me in a similar way in consequence of an advertisment - he accounted for his not coming forward before about a shop, on account of his father's death; I said I had a shop to dispose of - he asked the terms; I gave him the address, he went and looked at it, and returned to me the same day, saying, he thought it just the thing he was in want of; I mentioned 40l. as the price of the shop and fixtures - he then proposed to give a bill of exchange for that amount, which I objected to in the first instance; he said the bill was as good as money - that his cousin, who was to be the acceptor, was a very respectable merchant, residing in the City, in Cateaton-street, and said his name was George Henry Hunter; he called him his cousin repeatedly - I said it would be better for me to see his cousin before the bill was drawn: he then proposed my going down with him the next morning, and next morning I met him at the house in Cateaton-street - he was waiting at the door, not in the house, and told me his cousin was not in doors; I afterwards went in with him and he asked a person in the warehouse "Have you any idea when my cousin will return?" the answer was "I think not before one o'clock, but I am not able to say;" I said I could not wait for I had business at home - he said he would wait and endeavour to see his cousin, and call on me in the course of the day: I returned home, and in the afternoon he called on me and said he had seen his cousin, who was sorry he was not in the way when I was there, but if I would furnish the prisoner with an inventory, he would accept the bill the next morning - he then proposed that I should go down with him the next morning, and appointed to be at my house between nine and ten o'clock: he came about that time and said, "Well Mr. Morley, if you will draw the bill on my cousin, I will take it and get it accepted:" he said he was very near-sighted and could not draw it himself, and he would get a stamp; I said I was very busy, and as I had to negociate it, it would be better for me to draw it - he then fetched the stamp, and asked me whether I would oblige him by making it 50l. instead of 40l. as he had been disappointed that morning of some money, which a gentleman in Brunswick-square had promised to pay him, I think it was 15l.; I ultimately agreed to that - I drew the bill, and he took it away, and brought it back with an acceptance on it; I gave him the balance, which was 10l. - this is the bill (looking at it), this acceptance was on it when he brought it back - I gave him 10l. in cash, and gave him possession of the premises a few days after, according to agreement: when he brought the bill back, he said, "Here is the bill;" I said, "Is it accepted? you are quite sure it is your cousin's acceptance, the party who you took me to see on Saturday in Cateaton-street?" - he said it was. I paid the bill away to William Hall of Judd-street a few days before it was due- it was only drawn at one month; I have endorsed it, and the prisoner also endorsed it - I wrote his name, at

his request, as he could not see to write, and he made a mark: I believe he is not accustomed to write, but puts his mark. The bill became due on the 11th of December, and on that morning Cotterell came to me with a message; I took him with me to Mr. Hall, and afterwards went with Cotterell and Hall's son in search of the prisoner - he came to us at a public-house; we were desired just to step in there and he would come to us with the money; he came up to me and said, "Have you got the bill?" I said, "I have not, I paid it to Mr. Hall, and he has sent his son with the bill;" he said, "I have not the money at the present moment, but I shall have it in half an hour - I am going to receive 94l." I told him he had better speak to Hall's son, who had got the bill, and I believe he told him he would come down in half an hour and take it up - that he had got to go as far as Covent-garden for the money; I went to Hall again about one or two o'clock, and found it was not taken up - it was returned to me, and I presented it at George Henry Hunter 's in Cateaton-street; Hunter was not at home - I presented it again next morning, but it was not paid; I saw him the second time: I saw the prisoner about two or three hours after, at Mr. Hunter's in Cateaton-street - I am not certain whether this was two, or three days after the bill was due - he persuaded his cousin very much to settle it, and pay the money; Mr. Hunter said "How can you think of my settling it? you know it is not my acceptance"- the prisoner said he hoped he would settle it, and he would endeavour to satisfy him by making the shop over to him: I gave the prisoner in charge the next day, having called on Mr. Hunter again to see if there were a possibility of settling it, but he seemed to say I was as bad as the prisoner - that I had taken the bill knowing it to be forged: the prisoner gave me the bill, with the acceptance on it, in Sidmonth-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you since got possession of your premises? A. I have, and the fixtures; I bought the premises back a few days after, of a person the prisoner had sold them to - I paid for them to get them again. I believe the prisoner was brought up a musician.

Q. Do not you know that he has been blind from his birth? A. He could see the money when he took it off my counter; he is near-sighted, but not blind - he is not led about. I wrote the direction on the bill, as well as the body; I received it from Hall on the 11th, when it was due, and gave it to the officer at Hatton-garden, it was given up to me yesterday. The prisoner was apprehended about a week after it became due - he lived in the house from the time I gave him possession till he was taken; he told me it was an understanding between him and his cousin, that if he could get any business for that amount, he would give him his acceptance: I only went to his cousin's once before the bill was drawn - I did not entertain any suspicion when I asked if it were his cousin's acceptance; I had inquired and considered Mr. Hunter's acceptance good.

GEORGE HENRY HUNTER . I have a warehouse in Cateaton-street - my father's sister married the prisoner's father; she died childless, and there was a second marriage- I have known the prisoner many years; the acceptance on this bill is not my hand-writing - I never authorized him to accept it in my name, When Morley presented the bill, I really was so staggered, I hardly knew what I said; I saw the embarrassing situation I was in, and declined giving any answer - I had told the prisoner if I saw he had an opportunity of setting up in the world, I might assist him, and I should have assisted him; I had not told him if he took any premises I would accept for the amount - I have told him at various times I would help him; I, in conjunction with others, was to assist him - I did not send any message to Morley that I was sorry I was not in the way - I did not know he had called.

Cross-examined. Q. Has the prisoner been blind from his birth? A. He is not blind; he can neither read nor write: he can just grope about the street - he has not been educated, except in music; he was under Mr. Parkes, a blind musician: he has but one eye - any one would think him blind; he bore a good character - I have assisted him materially at times: he knows nothing at all about negociating bills - he may know what a bill of exchange is; I should not think he knew of three days' grace being given on bills; I believe he expected my assistance if he could get a shop - he formerly had to draw a bill, and was so ignorant I was obliged to draw it for him.

JOSEPH HANSON . I live at No. 112, St. John-street. About the beginning of November the prisoner applied to me to write his name across a bill, as he was blind, or nearly blind - I am sure he said his name; I am confident of it: I asked what I should write - he said, "Accepted, G. H. Hunter ;" (looking at the bill) this is my hand-writing - I have written something for him before: I asked him to put his mark to this bill - he said he would do that in the presence of the person he paid it to; at the same time saying it would not be taken without he put his mark in the presence of the person he gave it to; he left the shop - he said he was a neighbour up above, and would be a customer to me - he was very much obliged to me for my kindness, and wished me a good morning; this was at Hoxton, in Middlesex - I was in the service of my master, who has a shop there.

Cross-examined. Q. How often had you seen him before? A. Only once, about four days before; I did not think this an odd request, as he appeared extremely deficient in sight - I did not doubt his being the person he represented.

JURY. Q. Was there any address on the bill? A. I believe there was, but I did not read it - I saw nothing deficient in it.

WILLIAM HALL . I live in Judd-street. Morley paid this bill to me; on the day it became due the prisoner called on me about eleven o'clock - the bill had been presented: he said he had got to go to Westminster, and should be back in the course of an hour, and take it up; in the mean time Morley came and asked me if the bill had been paid - I told him it had not, and about one o'clock I gave Morley the bill to present to Mr. Hunter.

Cross-examined. Q. Does the body of this bill, and the address, appear to be written by the same ink? A. Yes, I should suppose so; there does not appear any difference to me.

WILLIAM NIMMO . I am a constable of St. Pancras. -I took the prisoner into custody; I received this bill at

Hatton-garden Office, and kept it in my possession till I produced it at Hick's Hall; I put my hand-writing on it before I parted with it.

JOHN COTTERELL . I live in Drummond-crescent, St. Pancras - the prisoner was my landlord; I lived in the kitchen of his house. On the 11th of December he told me to go to Mr. Morley, in Sidmouth-street, to ask him if the bill became due that day or the next, and if it were due that day, if he would bring the bill to his house he had the money to pay him - this was between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; I went and gave the message to Morley, and went with him to Mr. Hall.

CHARLES HALL. I am the son of William Hall, of Judd-street. I went with Morley on the day the bill became due, to present it; the prisoner intimated to Morley that he had not got the money, but that he would settle it before twelve o'clock that day - he intimated that he had disagreed with his cousin, and should pay it himself.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any reason to suppose Morley suspected the bill was not good? A. No; he deals with my father - he had brought it to my father on the day it became due, not before; I did not hear the conversation between him and my father, but believe it was brought for the purpose of its appearing to come from my father - Morley had not the least suspicion of its being bad, that I know of.

Prisoner's Defence. I called on my cousin on the 8th of November; he promised to let me have a little money if I could get any thing to suit me - he was not at home, and I did take this bill, and ask a gentleman to accept it; I was not aware of the danger of it at the time.

HENRY AUSTIN. I am related to the prisoner, the same as Mr. George Henry Hunter, and have known him from a boy - I always understood him to have been born blind; he underwent an operation, and was then enabled to see with one eye, so as to move about - I never heard his character impugned: I lent him 50l. about twelve months ago - he could not pay me, having lost money by his father; Mr. George Henry Hunter and I had agreed jointly to advance him money to forward his views - he calculated on that money by the time this bill was due.

ISAAC MORLEY . The prisoner was taken into custody on the premises, but in an upper room - he had disposed of the shop.

NOT GUILTY .

First London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18290115-7

272. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 dead goose, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Pigott .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-8

273. WILLIAM CUMMINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 wrapper, value 1s.; 24 night-caps, value 11s.; 24 worsted frocks, value 4l. 10s.; 12 other frocks, value 21. 10s., and 36 other caps, value 25s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Bulcock Burbidge .

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On Wednesday, the 24th of December, I was passing along Bishopsgate-street; I observed a coach back into Devonshire-street- I went up, and saw a man shutting the door and going away; the coachman said, "Where am I to drive to?" the man was at that time shutting the door, and seeing me went away without answering him, as I said, "Never mind. coachman, I will tell you in a minute;" I opened the coach-door, put my head in, and the prisoner jumped out as quick as he could at the door I stood at; he could not get out at the other door, as this bale of goods was there - I laid hold of him; he said, "Let me go:" I called for assistance, and he was secured; he certainly jumped out as if to escape, but I detained him, and found a large bale of goods in the coach, and a bill of parcels, which led me to Mr. Burbidge.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You and your brother were on the look out? A. Yes - the coachman is not here; he said nothing in the prisoner's presence: he did not say the prisoner was never in the coach - I did not speak to him, except telling him I would tell him where to drive.

COURT. Q. Are you quite certain the prisoner was in the coach? A. Yes: I never let him go - he had not got half a yard from the coach.

JOHN BAXTER. I am clerk to Mr. Thomas Bulcock Burbidge , wholesale hosier, of Bridge-street, Southwark. I entered the goods which were packed in this package; they were to go to Chester-quay: I made out the invoice- this is it (looking at it;) it was put inside the package, and is my hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you before the Magistrate? A. Yes; I heard nobody say the prisoner was not the man who called the coach.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES CHAMBERS. I am porter to Mr. Burbidge. I was driving the horse and cart, with this package in it, going to Chester-quay - I missed it in Houndsditch, between five and six o'clock.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I was with my brother, but not when he first went up to the coach; I was nearly opposite Devonshire-street, and saw two persons - one of them jumped up in a pleasing sort of a manner: one gave the other an umbrella to hold - I followed him to the coach-stand; he sent the coachman, who drove to Devonshire-street - one of the men was standing there, and I did not then go up, as I did not want them to see me, but when I got up I found my brother holding the prisoner - I was waiting at the end of the street, to stop the coach when it came out; the prisoner is not the man who hired the coach from the stand.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to have the coachman and beadle called who forced me into the coach; I was not in it till they forced me in - the coach is No. 20l.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I assisted in putting him into the coach after he was secured.

GEORGE GIRTON . I am a beadle. I did not come up till the prisoner was secured.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-9

274. THOMAS WALL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 2 cheeses, value 18s. , the goods of Alexander Duncan .

ALEXANDER DUNCAN . I live in Broadway, Ludgate-hill , and am a cheesemonger . On the 9th of December

he prisoner was brought into my shop with this cheese, which bad laid in my side window; he had drawn up the window to get it.

HENRY COOK . I saw the prisoner lift up the window, and take the cheese out; I am waiter at the Queen's Head public-house, opposite: he ran away with it - I saw him secured.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am an officer, and took him in charge.

The prisoners pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-10

275. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of William Wilson , from his person .

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a stationer , and live in Southampton-row. On the 23d of December, between three and four o'clock, I was in Holborn , and had a handkerchief in my coat-pocket - I did not feel it taken, but was told it was gone; I found the prisoner and the handkerchief in about five minutes; I cannot swear to the handkerchief: I had only bought it a quarter of an hour before.

THOMAS GROVE. I am a watch-case maker. I was coming down Holborn-bill, and at the corner of Shoe-lane (there was a crowd), I saw the prisoner and two others in the act of picking pockets - I saw the prosecutor come up, with a bag in his hand, and the prisoner took the handkerchief from his right-hand pocket; I secured him, and took him to the watch-house - I saw him take it out of the prosecutor's pocket; he threw it down - a woman picked it up. and gave it to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of Shoe-lane: there was a crowd round a man who was selling pamphlets - a gentleman lost his handkerchief, and a man charged me with it; I denied it, and he gave me in charge; he went after the gentleman, who said be could not swear to the handkerchief, as a woman had stopped him, and told him if he did not mind his handkerchief would fall out: at Guildhall he said most likely it had fallen out of his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-11

276. JOHN CALLAGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , at St. Botolph without, Bishopsgate, 1 tea-chest, value 2s., and 80 lbs. of tea, value 20l., the goods of Joseph Otley and another, in his dwelling-house .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HENRY WORMALD. I am in partnership with John Otley - we carry on business in Devonshire-square, in the parish of St. Botolph without ; Mr. Otley lives there, but I do not: we are tea-dealers . On the 18th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, we had three chests of tea corded up in our warehouse, for delivery - the counting-house is parted from the warehouse by a glass door; I could not see into that part of the warehouse from where I sat - I was writing, alone, in the counting-house and heard a chest of tea being moved by the door- knowing none of the porters were at work, I just opened the counting-house door, and saw a man, whom I believe to be the prisoner; his face was towards me, but I am near-sighted - he had on a blue coat, with metal buttons, also a blue waistcoat and trousers; he was about the prisoner's height: I do not swear to him, but believe him to be the man - I cried Stop thief! he immediately ran off towards Borer's-buildings; he had nothing when he ran, but before he ran he was in the act of disengaging himself from the chest of tea - he had got it out of the warehouse on to the first step, in the street, and on my crying out, disengaged himself from it; the chest had been on the top of two others - he dropped it immediately I opened the counting-house door; having nobody in the counting-house I did not like to leave the premises, and did not pursue; I found the chest on the steps - there were 80 lbs. of tea in it, worth 20l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How many partners have you? A. Only one; the person was about three yards from me - he went off a few seconds after I opened the door; our warehouse is part of the dwelling-house.

GEORGE GIRLING . I am beadle of Devonshire-square. On Thursday morning, the 18th of December, I was on duty in a watch-box in the square; the box commands a view of the prosecutor's premises - about eleven o'clock I saw the prisoner and two others walking to and fro; the reason I noticed the prisoner was that he came to my box door, and hallooed out, "Jack, Jack" - I looked out of the window, and saw one of his companions walking round the square; I suppose he came there to see how far my window commands a view of the square - I could see the prosecutor's door from the box; they passed to and fro - the prisoner gave his umbrella into the hands of one of his companions under the archway; he then crossed towards me, and then took a circuit to Mr. Otley's door, walked up the steps into Mr. Otley's warehouse, and laid hold of the tea-chest - it was too heavy for him, as I suppose; he laid hold of it, and at that moment Mr. Wormald opened the counting-house door: I saw him clap his hands on the tea-chest, which was within the door - the door was open, and I could see the chest: in order to have a better view of him, I drew back the slide of my window, and when I again looked he was in the act of dropping the tea, and Mr. Wormald was at the door; the prisoner ran away - Mr. Wormald called Stop thief! I opened my box-door, with a little difficulty, to run round under the archway, which leads into Borer's-buildings and Still-alley - I went another way, and met him and his two associates in Borer's-buildings, within three or four minutes of my seeing him run from the door, and am positive of him, and his companions also; I went up, collared him. and said, "You are my prisoner;" I had no sooner said that than the other two attacked me, cut my cheek, and bruised my head - the man who had received the umbrella from him knocked me about my head and legs, and then they dragged me into Cutler-street, and rolled me into the kennel; I was a good deal ill-used, and the prisoner struck me several times with one hand, which he had at liberty, but I never let go my hold of him - assistance came, and the others got away.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known the prisoner before? A. Not the prisoner - I lost sight of him for about four minutes, as I went round to meet him; it was about seven minutes from the time the umbrella was changed

till he ran away - I was not struck till I seized him; I told him what I charged him with - I will not say that was before I was attacked, for the attack was almost directly; I think I should know one of the other men again - my attention was directed to him also; the warehouse is twenty or thirty yards from my box - what I saw was through my window, which is about a foot and a half long, and a foot broad.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. From the time you saw him till the chest was taken were you watching them? A. Yes- I observed the prisoner particularly, and am certain he is the man who went into the warehouse and took the tea.

Prisoner's Defence. The street-keeper says he was not more than four minutes going four hundred yards - that is the distance he went, and I was taken not fifty yards from the prosecutor's.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence.

Reference Number: t18290115-12

277. JOHN EILES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 reticule, value 2s.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 card-case, value 3d.; 1 pair of clasps, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d.; 3 sovereigns, 1 crown, and 5 shillings, the property of Elizabeth Ann Dickson , from her person .

ELIZABETH ANN DICKSON. I am a widow , and live on my property. On the 21st of December, I was returning from the Worthing coach, and coming through Smithfield - I had a bag, containing my purse and the articles stated in the indictment; I had a small basket and parcel with me, also my umbrella and a dog - I took the basket off one hand and put my bag on my arm while I rested to shift my bag; I felt somebody pull me behind and missed my bag - it was snatched from me I have no doubt - I did not see who did it; I turned round and saw a man running about five yards off - he was rather a tall man: I said, "Stop that man, he has robbed me!" and he was afterwards stopped; I entirely lost my property, and cannot say how far the man ran.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you tell whether the man taken, was the man who ran from you? A. No - it was not very dark, but I should think too dark to swear to a man; I had just paid the coachman - I felt the reticule pulled and missed it immediately; the person did not come in front of me; it is very possible it might have dropped.

COURT. Q. What made you say it was snatched? A. I felt some one pull, and felt a jerk at it, then missed it - a lady called out "You had better go forward, the man who has robbed you, is taken."

Q. Do you mean to say that it dropped, or was taken? A. It must have been taken, I think - I felt a jerk and immediately missed it.

JOHN CARTER. I live in Chancery-lane, and am a shoemaker. I was in Smithfield: about twenty yards before I got to the prosecutrix, I saw her, and a man, I believe - I thought him a middle-sized man - I walked down and got within four yards of them, and saw the man make a sort of a wrestle, then run away, and the woman screamed out directly; I ran after the man and was very near getting hold of him - he turned down Hosier-lane, through a passage; I fell over some rails instead of jumping over them - I got up and followed him again, calling Stop thief! five or six people ran after him; I pursued the same man who took the articles - I believe the man I followed was taken; he might be out of my sight in the middle of Hosier-lane, but I do not think he was - the same man was taken; I was out of breath - I cannot say whether the prisoner is the man, in the dress he has on now; I have said I could swear to him when he had the other clothes on - he had a light waistcoat on at the time; I saw the same person taken who I pursued, and that man I saw at the office - the man at the office was the man who robbed her; if the prisoner be the man who was at the office, he is the man who committed the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you think the wrong man was taken for this? A. I do not think it myself - I am tall; I thought he was a middling sized man - I called Stop thief! after I could run no longer; I was never out of this country; I was on the Chatham river for about three years, sometimes fishing and sometimes sailing: I was transported for theft, but it was proved I never did any thing of the sort - I am " Jack Carter " the pugilist, but I learned the shoemaking trade; the reticule was not found- I was not searched.

PAUL STANTIDE . I am eleven years old. I was in Smithfield and saw the prisoner running - I am sure he is the man; I saw him snatch something from the lady - he knocked me down as he ran away; I am sure he is the person - he was taken in Hosier-lane, about fifty yards off - it was between eight and nine o'clock; the gas was lighted- I lost sight of him for about three minutes; I was about four yards from him when he took the bag, and am positive he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. At the corner of Cloth-fair; the lady was between there and Long-lane - I did not see the prisoner taken; I was about the middle of Hosier-lane - four or five people were running; there was nobody near him when he made the snatch; Carter was about four yards from him, and the gas-lamp was about two yards off - I was asked the colour of what he took, and directly said it appeared to be black; Carter ran very hard after him - I was on the opposite side and was flurried; I followed him, after being knocked down, to see where he went - he had run about three minutes before I lost sight of him, and about fifty yards.

COURT. Q. Were you frightened till you were knocked down? A. No.

THOMAS ANDERSON . I am a watchman. On the 21st of December I heard an alarm in King-street, opposite Hosier-lane - I saw the prisoner running down the lane, and several persons pursuing him; he was the first man, and I stopped him - I did not see Stantide till at the watch-house- he there said he was the man; nothing but a pair of scissors was found on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the boy asked the colour of what was taken? A. Yes; he said it was black, and said he had been thrown down - Carter was in the watch-house, and said he was a shoe maker.

GEORGE GODFREY. I am the watch-house-keeper. The prisoner was brought in; the boy told the story he has now - the prisoner said he was a tailor, but there being no marks on his finger, I doubted it; he then said he was a ca

binet-maker employed near Spafields, but would not tell the street.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you send persons out to search in the tract? A. Yes; they found nothing - the boy said he thought it was a bag that he snatched - he could not exactly say the colour, but thought it was black; Smithfield is well lighted - the robbery was committed in the darkest part, but that is not too dark to see a person.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-13

278. SARAH SMITH and SARAH SHAW were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 canvas bag, value 1d.; 1 sovereign; 1 crown; 3 half-crowns; 4 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the property of James Brown , from his person .

JAMES BROWN. I am a labouring man , and live at Bromley, Kent. I came to town on the 19th of December, and was in West-street in the evening; I saw the prisoners in Smithfield - Shaw asked me to treat her; they were not both together then - I told her I could not; I was going up into the horse-market - I went away, and did not see then for some time - it was about four o'clock in the afternoon; I went into a public-house, and had a pint of beer, in West-street - the prisoners came in - they drank part of my beer; I went out - they followed me a little way, and in West-street , Smith put her hand into my pocket, and took my purse and money out; I was not playing with them - she did it in an instant; Shaw was looking on - they were both together; I went to go after Smith, and Shaw took hold of my coat, and would not let me go - two or three more women came up, and detained me while they both got away; the other women held me - I am certain the prisoners are the women; I never got my purse or money again - I went to the office, and in three-quarters of an hour they were taken.

Prisoner SHAW. Q. Did you not ask me to go and have a pint of beer with you, and we had a quartern of gin? A. No; I had a pint of beer.

JOHN AUSTIN KING. I was on duty. I saw the prisoners about three o'clock, in Smithfield, following the prosecutor about, and talking to him - I knew them well, and after going off duty in the evening, the prosecutor came to the Compter, and said he had been robbed; I and another officer went into several public-houses, and found the prisoners at the Crown, drinking gin - we took them to the Compter, and the prosecutor pointed them out to us; he was quite sober - I found nothing on them.

Prisoner SHAW. Q. Did he not say he was robbed in a public-house in Smithfield? A. No; I did not say I thought I had not got the right girls.

WILLIAM CADMAN. Between four and five o'clock the prosecutor came to the Compter, and said he had been robbed - he was perfectly sober.

JAMES BROWN . I never said I was robbed in a public-house, or in Smithfield; I stated what I have here.

SMITH'S Defence. I went into the Cooper's Arms public-house to have a pint of beer; the man was there having gin-hot - he asked me to drink, which I did; he had a glass of rum and water, two quarterns of gin, and a pint of porter - he came out of the door, and went away with two girls.

SHAW'S Defence. I was going along, when he asked me to have something to drink; he treated us with liquor - I took this young woman to have some; he wished us good bye, and went off with two young women; we went into a house to have a pint of beer - the officer came in and took us; he said he was robbed there - the landlady can prove he was not.

MARY WILLIAMS. My husband keeps the Cooper's Arms public-house. The prosecutor and some girls were drinking there on the evening of the 19th - that is all I know; I do not know how long he was in the house - my niece served them; they had a pint of hot beer with a quartern of gin in it, and a glass of gin and water between them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-14

279. JOHN NOELL , alias YARDLEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 14 ozs. of silk, value 35s., and 35 wooden bobbins, value 1s. the goods of Maria Gee .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of John Hulland and others.

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

ELIZA GEE . I live in Vincent-court, Silver-street, City; my daughter had some silk sent from Mr. Hulland - she live with me. On the 1st of October the prisoner came, and said he came for Mr. Hulland's silk; I told my daughter, who delivered it to him - I supposed at the time that he had come from Mr. Hulland; it was Mr. Hulland's silk.

Prisoner. Q. Is it not customary for journeyman to bring a written order? A. Not always; the prisoner is a weaver, and has worked for Mr. Hulland.

MARIA GEE . I received some silk from Mr. Hulland on the 30th of September, and on the 1st of October the prisoner came and asked me for Mr. Hulland's silk; I gave him thirty-five bobbins, which I had wound - he asked me to lend him a handkerchief, and he would leave it at the warehouse for me; I gave him one - I have not seen the silk or the handkerchief since.

Prisoner. Q. What time in the morning was it? A.Between eight and nine o'clock.

JOHN HULLAND. I live in Goldsmith-street - Gee worked for me. I sent her some silk in September; I did not send the prisoner for any part of it - he had been in my employ, but left about this time last year, and had no direction from me to do any thing after that; I had not seen him; I have not found the silk - there were fourteen yards, worth 38s.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-15

NEW COURT, First Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

280. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 pair of trousers, value 20s. , the goods of William Snow .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18290115-16

281. OWEN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on

the 13th of December , 1 basket, value 1s., and 1 skip of apples, value 7s. , the goods of Elizabeth Reed .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-17

282. WILLIAM CARLILE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 1 shirt, value 1s., and 1 round frock, value 7s. , the goods of John Ironmonger .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of James Bennett .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-18

283. EDWARD WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 2 lancets, value 4s.; 1 silver lancet-case, value 10s., and 1 pair of pantaloons, value 6s. , the goods of George Simpson .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-19

284. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 neck-chain, value 5s. , the goods of Christopher Battcher .

MARY EVANS. I am the proprietor of a stall in Mr. Trotter's Bazaar, in Soho-square . The prisoner came to my stall on the 16th of December - she bought nothing, but passed on to Caroline Battcher 's counter, which is about half the room from me; I thought I saw her take something from the counter, but what it was I could not tell - I informed Mr. Holsworth, who took her; I saw a chain, a pair of ear-rings, two thimbles, and a cork-screw produced - I believe the chain was taken from her bosom; I did not see any money found on her.

CAROLINE SMITH . I am servant to Mrs. Battcher. The prisoner came to the stall, and asked the price of some things, but did not buy any; there had been a gilt chain on the counter - when Mrs. Battcher came back I missed it; I had seen it before the prisoner came to the stand.

CAROLINE BATTCHER . I am the wife of Christopher Battcher . On the 16th of December I put the gilt chain out, just before I left the stall - I left Smith to take care of it; I returned in three quarters of an hour, and found the chain in Mr. Holsworth's possession.

ROSAMOND HOLSWORTH . I am housekeeper of the Bazaar. On the 16th of December Evans gave me information; I took the prisoner into the back room - she took the chain from her bosom; she said she wished to pay for it, and that she had nothing more - I saw some halfpence in her hand, and I think she had a purse in her other hand; these other articles fell from her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the chain, and when I saw her following me I was going to give it her; she took me by the shoulder, and said she would have me transported.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-20

285. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 2 hats, value 20s. , the goods of William Moore .

WILLIAM MOORE . I am a hat-manufacturer , and live in Piccadilly. The prisoner was in my employ on the 2d of January; these two hats are mine - they had been given him to finish; I do not know of their being delivered to him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is it your custom to take account of the articles delivered to the men? A. Yes, and they are responsible for them at the end of the week - if any are deficient they are not to be paid for by them; if a man was to say, "Here are two hats short, which have been stolen," I should make him pay for them - such instances have occurred.

HENRY JONES. I am in Mr. Moore's employ. On the 2d of January I found these hats concealed behind the steam-boiler, in the shop where the prisoner was at work- they were unfinished: I took them out, and asked the prisoner if he knew any thing of them - he denied it, but afterwards said they were his: he took them, and went to open them - I went to a distance, saw him crush one up and put it into his hat; in a few minutes he did so with the other, and put a piece of slate over them - I went and told the young man in the shop below; he came up and said, "Whose are these?" the prisoner said, "They are mine" - he then went and got the watchman.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a person named Holmes in the employ of Mr. Moore? A. Yes - he was examined before the Magistrate; he is not here - he did not say that he hand put one of the hats into the prisoner's hat; it was about twenty minutes to nine o'clock when I saw the hats - Holmes and Almond were working in the shop at the other end; I asked the prisoner who put them there - it was the prisoner's duty to work on hats in the warehouse; these hats were crushed up, and put behind the steam-boiler - a person might go to the boiler without seeing them, as there was no light near there, I went to the boiler, and put my hand accidentally on them- there were five or six lights in the room; it is about ten yards long - the boiler is there for the men to put their hats on; I saw the prisoner put them into his hat - I do not think he knew I saw him; I said I thought it was not a fit place for them to be in - after that he put them into his hat, and a piece of slate on, which he had his work down on; he did say he thought it was a silk handkerchief - I have seen him wear a handkerchief; when he came in the morning he used to take off his handkerchief and put it into his hat - he was at work that night without a handkerchief; Holmes was discharged by Mr. Moore because he worked in the same shop.

COURT. Q. Did you see Holmes have any thing to do with the hats? A. No - I spoke to the prisoner and Holmes about them; they both denied knowing any thing about them - I did not leave the shop; I saw him put them into his hat in about a quarter of an hour - the prisoner said, "They are my property" - the young man said, "Are they not Mr. Moore's?" he said No.

WILLIAM ALMOND. I received information from Jones - I took a light, and went up stairs to the steam-copper; my brother was working at the other end - I looked into the copper; the prisoner then had his back towards it -I saw his hat on a shelf near the boiler; I took it and said, "What have you got here?" he said, "They are my property;" I said, "Are you sure they are not Mr. Moore's" - he said, "No, they are my property;" I thought it very odd - I locked the two men in the room, and went down to Mr. Moore - he said they were his

hats; I went and got the watchman, and took him up stairs - the prisoner had then got his clothes on; I went and said to the prisoner, "Where is the other hat?" which I had left in his hat - he said, "What hat? I have seen no hat;" I went round to the steam-copper, and this hat was put into a small hole where the steam came out - he was then taken to the watch-house, and there he said they were Mr. Moore's hats, which he had to finish.

Cross-examined. Q. Holmes was then in the service of the prosecutor? A. Yes, but has been dismissed; Holmes had been there three or four months - he was accounted a good steady man; the prisoner generally wore a white handkerchief, but I cannot say what he wore that day - he said before the Magistrate that he thought it was his black silk handkerchief, but I had taken one hat out and shewn it him; he could not think it was a handkerchief - if these hats had been delivered to him to finish he must have returned them, or given some account of them; I do not know whether he would have had to pay for any that he did not return.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am night-constable. The prisoner was brought to me with the hats; I asked if they were his - he said, "No, Mr. Moore's."

MR. MOORE re-examined. Q. Why did you dismiss Holmes? A. They were taken before the Magistrate together, and I have no doubt but he knew the prisoner stole the hats; it is most painful to me to bring the man here - he is married, and has a family; he has behaved well till now.

Prisoner's Defence. Two men called at the shop and I went to give them some refreshment - I came back in about three hours; Jones brought the hats, and put them on my board - I know nothing about them; I asked Holmes how they came there in that state - he said he put one there; I took one and steamed it, and then I certainly did put them into my hat - I told Almond they were mine, being my work.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-21

286. ELLEN SWEETMAN and ALICE SWEETMAN were indicted for stealing on the 22d of December , 2 pairs of shoes, value 10s. , the goods of John Mann .

ALICE SWEETMAN pleaded GUILTY . Aged 12.

CHARLES MANN. I am the son of John Mann, a shoemaker , who lives in the Haymarket. On the 22d of December, a little before ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoners came to the shop, and asked to look at some double soled shoes; they tried some on, and objected to the price- I said I would not take less: I went to put the shoes into the glass-case, and they left the shop - I missed two pairs, and went after them; I saw a basket in the hand of Alice, in which were the two pairs of shoes; I took them back - Ellen said they were not mine, they were her sister's- they had no money.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PHILIP PERRY. I am an officer, and took the prisoners - they had no money at all: Ellen said if we would forgive her she would never do the like again - I am sure she said so.

ELLEN SWEETMAN 'S Defence. I had some money, but not enough to pay for the shoes, as they were 5s. - I said I would put him to no more trouble; my sister put the shoes into the basket, and when we got into the street she opened it, and showed them to me - I said, "Go back;" she said, "Don't ask me to go back:" I stood in the street, and saw the young man coming - I made him no answer, but my sister said, "They are not your's."

ELLEN SWEETMAN - GUILTY. Aged 17.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290115-22

287. THOMAS BROCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 7cwt. of lead, value 6l. , the goods of Matthew Robinson Boulton and James Watt .

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am constable of St. Katharine's Docks . On the night of the 25th of December I saw the prisoner on the premises, about seven o'clock; I watched him, and saw him go to a fence at the end of the engine-house; he got a ladder, and got on the top of the fence, and said, "It is all right" - I got behind a crane, and presently saw something put under the fence; the prisoner came round, drew it through a hole, and passed me - it appeared to me like a pig of lead; I went out at one of the gates, and round to Nightingale-lane, expecting to meet him, but he did not come - I went back, and got behind the crane; he came and passed me again - I again went to Nightingale-lane, but he did not come; I then went more on the works of the Docks, and in a few minutes I saw him and another man go down Nightingale-lane, without any thing; the prisoner went into a marine-store shop, and the other went away - the next morning I went in the track which the prisoner had passed along, and found one large pig of lead, and at a distance some other pieces, which appeared to have come from a melting-pot; I concealed myself that night, and saw the prisoner and another man come and cut one piece across - the prisoner took a piece up, and concealed it about his person; the other man went away: I ran across the works, and met the prisoner in Burr-street - the other man was not there; I asked the prisoner what he had got - he said nothing - I snatched his hands from his coat, which was clasped round him, and his small-clothes gave way; this piece of lead fell out - he said, "I suppose you know where I got it."

THOMAS HAYNES. I am a labourer, in the employ of Messrs. Boulton and Watt; they are engine-manufacturers- they have a large quantity of stores at St. Katharine's Docks; I have the key of them. On the 26th of December I saw the window of the engine-house had been opened- I missed four large pieces of lead, and some which had been melted in a pot; I have no doubt that this piece of lead is a part of one of the large pieces which had been in the engine-house, but it has been cut across - I had locked the engine-house on Christmas morning.

JOHN MOSLEY. I was agent to Matthew Robinson Boulton and James Watt; this lead was his property - I had seen it there two or three days before.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-23

288. JOSIAH HART was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 8lbs. weight of pork, value 5s. , the goods of Ralph Shum .

RALPH SHUM. I live in Haughton-street, Clare-market . I missed a belly of pork about half-past five o'clock on the 10th of December, from my cellar; the prisoner was in my service, but was out - he came home at nine o'clock: I

charged him with it - he denied it, but my brother came in, and he confessed it to him, and went with him to Vere-street, where he had sold it.

MARIA TASKER. The prisoner sold me a piece of pork- I gave the same to my daughter, to give to my son; the officer went and got it.

JOHN SHUM. I was present when the prisoner first denied the charge; I said it was of no use denying it, he knew he had stolen it - he confessed it; I said he must take me to the place, and he said, after the mob was gone from the door he would; he took me to Mrs. Tasker's.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been induced to confess the offence under a promise of forgiveness.

JOHN SHUM . The words I made use of were, "You had better acknowledge it, you know you are guilty;" I had no particular meaning in saying it would be better.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-24

289. HENRY GRANTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 gun, value 35l. , the goods of Joseph Egg .

JAMES MOGGRIDGE. I am a gun-lock maker, and live in Union-street, Lambeth. I work for Mr. Joseph Egg, at a factory at No. 5, Princes-street . The prisoner is a carpenter , and works in a shop under the factory; I left this gun safe on the 26th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock - I came back the next morning, and it was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Were you the last person there? A. No; the prisoner's father locks the door - I left two persons there, who are not here now: I know the gun by the number, and by the work - I had to put a new tumbler to it.

EDWARD FULLER . I am a pawnbroker. I received this gun in pawn on the 26th; I am not positive of the prisoner's person, but I believe he is the man; his appearance was different when I saw him at Bow-street.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I took up the prisoner on the 30th of December; I waited at a private house, which I understood he frequented - when he came I told him I had been waiting for him some time, and I wanted him for a gun; he said, "What gun?" I said, "The gun you have taken from Mr. Egg's;" he said, "I know nothing about it" - that it was a foolish thing, and a drunken thing: as we went along I accused him of dropping something from his left hand, and I told a person to pick it up - the prisoner said he had dropped nothing; he had got the duplicate - we went to Mr. Egg's; I searched him, and said, "You have not got the duplicate - I must strip you;" he then gave it me from the cuff of his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the duplicate on my father's premises.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-25

290. SARAH DUFFELL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of Ralph Wilcoxon .

RALPH WILCOXON. I am a shoemaker , and live in Walker's-court, St. James's . On the 30th of December the prisoner came and asked to look at some boots; I went out, and left my wife to serve - I returned in ten minutes; she had bought one pair, and was paying for them - I saw her take a pair from the back of a chair; I let her go out and then followed, and took them from under her cloak - she said she took them by mistake; another person had come in with her, and was sitting by her at the time - I understand the prisoner made the purchase; it was about seven o'clock in the evening.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who else was in the shop? A. A shopman cleaning a pair of boots; my wife was about a yard and a half from her - she had a bundle; the boots hung over her arm under her cloak -she was about four yards from my door when I took her; she might be looking at some things in the window - the officer took both pairs of boots from her; the 5s. which she had paid were not returned.

BENJAMIN WEBB. I am an officer. I produce the boots; I found 13s. on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman came in - I laid down a bundle, and took up the shoes with the bundle; my sister was with me - she was in a great deal of trouble; when I got out I stood at his window - he came and said"You have a pair of shoes more than you ought to have?" I said "I have not," but I looked down, and said "Yes, I have;" I went back and begged his pardon - I had no intention of robbing him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-26

291. MARY CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 purse, value 1s.; 2 sovereigns, 2 half-crowns, and 2s. , the property of Francois Casterique .

ANGELEQUE CASTERIQUE. I am the wife of Francois Casterique, of No. 30, Orchard-street. I was at the corner of Gilbert-street, Oxford-street , on the 23rd of December; I had my purse hanging on my arm - I heard something fall on the pavement, and the prisoner picked up some money close to me, but I did not think any thing of my purse- there were two sovereigns, two half-crowns, and two shillings in it; the prisoner was close to me, and touched my foot when she picked up the purse - a baker came out of his shop and pointed to her; I went on to No. 6, Gilbert-street, and stopped about three quarters of an hour before I missed my purse, when I wanted to pay some money - I then thought it was left at home; I went home, and found it was not there - I then remembered this circumstance; I have never seen it again.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What sort of purse was it? A. A long red silk purse, with money at each end; I had it on my arm when I came from home.

JOHN TAYLOR. I am a baker. I was in the shop at the corner of Gilbert-street, about a quarter before four o'clock- I saw the prosecutrix pass, and saw the prisoner close to her; I saw the purse fall, but did not see from whom - the prosecutrix went on - the prisoner picked up the purse; I went and told her that I thought it belonged to the lady who had just gone on - she said it was 3d. she had got in a piece of brown paper; I did not see what it was - I could not leave my business.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not ask what had fallen? A. No; I knew what she picked up, but I did not ask her- the lady had gone on five or six yards; I had some things in my hands, and could not go - I supposed it was the lady's purse; the prisoner had a barrow near that place, but she did not stop.

MARY KING. I was at the corner of the street; the pri

soner asked me if I knew whether Mr. Bullock was giving coals away that day - I said I did not; she then picked up what I believe was a red purse, and I saw her put it under her apron.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see what it was? A. No; she said it was three penny-pieces in a brown paper; I have known her twenty-five years - she sells things in the street, and had an honest character.

COURT. Q. Did you speak to her about its being a purse? A. No; I thought it was a red purse when she picked it up, and I said "Halves if the lady don't own it;" she said it was three penny-pieces in a brown paper, which she had dropped; I had nothing more to say about it.

Q. But you said before the Magistrate you said "Don't say so, it is a purse, and there is more than that in it?" A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did she say "There is only three half-crowns and one shilling?" A. No.

Q.Then that is a falsehood? A. Yes.

JAMES SELBY. I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and found 10s. 6d. on her, two half-crowns and five shillings in silver, and sixpence in copper; she denied having seen the purse, and I found none on her - she said the money was what she had taken in the course of the day for fish; she generally stands close by that shop - I had not been there that day.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband bought some soles, and I was selling them; Mrs. King passed, and I asked if Mr. Bullock gave out coals - I took four penny-pieces and a sixpence out of my pocket, and I dropped 3d. out of my hand; I saw nothing of the purse.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-27

292. JAMES CORD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 painting, value 3s. , the goods of William George Barry .

WILLIAM GEORGE BARRY . I am a broker , and live in Marshall-street, Golden-square . On the 18th of December, about a quarter before five o'clock, I was standing in my parlour, and saw an arm take something from the door - I ran across the shop, and missed a painting; I looked to the left, and saw the prisoner and no other person - he ran, and I pursued him, and took him in John-street, Golden-quare; I accused him of stealing my painting - he said he had not, and asked me if I had got it; I said, No; he said if I would forgive him he would tell me where it was - I said I would not; I took him back, and he said he would tell me, that it was in the private door of the next house - I went there, found it, and sent for an officer.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE. I received the prisoner and this painting; he said he had taken it by the advice of a person whom he did not know where to find.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a person named Campbell, who said he had been to the shop and bought the picture; he told me to go and get it, and he would meet me in Marlborough-row - he said if I did not go he would open my head for me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-28

293. ELIZABETH ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 brooch, value 1l.; 1 necklace, value 2s. 6d.; 1 purse, value 2s.; 1 bracelet, value 2s. 6d.; 1 diamond, value 10s. 6d.; 1 pistol, value 10s.; 1 saw, value 2s.; 1 powder-flask, value 2s. 6d.; 1 branding-iron, value 2s. 6d.; 2 knives, value 2s., and 1 razor, value 2s , the goods of John Alfred Trimmer ; and JOSEPH ADAMS was indicted for receiving the said goods, knowing them to be stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN ALFRED TRIMMER . I live at Kingsbury - Elizabeth Adams was in my service. On the 1st of December I missed some articles; this brooch, necklace, bracelet, purse and a diamond, I can swear to; this pistol belongs to a friend - these knives and other articles, I believe, are mine; they were brought to my house on Christmas day - Joseph Adams had been in my employ, but I discharged him I think, on the 9th of September, and the woman I discharged on Christmas day: I am certain this pistol and brooch were in the house after the man left.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When did the man come into your service? A. I think about the 9th of April; I forbade him the house, when I discharged him, but I was not then aware that they were married - I heard that about a fortnight before Christmas day, and then I gave him leave to come and see his wife - he might have stolen the articles.

THOMAS WYATT. This property was taken out of Joseph Adam 's box in his house at Brentford, which is nine or ten miles from the prosecutor's.

JESSE FULLER. I got a search-warrant, and found these articles - neither of the prisoners were at home; the house was locked up - I went to Mr. Trimmer's and saw them sitting by the kitchen-fire; this was on Christmasday. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-29

294. ELIZABETH ADAMS was again indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 2 bolster-cases, value 5s.; 2 pairs of socks, value 1s.; 2 pieces of lace, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s. , the goods of John Alfred Trimmer , her master.

JESSE FULLER . I went to Mr. Trimmer's on Christmas day, and found the prisoner and her husband in the kitchen- Wyatt went up stairs and searched the prisoner's box.

THOMAS WYATT. I went up stairs and saw a box, which I was told was this woman's - I think it was not locked; I there found these articles - she said nothing to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The box was open? A. I think it was - Mr. Trimmer was in the room, and might have unlocked it.

JOHN ALFRED TRIMMER. I was not in the room, it was Mr. Nicholson.

MR. NICHOLSON. I was in the room with Mrs. Trimmer. The servant pointed out the prisoner's box - I believe it was not locked.

HENRIETTA TRIMMER . I am the prosecutor's wife. I pointed out the prisoner's box to the officer - her name was on it; it was unlocked and these things found - I had not asked her about it, and did not speak to her afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there not another servant sleeps in that room? A. Yes - she is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-30

195. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , I coat, value 2s. , the goods of John Leaman .

JOHN LEAMAN . I am a smith , and live at Highgate. I lost my coat, on the 13th of December, from the door of an ironmonger's, in St. Giles's - my wife cried out, and I pursued; she took the coat from the prisoner's arm when he had got about twenty yards, and I took him when he had run about one hundred and fifty yards.

SARAH LEAMAN. I am the wife of John Leaman . On the 13th of December I was standing at the shop-door, and saw the prisoner take the coat - he put it under his arm, and crossed the road; I went over, and took it from him - he ran off, and my husband ran and took him.

BENJAMIN BODFIELD. I am a patrol. On the evening in question I was in High-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! the prosecutor took the prisoner, and I took charge of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the greatest distress - I had been out of work. GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-31

296. ROBERT RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 1 waistcoat, value 10s. , the goods of Mark Benjamin and Benjamin Benjamin .

MARK BENJAMIN . I am in partnership with my brother Benjamin Benjamin ; we are tailors and clothes salesmen , at Mary-le-bone-lane and New-street, Piccadilly . On the 24th of December, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked if I had a dark drab coat to fit him - he looked at several, none would suit, and he went away; on the Saturday night following, he came and asked for a waistcoat which he had looked at before, and offered me money for; I looked for the waistcoat, and could not find it - on the Monday following, I went to several pawnbrokers, and found it had been pawned - this is it; I can swear it had been in my house on the morning when the prisoner came, as I had taken it out of a box.

Prisoner. Q.What time was I there? A. It was about one or two o'clock; you said "Make haste, for my dinner is ready;" I could not say that if the property was restored. I would look over it - for the pawnbroker gave me the waistcoat; when I got there the pawnbroker said the man is here, and he asked the prisoner if that was the waistcoat the pawned, and he said it was, and that he had bought it in the North six months ago; I did not go out with the prisoner to endeavour to find any man; I told the pawnbroker I wished he would send for an officer, but he refused - I took the prisoner to my house and sent for one.

JOHN EDWARD MEEDES . I am shopman to Mr. Baker, the pawnbroker. On the 24th of December, we received this waistcoat - I think in the morning; the prisoner brought it; there is no mark on it - the prosecutor came to our shop and produced a pattern; I recollected having taken such a one in of the prisoner who was in our shop at the time - he paid for it and the prosecutor took it.

JOHN GUDGE. I am an officer. I took the prisoner for stealing a waistcoat; I went to the pawnbroker's, and when I returned, I said to the prisoner, "Have you any more tickets?" he said No; I took off his hat, and found fifty-nine duplicates in the lining; this is the waistcoat I received from the prosecutor.

MARK BENJAMIN . I gave the same waistcoat to the officer, which I got from the pawnbroker's - this is it - he paid for it, and I believe he was taking some things out at the time - he took a coat or something in; he said he bought it of a Jew.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 24th of December I wanted a great coat, and went out to purchase it, about nine o'clock; I met a Jew, of whom I had bought things before, and asked him if he had one; he said he had not, but he had a waistcoat, of which I had before asked him about; he asked me 10s. for this waistcoat; I said I had but one sovereign and 3s., and I would not give more than 7s. for the waistcoat: he then proposed that we should go to Mr. Baker's shop, where he said we could pawn it for 6s.; I went there, but they would not lend more than 4s. on it: on the 30th, I went to redeem some articles, and Mr. Baker asked if I had a waistcoat of that pattern; I said I had - the prosecutor then came to me and said, it would be a serions piece of business if I did not return the waistcoat; I redeemed it, and then said I would go and find the man; he said be would be glad if I would go to his shop, which I did, and I was there an hour before the officer came: in September last I was down in the North, and bought a number of clothes of a Jew, which I pawned, as they were articles which would not sell in London, and that accounts for my having so many duplicates; I would have found the man, if the prosecutor would have gone with me; he is a Jew salesman, and it is my firm belief that he is acquainted with him; I pawned the waistcoat between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; it was two when I was at the prosecutor's.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-32

297. HENRY PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 7lbs. weight of beef, value 3s. , the goods of John Wickham .

JOHN WICKHAM . I am a butcher . On the 9th of January I lost about 7lbs. of beef, from a board inside my window-shutter; I was out at the time - I went out at eight o'clock, and returned about eleven; I went to the watch-house, and saw the prisoner - I saw my beef at Worship-street.

JOHN BUTT. I had information that the prisoner and another had laid a plan to rob this shop; I went to my door, and saw the prisoner take the beef; he came towards me, and I caught him in my arms - he threw it down, and endeavoured to escape by kicking.

GEORGE CLAY . I took the prisoner; the beef was given up to the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the shop, and saw a bit of beef on the ground; I was stooping to pick it up, when the witness came and caught me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-33

298. HENRY ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 cart-tilt, value 2l., and part of a carttilt, value 1l. , the goods of Thomas Large .

THOMAS LARGE. I keep a cart . I missed a tilt, and part of a tilt, from my stable-yard, in Well-street, Oxford-street ; I missed them on Tuesday, the 2d of December - I know nothing of the prisoner.

ANN ACKERMAN. I bought this canvas of the prisoner on the Tuesday or Wednesday, the 2d or 3d of December;

he said it was his own, and he sold it to get beer for himself and some men; I gave 1/2d. per lb. for it - I do not recollect how many pounds there were, but I think I gave him 18d. or 20d.; he came before he brought it, and asked what I would give a lb. for it.

GEORGE AVIS . This is the canvas I brought from Ackerman's; there is a whole tilt and part of another.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-34

299. JAMES WELCH and THOMAS TURNER were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 5 books, value 6l., and 2 maps, value 2s. , the goods of John Bumpus .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Thomas Griffin and John Wilson Hillhouse .

THIRD COUNT, stating them to be the goods of James Bartlett .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS JONES. I am clerk to Mr. John Bumpus, a bookseller , of Skinner-street. On the 22d of December he sent me up an order from Plymouth; I made out the invoice of the books, and saw them packed up - I saw that they corresponded with the invoice, which I put with them- I sent the porter with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see the books themselves? A. Yes; I saw the man packing them.

NICHOLAS LISS. I am porter to Mr. Bumpus. On the 22d of December I received a parcel from Mr. Jones, which I took to Beal's wharf, I think about two o'clock; I delivered it to the book-keeper.

JOHN DARE. I am book-keeper to Messrs. Griffin and Hillhouse, the proprietors of Beal's wharf. I received this parcel from Liss, and desired Winfield to remove it.

WILLIAM WINFIELD . I am porter to Messrs. Griffin and Hillhouse. I took the parcel, and gave it to a man to put into the warehouse; I saw it there between ten and twelve o'clock the next morning - I did not miss it that day, but on the 24th, when I went into the warehouse, it was gone; I know Welch very well, and on the 23d he came there with ten casks of tallow in his waggon - he was in the employ of Mr. Bryan; the tallow was put into a warehouse nearer the street than where this parcel was; and, as the waggon stood, no person could get into the warehouse where the parcel was, unless they came under the shaft horse's head, as the waggon was drawn right across the door; Welch was there fifteen or twenty minutes, while they were striking the waggon - Welch had been there twice the week before, and many other times; I thought he was rather quick in getting his waggon out - the door of that warehouse is generally shut close; we are not in the habit of locking it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you there? A. Yes; I was at the tail of the waggon - we unloaded it as quick as we could; when it drove off I was gone to put up the last cask of tallow: I cannot say where Welch was - I did not see him going away; the warehouse was between where the books were and the street: a person must pass the warehouse I was in to get to that one - I cannot tell whether it was open; we had been putting goods in there.

COURT. Q. One warehouse is not within the other? A. No. I should think the parcel of books weighed half a cwt.; there were several other persons about, outside the gate - I cannot say who was inside.

