Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1828.
Reference Number: 18281204
Reference Number: f18281204-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., MAYOR.

FIRST SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 4th DAY OF DECEMBER, 1828, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. HUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY HENRY STOKES, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1828.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Joseph Littledale, Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ansley , Esq.; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; Robert Waithman , Esq.; and Mathias Prime Lucas , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; John Key , Esq.; Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

George Edling ,

James Greenus ,

John Lashbrook ,

Richard Thomas ,

Robert Young ,

Anthony Lant ,

John Sheffield ,

John Gooser ,

John Richardson ,

James Pearce ,

Thos. Younghusband ,

George Sanderson .

Second

Thomas Harrison ,

William Game ,

David Phillips ,

John Hill ,

Stephen Ponder , jun.

Chris. B. Bradshaw ,

Henry Tonkin ,

George Mare ,

William Smith ,

William Webb ,

William Cook ,

Joseph Douglass .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Thomas Taylor ,

William Thane ,

William Taylor ,

James Thompson ,

John Garnet Tyney ,

John Tudor ,

Henry Whitcroft ,

Thomas Key Walcot ,

Charles Whitehead ,

John Watson ,

Murray Ward ,

Henry Wild .

Second

Anthony Whiteley ,

William Wall ,

Thomas Yullon ,

John Webb ,

John Shepherd ,

John Semple ,

Michael Sloper ,

Thomas Thane ,

Thomas Scriven ,

Thomas Tyler ,

William Tozer ,

Thomas Wilkinson .

Third

James Wiggins ,

Augustus Whitmore ,

Richard Westall ,

Charles West ,

John Wiltshire ,

George Woodhall ,

John Wass ,

William Tugg ,

Robert Wernham ,

Joseph Thorowgood ,

Thomas White ,

John Wood .

Fourth

Richard Simmons ,

Peter Shoppee ,

James Verling ,

Frederick Simpson ,

J. Samuel Hunt ,

John Simmons ,

Samuel Tredethin ,

Francis Tabart ,

Nathaniel Tainton ,

William Thorn ,

Richard Taylor ,

James Tomline .

Fifth

William Willis ,

Benjamin West ,

John White ,

John Wiles ,

William Ward ,

William Say ,

Joseph Smith ,

Richard Strugwell ,

William Sanders ,

Simon Sanders ,

James Sarsons ,

William Smith .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 4, 1828.

THOMPSON, MAYOR-FIRST SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18281204-1

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Baron Hullock.

1. ARMSTRONG McCAUSLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 4 coats, value 4l.; 4 pairs of trousers, value 50s.; 9 waistcoats, value 2l.; 18 shirts, value 1l.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 1l.; 1 tablecloth, value 2s.; 8 spoons, value 4l.; 2 forks, value 1l.; 1 muffineer, value 5s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 5s.; 2 wine-lables, value 10s.; 2 sovereigns; two 50l., and two 10l. Bank notes, the property of John Lawrence , in his dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN LAWRENCE. I am an attorney , and have chambers at No. 52, Lincoln's Inn-fields . On Sunday, the 9th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I left them locked up safe, and returned about a quarter-past nine in the evening; I found the outer-door open - the drawer of my scrutoire, and all the drawers of my wardrobe were open; my cupboard-door was open: I missed nearly the whole of my wardrobe, four tablespoons, four or five dessert-spoons, some silver forks, a pair of sugar-tongs, a muffineer, a great coat, three body coats, three or four pairs of trousers, several waistcoats, a table-cloth, and some silk handkerchiefs; I have since seen part of the property at Bow-street - the prisoner was servant to Mr. Gough, who lives in the same house; I sleep at my chambers: the whole house is let out in different chambers - the owner does not live in the house.

DIANA MARTIN . I am the wife of James Martin , and am housekeeper at No. 52, Lincoln's Inn-fields. On Sunday, the 9th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came down to my room with a candle, and asked me to lend him my bunch of keys, in order to look for his own, which he had left in his master's chambers; my bunch had keys on it which opened all the doors of the chambers which I attend; I lent them him without any suspicion - he returned them to me in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; some time after this my servant gave an alarm, and when my husband came in we all went up to look at the different chambers- we went into Mr. Lawrence's chambers first, and found the door open; no violence had been used to it; all his drawers were open, as he has stated.

DAVIS DAVIS . I am a salesman, and live in Field-lane. On Sunday night, the 9th of November, about a quarter to ten o'clock, I was out, and was sent for; when I came in two persons were standing at the door - I found the prisoner inside; he had some gentleman's clothes in a portmanteau - I said it was rather an awkward night to bring clothes, and I should not buy them; I said, "How came you to bring clothes on Sunday night?" he said his master was going away early in the morning; he said he, or his master, was going to leave town that night or early in the morning: I left him in the shop, and went out to look for an officer; I returned in ten minutes, when he and the two persons were gone; the clothes were left behind - I took them to Hatton-garden next morning, and gave information; I was desired to go to Bow-street, and took the clothes there between eleven and twelve o'clock, and found the prisoner in custody; I had left the clothes at Hatton-garden for three hours, with Limbrick; I have no doubt that I took the same to Bow-street - they were shewn to Mr. Lawrence there; I had never seen the prisoner before the Sunday - he was dressed in livery that night; I have no doubt he is the man.

COURT. What opportunities had you of conversing with him? A. I might have been in the shop five minutes: I had a candle - I saw they were new clothes, and directly said, "I don't buy anything on Sunday night;" I was not at home when they first came - I found the clothes lying on a chair, not in a bundle; I went for an officer in about five minutes, and when I returned they were gone - I did not see him again till next day at Bow-street; the clothes were three coats, two pairs of trousers, two handkerchiefs, and a table-cloth - they were not in the portmanteau; I put them into it, and gave them to Limbrick at ten o'clock, and left them at the office till one, when I think he gave them to me. I think the prisoner is the man; I do not think I have the least doubt of him.

RICHARD GOUGH , ESQ. I am a barrister. On the 9th of November the prisoner was in my service. In consequence of something which happened to my chambers, I went to Bow-street on Monday morning, and saw a portmanteau, which is mine.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am an officer of Bow-street. On

Monday, the 10th of November, at four o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner, in bed at his lodging, in Houghton-street, Clare-market; he was afterwards taken to Bow-street - Mr. Lawrence saw some clothes there, which I now produce, and Mr. Gough saw the portmanteau; they claimed them in the prisoner's presence - I have had them ever since; they were produced by Davis: the prisoner denied the robbery.

DAVIS DAVIS . These are the articles the prisoner offered for sale, and the same I delivered to Limbrick; they are of a peculiar make - I have no doubt of their being the same; I cannot speak to the portmanteau.

MR. LAWRENCE. I have no doubt of these clothes being mine; they have been worn - I should be sorry to say they were worth more than 3l. or 4l.: I cannot say that I saw them before I went out that morning, but I have no doubt they were there.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You went out early - it is possible they might have been taken at different times that day? A. It is.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only . - Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-2

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

2. JOHN BAISTON WALKER was indicted for that he, on the 24th of October , in and upon Mary Ann Pace , feloniously, wilfully, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, feloniously&c. did strike, stab, and cut her in and upon her right side, with intent, feloniously, and of malice aforethought, to kill and murder her .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable, or to do her some grevions bodily harm.

MARY ANN PACE . I live with my father, in Trafalgar-square , Stepney. The prisoner has lodged in our first-floor for six years - he does not do any business, but lives on his half-pay, I believe, I took some carpets up stairs on the 24th of October; I was in the room, and was going to take them down stairs - the prisoner came into the room where I was, with a drawn sword in his hand - he stabbed me with it; he said nothing to me before he stabbed me, nor had I said any thing to him - he stabbed me four times.

Q. Did he say any thing to you between the different times he stabbed you? A. No. The sword went through the carpet; I do not know how many times it went through the carpet, but I had one stab in my side, one on each knee, and one in the stomach; I called out, and my uncle came - the prisoner then went out of the room: I do not know where he went to; when he was gone I locked the door - my uncle did not come into the room at all.

Q. When you locked the door did you look at your wounds? A. No; blood came from all of them - I called out of the window, and my uncle came up to the landing-place; I unlocked the door, and went on the landing-place, and my uncle took me down; I was confined to my bed for a week - a surgeon attended me; he is not here.

Q. What was the extent of the wounds in your side? A. Rather more than half an inch deep; the one in my stomach was very small - it was not deep; one of those on my knees was about three quarters of an inch deep, and the other about half an inch; the surgeon attended me every day - I got better at the end of the week; the surgeon was called in about ten minutes after: I have always been on good terms with the prisoner - he was always civil to me; this happened at two o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Had you ever heard the prisoner talk to himself? A. Yes - I have heard him talk to the chairs, tables and things; he has done this at different times, nearly all the while he has lodged with us: I am nearly sixteen years old- he used to call the chairs and tables by different Christian names, and tell them to answer him - that was all he used to say.

Q. How long used he to continue this? A. I do not know; I used to go up stairs at times and hear him, but I never used to stop to listen - he had his meals in the house, but not with the family - he had them alone; I had not observed any thing else about him - he had friends who came to see him; I have heard him talk to them rationally.

Q. Before this time, did you ever perceive any thing of violence about him? A. No - he would not speak to any body for a week together sometimes, and we used not to speak to him, for he would not answer us; he did not appear to me to be in possession of his right mind.

GEORGE PACE . I am the prosecutrix's uncle. On the 24th of October, I heard her call out and went up stairs; when I got to the top of the stairs, I met the prisoner with the sword in his hand, pointing it right at me - he never spoke at all; I went down stairs again as fast as I could, and made an alarm - persons came up with me, and he was then blowing the fire in his room; I went up to my niece and found her at the door, bleeding - I took her down stairs: I did not see her wounds - we went for a surgeon, who dressed them: she was confined to her bed about a week before she got about; I have lived there twelve months - the prisoner has been there all that time; I never exchanged twenty words with him - I have heard him talking to himself, but what about I cannot tell: he did not appear like a man in his right mind - I never heard him quarrel with my niece.

JAMES BARCLAY . I live about thirty yards from Pace.'s. On the 24th of October, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody - I went up stairs and found his room-door locked; I called to him to open it - he came and did so directly; I asked him to sit down in a chair - I looked round for a sword, and found this one; it is a sword in a stick - it was in the stick when I found it, up in one corner of the room; I told him he must go with me, and he requested I would allow him to put on another suit of clothes - I said it was not worth while, as he was going a very little way; he then requested me to allow him to lock up his apartments, for all the property there belonged to him - he did so, and we went down stairs together; I took him to Lambeth-street Office - he appeared very sullen and quiet; he never spoke.

MARY ANN PACE . This is the sword he had, I think- it resembles it; I had seen him with a stick before

but did not know it contained a sword - I think it is the stick I have seen him with.

Q. You say you were confined to your bed for a week, were you very ill all that time? A. I was; the wounds confined me all that time.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing whatever of the transaction.

ELIZA LADS . I am a widow. The prisoner is my nephew - he was under my care from eleven years old, for seven years; he is now forty-two years old - I consider him a deranged man: In 1815 he cut his throat, and he escaped from my house after that, with a wound in his neck - here is one of the hand-bills I circulated to have him found; I afterwards put him in the White House, Bethnal-green, which is a madhouse - he was there six or seven years, in and out; I have known him run about quite naked - I am certain he is subject to fits of derangement; since he has left the White House, he has exhibited symtoms of derangement - when he was sane, I always found him a very humane, kind man.

NOT GUILTY.

Being of unsound mind at the time .

Reference Number: t18281204-3

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

3. ROBERT SHEARSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , at St. Mary-le-bone, 2 watches, value 15l.; 1 clock, value 4l.; 2 rings, value 10l.; 2 pins, value 10l.; 3 pairs of ear-rings, value 30s.; 2 necklaces, value 10s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 5s.; 2 fans, value 15s; I toast-rack, value 5s.; 12 forks, value 2l.; 12 spoons, value 20s.; 1 caddy-spoon, value 2s.; 4 pairs of gloves, value 4s.; 1 pair of half-boots, value 5s.; 3 pairs of shoes, value 10s.; 1 shawl, value 20s.; 1 scarf, value 2s.; 5 dresses, value 4l.; 1 pelisse, value 4l.; 1 habit, value 3l.; 2 pairs of sheets, value 20s.; 3 tablecloths, value 2l.; 6 napkins, value 12s.; 2 towels, value 2s.; 1 gold medal, value 5l.: 1 piece of foreign coin, called a dollar, value 4s. 6d., and 2 crowns, the property of Elizabeth Ann Palmer , spinster ; 1 cruet-stand, value 7l.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 1 mustard-pot, value 4s.; 1 spoon, value 1s.; 1 pair of bottle-stands, value 10s.; 1 pair of snuffers. value 7s., and 1 snuffer-stand, value 3s., the goods of the said Elizabeth Ann Palmer and Mary Palmer , spinster ; and 3 dresses, value 3l.; 1 necklace, value 30s.; part of a minature-picture, value 15s.; 4 rings, value 4l.; 1 brooch, value 10s., and 1 thimble, value 20s., the goods of the said Mary Palmer, in the dwelling-house of the said Elizabeth Ann Palmer ; and THOMAS CROSSLEY , ELIZABETH GRAY , and SOPHIA MARSHALL , were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day, at the same parish, the aforesaid goods and monies, they well knowing the same to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

MISS ELIZABETH ANN PALMER . I am single, and live in Great Cumberland-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone - I am the owner of the house and pay the taxes; nobody but myself is interested in the house. I left town on the 15th of July last - Eliza Shearston was then in my service, as cook; she is still in my service - I left a great deal of property in my house, but no other servant than the cook; a woman, named Clifton, had permission to sleep in the house, to keep the cook company - I paid her for sleeping there; I had a French clock, which stood on a musical-box; that was in a glass bookcase - it could be seen from the outside: all the other articles stated in the indictment, were quite out of sight, and all locked up in different parts of my house. I returned to town on the 23d of October - I found Eliza Shearston there, and the house apparently as I had left it; she made a communication to me on my arrival, and in consequence of that I went to the bookcase - the clock was gone; the bookcase was still locked: I then examined my drawers and places, and found my property gone - I missed every one of the articles stated in the indictment, besides other property.

ELIZA SHEARSTON . I am in Miss Palmer's service as cook - the prisoner Robert Shearston is my brother; he came to my mistress' house, after she left town in July - he was then out of a situation, and I allowed him to sleep in the house occasionally; he first slept there about a fortnight after mistress left - he took leave of me on the Monday before the Friday on which I missed the clock; he left near a fortnight before mistress came home - it was about the middle of October; he told me he was going, with a party of performers from Astley's, to France - this was on the Monday; I recollect a musical-clock which mistress had in the bookcase - I had seen it there on the Thursday or Friday before the Monday; I missed it on the Friday, after my brother took his leave: I wrote into the county to mistress, to inform her of it, and I went to Lady Steward's about it. On the 23d of October, when mistress arrived, I communicated the subject to her - I had never seen either of the other prisoners at the house; I have not the least knowledge of them -I was constantly in the house during mistress' absence.

MARY CLIFTON . I slept in Miss Palmer's house during her absence from town, every night; I never saw Crossley, Gray, or Marshall at the house, nor have I any knowledge of either of them - the prisoner Shearston used to sleep in the house occasionally; he is the only person I ever saw about the house.

WILLIAM WARRE . I am assistant to Mr. Muncaster, a pawnbroker, of Skinner-street, Snowhill. I know the prisoner Crossley; on Wednesday, the 24th of September, he offered this set of cruets and frame to pledge, and he had in his hands a pair of bottle-stands - I cannot say whether they were silver or plated, as I had not them in my hands; he asked how much I would lend him on the cruets and frame - I asked him whose property they were- he said "I bring them for my mistress," or, "My old woman," I cannot say which; I told him he must send his mistress - he left the shop and I detained the castors; on the following morning the prisoner Gray came, and said she had come about the castors - I have known her some time before; I asked her whose property they were- she said "They are my own;" I told her I did not think they were her property - she then said she brought them for a friend of hers; I told her I must see that friend, and he satisfied that all was right before I advanced money on them - she left the shop, I still detaining the castors and stand; no one applied, and on the following Tuesday, information was given at Guildhall - I afterward accompanied Martin to No. 11, Ship-yard, Temple-bar, and saw Gray, Shearston, and Marshall;

the caslors were given up before Sir Peter Laurie - I can swear these are the same Crossley brought to me.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a City officer. A commonication was made to me on the 3d of October, by Warre; I went that day with him to Ship-yard, Temple-bar, and found three of the prisoners there - on my entering the room Warre pointed out Mrs. Gray, as the person who sent the castors there to pawn; I then desired the others to leave the room - I then told Gray I was an officer, and had come to make inquiry about the castors which she bad sent to pledge: I asked to whom they belonged - she said they belonged to a friend of hers; I asked who the friend was, and where they resided - she said they were gone into the country - she did not know where they resided, but she expected they would return in a few days; this was after I had told her I was an officer: on my conveying her to the Compter she gave me another account of how she became possessed of them, and in consequence of that I returned with her to Shipyard, in search of the person she said she had the castors from; I found Marshall there, but Shearston was gone - I asked Marshall what had become of the young man; she said he had gone out of the house immediately - I then took Gray to the Compter: I endeavoured to discover the owner of the property, and advertised it, but could get no information, and on the 11th of October the Magistrate discharged Gray, on her own recognizance to appear when called on; the castors were given over to me, and have been in my possession ever since: I first saw Miss Palmer about a fortnight after Gray was discharged; I was sent for to the Bank, and produced the castors, which she claimed and identified. On the night of the 1st of November, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw Marshall and Gray walking up the Old Bailey- I said to Gray, "You did not appear according to the recognizance you entered into;" she said, "I did not know what I was to do:" I said, "You have left Shipyard" - she said, Yes; I said, "Where do you now live?" she said she had no lodging; I took them into custody, and the nurse at the Compter searched them - some keys were given to me, which Gray said were hers, and that she lodged at Mr. Smith's, No. 51, Portpool-lane; I went there next morning (Sunday), and found a box in her lodging, which was locked - the keys I had opened it, and in it I found, among other articles, this fan; I asked Gray repeatedly, if she had pledged any thing else, or ever had any thing else - she said she had not, repeatedly: I asked her if the whole contents of the trunk were hers; she said they were; I asked her afterwards about a watch - she denied having had one; I told her I had received information that she had pawned one of the gold watches which were lost - she said she never had; I said, "You had better say you never pledged any of the forks or the mustard-pot - she said, "Yes, I did pawn them;" I asked where she had pawned them - she said somewhere about Fleet-market, she could not exactly tell me the name of the street. On Friday, the 7th of November, Crossley came to the Justice-room at Guildhall, to prefer some complaint, and I took him into custody: I got information, and went to Harrow on Sunday, the 9th, to Northall, to a cottage kept by one Ball, a bay-binder; I saw Ball - he came out of the cottage; I got in at last, but the prisoners were not there - I went into the yard, looked to the left, and saw Shearston just stepping through a gap of a hedge, which led to an adjoining field; I called him, and said, "Your name is Robert Shearston - I want you;" he stood still - I took him, brought him into the cottage, told him I was an officer, and apprehended him on suspicion of robbing the house where his sister was a servant - I did not hold out any threat or inducement to him; he was dreadfully agitated, and said he was very sorry for what he had done, and hoped his poor sister had not got into any trouble; I said, "It was a shocking thing of you to be guilty of such an act, when you were bound to protect the property;" he was so agitated he could say nothing more -I then brought him to town, and on the road he said he had given the whole of the property, except the clock, to some persons whom he named; I asked what he had done with the clock - he said he had lost it: before that I cautioned him not to say any thing which would be injurious to him - on our way to town he wished to see his sister, and saw her at Miss Palmer's; they were both so dreadfully agitated that neither of them could speak; I only heard the sister say, "Oh! Robert, how could you do so;" I took him away directly - he told me he understood the duplicates were wrapped up in brown paper, and placed somewhere for security, but he did not know where; I afterwards found the duplicates at Price's gin-shop, at the corner of Broad-court, Long-acre - I received them from Mrs. Price, wrapped up in this brown paper, which also contained a pair of snuffers and four knives, which have been used.

WILLIAM MOORE . I lodge at No. 11, Ship-yard, Temple-bar, and have lived there about eighteen months. I know Crossley and Gray, by the names of Mr. and Mrs. Gray - they lodged there, on the first-floor; I cannot say whether I have ever seen Marshall before - I may have seen her, bnt not to have any acquaintance with her.

ALEXANDER SMITH . I keep the house No. 51, Portpool-lane. Crossley and Gray took an apartment at my house, about twelve days before they were apprehended, and passed as Mr. and Mrs. Gray, till within two days of Gray leaving the apartment; Marshall used to come to see them - I knew nothing of Shearston: I was at home when Martin searched the room which Mr. and Mrs. Gray occupied.

MARY PRICE . I keep a wine-vaults, in Long-acre. -This paper, containing the duplicates, snuffers, and knives, I delivered to Martin; I received it from Gray: I do not remember whether any one was with her - I have seen Martin with her; she asked me to take charge of that parcel till she called for it again - it was sealed up, and I gave it to Martin in the same state: I do not know the other prisoners.

SUSAN WARD . I keep the house No. 3, James-street, New-cut, Lambeth. The prisoner Marshall came for lodge with me the beginning of May, by the name of Sarah Green - she lived with me till about the 8th of September: I have seen Shearston several times at my house - he came to see her; I only knew him by the name of George: Marshall only had one room - Shearston has passed the night in that room several times. I pledged a ring for Marshall, in the name of Green, at

Cannon and Co.'s; she gave it to me in the kitchen - I do not remember when it was; I asked 7s. upon it - they gave me 5s., which I gave to Marshall, with the duplicate - I remember seeing a dark coloured box in the possession of George; I never heard it play - ho was trying to open it: George gave me a pair of spoons, to pledge for 17s. - I gave them to my sister to pawn; she gave them back to me - I gave them back to George, and told him the pawnbroker said they were plated; he said a relation had left him a great deal of property in plate, but no money; I saw a necklace, which I thought was cornelian, on Marshall's neck - she said something to me about it, but Shearston was not present; I told Marshall she had better not wear the things, but give them back to him again, and said," I do not think he is any good- you had better get rid of him as soon as you can. On the morning I saw the necklace on her I called her down stairs, and said, I understood some things had been brought into my house, and the sooner she left my house the better - she went out, and left that night; I never saw her or George afterwards.

JOHN FLOWER . I am shopman to Cotterell and Co., pawnbrokers, of Shoe-lane. I produce a gold watch, pawned by the prisoner Gray. on the 3d of October, in the name of Morris - I have known her many years, and that is the name she went by; I advanced two guineas on the watch - it is a French watch, and worth three guineas, or 3l. 10s.

JOSEPH PARKER . I am shopman to Cannon and Co., pawnbrokers, of Charlotte-street, Lamheth-marsh. I produce a garnet-ring, pawned by Marshall, in September; nobody was with her to my knowledge. I produce another ring, pawned on the 5th of September, by Ward, in the name of Mary Green, of James-street, for 5s., and a brooch, pawned by Ward.

GEORGE BARBER . I am shopman to Mr. Essex, a pawnbroker, of the Strand. I produce a gold watch, pawned on the 5th of September, for 4l., by Crossley; he afterwards called, and wanted 1l. more on it - I saw nobody with him either time; it is worth about five guineas or 5l.: I produce a miniature-frame, pawned on the 10th of September - I do not know who by; I asked Crossley where he lived - he sad at No. 11, Ship-yard; when he wanted a further advance, I inquired there, and found he was gone.

HENRY FOWLER . I am shopman to Lamb and Gideon, pawnbrokers, of Stanhope-street, Clare-market. I produce a neck-chain, pawned by neither of the prisoners, to my knowledge.

SAMUEL HAVS . I am also shopman to Lamb and Co. I produce some silk dresses, pawned by Gray - also six silver forks and a mustard-pot, pawned by her at different times - also a fan, pawned by her on the 11th of September; I have six other forks, four dessert-spoons, and two tea-spoons, pawned on the 16th of September, by Gray, in the name of Ann Marshall - three gowns, pawned by her on the 17th of September, in the name of Marshall; I have two other dresses, pawned for 2l.

WILLIAM DUTTON TOWNSEND . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Russell-street. I have a purse, some bracelets, a gown, and a variety of articles, pawned by Gray, in the name of Marshall, on the 20th of September - also a pair of jet ear-rings, pawned on the 25th of September; I do not know who by.

THOMAS RYLAND . I am shopman to Mr. Cotterell, a pawnbroker, of Shoe-lane. I have a riding-habit, pawned on the 22d of September, in the name of Ann Gray , and I believe by Gray.

JAMES DRY . I am shopman to Ashman and Son, pawnbrokers. I have a pair of bottle-stands, pawned on the 23d of September, by Gray, in the name of Marshall.

SAMUEL HUISH . I am shopman to Mr. Wassal, a pawnbroker. of Pickett-street, Strand. I produce a gown and some other articles, pawned on the 25th of September, in the name of Marshall; I do not know who by: I have a pair of ear-rings pawned on the 30th of September, by Gray, in the name of Marshall.

MISS PALMER. This cruet-stand is the property of my sister Mary and myself - she is single; the stand is worth 7l. as old silver, besides the cruets - I have seen all the other property, and as far as I can judge, it is mine; it was all in the house when I left town.

WILLIAM WARRE re-examined. I have weighed this castor-frame - it is worth between 8l. and 9l. as old silver.

The prisoners made no Defence.

SHEARSTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Of stealing the castor-frame, being above the value of 5l., in the dwelling-house. Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, conceiving him to be the dupe of other parties .

CROSSLEY - GUILTY . Aged 72.

GRAY - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

MARSHALL - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-4

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

4. FRANCIS SWEENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 83 yards of carpet, value 9l., the goods of James Riley and Alfred Lapworth , in their dwelling-house .

JAMES RILEY . I am in partnership with Alfred Lapworth - we are carpet manufacturers , in Old Bond-street ; a porter sleeps on the premises - neither of us have slept there since last June; we have converted it entirely into a warehouse - Mr. Lapworth lived in the upper part till June: the porter sleeps in a back room, which we use as a counting-house, entirely for the protection of the property - it is not a dwelling-house now. On Monday, the 17th of November, I had not left the door two moments, and had got about seven yards down the warehouse. when I heard a noise, and seeing a shadow I turned round, and saw the prisoner passing the window, with a piece of carpet on his shoulder; I immediately ran to the door, and was asked by a person if I was looking for the young man who had taken the carpet, and he directed me a contrary way to which I knew he had gone; I left somebody in charge of the warehouse, and pursued the prisoner, having him in view all the time - I ran down the street opposite No. 8. took hold of his collar, turned him round with the carpet on his shoulder, and it fell down; he then made several efforts to get away - a crowd gathered, none of whom would give assistance, though I repeatedly asked them; till Lovelock came and took the carpet back to our ware

house. I took the prisoner back, and gave him to the street-keeper.

JAMES LOVELOCK . On Monday, the 17th of November, I was in Old Bond-street, between four and five o'clock in the evening, and saw Riley and the prisoner tussling together; Mr. Riley called me to assist him, which I did - I then took the carpet back to the shop; it was at their feet, on the pavement, when I came up - I went to Marlborough-street with the prisoner; I afterwards came back, took the carpet to the office, and delivered it to Valentine - I am certain of the prisoner.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer. -On the 17th of November, Lovelock brought the carpet to me at Marlborough-street Office; the prisoner was brought there about a quarter-past five o'clock.

MR. RILEY. This is our carpet, and the same as fell from the prisoner's shoulder; I had shewn it at two o'clock, and only missed it at a quarter-past four, when I saw him go by the window; it was on the second shelf from the ground - it measures eighty-three yards and a half, and is worth 8l.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by the shop, and a respectable man asked me to carry the carpet to the bottom of Bond-street, and he would give me 1s. - I said I would; I got above two hundred yards, when Riley came and asked where I was going with it - I said I was going to carry it to the bottom of the street; I turned round to look for the person, and saw nobody but this young man, who came and took the carpet.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-5

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

5. JAMES KING was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , three 5l. Bank notes, the property of John Abbott and George Bradley , his masters, in their dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES FLINT . I am an attorney, and live at Stafford. Early in November, I sent the prosecutors, Messrs. Abbott and Bradley, a 20l. Leicestershire Bank note, enclosed in this letter, (looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you take a memorandum of the note? A. My clerk did - he is not here.

JOHN ABBOTT. I am an attorney in partnership with George Bradley - we live in Furnival's Inn ; I reside in the house, but Mr. Bradley does not. On the 12th of November the prisoner was in our employ, as clerk; I had him taken up two days after the notes were missing.

Cross-examined. Q. Are your premises in Middlesex? A. Yes - part of the Inn is in the City, but this is in the County; I sleep there alone.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Does Mr. Bradley occasionally take meals there? A. Occasionally.

JOHN BEDFORD . I am clerk to the prosecutors. I received this letter from Mr. Flint, enclosing a 20l. Leicestershire note; I took it to Messrs. Pares and Heygates' Bank, and got three 5l. Bank notes and five sovereigns for it - I did not take the numbers of the notes; I deposited them and the sovereigns in a drawer, in a desk in the office - I paid away the sovereigns, and saw the three notes there on Tuesday, the 11th of November; the drawer was not locked - the prisoner had access to it; he has a salary and is not an articled clerk - he had only been there a week: I missed the notes on Thursday, the 13th.

Cross-examined. Q. How many clerks are there? A. Only him and myself: the notes were in the clerk's office - there is a passage leading from the Inn; the desk was not locked - I am certain I had received the notes at Messrs. Pares and Heygate's; when questioned about them, (from the state of my feelings at the moment, thinking I might be charged with it myself,) I stated that I could not, at the moment, state where I changed the note, and stated to the Magistrate I thought it was at Messrs. Williams and Co's. - I am sure I said I thought so; I did not speak positively - that was the impression on my mind then, and that I had received four 5l. notes and no sovereigns; I signed a deposition containing both those statements.

Q. How do you account for the difference? A. From the agitated state of my feelings, fearing I might be suspected: the notes were missed on the Thursday, and he was before the Magistrate on the Friday - my agitation would have continued up to the present moment if he had not confessed it: the impression on my mind was that I changed it at Williams', but I afterwards looked at the book and found there were more Leicestershire Banks than one, and seeing that one paid their notes at Pares and Co's. it came like an electric shock upon me, and I recollected going to Pares', where I had never been before, and had to inquire where it was; I corrected my deposition at the second examination, which was on the following Friday.

COURT. Q. Did you ever change a country note at Williams? A. I beheve not; I have been there with cheques shortly before, but had never been to Pares'.

PHILIP DAVIES . I am cashier at Messrs. Pares and Heygate's - I have our banking-book, in which is an entry on the 21st of October, of a 20l. Leicester Bank note being changed; I gave three 5l. Bank notes and five sovereighs for it - the notes were numbered 1,339, 1,340, and 1,341, dated 13th September, 1828.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the whole entry in your own writing? A. Yes; I did not know Bedford at the time- he called afterwards in ascertain the numbers; I think he inquired the way in which it had been cashed.

MARY NIE . I am married. I frequently saw the prisoner - I remember seeing him on the 12th or 13th of November, and to the best of my recollection it was on a Thursday; he gave me a 5l. note and asked me to change it - I put my name on it - this is it (looking at it) I gave him change.

Cross-examined. Q. What business is your husband? A. We keep a wine-vaults in Thorney-street, Bloomsbury; I gave him four sovereigns and nineteen shillings, took the note from him, and put my name on it - my husband is not regularly in the business; he is in a solicitor's office: the prisoner has been backward and forward to our house for two years, but I believe never sat down there - I always ask the name and address of persons

who give me notes, and then I put M. M. and the date under it.

GEORGE BRADLEY . I am in partnership with Mr. Abbott. I said nothing to the prisoner, but he said to me at Bow-street on the 14th, "I wish you would persuade Mr. Abbott to forego the prosecution against me;" I said"I shall do no such thing" he said "Pray do, I will give you or Mr. Abbott any security you may want - I did it in an evil moment."

Cross-examined. Q. Was this taken down in writing? A. No; it was said to me privately - he first proposed that Mr. Abbott should forego the prosecution; I said"You should keep yourself honest," and then he said he did it in an evil moment.

SAMUEL CLARK . I keep the Three Kings public-house, Orange-street, Bloomsbury. On the 12th of November, I received a 5l. Bank note from the prisoner, and wrote on it at the time. (looking at one) this is it - I wrote "Raymond-buildings. 12 - 8 - 28" on it; I have known him a long time, and have no doubt of him.

The notes produced, were Nos. 1339 and 1340, dated 13th September, 1828.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 43.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-6

Before Mr. Justice Littledate.

6. GEORGE KNIGHT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Marshall , on the 17th of November , and stealing 2 smelling-bottles, value 10s., and 1 glass toilet-bottle, value 4s. , his property.

CHARLES HOCKING . I am shopman to Mr. George Marshall, a druggist of Brewer-street, Golden-square - he keeps the house and lives there; the shop is part of the dwelling-house. On the 17th of November, about five o'clock in the evening, I was engaged in the shop, when Dyson told me something, and some time after that, I heard a cry of Stop thief! I immediately went into the street, and, on examining the shop-window, saw a pane of glass had been broken, two smelling-bottles and some toilet-bottles were taken out, which I had seen there about two hours before - the window was then whole; I did not notice it after that - I did not miss the bottles till about six o'clock.

Prisoner. You said at the examination that you saw the bottles in the window last about three o'clock.

COURT. He said about half-past three o'clock.

BENJAMIN DYSON . On the evening of the 17th of November, about five o'clock, or a quarter-past, I saw the prisoner at the prosecutor's window - he was standing still at the corner when I first observed him; two young men, who stood opposite, whistled, and he went away from the window - I passed by and observed the glass was cracked across, in two different directions; I returned, went into the shop, gave information, came out immediately, and crossed Golden-square to fetch a constable, who took his station opposite Mr. Marshall's, and I stood at a doorway in Brewer-street; I saw no more till the prisoner was in custody - I took his hat off and found two smelling-bottles in it, which I delivered to Knox, the constable, at the watch-house: I am certain of the prisoner - I think I have seen him about the neighbourhood before; I live at No. 24, Brewer-street.

THOMAS MINTER . I am a constable. Dyson came to me on the 17th of November, about a quarter-past five o'clock in the evening, I went with him to Mr. Marshall's, and saw the prisoner with two companious; I secreted myself in a doorway, in James'-street, where I had a command of his actions - I found him and his companions repeatedly going up to the window; they attempted to get the glass out, and every time they attempted it, I passed them and saw the glass was secure, except the crack - the last time I saw the prisoner take from the window some articles, but could not perceive at the moment what they were; I went up and tried to catch hold of him first - he ran away and I after him; I cried out Stop thief! and as he ran he threw the glass bottles from him in every direction, from his hat and his pocket; I caught him at the corner of Mary-le-bone-street, and never lost sight of him - I was so close that I struck him with my staff three times: one or two patrols assisted me in taking him - it was five or ten minutes after six o'clock when we took him.

Prisoner. Q. When you took me back, I asked you where my hat was? A. You did: I believe somebody had taken his hat from his hand, but I cannot say - I thought he had thrown it away with the bottles, as he threw his handkerchief away; he ran at a tremenduous rate - if it had not been for the patrols, I do not think we should have taken him.

Q. You said "Your hat is right, you can have it directly"? A. I do not recollect saying so.

HENRY POWELL . On the 17th of November I was in Brewer-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I immediately ran into Mary-le-bone-street, and saw the prisoner,(who was running) stopped by the patrol - he let a toilet-bottle falt out of his hand in Mary-le-bone-street, about five minutes walk from the prosecutor's house; I picked it up immediately, went to the watch-house with him, and gave it to Knox.

GEORGE KNOX I am watch-house-keeper of St. James'. The prisoner was brought to me on the 17th of November, soon after six o'clock in the evening; two smelling-bottles, a toilet-bottle, and some broken pieces of bottles were delivered to me, by the patrols, who picked them up - Dyson delivered me both the smelling-bottles, and Powell the toilet-bottle; I have had them ever since - Dyson delivered me the hat; I offered it to the prisoner, and he denied it being his.

Prisoner. I told him mine was a silk hat, and that was a beaver one. Witness. He said his was a silk hat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing along the street, and going tdwards the square, heard a cry of Stop thief! I turned round, and saw a young man following me; I was stopped and accused of robbery, and in the bustle lost my hat: as I was taken to the doctor's shop, I asked the constable where my hat was - he said I should have it directly; he had picked it off the ground.

GUILTY. Aged 22, Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-7

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

7. JAMES MARSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Bills .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18281204-8

8. FREDERICK LEYBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Edward Gordon Stafford .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-9

9. CHARLOTTE LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 3 yards of lace, value 10s. , the goods of David Ross .

JANE ROSS . I am the wife of David Ross , a seaman , and live in Montague-court, Bishopsgate . The prisoner was out of a situation, and slept in the same room with me; I missed three yards of lace, before the 10th of November - but did not miss the handkerchief till I found it in pawn - she lodged with me about four months ago, then went to another place, and about six weeks ago I missed it; she was not in the house then - the lace was kept in a drawer, which was frequently left unlocked; I found the lace and handkerchief in pawn at Cotton's, on the 19th of November; I know the lace to be mine, and believe the handkerchief is also mine, but part of the name is out of it.

FRANCIS COTTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Shoreditch. On the 10th of November this lace and handkerchief were pawned together, for 1s., by a female, in the name of Charlotte Lawrence - I cannot say who she was.

JOHN LINAM . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at Mrs. Ross' house, on the 17th of November; Mrs. Ross said, in her presence, that she had lost a number of things, and suspected her - I asked the prisoner for her keys; she gave them to me, and I found the duplicate for the lace and handkerchief in her box - she said they were her own, and that a great many of the things in her box had been put there by mistake.

JANE ROSS . Here is a mark on the handkerchief; it was marked J.L. No. 1 - the L. remains but here is the mark of the J.; my maiden name was Law - I know my own needle-work: I can swear to the lace, having had it six years, but have not worn it for two years - she had left my house, and came back again; I never saw her wear any lace like it - I told her I had lost it.

Prisoner's Defence. The lace is mine, and the handkerchief; my name begins with L. - when I came home my box was opened, and these things pulled out; I was quite surprised to see them, as I am certain I locked my box when I went out in the morning; Ross has many lodgers. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-10

10. CHARLOTTE LAWRENCE was again indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 1 shawl, value 1s., and 1 yard of linen, value 6d. , the goods of David Ross .

JANE ROSS . I did not miss these things till they were found in pawn; I missed the shawl, but thought I had put it in some other place - when I saw it at the pawnbroker's I did not know it at first, as it had been a white one, but she has sewn a border on it; the border is mine, but did not belong to that shawl - I can safely swear to it on examining it: this yard of Irish was dirty outside - it had been wrapped round some other linen which was found in her box; I swear it was in my possession while she lodged with me.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am servant to R. P. Hyam, of Bishopsgate-street. On the 3d of November the prisoner pawned this shawl and yard of cloth, in the name of Charlotte Lawrence , No. 13, Montague-court, Bishopsgate, for 5s.

JOHN LINAM . Mrs. Ross claimed this property, in my presence; she had said she missed the linen before.

JANE ROSS . This is my shawl - I pointed out a mark in it at the Mansion-house; here is a rent from a nail, and I sewed it up myself: I had not seen the shawl when I described it as having that mark - I believe the linen to be mine from the dirt outside.

JOHN LINAM . I heard her describe the shawl by a rent in it before she saw it - she said that at her own house, before she went to the pawnbroker's, and mentioned the cloth.

Prisoner's Defence. The shawl belongs to me.

SAMUEL STEVENS re-examined. Ross saw the shawl in our shop before she went to the Mansion-house, but it was rolled up - she could not see the rent; she had not seen it open before she described the rent in it.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-11

11. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Joseph Niblett .

HENRY JOSEPH NIBLETT . I am a salesman , and live in Fleet-market . On the 1st of December, about nine o'clock at night, these shoes hung at the door, within reach of a person passing; I heard something snatched down, turned round, and my lad said a pair of shoes were gone - I pursued up Harp-alley, and took the prisioner; I opened his jacket, and asked him where the shoes were - he said, "What shoes?" my lad said they were behind him, and I took them up.

FRANCIS THOMAS . I am servant to Mr. Niblett. I saw the prisoner take the shoes; master went after him- I followed, and saw him taken: he let the shoes fall behind him - I am certain of his person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT WOOD . I received the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-12

12. JOHN WOOLLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 3 bladders, value 1d.; 24 lbs. of lard, value 16s.; 80lbs. of soap, value 3l.; 5 glass bottles, value 1s. 5d.; 1 gallon of fish-sauce, value 12s.; 4lbs. of honey, value 2s. 8d.; 4lbs. of treacle, value 1s. 4d.; 2 lbs. of tamarinds, value 1s. 6d.; 2lbs. of arrow-root, value 4s.; 12 ozs. of other soap, value 1s.; 1 pint of soy, value 1s. 6d.; 1 quart of essence of anchovies, value 4s.; 1 jar, value 6d., and 1 jug, value 1s. , the goods of John Gale and others, his masters.

MR. AMBROSE WARD . I am a druggist, in partnership

with John Gale and another; our warehouse is in Bonverie-street, Fleet-street - the prisoner has been about six years in our employ. On the 4th of November our warehouse was entered by thieves, and a large quantity of property taken away; in consequence of this we employed our porters as private watchman - they took their turns, and on Saturday, the 15th of November, it was the prisoner's turn, with another man, to guard the premises; nobody sleeps there; I left about eight o'clock- on Monday, the 17th, the moment I went there, information was given me; I found marks of violence on the laboratory sky-light, and from what I heard I had the prisoner apprehended on the premises, when he was at work - he lived at No. 42, Primrose-hill, and occupied two lower rooms, the kitchen, wash-house, and two bedrooms on the first-floor; we have too many articles to miss them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You would not have kept him six years unless you had a good opinion of him? A. It was owing to the character we had of him that we kept him, but I believe it was a false one - he did nothing to deserve a bad character with us before.

MR. WILLIAM WADHAM COPE . I am one of the City marshals. I was sent for to search the house No. 42, Primrose-hill, Salisbury-square where the prisoner resided; I found his wife at home, but not him - I found some spices, soap, and other articles in the lower rooms; in the bed-rooms I found the articles stated in the indictment; the prisoner was present part of the time I was searching, and saw me find the things; some he said were his own, but all they brought away he said were Mr. Ward's - he said so voluntarily.

Cross-examined. Q. He was not at home when you first searched? A. No; he was sent for, and came in five or ten minutes - Mr. Ward was at the house then; nothing was said to him by Mr. Ward in my hearing - but on my finding different property, he said, I suppose a dozen times, that such and such things were Mr. Wards's - some of them were found before he was with Mr. Ward.

MR. WARD. I held out no threat or promise to him; these articles are such as we deal in, and he had access to them.

JOHN GILL . I am a surgical-instrument maker. I have known the prisoner in the prosecutor's service some years; on the 17th of November, I was at their warehouse in Bonverie-street, and heard an attempt had been made to enter the premises on the previous night; I advised Mr. Ward to give information at the Mansion-house - very shortly after that he, Mr. Cope, and I, attended at the prisoner's apartment in Primrose-hill; I saw all the property found -I did not threaten or promise him any thing; on finding about three - quarters of a hundred-weight of soap under the stairs, I said

"Woollett, this is a very bad job, the further we go the more we discover;" he held up his hands in despair, and said "I hope the gentlemen will not deal hard with me."

EDMUND SHEPHERD . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I was sent for to look at the property found, and knew it to be master's; I knew the large quantity of soap, and a small quantity of other soap.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it Castile soap? A. It is called so - it is a particular kind of soap; Gale and Co. are the only persons who sell soap of that nature - I have never seen any like it elsewhere; I do not swear masters are the only persons that sell it, but I believe so - and here is a quantity of soap of my marking and perfuming - here is one piece I can swear to, it was cut into bars, and here is where I cut out some dirt, it is then cut in pieces and stamped, but this is not stamped - one piece has the stamp on it, which we use; I swear to this piece marked "Old Brown Windsor Soap," we never sell that in London: it is damaged, and damaged soap is never sent out of our premises, but melted again - the damage was discovered after I stamped it, there is n white speak in it, it was locked up with others to'be melted; here is another piece, I can swear to, having cut a white speak out of it about six months ago- I cannot particularly say when I cut it out.

MR. WARD. The value of all the articles found is about three guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. Living on the premises for four or five years, I had the privilege of having soap and other things for the use of the house; my wife being in the habit of cooking, we had sauce and other things.

MR. WARD. We dined there now and then, and he used to cook for us, but was not allowed soap or sauce, or any thing of the sort; he lived on premises belonging to the firm. GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-13

13. EDWARD CEAIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 2 reams of paper, value 24s. , the goods of Christopher James Magnay , and others.

MR. JAMES MAGNAY . I am engaged in the house of Christopher James Magnay and others, wholesale stationers , St. Martin Vintry; I know this paper to be theirs, by the marks on it - the prisoner is a stranger.

RICHARD BARLOW . I am a private in the 3d regiment of Foot Guards. I saw the prisoner coming out of the prosecutors' cellar with the two reams of paper, one on each arm- I did not lose sight of him till I stopped him; he wanted me to let him go.

JAMES GARFOOT . I was standing in Thames-street - Barlow and I stopped the prisoner with the paper, which the prosecutors' claimed.

WILLIAM JOYCE . I am a constable. This paper was delivered to me; the prisoner said another boy gave it to him, and agreed to meet him in Queen-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I stood in Thames-street; a young lad with two reams of paper under his arm, asked if I had any work - I said No; he said he would give 6d. to carry it to King-street - he ran round the next turning.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-14

14. JOHN GRIFFITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 chain, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 10s., and 2 keys, value 10s., the goods of Arthur Gardner , from his person .

ARTHUR GARDNER . I am a hair-dresser . and live in Old Jewry. On Sunday, the 9th of November, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I was returning home from visiting a friend - I had had a few glasses of wine, but was not intoxicated; as I came through Church-passage, Old Jewry , I was hustled by four-men against Mr. Duncan's

door - I am quite sure my watch was safe then; they hustled me against the door - there was immediately a scream from the servant girl inside the house, and they immediately ran off; I called Stop thief - it was done so suddenly, it was impossible to see what they were doing; the watchman caught the prisoner at the end of the court - he got from him; he sprang his rattle, and another watchman stopped him, about twenty yards from where I was hustled - my watch was gone, and has not been found, but part of the chain was found; I saw it in the constable's possession, and swore to it; mine was a silver watch, gold chain and seals, and key, worth 5l. altogether - I could not speak to their features, but the prisoner was not out of my sight at all.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not been drinking? A. I had a few glasses of wine with a friend, but was not intoxicated; I was much alarmed at the watch-house, but not intoxicated - I have no recollection of saying the prisoner was not one of the men - I will not swear I did not say so.

Q. You did not then strongly assert that he was not the man, and he was about being let go? A. No, I did not; I do not recollect any thing of the sort - I knew perfectly well what I was about; I was quite collected, quite sober - I possibly was not what you might call quite sober, but knew perfectly what I was about; he was not about to be discharged in consequence of what I said - when I first went into the watch-house I was so alarmed I could hardly speak.

Q. Were not the first words you gave utterance to, that the prisoner was not one of the men? - A. I have no recollection of saying so; he did not object to be searched - I will not swear he was not asked if he objected to be searched - he was searched, and nothing of mine found; I said I was robbed of my watch when he was being taken to the watch-house, and in the watch-house - the watchman went out to look for my property; I remained at the watch-house a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, sitting opposite the prisoner.

Q. Did you not jump up, after sitting opposite the prisoner a considerable time. and say

"D - n me, that is the man, I will swear to him?" A. I sat down, and was collecting myself, and began to think what I was about; I do not recollect saying he was not the man - I was certain of him from the time I went into the watch-house, from his not being out of my sight, and there was nobody but the four in the passage.

THOMAS BRANSTON . I am a watchman of Cheap ward. I was stationed, on the night in question, in Iroumonger-lane, about half-past nine o'clock; I heard a cry of Watch! and Stop thief! several times, it came from Church-court, leading from the lane to the Old Jewry, I was about fifteen yards from the court; I saw the prisoner running out of the court as fast as he possibly could, and laid hold of him- he said "It was not me, it was not me, there are two or three, they are gone the other way;" I turned my head, and saw three men came out of the court running, and as I turned round the prisoner made his escape from me, and as soon as he got away he pulled his hat off, and ran down the lane as fast as he could - I sprang my rattle, cried Stop thief! and never lost sight of him; he kept his hat in his hand - my fellow watchman came into the lane, met him, and stopped him; I saw part of a gold chain picked up, against Mr. Duncan's door, which the prosecutor claimed; we took him to the watch-house, the prosecutor followed - the prisoner was searched, and nothing found on him; I was ordered by the night officer to take a lantern and look over in the church-yard, but could find no watch; a smaller part of the chain, and part of a ring were found at day-light next morning, by a person who is not here; the prosecutor seemed very much agitated, indeed, in the watch-house - I did not see him till he got in; he did not appear insensible from liquor - he said the prisoner was one who helped to rob him; the prisoner was never out of the lane, he was stopped fifty or sixty yards from the passage.

Cross-examined. Q. When the prisoner came into the watch-house he was immediately searched? A. Yes: he was not asked if he had any objection to be searched -I have no recollection of his saying he had no objection; I was not there all the time, I was there when he was searched, but they might have searched him again - he was not about to be discharged; the prosecutor appeared agitated, and as if he had taken a little, but not intoxicated - he did not say the prisoner was not the man who robbed him in my presence, nor was the constable of the night about to discharge him; they sat about searching him directly he got into the watch-house.

DAVID LAING . I am a watchman. On the 9th of November I was in Cateaton-street, and as I was calling half-past nine o'clock, I heard a cry of Watch! Stop him! I made towards Ironmonger-lane, where I heard the voice - I heard a rattle spring, went into the lane, and saw the prisoner running down the lane, towards Cateaton-street, pursued by Branston, coming towards me; when he saw me come up the pavement, he jumped into the road, and tried to get past me - I struck at him with my stick, and got hold of him; Gardner came up just as we were beginning to take him to the watch-house- when I caught the prisoner he said, "I am not the man - I am not the man; they are gone another way:" there was nobody but him and the watchman till Gardner came to us - I do not recollect Gardner saying any thing when he came up, but the watchman said he was the right man, and we took him to the watch-house; Gardner was very much flurried, and was obliged to sit down in the watch-house some time before the night-constable would take the charge - the night-constable came in a little after us; Gardner saw part of the chain which was found, and said it was his - he was quite sensible.

Cross-examined. Q. Quite sensible? A. Yes; I was not in the habit of seeing him before, but he appeared sensible - not knowing him I cannot say whether he had been drinking, but I mean to say he was sensible; he might have had a drop to drink. I saw the prisoner searched - he was a little time in the watch-house before he was searched, about a quarter of an hour; the constable of the night was not there at first, but when he came he was searched - I did not hear him asked if he objected to be searched, but he said he had no objection; the prosecutor always said he was one of the men, and that he never had him out of his sight - he never said he was not one of the men, in my presence, nor was he about to he discharged. I went out to look for the chain, but found nothing; I was not in the watch-house all the

time: a little while after the constable of the night came in I went out to my beat.

HENRY NOTLEY . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was at the watch-house when I came in; I saw Gardner there, and in my opinion he was a little intoxicated - he was not insensible from liquor, but was agitated very much indeed, and not for some time after he was there did he declare that the prisoner was the man.

Q. Did he ever express a doubt about him? A. He was in such an agitated state of mind I could not take notice of what he said at first; I never heard him express a doubt about him - he gave charge of him after some time, but before that I sent the watchmen out to look for the property; the chain was not brought in till after he was sent to the Compter - Gardner was gone then; he claimed it before the Lord Mayor - it was delivered to me by Armstrong, the superintendent of the watch: I have had it ever since - here is also another part, which was found next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner searched? A. I did; I had then been about ten minutes in the watch-house - I did not hear him asked if he objected to be searched; he did not object - he said he was not the man; Gardner was in a state between agitation and intoxication - he might certainly have made a mistake; the prisoner and he sat down face to face.

Q. And did he not jump up, and say,

"That is the man- I will swear to him?" - A. He did say he would swear to him ten or fifteen minutes after he was there, but there were persons intervening between them till then -I was not about to discharge the prisoner, but wished to be satisfied whether Gardner would really identify him, and he positively identified him before he left the watch-house - he might certainly make a mistake, as well as most of us.(Watch-chain produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281204-15

NEW COURT, First Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

15. WILLIAM CUMMERFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of George Howell , from his person .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281204-16

16. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 5 lbs. weight of mutton, value 3s. , the goods of William Weaver .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-17

17. JOHN PARSONS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 12 locks, value 24s. , the goods of Edward Shearman and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Daniel Prince Clements .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 74.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-18

18. ELIZA LUFFLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 9 yards of stuff, value 6s.; 2 pieces of patchwork, value 5s.; 1 pillow, value 1s.; 1 sheet, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 blanket, value 2s.; I hat, value 2s.; 1 hat-box, value 1s.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 2 frocks, value 2s.; 1 blanket, value 1s.: 1 rug, value 1s.; 2 gowns, value 4s.; 1 shawl, value 2s.; 1 pillow-tick, value 1s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 1s.; 2 muslin curtains, value 1s.; 2 dressing-gowns, value 2s., and 2 shirts, value 8s. , the goods of James Toovey .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-19

19. CHARLES TODD was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-20

20. GEORGE FLEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of James Wilkinson .

JAMES WILKINSON . I live in Wilson-street . On the 15th of May I was alarmed by some one breaking my window, at four o'clock in the morning; I got up, and dressed myself, and told my apprentice to do so, which he did - I went out, and as soon as I got to the door the prisoner ran round the corner, and knocked me down; I got up - he knocked me down again, and said he would silence me; he took my hat: an officer came and took him to the watch-house - I went there, but was in an ill state of health, and it was booked as an assault; we went before the Magistrate, and he was ordered to find bail - he had my hat in his possession before the Magistrate, and I said so, but the Magistrate did not seem to pay much attention to me; he was talking to a gentleman.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you not know him before? A. Yes, perhaps for ten months; he lived at an oil-shop, kept by Brown - I do not know that he lived there afterwards; I went every where to look for him after I filed this hill, which was in September - he was held to bail that I might file a bill against him; he had a hat on when he knocked me down, and I think he had one at the watch-house: I do not know who broke the window- my wife was not at home; she came up after this - I did not see her at the time I saw the prisoner; my hat cost 25s. - it was a pretty good one: the officer who took the prisoner is not here. Vann, the officer, stated before the Magistrate that the prisoner had my bat, and the Magistrate said, "I have ordered him to find bail."

ANN UNDERN . I am in the ostrich-feather business. -The prosecutor lodges with me; he had been in a dangerous state of health: I called to him to see who broke the window - the prisoner rushed up, knocked him down, and took his hat; I went up to him, and he knocked me down- the prosecutor got up, and the prisoner knocked him down again, and said, "I will silence you;" he appeared before the Magistrate with the prosecutor's hat - I cannot say whether he was sober or not.

COURT to JAMES WILKINSON . Q. Do you not believe your wife broke the window? A. I cannot say - she was out; there was another female in my room: I was ill, and was glad of any body. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-21

21. GEORGE TOMLINSON was indicted for stealing,

on the 8th of November , 1 copper, value 1l. , the goods of John Harvey .

JOHN HARVEY . I live in Gloucester-street, Spa-fields. I had a house No. 13, Southampton-street - there was a copper in the wash-house; I had taken it out of the brickwork, and put it into the back-kitchen of the house for security a day or two before - I did not miss it till the prisoner was in custody; this is it, I believe, but I have no mark on it.

JOHN AVERY . I am a constable. I received charge of the prisoner; when I came up the people said, "That is the man;" the copper was standing by him - this was in Penton-place, about one o'clock in the day, about three hundred yards from the prosecutor's house; I have tried the copper, and it fitted exactly - the prisoner said a man gave it him to carry, but he did not say who, nor where he was to take it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had to take some things to Pentonville, and on returning I met a man, looking like a bricklayer, and a sailor; they asked me to carry this copper - I took it up, and the sailor walked before; some person came and asked how I came by it - I said, "That man gave it me to carry;" they saw him, but did not take him - he went away. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-22

22. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 1 boot, value 6s. , the goods of Ralph Wilcoxon .

RALPH WILCOXON . I am a shoemaker , and live in Oxford-street. I saw this boot in my shop on the 3d of November, and on the 5th a person came for a pair of boots, and I missed this; I know nothing of the prisoner, but the boot was taken to another shop of mine by the officer, and I heard of it - the boot had been near my door.

WILLIAM ORGER . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house on another charge about ten o'clock at night on the 4th of November, and had this boot in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated.

WILLIAM ORGER . He was sober.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-23

23. WILLIAM GODFREY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 10 sets of collar-buckles, value 5l. , the goods of Robert Higgins and John De la Fontaine .

JOHN DE LA FONTAINE . I am in partnership with Robert Higgins - we are coach and harness platers , and live in Archer-street . On the 16th of October we lost nine or ten sets of collar-buckles, which had been in pigeon-holes in our shop; I went out soon that morning, and returned about nine o'clock - I then saw four of the pigeon-holes empty; the prisoner served his time to us, but had left us.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I received the prisoner at the office, but I cannot say when - he was in charge on another offence; I found these three keys, this knife, and this cloth on him - one of the keys opens the prosecutors' private door; I opened it with it, and there is a communication from that door to the shop - the prisoner told me he had no residence, but slept at nightly lodgings; I ascertained that he lived with a woman - I went to her and found his lodging, and there I found this buckle.

ELIZABETH TURNSTALL . The prisoner's wife took a room of me - I received the rent from the prisoner; that was the room the officer searched - I think they were there about three weeks; I believe they came about the 9th of October.

CHARLOTTE WORMHALL . I am in the service of the prosecutors. On the 30th of October I heard some one open our private-door - I went down and saw some one like the prisoner; I asked who he wanted - he ran out and shut the door; I cannot say the prisoner was the man, but it was like him; on the 5th of November I heard some noise at the door again, but the lock was down, and they could not open it - I went to the door, and saw the prisoner; I asked what he wanted - he said"I did not do any thing;" we open that door with a latch-key like this one - I have no doubt but this would open it.(Buckle produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I said it was a nightly lodging, because I paid for it nightly: I bought this buckle of a man for half a crown - there are many made like it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-24

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

24. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 pair of boots, value 30s. , the goods of Aaron Teakle .

ROBERT ADAMS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Aaron Teakle , boot-maker , of Wardour-street . The prisoner and another boy came to the shop, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening - they both said they wanted a pair of boots; I said I had none that would fit them - they said, "Let us see?" I took one boot off a hook - they looked at it, and asked me to let them look at the other. which I did; they appeared to be together, and talked together; they asked the price of the boots - I said 2l.; they said they were too dear. and asked me to make them a piece of wax-end for a dog's collar - I said I had no hemp that would make it; they asked where they could buy some - I said in the court over the way; they went out, and returned together in about three minutes with some hemp - I told them to come into the back-shop with me, and I would make it; the prisoner went with me, and the other staid in the shop - in two or three minutes the prisoner said to the other, "Go and tell my brother Tom not to go out till I come," and directly he said that the other went out; I went to fasten the door, and missed the same pair of boots which they had looked at at first, and which I had hung up again - they were safe when they came in the second time; I kept the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This prisoner could not have touched the boots? A. No - not while he was with me.

AARON TEAKLE . The boots were my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know the other person except by sight - I met him in the shop.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 6 Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-25

25. WILLIAM JOHNS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 2 books, value 10s. , the goods of Samuel Sotheby .

SAMUEL SOTHEBY . I am a book-auctioneer . I lost two books from off my shelves on the 27th of November - they were found on the prisoner.

THOMAS THORPE . I am a bookseller. I was attending the sale, and saw the prisoner, whom I knew, take these books off the shelf, and put them under his coat - I had seen him there the greater part of an hour - he had gone round and looked at several books; he went towards the door - I went and collared him, and brought him to the table: I said he had two books - he said at first that he had not; I said he had, and then he took the books from under his coat.

MATTHEW PATTISON . I was sent for, and took the prisoner; these are the books.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he merely took the books down to look at them by the window.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-26

26. GEORGE REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Frederick Lashbrooke .

FREDERICK LASHBROOKE . I am a gentleman's coachman . On the 4th of August I lodged at the Adam's Arms public-house, in Southampton-street ; I left my blue box-coat in the kitchen on the night of the 3d, and when I got up next morning it was gone - I know nothing of the prisoner, and have not seen my coat since.

JOSEPH COUNT . I am a rag-merchant; my brother keeps the house in which this robbery was committed - I slept there, as my wife was confined. On the morning of the 4th of August I had to go over the water - I got up at half-past five o'clock; I heard some one on the stairs- I thought it was the pot-boy, and said, "John, what is it o'clock?" the prisoner answered, "It is about seven" - I went down, and heard the prisoner jump as from a table or dresser in the kitchen; I had seen him here the night before - he said, "Do you live here?" said, "I sleep here" - he said, "I am looking for my bundle, but can't find it;" he went to ask the boy - came down again and said,

"I can't find it, but I will take my box-coat, and come again after breakfast;" he then threw a blue coat, over his shoulder, and we went out together as far as London-street - I then bid him good morning; I am sure he is the man.

HENRY SUMMERS . I was drinking with the prisoner in the night of the 3d of August - he came in just after he, and had no bundle; he said he had had a few words with his wife, and came to lodge there.

JAMES MILLIDGE . I slept at that house. The prisoner slept with me - I did not hear him get up, but I awoke at seven o'clock, and he was gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I was working at Hounslow, and came up to see my wife - we had a few words, and I went to lodge at that public-house; I got up in the morning, and went out just as the watchman was going five o'clock- I went off to Hounslow.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-27

27. JOHN JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 2 silver spoons, value 10s. , the goods of Martin Stapylton , Esq.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am butler to Martin Stapylton , Esq. of Manchester-square - Mulvey was a fellow-servant of mine; the prisoner used to visit him - I have seen him there several times after the beginning of October; I missed two spoons on the 5th of November - the prisoner had been there the day before.

JOHN MULVEY . I was footman in this family, but have left it. I have known the prisoner between five and six years - he used to visit me, and was there on the night of the 4th of November; we had a party that night - I never authorised him to take the spoons.

THOMAS LUCAS . I am servant to Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker, of Tottenham-court-road. I have a desertspoon, pawned on the 5th of November by a young man, in the name of Stone, to whom I gave this duplicate.

HENRY GODDAND . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 12th of November, and on his person found twelve duplicates - one of this dessert spoon, and one of a tea-spoon, which I got from Mr. Fleming's; I asked how he came by the spoons - he said they were given him by John Mulvey , who had lived with a Yorkshire gentleman, of the name of Benyon; about a fortnight before John Mulvey did live with a Yorkshire gentleman of the name of Benyon.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I hope you will be as merciful as you can - it is the first time I ever was in a Court of Justice.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-28

28. ELIZABETH MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 9 sheets, value 2l.; 6 pairs of stockings, value 6s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 5s.; 2 gowns, value 4s.; 2 half-handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 1 tippet, value 2s., and 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Verey , her master.

CHARLES VEREY . (Examined through an Interpretess.) I am a confectioner , and live at No. 231, Regent-street. The prisoner was in my service - she washed for me first, and I then took her into my house; I missed a number of articles while she was there.

HERBERT JOHN CLARK . I live with a pawnbroker in Wardour-street. I have some sheets pawned by the prisoner at different times from the 11th of September, and here is a gown pawned by her.

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . I am a pawnbroker, of Longacre. I have a gown and waistcoat pawned by the prisoner.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found seventy-two duplicates in her pocket; I afterwards received information that she had a box in Portland-town - I went there, and found some more duplicates and some articles.

MARY ANN TISSILAIC . I went with the officer, and took the prisoner at her lodging; the servant told us the box was at Portland-town - we went and found it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-29

29. SARAH PRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th October , 4 handkerchiefs, value 8s.; 5 sheets, value 15s., and 2 gowns, value 10s. , the goods of Matilda White , her mistress.

MATILDA WHITE . I am single, and live in Titchbourne-street , Edgware-road. The prisoner was in my service for about six weeks, and had lived with me before - I went on the 8th of October to Tonbridge-wells for my health; I returned on the 21st of October, and she was gone - I found only a char-woman there, whom I had before employed; I had entrusted my house to the prisoner - I missed five sheets, two gowns, and some other things, which have been given up to me; I had always found the prisoner honest before.

JAMES HILLVER . I live with a pawnbroker, in the Edgware-road. I have five sheets, four handkerchiefs, and a table-cloth, pawned by the prisoner at different times after the 16th of October.

JAMES GILL . I live with Mr. Baker, a pawnbroker, of Upper George-street. I have two gowns, pawned by the prisoner in October.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I took the prisoner on the 4th of November; she had a bonnet on which her mistress had lost - a great deal more property has been given up by other pawnbrokers.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading distress, and representing the prosecutrix to be a woman of the town.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-30

31. SARAH HARPER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 sovereign, and 4 shillings , the monies of Daniel Watkins , her master.

DANIEL WATKINS . I am a surgeon , and live in George-street, Portman-square. The prisoner was my servant for for about six months.

JULIA MARIA WATKINS . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 11th of October, I gave the prisoner a sovereign and some silver to pay a butterman's bill, of the name of Shuttleworth; I did not know exactly how much it was - it was a fortnight's bill; I did not know it was not paid till she was taken up.

JOHN SHUTTLEWORTH . I am a butterman. There were several bills due to me - the prisoner was to pay me 1l. 4s. 11 1/2d., but she never paid it; she was taken up on the 30th of October, but the officer is not here.

DANIEL WATKINS re-examined. Q. When did you first understand the money had not been paid? A. I believe it was about the 20th, but on the day previous to her being taken, she came to borrow 5l. for a friend, and we dissuaded her from that - she had not quitted my service.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-31

18. ROBERT HASTINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September, 1 watch, value 40s.; 2 seals; value 10s.; 1 watch-key, value 1s., and 1 watch-chain, value 6d. , the goods of John Rayner .

JOHN RAYNER . I am a porter at the Spread Eagle, Gracechurch-street - I live in Camomile-street . I saw my watch, seals, and chain, all safe on Saturday, the 20th of September, when I went out, and when I returned, they were gone - it was a silver watch, capped, and jewelled, made by Hamley.

REBECCA RAYNER . I am the wife of the prosecutor. -I had seen the prisoner once before, when he called to see a lodger of mine, named Frazer: on the 20th September, he came again and said that Frazer had sent him, and he would be much obliged to me to give him something to eat and drink, and Frazer would settle; I saw the watch safe when he came into our room, and when he was gone I missed it.

HENRY POWELL . I am assistant to Mr. Cameron, a pawnbroker of the Strand. On the 20th of September, the prisoner pawned a silver watch, made by Hamley, with me, and it was taken out by a clothes-dealer two days after.

JOHN MOSES . I bought the duplicate of the watch of the prisoner on the 22d of September; he came first, and I told him to come in half an hour - I went, saw the watch, and told the prisoner, when he came again, that 2s. was the most I would give for it - 30s. had been lent on it; I sold the watch to a dealer - I do not know who was the maker; it was silver.

DAVID GEORGE ALDERSON . I am an officer. I received the prisoner on the 27th of October - I got this seal from Mr. Cole.

CHARLES COLE . I am a clothes-salesman. I gave this seal to the officer; the prisoner, to the best of my belief, came and bought a coat of me for 15s. - he had not money enough, and gave me 10s. and this seal; I took it and thought no more of it - the officer came and brought the prisoner, who I believe was the person, though he appeared altered.

Prisoner. Q. Had not I two or three half-crowns more in my pocket, and did not I toss with you for a pot of beer? A. No, you are wrong, you gave me four half-crowns - I did not toss at all; I believe there were some persons in the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I certainly acknowledge that the crime is of a very aggravated nature, but having been out of employ four months. and having no friends, I implore your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-32

32. JAMES FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 4 books, value 20s. , the goods of John Booth .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-33

33. EDWARD BRANCH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 coat, value 35s. , the goods of William Sharp .

The witnesses did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-34

34. JARVIS MURRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 92lbs. weight of lead, value 30s. , the goods of Henry Samuel Crane .

HENRY SAMUEL CRANE . I am a manufacturing chemist , and live at Stratford, in Essex . I missed a piece of lead on the 19th of July - it had been cut out for a chemical vessel, and was in a shed; the prisoner had worked about my premises, and on the 10th of July had unloaded some coals for me, with a man named Connotly, but neither of them worked for me on the 19th of July.

HENRY CRANE . I am the prosecutor's son. I know

this lead to be my father's - I did not see the prisoner about there on the 18th or 19th of July.

CHARLES WYATT . I saw the prisoner on the 18th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, with this lead on his back; he was going down Cut Throat-lane, and Connelly with him - I knew him quite well; I got up into a tree, watched them, and saw them put the lead into some bushes, and go away - I went and told Mr. Giles' foreman, for whom I work; we went, got the lead, and put it into Mr. Giles' granary - this was in the Country of Middlesex.

Prisoner. The other had the lead. Witness. He had it first and then you took it.

JOHN BURNHAM . Wyatt came and told me of it; we went and took the lead to our master's granary - I shewed the same lead to the prosecutor.

JAMES BROWN . I am a watchman. I produce the lead.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of working in the coal business at various places, and I dare say I was coming along at the time this boy says he saw me with the lead, but he did not see me touch it; I have never been away from the place - I get up in the morning to go to work, and return at night.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-35

35. JOHN QUIN, alias PIMM , and JAMES WALKER, alias JOHN MAYWOOD , were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 1 wooden figure, value 6s., and 1 iron bolt, value 6d. , the goods of James Holloway .

JAMES HOLLOWAY . I keep a shop in the general-line at Wapping High-street . On the 29th of October, I lost a figure of an African, which has not been found, but I believe this bolt is what fastened the figure; I missed it between six and seven o'clock in the evening - an old knife went through this hole in the bolt; I know nothing of the prisoners.

THOMAS AMES . I am an officer. I received information on the 11th of November, and went to Juniper-row, Shadwell, where, I was told, the prisoners lodged; I got there about ten o'clock at night - the prisoners were not there; a little boy opened the door - I found another boy asleep in a bed; I searched the room, and found this bolt and some figures - I then went to different public-houses, and found the prisoners the same night at the Shakespeare Head public-house, Shakespeare-walk; Quin was at the door, and the other in the tap-room - I took them into custody and asked them if they had any figures at their lodgings; they said No - I told them I had been to their lodging in Juniper-row and found some Scotch figures - they said they knew nothing about them - they had nothing but two or three shirts; Walker said he lodged at Hackney.

Prisoner QUIN. Q. Was not I up in a corner! A. No, on the step.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-36

36. JOHN QUIN , alias, PIMM , & JAMES WALKER , alias JOHN MAYWOOD , were again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 2 tubs, value 8s. , the goods of William Lowndes .

MARY LOWNDES . I am the wife of William Lowndes; we keep a shop in King's-place, Commercial-road, and sell tubs. On the 8th of November, I lost these two tubs from off a water-butt, outside the door; a little before I missed them I saw a man very much like Walker, standing against the rails, close by the tubs - he is very like the man, but I cannot swear to him.

Prisoner WALKER. Q. What time did you lose them? A. Just after eight o'clock at night - I did not say I missed them after nine; here is the block-mark on them - you have rubbed out the lot mark.

THOMAS AMES . On the 11th of November, in searching their house, I found these two tubs, which I took to the office.

CLARETTA COPE . The two prisoners lodged with me in Juniper-row, that is the place the officer searched - they lodged together; they came about seven weeks before the officers came - Walker brought in these two tubs about seven o'clock on the Saturday night, Quin was not with him then, but on the Tuesday morning, Quin and Walker each took a tub out, and brought them back again.

Prisoner QUIN. Q. Did not Walker ask you to take one? A. Yes.

JAMES GARRETT . I am a coal-whipper. These prisoners lodged at the house where I do; they said they were brokers' men, and had to do these dolls up - they lodged together.

Prisoner QUIN. Q. Does any body else occupy that room? A. A boy and a young man sleep there.

MARY STOREY . I live in King David-lane, Shadwell. Walker called at my house on the 11th of November, and asked me to purchase these two tubs; he wanted 10s. for them - I said they would not suit me, he turned round and said "Take them at any price."

WALKER's Defence. The prosecutrix said that she had them at home at eight o'clock, and the landlady says I brought them at seven; a woman gave them to me, and said she brought them to sell for her husband, who was in Whitecross-street - the person I had them from is here, her name is Mary Turner .

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

QUIN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-37

37. JOHN QUIN , alias PIMM , & JAMES WALKER , alias JOHN MAYWOOD , were again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 2 wooden figures, value 10s. , the goods of Christopher Fryer .

GEORGE HOWS . I live with Mr. Christopher Fryer , a tobacconist , at Shadwell. These two figures were in his shop on Tuesday, the 11th of November - I saw them at eight o'clock in the morning, and missed them at five in the evening; they were hung up by a hook at the door - I did not see either of the prisoners.

THOMAS AMES . I found these two figures in the cupboard up stairs in the room I searched - I then went and took the prisoners about ten o'clock at night; I asked them, going to the watch-house, whether they had any figures - they both said they had not, nothing but two or three shirts.

CLARETTA COPE . The prisoners lodged with me about seven weeks before the 11th of November, and slept in a bed by themselves; my son, and another lodger slept in the room - the prisoners passed as brokers' men; I know nothing of these figures, but I saw a little black figure in the room.

Prisoner QUIN. Q. Did you ever burn a figure? A. No.

JAMES GARRETT . I know nothing of these figures, but I have seen the prisoners bring different figures in, and take them out.

Prisoner WALKER. Q. Was not Mrs. Cope very ill on the 11th of November - had not you been beating her, and was not she in fits? A. Not at all.

CLARETTA COPE re-examined. Q. Were you very ill? A. Yes, and I was in bed, I did not see these figures brought in.

WALKER'S Defence. The house is open to several others besides us, and that night the door was open, the house was full of different people: any body might have taken them in - I never saw them till the next morning.

QUIN's Defence. I had nothing there but shirts; I was not in company with Walker, I was outside the door.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-38

38. JOHN QUIN , alias PIMM , & JAMES WALKER , alias JOHN MAYWOOD , were again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 1 wooden figure, value 15s. , the goods of James Plested .

JAMES HANSON. I live with Mr. James Plested, a grocer and tobacconist , at Shadwell . I put up this figure in the morning at the door, and it was missing at eleven o'clock at night - it was fixed in staples by these irons at the back of it; I know it to be his.

GEORGE DEVERELL . I am an officer. I received information of the robbery, and knowing Quin, went in search of him; I found where he lived, and went and armed myself, and got further assistance - this was about half-past seven o'clock; we found Mrs. Cope in the back-room, she said "Quin is out" - we went and took him with Walker; Walker said he lodged at Hackney - I said "Where did you sleep last night?" he said I was no Father Confessor, he would be d - d if he told me; I found this figure under the bed in the room which Cope said they lived in.

CLARETTA COPE . The two prisoners lodged with me; there were two beds in that room, but only one bedstead, in which the prisoners slept; I did not see any figure brought in.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-39

39. JOHN QUIN , alias PIMM , & JAMES WALKER , alias JOHN MAYWOOD , were again indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 2 wooden figures, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Lock .

THOMAS LOCK. I live in Shadwell , and am a tobacconist . This figure was taken from my door on the 11th of November, about seven o'clock; I know nothing of the prisoners.

MARY STOREY . The prisoner Quin sold me a bedwrench some time ago; he wanted 1s., and I offered him 9d. - I had only half a crown; he took it to get change, and never returned. On the night in question I saw a person who I took to be him, with this image on his shoulder, but the night was very foggy; I ran after him, and found my landlord at his door - I desired him to run after him; we ran after him; I called out, "Pimm;" he threw down the figure, and a scuffle took place between him and my landlord; he had the same jacket on as he has now.

THOMAS DRUMMOND . I keep a hair-dresser's shop, in King David-lane. On the night of the 11th of November Storey came to me; we went after the person - she called out, "Pimm;" he turned round, and looked over his left shoulder - he had this image on his shoulder, and was going to turn into a place called the Gap; I seized the image and him - he pitched the figure on me, and knocked me down; I got up, and he threw me down again, and left me in the dark - I believe Quin to be the person, but I cannot swear to him.

Prisoner QUIN. Q. Have you not known me in the brokering line? A. Yes - you used to work for Mr. Henfrey.

QUIN's Defence. I was at Bethnal-green till eight o'clock that night, and then came down to the Shakespeare Head public-house, when I was taken.

QUIN - GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

WALKER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-40

40. WILLIAM SIMPSON and JOHN BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 quadrant, value 3l. , the goods of Joseph Stancliff .

JOSEPH STANCLIFF . I am a school-master , and live in Sidney-place, Commercial-road . On the 13th of November I lost a quadrant from a glass-case, about five yards within my door; I was ill, lying on a sofa - the butcher's boy cried out, "They have stolen a sextant:" I went to the shop, and missed it. I have seen the prisoners in the road together - I received the quadrant about half an hour afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Who brought it to you? A. A number of persons came up and brought it.

IVON HOPPEE . On the day the quadrant was taken I saw the two prisoners near the prosecutor's, looking in at the window - I saw them together about three minutes; I was on the other side of the street: I did not see either of them do any thing, but in a few minutes I saw another lad come out of the shop with something under his jacket; the wind blew up the jacket, and I saw the bright brass of some instrument; I did not see the three together at that time, but I had before - when I looked at them Brown came to our shop, and wanted half a pound of beef-sleaks; I pushed him out of the shop, and called my master: I then called to the prosecutor, "They have taken a sextant;" the two prisoners then called out "Brush," and the other one ran away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did these two lads run away? A. No, they came for the steaks; they both cried "Brush" -I never said they came for the steaks before he took the instrument, he was crossing the road at the time, and he ran off.

WILLIAM COX . I was standing in Duke-street, and saw a lad with a blue jacket and canvas trousers carrying this instrument, which he put down, and walked off; in a few minutes I saw Hoppee come along.

MARY ANN ROWLAND . On the 13th of November I heard a voice in the passage of my house, which is about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's; I came down, and saw this instrument in the passage, which I gave to the prosecutor - I did not see who put it there.

JAMES LEA . I am an officer, and produce the quadrant; I received information of the robbery, and took the

prisoners next day, in Sun-court - I had known them before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-41

41. MARY ANN CROSSLEY was indicted for bigamy .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

HENRY WILLIAM FACEY . I am parish-clerk of St. Luke's, Middlesex. I produce the marriage-register of that parish, by which I find, on the 6th of February, 1814, Richard Crossley and Mary Ann Rothwell were married in that church - it is signed."Richard Crossley, and Mary Ann Rothwell , her mark."

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Is that the original? A. Yes - it is witnessed by Mary Ann Brock .

MARY ANN MURPHY . My name was Mary Ann Brock . I was at the church at the time of this marriage, and saw the prisoner married to Crossley; I am sure she is the same woman: Crossley is alive - he is now in Court; he is in the service of a brewer.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner? A. A few months before the marriage; I had known her husband about the same time: I do not know when they separated, but they lived together some months - I have no reason to know that they have been separated for ten or eleven years - I have not heard so; I have not seen him for the last seven or eight years.

COURT. Q. What was she at that time? A. She was nothing that I saw; Crossley was a cooper at Whitbread's brewhouse - I did not know her parents.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am the parish-clerk of Hackney, and have the register of marriages - (reads) "29th of June, 1828 , Henry Lee , of this parish, bachelor, and Sarah Jane Smith, widow, were married by licence;" I knew Mr. Lee, and have seen this woman a few times - I am certain she is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You produce this from the place where these books are kept? A. Yes - I had known the prisoner a few days before; this is the marriage licence.

DR. HENRY LEE . I am a physician , and live at Hackney. I married the prisoner on the 29th of June last.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long had you known her? A. I believe I had seen her about three years before - I had only known her this year, about six weeks before I married her; I got no money with her - I did not get 900l., nor one farthing; it was a match without money - I know of no other motive but affection to assign on my part; I do not feel myself bound to tell whether it was a love match - I believe it was on the 12th or 13th of July, that I put her into a mad-house; we were married on the 29th of June: I had the certificate of a medical man - she gave me reason to suppose she was going to perpetrate some fatal act, but whether on myself or any other person I could not tell; I did not let her out of the madhouse - I left my family to act for me; I was out of the country at the time, and my family had medical men to see her - my father acted for me; I had never been married before. I mean solemnly to depose on my oath, that before I married the woman at the bar, I had never been married - I swear I got no money from her; she lived in a house at Clapton; it was a furnished house taken for her - the furniture was returned to the person she hired it of; I visited her there - she had a servant, and her son lived there; she told me she had been married before, but her husband was dead: she did not desire me to make inquiries whether he was alive or dead - she prevented me from it; she implored me not to make inquiries as to her circumstances or history before I married her; or rather not to divulge what she told me respecting herself - she begged me not to mention any thing to any body respecting her circumstances; she implored me not to make inquiries respecting her - her history was very long.

COURT. Q. Were these circumstances, which were not to be divulged, any thing relative to her having a former husband? A. No, none whatever, nor as to a doubt of his being alive; I had no reason to believe that she had a husband alive; I did not make any inquiries in the neighbourhood - I had no doubt of her having been married.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she wear stays? A. Yes - there was no money found in her stays; I never got a shilling with her - she begged me to keep her history secret; she said her husband's name was Smith - that he was executed for forgery, and that was the reason she did not wish her story to be known; I am not certain whether I asked her where, but I believe she said at Newgate - I took her without a farthing of money; I sent her to Dr. Munro, at Clapton - I continued to cohabit with her for the fortnight, and slept with her the night before I took her to Dr. Munro's; I breakfasted with her the same morning: I did not tell her where I was taking her - she thought I was going to the house she lived at; she did me no mischief - I had lived with her till then.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner near Bow church, on the 3d of November.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Reference Number: t18281204-42

42. MARY ANN CROSSLEY was again indicted for a like offence .

HENRY WILLIAM FACEY . I produce the register of the marriage on the 6th of February, 1814, as in the former case.

MARY ANN MURPHY . I was at the marriage - my name was then Brock; the prisoner's husband is now alive.