GEORGE FRANCIS KAINES. I am a bookseller, and live in the New-road, St. George's in the East. About seven o'clock in the evening of the 23d of December, Welch came to my house - I was at the parlour-door, inside my shop, and there were some persons in the shop; Welch called me to the door, and said, "I have a parcel of books belonging to a young man, a friend of mine, if you like to buy them;" I asked where they were - he said in his waggon - I said I could not buy them without looking at them, and he said if I would go with him I should see them; as we were going along to Princes-square, where the waggon was, I asked him if it was all right, as it was not proper to go and buy books in a waggon in the street; he said Yes, they were all right, or he would not have come to me - when we got to the waggon I found Turner; Welch called him by some name, and said, "Jump up and show Mr. Kaines those books:" Turner got up at the hind part of the waggon, and showed me one book, which was Goldsmith - it was a little way in the waggon, and covered with the till; I asked if they were all like that - Welch said he did not know that they were; I said that was not a proper place to look at them, and I should like to see them at my own house - Welch then said, "Take them round to Mr. Kaines;" Turner took them on his shoulder, and brought them to my house - they opened the parcel, took out the books carelessly, and seemed very much flurried, which excited my suspicion; Welch seemed in a hurry to get his horses home, and I said, "You had better put your horses up and come again;" they went away, and returned in about twenty minutes - in the interval I examined the parcel; I found these books and maps with this invoice, and the direction- I sent to Lambeth-street, but the officer had not come; when the prisoners returned I told them I had not had time to look over the books, and they had better come again in half an hour - they went away, and I gave the watchman directions to watch outside; they came again, and I gave charge of them on suspicion - I asked them if they came honestly by them, as I did not think they had, and Welch said by G-d they did; Welch also said I might as well have told him they were not all right, and avoided bringing him into trouble - it was as near seven o'clock as possible.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Welch exclaim by G-d, in a way of surprise? A. No, but that they were his own property; I knew Welch before, by his driving and passing by me, for Mr. Bryan - I had spoken to him; Welch said at the watch-house that Turner was to give him a shilling for carrying them.

WILLIAM WINFIELD . The waggon left Beal's-wharf about five o'clock - it is in Thames-street.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a watchmen. I was sent for, and took the prisoners - Mr. Kaines took the parcel to the watch-house.

STEPHEN CARTWRIGHT. These books were delivered to me by Mr. Kaines, and I have had them ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Welch say he had been employed to take them for sale? A. Yes - I never heard

him claim them as his own; I asked Turner how he came by them - he said he picked them up on the wharf; he told the Magistrate so too: Welch did not say that he had received them from Turner, but that he was employed to carry them - Turner said Welch knew nothing about them, that he was as innocent as I was. The direction was on the parcel, "Mr. Bartlett, Plymouth."(Property produced and sworn to.)

WELCH'S Defence. I suppose I was not ten minutes unloading - I do not know that I ever got unloaded quicker. Turner tapped me on the shoulder on London-bridge, and said he had a parcel on the tail of a waggon, which was not very heavy, and asked where I was going; I said to Ratcliff-highway - he put the parcel into the waggon, and went on behind; when I got to my stable, I said,"You must take them out here, and give me the shilling;" he said, "I cannot till I have sold them," and he asked where he could sell them; I knew Mr. Kaines, and went to him - I said, "Here's a young man got some books to sell, perhaps they will suit you;" he went to the man, but Mr. Kaines kept speaking to me - he never said a word to him at all; I said, "They do not belong to me - I know nothing at all about them, and he appears quite ignorant;" Mr. Kaines said, "Come again in half an hour;" I went and put up my horses - Turner came into the yard, called me out, and said, "If you will go with me to the bookseller, perhaps he will give me more for them," and I did go with him.

GEORGE FRANCIS KAINES re-examined. Q. Did he say that Turner was the owner? A. He said they were a young man's, a friend of his; he afterwards spoke of Turner as the person who owned the books: I asked them both how they came by them; Turner made no answer, but Welch said they were honestly come by - Turner had an apron on: my house is about a hundred yards out of the way from Beal's-wharf to Mr. Bryan's; I did not see the direction on the parcel in the waggon - there was a cloth over it.

TURNER'S Defence. Welch knew no more what was in the waggon than any gentleman of the Jury; I asked him, as a favor, if he knew of a bookseller, and he said he did.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

WELCH - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-35

300. JOSEPH CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 36 trusses of hay, value 3l. , the goods of Joseph Perry .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of George Clark .

JOHN AUSTIN . On the 27th of December I was bringing a load of hay from Harrow, where I live, to St. James'-market , for Mr. Joseph Perry; I stopped at Paddington, at Mr. Clark's, the hay-salesman - he told me to take it on to the market; I took it there, and put it on Mr. Clark's stand - I took out my horses, and took them to the barn, where the horses are put up; I then went back, and as I was coming away with my cloth and shovel, I saw the prisoner; he asked me how I got on this Christmas - I told him middling: I left him, and went away; this was about nine o'clock in the morning - I saw no more of it: I expected Mr. Clark or some of his people would be there soon - I knew the prisoner; he is a hay-carter .

MARTHA PITCHER. I live at No. 42, China-mews. -On the 27th of December, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought a load of hay to our house, which he unloaded in the coach-house - he asked me if my husband was at home; I said No: he said he had brought a load of hay for him - I asked what the price was; he said 3l.; I asked a boy who was with the prisoner, whose hay it was - he said he did not know; I went round the cart, and saw the name of Joseph Perry on it - I said I had not the money to pay for it: he said it did not matter - I gave him 2s.; in the evening he called, and I gave him 10s. more - on the Saturday he came and had 18s., and after that he had the 1l. 10s.

JOHN PITCHER. On Wednesday, the 31st of December, the prisoner came to my house, and had the rest of the money for the hay - I afterwards took him in Whitechapel - I told him I had laid a wager with a person that he did not bring his hay from the Haymarket; he said, "I will come," and then I gave him into custody.

GEORGE CLARK. I am a hay-salesman, and live at Paddington. Austin came to me, and asked if I could load the hay in - I said No: I went down to the Haymarket about ten o'clock, and it was gone.

JOHN BISHOP . I tied up the hay at Mr. Perry's; I have seen four trusses of it at Mr. Pitcher's - it is my binding, and it is the some quality of hay; I have no doubt of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in the Edgware-road, of a young lad who was driving it; I could not read the name on the cart - I took it to Pitcher's.

JOHN AUSTIN re-examined. Q. What was to be done with the cart? A.It was to have gone to the hay-barn for me, that I might have it the next market-day; it was taken there, but I do not know by whom.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-36

301. JAMES COXON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 saddle, value 70s. , the goods of William Langdon .

WILLIAM LANGDON. I live in Duke-street, Manchester-square. On the 19th of November I lent this saddle to the prisoner, as he said he wanted to ride a horse, for a day or two; I applied for it several times, but never could get it back again - the only answer I could get was, it was lent.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not the prisoner groom to Dunlock? A. Yes - I have not been able to find Dunlock since; Mr. Dunlock was in my shop three or four times - he had dealt with me for harness, and owes me about 43l.; the prisoner and a man brought a horse to the door at the time he borrowed the saddle - it was not borrowed on his master's account; I did not give it to him on condition that be was to pay 4l. if it were liked - I never said to any body that I told him the price of it was to be 4l., if it were liked; the price I asked for it was 3l. 15s. - I have seen Samuel Beazley ; he is a helper in the stable: I do not know Ann Lock - I will not swear that I never saw her: I lent him the saddle for a day or two.

WILLIAM NORRIS CRIPPS. I am a saddler, and live in Great Windmill-street, Haymarket. I bought the saddle of the prisoner, about the 20th or 22d of November - I gave 1l. 18s. for it.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

SAMUEL BEAZLEY. I was in the employ of Mr. Dunlock; I do not know what he was - he appeared to me like a gentleman, but he is gone I do not know where. The prisoner went to the prosecutor, and got the saddle, but whether he bought it or borrowed it I do not know; I had a horse at the door at the time - the prisoner and the prosecutor came out together; the saddle was put on the horse, and Mr. Langdon girted it on - three or four days after Mr. Langdon called, and asked me where the groom was; I said I believed he was gone round to my master - he then said, "Where is the saddle?" I said, "I know nothing about it - I believe the groom has lent it;" "Oh,(said he) I told him the price of the addle, but he did not say exactly he would have it then;" I am sure he said that, and he said the prisoner called two days after, and said he would have it; Mr. Langdon said, "It does not belong to me - it belongs to a gentleman I have got it to sell for, and the gentleman has altered his mind, and he must have it back." Ann Lock has washed for me some years, and it happened very apropos that she was there, up stairs, looking up my linen; she could hear what was said.

ANN LOCK . My husband is a butcher, and lives at Windsor - I am a laundress. I was up stairs, and could not see Mr. Langdon, nor he me; I heard him say he told the prisoner the price of the saddle was 4l., but he did not say he would keep it then - he had called in two days, and said he would keep it, but since then the gentleman he had to sell it for had altered his mind, and he wished to have it back again - the conversation was carried on in a loud tone of voice, and the prosecutor seemed a little angry; I was only up twelve or thirteen stairs, and there is no door.

WILLIAM LANGDON. I deny all that entirely.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Had you it to sell for a gentleman? A. No, it was my own; I went to ask for it, and he said it was lent - I was angry at not getting it back.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-37

302. JAMES BUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 cloak, value 17s. , the goods of William Prosser .

JOHN CHAPMAN. I am shopman to Mr. William Prosser, who lives in Leonard-street . On the evening of the 10th of December a young woman came and told us a cloak had been taken from the door; I went out, and found it on the prisoner, who was walking along Windmill-street, about a quarter of a mile off - it might be an hour after I had noticed it in the shop; I asked him to let me see what he had got in his handkerchief - he said Yes: I said, "Come to the light," and he ran away; I pursued, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there no other persons with him? A. Not at the time I took him.

ELLEN WEBSTER. I was near the shop, and saw the cloak taken from the door, about six o'clock; the person pulled it down as he went by - I cannot say who it was.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Castle-street, and saw two men turn out of Friendly-place, one of whom dropped a bundle; I took it up - two young men came and asked what I had got: the witness then came up, and through fear I did run away, but I stopped when I had got about twenty yards.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-38

303. JOHN BRIDGES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , 1 pair of boots, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Shick .

JOSEPH SHICK. I lost a pair of boots about the first week in September, from my house in Rahere-street, Goswell-road ; they had been left in my bed-room - I had seen them safe a day or two before: the prisoner worked with the person who made the boots.

SOPHIA BURNHAM. I live with the prosecutor. The prisoner came one morning about four or five months ago, and asked if Mr. Joseph Shick was at home; I told him No. - he said he came after a pair of boots that were to be stretched - I went up stairs, and asked my young mistress - she told me to give them to him; I gave them to him to be stretched: I had never seen him before, but I am sure he is the man.

JOHN ANDREWS. I took the prisoner on another charge I found nothing on him relative to this.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Islington, and met the prosecutor; he asked me to go and take a glass - we went to a public-house: he there said he had got a pair of boots at his house which wanted stretching, that he was going out the following Sunday, and was afraid of being hurt with them; I went and got them stretched, and was returning - I went into the Blue Coat Boy public-house, and there was a large party at skittles; I laid down the boots, took off my coat, and laid it down over them - when I came to put it on, the boots were gone.

JOSEPH SHICK. I never gave him authority to go and take them; it was mentioned that they wanted some alteration, and my sister thought I had sent him for them.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-39

304. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 ass, price 20s. , the property of Joseph Gordon .

JOSEPH GORDON . I lost an ass on the 8th of December, from a field; I had seen it about an hour before - I heard of the prisoner's selling it on the Tuesday morning, at St. Pancras, about a mile or better from where it was taken - he gave no account of it.

THOMAS LYMES. I bought the ass of the prisoner for 9s. - he said his father had sent him to sell it.

WILLIAM JAMIESON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; he said two other boys had sent him to sell it, and said that their father won it at a raffle.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Camden-street, and saw the two boys - they asked if I knew any body who wanted to buy a donkey; I said No - they said they won it at a raffle: another person came by, who told them to go to Wittington-college, and there they sold it - they sent me for change for a sovereign, and then this gentleman came and took me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-40

305. THOMAS BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 basket, value 4d.; 1 brush, value 2s.; 1 hammer, value 6d.; 3 knives, value 6d.; 1 screw-driver, value 1d., and 6 pieces of pummice-stone, value 2d. , the goods of John Dawson .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-41

306. MARIA CHAMBERLAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 1 cap, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 mantle, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Melling .

ROBERT MELLING . I live at Isleworth . The prisoner took a furnished room of us on the 6th of December, and came on the 7th; she absconded on the 11th, I think - this property is my wife's.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know any thing of her? A. No - I do not know whether she is married.

ELIZABETH MELLING . The prisoner came to our house and remained there till the 18th; I missed a handkerchief - she said she knew nothing of it; on the Friday she did not return, and on the Saturday she came again - I said, Mrs. Roberts, (which was the name she gave me,)'you have taken a handkerchief out of my house;" she said, "If I have robbed such a poor woman as you, I ought to be burnt alive" - I said, "If you do not give it up, I will charge Crowder with you;" she bounced out of the house, and I saw her no more - I went to the pawnbroker's, and found the property; here is a handkerchief, a cap, and a mantle - they are all mine.

THOMAS WYATT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner and found this cap in a little bundle belonging to her, in her mother's house; the duplicates of the others were found on her.

MR. FALKARD. I am a pawnbroker. This mantle and handkerchief were pawned with me - I am certain the prisoner pawned the mantle on the 10th; I am not quite so sure she pawned the handkerchief - that was on the 15th; I gave these duplicates for them.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did the person come to you? A. I think in the afternoon - I cannot swear to the time.

Prisoner's Defence. The occasion of my pawning them was absolute want - I pawned them to pay for my lodging: I owed her 3s. 6d. for lodging and for a loaf of bread - I had work to go to the day after I was taken, and I should have taken them out; when I came back that Saturday night, about eight o'clock, she said if I did not get out of the room she would kick me out - I went out.

ELIZABETH MELLING. I did not - I was surprised at her not returning.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-42

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, JANUARY 16.

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

307. JOSEPH DONOVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , at St. Ann, 19 yards of woollen cloth, value 12l., the goods of Thomas James Fenwick , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM FOOKS . I am foreman to Thomas James Fenwick, tailor and slop-seller , of Fore-street, in the parish of St. Ann, Limehouse . On the 20th of December, at eleven o'clock in the morning, I was speaking to a neighbour over the way; I had not left the shop more than four minutes - I could see all over the shop; I left nobody there; I saw the prisoner, who is quite a stranger, come out of the shop with a bale of cloth under his arm- it measures nineteen yards, and was in my hands ten minutes before; it was just inside the door - he got about ten yards from the shop with it when I took hold of him, and asked where he got it; he said a man had asked him to carry it somewhere - he could not tell me where; no man was near; here is the cloth - the lowest value of it is 12l.; Mr. Fenwick lives there - it is his dwelling-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Has he any partner? A. No - I am certain the cloth was inside the house; I saw him come out - I did not go into the shop till I took him back; he said a man at the door gave it to him - he did not attempt to run away.

EDWARD SEABORNE. I am an officer and took him into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down to the West India Docks, and saw a man come out of the shop - I thought he was the master; he said, "Carry this as far as the bridge, I will pay you for it" - I said I had nothing to do, and would carry it; I saw two men coming, but did not attempt to run away - I turned round, and the man who gave it to me was gone.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18290115-43

308. BENJAMIN BURRUP was indicted for the wilful murder of Mary Mortlock .

Mr. W. F. GOODGER, apothecary of the Mary-le-bone Infirmary, and a surgeon, having deposed that the deceased died from inflammation, which he believed to be produced by natural causes, the prisoner was detained to be indicted for malicionsly shooting, (see 5th Day,) but on this indictment ACQUITTED .

Before Mr. Baron Vanghan .

Reference Number: t18290115-44

309. THOMAS MULVEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Mullins , on the 26th of December , at the liberty of Norton Falgate, and stealing therein two coats, value 5s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 8s.; 2 razors, value 1s.; 1 razor-case, value 1d., and 1 sixpence , his property.

RICHARD MULLINS . I live at No. 28, Cock-alley, in the liberty of Norton Falgate - I have a room there, and live there with my daughter, who is seventeen years old; I have no wife. On Friday, the 26th of December, I left my daughter in my room, about nine o'clock in the morning, and went out - I returned about five in the evening, and found the room broken open; my box was broken open - the room door was not injured; I had left there two coats, a pair of shoes, and two razors in a case- I gave them to my daughter to put into the box; I found the lock of the box broken, and these things gone- I had left the box sound; the officer has the things in his possession - I found him in the room with the articles; I am certain they are mine - I swore to them at Worship-street Office; I missed a sixpence from the corner of my

box - it was silver, but so thin as not to be passable; I shall know it again - I saw it before the Magistrate; I went there on the Wednesday - a cupboard in my room was broken open, by the top of the door being broken; I heard a noise in the court when I came home.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know the prisoner? A. He is a neighbour's child; I support my daughter myself - I have not many visitors; I know one Hooper - he might be acquainted with my daughter, but not in my place; I would not permit it - I do not know where Hooper is; the value of all the articles is 14s. - all the rooms in the house are let out in separate apartments; there are two other lodgers.

Q. Do you know how often Hooper has been tried here? A. No.

JANE MULLINS. I am going on for seventeen years old, and am the prosecutor's daughter; I lived with him at No. 28, Cock-alley - he left me in the house on the 26th of December, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning; I remained at home about an hour, and then went out - I am quite sure I locked the door; I was gone about half an hour - on returning I found the door locked as I had left it; I unlocked it, and came into the room - I found no difficulty in unlocking it; I heard a noise under the bed, and saw the top of the cupboard-door had been broken inside; the cupboard is in the corner of the room, and one end of it comes into the staircase, and there is a little board like a window in the partition - he had broken through this piece of board to get in; the board was nailed like a window that opened into the cupboard, and then the top of the cupboard-door was broken - it could not be unbolted, because there was a bureau bedstead against it, but it was broken away sufficient for the body of a person to come through; a box, which I had left on the bureau, had been taken down and put on the chair - it was not locked; I had left some clothes in it, but not my father's clothes in that box - there was another box under it on the bureau and that had been broken open; the lock was broken quite off, and two coats taken out which I had put there in the morning - I saw them on the bed, also a pair of shoes, and a sixpence; the two coats were on the bed - I did not see them on the bed when I came into the room at first, but I did afterwards; I saw the prisoner searched, and the sixpence found on him, but before that I had given an alarm to the neighbours - I locked the door and went out; I had not seen the prisoner in the room then - I went over to Beavis the constable, and gave an alarm, and he came back with me; I then found the prisoner sitting on the chair - the constable searched him, and found a sixpence, a bad sixpence and 4d. on him; I had locked Mrs. Betty in the room when I went out to fetch the officer.

Cross-examined. Q.Were you there when the clothes were found? A. I saw them on the bed; I knew the prisoner as a neighbour's child - he used to come to my father's, but had not been there that morning while I was there; a Mrs. Farrow, who my father knows, had come up - I locked the door when I went out, and left nobody in the room; nobody else had been there - I am not acquainted with Hooper; I know him - he had not been there that morning, nor had I seen him.

MARY BETTY. I live opposite to Mullins; she gave me an alarm out of window, and I went up to her room - I heard nothing, but she said somebody was under the bed; I then looked and saw the prisoner under the bed - he came out; she then locked me and the prisoner in the room while she went for the constable - she returned in about ten minutes with an officer, who took him; I saw him searched, and two bad sixpences found on him, and while Beavis was looking to see if there were any more property on the bed he ran away - the officer ran after him and stopped him, and then he was secured.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS. I am a headborough of Norton Falgate. In consequence of the alarm I went to the prosecutor's room, about one o'clock in the day, with Mullins, and saw the prisoner - I found in his waistcoat pocket a sixpence, mutilated; she said it was her father's -I was looking about the room, and he made his escape down stairs; I ran down, and look him - I returned to the room, and found two coats on the bed - some person handed me a pair of shoes and a razor-case, which they found under the bed; I found an old chisel on the floor.

JANE MULLINS. These are the two coats, which I locked in the box, and these shoes - they are my father's; these are the razors and case which were in the box which was not locked, and were taken out of there - this is the sixpence; there are only three rooms in the house, one above another - the landlord does not live in the house.

RICHARD MULLINS I know these coats to be mine, the shoes, the razors, and the sixpence - the chisel does not belong to me.

Seven witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

Before Mr. Justice James Parke .

Reference Number: t18290115-45

310. CHARLES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , 3 cows, price 67l. , the property of John Johnson .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-46

311. CHARLES WHITE was again indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 7 live pigs, price 16l. , the property of Sarah Colwin .

SARAH COLWIN. I live in Salamanca-place, Lambethbutts, and deal in pigs . On the 4th of October last, the prisoner, and a man named Samuel Lee, came to my house - two neighbours brought them into my yard, and asked me if I had any pigs to part with; I agreed to sell them seven pigs for 16l. 12s. 6d. - they were to be paid for and delivered the same day; I was to receive the money, when they were delivered, at White's place, in Leather-lane, Holborn - the prisoner and Lee agreed to pay for them on delivery in Leather-lane; I, and my boy took them in a cart the same day - we put them up a gateway just below White's door - I left the boy with the cart, to take care of them, while I went to receive the money; I saw both White and Lee in the house - it was a very wet day; I sat down some time, and had some refreshment - some time passed, and Lee went out with White's son; we had some bread and cheese and porter - Lee went out, with White's son; my boy, Mack, came to me, and told me, in the prisoner's presence, that Lee had told him the pigs were settled for - they had not offered me a farthing in payment; I stopped there till Lee came in, which was in about half an hour - he did not say what had become of the pigs; Lee said, in the prisoner's presence, "I have got nothing but a 50l.

cheque (putting his hand into his left-hand pocket), if you can give me change?" White went over to the public-house to see if he could get change, as he said, but he did not take it with him - Lee did not give it to him; he came in again, and said he could not get change; White sat down and said, "We must draw up a bill," and sent his eldest daughter out for a stamp, and drew out the bill: I did not at that time know the pigs were gone - my only reason for selling the pigs was to settle with my landlord for my quarter's rent; I told him so, that money I must have, and I could not go out of the house without it.

Q. Then when your boy came in, he did not tell you the pigs were gone? A. No, not till after the bill was drawn; the officer has got it - this is it (looking at it); White wrote it - Lee could not write, but put his mark to it, and made me put my mark to it.

Q.Before you received that bill. tell us what took place? A. My only object was to receive the money for my rent; I objected to take the note, for I wanted money, but at last took it, as I thought I had better take it, as I could get no money; I was to have been paid by one o'clock on Monday - I did not know the pigs were gone till Lee came in and began talking about payment; I then knew they were gone - the bill was not paid; I have not received a farthing: the pigs were worth what I sold them for; after I knew they were gone Lee gave me a sovereign as a deposit, and said that was all he had - I could not see the cart the pigs were in, in the room I sat; it was just beyond the gateway - Lee left the prisoner in the room when he went out; he was talking to me about one thing or another - I was not willing to part with my pigs without ready money, for they were my whole dependence.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had you known Lee? A. I never saw either of them before - the bargain was made openly in my yard; I have seen Lee since: I never supped with him off a fowl in my life- Lee and White are partners; the cart was mine - Lee lent me the horse to bring the pigs up; White's son came the same night, and fetched the horse home; I knew the pigs were gone when I took the deposit and the note, because I had nothing else to take: I took the note, expecting to receive the money; I cannot say whether the note was read over to me - they told me I was to receive my money on Monday at one o'clock: I do not think the note was read; I have not employed Lee since to buy me some pigs at Romford-market: when the note became due I went to their house. and saw them both in White's house, where the bill was drawn - I went there full twenty times after it was due, and saw them sometimes; they had not got the money to pay me - I saw White in Smithfield-market acting as a pig-jobber, and asked if he meant to pay me; he said he could not stop, but would meet me at a public-house; I staid there two hours, but he never came: he moved from his house, and was taken on another charge on the 26th of December.

WILLIAM MACK . I am servant to the prosecutrix. I went in the cart with the pigs to White's house; I waited with the cart while mistress went into the house: I was about half a dozen yards from the door - I staid there about half an hour; Lee and the prisoner's son came out; be gave me a drop of beer and a bit of biscuit, and then went in doors again - he came out again in about half an hour, and told me the pigs were settled for; he took the horse and cart away with the pigs: I went into mistress and told her the pigs were gone - I sat down and had a drop of beer before I told her, for I thought she knew it; I told her in the prisoner's presence what Lee had said - the prisoner said nothing to that; I staid there till Lee returned, which was about an hour; the prisoner was present - he told mistress he had no money for her, except she could give him change for a 50l. cheque; she said she could not, she had not got a farthing in her pocket - White then said he must draw up a bill; he sent his daughter out for a stamp, and drew the bill; mistress said a bill was of no use to her without the money - she came away with the bill after a bit.

Cross-examined. Q.Who gave the bill to your mistress? A.White - Lee signed it; she took it after I had told her the pigs were gone, as she found she could get nothing else; they brought the cart and horse home the same night, and the horse was taken away: the bill was not read at all; mistress did not ask to have it read - she has sent me four or five times since to see White; I sometimes saw them, and sometimes nobody; mistress has not had a pig since.

The bill being read, was drawn at four days after date, and signed S. Lee , his X mark, 36, Ayr-street-hill.

MR. PHILLIPS to SARAH COLWIN. Q. Did you not agree to go to Romford with Lee, to buy some pigs? A. No, I had some porter with Lee at a public-house the day the pigs were agreed for; it was before they were taken away- they endeavoured to buy them on the Wednesday, but on Saturday I took them home; I met Lee in Smithfield one day and asked him for the money - I never met him by appointment at Lambeth-marsh.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18290115-47

312. BENJAMIN WILLIAMS and JOHN BRINKLEY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Watson , on the 26th of November , and stealing 2 vases, value 6s.; 1 box, value 10s.; 1 pair of pasteboard ornaments, value 7s.; 1 pleasant's tail, value 6d.; 5 shells, value 6s., and 1 pair of chap-sticks, value 3s. , his property.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

SUSANNAH STRACEY . I am servant to Mr. Watson, a stationer , of High-street, Wapping . On the night of the 26th of November I secured the premises - there is a room called the summer room; it looks towards the river - I saw that it was all fastened at half-past ten o'clock at night; it is part of the dwelling-house: the property stated in the indictment was then safe in that room - I went to bed at eleven o'clock, and arose at half-past six next morning - it was not day-light; I went to the summer room at half-past eleven o'clock, but could not get in, for the door was fast- I had locked and bolted it on the outside, at night, but I found it fastened within; Kinchlea came, and I went into the room about twelve o'clock - the articles were gone off the mantel-piece; and these curiosities from the cabinet, the pheasant's tail, five or six shells and the chap-sticks: I saw the vases, the box, and the pasteboard ornaments in Gros

smith's possession about four weeks after the robbery - I have since seen the articles in the possession of Mr. Willis.

MICHAEL WATSON. JUN. I am nephew of Mr. Watson and live with him. On the night of the 16th of November the cabinet of curiosities was safe - the China ornaments were on the mantel-piece; I went out early in the morning and, on returning, I heard here had been thieves in the house - I tried the door on the landing-place about twelve o'clock, and it was fastened inside; I went to the top of the house, and made a rope fast, then got out of the kitchenwindow: Kinchlea came and got up the bow-window, over the water - he ascended by the rope, got in at the window and opened the door on the landing; I went into the room and found it in a very disordered state - some things had been packed up in one of the chair-covers, and several were gone; there were dry and footmarks of more than one person having been there - the ornaments were gone from the mantel-piece, and a variety of other things, which we have not found; a great many things were taken out and put into a chair-cover - the China box was gone from the mantel-piece, and the pasteboard ornaments; the sterling value of all the property lost was about 7l. - I gave information at the public-office, but could find nothing out. On the day after Christmas-day, I was dining with my uncle, and, in consequence of a communication, he went out - after dinner I went out, and found Brinkley with my uncle; he asked my uncle if he had been robbed, he said he had; Brinkley said he could give him information (a reward had been offered by the parish for the discovery of several robberies) - the prisoner then said he could give him information respecting the property, but as he was then at dinner he would go and get a pint of beer and come when he had done: we finished our dinner and my uncle sent me to tell him he was at liberty - he came and went into the parlour; I was not present then, but on his coming out I was desired to go with him to a neighbour, named Holiday, who had been robbed, and on our way he asked if we had lost any stamps, or a small silver milk-jug, very stout and thick, or a Canary bird; I said No, and asked if he had seen any thing of some Maunday money - he said he had, and that all the things had passed though his hands: while we were waiting for Mr. Holiday, he described several articles they had lost, as well as a table-cover which we had lost - they had lost one, but ours was a blue one; he sat down for a little time, and seemed to be in thought - he said as they were very busy over the waters, he had a great mind to go and unbosom himself at the office below (the Thames Police), and that there was a man in custody at Union-hall -I asked how he supposed they could have got info our premises; he said the usual method was for two or three to go in a boat and row under the premises; one of two would get in at the window, the others row about, and when they had got what they wanted they gave a signal, and the boat rowed underneath and took them away - that the young fellow in custody could climb like a squirrel, and he had no doubt he was one of the men; Mr. Watson came and took him to another person - I saw him again at my uncle's, next day; he wanted him to give him money as he had been the means of giving information - he said he was a poor man with a family, and had lost a great deal of time in trying to find out an owner for the property: my uncle said he had not offered any reward, but (pointing to a bill in the shop) said the parish had; he then said he hoped he would speak a good word for him, as he was the first - he then went away; on the first day he came we received a letter from Union-hall, and my uncle went there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.What is the value of all the articles? A.7l. - they are fancy articles.

MICHAEL WATSON. I live at Wapping. On the morning of the 27th of November I found my summer room had been entered, and missed this property. On the 26th of December Brinkley came and asked if I had been robbed; I said I had lost a pheasant's tail and the chap-sticks, and he mentioned the shells as pearl plates - I believe I asked if he had seen a pair of sugar-tongs; he said Yes, they were marked on the bow - he described several articles which I had lost, and said they had all gone through his hands - that he had been disposing of several things, and a person was in custody in whose house some of the property had been found - that he had called at the Borough Compter that morning, and was acquainted with one of the turnkeys; he said he was a poor man with a family, and hoped I would give him something for his day's work, for he had lost a great deal of time about it; I took him to the summer room and shewed him the mark of a screw-driver, near the lock - he said he knew a tool that would fit that. I found at Union-hall next day, the vases, a small round China box, three shells, the pasteboard ornaments, and the pheasant's tail; I afterwards saw a pair of large shells and the chap-sticks in possession of Willis.

JOHN GROSSMITH. I am an officer of Union-hall. On the morning of the 23d of December I accompanied Pople to the Minories and apprehended Williams - Brinkley was present and spoke to him; we had been in conversation with Brinkley, and agreed that if he touched his shoe, we were to apprehend Williams - this apprehension was made in consequence of a communication made to us by Brinkley; we went that day to No. 12, Wickham-street, Vauxhall. where Williams lived - he has since told us it was his house, and I have since seen his wife, who was there; he is a waterman and lighterman - I found these two vases and a snuff-box on the mantel-piece in the front room, the phesant's tail in the cupboard, and three shells, the pasteboard ornaments were on the mantel-piece, Brinkley had before that mentioned these articles to us, but never said to whom they belonged - he said nothing to me about the robbery at Mr. Watson's: I recollected an advertisement in the Police Gazette - Mr. Watson was written to from Union-hall, and identified the property.

Cross-examined. Q.Williams was not present at this conversation with Brinkley? A. No - Brinkley never mentioned Mr. Watson's name to me; I saw Williams' wife in the house, and she was in the coach with him to Union-hall - he called her his wife, and spoke about his children; I never took him to the house.

RICHARD POPLE . I am an officer of Union-hall. I assisted in apprehending Williams on the 23d of December, in consequence of an arrangement made with Brinkley the previous night; we went to Wickham-street and found Williams' wife and children there, and these articles; I wrote to the prosecutor, who attended and claimed them.

JOHN WILLIS . I live in Chancery-lane and deal in shells and other articles. Brinkley came into my shop early in December, and offered me some articles for sale, and among

the rest, this pair of pearl shells, and a pair of chap-sticks - that is all I bought; he brought me five or six shells -I gave him 6s. 6d. or 7s. for all I bought; he stated himself as a man who traded to and from Holland, and that he had brought these articles from Holland - he said the shells had been polished there, and when he went again he would bring me more things.

Cross-examined. Q. He had other things of the same kind? A. Yes; he brought ten or twelve articles at different times, but I did not buy them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BRINKLEY's Defence. I declare my innocence of the robbery.

WILLIAMS' Defence. I was at home and in bed at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18290115-48

313. ROBERT PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of Charles William Tabor , from his person.

MR. CHARLES WILLIAM TABOR. I am a merchant , and live in Finsbury-square. On the 23d of December I was on 'Change, and had my handkerchief safe - I missed it at the corner of Cornhill, in Bishopsgate-street , when Thorowgood gave me notice; be produced one, which to the best of my belief, is mine.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD. I am an officer of the City. I was on duty in Cornhill, and saw the prisoner, in company with another person, following a gentleman into Finch-lane, which induced me to watch them; they returned from that gentleman - I still watched them, and observed Mr. Tabor walking arm-in-arm with a gentleman in Cornhill, and at the corner of Bishopsgate-street there was a stoppage with the carriages; I saw the prisoner put his hand into Mr. Tabor's pocket, and take out this handkerchief - I took hold of him: he turned round, and dropped it at his feet - I said, "What have you got here?" he said he knew nothing about it; his companion ran away.

Prisoner. You said, "You have got the gentleman's handkerchief;" I said, "I have not:" you said, "If you have not got it the other one has." Witness. I did not - it laid at your feet.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He saw the handkerchief five or six yards off, and pulled me to it; another lad, who was before me, had taken it, and threw it down - I bad been to Honey-lane with some brooms for my master; nobody was with me.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD . I am quite certain I saw him in company with the other for ten minutes; the handkerchief was in his hand when I took hold of him - I saw him drop it at his feet.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-49

314. WILLIAM NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 12 decanters, value 10l. 14s.; 2 water-bottles, value 1l.; 2 tumblers, value 5s.; 12 saltcellars, value 31s., and 4 salt-cellar stands, value 10s. , the goods of James Chaffin .

JAMES CHAFFIN. I deal in glass ; my warehouse is at No. 69, Fleet-street . On the morning of the 7th of January this property was taken; I had seen it the evening before, in my shop - I was told they were missed about ten o'clock next morning; I saw the prisoner in custody with them at Guildhall the same day - he is a stranger to me.

WILLIAM SINGLETON . I am a watchman. On the 7th of January, at three o'clock in the morning, I saw two bags let out of the first-floor window of Mr. Chaffin's house - I saw nobody near to receive them; two inspectors came up at the time - I informed them of it; we watched, but saw nobody come for them: the inspectors got the keys, searched the premises, and found the prisoner on the stairs - nobody lived in the house; nobody else could be found in the house: I cannot say how he entered; the house had not been broken open: I secured the bags - they contained the articles stated in the indictment.

ALEXANDER JOHNSON . I am an inspector of the watch. About three o'clock in the morning I saw Singleton, who gave me information; I left him at the back of the premises which all the property came out of, and went and secured the front of the premises - I went to Mr. Thatcher's, in Fleet-street, where I knew Mr. Chaffin kept his keys; I got them, and searched the premises, but could find nobody - I then searched the empty house at the back, but found nobody there; they could get from the empty house on to the roof of the premises - we then went back to Mr. Chaffin's, searched again, and found the prisoner in a room adjoining that from which the bags were let down - Huckle asked what he did there: he said he had not broken in: Huckle gave him to me - he said, "Don't pull me about, I will go quietly with Johnson;" the premises were not broken - I think he must have slipped in before they were shut up; the bags had been let out of the window down into the back yard.

JOHN HUCKLE. I am an inspector of the watch. -Johnson's evidence is correct; I heard the sound of glass in the room, pushed the door open, and took hold of the prisoner; I said, "What do you do here?" he said he did not break in.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I own I was in the house, but know nothing of the property.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-50

315. MARY CANNON and MARY ANN BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 4 pairs of shoes, value 20s. , the goods of Edward John Scott .

EDWARD JOHN SCOTT. I live on Holborn-hill , and am a shoemaker . On the 17th of December, at four o'clock in the afternoon, I was engaged in the front of my shop with a gentleman; the two prisoners came in together, and said they wanted a pair of shoes - I told them to go into the parlour; my boy went back with them, and in a few minutes he gave me information - I went into the parlour, and asked the prisoners if they could not find what they wanted - Brown said No, they would be measured for a pair; I left the lad to measure her, and returned to the gentleman - there were a quantity of shoes packed up in the parlour, two pairs in each parcel; they came into the shop, and Brown sat in a chair - Cannon hurried her to go away - they then left the shop, and before they had well got off the steps the female witness came and gave me information;

I followed them to the door of the next house, opened Cannon's cloak, and said, "Give me those shoes which you have got;" she said, "Well, here, take them," and delivered them to me - they dropped on the ground; I knew them to be one of the papers of shoes which were in the parlour - two pairs were in it: Cannon resisted violently; I held her till my boy came - I gave her in charge, and then went to Brown; I found another paper on her, containing two pairs - she said she had picked them up; it was perfectly clean, and it was a very dirty day - I am certain it was one of the papers of shoes which were in my parlour; Cannon bit me, and fought desperately.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Your attention was directed to the gentleman? A. Yes, but I am certain of both the prisoners; Cannon was quite sober - I never expressed a doubt about her: a great crowd collected, but I did not observe any women except the prisoners.

ROBERT BURGESS . I am in the employ of Mr. Scott. The prisoners came into the shop; I went into the parlour to attend them - I cannot swear positively to Brown; I have no doubt of Cannon: they both went into the parlour, and Cannon asked for a pair of shoes; there were plenty about, but none suited her - no other women came into the parlour; the other person who came with Cannon desired to be measured - before I had half done measuring her she wanted to hurry out of the shop, and said they would call to-morrow; they would hardly give me time to write the name on the measure: we received information - my master went out - I saw him take two pairs of shoes from under Cannon's arm, at the next door; that parcel had been papered up in the shop: she was very resolute, and fought- I held her while the officer was fetched; Brown was about a yard from her: there were only these two close together - I should not think she could be any other person than the woman who had been in the shop; a paper, containing two pairs of shoes, was taken from her - she went quietly, but we were obliged to carry Cannon to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q.You have some doubt of Brown? A.Very little; she had the shoes, and she very much resembles the person in the shop - they were both walking close together; my master got out first, and I was not a minute after him - there was nobody else near when we got first out; Cannon was quite sober.

COURT. Q.Was any other woman besides Brown within twenty yards of Cannon? A. We heard a person was waiting outside for them.

ELIZABETH CURTIS . I am servant to Mr. Scott. I saw the two prisoners in the shop when the shoes were stolen; I am quite certain of them both: they both went into the parlour, and sat down on two chairs - before Burgess went into the room Brown said she wanted a pair of shoes; he then went into the shop, and got a pair to fit her- Brown went into the shop, and was fitted there with a pair, but did not take them; Cannon remained in the parlour the while I went up stairs to the kitchen to fill the kettle, and when I came down I saw Cannon adjusting the shoes under her arm - I informed my master as they were going out; he went out after them directly.

Cross-examined. Q.Are you a house servant? A. Yes; I did not serve the prisoners - I am certain of Brown- I was in the shop all the time, except when I fetched the water, which took about three minutes; I left the boy with them then.

COURT. Q.Was Cannon alone in the parlour? A. No, Mr. Scott's sister was there; the boy was in the shop, looking for shoes for Brown.

ABRAHAM COLEY. I am a street-keeper. I was coming up Holborn, and saw Mr. Scott run across the way - I ran with him, and took Cannon, who made a very violent resistance; she was within one door of Mr. Scott's house: while I was endeavouring to take her I saw Holland, who took Brown - I saw him take this pair of shoes, in a paper, from under Brown's arm; the shoes were given to me as soon as I came up, and stated to have been taken from Cannon; I saw no other female near them.

Cross-examined. Q.You ran across the way with Scott? A. Yes - he had run over for assistance, and I went with him; it was opposite St. Andrew's church -Scott's young man was holding one of them; Holland came up with Brown in less than a minute and a half.

JOHN HOLLAND . I found a pair of shoes under Brown's arm; Cannon was in Coley's custody, but made her escape nearly to the end of Hatton-garden - she was taken and carried to the watch-house, and behaved very desperate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CANNON's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Judge and Jury.

BROWN'S Defence. I am innocent. I saw the shoes lying on the ground, and picked them up.

JOHN HOLLAND . They could not have been on the ground; it was a very wet day, and the paper was not even soiled.

CANNON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-51

316. JOHN JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Henry Horton .

HENRY HORTON. I am guard of the Birmingham coach , which comes to the Belle Sauvage, Ludgate-hill. On the 21st of December, as the coach was coming into London, I got up to blow my horn about the middle of Smithfield , to induce the coaches to make way; I had sat on my coat, and had two more coats under that - I felt it go from me; looked behind, and saw the prisoner running away with it; I got down, ran after him, and saw him laid hold of - he had not got it then; I suppose he dropped it among the pens, for he had it when he went in among the pens, and I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.What time was this? A. A little after nine o'clock at night; I never lost sight of him - I saw him all the way; it was a drab coat -I saw it on his arms; he went in among the sheep-pens, and must have dropped it there - he had not got it when he came out of the pens, and he went in with it; I did not see him drop it - I saw other people there, but he is the man I pursued; I never saw his face till he came out of the pens.

COURT. Q. You saw the body of a man moving with your coat, did you lose sight of him till he was stopped? A.Never; and that man was the prisoner - it was light enough for me to distinguish him.

JOHN WILLIAM RILEY . I am a surgeon's instrument maker. I was in Smithfield, heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw a man running out of the pens, and a mob pursuing him at a considerable distance, I suppose twenty yards - he gained ground considerably; I ran after him, and told him let him run as fast as he would, I would have him; and I caught him just beyond Hosier-lane; he had not got the coat then - he was the only person pursued; nobody was running before him.

Cross-examined. Q.Had he any coat when you saw him? A. No; Horton came up at the time I stopped him, and said, "That is the man who took my coat:" the prisoner said he was running after the thief.

GEORGE GODFREY . I am inspector of the watch. The prisoner was brought into my custody; he denied the charge, and said he was running after a man who was running, and who he supposed to be the thief.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to ask Horton if he did not state at Guildhall, that it was a moon-light night, and he could distinguish me well.

HENRY HORTON . No; you asked if the man had a smock-frock on, and I said he had not.

JAMES PAINTER . I am a drover. On Sunday night, the 21st of December, I heard the cry of Stop thief! in Smithfield; I was at work in the pens among the sheep, close by where the guard, and the man he was following, ran - he was pursuing only one man; I had seen nobody running before - I saw him following a man in a smock-frock; he came down close by the side of the gas-light, and jumped over the pales - no one was following the guard; the man got some distance before the guard got over the pales - it was a very moon-light night; I looked forward, and the man was gone - the guard must have lost sight of him; the prisoner is not that man.

COURT. Q.How far was the guard from the man in the smock-frock? A. The length of two pens; I am sure there was but one man, and he had a dirty smock-frock on - my attention was drawn by the man in the smock-frock calling Stop thief! and jumping over the pens; I never saw him before - I did not go after him nor try to take him; I was busy among the sheep, and could not get out of them - the man had got nothing; I did not point him out - I did not see him afterwards; the guard was as close to him as I was, and could see him - there was no other person running than the one in a smock-frock, who the guard was pursuing; I will swear that (not that I saw) I saw no other; and swear he was following no other; the prisoner was stopped nearly a quarter of a mile off; I was close against Cloth-fair, and he was stopped by Mr. Blacket's - I was two or three hundred yards from the Fortune of War public-house - I did not see the prisoner after he was stopped; I never saw him till to-night.

Q.How then did you know he was the man they took? A. I heard Gardner, the officer, say they had stopped a man for stealing a coat off a coach - I did not go to see the prisoner, but I can swear he is not the man the guard was following; the man went through the bullock-pens, then through the sheep-pens again - the guard passed me; I did not speak to him - the man must have lain down in the pens while the guard passed, for I did not see him till afterwards.

Q. You did not tell the guard that was the man? A. The guard was a long way off - when he jumped over the pens he had gone by.

Q. Who found you out to tell this story? A. Mr. Gardner was talking about having a man; I said, "If you have a man of that description, it is the wrong man, for he had a smock-frock on;" Gardner applied to me to come here -I have known him some time; he is an officer in the market- I never saw the transaction till the guard followed the man down the pens; I never saw the prisoner till to-night, and have no interest in this affair - I am in the service of Mr. Coleman, a drover; Gardner subpoenaed me to come here on Monday last.

JOSEPH COLEMAN. I am a Smithfield drover - Painter has been in my brother's employ about twelve months; I was with him in the pens about half-past nine o'clock on this night, but not quite close to him (I have been in my brother's service for seventeen years - he lives at Holloway) -I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw two people running; I do not think the prisoner was either of them - I never saw him before to-night, to my knowledge; the person I saw running before the guard, had a smock-frock on - I cannot say whether the prosecutor is the person in pursuit; it was a tallish man - I am certain the man pursued, had a smockfrock on, when I saw him go by the gas-light - he went by where Painter was putting up some sheep; I saw nobody else running, not to know them - I was busy among the sheep, and did not join in the pursuit: I do not believe the prisoner to be the man - I have no interest in saying so.

COURT. Q. You never saw the man before who was running in a smock-frock? A. No, I was not close enough to see his face - I can only tell he is not the man, by his dress, and he appeared a very short man; I heard a cry of Stop thief! but never saw the man after he went round the pens; the guard kept following him, and was closer to him than I was.

Q.Then he had a better opportunity of seeing whether he had a smock-frock on? A. I am certain he had one on- just as he passed me I heard the cry; I looked round, and saw two persons running, and one had a smock-frock on - I did not point him out; the guard was only pursuing one man - where he went to I do not know; he ran down the alley, and jumped over the pens at the bottom - the guard might be fifteen or twenty yards from him then, and must have seen him jump over; I did not appear before the Magistrate - I did not know a man was taken till Gardner told me of it a fortnight after: I heard no other cry of Stop thief! and did not hear of a lady having been robbed at the same place that night - Gardner served me with a subpoena to come here.

- GARDNER. I am a Police officer. I served these witnesses with a subpoena last Monday: I never saw the prisoner in my life till the night he was taken, when I saw him in the watch-house; I had been out that afternoon, and as a party had tried to rob another coach, I went to look for them, and soon after that a lady was robbed - I was rather too late for that; I went into the King's Head public-house, sat down, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went out, and tried to stop the person - a hurdle laid in my way; I stambled over it, and a person took the prisoner before I could get up - I returned to the King's Head, and who should be there but Painter; he said, "Well, have you got the prisoner?" I said Yes - he said, "For stealing

the coat?" I said, "I don't know what it is for;" he said,"Well, I believe you have got the wrong person, for I was in the pens, and a person came running by me in a smockfrock, and a person pursuing him;" I then went to the watch-house, and said I believed they had got an innocent man - that I understood what was lost was a drab great coat, with two or three capes, and a certain party hid it in the sheep-pens, and some time after the guard was gone by, one of the party came and took it out of the pens, and ran up Cloth-fair; I stated what I had heard of the coat before I saw the guard, and when I saw him, he described it, and it answered the description - I went in pursuit of the party, who I knew, and one of whom has since been taken for felony, but is not committed - it was for stealing a handkerchief last Friday: I never saw the prisoner till he was in the watch-house - I have heard Painter's and Coleman's evidence; Painter told me the same he has stated here -Buckland, the attorney, applied to me, or I should not have been here.

COURT. Q.Then you know nothing about the actual fact? A. No; I did not go to the pens to look for the coat, because I was informed the party had taken it away before I heard of it, and I went to a certain house - the man's name was Mike Reid, a very bad character, a cad in Smithfield; I did not look after the coat for I was informed it was gone.

Q.And you do your duty as an officer, when you are told property is moved, not to go and see if it be so? A. I followed the party who I was told had carried it away; I went to the prosecutor, and asked him to point out the way the thief had run, and he pointed out the same tract as Painter told me he had run; the place it was said to be hid in, was about one hundred yards from the public-house, but I followed the party to a house, and if I had gone to look for the coat I might have got there too late - I found a party at the house, and they were all in a flurry, but they had nothing; I have been an officer twelve months - Mr. Buckland came and asked if I would serve Painter and Coleman with subpoena's; I said I would, as I knew the public-house they frequented - I did not appear before the Magistrate next day; I was busy in the market, and was up till half-past twelve o'clock that night - I knew nothing of the transaction; I am a City officer appointed by the Lord Mayor; the description given to me answers the description of Mike Reid, who I knew before - I was told the party had just gone off with the coat, and went to look for him; Reid has been in custody since, but I did not know it till he was acquitted.

HENRY HORTON. I did not see Painter or Coleman that night, not to notice them - my object was the prisoner; I followed him till he was taken, and never lost sight of him - I saw nobody dressed in a smock-frock; the man I pursued was not dressed in a smock-frock.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-52

317. HENRY MILBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , half a sheet of brown paper, value 1/2d. and 30 sheets of other paper, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Waterhouse and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of William Henry Green .

MR. WILLIAM HENRY GREEN . I live in Sambrook-court, Basinghall-street. On the 30th of December I sent a parcel by my clerk, directing him that it should go to the Saracen's Head for the coach; I did not pack it up, but I saw it when it was opened - it contained an abstract of a title which I have now in my hands: I am an attorney; I saw it again before the Magistrate - the prisoner was then in custody.

THOMAS FELGATE. I am a book-keeper at the Swan with Two Necks, Lad-lane; William Waterhouse and Co. keep it. On the 30th of December, between one and two o'clock, I received a parcel, directed "Messrs. Jervis and Co., Hinkley, Leicestershire," and booked it; it was given to the porter to take to the coach - the prisoner was a stranger in the yard; I was fetched from the office into the yard about five or ten minutes after I had given Thurlow the parcels; I saw the prisoner standing by the Hinkley coach-door, and the guard holding him - he charged him with abstracting this parcel from the coach; he said he was only standing by there.

Prisoner. Q. On which side of the coach was I standing? A.On the near-side, the left side; I was coming across the yard when I saw you - you were standing by the near fore-wheel of the coach.

JOHN THURLOW. I am a porter at the inn; I convey the packages from the booking-office to the different coaches. On the 30th of December I took this parcel out of the office, and put it at the bottom of the coach with others: I put it at the bottom of the coach - I put the off-side door too; the prisoner, who was quite a stranger, was on the near-side of the coach - I put the off-side door too; the prisoner, who was quite a stranger, was on the near-side when I saw him; I did not see the near-side door open then - I told the guard I had better begin to load the fore-boot; I got up on the box to do so; I had not observed the prisoner then - I put the luggage into the boot as the guard gave it up to me, and I heard the guard call out to the prisoner,"What business have you there?" I did not hear him give an answer; the guard jumped over the pole, and said, "You have got a parcel under your arm" - I did not see it under his arm myself; the guard brought the parcel from the near-side of the coach to shew it to me -I could not see where he took it from; the prisoner stood at the side of the coach: I am certain I had put the parcels at the bottom on the off-side, and closed the door; I put it down at the bottom, not under the seat - this was a quarter of an hour before the coach would set off; the guard and the prisoner walked across the yard to the book-keeper - the guard had not laid hold of him; the book-keeper came out - the prisoner had a large bag on his shoulder when I saw him by the side of the coach; it appeared to be empty: he was taken into custody.

Prisoner. Q. How many parcels did you put into the coach? A. About seven or eight; I did not count them - I put this one on the top of the others at the bottom of the coach, where the people's feet go; I put them there for the guard to sort them.

JONATHAN COOK. I am guard of the coach. The prisoner was a stranger to me, and a stranger at the yard; I observed him against the pole of the near-side door of the coach - the door was then open; there was no other person near that I could observe: I asked what he was doing there - he said nothing at all; he had a bag over his shoulder - he did not appear to have any thing in it: after.

I spoke to him I observed this parcel under his left arm -I asked what he did with it; he went to the coach-door, and threw it into the coach - I did not know what it contained; I am sure I took the same parcel from the coach - this is the cover of it; it is directed "Messrs. Jarvis and Power, solicitors, Hinkley, Leicestershire" - I sent to the book-keeper to come out, and told him he had taken a parcel; he said he could take his solemn oath he had never meddled with it: an officer was sent for, and he was taken - he did not tell me what brought him into the yard.

Prisoner. Q.Did you see me take it out of the coach? A. No - I might be three-quarters of a yard or a yard from the near fore-wheel; when I saw you, you were just opposite the door, as it stood open.

Q. If I had a parcel under my arm, what occasion had you to ask what I did at the coach? A. I did not perceive the parcel under your arm till I spoke to you - you had the bag over your arm, and the bag did not quite cover it; it did not cover any part of it: there were seven or eight parcels in the coach; I did not say at Guildhall there might be nine or ten.

MR. GREEN. This is the cover of the parcel.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner for stealing a parcel from the coach; he denied having taken it: I asked what brought him into the yard - he said he had no business there, curiosity brought him there, merely to see the coaches load; seeing that he had a black bag, I asked what he dealt in - he said he was a dealer in old clothes: I found 1s. 3d. on him - there was nothing in the bag.