LEONARD BATTY . I am an exciseman, and live at Hull. I produce a copy of the register, taken from the books in Barnsley chapel, at Silkstone, in Yorkshire.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you any body with you? A. Yes, and I saw him write it from the book - I looked over his shoulder: I had it read out to me, and I compared them; (reads) "4th December, 1818, John Pickering , bachelor, and Mary Ann Crossley were married in this parish;" I signed it, but have no recollection of the couple who were married.

JOHN PICKERING . I was a labourer . I married this woman in Barnsley chapel ten years ago this day; I lived with her till the 7th of January following.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you get any money from her? A. No - my marriage was for love, and partly expecting money; I expected 95l., which she represented she had - I had seen her for a month before, and known her for a week; I was subpoenaed here: I

have seen Crossley since I came to town; I saw no signs of madness in her - I think I was mad when I married her; she was unpleasant some time afterwards.

THOMAS VANN . I took the prisoner on the 3d of November, near Bow church.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-43

Fifth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

43. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Francis Sullivan .

FRANCIS SULLIVAN . I live in Monmouth-street - I keep a cellar, and sell shoes there. On the 22d of November I brushed a pair of shoes, and put them at my door at ten o'clock; in about half an hour the beadle brought the prisoner and the shoes.

FRANCIS MACE . I heard a cry of Stop thief! at about half-past ten o'clock; I saw the prisoner running first and took him - a man in the crowd gave me the shoes.

PATRICK LYNCH . I saw the prisoner and another young chap come to the top of the cellar - the other took up one shoe and looked at it, and then took up the other, and gave them to the prisoner, who took them away under his coat; I had watched them for about an hour - I saw the shoes picked up and given to the officer.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take the shoes from the other? A. Yes, I did.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running along Monmouth-street after a chaise, and a person came running behind me and took me.

JURY to PATRICK LYNCH . Q. Did you lose sight of the prisoner? A. No - I saw him drop the shoes; he was about a dozen yards from the cellar.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-44

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

44. MARY SLADE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 carpet, value 8s.; 1 set of bed-furniture, value 4s., and 1 bolster, value 4s. , the goods of John Spill .

MARIA SPILL . I am the wife of John Spill - we live in Church-lane, Hampstead ; the prisoner rented a ready-furnished room in our house for about five months. On the 26th of October I missed the carpet and bed-furniture out of the first-floor front-room, in which nobody lived - the bolster was in the room she hired; I asked if she knew any thing about these things - she said No.

CATHERINE WILLMORE . I am the wife of Zachariah Willmore - we keep a shop. I bought this bed-furniture of the prisoner for 4s., on the 25th of October - I put it into water; I shewed the same to Mrs. Spill on the 28th.

ELEANOR PRESTON . I live in Golden-square, Hampstead. On the 26th of October the prisoner came with a carpet - my mother came in while she was shewing it to me; we bought it of her for 5s.

ISRAEL SIMMONS . I am a salesman. I bought this bolster of the prisoner for 4s., I think near two months ago.

PHILIP MASE . I am an officer. I took up the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-45

45. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 2 boots, value 5s. , the good of Joseph Peate .

JAMES AYRIS . On the 7th of November, about half-past two o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner and another lad come into my master's shop, his name is Mr. Joseph Peate ; the other took up a pair of boots from the door, and gave them to this one; they ran off - I followed them, and took the prisoner with the boots under his apron.

GEORGE ELLIS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the boots - I was going on an errand, and looking in at the window the gentleman came and took me, and took up the boots.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-46

46. ANN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 tea-caddy, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 pinafore, value 6d., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d. , the goods of James Chatfield .

ARABELLA CAMPBELL . I am single, and live in Old Compton-street . I lost a tea-caddy and some other things from the drawers in the parlour, on the 27th of November; I had seen them about an hour before - the shirt and handkerchiefs were James Chatfield's, my sister's husband; all the things were brought back: I know nothing of the prisoner.

ANN MURPHY . I am a servant to Mr. Chatfield. On the 27th of November my mistress sent me for change for a shilling, and when I went out the prisoner was sitting in the shop; my mistress came after me to the shop, and told me to watch the prisoner - I did not see her come out of my mistress', but I watched her into Church-street; I saw her open a shirt, and she had the other things under her arm; I took hold of her, and asked what she was going to do with them - she said to sell them; I asked where she got them - she said it was no odds to me; I took her back, and my mistress sent for the officer - she begged my mistress to forgive her; the things had been in the parlour - I had left the shop about half an hour; she dropped the shirt when I came up.

JAMES HODGES . I produce the articles which I got from the prosecutrix - I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person who took them - I went in with a woman to buy a bonnet-shape.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-47

47. GEORGE ADE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 2 pecks of chaff, beans, and oats, mixed together, value 3s., the goods of Mary Gibbs , his mistress ; and WILLIAM PEACOCK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN SUMMERS . I took William Peacock about five o'clock in the afternoon, with this sack of oats, beans, and chaff in his hands outside Mrs. Mary Gibb's gates, to whom I am servant; I asked how he came by it, he made no answer - I took him into the yard, and sent for an officer; Peacock is a milkman, and keeps a green-grocer's shop - he wished me not to make a piece of work; before I saw Peacock I saw a coal-waggon outside the door, I do not know whose it was - I had been called to look under the manger, where I saw the same bag, with the same articles

in it - I set a person to watch it; Ade worked for my mistress - the value of this is about 3s.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Mrs. Gibbs here? A. No; I am ostler there, and Ade was employed there - I did not see Peacock speak to the persons with the waggons, they had three or four horses in each - he had served me with milk; he came across to me; I had not called him - he held out the bag to Ade; I had hold of him by the collar - what he said was so very low, I could not hear him; I did not hear him say "Here's this bag back, I don't know what it is;" I was in a bustle at the time - I took Ade up, and gave him in charge - he was let go out of the yard - the gate was shut; there was another way he might have gone out - he went by himself to get his coat and hat; Peacock was going towards his own home when I first saw him, but he came across to me.

COURT. Q. When you first saw him. did you see any thing in his hand? A. Not at first, but when he came back, just passing the horses' heads, I saw the bag in his hand, he had got about fifteen yards; I cannot say whether he saw me before he turned back - I suspect so; he could have seen me, his side face was towards me.

WILLIAM KETTERIDGE . I am a gentleman's servant. I went to Mrs. Gibbs' stables about nine o'clock in the morning of the 7th of November, to see a young man, and while I was talking to him I saw this bag under the manger; I asked him what was there - he said he did not know; I pulled it from under the manger, and then went and told the ostler, who came and looked at it, and desired me to put it back again, which I did - he then told me to watch to see who took it away; I stopped till about five o'clock in the afternoon, and Ade went to the public-house to get a light - during that time Summers told me to lie down in the next manager; I lay there about ten minutes, and saw Ade come and take this bag up - I followed him, and saw him deliver it to Peacock, who was about ten yards from the gates.

Cross-examined. Q. Was Peacock there to serve milk? A. Yes; I did not see how far he got from the gates - I saw him again in about five minutes; I did not hear him say he got it from Ade.

COURT to JOHN SUMMERS . Q. Did you see any thing of its being put into the waggon? A. No - but the waggoner came into the yard, and said that Peacock had put it into the waggon; I do not know the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever say you saw Peacock put it into the waggon? A. No; the carter came into the yard, and said Peacock had put it into the waggon, then served a house with milk, and then came and took it; I keep the key of the corn-bin, but do not always lock the door - and did not that morning.

COURT. Q. What does the bag contain? A. Oats, beans, and chaff, mixed, and a stable rubber, which I know- it is such a mixture as we regularly feed the horses with- I told Peacock he ought to be ashamed of himself to rob us; they both said, "Don't make a peace of work" - I said I could not look over it, because we had lost so much- I told Mrs. Gibbs' son of it.

JOHN LACY . I am an officer. I took the prisoners, and produce the bag; nothing passed in my presence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-48

49. JOHN LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 4 gross of screws, value 21s. , the goods of Joseph Bennett and James Hunt , his masters.

MICHAEL KELLY . I am a labourer, and live in North East-passage. I worked with the prisoner at the St. Katharine's Docks - on the 13th of November he was at work, and left to go to breakfast; he returned at half-past ten o'clock, and I asked if he were coming to work - he said not till after dinner: I watched him, and a few minutes before twelve I saw him lay over the place where the screws were, lift up a paper, and tuck something under his frock; I went and told the foreman.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who is your foreman? A. He is here, but they were the property of Messrs. Bennett and Hunt. I was sober, and so was the prisoner.

WILLIAM LATHAM . On the 13th of November Kelly told me about some screws; I ran out, and overtook the prisoner - I turned him round, and took a paper of screws from under his smock-frock; I told him he must go back with me: he begged of me to let him go - I said he must go to the builder's office; he then wanted to go to the store-room, to put down what he had got, but I would not let him - the officer then came and took three other papers of screws from him; they are the property of Joseph Bennett and James Hunt - they had such screws there; we could not miss them.

Cross-examined. Q. Were they not the property of the St. Katharine's Dock Company? A. No; they are the property of Joseph Bennett and James Hunt , contractors for the work - I was not present when the contract was made; I have heard Mr. Bennett say so.

COURT. Q. Who employs you? A. Messrs. Bennett and Hunt; Mr. Joseph Hunt pays me, and sometimes a clerk in his name.

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I saw the witness with the prisoner a few minutes after twelve o'clock; the prisoner appeared sober - the witness had this paper of screws in his hand, and I found this paper of screws in the prisoner's hat, and these two papers in his trousers.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Mr. Bennett here? A. No, nor Mr. Hunt; I have seen them write their names - Mr. Joseph Bennett generally pays me; I know they are the contractors - I have seen the agreement in the clerk's office; Mr. Bennett was before the Magistrate, but was not bound over - the prisoner had been in constant employ about twelve months.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-49

50. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 2 sovereigns, the monies of Joseph Ustonson , from his person .

JOSEPH USTONSON . I am a fishing-tackle maker , and live in Fleet-street. On the 23d of November I met the prisoner at one o'clock in the morning, in Chancery-lane ; she accosted me contrary to my will - I gave her no encouragement, but she followed me, and I found her hand in my pocket, where I had three sovereigns and some silver, which I had counted just before - there was no one near me but her; I called the watchman, who took her to

the watch-house - before she got there she dropped the sovereigns: I heard them drop, and at the watch-house she said, "I have robbed you - forgive me," or something to that effect.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What time was this? A. To the best of my knowledge, about half-past one o'clock - I went into no court with her; she might have followed me through some courts in my way home: I had spent the day with a friend, and had been to church - I then went for a ride in the Regent's-park, and afterwards to a friend's on Laurence Pountney-hill; I then went home with a friend to Bedford-row, and was then going home down Chancery-lane - I had been drinking wine till ten or half-past ten o'clock; I drank perhaps seven or eight glasses of port, and some sherry, but no porter nor spirits - I was sitting two or three hours over my wine: I did say I thought I had lost my watch-chain; I did not go into any dark court with her - I do not know Bishop's-court; there are several courts, but I do not know the names of them: there was no talk on my part about going to any house, and I do not know that she did - I did not countenance any thing of that kind; I am sure that I did not give her what I thought were two shillings, for some little benefit conferred in Bishop's-court - I was not near falling down; no one advised me to go home, as I was in such a state - some one might have said so; my spirits might be elevated from its being the first time I was robbed: wine will raise the spirits without taking the senses - I did not hear any one advise me to go home; I did not let the prisoner go - I gave her in charge.

WILLIAM WILKINS . I am a watchman. I was in Chancery-lane about one o'clock; I went to the place - the prosecutor called Watch! and he gave charge of the prisoner for robbing him of two sovereigns - in taking her along she dropped the sovereigns out of her hand; I took up one, and my brother watchman took up the other - the prosecutor appeared to be rather the worse for liquor; the prisoner owned to robbing him and taking the sovereigns out of his pocket - in going to the watch-house she tried to slip a piece of money into the right-hand cuff of my coat; that was before she dropped them.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she drunk? A. I did not perceive it; but the prosecutor was; it was at the end of Bishop's-court I took them - the prosecutor said if she would give him back the money he would not give charge of her; he said in the watch-house that he thought he had lost his watch-chain, but he had not: the prisoner said he wished to have connexion with her - I did not give her an opportunity of escaping; when I heard the call Watch! I went up to the place, and as soon as he said she had robbed him, I took her - I did not hear the watch-house-keeper advise him to go home, because he was in such a state.

COURT. Q. Do you think it at all possible that he might have been with her within a few minutes, and have forgotten it? A. Yes, I do - he was too far gone to have any senses at all.

WILLIAM MOY . I was officer of the night. I came to the watch-house in about five minutes; I found the prisoner and the prosecutor there - the watchman gave me the two sovereigns; the prisoner admitted that she stole them, and begged for mercy - the prosecutor said if I would give up the two sovereigns she might go, but I would not let her; she did not say he had been with her till she was before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you serving in your own right? A. Yes; I am a bricklayer. The prosecutor was not kicking up a little row - he was the worse for liquor, but he could go along the street very well; I should think he could not have forgotten what had taken place -I did not hear him say he had lost his watch-chain; I did not hear that till this evening - I was not there for about five minutes; I was going round to see that all was right- I never said I thought he was so drunk he would not venture to come forward.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me two pieces of money- I wished him to go to a house, but he said he had rather stop in the court, which was Bishop's-court; I was with him some time, and did satisfy him.

JURY to MR. USTONSON. Q. Did you make any proposition to give her any money? A. No, none whatever; she did not ask me for money - my way home is down Bishop's-court.

WILLIAM WILKINS re-examined. Bishop's-court is the first turning from Cursitor-street - they were about three houses down.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-50

51. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 copper boiler, value 10s., the goods of William Bray , and fixed to a certain building ; against the Statute.

WILLIAM BRAY . I keep the Six Bells public-house, King's-road, Chelsea . The prisoner had been in my service, and left me about a year ago, but I frequently saw him - he never said any thing to me about a copper; Birch, the night watchman, gave me information, and I missed my copper boiler from my wash-house - it had been fixed in the brick-work; I had seen it the night before: I have every reason to believe it is mine - it is the same age and size.

JAMES BIRCH . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 7th of November, about half-past five o'clock, the prisoner was coming down Ebury-street, with the copper on his left shoulder, about a mile from Mr. Bray's; I went to him, and asked where he got it - he said from Chelsea, and was going to take it to the place; he said it was his own, and began to slide away - I took him to the watch-house and to the office; I found at Mr. Bray's they had lost one - it had been used for boiling pots and kettles in.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury - Confined 3 Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-51

52. JAMES EDWARDS was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM WESTWOOD . I am a jobbing carter , and live at Cambridge-heath. The prisoner was in my service; I sent him on the 4th of November with a load of lime - he was to bring back 1l. 1s.: he went out about one o'clock and did not return - I did not see him again till the 17th; he left my cart and horse loose in the road.

THOMAS EMMINS . I am in the employ of Mr. Haylock, a bricklayer. On the 4th of November the prisoner came with a load of lime, I paid him a sovereign and a shilling.

THOMAS VANN . I took the prisoner on the 17th of November, in the City-road, unloading a flour-waggon; I told him what I took him for - he made no answer.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the money and put it into my trousers pocket, where there was a hole, and I lost it -I did not know what to do about returning to my master.

JURY to WILLIAM WESTWOOD . Q. Were any wages due to him? A. No - I had given him his wages on the Saturday night, and some over to buy him some clothes; he had been with me but eight days - he said at Worship-street that he had lost the money.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-52

53. JAMES AYLET was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 78lbs. of potatoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Palmer .

RICHARD PALMER . I live at Enfield . The prisoner was in my employ - I caught him in my potatoe-bank on the 15th of November, with some potatoes in a sack; I asked what he thought of himself - he said it was the first time he ever attempted such a thing; it was about half-past one o'clock in the morning, and being rather an awkward time I let him go to London with his team - he came back again: he could have nothing to do with those potatoes in the course of my employ.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. When was he taken? A. The same afternoon, but he escaped, and came back on the Tuesday for his wages; I owed him 1l. 9s. 4d. - the potatoes were worth about half a crown: when he came back I asked him if he was not ashamed to see me again - I did not tell him to get out of the stable. nor any thing to that effect; he asked me for his wages - I walked out, and said, "You shall have your wages;" I went out and got the constable to take him - I paid him his wages before Mr. Hardy three days afterwards; he has borne a good character.

JOHN WILSON . I took up the prisoner by Mr. Palmer's desire, on the Saturday; he said, "Let me see my master"- I said, "I have no objection;" he slipped out, and on the Tuesday I was sent for to take him again - he was there when I went there, and made no resistance.

MR. CHURCHILL to MR. PALMER. Q. Was the constable waiting for him on the Saturday? A. Yes - he was not there on the Tuesday; the prisoner came for his wages, and I went for the constable.

JURY. Q. Did you send for the constable before he returned on the Saturday? A. Yes; the prisoner said,"Let me see the master," and then he went, and I saw no more of him till the Tuesday.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-53

OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

54. WILLIAM DEACON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , at St. Mary, Islington, 1 gelding, price 4l. , the property of Edward Sherwood .

EDWARD SHERWOOD . I am a bone collector , and live in Granville-street, Walworth. I left my gelding in a field in Maiden-lane, Battle-bridge , at five o'clock on Saturday evening, on the 1st of November, with other horses - part of the field is railed, and the rest enclosed with a ditch; I went to the field again on the Monday morning, and it was gone - I made enquiry, and about six o'clock that evening I got intelligence; I went to Mr. Monk's, of Whitechapel, and gave him a description of the horse - I then went into his premises; I found my horse among others, and could swear to it - I had seen the prisoner in the neighbourhood of Battle-bridge several times.

WILLIAM MONK . I am a horse-slaughterer, and live in Whitechapel. Sherwood claimed a horse on my premises; it was brought there on Saturday evening, the 1st of November, about seven o'clock, by the prisoner - he offered it for sale; it being dark, and he being a stranger, I put several questions to him, the answers to which confirmed my suspicions; I detained him, and took him before a Magistrate - he was remanded till the following Tuesday, and on the Monday Sherwood claimed it; I had had it led about with a written statement on it - I asked the prisoner if it was his own - he said it was; he gave me his name and address, and said he had had it several months - I asked what he used it for - he said he was a costermonger; I asked where he dealt, and offered to go any where with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along, about six o'clock, looking for a job - a man came and asked if I knew where I could sell the horse; I said I could sell it at the knacker's, at Bethnal-green - he said he had taken it there, and they would not give enough for it; I said I knew a place in Whitechapel - he told me to say it was my own, and to get what I could for it.

WILLIAM MONK re-examined. There was another man on my premises at the time, but as he denied all knowledge of the other I did not detain him - the prisoner made no resistance.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18281204-54

55. PETER GLENNON was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Ann Mountain , about twelve o'clock, in the night of the 22d of October , at Friern, Barnet, with intent to steal the goods and chattels therein .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

MARY SLATER . I am servant to Sarah Ann Mountain, who lives at Whetstone, in the parish of Friern, Barnet . On the night of the 22d of October I was at home - Lawrence and I locked up the house together; the iron door leading to the garden was locked - it opens into a kind of hall; there is a door leading from the hall to the dining-room, and another door leading to an inner hall - I saw the hall-door next morning - it was open; the lock had been picked - that is the outer-door of the house; I went to bed at half-past nine o'clock, at the same time as my fellow-servant, and about one o'clock in the morning I was disturbed, and heard a noise in the house - I alarmed Lawrence, who slept at the back of the house; he got up and got out of window - I went into his room, and assisted him in lowering himself down from the window with a gun, by a cord; I looked out of window, and saw a man run across the lawn - it was a moonlight night; my mistress occupies the house.

GEORGE LAWRENCE . I am a servant to Sarah Ann

Mountain. On the night of the 22d of October, I fastened up the house and the door leading to the garden. Slater alarmed me about one o'clock in the morning; I got out of bed, went to the bed-room door, and heard a knocking, as if persons were endeavouring to break into the lower rooms of the house - I partly dressed myself, took a cord from my box, and lowered myself down with a gun; when I got to the garden I ran to the corner of the house, and saw four men come from within the stone hall - I told them if they did not stop I would blow their brains out; they did not attempt to stop - I pulled the trigger of the gun, but it did not go off; I pursued and overtook one of the men, hit him with the barrel of the gun, and knocked him down into the shrubbery - he got away; I pursued the other three - they jumped over an inner-fence, about four feet high; I pursued and hit one of them with the barrel of the gun - the other two ran to the front-gate; one ran against the bell-wire and broke it, and in getting over the front-gate I hit one with the barrel of the gun - he made his escape; I broke the barrel from the gun - I took up the barrel of the gun, and in striking the prisoner with it, as he was getting over the gate, I broke his arm and knocked him off the gate; he ran under a fir-tree, and exclaimed,"I will give myself up, I think you have broken my arm"- I said, "If you don't stop I will blow your brains out;" another one then got over the gate - a waggoner was coming by; I called him to my assistance, and the prisoner was secured - I found his arm was broken; on searching the premises we found two hats, a silk-handkerchief, and a chisel - the lock of the outer-door of the hall had been picked, and the inner-door had been attempted and the pannel broken.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You have no doubt of the prisoner being the man you struck? A. Not the least - I was agitated; I attempted to fire my gun when I found they would not stop - I saw four men quite distinctly; they only turned one corner in the course of the pursuit, and were not out of my sight; I was as close to them as a man could be - quite close to them; I had overtaken one of them before they got to the corner - I stopped to fire the gun before I turned the corner, and got up to the corner at the same moment as the last man of the four; I could see round the corner.

Q. You saw the prisoner getting over a gate, and on your breaking his arm he said he would give himself up? A. Yes - all the four men were dressed in dark clothes - I saw one of their faces, and I saw the prisoner's face also.

MR. BARRY. Q. Is your mistress' house in the parish of Friern, Barnet? A. Yes - her name is Sarah Ann Mountain; she is a widow.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening before the robbery I went with a friend to Barnet to get a situation; on my return home I was partly intoxicated - I heard a call of Stop! several times; I was getting over the gate when I was struck with a gun, and gave myself up immediately.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18281204-55

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

56. THOMAS BENNETT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Follett , on the 1st of October , and stealing 1 cloak, value 42s; 2 dresses, value 26s.; 3 shawls, value 42s.; 1 scarf, value 10s., and 1 gold pin, value 5s., his property; 4 coats, value 4l.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 2 pairs of trousers, value 25s.; 4 shirts, value 10s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Andrews .

JOHN FOLLETT . I live at No. 16, Great Ormond-street . I was out of town when this happened.

THOMAS ANDREWS. I lodge in Mr. Follett's house - I am related to him. On the 1st of October I went out not later than seven o'clock in the morning - I returned at a quarter to nine in the evening, and in consequence of information, I made search, and missed four coats, two waistcoats, and the other property stated as mine - I had seen the shirts and part of the linen in the morning, when I put them into my drawers, and had worn one of the coats on the Sunday previous; as far as I can remember all the clothes were then safe - they were kept in drawers in my bed-room, which is the back-attic; the drawers were not locked.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you leave any body in the house? A. Yes, all my family, who reside there.

SARAH TERRELL . I am servant to Mr. Follett. On Wednesday, the 1st of October, in the evening, nobody but me was at home; I had occasion to go up stairs about half-past seven o'clock, and in mistress' bed-room I found the bed-side carpets very much disordered and tumbled - I had a candle with me; I then went into the front-attic, and found the window open - it is an old fashioned casement-window; it was taken off the hinges, and put on the parapet - I had been in the room at a qurater-past six o'clock that evening, and fastened that window; I came down stairs, and went out at the door to call for assistance - I saw Lipscomb, the constable, passing the front of the house; I called him, and we examined the house together, but did not miss the property at that time - while we were searching, Medlycott, another officer, knocked at the door with my mistress' wearing-apparel; I went to the back-attic, and found Mr. Andrew's bed very much disordered, and the lock of a writing-desk had been forced - I had been in that room also at a quarter-past six o'clock, and left the bed smooth; it appeared to have been disturbed by the desk being put on it to be forced.

JAMES MEDLYCOTT . I am an officer of Bow-street On the 1st of October, in the evening, I was in Great Ormond-street on duty, with Wells and two other officers; I was going up the street about a quarter before eight o'clock- a man passed me on the same side of the way; the back of his coat being white attracted my attention - I looked over the way, and saw the prisoner carrying a bag; it was dark, but there was light from the lamps - I went after him, and when within four or five yards of him, at the entrance of Queen-square, he threw the bag down and ran away; I pursued - he got over the iron railing into the enclosure of the square; I got over also, and pursued - he ran once or twice up and down the garden; I was close to him, but could not lay hold of him - he got over the rails again, and over some more rails into a gentleman's private-garden, at the north end of the square, and was within a yard of the further railing to get into Guildford-street when I laid hold of him; I had got over; I never lost sight of him from the time the bag was thrown away - the prisoner is the person I seized; I speak most positively to his person - I found the bag in possession of a man named Cox, after I

took the prisoner; I cannot say it was the same - I took the prisoner to a public-house at the end of Ormond-street and searched him - and found a pair of Wellington-boots, one in each coat-pocket; the soles were wet, as if they had been recently worn - on further searching his trousers, I perceived something white fall from some part of his dress on to the ground, and found it was a garnet-pin, stuck on to a piece of paper, with the name of Follett on it; I picked it up immediately, at his feet - it has remained on the paper ever since: I found Cox and another officer, standing with the bag, very near the spot where I saw him throw it away- neither of them are here; it appeared to be the same bag- I had not seen them take it up; we all went to the watch-house together, with the prisoner and the bag - it contained the articles in the indictment. I had no conversation with the prisoner, except when I was locking him up; he asked me to give him some water.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The person you took to the watch-house escaped, did not he? A. He did; I described his person to the solicitor of the parish, and he was re-apprehended on the 30th of October - I described him as having a dark complexion, with dark whiskers, dark eyes, and dark hair; he wore whiskers at that time - he had a dark coat on, but whether blue or black I cannot tell. An advertisement was put into the papers, I suppose from the description I gave, but I had nothing to do with correcting it; I described him as having a black waiscoat and black silk handkerchief - I took particular notice of him at the watch-house, and knew him by his features - I gave the description from my observation of him.

COURT. Q. You took him within a yard or two of the rails, how did you get him out of the garden? A. The gates were opened by the servant; I took him to the public-house, and never let go of him - Wells had hold of him with me; he might have been in the public-house a quarter of an hour - I partly opened his clothes; his coat was not taken off - I found in the morning that he had escaped through the roof of the watch-house; I am quite certain of him; he at that time wore whiskers, and with running I suppose his complexion altered - he was hot with running: I entertain no doubt whatever of him - I gave the description of him four or five days after.

JAMES WELLS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 1st of October, I was on duty in Great Ormond-street, with Medlycott, about a quarter to eight o'clock, and saw the prisoner at the bar carrying a bag, on the opposite side to me; I crossed over to him to look at the bag, and saw another one cross to him - he met him half-way in the street; I came back to Medlycott, and went up to the man again to take hold of the bag - he dropped it at my feet, ran down Queen-square, and got over the rails into the corner; Medlycott pursued him - I took the property and gave it into the care of Cox the conductor, who was with us, and went to assist Medlycott: the man was then in the gentleman's private garden - I got over, and came up soon after Medlycott apprehended him; I handcuffed him - we took hold of him, one on each side and took him to a public-house in Great Ormond-street - I had an opportunity of seeing his face as I went along; he was searched at the public-house- that occupied ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; his hat was taken off - I saw the pin picked up between his feet, but did not see it dropped: I accompanied him to the watch-house, each of us holding him as before, and there we left him; the prisoner certainly is the man - he has had his whiskers taken off since; I had never seen him before -Cox followed us to the watch-house with the bag; he was not half a dozen yards behind - I left him at the corner of the square while I pursued, and found him at the same place when I came back; I had been absent about ten minutes - I knew the bag by the state of it, and the colour, which was a dirty brown; I have every reason to believe it is the same - there are some holes in it, which I noticed at the time; Medlycott took the pin - it was produced at Bow-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. It was dirty? A. Yes, but not with mud, by what I could see - it was not a dark night. I saw an advertisement in the "Hue and Cry," and was with Medlycott when he gave the description - he gave it principally himself; I do not know that I said any thing: I heard him describe him as of a dark complexion - he is not a fair man; he has not got dark hair - I do not know that he was described as having dark hair; he described him as having dark eyes - his eyes are not dark; I have seen many fairer men than him: Hatton was the constable of the night - he was not there when we took him; he came afterwards, but did not see the prisoner, to my knowledge; there was only a woman there - Medlycott locked him up himself; neither Hatton, Cox, nor the woman were examined by the Magistrate, but a man was who assists in locking up - he was there when we called afterwards; he is not here: he was asked if he was the man, and said he did not know him - he had no opportunity of seeing him; what he said was not taken down.

EDWARD HUGGLESTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was at the watch-house in Eagle-street about half-past eleven o'clock that night, and saw the person whom Medlycott had taken, and from the view I had of him I consider the prisoner to be the man; I will not swear positively to him, because I only put the light in his face, and looked at him, but it was a month afterwards that I saw him again; I apprehended him afterwards at a china-shop in James-street, Oxford-street, taking down the shutters - I told him he was my prisoner, for felony; I did not say what - he told me to let him take the shutters in; I said I would not- it was about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; I was passing the door: I had been looking about for him a good while - I seized him by the collar, and he held tight by the shutter; I pulled him away, and we fell into the kennel together - another man came to my assistance, and we took him straight to the watch-house - I took him, considering him the man I had seen in the watch-house, and who had escaped.

Q. What induced you to consider him the man? A. By information I had received; he had black whiskers on in the watch-house - they were shaved off when I took him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You put the light in his face, I suppose, that you might know him again? A. To see if I had seen him before, and I remarked that I had not - I looked at him that I might know him again; I took him as much from my recollection of his person as any thing - I had received information, and when I saw him I considered he looked like the man, or I should not have taken him; he had no whiskers, but there was the mark all down where they had been, and they were

growing again - I have no doubt they had been shaved off just before; I consider that his hair is dark, (it is not light) and that he is of a dark complexion; I did not describe him as having a blue coat - I think there was a blue coat in his house when I searched it; I never told the Magistrate there was no blue coat - we brought no clothes away; Hatton was in the front-room of the watch-house when I went to look at the man - he did not go with me; his assistant was there, and at Bow-street, but was not examined - I do not believe he was asked a question by the Magistrate.

Q. Do you mean to swear no person asked him at the office, if the prisoner was the man who was at the watch-house, and he said he could not tell? A. He might, but I did not hear it; there were about fifty people in the office, and I might not hear it - I did not see Cox there; I saw Wells there, and was there all the time with him.

COURT. Q. You were at the watch-house on the night of the apprehension, about half-past eleven o'clock? A. Yes; Wells and Medlycott were there then - Hatton was in the outer-room; I do not know whether he went into the place where the prisoner was: the assistant opened the door for me - we did not continue there a minute.

WILLIAM WENTWORTH . I am a green-grocer. I was at the corner of Devonshire-street between seven and eight o'clock on this night, and heard an alarm - I ran down the square, towards the cry, and saw a man getting over the rails, and the officer after him; several persons were on the other side of the square - I got over, and assisted in the pursuit; he ran towards the top of the square, and then to the bottom - he was taken at last in Mr. Bainbridge's garden; I got into the garden, and he was taken - I assisted in taking him back; I took hold of his coat - he was taken to the public-house; I continued there all the while he was searched, and am certain the prisoner is the man - I held the candle while the officer searched him; I particularly took the candle to look at his face, to see if I knew him, and am quite certain of him - his face is not in the same state now; his whiskers have been shaved off: I call his hair dark, and his eye-brows dark, and a very full eye - his appearance corresponds with the description of the man I saw in the public-house; he is the man - I never saw him before, nor afterwards, till he was at Bow-street; I knew him there immediately.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you see the advertisement in the Hue and Cry? A. No; I know the officers had given a description of him: I was not asked to describe him for the advertisement - I saw the officers the morning he escaped, but did not talk with them about his description; I have never been consulted about it- his complexion is dark; his hair does not appear so dark as when he had his whiskers on, but he had a hat on - when we began searching him the officer took it off, to examine him, but I did not notice his hair then; I noticed his whiskers more than his hair, and looked at his face: Medlycott called on me, and said he had the man in custody who committed the robbery, and I went to see him -I cannot say when that was; it was on the day of his second examination.

JAMES MEDLYCOTT . I produce the pin,

SARAH TERRELL . I know this pin to be my mistress' - I had not seen it for some time before, but it was stuck into this small piece of paper, which is a green-grocer's bill; it was on this bill the last time I saw it, and had been on it for two or three years.

The property contained in the bag was here produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, and have people to prove I was at home on the night of the robbery.

MARY RAWLINGS . My husband is a hair-dresser, and lives at No. 4, James-street, next door to the prisoner, who keeps a china-shop, and sells earthenware. On the afternoon of the 1st of October my husband was gone out, I saw the prisoner in the act of putting down one of his pans, and I spoke to him, and mentioned to him that my husband was gone to a sparring benefit, as I was very angry at his going, as it was a very busy day in the shop- it was a little after dark when I saw the prisoner; he was taking in his things - I told him where my husband was gone; he did not seem to answer me, but went in, and I did not see him again that night - I cannot say what time it was, but it was after dark; I never missed him from his business after that - I was in the habit of going out in the morning, and saw him in his business.

COURT. Q. At what time does he shut up? A. About ten o'clock; his wife also attends to the business.

DAVID BURTON . I have been in the army, and receive a pension on the first Wednesday in October, which was the 1st. I owed the prisoner 3s. 6d., and gave my wife a sovereign to go and pay him for a dozen plates, on the 1st of October.

MARY BURTON . On the 1st of October I went with my husband to receive his pension, and received a sovereign from him to pay the prisoner for some plates; I went the same night, and saw him in his own place, in James-street, about nine o'clock, and paid him - I found him in the shop.

COURT. Q. How long had you known him? A. Between six and seven months as a neighbour; we live next door - my husband is always paid on the 1st of October.

JAMES HUGENS . I am a coach-plater, and live in Craven-street, Soho. On the 1st of October, I bought some glasses at the prisoner's shop, and here is the bill of them- I bought them of him about a quarter-past eight o'clock in the evening: there is a receipt on the bill.

COURT. Q. How happens it that you recollect it was on the 1st of October? A. Why, I went to see a particular acquaintance, who lives in James-street, and went and bought the glass; I only know it was the 1st of October by that date being on the bill - I bought two cut tumblers; I never bought articles of him before - I received the bill at the time I bought them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-56

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Littledale.

57. EDWIN alias EDWARD HARRIS , alias EDWARD NUTTING , and WILLIAM WOODWARD , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Tolley , on the 25th of October , at Hillingdon, and stealing therein 5 spoons value 30s. his property; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Robert Prior ; and 2 shirts, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas George Stamper .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES TOLLEY. I am a chair-maker , and live on Uxbridge-common ; my wife died a fortnight or three weeks after this robbery; she took in washing for different people. On Friday, the 24th of October, I was at home - my family consisted of nobody but my wife and myself; we went to bed about ten o'clock; I fastened the doors myself - we arose about six o'clock in the morning - and on coming down stairs I found the back-door wide open - a large hole was cut out of it with a circular centre-bit that enabled them to open the door; I missed two baskets of linen, which belonged to Mr. Stamper, Mr. Prior, and others - some of it was our own; I lost two silver table and six silver tea-spoons, two pairs of metal sugar-tongs, and a pair of shoes; the spoons were marked T - I had had them thirty years; I went and informed the constable - he came and examined the house; I saw the spoons on the following Monday, in pawn, at Mrs. Harford's shop at Windsor; I saw some linen before the Magistrate at the King's Arms, where the prisoners were examined - it was part of the linen stolen that night; I saw two shirts belonging to Thomas George Stamper , and a handkerchief of Mr. Robert Prior 's; I had seen the spoons about a week before the robbery in a corner-cupboard; my wife had the care of the shirts; I had not noticed them.

GEORGE RADNOR . I am assistant to Mrs. Harford, pawnbroker, of Windsor. On the 25th of October, before twelve o'clock in the morning, Harris came and pawned two silver table-spoons and six silver tea-spoons, they have the letter T on them; I asked him if it was his own property - he said it was; I asked his name - he said Thomas Taylor, and that he lived at Woodward's, at Langley; Tolley saw the spoons on the Tuesday.

Prisoner HARRIS. Q. Am I the man who pawned the spoons, or did I come to buy a hat that day? A. You came to pawn the spoons.

Prisoner HARRIS. I went to his house that day about half-past five o'clock to buy a hat - he said he had but one in the shop. Witness. He never came to buy a hat to my knowledge; nor did I see him at half-past five to my knowledge.

CHARLES TOLLEY . These spoons are mine, I have not the least doubt of them - I had seen them about a week before the robbery; I rent the house myself; my wife's name was Mary.

Prisoner HARRIS. Q. Did you say before the Magistrate that you had not seen the spoons for a month before? A. I said no such thing.

Q. The Magistrate asked if you could swear to them you said No; but you believed your wife could? A. No; nothing of the kind passed.

WILLIAM REID . I am constable of Hillingdon. I know Tolley's house - it is in Hillingdon parish; the prisoners were brought to me on the Tuesday, in custody from Brentford, to Hillingdon; I took a shirt off each of their backs; I produce them, and Woodward had this handkerchief round his neck.

Prisoner HARRIS. They said their shirts were marked, neither of them are.

Prisoner WOODWARD. They could not swear to the shirts or handkerchief.

WILLIAM REID . The shirts were positively sworn to by Mrs. Tolley.

ROBERT PRIOR . Mrs. Tolley washed for me - she had a week's washing of our's at the time of the robbery; there was a handkerchief of mine marked with my initials, in the middle, with the same coloured silk as the handkerchief; I saw this handkerchief before the Magistrate, and swore to it - I have no doubt about it; it was delivered to Mrs. Tolley to wash on the Tuesday previous - it was marked R.P. - the letters have been picked out, but there is sufficient left to show where they have been; I did not deliver the things to Mrs. Tolly myself.

BENJAMIN SMITH . I was before the Magistrate when Mrs. Tolley was examined - this (deposition (looking at it) is in the Magistrate's hand-writing, and is signed Richard Henry Cox - I saw him sign it, and saw Mrs. Tolley put her mark to it; I am clerk to Mr. Walford, the attorney for the prosecution; her examination was taken in the prisoners' presence, and it was read over to her in their presence - she made her mark to it, and the Magistrate signed it in their presence; she was sworn before she gave her evidence.

The deposition was here read as follows:-

MARY TOLLEY , wife of the above named Charles Tolley , on oath saith, that she put the above named spoons into her cupboard, down stairs; the spoons now produeed are the same; that she takes in linen to wash - that the night before her house was broken open, there was the following linen, as near as she can remember: three neck handkerchiefs, one table-cloth, one table-napkin, two frilled shirts, and one calico night-shirt, belonging to Mr. Stamper; there was a yellow silk handkerchief belonging to Mr. Prior; the two shirts now produced she believes to be the property of Mr. Stamper, and are those which were stolen from her house: the silk handkerchief now produced she believes to be the property of Mr. Prior, and the same that was stolen from her house; two plain shirts, one muslin handkerchief, one lace cap, two night-caps, a petticoat, and an under flannel waistcoat, a child's shift, one large table-cloth, three aprons, two towels, and four pair of stockings, were also stolen.

The mark of X MARY TOLLEY.

Sworn before me this 28th of October, 1828, R. H. Cox.

WILLIAM REED . The sheets and handkerchief which were taken from the prisoners, were shewn to Mrs. Tolley- the house is in Middlesex.

CHARLES TOLLEY . My wife only washed for one Mr. Stamper - he is a clergyman; he Christian names are Thomas George .

HARRIS' Defence. On the Saturday at twelve o'clock, when the pawnbroker says the spoons were pawned, I was at Belfont at dinner - I did not get to his shop till half-past five o'clock in the afternoon, when I went to buy a hat; he said he had but one and that was too large.

WOODWARD'S Defence. I know nothing of the spoons - I went to Windsor next morning, and we both came back together.

HARRIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

WOODWARD - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Reference Number: t18281204-57

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

58. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , at St. John, Clerkenwell, 3 watches, value 13l., the goods of Thomas Emmerton , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS GEORGE EMMERTON . I live with my father who is a wholesale cutler and dealer in watches at No. 10, Red Lion-street, in the parish of St. John, Clerkenwell . -

On the 6th of November, at nine o'clock in the morning, I was coming up the kitchen-stairs, which lead to the passage, and from there to the front-warehouse, and saw the prisoner in the act of turning from one of the glass cases at the side of the warehouse; which is part of the dwelling-house; directly he saw me, he left the warehouse, and ran into the street - I saw in his left hand a bag or handkerchief or something: I ran after him, calling Stop thief! he was running - I followed him along Red Lion-street, across Clerkenwell-green, down Jerusalem-passage into St. John-square, across the square, through a narrow court, called Jerusalem-court, and then he crossed St. John-street, into Great Sutton-street, and there hid himself under a water-butt in the yard belonging to the Portable Gas Company -I had only lost sight of him while he turned the corner for a moment; I am certain the man found under the tub, is the man had I pursued - he was secured and taken to the watch-house by two witnesses - a constable was sent for, and he was searched, but the property was not found on him; he said at the watch-house, that if my father did any thing to him, that he had friends who should visit us again - he said that to me, and he said before all the people in the watch-house, that we should all have our deserts; I left him there, went home, examined the glass case, and missed three silver watches, which I had seen about ten minutes before I saw the prisoner there; I had left nobody in the warehouse when I went down stairs - I was absent about ten minutes: I had shut the door after me, but my mother was in the kitchen; she came up and stopped in the warehouse while I pursued him - she came upon my calling Stop thief! and was in the warehouse when I came back; the prisoner went out at the front-door into the street - that door was fastened when I went down stairs; he must have opened a middle-door, (which was shut) in the passage, with a latch-key, and then gone down the passage - the street-door was not shut, but the middle-door was; he went out at the front warehouse-door, which was double-bolted inside, when I left it, but it could be opened inside - I saw him go out at that door- I did not see him throw any thing away; I afterwards received two watches, and the outside case of a third - a lad, named Tremlett, gave me one watch, and another lad named Jackson, gave me another watch, and the outside case of a third; I had seen these watches in the glass cases that morning I am positive, and the case had the movements in it then.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How old are you? A.Sixteen: my father's name is Thomas - he has no partner; I was down stairs about ten minutes, during that time, there was nobody in the warehouse - my mother was there while I went in pursuit; the warehouse-door was bolted inside - the front street-door was open; there is a middle-door in the passage, which was fast - the person who ran away had a bag or handkerchief; I never said I was positive it was a bag - I did not see it in his hand while I pursued, but I saw it when he started from the glass case.

Q. How far from your warehouse is the court where I understand some watches have been found? A. About as far as from here to the corner of Newgate-street; I lost sight of him only for a moment or two - no bag was found on him; what he had appeared more like a brown canvas bag than any thing - nothing of the sort was found on him, nor in the way he had run; I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. When he said some of his friends should call on your father, did he not represent that he was unjustly detained, and his friends, and their attorney should call? A. No - he said his friends should visit us again, and we should all get our deserts; he did not say he was not guilty when he was first taken - at the watch-house door he said he did not know what it was all about; the tub was in a dark corner of a shed in the yard.

COURT. Q. Did you take him from under the tub? A. He was underneath the tub, which was on a high stool- he said he was was easing himself; his dress was as perfect as it should be - I did not see him go under the tub; he turned into the gas-yard, and we lost sight of him for a moment.

THOMAS EMMERTON . I am the last witness, father. -On the morning in question I was up in my bed-room, putting on my boots, my son cried out there was a thief in the warehouse; I ran down stairs, looked into the glass-case, and three watches were gone, which I had seen there the night before - I had not been in the warehouse that morning; I went out and found the prisoner in custody - the two watches were given to me by persons who picked them up; they were worth 12l. or 13l. in the state they were delivered to me - that is a moderate estimate; my house is in the parish of St. John, Clerkenwell.

CHAHLES DICKMAN JACKSON . On the 6th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was in St. John-square, Clerkenwell, and saw the prisoner run from Jerusalem-passage to Jerusalem-court; there was a cry of Stop thief! I joined in the pursuit, and saw him heave the watches away - he turned to heave them over a wall, but they struck against the wall, and fell back again; he threw them with both hands; I picked up one watch and one case, and gave them to the prosecutor's son, in the same state as I found them - there was a chain, seals, and a guard to the watch; I gave him the same as I picked up, and the same the prisoner tried to heave away - I stood a minute when I picked them up to see if the owner was by- he was not, and I ran on; I lost sight of the prisoner, but was present when he was taken in the gas-yard, under the butt - the prisoner is the man, I am certain; I saw him run across the square, and saw his face then, and he is the man who hove the watches away. I went to the watch-house, but did not go in, till they sent for me - the prisoner was there; he said if I appeared against him, his friends should do something to me - I am certain of that.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How far were you from the person? A. Not above ten yards; I was passing the square - I could not see what he had in his hand when he ran across the square; he sumbled his hands about going down the court, and I saw him throw the watches away - I did not see any canvas bag; I did not lose sight of him above three minutes - I asked a girl which way he was gone when I took the watches up; she is not here: he had one corner to turn in the court after he threw them away; he was angry at the watch-house, and said we should repent of it.

COURT. Q. Did you hear the things fall that he threw away? A. Yes; it made a jingling noise - I instantly ran to pick it up, and another boy picked one watch up I am certain I picked up what he threw away.

HENRY TREMLETT . I was in St. John-square; I was passing through the square, and saw a man running - I saw him heave away some watches; they hit against the wall, and fell on the ground - I took up one of them, and gave it to Mr. Emmerton's son; I went after the man - I was at the end of the yard when he was taken; I did not see him taken: I did not go to the watch-house - I should know the man again; the prisoner is the man - I never saw him before, but he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you in company with the last witness? A. I was; we were walking in the square - I did not see him take them out of any thing, but he had something in his hand, and I think it was a handkerchief.

SAMUEL RODWAY . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Benjamin-street, St. Sepulchre's. On the 6th of November, about nine o'clock, I was in a coffee-house on Clerkenwell-green, at breakfast; I heard a cry of Stop thief! ran out, and saw the prisoner just run past the door - I followed him; he got into Aylesbury-street, into St. John-square and Jerusalem-court; I went up to the end of Albemarle-street, and saw the two boys with the watches, and looking up Sutton-street I saw somebody turn into the gas-yard; I went up the yard, into a shed on the left-hand, looked round, and in a dark corner at the end of the shed, under a water-butt, found the prisoner - I took him out, and asked what he was doing: I am sure he is the man I had seen running past the door; he said he went here to ease himself - there was sufficient room for that, but his dress was in the same state as when I saw him running; I told him it was singular his clothes should be buttoned up, if that were the case - he made no answer; he prosecutor's son went up the yard with me, I believe- if not he was soon after me; I took him to the watch-house - there was no constable there; one came and earched him - I did not hear him say much myself, but understood him to say he wished we might be served out in some way or other in return; we went back to where I found him, but found none of the property - there was a sink or something under the butt.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. No canvas bag was found on him? A. No; his waistcoat was butoned when I took him.

CHARLES ANDREW CARTER . I know the prisoner. - On the morning of the 6th of November, between nine and ten o'clock, I was standing immediately opposite the prosecutor's door, in conversation with a friend; I saw the prisoner coming out of the prosecutor's house, and from his manner I looked at him, and had a full view of his person - seeing the prosecutor's son follow him, I thought he was a workman; I saw something in his hand - he did not come out very quickly at first; Emmerton, jun. called ut Stop him! and Stop thief! he ran away - I followed him across the green, and through Jerusalem-passage, but did not go up the court; I went round, and took him in the gas-yard - I am fully satisfied he is the man; I am certain of him: I helped to take him to the watch-house - he had something in his hand when he came out of the house, but what I cannot say; it looked like an apron or a piece of something.

JOHN CRAIGHEAD . I am headborough of St. John, Clerkenwell. I have two watches and a case, which were given to me by Thomas Emmerton , on the morning of the 6th of November, at Hatton-garden; they are now in the same stute - here is a gold chain and three gold seals to one of them; I searched the prisoner, but nothing was found on him except 3d.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you head-borough of St. James? A. St. John ; they are united parishes, but have different churches.

THOMAS GEORGE EMMERTON re-examined. These are the articles which were in the glass case that morning; I am positive of them - I have worn one of the watches for two years, and the other I had in my hand that morning; here are the movements, which were found about a week after he was apprehended - I do not know who found them; I know the case: the value of the property is about 13l. - they are all my father's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I only went up there to ease myself; I went to Islington that morning to get a waistcoat to make for my cousin: as to my being under the butt, it was a very dirty place, and I had no dirt on my clothes -I was not under the butt, but by the side of it: when the prosecutor came to the watch-house he said he had lost four watches - he came again, and said he had lost three.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his character .

Reference Number: t18281204-58

Before Mr. Justice Littledule.

59. THOMAS HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 7 coats, value 8l.: 6 waistcoats, value 2l.; 5 pairs of trousers, value 4l., and 5 yards of cloth, value 2l. 10s., the goods of William Gofton , in his dwelling house ; and MARY BLOOR was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM GOFTON . I live in Gilbert-street, Grosvenor-square. These goods were stolen from a house of mine in Oxford-street ; I pay the rent and taxes of it, but do not sleep there - my foreman sleeps there, and boards with me in Gilbert-street, and one of my lads belonging to the house in Gilbert-street sleeps there; the foreman sleeping there is considered as part of his wages - he has 2l. a week besides; the shop communicates with the dwelling-house, and is part of it - I carry on the business of a tailor there; George Stringer was in my employ - his father was my foreman, and is so now. On Sunday morning, the 30th of November, I sent for an officer; I charged Stringer with robbing me, and told him it would be better to confess, and if he would tell me the parties who were implicated, I would forgive him - he then gave me information.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You knew nothing of the matter but what he told you? A. No; he is not related to me - he has been about six months with me; I am a tailor and pawnbroker - his father has been about four years in my employ.

Q. A. person transacting business with them might naturally suppose they were respectable people and doing no wrong? A. That they certainly might, as they had been so long with me - the father had the entire management of the tailor's business, as I do not understand it.

GEORGE STRINGER . I was in Mr. Gofton's employ for six months, and left him last Sunday morning; Hall was

in Mr. Gofton's employ, as a journeyman tailor - he worked in Barrett's-court, Oxford-street, opposite the house, and came there once or twice most days; about three months ago I asked him for 30s. to pay a debt in the City - I told him I had received a letter from the person, and it must be paid; he said I might take something and pledge it, and there would be no harm in it, provided I got it out again - I hesitated a little while, and then gave him a suit of clothes belonging to Mr. Gofton, for the the purpose of getting 30s.; he took them, and brought me back 30s. the same evening - I took the coat out of a drawer, a pair of blue trousers and waistcoat out of a wrapper; they were all in the shop - he was present when I took them, and I gave them to him; two days after I told him I thought we had better get the clothes out again, as I was afraid we should be found out- he said, "Oh, never mind - we are quite safe;" no one knew of it but ourselves - nothing was done then; I never mentioned it to him again - we had before that pawned things and got them out again: I would not have let him have these if he had not undertaken to get them out; about three days afterwards I delivered him a pair of blue trousers and two black waistcoats of master's, worth 25s., for the purpose of getting money on them, which he promised, and he brought me 10s. back - he did not say whether he had pawned them or not; he saw me take them: about a week after that I delivered him two fancy waistcoats and a pair of dark drab trousers, to get money on - he brought me back 10s., and was present when I took them.

Q. Did you expect to be able to get all these things out of pledge? A. No - I expected to get out the first, but not the two last; he never told me whether he pledged them or not, but brought me back the money - he never produced any duplicates.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had he been in the service of Mr. Gofton? A. I do not know - I had known him about six months; my application to him was to raise money for myself - he was in the shop when I took the black trousers and two waistcoats; I did not tell him what I wanted the money for - he was to have part of the amount he got for the goods; there was no bargain made that he was to have any thing.

Q. Your master found you out, and on his pressing you to name somebody who was concerned, you named the prisoner? A. Yes - the prisoner never told me I might take money of master's, and charge it to him as paid on account.

EDWARD DYER . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, a pawnbroker, of Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. On the 28th of November, Hall pawned a great coat and a pair of dark drah trousers.

GEORGE STRINGER. These are not the trousers I gave him when he produced the 10s. - he had these the second time; here are some black trousers and two waistcoats produced by another witness - I cannot identify the drab trousers, as I gave him others; they were delivered to him about three days after - I think I gave him more than one pair of black trousers; nobody in the shop missed them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-59

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

60. MARY ANN WALTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 umbrella, value 10s. , the goods of Eliza Eaton , her mistress.

The umbrella being the property of Sarah Eaton (see 4th Day,) the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18281204-60

61. MARY ANN WALTERS was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , 1 watch, value 10s.; 5 rings, value 7s.; 1 silver fruit-knife, value 7s. 6d.; 1 pen-knife, value 3s. 6d.; 1 necklace, value 5s.; 2 scentbottles, value 25s.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 20s.; 2 brooches, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 1l., and 1 scarf, value 10s. , the goods of Elizabeth Eaton , her mistress.

ELIZABETH EATON . My mother keeps a public-house in Fenchurch-street . The prisoner was her servant , not mine; these articles were mine, and kept in drawers, which were entirely appropriated to my use - I missed all these things on the 28th of August, and made my loss known to every body in the house; my drawers were always kept locked, and were in the second-floor front-room - I found the property at the pawnbroker's, on the 30th of October, when I went to inquire about the umbrella; I am sure they are all mine - I never authorised any body to pawn them; I was out of town when they were pawned - the prisoner was taken up about the umbrella.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You were not in town at the time? A. Not when they were pledged; I missed them on the 28th of August, when I came home - the prisoner lived three months with us; my mother had another female servant - there were four lodgers besides the pot-boy who slept in the house - another of our servants was charged with stealing things; Walters came and told my mother that Ann Crawley had taken some dripping - my mother came and mentioned it to me - and after Crawley was gone away, the prisoner said she had lost several things, they were found in Crawley's possession as the prisoner swore to them; I believe a hankerchief, stockings, and aprons were found - we had a servant named Roach four or five months ago - I went out of town on the 2d of August, and put the jewellery away on the 1st - I returned on the 23d, but did not miss them till the 28th; Roach was in the service when I left town; the prisoner told me, after I came from the pawnbroker's, that she certainly had pawned the umbrella - I never urged her to acknowledge the robbery, nor said I would bring Ann Crawley forward to hang her, or that I would not hurt a hair of her head.

ERENEZA HODGES . I am servant to George Barker , a pawnbroker, of Aldgate High-street. I have a watch and three rings pawned on the 23d of August - a shawl and scarf on the 18th - and on the same day a necklace, two scent-boxes, a silver fork, a pen-knife, two brooches two rings, and two pairs of ear-rings, all pawned together: they were all pawned in the name of Ann Roach: I did not take in any of them, and cannot tell who pawned them; but on the 30th the prisoner pawned the umbrella; the duplicates are in the hand-writing of our young man; I was only bound over about the umbrella.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I apprehended the prisoner and found no duplicates on her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-61

62. JOHN HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on

the 12th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Donald Sinclair , from his person .

DONALD SINCLAIR . I am an attorney , and live in Devonshire-street, Trinity-square. On the 4th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going to my chambers in the Temple, and recollect my handkerchief being safe at the bottom of Fleet-street - I was stopped about the middle of Fleet-street by Roe, who asked if my pocket had been picked; I felt, and my handkerchief was gone; he had hold of the prisoner, and produced it; I had not seen him near me.

JOHN ROE . I am a constable of the City. On the 4th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner with a person following the prosecutor in Fleet-street; I saw him attempting his pocket, and get the handkerchief out a little way just before I came to the Bolt-in-Tun; I followed him about fifty yards further, when he got it quite out; I went up and seized the prisoner, and took the handkerchief from him - the other went away while I was struggling to get the handkerchief from the prisoner; I took him directly after, but he was discharged, as I had not seen him do any thing - he was in company with the prisoner, and touched him over the elbows.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I humbly throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281204-62

63. ELIJAH STUBBINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 4 spoons, value 18s., and 1 scent-box, value 8s. , the goods of Caroline Huffam , his mistress.

Mrs. CAROLINE HUFFAM. I am a widow , and live in Bucklersbury . The prisoner was about six months in my service as foot-boy - I had a good character with him; about the 20th of November I missed four silver tea-spoons, which were in his care - and a few days after I missed the scent-box from my work-box; I asked him about the spoons - he said he knew nothing about them; I have not found them; I sent for an officer, who found the box in his possession; he slept at his mother's.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a constable. On Saturday, the 26th of November, I went to the prisoner's mother's, and staid till he came in; I then charged him with stealing the four spoons and scent-box - he denied it; I searched him, and in his left-hand trousers pocket found the silver scent-box; I told him if he did not tell me where the spoons were I would lock him up; he said he knew nothing of them.(Scent-box produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The constable said if I did not confess he would send me out of the country for life; the child was playing with the scent-box, he threw it out of doors, and I picked it up.

MRS. HUFFAM. I have a little boy.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-63

64. HENRY NEWTON was indicted for stealing on the 30th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 6d. the goods of Zachariah Foster , the younger, from his person .

ZACHARIAH FOSTER, JUN. I am the son of Zachariah Foster, boot-maker, of Newgate-street. On the 30th of November, about a quarter to eleven o'clock at night, I was seeing a lady home from my father's, I had a cotton handkerchief in my inside coat-pocket - my coat was buttoned; I did not see the prisoner near me, or miss it till I got to Holborn-bridge , when Toole asked if I had lost any thing; I found the prisoner had been secured, and my handkerchief was produced to me.

THOMAS TOOLE . I am shopman to Mr. Gibson, of Goswell-street. I was coming down Holborn-hill, and saw Mr. Foster with a lady - I was walking quite fast, and saw the prisoner, with two others behind him, walking behind Mr. Foster - I saw the prisoner's hand in Mr. Foster's pocket; the tail of his coat was lifted entirely up in his hand; the other two were walking quite quick up to him; I saw him take the handkerchief out; I said to Day, who was with me,"Lay hold of him, and I will go and tell the gentleman;" as Day laid hold of him, the other two ran away across the road - they were lads; the prisoner finding himself taken, threw the handkerchief down immediately; I saw him throw it down, and shewed it to Mr. Foster, who claimed it, when I brought him up to the prisoner - a woman picked it up, and said it belonged to the gentleman - she gave it to me; I took the prisoner to the watch-house with it.

PEDDER DAY . I am a chair-maker, and live in French-court, Goswell-street. I was with Toole, who pointed the prisoner out to me - I had observed him before; I laid hold of him, and he resisted to get from me; I saw him drop the handkerchief out of his hand.

JOSEPH YOUNG , The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - he was quite intoxicated; I sent him to the Compter.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing up Holborn-hill - some young man went by and threw the handkerchief down; this young man laid hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281204-64

65. EDWARD NIGHTINGALE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Zachariah Foster , the elder, on the 27th of October , at Christchurch, and stealing 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , his property.

ZACHARIAH FOSTER , JUN. I am the son of Zachariah Foster, who rents the house No. 100, Newgate-street, in the parish of Christchurch , and is a boot and shoe-maker . I was in the shop on the 27th of October, about six o'clock in the evening - the shop window had been broken before, and three sheets of paper pasted over the hole; they must be broken before any thing could be got at; I observed nothing till Tett came and told me something was gone; I looked at the window, and the paper was broken quite large enough to admit a person's hand; there were shoes within reach, and I missed a pair which I had seen there shortly before; I went out and the prisoner was pointed out to me about eight yards off - I pursued, and never lost sight of him before I took him,

I took the shoes from under his coat - they are worth 5s.; he said nothing.

CHARLES TETT . I am a paper-stainer, and live in Dean-street, Soho. I was in Newgate-street, and observed the prisoner put his hand through the paper and take out a pair of shoes; I immediately went in and informed Mr. Foster, pointed the prisoner out to him, and never lost sight of him till he was taken, and brought back with the shoes in his possession; I saw them taken from him - it was near six o'clock, and dark.

HENRY COLLEY . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner and the shoes.

ZACHARIAH FOSTER, JUN. These are the shoes which were taken from the window: I am quite certain the paper was quite entire shortly before - I found it torn away, and picked it up afterwards; I have no share in the business.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Reference Number: t18281204-65

66. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of James Walter Brewer .

JAMES WALTER BREWER. I am a shoemaker , and live in Lombard-street . On the 14th of November, about nine o'clock in the evening. I was cutting at my board, and heard a noise - I looked up, and saw the prisoner in the act of leaving the door, which was open; I ran round the counter, followed him, and caught him in Gracechurch-street, without losing sight of him, and found these shoes in his hand - they had been about two feet within the door the watchman took him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking in the street, and these shoes were thrown over to me; I picked them up - a person unknown to me gave them to me.

MR. BREWER. There was nobody near him.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18281204-66

67. GEORGE WILLIAMS, alias MERRY , was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Stock Turner Green , from his person .

MR. JOHN STOCK TURNER GREEN. I am a student of the Middle Temple, and live in Bedford-row. On the 1st of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I was on Snow-hill , and had just used my handkerchief, which was in my outside coat pocket; I was refering to a memorandum which I had in my pocket, when a little boy told me my handkerchief was stolen - he pointed to the prisoner, who was running; I ran after him, and secured him down an alley leading from Snow-hill, without losing sight of him - I have not found my handkerchief; I had seen nobody near him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not lose sight of me in turning the corner? A. No; I asked him to stop, and told him I would catch him if he ran to the devil.

WILLIAM HENRY CHAPMAN . I am sixteen years old, and live in Ropemaker-street, Finsbury - my father is a turncock belonging to the New River company; I was an errand-boy, and left my place on Saturday last. On the 1st of December I was in a shop on Snow-hill, and saw Mr. Green within two yards of me; I saw the prisoner and two others behind him - the prisoner was taking out the handkerchief; they were all three in company: he took the handkerchief out of Mr. Green's pocket, and gave it to one of the other two, in a fustian jacket; I went and told Mr. Green - I ran with him, and never lost sight of the prisoner; I saw him, taken - the other two ran down the alley before him; I am quite sure of his person.

Prisoner. Q. You was in a shop, and there was a crowd and a cart? A.There was nobody to prevent my seeing them; a cart stood by the curb - Mr. Green was reading something; there was nobody but these three near him: the prisoner said at Guildhall that he would thrust a knife through me.

THOMAS PIKE . I am a constable. The prosecutor brought the prisoner to my house; he was very rough, and swore at the boy and all of us - he said openly before the Magistrate, that he would thrust a knife into the boy.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman named Wingfield said at Guildhall, that my name was Murray, which it is, as I had given my mother's maiden name; I certainly made use of the words in consequence of that, but did not say I would stick a knife into him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281204-67

68. LEVI CURTIS and JOHN HALL were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Joseph Richard Potts , from his person .

JOSEPH RICHARD POTTS. I live in - street, Bloomsbury, and am a Venetian blind-maker . On the 10th of November, about half-past twelve o'clock, just as the Lord Mayor's procession was passing the end of Coopers'-row, Minories , I lost my handkerchief from my inside coat-pocket, which was not buttoned - I did not feel it taken; I was looking at the procession, and had not observed the prisoners: Reardon came up, and asked if I had lost my handkerchief, and on feeling I missed it - he had laid hold of Hall, and had it in his hand; Pine had hold of the other prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL REARDON . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was in Coopers'-row with Pine, and saw the two prisoners together; I watched, and saw them attempt several people's pockets - just as the Lord Mayor's carriage passed I saw Curtis rush forward, and lay hold of the skirts of Mr. Potts' coat; he pulled a handkerchief from the inside pocket, and handed it to Hall, who put it into his breeches - I laid hold of him, took it from him, and told Mr. Potts, who claimed it; Pine secured Curtis - I had been watching them for about ten minutes.

JOSEPH PINE . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was with Reardon, and saw Curtis very busy at different pockets; at last I saw him take something from Mr. Potts' pocket, and give it to Hall, whom Reardon secured, and took it from him - I took Curtis.

CURTIS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

HALL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18281204-68

69. LEVI CURTIS and JOHN HALL were again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 watch, value 10l.; 1 chain, value 21s.; 1 seal, value 21s., and 1 key value 5s., the goods of Thomas Todd , from his person

THOMAS TODD . I live in Fenchurch-street. On the 10th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was passing through a crowd at the corner of Queen-street , to get to my office; I did not perceive my watch taken, but am certain it was safe shortly before - it was gold, and worth 10l.; I missed it as soon as I cleared myself of the crowd: Reardon and Pine brought it to my office on the 14th of November.

DANIEL REARDON . I took the prisoners to the watch-house, and left them there; I had not seen them near Queen-street - I did not look into the hole to see if any body else was there, but afterwards thought I had not searched them properly, and returned in ten or fifteen minutes; I found them both there - there was nobody else there: immediately I opened the lock-up room, Hall jumped down from an iron railing, and sat down by the side of Curtis - I perceived that Hall had a different handkerchief on to that he had before; I said, "Pine, he has got a different handkerchief on, look up at the railing for his handkerchief;" I took the prisoners out of the place, and Pine produced a handkerchief, with a gold watch, seal, and chain, which Mr. Todd claimed on the 11th, not the 14th - I did not show it to the prisoners till they got to the Compter; they then said it did not belong to them.

Prisoner CURTIS. Q.When we were put into the place, was there not a young man there? A. Not to my knowledge; there was nobody there when I returned.

Prisoner HALL. I did not jump from the window - we were both standing up instead of Curtis sitting down. Witness. I asked him what he wanted up there.

JOSEPH PINE . I returned to the watch-house with Reardon in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; as we opened the door we saw Hall had a different handkerchief on - I found the very handkerchief he had on his neck before on the floor, and up at the place he dropped from, I found this watch, on the iron grating.

DANIEL REARDON. Pine showed me where he found the watch - it was where Hall dropped from.

CURTIS' Defence. There was a young man in the lock-up place; he said it was for a row, and soon after two officers came and took him out, searched him, and gave him his liberty - he wore a sailor's jacket.

CURTIS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

HALL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281204-69

70. TIMOTHY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 1 great coat, value 1s. , the goods of James Axtell .

JAMES AXTELL. I am carter to Thomas Lock. On the 4th of December my great coat hung on the shaft of the cart in Mr. Ward's yard, in Jewin-crescent ; I did not see it taken: Mr. Ward told me it was gone - I went after the prisoner, who was pointed out, and took him with it on his arm, without losing sight of him.

WILLIAM WARD . Axtell was loading the cart on my premises, with dung; I saw the prisoner stooping down, picking up something, and soon after that I met him with the coat on his arm, and asked whose it was - he said it belonged to himself.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-70

NEW COURT, Second Day.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

71. CAROLINE McCANN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 rope mat, value 5s. , the goods of John Norris .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 53.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-71

72. JOHN BASSETT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 5 books, value 5s. , the goods of Frederick Barker .

MARIA BARKER . I am the wife of Frederick Barker , a bookseller , of Hammersmith . At half-past twelve o'clock on the 25th of November, I saw the prisoner run out of our shop as I was coming from the parlour - he was quite a stranger; I ran out, gave an alarm, and my husband, (who was in the street) ran and caught him - he came up just after I lost sight of the prisoner; I am quite sure he is the person - I did not see any thing in his possession; I missed five books, which I had seen in the morning - these are them; they are Paley's Works, and had been on a shelf by the side of the window.

FREDERICK BARKER. I am the husband of the last witness - these books are mine. I was coming home, my wife came running and gave me information; I and another went across a field, and saw the prisoner going out at a gate - two men were there who pointed to know if they should stop him; we said Yes, and they pursued - a gentleman came up towards him, and stopped him; I did not lose sight of him - I came up directly; I did not find the books, but a person brought them into the shop while I had the prisoner there: I can swear to the books by the private-mark in them.

Prisoner. Q.Did you see me when I crossed the field? A. Yes; I was coming down the road - I saw you at the end of the field; you ran then.

GEORGE STEPHEN BOND . I was at Hammersmith on the 25th of November, and saw Mrs. Barker calling Stop thief! I ran round to the corner of the building, and met Mr. Barker; I told him, we ran to the end of the field, and saw the prisoner going out of the field - that was the first I saw of him; it was near a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's - he was not running then, but as soon as we cried Stop thief! he ran; I found these books by the side of a kiln, in the direction he went - I did not see him go by the kiln, but he must have gone by there to have got to where I saw him.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I went and took the books at the shop; the prisoner was then in the watch-house.

THOMAS JENKINS . I am a watchman. I saw a row round the shop; a person called me over - I was going with the prisoner to the watch-house, and he tried to get from me; he begged of Mr. Barker not to lock him up - he said Mr. Barker had a family of children, and there was no telling what they might come to; I saw another person, and when the prisoner was resisting, and I had him on the ground, he called to the other "Now George, or Joe, now is your time to assist me," but some persons being round, I suppose he was afraid - I had hold of the prisoner at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Hammersmith for work, and saw two more boys running across the field; I ran with them, and at the corner of North End-road, they took me into custody - I know nothing of the books.

MRS. BARKER re-examined. Q.When did you miss the books? A.When my husband came in, I asked if any thing was missing; he looked round and did not miss any thing - I looked round and said "Here is something missing here;" he then said what it was - that was before the books were brought in; the prisoner was brought in in five or ten minutes.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-72

73. JAMES BAYLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 dozen of plates, value 3s. , the goods of Martha Barker , widow .

MARTHA BARKER . I am a widow, and keep a china-shop in Lower-terrace, Islington . On the 17th of November, I was standing in my shop, and saw a man at my window; I looked very hard at him, as I thought he meant to rob me - I went and removed every thing from the door; I then shut too my folding-doors, and lighted the gas; I went into my parlour and sat down - I then saw my shop-door very gently open; I rose up expecting it was a customer, went forward and saw a man stooping down, taking some plates; he ran away - I went to the door, and cried Stop thief! and then I saw the prisoner. (who was the man I first saw at the window) standing at Dr. Sharpe's, four doors from my house - Dr. Sharpe's boy came and asked what was the matter; I said I had been robbed again - he went and told his master, who sent for an officer. I described the man I had seen at my window - he came and brought these eight plates the next day, which, from the pattern, I believe to be mine; I have no mark on them - I did not see any thing in the prisoner's hand in the street; I first saw him between four and five o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This young man has a brother has he not? A. Yes, and he is like him; I do not know whether any thing was found upon the prisoner - I had not seen him before, to the best of my knowledge.

COURT. Q. Had you seen his brother before? A. No; I saw him at the office, and their hair is alike - I do not think it possible I could mistake the one for the other.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am an officer. The prosecutrix gave me information of the plates being stolen, and described a young man with a light flannel jacket, and a red cap; knowing Baylis, I went to Islington workhouse, and got information where he lodged; I went to Paradise-place, and saw Martha Baylis , the prisoner's brother's wife - she went to the cupboard, and gave me out these eight plates; the prisoner's brother is shorter than him; I do not think a person could mistake the one for the other - their hair is alike: I did not know the brother, but I did the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q.Might not a person mistake one for the other? A. It might be so; his brother's wife gave me these plates.

THOMAS COPE . I and Taylor took the prisoner; I had known him about the place.

CHARLOTTE BAYLIS . I am the prisoner's brother's wife. The prisoner brought these plates home on the Monday evening, about six o'clock, and the next morning the officers came; I gave them to them.

Cross-examined. Q.Was there no suspicion of your husband taking them? A. No: they were in our lodging- no one was at home but me when he brought them; my husband is not here - the prisoner asked me to let him leave them till the next day.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them at Aldgate.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-73

74. JOHN STEPHENS was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-74

75. JOSEPH DEARMAN was indicted for stealing, a variety of carpenters' tools, value 21s., the goods of Charles Chamberlain ; and another quantity of tools, value 21s. , the goods of Thomas Newell .

CHRISTOPHER CHAMBERLAIN . I am a wheelwright , and live at Enfield; the prisoner lived there, but did not work for me; Thomas Newell worked with me. Newell's shop was broken open on the night of the 23d of April, when we went in the morning we found it broken open, and missed the tools; I lost an axe, two planes, and two spoke-shaves.

THOMAS NEWELL. I work for my father. I went to work that morning, and missed eight planes and a saw; here are six of them - the prisoner lived in the place.

WILLIAM THOMAS CLARKSON . I am servant to Mr. Capel, a pawnbroker. On the 29th of April the prisoner brought seven planes to pawn for 5s.; he told me he brought them from a poor man named Wright, who was out of work - I live at Barnet, five or six miles from Enfield.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you ever seen the man before? A.Never; our shop is not much frequented.

COURT. Q.Have you any doubt that he is the man? A. No; I saw him again in about a month.

JOHN WILSON . I heard that the things were pawned at Barnet; I went and got them - I took the prisoner, but found no duplicates on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Who told you they were stolen? A. Mr. Hicks told me some tools were gone to Barnet; Hicks would have been before the Magistrate, but the prisoner broke out of the cage, and we never saw him again till about a fortnight ago.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search him? A. Yes, but found nothing on him; I took him first on the 22d of May.

Prisoner's Defence I know nothing about the tools -I never saw them.

CHRISTOPHER CHAMBERLAIN re-examined. Q. What is the value of these planes? A. This one is worth about half-a-crown; I gave 3s. 9d. for this small one two years ago.

JURY to JOHN WILSON . Q. Did the prisoner abscond after the robbery? A. He remained till the 22d of May; he went before the Magistrate on the Monday - on the

Tuesday he broke out of the cage, and was not taken till about a fortnight ago, in Hertfordshire: he had been in no employ for some time.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-75

76. PATRICK BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 40 lbs. weight of nails, value 8s.; 103 screws, value 1s. 4d., and 3 hinges, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Cubitt , and another; and 1 apron, value 2d. , the goods of Joseph Child .

JOSEPH CHILD. I am a plasterer , in the employ of Thomas and Lewis Cubitt . I was working on the 17th of September, at a house in Francis-street, Gower-street ; I left this apron there at half-past four o'clock on the Saturday night, and missed it on the Monday morning when I went to work; there were some tools, nails, and screws of Mr. Cubitt's there - some were in the kitchen, some in the other parts of the house, and some in the next house, of Mr. Cubitt's; about one quarter of these nails, I think, were in the kitchen.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.What do you know your apron by? A. By its general appearance, the strings being worn out, and several holes in it; it is a different shape to those generally worn - it is made to cover the breast; there is nothing particular in those nails that I know of - the house was not left open; the backdoor of the kitchen was partly blocked up, but a person might climb over.

JEFFERY DONOHUE . I saw the prisoner on Sunday, the 16th of November, coming across the fields, with one of these bundles under his arm, about half-past three o'clock; I spoke to the watchman, and he said, "Let him be:" we saw him go and cover it over, and then go away; we then went, and found these three papers of nails, screws, and hinges; we saw the prisoner come there the next morning, about half-past nine o'clock - I had seen him before, and am sure he is the boy.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you employed on the premises? A. Yes; and assist the watchman on a Sunday; I only saw him with one bundle - he was coming from the place from which the nails were taken - he put them in the end of the field.

MICHAEL DONOHUE . I was employed as a watchman on Sunday afternoon - this witness came and told me there was a boy with a bundle - it rained very fast; he went and found these three parcels, which weigh about 40lbs.

JOHN HIERON . I am employed on these premises for Messrs. Cubitts'. On Saturday the 15th I left the house fastened up about half-past five o'clock; I left nails, screws, and hinges of this description there; on Monday morning these were missing; I cannot say that these are them, but they are of the same description - I see no difference; about one-third of them were in my possession - they are dirtier than they were.

COURT. Q.Are the hinges of the same pattern? A. Yes; and they are cast-iron.

JEFFERY DONOHUE re-examined. Q.Did you say any thing to the prisoner when you saw him? A. No; I was some distance from him; the next day, about half-past nine o'clock, he came to the same place with a large bag, I suppose to take the property away; we did not stop him on Sunday, because we did not know that he had any thing of consequence.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming across the fields saw the bundle, and took hold of it; I know nothing about it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-76

77. ANN CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 lb. weight of cheese, value 7d.; 1lb. weight of bacon, value 7d.; 1lb. weight of soap, value 7d.; 2 pinafores, value 6d., and 2 pockets, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas Fox .

ANN FOX . I am the wife of Thomas Fox , a cheesemonger , of Camden-row, Bethnal-green. The prisoner was my servant , and had gone out on the 26th of October for a holiday; I suspected her, and sent for an officer; when she came back, I asked if she knew of any thing that was missing - she said No; I said, "We will go up stairs and see if all is right;" the officer, who was in the other room, then came out; the prisoner went up first - the officer said, "Unlock the box;" she hesitated; the officer said, "Have you any thing in the box that is not your own; she said, "Only some cheese and bacon;" she then opened it, and, tied up in a pinafore, which I have every reason to believe is mine. I found this bacon, cheese, and soap - the officer said she must be searched; she then opened her gown, and in her bosom we found this other pinafore; they are blue pinafores with a white speck - and under her feet we found this pair of pockets, which I had worn on the Sunday; I am sure it was not there before she came in, for I had been sitting there all the evening - she was very much intoxicated, and was taken to the watch-house; I found her in tea and sugar.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. What time did she go out? A. About eleven o'clock in the morning; when she returned she went up stairs to pull her bonnet off, and then came down again; I found the pockets in front of the chair where I had been sitting - there is nothing particular in this cheese or bacon - there might be more like it; I allowed her about 2lbs. of soap for washing, and if she wanted more she had it.

JURY. Q. Did you ever give her the bacon for the use of the house? A.Whatever she wanted for the house she always had; there is no mark on the pinafores; my children made them; I had a dozen of them.

MR. CHURCHILL. Q.Had not the prisoner the care of the dirty linen? A. She washed her own things with mine - they might have been mixed in the drying; when we found these things, she said she meant to give them to a poor creature.

SAMUEL MAYNE POWELL . I am an officer. I was sent for by the prosecutrix, and found what she has stated.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-77

78. WILLIAM CRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 fustian coat, value 20s. , the goods of Robert Marmaduke Webb .

ROBERT MARMADUKE WEBB . I am ostler at the Nag's Head public-house, at Enfield . On the 24th of Septem

ber, between eight and nine o'clock, I lost a fustian coat from between the pantry-door - it was safe at seven o'clock in the evening; I never saw the prisoner till he was apprehended, which was about six weeks afterwards - this is the coat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was the 24th of September? A. Yes.

AARON HART . The prisoner brought the coat to me, and offered it for sale, about the 25th of September, in the morning; I live at Tottenham - I offered him 6s. for it, which he would not take; I then went out and when I came back Mrs. Hart had paid him for it.

GEORGE HUMMERSTONE . I bought this coat of Hart in October last, for 11s.

JOHN WILSON . I took up the prisoner about the 21st of November - Enfield fair began on the 23d of September; I told him that I came to take him for a coat that was stolen from the Nag's Head, on Enfield fair day, and sold to Hart; he said he did sell it, but a man had promised him a pot of beer for selling it, and he only gave him 3d., and that he had told Hart so.

AARON HART re-examined. Q. Did he tell you he sold it for another man? A. No; I knew him before, and he continued living at Enfield.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a labourer, and live at Edmonton - the prisoner has lodged with me about ten months and gets work where he can. I remember the first day of Enfield fair - it was on a Tuesday: I saw the prisoner on the Wednesday evening, about seven o'clock, as I was coming home - he came in between nine and ten o'clock, and slept at my house that night; Enfield is about three miles from there - at seven o'clock he had a donkey and a a little cart going from Upper Edmonton, towards Lower Edmonton.

COURT. Q. Did you see him between seven and nine o'clock? A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-78

79. WILLIAM DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 2 pewter pots, value 3s., the goods of James Clayton ; 1 pewter pot, value 10d., the goods of William Norris ; 2 pewter pots, value 3s., the goods of John Henry Gurney ; and 1 pewter pot, value 10d. , the goods of Charles Henry Fisher .

JOHN HENRY GURNEY . I keep a coffee-house at Somer's-town. These two pots are mine - I had not missed them.

CHARLES HENRY FISHER . I keep the Jubilee public-house , in Gee-street. This pot is mine.

WILLIAM NORRIS . I keep the Castle public-house , in Somer's-town. This pot is mine.

WILLIAM SIDNEY SMITH . Another officer was called to take the prisoner on the 24th of November; I went and searched his lodging, and found this garden-pot stand broken to pieces, and it appears as if metal had been melted in it; I found these two pieces of pewter, which appear to have been melted, in it - I then took the prisoner to the office, and on the road he said he had melted the pewter, and had picked up the pots in the street that morning; these two pieces of pewter were on some other premises, twenty yards from his lodging.

JAMES CLAYTON . I am a publican . These two pots are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-79

80. ELIZA DAVIS and JOHANNA McCARTHY were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 gown-skirt, value 3s. , the goods of William White .

MARY WHITE . I am the wife of William White - we live in Rosemary-lane . On the 5th of November my husband was at Liverpool; the two prisoners came to my shop to buy a pair of shoes - McCarthy went to fit the shoes on, and Davis stood behind her; I suspected she was doing something wrong, and took hold of her - she had the gown-skirt; she called me a hundred fools, was very abusive, and used all sorts of ill language - I sent for the officer who took them both; they are sisters.

Prisoner McCARTHY. Q.When you took the gown, you hit her over the face? A. No, I did not.

MARY NOLAN . I am servant to Mrs. White. I was in the shop when the prisoners came in to buy a pair of shoes - I went to take the child into the room, and heard Mrs. White scream; I went into the shop, and saw Mrs. White pulling this gown from under Davis' clothes.

GEORGE BARLOW . I live in the adjoining shop: I was at work - I went to the street-door, and saw several persons - I looked into the shop and saw Mrs. White pulling the gown from the prisoner's feet; I got the patrol.

ALEXANDER ANDERSON . I am a patrol. I took the two prisoners that evening - I did not search them, because the property had been taken away.

DAVIS' Defence. She shewed us some shoes, and asked 3s. 6d. for them: McCarthy bid her half a crown, but she would not take it - she was then going out, and she called her back to try them on; I took up that gown from the counter and asked if it was to sell - she snatched it out of my hand, and struck me across the face, then took up a stool and struck me; I asked what was the reason of it - she gave charge of me, and said she had lost two blue coats, and if she could, she would hang us; she was very much intoxicated, and very violent.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-80

81. JANE GOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 sovereign and 1 half-crown , the monies of George Simmons .