Prisoner's Defence. Does it seem feasible, that if I wanted to steal the parcel I should take the smallest, when I could have taken others much more handy, and from the shape it is evident it could be of no value.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-53

NEW COURT, Second Day.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

318. GEORGE CURTIS and CHARLES FOOTE were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , I plane, value 2s., and 1 hammer, value 6d., the goods of George Brewer; 1 hammer, value 6d., and 1 chisel, value 1s. , the goods of Robert Hall .

THOMAS CAMPBELL. I live in Gainsford-street, Islington . On the 14th of December, about one o'clock, I was looking out of window, and saw the prisoners at an unfinished house opposite; I saw Curtis take off the staple of the door - Foote went in, and Curtis stood outside, leaning on a rail; Foote came out in a few minutes - he replaced the staple, and they walked off; I pointed them out to Hambrook.

GEORGE HAMBROOK . Campbell pointed out the prisoners, and I followed them; I found this large nail either in the pocket or the hand of Curtis - I took them to the office, and the tools were found on Foote; they had got about a quarter of a mile.

GEORGE UPWARD. I am an officer. I found two hammers, a chisel, and a plane on Foote: Curtis said they had done it for want of bread, or something to that purpose.

GEORGE BREWER . I am a carpenter. I was working at this house; I left this hammer and plane there on the 13th of December.

ROBERT HALL . I am a carpenter. I was working at the house - this hammer and chisel are mine; I left them on the bench on Saturday night.

JOHN BRUNDLY. I took Curtis, and found this spikenail on him; he said he had done it for want, he had been in town ever since Monday morning, when he came to the Old Bailey to bring his brother some money.

CURTIS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

FOOTE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Four Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18290115-54

319. JOSEPH CHISLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 3 caps, value 3s. , the goods of William John Barker .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing, 1 cap, value 1s., the goods of George Bishop ; 1 cap, value 1s., the goods of James Chapman Bishop ; and 1 cap, value 1s., the goods of George Haines .

WILLIAM JOHN BARKER . I keep a school at Stoke Newington . On the 21st of December last I was sitting up at night in my gardener's tool-house; the prisoner made his appearance in the garden, about half-past two o'clock in the morning - he must have got over the wall: as soon as he saw me he attempted to make his escape - I had a gun loaded with small shot, and fired at him; I and my gardener took him - these three caps, which belong to my scholars, were found on him.

CHARLES WILLIAM BISHOP. I am one of Mr. Barker's scholars. This cap is mine - it hung up in the play-room, which adjoins the house.

GEORGE SPEECHLEY BISHOP. I am a scholar of Mr. Barker's. This cap is mine, and was in the play-room.

CHARLES GREATHURST. I am the gardener. I was sitting up with Mr. Barker; about half-past two o'clock the prisoner came, and we secured him.

WILLIAM BURNS. I am an officer. I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and had his wounds dressed; he had a few scores in his back, nothing particular - I found these caps on him.

Prisoner. I hope you will take into consideration that I suffered a great deal by it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-55

320. MARTHA HAINES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 1 watch, value 4l., and 1 umbrella, value 4s. , the goods of John Middleton .

JOHN MIDDLETON . On the 25th of December I was at the Three Compasses public-house, in Glasshouse-street, Whitechapel ; the prisoner followed me in, and asked me to treat her - I did not drink with her; I only paid for what she drank: I put down my umbrella in front of the bar, and took out my watch to see the time, as a gentleman had asked me - the prisoner then took the watch out of my hand; I had occasion to go to the door, and while I was there she passed by me with the umbrella in her hand - I followed her, but she got away; I saw the watchman, and told him - we went into a house, and I saw the prisoner there; I am sure she is the woman: I have never got the watch or umbrella since - it was twenty minutes before

two o'clock; I was quite sober - I had been walking with some friends, and missed them; I went into the house, thinking they might have gone in there - I met the prisoner and another woman at the door, who asked me to treat them; I said I did not mind - three glasses of shrub were poured out, but I did not touch them.

WILLIAM WARNE. I am a watchman. The prosecutor stated this circumstance to me; I had seen the prisoner and another woman in and out of a house, and going down a street with two sailors - I took the prosecutor to a brothel, and the prisoner was there; he said she was the woman - she only said if she was to go she would go; this was near three o'clock: I asked her several times what was become of the things - she gave me no answer; I cannot say whether she was sober, but the prosecutor was as sober as he is now.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man till he gave me in charge - I had been in bed for hours.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-56

321. JEREMIAH LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 1 coat, value 12s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 10s., and 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Prince .

THOMAS PRINCE. I am a porter . On the 29th or 30th of December I lost the articles stated; I had seen them safe on the 29th, at half-past six o'clock in the morning, when I went out to work - the prisoner lives with his father and mother, in the back room; I did not miss my clothes till the 31st, when I went and redeemed them at a pawnbroker's in the Strand.

WILLIAM LINSLEY . I am the prosecutor's brother-in-law: I told him his property was gone, and took him to the pawnbroker's, in Pickett-street; we there found the articles - my wife saw the prisoner pawn them

SAMUEL HUISH . I am a pawnbroker. These articles were pawned with me by the prisoner, on the 30th of December.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-57

322. JOHN RUDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 3 shawls, value 28s. , the goods of Henry Hodge .

HENRY HODGE. I am a linen-draper , and live at Bow . On the 17th of December I lost three shawls, but I was not at home; I had seen one of them the day before and the other two about a week: I went to Lambeth-street Office, and saw three, which I knew to be mine - they have my private-mark on them.

LEWIS CHAMBERS . On the 17th of December I was looking out of my window, opposite the prosecutor's shop- I saw the prisoner, in company with a young man, walking backwards and forwards, looking into the shop; it took my attention: I then saw the prisoner go into the shop - he had an apron on; I saw him take something from the shop counter; when he came out he had something in his apron: I ran down stairs, and informed the officer - when the prisoner came out he began to walk very fast; I saw the officer go and take him - I am sure he is the boy.

Prisoner. Q.Where were you? A. Up stairs; our window is much lower than Mr. Hodge's - his shop goes up three or four steps; I only lost sight of him while I came down stairs - it was not five minutes from the time he went into the shop till he was taken back; the officer lives nearly opposite: I did not lose sight of him while I called the officer, as he stood at his door - when he was taken he was untying his apron; it was dropping from him.

CHARLES HUDSON . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner; he was running round the brewhouse corner - these shawls were in his apron, which was untied from his body, though he had not quite dropped it.

Prisoner. Q.Was the property on me? A. Yes - you had the apron in your hands; the string was untied from behind: I took them from your person.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

Reference Number: t18290115-58

323. EDWARD BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 1 half-crown , the monies of Orlando Stone , his master.

CHARLES RYMER . I am a shopman to Orlando Stone - he resides in town, but I manage his business at Hampton-wick; he is a haberdasher - the prisoner was his shopman . Having missed some property, I marked six half-crowns between five and six o'clock on the 21st of December; I put them into the till and went up to my tea, leaving the prisoner and the boy in the shop - I left them about half an hour, and when I returned, I missed one half-crown; I sent for an officer - the prisoner was searched, and the marked half-crown was found on him.

JAMES STURT. I am an officer. I found in the prisoner's right-hand trousers-pocket, one half-crown, two sixpences, and two penny-pieces - here is the half-crown.

CHARLES RYMER . This is one I had marked; the other five were left in the till.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Where did the prisoner come from to your master's service? A. I have heard him say that he lived with Mr. Fletcher many years - I have told him not to take money out of the till to repay himself for what he lent me; I did owe him half a crown, but that was a private account - I borrowed it on a Sunday; I have borrowed on several occasions - sometimes for the till, when I was short; I did not tell him what this half-crown was borrowed for - it was to come up to London: I had forgotten to pay him - I sent it after him by Jones, and I believe he refused it at first; I did not inform my master that I borrowed money from him - it is very usual to borrow if we are short of silver; I told him it was for the till.

Prisoner. Q. Have I not given money for oil of a morning, and taken it out of the till afterwards? A. Yes, when you have told me of it.

Prisoner's Defence. The half-crown was taken by me, because Mr. Rymer owed it to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-59

324. JAMES HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 3 yards of carpet, value 10s. , the goods of James Reyley and Alfred Lapworth , his masters; and JAMES CHAMBERLAIN was indicted for feloniously

receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen ; against he Statute.

HALL pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am and officer of Marlborough-street. I apprehended Hall, and, in consequence of what he said, I went to Chamberlain's about the 16th of December; I found him at his master's, a cheesemonger, in High-street, St. Giles' - I asked if he knew a person named Hall; he said he did not - I asked him again, and he again denied it; I asked if he meant to say that Hall had not been with him on the Sunday - he said he had not; I then said, "I am an officer, I give you time to consider, and then give your answer; do you mean to say you do not know a person named Hall?" he said, "I do not;" I then said, "I know that is untrue, I know you do" - after some hesitation, he said he knew a little boy named Hall; I said, "The person I mean is taller than yourself - did the person you speak of, give you any thing on Sunday?" he said, "He did not;" I said I knew more than he was aware of, and I was aware he had given him something: after some hesitation, he said he had some bits of carpet - he had asked him for some bits to cover a stool; I asked if he knew who Hall lived with, and what his master was; he said he knew that he lived with a carpet-manufacturer, and he had told him the cuttings were of no use, and his master cut them up, or sold them to Jews - I went with him to a house in Vinegar-yard, where he opened a drawer, and there were these carpets rolled up - he said Hall had been there on the Sunday, and dined with him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.When you went and asked the question about Hall, did you not say "Little Hall?" A. No - I do not know a person named Hall in the employ of the prisoner's master - I do not know of any other Hall.

ALFRED KING. I saw the prisoner and Hall at the Police office; Chamberlain said there, that he had seen Hall some days previous to the Sunday.

JAMES REVLEY. I am in partnership with Mr. Alfred Lapworth - Hall was in our employ for about six weeks; this pattern of carpet is made for us particularly, and no one else - we sell it at 8s. a yard; this other I believe is ours.

JURY. Q. Are these remnants? A. This one is a remnant, but the other piece (if it is ours) is cut off a whole piece - I cannot swear positively to that; we never dispose of remnants to Jews, or in any other way, because they would come in in rooms, as well as if they were a whole width.

COURT. Q. Do you ever permit your servants to sell any thing? A. No; there is a specific in junction that they shall not.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer told me he was an officer, and I was frightened - he said, "Recollect yourself" I said, "Do you mean Hall that works for my master?" he said No; he said, "Recollect yourself," and I then said"I do," he was at my house on Sunday, and gave me two bits of carpet, and I will go and fetch them;" I met Hall, who I had not seen for two years before - he asked me to give him something to drink; I said I could not as I was going on an crrand - we parted, and on coming back, he saw me loading a cart at my master's door; he said"Jem, where do you live?" I said in Vinegar-yard - he said "I will call;" he called, and saw a stool with three legs, he said, "I have a bit of carpet at home, I will give you to cover this stool," and he brought one of the bits - he then said, "I have got another bit at home, for when we take out carpets, these are what we take out, and they are our perquisites:" on the Sunday fortnight he brought it, and threw it down, and said, "There, Jem, it is no use to me, it is my perquisite;" I said, "I thank you, I hope I shall get into no trouble about this" - he said, "Oh! no, it is perquisites;" I said, I would not have it, if I knew he came by it dishonestly - he went to market with me and my wife, and got a bit of meat for dinner; he went for a pot of beer, and I sent for a pot of porter.

CHAMBERLAIN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-60

325. DAVID EVANS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 17th of November , 2 hearth-rugs, value 3l., the goods of James Reyley and Alfred Lapworth , which had lately before been stolen, he knowing the same to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at his lodgings, and found some duplicates there - here is one of a hearth-rug which had been pawned in Mary-le-bone-street; I found another hearth-rug at Mr. Burchett's; the prisoner (without my making him any promise or threat, as Hall and Chamberlain were going from the room) called me to him, and said "Here, here, what a bl-d rascal that Hall is:" I went after him, and he again said "What a bl-d rascal that Hall is;" and said he saw Hall cut the carpet off the length, and bring it out - he then said that Hall had given him the rugs to pawn - that Hall had most of the money, except 18d., I think it was to redeem a waistcoat; he also said that he had given him some drugget, which he had pawned at another place; he said he saw the carpet cut off at Mr. Reyley's shop; in consequence of what he said, I went to Mr. Burchett's, and there I found one rug, and at Mr. Ross's, another, of which this is the duplicate, which I found in the prisoner's wife's hand - she was endeavouring to conceal it.

THOMAS BURCHETT . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Paddington-street. This rug was pawned with me by the prisoner; I asked if it was his own - he said it was; that he made them on his own account; he asked me, I think, 12s.; I said I would make it 10s.; he said "If you make it 12s., I have two other duplicates which I will redeem," and I did; he pawned it in the name of William Seele - my man wrote the duplicate.

JAMES MEEDY. I am shopman to Mr. Ross, a pawnbroker, of Paddington-street. On the 13th of November the prisoner pawned this rug in the name of David Evans; I asked if it were his own; he said Yes, he dealt in these things, and they were worth from 30s. to 35s. a piece; I lent him 10s. upon it; on the 18th of November, another man came, and had the same rug put in the name of John Williams.

Prisoner. Q.Was it 10s. or 12s. I asked for it? A. Ten shillings; I am sure I asked you those questions; I said at the office another person came and paid the interest, and it was so.

JAMES REYLEY. I am in partnership with Alfred Lapworth : we had these rugs in our shop, and never sold

them; Mr. Denby is the manufacturer - we lost them while Hall was in our service.

MR. DENBY. I manufactured these rugs for the prosecutors; we make this particular pattern for no other persons.

Prisoner's Defence. My brother-in-law, Hall, came to our house, and said "I wish you to pawn something," and gave me a bundle with two rugs. a piece of carpet, and a drugget; I was to put them in in my own name, which I did- he came in the morning, and fetched away 22s.; I was to take the rest of the money down to a public-house, in Bond-street, and have a roll and cheese, and a pint of beer; I have a wife and child.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-61

326. JOHN FELLOWS was indicted for Embezzlement .

SOPHIA EADY . I am the wife of James Eady , a master chimney-sweeper : the prisoner was his journeyman ; he had 2s. per week, board and lodging; when he receives money he should give it to me; my husband was laid up; on the 19th of December, I sent him out to work - he came back in the evening, and said he had done the work; I asked him for the money - he would not answer, but gave me very ill language: the little boy who went with him came home in the day, and told me he had been doing the work; sometimes the accounts do stand over.

ELIZABETH JONES. I employed the prisoner to sweep our chimney, in Lisle-street, at five o'clock that morning, and paid him 6d.

MARY CLARKE . I live at No. 46, Gerrard-street. The prisoner swept my chimney on the 19th, and I paid him 6d.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-62

327. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE PALLISER . I live at No. 8, Finsbury-place, and am a saddler : the prisoner was foreman at another shop of mine, No. 5, Finsbury-place - he had 30s. a week; he had been foreman to my predecessor there; I have had that shop about six months - he had been there three years; he was in the habit of receiving money on my account; he sold two whips on the 16th of December for 22s., and only accounted to me for 18s. 6d. - here is a memorandum-book of his own keeping, in which he enters them for 18s. 6d. - we settle every Saturday night; these were sold on the Tuesday; the entry, by the date, was made on the Friday; he does not say to whom they were sold.

ROBERT CLARKE . I am clerk to Mr. Waterhouse, of Lad-lane. I bought these two whips on the 16th of December, of the prisoner, for 1l. 2s. - he gave me this receipt;(read) "One chaise-whip and one hunting ditto 1l. 2s. - paid, T. Wood."

MR. PALLISER re-examined. Q. How long after did you discover this? A. I had occasion to suspect him, and I had market these goods; I employed Mr. Clarke to buy them; when he rendered his account on the Saturday, I particularly asked him if this was a correct account of all he had sold; he said it was; it was his duty to account to me every Saturday night; he ought to have entered there 22s.: if I had been in the shop I should have sold them for 24s., which was what he asked for them; I am sure he said, and in the presence of my clerk, that the account was all correct.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What did you pay for them? A. I do not like to tell that; I should not have sold them for less than 24s., and then I should have got about fifty per cent; he came into my service form Window Grice: there had been no disagreement between him and me about working over-hours; there is a custom among our men not to work by candle-light for twelve nights before Christmas, but it had not come to that time; there were no mistake about any collars.

THOMAS GARTON . I took the prisoner; he said he did it through distress when he was before the Magistrate; that was not taken down.

MR. PALLISER. I heard him state that - it was not taken down in writing; the officer said he found four sovereigns of him. GUILTY . Aged 46.

Reference Number: t18290115-63

328. THOMAS WOOD was again indicted for embezzlement .

GEORGE PALLISER . The prisoner was in my employ, and had the care of a shop for me, and used to receive money, which he should enter in this book; there is no entry of 14s. on the 17th of December.

GEORGE CLARKE . Mr. Joseph Waterhouse requested me to go to the shop, and purchase two dozen collars, a pair of spurs, and a bit of sponge; the prisoner made this bill for them, but did not put a receipt to it - "I pair of spurs, 8s.; 2 dogs' collars, 4s.; sponge, 2s.," making 14s., which I paid him.

GEORGE PALLISER . This is my property - they ought to have been sold for about that price; it was the prisoner's duty to have entered them in this book, which he has not; I went in about an hour after Mr. Clarke had left, and asked him if any one had been there to buy any thing; he said there had not.

Prisoner's Defence. I found I sold the collars too cheap, for a gentleman came into the shop, and asked the price of one, and I told him half-a-crown; he would not give that, he went to the other shop, and the boy came to me for some: I asked him what they sold them for: he said 4s.; I then found I sold them too cheap, and I meant to keep the money back till Saturday to make it right.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-64

329. ELIJAH RIVERS was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES SLATER . I am a butcher , in partnership with Mr. John Main : we live at Queen's-buildings; the prisoner was our servant , and boarded and lodged in the house; we make up our accounts every quarter, and then we settle with our servants; but if they want money in the mean time, they ask, and are never refused: the prisoner came into the service in March last, as a weekly servant, and was accustomed to receive money, and to account for it immediately he came home, or not to let the day pass over; Clark was a customer, and I considered he owed me a great sum of money.

SAMUEL CLARK. I am a butcher, and deal with Messre. Slater and Main. I paid the prisoner for his masters, between the 16th of August and the 8th of December, at sixteen payments, 24l. 11s. 2d. - he received the money weekly, and these are the receipts which he gave me for it; on the 8th of December, I paid him 1l. 6s. 3d., and this is the receipt.

JAMES SLATER. The prisoner never accounted to me for one penny of this money; I had not spoken to him on the subject, but it was his duty to come and pay it, which he never has done; we make up the accounts at the end of the year; when I accused him of receiving this money, he said he had not received it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-65

330. WILLIAM YARDLEY and SAMUEL LEGRAVE were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 3 pairs of breeches, value 30s.: 4 waistcoats, value 20s.; 3 handkerchief, value 2s.; 2 brooches, value 20s.; 1 box, value 6d., and I pair of scissors, value 1s. , the goods of John Skinner .

JOHN SKINNER . I am ostler at the Castle Inn, Kingsland-road . The prisoners came there on the 10th of December, and slept together that night, within one room of me - in the morning, I saw them go down stairs - my box had been in my room, and I left it safe when I went out to work; I went afterwards, and found it had been broken open, and all these articles taken - I gave information, and recovered part of the property.

THOMAS HUNT . I took Yardley for another robbery, on the 11th of December; on going to Bow-street, I heard of this robbery, and found on him this pair of scissors, 2 brooches, a handkerchief, and comb; I have since found two waistcoats.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, Yardley Pleading distress, and Legrave stating that Yardley had fetched the clothes into the bed-room, and that he considered them his property.

YARDLEY - GUILTY . Aged 15.

LEGRAVE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-66

331. WILLIAM YARDLEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 pair of trousers, value 1l., and 1 waistcoat, value 10s., the goods of Samuel Jones ; and 2 sheets, value 10s. , the goods of William Heard .

SAMUEL JONES . I live at Hampstead; I am out of a situation, and was lodging at Mr. Heard's, at the Duke of Hamilton Inn, Hampstead . On the 8th of December my property was safe in my own bed-room, at the top of the house; I know nothing of the prisoner.

WILLIAM HEARD . I keep the Duke of Hamilton . I lost two sheets from the bed that Jones slept in; I saw a lad about the prisoner's size there, but I cannot say it was him.

JAMES MASTERS HOWIE. I am a pawnbroker. I have two sheets pawned by the prisoner on the 8th of December.

EDWARD FITZHUGH . I am a pawnbroker, in Church-row. I have a waistcoat pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years. - To commence at the expiration of his former sentence .

Reference Number: t18290115-67

332. ROBERT YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 iron trough, value 5s. , the goods of Gobbett Thompson .

GEORGE RIMES . I am a servant to Gobbett Thompson, a butcher ; his stables are in Dock-street . I saw this iron trough safe, about the 10th of December, at the bottom of the stable, where his cart stands - the stable was always locked; I know nothing of the prisoner, but on the 15th of December I saw the gate and the stable-door open, and the trough was gone.

CHARLES DUNN . I keep a broker's shop in Church-lane, and bought this trough on the 15th of December, about two o'clock, or a quarter-past two, of the prisoner: I gave him 1s. 4d. and a halfpenny for himself: 3s. per cwt. is the regular price; I asked where he came from, and said it was entirely out of my line; only on account of his great distress, and having bought things of him before at the house, I bought it; this trough might be as good as new for all the purpose it was made for.

EDWARD MOORE . I am nine years of age; I do not go to church - I know the necessity of speaking the truth; I live with my father and brother, in East Smithfield, just by Mr. Thompson's stables - I have known the prisoner for about two months; I saw him one Monday evening, about a month ago, take this trough from his stable - the door was then open; I asked where he was going to take it - he said he could sell it for half-a-crown in Back Church-lane; I told my father and mother of it.

JOHN HARNEY . I am an officer. I found this trough at the broker's; it is a respectable looking shop - the prisoner's mother took me there, and the broker fetched it from the room behind the shop.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290115-68

333. SUSAN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 2 lbs. weight of cheese, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Nicholson .

WILLIAM ATKINSON . I am in the employ of Samuel Nicholson, a cheesemonger of Tottenham-court-road . On the 15th of December the prisoner came to purchase some butter, and Mrs. Nicholson sold her some; she paid for it, but did not ask for any cheese - she then went to the other side of the shop, bought some bacon, and went out; I did not miss the cheese, but Mrs. Nicholson saw her take it; I went after her, and took her about fifty yards off - the cheese had broken in two, and I found one piece in her hand, and the other on the ground.

ELIZABETH NICHOLSON . I was at home, and served the butter; the prisoner then went to the other counter; I saw her leave the shop with a piece of cheese between her basket and her person - Atkinson followed, and took her; I am certain it is ours.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it; he did not find it on me.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290115-69

334. CHARLES LEWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 1 cap, value 3s. , the goods of John Hull .

JOHN SPOONER . I live within a few doors of Mr. John Hull , a hatter . On the 11th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner, with two other boys, near his house, and I watched them - I was on the opposite side of the way; I saw one of them (not the prisoner) reach into Mr. Hull's shop, and take the cap off a book; he put it on the prisoner's head, and they all ran off together

- the prisoner had nothing on his head before; I secured him almost immediately, within twenty yards.

JOHN HULL , I keep the shop: this cap is mine - I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me that took it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-70

335. MARGARET JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 8 pairs of stays, value 20s. , the goods of Catherine Agar .

CATHERINE AGAR. I am a widow . On the 19th of December the prisoner came to my shop with two more persons, about half-past eight o'clock at night - they inquired for some bonnets; one of them selected a bonnet, which came to 1s. - the other two stood before the prisoner; I do not think they were in the shop a quarter of an hour before I missed some stays - I said to the prisoner"You have taken my stays;" she said" I have not;" they did not go out, for I would not let them - I sent for an officer, but could not find one; I kept the prisoner in the shop, and put my hand up her clothes, where I found these eight pairs of stays, which are mine.

WILLIAM WHOWELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the stays.

ELIZABETH BENNETT . I am servant to the prosecutrix - what she has stated is correct.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take them: they were on the ground; she said I had taken them, and I said I had not; I said "Here's a parcel lies down;" she told my friend that if I had cried she would not have taken me into custody, but I seemed so hardened.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-71

336. ANN MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , I pair of ear-rings, value 6s. , the goods of Caroline Susannah Metcalfe .

CAROLINE SUSANNAH METCALFE . I am single , and keep a jeweller's shop , at No. 88, Oxford-street . On the 27th of December, about half-past ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came and asked to look at a pair of ear-rings; I took the tray from the window, and shewed them to her; after looking at them some time, she said she would call again on Monday: I then missed a pair of ear-rings from the tray which she had been looking at - I said I missed a pair of ear-rings which I was confident were there when she came in; she said she had not got them - she asserted that over and over again; I still stated that I was sure she had got them; she had a pocket-handkerchief in her hand, and I asked her if she would shake that, as probably she had taken them up in a mistake; she shook it, and said "It is not here - it is not here;" and if they had fallen then I must have heard them; she was then shuffling her foot on the ground, and I asked her to move from the counter, as probably they had fallen; she moved a little backwards, and as she moved she scraped her foot again, and got these ear-rings to the step of the door, which was not far from where she stood; she then stooped, snatched them up, and ran away; I got from behind the counter, and gave an alarm - she ran to Castle-street, which is about thirty or forty yards off, and there she was taken; I ran after her as fast as I could, and was not far from her when she was taken: I have never seen the ear-rings since, but I am positive and certain that I saw her take them from the ground, and run away with them.

JURY. Q. Was there any card attached to them? A. Yes; and when they were on the ground, I saw the card to them turned upside down.

GEORGE HOWE . I am a watchman. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a great number of persons running; I went up, and one said, "This is the girl that has stolen the pair of ear-rings;" I took hold of the prisoner - she said "I have got nothing;" I said "If you have got nothing, you need not to have run away."

Prisoner. I was used very ill in the street before the watchman came up; I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-72

337. JOHN COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 live fowl, price 2s. 6d. , the property of Joseph Dyson .

JOSEPH DYSON . I live in City-gardens, City-road , and keep fowls . On the 19th of December, I lost one from the front of my street-door: a witness told me to follow the prisoner, which I did: I took him between two and three hundred yards from my house with my fowl in a bag; I asked where he got it - he made no answer.

ELIJAH SHARLEY , I saw the prisoner near Dyson's - he took up one fowl just against a dead wall, and put it into a green bag; I told Dyson of it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290115-73

338. JOHN COCKFIELD and GEORGE DONALD were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 box, value 1s.: 2 gowns, value 10s.; 2 shawls, value 8s.; I scarf, value 4s., and 10 yards of crape, value 20s. , the goods of Elizabeth Hare .

ELIZABETH HARE . I am servant to Mr. Bryson, a publican, of Lower East Smithfield ; I had this box there, which contained two gowns, two shawls, ten yards of crape, and some other things; I missed the box and its contents from my room, on the 1st of January - the two prisoners lodged there; Donald had been there two or three months: Cockfield not so long.

JOHN JAMES . I am a watchman of St. George's, Middlesex. On the 1st of January, I fell in with the two prisoners, in Wapping-street, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, in company - Donald was carrying this box; I asked where they brought it from, and where they were going - Donald said he did not know exactly where he was going, but that he brought it from Cherry-garden stairs; I said "I must take you into custody:" he said I might do as I liked about that; he then said he found it at the corner of Hermitage-street: Cockfield also said they had found it - I took them to the watch-house, and found the prsoecutrix - it had not then been opened, but the prosecutrix produced the key the next morning.

DONALD'S Defence. We had been drinking with two shipmates, and came home at twelve o'clock, and then went out again to go to another house; in coming home, I saw this box in Burr-street, and a sailor standing by it:

I had taken a glass or two, and I asked the man what he had got - I could not make out what he said; he then went away, so we took up the box, and went to our own door, but could not get in; I then took the box to a young woman's mother, where I thought we could get a lodging.

COCKFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 23.

DONALD - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-74

339. JOSEPH BURNHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 5lbs. weight of horse-hair, value 3s. , the goods of Ephraim Ware .

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. On the 29th of December I met the prisoner, about a quarter before nine o'clock in the morning, in the Edgware-road - he was about twenty-four miles from the prosecutor's - he lives at Bovington, in Hertfordshire ; I asked the prisoner what he had got in his basket - he said horse-hair; I said "That is right, I have been looking for horse-hair a good while;" I took it down from his head, and found this horse-hair tied up in bunches, but not tied up with string as it is now; I said "Have you been cutting this off yourself?" he said No, he had not; I said "How do you account for having it in your possession?" he said he bought it of a man at Missenden; I then searched his pockets, and asked if he had not got a knife about him - he said No; I found no knife, in his pockets, but I took off his hat, and found this knife, and a pair of gloves in it; I said "Do you know the man you bought it of?" - he said "No, I do not know him- I never saw him in my life;" I said "Are you sure you bought it Missenden?" - he said "no, it was between Missenden and Aylesbury;" I said "At what time" - he said "About four o'clock this morning;" I said "That is impossible - you could not have come that distance in this time:" he said he gave 4s. for it altogether: I got three hundred hand-bills printed, and did every thing in my power till I found the prosecutor.

JOSEPH WARE . I am the son of Ephraim Ware: he lives in Hertfordshire, about twenty-four miles from London. On the 28th of December, my father's horses were all safe in the stable, with their tails on; and at four o'clock the next morning, I missed all the hair off four horses; I have matched it to the horses, and can swear to this bunch in particular, and the other I believe are my father's; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I told Mr. Webster I bought it at four o'clock in the afternoon; I bought it it between Aylesbury and Great Missenden, and gave 4s. for it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-75

340. JOSEPH BURNHAM was again indicted for stealing. on the 28th of December , 6lbs. weight of horse-hair, value 4s. , the goods of Henry Harwood .

PHILIP WEBSTER . I met the prisoner on the 29th of December, in the morning, with a basket, carrying a quantity of horse-hair; I took it down, and found this horse-hair, which are the tails and manes of nine horses, all in bunches; I asked if he had cut it off; he said No, he had bought it of a man at Missenden, whom he never saw before; I said "Are you sure you bought it at Missenden?" he said No, between Aylesbury and Missenden, at four o'clock that morning.

HENRY HOWARD. I live at Bovington, in Hertfordshire . I have five horses, which I put safe into my stable on the evening of the 20th, and the next morning my boy told me they had lost their tails; I fitted this hair to the tails, and am certain it is mine; I believe the prisoner was pretty well known at Watford.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years, from the expiration of his former sentence .

Reference Number: t18290115-76

341. JOHN BRISTOW was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , I pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Walter Pitmann .

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am a painter. On the 30th of December, at half-past nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another, near Mr. Pitmann's shop; I watched them. and saw the prisoner go into the shop, and take a pair of shoes from the right-hand side of the door - I told the shopman, who ran and took him with the shoes in his possession; he was brought back and given to the officer.

WALTER PITMANN. I keep the shop , but was out that night - when I came home my shopman told me of the circumstance; these shoes are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-77

342. CHARLOTTE BRITTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 4lbs. weight of beef, value 2s., and 5lbs. weight of mutton, value 2s. , the goods of William Mitchell .

JOHN PENTON . I am a butcher. I was in Mr. Mitchell's shop, in Kingsland-road , on the 2d of January; a woman came and gave information - I went out, and she shewed me the prisoner, who I secured, but a short distance from the shop; I took her back, and Mr. Mitchell found the meat on her - there were two pieces of beef, and three pieces of mutton.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I keep the shop : the prisoner was brought back with a basket, and under some bacon was my meat - there were 9lbs. of it; I was in the shop, but did not see her - I do not think she had been in the shop; the meat laid there a few minutes before.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a woman had just given her the basket to hold, and that she was ignorant of its contents.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-78

344. JAMES BIRCH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 stove, value 6s. , the goods of George Thomas Clemmans .

GEORGE THOMAS CLEMMANS . I live in Hackney-road . and am a broker - this stove was outside my door on the 8th of December; I was at dinner, and did not see the prisoner near the shop - a witness gave an alarm, and I went out; he had then got the prisoner and stove.

WILLIAM SNELLGROVE . I saw the prisoner take this stove, put it on his shoulder and go away; I got close to him, and he threw it on my arm - it cut my wrist; he then ran away, and I went and collared him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290115-79

345. GEORGE TAYLOR and CHARLES TAPPS were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 basket, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 breast of mutton, value 1s. 3d.; 2lbs. weight of sugar, value 1s., and 2 ozs. weight of tea, value 3d. , the goods of Thomas Furr .

JOHN BRINCHLEY . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 20th of December I was in the Liverpool-road, about twenty minutes before five o'clock in the evening, and saw these two lads there; Taylor crossed from the road into the footpath - I turned, and said to him, "What have you got here?" he said, "Nothing but a breast of mutton, which I have brought from Kingsland, and am going to my father's in White Lion-street;" Thomas, who was with me, said to him, "What has the other boy got?" he said,"Tea and sugar;" we were going along with Taylor, and saw Tapps - I took them both into a baker's-shop: I found these razors on Taylor, this spike-nail, and this bunch of keys; I afterwards found Furr - he is a waggoner , and when in town lives in Smithfield; he stated that he lost this property in Islington-road : this tea and sugar was found on Tapps.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I was with Brinchley on the 20th; we saw the two prisoners - they separated: Taylor came on the footpath, rather at the back of us; we went back to him, and he stated what my brother-officer has said - we afterwards took Tapps.

THOMAS FURR . I am the waggoner of the Peterborough waggon. I was in London on the 20th of December; this basket is mine - this tea and sugar, and these stockings are mine; there was also a piece of mutton: I had tied the basket at the hind-part of my waggon when I was coming up St. John-street, with a thick rope - when I got to Holloway toll-bar I missed it; the rope had been cut.

TAYLOR'S Defence. I was coming from Crouch-end, and picked up the basket as I was passing the Adam and Eve public-house, about a quarter after two o'clock.

TAPPS' Defence. I was with Taylor, and saw the basket lying in the road; we stood some time, but no one came - we asked two or three people if they knew any body who had lost any thing; they said No.

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 16.

TAPPS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-80

346. WILLIAM TOPPING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 pair of boots, value 20s. , the goods of Holsey Janson .

WILLIAM TURNER . I am servant to Mr. Holsey Janson, a gentleman , who lives at Stamford-hill . On the 10th of January I saw the prisoner going out of the front gate, about twelve o'clock in the day; I stopped him, and he gave me the boots, which he had taken from the washhouse - he had no business there.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I begged his pardon, and he let me go about my business, but I was taken again.

GUILTY . Aged 57.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18290115-81

347. HENRY SIMMONDS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 shirt, value 10s. , the goods of Alexander Bruce .

MARTHA RICH . I live in Frederick-street, Portland

town , and wash for Mr. Alexander Bruce , who is surgeon to the Asylum for the recovery of Health . On the 18th of December I hung my clothes out to dry; when I took them in I missed a shirt of Mr. Bruce's.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am an officer. On the 18th of December I was in St. John's-wood-road, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I found the prisoner and another boy charged with robbing a till of 3d., and in the prisoner's hat I found this shirt, which he said he found in the road, covered with straw; I took it to Mrs. Rich, who identified it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the Wellington-road, and saw this shirt under a hedge; I took it up, and was going on - a boy was called after; the officer came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-82

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

348. JOHN MACDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 set of fire-irons, value 12s.; 2 standards, value 12s., and 7 yards of carpet, value 10s. , the goods of Benjamin Joseph , his master; and JANE MACDONALD was indicted for feloninsly receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

BENJAMIN JOSEPH . I live in Wardour-street, Soho , and am an upholsterer ; John Macdonald was in my service. I missed all these articles; I have only found ten yards of carpetting: on the 8th of December I missed the brass fender and a coal-scuttle; I saw John Macdonald had a new pair of trousers and a waistcoat - I accused him of taking the things which I missed, and he strongly denied it; I asked how he got the wasitcoat and trousers - he said his mother took them out of pawn for him: I then went to the other prisoner's house, who is his mother, and there saw my carpeting lying down in the place, but she was not at home - I knew the carpeting to be mine; there were about four yards and three-quarters in one piece, and two yards and a half in another - they were different patterns; one was cut from a piece and the other the breadth from a whole carpet: the breadth had been cut in two and joined, so as to make a square piece - I came home, and said to John, "How could you send me to your mother's, for I have found my property there?" he said if I would forgive him he would tell me the truth what he had robbed me of; I said I would not make any promise of the kind, as he had strongly denied things that I had accused him of before - I sent my servant for an officer, who came, and took him; he said, when the officer came, that the fire-irons were in pawn for 8s., at Mr. How's, in Broad-street, St. Giles' - I went there, and the pawnbroker took the trouble to look over his book, but they were not there; his shopman then said that his mother had been there - the irons were not found there, but the officer got them.

Prisoner JOHN MACDONALD . You said if I confessed you would forgive me, and when I confessed he sent for a constable. A. No; I said if he confessed where a pair of trousers and waistcoat were, which I had lost, I would forgive him, but he would not till the officer came, and then he confessed; he had been in my service about three months.

THOMAS GOOK . On the night of the 9th of January I was sent for to take the male prisoner; Mrs. Joseph said something to me, and then the prosecutor came in, and said he had been robbed - I said, "Bring him up," and as they were coming in at the door I heard Mr. Joseph say, "Mind I make no promise;" I took the prisoner, and searched him - I asked him were the articles were; he said he took the fire-irons, and gave them to a woman outside the door of Mr. How's - she pawned them, and he gave her a shilling; he said he had sold the waistcoat and trousers for 8s. - the carpet he took to his mother's; I went to his mother's the next morning, and found the carpet - I then went to where his mother was nursing and asked her where the fireirons were - she said she sold them to a young man named Glass, for 1l.; we went to Glass' - we then went to his sister's, in Liquorpond-street, and there we got them; the female prisoner was with me - she said she wanted the fire-irons that were sold by John Macdonald .

JOHN GLASS . I bought these fire-irons of Jane Macdonald - she had been nursing my mother seven weeks previous to her death; she came to me one evening, and said she had a set of fire-irons to dispose of for a person in great distress, and wanted 1l. 5s. for them; I said I could not afford it at that time, but if she would come again I would buy them - she came again, and I offered her 1l. for them; she said she thought that would not do, but she came again in a day or two, and I gave her a sovereign - I offered her a shilling for her trouble, which she refused: Gook came to me - I took him to my sister's, and there delivered them up to him on the 5th of December.

BENJAMIN JOSEPH re-examined. I missed the fireirons about six weeks before this date, and the carpeting about a fortnight before; I can swear to these fire-irons by handling them, and having so many sets of them - I know the pattern, and had missed them; I mentioned them to the prisoner, and he said, "You are always accusing me; "I said, "I have a right to accuse you, for I never lost any thing before you came, and am continually missing things now" - I said I had more fire-irons than I had then in my shop; he said, "You don't know what you have got, and you think you have got thieves about you;" I had given him warning to quit me a fortnight before the 8th of January, in consequence of the trousers and the waistcoat; I found out the carpeting a fortnight before - when the officer came, I said, "You rascal, you have robbed me of carpeting, and it is up at your mother's house;" he said, "I have robbed you of nothing but the carpeting, and I hope you will forgive me" - I am sure he said that.

Prisoner JOHN MACDONALD. Q. When you counted the carpet there were five breadths, and there are five breadths there now? A. No - if that were so, how could this breadth be here? this quntity is deficient.

JOHN MACDONALD'S Defence. My mother is innocent of the charge, not knowing but that the things were come honestly by.

JANE MACDONALD 'S Defence. I knew nothing of how he was going on.

JOHN MACDONALD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Of stealing the carpet. Transported for Seven Years .

JANE MACDONALD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-83

349. MORRIS SHANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 3 planes, value 7s.; 18 chisels, value 11s.; 3 screw-drivers, value 3s.; 3 saws, value 9s.; 19 gouges, value 7s.; 1 square value 4s.; 1 bevil, value 1s.; 5 gimblets, value 1s; 16 files, value 5s.; 1 pair of dividers, value 2s.; 2 screw-wrenches, value 6s.; 18 brad-awls, value 9d,; 1 saw handle, value 2s.; 1 saw, set, value 6d.; 1 mallet, value 1s.; 1 guage, value 6d.; 4 hammers, value 3s.; 1 spoke-tool, value 1s.; 1 pair of pincers, value 1s.; 1 adze, value 2s.; 11 tool-handles, value 1s., and 2 scrapers value 6d. , the goods of Felix Booth , Esq. , and William Taylor Copeland , Esq.

WILLIAM LEVY . I am an officer of the Sheriffs. I put the prisoner into the house of a carpenter's tool-maker, in Great Smith-street, Westminster - the articles stated were in his care; the whole shop consisted of these kind of articles: we levied the distress on the 1st of December, and he went in the same day.

CHARLES NURSE . I was an apprentice to Richard Caneding, a carpenter's tool manufacturer. On the 1st of December Mr. Levy put the prisoner in possession; on the Wednesday, just after dinner, I had to go into the shop, and the prisoner said to me, "I want somebody to take a parcel into the City for me - I do not mind paying them for it;" I went over with my mistress to my master, and my master told me to take the parcel - I went over and said I was going out with the horse and chaise; the prisoner then asked me to take the parcel and gave me a direction where to take it and a note - it was directed,"Mr. Levy, pen-cutter, Chicksand-street, Osborne-street, Whitechapel;" I believe there was a direction in the parcel, but I do not remember what it was: I took the parcel to my master, and he opened it - it contained all the articles stated - a great number of tools.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you not heard your mistress say, that she gave the prisoner these tools? A. No.

JOHN CRAPP . I was plaintiff in this action. The prisoner was put in possession by Levy; I heard something of this sort had happened, and gave information of it - the prisoner was taken into custody; he called me aside, and said he hoped I would not prosecute him - he did not know there was any particular harm in it, and it was a regular thing.

Cross-examined. Q. Was that all he said? A. Yes, to my remembrance; he did say that Mrs. Canedine said he might have a thing of a sort, and Mrs. Canedine has confirmed that to me - the goods were sold by a bill of sale; Mrs. Canedine is lodging in the house, but she is not in possession - her husband is in the Marshalsea; I have a person in possession of the goods: my man is serving in the shop; the apprentice is merely employed to tell the prices - Mrs. Canedine is not selling the things.

ALEXANDER ETTERSHANK . I was in Mr. Canedine's employ. The prisoner called me on one side, and asked what he was given in charge for; whether it was for his mother having been in the morning, and taken away a screw-driver with a plane.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable of Queen-square. I went to the house, and took charge of the prisoner; I stopped there till Mr. Levy brought another sheriff's officer - the prisoner said if he had known five minutes before what we came for, we should not have found him there.

MR. CLARKSON called -

ANN CANEDINE . I am the prosecutor's wife. I gave the prisoner permission to take some goods, but I cannot discriminate what they were; I understood he was going to take some, and I saw him select them - he gave me to understand they were for himself; I did not know how it might terminate: he was taking down an article, and I said, "What are you doing, Mr. Shannon?" or words to that effect; he said, "I am looking out a few things for myself" - I said, "Very well; "I was unacquainted with the business; I thought he was going to look out a few things for his own use - I did not know to what amount he was taking then, but I did not suppose it was to the amount he did take; I was with my husband when the boy came over - I am still living there, but not selling in the shop; I thought I had some controul over the goods - he had been in the shop about three days; the amount of the whole he took was 3l. - something, I believe, at the selling price.(Note read.)

To Mr. Levy, Chicksand-street, Osborne-street, Whitechapel.

DEAR SIR. Be so kind as to mind this parcel till you see me. Your's, &c. M. SHANNON.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-84

350. GEORGE QUANTOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 coat value 10s. the goods of Henry Shearwood .

HENRY SHEARWOOD . On the 23th of December I left my van opposite to Mr. Sim's shop, in Clerkenwell , while I went in there; I returned in a few minutes, and a stranger told me a fellow had taken the coat - I pursued, and in fifteen minutes I saw the prisoner in Wilderness-row, wearing my great coat, which had been in the van; I charged him with it - he endeavoured to go on, and not to take notice of what I said, but I called for assistance and took him.

JAMES CLIFFORD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner; he said he was very sorry I had the trouble of taking him to the Police-office - I heard him say before the Magistrate that he took it form the van.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had bought the coat of a man in the street for 4s.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290115-85

351. WILLIAM PEARCE was indicted for stealing on the 18th of December , 1 stove-grate, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Rayner .

THOMAS RAYNER . I am the son of Robert Rayner , an ironmonger , of Crawford-street . On the 18th of December a little boy came and told me a stove-grate was taken; I had seen it five minutes before - I went out and saw the prisoner with it on the other side of the way; he was quite a stranger: I went to him - he put it down, and ran away; I kept him in sight, and called Stop thief! he was stopped in York-street - I am certain he is the person.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I was in York-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I looked towards the sound, and met the prisoner - I took him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me before? A. Yes, I have.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Crawford-street, at half-past six o'clock, or a quarter before seven - this stove stood off the edge of the pavement; I stood by it for about five minutes - I was distressed, and took it across the road; they cried Stop thief! and I sat it down; I have had neither father nor mother since I was nine years old.

THOMAS RAYNER re-examined. The stove stood inside a railing; it was four feet six inches from the place he took it - a person must have got over the railing, or hooked it towards him; it was about half-past six o'clock.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-86

352. GEORGE PHILLIPS , and CHARLES DUTTON were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 set of cart-harness, value 25s; 2 line-cloths, value 8d., and 1 roller, value 1s. , the goods of James Sarson and Henry Sarson .

ELIAS HAYDON . I am servant to James and Henry Sarson . I went into their stable at half-past five o'clock on the 10th of December, and missed the cart-harness, which I had seen at three o'clock - this is it; I know it to be theirs: I know nothing of the prisoners.

ROGER SEECUMB . My master is a saddle and harness-maker, and lives at No. 26, Long-lane. The prisoners brought the harness to his shop about half-past three o'clock, on the 10th of December; I hung it up on a pin in the shop - a man came in the evening and inquired about it; it had been sent to our other shop by one of the boys, but I am certain it is the same harness - it was taken away by Vann.

THOMAS VANN . This harness was brought to the office, and Dutton was brought the same day - the other man was charged on suspicion of stealing it; that was on the 23d - I had taken Phillips, and Dutton told me that Phillips used to take him about, and give him a shilling or eighteen-pence for carrying things; he said he knew nothing about that, but Phillips had employed him to carry it: Phillips said he bought it for 12s. of a man at a watering-house, in the City-road, and could produce the party - I said "That would be right for you to do;" he did not mention any name - Dutton said before the Magistrate, that it was bought by Featherston-street, in the City-road.

PHILLIPS' Defence. I was in the City-road, and I met a man with a kind of shooting-jacket; he had this harness on his back - I asked if it was for sale; he asked 18s. for it - I said "I will give you 12s.;" he called me back, and took it: I went to the shop in Long-lane and sold it- I asked the foreman 1l. for it; he said he would give but 16s.; I said "Well, if you will give me something to drink you shall have it:" the man I bought it of, gave me the name of Thomas Cope , and said he was always near the bridge.

DUTTON'S Defence. I was out of work, and met Phillips, who said things were very bad, and as he had a little money he thought of buying an old harness; he went round to different gentleman's servants and bought it up- he met a man with this harness, and bought it; we went to the shop and sold it for 16s.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

DUTTON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-87

353. HENRY REDFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 sovereign , the property of James Derling .

SARAH DERLING . I am the wife of James Derling -he is in the 12th Lancers . I came to town from Isleworth to purchase some articles, on the 7th of January; I went into a public-house - the prisoner was in the taproom; the woman there said he was in great distress, and he would carry my basket for a few halfpence; I said I would give him 6d. to take it - he went with me to the White Horse cellar , and as we were going along, he said many a one would have run away with the basket, but he would not: when we got to the White Horse cellar I said "Will you take this sovereign and get change, as I have the baby in my arms, and the basket;" he cut away in a minute with it - I sat down and cried; the people said I was a very simple woman: I went home, and came to town again on the Friday, and thought I would catch him in the evening - I went to the public-house, and said"Can you tell me where that lad lodges who took my basket to the White Horse cellar?" the prisoner was in the tap-room, and he ran out - the master of the public-house ran after him and brought him back; I caught him, kept hold of him by the collar, and would not let him go till I got to Bow-street.

JOSEPH PINE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the office: the prosecutrix brought him there - he seemed to be struggling.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman came and asked me to carry her basket, and when we came to the Black Bear public-house, she went and called for a quartern of gin and cloves; she gave me 6d. and I left her - she had several half-crowns, some shillings and coppers in her hands; she said "I am not like some people, I have got plenty of money:" she was in liquor - she came on the Friday and took me, and swore I had the sovereign.

SARAH DERLING . It was a sovereign I gave him.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-88

354. JOHN JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 cigar-case, value 1s., and 1 snuffbox, value 6d. , the goods of Sidney Strong .

BENJAMIN REID . I am shopman to Sidney Strong , a tobacconist of St. John-street, Smithfield . On the 26th of December, we missed a cigar-case and snuff-box from the window; I did not see them taken - I had seen them safe on the Wednesday evening: these are the articles.

JOHN GRUNDLEY . I took the prisoner on the 26th of December, about half-past twelve o'clock in the day; I found these articles on him - he said the other one who was with him stole them and the shoes likewise.

Prisoner's Defence. I met two boys at the top of John-street, whom I knew; they asked if I would carry these a little way - I said Yes, and I asked where they got them; they told me. GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-89

355. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 1 coat, value 2s. , the goods of Benjamin Haskey .

CATHERINE HASKEY . I am the wife of Benjamin Haskey , and live in Northampton-row, Rosamond-row, Clerkenwell . On the 22d of December I left my house about twenty minutes before five o'clock, and returned about six- the window was broken, the blinds were open, and my drawers and boxes were stripped; the coast, and a variety of other things were gone - the prisoner used to bring my beer from the public-house; he came at nine o'clock that night - I said I wanted no beer, I had been robbed; he came again at ten o'clock, but I took no beer; he came again the next day - I took no beer, and the officer brought him about five minutes after, with the coat.

MARTHA KAMP . I go out nursing. I was opposite the prosecutor's house, and saw this witness take her husband's tea - I then saw the prisoner, and a man in light coloured clothes, come to her gate; I turned, and made up the fire- I then saw the prisoner walking up and down by himself; I thought he was waiting for the pots: I left the window, and left him walking about - at six o'clock I heard the prosecutor had been robbed; my mistress told me to go and see what was the matter - I then went and told what I had seen.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see me go to the door for pots? A. I have seen you with pots, and you had a pot in your hand.

JAMES PEPPER. I live next door to the prosecutor. There were some suspicious of this pot-boy, and on the 23d I saw him in Corporation-lane with a bundle, about half-past twelve o'clock in the day; I saw him go into a green-shop, and he had no sooner crossed the threshold of the door than he dropped the bundle: I gave information in about five minutes to Walker, who took him, and found the bundle at the green-grocer's.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see a man come up to me with a bundle? A. There was a young man with him, but the prisoner had the bundle; the other had it first - the prisoner left the bundle at the house, and both went off to the end of the lane; the other man then absconded.

JEREMIAH FIELD . I am the green-grocer. The prisoner brought the bundle to my house.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see the other man with me? A. Yes: after you left the door I heard you say "Come on," and then I saw another man with you.

JOSEPH WALKER . I got this bundle from Mr. Field's shop; I took the prosecutor with me, and then went and got the coat - he said it was his.

JOHN RICHARDSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at his master's house; Walker had got the coat - I told the prisoner there was a coat found at Field's which he and another man had left there; he said the other man came and asked him where he could leave a bundle, and he took it there.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 23d of December, I was in Mr. Giles' employ; between twelve and one o'clock I was out and met a man, who asked me for a pint of beer: he asked if he could leave a bundle half an hour, and I said "Yes, at Mr. Field's;" I went and asked if I could leave it there, and he said Yes, and I threw it down.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-90

356. JANE GRADY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 2 1/2 yards of kerseymere, value 12s. , the goods of Michael Fennell .

MICHAEL FENNELL. I lost two yards and a half of kerseymere which was cut out for a pair of trousers; I lost it form my bed-room, No. 25, Henrietta-street, Manchester-square , on the 2d of December, at six o'clock in the morning; I am a tailor : the prisoner and her father lived in the same house - the officer has the article; I cannot swear to it, but believe it to be mine - it is the same colour, same quality, and the same sort of cloth; I do not see any difference between that and mine: I had seen it safe the last day of November.

THOMAS GOOK . I took the prisoner by her father's request, on the 11th of December; I told her what it was for - she resisted very strongly; she then said she had pawned the kerseymere at Mr. Wood's, in High-street, St. Giles's, and had left the duplicate with her mother.

GEORGE TURNER . On the 2d of December, this cloth was pawned with me by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was three months out of work, and parted with all my clothes to support me; I went to my brother to ask him to lend me a coat to get something out of pawn - he lent it to me; I went to get the coat and I could not; I knew there was a bag of my brother's in the prosecutor's room, and I went and took this piece of kerseymere, thinking it was his, or I should not have taken it.

JURY to MICHAEL FENNELL . Q. Had you any idea there was a coat of her brother's in that room? A.There was no bag there; there was a bag which her mother lent me to put my things in.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-91

357. JAMES FARRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 8lbs. weight of beef, value 4s. , the goods of William Dobbins .

JOHN GREEN . I am a beadle of St. Giles. I was on duty between seven and eight o'clock on the 1st of January, in Drury-lane , and saw the prisoner and another boy, smaller than he, together; the other took a piece of beef, and gave it to the prisoner; who placed it under his coat -I went up to the prisoner; he dropped the beef, and I secured him - the other boy got away; the prisoner was close to him, and covered him when he took it.

WILLIAM BLANCHARD . I am in the employ of Mr. William Dobbins . The beef was brought to my master's shop the same night; it was his property - I had seen it not half a minute before: I suppose it was brought back in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Prisoner. That witness said he could not swear to the beef at all. Witness. No, not to my knowledge - I said no such thing.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer took and struck me, and said he saw me take the meat; at the watch-house he said, "You are sure to get clear - I think you dropped the meat;" I said, "I did not:" I was walking about slowly, down Drury-lane.

JOHN GREEN re-examined. Q.Did you express any doubt as to his being the person? A. No, nor feel any; he had a great coat on, which was covered with the brine of the beef. GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-92

359. ELIZABETH CANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 pail, value 1s., and 2 fishes, value 6d. , the goods of William Taylor .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I sell earthenware . I lost a pail and two live fish on the 20th of December, from my yard- it was on a Saturday, between twelve and one o'clock; my wife and I sat up all night, to make sweet-stuff - we were talking to a neighbour about it, and the prisoner came; I sent for an officer, and had her taken - she then confessed the truth, and took us to the parties she sold it to.

ANN DAVIS . I bought the pail of the prisoner, on Saturday, the 20th of December, between four and five o'clock; I gave it to the prosecutor on the Sunday.

JAMES HANLEY . I went with the prosecutor, and found the pail at Davis'.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290115-93

360. MARY ANN COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 2 pewter pots, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Gurney .

JAMES GAMBLE . On the 16th of December, about half-past-seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner stoop and pick up something by the side of a door; I could not tell what it was - I walked on, and saw a quart pot by the side of a door; I took it up, and it had the name of Gurney on it - I went on to the end of the street, and saw the prisoner take that up; Hughes stopped her with it.

CHARLES HAYWARD HUGHES . I took the prisoner and found a pint pot in her left hand; Lecount gave me a quart pot, marked "James Gurney, Royal Oak ."

JOHN LECOUNT . I took this pot from the prisoner - it has my master's name on it, " James Gurney ."(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290115-94

361. THOMAS CARPENTER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 1 sovereign , the money of James Bottrill .

ALICE BOTTRILL . I am the wife of James Bottrill . I entrusted the prisoner with a sovereign on the 1st of January, and three duplicates, to get the articles out of pawn; I never saw him again till he was taken, on the Wednesday- his mother lived in the same house with me; he has borne a good character: he sells play-bills and other things - I do not know what became of the duplicates; I went to the pawnbroker's, but no one had been there.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I took up the prisoner; I found no money on him - he said he lost it out of his pocket: I said, "Which pocket?" he said, "This pocket;" I examined it, and there was no hole in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost the money.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290115-95

362. ANDREW CALDWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 1 wooden heel, value 5s., 1 box, value 1s.; 3 lasts, value 30s., and 2 shoes, value 10s , the goods of Thomas Butcher .

THOMAS BUTCHER . I am a shoemaker , and live in Atford-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 18th of December these articles were stolen from one corner of the parlour: I had seen them the afternoon before in the box; the prisoner lodged with me - this letter is in his own hand-writing- (read.)

Newgate, December 22, 1828.

DEAR FRIEND, - I take this opportunity of sending you these few lines, to see if you will he so good as to send me the small sum of money that is coming to me from Bembridge, and to send me my clean shirt; if you speak to Mrs. Weston to give you the shirt, not the apron nor the other - please to let some of the shopmates come to see me, and bring me them; I do not like the place I am in, but I have got justly what I deserve - you know the reason I took the box, was that I could not get it no other way; the reason I did not give it you when you asked the office-man what time it would go, and he told me it went off at six o'clock in the morning; I have not got a penny to buy paper to write to my parents - any one coming to see me must be my father or my brothers; they will be admitted from ten till two o'clock any day but Sunday. Your's, most, &c. ANDREW CALDWELL.

Prisoner. When he charged me with stealing it he said he would let me off, and then he said he would transport me; so I thought, when I came here, if I confessed he would send me the money, and would forgive me.

MARY BUTCHER . I missed the box on the morning of the 18th; I left the house on the evening before, not above ten minutes - the prisoner was in the back parlour: I borrowed his key to get in - when I came back his light was out; he did not appear to be there: I spoke to the prisoner about it, but he was the only person who was there; on Wednesday evening we found the box at Piccadilly.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am a constable. I went with the prosecutor to the White Bear, Piccadilly, and inquired whether the book-keeper had received such a box - I got it; it is directed for James Caldwell , Dean's-gate, Manchester, in the prisoner's writing.

Prisoner's Defence. There were seven lodgers in the house, and all had liberty to go to this parlour.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-96

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JAUNARY 17.

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

363. HENRY WOOD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Wheeler , on the 10th of January , at Paddington, and stealing therein 1 hat, value 1l.; 1 set of bed-furniture, value 3l.; 4 frocks, value 4s.; 2 pillows, value 2s.; 1 bolster, value 1s. 6d.; 1 piece of sheeting, value 6s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 pair of overalls, value 3s.; 1 pair of gaiters, value 2s.; 1 pincloth, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 bed-gown, value 6d.; 1 blanket, value 3s.; 1 chair-cover, value 1s., 1 counterpane, value 5s.; 1 cravat, value 1s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., his property .

GEORGE WHEELER . I live at No. 7, Orme-square, Bayswater , in the parish of Paddington. Last Saturday,

the 10th of January, Mrs. Wheeler and I were in the dining-room - we had occasion to send the servant out about nine o'clock in the evening, and the female servant came and said there was a light in the attic, and immediately afterwards the other servant came in and said something; we immediately went up stairs - the servants ran before me, and on getting to the top of the landing, I had more information - I saw the prisoner directly after he was taken; he said to me "Sir, I have left my cap in your back attic, if you will be so good as to send your servant for it, as it is cold;" he was taken into custody - I saw his cap in the attic, he claimed it at the watch-house, and got it; there are two unfinished houses next door to mine - he had got up the rafters of those houses, lifted up my window, and got in; I know the window was shut an hour before - I was in the room myself; it is a sort of lumber-room - the window was then shut, and the room in its usual state; it could be opened from without, as it, was not bolted: the articles stated in the indictment were then secure in the two garrets - I found them packed up, ready to be taken away; several other articles were strewed about - a large feather bed, and many other things, were moved from where I had left them.

BARTHOLOMEW CROWLY . I am servant to Mr. Wheeler: about nine o'clock he sent me out, and as I returned I saw a light in the back attic, and the window half open- I came in and told master; I went up stairs before him and the servant girl before me - when I got up I saw the room very much disordered; I went down stairs and got a gun, then went out on the roof, but could see nobody - I returned and went back to Petersburgh-place, as I knew the persons must come down through the empty house, and come over the wall; I saw the figure of a man inside the carcass of the house - a person came on the wall, about ten yards from me, and stood looking, as if watching for an opportunity to come over; he seemed to be going back again, and I called out, that if he stirred, I would shoot him, but he went - a man came up with a lantern, and I went into the empty house, and found the prisoner concealed in the cellar of the second house from my master's; he had nothing on his head, and he asked for his cap in the watch-house - he claimed the cap which I found in the back attic of master's house; there was a cravat, marked G. W. in it - I found a phosphorus-box in the front attic, and also a small turn-screw; I found a hat a few yards from him.

JOHN GLENNING . I am a watchman, and took the prisoner into custody.

MR. WHEELER. I have brought the property here - this is the bundle, it was packed up just as it is now; many other articles had been moved from their places. -When the prisoner was taken, this hat was within a few yards of him - it belongs to me; he had taken it instead of his cap: this counterpane is mine, and I can swear positively to all the things - this is the cap he claimed.

Prisoner's Defence. The cap does not belong to me; I know nothing about the matter. I was going home about half-past eight o'clock that evening: I live two hundred yards from the spot - I jumped over the wall to ease myself: I heard a rattle spring just as I got over, and saw the hat in the yard - I had a paper cap on; I picked up this hat and threw it into the back wash-house- the man came and took me out: Mr. Wheeler came to the watch-house about an hour after with the things, and said it would be better for me to tell him all about it, and he would make it go easy; I had been drinking all the afternoon, and he made me confess being there (which was false) in hopes it would be better for me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of his youth, and by the Prosecutor believing he was intoxicated.

Reference Number: t18290115-97

363. JOHN WOODASON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Tilliard , on the 8th of December , at Bedfont , and stealing therein 1 shawl, value 6s.; 1 pair of half-boots, value 5s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s., and 2 waistcoats, value 3s., his property .

HENRY TILLIARD . I live in the parish of Bedfont. On the 8th of December I and my wife were out; I left the house two hours after her - it was all fastened and locked up, and my property quite secure a little after nine o'clock; I returned about twelve and found my house broken open- the lock was taken off the front door and the door stood ajar; I went in and missed a shirt, a pair of half-boots, two handkerchiefs, and two waistcoats - I knew the prisoner; he was brought up to Bedfont - suspicion fell on him; I saw him on Hounslow-heath the next day, and as soon as he saw me he ran away - I called to two men to stop him; he was secured and gave me a duplicate, which led me to the pawnbroker's, where I found all my things.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. I have the property and the pawnbroker has both the duplicates.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Brentford. The goods, produced by the officer, were pawned at my shop on the 8th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon by the prisoner: I gave him the duplicate found on him - it tallies with my own.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner to HENRY TILLIARD . Q. You told me if I told you where the things were, you would let me off? A. I did not.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18290115-98

364. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Vanghan .

Reference Number: t18290115-99

394. GEORGE WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 1 mare, price 20l. , the property of Richard Coleman .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD COLEMAN . I am a butcher , and live at Mitcham, Surrey . In 1825 I had a brown mare: on the 28th of January, I saw her in the stable, and locked the door, about ten o'clock at night; on the following morning I went to the stables, about half-past six o'clock, and it was gone - the stable-door appeared to have been wrenched open by a bar, about the width of a common chisel.

Q. In consequence of information from Bow-street, did you afterwards go to Millhill? A. Yes, on the 15th of March, 1825, I went to Mr. Satchell's, and there found my mare - I am quite sure it was the mare I lost from the stables on the 28th of January; I have since sold her to

Satchell, for 21l. 5s. - I went before the Magistrate, but did not see the prisoner there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Satchell had taken a fancy to her, and bought her? A. Yes - I had not seen the prisoner near my premises.

DANIEL DOSSETT . I keep the King's Head public-house, at Millhill, Hendon. In 1825, I saw the prisoner - I cannot say whether it was February or March; I saw him at Millhill - he was riding a brown mare, and offered her to me for sale; I did not purchase her, as she was not big enough - Satchell had previously asked me to look out for a mare; I called him over, as he was standing at his door; it was shown to him - I afterwards saw her in his possession.

Cross-examined. Q. This might have been in March? A. Yes; I knew the prisoner before - he was bred and born near me; he called at my house - it was day-light; there was no concealment.

COURT. Q. Did he put it up at your stable? A. No, it stood at my door - Satchell bought it immediately; he was to have it on two days' trial, and if it suited, then he was to give 14l. for it - but if not, he was to pay 10s, for the use of it; the prisoner used to come backward and forward to see his mother - I do not know what his business was.

THOMAS SATCHELL . I live at Millhill, and am a butcher. In January, 1825, I knew the prisoner - I bought a mare of him, about the latter end of February, or the beginning of March; it was the mare I saw when Dossett was there - I gave him 14l. for it; I had her from Saturday till Tuesday, to try her - I was to give 10s. if she did not suit; she was claimed by Mr. Coleman a week or a fortnight afterwards - I restored her to him; after having restored her, I received the 14l. back again from the prisoner, at different times - I had known the prisoner by sight before, and understood he was a sort of horse-dealer.

Cross-examined. Q.When it turned out all was not right, he paid you by instalments? A. Yes - he had not desired me to conceal her at all; I did not ask how he came by her - I considered 14l. a fair value, from her appearance, but I found she suited me very well, and afterward gave 20l. for her; she was worth that to any man, who knew her value by trying her.

JOHN SMITH . I am a Bow-street horse-patrol. In March, 1825. I apprehended the prisoner, at Dossett's, the King's Head public-house, Millbill, - about the 5th of March; I apprehended him on the day he received the money - I went before the Magistrate, Mr. Clark, of Hendon, who is now dead; I could not produce any owner for the mare, and wished to have the prisoner remanded; he was discharged on his own recognizances, to appear again on the Saturday following, in case he was wanted - he never appeared again; I went all over Highgate, where he lived, to see if I could find him; at the time I discovered the owner, which was near a fortnight afterwards, I could not find the prisoner - he had not himself informed me he lived at Highgate; he told the Magistrate he lived at Highgate; when I apprehended him, I told him he was charged on suspicion of stealing two horses - it was not on this charge at all, and on asking where he lived, he replied at Highgate.

Q. Finding he had sold Satchell a mare, he was discharged, to appear on Saturday, if called upon? A. Yes, I looked for him at Highgate, for a fortnight after -I did not find him; I have been searching for him from that time to December last - every means have been used to find him; he dealt in horses.

GEORGE GOFF . I am a constable of Surrey. On the 29th of December last, I assisted Myers in apprehending the prisoner, at the corner of Plumtree-street, St. Giles's; he asked on what charge it was - I said, on suspicion of horse-stealing, and that I had several charges; he asked me the particulars - I told him he was suspected of stealing a black horse, or gelding, from Millhill, which his brother was in custody for; he said his brother would be tried that day, at Kingston, but he had nothing to do with it; his brother was not to be tried that day, for I had to attend the trial myself, on the Tuesday, but I did not contradict him - I told him I suspected him of stealing a mare advertised in the Hue and Cry, from Mr. Duke, of Ratcliff-on-Trent; he said he knew nothing of it - I said there were two horses stolen from Chiswick, about a fortnight back; he said he knew nothing of it - he said, "Huffey White has been saying something about me;" I said he had been hung years ago - he said No, he was in Newgate now; I said there was a man named White there - he was tried yesterday.

Cross-examined. Q. He used the phrase "Huffey?" A. Yes - I did not mention Coleman's horse to him; I had heard of this charge, but it did not occur to my mind.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Dossett knows I have been through his place, and stopped at his house since this with sixteen horses; I never got out of the way - I lived at Somer's Town, on moving from Highgate.

DANIEL DOSSETT . I have seen him once or twice since with a string of horses; I mentioned to him about this mare; he said it was all right; I saw him after that - I remember his coming to my house to buy a mare of Mr. Woodward, within the last year.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-100

Before Mr. Justice Park.

365. WILLIAM JENNINGS and GEORGE CHILDS , alias GILES , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joshua Henry Nunn , on the 25th of December , at St. Mary-le-bone, and stealing therein 3 towels, value 3s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 6s., 3 shirts, value 9s., and 1 gown, value 3s., his property .

JOSHUA HENRY NUNN . I live at No. 21, Lisson-grove, North , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone, and keep the house. On Christmas-day, I went out about four o'clock in the afternoon, with my wife, leaving nobody in the house: we went to No. 49, Paddington-street, and staid there till six o'clock in the evening: I returned home then with my brother, leaving my wife at his house in Paddington-street, with my mother and sister - I had locked the shop-door. and fastened it with two bolts inside; I locked the parlour-door, and put a padlock on the outside - there is then a passage and a middle-door in the passage; I had left a good light burning in the shop, so as to be seen outside; I am a boot and shoe maker ; the windows were all fast -I double-locked the outer-door, I am positive; when I

came back, on putting the key into the lock, I found it was on the single-lock; I went in and saw nobody till I got into the parlour; I found the middle-door wide open - I had left that latched; the padlock of the parlour-door was off, and as soon as I put my hand against the door, it was open - I then saw two men in the shop, and said to my brother "Here is two men in the shop!" the prisoner Jennings was the first - he stood the first towards me, and when he saw me he came towards the door; I collared him - we scuffled through the passage till we got to the street-door; I opened it, and got on the outside - got hold of the knocker, and pulled it, while they pulled inside, leaving both of them inside with my brother: I called for help, and as soon as I saw my neighbours coming to my assistance, I let go of the door, and it went open - I then caught hold of Jennings again as he came out, and held him till my neighbours secured him; I never lost sight of him, except while I was holding the door against him; as soon as he was secured, I ran into the house again, and found the other prisoner - he opened the back-door, and made his escape that way - it goes into a carpenter's yard: I did not notice him so as to know him; when I got into the house, I picked up an iron crow-bar in the passage - I had not left that there; a bat and handkerchief were also in the passage - Jennings had a hat on; I picked up a lantern in the shop: the light I had left was burning - the lantern was not left there by me; I went into the parlour, and one drawer of a chest had been broken open, and things taken out - that was the only drawer I had left locked; the things were all strewed about, some shirts, towels, and various things; nothing was missing, but I am sure the things were in the drawers when I went out.

Prisoner JENNINGS. Q. Was I in the passage or on the pavement when you laid hold of me? A. When I took hold of him the second time, he had not passed the outer-door; I at first laid hold of him at the parlour-door.

THOMAS NUNN . I am the prosecutor's brother: I went with him to his house, and found the parlour-door open -I saw the two men in the shop, but I more particularly observed Childs - I had a view of his face, for the light was shining on it: I saw my brother struggling with Jennings; I was left in the house when he pulled the door to, and in the confusion Childs made his escape down the stairs, along the yard - he could easily get over the wall into the carpenter's yard; Wall, the officer, was called in: I went with him to several houses in search of Childs, and at last went to the Globe public-house, and saw six or seven persons there, and immediately fixed on Childs; I had no doubt whatever that he was the man - he was taken into custody.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I was called into Nunn's house, and saw Jennings in his custody; as soon as he saw me, I said "Is that you Bill?" he said "I know you are an officer;" I was then going to search him - he put his hand into his right-hand breeches-pocket, pulled out 10s. which he counted, and said he should keep that: I said I did not want to take his money; I searched, but found nothing on him: Nunn delivered me a handkerchief, this hat, a lantern, and crow-bar, in his presence - I have had them ever since; I afterwards compared the crow-bar with the drawer which was locked, and also to four doors, and they exactly matched with it; I sent for my handcuffs - Jennings said "I will walk with you, but if you handcuff me you shall carry me;" I was obliged to send for a coach, and take him to the watch-house; from the description Nunn's brother gave me, I went with Perrence and him in pursuit of the other man - we went to the Globe, in Steven-street, Lisson-grove, looked into the tap-room, and saw six or seven people; I charged Nunn to be particular, as I would not take away the liberty of any innocent person - he looked round, and pointed out Giles immediately; I called to him, and said "George;" (I knew him before) - he then came to the bar: I again said to Nunn "Be positive, for I won't take an innocent person's liberty away" - he said he was the man: I then took him - he walked very quietly with me to the watch-house: I searched him, and found a common latch-key on him - I examined Nunn's premises, and over the wall there is one brick fresh broken off, and just to the right, out of the yard of Sewell, a carpenter, where the jump was made from the wall, there were footmarks of shoes half-soled - there were the marks of the slip where the jump was quite fresh: when I got him to the watch-house, I asked Giles to take off his shoes: he said I might take them off, which I did - I compared them next morning with the place, and they tallied - there were the very impressions exactly, and here they are with the mud on them still.

HENRY JAMES PERRENCE . I went with Wall to compare the shoes; I had seen them taken off the prisoner- they corresponded in my judgment.

Prisoner JENNINGS. The evidence he has given now he did not give at the office, and Wall said at the office the housekeeper saw them compared; this young man is frequently in Wall's company - what he is saying now is merely that he may have his expences.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I said Nunn was present and saw them compared, and Perrence also.

THOMAS NUNN . I was present and saw them compared- Perrence was there.

RICHARD PATRICK . I live in George-place, Lisson-grove, near to where Nunn lives. My brothers were in a confectioner's shop, next door the prosecutor's, on the 25th of December; I went out of the shop to hide from them about six o'clock in the evening - I saw Nunn and his brother come up to the door to unlock it; they went in - I heard a tustling in the passage; Nunn came out, and held the door by the knocker: he called out Murder- a great many people came up; he got the door open again - the prisoner Jennings came out; I am sure he is the man - he came out of the house, and was not one of the people who came up; I did not know him before -Nunn laid hold of him on the step of the door; I saw Jennings about a yard within the door, and am certain he came out of the house.

JOSHUA HENRY NUNN . I found, scattered about, three shirts, three towels, a gown, and various things.

JENNINGS' Defence. Patrick lives close to Wall, and is continually in his company; the other witness lives next door, or next door but one to him: I work hard for my living - I was going to my brother-in-law when I was accused of this; Giles was not near the place - I have since made it known to the Magistrate, who committed

me, that he is not the man, and given him information who the person was that committed the robbery.

CHILD'S Defence. I know nothing about it; I sent all my witnesses home ten minutes before my trial came on.

JENNINGS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

CHILD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor, on account of their not having done any personal injury.

Reference Number: t18290115-101

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

367. JAMES NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 gold-mounted portrait, value 50s., the goods of George Corfe , and 1 brooch, value 50s., the goods of Eliza Corfe , in the dwelling-house of the said George Corfe .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE CORFE . I live at Hilton, in the parish of Isleworth , I had a miniature portrait which I lost on Wednesday, the 7th of January; I saw it the preceding evening - it was brought down to show a lady, and left in my sister's bag.

ELIZA CORFE . I am the prosecutor's sister. He delivered this miniature of my uncle to me on the evening of the 6th of January; I put it into my bag, where I had a brooch and a book - I saw the bag safe at ten o'clock next morning, and about eleven a man came to the door, and in the evening, I missed them and a pink bag which they were in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you been out that day? A. No; nor did I go into the garden.

ELIZA GIDDING . I am servant to Mr. Corfe. On the 7th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came with a message from my father to Miss Corfe; I let him into the kitchen - fetched him a little wine, and saw him go away about one o'clock- nobody else had been there.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him long? A. My sister kept company with him; I have known him a year and a half - he bore a very indifferent character; I never kept company with him: he was not in any work.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable. I went in search of the prisoner, and found him on the 13th, about one o'clock in the night, coming to his lodgings: I took him to the cage - I went to his lodging before that, and in his box found this brooch and miniature, but not the bag: his door was not fast, but a chair against it: when I took him he said, "You have taken my box away -I heard that at the Nagg's Head public-house;" I said I had; I took him before the Magistrate next day, and he asked my leave to look into his box, which was on the ground - the Magistrate then asked if that was his box; he said it was: that was the box I found the property in- I had been waiting three hours for him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent there to inquire about a place; I was two hours in the kitchen, and as I walked out of the house I picked up the property - Gidding had asked me to come and dine there on the Sunday, and bring her sister; I thought if the property was inquired after I could tell them I had got it, but as I heard nothing of it I threw it into my box. GUILTY . Aged 33.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-102

Before Mr. Justice Park.

368. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 tea-urn, value 5l., and 4 yards of woollen cloth, value 1l. 12s., the goods of Joseph Lovell , to whom he was an apprentice , in his dwelling-house .

JOSEPH LOVELL . I am a coach-maker , and live at Uxbridge . On the 26th of November I missed a plated tea-urn, about four yards of woollen cloth, and several other things; my shop is part of my dwelling-house, except the show-shop, which is across the yard - the cloth was in a place separate from the house; it was in a shed in the yard, which has no internal communication with the house; the urn was in the dwelling-house - it is worth 5l.; it was a present - I had had it twenty years; it was plated, with silver edges -I only heard what it cost; the prisoner is my apprentice - he has been so nearly four years, and lived in my house; he left quite unexpectedly; I had left home on Monday morning, the 24th, and returned on Wednesday, the 26th, and he was gone - he had gone home on the Sunday to dine with his father, as usual, and I left about ten o'clock on Monday; he had not come home then - he used to return on the Sunday evening; on the 26th I found he had not come home; I missed, among other things, a silver tea-spoon; on the Tuesday following my return home, I received by the coach the tea-ura and cloth - I had seen the cloth in my work-shop shortly before.

MRS. ELIZABETH LOVELL . I am the prosecutor's wife. On Sunday morning, the 24th of November, I saw the teaurn in the house; I missed it on the Wednesday following -I had not gone away with my husband; we kept it in the cupboard under the side-board, but it had been taken out the day before - I missed one tea-spoon.

RICHARD KIMBER . I am a silversmith, and live at Uxbridge. I bought part of a tea-spoon of a man named Grange; I gave it to the officer; I think it was on Monday, the 24th.

HENRY GRANGE . I took part of a tea-spoon to Kimber's; I received it from William Barnett , not from the prisoner - I did not see him about it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Barnett was taken up? - A. Yes.

THOMAS BEESTON . I live with Mr. Jones, a pawnbroker, of Broad-street, Bloomsbury. This urn was brought to me, on the 28th of November, by a man, who gave his name John Yates ; the prisoner was not with him - I know nothing of the prisoner; I took it in pledge from Yates - I sent it up stairs, and in about two days it was delivered to two gentlemen, whom I have since seen at Uxbridge; one of them was named Stranson.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Would not 4l. be a fair value for the urn? A. It is difficult to say - it might fetch more or less; I might be disposed to give 4l. for it, but to sell, it might not be worth that.

JOHN FARRANT . I am a constable. I went in search of the prisoner, but Mr. Stranson took him.

JOHN BARNES . I am a workman of Mr. Lovell's. After the prisoner was taken into custody, I went to him, in the cage; I did not hold out either threat or promise to him - he spoke to me first, and asked what master and mistress said about his going away, and about the things; I told him all mistress cared about was the tea-urn, as her father had given it to her when a child, and she was afraid it was

broken up; he said, "No, it is not; tell mistress it is safe, and to-morrow morning, when you bring my breakfast, at half-past eight o'clock, I will tell you where it is;" I was to take his breakfast to the cage, and next morning, when I took it, he told me the urn was in pledge at Mr. Jones', in Fore-street, leading to Oxford-street, for 10s.; that one of the silk gowns was in pawn in London-street for 4s., and another at Reading, with two of master's shirts wrapped in it, for 5s.; that the cruet-stand was at the girl's sister's, whom he went away with - he did not say who she was.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you he had pledged it? A. No; he said it was pledged; I know Dexter - he was not present at the conversation; he plays the flute in the Middlesex band; I did not tell the prisoner it would be better for him to tell me about it - nobody was present.

Prisoner's Defence. Dexter was present.

THOMAS DEXTER . I belong to the West Middlesex Militia. I was at the cage with the prisoner and Barnes -I was at work near there for Mr. Collyer, painting a cart; Barnes gave Walker some breakfast; Walker desired him to give Barnett some - he would not; he at last allowed me to give him some - I then went back; Barnes was kneeling across the bar of the step, and said, "You had better tell where the things are:" Walker made him some answer, which I could not undersand - he said, "You had better tell, for there is a man coming forward where you offered the cloth for sale:" he then said the urn was at Jones', either in Fore-street, or Forth-street.

COURT. Q. What business had you at the cage? A. Curiosity led me there; Barnett was in a separate cell - I was absent part of the time.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-103

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

368. HENRY BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 15 lbs. of brawn, value 20s. , the goods of Michael Myers , his master.

MICHAEL MYERS. I live in St. Peter's-alley, Cornhill , and am a fishmonger ; the prisoner entered my service on the 22d of December, and that evening we had a quantity of brawn come in - we only cut one collar, and there was half of it remaining; at half-past nine o'clock in the evening I saw five collars and a half safe, and in the morning, about half-past four o'clock, the half was gone; I have twelve shopmen - when they came in the morning, I mentioned to them that I had lost half a collar of brawn, which I had seen safe at half-past nine o'clock, and said if I caught any one robbing me I would prosecute them; about ten o'clock that morning an officer came and produced the half collar of brawn - I knew it to be mine; the prisoner was in custody.

SAMUEL DAVIS. I am an officer. About twenty minutes to eleven o'clock at night I was walking along the Poultry, and saw the prisoner with something under his left arm, and looking about him very suspiciously; I went by him, and saw he had this brawn wrapped up in a flannel apron - I saw a knife in his right-hand, as if he were cutting it open, and when he came under the light I saw him cut a piece off, and put it into his mouth; I then asked what he had got there - he made no answer, but turned round; I took it from him, and asked where he came from - he said he was going to take it to a customer, at Kentish-town, and had got it from his master's, in Leadenhall-market - he named a person who I never heard of; I said it was odd he should be cutting it - he made no answer; I took him to the watch-house, and found only 1d. on him - he then told me he had left home in the morning with 10s., and went to Billingsgate and bought this brawn there for 7s.; I locked him up, and next morning inquired of Mr. Myers, who claimed it.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290115-104

369. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 2 tongues, value 5s. , the goods of Andrew Gibbs .

ANDREW GIBBS . I live at Aldgate , and am a salesman . On the 14th or 15th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, these tongues laid near my shop-door; I went up stairs a few minutes, and one of my servants called me down - I found the prisoner in custody with them; she had been about the market.

JOHN PAYNE CROCKFORD . I am in the employ of Mr. Gibbs. I saw the prisoner come into the shop - a boy at the door called out that she had something in her lap; I ran. and took her about ten yards off with the two tongues.

JOHN JANSON . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to me.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-105

370. JOHN BROWN and JAMES BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 2 wooden measures, value 2d., and 28 lbs. of figs, value 14s. , the goods of Charles Borer .

CHARLES BORER . I live in Clement's Inn-passage, Clare-market, and am a grocer . On the 12th of December I sent my young man to fetch some drums of figs in a cart, and when he came home there were two missing, worth 14s.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Bedwell and Yates. These figs were delivered on the 12th of December, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, to Mr. Borer's cart - there were ten drums; I afterwards saw two drums before the Magistrate: I had put a chalk-mark on them, which is still on; I have not the least doubt of them.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you mark them for that order? A. Yes, with the letter B.

WILLIAM GEORGE HOLDITCH . I am in the employ of Mr. Davis, who keeps a cart. I was employed to fetch these figs from Bedwell and Co., St. John-street; I went with Borer's young man for them; I received ten drums between six and seven o'clock - I had other goods in the cart; I rode inside the cart, driving the horse - I was going on to Ratcliff-highway, and as I returned was to take up goods in Thames-street, and then to go to Mr. Borer's; as I entered John-street, Minories , I was informed something was taken out of the cart - I then looked, and missed two drums of figs; I only had eight left; I had seen nobody near the cart - I saw two before the Magistrate, which appeared to be like the others.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is Mr. Borer's boy who went with you? A. He is at home; he rode in the cart with me - I drove with reins; a boy told me some men had taken them. and had run up the Minories.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a constable. On the 12th of December, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing at the end of Little George-street, and saw the two prisoners in company together, in George-street, which is no thoroughfare; I went up the street, and they came down on the opposite side - in going up the street I kicked against the head of one of these drums; I saw Baker with something very bulky in his apron before him - they were about twenty yards from the drumhead: I looked after them, and Brown made a stand; I immediately went up to Baker, and said, "Young man, what have you got there?" he d-d me, and said what was it to me; I pulled out my staff - he immediately let the two drums of figs fall at my feet, out of his apron -I immediately laid hold of him, and he began to struggle with me; Brown then came up, and struck me a most dreadful blow on the cheek-bone - it cut the flesh off the bone; I staggered, and fell against a gate - I was obliged to let go of Baker; they then both immediately fought me - I began to make a noise, saying, "Why, you are going to murder me!" and they ran away, leaving the figs behind them - (about half an hour afterwards Holditch came to the watch-house, saw the figs, and claimed them); when the prisoners ran away I pursued them and never lost sight of Brown till I had him in custody -I lost sight of Baker for about five minutes; he was taken in John-street - they had separated in New-square; they were both secured in the watch-house about the same time: John-street is in the City, and so is the place where I found the figs; they were afterwards claimed by Mr. Borer - I saw the letter B in a chalk-mark on them; the drums are here - the greater part of the figs were taken while I pursued the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. Who accompanied Holditch to the watch-house? A. Nobody that I saw; I first saw the prisoners together in Little George-street - they were together when I first saw them; Brown might be about five yards off when he stopped to look at me: I was not pursuing him more than half a minute - he might run three hundred yards; he turned one corner - I was close at his heels, and am certain of him; I never said I thought he had not taken an active part in ill-using me, or that I was not certain of Baker.

THOMAS DEVEY . I am a constable of Aldgate-ward. I was in John-street, between seven and eight o'clock, on the 12th of December. and heard an alarm of Stop thief! I was on the opposite side of the way, ran across the road and took Baker, who was running - a young man stopped him: I took him back to Little George-street, and about two minutes after I was at the watch-house Roberts brought Brown in; I received a drum of figs in Vine-street - they had been picked up; the other drum was brought to the watch-house next morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BAKER's Defence. I was standing by Whitechapel-church - a gentleman got me to carry a box for him to Tooley-street - he gave me 2s.; as I returned I heard a cry of Stop thief! I looked up, and saw a young man running - I ran, and a man took me; I said, "There runs the man on the other side of the way," but he said he should not let me go.

BROWN'S Defence. I was in the Minories with a friend, a hackney-coachman, and all at once heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran as well as the rest - the gentleman is not here who let the thief pass him, and took me.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 26.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-106

371. JOSEPH CUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 2 pairs of boots, value 20s. , the goods of Edward Clarke .

EDWARD CLARKE . I am a shoemaker , and live in Fleet-street . On the 14th of January, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I was in the back shop - these boots were in the front; I did not see them taken - they were recovered a short time after.

SUSAN BARRETT . I live with Mr. Clarke. I and him were engaged in the back shop - I heard a noise in the front shop, and saw the prisoner going out with the boots in his hand; he turned round, and immediately ran out -I pursued him; he went about two doors from the shop, saw me following, and immediately ran - I am quite certain he is the person; he ran down Poppin's-court - I saw him stopped at the bottom of it - it leads to Harp-alley; he dropped the boots in the middle of the court: there were two pairs - there was nobody in the front shop; I have not the slightest doubt of his person.

Prisoner. I was stopped in Fleet-market? A. He had not got into the market.

JAMES PRATT . I am a plumber, and live in Storey-street, Commercial-road. I was passing Mr. Clarke's door, and a young lad hallooed out Stop thief! I saw the prisoner run with the boots in his hand - I ran after him; he dropped the boots about the middle of Poppin's-court- I did not see him drop them, but missed them out of his hands; I stopped him myself - he got to the end of Harp-alley; I never lost sight of him.

JAMES BRADLEY . I am a day-patrol. I was at St. Bride's watch-house when the prisoner was brought in; Mr. Clarke brought me the boots.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running down Harp-alley, but never had the boots.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-107

372. HENRY DYER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Jones , from his person .

JOHN JONES . I live in Langford-street, Portman-square. On the 14th of December I was returning home up Holborn-hill , about eight o'clock at night, and about five minutes before I missed my handkerchief, I am quite certain it was safe; I did not miss it till the witness gave me information - I then felt, and missed it: I did not see the prisoner then; I have never seen the handkerchief since - it was a silk one.

THOMAS TOOLE . I am a journeyman shoemaker, and live in Goswell-street. I was coming down Holborn-hill a little after eight o'clock, and saw four young men in company with each other - the prisoner was one; Mr.

Jones was coming towards me - I saw them all four follow him up as close as could be, put their hands into his pocket, and lift it up two or three times; at last they took the handkerchief out - the prisoner and another were close together behind him, and the other two were behind them; the prisoner, I think, was the one who took it - I saw his hand near the pocket; I saw Brown, the watchman, coming up - he put his light into two of their faces, and said to the prisoner, "What handkerchief have you got there?" he had a handkerchief in his hand - the prisoner replied, that it was his own to be sure; I thought the handkerchief was red and yellow - I could not see whether it was silk; he walked away, and Brown put his light into the other's face, and then they all walked away together - Brown went after them; I spoke to the prosecutor - he felt, and missed his handkerchief; I went with him, and saw the watchman at the end of Field-lane - I turned up Field-lane: the prisoner was coming down the lane again - I said, "This is him," and he was taken; I am certain he was one of the four - he was searched, and nothing but a handkerchief found on him; I thought it was the same I had seen in his hand - he had stopped at the corner of Union-court, and wiped his face with it: Jones did not claim it - he said it was his own.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. That handkerchief is the same colour as the one you saw in his hand? A. Yes - I did not see the watchman till he put his light in their faces; I then followed the other two: I had not time to tell him, there were so many people passing; I went after them directly, and when I turned round, I could not see the watchman again - I am in Mr. Gibson's employ; I did not see a handkerchief in the prisoner's hand before the pocket was picked, but a minute or two after he was wiping his face with one; it appeared to me to be red and yellow - he was taken in about eight minutes; I know Kennedy - he worked with my father; I never received any money from him - he is a trustworthy man, as far as I know; I received no money from any woman, in his presence, on any account - he never asked me for a receipt for any money; I was at the Maidenhead public-house, in Goswell-street, with him - I had some gin and beer; Kennedy was there, and a woman, who said she was the prisoner's wife - I refused the money; I did not say I would not take it before a third party: his wife paid for the gin; I thought it no harm to drink it -I doubt her being his wife.

COURT. Q. Was this before or after the prisoner was committed? A. After - about a fortnight after he was taken up; I do not know where the woman lived - she found me out, and not I her.

RICHARD BROWN . I am a watchman of St. Andrew, Holborn. I was calling eight o'clock, and passing down the hill - there were a number of people together; I looked round, and saw some characters I did not approve of - the prisoner was one of them; I knew him before; I had just come out of the watch-house - I turned round, and perceived the prisoner, and another by his side; I was on the curb, and did not see Mr. Jones, to my knowledge - I turned my light round, looked very sharp towards him, and saw him; I believe it to be him, but the other was not much unlike him, either in person or dress- I saw him rising, and taking up a handkerchief from the ground, as I considered; he put it up to his mouth: I put my light up towards him; it seemed a sort of red and yellow, or red and white, handkerchief - I turned round, and threw my light into his companion's face; I then went round to a third one - I knew them all to associate together on the hill; I saw a female there, who, I believe, passes as the prisoner's wife - she avoided me; I turned, and saw the prisoner pass down Field-lane; Toole came running up to me, in two or three minutes, and said the gentleman who had been robbed of his handkerchief was coming back, and informed me of the robbery - I then went with him down Field-lane, and saw Dyer coming up: Toole said he was the man who took the handkerchief: he was alone, returning towards Holborn- I then apprehended him, and endeavoured to take him to the watch-house, but not without considerable resistance, fighting, kicking, and taking hold of me by my neckhandkerchief; I was obliged to tear his clothes to hold him. and called the neighbours to assist me: Toole had hold of him, as well as me; I told him what I took him for - on our way to the watch-house, two of those I had seen in his company before he went into Field-lane, were pressing very hard upon me, and his resistance becoming stronger, I was obliged to use my staff to protect myself, and threatened them - I should know them again; I saw them the next day, in Guildhall-yard, and pointed them out - he was searched, but nothing found on him, except a handkerchief, with a kind of chocolate bird's-eye, that I had seen in his hand in Field-lane; it was folded up, as if it had come off his neck: Mr. Jones said it was not his.

Cross-examined. Q. Had not the prisoner a neckhandkerchief on? A. Certainly; he had this in his hand- he had a light handkerchief on when I held my light to his face; I could not exactly see what kind of handkerchief was on his neck, as the one he held in his hand concealed it: the other man was near him; I had to walk a little way to put the light in the third man's face, but he avoided me - the prisoner knew I was a watchman; there are twenty places where he might have got rid of the handkerchief - the one he had when taken, was not the one I saw him rising with; it was not a chocolate colour, I will swear: I said to the prisoner, "You have picked up a handkerchief;" he said, "Well, if I have, it is my own:" I did not then know of the robbery, or I should have taken him; I described the handkerchief I saw him with - Jones, and a lady who was with him, said that was the colour; I have seen Toole before at different times - he attends there to assist the officers, or watchmen, I understand.

COURT, Q. From your observation of the handkerchief he had, and the one found on him, can you, with certainly, say they were not the same? A. I am positive of it: I told the prisoner it was not the one I had seen him with.

MR. PHILLIPS to THOMAS TOOLE. Q. Have you never assisted the officers in seizing people? A. If there is any thing amiss, and they call me, I suppose I am compelled to do it - I cannot say how many charges I have given evidence on; I am not out except on Sundays - I may have given evidence seven or eight times; I was refused my expences once, because I was not exactly on the trial; I never did it for lucre - I never got above 10s.

THOMAS WILDEY . I am superintendent of the watch. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I searched him and found a handkerchief in his pocket and 6s. 6d. -Jones did not claim the handkerchief: Brown said the one he saw taken was a red and yellow one; Jones and the lady said that was near the colour - it took ten of us to keep the gang off, as we took him to the Compter - it was as much as we could do to handcuff him; knowing him to be a desperate character we wanted to handcuff him behind, but could not: as we we went along, he said, "Let me take out my chive," (which means knife) previous to that he floored me in the street, by putting his feet before me.

Cross-examined. Q. Was a knife found on him? A. No; we were dragging him along, his hat fell off and he would not go without it - he said, "Now put my handkerchief into my hat, or else I won't go;" the watchman carried it - he said, "Now put it on my head," and he did so.

COURT. Q. Did he make a violent resistance before his hat fell off? A. No, afterwards in Skinner-street - persons surrounded us all the way from the watch-house.

JOHN JONES re-examined. I saw Brown in the watch-house, but did not hear him describe the handkerchief; I had a lady with me - I do not recollect her making any observation about it - it was brown, yellow and black; the same as this border. (producing one.)

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You would not call it red and white? A. I cannot call this white.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking with a friend, and was rather intoxicated - they wanted to handcuff me with my own handkerchief, and used me very basely, knocking me about, and kicking me; I would not allow them to handcuff me with the handkerchief, being in liquor, but I am totally innocent of the crime.

BRYAN KENNEDY . I worked with Toole's father at shoemaking, about five years ago - I now work for myself; I was at the Maidenhead public-house with Toole, and the prisoner's wife; I saw two sovereigns laid on the table- we had some gin which she paid for; I heard her ask Toole for a receipt outside the door - he told her it was all right, there was no occasion for any receipt.

COURT. Q. Who put the sovereigns on the table? A. The prisoner's wife; she put them to Toole to settle the business between the prisoner and Toole - I have known the prisoner four years, by mending his shoes.

Q. Where did you find the prisoner's wife? A. She came to the shop where I live, in Lower West-street, and asked if I knew young Toole; I told her I did - she begged me to come with her to Goswell-street, where he is employed; I believe she knew him before: she asked me to go to settle the affair between Toole and her husband, he being confined in Gaol - I heard he was confined, being taken taken up by Toole in Holborn; I did not know what for - she did not tell me, but when she offered the money, I heard her say he was never guilty of taking the handkerchief; I would not have wished to be present if I had known any thing about it - nothing was settled before me; I did not see Toole take the money, only she laid it down before him - he called her out, and said he wanted to speak to her outside the door; she and he went out - the sovereigns then laid on the table where I sat; there was nobody inside the room but me - she said she had borrowed the sovereigns and it was more than she could afford; he then said he wished to talk to her outside - she came back and said to me, "He won't come in; he don't like to take the money before you;" I said, "Come in," and he said,"Yes, I will, if you will go out" - I came out and he went in: I saw him come out again - she then said, "I should he glad to have a receipt for the money;" he said there was no occasion, he would make it all right.

Q.How long had the prisoner been in Gaol? A. I was informed he was taken on Sunday - this was the next evening; I never told this to anybody till I came here - I never mentioned it to the prisoner's attorney, or to anybody till a little before five o'clock this evening; I was told I had to come into Court - I had never mentioned it even to my wife and family.

Q. Did you tell the woman this was a very improper thing? A. Indeed I did not understand about that; that laid in the man's own breast - I said to Toole, "Now you know best, whether it is best to take it or not."

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner's wife knew you could prove this? A. Yes.

THOMAS TOOLE . I can contradict this altogether; Kennedy came to me at different times, and asked me to take 3l. to settle it - I said I would take no money whatever: he then asked me to make the thing as easy as I could - I said I would not say more than I had before the Magistrate; they came two or three times to make it up, and Mr. Gibson came and fetched me to make it up.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you drink with the prisoner's wife? A. I did, and she proposed to give me 2l.; I said I would have nothing, and I told Mr. and Mrs. Gibson so- Kennedy was the first person who came to me and said I had better take it.

BRYAN KENNEDY re-examined. Q. Before the prisoner's wife appeared, did you not propose to Toole to take money to make this up? A. No; I told him she would give him 2l. as she told me, and said, "You know the difference, whether you will take it or not" - that was before he saw the prisoner's wife; just before, she was standing alongside of him, but he did not see her; it was the night before we met at the public-house, and he said, "Make up as much as you can - come on Monday night and we will settle it."

Q. You said before, that you knew nothing of it till she came to take you to Toole? A. No; it was the same night- she got him the money that night, but he did not take it, and on Monday she offered it again; I believe it was on the Monday night following, but I cannot say - I know Mr. and Mrs. Gibson.

THOMAS WILDEY . When I was taking the prisoner to Gaol, his wife offered me a sovereign; I said No, I was not going to lose my situation for a paltry sovereign - this was in the prisoner's presence.

Prisoner. That man went and drank liquor with me before we got to Newgate; we sat in the public-house a long time - my wife was with me; he proposed for her to give him money, and to raise what I could.

THOMAS WILDEY . It is not true; I did go into a public-house with him and his wife, to oblige them, as he said he was very cold, and had had nothing to eat - they had a pot of ale, and, I believe, a glass of gin; his mother and a little girl were there - I did not propose to make it up; I had a glass of ale at his expence - I told him if he offered

me fifty sovereigns I would not take it - I know it is against orders to go into public-houses with prisoners, but it was entirely at his request.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290115-108

NEW COURT, Third Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

373. ANN GOOSEBERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of January , 20 lbs. weight of beef, value 16s. , the goods of Joseph Britton .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-109

374. WILLIAM LEGGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 dead goose, value 7s. , the goods of Thomas Roberts .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I keep the Snow Shoes public-house, in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea . I sent for the prisoner on the 26th of December, to hang a bell in the one-pair room, and in about two hours I missed a goose, which hung at the bottom of the stairs, about ten feet from the bell; the prisoner offered to pay for it at my house and at Queen-square.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not the Magistrate permit him to go away on his own recognizance, on the first examination? A. No, it was on bail; he had two examinations - he has surrendered this morning.

THOMAS PRICE . I am servant to Mr. Roberts. I saw the prisoner, on the 26th of December, in the club-room - he was not on a ladder; he was within reach of the goose - he offered to pay for it at Queen-square Office.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say that sooner than have a bother about it, and be brought to the Old Bailey, he would give 7s. out of his pocket? A. No.

HANNAH COLLETT . I am a pensioner's wife. On the 26th of December, I went to the prosecutor's for some beer- I saw the prisoner standing on a ladder, and taking down a goose; he put it into his apron, wrapped it up, and put it into his basket; I was close by the foot of the ladder when he had the goose in his hand; I said to him that if I was in my own country, I could buy one like that for 1s. 2d.; I did not tell the landlord then - I did not know that he was stealing it; I told the landlord and landlady the next day - I was not at home the day they went to Queen-square; my husband told me at night the goose was stolen- he had a pint of beer, and they told him.

JAMES THOMAS . I was at the house on the morning of the 27th; I heard the prisoner say if the goose were taken, it was for a lark, and he would go and look after it.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was that said before? A. Mr. Roberts.

WILLIAM WALKLEY . I took the prisoner; he is a man I never heard any thing against.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he bailed? A. Yes; he is president of a benefit society, and the Magistrate knew he could not run away from the society.

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing to do with it, and know no more of it than I do of my dying day.

CHARLES CARTER . I am carman to Mr. Montford. I have known the prisoner eight years - he has been an honest industrious man: Collett came to me one day, and said she was going to appear against Leggett: it was much against her will, but she was obliged to go - I had been with Leggett, drinking in Mr. Roberts' house, for three hours that day, and on my oath he came out with nothing but his apron.

Cross-examined. Q. What day of the month was this? A. The 26th of December; we were there from between two and three o'clock till near five: I assisted him to do the bell - we had two or three pints of beer, and went to the bar to get something to drink; I was taken to Queen-square, and was accused of having taken a pail - I said they must prove it; we came out together, and I can swear he had nothing - I took the ladder there; I cannot swear I did not see the goose: I saw a leg of mutton there; the waiter made some observations about the mutton - my foot was then at the bottom of the ladder - there was no goose near that.

COURT. Q. Who came out with Leggett? A. Burgess, Darby, and I; I did not see the ladder in different places.

JOSEPH DARBY . I am a cooper. I was in the house, and went out with the prisoner - he could not have had a goose without my seeing it; he had his apron on as he has it now, and had no goose in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he any other apron on? No, I had had part of two pints of ale, and had been in the room up stairs; I did not see the ladder - I only came down after he had done his work: he came into the room, and we came out together; there were three of us, but no one had a bundle that I saw; I had been about an hour with him; he came into the room, and said he would be a pint with us.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-110

375. JOHN BRIGDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d January , 1 coat, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Waite .

THOMAS WAITE. I am a hackney-man , and live in Hertford-street . I was in my house at dinner, and had left my coat on the coach-box; in about a quarter of an hour, my little girl said "There are some boys round the horses" - my wife then got up and called me: I got up, and saw the prisoner get on the splinter-bar, and take the coat- I called out "Leave the coat alone;" he turned, and looked at me with defiance, and then ran off - I pursued him; he dropped the coat in York-street; I followed him beyond St. Mary's church: he got up into a corner - I went up to him: Mr. Cox and I took him.

ANN WAITE . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I saw the prisoner take it off the box, and put it over his shoulder - I have not the least doubt of his person.

JOHN COX . I am a watchman. I assisted in taking the prisoner; I had seen him running.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it - it is impossible they could see me if the curtain was up.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-111

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

376. ELIZA ANTHONY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 2 silver spoons, value 25s.; 1 crown,

4 half-crowns, 15 shillings, and 31 sixpences , the property of Lawrence Brown .

MARY RILEY. I am servant to Mr. Lawrence Brown , of Pierpont-row, Islington : the prisoner used to come to his chandler's shop for various articles - she lived with her mother; the spoons and money were taken from my bed-room up stairs - they were in a box, I missed them five weeks ago to-day; I had see them safe about half-past four o'clock on that day: I did not see her there - she might have been there, but did not come in at the front door: there is a back-door; I heard her tell the officer where he could find the money.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Did you say if she told you where the money was you would not hurt her? A. No, I said nothing to her, as her mother was absent.

THOMAS COPE . I am an officer. I took the girl on this charge; she said "Oh, Mr. Cope, don't take me to Hatton-garden;" I said "You are a naughty girl;" she then took me to the pawnbroker's where the two table-spoons were -I took her to the watch-house, and she said if I went over the way I should find the bag and money, which I did - here it is; it was behind the stove, as she told me: here is a crown-piece, four half-crowns, and some other silver, some penny-pieces and some halfpence.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Was any promise made to her? A. No, not any.

GEORGE STOWELL . I am shopman to a pawnbroker at Islington. I have two spoons which were brought by the prisoner; I detained her.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290115-112

377. GEORGE KING was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 1 watch, value 3l.; 2 seals, value 30s.; 1 key, value 5s., and 1 ring, value 2s, the goods of William Flowers Heather , from his person .

WILLIAM FLOWERS HEATHER . I am in no business. I was in Hackney-road on the 11th of December, between four and five o'clock - I had my watch snatched from me opposite James-street by a person by my side; he ran down James-street, turned a corner, ran into a field, and behind a house - I lost sight of him for about two minutes; he carried away my watch and seals; I gave an alarm, and cried Stop thief! he was pursued - I took the prisoner myself: he had crossed another field, and ran about three hundred yards - I asked whether he had my watch; he made no answer; I cannot swear he is the person that took my watch, it being dark.

WILLIAM STANLEY . I am a glass-cutter. I was at my own door, in Birdcage-walk, Hackney-road; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and went round the corner - I saw several persons collected; I went up, and among them I saw the prisoner, who was accused of robbing a gentleman- he denied it, but the gentleman came up, and he was asked if he knew the prisoner - he said he could not say it was him; no one attempted to take the prisoner, and the people began to disperse, but the prisoner did not go from the spot; in a short time, I saw him stoop, and pick up something; I heard, what I thought were the seals of a watch rattle against the case; I asked what he had got - he made me a saucy answer, and ran away - I pursued, and cried Stop thief! he got into a field, and I saw others pursuing him - I stopped till he was brought back; I asked him where the watch was - he said "I have no watch - you may search me;" I was quite positive he had had it- I said "If you were to search you might find it," and about four or five yards from the path along which he ran, the watch was found without a case; I returned to the spot where I first saw him stoop, and there we found the case.