GEORGE SIMMONS. On the 8th of November, about nine or half-past nine o'clock, I was passing through Gordon-square, leading out of Tavistock-square , and met the prisoner - she accosted me, but I only staid with her about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, as I particularly wished to get away; I did not retire with her at all- I kept on the road; I went on about twenty yards, and she still kept stopping me - I had a sovereign, a halfcrown, and some other money in my left-hand trousers pocket; I had a shilling and a sixpence, besides what I gave to her - because she asked me, and for the purpose of doing her good, as I supposed; I took out the whole of the money, and selected the shilling and sixpence from it; it was then all right: she saw the money in my hand, and left me in two or three minutes - I afterwards missed the sovereign and the half-crown; I saw her again about eleven o'clock that night, in Tavistock-square - I had

been in search of her till then; the watchman took her -I saw her searched in the watch-house, and the sovereign was taken from her shoe; as we went down the street she dropped the half-crown, which the watchman took up - she had only a single halfpenny besides.

CHARLES MORGAN . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner, and as we were going along I heard a half-crown fall - I took it up; she said it was hers - she did not say who gave it to her; at the watch-house I asked what money she had got - she said very little; she gave me her pockets off, and there was one halfpenny in them - Tarry found the sovereign in her shoe.

WILLIAM TARRY . I am the watch-house-keeper. I took the sovereign from her left shoe - she said we could not blame her, she thought it was a shilling; she acknowledged afterwards that she had a sixpence in her mouth.

Prisoner's Defence. It was nearly one o'clock when he met me - he stopped half an hour with me; he put down his basket and said, "I have been waiting for you to give you a drop of gin" - I said a trifle of money would be more acceptable; he said, "Walk and talk, and I'll give you a little;" he gave me the sovereign for a shilling, and a sixpence - the half-crown I had from a gentleman in Tottenham-court-road; in about an hour he and the watchman met me - he said, "I have been waiting for you some time;" I said, "For what?" he said, "You have got a sovereign of mine" - I was then taken to the watch-house; in going along the half-crown fell - I said,"That's mine;" the prosecutor then said, "I think you have got more money" - he did not give it to me out of charity; he wanted * * * * - he is married, and has a family.

COURT to GEORGE SIMMONS ? Q.Are you sure it was 1s. 6d. you gave her? A. Yes - I had received 30s. for my week's wages, and laid out 6s. for my children; I had then 1l. 4s. left, and gave her 1s. 6d. - I met no one else till I missed my money; I was as sober as I am now.

JURY. Q. Was the place dark? A. Not particularly dark - it was moonlight; I could easily discover a sovereign from a shilling at any time if I were blindfold.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-81

82. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , 1 tea-caddy, value 2s; 6 pictures, value 1s.; 2 plates, value 6d.; 1 bed-wrench, value 1s.; 8 screws, value 8d.; 1 hammer, value 6d.; 2 gimblets, value 6d.; 2 books, value 2s.; 1 looking-glass, value 6d.; 1 shirt, value 9s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3d., and 1 candlestick, value 6d. , the goods of George Too .

CATHERINE TOO . I am the wife of George Too, a labourer - we live at Kingsland . On the 17th of December, 1827, the prisoner lodged in our house, and got up at a quarter before six o'clock in the morning to go to work; when he was gone these things were all missing - he did not return; I believe these six pictures and this candlestick are mine - I have seen no other part of the property; it was all safe the night before.

SAMUEL WILLIAM NORTON . I am a marine-store dealer, and live in Grub-street. I bought these six pictures and this candlestick of the prisoner, at the beginning of this year; he stated he was about removing, and had several domestic things to sell, which people in poor neighbourhoods often do - I made no hesitation about buying them; I bought a tea-caddy of him, which I sold again - I found this duplicate in it, which I left on my mantel-piece to give him if he called.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. I received information of the robbery on the 4th of February last - I went to Norton's house, and there I got these pictures, candlestick, and duplicate.

WILLIAM BENNETT WEBSTER . I took the prisoner on the 4th of November, as he was going along the road; the prosecutor's mother pointed him out to me - he said he knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-82

83. MARY HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 petticoat, value 3s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 scarf, value 10s. , the goods of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Bath-street, Old-street. The prisoner had been in my service about three months, and had left on the 18th of November; we missed these articles as soon as she was gone - the next day I found her in Silk-street, Grub-street, with a family she had taken up with; we found all the things in the next room, except the scarf - she sued for mercy; I said I could not, having pardoned her in the morning for taking silver from my pocket.

JAMES HOLEHOUSE . I am a pawnbroker. I had a scarf pawned with me, but not by the prisoner; I gave this duplicate for it.

HENRY HARRINGTON . I am an officer. I produce the property - this duplicate was found in her box.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of her youth and former good character .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-83

84. JOHN HARRUP was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 3 1/2 lbs. of bacon, value 2s. 4d. , the goods of George Atkins Mills .

FREDERICK PERKINS . I am in the service of George Atkins Mills, of Rosemary-row, Chelsea ; on the 11th of November, the prisoner passed his shop, and took the bacon; I went after him, and he dropped it at his feet -I brought him back with it; he was drunk.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you made any inquiry about the poor man? A. Yes, and I believe he was in great distress - he has six or seven children, who are gone to the workhouse.

Prisoner. I was in great distress, and had not a bit of bread in the house.

GUILTY. Aged 44.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-84

85. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 shovel, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Cope .

THOMAS MITCHELL . I am in the employ of Mr. Henry Cope, and was using this shovel on his premises - he is a farmer , and lives at Mile-end ; when I had done work on

the 21st of November I put it away - at three o'clock the next morning I missed it; this is it.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am an officer. On the 21st of November I was returning from the watch-house, about a quarter before seven o'clock; I met the prisoner with this shovel, and a number of other articles - I asked him his name, and he said Wright; I knew it was not, and took him to the watch-house - I have known him many years. GUILTY . Aged 70.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-85

86. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 12 pairs of stockings, value 12s. , the goods of William Platt .

WILLIAM PLATT. I live in Oxford-street . On the 14th of November I was busily engaged, and was informed that a bundle of stockings had been taken from the door; the person told me that if I would come out he would point out the boy - I came out, and saw the prisoner and another boy - they divided, and ran off; I pursued, and took the prisoner - the stockings were picked up close to where he had passed: there are twelve pairs of them - they are mine, and had been at my door.

ANGELIOUS BETRAUN . I am an officer, and took this boy - he threw down the stockings - I went and took him. GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-86

87. CHARLES LONG and AMELIA LONG were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 2 sheets, value 10s.; 2 blankets, value 8s., and 2 pillows, value 4s. , the goods of Mary Griffiths , widow .

JOHN ELLICOCK . I am a headborough. I was sent for, on the 8th of November, to apprehend Amelia Long , at Mrs. Griffiths, in New Gravel-lane , where she had a furnished apartment - the man was not there, but he came in; Amelia gave me seven duplicates; and said they were in a starving condition - Charles said he sent his wife to pawn the things.

JOHN RALPH LAWSON . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a sheet, pawned with me on the 15th of October, by a woman, in the name of Amelia Long - I gave her this duplicate.

JOSEPH MICKLEFIELD . I am a pawnbroker. This sheet was pawned with me by a woman, in the name of Long - I gave her this duplicate.

ROBERT STUPART . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket, pawned with me on the 25th of October, by a woman, in the name of Long, and a quilt, on the 5th of November, in the same name - I do not know who it was; I gave her these two duplicates.

THOMAS GEORGE SIZER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket and two pillows, pawned at separate times by a woman, in the name of Mary Long.

MARY GRIFFITHS . I am a widow. I had let all these articles as a part of the furniture of the prisoners' room - they had been about a month with me.

The prisoners put in a written Defence, stating their intention to redeem the property, and pleading distress.

CHARLES LONG - GUILTY. Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

AMELIA LONG - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-87

88. ELLEN MERCHANT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 4 sovereigns, and 14s. , the property of Garrett Comerford .

GARRETT COMERFORD. I am a sailor . On the 6th of November I met with the prisoner, and went with her to Mrs. Wright's, North-alley, Strand : we went to bed about a quarter-past twelve o'clock, and at three in the morning I missed her - I then felt for my jacket, in the pocket of which I had four sovereigns and 14s. when I went to bed; my money and shoes were gone; there was no one in the room: my shoes were new - I had bought them in the morning, when I had been paid off from the ship Challenger; I had been drinking with some of my shipmates, but I had my senses about me when I went to bed - I did not get up, but lay till the morning; I then a went down, and inquired for the prisoner - I saw her afterwards, but only 15s. 8d. was found on her; she had bought some things with the money.

Prisoner. When I met you in the Strand you were talking to two women, and was so tipsy you could scarcely stand - you asked me and the others to have something to drink; we went and had a glass each, and then we went to that house: the woman who keeps it was forced to lift you up stairs, and you gave me 4s. - I said I would not stay with you for that. Witness. No; I gave 5s. to the person who keeps the house - she took 3s. for the room, sent for half a pint of rum, and gave me 1s. back - that shilling the prisoner did not take; she left her own articles in the room.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner on the 6th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, on the complaint of the prosecutor; I found her in a room in the Almonry at Westminster - I found these articles of female apparel in the room; I found 15s. 8d. in money on her, but did not find the man's shoes.

MARGARET WRIGHT . I keep the house. The prisoner and prosecutor came there, and paid me 3s. for the room - the next morning he came down, and asked for the mistress; a person called Mrs. Wright - he said, "I think it's all wrong;" he stated that he had lost his money and shoes - I looked for them, but could not find them; I heard a little slam of the door about one o'clock, but thought it might be some dogs.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not have the man's money; I bought these things out of some I received from a gentleman - when I left the house it was not eleven o'clock; this woman keeps a brothel, and keeps women to rob gentlemen.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-88

89. ANN MALONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 17 yards of stuff, value 14s. , the goods of George Wagner and William Chapman .

THOMAS UPTON . I am in the employ of George Wagner and William Chapman , of Greek-street, Soho . On the 28th of November the prisoner came for some trifling article; I had some suspicion of her - when she was gone, I followed, and found this stuff under her shawl - it had been on the counter.

THOMAS WILSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce this stuff.

Prisoner's Defence. If I did it, it was out of distress, but I did not know what I did till I got to the watch-house - I have five children to maintain; this is my first crime, and I throw myself on your Honour.

GUILTY. Aged 46.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-89

90. JOHN OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 1 cake of soap, value 2s. , the goods of Elizabeth Thomason , widow .

ELIZABETH THOMASON . I am a widow, and live in New Montague-street - I keep a little shop . On the 13th of November the prisoner was met at my door with a cake of soap; it had been in my window for about a fortnight.

EDWARD TAYLOR . I live in the prosecutrix's house; I had been out for about five minutes - I met the prisoner just by the door, with the soap in his apron; I said, "What have you got?" he said Nothing - I said, "I must look;" he then dropped the soap from his apron - I have inquired and find his family are respectable.

THOMAS EAGLES . I produce the soap; the prisoner lives in Holywell-lane, which is infested with a great many boys - I never saw him with them.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-90

97. JANE PROBIN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , 1 watch, value 18s. , the goods of James Aussinder .

JANE AUSSINDER . I am the wife of James Aussinder, and live in Phillips-street, Kingsland-road ; the prisoner lodged in the same house for about three weeks. On the 16th of August I saw the watch safe, and missed it that day; it had been under my pillow - I had been confined to my bed, and the prisoner was nursing me: I gave her her food for what she did - I never authorised her to take it.

EDMUND JULIUS SUTTON . I am a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned on the 16th of August, but I cannot swear to the person.

DANIEL MANSFIELD . I was in the employ of Mr. Sutton, and took in this watch of the prisoner, on the 16th of August: I gave her this duplicate.

WILLIAM ORGER . I took the prisoner into custody on the 4th of November.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the watch on the Saturday morning, told me to have it valued at Mr. Miller's, and get as much as I could on it; I pawned it, for I was in great distress, and did not return.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-91

91. JOHN POWERS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 1 tea-spoon, value 3s. , the goods of Alexander Fowler .

HENRY KEMP . I am a groom to Mr. Alexander Fowler, of Park-place, Paddington . On the 9th of November Joseph Stone came and asked me about a tea-spoon; I then looked, and missed one - I do not know when I had seen it before; I had not counted them: I received this spoon, which has my master's crest on it, from a person in the road, who I was told was the prisoner's father.

JOSEPH STONE . On the 8th of November the prisoner came into a public-house in the Edgware-road, where I live; I asked him how he got on with his job - he said very well, he had nailed a feeder; I did not understand then what he meant, but in the course of the evening I saw a spoon in his hand - the bowl was up his sleeve, and the other part in his hand; I saw the crest of a bird on it - he said, "I think I shall make 3s. of this:" he went out with a person, returned in about half an hour, and said he had only made 18d. - it was late that night, but next morning I told the witness.

WILLIAM PADWICK . On the 8th of November the prisoner went with me to help me cover a drain at Mr. Fowler's; he had to go through the kitchen to go in and out.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am a patrol. I heard of this robbery, and on the morning of the 9th I went and took the prisoner, in bed; he said he knew nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-92

98. THOMAS RANGER and JOHN BRETT were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Matthew Heath Moss .

MATTHEW HEATH MOSS . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Golden-lane . On the 27th of October this handkerchief was taken from inside my shop, about two o'clock; I did not know of its being taken till the officer brought it back - I had seen it safe about twelve o'clock.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am an officer. I saw the two prisoners, with another lad, within two doors of the prosecutor's, soon after two o'clock; I saw one go to the shop-window, and then Ranger went in and came out again - I told Buckle, who came by; I then saw Ranger go into the shop again, take something, and run out with it, up Harts-born-court - Brett was close by him, and he ran up Cowheel-alley; I pursued him, and met Ranger near the top, Buckle was pursuing him - I saw Ranger throw something into a passage - Buckle went and found this handkerchief.

JAMES BUCKLE . I was told by Fordham to watch these lads; I saw Ranger go into the shop, look at some articles, then snatch down the handkerchief, and come out - I followed him, and cried Stop thief! we met Fordham at the top; he took Ranger - I went into the passage, and got this handkerchief; we then went and took Brett in Old-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RANGER - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

BRETT - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-93

92. JOHN STEELE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , 1 saddle, value 7s., and 1 bridle, value 3s. , the goods of George Trent .

JOHN BURRELL . I am a servant to Mr. George Trent; this saddle and bridle were in his sheep-fold, in Hyde-park , on the 7th of November; the horse was brought into the park between twelve and one o'clock in the day - I was looking after one particular sheep, and saw the prisoner take the saddle and bridle, and go away with it; Collis stopped him with it on his arm, when he had walked about two hundred yards.

WILLIAM COLLIS . I saw Burrell running, and pointing to the prisoner in the park - I went and stopped him; I asked where he had taken that saddle and bridle from -

he said he had picked them up from the ground; he wished us to liberate him, and say nothing about it.

JOHN LACEY . I am an officer, and received charge of the prisoner; I produce the saddle and bridle, which I received from the witness - the prisoner said he was in great distress, and, to the best of my belief, he was; I found nothing on him.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-94

93. ELIZABETH SHEROOD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 13 pieces of ribbon, value 18s. , the goods of William Rotherham and John Hill Grinsell .

JOHN HOARE . I am shopman to William Rotherham and John Hill Grinsell, linen-drapers and haberdashers , of Nos. 39, 40, and 41, Shoreditch . On the 25th of October I saw the prisoner in the shop, and saw her take one piece of red ribbon, and put it into a basket; she took it from a box of ribbons which she was looking at - I gave information to a person who was walking up and down the shop; he took her into the back parlour, and searched her - the basket was opened, but only one piece was taken out: before the officer came these thirteen pieces of ribbon were found, and six of them I can swear to by the shop-mark - the others I cannot; she had bought some article.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Did you search her? A. No; I think some money was found in the basket, the ribbons are worth about 18s.

HENRY STEVENTON . I am in the prosecutor's employ. I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and ask for some ribbons; I shewed her some - she did not like any in the first drawer; I shewed her a second: I saw her take a roll of red ribbon, and keep it in her hand some time - she then asked for some more ribbons; while I was getting them I saw her put the ribbon into her basket.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I was sent for, and took the prisoner; I asked her how she came by these other seven pieces of ribbon - she said she took them all from the shop, and begged for mercy.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18281204-95

94. JAMES WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 2 saws, value 8s. , the goods of Robert Dower .

ROBERT DOWER. I am a carpenter ; I was working in a house in River-street, Clerkenwell , on the 12th of November, and left between twelve and one o'clock to go to dinner - when I returned I missed two saws; this is one of the saws: I know nothing of the prisoner.

THOMAS CORDWELL . I am a pawnbroker, of Exmouth-street. This saw was pawned with me, by the prisoner, about one o'clock on the 12th of November; my house is about a quarter of an hour's walk from River-street.

Prisoner. Q. You said you only believed I was the man? A. No, I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Weeks , and Publicly Whipped near River-street .

Reference Number: t18281204-96

95. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on he 22d of November , 8lbs. weight of cheese, value 4s. , the goods of Andrew William Angus .

ANDREW WILLIAM ANGUS. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Charlton-street, Somer's-town . On the 22d of November I lost two pieces of cheese; I did not see them taken, but I was told they were taken by a sweep - they were on the stall-board, and the window was up.

SARAH HARRIS . I saw the prisoner take the cheese from the stall-board in front of the window - he put it under his arm, and walked gently down the street: I sent my sister to tell Mr. Angus - I am sure he is the person; I had not known him before: I was putting up our shutters at the time.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am an officer. The prosecutor brought the prisoner to me, with the cheese - he said he bought it at 3d. per lb., at a shop in Tottenham-court-road, and that it came to 2s. 3d.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never near the house - I was in bed at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-97

96. ELIZABETH WETHERELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 1 shawl, value 2s. , the goods of Matilda Brown .

MATILDA BROWN . I am single . The prisoner came to my mother's on the 2d of November, and said she wanted a cup of tea - she had her breakfast the next morning; I went to my mistress's returned in two hours, and found the prisoner asleep in my bed - she got up and went away. On the Monday morning I missed my shawl, and asked my mother, who could not tell me any thing about it - I met the prisoner on the 5th of November with an old handkerchief of my mother's in her hand; I went and asked her for it, and she gave it me; I went home, and told my father that I thought she must have my shawl - we went and took her; we asked her what she had done with it - she said she had sold it for 9d.

RICHARD CUFF . Brown, the watchman, asked me if I knew Lofty Bet - I said Yes. I know her very well, and we went and took the prisoner; I got this shawl from Mrs. Hine, at Chelsea - the prisoner told me she had sold it there.

MARY HINE . I keep a shop. The prisoner sold me this shawl for 9d. about the 4th of November.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-98

97. MARY WOOD was indicted for bigamy .

JOHN COX . I am the parish clerk of St. James, Garlickhithe, in the ward of Vintry. I produce the Register of Marriages in that parish; (reads) - "24th of March, 1818, John Wood , bachelor, and Mary Hook , spinster, were married by banns by me H. C. O. Donohue in the presence of Thomas Cook and Esther Cook ;" I was present at the marriage; the prisoner was the woman who was married - I saw her husband at Worship-street at the last examination.

JOHN LANGHAM . I am a porter . I was married to the prisoner on the 15th of July last by banns, at St. Dunstan's, Stepney.

Prisoner. He knew every thing concerning it - I had lived with him four or five months, and was in the family-

way; I told him I was married; he said if I did not have him he would kill me; he said he would be a father to my child, and he would have me - and he went to my father to know what name I was to be married in; he dined there, and had beans and bacon for dinner. Witness. No; I never dined there in my life.

WILLIAM EAGLES . I live in Nelson-street, and was present at the prisoner's marriage with Langham; I angham is now living with my sister as his wife.

JANE EAGLES . I have heard the prisoner say before Langham, that she was married before their marriage - I thought it was a romance of her's to say she was married; I do not know any thing of Wood; I saw him at Worship-street: I suppose he is fifty years of age.

Prisoner's Defence. I married Langham; for the last four months he has lived with that woman - he has used me ill; I threw myself into the canal, and, unfortunately, a bargeman took me out; Langham knew every thing about this; he said, "Go away, you can get your living at service;" I said, "If I go away I will leave my country;" I met him in Bishopsgate-street; and asked him for a shilling - and said, "What am I to do?" Wood has been living with a woman for nine years.

GUILTY. Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of her husband's ill-usage .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-99

98. ROBERT MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 coat, value 1l; 1 purse, value 2d.; 13 sovereigns, and 25s., the property of John Hume , from his person .

JOHN HUME . I am a master-mariner . I lost my coat, thirteen sovereigns, and 25s., on the 28th of November; I was coming along Wapping , and the prisoner came and asked alms of me - I took him into the White Swan public-house and gave him some neat brandy, and then we had some brandy and water - I agreed to take him on board my ship if he suited me; I gave him my coat to take care of, and when I came out I missed him and the coat; when I got on board the ship, I missed this money from my trousers pocket - I have never seen my coat since; I was neither drunk nor sober - I gave his description at the Thames Police-office, and they brought the prisoner on board, and asked if he was the man - I said he was.

JAMES HARRINGTON . I keep the White Swan public-house - the prisoner and prosecutor came there and remained about two hours; I asked the prisoner if the person he was in company with was his Captain - he said Yes; when they went out I saw the prisoner had the Captain's coat on his arm; they went out together to go on board, as I understood - the Captain was rather drunk.

JOHN ADAMS . I am a Police constable. I heard the Captain's complaint - I had the prisoner in custody at the time, and I thought he was like the person; I took him to the White Swan, the lady said she could swear to him; I then took him on board, and the Captain swore to him; the prisoner came in very tipsy on the Saturday - he had this purse, which the Captain swears to, and six sovereigns; he was committed till he was sober; I told him he was charged with robbing the prosecutor - he said he did not know him.

JOHN HUME . This is my purse; I went from the White Swan to my ship, but missed the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been paid off from the Carnarvon frigate on the Thursday - I was in the Coach and Horses public-house all Friday very tipsy, where the officer took me.

JOHN ADAMS . It is all false about his coming home - he has been about the neighbourhood these three months.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-100

99. THOMAS WILLIAM SHEPHERD was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN SUMMERLINE . I am a butcher , and live in Fitzroy-court. The prisoner was in my employ for eight or nine months - he used to take out meat, and had a book in which I put down the weight; he received the money, and gave it to me once a week; Samuel Thompson takes my fat - he is a tallow-chandler; he owed me, on the 8th of November. 1l. 2s. 8d.; I sent the prisoner for it that day, but he did not come back - on the 13th he surrendered.

SAMUEL THOMPSON . I paid the prisoner 1l. 2s. 8d. on the 8th of November; I could not swear whether it was silver, or a sovereign and silver - I gave him money to that amount; he did not give me any receipt. but when I pay him we cross it out of our own book; I have known him seventeen years, and never knew any thing against him - I believe he lived with Mr. Summerline's brother once.

WILLIAM BRACE . I was a constable of the night - the prisoner came and surrendered himself up; he said he had been in the country, and had converted the 1l. 2s. 8d. of his master's money to his own use - he had pawned part of the things he had on at Brentford; I advised him to consult his master, but he said he should decline that, he wished the law to take its course.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-101

100. JOSEPH HANNAH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 1 coat, value 16s. , the goods of Henry Unwin .

HENRY UNWIN . The prisoner lodged and slept with me for five weeks; I believe at that time he had nothing to do - I do not know what he is. On the 20th of November I missed a coat, which had been in a closet by the side of the bed; the prisoner had slept there that night; I got up five minutes before six o'clock - my coat was then safe; the prisoner did not get up till half-past six-I did not see him again till the 27th, in St. Giles' watch-house; when I came home I missed my coat - the watchman has it.

PATRICK KALLAHAM . I took the prisoner last Thursday week, in Queen-street, from information which I received - he had this coat on; I asked him where he got it - he did not tell me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work, and was forced to sell my own coat off my back to support my family; I took this coat to go after a place, but not to steal it; I went to a place at St. John's coffee-house, and

could not see the gentleman - I was going again on the Thursday, when the watchman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-102

101. CHRISTIAN GRASS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 6 ozs. weight of tobacco, value 1s. 4d., and 4ozs. weight of cigars, value 7s. , the goods of Jacob Nathaniel Barlin and David Barlin .

ELIZABETH BARLIN . I am a widow; my sons are Jacob Nathaniel Barlin , and David Barlin - they are tobacco-manufacturers , and live in Whitecross-street; the prisoner was in their employ as a porter : last Friday he came out of the warehouse - I was behind the counter and desired him to show a person some tobacco; he turned his back towards me, and I saw some tobacco in his pocket - I went to him, and said, "Christian, how can you rob your masters?" he said he did not know how it came there - he said it was the first time.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer. I went and took the prisoner, then went to his lodgings, and found these six dozens of cigars there; he denied the cigars, but not the tobacco - he said he bought the cigars, but did not say where.

Prisoner. The cigars do not belong to them; the tobacco I do not deny.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-103

102. ELIZABETH DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 spoon, value 6s., 2 sheets, value 8s.; 1 remnant of flannel, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 piece of linen, value 1s. 6d. the goods of William Smith .

GEORGE SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. I have a gown, a spoon, two sheets, a flannel waistcoat, a pair of stockings, and a piece of linen, pawned with me by the prisoner at different times, from the 16th of September to the 8th of November; I shewed them all to Mr. Smith, who claimed them.

WILLIAM SMITH . The prisoner was in my service to nurse my wife, and to do domestic work; she was in my regular service from the 4th or 5th of September, to the 14th of November - I had the greatest confidence in her; I have looked at these articles, and, to the best of my belief, they are mine - I can swear to this spoon, and these sheets.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you present when she was taken up? A. Yes, Sir; Mrs. Smith is very ill, and has been in a bad state of health for years; she has kept her bed from the 4th of September - the prisoner did say Mrs. Smith sent her to pawn them, and that she had given Mrs. Smith the duplicates, but my wife denied it; the prisoner did not deny pawning them.

COURT. Q. Was the prisoner ever taken to your house? A. No; the articles were pawned in three different names.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Smith knew of my pawning the things, to get various little things which Mr. Smith did not allow her, grapes, pastry, and liquor; if I had had millions of money, I might have laid it out for her; I laid out all my wages. and when I had no more, I thought it no harm to take various things to get them, till we could redeem them.

MR. SMITH. I have every thing that is necessary in my house as a medical man, and many of these things were taken when my wife was not able to turn in her bed.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-104

Fourth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

103. JOHN MURRY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 4 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the monies of James Allen .

HANNAH ALLEN . I live with my uncle, James Allen , at the King's Arms public-house, at Blackwall . On Wednesday, the 29th of October; I saw the prisoner there; I had seen him on the Sunday before; he came about half-past three o'clock that day, and took up a telescope; I heard the money-drawer open, and challenged the prisoner with it; I opened the drawer, and missed four shillings -I am quite sure the prisoner took it; there had been four shillings in the till, and three or four sixpences.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.How many persons were in the tap-room? A. My uncle and a young man were sitting in a little recess, playing at cribbage; the prisoner took up a telescope - I had my back to the till; the prisoner was by my side, looking through the telescope; it is a house of pretty much business - it was daylight; I am not the only person who has access to the till; sometimes my uncle goes to it, and sometimes Mr. Biggs, who was in the house them - all money taken from customers is thrown in the usual way, into this till; the till is opened every time money is put in; it never happened to me, in the hurry of business, to leave that till open; I never saw the prisoner till the Sunday before - he was in the bar; he appeared a very respectable man; after I took the money from him, and my uncle had sent for an officer, he said it was his own money - he had a glass of gin before dinner, and paid my uncle for it; when there is about one pound of silver in the till, I take it out; I had taken out change for a sovereign, and left only some sixpences in; I then took 4s. of a gentleman, and put that in - the prisoner was not given in charge then; my uncle could not find an officer, and he turned him out, and told him to go about his business; he was not struck and ill-used, neither in the house nor out of the house, to my knowledge; he returned in the evening, of his own accord, with two officers - I did not hear him desire my uncle, if he had any charge, to give him into custody; my uncle went up stairs with them - I was in the bar.

COURT. Q. How long before had you been at the till? A. Ten or twelve minutes; I heard the till open, and took the money from the prisoner's hand.

JAMES ALLEN . I keep the house; the prisoner came into my bar, took up the telescope, and went to the window, near the till; I was sitting in a recess, in conversation with a young man; I saw my niece rise hastily from her seat, and challenge the prisoner with taking money out of the till - I rose up, and saw my niece take four 4s. 6d. from his hand; I called out, "Send for an officer!" but an officer could not be found - I kept the prisoner some time, and then told him to go about his business.

Cross-examined. Q. What were you doing? A. I was having a game at cribbage with a person in the recess; my niece sat with her back to the prisoner - she

could not see him as she sat; she was sitting partly with her back to the till: after my niece took the money from his hand, he said it was his own; he had paid for a glass of gin and water about one o'clock - he gave me a shilling, and I gave him a sixpence; I did not notice whether he had any more silver in his hand; this took place about three o'clock; he returned with two Police officers in the evening, and said, if I had any charge, to give him into custody - that was not said in the presence of my niece; they went up stairs with me; I did not ill-use the man, and call out to a mob outside that he was a thief - two of the persons who ill-used him have been punished for it; I made my complaint against the prisoner on the 21st of November; I went to the office to answer a charge he made against me - he summoned me up for 4s. 6d.

COURT. Q.When did you take him before the magistrate? A. On the 21st of November; I knew the whole of this transaction from my niece; I did not make an accusation against him till I came before a magistrate, because I was aware of the expense and trouble of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-105

104. GEORGE FLAWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , 3 fowls, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Thurgood .

JOSEPH THURGOOD . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Goodge-street . I lost three fowls from my window-board last Saturday - they were brought back in about three minutes with the prisoner.

THOMAS SWINDELL . I live in Upper Rathbone-place. I was going out last Saturday, and saw the prisoner and another boy pass the prosecutor's window - they passed twice, and as Mr. Thurgood was going into the shop, the prisoner held out his apron, and the other boy whipped the fowls into his apron; I crossed the road - the prisoner dropped the fowls, and I took them up.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-106

105. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 1 bird-cage, value 2s. , the goods of John Griffen .

JOHN GRIFFEN . I live in the New Market, Soho . On the 1st of December, I lost this cage from inside the doorpost - I saw it again in about a quarter of an hour; the prisoner was brought back to me.

CHARLES BIGGS . I am a carpenter. The prisoner came into the market, and wanted to sell a butter-flat, about half-past three o'clock - we refused it, and he went to other persons - he then took the bird-cage from a hook inside the passage, and put it into the butter-flat; I went and took him - he wanted to deliver up the flat and the cage, and wanted to go, but I would not let him.

GEORGE OWEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner. Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the bird-cage.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-107

106. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 4 books, value 13s. , the goods of Edward Roper ,

EDWARD ROPER . I keep a bookseller's shop in South-row, St. Pancras .

GEORGE BOWER . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 25th of November, I was in Charlton-street, about four o'clock in the afternoon - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw several persons pursuing the prisoner; I ran, and took charge of him - I searched him, and found a duplicate of some books which had been pawned the same day; I found no books on him, but in taking him back, a person, who is not here, found some books, which I produce; when I took the prisoner, he said "I have not your books" - I could not find the owner of the book to which this duplicate alludes.

GEORGE FOSTER . I assisted in taking the prisoner; he told me it was against his inclination to go thieving, but he must either do that or starve; and that he took the books entirely for want.

MR. ROPER. I saw the books picked up; I was in my shop - I heard a gentleman call and say "A man has taken your books;" I pursned the prisoner - he said "I have not your books;" I had seen them about half an hour before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-108

107. JOHN EDWARD KING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 2 live tame pigeons, price 3s. , the property of Elizabeth Everett .

ELIZABETH EVERETT . I am a widow , and live in Kingsland-road . On the 26th of October, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was behind the counter, and the pigeons were under the window, close by me - it was on Sunday; a person was having some oysters, and two girls came into the shop; the prisoner then came in, pulled up the lath of the pen, and took two pigeons out of six.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer, and live opposite to the prosecutrix. I went over, and heard she had lost the pigeons - I took the girls who were in the shop, and from some information, I went to a house in Bethnal-green, where I took the prisoner.

JOHN WILLIAM WINTLE . I was on duty on the Sunday night, and when the girls were brought to the watch-house, they said rather than he locked up they would tell who did it - I went with Smith, and took the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-109

108. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 15 handkerchiefs, value 40s , the goods of James Creed Eddels .

WILLIAM ROE . I live shopman with Mr. James Creed Eddels , hosier , of Coventry-street. On the 4th of November, three young men came into the shop one after the other - the prisoner was the last of them; they took no notice of each other - the first one wanted to look at some shoe-ribbon, the second at some silk handkerchiefs, and the prisoner asked to look at some riding-belts - while I was serving the second person, I saw the prisoner take some handkerchiefs, and put them into his hat; I kept him while I served the second, and then shewed him the belts; he selected one, left 1s. on it, and said he lived in Sydney's-alley; I let him go out, then pursued, and brought him back - I found fifteen handkerchiefs in his hat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Why did not you seize him directly you saw him take them? A. Because I had no one in the shop; there was a lad in the parlour who had served the shoe-ribbon, but he was in the parlour while the prisoner was being served - my master

is not here; I cannot tell whether it was one of the other men's hats the prisoner took, but he was the only one who pulled his hat off.

EDWARD BOULTON . I was coming down Princes-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - I saw the prisoner running, and the man took him - I saw the handkerchiefs thrown from the hat.

THOMAS PLUME . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the property.

WILLIAM ROE . These are my master's property - it is called a piece of handkerchiefs; they are divided by these bits of white - it might do for anything else.

Prisoner. He did not see me throw down the handkerchiefs - another person threw them down in the crowd.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-110

109. THOMAS COLLARD and ROBERT HAYDON were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , 1 coal-scuttle, value 4s. , the goods of George Vincent .

MARY ANN FRANCIS . I am servant to Mr. George Vincent , an attorney , of Bedford-street, Bedford-square. On the morning of the 10th of November, when I opened the drawing-room windows, I saw Collard in the area, handling the coal-scuttle to two lads who were waiting outside - I called Stop thief! the other two ran away, but Collard was taken before he quite got over the rails; Haydon was one who ran away, and was taken soon after; I can swear he is one - he was close to Collard, just outside the railing -Haydon walked, and the other, who took the scuttle, ran, but he was liberated.

WILLIAM CAMPBELL . I am an officer. About ten minutes past seven o'clock, on the 10th of November, I met a young man coming down Tottenham-court-road, who told me that Mr. Vincent had been robbed of a copper coal-scuttle, and he suspected a person had it who went through the square; I went is pursuit of him, but did not find him - in returning I met the servant with Collard, who I took to the watch-house - he then took me to a house, and in searching a room I found these keys; I looked further, and found the scuttle in the cupboard - Haydon was in the room, and I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner COLLARD. Haydon had nothing to do with it - it was another young man, who jumped out of the window, that took the scuttle.

COLLARD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

HAYDON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-111

110. HANNAH CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 shawl, value 10s. , the goods of John Williams .

JEMIMA WILLIAMS. I am the wife of John Williams - we live in Mount-row, Islington . On the 18th of November I lost my shawl from a chair in the kitchen - the prisoner was a carrier to my brother, where I live.

HENRY CHURCHILL . I am an assistant to a pawnbroker, at Islington. I have a shawl, pawned by the prisoner on the 18th of November.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know her before? A. No; we have not a great deal of business - it was pawned in the evening, when the lamps were lighted; I do not recollect that there was any other customer there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days

Reference Number: t18281204-112

111. SARAH ASHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , 1 drinking-glass, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Hood .

ELIZABETH FLENLEY . Mr. William Hood is a distiller , and lives in Circus-street , near the Yorkshire Stingo public-house - I was taking care of a house for him: I had served the prisoner with a pennyworth of gin, about eight o'clock in the evening, of the 17th of November - she emptied her glass, and set it down; there were three tumblers which I had washed, and placed on the counter- about half an hour after she was gone I missed one of them; about nine o'clock the watchman came and gave me information - I went with him to the watch-house, and saw the prisoner with the tumbler; I cannot say that she stole it, but I swear I had the tumbler there - it has my brother's name on it - he kept the house.

JOHN FALIN . I am a labourer. I was standing in a shop about nine o'clock that night, when the prisoner came and offered the glass for 9d. - a man offered her 6d., which she agreed to take; he went up stairs for it - I looked at the glass, and saw the name of Burrell on it; I told her I suspected it was stolen, and gave her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES DUNN . I am the watchman. I took the prisoner, and the tumbler.

Prisoner's Defence. She knew very well that I had no tumbler when I went out: I was going to the dispensary, and met a woman who keeps a potato-shop - she asked me to go to this shop and sell the glass for her, as she owed the man for some coals.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-113

112. WILLIAM LEDGERWOOD & WILLIAM HICKS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 tub, value 1s., and 105 lbs. weight of butter, value 3l. , the goods of John White .

JOHN WHITE . I am a cheesemonger , and live at Little Fulham. This tub of butter is mine - I had bought a quantity of goods the day before, of Leedham and Walker, in the Borough; I had ten casks of butter, marked L.W., which was cut in the wood of the cask; I received them on the evening of the 12th of November - I lost one that evening; it was not cut in half when I lost it - I believe this to be it; the mark on it corresponds with the invoice- I know nothing of the prisoners.

JOHN POCOCK . I am in the service of Mr. White. I received ten tubs of butter between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - they were put on the curb-stone opposite the door; we were making room for them, and in about half an hour one of them was gone - I know nothing of the prisoners.

THOMAS ELLINGHAM . I am carman to Ledham and Walker. I delivered ten tubs of butter at Mr. White's a the 10th of November, just before eight o'clock in the

evening - this is one of them; I know nothing of the prisoners - I never saw them till now.

ALLEN GIBBS . I am a waiter at the Hope and Anchor public-house, Waterloo-street, Hammersmith. I went out with my beer on the evening of the 12th of November, and saw Ledgerwood about one hundred and fifty yards from Mr. White's, with a tub on his shoulder - I had known him before as a rush basket-maker; he passed my master's door, and was going the same way with me - I had my lantern, and walked on alongside of him about twelve or sixteen yards; there was a little mud and siush in the road and he went right through it; I said, "Halloo there, you will get into it presently!" he said, "Don't say nothing" -I still kept on by the side of him to the bottom of the lane, but as I was going to turn to the left I saw a young man -I put down my beer, and went to him; Ledgerwood went on - I then heard the tub fall; I thought he had thrown it down and gone away - I went to see, and he was alongside of the tub; I said to him, "What, can't you carry it?" he said it was so heavy; as I was turning away to go to the young man, who lives at the Windsor Castle public-house, some one down the lane called out Canter, or some such name, and Ledgerwood answered; the other one then said,"Where are you?" and Ledgerwood said, "Here I am-come on" - I believe this to be the tub.

GEORGE HURST . I live at the Windsor Castle. I was at the bottom of Waterloo-street with my beer, and put it down to rest - I saw a man go by with a tub, but I did not see who it was; I did not go from my tray - I knew the prisoners before, and had met them together the same evening about half-past seven o'clock.

JAMES TYTHERIDGE . I live at Turnham-green, and deal in butter in a small way. Ledgerwood and the other prisoner brought me a cask of butter to sell on the 13th of November - I bought it of them, but did not pay all the money; I paid Ledgerwood: I delivered the same cask to the officer - this has the same marks on it.

JOHN REYNOLDS . I am an officer. I got this tub from Tytheridge, at his shop - it has been in my possession ever since.

LEDGERWOOD'S Defence. I found this tub of butter that night; I took it up, and put it on my shoulder - the night was very foggy, and when I got to the bottom of the lane it fell off my shoulder; this young man was coming along, and I called to him to lift it on my shoulder, and that is all he knew about it.

LEDGERWOOD - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

HICKS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-114

113. THOMAS MILES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of George Hart , the elder.

GEORGE HART . I am a baker , and live in Mile End New-town . On the 31st of October, I was going into my bakehouse, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner brought back soon afterwards.

GEORGE HART . JUN. On the 31st of October, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, reach over the counter, and run out - I ran after him, and called Stop thief! he threw down a two-pound loaf, and I took it up - then he threw down a two-pound brick, and I took it up; I can tell him by his yellow handkerchief.

FREDERICK GEORGE HART . I am the prosecutor's son; the prisoner came in and took the two loaves; I am perfectly sure he is the person.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I was in Spital-street on the night of the 31st of October; I saw the prisoner running at great speed; I told him to stop, and he did not; I struck at him, and knocked his hat off - I pursued and took him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-115

114. JOHN MARKHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 20lbs. weight of coffee, value 25s. , the goods of Thomas Brook .

THOMAS BROOK . I live in High-street, St. Giles's, and am a grocer . On the 19th of November, I saw the prisoner standing at my door; two persons came into my shop to purchase figs; I heard the coffee rattle, and, on turning, saw the prisoner running; I called Stop thief! he was taken, and I took this bag of coffee from him, which had been standing at my door.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-116

115. THOMAS POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 10 yards of calico, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Richard Buckingham .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a watchman - I know Mr. Buckingham's house - he is a linendraper , in Shoreditch ; about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon of the 18th of November, I saw the prisoner near his house, and he took a piece of calico from the railing at the window; he pulled at it several times, and got it away; I went and seized him with it, just as he got across the road; he was rescued from me by the assistance of two females, who held me by the waistcoat and the arm till he got away; he dropped the calico - I took it up and gave it to a person to take it to Mr. Buckingham's; I pointed him out to an officer the next morning, and he was taken.