JOHN JACKSON . I heard a cry of Stop thief! on the 11th of December; I opened my door, and saw the prisoner and another running - I ran after them; they went round a house in Nelson-fields - the other said to the prisoner "You go round that way," and they came back to the people: I followed the prisoner, and the prosecutor came up; I pointed out the prisoner, and said "That is he;" I saw the prisoner stoop. and pick up something, but I did not see the watch; he then ran off - I saw him thirty or forty yards off in the next field.

JOHN VANN . I was passing the field, and saw a mob; I went up, and saw a man pick up the watch - I found the prosecutor; I know the prisoner must have gone within two or three yards of the place where the watch was found.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent; I hope and trust you will take my case into your most merciful consideration.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Of stealing, but not from the person. - Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290115-113

378. GEORGE GARDNER was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN SMITH RELF . I am a baker , and live in Drury-lane . The prisoner had lived with me eight days before the 16th of December - he was a weekly servant , and was to receive money for me, and to deliver bread; he was to account for the money he received when he came home.

ANN STRUBE . I used to take bread of the prosecutor. On the 16th of December, I paid the prisoner 5l. 4s. 6 1/2d. for his master; he wrote paid in the book which used to go backwards and forwards.

JOHN SMITH RELF . The prisoner never accounted to me for this money, or any part of it; when I sent him out on the 16th, he never returned - I found the book in the barrow which he took his bread out in: I never found him till last Monday evening, when I saw him going into a baker's shop, and took him.

Prisoner. I lived with him three weeks and two days.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-114

379. ROBERT NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of January , 70 lbs. weight of lead, value 10s. , the goods of William Henry Roskell and Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH . I have a building in Edward-street, Sander's-gardens ; it was uninhabited: I went there on the 1st of January, and found the leaden gutter had been ripped and rolled up; there was about 1 cwt. of lead removed, which had before been fixed - I got a person to watch: William Henry Roskell is my partner.

LEVETT ALEXANDER . I am a patrol. I was desired to watch this building; I went there at half-past eight o'clock

at night on the 1st of January - I did not see anybody there, but I heard a noise - I removed the lower shutters, and got into the lower room, where I caught the prisoner; I got him up, sprung my rattle, and Smith, the night - officer, came.

GEORGE SMITH . I was sent for to watch this house; I heard the rattle, and went and assisted in taking the prisoner - I received this lead from the watchman, but I did not fit it, because it had not been taken out of the gutter; about I cwt. had been entirely taken away.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-115

380. JOHN WALLBROOK and JAMES MURLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 1 coat, value 7s., and 1 hamper, value 1s. , the goods of James Claxton .

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. On the 23d of December, between four and five o'clock in the evening, I was in Whitechapel , and saw the prisoners following a country hay-cart, which had this hamper in it, containing the coat; I and Shipman followed the prisoners for a quarter of a mile - they made several attempts to get it out of the cart: at last Murley got it out, and gave it to Wallbrook - it had been in the bed of the cart, and there was a tail-ladder at the back of the cart; Shipman seized Wallbrook - I followed Murley, and caught him.

RICHARD SHIPMAN . I was with Keys, and saw the prisoners dodging the cart; Wallbrook tried six or seven times before he got the hamper, and then Murley took it out, and gave it to him - he took it under his arm, and I seized him.

JAMES CLAXTON. I was driving a cart for William Claxton , my father, who is a hay and straw carter . I was going home - my father was with this cart, and I was with another; I know this hamper to be my father's.

FRANCIS KEYS re-examined. His father was with this cart, but he met with an accident, and the next day this lad came up himself; it is this lad's hamper, in which he had brought up some chickens, and he was taking home his own great coat in it - it is his own coat and hamper.

WALLBROOK - GUILTY . Aged 19.

MURLEY - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-116

381. CHARLES WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 4s., and 1 pair of overalls, value 2s., the goods of Henry Baines : 1 blanket, value 4s., and 1 apron, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Parish .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-117

382. WILLIAM HANCOCK and JOHN HANCOCK were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 32 live tame fowls, price 3l. , the property of William Robinson .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS SKILL . I was in the employ of Mr. William Robinson , of Holloway . On Sunday, the 4th of January, he had thirty-three fowls; I saw them that day in the yard, but did not see them locked up - I had known them for about seven months: on the morning of the 5th, thirty-two were gone; they were marked with a cut on the right wing - I have since seen the one that was left behind, and I saw some fowls at the watch-house on the evening of the 5th, but I could not say that I knew them; and the wings of Mr. Robinson's fowls were cut - I cut them, and the wings of the fowls I saw were cut in the same way: I believe some of them were a good deal like them.

JOHN MORGAN . I am an officer of Islington. I heard of the robbery at Mr. Robinson's; there was a reward offered for the fowls: I knew the prisoners, and about twelve o'clock on the Monday I went to John Hancock's house, in White Conduit-fields - I had before that been to Mr. Robinson's premises, and found the lock had been forced off the hen-house door - it appeared as if it had been done with a three pronged fork; I saw footmarks on the ground of more than one or two persons - one was a very large footmark, and the welt of the foot was worn away in one part. I met John Hancock coming out of his house, with a basket, and said to him, "What have you there?" he said, "Some fowls, which are my property, and I am going to sell them;" I asked him to admit me into his house, to see if there were any more; he said he could not, for the door was shut - his wife had got the key, and no one was there: I said I should force the door - he said at my peril; Mr. Mayor, who was with me, pushed the door, and it opened very easily; they were folding-doors, and not bolted - John had four fowls in his basket, which were picked; I found four fowls not picked, in a room in the house, and in another room I found William Hancock, sitting picking a fowl, and some more fowls, not picked, below in a fire-place, under some straw which a dog lay on - I found a sack, which had feathers in it and it was bloody; I took these shoes from the feet of William, and this piece of the welt of his shoe exactly corresponds with the mark made in the ground - it was a red soil, but soft; some of the footsteps were in a direction from Mr. Robinson's premises, towards White Conduit-fields, and some the other way, which appeared to be going and coming; there were some other footsteps there; I showed the same fowls to Selman the same day, and to Jones on the Friday following - they identified them; there was a cut upon the right wings: I went after the examination to examine the fowls at Hancock's, when I found some which had been cut in the right wing, and some in the left, but they appeared to be cut rather cleaner.

COURT. Q. What is the distance between the prosecutor's and John Hancock's? A. I should think a mile and a quarter; this large shoe, which I took off William, tallies in all respects in length and breadth, and in the mark of this piece likewise - there was no mark of nails, because the ground was rather too wet; I found some other footmarks, which corresponded with the size of John Hancock 's shoes: the prisoners are both bricklayers: I know there was a reward, in which I expect to participate.

Prisoner JOHN HANCOCK . He said the little shoes did not match at all, only the big ones. Witness. No - I said I could not swear to them.

Prisoner WILLIAM HANCOCK , The fowls belonged to us; we asked him to take the live fowls to the office, but he did not. Witness. Because I considered that the fowls which were running about knew the premises.

WILLIAM MAYOR . I am an officer. I went with Morgan to examine the prosecutor's premises; what Morgan

has stated is correct; we went to John Hancock's, and saw him coming out with a basket, and a cloth over it, with some fowls in it - we then went into the house, and found some fowls; here is one of them which had not been picked.

SAMUEL JONES . I am an auctioneer, and am son-in-law to Mr. Robinson - he had thirty-three fowls in his premises; I was acquainted with them: this is one of them -I know it by a particular mark here; it was bred on the premises: I locked up the hen-house door myself, about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 4th, and saw the whole of the fowls there; when I went in it happened that dinner was announced, and I did not put the key in its usual place, but put it into my pocket, and it was there till ten o'clock at night - the premises are surrounded with a paling, about five feet six inches high.

COURT. Q. Can you swear positively to this fowl? A. Yes - I sometimes took them their food; Skill did not live in the house - he used to feed them, and knew them: the cut in the wings was his own cutting.

THOMAS SKILL re-examined. I am out-door gardener to Mr. Robinson; I have examined the cut on the wing of this fowl - I cannot say whether Mr. Robinson had such a fowl; I never took notice of any particular fowl, so as to know it again; he had fowls something like it: I cannot say that this wing is my cutting, as I did it in the dark, with a large old pair of sheep-shears, about a fortnight before they were stolen; I have been listening to what the officers have said, and I believe it is true, as I heard it before - there were footmarks of more than one person, but I did not take particular notice; I went with Morgan and Mayor when they measured the footmarks, and every thing matched as he says.

GEORGE SELMAN . I know this fowl - I had it in Mr. Robinson's loft for a good bit, while it was a chicken; I am sure it belonged to Mr. Robinson: it is all white except the rump.

JOHN HANCOCK 'S Defence. I had twenty-five at first, and killed nine, to get myself a pair of shoes; I picked four to take to a gentleman to sell - I have about a dozen at home; I have kept fowls all my life: the landlord gave me warning because I kept so many; he said they picked the garden, and that was why I cut their wings; some I have had for two years, and some one year.

WILLIAM HANCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 31.

JOHN HANCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-118

383. JOHN PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 2 coats, value 4l. , the goods of William Turner .

WILLIAM TURNER . I live at Epping-forest. On the 14th of December I called on a friend in Alpha-road ; I left my two coats on my horse - I had not been in the house two minutes before the prisoner came and took them- I saw him through the window, and went out; he saw us, and threw down the coats - he went down a turning which is no throughfare; my friend got up to him and took him: we brought him back to the Nightingale public-house, and gave charge of him - I am quite certain of his person; I never lost sight of him - these are my coats.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, denying that he had touched the coats.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-119

384. THOMAS VIZARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 60lbs. weight of iron railing, value 8s. , the goods of James Gilbert and Joseph Gilbert .

PHILIP SWINGLER . I am a Bow-street patrol. A little after eight o'clock in the evening of the 20th of December, I met the prisoner going through the turnpike near Pentonville chapel; I asked what he had got - he said a few pieces of iron, which he had picked up in Bethnal-green, and he was going to take them to Tottenham-court-road, where he lived; he afterwards said to make a drop of beer of - I took him to the watch-house, and on the Monday I found they belonged to the Back-road, Islington, which is at least three-quarters of a mile from where I stopped him.

JOHN CORKER . I am in the service of Messrs. James Gilbert and Joseph Gilbert - they are iron-founders . This is their property; we have ascertained since that a great number of iron rails had been taken from a square, called Gibson-square , which is making in White Conduit-fields.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.When did you last see it safe on the premises? A. I saw the body of the railing there, but I cannot say I saw this rail; this is a particular pattern, which you will not find any where- it was lying piled up in the middle of the square, ready to fix; I should think it is two miles from Bethnal-green: it is a particular model, which we had from the surveyor.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290115-120

385. GEORGE WARWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 12lbs, weight of feathers, value 16s., and 2 sheets, value 4s. , the goods of John Craft .

SARAH CRAFT . I am the wife of John Craft - we live in Gloucester-court, Whitecross-street . I let the prisoner a lodging in June - he only staid two nights, and left on the 16th; he had taken it by the week: he left the door locked - I broke it open, and missed 12lbs. of feathers and two sheets; I never found him till the 30th of December.

ELIZABETH CRAWLEY . I recommended the prisoner to Mrs. Craft; I was with her when she broke the door open - I never saw any thing but honesty of him.

Prisoner's Defence. The place was so swarming with vermin I could not stay; I went to the workhouse, where my family were as paupers.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290115-121

386. THOMAS BRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , 1 hay-knife, value 12s.; 1 pair of steelyards, value 10s., and 1 hay-skewer, value 6d. , the property of Henry Hodsdon .

HENRY HODSDON . I live at Ruislip, in Middlesex , and am a farmer . This property was at a hay-rick, near my house; I had used them on the 23d of May, and left them in the rick - I have seen the prisoner before, at Icknam; on the morning of the 24th, when I got up, I saw some person had been there, by the feet in the grass; I went to the blacksmith's, and received information - I got a warrant, and went to his house; he was not at home, but we found these things up stairs.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Had you left the steelyards in the hay-rick? A. Yes; it was the 27th when I saw them again - I know it was the prisoner's house, because his family were at home, and the people at the next cottage knew him.

EDWARD SCEENEY . I went and searched the prisoner's house on the 27th of May: I have known him a number of years; I found all these articles there - I took him the same evening, and put him into the cage; I took him out the next morning, to give him some refreshment, and he made his escape.

Cross-examined. Q.Where did you find the prisoner? A. At lcknam, but not at his own house; I had not seen him at his own house for some time past.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at work for Mr. Thomas Brill; I called at a public-house, and had a pint of beer, and took these tools home; the prosecutor said he could swear to the knife by two notches - the Magistrate asked him to let him look at it, and then he said he had broken a piece off his knife; I never had my feet on his ground.

THOMAS BRILL . I am a farmer. On the night of the day they say this was done, the prisoner was at work for me, and was with me at Acton; it is about nine miles from the prosecutor's - he has worked for me a good many times.

HENRY HODSDON re-examined. Q. When did you miss these things? A. On the morning of Saturday, the 24th; I had seen them about eight o'clock on Friday night, the 23d.

THOMAS BRILL re-examined. I live at Harefield. The prisoner had been threshing for me on the Friday; I do not know what day of the month it was - he used to go and see his wife: he has eight children; I do not mean to say he slept at Acton that night - I paid him at nine o'clock, he left me, and was going home; he did not work with me afterwards.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-122

387. WILLIAM BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 tea-spoon, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Lovell .

JOSEPH LOVELL . I am a coachmaker , and live at Hillingdon . On the 26th of November I missed one teaspoon and six or seven articles, but I have had part of the articles back; I had an apprentice, named Warcup - we had reason to suspect him, but he has absconded; I have seen the prisoner a great many times before, he lived at Hillingdon, but I never saw him in company with Warcup - my premises had not been broken into; I saw part of the spoon again, the day I missed it; this is part of it.

RICHARD KEMBER . I live at Uxbridge, and am a watchmaker. I bought part of a silver spoon of Henry Grange ; I cannot swear this is the bowl, as there was no mark on it, but I bought such an one.

HENRY GRANGE . I live at Uxbridge, and am a labourer. I sold part of a spoon like this to Mr. Kember - the prisoner asked me to go and sell it for him; this, I think, was on the 21st of November; he is a hurdle-maker - I did not buy it of him; he did not give any reason why he gave it to me to sell.

ELIZABETH LOVELL . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I cannot swear to the spoon; we missed a great many other articles; an apprentice has absconded.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-123

388. JOSEPH VOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 12 yards of ribbon , the goods of Thomas Sinnson .

THOMAS SINNSON . I am a silk mercer , and live in Regent-street . The prisoner had been in my service for about a month; on the 12th of January, I employed Schofield, who came and searched the prisoner's box, in his bed-room, and found there twelve yards of ribbon, which are mine.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I found the key of the prisoner's box in his pocket, and in his box I found these twelve yards of ribbon, which he admitted he had taken.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290115-124

389. CHARLES TRUE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 2 handkerchiefs, value 15s., the goods of Mary Thacker , from the person of Hannah Thacker .

HANNAH THACKER . I am the daughter of Mary Thacker - she is a widow , and lives in Hoxton . On the 5th of December, I was carrying a bundle of my mother's, containing silk handkerchiefs, night-caps, and other things - the prisoner met me, and snatched them from me; the things fell out of the bundle - he carried away two silk handkerchiefs, and an apron, and made his escape - I had seen him several times before, but had never spoken to him, nor he to me: I am sure he is the person.

WILLIAM THACKER . I am the witness's brother: she told me, when I went home, that these things had been taken - I knew the prisoner before, and had spoken to him, but he was no friend of mine; I met him in Shoreditch, and accused him of the robbery - he denied it; I asked him to come to my mother's - he came to the door, and then ran away; he is a butcher .

WILLIAM WELLS . I live at Hoxton. On the 5th of December, I saw this young woman with a bundle, coming along; I saw the prisoner go and take it - most of the things dropped, but some remained in his hands, and he ran away with them; I had seen him before about the town.

Prisoner's Defence. It was in a dark place, and this witness owes me a grudge; he gets his living by stealing dogs, and selling them at the Exchange.

WILLIAM WELLS . No, I do not - I can get a good character from the Robinhood public-house, and from the master I last lived with.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-125

390. JOHN THORNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , 1 pair of boots, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William James Tillinghast .

THOMAS TOOLE . I am shopman to Mr. Gibson. Last Wednesday week, the prisoner brought a pair of girls' boots to our shop, to sell; he said he had made them himself, with some leather he had by him - he said he had some 6s- Wellington boots; my mistress offered him

some shoes to make, but he said he would not have any shoes, he would have boots.

WILLIAM JAMES TILLINGHAST . I am a shoemaker , and live in Brick-lane, Spitalfields . The prisoner was in my employ, and lodged in the house; these boots are mine - they were taken from a particular shelf in my shop; they are not his own work - he never made any of this sort; they had not been soled - he has been with me about three months.

Prisoner. It is the first time of my being placed at the bar, and I request mercy. GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290115-126

391. CHARLES SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 2 coal-skuttles, value 5s. , the goods of George Wilkins .

EDWARD INGRAM . Mr. George Wilkins is a bricklayer, and lives in Crown-court, Haymarket . On the evening of the 22d of December, I saw the prisoner and another young lad; they each of them took up a coal-skuttle from the prosecutor's door; I followed, and cried, Stop thief! the prisoner was taken - the other got away.

GEORGE WILKINS . I am a bricklayer , and keep a little broker's shop . I was not at home when this happened.

JOHN GOOK . I am a shoemaker. I saw the prisoner running; I pursued, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first time I was ever brought to any public place, and, if I get away, it shall be the last time.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290115-127

392. JOHN SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 7 lbs. weight of lead pipe, value 1s.; 1 brass cock, value 10d., and 1 screw-plate, with taps, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas Rowe .

CHARLES EVANS . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner in Cromer-street, about a quarter before two o'clock, on Christmas morning, with these articles inside his coat; I asked what he was going to do with them - he said he was trying to sell them; I asked where he lived - he said, any where where he could get money.

THOMAS ROWE . I live in Suffolk-street, Westminster . My workshop was broken open; it is about half a mile from Cromer-street; the prisoner left my shop about three o'clock, on Christmas-eve, and swore he would have something of mine before it was long - I let him work in my shop, because he said he had some work to do; he had two children, and nobody would let him work - these articles had been in a secret place in my shop, and nobody but him knew where they were; the door had not been broken, but a part of the partition had.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290115-128

393. FREDERICK SELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 2 live ducks, price 5s ., the property of George Harp .

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a watchman. Between three and four o'clock in the morning of the 16th of December, I was in George-street, Spitalfields; I saw the prisoner pass with a bag in his hand - I knew him, and said, "Fred. what have you got there?" he then walked on quicker, went up a court, and was trying to get in at his own door; I went up, and said, "Where is the bag?" he said,"I had no bag; I looked about, and saw this bag, with two ducks in it - as soon as he saw me take it up, he absconded, and I did not see him again till Friday, the 19th; he was eighty or a hundred yards from the prosecutor's when I saw him.

GEORGE HARP . I live in Flower and Dean-street, Spitalfields . On the morning of the 16th of December, I lost these two ducks out of my yard, which is enclosed by a wall from seven to eight feet high; I know them to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any thing about them. GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-129

394. JOSEPH SIBLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 9lbs. weight of figs, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of James Reading .

GEORGE READING . I am brother of James Reading - he keeps a grocer's shop . On the evening of the 16th of December, about half-past nine o'clock, I was having my supper, and was informed some boys were at the door; I ran out, and saw the prisoner with this drum of figs in his hand; he dropped it at the step of the door, and ran away - I pursued, and he was taken at the top of the street; it my brother's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw some persons run - I ran, and a gentleman stopped me, and said I had stolen a box of figs; the officer told the witness he must swear that he saw me drop them, or else they could not hurt me.

GEORGE READING . I saw him drop them; I think there was another big boy there at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-130

395. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Alfred Taylor .

ALFRED TAYLOR . I am a shoemaker , and live in Bond-street. I sent John Randall , my errand-boy, on the 15th of December, with a pair of boots to Mr. Wainwright's - he came back without them, and gave some information; these are the boots.

JOHN RANDALL . I was sent to Mr. Wainwright's about three o'clock; I got to Tower-hill , and there the prisoner came up to me - he was quite a stranger; he said he had been to Mr. Taylor for Mr. Wainwright's boots - he gave me 2d., and wanted to take the boots: I would not let him take them, and said I would see him to the door with them; he said he was employed by Mr. Wainwright - we walked some distance, and then he said it was a little way down the street where Mr. Wainwright lived; he put down his hand to take them, and I let him have them - he was walking away with them, when the officer came up and took him.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD . On the 15th of December I was at the end of London-bridge, and saw the prisoner and another person cross from Fish-street-hill; I turned to watch them, and saw this lad going down Thames-street - the one that was in company with the prisoner got in conversation with the boy; he then came and

spoke to the prisoner, who went and spoke to the lad, and took him down as far as Brick-lane - I still watched them, and when they came to Fashion-street, I saw the prisoner with the boots in his possession; I crossed the street, and asked where he was going with them - he said to his master, who lived in some square; I cast my eye on the direction, and said, "This will not do," you must go back with me - the boy still said it was right, but I said it was not.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me with another man? A. Yes - the other one went as far as the Custom-house with the boy, and then afterwards he followed behind the prisoner and the lad when they got to Tower-hill; the boy was not above ten yards from the prisoner when I detained him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Thames-street, and crossed Tower-hill - the lad came and asked me the direction; he had first inquired of an oyster-woman - I could not tell him; he said he had never been there before - when the officer took me, he asked where I was going, and I said to Webb-square; I said "The boots are not mine, they belong to that lad;" I have a brother lives in Fashion-street, and I was going there: I was sent here for stealing, and you cannot prove this is stealing - it was getting them under false pretences. GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-131

396. MARY SWEET was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 29 yards of lace, value 18s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s. , the goods of John Graham .

WILLIAM FORD . I am in the employ of John Graham, a linen-draper , of High Holborn . On the 5th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was in the shop - I believe I had forty customers; I cannot tell whether she came in alone, or not - she came to me for some silk handkerchiefs; I shewed her three different parcels - she did not like any, and sent me back for another parcel; while I was gone she took two silk handkerchiefs, with my mark on them - I saw her put them under her gown into her pocket; when I came back I taxed her with it - she denied it, and asked if I meant to insult her; I jumped over the counter, and she dropped them on the floor, with this piece of lace - these are the two handkerchiefs; here are twenty-nine yards of lace - I had seen a young man on the opposite side shewing her some lace, not five minutes before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is that young man here? A. No - his name is Elim; there were some people near her: the firm is not Graham and Nixon - it is Mr. John Graham only; she had bargained for one handkerchief with me - she came from the window, and was to have paid 9 1/2d. for it; she did not say she was putting her hand into her pocket to pay me - this could not have fallen by accident.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I took the prisoner - she gave me 22s.; she said she knew nothing of the charge; after we took her to the watch-house, we recollected she lived at the Hat and Tun public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-132

397. THOMAS PITT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 4 loaves of bread, value 3s. , the goods of David Scott .

GEORGE GRAY . I am a servant to David Scott - he is a baker . On the 13th of December I left his basket at the corner of Baker-street - I went three doors up; I saw the prisoner take the loaves out; I followed, and took him - he said he had bought them; I said I was sure they were mine, and took him to the office.

Prisoner's Defence. It was distress - I went to the basket, intending to take one, but I took four, as they were all together; I had not been in bed for three nights.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290115-133

398. JOHN PUDDY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Hugh Richardson , from his person .

HUGH RICHARDSON. I am a coal-merchant . On the 27th of December I was in Holborn-court , about half-past eleven o'clock in the forenoon; I had a silk handkerchief - I did not miss it till the witness told me of it pointed out three lads that were running; I pursued them, calling out Stop thief! and the prisoner dropped the handkerchief - I saw the officer stoop to pick it up, but it was taken by a little boy; the prisoner and one of his accomplices were taken - I am sure the prisoner dropped it.

JOHN CLARK . I was in Holborn-court - I saw the prisoner pick the prosecutor's pocket; there were two other lads with him, but he took it, and I saw him drop it.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD . I was passing down to Holborn, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I took the prisoner - a little boy picked up the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. (Written.) I was going home, running down Southampton-buildings; a short distance from the top of the street, a young man (running in the same direction that I was) as he passed me, slyly pushed something into my hand folded in a very small compass, which on opening I found to be a pocket-handkerchief; I directly threw it down, still continuing to run as before, until hearing the cry of Stop thief, I halted to ascertain who they were in pursuit of, and I, together with the young man who gave me the handkerchief were immediately taken and charged with the theft; but upon the witness, who has given his evidence against me, pointing me out as the thief, the other young man was suffered to escape - I solemnly declare that I never saw the young man who gave it to me before.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-134

399. JOSEPH EDESON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 sovereign, the money of Samuel Denton , from the person of Harriet Bowley .

HARRIET BOWLEY . I live with Mr. Samuel Denton - he is a lawyer . I went on the 8th of December to Mr. Churchill, for a pound of eels - I asked for change for a sovereign; she said she could not give it me, she had no doubt I could get it at the corner - the prisoner was in the shop, and asked if he should get me change; I thought he was the woman's son, and gave him the sovereign - he did not return with that, nor the change.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I received information of this robbery, and took the prisoner; I found 8s. or 10s. on him - I asked him how he came to do it; he said his father turned him out, and caused him to go stealing - he could not starve. GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-135

400. JOHN FLETCHER & MARY MARSHALL were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 blanket, value 4s. , the goods of Joseph Davis .

MARY DAVIS . I am the wife of Joseph Davis. The prisoners came to lodge at my house on the 19th of December, and were to give me 5s. 6d. per week - they had been but about two hours in my room, and were in and out a good deal; I began to be suspicious that they did not bring the goods they had said they would, and set my daughter to watch them - Marshall went and pawned a counterpane belonging to Mrs. Kemsley, and then she went and pawned a blanket of mine.

MARTIN SUTTON . I am a pawnbroker. This blanket, which is claimed by Mrs. Davis, was pawned with me by the female prisoner, on the evening of the 19th of December.

SUSANNAH CORNFORTH . I am the daughter of Mrs. Davis. She told me to watch the female prisoner - I followed her to the pawnbroker's, and never lost sight of he till she went in there.

MARY DAVIS re-examined. Q. Was the man in the room when the woman went out? A. I believe he shaved himself, and went out after her - I went up just before, and saw him shaving himself; she had the key of the room when she returned - there is a private door, and we were in the shop; she told me she did it by his desire.

JURY. Q. Did you have any reference? A.She told me she came from a good way off - I think Hampstead-road, and said she was going to bring in a mahogany table and a chest of drawers.

Marshall put in a written Defence, pleading extreme poverty, and stating that she has been respectably situated in life.

MARSHALL - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

FLETCHER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-136

401. JOHN FLETCHER & MARY MARSHALL were again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 2 tea-spoons, value 5s.; 2 quilts, value 3s. 6d., and 1 pillow, value 2s. , the goods of William Kemsley .

MARY KEMSLEY . I am the wife of William Kemsley - he lives in Union-street, Hackney-road . The prisoners took a room of me at 5s. per week - they staid but two nights, and then went away; they lived together as man and wife - they locked their door, and took the key; I got a smith to open the door, and then missed the articles, this was on the 19th of December, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning.

MARY DAVIS . The prisoners came to lodge with me on the 19th of December - I went into their room that day, and found fourteen duplicates, two of which relate to this property.

SARAH WILLIAMS . I live in Wood-street, Spitalfields, and am a pawnbroker. I have a quilt pawned with me on the 19th of December, by a woman; I could not swear to Marshall's person, but I believe she is the person - this is the duplicate I gave.

MARTIN SUTTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have two spoons pawned with me on the 19th, by the female prisoner.

THOMAS MILLAR . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pillow and some patch-work belonging to Mrs. Kemsley, pawned by Marshall.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARSHALL'S Defence. I took the key of the room, with the intention of returning in a few days.

MARSHALL - GUILTY . Aged 26.

FLETCHER - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years - Marshall's sentence to commence from the expiration of the former term .

Reference Number: t18290115-137

402. HENRY MYERS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 1 cloak, value 20s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 7s.; 1 coat, value 5s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 snuff-box, value 6d. , the goods of George Cheese .

GEORGE CHEESE . On the 5th of January, I went out to spend the day - it was late in the evening when I went home; when I got into the air, what little I had had took an affect upon me; the prisoner picked up with me in the street, and said he would take me to a lodging; I cannot say what street it was: he was quite a stranger to me; we went to a house where we slept in the same room - in the morning, the landlord awoke me, and asked if I knew the young man, as he had got all my clothes on; I do not know what time it was.

JOHN MINTO . I keep a lodging-house, in Wentworth-street, Spitalfields : the prisoner and prosecutor came to my house about half-past one o'clock - they had separate beds; the prosecutor paid for the room - the prisoner came down to go out about four in the morning; my wife challenged him with having a cloak - the prisoner said it was his brother's, and it was all right; I jumped out of bed, and went up-stairs; the prisoner got up before me, and was pulling off the cloak, and trousers - the other things were in the coat-pocket, I believe.

BENJAMIN PAINE . I took the prisoner - these two handkerchiefs were in his hat; he had his own clothes on over the prosecutor's.

Prisoner. Q. The handkerchiefs were on the bed? A. No, they were in the hat.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-138

403. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 1 pair of trousers, value 36s., and 1 waistcoat, value 22s. , the goods of William Thorogood .

WILLIAM THOROGOOD . I am coachman to the Dunmow and Ongar coach : this parcel was in my care, and I have had to pay for it; I put it into the hind-boot of my coach about a quarter before three o'clock, at the Bull Inn, Aldgate; I was at Abridge at half-past four, which is fourteen miles from town; this is the parcel; I know nothing of the prisoner - I left the coach at Ongar.

JOHN BAZALEEL SQUIRE . I am clerk to Mrs. Nelson, of the Bull Inn; this parcel came directed to Lane Fyfield - I took it in, and gave a receipt.

WILLIAM COX . I am an officer. On the 14th of December I met the prisoner in Swan-yard, with a bundle; I asked what he had got - he said "What is that to you?" I said I must know - he then said a pair of breeches; that did not satisfy me, and I took him to the watch-house; I found a pair of trousers in the bundle, and on him I found a bill for a pair of trousers and a waistcoat: I asked where the waistcoat was, and it was on his body; these are the

articles; he told me a man gave him them to carry, and afterwards said he picked them up near the sixteen mile-stone in the Ongar-road.

MR. SHEA. These are my property - they were sent by the coach.

WILLIAM THOROGOOD . The coach is mine, and the man who took the coach at Ongar is my servant; I am answerable for all the property in it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-139

404. MARY JORDAN and MARY FOX were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 2 sheets, value 8s.; 1 pillow, value 4s., and 1 blanket, value 4s. , the goods of William George .

MARIA GEORGE . I am the wife of William George: we live in Darby-court, Piccadilly . I let a lodging to Jordan on the 10th of December - she did not say Fox was to live with her, but she brought her with her as a friend to sleep with her a night or two - that was on Wednesday, and on Saturday they were taken; I had been in the room, and missed two sheets, a pillow, and a blanket; my husband had them taken up.

JAMES STOKES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 11th of December, Jordan pawned this one sheet - on the 12th Fox pawned another; she said she was sent by Jordan; and on the 13th, Fox pawned a blanket for 1s. 6d.; they each time stated that the other sent them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JORDAN'S Defence. I was waiting for my box coming from Wandsworth; I was distressed, and meant to replace the things on the Monday - I pawned the blanket to get my gown to go out.

FOX'S Defence. I was sent by her to take the sheets and the blanket each time - she told me it was because she wanted the money, she told me she would replace them when her box came from Wandsworth - she was ashamed to go to the pawnbroker's herself, not having any gown.

JORDAN - GUILTY . Aged 31.

FOX - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-140

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

405. JOHN HODGKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 1 pair of boots, value 6s. , the goods of Moses Morgan .

JOHN BARWICK . I am a shopman to Mr. Moses Morgan, of Oxford-street . I was at my dinner at about half-past twelve o'clock - when I returned, these boots were missing- I passed by them at twelve.

CHARLES CLARK . I am a modeller. I was going from my dinner, and saw the prisoner with the boots; Mrs. Morgan came to the door, and cried Thief! and desired me to go after him; I lost sight of him for about a minute, and as I lost sight of him he threw them into an area; I am sure I saw him take them from the door of the shop: I saw them taken out of the area about a minute afterwards - I took him directly, and gave him into custody; the boots were then brought up: he went down Davis-street, Robert-street, and was taken in Thomas-street.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - the boots were brought up out of the area; I saw the prisoner running - he was stopped just by No. 14, Guildford-street, in the area of which house the boots were.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Thomas-street; the people came up and said, "Where are the boots?"- I said, "What boots?" some one said, "There is a pair of boots down the area."

JURY to CHARLES CLARK . Q. When did you see the boy first? A. I was coming down Oxford-street, and I saw him coming down the step of Mr. Morgan's door, with the boots in his hand, putting them under his jacket; Mrs. Morgan came to the door, and cried Stop thief! and she desired me to stop him - I went after him, and am positive of his person - he was two or three doors from the area when I took him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-141

406. JOHN HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 1 set of bed-furniture, value 28s., and 1 blanket, value 2s. , the goods of William Sadgrove .

RICHARD ROWE . I was standing at the corner of West-street, about half-past nine o'clock at night, on the 22d of December - the prisoner passed me with a blanket round a bundle under his arm; he turned into Field-lane, and went into No. 9 - I stood looking, a young woman came out, and said "What are you looking at?" I said" At that print;" she then went in - I followed her. and I heard her say as she went in, "It will not do for me;" I then went in, and took the prisoner, and these articles - I delivered him up to Barnley; he had laid the blanket on the counter, and this furniture upon it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know this woman very well? A. No; I do not recollect speaking to her before; she is not here - I do not know whether he was selling these things to her - she said it would not do for her; I asked whose things they were, and he said they were his own; he gave an address at the watch-house.

COURT. Q. Do you know whether it was his master whose address he gave? A. I do not know; his master came to the office the next day: I saw the prisoner carry the articles, and he walked into the shop; I stood about a minute at the door, and the young woman came out.

JOHN BARNLEY. I am a constable. The prisoner was put into my hands, with this property; I asked him where he lived - he told me at Mr. Sadgrove's, Eldon-street, Finsbury , and said the property was his own - he was going to take it home: I asked where he got it; he said that was not my business: I went to his master.

WILLIAM SADGROVE . The prisoner was living with me; this blanket and furniture are mine - they have my private-mark on them: they were in my warehouse; I cannot exactly say when I had seen this print - I missed it when I heard of this.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you other furnitures of the same kind made up? A. Yes; we had sold some - I should think not more than half a dozen pieces; we always put the private-mark on our articles; this was not sold.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to leave a white four-post furniture, and this was with it; I had taken it to Newington; I rolled it up in the wrapper, and was taking it home- I was coming down Field-lane, and this Jew woman said"Have you got any thing to sell?" I said No - she laid

hold of me, and said,"Let me look;" she dragged me in, and the watchman took me directly.

MR. SADGROVE. He was out with furniture that day and the day before, but with none of this descripution; he had to take a set of scarlet curtains to Shacklewell - he packed up the parcel: we have several blankets to pack goods in - the prisoner said he had done it by mistake; he has lived four years with me.

JOHN HENRY SADGROVE . I let the prisoner out about eight o'clock that evening; he was then to go home - he had gone out about four o'clock in the afternoon, to take the red curtains home; he came back about eight in the evening, and went away immediately - he took no parcel with him.

Cross-examined. Q. Then when he was going out for the evening he had no bundle? A. No; I cannot exactly swear who packed up the bundle he took out in the afternoon - the orders were for him to pack it up, and take it to Shacklewell: it was about four o'clock in the afternoon: the porters do one another's work, unless they are heavy goods; I am sometimes away - they might, in my absence, assist one another with light goods.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-142

407. ANN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of January , 1 dress, value 2l.; 1 shift, value 5s., and 1 table-cloth, value 2s. , the goods of Benjamin Skinner .

SARAH SKINNER . I am the wife of Benjamin Skinner, who is a porter - we live in Oxford-market . The prisoner lodged with us four years ago; on the 10th of January she called, and remained from twelve o'clock till seven - I was out of the room part of the time: I missed these things the next day.

JAMES STURART WALLIS . I am a pawnbroker. The shift was pawned with me last Saturday week, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, by the prisoner.

WILLIAM CRUSH . I am a pawnbroker. This gown was pawned by the prisoner on Saturday last, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD. I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found these two duplicates at her lodging, and the table-cloth was there; I took them to Marlborough-street, and she said they were her own - she admitted that she stole the silk dress, and did it through distress - I found this key, which opens Mrs. Skinner's drawer, on her.

Prisoner. That is the key of my own box. - I own to pawning the things.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290115-143

408. WILLIAM FULKER and THOMAS BOREHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 9 bottles of wine, value 2l.; 1 bottle of cyder, value 2s.; 1 horse-collar, value 5s.; 1 roller, value 1s.; 2 roller-pads, value 4s., and 1 halter, value 1s. , the goods of John Wright and James Gathorne Remington .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of Rowland Stephenson .

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a constable of St. Sepulcher's. On the 5th of January, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was in Cow-cross-street, and saw Fulker with a horse-collar on his arm, and some horse-rugs at his back - I asked what they were; he said two old horse-rugs: I said, "There is something else;" he said, "Yes, there is a basket, that has some wine in it, which I have brought from St. Bartholomew's Hospital , and am going to take it to Queen-square;" I found eight bottles of wine, and one of cyder, in it - he said the groom had given them to him; we afterward went, as soon as the families were up, to Mr. Stephenson's, and found Boreham - he denied it at first, but afterwards said he gave them to him to take to Queen-square, where some other part of the family live.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Perhaps you can tell where Mr. Rowland Stephenson is? A. I wish I could, Sir; I do not know that he did not give them to him - he was off at that time, I believe; I did not go to look for Mr. Stephenson - it would be like looking for a needle in a bottle of hay: these bottles do not appear to me to have been lying in the cellar - he was on the road to Queen-square.

JOHN FORBES . I am the street-keeper. I assisted in conveying Fulker to the watch-house; I found two bottles of port in his pocket - I asked where he brought them from; he said from St. Bartholomew's Hospital, and they were given to him by the groom, Boreham, and that the horse-furniture was old things, which he was going to take to the stables in Southampton-mews, to the coachman- he did not know any other name for him than John.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot tell whether Mr. Stepheason had not directed him to take them to Queen-square? A. The Mr. Stephenson who lives in Queen-square is not here that I know of, Mr. Rowland Stephenson was away at that time - what directions he might have given to any part of the family I certainly do not know.

HESTER CHANDLER . I am housekeeper to Mr. Stevenson, at St. Bartholomew's Hospital. I had charge of his wine - it was kept in the cellar, and the key of it was in a cupboard in my room; the door was often unlocked, and so was the door of the room; the key that unlocked that cupboard unlocked every thing in the room where I kept all the plate, linen, and other things - the two prisoners have been there some time, and are very worthy servant s.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you missed no wine? A. No - I went to the cellar directly, but missed nothing.

GEORGE BAKER . I am stable-boy at Mr. Stephenson's, in St. Bartholomew Hospital. I came down at seven o'clock on the morning of the 5th; I saw Mr. Phillips at nine - he asked if I knew any thing of the property gone from the stable; I told him No: I told him I had seen the collar and rugs in the stable.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-144

409. JOHN EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 watch, value 1l., and 1 seal, value 10s. , the goods of Charles Gracie .

CHARLES GRACIE . I am a saddler . On the 19th of December I was in my shop: a bullock got into the passage; the prisoner, who said he was a drover , and another person, got in to turn it out - the prisoner went into the parlour; my watch laid on a shelf opposite the parlour-door,

where I had seen it safe twenty minutes before - I went into the parlour, and the prisoner ran out directly; the bullock was not gone then; as I went into the parlour, I saw the hand of one of them go on the shelf; the other man remained there, and helped to get the bullock out - these are my watch and seals.

JURY. Q.Did you ran after him? A. I ran back to the shop, and told Mr. Warden the prisoner had got my watch, and he ran after him.

BENJAMIN WARDEN . The witness told me this chap had got his watch; I followed him down Albion-place, and overtook him in a street which turns out of John's-lane; when I took him some persons behind me called out,"Here is the watch, in an area;" I took him to the watch-house, and then went and got the watch from Mrs. Dawson, who had taken it up - I swear the prisoner is the man who ran out of the door, though I lost sight of him as he turned the corners.

SARAH DAWSON . I took up the watch in our kitchen-area, and gave it to the street-keeper; I had heard a cry of Stop thief! but did not see any one running.

GABRIEL AILLEC . I live in St. John's-lane. On the 19th of December I was in the lane; the prisoner was running, pursued by Warden and some others; he passed Mrs. Dawson's area, and I saw him throw something down the area - I looked and saw it was a watch; I saw Mrs. Dawson take it up, and advised her to keep it till the officer came - I am sure it was the prisoner.

JOHN ROBINSON . I was coming round, and took the prisoner to the watch-house; as I took him to the office, he said, "Well, master, I think I am done for this time;" I said,"I do not know;" he said, "Perhaps, I may be a man when I come back again."

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming of Smithfield; Mr. Baker, a man I have worked for for some years, told me a bullock of his was gone - some one had hunted it away; I was going up St. John's-lane - my stick fell from my hands, and a man opened his arms, and caught me at the corner of Berkeley-street; the witness then came up, and said,"Where is my partner's watch?" I said, "I know nothing about your watch;" and said,"I will go any where with you; I have got no watch:" the other witness then said he saw me drop it - I said, "Was it not my stick?" and then he said, "I believe it was a stick."

GABRIEL AILLEC . The prisoner never asked me if it was not his stick.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-145

410. NATHANIEL DELLACOURT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 8lbs. weight of mutton, value 4s. , the goods of John Owen .

JOHN OWEN . I am a butcher , at Fitzroy-market . On the morning of Christmas-day I lost five or six hind-quarters of mutton, and two or three shoulders - it was about ten minutes before six o'clock; I was in bed at the time, but I got up, and went down; I had a large dog, but he was killed; I found one loin of my mutton, about nine o'clock, at the prisoner's house, which is not a quarter of a mile from mine - I swear to that as mine, for I had chopped it off the night before, which I never do; I generally saw them, but my saw had been stolen - he had cut the score out with a knife, which my foreman could have sworn to: there was a certain score on the shoulder.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you mean outside the back of the sheep? A. No; in the meat, on the back of the meat; it was in at a quarter-past twelve o'clock that morning - the prisoner does not keep a shop; he carries fish about the street, and meat as a hawking butcher ; I went to a back attic, where I found this meat - there was no other meat there; I compared the mutton before the Magistrate with the fellow loin, and it fitted.

Q. When you entered this man's place, did you not point out another reason why you knew the mutton to be yours? A. I said the suet was taken out of one loin, and not out of the other, which I had lost.

Q.Now, upon your oath, did not the man point out the suet that had come from that loin of mutton? A. Yes, he did shew it to me.

COURT. Q. Then you said, "That is my loin of mutton, because the suet is taken out"? A. Yes; he said, "Here's the suet," and showed me some which was broken into twenty pieces, but there may be twenty pieces of suet which appear the same.

Q. But now you swear to it by something else? A. I missed two, and I thought this had been the other, but I found it was the one which I had chopped off, and I said to my boy, "I think I have chopped it off as clean as if I had sawed it:" I missed two loins of mutton - one was of a wether sheep, and this was it; the other was a ewe one, which I have not seen - there are strings to a wether sheep, but not to a ewe.

THOMAS SMEE . On the 25th of December Mr. Owen called me up, about half-past six o'clock; I went with him to a house, and up three pair of stairs, the door was open, and Smith said, "That is Nat, who I saw with a quarter of beef upon his shoulder;" I said, "Then you are my prisoner:" the other officer took the meat from the table.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am a Bow-street patrol. I went to the prisoner's lodging about nine o'clock; I produce a piece of bone which came out of the loin of mutton found on the table, under a cloth, in his room, which the prosecutor claimed.

WILLIAM SMITH . I live in Fitzroy-market. I saw a person at Mr. Owen's shop, on the morning of the 25th of December - I cannot swear to him; he was trying to get a quarter of beef on his shoulder.

Cross-examined. Q. You say you cannot swear to the person: Did you tell the officers that was the man? A. I said I thought it was; another man called him Nat, and I knew his name was Nat.

COURT. Q. Did you not know the prisoner's person before? A. I know him by living at Mr. Wilday's - I did not say it was a man very much like Nat.

Q. You wrote your name to this deposition, and it says(reads) "It was dark, and the gas-lights were extinguished - I told Mrs. Owen that I saw a man very much like Nat go out of Mr. Owen's shop?" A. I told her I thought it was like Nat, and I heard a man call him Nat.

Q. Did you not tell her you thought it was Nat that committed the robbery? A. Yes, and that I heard a man call him Nat besides.

JOHN OWEN . There was a loin missing such as that found at the place; this is the bit of bone - it has the three

marks corresponding with those that I made with the chopper.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-146

411. SAMUEL DURHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 2 metal weights, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Clark .

THOMAS CLARK . I am a baker . On the 5th of January I lost some weights from my house in Limehouse , about twelve o'clock, but I was not at home.

ALFRED LINAS BALL . I was going down the Commercial-road , on the 5th of January, and saw the prisoner looking in at the prosecutor's window; after I had got some distance I missed him; I came back and saw him leaning over the counter, and reaching something towards him - I drew back and then went and looked in again, and saw two women serving him with something: I drew back and then saw him come out with his hat in his hand, putting something into his pocket - I followed him down the East India-road and said, "What have you got in your pocket?" "Only my bread and butter," said he; I said, "Let me see" - I took the bag with his bread and butter in it; I saw him trying to put his hand into his right-hand waistcoat-pocket - I found this 1lb. brass weight in it: I took him back, and asked Mrs. Clark if she had lost any thing - she said No; I shewed her the weight, and she owned it - I then found the other weight in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had a halfpenny-worth of grey peas in the shop, and was putting them into my pocket, when he came up and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18290115-147

412. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 seal, value 5s., and 3 pieces of silver, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Greathurst .

CHARLES GREATHURST . I lost a watch on the 17th of December, from my bed-room; the prisoner worked in the same house, but did not sleep there - I had left them safe on the Wednesday, and missed them on Friday night, when I came home.

WILLIAM BURNS . I took the prisoner into custody on the 19th of December, and found this duplicate of the watch on him.

THOMAS MILLAR . I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned with me by the prisoner - I gave this duplicate for it.

WILLIAM BENNETT WEBSTER . On Friday the prisoner came to my house and sold me these three pieces of silver.

CHARLES GREATHURST. I can swear to this watch, seal, and silver; I believe it to be mine - it was attached to the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined 1 Month & Whipped .

Reference Number: t18290115-148

413. JOHN BARTON and JOHN GRAY were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of January , 4 brushes, value 15s. , the goods of William Thompson and Henry Sheen .

HENRY ELBERY LEWIS . I am in the service of Messrs. William Thompson and Henry Sheen, oilmen , of Shoreditch . On the 8th of January the officers brought five brushes to our shop; I knew them to be my masters' by the marks - we missed them directly the officers told us of them, as we knew where they had been hanging; I know nothing of the prisoners.

Prisoner BARTON. When this witness was brought to the watch-house, he said he could not swear to them, but he knew they had lost some. Witness. No, I did not.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I am a headborough of Shoreditch. I was near the shop and saw Barton standing against one door-post of the shop, and Gray against the other; I knew them and looked very hard at them - I then met two of the Bow-street patrol, and while in conversation with them, I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw Barton crossing the road; he then turned to the left, and took a contrary direction - Gray went another way, but I took him in about half an hour, having a knowledge of him; I saw Fowler pick the brushes up, which were what Barton dropped: it was Fowler who raised the cry of Stop thief! and he made a catch at Barton, but missed him.

JURY. Q. Did you see Gray speak to Barton? A. Yes, at the door-post, about three minutes before the robbery.

JAMES FOWLER . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 8th of January I saw the prisoners at the prosecutors' door; I stood and watched them a few minutes, and saw one, who I think was Gray, or another man, take the brushes down, and give them to Barton - they then both ran: Barton ran almost up against me - he dropped the brushes, and I took them up.

JOSEPH FRYER . I saw the prisoners standing against the shop window; I saw Gray take something down and give it to Barton - I pursued and took Barton; this was between five and six o'clock.

BARTON'S Defence. This man is swearing false, I never had the brushes.

GRAY'S Defence. I was not with this man that day - I have seen him before, and worked with him.

BARTON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

GRAY - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-149

414. WILLIAM ASHTON and JOHN FRANCIS were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , part of two pairs of trousers, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 5 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 3 night-caps, value 1s 6d.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 3 knives, value 1s.; 1 frock, value 6d.; 3 boxes, value 20s.; 1 snuff-box, value 2d.; 3 shirts, value 6s.; 1 steel, value 6d., and 1 apron, value 6d. , the goods of William Bright .

WILLIAM BRIGHT . I lost all these articles in three boxes on the 22d December from my master's, Mr. John Mills ; I had lived with his mother in King-street, and William Ashton went with me to help me carry my three boxes to Mr. Mills, No. 71, Wardour-street - I carried two and he one; he stood opposite while I took them in - this was the Saturday before Chrismas-day; on the Wednesday following I went to fetch them, and they were gone -I have never seen the things since; no one knew where the things were but him - I knew Francis by sight.

JOHN MILLS . I live in Wardour-street. On the 20th of December three boxes were brought to my place, and I

put them into my shop - on the Monday, about twelve o'clock, Francis came and said he came from William for the three boxes; I refused to give them up without a note- in about three hours he brought me this note, and said the prosecutor was sorry he could not come himself - I then delivered them up. (Note read.)

SIR; - Please to send by the young man that came this morning, three boxes, for I have got a situation and I don't think I shall have an opportunity of coming myself.

WILLIAM KNIGHT .

ABRAHAM BARNARD . I saw Francis take the boxes away, and give Mills the note.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. On the 24th of December I received information, and went to a house in Bethnal-green where the prosecutor lodged; and, from the conversation I had with him, I apprehended the prisoners.

JAMES FITZPATRICK . I went with Brown and took the prisoners.

WILLIAM BRIGHT re-examined. Q. Is that note written by you? A. No; I never authorized Francis to get my clothes - I had seen him before; he often used to come to the house I lodged at in company with Ashton - Ashton came and asked me whether my name was William Bright or William Knight ; I told him it was William Bright - he said he had bet a pot of beer on it with a drover named Saul; Francis was not present - he came in and went out again directly; this was about ten o'clock on the Monday that the things went.

FRANCIS' Defence. At the time the witness says I received the boxes, I was with the prosecutor - about three o'clock I said I was going to boy a second-hand shirt; I went and bought one, washed myself and put it on.

COURT to JOHN MILLS . Q. What name did Francis give you? A. He only said he came from William - I knew him by no other name.

JURY to WILLIAM BRIGHT . Q. You knew Francis as well as you did Ashton? A. Yes, I have seen him - Francis did not know from me where my boxes were; I have no idea whose writing this note is - Francis can read and write to.

FRANCIS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

ASHTON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-150

OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JANUARY 19.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

415. JOHN PAGE was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Ann Mountain , about two o'clock in the night of the 22d of October , at Friern, Barnet, with intent of feloniously and burglariously to steal the goods and chattels therein .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution

GEORGE LAURENCE . I am gardener to Sarah Ann Mountain , who lives at Friern, Barnet - her house is about nine miles from town; there are shrubberies and gardens about it. I secured the house myself on Wednesday night, the 22d of October; the door of the hall, at the back of the house, was quite secure - I locked it myself; the iron door, leading to the garden, was secure - there is an outer door, then a hall door, and then an inner door, which opens immediately into the house; they were all quite secure - I fastened them myself; I was alarmed about half-past one o'clock by the female servant - I got out of bed, partly dressed myself, got a cord and lowered myself from the window by fastening a cord to the bedstead; I took a loaded gun with me - on turning the corner of the house I saw four men, and desired them to stop; they were then coming out of the stone hall, all four of them - I discharged my gun at them and missed fire; the prisoner is the man I knocked down on the lawn of the shrubbery - I am sure he is the man - it was a beautiful moon-light morning; I hit a second man, and knocked him off the gate - he was taken into custody, tried here last Session, and convicted; I conveyed that man away that morning in a cart - I saw the prisoner again on the 10th of December at the Swan with two Necks public-house at Whetstone - I knew him the moment I saw him; this was about a quarter of a mile from Mrs Mountain's - I examined the house after taking the man into custody, the lock of the outer door had been picked, and the pannel nearly cut out of the inner hall door- it had been pierced through nearly all round the pannel with a centre-bit.