Prisoner. He stated to my parents that another man took it off the rail. Witness. No - I never said so - I saw what I have stated.

RICHARD BUCKINGHAM . This is my property - it was hung out on a rail.

DANIEL CROCKWELL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-117

116. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of Anthony Smith Johnson .

ANTHONY SMITH JOHNSON. I am a boot and shoe-maker , and live in Seymour-place, Camden-town. On the 24th of October the officer came and asked me if I had lost a pair of boots; I looked and missed a pair, which he showed to me; I had seen them safe about twelve o'clock, and this was about half-past one.

RICHARD DEACON . I am a constable of Kentish-town. About half-past one o'clock I saw the prisoner and two others come up the town - I suspected and followed them; they went up towards the tunnel; I gave a signal to a man to stop them, which he did; I came up and searched the three; I found these boots on Davis, who

said he found them; I locked them all up; it was about a mile from the prosecutor's.

Prisoner's Defence I was walking along - I saw the shoes, and took them up.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-118

OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6.

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

117. CHARLES YATES , alias COOMBS, alias WILLIAM SMITH , was indicted for that he, at the Delivery of the King's Goal of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, in the suburbs of the City of London, on Wednesday, the 5th of December, in the 2d Year of the Reign of the present King, by the name of Charles Yates , was tried and convicted on a certain indictment against him for burglary, and was thereupon ordered to be hanged by the neck, until he should be dead; but His Majesty having been pleased to extend his Royal Mercy to him, on condition of his being Transported to the Coast of New South Wales, or some one or other of the Islands adjacent, for, and during the term of his natural Life, which, being in due manner signified by one of His Majesty's principal Secretaries of State, he was ordered to be transported accordingly, pursuant to the Statute; and that be afterwards, on the 20th of August , in the 9th Year of the present Reign, feloniously was at large without lawful cause, within His Majesty's dominions, (to wit) at St. Pancras, before the expiration of the term for which he had been so ordered to be transported ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, for that he, at the said Delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden as aforesaid, was ordered to be transported to the Coast of New South Wales, or some one or other of the Islands adjacent, for, and during the term of his natural life, pursuant to the Statute,&c.; and that he afterwards, on the 20th of August, in the 9th Year of the present Reign, feloniously was at large, within His Majesty's dominions, (i.e.) at St. Pancras, without any lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term, for which he had been ordered to be transported; against the Statute, &c.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Reference Number: t18281204-119

118. JOHN ATRIDGE was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Arment , on the King's highway, on the 21st of November , at St. Anne, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 shirt, value 6d.; 1 coat, value 6d.; 2 stockings, value 3d.; 1 apron, value 3d.; 3 shirt-collars, value 3d.; 2 shoes, value 4d., and 1 handkerchief, value 2d. , the goods of Edward Birch Brown .

GEORGE ARMENT. I am fourteen years old and live with my father, (who is a carman) in King-court, King-street, Curtain-road. I was carrying a bundle containing shirts and things to Mr. Birch Brown, who is toll-gatherer at the iron bridge on the Barking-road, on Friday, the 21st of November, at a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening - it was quite moon-light; I was in the Commercial-road , opposite the finger-post - a person came behind me, took hold of my legs and let me fall back on the gravel-stones in the road; I fell with the bundle in my hand - he took and put his arm over, and pulled the bundle away from me, while I was on my back; it was quite light: I looked at him and saw his face - he then ran across the field; I ballooed out Stop thief! a gentleman pursued and stopped him about one or two hundred yards off, and I got my bundle - the prisoner is the person; he was quite a stranger to me before - I saw him running with the bundle and saw him throw it away; Mr. Garmonsway took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you never say the person threw the bundle away instartly and another man picked it up? A. Yes; I never said he had a blue dress and a yellow neck-handkerchief, to the prisoner's father, nor to any body.

COURT. Q. You saw him carring the bundle, and when he was pursued, he threw it away? A.No, before he was pursued - when he had run forty or fifty yards; a stranger picked it up, and I got it afterwards.

CHARLES GARMONSWAY . I am a clock-maker. I was in the Commercial-road on Friday evening, the 21st of November, about a quarter to nine o'clock - it was a bright moon-light night; I perceived a scuffle - two or three prostitutes were standing about, and some persons hustling; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a man run with a bundle; I immediately pursued him, and came very close to him, when he threw the bundle away - I still pursued him across the field; he jumped on a bank, and I got on the bank at the same time - he jumped over and I also; he turned round, and struck me in the face; I made a snatch at him, and I stooped down and laid hold of him - it was the prisoner; he ask what business it was of mine; I took him back, and found Arment crying and inquiring for his bundle of clothes - I took the prisoner to the spot where I had seen him throw the bundle down - it was taken up and given to Arment; I gave the prisoner in charge, and am certain he is the man who threw the bundle away - I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined. Q. When you brought him up, did the prosecutor say he was the person who took the bundle? A. I cannot say, there was so much confusion - I do not recollect his saying so.

GEORGE ARMENT re-examined. I am sure I said, when he was brought back, he was the man who robbed me; I also said so at the watch-house.

ALEXANDER HUGHES . I am a Police constable. I saw Mr. Garmonsway bringing the prisoner along, and took charge of him with a bundle.

Cross-examined. Q.Did the boy say at the watch-house, that he was the man who robbed him? A.He did.

EDWARD BIRCH BROWN . The bundle is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home - another lad was with me; the other boy went by him and threw him down, but I did not touch him - as he was getting up, I picked the bundle up and went away with it, but I never laid a hand on him.

JOHN DOVLE . I am foreman to Mr. Willett's, of the Commercial-road, where the prisoner worked: I have known him nearly two years - he bore a most excellent character; he was at work on the premises, at a quarter to seven o'clock on the night in question, within three hundred yards of where the robbery was committed.

Two other witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

- ATRIDE. I am the prisoner's father. When the prosecutor first went before the Magistrate, he said the

man who robbed him was a sailor ehap in a blue jacket and a red silk handkerchief - the officer was not present.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, an account of his character, and believing it to be his first offence .

Reference Number: t18281204-120

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

119. MATTHEW RIELY was indicted for that he, on the 16th of October , at St. Mary-le-Bow, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain order for payment of money, which said false, forged, and counterfeited order, for payment of money , was then and there as follows:-

Threadneedle-street, (62,) London, 15 October, 1828.

Messrs. Grote, Prescott, Grote, and Prescott, pay Stamp Office, or Bearer, One Hundred and Eighty Pounds 10s.

£180 10s. LANE and CROFT. with intent to defraud George Grote and others; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, on the same day, at the same parish, a certain false, forged, and counterfeited order, for payment of money, well-knowing the said last mentioned false, forged, and counterfeited order, for payment of money, to be false, forged, and counterfeited, which said last mentioned false, forged, and counterfeited order, for payment of money, was then and there as follows:- Order set out as above, with intent to defraud the said George Grote and others; against the Statute.

THIRD COUNT, like the second Count, only with intent to defraud Charles Lane and another; against the Statute, &c.

FOURTH COUNT, like the second Count, only omitting the words in italics, and substituting the word is.

FIFTH COUNT, like the third, with the like variation as in the last.

SIXTH COUNT, the same as the fourth, only omitting the figure "6," in the number of the banking-house.

SEVENTH COUNT, the same as the sixth, only stating his intent to be to defraud Charles Lane and another; against the Statute.

MESSRS. BRODRICK & LAW conducted the prosecution.

HOPPER BANKS . I am clerk to George Grote, Prescott, and Co., bankers , of Threadneedle-street; there are other partners. Messrs. Lane and Croft, solicitors , of Lincoln's Inn-fields, kept a cash-account there, and drew cheques on them. On the 16th of October, a few minutes past nine o'clock in the morning, this cheque (looking at one) was presented to me - my opinion is that the prisoner is the person who presented it; the largeness of the amount, and it being drawn for stamps drew my attention to it, and it is my belief that the prisoner is the person - I saw him two or three days after at Marlborough-street, three were several persons present at that time, and my recollection of the person enabled me to point him out from the rest; (referring to a book) this entry is made by myself, and I find by it that I paid for this cheque a 100l. note, No. 18,276, dated the 20th of September, 1828; one of 40l., No. 2,016, dated the 23d of July, 1828; and another 40l., No. 19,802, dated 21st April, 1828; and 10s. in cash - we do not make any mark on notes, we only know them by their number, date, and amount; (looking at three notes) these correspond in number, date and amount, with my book - the cheque was perfect when presented to me, it has since been punched, and part of the number of the house, which was 62 is punched out, and part of the G is wanted in the name Grote - that is our mode of dealing with cheques.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You speak to the prisoner from your belief? A. I do: I never entertained a doubt about him - it was my belief he was the man when I first saw him, and has been so ever since.

WILLIAM KEMPSTER . I am a teller in the money office at the Bank of England. I have an entry made by myself on the 16th of October (it was about half-past nine o'clock in the morning,) of a 100l. note, (looks at one) this is it - it was presented to me to be changed for a 50l. note, and fifty sovereigns; there is "Matthew Riely, No. 11, New Turnstile, Holborn, on the front of it - I wrote that myself; it is usual for the person bringing the note to write the address, but I wrote it on this occasion - the same address is on the back of it, but the word "Stile" is punched out, that was on it when it was presented, and I wrote the same on the front, being afraid the address would be punched out - I copied it from the back, the front being the proper place to put it; I gave a ticket on the pay-clerk for a 50l. note, and fifty sovereigns.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose it is usual to take the numbers of the notes for which you give change? A. No; we only take the name, and what notes we give for them -I do not think I wrote this address in the presence of the person who brought it.

JOSIAH FIELD . I am pay-clerk in the cashiers office of the Bank of England. I posted a 50l. note which was paid for this ticket, (producing it;) I entered the ticket in the cash-book, and posted a 50l. note, No. 13,121, dated the 13th of September, 1828, which I gave for it; this note(looking at it) corresponds in number and date - this must have been early in the morning, from nine to half-past nine o'clock.

JAMES COLLIER . I am a tailor, and live at Nos. 41 and 42, in the Poultry. On the 16th of October, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop; he asked me how I did - I said he had the advantage of me; he said, "Oh, you must recollect me very well at Mr.Lane's, Lincoln's Inn-fields" - I then recollected that I had seen him at Mr. Lane's; he said he had lost an uncle, and wanted a suit of clothes made that evening by eight o'clock - I said it was a short notice, but we could get them done; I booked the order for a blue suit of clothes; the whole dress was to be blue - I asked his name; he gave me the name of William Maxwell, No. 4, High-street, Bloomsbury - after writing his name and address down, I said he was almost a stranger to me, and I should like a little deposit: he immediately said, "Oh, deposit; they say pay before hand is very bad pay, but here is the money" - he had a large canvas bag with him, which appeared to contain fifty or sixty soverigns; the clothes came to 8l. - he then said he was going to America the next morning, and ordered some shirts, a travelling cloak, and all the articles together came to 17l. - I am a tailor, hosier, and glover; he paid me the 8l. first, and paid the rest to my brother in my presence - I wrote the address he gave me in the order-book - he was going away, and had nearly got to the door when he came back, and said, "I

wish Collier you would give me change for these notes;" he produced two of 40l. and one of 50l. - I said I kept a banker's, and never kept so much money in the house; he then said, "Oh, any of your neighbours will change it for you;" I said, "No, if it is any convenience to you I will send the notes to the Bank for change" - he said it would be a very great convenience, and gave them to me for that purpose: I asked him to have the kindness to write his name and address on the top of the three notes - he then said his name and address were the same as he had given me in the order-book, and desired me to write it on the top of each note; I did so, and put 16th of October, 1828, and my initials - (looking at three notes) these are the three I received from him; here is one of 50l., No. 13,121, dated the 13th of September, 1828: No. 2,016, 40l., dated the 23d of July, 1828; and No. 19,802, 40l., dated the 21st of April, 1828 - I was going to give them to my foreman, but he said, "Oh, never mind the 50l., the two 40l. changed will be quite sufficient;" I then returned him the 50l. and gave the two of 40l. to my foreman, to take to the Bank and get sovereigns for them - he bought a canvas bag to put the sovereigns into which the man brought from the Bank, and he (the prisoner) left a bag behind him; on the following day I received this letter (looking at it): before he left, my man brought the sovereigns which were delivered to the prisoner - he put them into the new canvas bag, and took them away.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner was dressed much as he is now, was he not? A. I cannot say - he ordered a blue suit; that was not a colour for mourning - that aroused my attention, and induced me to ask for a deposit

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was sent for on the 16th of October, and went to the Goat public-house, Pall Mall, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, and found the prisoner there - he was given in charge by the landlord; he was very much in liquor - I searched him and found a 50l. note, sixty-six sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and five shillings in silver on him, also some bullets, powder, and flints, and the landlord gave me a brace of pistols; I asked the prisoner about the property, he said it was the savings out of his wages - that he was going to Ireland to see his mother; I asked him name and address - he would not give me any name or address then, but at the watch-house he told me he was a clerk to Lane and Croft, of Lincoln's Inn-fields, and gave me the name of Riely - this is the 50l. note I found on him (looking at it); I laid it on the table in the parlour, and while I was counting the sovereigns be snatched the note up and tore it in pieces - we could not get it form him he was so violent; we found it on the floor at last - I am certain this is it, the landlord put his name on it in my presence; it has been pasted together, and I put my initials on it; it is No. 13,121, dated the 13th of September, 1828 - I did not see him write any note myself.

Cross-examined. Q. The landlord of the Goat sent for you? A. Yes; I found the prisoner sitting down there making a great noise - he appeared to be very tipsy; the landlord produced the pistols; I suppose I was twenty minutes in the public-house before we could secure him - he was so violent, kicking us, and knocking us down, and knocking the tables down - I, Smith and another man were in the room; the landlord did not interfere, he was so much alarmed.

Q. Did you not think the prisoner out of his senses? A. He appeared like a man that was so, but I really think it was the effect of liquor - I had never seen him before; he did not cry out - he was so tipsy, that next morning he did not know me, nor the man who handcuffed him - he lay down on the floor, and kicked and fought; there were three of us endeavouring to secure him - he did not bite me - I believe he attempted to bite somebody; he kicked me very violently - his coat was not off; I found the bullets in his waistcoat-pocket, and the powder in a canister in his coat-pocket; there was a fire alight in the room - the flints were in his pocket; I did not see the pistols in his hand - they were loaded, and had flints in them; there were balls in the pistols - the powder is taken out - they were not cocked - I do not know whether they had been.

MR. BRODERICK. Q. How was he next morning? A. Very cool and collected, but he did not know the officer who took him the night before.

MR. CHARLES LANE . I am a solicitor, in partnership with Archer Denman Croft - we carry on business in Lincoln's Inn-fields - the prisoner was a copying-clerk in our office for four years; we keep cash at Grote and Co's, and draw cheques on them - this cheque (examining it) is not the handwriting of myself or partner - I believe it to be the hand-writing of the prisoner; I am perfectly well acquainted with his hand-writing - I never gave him authority to draw any cheques - he was in our service till within three or four days of his apprehension; the name and address on the back of the 100l. note produced I believe to be the prisoner's hand-writing. it is Matthew Riely , No. 11, New Turnstile, Holborn;" (looking at a letter) -I believe this to be his writing.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether he lived where he has endorsed his address? A. He lived in New Turnstile.

Q. In his capacity of copying-clerk, had you any reason to find fault with him? A.Latterly, I had - his memory was particularly defective, and at times he conducted himself so strangely, I could not account for his conduct; he asked me, about a fortnight before this, to lend him 10l., and I gave it to him - I have had a letter from him since, in which he says he asked me for 50l., but I have no recollection of it; I may have refused him a loan, as he frequently asked to borrow money - about a fortnight before this transaction, I gave directions for his discharge from the office - he called on me early in the morning, and was nearly half an hour in my library, protesting that if I discharged him he would not exist - that it must be his death- that he could not live without a character, and if I would take him back he would serve me as a slave - he said this quite in a wild manner, sometimes laughing, and sometimes crying, and in a familiar tone, quite different to his ordinary manner of expressing himself - he alluded to some intimacy with my maid-servants, which I could not account for, and I suspected at first that he was in liquor- I at that time would not consent to take him back, having warned him a great many times, as well as my managing-clerk, that if he absented himself, as he had often done, he would not be retained in the office, and I had made up my mind not to take him back; I was then going out - he followed me into the hall, and appealed to my feelings in the strongest manner, asking me if I expected

mercy in Heaven if I shewed none here; he asked me to go back again to my room, which I did - he then went to the window, and putting his hand into his bosom, drew out a pistol, and solemnly commenced a sort of oath, declaring he would destroy himself if I would not take him back; I remonstrated with him - he had the pistol towards me, at that time, I approached to take it form him; he said in the most vehement manner "Beware, sir, it is loaded and cocked;" I afterwards ascertained that it was loaded and cocked - I told him I would not be intimidated, and ordered him immediately to uncock it, and stop it, which he did - fearing what might be the consequence of giving him a positive denial, I told him to come to my chambers at eleven o'clock, (this interview was about half-past eight in the morning, at my house) - I told him he must give me up the pistol before I could speak further with him: I knew he had an umbrella with a sword in it - previous to eleven o'clock, I went to where he lodged to satisfy myself if I could, of the cause which led to his present state of mind.

Q.Then I suppose you considered his mind disturbed? A. At that moment I did, because I told him I could give him a character, as a copying-clerk, as a most excellent writer, in point of his hand-writing; I satisfied myself from my inquiries, and was at that time induced to think his regret at leaving my officer had been the immediate cause of his then state of mind - I believe he always had a great respect for me - he always expressed himself so to others; he came at eleven o'clock, certainly, in a different state, and in a state which he could not have been had he been in liquor at half-past eight - that was the impression on my mind, and as such I agreed to take him back, and lent him the 10l., he asked for, to pay some debt; he brought me a pistol at eleven o'clock, and said it was the one he had shewn me, and it seemed the same - it was then uncocked and unstopped, but was primed and loaded with balls.

Q. Then your intention to discharge him arose from his absenting himself, and other causes,than the mode in which he did his business? A. Yes, for absenting himself, but his manner of writing was as good as ever.

MR. LAW. Q. How long before he finally left you did this transaction take place? A. About a fortnight; he continued with me till within two or three days of the transaction in question.

COURT. Q.What made him go away finally? A. He discontinued coming to the office of his own accord.

Q. At any time, except the occasion you have referred to, did he give any indication of this sort of passion? A. I always thought him passionate and strange - I have endeavoured to persuade him to conduct himself in a proper manner, and he treated it with levity.

Q. But previous to this interview in the library, was this strangeness, or his intemperance, of such a character as to induce you to suspect a derangement or aberration of intellect? A. No; I thought he had been among players- he would enter the room in a forced attitude, when I have rebuked him - I was never aware of his having been in the company of players - I have asked him, and he has denied it; his manner was theatrical.

MR. ARCHER DENMAN CROFT . I am in partnership with Mr. Lane. I never authorised the prisoner to draw any cheque in our name - I believe this cheque (looking at it) to be in the prisoner's hand-writing - this letter I also believe to be his writing - also the address at the back of this 100l. note.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the prisoner is indebted to the gentlemen who conduct this prosecution, for the means of defending himself on this occasion? A. I do not know it.

GEORGE EDWARD BAKER . I am clerk to Messrs. Lane and Croft, and have been so about a year and a half; the prisoner has been there all that time - I believe this cheque (looking at it) to be his hand-writing; the address on the back of the 100l. note and this letter are also in his hand-writing.

Cross-examined. Q. You possibly have observed this strangeness of manner in the prisoner? A. I have not had the opportunity - he wrote in the office with me, but I never saw any thing like Mr. Lane has described.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You never observed any thing of the kind? A. No; he absented himself of an evening for the last fortnight - he comes from Ireland, as I have heard him say.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Accountant's Office in the Bank - I have produced three cancelled notes, one of 100l., No. 18,276, dated 20th of September, 1828 - two of 40l., NOs. 19,802, dated 21st of April, 1828, and No. 2,016, 23d July, 1828.(The cheque was here read, see indictment.)

Prisoner. I do not want to say any thing at all.

SARAH CARTER . I am in the service of Mrs. Mitchell, of Lancaster-place, Waterloo-bridge - I have very frequently seen the prisoner near the house - he never called there to my knowledge; the last time I saw him was about two months ago, about four o'clock in the afternoon - he was on the opposite side of the way in the street, walking backward and forward, beating his breast.

Q. Did you appear at the drawing-room window? A. Yes; I saw him take a pistol, or something from his bosom, and hold it in his hand.

Q. Was it held towards where you were standing? A. Yes; I stood at the window some time and then went out to him - he said he had come to wish me good by and presented the pistol - I said I was not alarmed; I knew him before; he said he did not wish to alarm me, but probably he should be a corpse before the following morning; he appeared extremely agitated - nothing else passed.

Q. Now, from the conduct he exhibited to you, did you consider him in his right mind? A. I considered it extremely strange, and wrote him a note to say I thought it was bordering on insanity, as I thought so.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long have you known him? A. About eight months; I frequently saw him - he was making love to me; I had not refused him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is your mistress here? A. No: she has been confined to her bed for a week, or she would have been here.

CHARLES REDMAN . I live at No. 17. Seymour-crescent, Somer's-town, and am clerk to an attorney. I have known the prisoner several years - he lodged with me once; I have not been on very familiar terms with him lately - he used to sleep with me; he lodged with my mother for about six months, and has occasionally slept with me afterwards: it was about eighteen months since, that

he lodged at my mother's - while he was there, at intervals his conduct was the very best, and at others the most extraordinary, in fact the must ridiculous; he has occasionally told me that if he could raise a sufficient sum of money, he could establish a title to a very large estate in Ireland- from the knowledge I had of his father and mother, I knew it was impossible, as their circumstances were quite the contrary to affluence; he very often, when lodging with me, would get up at two and three o'clock in the morning, and go stamping and fuming about the room, take off his night-cap and stamp on the floor; I have remonstrated with him, and he has said I did not know his mind, and could not judge his feelings - he said he was an object that the world had crushed; he would get out of bed in the middle of the night, and recite pieces from Hamlet, and from Richard - he always told me I could not tell what his feelings were; he frequently raved in this manner: I have remonstrated with him for spending his money in the most ridiculous manner, and told him his mother and father were objects of charity rather than of contempt, for he always spoke contemptuously of their poverty, not of their conduct to him - he has made no reply to my remonstrance that I recollect; he has frequently called out Murder! in the middle of the night, and when I have shaken him to awake him, he has seemed to imagine he was within the grasp of some superior force; and occasionally when he was awake he appeared to think so; at other times he would smile, and appeared to wish that I should not speak of such matters; his conduct has been so inconsistent at times, representing me, at one time, not his friend, and at other times as his best friend, as I have been told by others: I discontinued to visit him on account of his inconsistences, and I left the lodging - about four weeks ago, I met him going from Searle-street towards Great Tunrnstile - he was coming down from Holborn, and had the stick of an umbrella in his hand; he spoke to me - I rather crossed to get out of his way, when he stopped me, stamped his foot and called out "Villain!" I smiled at him, and rather laughed; he drew a small sword-cane from the stick of the umbrella, and presented it at me directly - he put it up against my breast, I retired towards the wall and he followed me.

Q. Do you mean that he presented it at your breast, or thrust at you? A. He thrust it at me, put it towards me- I went to the wall and he advanced; I thought he was mad at the time, and asked if he had been drinking.

Q. You thought that he was not in his senses, either from liquor or some other cause? A.Exactly so - the point of the sword entered my waistcoat; he called me a villain, and said "When I have got you, I will have you on the hip;" what he meant I do not know - he said his hand had wreaked vengeance on villains before then.

Q. From the conduct he evinced when you saw him then, and from his whole demeanor, do you believe that at times he was out of his senses? A. I do firmly.

MR. LAW. Q. The last transaction happened in Searle-street? A. No, in Lincoln's Inn-fields, against the dead-wall, about eight o'clock in the evening - it was about four months ago to the best of my recollection; it did not make such an impression on me, as to enable me to speak to the time - it is about eighteen months ago that we lodged together; that was in Clement's Inn-passage, not at my mother's, but he occasionally came to my mother's to sleep - to the best of my recollection I ceased to lodge with him eighteen months ago - he represented that he was entitled to an estate, not that his father and mother bad got any money; I was not hurt in Lincoln's Inn-fields- I laid hold of the sword; and it ended with my laughing at him.

Q. You thought him mad, and it ended in your laughing at him? A. Yes - I rather unconsciously retreated against the wall; I have been in the habit of taking meals with him - he was remarkably extravagant. but not at his meals; it was in other matters - I have seen him in liquor but not often; it produced rather a merry effect - (looking at a letter) this is his hand-writing.

EDWARD TUFF . I am a law stationer, and live in Portugal-street; I have known the prisoner about four years, or rather more - I have been in the habit of seeing him very constantly, but not within the last eight or nine months; I saw him constantly up to that time.

Q.During your acuquaintance, what has his conduct been? A.Extremely strange at times: what first excited my attention, was his manner of stamping about the room; he would often come up, and walk up and down the room for about five minutes, making use of different expressions, but take no notice of whoever might be there, and give no answers to questions which were put to him, and about two years ago he came into the room apparently intoxicated; I thought he was so when he came into the room - he laughed hysterically, and said he had some good news to tell me; he then burst into laughter, which lasted for some time, and then told me his father was dead; I spoke to him about it; he said, "You don't know my mind," it was impossible for any one to know his mind, and that he had secrets which would die with him; I met him about two months after that, at the bottom of Chancery-lane. passed close by him, and he did not notice me; I tapped him on the shoulder - he took no notice of that, but kept on; he must have known me if he had been in his senses; he proceeded through the Temple - I followed him; he stopped several times in the Temple, and put his hand up to his mouth, as if thinking of something; he stamped several times, and appeared in thought; I was not in sight, but watching him; he then went on, stopped in William-street, folded his arms, looked up toward the clouds, knit his brow, his eyes flashed, he bit his lips and grated his teeth, as if he was thinking of something desperate; I then went over to him, and said, "Riely, what is the matter?" he did not notice me at first, but afterward turned round, frowned at me, and asked why I disturbed him; he did not wait for a reply, but said he had just been spending a few of the happiest moments he ever had - I said I thought that he was drunk, and asked if he was drunk, or what was the matter with him; he made no reply, but stamped his foot, and said, "Say no more about it;" previous to my first speaking to him, he said, "I'll do it," throwing his arms down - I then accosted him. I remember meeting him in Portugal-street, fourteen or fifteen months ago, about our months after the time I have mentioned - he was walking very fast; I stopped him, and asked why he was in such haste, and where he was going - he replied, very abruptly, "Out of the world;" he spoke in a very agitated manner, and his countenance was

very gloomy; he continued to say, "I am sick at heart - if you are my friend, leave me to my fate;" he has repeatedly spoken about suicide - I pressed him to go to my lodgings at this time, and he said that he thought he was born to be his own destroyer; he used to make suicide a general conversation - he often said it preyed on his mind that be feared his wits were deranged; that was last November twelvemonth - I was in the habit of seeing him frequently, till within this last eight or nine months - and from my observation of his conduct, I believe him at times to be out of his mind.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You have seen him only occasionally for the last eight or nine months? A. No - he did not lodge with me - only visited me; he would quote from different authors, when he has passed up and down the room - he has not been an actor.

ELIZA TUFF . I am the wife of the last witness; I have known the prisoner three years - he came to me one evening, about the 20th of September last, between six and seven o'clock; my husband was not at home - he came staggering in, as if some one was pursuing him; he appeared quite exhausted, much frightened, and looked very wild- I spoke to him first, and asked what was the matter with him; he said he was going to kill himself, and that he came to die there - that he must die in the course of three hours; he produced a pistol, laid it down on the table, and said it was loaded - he took it up, and shewed me that it was loaded with powder; this very much frightened me - he perceived that; he stamped about the room; I asked him if he would go, and after walking about the room about ten minutes, he went, and cried as he went away, and said he should never see me any more, wished me good by, burst into tears, and left - I had opportunities of seeing him before this occurrence, but never saw him conduct himself in an extraordinary manner before; that was the only opportunity I had of observing his conduct.

MR. LAW. Q. Do you happen to know whether this was when he had the disagreement with Mr. Lane, who was about to discharge him? A. I rather think it was - he said the pistol was loaded; he appeared overcome and agitated.

JOHN MCQUIN . I am a tailor, and live in Clement's Inn-passage. I have known the prisoner nearly four years, he lodged with me formerly, and Redman lodged with him in another house in the same passage; the prisoner lodged twice with me about four months, and after that for about two years, and it is two years since he left me - my idea was always that he was not correct in his mind, certainly, from his odd behaviour; the first thing I observed was when he lodged with me he bought a sword stick, I thought not much of that, but at last he played with it like a child, he could hardly keep it out of his sight, and always had it out - I told him I thought it was not proper conduct, and then he said he would run me through with it; I did not conceive that he meant to do so, but I told him I would not have such a thing in my house; I took it from him, and broke it; and afterwards, some time before he left me, he bought an umbrella with a sword in it - I would not allow him to keep it in my house; he pledged it, and said he could have it out then at any time he wanted it; his conduct was never at all like a reasonable person - he would come in as gloomy as if he were going to drop into the grave the next moment, and a few minutes after would be laughing and cheerful - then change again to the very reverse; I do believe he was at times subject to fits of insanity.

MR. LAW. Q. Did you apply to any medical person about him? A. No, nor have him removed from my house.

JURY. Q.Did you think his behaviour was affected or real? A. I did think it was real - he would sometimes affect it, and recite plays, and so on, but I believe it was real; I do believe it was the effect of a disordered mind.

- WILLIAMS. I live at No. 50, Brunswick-street, Blackfriar's-road - I have been an eating-house keeper, but am not in business at present. I have known the prisoner eight or nine months last past - the latter part of that time his conduct has been extraordinary; on one occasion, he frequented my house to dine - that was about the 12th or 13th of September; I know the date, as I gave up my house on the 15th: on one occasion he came to my house, and took refreshment, after which, a baker who lived opposite came in - he then concealed a knife under his sleeve, and went out; I followed him - he then shewed me the knife, and said "Why dare that rascal enter the house;" I said "Riely, pray put the knife down - don't conceal it in that manner;" he then came into the house again, and in a short time the baker left the house; Morell, who had lodged with me six months, came in - he looked at him in a most varacious manner - he went, and caught hold of a large carving-knife, presented it to the lodger's breast, and asked him if his life was not in imminent danger I at first thought it was a joke, but I was obliged to interfere - I never saw a man look so wild in my life - I was obliged to get the lodger to bed: he was not drunk; in the early part of the time I knew him, he conducted himself well, and dined up stairs among respectable persons - he would come down to the shop to order his dinner - he would pat his head before he could recollect what to order- I told him what I had got, and he would at times order his meat, and say "Bring me all the vegetables you have," and at times he would say "Bring me all you have" - not saying vegetables; persons in the room have observed that, and made remarks about it within a week of the time I gave my business up; I believe his conduct to be the result of an unsettled mind: on the same evening (I think) he was going out, he followed me about a dozen yards, and said"Williams, I shall never like a woman again" - speaking in rather a troubled hurried, manner; I parted with him as soon as I could; his conduct at last very much alarmed me; I did not like to disturb the neighbourhood by calling the watch, as there was another man present when he presented the knife, and I thought no harm could come.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did he lodge in your house? A. No - it was not him I wanted to get to bed, but my lodger; I prevented the prisoner from getting at him - he tore his coat.

Q. Did his saying, he should never like woman again, make you think him mad? A. No - his presenting the knife, and his manner generally, and the manner in which he said he never should like woman again - he turned and spoke to me in the most abrupt manner; I was no acquaintance of his.

FRANCIS MCGOWER . I keep the King's Head public-house, Pall-mall - it was formerly the Goat. I was subpoenaed here about an hour ago - I remember the prisoner coming to my house on the day he was taken; I had never seen him before - he came a few minutes after one o'clock,

passed by the counter, and asked if he could dine; I said he could have a steak or chop - he said, "Let me have rump steak and a bottle of sherry, and I shall be proud and happy of your company;" I said I was obliged to him, but I did not drink sherry so soon - I went up stairs to dress, and when I came down, he again sent for me to drink a glass with him; I apologised and declined: he went away, and came again about seven o'clock, and said,"You would not do me the favour to drink a glass of wine with me before, but I shall be happy to drink with you now" - I said I was not found of sherry, but would drink a glass of weak brandy and water, which he ordered; on sitting down he pulled out a note, and asked for change of a 50l. note - I said the people had all shut up, and I could not get change; he said, "Well, drink your brandy and water, and I will be back directly - I am going to Egg's;" he went out, came back, ordered a bottle of port, threw a brace of pistols on the table, and again threw the note on the table: I said, "Really, from the manner you have behaved with this note, I should think it is not a good one"- he said, "You villain, I will blow your brains out," and raised the pistol to me; I caught hold of him, knocked his arm on one side, and caught him by the neck handkerchief - the servant came to my assistance, and the patrol was called in.

Q. Did you believe at the time he was going to shoot you? A. From my not knowing him before, I really cannot say; the officer examined the pistols afterwards - they were both loaded; he was sitting close to me on the same seat when he presented them - he brought them in openly in his hand; I have inquired at the gunsmith's, and found he had changed another pair of pistols for them - he is a very powerful man.

Q. From what you saw on that occasion, do you think the man was in his senses? A. I should think not, for he could not escape if he had shot me - he must have been taken immediately; he had taken part of a bottle of sherry at one o'clock, and in the evening I do not think he tasted the brandy and water, but believe he drank a glass of port.

Q. That was not enough to produce such conduct as the effect of liquor? A. I should think not.

MR. LAW. Q How many times was he in your house that day? A. Three - on the first occasion he had a bottle of sherry, of which two other persons partook, I understand so from my servant, but was not present; he was absent from two till seven o'clock - he did not apply to me to change the 50l. note on the first occasion, but he did to my wife, as she told me; he applied to me at seven o'clock, before he went out, and again when he came back with the pistols.

Q. Was he earhest with you to procure change for the 50l. note? A. Yes - he said he was going to Ireland next morning, and that the note was of no value there; I told him it was as good there as in England, and on my intimating there was something wrong, he jumped up with the pistols; I do not suppose he would have presented them if I had not said that.

The letters identified as the prisoner's writing, were as follows: -

To Mr. Collier, Nos. 40 and 41, Poultry,

Sir - Be so good as to send my bag, and the articles I bought of you to the Police-office, Marlborough-street, immediately, and ask for Mr. Riely; my name was not Maxwell, but Riely.

Friday, 1 o'clock.

To - Gates, Esq. Solicitor, Lombard-street Newgate, Nov. 1, 1828.

Sir - I have to request that the clothes which I purchased of Mr. Collier may be delivered up to me, as I am here without even a change of linen; I cannot anticipate that my prosecutors will offer any objection, indeed I have every reason to think, that had I mentioned my wish before the Magistrate yesterday, it would have been complied with, and he (by the officer) sent me word, that had I mentioned it when they were there, he would have seconded my request, and he authorised me to say as much; of course the purchasing the clothes, and the forgery are two distinct things, and as I am committed for the capital offence, I trust that you will not think it necessary to detain the clothes from me; I would also mention, which I beg you will state to my prosecutors, that I have not even the means of employing a solicitor for me at my trial, begging an answer at your convenience. I remain, Sir, your most obedient servant, MW. RIELY.

Be so good as direct, "M. Riely, No. 23 Ward, Master's side."

MR. CLARKSON to EDWARD TUFF . Q.Is it your opinion, from what you have related, that he was subject to occasional aberrations of intellect, or that he was always so? A. Subject to attacks - I have seen him at times perfectly himself.

MR. LAW. Q. Were you acquainted with the reason of these attacks? A. No - he never would tell me.

Q. Do you mean to say, it is your belief, in the ordinary transactions of life, that he was not capable of judging of the difference between right and wrong? A. At times, for the reasons I have given.

JURY to GEORGE EDWARD BAKER . Q. You were eighteen months in the employ of Messrs. Lane and Co. - during all that time the prisoner occupied the same office with you? A. Yes - I never have observed any thing singular in his behaviour.

Q. His behaviour was not such as to lead you to suppose his intellect was deranged? A. No, certainly not; I have seen the cheque - I should not say that it was an imitation of Messrs. Lane and Co.'s signature.

Q.Is it in the prisoner's natural manner of writing? A. No - I think it a little constrained.

Q. to HOPPER BANKS. You observed nothing singular in the prisoner's behaviour? A. Not at all - I cannot state whether any words passed between us; I think it very probable that I asked him in what notes he would take it- I observed the cheque, and imagined it to be the handwriting of Messrs. Lane and Co., or I should not have paid it; the cheque is dated the 15th - it was presented on the 16th.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Of uttering the cheque, knowing it to be forged.

Reference Number: t18281204-121

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Littledals.

120. FREDERICK COLE , alias PHILLIPS , was indicted for feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously stabbing and cutting George Baker , on the right side of his body, with intent to kill and murder him .

THREE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. SMITH conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE BAKER . I am a watchman of St. Andrew, Holborn. On the morning of the 13th of November , I was on duty in Holborn , calling half-past one o'clock, when Mr. Scarf called me in to clear the Coach and Horses public-house; the landlord has been dead these three

months - I went into the house, and saw about six persons there, as well as I can recollect; three of them stood at the bar - the prisoner was one of them; he was standing at the farther end of the bar, and two others in his company - they were tossing up halfpence with each other; the gentleman who called me in told me to clear the house- he acts as landlord; he told me in particular to take the prisoner out first - he said, "I have tried to get him out myself, and he has threatened to put my head were my feet are;" he pointed him out a second time to me: on his first pointing him out I said nothing to him, but the second time I went up to him, and said, "Have the kindness to go out;" I said nothing more then - he told me he would not; I then told him I would put him out if he did not; he told me he would be d-d if he would be put out by me or any one like me: I then seized him by the breast, and with my left-hand removed him from where he stood a short distance towards the door - the two young men in his company endeavoured to rescue him from my hold, but I never let go; I got rid of the smallest man by myself, and with the assistance of a man who was in the house, I got rid of the other - I then removed the prisoner to the door.

Q. At the time you had him at the door was any other person near you? A. No one: while I was in the act of lifting the latch to open the door, I received a stab, but what with I do not know; previous to my getting him to the door, he held me by the collar of the coat with both hands, till we got to the door, and while I was in the act of lifting the latch he let go his hold altogether; and the door being locked and latched, while I was trying to open it, I received a stab - I left something prick me very sharply; I did not see the prisoner do any thing with his hands, as my head was turned towards the door: when I first removed him from the bar, he had some money in his hands - he put it into his pocket, and seized me by the collar; the other persons were about six feet from me at the time - I have measured it since; there was no one else near enough to have done it - I kept my hold of him all the time, and got him out at the side-door, which leads into a coach-yard; two brother watchmen and a patrol came to my assistance - I found blood running down my thigh; I moved my hand down, and found my fingers all over blood - the patrol and watchmen asked me what was the matter; I said, "This rascal has stabbed me!" I found my clothes had been penetrated - I turned them up, and saw blood gush out from my shirt - here is the shirt I had on, and my watch coat also; there is a hole in it corresponding with she wound in my side: I gave the prisoner in charge of Lyons, and gave the two young men who were with him in charge also - they were taken to the watch-house: I went to a surgeon, and got my wound dressed; I returned to my beat, and remained there the rest of the night.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were there not ten persons there when you went in? A. On my oath there were not; I do not know whether Henry Bennett was there - all the persons were strangers to me except two; he was not one of those I gave in charge: I asked the prisoner to be so good as to go - he said he would not; I then said, "I will make you;" he said, "I'll be d-d if I do:" I did not seize him by the throat - I never touched his throat; I took him by the breast, and got him out, without shifting my hold; I dragged him from the bar to the door before I was stabbed - my face was towards the door: I had left two persons at the bar, who were in company with him.

Q. Where were the two when your face was towards the door, as you were endeavouring to unfasten it? A. About six feet from me; I could see them - they were not behind me - I held the prisoner with one hand, and the men were sideways while I was opening the door; they used the utmost exertion to get him from me, till I got within six feet of the door - there was nobody at the door but me and the prisoner when I received the stab; I said the others were within three or four feet of me, but I have since measured it - he was examined three times; I said at all those examinations that it was three feet - I had not then been to the house; I did not measure the place till after the examinations: there was no rush forward at the time the door was being unfastened - the attempt to rescue was at the further end of the bar; they tried to rescue him from the bar, and have been held to bail for it: I went and knocked a surgeon up - he dressed my wound, and I returned to my beat; I have been on my duty every night- there was no occasion for me to be confined: the attempt to rescue was a long time before we got to the door- the waterman took off one, and I got rid of the other.

Q. Before you got to the door these men were quiet? A. Yes, and I afterwards gave them in charge; the prisoner held me by the collar, with both hands, all through the piece, till I came to the door - he had a kind of white frock-coat on, not a great coat; it was buttoned up: this is a watering-house.