COURT. Q. You say it was a very moon-light night, and before you took the man tried last Session, you knocked a man down? A. Yes; the prisoner, now at the bar, is the man I knocked down in the shrubbery - I am quite positive, I cannot be mistaken in his person; I said he was the man immediately - I had my senses about me perfectly.

Prisoner. Q. What dress had I on? A. Not the same you have now.

Q. If you saw my face of course you could tell the colour of my coat and handkerchief? A. You had a black or dark silk handkerchief - I cannot exactly say the colour of your coat; I had a full view of your face as you ran along, and when you were on the wall - at the time you came out of the hall I was fifteen or sixteen yards from you: I had a perfect view of you then - I was close to him when I knocked him down and had a full view of his face; my attention was directed more to his face than his coat, and as such I could see the handkerchief - I had gone to bed about half-past nine o'clock.

HANNAH MORLEY . I am servant to Mrs. Baker of the Swan with Two Necks, at Finchley. On Thursday, the 23d of October. I heard of Mrs. Mountain's house being broken open - I had seen the prisoner on the 22d in company with three others at our house, from half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, or from that to five; our house is a quarter of a mile from Mrs. Mountain's - they had a pot of beer and four empty pipes; I am quite sure the prisoner was one - I saw him again on the 10th of November at Mrs. Baker's, there were two more men with him then; they had a cart, and took some refreshment - and a fortnight after Lord Mayor's day I saw him again at mistress's; I saw him a fourth time on the 10th of December, when Laurence came in and identified him at once - I am quite sure he is the man I had served with the beer.

COURT. Q. Who waited on him on the 22d of October? I did; they were not in the house, but drank

their beer outside the door - we had lights in the house; they did not come into the tap-room - it was not dark; I could see them distinctly - I served them, and a tall man paid me; I had the means of observing them - I did not notice the prisoner's neckcloth, but am quite sure he is one of the men.

Prisoner. Q. You say four pipes of tobacco were had? A. Four empty pipes; they had them ouside the door- I did not give them a light; the tall one went into the parlour for the light.

THOMAS HARRIS . I am a labourer. and live at Whetstone. I recollect hearing of the attempt to break into Mrs. Mountain's house, and recollect a man being conveyed away in a cart, in custody, by Laurence next morning by the Bricklayers' Arms public-house - I had seen four men together the day before that (Wednesday) walking at Whetstone about a quarter to five o'clock in the afternoon; the man I saw in the cart was one of those men, and the prisoner was one of them - I am quite sure; I was standing against the turnpike-gate when I saw him - they had pipes and were all four smoking.

GEORGE LAURENCE . The man I secured on the night of the robbery was conveyed by me next day to prison in a cart; we took him by the Bricklayers' Arms and that way.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I have five witnesses to prove I was at home in bed on the night in question, all night.

No witnesses appeared for the prisoner.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18290115-151

Before Mr. Justice Park.

416. ROBERT BARTON was indicted, for that he, on the 30th of October , at St. Margaret, Westminster , feloniously did utter and publish as true, a false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money, well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited , as follows: -

No. 83, No. 2 White Hart-ct. Lombard-st. London, Oct. 30, 1828.

Masterman, Peters, Mildred, Masterman and Co.

Pay No. 83, or bearer, Ten Pounds,£10: 0: 0. ROBERT GRANT . with intent to defraud Thomas Paull ; against the Statute.

2d COUNT, the same, only stating the intent to be to defraud Henry Nelson Coleridge .

3d COUNT, the same, only stating the intent to be to defraud William Masterman , and others.

MR. CARRINGTON conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS PAULL . On the 30th of October, I was at the office of the King's College, Parliament-street ; the prisoner came, and asked for a Prospectus of the King's College, about half-past eleven - he asked for it, for Mr. Robert Grant , of St. John's-wood; one was given him - he went away, and returned about half-past three o'clock, and produced a cheque, to pay a donation of 5l. for Mr. Robert Grant ; this is the cheque (looking at it) - I received it, and gave him five sovereigns in change; this is the same cheque that was uttered by him to me - I I paid it into Messrs. Cox and Biddulph.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you ever seen the person before? A. Not before that day; he went away directly I gave him the list - he staid five or ten minutes the second time, when he tendered the cheque; the office is a back room - I saw him first in the passage; he came into the back-room both times - the weather was not particularly thick; I cannot recollect whether the son shone - the cheque remained in the office till about four o'clock, or half-past, the usual time for taking cheques to the Bank; I took it there myself - it was in my custody till then; I saw it again two days after, when it was returned - it has been kept in the office ever since; Mr. Coleridge had it in his possession; I gave it to him on the same day it was returned - I did not see it again till the prisoner was apprehended; it has been in my possession since the examination - I am not acquainted with Mr. Robert Grant .

MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Although your's is a backroom, is there light enough to see a person, so as to know him again? A. Perfectly so; it is a dome sky-light - I have no doubt of his being the person; here is the name of Cox written across the cheque - that was done by me, before I parted with it.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a clerk in the employ of Masterman and Co. Nobody of the name of Robert Grant keeps an account at our house; there is more than one partner in our house - I do not know any person of that name.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is your business carried on? A. In Nicholas-lane; the cheque is directed White Hart-court, Gracechurch-street - we have removed from there six or seven years; I have searched the books, to ascertain if we have a customer named Robert Grant - I can say, we have had no such customer for the last fifteen years; I have been twenty-one years in the house.

Q. Could your house be defrauded by this cheque? A. I should think not; we should immediately have discovered the fraud, and not have paid it - we have no establishment in White Hart-court; we have no customer named Grant, that I recollect, but am certain we have no Robert Grant ; I have only examined as to Robert Grant .

MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Your cheques are now in a new form? A. No, we still have old cheques presented every day, addressed to White Hart-court.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I know St. John's-wood - it is near Regent's-park; I have made inquiry for a Robert Grant there, and can find no such person in St. John's-wood - I made diligent inquiry; I tried as much as I could to find such a person, but could not.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you make the inquiry? A. On Wednesday last, not before; I was inquiring from ten o'clock till two - I did not go to every house; I made what inquiry I thought sufficient; I also inquired near the Regent's-park, as I was informed he had said St. John's-wood, Regent's-park - I found a Mr. Grant in Regent's-park, and only one; I cannot swear there are no others - I inquired of those who I knew were best acquainted with the inhabitants, if they knew a person of that name, residing, or that did reside, in or about St. John's-wood; I inquired at a great many houses in St. John's-wood - it is not a very large place; there are a great many detached buildings called St. John's-wood, which are not so - it was formerly called Mary-le-bone-park.

ALFRED TOPPER . I am a postman. I know St. John's-wood; the whole of it is in my district - I have been postman there for three years; I know no person there named

Robert Grant - no person has lived there, in my time, to whom I have had to deliver a letter.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there any persons named Grant? A. One Mrs. Grant; I do not deliver in Regent's-park - I have known no Mr. Grant whatever, all the time I have delivered letters.

MR. ROBERT INNIS GRANT . I reside in Regent's-park.(Looking at a cheque) - This is not drawn or signed by me; it is not at all like my writing - I never passed by the name of Robert, alone; I never kept an account at Masterman's. (Cheque read)

MR. CLARKSON to MR. PAULL. Q. You are in the establishment of the College? A. Yes. as collecting clerk; I paid the 5l. to the prisoner - Mr. Coleridge has repaid it to me; I believe the King's College is not a corporation - I do not know whether Mr. Coleridge has been defrauded of the 5l. or no; I am no loser - I cannot say whether Mr. Coleridge, or the College, will he losers; I am no sufferer - Mr. Coleridge's names are Henry Nelson .

The prisoner then made the following defence, most of which was written: - My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, -Being deprived by law of the benefit of the eloquence and arguments of Counsel on my behalf, I am compelled (and I am very unfit,) to address a few words for your consideration. I am aware you will consider the awful situation in which I am placed, and under such consideration I feel confident of your favourable indulgence - that you will excuse my timidity in addressing you, rather than leaving the case against me as it now stands, to your Lordship's unbiassed judgment. Through a mercantile life of twenty years, during a part, at least, of which, I have been perhaps useful in my generation, though it has been sadly checquered by misfortune, I have never until now been criminally charged before a Magistrate, nor until now did I ever open my lips in a public audience, however small. Upon the evidence produced against me, I shall make no comments, leaving that to one who is able and competent to the purpose, and who will give me the benefit of any decrepancy, should any appear there - in: I am charged with having paid, or uttered, a forged cheque, knowing it to be forged, and should you consider the evidence sufficient, and the instrument a forgery, I am afraid I shall have little left to do but to entreat, under circumstances, your favourable recommendation, and, viewing the amount and circumstances of the case, I hope such recommendation may not be denied me; but, Gentlemen, there is a point, of which, I trust, you will fully satisfy yourselves before you return a verdict of guilty, viz. That I knew and considered the instrument to be a forgery at the time I paid it away - for I conceive, that unless you are satisfied that I considered it a forgery at that time, I could not have paid it with a guilty knowledge; and, Gentlemen, I most positively aver, that taking the case as proved against me, as far as regards the payment of the order, that I cannot even now bring my mind to the conviction that I have committed a forgery. Upon whom have I forged? On no person living. Whose name have I used for the purpose of ob taining money? No one's; that I may have spoken falsehoods, and made false representations, may be true, but that I have committed a forgery, in the common acceptation of the words, is not the case; it possibly may, by law and precedent, be considered otherwise, but what is true in fact, law and precedent ought not to make wrong - there are precedents for burning women for the supposed crime of witchcraft, and men as wizards, and precedents for the putting to death one sect of the professors of the all-merciful religion of Christ by another sect, because they were at variance in some doctrinal point, or in their modes of worship, but will any of you say such precedents ought to be followed? No, not one; Gentlemen, the severity of the law of forgery seems to have aimed at the protection of great mercantile bodies, or individuals, upon whose firms or names (as third parties not present, to protect themselves,) credit or property was obtained - a person pays a forged Bank of England note, the credit of property given in exchange is not given upon the credit of the person paying it, it is given upon the faith of the security given them by the note on a Company well known - so is the case as to small Companies, or individuals; the tradesman knows the character and responsibility of another tradesman, and though he may not know, or be sufficiently acquainted with his handwriting, so as to detect an imitation, yet, from his knowledge of the individual, he takes the order, or bill of exchange, upon such knowledge, and the credit is given on the supposed security of a known individual; how different is the case before you - I shall take the case as in some measure proved by the witnesses; they say I called upon them, and inquired for so and so, and presenting an order, purporting to be one for money, drawn by a person they had never heard even a whisper of before, in fact, it is sworn no such person does exist. Upon whose credit then do they take it? Upon the credit of a non-entity; certainly not, for they could attach no credit, or conceive they had any security, by holding the order of an individual, who, if in existence, might not be worth a straw - No, Gentlemen, the credit they gave, or property they parted with, must have been so given or parted with upon the representations of the party offering it, and not upon any supposed security of holding an order of a person, of whom they knew nothing, therefore the crime is in the appearance of the instrument offered. Such being the view of the case, and, I conceive, is the common-sense view, will place me out of the reach of the forgery, and especially if you believe that a party may pay away such an instrument without knowing that law constituted it a forgery - Such, Gentlemen, will, I trust, be your view of the case, but should you think otherwise, let me humbly entreat you to weigh the case as it affects the interest and peace of the community, and, taken in every point of view, you must agree that it is a comparatively slight offence; and here I dare not trust my feelings, but, Gentlemen, is the offence to be compared in magnitude of moral guilt, with the panderer who seduces from the parental roof perhaps your only child, and after having satisfied his propensities, leaves the poor innocent to seek her bread by wretched prostitution? compare it to the profligate seducer, though only punishable in his pocket, who enters your house as your friend and confidant, and under that specious cover seduces from your arms and affections the wife of your bosom, who had been the joy of your younger, and who you had looked forward to he the solace of your declining years, and leaving the children upon whom you doat worse than motherless. As against the mercantile interests of the country, the name of an individual, or firm, utterly unknown, or not in existence, could never be circulated by a person unknown to others, to an extent to affect the well-being of the smallest trading interests - next view it as it affects the peace of the country, and here, from the feelings I have before to day witnessed, and the expressions I have heard, I am certain the humane Judge, before whom I appear, will agree with me that it is comparatively slight; compare it with the ruthless highwayman, who, on the pain of your life, robs you of all your person carries, or, perhaps to secure his own escape, leaves his bleeding victim a wretched spectacle of his barbarity; compare it, I say, with the case of the burglar, who, in the dark and silent watches of the night, breaks open your fancied castle of security, and, perhaps binding the trembling inmates hand and foot, confines them to a dark dungeon, there(but for the interposing hand of Providence,) to starve or contract disease, which increases, as life is protracted, or, if resistance is offered, with deadly weapons maims for life, or sends

his hapless victims to the judgment seat of his Creator; compare the charge against me with those, my case is a fly-bite in guilt - if, when proved to its fullest extent, what is it? a person, who almost with his own concurrence, for there certainly does appear a great want of discretion, if not blameable negligence, in a person taking from an entire stranger, at first view, an order for money, (it is very different to a Bank note,) of the quality of which order he knows nothing - I say, taking it in its fullest extent, the peace of society is not broken in upon, the peace of mind of the person taking it is uninjured, his bodily health, powers, and existence are not endangered, and he loses, What does he lose? (far too much, certainly,) but only what any citizen could replace in a week, or what many tradesmen could replace by his profits in a day, if not in a few hours; I have stated I had no guilty knowledge of the offence being a forgery, and nine out of ten persons in the common walks of life would take the same view. I have compared it with other crimes, some of which are only punishable by remuneration from the purse, or confinement in a debtor's gaol, and some with life, all of which, I think, you will agree with me are greater crimes; if I have been prolix, or intruded upon your valuable time, let the situation in which I am placed plead my apology - consider my feelings - consider the anxiety for my near and dear relations - consider that your verdict (but for the interposition of Sovereign mercy,) will place me in the hands of the public executioner. I implore you to weigh well my case - to consider mercy as one of the attributes of Heaven, and to allow the consideration of the feelings of humanity to turn the balance in my favour; and, with the fullest conviction of the humanity of my Judge, I place my future life at your disposal.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 38.

Reference Number: t18290115-152

417. ROBERT BARTON was again indicted for that he, on the 14th of November , at St. Giles in the Fields , feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money, well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited , as follows: -

No. 63. No. 2 White Hart-ct. Lombard-st. London Nov. 14, 1828.

Masterman, Peters, Mildred, Masterman and Co.

Pay No. 63, or Bearer, Ten Pounds.£10. 0: 0 ROBERT GRANT . with intention to defraud Joseph Snow ; against the Statute.

2d COUNT, stating it to be with intent to defraud the Society for the Management and Distribution of the Literary Fund .

3d COUNT, stating it to be with intent to defraud William Masterman and others.

418. ROBERT BARTON was again indicted for that he, on the 12th of December , at St. George, Bloomsbury , feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money, he well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited , which is as follows: -

No. 45. No. 73, Lombard-street, London, 12th Dec., 1828.

Messrs. Bosanquct, Pitt, Anderdon and Franks.

Pay No. 45, or Bearer, Five Pounds.

£5: 0: 0 ALEX HOPE.

with intent to defraud James Phippen ; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the intent to be to defraud Samuel Bosanquet and others.

To both which indictments the prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH .

Reference Number: t18290115-153

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

419. THOMAS STEWART was indicted for the wilful murder of James Soppett .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MARIA SOPPETT . I am the widow of James Soppett. On the 24th of December , about a quarter-past five o'clock in the evening, I was walking with him at Teddington - it was light enough to see at some distance; I was two or three yards before him, and saw a cart approaching towards me at full gallop, as hard as it could; there was a man in the cart - I did not see him strike the horse, and it passed me safely; I heard a woman in the road call out - I directly turned round, and saw my husband lying on the ground; he never arose alive - the street is straight there.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Were you walking on the footpath? A. Yes; it is level in the carriage-road - the church is a little distance from the spot; some white tomb-stones project close to the road, about two hundred yards from where this happened - I found my husband lying in the road.

COURT. Q. When you had seen him last, he was on the path, have you any reason to suppose he was crossing the road? A. There is a regular crossing there, and he was crossing from me to the other side when it happened.

JONATHAN KING . I am a fisherman, and live at Twickenham. I was coming from Teddington church towards Twickenham, and saw a chaise-cart and horse; when it came by me, the horse, I think, took fright at the white tomb stones - I cannot say the prisoner was the driver; he came by me, and hit the horse over the head or neck, by the side of the church, after he had passed the church: I only saw him strike the horse once - he was then two hundred and fifty yards, or more from where the accident happened; he was about twenty yards behind me when I first saw him, and just level with me when he hit the horse - he had got hold of the reins as light as he could hold them.

Q. And it was then he struck the horse? A. Yes; the horse was going as hard as it could, and he was stopping it as much as he could; I walked on and heard a woman scream out - there were two women there; I ran to the place as fast as I could - William Turner stood there, and said, "Here lies a man:" I went to him, put my arms under him, and drew him away - the person in the cart drew the horse back before I got up, and came to where the body lay: I lifted the man up, and said he was dead - he said,"Is he by G-d?" I then took him further, put him under the pales, and then none of us could see the prisoner and the cart - it was dark; there were pales on each side, and high trees and wood before us; we could not see his face: I said, "D-n you, you have killed a man" - he then said he was sorry for it, or something, I could not exactly hear what; he asked Turner if he would go up to the village for a doctor to come and take him away - Turner said he could not, for he wanted to get home; the prisoner then asked me - I refused, but gave no reason; I might say he would kill me as well as the man, but they bothered me so before the Grand Jury, I did not know what I said: I do not know whether I said why I would not go - he turned his horse round, and said if we would not go with him, he must be off; I cannot exactly tell what he said - I believe he said he must go, or something, but I really forget his words; it was that he should go and would not stay - that he would be d-d, or something; he would go and seek redress.

Q.Who was to seek redress? A. He did not say; I would tell you what it was, if I could think of it - it was if we would not go, he was off, or something; he had asked us to get into the cart, and go with him for a doctor - we refused: I told him he would kill me, or something of that kind - he then went off; I forget what he said - he said we might seek redress, and then we might kiss his *** and be d - d; he went away towards Twickenham, and I went towards Teddington, for a doctor; I have not spoken to the prisoner since - I saw him on the steps of this Court, but no where else; I have not conversed with anybody about this.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was it a clear or a dark night? A. Quite dark: I never saw the prisoner before - there is an awkward turning by Teddington church, and there are white tomb-stones close to the road; this is not the first horse I have seen startled by them - there are some poles project on the opposite side; he had passed them - he struck the horse to right it back into the road; it was before apparently going out of the road: he did not strike till the horse shyed, and he was pulling it in as hard as he could up to the time I heard the woman scream - the accident happened in a darker part of the road; he could not have seen the man in the road.

COURT. Q. Did you observe at what place the man was going before the horse shyed? A. Just at a trot, not very fast.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did it appear to you that he was driving furiously, or endeavouring to recover his horse? A. I think it was to recover it - he was not driving furiously; he was on his right side: the body lay on the left hand, very near the footpath - his feet were about a yard from the path, and his head in the road; the road is about seven feet wide; he was a tall man.

Q.Before the prisoner used these abusive terms, you had used abusive language to him? A. I did; it was in answer to our observations; he appeared irritated at what we said; he had asked us both to go for a doctor.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were near the church when he struck the horse? A. Yes; I could see before he started that he was pulling in his horse, and he kept on that way as far as I could see, which was not all the way; the man's head was crushed.

HESTER O'HARA . I was walking by the deceased, and saw a cart coming; he was crossing the road - the cart came up, and the horse knocked him down; it was galloping very fast: there is a bend in the road; the driver stopped the horse immediately, and turned it back again; I told him he had done murder, and not to ride over the man again: he said the man was not dead yet; two men came up: one of them lifted him up out of the road against the pales; the man in the cart asked them to go with him for assistance - the man said he would not trust himself with him, (he did not say why) he would go himself; he then turned round his cart, and said, "You may seek for recompense, and be d - d, and catch me if you can;" I was much frightened, and did not hear the men say any thing to him before that; the deceased's wife asked his name, but none of us could tell; he was gone then: no questions were put to him about his name - he said nothing about it: I live at Kingston, and went home with my children, who were with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Of course the people there saw you with your children? A. Yes; I had one in my arms, and one by my side: I took care of the man while they went to look for help; my husband works at the wire business; I sell matches about, but do not beg: when the cart turned back, it appeared to be going very near the spot where the man lay; I told him not to run over him again - it was in the clearest part of the road; there are no trees there, but little pales - they are not high: it was not so late as half-past five o'clock, for I asked the time afterwards; I had a drab cloak on that night, and here it is - I wore it here; I had not heard it mentioned that a person there had a drab cloak on.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you any other cloak? No- I have no knowledge of the prisoner; I did not hear the other witnesses examined.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a malster, and live at Teddington. I came up about two minutes after this accident happened; I cannot swear the prisoner is the man who was in the cart: it had gone by me at a great rate before the accident, just on this side Teddington church, galloping as fast as it could - I did not see the driver flog the horse- I did not see him till after he had passed the tombstones; I heard a woman halloo out - they said "For God's sake, Sir, come along as fast as you can;" when I got up, I saw the poor man lying in the road; King came up - we lifted him up, and sat him on the path with his back against the pales; then the prisoner, if it was him, said "Let us proceed to get some assistance - one of you go along with me;" King said "I will see you d - d first - I will not go with you; you will serve me the same," or something: when he found neither of us would go, he turned his horse and said, "Do your best and worst - catch me if you can:" I heard no more ill language; I left the poor man in care of the women, and went away, for I was hurt at seeing him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear King use any bad language to the man? A. What I have said: it was just getting dusk: it appeared to me that the horse had taken fright, and started - there is a sharpish turning by the church-yard, and some white tomb-stones come almost flush on the road, at the corner, and are likely to alarm a shy horse on a dark night; the man seemed to be holding the reins tight: there are several trees on each side, which make it darker.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-154

Before Mr. Justice Park.

420. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for falsely, deceitfully, and traitorously colouring a counterfeit half-crown, with materials producing the colour of silver; against the Statute, &c .

MESSRS. BOLLAND & LAW conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On Saturday, the 27th of December, in consequence of information, I went to No. 10, Little Earl-street, Seven-dials , about twelve o'clock, with Reynolds: I found the street-door open; I went up four pair of stairs, and came to a door which I found fastened - I told Reynolds to break it open - he did so instantly, by putting his shoulder against it; on entering the room, I found the prisoner sitting by the fire-side, near a table - he was much alarmed; he was rubbing something, which he dropped out of his hand; on the table was this pipkin, four bad half-crowns,

and five shillings - when he dropped the things he said,"Oh, my God! (or words to that effect) I am trepanned:" Reynolds picked up what he dropped - it was a half-crown, and he had in his other hand a bit of rag stained with some kind of colouring; I secured him, and examined his hands and fingers - his left-hand thumb and fingers in particular had a kind of yellow cast on: I asked him how old he was - he said fifty-one or fifty-two- I said "I think you are old enough to know you are doing wrong;" I turned and said, "What are you doing here," (pointing to the table) - he said it was poverty that brought him to it; I took him to the Police-office - I searched his other pocket at the office before I left him, and found a bad shilling in his coat-pocket, and a farthing to which some colour had been applied: I have them both here; I left Reynolds in possession of the room, and on my returning there, I found this pipkin and some sand paper - there was some colouring in the pipkin; I also found a file, and two cups with some wash in them, (which I have since emptied into bottles,) and a paper of cream of tarter - the paper was open on the table; the colouring in the pipkin was in a dry powdered state - some of the sand-paper was quite clean, and some rubbed, with a brassy appearance on it; I took a piece of old iron hoop from the fire-place, and one end of it was red hot.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. He said he had been trepanned - did he give you the name of the person? A. He did not, certainly - I know to whom he referred; I never knew any harm of that man: he is not in the service of the Mint; he is in the coach way: he was employed by Mr. Powell on this occasion; I had seen him three or four days before, and saw him that day before we went to the prisoner's room: I do not know that he had the key of the prisoner's room in his pocket.

Q. Is it not usual, to your knowledge, for some persons connected with the Mint to keep men in their pay to make inquiries, and give information on these subjects? A. No, I do not; I never participated in any thing of the kind: I gave the man 1s.; the prisoner was asked by whom he was trepanned, and said he did not know where the man lived, or his name: I knew his name; I am principally employed in prosecuting persons of this description; I knew the prisoner lived there before - for what I know, this may be the first occurrence of the sort that ever happened to him.

MR. LAW. Q. You gave the man 1s.? A. Yes, to get a drop of beer; he came down to give this information, on which I acted, and which information I found correct.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a constable. I accompanied Limbrick to this honse, and found the room door fastened; Limbrick told me to break it open: I did so, and directly observed the prisoner sitting by the side of the fire - he dropped the half-crown From his hand into the fire-place, and had a rag in his other hand:. I picked the half-crown up, and have it here - these other things laid on the table; I produce all the money: I found four half-crowns and five shillings on the table, all bad - some of them are finished, and some not.

WILLIAM LANE . I am a bedstead-maker, and live in Little Earl-street. My father is landlord of this house: the prisoner lodged in the top back room; he occupied it alone - he came there about the latter end of August.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know any thing of him? A. Not till he came there; he behaved well, and is a bellhanger: he went out regularly to work, and paid his rent regularly till five or six weeks before this happened - he then stated he had not finished his work, and could not pay us.

JASPER ATKINSON , ESQ. I am a moneyer of the Mint. This is a base half-crown - it has to undergo another process before it could be circulated.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of base coin. This half-crown appears to be in a state of process for re-colouring; I have looked at the different materials produced; the pipkin contains some part of nitrate of silver, which I have tried, and it colours copper money: all these things are such as are generally used for this process; two or three of the shillings are cast, and do not require it; the others are copper and brass.

MR. POWELL. I am assistant-solicitor to the Mint. The person who gave this information, came to me; all informations are given to me in the office, and, when necessary, the officers are employed - we do not suffer officers to receive informations, or to act without our first making inquiry; the man came to me of his own accord - we do not employ them to go about inquiring.

Cross-examined. Q. You, of course, are fully aware of the person to whom the officer alludes? A. Yes - I never saw him before he gave me information of this particular man; he first came to me, as far back as the beginning of November - I saw him, perhaps, half a dozen times before the prisoner was apprehended; he did not give me information about the prisoner at each of those times; I believe his name was introduced every time, though other subjects might be introduced - his first information did not refer to the prisoner alone; the prisoner was apprehended in consequence of what passed between this man and the officer at that particular time; I was not on the spot at the time of the apprehension, but was there immediately after - we are generally near the spot, in order to go and see what is found; I had seen the informant that morning, about two hours before- he received nothing from me before the apprehension; I have since given him 5l.; and, in explanation, I must say that he had never applied to me for a single sixpence, and had been losing a great deal of time for upwards of a month; he was out of work, and I thought it not too much, he having lost upwards of five weeks - I shall charge the 5l. in my account; I have general authority to pay monies.

MR. LAW. Q. Have you general authority to employ persons giving informations respecting base coin? A. Yes - we take every means in our power to ascertain whether the reports are true, and from the general knowledge we have, we can almost always tell whether the person is deceiving us or not; we do not rely on the single person giving information.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was there any thing in the information of that individual which would lead you to know or believe whether the prisoner might or not be entrapped? A. There certainly was - I knew his comnexions; we take all the means we conceive legitimate, to inquire into the truth of the information, and in this case I took all the pains I could to satisfy myself that he

was directing his information correctly; I had other information.

JURY. Q. Has Mr. Powell any apprehension that the 5l. will be disallowed in his account? A.None whatever.

Prisoner's Defence. I will state the truth, as far as I can. On the day before Christmas, this individual called me out of the shop where I have worked six or seven years, to go and drink with him, saying it was Christmas time; I went with him to several places, and drank both liquor and porter, till I got intoxicated, and towards evening we parted; in the morning he came to my lodgings, before breakfast, and brought these very identical things- I had not even a bad shilling, sixpence, half-crown, or anything; I had not 1d. - even the halfpence the officer took from my pocket belonged to him; he brought in these things, and put down 9d., saying it would purchase some stuff, and wanted me to go out for it - he went out, after preparing these things himself, for colouring - he scowered them, and then said he was going to meet a person to get some money; he went out and returned in about twenty minutes, with some money, then tried the stuff, and said it was not sufficiently strong, it required cream of tartar, which he went and bought himself, went through the process with it, and asked me to assist him; in about twenty minutes more, he said the stuff was not good enough, he would go and get some more silver - he took the latch-key of my door, saying he would get it, and return in about ten minutes, in the course of which time the officers came - when he brought in the cream of tartar, he wanted to take the key from outside the door and put it inside, which I never did, for I always kept it outside, and I made him return it to the outside. As I now stand here, I plead your clemency before God; I am fifty-six years of age, and from my childhood have obtained an honest livelihood by hard work, and my character was never impeached - I hope you will take all this into your serious consideration, and spare my life.

WILLIAM LANE re-examined. Our street-door has a latch, and is always kept shut; every lodger has a key.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-155

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

421. GEORGE ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Clark Robinson , on the King's highway, on the 26th of December , at St. Sepulchre , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 7s., and 1 linen collar, value 1s., his property .

JOHN CLARK ROBINSON . I live in Well-street, Oxford-street. On the night of the 26th of December, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was in West-street , St. Sepulchre's; I was alone - I knew very well what I was doing; I was sober - as I went down the street, I was tripped up by four young men, who I saw standing together on the pavement; it was a dark night - I had never seen them before, and should not know any of them; I was tripped up, and rolled in the mud - in a minute they were all four on me; I called Watch! directly, and then they dispersed; three ran up the hill, and one down - I had lost my hat then, and I took two of the men myself; the patrol took the third - the hat had my wife's collar in it; I had no idea the hat was gone, till I got up - it came off my head on being tripped up; we took the three men to the watch-house - I had not lost sight of them; I followed them immediately - they were all searched, but nothing found on them; they were locked up for the night - I gave a description of the fourth man, as well as I could; the patrol went out in search of him - I stopped at the watch-house about two hours, to dry myself, and, while I was there, the watchman brought the very man in - (the prisoner) - I could recognize his person; they asked what sort of a hat mine was - I told them it was a silk one, and had my wife's collar in it; he said, "Well, that will do?" and produced it; it was on the prisoner's head, and the collar in it - I could not have sworn to the hat by any mark, but by the collar being in it; it was very like mine - they did not shew it me, till I told them what was in it; the prisoner said nothing when I claimed it - he said nothing, in my presence, about the collar; the hat and collar are worth 8s.

GEORGE JORDAN . I am a patrol. I was in West-street, near one o'clock on the morning of the 27th of December; the prosecutor called Watch! and said he had been knocked down and robbed - there was a mob round him; I had not seen him knocked down - he stated what he had lost; I asked him if he could identify any of the men - he said he could not; there was a mob gathered - I told them to disperse, and called another watchman to clear them away; we were obliged to take three to the watch-house - the prosecutor went with us, and not finding the property on them, he stated what sort of persons he suspected, and I went to look for the fourth, from his description; and about an hour after I saw the prisoner coming down Great Saffron-hill, which leads into West-street, with a flannel jacket on; he had a hat on - I took him, and asked what hat he had on, knowing it to be a different one to what he generally wears; I knew him before - he said it was his own hat; I told him I did not believe it, and he must go with me to the watch-house - I took him there; I took the hat off his head going along, and found a collar in it - I saw the prosecutor at the watch-house, and asked him to describe his hat; he said, if he saw it, he should know it, and that there was a collar in it; he did not say that before I told him I had found it - he had not mentioned it in my hearing; he did not mention the collar, until I showed it him- I did not ask if he had lost any thing else; the prosecutor said the collar belonged to his wife - the prisoner said nothing to that, but as we came along, be told me if I would let him go he would make it all right, and he attempted to tear the lining out of the hat, but I would not let him.

JOHN CLARK ROBINSON . I have no doubt this is my wife's collar - we had been out to a party the night before, and as she was coming home the wind blew it off her neck; I took it up, and put it into my hat, and forgot to take it out the next day - I believe the hat to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the street - the prosecutor was quarrelling with a female; I went up and interfered - he pushed me down; we both fell in the crowd - he picked up my hat by mistake, and I picked.

up his; he was in liquor - they could get no sense into him at the watch-house; he had sworn to another hat before I was taken.

JOHN CLARK ROBINSON . I was not talking to any girl- I am a painter .

GEORGE JORDAN . The prosecutor had been drinking, but stated every thing exact; I know nothing about his swearing to another hat.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18290115-156

Before Mr. Justice Park.

422. ROBERT YOUNG and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Bernier , on the 16th of December , and stealing 4 table-cloths, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 1 cloth, value 1d., and 1 basket, value 2d., her property .

ELIZABETH BERNIER . I have a husband, who lives with me; these things are his property.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-157

423. JOSEPH BURNHAM and ESTHER SHAW were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Matthew Milton , on the 1st of December , at Hillingdon , and stealing therein 3 coats, value 8l.; 1 piece of linen, value 2l.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 1 spoon, value 4s.; 3 waistcoats, value 1l.; 36 knives, value 3l.; 36 forks, value 3l.; 2 salt-cellars, value 10s.; 1 apron, value 1s.; 1 hat, value 18s.; 4 hams, value 50s.; 3 pairs of boots, value 4l.; 7 dozen bottles of wine, value 21l.; 10 sheets, value 5l., and 5 shirts, value 50s., his property .

MATTHEW MILTON . I live at Hillingdon, and keep the house. On Monday, the 1st of December, about six o'clock in the morning, I left my house, and returned on Tuesday evening, between four and five o'clock; I left a maidservant in the house, and two men servants sleep in the yard; my wife and children were at another house. On returning on Tuesday afternoon I missed some property; the damage done to the things left behind was more than the value of what was taken: I should think my whole loss, from damage and all, is 200l. or more.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know the prisoner Shaw's husband? A. Yes, he lived at Drayton, I believe, with her; he has absconded, I understand: I was looking after him.

JAMES HIGGS . I live at Useley, near Hillingdon, and am a brickmaker. I heard of the robbery at Mr. Milton's house; on the day before I heard of it I saw the prisoner Burnham - I was at work at the brick-kiln, and was stamping to keep my feet warm; Burnham came along with another man, taller than himself - I did not know either of them before: I said, "Good morning, Puttey - I wish I had had a little of what you have had too much of;" they both appeared intoxicated - the tall man said to the prisoner, with a wicked oath, "If we had known it we would have had all the furniture;" Burnham said, "Would you? Would you?" that was all I heard him say; the tall man lay down about twenty yards from the kilu - Burnham went about one hundred yards below him, and stood at the bridge; Burnham had two large bundles, and the tall man one - two of the bundles were coloured, and one white; this was a little before eight o'clock in the morning - it was quite light; they went away: Mr. Milton's house is about a mile from where I saw them. I know the prisoner Shaw- I met her that day, close to my own home, which is about three hundred yards from the kiln; she had nothing with her: it might be a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after I saw the men - she had a shawl and a bonnet on.

Prisoner BURNHAM. Q. Did you ever see me before? A. No; I took particular notice of you, because you leaned against me, and the other man I could not see so well, as his shirt-collar came so high over his face, and his hat came over his face.

RICHARD SMITH . I keep the King's Head public-house, North Hyde. On the Tuesday or Wednesday morning, the 2d or 3d of December, about nine o'clock or half-past, I saw both the prisoners - they had another man with them, rather taller than Burnham; they were in my public-house, which is about two miles and a half, or three miles, from the kiln Higgs works at - they were all in company together, and had one pot of beer; they had three bundles - I did not notice, but believe one was in something white; I had known the woman before for eight or ten years - I did not know Burnham before: the tall man was not Shaw's husband; the two men carried the bundles - they staid in my house about half an hour, and then went towards Brentford, all three together.

JOHN BURCH . I am constable of Hillingdon. I went to Mr. Milton's house on Wednesday, the 3d of December, and found the glass broken in: the back-parlour window shutters were cut with a centre-bit; I went down to the cellar door, and found that broken open - a great many of the locks of the drawers and cupboards up stairs were forced; the laths of the wine-bin in the cellar were broken down, a great deal of wine spilt about, and bottles broken- I did not know Shaw before: I went to her house about nine o'clock that evening, and searched her pockets; I found a little purse, with four duplicates in it - she was in bed when I knocked at the door; her husband was not there - she said he was gone down into the country; I found this pair of shoes under her bed: I found one port wine-bottle, a dark-lantern, this hammer, with a crow-bar at the end of it, this little saw, and a little whistle - I found nothing more; I took one of the duplicates to Butcher's, at Brentford, and found two coats: I observed some pattenmarks on the gravel-walk under the window which was broken; the window is about three feet from the ground: there is a back door to the house, near the window - there is no out-house or privy between the back door and where the patten-marks were on the gravel.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether there are any female residents in the house? A. There is one female servant; I have not compared any pattens belonging to Shaw with the marks - I found nothing else to indicate that a woman had been there; I found no pattens in Shaw's house: search has been made for her husband, but we have not been able to find him - she did not say the lantern and things belonged to her husband; I did not ask her.

MRS. MARY ANN MILTON . I am the wife of Matthew Milton; we have one maid-servant. I was at home on the Monday till half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, and then went about half a mile's distance, to another house of our's, and slept there that night; I left the maid-servant at the house - it was not particularly wet; it was dirty:

the gravel was moist, and pattens would make an impression on it. About eight o'clock on the Tuesday morning, in consequence of something the man-servant told me, I went back to the house at Hillingdon, and observed that the house had been broken open; I had seen it shut up before I left, and saw the back-parlour window secure - I observed some patten-marks on the gravel-walk, which I had never seen before in my life; there is no out-house or building that a female might put pattens on to go to - I myself have no pattens: I missed every thing out of the drawers; they were very much broken indeed, and all the things turned out in my bed-room; the cellar was locked up on the Monday, and the key put into my bed-room drawer - I found the beer-cellar door standing wide open; I missed a large cheese and a great deal of wine, some table and bed linen out of the drawers, and from different places in the house, shirts, coats, and a variety of other things.

Cross-examined. Q. No pattens were found on the prisoner's premises? A. No; my servant never wears pattens in that part of the place.

SUSAN DARLING . I am servant to Mr. Milton. I was left in the house when they were gone; I saw the house fastened before I went to bed; the doors, windows, and every thing: the back window was quite safe, and the cellar door was fast - I went into master's bed-room, and all the drawers were safe; I was alone in the house: I heard a noise in the middle of the night - I lay still, and heard the clock strike two; I got up about half-past six o'clock, when the young man, Laurence, called me - I found the window broken, and the shutter broken in the back parlour; the shutter was cut out - I found mistress' drawers all taken out and turned upside down in the room: Laurence had been in the house till after eleven o'clock the night before, when I let him out to go and sleep in the yard, and then I fastened the house; at that time he observed to me that there was a whistle, and I heard it myself: I missed four great coats from the hall in the morning. and one from the parlour, and a pair of shoes - there was some linen gone, a large piece of roastbeef, and four hams were taken out of the kitchen - six aprons of mine were taken from the kitchen-drawer; I am sure all these things were quite safe the night before. I did not wear pattens there, and had none; I have worn some since - I did not make the patten-marks by the window.

JAMES LAURENCE . I am a servant to Mr. Milton. I was at his house on Monday, the 1st of December, and staid there till a little after eleven o'clock; as I was going away I heard a whistle - I mentioned it to the maidservant: I got up at two o'clock in the morning, to help the man put the horse to the cart - master is a farmer; I heard no noise then - I went to bed again, got up about half-past five, and went out into the fields to get the cows; I found a basket near the road, about two hundred yards from the house - I had used that basket in the house the night before, I am certain; I found the gate of the house open, and called up the maid-servant.

SARAH SMITH . I am the wife of Richard Smith - my evidence is the same as my husband's.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Were you in the public-house with your husband? A. I saw the woman come in first, and order the beer: the two men followed after her - they came in a few minutes after her.

JAMES CHAPMAN BUTCHER . I am a pawnbroker, and live at New Brentford. On Tuesday, the 2d of December, the female prisoner came to my shop and offered two coats in pawn about twelve o'clock; they were wrapped in an apron - she asked 1l. on them; they were dirty, and she accounted for that by saying her husband was drunk, or had been drunk, and they would be taken out again in the course of the day; they were not taken out - I delivered the coats on the 4th of December to Murray and Burch, who brought the duplicates; I have the duplicate here - the name on them is William Walley .

JAMES PIPER . I live with my father, who keeps the Six Bells public-house, at Brentford. On a Tuesday, five or six weeks ago, I remember two men coming to my father's house between eleven and twelve o'clock; the male prisoner was one, the other was a tall man - they had a pint of beer to drink; they were both fighing, but not together; Burnham fought with a boatman - I remember Shaw being there; I did not see her in the house, I saw her out of doors - she came just as they had done fighting; I had seen her before - I did not notice any bundle with her; I do not know whether either of the men was Shaw's husband.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether she is married? A. No.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I apprehended the prisoners. I know nothing more.

CHARLES MURRAY . I am a headborough. I have two coats which I got from Mr. Butcher at Brentford.

MR. MILTON. These coats are mine, I am certain - these shoes are mine, I know them well; I have worn them - I know nothing of the saw, hammer, or lanterns.

MRS. MILTON. This is my apron.

BURNHAM'S Defence. I am innocent - I never saw a thing belonging to the gentleman till they were at Queen-square.

SHAW'S Defence. My husband brought these two coats home to me, tied in the apron as they were: he took the two shoes out of the apron, and gave me the coats tied in the apron and made me go and pawn them- I never wore pattens. I have my marriage certificate here.

RALPH IVES . I am a labourer; Shaw is my daughter. I was present at her marriage at Stoke church, Oxfordshire; she married John Shaw about two years ago as near as I can recollect - I have not seen Shaw lately; after their marriage they lived in one of General Arabin's houses at Hillingdon.

Two witnesses gave Shaw a good character.

BURNHAM - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

SHAW - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18290115-158

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

424. MARY ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of December , 1 tin-boiler, value 8s.; 1 bed-tick, value 2s.; 7 stone bottles, value 1s.; 1 metal bleeding-bowl, value 2s., and 9 printed books, value 1s. , the goods of the Mayor, Commonalty, and Citizens of London, of the City of London, as Governors of the house of the

poor, commonly called St. Bartholomew's Hospital , near West Smithfield, London, of the foundation of King Henry the 8th.

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT DAINTRY . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 18th of December I was at Vauxhall-gate; Collins came by - I stopped, and questioned her about a basket which she had got; and in consequence of what she said the prisoner was apprehended - I have got the things here.

MARY COLLINS . The officer stopped me with these articles - I got them from St. Bartholomew's Hospital from sister Ross, the prisoner; she told me to take them to her mother's, No. 14, Ely-place, Lambeth, and when I came back she would pay me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know her before? A. I did; I had been to and from to my husband, who died in the hospital, and I had a child under her care - I do not know whether any one saw her give me the things; there were plenty of people in the ward - they were wrapped up and in a basket; I did not know what they were.

WILLIAM WICKS . I am steward of the hospital. On the evening of the 18th of December, two officers called on me - I saw the prisoner; she denied knowing any thing of the property or of Collins - I asked her if she knew any thing of the property being moved from her ward; she said No - I Said, "Then I must call in the officers, who are in the adjoining room;" the property was on the table -I asked if she had had any thing removed from her ward, which she also denied; I then called in the officers - they asked if she knew any thing of the property; they said they had seen Collins - they neither threatened or promised her any thing; I said I should not allow her to sleep in the ward that night, and the officers took her away - she said she would give herself up, and she confessed having given the property to Collins; the linen is never sold from the hospital - this boiler was made for the Queen's ward on the 12th of December, and on the 18th it was not to be found - there are two nurses to the ward; the prisoner was the sister, and had command of the ward.

SAMUEL WALL . I furnished this tin boiler to the prisoner's ward on the 12th of December. I know it well, it is moveable.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Confined 2 Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-159

425. JOHN FORWARD was indicted stealing, on the 9th of December , 4 ozs. of tea, value 4d. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-160

426. EDWARD RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of January , 2 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 7 half-crowns, 16 shillings, and 5 sixpences , the monies of William Randall ; and that he had been convicted of felony at the Session, held at the Old Bailey, on the 17th of April, in the 3d year of his Majesty's reign .

WILLIAM RANDALL . I live in Long-alley, Sun-street . I did not know the prisoner till he came to me on the 14th of January, between one and two o'clock, to order four Spanish wood bedsteads for a West India order; I keep an open shop - there was nobody but myself in the shop; he asked me the price of four which were in the shop - they came to 24l. 10s.; he said they were to be very carefully packed and delivered at the West India Docks, to Captain Wilson - the packing was to be 12s. more; he said he would write out an invoice on the day I took them to the Docks - he said Captain Wilson was very busily engaged, and if I did not see him, I need not fear having my money, for the Captain would be on 'Change or Cornhill, and I was to meet him the same day, at four o'clock, at the Jerusalem Coffee-house- I went and met him coming out of the coffee-house; he said Captain Wilson was very busily engaged in the Committee-room at Lloyd's; he took me over there - he had desired me to bring the difference of a 30l. note with me, which I did: when he got me into the passage at Lloyd's, he said on the stairs, "Have you got the bill?" I said Yes- he said, "Then give it to me, as the Captain is busily engaged in the Committee-room, you cannot see him;" I gave him the bill - he said, "You wait here, and I will go and see the Captain - I will be back in a minute or two;" he came back in about ten minutes, and said, "Have you got the change for a 30l. note? I said, "I don't think I have, but the bankers are all open, and I know a banker's where I can get it if you will give me the note;" he said that would not do, I could go home and get it: I put my hand into my pocket and gave him 4l. 16s. - he said that would do, and he would call in the morning for the 2s.: he had a quantity of papers in his hands, and was writing with a pencil; he took the change and took no notice about the 30l. note, but turned round on his heels, and was walking away; I tapped him on the shoulder and said, "Where is the 30l. note?" - he said, "God bless me. I will fetch it in a minute, I was going for it;" I began to suspect then, and told him so - he said he could be trusted with 500l.; he was going away and I said, "Mind you are not gone long;" he said, "I cannot be long," I at last said, "I won't let you go, I will have my money back;" he did not wish to give it me back - I collared him, and said he should not go, I would go to Captain Wilson with him; he said they would not allow me in there - he never took me to Captain Wilson; he struggled a good deal, but I kept hold of him. I have heard nothing more about the bedsteads; the money consisted of two sovereigns, and two half-sovereigns - I insisted upon having it from him, or I would take him be- the Lord Mayor; he said, "Oh, nonsense," but at last I said I must have my money back, and then there could be no harm in letting him go - he gave me my money, and I gave him in charge.

JOHN BRADY . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge; I knew him before - he begged of me to let him go; he said nothing to the charge - I have a certificate of his conviction in 1822: I took him into custody then and heard him tried - he is the very person who was tried by the name of John Edward Hewitt. (Certificate read.)

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290115-161

427. JAMES BIDEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Hypolite Bailliere , from his person .

HYPOLITE BAILLIERE. I live in Bedford-street, Bedford-square: I am a bookseller . On the 26th of December, about half-past three o'clock, I was in Cheapside ,

returning home; I had a handkerchief in my pocket: I did not notice the prisoner near me; Thorowgood told me it was gone; I felt, and missed it, and saw it in the prisoner's hand; I knew it - it had no mark; it was the same pattern and colour.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD . I am an officer of the City.

I followed the prisoner from the Royal Exchange, in company with another - I knew them both before; I saw them both follow the prosecutor from the Poultry to the corner of the Old Jewry, and there saw the prisoner putting the handkerchief into his pocket - it had been hanging out of Mr. Bailliere's pocket about half an inch, in the Poultry; I did not see it drawn out, they were so close to him; I took hold of the prisoner, with his hand in his pocket, and the handkerchief in it - I told Mr. Bailliere; his companion ran away; I have seen him several times since, but have not taken him: I shewed the handkerchief to Mr. Bailliere, who said it was his - the prisoner said some man had picked it up, and given it to him; I was so close to him, that was impossible, and neither of them had stooped - he never claimed the handkerchief as his own.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home; there were plenty of people passing - I took the handkerchief up, opened it twice, and carried it open in my hand ten or fifteen yards, when he came and seized me - he asked what I had got; I told him a handkerchief; I said "I picked it up, and if it is your's, tell me the colour" - plenty of people must have seen me pick it up; I did not say a person gave it to me.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD. He told me the person who ran away gave it to him into his hand - neither of them stooped.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290115-162

428. JOHN TRAVWICK was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The circumstances of this case amounting to felony, the prisoner was detained till next Sessions, and on this indictment ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18290115-163

429. WILLIAM PARSONS and BENJAMIN HOLLAND were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of John Foster , from his person .

JOHN FOSTER . I am a carpenter , and live at Stoke Newington. On Sunday, the 21st of December, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was in King-street, entering into Smithfield , going home; I had a handkerchief safe half an hour before; I did not perceive the prisoners near me; I heard a cry out that my handkerchief was taken; I turned, and Toole had the prisoner by the collar- I felt in my pocket, and it was gone; it was shewn to me by the constable: Parsons was gone; it was shewn to see Holland till next day, at Guildhall.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you sober? A.Quite.

THOMAS TOOLE . I am a shoemaker. I was going up King-street, Smithfield; I saw Mr. Foster and another gentleman arm-in-arm: I saw the prisoners try two or three gentlemen's pockets before they came to Foster, and get the handkerchiefs half out: I saw Holland lift up Foster's pocket two or three times, and saw him take the handkerchief out - Parsons was alongside of him; directly he got it out, he gave it to Parsons: I was five or six yards from them; they crossed over the road to me -I crossed, and went to lay hold of them both; I got Parsons, but Holland ran away on my taking the other; directly I took hold of Parsons, he threw the handkerchief down: a gentleman picked it up, and delivered it to me- I sent a young man whom I met after Holland, who was brought to the watch-house in about half an hour; I gave the handkerchief to Wildey - the prosecutor claimed it; I am quite certain of Holland: I knew both of their persons before.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not a Police-officer? A. No; I was not out with the officers; I have been present accidentally when robberies have been committed: I do not go out to look for these things; it was on Sunday night- I had been up Holborn, Brook-street, and round that way, and met Young; we were together when this happened - we were never engaged in a case together before; I saw Holland lift up the pocket two or three times before; I told the prosecutor the instant it was done; I may have been examined here six or seven times; it is not half so profitable as shoemaking - I can earn twice as much at my business.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I am a saddle and harness maker. I was with Toole on Sunday night; I met him in Holborn - I saw the prisoners try several gentlemen's pockets- they got two handkerchiefs half-way out of two gentlemen's pockets; I watched them farther, and saw Foster - they followed him into King-street, up nearly to Smithfield-bars; I saw Holland take the handkerchief out of Foster's pocket, and give it to Parsons, whom Toole collared, and called the prosecutor - Holland ran away; I ran after him, and took him at the corner of West-street, directly - I called the watchman, who took him to St. Sepulchre's watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. You are Toole's friend? A. We live close together; I went out to take a walk - not to look for thieves; I never gave evidence before; I was five or six yards from the prisoners - I cannot be mistaken.

THOMAS WILDEY . I am inspector of the watch. I saw the prisoners trying several pockets, between eight and nine o'clock; I was at the watch-house when Parsons was brought in - a handkerchief was produced -Foster saw it, and claimed it; Toole delivered it to me; Holland was afterwards brought in.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PARSON'S Defence. I was on Snow-hill; I saw the handkerchief on the pavement, took it up, and hallooed out to see if anybody owned it; this young man collared me, and accused this prisoner of picking a pocket.

HOLLAND'S Defence. I was coming up; heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran to look at the mob - a gentleman knocked me down, and took me.

THOMAS TOOLE . I might have seen them about for a month before this; I know them quite well.

PARSONS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HOLLAND - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18290115-164

430. MICHAEL KEEFE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of December , 1 table-cloth, value 1s. , the goods of Robert Webb .

ROBERT WEBB. I keep an eating-house in Great Tower-street . The prisoner came, and had some refreshment, on the 10th of December, about dusk: he paid for what he had, and went away; having suspicion, I kept my eye on him, and immediately he went out, I looked at the table, and the cloth was gone; I sent the waiter after him - he brought him back, and I took it from his hat- he said he could bring a number of people to his character.

JAMES HALL . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took him in charge; the table-cloth was taken from him before I came: he had about 2 1/2d. in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-165

NEW COURT, Fourth Day.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

431. JANE BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 purse, value 12s., 2 half-crowns, and 11 shillings , the property of Nicholas Conne , her master.

SUSANNAH CONNE. I am the wife of Nicholas Conne ; the prisoner never was in my service - she came to see my servant on Sunday, the 30th of November; I had been writing in the kitchen, and had changed a sovereign - I had put 16s. into my purse, and left it on the books in which I had been writing; I saw the prisoner come in, and go down into the kitchen; I afterwards rang for my servant, to put coals on the fire, which she did, and soon after the prisoner and she went out to church; about seven o'clock, I then recollected my purse had been left in the kitchen; I went down, and it was gone; when my servant came home, I spoke to her, and got the prisoner taken up, on the 8th of December - the purse was found in her possession; I know it because it came from Paris a short time ago.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD. I took the prisoner on the 8th of December, and found this purse in a pocket, in a bundle, under the bed, which the prisoner owned; she denied it at first, but afterwards said she took it, with 16s. in it, through great distress, that she had lived upon the money, and the servant had nothing to do with it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-166

432. JAMES DILLON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of January , 1 saddle, value 20s., and 1 pair of mud-boots, value 5s. , the goods of Nicholas McCann .