MR. SMITH. Q. You took him in charge by request of the landlord? A. Yes, I took him out at his request; I was perfectly sober, and he appeared so.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am serjeant of the watch. I was on duty on the morning of the 17th of November, between one and two o'clock in Holborn, and hearing a noise. I went into the Coach and Horses; I found Baker and the prisoenr there - the first word I heard Baker say was, "I am stabbed!" he said to the prisoner, in a short time, "Come forward - you are the villian who has stabbed me; you know you are;" I did not hear the prisoner make any reply - if he had I think I must have heard it; I gave him into the hands of Lyon, another watchman - I cannot say whether he had a knife about him; I was not more than five or six yards from him, when the prosecutor told me he had stabbed him: after Baker gave him in charge he knocked at the public-house door, went in, and called me in - there were two men standing at the bar; he gave them in charge. I afterwards went to the watch-house - we searched all the three men; I found no instrument on the prisoner - I returned with Stiggell to search for the instrument Baker had been stabbed with; the house was shut - I knocked, and Scarf opened the door; I got a light, and found a knife in the passage, between the door and the end of the bar, not two feet from the door - it has two blades; one was open: the prosecutor examined it by the light at the watch-house, and pointed out one spot on one side of the blade - it appeared to be blood, and next day I examined it more particularly; it appeared to be blood, dried, on one side of the knife: I

saw the cut in Baker's clothes, and saw blood come from the wound.

Cross-examined. Q. At what time did you get there? A. About a quarter-past two o'clock; the prisoner was then in custody - I saw nobody but two watchmen there; I should think it is not more than six feet from the end of the bar to the door; the place where they usually drink is five, six, or eight yards from the door, I should think - I found the knife between the end of the bar and the door; the door opens to the left, and immediately behind it was the knife: I did not hear the prisoner say he could not have done it, as he had no knife - Lyon had got hold of him; my attention was attracted another way - I might be four or five yards off.

MR. SMITH. Q. What do you mean by the place where they usually drink? A.That is opposite another door; I entered at a side door.

RICHARD STIGGELL . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Holborn - I went to the public-house, and found Baker with the prisoner in custody, close to the door, outside the house; I saw blood on Baker's under clothes - he said he had been stabbed, and that was the man who stabbed him; he was given in charge - I went to the watch-house with the three; I returned to the public-house with Davis and saw him find the knife, with a large blade open, within two feet of the door.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear the prisoner make any answer when the prosecutor said he had stabbed him? A. None.

DANIEL LYON . I am a watchman. I went to the Coach and Horses and found Baker holding the prisoner - he gave him into my custody, and said he had stabbed him; the prisoner said he had no knife about him.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not his words, "I could not have done it, for I have no knife about me?" A. Yes, that is correct - I heard him say that, it was in a low voice not loud enough for Davis and others to hear him; they were close by, but I had hold of him.

JOHN SCARF . My brother, who is dead, kept the house - I live there at present; on the morning of the 13th of Novemeber I fetched Baker there, because the prisoner and several of his companions were tossing - the landlady and I requested them to leave; they refused - I desired the watchman to clear the house; I desired him to take the prisoner, as the most outrageous among them - he said,"You must go out, clear the house," as near as I can recollect; they refused to go - Baker seized the prisoner by the collar - the prisoner seized him, and then there was a general struggle; Baker kept hold of him, and took him to the door - when they got to the door I am certain there was nobody within six feet of them; they struggled a short time at the door, and eventually the watchman took him out - nothing happened at the door that I knew of; after they went to the watch-house Davis and another came back - nobody had been to the house from the time the prisoner was taken till they came back; nobody could have put a knife there between those times.

Cross-examined. Q. I take it for granted you saw the whole from beginning to end? A. Yes, in the house; I put the gas out to make them leave off tossing - that was before Baker came; it was lighted then - I did not hear the landlady ask Cole to light it - I do not know who lighted it; there was a candle burning in the bar - the prisoner and three or four more were at the bar when I went for the watchman; they belonged to the prisoner's party - I cannot exactly say how many there were; I told the Magistrate there might be six - there were more than the prisoner and two others - they all remained there till the watchman came; I recollect nothing about a rush towards the door when Baker was lifting the latch - he seized the prisoner by the collar of his coat.

Q. Did he seize him by the breast? A. Not till there was a general scuffle among the whole of them, then he first seized him.

MR. SMITH. Q. The confusion was such he might seize him by the breast? A. He might.

ANN SCARF . I am the landlady of the Coach and Horses. I sent my brother for the watchman - there were then six people in the house, and while my brother-in-law was gone, the prisoner said he would serve him out.

Cross-examined. Q. Did your brother-in-law put out the gas? A. I asked them to leave off tossing, as I wished the house clear - my brother-in-law put out the gas; I lighted it myself - there was a candle in the next room; the gas was not out half a minute - I have not said this would not have occurred if it had not been for the interference of my brother-in-law - I did not see the prisoner with any knife.

PERIGRINE FERNANDEZ . I am a surgeon, and live in Lamb's Conduit-street. On the morning of the 13th of November Baker came to me; he had a superficial wound on the right side of his abdomen, which I dressed - it appeared to have been done by some sharp instrument; I have seen the knife produced and his clothes together, and undoubtedly the wound might have been inflicted by such an instrument; the outer coat was extremely thick - it penetrated only one fold.

Cross-examined. Q. It was a superficial wound? A. Yes - it had hardly passed into the integuments - it was a perfect cut, which you would ordinarily inflict on your finger; I put a piece of plaister on it, and afterwards put another piece on.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove I have not had a knife in my possession.

GEORGE BAKER . I saw no knife in his hand.

HENRY BENNETT . I am in the employ of Mr. Gibson, a baker, who lives in Grenville-mews: the prisoner is my fellow-servant; I went to the Coach and Horses with him on this night - there might be eight or nine there with us drinking together - I did not see the tossing - I had my back against the settle; Scarf put the gas out, to get the house cleared - at the time the watchman was sent for, the whole eight or nine were about the bar; the watchman took the prisoner somewhere by the neckcloth, and dragged him away very violently; I look upon it, it must have gone so far as almost to strangle him - the prisoner resisted as well as he could; three or four more stood behind; there was a rush altogether towards the door - they all went to the door together.

Q. At any time, while you were there, were the watchman and prisoner struggling together, away from the others? A. No - they were altogether when the watchman got out of the door, and complained of being wounded; Cole has been six or eight months in Gibson's service - I never saw him with a knife in my life, and have

reason to believe he had none, for I have known him borrow one of master to cut the washers for his wheels; he had his coachman's coat on, and it was buttoned.

Mr. SMITH. Q. What colour was his coat? A.A drab one; my only reason for saying he had no knife, was his having borrowed one - during no period was he and the watchman separate from the rest; I persist in swearing that; I am a glass coachman, and was never here before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-122

Before Mr. Recorder.

121. JOHN WARD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ann Milton , on the King's highway, on the 30th of November , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 cloak, value 10s. , her property.

ANN MILTON. I live in Queen-street, Seven-dials, and work at shoe-binding . On Sunday, the 30th of November, at half-past eleven o'clock at night, I going home from my father's, who lives in Windmill-street - Williams was with me; the prisoner came up to me - I had seen him before, but never spoke to him before; he came up, and asked me what I had to say about him - I did not understand what he meant; I had said nothing, nor heard any thing said about him - I told him I did not know him; he immediately struck me in the face, and then gave me another blow on the shoulder, which knocked me down - he then snatched the cloak off my shoulders; Williams was by at the time; he ran away - I ran after him; I called Watch! and he ran into a passage in Nottingham-court - he dropped my cloak when I called Watch! the watchman picked it up - he ran out of that passage into another, and the watchman took him out of bed; I went down to the watch-house with him - he did not deny striking me, but denied taking the cloak.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What kept you out so late? A. I had supped at my mother's; I am always hard at work till eleven or twelve o'clock at night, at home - I never spoke to the prisoner before; Williams ran after him, and said the cloak did not belong to him - he then gave her another blow, and knocked her down senseless; I had called Watch! before she ran after him - I did not throw the cloak down myself, I am certain; we did not take hold of him, and ask him to go with us - he owned that he struck me; I asked no money to compromise this - I live with my sister; Williams lives with me - there was no crowd when he knocked me down; I saw nobody - there might be one or two persons; I swore to the prisoner at Bow-street.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS . I work at shoe-binding, and live in the same room as Milton, in Queen-street, Seven-dials. On Sunday night, the 30th of November, I was coming home with her - I had never seen the prisoner before; we were just turning the corner - the first thing I observed, was a man come between us; I know the prisoner by his squinting - he came up and asked Milton what she had to say about him; she said she did not know him - he then put up his fist and struck her a blow in the face; I do not know whether it was a severe blow, but he struck her again on the shoulder, knocked her down, and took the cloak off her back - I went and caught him by the collar, and said the cloak did not belong to him; he then struck me on the face, and knocked me down - I lay for a few minutes senseless; I got up, and called Watch! I went and looked down Nottingham-court, and saw Milton at the corner - the watchman went into a house, and took him out of bed; the watchman picked the cloak up off the ground, but not in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q. This was a late hour - were you supping at the same place as Milton? A. Yes - at her mother's; her sister had a child christened - the sister lives in the same room with us, but was at her mother's; neither of us caught hold of the prisoner's arm - it happened in King-street ; there was scarcely any body about- I saw two or three persons at the lower end of the street; I was at Marlborough-street next day - the prosecutrix said she knew him by seeing him about, but not to speak to him; I have not lived there long.

JAMES DUNN . I am a watchman. On the 30th of November, at half-past eleven o'clock, I was standing in King-street, Seven-dials, and heard a call of Watch! repeatedly - I was about fifty yards from Queen-street; I went up as quick as possible; the prosecutrix said,"Watchman, it is a very hard case that I should be knocked down and robbed;" I asked where the person was, could she point him out - she said No, he is not here; I ran a few yards further and picked the cloak up; I went further down and she called Watch! again, and said, "He is gone this way;" I asked if she should know the man - she said "Yes, he has got a cast in his eye;" I went and knocked at Ward's door, knowing him before: he lives on my beat - his mother let me in; I found him in bed undressed all but his shirt; Milton said he was the person - I think he squints; she said her cloak was gone, but did not say how it went from her - she said she was knocked down and robbed - she claimed the cloak.

Cross-examined. Q.How soon after she complained of being knocked down did you go to the prisoner's house? A.About ten minutes, to the best of my knowledge; I found him comfortably in bed; the prosecutrix saw him undressed - I was not going to take him out of bed unless she said he was the person; she did not tell me what she had been robbed of - Watch! was called with a load voice - I cannot say it was her that called; she said she had called; I did not see the prisoner till I saw him in bed: I picked up the cloak in King-street, about thirty yards from his house - I did not see Williams to know her, there were so many people about - I could not be less than five minutes going up to her; there were then forty or fifty people assembled.

ANN MILTON . I did not see the watchman pick up the cloak: I was knocked down between twenty and thirty yards from the prisoner's house.

Prisoner's Defence. I have proof that she took 5s. from my mother.

ROSA ANN COLLINS . I saw all this row - I was coming home from work about eleven o'clock at night, and these two young women were before me - I live in Great St. Andrew-street, Seven-dials; I am cook at an eating-house - I saw these two young women at the corner of Queen-street, and both appeared as if they were quarrelling with each other; one asked leave of the other to lie her cloak, and she said she would not let her; Ward was coming by, and one of them laid hold of him by the arm, I cannot say which, I was not near enough to tell - she

said something to him, and he resisted going with her; she would not let him go - he turned round, and rather shoved or knocked her down, I do not know which; she fell - she ran after him, and swore she would be d-d but she would have him, and the cloak fell off her shoulder; she called him a cock-eyed ***; she called Watch! the watchman came and picked the cloak up.

Q. Which of the young women it was you could not tell? A. No; they were both quarrelling among themselves at first - the cloak was picked up about thirty yards from the prisoner's house; I have not heard the evidence which has been given - I do not know where the watchman went, for I went home; Seven-dials is generally full of women on all sides.

COURT. Q. Was the watchman by at the time she called him these scandalous names? A. I do not know whether he heard it, he was coming up - after she ran after him she called him these names, and then she called the watch; the women were both quarrelling - I only saw one of them knocked down - I was about ten yards from them; I was there when Ward first came up to them; I only saw him strike one - I will swear he did not strike them both; I have seen both the women before, but never spoke to them; I live in the same neighbourhood with Ward.

Q. Do you live in the same house? A. Yes I did, but not at this time; and these girls lived in the neighbourhood at that time - it was about four years ago; I first heard of his being taken up last Monday; about half-past eleven o'clock I went to the office, but was too late to get in.

Q. What passed when these two women laid hold of him? A. I do not know - but he resisted, and pulled his arm away; she would not let him go - they were both very much in liquor, by their appearance and their discourse.

Q. What discourse? A. Why they called him a cock-eyed *** - and I dare say they wanted him to go with them; I know they did not get their living honestly when they lived in the same neighbourhood as I did four years ago.

JAMES DUNN re-examined. They did not appear to be drunk - I could not see the least appearance of it; I did not know them before - if they had been loose women about that neighbourhood I must have known them - I know Collins, but did not see her there; I did not hear either of the witnesses use any indecent language.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Did either of them mention a cast in his eye? A. Yes; they said he had a cast in his eye; Collins might have been there and I not see her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-123

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

122. CHARLES EVANS was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Gregory Prater , on the 10th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 purse, value 1s. 6d.; 12 sovereigns, 2 half-crowns, and 3 shillings , his property.

WILLIAM GREGORY PRATER . I am now a prisoner in the King's Bench. On the 10th of November I lived at the New Inn. Old Bailey - between five and six o'clock that evening I was a breast of Fleet-market, in Ludgate-hill , there was a great crowd in the street - I had a purse containing this money; I was passing on towards Fleet-street, and was tripped up by the prisoner - he had not spoken to me - I did not know him before, but am certain of him; there were seven more in the gang - I called the officer, and one came and seized him; I felt the prisoner's hand in my pocket two or three times - I am certain it was his hand: the money was in my righthand pantaloons-pocket - the others made off with the purse - it was not found on the prisoner; he was not out of my sight after putting his hand into my pocket - he was secured directly; the Lord Mayor's procession had passed.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Which way were you going? A. Towards Fleet-street; I became a prisoner about ten days after; I had come straight from the New Inn; I had drank nothing that day - I did not go to see the show, but was out on busines, and on the Fleet-market side; he followed me and tripped me up; there was a great crowd and confusion - I did not fall from the pressure of the crowd, but was tripped up; I felt his hand in my pocket - he was behind me; I did not count the gang, but the officers and several people said there were seven; the crowd did not push me down.

Q. The man who tripped you up was behind you - how do you undertake to swear it was the prisoner? A. I looked him in the face just after I was down - there was a great crowd near me.

Q. And seeing him, you conclude he is the man who tripped you up? A. Yes; he was taken immediately and searched, but no property found.

COURT. Q. Did you see the prisoner from the time his hand was in your pocket? A. Yes, immediately I was lifted up; I did not see his face at the time his hand was in my pocket; only when I was lifted up.

EDWARD HUGGLESTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I saw the prisoner and a number more round Prater - that was the first thing I saw; I am quite certain of his person: a drove of bullocks was coming out of Fleet-market- they stopped the way; the procession had passed nearly an hour - Prater was going into crowd; these men surrounded him, and forced him on - the bullocks passed, and the crowd went on; I heard Prater cry out that he was robbed - I pushed into the crowd and seized the prisoner. who was down on his knee close by Prater; I laid hold of him, pulled him out of the crowd, and took him into a shop opposite - I searched him, but found nothing on him - Prater did not point him out, but I considered he was the man being close to him; he was tripped up before I got to the spot.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he did not, in your presence, charge him with the robbery? A. No - I took him from seeing him near his person; it was between five and six o'clock, and nearly dark.

JOSEPH WILLIAM HADDOCK . I am a constable. I was at the corner of Fleet-market about half-past five o'clock, and saw Mr. Prater; I saw the prisoner with several others pushing about in the crowd - they were not going on, but remained nearly in the same spot; as soon as a throughfare was made, by the oxen passing, I heard Prater call out that he was robbed - he was then on the ground, and the prisoner kneeling down by his side on

one knee; I went up and saw the prisoner draw his hand from the prosecutor's pocket - I laid hold of him immediately, and the others I believe went off, but I took the prisoner away directly; he was searched afterwards, but nothing found.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any body in the crowd that was not pushing about? A.Certainly - they were all in motion, trying to go on, but they were stationary; they could not get on for the oxen - I might be two yards from Prater when he was knocked down, but I did not see it; he was down before he called out, and was surrounded immediately he fell - I pushed through them; I was behind him - the prisoner was down on one knee by the right-hand side of me, and on the right side of the prosecutor, who was on his back; I was to his left, and saw the prisoner draw his right hand from his right-hand pocket.

Q. Do you mean to say he drew his hand from his pocket, or out of it? A. From it - I cannot swear his hand was in it.

Q.Was he not down assisting the man up? A. I cannot say, but I do not think he was; there was a gas-light - I did not seize him by the hand, but by the collar; I saw his right hand distinctly, but saw nothing in it - my brother officer was on the right-hand side of him; I do not know which of us got up first.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work till twelve o'clock that day, and said to my wife I should like to go and see this show, because they talked about Gog and Magog; I went - there was nothing of that; I was returning when this officer came and took me, and said I had robbed a man; I was going home, only the beasts coming by made me stop - I was brought up on the Tuesday morning; the prosecutor said he could not swear to me, he believed I was the man, and on the Saturday he swore I was the man, by the officer's persuasion.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-124

123. JOSEPH CUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Francis .

THOMAS FRANCIS . I am a shoemaker , and live in Fleet-market . These shoes hung at my door, within reach of any body; I was at the back of the shop, and did not see them taken, but heard they were gone - I went out and caught a person about one hundred yards from the shop; I had seen him busy in moving something from his coat, and give it to the prisoner, who is a stranger.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD . I am a constable. I was standing opposite Fleet-market, near Francis' shop, and saw the prisoner in company with another running from Fleet-market; Francis, who was pursuing, took hold of the other, and the prisoner ran down Field-lane - I parsued, and took him with the shoes under his coat; he had run, but was stopping when I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in the market- I was not running.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-125

124. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 1 gown, value 8s., and 1 shawl, value 5s. the goods of John Hodges .

MARY HODGES . I am the wife of John Hodges , clothworker , of Wood-street ; these things hung on the first-floor. On the 3d of December, at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a person coming down stairs, and caught the prisoner, who is a stranger, on the stairs with them wet in his apron; our warehouse-door is open in the day-time - I had seen them safe twenty minutes before.

JOSEPH KILLEYSLEY . I occupy the lower part of Hodges' warehouse. Mrs. Hodges called me - I went, and laid hold of the prisoner; he dropped the things.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to go to Wood-street, to call on John Williams; I was going down stairs - these things lay there.

MRS. HODGES. No young man lodges at our house - he inquired for nobody.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18281204-126

125. JOHN MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 40lbs. of lead, of and belonging to William Brass , and then fixed to a certain building of his .

WILLIAM BRASS . I am a builder - my workshops are in Wood-street, Cheapside: the house, No. 23, Wood-street , belongs to me, and was under repair. On the 10th of November, I saw the lead safe; the prisoner was employed at the building; I went there on the 11th - this lead was then stripped from the front; it weighs 40lbs. - I saw it fitted to the building, and have no doubt of it: he was a labourer employed by the plasterer.

WILLIAM HENMAN . I am a constable. On the 11th of November, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was passing these premises, and hearing the door shut too, and knowing the men had left work, I looked through the board, and saw the prisoner shutting the door - this bundle was lying down by his side; I said "What are you doing?" he said "Shutting the door:" I said "Does Mr. Brass know you are here at this time?" he said "Yes, and if you will go with me, he will satisfy you;" I said "What have you got in this bundle?" he said "Bits of wood," but I found it was lead - he endeavoured to escape, but I secured him; I saw the lead fitted - it matched exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it lying down, and thinking it was of no use, I took it up to make a few halfpence, being very much distressed.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-127

126. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 1 watch, value 10s.; 1 chain, value 3s.; 2 seals, value 10s.; 1 key, value 5s., and 3 sovereigns , the property of Robert Brows .

ROBERT BROWS . I am a carpenter , and have lodged in Cock-court, St. Martin's-le-grand , for four years: the prisoner lodged in the same room as me for two nights - we slept in the same bed. On Thursday, the 20th of November, I went to bed alone. at ten o'clock; the prisoner did not come into the room till seven in the morning; I was then getting up - he threw himself on the bed with his clothes on; I went to my box then, and saw my watch there - I shut the box, but am not certain that I locked it -

I had three sovereigns there as well; I left him in the room- I returned in the evening; the watch and sovereigns were then gone; I saw them next day at twelve o'clock in possession of Squires; nobody else slept in the same room.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not certain that you locked your box? A. No; I left him in the bed-room -I did not know he was going to Birmingham that day.

JOSEPH SQUIRES . I am a baker, and live in St. Martin's-le-grand. On the 21st of November, I was going down St. Martin's-le-grand, and saw the prisoner - he offered me the duplicate of a watch - I did not buy it then, but appointed to meet him at five o'clock; I bought the duplicate of him at half-past seven - that was on the evening of the robbery; it was pawned at Essex's - I redeemed it that evening, and heard it was stolen the same evening.

Cross-examined. Q. On what day did you meet him? A.Wednesday, the 21st; I had known him about three weeks by his lodging in Cock-court - my brother lodged in the same house; I had no reason to suspect him - I gave him 2s. for the duplicates; it was pawned for 8s.

GEORGE HANSON . I am servant to Mr. Essex, of Aldersgate-street: the prisoner pawned this watch for 8s. - he came afterwards with Squires, who redeemed it in his presence.

Cross-examined. Q. The prisoner did not seem anxious to go away, did he? A. No.

WILLIAM SMALLSHAW . I am a pawnbroker. A steel chain, seal and key, were pawned with me by the prisoner, on the 20th November, (Thursday, I think,) for 3s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MITCHELL . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge about half-past eight o'clock on Thursday, the 20th of November - I found three sovereigns and a half and some silver on him; he said he had brought eight sovereigns from Birmingham.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-128

127. RICHARD PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 29lbs. of lead, value 3s. belonging to James Chant , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

JAMES CHANT . I rent the house, No. 40, Mark-lane , but do not live there - I let it out as counting-houses, and had employed the prisoner to mend the pavement in the yard the day before this happened: I am certain the lead was then safe; he worked for the Board of Orduance, and came on Tuesday evening to do this job - he took up some stones, and came next night from six to nine o'clock - the lead was part of a spout in the yard - he had nothing to do with that; I saw the yard next morning, and the lead was gone; it cost me 25s. to replace it.

Prisoner. Q. You told me to do what was necessary, and I found out a leak in the cellar? A. I gave him no order to touch the lead - the gutter was perfect.

JAMES HALL . I am a patrol. A few minutes before nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of the door with a small cask on his shoulder, and a shovel - I followed him into Hart-street, and then stopped him, and asked what he had got there - he said, a small bag of composition, and what were his working tools; but I found it was a shovel, this lead, and a lock; I took him to the watch-house, and asked who he worked for; he said he could not tell me his master's name, nor where he lived; I asked if his employer ordered him to take away the lead; he said No, and I detained him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner, in his defence, entered into a long detail of the work he had performed, and stated that as the lodgers were removing, he thought it was best to remove the lead for safety.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18281204-129

NEW COURT, Third Day.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

128. THOMAS DARVIL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 3 sows, price 8l. , the property of George Lovett .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-130

129. GEORGE PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , 19lbs. weight of bacon, value 10s. , the goods of Henry Ficking .

HENRY FICKING . I keep a chandlers'-shop in Essex-street, Whitechapel . About a quarter after nine o'clock on the evening of the 21st of November, I was in my little room, and heard somebody in the shop; I turned, and saw the prisoner run out with something in his apron- I ran and overtook him in a minute, with a piece of bacon in his apron; I had seen it safe five minutes before.

JOHN POWELL . I am a watchman. I went to Mr. Ficking's - I saw the prisoner coming along with the bacon - the prosecutor laid hold of him in the passage of a public-house; I took him - he was about fifty yards from the shop; and said he hoped I would forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home and passed this man's shop - a man ran by me and dropped this bacon; he said something which I did not understand; I took up the bacon, went on, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18281204-131

130. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 3lbs. weight of beef, value 2s. the goods of Isaac Turtle .

ISAAC TURTLE . I am a butcher , and live in Tottenham-court-road . About eleven o'clock in the morning of the 25th of November, I saw the prisoner take a piece of beef out of a dish we generally keep salt-beef in, inside my shop - he ran down the road; I pursued him - he threw it out of his apron; I saw Bond, the officer, secure him about one hundred yards from my shop; I picked up the beef.

JAMES BOND . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; Turtle's statement is correct.

Prisoner. I had no other way of getting my living; my father and mother turned me out of doors.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-132

131. WILLIAM HENDERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 2 cheeses, value 3s. the goods of George Taylor Fox .

FREDERICK BOND . I was near Mr. Fox's shop, be

tween six and seven o'clock on the 15th of November; I saw the prisoner take one cheese and walk away with it, he then put it into his right-hand coat-pocket - Mr. Fox and his son were lighting the gas; I told them of it - the son ran after him and told him to come back, that his father wanted him; he said he did not want his father, and turned down Riley-court - the son called Stop thief! he crossed the road and turned down a dark passage; I saw him taken by Mr. Fox - I lost sight of him in the passage, because it was dark, but am quite sure he is the man.

GEORGE TAYLOR FOX . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Cromer-street . My window slides up, and there is a board on which we put cheese; while I was trying to make the gas burn better, it all went out - at that time this took place; I pursued and took the prisoner.

GEORGE FOX . I went after the prisoner, whom Bond pointed out; he went into Riley-court, and I called Stop thief! he crossed, and went down another court which had no thoroughfare; my father came up and took him - the cheese was not found on him, but I felt it in his pocket when he turned down Riley-court; my father said "Go down the court." and I went and found these two cheeses - I only lost sight of him when he was down the court.

BENJAMIN BARRETT . I am an officer. I produce the two cheeses which were delivered to me by Mr. Fox.

Prisoner. I never had them in my possession; I was going up the street.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-133

123. THOMAS MULLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 tobacco-box, value 6d.; 1 knife, value 3d.; and the sum of 4d. in copper monies , the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a labourer . My waistcoat, with a tobacco-box and a knife in the pocket, lay on a lamppost in East Smithfield , on the 30th of October, between three and four o'clock; I hung up my shovel and my waistcoat on it - I did not miss it till some persons came and asked me if I had not lost my waistcoat; they sent me to Mr. Murray's shop, and there I found it and the prisoner in custody.

JOSEPH PARKER . I was standing at Mr. Murray's door, and saw the prisoner cross the road and pick up a waistcoat which he put under his coat - he ran up Farthing-alley; he turned round and saw me watching him - he then went into a house and came out without the waistcoat, he came down the alley, and went up Butler's-buildings, and in a short time he came down without his coat; I informed an officer who took him - we went and got the waistcoat; I am certain he is the man - I should have stopped him, but did not know but that he was going to take it to some person at the Docks.

JANE BARKWOOD . I live in Farthing-alley. On the 30th of October, about a quarter or half-past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner come up the alley, with something under his jacket, and go by my door; I noticed him particularly, by seeing Mr. Parker watch him - this gave me a suspicion; he made a stop several times in going up the court, and at last went into Mrs. Price's, which is the end house, and when he came out he had nothing; I went and told Mrs. Price.

MARY PRICE . I live at the end house in Farthing-alley; the prisoner came and asked for a person of the name of George; I said there was no such person there - he was quite a stranger; I was very busy, and did not notice any thing he had with him - when he was gone my neighbour came, and said he had left something that was stolen; he had left nothing to my knowledge, but when I came to the place where he had stood there laid this waistcoat.

ROBERT MARSTON . I am an officer. I produce the waistcoat, a tobacco-box, and the knife, which were in the pocket of it; I took the prisoner just before four o'clock- he denied having taken them, and we had a struggle.

Prisoner. Q. Was I drunk? A. No; you appeared as sober as you are now.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went up the alley to look for a friend; when I came out I went to a public-house; then a man shoved me off the curb-stone, and I pulled off my coat- I was tipsy; the pawnbroker's man then came up and took me to the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-134

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

133. JOHN PULBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November , 10 pairs of shoes, value 20s. , the goods of the Guardians of the Poor of St. James', Clerkenwell .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Joseph West .

THIRD COUNT, stating them to be the goods of the Overseers of the Poor.

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH WEST . I am master of Clerkenwell workhouse : the prisoner was employed there as clicker , and had access to the shoes and leather, but he had no right to carry any away; all the shoes are marked with "C. W." with an iron, which I produce - these shoes are the property of the Overseers of the parish, and are in my care.

WILLIAM SCHOFIELD . I am one of the Overseers of St. James', Clerkenwell. About the 15th of November a great number of shoes were missing from the workhouse; I went to the prisoner's lodgings, with Lloyd, the officer, and there we found seven pairs of shoes, which the officer took charge of.

ANDREW LLOYD . I went to the prisoner's lodgings; I found these shoes, and these pieces of leather - I found two duplicates in a pocket-book, in a box, at his lodgings, and two more duplicates on his person.

JOHN MCLACHLAN . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a pair of shoes pawned with me, on the 2d of August, by a woman named Ann Edwards - I gave her this duplicate.

THOMAS CORDWELL . I am a pawnbroker. I have two pairs of shoes, pawned in the names of Sarah Jones , and Eliza Jones , for which I gave these two duplicates.

JOSEPH WEST . These shoes are marked with this iron- we mark one of each pair; this pair has been soled and tapped with leather belonging to the Overseers.

Prisoner's Defence. The shoes were given me by different Overseers. I applied to the different monthly

Overseers, and was mostly employed in the wardrobe; and my wife was employed at her needle; she often had shoes made her a present of - if she had not, I should not have been able to have kept her and my children; some of them were pawned because I got others, and raised money on them to suport my family; some of these never belonged to the house, though they have been mended with leather from the house. I had been employed in cutting, and the gentleman, who has the management of the house, said I must learn to make shoes, which I said I was willing to do. I have a wife now sinking in a decline, and five infant children.

JOHN SCOTT . I am one of the Guardians of the Poor, of the parish of Clerkenwell. The prisoner has a wife and children, and has had shoes from time to time, but we never give shoes away without persons are in great distress; and, to prevent imposition, they always go away with them on their feet; most of these are quite new - we missed fifty-five pairs in all.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-135

134. JOHN MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 watch, value 20s. , the goods of William Edward East .

WILLIAM EDWARD EAST . I lodge at Somer's-town ; the prisoner and his mother lodged in the house. I lost my watch from the mantel-piece, in my room up stairs, on the 5th of November; I heard some person coming down stairs while I was at breakfast - I left the watch safe when I came down. I went up in half an hour, and it was gone; I directly commenced a search for the prisoner, but he could not be found; I did not see him again till the 10th, when he was taken by the officer; his mother gave me the duplicate of the watch on the Sunday.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; he said he had pawned the watch - I asked what he had done with the money; he said he did not pawn it, another boy pawned it, and some boys persuaded him to spend the money.

PHILIP EATON . I am a pawnbroker, of High Holborn. I have a watch, pawned on the 5th of November, by a boy, but I do not think it was the prisoner - I gave this duplicate for it.

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18281204-136

135. SARAH COUTS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , 1 gown, value 8s. , the goods of Susannah Terrell .

SUSANNAH TERRELL . I live in Pear Tree-court, Shoreditch ; the prisoner lodged in another room in the same house - I work at a laundress' , at Hoxton. When I came home at night, on the 19th of November, I missed a gown from my box in my bed-room; I suspected the prisoner - she said she had pawned it, and I might take the duplicate; she made use of very bad language - I never authorised her to pawn it; I have known her three or four years - she never pawned any thing of mine before - she said she pawned it in Shoreditch, but it was in Bethnal Green-road.

WILLIAM COMBS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Church-street, Shoreditch. I have a gown pawned on the 19th of November, to the best of my belief, by the prisoner.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutrix had lent her the gown to pledge.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-137

136. JAMES STEVENS , alias ROBERT STANLEY , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 4 spoons, value 40s., and 1 shirt, value 10s. , the goods of the Honourable Frederick Dudley Ryder .

WILLIAM ALEXANDER . I am valet to the Honourable Frederick Dudley Ryder , eldest son of Lord Harrowby - he resides at his Lordship's house in Grosvenor-square , and has some plate of his own; I saw it all safe on the 25th of October, in a cupboard in the bulter's pantry, where it is usally kept. The prisoner has been in the employ of the family for these eight years, as a sort of odd man - he did not sleep there: he had access to the butler's pantry: I recollect seeing him about the house on the Monday, and on Wednesday, the 29th, an officer came to the house; in consequence of what he said I looked at the plate, and missed these two table-spoons, this dessert-spoon, and these two tea-spoons: the prisoner had a good character - he was paid by the servants.

MOSS WOLFE . I am a salesman, and live at No. 53, Holywell-lane, Shoreditch. On the 29th of October I was in Upper Rathbone-place, and saw the prisoner with something in a basket; I asked him if he had any thing to sell- he produced these spoons and two shirts; I asked where he lived - he said at No. 59. Duke-street, Manchester-square; I said I would go and see if it were true - I gave him into custody.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I produce these spoons, which I received from Wolfe; the prisoner was taken into custody.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18281204-138

137. DENNIS HAYS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 4 sacks of potatoes, value 17s. , the goods of Martin Doherty .

MARTIN DOHERTY . I live on Saffron-hill, and deal in potatoes . On the 30th of October I was at a wharf in Tooley-street, looking at some potatoes; the prisoner came and recommended some to me, and I bought four sacks - he asked me to let him take them to my house, to which I agreed - he got a truck, put the sacks on it, and I assisted him part of the way, then gave him my address, and agreed to give him 1s. 6d., which was to be paid at my house: I parted with him between twelve and one o'clock- I got home about half-past two; he had not been there: I found him the next morning, at the next wharf to where I bought them - I asked him what he had done with them; he said he met a person who gave him something, and got him tipsy, and then he insisted that he should sell the potatoes, which he did, and spent the money; he shewed me the house that he sold them at, and the persons shewed me the potatoes, but would not deliver them up - the Magistrate would not grant me an order to get an officer to take them.

THOMAS GOLDING . I am a potatoe-dealer. I bought

three sacks of potatoes of the prisoner, for 11s. 5 1/2d.; I asked where he got them - he said he bought them of Day, and he shot them down: the prosecutor came the next day, and claimed them, but I thought I would not give them up, as I gave the full value for them - I recommended him to give charge of the man; I attended before the Magistrate, who told me it did not signify if I kept a sample of them, and brought them here; the prisoner appeared to be drunk, but he could walk with them quite steady - I sold them at a loss; they were very bad ones: I am no great judge of them-I have been but three months in the trade: I had mixed them with some others, as I had no place to keep them separate.

CHARLOTTE PENSCHKY . The prisoner came to my door a little after four o'clock, and I bought the other sack of potatoes of him; he had been drinking, but was not very drunk - he brought them into the shop very well; I paid him 3s. 4 1/2d. for it; they were very indifferent potatoes - I mixed them with some others in my cellar, which I sold; I have not been long in the trade: he told me they were his own - I heard afterwards they were not, but I sold them; no person told me I must not sell them - he swore by all the powers above they were his own, and thought they were.

WILLIAM MARLBOROUGH . I am an officer. The prisoner offered me some potatoes, but I would not buy them.

Prisoner's Defence. I agreed to take the potatoes home, and he told me he was coming; he went with me to the top of the street, and then gave me his direction - I cannot read; I pulled the truck into Smithfield - I met a man, and asked him to assist me; I gave him the direction, and he said it was not Saffron-hill, but some street in Cheapside - I went there, and it was not there; I then went back again: the man gave me a glass of gin or two - he took some of the potatoes, and shewed them to the woman first - she sent her boy, and said she would give me 2s. 6d. per cwt.; I left it, and said the sack should go back - I said,"I shall have to make the money good when the man they belong to comes down." I took the sacks back to the wharf.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-139

138. THOMAS HUGHES and JOHN SIMMONDS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of John Wildey .

THOMAS ROBARTS. I am a painter. On the 12th of November I was in Oxford-road ; I saw Simmonds take this hat from Mr. Wildey's door, and give it to Hughes - he got half way across the road; I took Hughes with the hat - Simmonds was taken afterwards.

ALFRED WILDEY . I am the son of John Wildey. -This hat was hanging at his door for sale; I know nothing of the prisoners.

HUGHES' Defence. I was standing at the door, and this young man was standing there; he asked me if I was going the same way he was - he gave me the hat to carry.

SIMMONDS' Defence. I was going home, and the watchman came and said, "I want you about the hat, which the potatoe boy said you took;" I know nothing about it."

HUGHES - GUILTY . Aged 15.

SIMMONDS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-140

139. CATHERINE LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 2 wooden toys, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Pickard .

JOSEPH PICKARD . I live in Plumtree-street, and am a brush manufacturer . On the 28th of November, these two wooden horses stood four feet within my shop; I heard a noise, turned, and saw the prisoner with them in her hand - I ran out, and took hold of her; she immediately put them down - she had just gone by my window; these are them.

Prisoner's Defence. They were lying at the door - I picked them up; I was going to take them home - I never put them into my apron.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18281204-141

140. GEORGE NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 2 pairs of boots, value 10s. , the goods of William Hubbard Dutton .

WILLIAM HAYWARD . I live with Mr. William Hubbard Dutton, a boot-maker , in St. Martin's-court . On the 14th of November, the witness, Campbell, came and said two boys had run away with some boots - I went out, and saw a lad with the boots, and the prisoner talking to him; I went up and asked for the boots, and the prisoner knocked me down - I got up, and the prisoner knocked me down a second time; I got up, and followed him till he was taken - the boots were thrown down by the other boy.

JESSE CAMPBELL . I live opposite Mr. Dutton's. On the 14th of November, I saw two boys looking in at the window - they kneeled down, and one, less than the prisoner, took a pair of boots; the prisoner, I believe, was looking in at the window at the time - they went on with the boots, and I told Hayward, who ran out, and saw them - I believe the prisoner is one; he was dressed like a sailor, and had the same things on at the office - he was not dressed as he is now.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear to my face? A. No - but I swear to the dress, and did so when I saw him.

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and followed the prisoner - I saw these boots thrown away in Earl's-court; I took them up, and put them into the shop - Hayward still followed the prisoner, and I saw a gentleman stop him; he had sailor's clothes on - I had seen him and another lad together about three minutes before the boots were taken; another person stopped the little boy with the boots - the prisoner went to knock him down, and knocked his hat off.

Prisoner's Defence. I was comming through the court; I stopped and looked into a window - there was a boy lurking about the door; I went on, and he passed me with the boots - then Hayward came, and asked me if I had seen any one with boots; I pushed him down - then he came again, and asked if I had seen any body pass with boots; I told him no, and gave him a shove - I must have hit him with great force to have knocked him down.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-142

141. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 sow, price 5l. , the property of William Williams .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. I live at Ealing , and am a publican . I lost a sow on the 26th of October - she was safe

in the sty when I went to bed the night before; the prisoner lived at Turnham-green - the entrails of a pig were found upon a dung-hill, about seventy or eighty yards from his house.

JONATHAN SELLS . I am a butcher. I was desired by the prosecutor to go and seek for a sow - I went to Turnham-green; I saw the entrails of a sow, which I opened, and found eleven pigs - it appeared to have been about half gone; I went with the officer to the prisoner's - there we found, in a back wash-house, two hind lines of pork, which appeared to me to be fresh killed - the prisoner's wife brought down a quantity of pork, salted; the belly-piece was cut off; I could not see whether it was a sow pig or not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-143

142. JANE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , 1 cloak, value 15s. , the goods of Joseph Wood .

JAMES ELLISTON. I live with Joseph Wood , a linen-draper , in Shoreditch. On the 27th of November, I was serving a lady: the prisoner came into the shop, and ran out again - I ran out, and took her with this cloak on her arm; I know it by the mark on it.

Prisoner. I am sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-144

143 JOHN WILDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of John Baker .

JOHN BAKER. I drive a one horse chariot . On the 30th of October, about half-past five o'clock in the morning, I was in Tottenham-court-road - I had occasion to go and put two letters into the Post-office; I got down and left my chariot in the care of Robert Hawkins - I left my box coat on the box; when I returned, it was gone -I have never seen it since.

ROBERT HAWKINS. I go out with asses' milk, and live with my mother. I was left to mind Baker's chariot near the corner of Warren-street - I was on the left-hand side, near the horse's head; I saw the great coat on the box - the prisoner came, put his foot on the wheel, and took it off; he went across the road, and that was all I saw of him - I told the prosecutor of it directly he came up; I was not acquainted with the prisoner before, but I knew his person.

Cross-examined by Mr. CHURCHILL. Q. How long have you known him? A. Four years; he lived in Fitzroy-market - I knew his name and told the coachman; it was light - I was at the horse's head, and he came on the other side; my head reached to the head of the horse - I had no conversation with Mrs. Wilday about this; I do not know her - I never said I expected to get something if this man were convicted.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I was the officer or duty - the prosecutor brought Hawkins to me, and said he had lost a coat; Hawkins said he did not take it, but Jack Wilday did - I went down the road and took the prisoner, who I knew before.