NICHOLAS McCANN . I am a surgeon . On the 9th of January I went to see a patient, in Frederick-street, Westminster ; a boy had followed, and asked to hold my horse a few minutes; I said Yes; he wore a light short jacket, a seal skin cap, and was about the height of the prisoner, but I cannot say that it was him - the saddle and mud-boots were on the horse when I went in, and the leathers were fastened to the saddle; I came out in about ten minutes, and missed the horse - I found him on the right side of the road, but the saddle, boots, and boy were gone- it was between four and five o'clock.

WILLIAM IVIMEY . I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday evening, the 13th of January, in a house in New Tothill-street; I found nothing on him - he denied the robbery.

WILLIAM CONNER . On Friday, the 9th of January, I met the prisoner, with a saddle and mud-boots on his head, about five o'clock in the afternoon, in Duck-lane, Westminster; I asked him where he got them; he said from a gentleman's horse in Regent-street - he wanted to leave it at Mrs. Palmer's, but she would not let him, and he took it away.

Prisoner. Q. Have you ever been in trouble? A. Never; I was never here, or under any charge - I am a cutler; the prisoner asked me to give him a night's lodgings, which I did.

MARY ANN McCASKER . I am the patient the prosecutor came to visit. I saw this boy in the afternoon, between three and four o'clock, and took particular notice of him; I saw him about four o'clock, as near as I can recollect, and I am quite sure he is the boy who took the prosecutor's horse - he crossed the road, and took it; I am certain of him - it was not dark.

Prisoner's Defence. Conner enticed me away from my place, and then wanted me to go out with him thieving; he said he did not want me to touch any thing, but to go with him - I am innocent of the crime; I have sent for the woman where he says I wanted to leave the saddle, but she has not come.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-167

433. HANNAH GOODMAN was indicted for bigamy .

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am a constable of Leeds. I apprehended the prisoner at Liverpool; I know nothing of this circumstance.

MARY GOODMAN . I was present at the marriage of the prisoner with my son, Henry Goodman , on the 4th of June, last year, at St. Martin's Old Church. Birmingham.

Prisoner. Q.You know your son was married at the time? A. No, he was not; I went to church with you.

Q. Yes, he was married to a Miss Williams, and he brought her home to you? A. No - he had been married to a widow woman, and lived with her six years; I was with her when she died - he was a widower, and was married to the prisoner as a widower; he is still living.

Q. That was not Miss Williams, she came from Worcester? A. I knew a person of the name of Williams, but, upon my oath, he was never married to any other woman but the prisoner; he brought no woman home to my house - I keep a public-house; he did not live with her in Furnival's Inn-court.

WILLIAM EAGLE . I married the prisoner on the 15th of September last, at St. Martin's church, Middlesex .

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Goodman certainly was a married man, and had a wife and two children in London.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-168

434. THOMAS GYETT was indicted for stealing,

on the 15th of November , 4 fruit trees, value 2l., the goods of Reginald Whitley , Peter Braines , and Thomas Milne , then growing in a certain garden .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES PITMAN . I am foreman to the prosecutors; they are nurserymen , and live at Fulham - they have recently been robbed of fruit trees, to the value of 5l.; I have seen part of them in the possession of Mr. Bacchus, a publican, at Hammersmith - I saw them about three weeks ago; I can speak to one of the trees which are here - here are four; the value of each one is about 10s. or 10s. 6d. - they are standard-trained nectarines, or peaches; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were they taken at different times? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. What do you mean? were they taken one at a time? A. No, three and four at a time; we lost more than these - the smallest number we lost at once was two, and the smallest value of any of them, was about 6s.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-169

435. ALEXANDER FOX and THEODORE FOX were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 2 shirts, value 9s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 3 collars, value 2s.; and one night-cap, value 1s., the goods of Robert Downes , and 1 cap, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Hill .

ROBERT DOWNES . I am a silversmith , and live in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell. I lost these articles from Mr. Black's, Cow-cross , where I had taken them to be washed, on Tuesday night, the 30th of December; I put them on the counter between eight and ten o'clock - I know nothing of the prisoners; these are the articles.

EDWARD HILL . I am a baker . I had a fur cap, which I lost from the bake-house at Mr. Black's.

MARY MACMELLON . I live at Mr. Black's, where the prisoners brought potatoes to bake; Downes brought these clothes for my sister to get washed - the two prisoners, and another boy, came and had their potatoes out about seven o'clock, and the other boy came about ten o'clock, to know if he could have the potatoes warmed again; I said No - the prosecutor came again, and said, "Where is my bundle gone?" next morning, I recollected that a boys had come with potatoes, and gave the information.

RICHARD MILLER . I am an officer. I went with Terry, and took the prisoners - I found the property in the house; most of the things were in Alexander Fox 's box - the cap was in Theodore Fox's box; they said they were their own.

JAMES TERRY . I went and took the prisoners; I found part of the property in Theodore Fox's box - he said it was his box, that the things were his, and he could take me to the person where he had them made; there was a third boy, but he said nothing; he had been seen at the baker's - they were all in bed; Theodore Fox said he bought the cap in Tottenham-court-road.

EDWARD HILL . I know this cap to be mine; there was some flour inside of it - I am sure it is mine, and was in the bake-house about five o'clock; I missed it about eleven.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THEODORE FOX'S Defence. The things found in my box belonged to me.

ALEXANDER FOX - GUILTY . Aged 13.

THEODORE FOX - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18290115-170

436. THOMAS LEE and GEORGE HARBER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 7 bushels of plaster of Paris, value 2l. , the goods of James Laing .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES LAING. I have been building a terrace of houses, at Upper Clapton ; the two prisoners were in my service - I never authorized them to take away any plaster of Paris, or any thing else.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You were on very bad terms with these men? A. No; I had not had a quarrel with Harber on the Saturday - he had, at various times, demanded money of me; I usually carried a brace of pistols with me, as I went up the green lanes - one Saturday night, five or six weeks before, the men were all drunk, and were very uproarious; Harber insisted upon having money I was certain he had not earned - he brought a mob of labourers, and swore he would not leave without money; I had a pistol, and I took it from under the cushion, and said, "If any man attempts to break the peace, it will be at his peril;" Harber, and about a dozen others, were in the room at the time, but that was all settled, and, I think, a week afterwards, he came to me and affected to be sorry for it; I did not consider myself in safety among them - I was not only in danger of my life, but my work was neglected; I said, "I think you are a good workman - I think the only apology that can be made, is, that you were drunk; I shall take no further notice of it, if you will go on with your work," and he went on; he left me on Saturday, the 13th of December - on the Friday afternoon, I said,"Harber, you will let me know at what price you will take the next adjoining house," and he said he would; I said, "I would rather let you do the whole house at a price, than at measuring value," and the next day I brought another plasterer on the ground; Harber took offence, and told my foreman he would work no longer, as another plasterer was brought on the ground - he received what money was appropriated for him, on the Saturday, and left; I saw no more of him till the Tuesday, when he and Lee came and insisted upon taking away some articles - I said I insisted upon nothing being removed; I happened to be in one of the buildings, and I saw Lee taking something - I gave him notice that I would have him taken as a common felon; he came again, and gave me some abusive language - Harber has no claim on me.

JURY. Q.Whose materials were the houses built with? A. Mine; I paid him so much per yard - the plaster of Paris was taken from the casting-room.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You were building these houses, and found all the materials? A. Yes - the prisoners had nothing to do with the materials, but to use them; I never authorized them to carry any to their own houses.

SAMUEL MEAD . I was employed by Mr. Laing, to

make plaster; the prisoners worked on the premises; I saw Skinner there - I saw Harber and Lee in the casting-room; there was a little green box, with about three pecks of plaster of Paris in it, which the prisoners carried away - they went across the common, towards their house; they live together, down Hill-street - this was about five weeks ago to-morrow

Cross-examined. Q. What day was this? A. On Thursday, about eight o'clock in the evening; some of us worked quite late that night - my brother Robert was with me, no one else; I asked Harber where he was going to take it - he said down to the cottages; I watched him, but he did not take it to the cottages - Mr. Laing's houses are in the road, but he went past the cottages - I followed him to the first of the cottages; I do not know that he could see that I was following him; it was eight o'clock in the evening - I did not see him go to his own house; I saw the box again in the casting-room - that was three or four days before he left the prosecutor's employ; I did not tell anybody of this, till he had left Mr. Laing - I heard him say he would have nothing more to do with Mr. Laing; when Mr. Laing asked me, I told him - he asked me whether I had seen the prisoner take any plaster away; he said he would pay me for the day's work that I had lost - he did not say, "I will give you a shilling or two;" I have not told anybody that Mr. Laing promised to give me some money; he did not say any thing about a prison to me - it was a week, all but one day, after I saw it, before I mentioned it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Mr. Laing directly or indirectly offer you any thing to tell him? A. No; I did not tell this before the prisoners were taken, because I thought they would hit me.

MR. LAING. The value of a bushel of plaster of Paris is about 7s.; I never offered any bribe to Mead to tell me any thing about this, but I said I would pay him his day's work if he lost any time in my employ - he has been working two years on my premises, and has been regularly paid.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not Harber under contract to work for nobody but you? A. That was the impression, but there was no contract.

HARBER'S Defence. I never took any thing but to use in his employ; we did work at several different places on the premises.

CHARLES PITT . I am a surveyor, and was employed by Mr. Laing during the time Harber worked there; it was part of an understanding that Harber was to work for no one but Mr. Laing - there is an agreement to that effect; I wrote it out myself, at Mr. Laing's desire, in Mr. Laing's own agreement-book; Harber was to do the plaster work - I am not aware that it was immediately necessary for him to work at home; he brought originals of particular patterns from his own house, and if I had given him directions to put up a particular enrichment, it might have been necessary for him to have taken plaster to produce it: all the enrichments, with the exception of four, were furnished by him; Mr. Laing agreed to furnish all the materials, and it might have been necessary to take some home - as Mr. Laing's agent I should not have objected to it. During October and November there was work done off the premises, and I gave Harber orders to take materials for a particular job; I was not on the premises in December - I left about the 24th of November.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you ever give Harber orders when he was taking it to his own house, to say he was taking it to the cottages? A. No.

JURY to MR. LAING. Q. Have you not reason to suppose that upon some occasions this man took the plaster home, to make ornaments to show? A. I never had reason to suspect any such thing.

BENJAMIN GREEN . I live in Islington-terrace, and am a plasterer. I have known Harber eight or ten years - I have worked several times with him; when we want to do cast-work we generally take plaster home, and do it at home; I allow my men to do it - it is the general understanding of the trade.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How came you to add this? A. Because I understand he is taken up for stealing a bushel of plaster.

COURT. Q. Do you expect your men to tell you when they take it home? A. Oh Yes, Sir.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. But if the person who has the charge of the plaster knows it, is that enough? A. Yes- my labourers often give it to the men.

JOHN LEONARD . I have known Harber seven years; I have suffered plasterers to take plaster home, or to do it in building - it is the custom when men do not find the materials, to have it home, and sometimes they come to the shed and ask for plaster; they do not ask the master for it - it is necessary, in order to expedite business, that a person should do casting at home.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. That is done openly, and the master knows of it? A. Not at all times; when the permission is once granted for a man to do cast-work at home. he comes and has it.

COURT. Q. What are you? A. A master plasterer: if I am working at a building, and want my men to do work at home, they are allowed to take it home, if they come to the shed for it - this applies only in cases where the men are doing work, labour; suppose I do work for a person who finds his own materials, then it is sometimes taken home.

WILLIAM HALLETT . I have known Harber nearly ten years; he has done five houses for me - I found every material; I should conceive it necessary in doing ornamental work, for some casts to be made at home, supposing the plasterers to work late at night, and want the ornaments in the morning.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If a man were taking some plaster to his own house, he would have no hesitation in saying so? A.Certainly not, but I should think he was bound to bring it back.

JOHN WILMOT . I am a plasterer, and live in Cromer-street. I have known Harber nearly seven years. If a master finds materials, and employs plasterers, it is very general for them to take a little home - if a man does the labour only, he is entrusted to take these things at times, when he thinks he wants them, and it would take half his time to go backwards and forwards to ask the master.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-171

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

437. ARTHUR WILLIAM LANGFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of December , 7 pairs of sheets, value 20s.; 4 blankets, value 10s.; 4 table-cloths, value 10s.; 6 napkins, value 3s., and 4 pillow-cases, value 2s. , the goods of Peter Watson .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

PETER WATSON . I am hall-porter to Prince Polignac, the French Ambassador, in Portland-place. The prisoner is my cousin - my wife has been dead upwards of five years; I took apartments in May last in Beaumont-street : I had some furniture and linen there - all my linen had been at Mrs. Simmons', at Bethnal-green, and she sent it there; I allowed the prisoner to sleep in my apartments in Beaumont-street, and gave him the key of them.

REBECCA SIMMONS . I live at Bethnal-green. In March last I delivered some sheets. blankets, tablecloths, and napkins, to the prisoner, to take to his cousin's apartments; I did not count them: I cannot say whether there were any pillow-cases - they were Mr. Watson's property.

MR. WATSON. I missed this property from my apartments - he never gave them to me.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you give my sister leave to take any thing that was there, and to make use of it? A. The keys were in her possession; she might use the things, but I did not give them to her - that was at Bethnal-green; the property at Beaumont-street I had confided to the prisoner.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer of Mary-le-bone. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday. the 13th of December, on another charge; I searched Mr. Watson's apartment - there was scarcely any thing there; no sheets on the bed, and the drawers empty.

MR. WATSON re-examined. Q. Up to what period did the prisoner continue in the lodging? A. From the time I took them till he was apprehended; the officer took the key of my apartment from him: this property ought to have been there - I believe I have been there but twice since I had the lodgings; I think they were taken in May, but cannot tell when - I never had any other apartments; I have paid two or three quarters' rent, and there is one to pay.

REBECCA SIMMONS re-examined. Q.When did you deliver these things to the prisoner? A. In March - he was to take them to Mr. Watson's apartments; I did not know where it was, nor ever saw it - I am certain it was in March: he brought the rent in the evening of quarterday, and it must have been two or three days before that he had them.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor gave my sister, Mrs. Shaw, charge of these things, and she made use of them before he took her to France; they were never taken to Beaumont-street.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-172

438. ARTHUR WILLIAM LANGFORD was again indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 4 neck-handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of Peter Watson .

CAROLINE SARAH SHAW . I am the prisoner's sister; he brought four dirty neck-handkerchiefs to me when he came out of the country - I think it was in November last.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer of Worship-street.

I went with Buckeridge, and searched a house in Sydney-street, Commercial-road; I found these four handkerchiefs, and a great variety of articles.

PETER WATSON . I never gave the prisoner these articles, nor suffered him to use them in any way as his own - they are my best cravats, which I kept for my own particular use; they were at the Ambassador's, house and must have been taken from there, either while I was in the country, or after my return, without my knowledge.

Prisoner's Defence. These handkerchiefs he had in the country, and I had them to wear while I was in the country; I took them home dirty to have them cleaned.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years, to commence from the expiration of the former term .

Reference Number: t18290115-173

439. HANNAH BLAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of January , 11 yards of calico, value 4s. , the goods of John Graham .

THOMAS WHITAKER. I am servant to Mr. John Graham, of High Holborn , a linen-draper . On the 5th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was walking up and down the shop - the prisoner came in, and went about two thirds down the shop; she asked to see some Irish cloth- she had a white apron on; I saw her stoop down, and tuck it under the string - I shewed her some Irish cloth: she said she hoped it would be good, and bought seven yards of it, at 2s. 6d. per yard; she then requested me to shew her some inferior, and while I was shewing her that, a person was detected in stealing something - the prisoner said what a shocking thing it was that people did not know better; I saw a piece of calico at that time by the prisoner's side: she then requested me to shew her some muslin - I went for that, and when I returned the calico was gone; I saw something under her shawl, and told Mr. Graham - I continued to serve her, and took 2l. 4s. 7d. of her - I tied up the parcel, gave her change, and she went out; I followed, and told her she had something under her shawl, or in her apron, which she had no right to: I took her into the shop, opened her apron, and found these eleven yards of calico.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who is Mr. Graham's partner? A. He has none; this is one of our bills, but we have no such bills now - I believe we gave this to the prisoner; the parcel she had, occupied a considerable bulk - I tied it up; this calico was not in the bundle - I removed her from that part of the shop to another: I do not know that I made a mistake in making out this bill - my memory does not serve me for it: when she came back, she gave me the parcel of things she had bought, and desired me to send it home; I sent it immediately - she told me to send it to Trinity-lane, and to tell her husband what had taken place, as she had no one else to send.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-174

440. JAMES STEPTO was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December , 1 1/2 bushel of wheat, value 13s. , the

goods of Henry Walker ; and MARY STEPTO was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen; against the Statute .

HENRY WALKER. I am a farmer , and live at Enfield-highway . On the 8th of December, I sent my man to dress the wheat - he could not finish it; he heaped it up in the middle of the barn, and left it; the next morning, he came and told me the barn had been broken open; I went, and missed a bushel or two - it was found in the mill: the prisoners lived close by me, and knew my premises well - they are mother and son; neither of them worked for me - there was a hole which I consider only sufficient for a boy like the prisoner to get through; he was taken up, and then ran away - he came to me; I made him no promise or threat, but he came, and said he would tell me the truth; he did break through the barn, and take it, that his little brother held the sack outside, and he put the wheat in.

WILLIAM STOTEN . I worked for the prosecutor. I left the barn all secure on the night of the 8th of December, about five o'clock; I returned at half-past six in the morning; the boards had been pulled down - there was a hole about ten inches wide, through which a boy could get - I missed from one to two bushels - there were nine quarters of wheat; I went and told master - I have seen some wheat since.

WILLIAM ALSOP . I am a miller. This wheat was brought to me by the two prisoners to grind, on the 16th of December; I gave it to the officer - there is one bushel and a half of it.

JOHN WILSON . I am a constable. I took the prisoners on the 18th of December; I had seen them taking wheat to the mill, and told the prosecutor - I suspected it was not right; the boy made his escape.

WILLIAM STOTEN . This is very much like the wheat - it was not quite clean; it is a mixed wheat, red and white, and here is rubbish which the machine would not take out.

MR. WALKER. I have been a farmer nearly all my life; I believe this wheat to be mine - it is not in a fit state to send to the mill.

JAMES STEPTO - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARY STEPTO - GUILTY . Aged 57.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-175

441. DANIEL HEATH was indicted for bigamy .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

OCTAVIUS YOUNG THISELTON . I am parish-clerk of St. Pancras. I produce the register of marriages in that parish, which states that on the 12th of May, 1823, Daniel Heath , batchelor, and Caroline Charronneau , were married by banns by W. H. Charlton , in presence of Thomas Ayling and Sarah Elizabeth Moore.

AMY SARTI . I am sister of Caroline Charronneau. I know the prisoner - my sister lived with him as his wife for five or six years; she went by the name of Caroline Heath - she was alive ten weeks ago; I had an uncle who died lately - I do not know whether the prisoner got any money.

COURT. Q. Did your sister and this man live together, and pass as man and wife? A. Yes; by the name of Heath.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did you live at this time? A. In King-street, Bloomsbury, and my sister in Crown-street; I do not think I was more than three or four times at her house - the last time I saw her, Daniel Heath was with her; that is ten or twelve weeks ago.

HARRIET MEREDITH. I am sister of Caroline Charronneau. I know of their living together as man and wife for five or six years - I saw her ten weeks ago.

Cross-examined. Q. Where do you live? A. In different parts of the town, since my sister's marriage - it is about four years since I first saw her living by the name of Mrs. Heath; I saw her three or four times - I did not sleep in the house.

WHITWORTH ROBERTS . The prisoner was in my employ; I believe this name Daniel Heath , in the register, to be something like his hand-writing, but his present hand-writing varies from this - I should think this to be his hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. If you had seen these words any where, should you have said "That is my clerk's handwriting?" A. I should not if I had not heard something -I do not know that I should have supposed the contrary, but I should have doubted it exceedingly: the inclination of my belief is that it is his.

SIMEON LEVY . I think I know the writing of the prisoner - this looks like his writing; I think it is his.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen enough of his writing to give a firm opinion upon the subject? A. I think I have; this is rather more aslant than he generally writes; I knew his hand-writing five years ago - I do not know that I should say I believed it to be his hand-writing in any other way.

BENJAMIN PARROTT . I am a shoemaker. I know the prisoner: I can swear to his hand-writing - I believe this to be his.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you ever seen him write? A. Yes; he bound me, and signed my indenture; I have not seen him write on any other occasion - I have no doubt about it.

THOMAS BROWN . I know the prisoner; I have seen him write, not many times, but enough to enable me to speak to my belief of his hand-writing - these words " Daniel Heath " are not exactly like what I have seen him write - it is different, but I believe it to be his.

Cross-examined. Q.You say it is different to what he writes? A. There is a similitude; it is different in one point of view - if I saw it any where I should say I believed it to be Daniel Heath's.

MARGARET EVANS . I married the prisoner on the 19th of September, 1826 , at St. Giles ' - I had known him about two years before; he was an attorney's clerk - he represented himself to me as single, and offered me marriage just before we were married; I lived at that time in Devonshire-street, Queen-square - I was not possessed of any property at that time; I was to have about 80l. - I believe the prisoner knew that at the time; he had it after we were married - we had a milk-walk afterwards; this is a copy of our marriage register which I got at St. Giles' church - I had one child by him; he never treated me very well - I was afterwards separated from him; he threatened it several times; I have the child still - I did not learn he was married till about seven months

afterwards; I charged him with it - he denied it at first, but afterwards admitted it. I remember signing a paper which he wished me to do; he took the paper - I married him in the name of John Lloyd; I cannot tell exactly when I learned that his name was Heath - when he left me he took the greater part of the furniture away; I should not have signed that paper had it not been for him - I have no means of subsistence now; he would not maintain the child, or I would not have proceeded against him - I told him so, but he still refused to give me a shilling for the child.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you acquainted with him? A.About two years - I knew him all that time by the name of Lloyd; I never inquired for him by the name of Heath - I was at home with my step-father; the prisoner was introduced to me at home - I am sure of that; it was not at a dance - that was afterwards: I wrote what Mr. Lloyd told me and signed it - this was in Devonshire-street, six or seven months after we had been married, to the best of my recollection; I do not recollect when I dated the paper - I believe he had it dated backward; I wrote the date - I got about 80l.; that was laid out in the purchase of a milk-walk, which I carried on while he was at the attorney's office; the money did not all come into my hands, he took the gold and I was to keep the silver - I continued the milk-walk about three months; I took it in October - I signed the paper after that; he did allow me 15s. a week - he did not say if I would leave off drinking and improper company he would continue to allow it, but if not he would only allow me 8s.: I never kept improper company - I do not know of any gentleman who left tobacco on the chimney-piece; my uncle came to see me - I never visited his mother, Mrs. Heath, before I was married.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You have said the contents of that paper were written by you at the instigation of the prisoner? A. Yes; I do not know what the date is - I do not think I wrote the date: if I did, it was at the prisoner's desire - he only continued to pay me the 15s. a week for about two months; I have been separated from him about five months - I, after that received 8s. a week for the child; he has left that off about two months.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You say during two months he allowed you 15s. a-week? A. Yes - after that 8s. a week; but during the last two months I have not received any thing.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am the parish-clerk of St. Giles-in-the-Fields - I have the register of marriages in that parish. On the 19th of September, 1826, John Lloyd, bachelor, and Margaret Evans , were married by banns.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am a Bow-street officer. I took the prisoner on the 3d of December at an attorney's, in Lincoln's Inn - I told him what he was charged with: he said he could clear it up.

MR. MELECH. I was clerk in the same office with the prisoner for nearly three years. I never knew Margaret Evans to inquire for him at the office, but I have seen her at his house; it was in the spring of 1826, I think - the milk business was carrying on there; a little girl was there when I called, and I asked her for Mr. Heath - she went in, and Margaret Evans came out and said, "Mr. Heath, I suppose you mean Lloyd?" I said very likely it was Lloyd, and I left a note for him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was their milk business going on? A. I saw utensils about - I will not swear it was in 1826; it might be before or after.

Prisoner's Defence. I was introduced to the prosecutrix in September, 1824, at an assembly, in Ship-yard, Temple-bar; in consequence of unpleasant domestic occurrences, I occasionally spent my evening from home, and not wishing my friends to know I frequented so low a place, I took the name of Lloyd there; the prosecutrix did not know any thing relating to me till several months afterwards, though she resided in Devonshire-street, and I within half a mile of it - I mention this to shew the impossibility of my living there, and her not knowing how I was situated previous to Christmas, 1825; I told her my residence, name and every circumstance; I know it took place previous to Christmas, 1825, because her residence was then turned into a milk-shop, and told her while the front was being taken down; she knew this, though she comes to day and swears she knows nothing of it - it is for nothing but to extort money from me.

THOMAS LLOYD . I lived in the same house as Heath - he shewed me this paper on the 17th of September, 1826, the day but one after it bears date (read).

DEAR LLOYD. - You may rest satisfied I will take no advantage of your having a first wife living, if we are married.

16th Sept. 1826. MARGARET EVANS .

Q. You remember this paper being shewn you? A. Yes, and I took a note of it in a memorandum-book - he desired me to note it particularly; he asked me to look at that letter, and remember that I had seen it - I did not make any mark on it; I have not my memorandum-book here; he did not dictate any memorandum - he desired I should remember it in case any thing should happen; I did not say the paper will speak for itself - here is the date on it; I read it, but did not ask why it was shewn me - I believe I told him it was felony to have a second wife; I do not know what he said.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You were desired to notice the date of it? A. Yes.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you at Mr. Health's mother's in 1826? A. Yes, all the year - I saw Margaret Evans there in May that year - there was a child there very ill, and who is since dead; she asked if that was Mr. Heath's, and expressed great sorrow at its illness.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-176

442. JOSEPH ADAMS was indicted for receiving, on the 25th of December , 1 feather-bed, value 45s., the goods of William Crighton , Esq. , which had lately before been stolen; against the Statute .

WILLIAM CRIGHTON, ESQ. I am a Magistrate , and live at Brentford . I missed a feather-bed from a room on my own premises, with a vast quantity of other things - I saw it on the 15th of November, I think, and missed it about ten days afterwards; the prisoner is a tenant of mine, and lived in a room not far from me at 1s. a week.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When did you see it again? Q. Ten days after I lost it.

JESSE FULLER . I am a constable of Brentford. I obtained a search-warrant on the 25th of December, to

search for some holly on the prisoner's premises - I could not find that, but I found this bed; the prisoner was not at home - he has a wife; she does not live there - he lived by himself; he said before the Magistrate that he received the bed from George Yates, a man not yet in custody; that he took it out of Mr. Crighton's warehouse window, and took it to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was that taken down in writing? A. I do not know - there were no hopes held out to him in my hearing.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I am a servant to Mr. Crighton, and know the feather-bed to be my master's - this is it; it was on his premises.

COLONEL CLITHEROW. This case was investigated by me as a Magistrate; I took the depositions - all that the prisoner said was not taken down; no promise or threat was held out to him, I am quite confident.

JOHN JAMES CLARK . I attended the examination before Colonel Clitherow as clerk; there was no promise or threat held out to him - this was considered as a material part of the deposition, and is all that was taken down.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-177

443. JOSEPH ADAMS was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 1 pair of tongs, value 1s.; 1 poker, value 1s.; 1 rake, value 1s.; 1 wafer-stamp, value 6d.; 1 bed-wrench, value 6d.; 2 padlocks, value 1s.; 1 hammer, value 6d.; 1 cravat, value 1s.; 2 forks, value 2s.; 1 rule, value 6d.; 1 turn-screw, value 6d.; 1 powder-flask, value 2s.; and 1 basket, value 1s. ; the goods of John Alfred Trimmer .

SECOND COUNT, for receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JESSE FULLER . I am a constable of Brentford. I took the prisoner on the evening of the 25th of December, in Mr. Trimmer's house; I took him the next afternoon before Colonel Clitherow - I searched his lodging, in Upper Butts, Brentford, and found these shoes, two padlocks, a drinking-horn, ring-case, and wafer-stamp.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you know the prisoner's wife lived with Mr. Trimmer? A. She did; I do not know who took them.

JOHN ALFRED TRIMMER , ESQ. I live at Kingsbury .

The prisoner was in my service - he came on the 27th of April, 1828; he had left me before Christmas-day - I had a female servant, and it turned out that she was his wife; I gave him permission on Christmas-day to dine with my servants - in the course of that day two officers came to my house; I know this wafer-stamp, padlock, Morocco ring-case, and rake to be mine - I believe the poker and tongs are mine; I never gave the prisoner authority to take any of them.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner had lived in your service? A. Yes, and his wife continued up to Christmas-day; I discharged him on the 9th of September - I did not miss these articles till I saw them at three o'clock in the morning of the next day, in the officer's possession - some of them might have been stolen between the 9th of September and Christmas-day, but some of them I saw after the 1st of December; the prisoner came to the next house, and was admitted by a man who I keep as a gardener.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When you discharged him, did you know he was married to the female-servant? A. No- I had seen this wafer-stamp on the 1st of December; he was well acquainted with the house; I had left him there for two months in charge with his wife: this cravat is mine - it has my name on it in full.

JURY. Q. Was the prisoner in the habit of visiting at your house? A. I forbade him the house till I discovered he was married, and then I told his wife he might come; he came the first time on the 14th of December, and then the second time on the 25th.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Of Receiving. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-178

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

444. JOSEPH BATT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 1 brass lamp, value 14s. , the goods of Thomas Brampton .

THOMAS BRAMPTON . I keep the White Horse public-house, Aldgate . I lost a lamp from my passage on the 14th of December, just by my door; between three and four o'clock the prisoner came in - in twenty minutes I missed him and the lamp; this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it lost by you in the state in which it is now? A. Yes - it was in use, and there is oil in it; there were many people in the tap-room and parlour, but no person in the passage but him - I have the fellow-lamp to it.

THOMAS WATERLOW . I am a constable. The prisoner came into my shop in Peter's-lane, which is six or seven minutes walk from the prosecutor's, on the 14th of December, about ten minutes after four o'clock, for a 1d. loaf; I asked what he had got - he said a lamp, and he would sell it to me; I looked at it, and the oil was streaming down; I said it was a strange thing to bring a lamp on a Sunday afternoon, and asked where he was going to - he said to St. John-street, and had brought it from Long-lane; I went after him and said, "You say it came from Long-lane, we will go there" - he swore he would not; I then took him to the watch-house - he told me several different stories, but at last I found the prosecutor; the lamp fitted the bracket exactly.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-179

445. HENRY CARPENTER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 1 stove, value 2s. 6d., and 1 gun, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of George Masters .

GEORGE MASTERS . I am brushmaker , and live in Berkeley-street, Clerkenwell . I lost a stove and a gun from my garden: I left all safe at a quarter before five o'clock on the evening of the 17th of December - next day, between two and three o'clock, I found the summer-house door broken open and these things gone; I had set the little gun loaded with about half a pipe of powder, and half a pipe of shot, but the powder had got wet and did not ignite.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN RICHMOND . I am an officer. On Wednesday evening, the 17th of December, between six and seven o'clock, I met the prisoner in the New North-road, with these things - I had heard of the robbery, and asked him where he was

going; he said to Old-street, St. Luke's, to a person named Marten, but he was then going towards Hackney: I sent to a man named Marten, who came and said he knew nothing of him, nor the articles - his shoes were off, and his feet were very dirty, as if he had waded through a ditch; there is a ditch round those gardens: he was five or six hundred yards from the garden.

BENJAMIN GARRETT . I am a patrol. Richmond and I stopped the prisoner with these things; he said he was going to Mr. Marten's in Old-street-road: I went to Mr. Marten's, to see if he knew the prisoner, but he did not - the gun was loaded.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the New North-road, a young man asked me to carry these things to Mr. Marten's in Old-street-road. I was discharged on Friday on my father's bail, and taken again on the Sunday following. GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-180

446. GEORGE DUKE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , 26lbs. weight of sugar, value 10s , the goods of William Henry Dickenson .

WILLIAM HENRY DICKENSON . I live in Wellclose-square , and am a sugar-refiner . On the 9th of December, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, as the prisoner was leaving work, I had some suspicion, but allowed him to leave the premises; I then called him back, and found the 26lbs. of sugar on him, in various parts of his coat and trousers.

PHILIP STIEBER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner- he only said he was guilty of taking it.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

WILLIAM HENRY DICKENSON . He was not in distress; he has been in my service two years, and had 22s. per week - I had lately lent him 3l.; he has a wife and family.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Five Month .

Reference Number: t18290115-181

447. WILLIAM CARTER and THOMAS TIMMINS were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 1 sow-pig, price 3l. , the property of William Glover .

WILLIAM GLOVER . I live in George-street, Battle-bridge , and am an engineer . A little after ten o'clock on the morning of the 16th of December, I turned my sow out; she went into the street, and we have never found her since - I went out to look for her in about half and hour; it was black and white - she had a white streak over the shoulder, and a piece cut out of the right ear, near the edge- it was a mark and was about half an inch wide: I know nothing of Timmins, but Carter has been at my house - he came three or four days before I lost the sow, and told me to take care of it or I should lose her; I asked what he meant- he said he knew the sow, and knew the parties: that was all I could get out of him - the sow had nine pigs sucking.

JAMES NEIGHBOUR . I am a labourer, and work at Battle-bridge, near the new bridge, leading to the Caledonian Asylum. On the 16th of December, at half-past ten, or a quarter to eleven o'clock, I saw a black and white sow, with a stripe over one shoulder; Carter was driving her - he was on the left side of the road, and Timmins on the side of the path; they went on to a cross-way, and I saw Timmins throw something at her twice - Carter then took up something and threw at the carcasses of the houses; Carter smacked a whip.

WILLIAM LONG . James Neighbour and my father sent me to follow these men; I went after them to Camden-town- the pig was before them: I had seen the prosecutor with that pig at Battle-bridge, not above a week before, driving it - I knew it to be his pig; when they got to Camden-town, Carter went down a street, and Timmins stood at the corner; the pig went down the street - Carter went towards John Cook 's, but I did not see him go in; I do not know whether he knocked or rung at the door - I left them then. I did not know where the prosecutor lived, but he came in the afternoon, and I told him - he gave me 6d. to go and shew him where they went to; he went to John Cook 's, but did not find it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You did not know where the prosecutor lived? A. No, but I had seen him with the same sow once before; there was no brand on it - it was a black and white sow, a remarkable one, about two feet high - she was not very big.

JOHN HARRISON . I live in Mornington-gardens, Camden-town. On the 16th of December Carter offered me the sow for sale - it was black and white, with a black stripe over her shoulder, and a piece out of her ear; I think it was between one and two o'clock: Carter said a man had been distrained upon for rent, and he had separated the sow from her pigs - I said I would have nothing to do with it; he said I should have her at any price I chose in a medium way - he did not say where she came from.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Glover? A. No, nor the sow before; I knew Carter well - I have one or two pigs which I bought honestly.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable, and took Carter. I told him I came respecting a sow - he said he knew nothing about it, and had never seen it; I told him it was no use denying it, we had got information where the sow was - he then said he would tell me the truth, that Timmins employed him to go and sell it; I said it was a black and white sow, and was Glover's.

JOSEPH CADBY . I was with Colton - Carter first denied any knowledge of it, and then said he had been with Timmins who had employed him to sell it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was mentioned that it had been stolen? A. Yes; he said he knew nothing about it, he had been employed to sell it.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a constable. In consequence of what was said at the examination of Carter, I went the next morning and met Timmins coming out of a court where he lives - I said, "I want you about a sow" - be up with his fist and attempted to strike me; I told him I would break his arms if he did - he said he would be d-d if he would go with me; if he was wanted he was at home at any time.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. He did not strike you? A. No; he knew I was an officer - he is a running-dustman; I never had a warrant against him -I had a stick with me when I took him.

LOVINIA HARRISON . I am the wife of John Harrison - we live in Mornington-gardens. On the 16th of December, the prisoners came together, and brought a sow; my husband was not at home - I asked them to come in till he returned; they came in - Carter said to me, "This

Thomas Timmins is distrained upon for rent, and he wishes to sell this sow" and he thought it would suit my husband - they sat a few minutes, and then asked me to give them leave to put it into my yard, while they went to get a pint of beer - I assisted them to put it into the yard; Carter returned in ten minutes, but not Timmins - my husband returned; I asked Carter what he asked for it; he said 2l. - my husband and he joined in conversation, and I went away; all I heard him say more, was, "You can have it reasonable;" Carter came again next day - my husband was at home; he said, "I am glad you did not buy the sow, for she was a stolen one;" I said, "What is the use of your coming now, you knew that before, and should have told me that before you offered it to me, for before you had gone ten yards from me, my husband said to me, "What did you let them drive her into my yard for, for how do you know but they have stolen her?'" Carter pretended that he did not know anything about it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When they came at first, your husband was not at home? A. No - when Carter came the second time, he was alone, and all that passed then was in the absence of Timmins.

JOHN COOK . I live in Camden-town, and do jobbing work with a horse and cart. On the 16th of December. Carter came to me, about twelve o'clock; he asked me if I wanted to buy a sow, and shewed it me - it was a black and white one, a Norfolk breed; I did not see anybody else at that time - the sow was in Clarendon-street; I live about a quarter of a mile from Harrison.

JOHN HARRISON re-examined. Carter came the next day, and said it was a stolen sow; that he did not know any thing of the man who got him to accompany him to sell it - I said I had a suspicion of it from the first; he wished me to bold my tongue, and went away - I said,"If anybody asks me about it, what can I say? I must tell the truth" - I did not tell the Magistrate about this; I told all I was asked.

CARTER'S Defence. About half-past ten o'clock, I was in Maiden-lane; I saw the sow, and Timmins with it - he asked if I knew anybody that wanted a sow; I said I could very likely sell it - I went to Cook's, who did not want it; I then went to Harrison's, where I have sold pigs - they did not want it.

JOHN HARRISON . He never sold me a pig.

TIMMINS' Defence. I met this man driving a pig - he said he was going to take it home; we went to Harrison's, and then I went home.

CARTER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Four Months .

TIMMINS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-182

448. JANE EYNON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , 1 blanket, value 3s., and 1 sheet, value 2s. , the goods of James Power .

MARGARET POWER . I am the wife of James Power - we live in Red Lion-court, Saffron-hill . In November last, the prisoner and a young man came as man and wife, and lodged with me till the 2d of December; I missed this sheet and blanket on the 5th of December.

WILLIAM IVEY . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this blanket on the 14th of November, in the name of Betsy Williams , No. 11, Saffron-hill - I do not know who pawned it; our shopman took the sheet in, and these are the duplicates.

WILLIAM PETTIFOR . I am a watchman. The prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner to me - I found these two duplicates on her.

Prisoner's Defence. Another girl took the room, pawned the articles, and left the duplicates there.

MARGARET POWER . My husband met her in the street - she gave him the key, and came home and laid the duplicates on the table; they took the room in the early part of November - I saw a person with her for three or four days.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290115-183

449. ANN GOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 2 sheets, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Parr .

SARAH PARR . I am the wife of Joseph Parr - we live in Tower-street, St. Giles's . On the 12th of January, about seven o'clock in the evening, I heard a person stumble up stairs; I opened the door, and saw the prisoner going up - I asked her where she was going: she said to one of the lodgers - and in ten minutes I heard a stumble again; I went out, and saw her with these two sheets in her hand - I asked where she got them; she said I had that moment given them to her - I said I should send for an officer; she said, if I did, she would tell all she knew about my receiving stolen property - these sheets had been taken from a lodger's bed, in the back attic, who had left the room about half-past five o'clock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I had been drinking, and made a mistake in the house; I never took them - I fell down on the stairs, and most likely fell over them. Witness. She had them in her hand, and when I opened the door, she threw them down - I do not think she was sober.

JOHN GROOM . I took the prisoner; she appeared to have been drinking - she was very saucy; she said an old woman told her to come and take them - I went up stairs, and found the other part of the bed things on the floor.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-184

405. MARIA HENTSCH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of December , 2 blankets, value 5s., and 1 sheet, value 2s. , the goods of William Williams .

SARAH WILLIAMS . I am the wife of William Williams : the prisoner lodged with us; on Monday, the 22d of December, I went up stairs to ask for the rent; she said her husband had deserted her ever since Saturday, and she could not pay me - I then missed the things: she said she had pawned them for her own use; I asked how she could be so wicked, as she knew I had lent her money; I had nothing to depend on to support myself.

WILLIAM TYE . I have a blanket and two sheets pawned - the sheet on the 17th of December, for 1s. 6d.; one blanket for 1s. 6d., on the 9th of December; and one blanket for 2s., on the 11th of December, by a female, but I cannot swear to the prisoner.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and found on her these three duplicates: she said her husband had left her since Saturday, and she said at the office before him that he sent her to pawn them, which he did not deny.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and stated that her husband had compelled her to pledge the articles.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18290115-185

451. MARY ANN JENKINS and JOHANNAH JAMES were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of December , 2 blankets, value 6s.; 1 sheet, value 1s.; 1 bolster, value 3s.; 1 counterpane, value, 1s., and 1 flat-iron, value 6d. , the goods of Benjamin Heales .

MARY ANN JENKINS pleaded GUILTY.

Judgement Respited .

MARTHA HEALES . I am the wife of Benjamin Heales: the prisoner James and her sister, who has pleaded guilty, lodged in my house for five days; I found their character would not suit me - I went up, and found James there; I missed the articles stated from the bed, and asked her where they were; she said she did not know: I asked where the flat-iron was which she had - she said she did not know, as she was led into an error; she was very drunk- this was about eleven o'clock.

SAMUEL HEMPSTEAD . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have a sheet pawned for 9d., on the 5th of December.

JOHN BUCKRIDGE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a flatiron pawned by James, on the 9th of December; I am sure of her person.

WILLIAM HUMPHRIES . I am a pawnbroker. I have some patch work pawned with me by Jenkins.

WILLIAM TYE . The prisoner James pawned a blanket with me for 1s. 6d., on the 6th of December.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am an officer. I took James, on the 16th of December - while we were in the room, Jenkins came in; James said before Jenkins came that they had pawned them, as they wanted necessaries; I found some duplicates on Jenkins, six of which led to these things.( Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that Jenkins was a widow with four children, and very ill; that they had been compelled to pledge the articles, in consequence of distress.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-186

452. WILLIAM LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 dead fowl, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Daniel Gunston .

DANIEL GUNSTON . I am a cheesemonger , and live in St. John-street-road, Clerkenwell . On the 26th of December, I lost a fowl from my shop, about half-past one o'clock; I saw some lads pass the door; I went out, and saw the prisoner drop the fowl: I overtook him without losing sight of him; I had seen the fowl safe half an hour before.

ROBERT GUNSTON . I took up the fowl; I had seen the prisoner at the window, but did not see him take it.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a boy had given him the fowl to carry, and that the prosecutor had knocked him down, and beat him cruelly.

DANIEL GUNSTON re-examined. I missed the fowl the moment he passed the window; I ran out, and saw him with it - he ran about twice the length of this Court: he never said a boy gave it to him; I did knock him down, or use him ill.

JURY. Q. Are your goods much exposed? A. They were not then; I saw something go off the window-board.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290115-187

453. WILLIAM MILWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 box, value 1s; and 313 cigars, value 23s. , the goods of John Newman .

JOHN NEWMAN. I am a tobacconist , and live in Pitfield-street, Hoxton . On the 4th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I lost a box, containing three hundred and thirteen cigars from my window - I did not see them taken, but as he lifted them up he struck the jar off the counter, and that alarmed me; I ran out in a moment, and saw the prisoner - he had just got off the step of my door; the witness secured him, and brought him back - I observed him at the time, and am certain of his person.

CHARLES WRIGHT . I am a traveller. I was passing the shop-door, and saw the prisoner come out with the box of cigars under his arm; I detained him before he got off the step-the prosecutor was in the room; I took the prisoner into the shop, and the prosecutor took the box from him.

JOHN RICHMOND . I took the prisoner into custody - he said he was starving, and had neither father or mother.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290115-188

454. MICHAEL NOWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December , 1 decanter, value 10s. , the goods of Ralph Lazarus .

ROSETTA LAZARUS . I am the wife of Ralph Lazarus - we live in Old-street . On the 11th of December I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner come and take this decanter; he gave it over to another lad, who ran away with it; I pursued the prisoner, and took him - I never lost sight of him.

CHARLOTTE HOLDFIELD . I saw the prisoner and another boy pass my mistress door three times; I saw the prisoner come and take the decanter - he ran out with it; my mistress ran after him.

WILLIAM HALL . I am the officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor came and took hold of me, and said I had been into his shop - I do not know where it is.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-189

OLD COURT.

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JANUARY 20.

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

455. THOMAS BANKS was indicted for stealing,

on the 1st of October , 6 shirts, value 1l. , the goods of John Hambleton Orr .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-190

456. WILLIAM WYNNE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 basket, value 2s.; 72 oranges, value 3s., and 5 apples, value 2d. , the goods of Thomas Rogers .

THOMAS ROGERS. I live at Lambeth, and work at the Thames-tunnel . On the 16th of January my little girl was minding these things in the basket; I was absent a short distance, and on coming back received information - I went in pursuit, and came up to the prisoner with them on his head.( Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man overtook me, and asked me to carry them while he warmed his hands.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18290115-191

457. JOSEPH PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 1 brass lamp, value 5s. , the goods of John Thompson .

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a furniture-broker . About ten o'clock in the morning of the 26th of December, I saw the prisoner come to my door, and take something off a chest of drawers; I made my way towards him, and saw him run - I ran after him, and when I was within a yard of him he turned round a court, and dropped this lamp from under his coat; he got away - I informed an officer, and he was taken three days afterwards; he is the boy, I am certain - I pointed him out from among ten others.

RICHARD HARTLEY WALL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 29th of December, from the prosecutor's description, and he pointed him out from among other boys.( Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-192

458. EDWARD WALLIS was indicted for stealing. on the 15th of January , 1 coat, value 20s., and 1 pair of muffetees, value 6d. , the goods of Joseph Copas .

JOSEPH COPAS. On the 15th of January I was at the Hoop and Horse-shoe public-house, Queen-street, Tower-hill . I belong to the St. Katharine's Docks - I placed my coat on the bench, about half-past five o'clock; the muffatees were in the pocket - in a short time I missed it; there was no stranger in the room but the prisoner - he was then gone; I am certain he is the man - I have never seen my coat since; next day I stood at the gate and saw him pass; I apprehended him, and gave him in charge - nobody else was in the room except three of my brother-workmen, who were still there; it was a blue coat, with gilt buttons.

NATHANIEL DYER. I was sent for to the Dock-gate, and apprehended the prisoner; he told me voluntarily that he had sold the coat, and took me there, but I did not find it.

HOWARD LEWIS . I am a clothes-salesman, and live in Cable-street. On Saturday evening the prisoner came and offered a blue coat, with gilt buttons, for sale - I did not buy it, but he went away, leaving these muffetees on the counter.

JOSEPH COPAS . I believe these to be mine.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18290115-193

459. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , 1 pair of half-boots, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Crispin Wilsden .

THOMAS CRISPIN WILSDEN . I am a shoemaker , and live in John-street-road . On the 16th of January I was standing in my parlour, and saw a man come round the shop-door - I looked again, and saw nobody; I still watched, and saw a face looking round the post-at last I saw the prisoner come and take the boots off the post: I caught hold of him just at the door, and asked him if he was not ashamed of himself - he said, "You b - r, if you don't let me go I will kick your shins;" I then thought, I would take him to the office; they hung inside the door.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18290115-194

460. STEPHEN RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January . 1 watch, value 5l.: 1 chain, value 2l.; 2 gold seals, value 2l., and 1 key, value 5s. , the goods of Carmelo Torge .

CARMELO TORGE I was at Covent-garden Theatre on the 13th of January; I am a musician employed there. At half-past twelve o'clock, after the performances were over, as I came out of the pit, under the Piazza, a man came right opposite me, pulled out my watch, and ran away; I ran after him, seized him, and threw him on the ground with the watch in his hand - the watchman came up, and took it out of his hand; the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. BODKIN. Q. It was dark, I suppose? A.There were plenty of gas-lights - a great many persons were about; he had not gone three steps before I took him; the force of the pull knocked the watch against the wall, and broke the glass.

ANDREW BARNES . I am a watchman. I saw the watch taken out of his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken in Russell-street, which is more than two hundred yards from where the robbery was committed.

ANDREW BARNES re-examined. I at first took him under the Piazza: two of his comrades came and knocked my arm - he got from me, and was re-taken: I am certain he is the man - he was never out of my sight.

CARMELO TORGE. I said he was the man when he was taken, and he said,

"It is the first time I ever did such a thing."

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18290115-195

461. BENJAMIN BURRUP was indicted for that he on the 17th of December , at St. Mary-le-bone, in and upon Mary Mortlock , unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder, and a leaden bullet, unlawfully,&c. did shoot at the said Mary Mortlock , with intent

feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethough, to kill and murder her; against the Statute .

2d COUNT, stating his intent to be to disfigure her.

3d COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable her.

4th COUNT, stating his intent to be to do her some grievous bodily harm.

MR. CRESSWELL conducted the prosecution

THOMAS WHINNETT . I am a watchman of Mary-le-bone. On the night of the 17th of December, I was doing serjeant's duty in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone, and about a quarter-past ten o'clock I was in Crawford-street , on the left-hand side, going towards Paddington; there was a man and a woman on the opposite side, coming towards me - I could hear them talking loud, but could not hear what they said; when they came opposite me they made a stop - I was crossing towards them when the woman stood with her back towards me; I saw the flash of a pistol, and heard the report - I immediately ran over: the woman turned round, and ran across the street into a baker's shop - I took the man immediately by the collar-it was the prisoner: he said,

"I am your prisoner, it is me that has done it, take me to the watch-house" - he said,

"There is the pistol, pick it up;' I picked it up, having hold of him at the same time - it laid about three or four yards from where he stood; a watchman came to my assistance - the prisoner appeared to have been drinking, but it appeared to me that he was quite sensible.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How near were you to the two persons when the pistol was discharged? A. I think seven or eight yards from them - I had both the persons distinctly in my view at the time I saw the pistol discharged - I saw the flash, but did not see in whose hand it was in.

Q. Then, for ought you know. the woman might have discharged it herself? A. That I cannot say - they were both walking together: whether she had hold of his arm I cannot say - I did not notice whether the man was reeling or not; it appeared to me that he was perfectly sensible when I spoke to him, and when he spoke to me.

Q. When he spoke to you, was it as a steady and collected man; or was it in an agitated, frantic state? A. He stood perfectly straight when I took him by the collar- he did not appear the least agitated or disturbed, not at that time - I saw them for about a minute before the pistol was fired, or not quite so long. I said on the former trial I heard the man speaking, but could not hear what he said; he seemed to be in a rage.

Q. After your gave your evidence the girl's deposition was read? A. Yes; she said he was very rude - that he spoke to her and seemed in anger.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. How long was it that you had an opportunity of seeing them, previous to the pistol being fired? A. About a minute; I do not recollect seeing anybody near them when the pistol was fired.

COURT. Q. They were speaking very loud, and it appeared to you that they were in a rage? A. It did.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I heard the report of the pistol about a quarter-past ten o'clock, as near as possible - I went to Whinnett's assistance; I saw a young woman run across to the baker's shop - I ran to the baker's shop - door, then turned back and seized the prisoner with Whinnett; he said,

"I am the man! I am the prisoner; take me away to the watch-house, don't let me stand here; he - appeared to me a little in liquor - he spoke very fair, and appeared sensible; I did not go with him to the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you pay any attention to the appearance of the man; did he appear agitated and disturbed? A. Why, he looked very wild - I came up with Whinnett: I saw the flash - I was about twenty yards off; he seemed to be wild.

COURT. Q. Did you ever before see the state a man was in when he had been shooting a person? A. No.

WILLIAM CROFT . I am a labourer in the employ of Mr. Allertern, of Little Chesterfield-street. On the night of the 17th of December I was in Crawford-street, and heard the report of a pistol - I went up, and saw Whinnett had got hold of the prisoner - he said,

"I am the man that has done the deed - I am the prisoner; don't detain me"- and he said, "There is the pistol on the ground." He appeared to me to be a little in liquor.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Knight there before or after you? A. Before - the prisoner appeared a little wildish; he said,

"Don't detain me in the street, take me on."

RICHARD BURT . I am a watchman of Mary-le-bone. On the 17th of December I was in Baker-street, about a quarter-past ten o'clock - I heard a pistol fired off, went up, and found Whinnett and Knight with the prisoner in charge; Whinnett desired me to lay hold of him, and Knight to look after the woman - we took him to the watch-house; and in Baker-street we were going to search him, he said he had no arms about him, and that he hoped he had done the deed effectually - we went further on, and he said if he had another (he did not say pistol) he would serve himself the same; he laughed at the watch-house, and made a joke of the charge.

Cross-examined. Q. He said he hoped he had done the deed effectually? A. Yes; I am certain of those words.

Q. Did he use these words in a wild incoherent way? A. He said so in a laughing manner, not wild - he spoke loud.

Q. As though he seemed to enjoy what he had done? A. Yes, and said if he had another he would have served himself the same, in a kind of laughing manner; and at the watch-house he laughed and made a joke of it, but appeared in perfect possession of his senses - he made a bravado of it.

COURT. Q. You said on the last trial that when you went up you heard pretty loud talking? A. There was a crowd of people round the shop talking.

Q. And the prisoner seemed to you to be in a passion? A.Not at that time; he had been drinking, but was not drunk - he appeared to speak reasonably about what he had done: I laid hold of him on one side and Whinnett on the other - he walked steady.

ANDREW HUTCHINSON . I live with my father, a baker, in Crawford-street. On the night of the 17th of December I was in my father's shop, heard the report of a pistol, and saw the sparks of fire from burning paper; a young woman came to the shop - her face was bloody on one side, and black on the other; she at last came into the shop, and medical assistance was obtained for her.

THOMAS HARRIS . I am constable of the night of Mary-le-bone. On the night of the 17th of December the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, charged with shooting a woman in Crawford-street; I asked what he had to say; he said that was best known to himself; I went to see him about ten minutes after that - he said nothing then; I went a second time in about a quarter of an hour, and he said he had done the deed, and inquired how his Mary was - he said she had been his ruin; he was not sober, nor was he to say drunk; he had been drinking - I received a card from him, with his address on it; I took it from him in searching him, before he was locked up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he deliver you the card? A. No, I took it from him; when he came to the watch-house he looked very wild - he did not laugh when he came there that I recollect; he did afterwards.

Q. When he came to the watch-house did he present the appearance of a man in an agitated, disturbed state of mind, or one who had committed such an act, and was making a bravado of it? A. No; he appeared wild - he looked like a man that was wild, and who had committed a great act - that disturbed appearance continued while he was in my view, and when I went to him in the lock-up place he appeared the same; nothing but his card and a knife was found on him; when he was brought in, I asked what he had to say for himself; he stood upright - he did not ramble about as a drunken man would - his wild appearance made me suspect he had been drinking; I attributed his wild appearance to liquor, and the act together.

RICHARD LLOYD . I am acquainted with the hand-writing of Mr. Griffith, the Magistrate; the attesting signature to this deposition is his writing.

WILLIAM FREDERICK GOODGER . I saw Mary Mortlock sign this deposition (read).

Middlesex, to wit - The information of Mary Mortlock , of No. 13, Salisbury-mews Mary-le-bone, residing with her father and mother, aged eighteen years, on her oath, says, my father is the driver of a hackney-coach; I know the prisoner-I do not know his name: I think I have known him a week - I first saw him at the play last Thursday week, at Covent-garden Theatre - the play was Othello, and the Beggar's Opera; I went from the play-house home to my father's next morning I saw the prisoner in Oxford-street, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon - I met him by appointment; I was with him about an hour: I was to meet him again on the Wednesday evening following. On Wednesday evening last I met him at ten minutes after six o'clock, at the corner of Woodstock-street and Oxford-street, at a public-house; he was there first - I staid about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, while he drank a glass of gin and water - I then went with him down Orchard-street, to Salisbury-mews; he wished me good night, and said he should go and have a pint of ale, and asked me to go with him, which I did; I went to the Bee Hive, in Crawford-street - I staid there with him till a quarter-past nine o'clock - we were in a back parlour there; he had two pints of ale and a pipe: when I left the Bee Hive I went with him to Gloucester-place, he was going to bid me good night there; he was in liquor, and I thought I would see him to Crawford-street - I did not know where he lived: we went up Baker-street, by the New-road, and back again to Gloucester-place; I stood talking with him in Gloucester-place about a quarter of an hour - it was then almost ten o'clock: we then went round into Thornton-place, and there he would have a pot of ale, at No. 4, Thornton-place - as we were coming out the watchman went"Past ten," we then went back into Crawford-street - we were talking together; I was telling him not to go into a public-house, but to go home - he said he would: he told me he lived towards the City - I told him I would go as far as Baker-street and Crawford-street; I asked him if he knew where he was - he said No, but he said he was going down Regent-street; I think he had been drinking when I first met him- when we were last in Crawford-street he could hardly walk straight; he was very wild in his behaviour: I asked him to write to me - he said be would. I was pursuading him to go home; he said he would see me back, and find his way himself - I went as far as the corner of Spring-street; I had hold of his right arm: I was outside, nearest the curb-stone, when I was shot; I said,

"Lord have mercy upon me,

"and I ran over to a baker's-shop - I did not see the pistol, or the person who shot me; Mr. Bushell, the surgeon, came to me at the baker's-shop, and brought me here - I did not see any other person near me when I was shot, except a watchman. When I first saw him at the play-house, he asked me if my name was Davis. MARY MORTLOCK .

Taken and sworn by the said Mary Mortlock , in the infirmary in the workhouse of the parish of St. Mary-le-bone, in the said County, in the presence and hearing of the prisoner, Benjamin Burrup , before me, one of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the County of Middlesex, this 19th day of December, 1828. E. GRIFFITH.

MR. GOODGER . I am a surgeon. I saw a piece of lead extracted from the deceased's face - I produced it on the last trial.

THOMAS SHELTON , Esq. I received this piece of lead from your Lordship immediately after the trial; it is now precisely in the same state, and has been under my care ever since; your Lordship has written on the paper which it is wrapped in,

"A piece of lead proved by the surgeon to have been found in the face of Mary Mortlock . J.A. Park."

MR. GOODGER. It is the same I extracted.

Prisoner's Defence (Written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - Many persons before myself have stood in the awful situation in which I am now placed, but, perhaps, no one in the same perplexing circumstances; for although I have the life of a fellow creature to answer for, I solemnly declare that I never had the least intention of injuring any other person than myself. I had been for some time in a very distressing and unsettled state of mind, arising out of some pecuniary disappointments and family disputes, and these matters had so unsettled my understanding, and overcome my reason, that I looked forward to an act of suicide as the only resource left me; this I had meditated for some time, and have more than once expressed my intention indirectly to some parts of my family, and this long before my unfortunate meeting with the deceased, against whom I had no sort of hostility - I never had the least dispute or difference with her, and could have no possible, or even imaginary, motive for seeking to do her the least injury, and much less to deprive her of life, in so shocking a manner. I came to town with an intention of using the pistol against myself, and endeavoured to borrow from intoxication the resolution necessary for effecting my purpose. Of the fatal transaction I have no recollection whatever: my memory sunk under the influence of the excess of liquor I had drunk, and I do not remember any thing of the occurrence; but I am certain that I could not have meant to destroy the deceased - I must have intended to have carried my original intention against myself into effect, and not to have destroyed an innocent and unoffending person. The deceased herself, in her deposition, bears me out in the statement, that no dispute or angry words had ever occurred between as- all had been in perfect good humour up to, and even at the very moment, when the pistol was so fatally discharged; and I

may hope, perhaps, not to be considered so lost to every thing human, as, without any sort of provocation, to have committed so dreadful an offence. Tired of life as I have been, and awfully situated as I now am, I resign myself into your hands, with the most implicit reliance on your justice and humanity - only troubling you further, with assuring you of the deep and endless regret which I must ever feel, while any sense remains to me, at having been, though quite unconsciously, the means of terminating the existence of the unhappy victim of my lamentable frenzy.

WILLIAM PEARSON . I am a journey man tailor, and live in Upper Rosamond-street, Clerkenwell. I have known the prisoner upwards of two years; he was a very steady young man, industrious, and well behaved; his conduct has not undergone any change till within these last two or three months: he has since that seemed very curious in his talk and manner to what he has been before - his mind has appeared affected for within a month of this transaction; from the conduct he has evinced for the last two or three months, I think his mind is subject to occasional fits of derangement; I dined with him on the day this accident happened - he was very curious in his manner, and made a dreadful noise; he did not appear to have the command of his senses.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing about suicide? A. He was talking once about a man who shot himself going into Regent's-park; the newspapers called him a gentleman - he said he wondered, if he shot himself, whether they would call him a gentleman; he left me about five minutes past five o'clock - we had had two pints of ale, and a glass of gin and water between us; I cannot say whether he had taken any thing before dinner.

Q. Did he say any thing particular to you that afternoon? A. Yes: he forced me to take dinner with him at last; he said I had better dine with him - I refused at first; he pressed me, and said it might be the last I might eat with him - I asked why? but he gave me no answer; I did dine with him at the Mitre tavern, St. Martin's-lane, and just before dinner he made a groaning noise with his mouth; I said,

"You had better not make that noise;" he said, "Oh, nousense!" I felt ashamed of him, as there were people in the room, and took very little notice of him; when he left me at five o'clock, he said he was going to his brother's, and would meet me at a quarter before nine o'clock that evening again, at the same house - I went there, but he did not come; from his conduct that day, and from what I had seen of him before, my opinion is he was not in his right mind.

COURT. Q. Did you conceive him incapable of distinguishing between right and wrong? A. I think he was not in a state to be trusted by himself; I said, "Shall I go with you?" be said No: I pressed him to let me go, but he would not.

MR. CRESWELL. Q. He pressed you to dine with him, you mean he invited you? Q. Yes; I suppose he paid for the dinner, but I did not see him pay.

Q. Did he do every thing as far as you saw, like a rational man? A. Yes.

COURT. Q. Where do you work? A. At Mr.Burchart's, Clifford-street, Bond-street; the prisoner lived at Greenwich, but came backwards and forwards, and I have gone down there on a Sunday; I never thought of calling in a medical man to him.

Q. You did not think he could distinguish between right and wrong? A. That was on this Wednesday that I noticed it so particularly.

Q.Was the most particular thing you noticed, his pressing you to dinner - did you think that an act of derangement? A. No, but the way he went on talking; he said if he could not get his bread one way, he could another - he could get it at brush-making, or could write with his right hand or left.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Before you observed this alteration, was he a man of mild humane conduct? A. Yes.

WILLIAM BLIGH . I am landlord of the Mitre public-house, and have known the prisoner seven or eight months - he belongs to a society of tailors, which is held at my house; I noticed nothing particular in his conduct when I first became acquainted with him, but on the Monday that he came up from Greenwich, he had left his mother's, and came up to take his certificate from the house - he was talking to several people in the parlour, and on the Tuesday he was talking to a gentleman in the parlour, about a gentleman shooting himself in a hackney-coach; they had called him a gentlemen in the papers - he said to one of the tailors,"Do you think if I was to shoot myself, they would style me a gentleman?"

Q. Was this observation made in a wild agitated manner, or calm? A. Why I think he had drunk a glass or two of ale: I thought he was in a deranged state of mind on the Wednesday - he came in between twelve and one o'clock I think; he came into the bar, as he was allowed to do, and took some bread and cheese, and had three or four glasses of ale - he went into the parlour to see the rest of the gentlemen, and had a glass of gin there; he and Pearson dined together about half-past two o'clock.

Q. From what part of his conduct did you consider him deranged? A. He had two pints of ale, and a glass of gin and water before dinner; he came into the bar again about five o'clock, and asked me for a bundle - he untied it, took out a pair of shoes and said, "I am going to give these to my brother, but suppose I shall get up thanks for them;" I said, "You are talking strange to-day, what is the matter with you?" he said he was lost - he should not be lost neither, for he had three or four trades to his hand; my wife said he was tipsy - I said No he was not; I asked what trade he was before - he said he was a clerk, a tailor, a brushmaker, and a packing case maker - that he had travelled to Old Ford, and if he travelled as he had done, he could get his living.

COURT. Q. From this you judge he was insane? A. Yes.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was this said in a calm manner? A. He was walking backwards and forwards in the bar, and appeared to be strange.

COURT. Q. Did he pay for his dinner? A. No - I thought nothing of that; he never ran a score with me, but made it a rule to come to the bar and pay me.

RICHARD BURRUP . I am the prisoner's brother: I have lately discovered a difference in his conduct and habits on Friday, the 12th of December, he called on me, and appeared very wild; that was the first time I had seen him for six months - he then appeared much agitated, and told me I was not to be surprised to hear of his death, for he

certainly should make away with himself; I do not recollect his saying any thing more.

Q. Did all this appear like a calm and collected man, or as if he did not know what he was about? A. He had been walking about the room in an agitated state, and saying nothing, then turned round, and said, "Richard, you must not be surprised to hear of my death, for I certainly think I shall put an end to myself?"

Q. Had he his intellects about him then? A.He had; I did not think him insane.

COURT. Q. What steps did you take to prevent his making away with himself? A. I did not take any steps; I did not take much notice of it - his character was very good, from what I have had an opportunity of observing.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18290115-196

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

463. JOHN OSBORNE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Murrell , and with a certain sharp instrument cutting and stabbing her, with intent to kill and murder her .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, varying the charge.

MARY MURRELL . I live in Dock-street, Whiteehapel. I am an unfortunate girl; I know the prisoner, by seeing him once or twice, at the Anchor and Hope public-house, East Smithfield, but never had any conversation with him, at any time - on the 10th of January , between three and four o'clock, I went to the pawnbrokers, to pledge a gown, opposite St. Katharine Docks, and as I came back, I saw him; he came and caught hold of my shawl I and gown, and said, "You have robbed me of one sovereign and 4s.," and struck me - I told him he mistook me for the wrong person, and that it was the girl he had been with; I had seen him that day with a girl named Mary Ann - I had never been with him, nor had I drunk with him; he struck me in the face - I told him I would give him in charge, and went to Amey's (the officer) house, in East Smithfield - I saw Mrs. Amey, and asked if Mr. Amey was at home; she said No - the prisoner followed, and asked her for a knife; she asked what he wanted with it; he made no reply, but took a three-pronged fork off the counter, and stuck it into my left shoulder, and left it sticking there; he said nothing - Miss Amey took it out; I do not know how, for I fainted away, and she took me into a back-room - I found the prisoner in the shop, when I came out of the back-room; I did not hear him say any thing - I had not taken any of his money; I had not been with him, nor talking with him- after the fork was taken out of my shoulder, I heard him say he would stick a knife into my heart, if he could catch me; I was then in the back-room - when the officer came, he said he would stick a knife into my heart, and he the death of me; I was coming out of the back-room at the time; I had not spoken to him at all - my arm did not bleed much; I have felt no inconvenience from it - I had a shawl and a black silk gown on; I cannot say whether the fork went through my shift sleeve - it went through my shawl and gown; a surgeon looked at it.

Prisoner. Q. How did you come by the money which you had? A. I had 3s. and a duplicate, which I had pledged a gown for that day.

Q. You had a sovereign in your hand, and took and gave it to a man who ran outside the door? A. I had no sovereign at all, nor any more money than 3s.; I gave no sovereign to any man.

ELIZABETH AMEY . On the 10th of January, the prosecutrix came to my house, about four o'clock, and in about a minute after the prisoner came in, and asked my mother for a knife; she asked what he wanted with it, and, in the meantime, he took the fork off the counter, and stuck it into Murrell's shoulder - it was a small three - pronged fork; she was sitting sideways to him, on a basket; he stuck her in her left shoulder - he said nothing before that; he left it sticking in her shoulder - she got up off the basket, and staggered; I took hold of the fork, put my left hand against her, and pulled it out with my right, because I had a difficulty in getting it out - she then fell backwards; I took her into the kitchen - she fainted; I pulled her things off her shoulder - it had gone through her shawl, gown, and shift-sleeve; the shawl was doubled once - the gown was lined; I then saw three wounds of the fork, corresponding with the prongs - I suppose it had gone in about a quarter of an inch, or not quite so much; it did not bleed a great deal - while I was looking at it, the prisoner was in the shop; he said he would have his money or her life - I then went down for an officer, who came and took him; he then said he would stick a knife into her heart, or have his money - she went in the evening to a surgeon, after going to the office.

JAMES FOGG . I am an officer. On the 10th of January, I was fetched to Amey's house, East Smithfield; I found the prisoner, the prosecutrix, Mrs. Amey, and her daughter; the prosecutrix was then coming out of the back-room, into the shop, I showed him her shoulder, and asked what he did it for - he said she had robbed him of a sovereign and 4s., and that he would sooner lose his life than his money, and if she did not give him his money, he would stick a knife into her heart, and be the death of her; I took him into custody - the fork laid on the counter; I brought it away, and produce it - I searched the girl, and found nothing; I had seen her give a duplicate and 3s. to Mrs. Amey - it was the duplicate of the gown pawned that day for 3s.; I took her to a surgeon, after the examination.

GEORGE BESTON . On the 10th of January, a little before eight o'clock in the afternoon, the prosecutrix was brought to my shop; I examined her left shoulder, and observed three punctures as of pricks from a fork, in the fleshy part of the arm; it was in the least dangerous part - not at all calculated to disable or disfigure her: they are now quite well; they healed by the first intention.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from the country to receive my pension; I lost my arm at the battle of Navarino- I fell in with a shipmate, and took him to a public-house, and there this girl stood before me; she whipped her hand into my pocket, took 24s. out, and started off as quick as possible: I followed her to this house - she whipped a sovereign into a man's hand, and he ran away; she kept 3s., and 1s. fell on the ground: I asked her for my money - she said, "Go to hell, I have no money of your's" I could not find an officer; I was deranged with losing my money, and being intoxicated, followed her to this house, but how the fork came into my hand I cannot tell; I mentioned no such words as that I would have her life.

MARY MURRELL . I had been to pawn the gown, and

was coming back; I had seen him in company with a girl about half an hour before I got to Amey's,

JURY to ELIZABETH AMEY. Q. Did he offer to go away before the constable came? A. No; my mother told him he had better go: he said no, he would not go till he had his money or her life. NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

Reference Number: t18290115-197

464. WILLIAM CONNELL was indicted for that he feloniously did counsel, procure, and command Dennis Aaron to steal 2 coats, value 4l. 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 15s., and 1 waistcoat, value 12s. , the goods of Eleanor Dunderdale .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen.

ELEANOR DUNDERDALE. I am a widow , and live in Queen-street, Seven-dials, Soho. I have a son named Dennis Aaron : since my husband's death, I lived in the same house as the prisoner: I had a suit of clothes of my late husband's in my possession on the 3d of December -I put them into the drawer, and left the key in: they had only been worn three hours.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What age is your son? A. Just turned twelve: he bought a donkey and cart out of this money; I had given him no directions to buy them; I did not know he was about them - I am not now in business: I kept a bottle-shop, in King-street, Regent-street, twelve months ago; my son was out for two nights after I missed my clothes; I have two sons - one is ill, and the other belongs to the coast blockade; my son who is ill is in prison - I do not exactly know where; it was not for any misdemeanor; I have had no son transported; I was once in trouble through buying some lead.

DENNIS AARON . I am the prosecutrix's son. I had lived in the same house with the prisoner, but at the time in question, I lived with my mother; I met him in the street on the Monday before the robbery, and was walking with him; I saw some clothes in a shop - he said there was a fine suit of clothes; I said my father-in-law had as fine a suit as them: he said, "Get them;" I said,"How do you mean;" he said, "Get them, and we will have a spree:" I told him they were at home, and then I said, "Very well;" my mother went out on the Wednesday, and I got the clothes: I do not exactly know what they were, as they were tied up; there were two silk waistcoats and a pair of trousers; I got them from the drawers- he waited for me at the corner of Compton-street, which was some distance from my mother's I took them to him there - he took them from me, and said, "Let us sell them out and out to some Jew;" he then said "I am known at Chaffer's and Mills', and will take them there;" I went with him to the door - he went in, and came out and gave me three sovereigns and 9s. - I do not know what he got for them; he had a bottle of medicine in his pocket; he said, "Come to the Cock public-house:" and he left the medicine there; when be called, this young man was there, and some more, and said, "Treat them - give them some gin," be took this young man to the Adelphi Theatre, and I went with him - I stayed away from my mother two nights: I paid for all three at the Adelphi - we went into the gallery, and had some oranges and things; I went next morning, and bought a donkey and cart; I do not know what I meant to do with them; I did not tell my mother I was going to boy them.

Cross-examined. Q. You are quite sure your mother did not know you were going to buy them? A. No; they were kept in the stable of the man I bought them of: I do not know what I was to pay for the keep - I had once mentioned to my mother that I wanted to buy the donkey and cart; she said, "Puff, puff, I don't want you to get such a thing - I want you to go to a trade;" I bought it of Anderson, in Belton - street.

ALEXANDER MILLS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Greek-street, Soho. On the 3d of December, between two and three o' clock, the prisoner pawned two coats, a pair of trousers, and a waistcoat, for 4l., in the name of John Luney - I had known him before, and he had pawned goods, but I asked his name, not knowing it; he said that he brought them for his master, who had sent them to raise money to pay his servants; I do not know whether he always pawned in that name: I gave him three sovereigns and 20s.

DANIEL GEORGE ALDERSON . I am an officer. I have a receipt for the donkey, which I received from the prosecutrix on the 8th of December.

MRS. DUNDERDALE. When I found my son, I found this receipt and duplicate on him.

Q. Have you ever seen the man he bought the donkey and cart of? A. I was coming down Crown-street one day before this happened; my son said, "That is the donkey, mother, I should like that;" I said; "Stuff of nonsense, I don't want to see it, or speak to the man;" I never spoke to the man about it in my life.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where were you married? A. At St. James church, Piccadilly, about six years ago; I cannot exactly say how long ago it was - I never said I was not married to Mr. Dunderdale, nor ever swore it.

DENNIS AARON . I got this receipt from the man who sold me the donkey: the prisoner gave me the duplicate the day he pawned the things; he wished me to give it back to him - I would not.

Cross-examined. Q. How much did he give you? A.3l. 9s.; I do not know what I paid at the different places; I gave 2l. 7s. for the donkey and cart - I had 3s. when I met my mother; I paid 3s. at the theatre: I do not know what I spent at different public-houses.

DANIEL SULLIVAN Anderson, who sold the donkey and cart, asked me to sign this receipt, which I did; I saw it given to Aaron.

The receipt was here read; it was for 21. 7s. and witnessed by William Connell and Daniel Sullivan.

PHILIP ANDERSON . I live at No. 4, Belton-street, Longacre, and am a costermonger. In December last, I sold a donkey and cart to Aaron, by his mother's desire; the prisoner was with him.

Q. When did the mother desire you to sell it? A. About a month, or five weeks before that, she met me in Crown-street; the boy said, "That's the donkey and cart;" she said to me "Is this the donkey and cart you want to sell?" I said Yes; she asked what I wanted for it - I said, 3l.: she said Pooh, she would give no 3l. - I said, then she need not alarm herself about it, I could keep them, and she could keep her money; she went away about fifty yards - the boy then came back, and said,

"Say you will take 2l. 10s. for it, and mother says she will have

it:" I said, "No, your mother shall not have it for less than 2l. 12s.;" he said he would give me the 2s. out of his own pocket, and I could give him a receipt for 50s.: that he would come for it at night, and he accordingly came at night, and said his mother and aunt wanted to see it in Piccadilly- I sent my servant for some Duke's groom to look at it, to see if it was worth the money: they brought it back, and said it would be bought.

Q. How came you to take 2l. 7s. for it? A. Why I was distressed; I did not sent to say he should have it for that; when he bought it, he brought it back to my stables two nights, and after that took it to Hopkins-street; he was to pay me 1s. 6d. a week for keeping it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you give this account before the Magistrate? A. Yes, part of it; the Magistrate would not hear the whole; I did not know the prisoner before, and am no friend of his.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to represent that you wanted to tell the Magistrate all this, and he would not hear it? A. Yes; he said he did not want to hear it all - that I must find bail.

DANIEL GEORGE ALDERSON . I was before the Magistrate; the witness said the prosecutrix had been to him about purchasing the donkey and cart previously; he did not state about the 2l. 12s.: the Magistrate said he had heard enough - he might convince the Jury about her going to him.

MRS. DUNDERDALE. I met him promiscuously coming down Crown-street, but I never spoke to him: I did not ask if it was the donkey and cart he wanted to sell, or what he wanted for them, or make him any offer; I said nothing whatever to him: I was fifty yards from him when my boy was talking to him: on my solemn oath I had no conversation with him.

DENNIS AARON . I remember meeting Anderson in Crown-street - my mother did not say a word to him; she went on - I stood and spoke to him, and asked what he would take - he said 3l.: I said, "Cannot you take less, and I will try and ask my mother to buy it:" my mother never bargained for it - I did say if he would give a receipt for 50s., I would give 2s. myself.

MR. PHILLIPS, Q.Was he to keep it for you? A. It was to stand in his stable - he said he would keep it two or three days for me; I do not recollect that I was to pay him: for the keep, but he said the day after that I was to pay him: a boy who worked for him got me a stable in Howard-street, which I was to pay half a crown a week for: I was to give Anderson 1s. 6d. for the stable alone - I did not take it away one night before I bought it: his boy asked me to say I was going to shew it to my aunt, because he wanted to shew it to another boy, and I did so.

DANIEL SULLIVAN . I heard nothing said about 1s. 6d. a week for keeping the donkey - I did not know Anderson before: I did not hear the Magistrate stop him for giving his evidence.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day previous to the robbery, Sullivan was in my company all day; I can prove I never saw the boy - when he says he met me, I was going to the Dispensary, when he came up and asked me to pawn the clothes; I asked whose they were: he said he was sent to pawn them; I went in, and gave him all the money - he insisted on my having some drink: I went and had some rum, and then did not know what I was about - he made me go to the play: I said I had no money, and he lent me three half-crowns; I persuaded him all I could to go home, but could not, as he said he was going to buy a donkey in the morning; and being afraid he would be robbed, I remained with him all night, and in the morning went with him to buy the donkey.

DANIEL SULLIVAN . I went into his company between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and was with him all day: I did not see Aaron in his company - I left him from twelve o'clock to half-past, and was with him from then till nine at night - I have known him six months.

DENNIS AARON . It was on Monday that he pointed out the fine clothes - I think it was before ten o'clock.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

Reference Number: t18290115-198

465. ELIZABETH SUGDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of January , in the dwelling-house of Edward Edwards , her master, 30 yards of silk, value 4l.; 20 yards of satin, value 30s.; 11 yards of poplin, value 14s.; 33 handkerchiefs, value 17s.; 1 veil, value 15.; 15 yards of cambric, value 5s.; 6 yards of gingham, value 5s.; 4 yards of lace, value 5s.; 5 caps, value 2s.; 10 yards of linen, value 10s.; 2 yards of flannel, value 1s., and 100 yards of ribbon, value 20s., his property .

EDWARD EDWARDS . I am a draper , and live in Union-street, Mary-le-bone ; the prisoner had lived exactly a month with me as servant of all work , and had nothing to do with the shop. About the 16th of January I missed this property - the value of the whole was from 12l. to 14l. - on Friday night last I had both her and the young man up stairs, and said that a length of silk was missing, and also a black lace veil: I insisted on searching their boxes, or I would sent for an officer - they were willing for us to do so; she said to my wife and sister, "You may search my box;" they both went up stairs with her, and my wife brought this property down, which I can swear to - she had eight guineas a year,

JANE EDWARDS . I am the prosecutor's sister, and live with him. I was present when the prisoner and the shopman were called up and told that a black veil was missing, and a length of silk, and asked if they would have any objection to let us look into their boxes: the prisoner said,"Not the least in the world;" Mrs. Edwards and I went up stairs - the prisoner went first and my sister followed her immediately; her box was locked - she opened it herself with a key: I found in it five or six parcels done up in brown paper; Mrs. Edwards opened them - some contained the gros de Naples; there were three lengths, measuring thirty yards, worth about 4l., some calico for linings, silk handkerchiefs, caps, lace, ribbons, and a black lace veil; she remained in the room and cried, and said she was very sorry; we brought them down, and showed them to my brother - I served in the shop, and know them to be his; I had missed one length of silk, and the veil - I had seen them three or four days before.

EDWARD EDWARDS re-examined. I know all this property to be mine by the marks; no one article is worth 5l. - they were missed at different times.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-199

466. FREDERICK BYRNE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 watch, value 8l., the goods of Kate Poole , widow , in her dwelling-house .

KATE POOLE. I am a widow. At the time of the robbery I lived at No. 16, Howard-street, Norfolk-street, Strand ; I was the sole house-keeper - I intended to let lodgings there; I saw the prisoner at my house on the 23d of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon - my servant let him in; he said he wanted lodgings for a rich uncle of his, a merchant - they had wanted a first floor and an attic for a groom; I shewed him the rooms, and he fixed on them - he said he would go and let his uncle know, and give me a decisive answer at six o'clock in the evening; he went away - I had some business in the City, and went there; I returned about five minutes past five, and had hardly got inside the door, and had put my watch into the case in the parlour; I then went up to the drawing-room to put off my shawl - I returned instantly, and saw the prisoner coming out of my parlour-door; (I had heard a knock at the door as I stood on the first-floor stairs going to the parlour) he seemed in a very great hurry, and said he could not give me a decisive answer till twelve o'clock next day, and went away - I went into the parlour, and instantly missed my watch out of the case, which stood on a writing-desk; he had taken it out of the case - I am quite certain no person could have been in the parlour from the time I heard the knock at the door till I saw the prisoner, for I saw my servant standing with the handle of the door in her hand; I have never seen the watch since; the servant who lived with me is gone to Ireland.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You went up to the drawing-room? A. Yes - that is on the first-floor; I went into the room, and left my bonnet and muff on the table; I was going to the bed-room, but hearing the knock went into the drawing-room; I saw the prisoner coming out of the parlour as I was on the last stair - I had heard the door open, and the servant came to the foot of the stairs, and called me down to the man.

COURT. Q. How long did you keep the house after this? A. Only two days, and as soon as I left I sent the servant home to Ireland - I am quite sure the prisoner is the man; the week before last Mr. Hoskins, the Magistrate sent for me - I found the prisoner in charge; I now live in the country - it was a gold watch, and worth 5l.; it was a present - it cost more than 5l.; I have had it, I believe, seven years.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

467. FREDERICK BYRNE was again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , 1 watch, value 8l., and 1 key, value 1s., the goods of Ami Auguste Ganeval , in his dwelling-house .

AMI AUGUSTE GANEVAL (through an interpreter.) -My dwelling-house is No. 41, Cold Bath-square ; I occupy the whole house.

MARIA GANEVAL . I am the wife of the prosecutor; I believe the house is in the parish of St. James, Clerknwell. On Friday, the 26th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at our house; he knocked at the door, and said he wanted apartments - I went up and shewed him the first-floor; I was up stairs with him a few minutes - he came down with me, and said he supposed I should like a reference; I said I would take nobody without: he wrote his direction down - I have it here; this is it: he wrote it in my presence, "Mr. Martin, No. 4, Chadwell-street:" he asked when I could call for his character - I said, "This evening or to-morrow;" he asked if I could not come then with him, and as he was a stranger, and recollecting I had a French gold repeater on my mantel-piece, I asked him to step up into the second-floor, where my husband was, and where there was a fire, if he would wait there he would be more comfortable - I begged of him to follow me up stairs, saying there was no fire in the parlour; we were in the parlour when he wrote the direction - he wrote it on the table in the middle of the room: as I left the parlour I said, "If you please to follow me," he was then out of my sight - I had got to the foot of the stairs, and when I got to the first-floor he said, "Must I follow you?" I said Yes, and when he got up stairs he said, "I am thinking it is putting you a great deal out of your way, and if you will call on Sunday the landlady and I shall be at home; I agreed to do so - he took leave of my husband; I followed him to the street-door, and opened the door for him myself; at the door he told me he had forgotten one of his gloves, which he had left up stairs - I went into the parlour, thinking he might have left it there, and not thinking of my repeater I did not miss it at the moment; I came out of the parlour, not finding the glove - he then said, "Never mind;" I said, "Oh, Yes, I will go up stairs," and went up to the first-floor, but did not find his glove; I came down, and he was off - the milkman stood at the door: I went into the parlour, and missed my French gold repeater, which I am sure was there when he gave me his direction; there was a gold key to it, and a black string - it was worth between 9l. and 10l.; it was not our own - my husband is a watchmaker.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was your proposal to go up and look for the glove? A. Yes; I did not go into the parlour to look for it at his request - I went in, thinking it might be there, and was then going up stairs; he said,

"Never mind" - if I had not gone up he could not have gone into the parlour again; he was in the house a quarter of an hour: he spoke very good French to my husband - I was in the room all the time; I saw the watch in the parlour when he was giving me the direction - we had had it about three weeks; if it had been English it would have been worth more - it has not been found.

AMI AUGUSTE GANEVAL. The lowest value of the watch is 10l. - I speak as a tradesman.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it old or now? A. It was not new, I suppose five or six years old - it was French work, and a single case.

COURT. Q. What would it cost when new? A. Fifteen pounds; the lowest value of it is 10l. - I suppose the maker would have a trifling profit at 15l.

JOSEPH WOODS . I am a milkman. I went up to the prosecutor's door to serve him with milk on the 26th of December; I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's door and run away; Mrs. Ganeval did not come to the door till he got out of sight. I believe him to be the man.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not mean to say you are

sure of the man? A. No, but I believe him to be the man.

MRS. GANEVAL. This is the milkman I spoke to.

Prisoner's Defence, I certainly went to take lodgings at the prosecutor's house, and asked the person if it would be convenient to come for my character at that time; she said it was not exactly convenient, but if I wished it she would go, and would I walk up stairs while she got ready- I went up, and afterwards thought it would be troubling her, and said,

"Never mind, I will give you my address, and you can call" - in fact, the apartments were too dear, but I did not know how to make an excuse, after the trouble I had given her; as I came out I missed my gloveshe said she would go up stairs; I said, "Never mind, it is an old kid glove."

Prisoner to MRS. GANEVAL. Q. Where did I stand when you went up stairs? A. At the door-he had time to go and take the watch then; when I went up stairs he stood at the door-he could have gone to the mantel-piece and taken the watch before he followed me up stairs.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

There were three more indictments against the prisoner.

Reference Number: t18290115-200

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

468. JAMES PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of Richard Clements .

RICHARD CLEMENTS. I am a tailor , and live in Bridgewater-gardens ; when this happened I was out of town, and had not seen my coat since Monday - it was in my parlour; I saw it before the Alderman, and was certain of it - the prisoner is a stranger.

CATHERINE CLEMENTS . On Wednesday evening, the 17th of December, this coat hung on the parlour door, between the parlour and shop - the shop was shut up about four o'clock; I had been into the yard, and as I came back, the prisoner stood in the shop, offering frying-pans for sale; I declined buying them; he sidled out of the shop - I missed the coat, looked round the door - post, and saw him on the pavement with it; I pulled part of it from him - he tustled with me for it; I called Stop thief ! my boy came out - a person came, and pushed him into the shop, he was secured - it was my husband's coat; he said he had done nothing.

Prisoner. Q. Was the door shut? A.It was on a spring-lock; he must have pushed with violence to get in; I did not tell the Magistrate it was ajar: I saw the coat on you before you left the shop - it is a tailor's shop; I deal in brokering myself; he said, "Lord have mercy on me; what could I have done? and Oh, dear, what could the matter be? and "Oh, dear, don't hurt me;" I do not think he said he did it through distress - he talked foolish.

WILLIAM HENRY FOSSEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Clements: about seven o'clock, mistress was gone out into the yard; the prisoner came in to sell some frying-pans; one door was fastened up entirely, but the other door he had to push very hard to get open - he had three large frying-pans, and placed them all round the door for mistress to look at; I said I did not think they would suit her, but he could stop a few minutes to see - I was at work with my back to him, and did not see him take the coat; when he was gone, I heard her say, "Where is the coat?" she went out, and called Stop thief! I went out, and found the coat under his arm - he kept hold of it, and was shoved into the shop.

JOHN PARRY . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I found him quite destitute.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, stated himself to be a native of Liverpool, and respectably connected; that himself and family had been in the Russian service, but was at present in great distress; and that a man had employed him to sell frying-pans, for which purpose he called at the shop.

GUILTY. Aged 39. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290115-201

469. HENRY HART was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Nathaniel Hubbert , from his person .

NATHANIEL HUBBERT . I am a salesman . On the 19th of December, between three and four o'clock, I was in Leadenhall-street; I felt the prisoner thrust his hand into my pocket, and take out my handkerchief; I immediately seized him, and he directly let it it drop from his hand - he appeared alone; he said nothing; Toole seized him.

THOMAS TOOLE , I was in Leadenhall-street ; a horse had run away with a chaise, and I went to assist the gentleman - it was not two minutes before I heard a cry of Pick-pocket I came up to Mr. Hubbert - he had then got hold of the prisoner; I took him into custody; Mr. Hubbert delivered me the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoners's Defence. I had just got home, and was going to join a ship.

GUILTY. Aged 17. Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18290115-202

470. LOUISA PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of December , 1 brooch, value 10s.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 1 sheet, value, 4s; 1 printed book, value 5s.; 1 umbrella, value 1s; 1 lace cap, value 4s.; 1 petticoat, value 3s., and 1 bed-gown, value 9d. , the goods of Phoebe Jelly .

PHOEBE JELLY. I live in Bridgewater-gardens - I keep a green-shop , and take in washing. The prisoner came and took my lodging on the 13th of November, and had half a bed at 2s. per week - she did needle - work for me at times; I missed a gold brooch, set with pearls, from the middle drawer, which was locked, in the room she s'ept in; two women lodged there - I did not miss some of the things till after I gave her in charge; I found the things in pawn.

CHARLES BAFF . I am a pawnbroker, of Goswell-street. I have all the articles named in the indictment, except the brooch - they were all pawned at different times for 11s., altogether, by the prisoner - all of them in the name of Ann Palmer , between the 18th and 23d of December.

GEORGE CURTIS . I am a pawnbroker, and live with Mr. Walter, of Aldersgate-street. I have a brooch, pawned on the 2d of December for 3s., in the name of Mary Harris .

JOSEPH ORTON . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner on a Saturday evening in December - the prosecutrix searched her, and found the duplicate of an

umbrella on her; next morning she gave me the other duplicate, and told me she intended to redeem them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to replace them as soon as I could.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-203

471. JAMES SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 40 yards of linen cloth, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of John Harris .

THOMAS BEAUMONT . I am a shopman to John Harris , a haberdasher , of Fore-street. On the 16th of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I was in the shop; the prisoner came in to beg - he took a piece of sheeting-cloth, and went away with it; I immediately followed him to the corner of Aldermanbury Postern - I called Stop thief! and he was stopped before I lost sight of him; I saw the cloth fall off his shoulder directly I called Stop thief! it was delivered over to the officer - he said he had done nothing, and what did I detain him for.

Prisoner. Q.Are you certain it was in the shop? A. It was six feet within the shop - just against the inner door in the lobby.

RICHARD DOWNES. I am a porter. I heard a cry of Stop thief! as the prisoner came along - I laid hold of him, and saw the cloth on the pavement; Beaumont claimed it - I took him back - an officer was sent for.

JOHN WEATHERHILL . I took the prisoner in charge with the property; I searched him, but found nothing on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-204

472. ROBERT ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 5 shifts, value 15s.; 6 aprons, value 6s.; 1 gown, value 5s., and 2 shawls, value 20s. , the goods of Mary Ann Chandler .

MARY ANN CHANDLER. At the time in question I lived at No, 4. Bell-street, Little Moorfields, City. I have known the prisoner three years - I am single ; he did not live with me - I am a servant ; I was stopping at a friend's in Bell-square - I was alone in the house, and had the care of it. On the 17th of November the prisoner came in, and said he was very thirsty, and wished me to fetch him a pint of porter, which I did; I was gone about five minutes - these things were in a box down stairs; he went away about ten minutes after I brought him the porter - it was about twelve o'clock in the day; I did not miss the things till next day - there were other things in the box; nobody but the prisoner had been in the house - my friend came home about an hour afterwards; I remained there myself till I missed the things - the house was secure at night - I found it so next morning; I saw the things when he was in custody two months after - there was nobody in the house to take them but him.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Did you meet the prisoner in the street at your first acquaintance, and he go home with you? A. No; he promised me marriage, but I discovered after he was taken up that he has a wife - I understood so before he was taken; I cannot say I was ever particularly fond of him - I gave him several things to send down into the country ready for our marriage; these are not those articles, and what I did give him was for our own use, not to run away with - I never slept with him in my life; I once lived servant in Noble-street, Foster-lane he was not allowed to come in there; he visited me frequently at Mrs. Powell's - I did not give him these things.

COURT. Q. You gave him some other things for your common use, expecting to become his wife? A. Yes; these were taken without my knowledge.

SARAH POWELL . I keep the house, No. 4, Bell-square. I have known Chandler five years; the prisoner visited her for three years - he represented himself to be single; I discovered that he was not single before he was taken up, and told Chandler when the things were stolen - I did not know it before they were stolen; he was to come on the 18th, to go out with her to buy the ring and the licence at Doctors' Commons - I heard him say so; he did not call -I did not see him again till he was in custody, on the 3d of January: when he did not come, I went to make inquiry at Mr. Wild's office, in College-hill, where he had once lived, and they told me he was a married man; Miss Chandler had given him some things to send into the country for the wedding - I think it was on the Thursday before the 17th of November.

Cross-examined. Q. They were to go to his father's in Norfolk? A. Yes, I had left the prosecutrix in care of my house on the 17th - I never knew any thing wrong of her; I never saw the prisoner at her place in Noble-street- he never staid at my house after nine o'clock, as my husband goes to bed early.

JOHN JAMES PRICE . I am a pawnbroker. I have five shifts pawned on the 17th of November; the person who took them in has left my service - they were pawned in the name of John Roberts , for 13s.; they were claimed by Chandler before the Magistrate, on the 8th of January.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of January, at No. 29, Allerton-street, Hoxton New-town, charged with robbing the prosecutrix; Powell was with me - he seemed to hesitate very much, and asked Mrs. Powell where Mary was; she said she was in a situation - he said, "Because if I see her I will get the things for her;" I told him he must go with me - I searched him, and found some duplicates on him, one of which was for these five shifts pawned at Price's, on the 17th of November.

MR. PRICE. This duplicate belongs to my shop, and is the corresponding duplicate cut from this one, and is in the name of John Roberts , George-yard.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix was acquainted with me better than two years; I met her accidently in the street - she asked me to accompany her home, and said when her master was gone to church of an evening she would let me in; I called several nights afterwards, while they were at church, took tea with her, and slept with her almost every Sunday night - she gave me these things to take away; they were always packed up - I did not know what they were.

MRS. POWELL. I had no reason to believe he was married till after the 17th of November.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18290115-205

473. JOSEPH FORRESTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Plumley , on the 15th of January , at St. Bridget alias St. Bride, and stealing therein 11 diamond pins, value 25l., and 2 brooches, value 10l. , his property.

JAMES LANGTON . I live in Duke-street, Spitalfields -I am a watchman of St. Bride's parish; Mr. Charles Plumley's house is on Ludgate-hill, in the parish of St. Bride . On the 15th of January, about a quarter to eight o'clock at night, I was coming down Ludgate-hill, and saw the prisoner standing against Mr. Plumley's shopwindow - I did not know his person before; I am quite sure he is the person - he turned his head round and looked about him - I was on the same side of the way, about two doors off near to Fleet-street; there was nobody near him - all in a moment I heard glass crash; he directly sprang from the window, and ran across the road to the Albion office, down Bridge-street, and I after him - he went through the coach-stand, and somebody on the other side of the way stopped him; an alarm had been given by several persons hallooing out Stop him! he kept running, and I lost sight of him for about two minutes; two young men brought him up towards the market - I knew him again, and am certain of his person; I laid hold of his left side, and took him to St. Bride's watch-house - I left him there, and went on duty; I did not see him searched - I went to Mr. Plumley's shop, but did not see the property found.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are you quite sure the prisoner is the man? A. I am; I did not know him before.

WILLIAM SINFIELD. I am shopman to Mr. Charles Plumley - he has no partner; I have lived with him and his father nearly forty years. I was in the shop when the window was broken - I heard a crash, looked round, and saw a man's hand in the window; I ran out, and before I could get out the party was gone - on looking over the window we missed a cushion with diamond pins and brooches worth between 30l. and 40l.; two of the pins have been found since - Mr. Plumley picked up one, and I believe a witness another; the house is in the parish of St. Bride.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not Mr. Plumley in partnership with Mr. William Davis? A. Not in the business on Ludgate-hill, I believe; but am not certain - Mr. Davis does not assist in the business; he never lived nor lodged in the house - it is entirely occupied by Mr. Plumley.

JAMES GRIMMAN. I am a hair-dresser, and live in Fleet-street. I was crossing Bridge-street about a quarter to eight o'clock on the 15th of January - an alarm was raised, and I saw the prisoner running down Bridge-street very swiftly - he was the person pursued; several people behind him were calling Stop thief! I pursued him into Crescent-place; and finding there was no thoroughfare there, he was returning, when I put my hand on his arm and secured him - I am certain he is the same person I saw pursued, and running from the cry - he made no resistance; I asked him what he had been about; he answered, "Why, I have only broken a window; let me go" - I am certain he said that; other persons came up, and he said "Take me quietly, don't make a noise" - I went to the watch-house, but did not see him searched.

RICHARD SHORT. I am an engraver, and live in Bride-lane. I was crossing Bridge-street, at a quarter to eight o'clock, and saw the prisoner running, and people calling Stop thief! he turned up Crescent-place - I followed, and he was taken; I saw one pin picked up, about the centre of the crescent, which is no thoroughfare - two diamond pins were found there; I saw one picked up, and saw one after it was picked up - Mr. Plumley claimed them.

HENRY WAKE. I live in Poppin's-court, Fleet-street: the prisoner was brought to the watch-house to me - I am the night-officer; I found nothing on him - I went out with a lantern; Mr. Plumley, and the watch-housekeeper went down Bridge-street, into Crescent-place - and halfway up Crescent-place, I picked up a diamond pin, and a few yards from me, Mr. Plumley picked up another, and claimed them both.

GEORGE FREDERICK BOOTH. I am an inspector of St. Bride's. I was in the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in; I found none of the property on him - I went with the night-officer to Crescent-place, and saw one of the pins picked up by Mr. Plumley.

MR. CHARLES PLUMLEY . I am a jeweller, and live on Ludgate-hill, in the parish of St. Bride's. I was not in the shop at the time this happened, but heard of it almost immediately; I stopped at the window to take care of the property - I afterwards went to the watch-house, and then to Crescent-place, and, as near the spot as possible he was stopped at, I picked up two diamond pins - Wake, the officer, has the other; they are two of the pins which were on the cushion in my window - the value of those two is about 5l.; the value of all on the cushion is near 40l. - I have no partner in the business on Ludgate-hill; I have a partner in a wholesale jewellery concern, but none in the shop: it is my sole property - there were eleven pins and two brooches.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18290115-206

NEW COURT, Fifth Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

474. WILLIAM LEA was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH POOLE . The prisoner was in my employ in June last; he left in July, without notice - it was his duty to solicit orders and to receive money, which he was to hand over to me immediately on his return; I never received from him these three sums, from Mr. Woodward - I received this letter from him; I have seen him write, and believe it to be his hand-writing.

THOMAS WOODWARD. The prisoner called on me for 2l. 3s. 6d.; on Mr. Poole's account, which I paid at the time I received the goods from him; I only recollect one date, which was June 13, when I paid him 2l. 12s. 2d. - I also paid him 1l. 13s., but I cannot tell the day; I am certain I paid them all to him

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had

but 26s. a week to support a wife and six children, and that having lost 10l. of the prosecutor's money, he had appropriated these sums for it, intending to make it up as early as possible.(Letter read.)

SIR, - In consequence of my mind being in the state it has been, by my having received the three sums of Mr. Woodward, which are, 2l. 3s. 6d., 1l. 13s., and 2l. 12s., and Mr. Bird 7s. 6d., in consequence of not being able to make Mr. Woodward's money up, has distressed my mind to the utmost, but I will pay you, if I work day and night; you will prove, on Monday, this is all I have received, when you call on the customers.

August, 1828.

MR. POOLE. He has always told me he had only two children, and only one of them is his own; I never heard of the loss of 16l,, till at Marlborough-street, the other day - he never told me he had had this loss; I have no recollection of his paying me 18l. the day before he left, but I will not swear he did not - he was in my service seven or eight months; I had a good character with him.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18290115-207

475. THOMAS LEE and GEORGE HARBER were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of December , 52 ornaments, value 50s. , the goods of John Laing .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES LAING . I am building a terrace of houses, and Harber was employed, as a plaster, by me; I was to find all materials - I never gave him authority to take away any plaster of Paris ornaments.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. When did he leave your employ? A.Two or three days before the 16th of December; on that day I saw him and Lee on my premises, from nine o'clock till twelve in the forenoon - there were a number of men on my premises: I had some plaster of Paris ornaments in the casting-room, one of which was locked up for safety; the prisoners went in at the window - I had heard that they had said they insisted upon having some things from the premises: that was on the morning of the 16th; they did not say certain models- they said certain articles manufactured from wood; they then went off the premises, and took some articles - I threatened that if they came back I would give them in charge.

- SKINNER. On the 16th of December I saw the prisoners take some ornaments from the casting-room -Harber told me not to say any thing about it; it was in open day, and all the men were about.

JURY to MR. LAING. Q. What did they allude to in the things they threatened to take away? A. Some rules and laths which they had to do their work, not ornaments; they said certain trestels belonged to them - I said, "Whatever belongs to you you shall have hereafter, but I am not aware that they do, as I have been charged in my surveyor's account for many things made by my materials;" there was no allusion to any ornaments.

NOT GUILTY . (See page 213.)

Reference Number: t18290115-208

476. THOMAS PEATY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January , 11 lbs. weight of sugar, value 9s. , the goods of Jane Newman .

JOHN NEWMAN . I am the son of Jane Newman , who keeps a chandler's-shop in Little Chapel-street, Soho . On the 13th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour, and heard a pair of scales rattle, which were on the sugar; I looked, and saw the prisoner - he was just leaving the door, with something which I thought was a loaf of sugar; I followed him, and he dropped the sugar - I never lost sight of him till he was stopped at the corner, eight doors off; I saw the sugar again in three or four minutes.

RICHARD ATKINSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Dean-street - he was running; I did not see the sugar till I came to the shop - he said he thought it was a loaf of bread.

Prisoner. I was much in distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18290115-209

477. WILLIAM RAY and CHARLES BUTLERS were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , 25 yards of cotton, value 8s. , the goods of Joseph Belcher .

JOSEPH BELCHER . I am a linen-draper , and live in High-street, Portland-town . On the 29th of December I went out about two o'clock, and returned at seven - I was then informed I had been robbed; I had left these goods safe when I went out.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am an officer. The watchman brought the prisoners and these things to Mary-le-bone Office, on the evening of the 29th of December; I was directed by the Magistrate to find the owner of them - the prisoners said nothing about them.

EDWARD GREEN . I am a watchman. I was on duty at a quarter before seven o'clock at night, in the Grove-road; Isaac Parker pointed out the prisoners to me - Butlers had this property; I went and asked how he came by it - he threw it down, and ran away; I caught the white cotton and the yellow handkerchief as he dropped them -I then pursued, and took him; I had never lost sight of him - he only said the other man gave it to him, as they had been in conversation in coming up Alpha-road; I am quite sure Ray is the person who was in conversation with him - I had never seen them before; they were nearly half a mile from Mr. Belcher's.

ISAAC PARKER. At half-past six o'clock that evening I was going from my own house in Wellington-road, and saw the two prisoners: Butlers had something in his apron, and Ray had this piece of blue cotton under his arm - I suspected something, and followed them some distance; when I got to the end of Alpha-road I saw the watchman, and told him - they then came up: Butlers then had a bundle in his hand, tied up in a yellow silk handkerchief - I told the watchman to go to him, and he threw it down; the watchman caught the calico and handkerchief. and pursued him: I went and took Ray - he said, "What have I done? I have done nothing;" I said, "You are one of them" - he said, "I have done nothing;" when I first saw them they were about three times the length of this Court from the prosecutor's: they went up Caroline-place, and to the top of the Alpha-road.

Prisoner RAY. I was only just speaking to this prisoner; I left him, and walked on - the watchman came and pursued Butlers. Witness. Ray had the piece of blue cotton till they came on to Caroline-place; I then

turned another way, and when they came up the road Butlers had it in a bundle, with the other.

RAY's Defence. I met Butlers with this bundle - he said he had been on an errand; I said, "I must make haste home;" he said, "Good night:" the gentleman then came up, and said, "I want you."

BUTLERS' Defence. I left work at half-past six o'clock, and went on an errand - I came back, and kicked something before me; I took it up, and put it into this handkerchief: Parker acknowledged himself that he had been a thief, and said he knew where the fence was.

ISAAC PARKER . No such thing; I said."I know you are going to the fence in the Grove," where they go to dispose of such things - I had seen the prisoners without any thing in Lodge-road, at half-past four o'clock, which gave me suspicion.

RAY - GUILTY