JOHN BAKER . Hawkins did not call out when I came up; I came up and said "Where's the coat?" then he said it was taken - he was looking to see where it was when I came up; I ran directly and Hawkins with me -I do not know whether he told me the coat was lost before I spoke to him; I believe I spoke first.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work at my father's when I was taken - I had but that minute come into the yard.

MR. CHURCHILL called -

CATHERINE WILDAY . I live at No.8, Market-street, Fitzroy-market. I was anxious to know the truth respecting the stealing of the coat, hearing what was reported, and I called to Hawkins, who was standing with a lot more boys, and said "Is your name Hawkins?" he said Yes; I said "What is it respecting this coat, that my lodger has been said to steal?" he said "Yes, I have sworn to him; and my mother and brother say I must stick to it;" I said "The officers are after another person;" he said "I have only sworn to one, and I shall have 3l. 16s. for it; and one is enough to transport:" he said"I hear he has a sister, who is very well off, and if any body would give me a little money, I would be out of the way, and not appear against him" - this was in my own parlour.

COURT. Q. Was the prisoner lodging with you? A. Yes - I am his aunt; he has lodged sixteen months with me - I think it was on the Monday night - I was at my door and called this lad; I think he was throwing himself in my way - the coat was stolen on a Thursday, and I think this was Monday; he is a notorious character, and is about with bad boys at all hours - I never knew him in custody, and did not know him before; but I have heard of him, and knew his brother well; the prisoner was very unwell one day, and did not come down till between three and four o'clock - I said to him "John, how came you so late?" he said "I was not well;" he went out to go to his father's, and I saw him no more; but I heard the report, in a short time, of what had happened; I cannot say what day it was - Warren-street is about a stone's throw from my house. The prisoner works for his father, in the same market, within a few doors of me - his father pays his rent; I know nothing of the coat: I did not ask Hawkins who was to give him the 3l. 16s. - he said the officer told him so; his own brother told me he was an infamous character, and he would not be ruled by his mother or him, and he should give him up to himself

ROBERT HAWKINS re-examined. Q. Were you in the parlour with Mrs. Wilday? A. I did not know that was Mrs. Wilday - I was in the parlour with her; I said somebody told me there would be 3l. 16s. for transporting the person, but I did not wish to have any money.

COURT to JOHN BAKER. Q. How long were you absent? A. Not more than a quarter of a minute, or from that to half a minute; when I returned, the boy was there; I stood with my foot on the step, and inquired what there was to pay for the letter - I had the money in my hands; the lady told me what there was to pay; I paid in copper; I believe I asked as I stood at the door, and they said 4d.

WILLIAM REDDINGS . I live in Dean-street, Hampstead-road, and am a shoemaker. I know Hawkins very well; I would not believe him on his oath, nor take his word for a pin - he lived with me about four months.

COURT. Q. Why would you not believe him on his oath? A. He told me so many lies - if he went on an

errand, I could not believe what he said when he came back.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-145

144. MARIA RUTTER was indicted for stealing, on on the 28th of October , 7 books, value 5s.; 2 pairs of gloves, value 2s.; 1 ear-ring, value 1s.; 11 plates, value 2s.; 1 cornelian stone, value 1s., and 4lbs. weight of soap, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Fairbairn , her master.

ROBERT FAIRBAIRN. I am a bookbinder . The prisoner was in my service - I missed some property, and applied to Marlborough-street before I discharged her; when she was gone, I went and scarched at No. 18, Exeter-street, Strand, where she lodged; I had kept one sovereign of her wages to see if she had left my property correct; she came for it, and told me that she lived in Exeter-street; I got the officer, and went there - her mother opened her box, and offered to shew every thing; I found three books of mine in it; she then opened some drawers of another daughter of hers, when I found a variety of articles belonging to me.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I went to search the lodging, and found this cap and this ear-ring; these plates and other things were in different places.

MR. FAIRHAIRN. This property is mine - this soap was secreted on the top of a cupboard in the prisoner's room; it had been locked up in a cupboard in my house; I can swear to these books as being mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The soap was given me to wash with - I bought a little pearl-ash; I borrowed two books to read; when I asked for my wages, he said "What has become of my property?"

SUSAN ELLIS . I am the prisoner's sister. This little box, this ring, and these nine plates, which the prosecutor took away, are mine.

COURT. Q. Are the books yours? A. No; nor the soap; the salt-cellar is mine, and has been so for years.

MR. FAIRBAIRN. This witness swore to my gloves, and they had my name in them; she was taken up as an accomplice. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-146

145. GEORGE GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of December , 1 copper pot, value 4s., the goods of John Rodhard , and fixed to a certain building of his; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN RODBARD. I have a cottage at Stanmore , which is empty - these was a copper pot fixed there; I saw it safe last Monday morning, and looked into it; on Wednesday, it was missing; the prisoner is a day-labourer- his father and mother live in a cottage of mine.

BENJAMIN CHANDLER . I live at Stanmore, and keep a shop in the ironmongery and braziery line. I bought a copper-pot of the prisoner on Wednesday morning for 4s. 6d. - he said it belonged to his mother, who sent him round with it; I sent to his father and mother to know if it were their's - they said No - the lid was left behind; it has been bruised and battered about; there is 14lbs. of that and the iron - I gave 6d. per lb. for it.

SARAH NEWMAN . I lived in the little cottage; I knew this copper - it was fixed there; I did not miss it.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in Mr. Drummond's shrubbery - then went and sold it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-147

146. CHARLES BOWLES LEA and HENRY PEARCE were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 66lbs. weight of lead, value 12s. , the goods of the Governors of the London Hospital ; against the Statute.

MR. CHURCHHILL conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH TOTHILL . I am engineer at the London-hospital . I found part of the gutter taken away on Sunday, the 4th of November; I went and told the Governors, and they set me and Brown to watch that night - and about eleven o'clock, we thought it not right to stop any longer; we went, and told the watchman to watch: he went off at six - at five we went again, and waited till near half-past six, when Brown said it was not worth while to wait any longer; soon afterwards, Lea came, and made a jump on the wall, and jumped on the parapet; I let him alone for about a quarter of an hour, then I thought he had been there long enough; I jumped on the wall, and he jumped down - I saw no more of him till he was taken; I did not see Pearce at all; Lea was cutting a sheet of lead with this knife - when he jumped down, the knife fell from his hand; some lead had been carried away on the Saturday night.

EDWARD BROWN . I was with Tothill - what he has stated is correct.

JAMES ROWLEY . I am an officer. I received Lea from Brown in the passage of the hospital; I know nothing of Pearce.

FRANCIS KEYS . I apprehended Pearce - he was pointed out to me on the Wednesday after the robbery, by one of the witnesses.

WILLIAM SCAVIOR . On the Saturday night, between six and seven o'clock, I saw Lea at the top of the hospital; Pearce and another man were there - two gentlemen were coming along, and I heard Pearce say bob, and Lea laid down; I am quite sure they are the men - I saw Lea let a hamper down, with something heavy in it; Lea said, "Shall I let it down with a rope." he said No - then he threw it down, and Lea got down; Pearce and the other man lifted it on Lea's head. and he took it off; the officer came to my house on the Sunday afternoon, and I told him.

JOHN BUCKEL . I was there on the Saturday night with Scavior - I saw the same as he did; what he has stated is correct.

MR. LAING. I am solicitor to the London-hospital. The Governors are incorporated by Act of Parliament: they are called in the charter, the Governors of the London-hospital.

LEA'S Defence. I left work at six o'clock, and went home to tea; these boys have forsworn themselves.

LEA - GUILTY . Aged 19.

PEARCE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

There was another indictment against the prisoners.

Reference Number: t18281204-148

147. ANN BIRCH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 hat, value 9s., and 1 handkerchief, value 3s. , the goods of George Mason .

GEORGE MASON. I am a labourer at Mr. Laycock's. I got very tipsy on the 24th of November - I lost my hat, handkerchief, and money; I do not know any thing about the prisoner - I do not know whether I went home with her.

WILLIAM LADD . I am a watchman, of Islington. I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner drinking outside a public-house; the prisoner was rather the worse for liquor, and the man was very much so - he fell down; I saw her untie his neck-handkerchief - I did not know but she belonged to him; I went and called the hour of eleven, and when I came back I found the prosecutor without his hat and handkerchief - I went and cried half-past eleven, and then I found her in custody of another watchman, with this hat and handkerchief.

CHARLES CHATTEL . About half-past eleven o'clock the prisoner passed me - I said "Old girl you have got a good hat there;" she said "Yes, will you buy it?" I said, "Let me see if it fits me;" I put it on and said "What do you want for it?" she said "Three bobs" - I said, "Come to the Camden's Head and I will pay you;" I got her under the gas-light and then said, "How long have you dealt in hats," I took her into custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-149

148. MARY STEWART was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , 1 shawl, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Hall , from the person of Charlotte Hall , spinster .

CHARLOTTE HALL . I sent my infant son Thomas out with my little daughter, (who is nine years of age,) on the 31st of October, about the middle of the day, to take a walk - the baby had a pair of shoes and a blue shawl on; she returned, and the child had lost the shawl and one shoe; I have a sick husband, and cannot often send my daughter to church; I do when I can - the prisoner says she sold the things at a rag-shop.

SOPHIA STEWART . I am the prisoner's mother. On the 31st of October, about one o'clock, she brought home a lightish blue shawl and a child's shoe - she said she found them; I did not make any inquiries - I tore the shoe up and mended my husband's stockings with it, and burnt the sole - I do not know what became of the shawl; she said her mistress lent it her - she wore it that afternoon, went out with it the next morning, then came home without it, and said her mistress had given it to a young woman who had got farther to go than she had.

JOHN MILLS . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner on the 2d of November, about nine o'clock at night; I told her it was for stealing a shawl off a child's neck - I took her to the watch-house, and she told the watch-housekeeper she sold it in a court in the Strand for 3d.; she said she took it off a child's neck - the prosecutrix was there and said if she produced the shawl she would not give charge of her - the watch house-keeper might say she would not be prosecuted.

CHARLOTTE HALL . I gave charge of the prisoner at the watch-house - the gentleman asked if she had done such a thing; she said she had - I said "You have robbed my child," she made no reply; my daughter, who had the child, was with me at the time, and pointed out the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-150

149. CAROLINE MACKEROY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , 1 half-crown, 2 shillings, 1 sixpence, and the sum of 6 1/2d. in copper monies, the monies of Abraham Hague , from his person .

ABRAHAM HAGUE . I am a cutler . About half-past two o'clock in the morning of the 23d of November, the prisoner overtook me in Holborn , and tapped me on the shoulder - (I had been to the Theatre with some friends, and from thence we went and had a pot of ale; we then went to an alamode-beef shop, and staid there till they came to tell us to go) - the prisoner asked me if I would see her home - I said I did not mind; I have no wife; we went together about twenty yards, and I found her hand in my waistcoat-pocket, where I had five penny-pieces; I took hold of her hand, and she had got the money out; I asked her for it back, she would not give it me - I then put my hand to my trousers-pocket and missed a half-crown, two shillings, and a sixpence; it was all safe not two minutes before - no one else was near me; I said if she did not give it me back I would call the watch - she gave me some sauce, and said she had nothing belonging to me; the watchman came out, and I gave her in charge for picking my pocket of five penny-pieces, one half-crown, two shillings, and one sixpence - she dropped the five penny-pieces; the watchman took one shilling from her mouth.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Were you quite sober? A. Yes; we had one pot of ale, and two glasses of gin and water, after leaving the Theatre; and one glass of gin after supper between four of us - I had no more than my share of that; I suppose we staid at the alamode-beef shop till about one o'clock - we had been in a public-house in Red Lion-passage; I was with the prisoner from the time she dropped the penny-pieces till she was searched.

MICHAEL SHINE . I am a watchman. I saw the prosecutor and prisoner, and went up and asked what they were doing there - it was a few yards from Feathers-court - they seemed to be arguing aloud; when I spoke to them the prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner for robbing him - I took her; she dropped five penny-pieces, which I picked up; we thought she had something in her mouth - I put my hand to her throat and she dropped the shilling out of her mouth; I then took her to the watch-house - she had a good way to walk, and I there saw the half-crown taken from her bosom.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you find on her altogether? A. I found nothing on her - she dropped the shilling into my hand, and the watch-house-keeper found the half-crown in her bosom; the prosecutor did not say how much he had lost till he got to the watch-house - I will not be certain whether it was before or after the prisoner was searched, that he said he had been robbed - we had trouble enough in taking her to the watch-house- she kicked, and bit, and struck every person that came near her; she appeared very drunk, the prosecutor appeared perfectly sober; to the best of my belief he did not see me before I spoke to them.

PHILIP RILEY . I was beadle of the night - the prisoner was brought in, and I asked the prosecutor what he was robbed of - he told me; I found this half-crown, this shilling, and this halfpenny, in the prisoner's bosom, and a dirty cap; the prosecutor gave me this farthing, and said he picked it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search her pockets? A. I shook them outside - I did not take them off; the prosecutor said what he had lost before she was searched

here is all he said he had lost within sixpence and one halfpenny.

Prisoner's Defence. I should not know the man if I saw him; I was locked up in the watch-house till morning, and did not know what I was there for.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-151

150. CHARLES GEORGE WALL was indicted for embezzling, on the 26th of October , 1l. 1s. 6d., the monies of William Allan , his master .

WILLIAM ALLAN . I live at No.7, Northumberland-place, and am in the coal trade ; the prisoner was my porter . I had a customer of the name of Mackintosh - he had small coals, and I believe he owed me 1l. 13s. on the 20th of October; if any money had been paid the prisoner, he should have accounted for it as soon as he returned, either to me or Mrs. Allan; he had been with me about seven months; on the 26th of October, I think it was, he paid me 12s., which he said he received of Mr. Mackintosh, and I requested him to call again as soon as he could for the remainder; I applied to Mr. Mackintosh for it about the 28th, and then had the prisoner taken into custody.

JOHN MACKINTOSH . I am a smith. I buy coals of the prosecutor - I paid the prisoner 2s. 9d. a sack; I paid as I had them; the largest sum I ever paid was 6s. or 8s. at a time; I cannot at all say what I paid him in the month of October; I never had any bill or receipt; I paid for them as I had them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-152

151. MARY BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 4 curtains, value 10s.; 1 pillowcase, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 1s.; 2 towels, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s; 1 frock, value 3s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 5 yards of furniture, value 9s., and 4 tassels, value 1s. , the goods of Samuel Smith .

SAMUEL SMITH . I keep the Friend-at-Hand public-house in the Colonnade . The prisoner was eight weeks in my service; I suspected her; and on Monday night, the 3d of November, I went up to her bed, while she was out, and between the mattress and sacking I found a bundle of articles of mine; I did not take it away - but on the following morning I sent her with a note to a friend, desiring them to keep her for an hour; I then went up to her bed and the bundle was gone - I could not find it any where; I sent for the constable - when the prisoner came back I accused her of robbing me, and asked ber to unlock her box; she went up stairs and attempted to open her box, but I believe I opened it myself, and I found the same bundle as I had seen it under the mattress; I asked her if that was all she had robbed me of; she admitted she had taken a table-cloth and some other things.

THOMAS BINFORD KERSWELL . I am a constable. I was sent for and took the prisoner; what the witness has stated is correct.

MARY SMITH . I am the prosecutor's daughter. All these things are my father's; here are four curtains, and a variety of other articles as stated in the indictment.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a woman named Macketts had induced her to commit the offence; and soliciting mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-153

152. WILLIAM WEBSTER was indicted for embezzlement .

BARNARD GRADY . I am a harness-maker , and live in Bedfordbury. The prisoner was my journeyman , I paid him by the week, and being ill, I entrusted him to receive money; I had a customer named John King , he never accounted to me for 6s. 3d. received from him, which he ought to have done directly - it was received on the Saturday, and we used to settle accounts that night; he left my service - I saw him again on the 22d of October; I had not been able to go after him, as I had had the typhus fever myself, and my family.

JOHN KING . I paid the prisoner 6s. 3d. on the 22d of September; he did not give me any receipt - he came and asked me for the money, and I gave it him.

JOHN GRADY . I recollect my father sending the prisoner into the City, to get this money; I waited till half-past eight o'clock, but he did not come home - I then went to a place where I thought he would be, but he never came there; he never came back, nor gave us any notice.

Prisoner's Defence. I was to have 9s. a week; I paid for my lodging, and 4d. for a shirt - the first week I worked one day, and he gave me 1s. 6d.; the second week he gave me a half-crown, I gave 1s. 6d. for a second hand shirt, to carry me through Sunday; on the Monday, I asked his wife to give me some money - she said, "Go to your drunken master, and let him give you some;" on the Saturday following, I went to reckon with him, and he left me 3s. in debt - I could never get it, and kept this money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-154

153. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 1 axletree, value 25s.; 2 springs, value 25s., and 4 scroll-irons, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Paul Wells .

RICHARD MILLEN . I am an officer. On the 24th of November, I saw the prisoner offering some springs and an axletree for sale, at a shop opposite my door, in Cow-cross - they were brought in a cart, by the prisoner and another person; the axletree was partly concealed, so that a person might have supposed it was a pole - they took them out, and put them into the cart again; I went up to the prisoner, and said I thought it was not all right - he said it was his own property, and he would sell them to me, if I would buy them - that he had taken them from his own cart the day before.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. What do you mean by being concealed? A.Part of it was in a bag - it was in Cow-cross-street, a public street; the prisoner's sister's name ( Harriet Wright ) was on the cart, and Barnet, where she lived.

JAMES TIVOY . I was with Millen; what he has stated, is correct - at the watch-house, I asked the prisoner where the cart was; he first said it was lying about his premises, good for nothing - I said I would go and see it; he then said it was no use, it was burnt.

JOSEPH PAUL WELLS . I live at Hadley , and am a

watchmaker . I had a cart there, which I saw safe on the Thursday before I missed the springs and the axletree - that, I believe, was on the 20th of November; I left my cart all correct, in a field belonging to 'Squire Barry - it was not under a shed; the prisoner told me, several months before that, if he wanted a pair of springs and an axletree he should know where to go; I said, "If you rob me, you will rob a church" - these springs and axletree are mine, and belonged to my cart.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you know them by? A. They are two odd springs, and here is some of the grass upon them, worn as it came from the field - it is almost growing upon them now, upon my honour; Hadley is just beyond Barnet.

NATHANIEL LANSBURY . I live at Hadley, and know the cart - I saw it all safe on Sunday morning, the 23d of November.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday morning, the 24th of November, I came up to Billingsgate, being a fishmonger, and one mile, from Barnet, I saw these things in a cart, lying in the King's highway - I took them up, put them into my cart, and went to market; I then went to Cow-cross-street, and saw an iron-shop, and thought I would sell them - this officer came in, and dragged me about like a dog.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-155

154. HANNAH SMART was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 3 sheets, value 1l. 4s., and 2 shifts, value 6s. the goods of Ann Millar .

ANN MILLAR. I live in Little King-street, Camden-town - the prisoner was in my employ for eleven months; on the morning she was taken, I missed these articles, and asked her about them; she said if I would forgive her, she would give me the duplicates, and laid them on the table; I said I could not, and sent for the officer.

JAMES HOWIE . I live with a pawnbroker, in Clarendon-square. I have three sheets, pawned on the 16th of July and 18th of October - I cannot say by whom, but I gave these duplicates for them.

ABRAHAM LORMIER . I am an officer. I received three duplicates from the prosecutrix; the prisoner told me where I could find another - these are the duplicates.

WILLIAM CORDWELL . I am a pawnbroker. I have two shifts, for which I gave these duplicates; I cannot swear who pawned them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court, for the sake of my children.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-156

123. ANDREW JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 4lbs. weight of brass, value 2s. , the goods of James Tindon .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-157

156. JOSEPH CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , part of a pair of bellows, value 10s. , the goods of George Wright .

GEORGE WRIGHT. I live in Long-lane , and am a bellows-maker . On the 24th of November, about half-past four o'clock, I missed a part of a pair of bellows from my door-post; the officer called upon me the next day, and gave me information.

DANIEL REARDON . I am an officer. On the evening of the 24th of November, I was in Old-street-road, and saw the prisoner coming along with the bellows under his arm; he saw me and some more officers, and laid them down at the corner of some rails, and ran along the road -I pursued and took him.

WILLIAM HALL . I was with Reardon, and took up the bellows.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking for work; the officer came and took me - I said it was not me, it was two young men who had run away; I had not had them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-158

157. ANN BONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 10 yards of carpet, value 20s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 5s., and 1 table-cloth, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Sewell .

THOMAS SEWELL. I am a tailor ; the prisoner was a lodger of mine. On the afternoon of the 4th of November my wife came to where I was employed; I went home, and missed a length of carpeting and a pair of trousers; I, and two officers searched about the house, and on the top of the water-closet I found this length of carpeting; the prisoner's husband works in the corn line, and she has lived there about eighteen months.

CHARLES COLLINS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Old Gravel-lane, Ratcliff-highway. I have one table-cover, a pair of trousers, a gown, and a waistcoat, pawned on the 4th of November, by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Wood.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking the carpeting - I say nothing about the other things.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-159

158. THOMAS HOWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , I watch, value 15s. , the goods of Elizabeth Weeks .

ELIZABETH WEEKS . I am a widow , and live at Hackney , and am in the straw bonnet business . I have known the prisoner for twenty years - he came to me on the 7th of of November; I believe he was in great distress - my sister asked him in, and he staid from ten o'clock in the morning until dusk; about nine o'clock, after he was gone I missed my watch - I did not see him again till the 11th of November, when I asked him about the watch - he denied it at first, but I said I would forgive him if he found it; he told me where it was - he has before been a respectable man.

WILLIAM CHESTER . I am a watchmaker, and live in High-street, Shoreditch. The prisoner came and offered this watch for sale; he said he said he was a sailor, and wanted to go on board a ship - I asked him what he wanted for it; he said 25s.: I offered him 15s., which he agreed to take.

JAMES ESSEX . I am a constable. The prisoner was given into my charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She promised she would fully

overlook the crime I had been so foolish as to commit; I took her to the place, and she got the watch - it was distress that led me to do it: I have been twenty-eight years in His Majesty's army and navy, and was at the battle of Navarino.

GUILTY. Aged 45.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix, believing it to be his first offence .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-160

159. CHARLES SAMPKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 watch, value 20s., and 1 watch-key, value 3s. , the goods of Henry Sayer .

SARAH SAYER . I am the wife of Henry Sayer - he is a mariner , and was on board the Hope, close by King Jamesstairs , on the 30th of November; the watch hung on the bolt belonging to the sky-light - we went down to Greenwich that day, and knew nothing of the transaction; the prisoner is a sailor , and comes from the same town in Suffolk as my husband.

WILLIAM ARCHER . I belong to the Hope. The prisoner came on board on the 30th of November; he staid from twelve o'clock till a quarter after ten at night - he came to see the ship's company generally; I had seen the watch hanging up on the sky-light bolt - when he was gone I missed it; I believe one of the ship's boys put him on shore.

DANIEL BLYTH . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, quite drunk, at the Three Crowns public-house, East Smithfield.

ROBERT MILTON . I am a pawnbroker. I have a watch, pawned on the 1st of December, in the name of Charles Sampkin , Edinborough Castle public-house, East Smithfield; I verily believe the prisoner is the man.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went on board the Hope; two lads put me on shore - I went to my lodging, and never went on board again.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-161

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

160. WILLIAM SMETHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 1 jacket, value 15s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 14s. , the goods of Richard Page .

RICHARD PAGE . I lost a waistcoat, a jacket, and a pair of trousers, between the 24th and 30th of November, 1827 - it was on a Saturday; they were in a barge at the bottom of the Catherine Wheel-yard, on the canal ; I left between eight and nine o'clock - returned a little after eleven, and they were gone from the cabin: I do not know the prisoner - I did not see him till three weeks ago, when he had the jacket and waistcoat on at the One Tun public-house, Brentford; he said he bought the duplicate of a young man named Sorrow, or Forrow, about ten months ago.

THOMAS TUNSTALL SAUNDERS . I made these clothes, and know them perfectly well.

JOSEPH DICKENSON . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner - the prosecutor stated that he had got his jacket and waistcoat on; I had seen him three days before with a smock-frock on - he said he bought the duplicate five months ago, of Sorrow or Forrow, and had got them out of pawn at Isleworth; I inquired and it was so - when before the Magistrate, he said he had made a mistake, it was the name which was on the duplicate which is Screw; the prosecutor came to me and asked what my expences were - I said "You have been before the Magistrate, you cannot make it up now."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-162

161. WILLIAM NAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November , one jacket, value 3s.; one waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d., and 11 shillings , the property of Samuel Cummings .

SAMUEL CUMMINGS. I live in Gulston-street, Whitechapel . On the 27th of November, I awoke about ten minutes after eight o'clock in the morning; I looked round - the prisoner who had slept with me was gone, and the property stated in the indictment - he had left his own coat and waistcoat behind him; I lost 14s.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the prosecuter's information, on the 27th, two days after the robbery (they were taken on the 25th;) I found the jacket, apron, and stockings, on his person; he acknowledged that he took them, but said there was but 12s.

Prisoner. I confess I took them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-163

162. THOMAS THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 2 halters, value 10s. , the goods of James Rhodes .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES RHODES . I am the brother of James Rhodes . On the 28th of November, I was on his premises at Islington , about eleven o'clock in the day, and heard a noise in the stable - I went in, and found the prisoner with one of these halters in his hand, and the other buttoned up inside his coat; they are my brother's; I had him taken into custody - he was not in my brother's employ; there was nobody else about the place, who could tell him to take them; he begged pardon, and said he would never come near the place again.

THOMAS COPE . I am an officer of Islington, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked one of the men if he would lend me a couple of halters; he said I might go and take them, and bring them back.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-164

163. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 cloak, value 2s.; 1 shawl, value 1s,; 1 apron, value 6d., and 1 pair of boots, value 1s. , the goods of Elizabeth Jane Hinton .

ELIZABETH JANE HINTON . I am a widow , and go out nursing. On the 20th of October. I lost a cloak, a pair of boots, a shawl, an apron, and a handkerchief, from where I lived, in Wellington-street, Camden-town ; I was out at the time - my mother came and told me they were gone; I had seen them safe at six o'clock that morning.

ELIZA HILTON . I live in Edward-place, Mary-le-bone. On the 20th of October, a pair of boots and a cloak were

brought to me by the prisoner; I pawned them in York-street, for 3s. 6d.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What are you? A. A staymaker; I never lived in the same house with him - I have never been on intimate terms with him; I deliberately swear that; I have known him about twelve months as a mere acquaintance, and no more - he brought me these things to pawn, and said they were his mother's; I work for Mr. Wilkie, and other persons - my sister lives with me - another young woman lived with me, but she has left; I have never heard of another young man who went to the prosecutrix's house; I cannot say positively whether I ever heard it insinuated that another young man, a friend of mine, went to the prosecutrix's house; I have not heard that he was there; I pawned the things in my own name.

ANN SELK . I am the mother of Elizabeth Jane Hinton, and lived with her in Camden-town. On the 20th of October, she went out in the morning to nurse, and I was in bed hardly sensible; the prisoner came in as a friend - I had known him before; he asked where my daughter was- I said nursing; the drawer was open, and he sat close to it, and out of it he took these things, but I did not perceive it; I saw him take hold of the cloak - I did not miss the things till he was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him take them? A. I saw them in his hand; and I saw him wrap the boots in the shawl and the cloak at the street-door; I was at that time at the window; I missed the things, and went as far as I could go, and then I went to the window, and called out"Mr. Clark, you have robbed me - come back! come back;" I had been almost insensible from a pain in my head - my sight is not very good; I did not see any other man in the house, and never saw Hilton till I came into court.

GEORGE KNOX . I am watch-house keeper of St. James'. I produce a shawl, an apron, and a handkerchief, which I got at Hilton's lodgings, in Edward-place; on the 21st of October, her sister went and fetched the shawl - I cannot tell from where.

ELIZA HILTON . This shawl was a wrapper to put the other things in; I did not take it; I only pawned the cloak and boots.

RICHARD PENNY . I am a pawnbroker. I produce the cloak and boots pawned by Hilton, on the 20th of October, in the name of Ann Hilton - not Eliza; I knew her before, but I never saw the prisoner.

HENRY WILLIAMS . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner, and took him to the watch-house - he did not say any thing.

Prisoner. Eliza Hilton means to say she has known me only twelve months, but she has known me six or seven years - I lent her money some time ago, and went to live with a female; Hilton used to come there - I then went to live with Ann Arnold , in Hilton's room; she frequently wanted me to do things which I would not - she wanted me to take a copper from a house where she lived- as to these things, I did not take them.

GEORGE KNOX re-examined. The prisoner acknowledged to me in the watch-house that he had taken the things, and was very sorry for it - he told me where they were, and I went, and got them.

- HINTON. I am the prosecutrix' eldest nephew. I heard of the prisoner taking some things, and I asked him to tell the truth; he said a boy hid himself in the place, and took the things, and when they came down he took them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Williams hear what the prisoner said? A. Yes - he said the boy stood behind the drawers, and that he was with him, and that he took the things to Hilton's.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-165

164. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Bryan Kennedy .

BRYAN KENNEDY . I am a shoemaker . I lost a pair of shoes, on the 25th of October, from my house - I saw them in the prisoner's hands close to my shop-window; I heard a rattle, and my boy went out to see what the noise was - another man took the shoes, a man came up and charged him to lay them down; he struck my boy, took up the shoes and gave them into the hands of the prisoner, who got rid of them somehow - I never got them.

BRYAN KENNEDY , JUN. The prisoner had the shoes in his hand when I came out - he had another man with him, who gave him the shoes; I had seen them together about ten minutes before - the other man struck me on the side of the head; I did not see the shoes taken from the shop, but I saw them in the other man's hands, and they were hitting one another with them; my father went out and asked the prisoner to put them down - he stripped to fight him; I had heard the shoes knocking about as I was in the parlour - it was between four and five o'clock.

GEORGE ROGERS . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner about eleven o'clock at night on the 26th - the prosecutor gave charge of him; he said that from the 25th he was in trouble for a row, and he was liberated on the Sunday morning - I said it was unusual to be liberated on a Sunday.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was by the prosecutor's shop when there was a scuffle, but denied having had the shoes in his possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-166

165. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 7 sheets, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Ewer .

THOMAS EWER . I am a broker , and live in Belton-street, Long-acre . The prisoner lodged there one night, and on the morning of the 28th of November, when he was gone, I missed seven sheets, which were safe when he went to bed - I did not know him before.

JAMES BEECHEY . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner near Robin Hood-lane, Poplar, on the 28th of November, with these seven sheets, which he said he found in a field between the East and West India Dock-road; he at first told me they were rags.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-167

166. JOHN RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , 1 watch, value 20s, the goods of David Ready .

DAVID READY. I am a shoemaker - the prisoner lodged with me. On the 3d of November I left my watch in my own house - it was taken between ten and twelve o'clock; I came back about twelve o'clock, and my wife told me it was gone - I had seen the prisoner that morning; he had access to the whole house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your wife here? A. No - the prisoner lodged with me, but what I could give him in three days could scarcely support him one day; he is very young - I suppose from fourteen to fifteen; he was in great distress, or I would not have allowed him to be there, and he would not have done it.

WILLIAM FOWLE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a watch, pawned with me on the 3d of November. by a lad very much like the prisoner - I am not sure he is the boy.

WILLIAM DODD . I am an officer. The prisoner was given to me by his own father. with the duplicate of the watch - he acknowledged that he went over to Blackfriars-road and pawned it, and said he did it from hunger.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18281204-168

167. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 watch, value 30s., and 2 seals, value 3s. , the goods of Sarah Howells , spinster .

SARAH HOWELLS . I am single. I lost my watch and seals on the 25th of October, from where I live, at the Marquis Cornwallis public-house, Marchmont-street, Brunswick-square ; the prisoner was once a fellow-servant of mine - I saw the watch and seals in the kitchen-drawer on the Saturday, about a quarter of an hour before it was taken; and saw it again on the Tuesday after; this is it - the seals are not on it now.

JAMES DREW . I am a pawnbroker. I took this watch from the prisoner on the 27th of October - there was no seal to it.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. The prisoner gave me this seal on the road to the watch-house.

WILLIAM CADDY . I took the prisoner in Penton-place- she at first denied it, but afterwards confessed it; we should not have found it but for her confession - she told the Magistrate she took it because she did not like to part with her clothes, on account of going to service again.

Prisoner. I have lost the first joint of my finger through a fever.

ANN WILLIAMS . She behaved very well before - she had been a fellow-servant of mine, a year and a half before that; she was out of place at this time, and called upon me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-169

168. CHARLES CRONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 3 live tame drakes, price 6s., and 1 live tame duck, price 2s. , the property of John Salmon .

JOHN SALMON. I live in Hackney-road . I lost three drakes and a duck from my place on the 11th of November - they were all safe that day, and I missed them in the afternoon; one drake and one duck are here now.

WILLIAM GARLAND . On the 11th of November, about a quarter before three o'clock, I was passing the prosecucutor's yard, and saw the prisoner go down by the side of a shed, where there is a small pool of water; I saw him drive three drakes and the duck from the pool into a dark corner of the field - I said, "What are you doing?" he said driving them home; I said, "Are they yours?" he said Yes - I said, "Do you work for Mr. Salmon?" he said Yes; I said, "You must go to Mr. Salmon's;" as we went along he gave a signal to some persons, but a person came by with a barrow, and I kept the ducks - (two of the drakes wese stolen last Saturday:) it was a foggy day, and I was obliged to keep close to him to see what he was doing with them - he used some very bad language, and when we got near the watch-house he got away, and got to White-street, where he made a stand, and said to some persons, "Now you b-rs, begin to mallet him;" some persons came up, but I got assistance, and secured him - he had no bag, but the persons that came up had.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a violent pain in my inside, and was making my way to the corner of the field; this gentleman came and said, "What are you going to do with these ducks?" I said Nothing; he then said he should lock me up, because I was saucy to him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-170

149. GEORGE ALLENBY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 1 carpet, value 50s. , the goods of John Marks .

JOHN MARKS. I am a broker , and live at Battle-bridge . I lost a carpet on the 6th of November, from off a table in front of my door; I heard a noise, went out, and found it on the pavement, and the prisoner in custody; it was removed about eight or ten yards from where it had been.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not he take the carpet from the fellow that stole it? A. I do not know - I do not know that there has been a person committed under the Police Act for this; the carpet was outside my shop: I had a man outside, but I suppose he was engaged.

COURT. Q. Did you see any other boy? A. No, I did not, but I understand there was another boy.

WILLIAM LEGGET . I was at my father's door, which is about eight or ten doors from the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner and another lad; the prisoner took the carpet, and the other lad struck me - I called out for assistance, and the other ran away; I seized the prisoner - Mr. Marks came out and took him.

Cross-examined. Q. What has become of the other boy? A. I do not know - it was the prisoner who took the carpet.

SAMUEL MOUNTSTEPHEN . I am an officer, and took the prisoner from Mr. Marks.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the other boy? A. No.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Seven witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-171

170. THOMAS WALTER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of December , 2 pieces of timber, value 2s. , the goods of John Matson .

JOHN CALLER . I am a patrol. On the 1st of December I saw the prisoner coming out of the premises of Mr. Matson, a builder, at Hackney , with two pieces of timber- he crossed the road, I crossed over, and asked where he was going; he said home, and if I were afraid I might see him home - I went with him to No. 4, Harford-road; he went in, and said, "You are satisfied now:" when I got out it struck me it was stolen - I went to Mr. Matson's premises, and saw pieces of timber which correswith those he had.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Does not Mr. Matson's timber lie very much unprotected? A. Yes. I have made inquiries about the prisoner, and have heard he was afflicted with the brain fever some weeks before.

EDWARD UNCLE . I am a carpenter, and work at Mr. Matson's. On the 1st of December the witness came to the yard - I looked, and missed two pieces of timber out of three which I had laid out about five o'clock, and this was about seven; I went to No. 4, Harford-street, and found these two pieces, which I can swear to.

Cross-examined Q. How many pieces of timber had you there? A. Only these three lying together; there were other pieces about.

WILLIAM ALGER . I am a conductor of the patrol. I went and found one piece of timber at Mr. Matson's - the man said there ought to be three; we went and got the other two, and matched them.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and four children entirely dependant on me; I am a clerk, and lived eight years in my last situation, but have been out of employ since my illness; I was a fortnight out of six weeks raving mad, and knew no more what I was about than a child unborn.

FREDERICK DASHWOOD . I am a watchmaker, and have known the prisoner these ten years; he has been a clerk at Messrs. Everett's - he has very recently had a brain fever, and was very bad; I saw him several times, and twice when I saw him he was deranged - I have had an opportunity of observing his conduct since, and he has been flighty; he had borne an honest character before that, and his parents are most respectable.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-172

123. JAMES PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 shawl, value 4s. , the goods of John Wells .

HENRY WILLIAM RUSSELL . I am in the employ of Mr. John Wells , of Broadway, St. Giles' . On the 5th of November, about a quarter before ten o'clock in the morning, I missed this shawl - a little girl, about nine years of age, came and told me of it.

GEORGE SKELTON . I was on duty at Broad-street on the 5th of November, and saw the prisoner come down King-street, about sixty or seventy yards from the prosecutor's, walking from there; I went up to him, and asked him how he came by that - he made no answer; I took him back to the shop, and took the shawl from his pocket - he said he picked it up at the corner of Lascelles-place; the prosecutor's shop is at the corner of that place.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, I suppose twenty yards from the shop; a woman saw me pick it up, and said, "What have you got there?" I said, "I do not know;" I opened it, and looked at it: she said she would give me 1s. 6d. for it - I said it was not mine, some person had dropped it.

JURY to HENRY WILLIAM RUSSELL . Q. What part of the shop was the shawl in? A.Within the door-post, fastened by a piece of string - the string was broken, and part of it left on the nail.

GUILTY . Aged 73.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18281204-173

172. MARY MEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 12 bobbins of silk, value 5s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1d.; 2 half-crowns; 5 shillings; 10 sixpences; and 24 penny-pieces , the property of Joseph Mandrell .

JOSEPH MANDRELL. I live in Grosvenor-square, Harestreet-fields, and am a weaver . On the 8th of November, I had twelve bobbins of silk, a handkerchief, and some money, all tied up in a bundle; I was coming from the warehouse with it under my arm, about eight o'clock in the evening, and it was drawn from me; I was rather fresh - my master was out, and I had been drinking; the prisoner picked me up, and took me to the White Horse public-house, and, having been drinking a little, I lay my head down, and went to sleep - when I awoke. I missed my bundle; she and the bundle were gone - I suppose I slept three hours; I went there about eight o'clock, and came away about eleven or twelve.

Prisoner. I met him in Shoreditch; there was a mob round him, I went to see what was the matter, and this man had fallen down and cut his face, and his master's silk was one way, and the money the other; he said he lived in Globefields and said, "My good woman, I wish you would see me to the White Horse public-house, in Wheeler-street, my wife is there." Witness. I had fallen down, but my property was all tied in a bag; she told the people she was my wife - I did not open my things.

MICHAEL SULLIVAN . I am a weaver. I saw the prosecutor and prisoner come into the public-house that evening; the prisoner called for a quartern of gin, and the prosecutor desired her to pay for it out of his handkerchief, which she did; I cannot say whether the prosecutor drank any or not - in a few minutes, I saw him lying on the table, fast asleep; I saw the prisoner afterwards pull the bundle of shute and money from under his arm - she took the silver from among the copper and kept it in her hand, and left the copper in the handkerchief; she afterwards went out, brought in the quartern of gin, and took the copper to pay for it - I went away in a few minutes.

WILLIAM PARKER . I was in the public-house, and saw the prosecutor and prisoner come in. I thought I knew the prosecutor, but I was not certain, his face was so bloody and bruised; I went to him, and asked him if he had not some knowledge of me - he said he had not; I said, "I beg your pardon, if I am mistaken;" the prisoner said, "You are mistaken;" I went back to my seat, and saw her take the silver out of the bundle, and put it into her hand; I cannot say whether there were shillings or sixpences - she took them with her right hand, and put them into her left; I did not notice what there were; what she did I do not know; she went to the bar, and to the back-yard, came in again, and sat down by his

side - they had another quartern of gin after that; she went out and came back again, sat down by him, and then went out again; I went and roused him up, and said, "Have you any knowledge of me?" he said Yes; the prisoner was then gone - he knew me then, and said, "I do know you;" I did not see what became of the bundle; when the woman went out, I saw one bobbin of silk.

JOSEPH JOHNSON . I was in the White Horse, and had a pint of beer. I saw the prosecutor asleep, and the prisoner by the side of him; I saw her take some silver and put into her hand, and afterwards she called for a pint of beer, which was brought; she took the halfpence out of the handkerchief, and paid for it - the prosecutor was still asleep; she drank some of the beer, and handed it to a man on her left - I saw the bundle before she went out, but did not see it taken.

ANN MANDRELL . I am the prosecutor's wife: he came home at half-past twelve o'clock; I went the next day and saw the prisoner, who said she would take me to Mr. Taylor; she said she had 3s. 6d. of my husband's money, and Mr. Taylor had got the bundle, and the silk.

BENJAMIN BEAVIS . On the Sunday morning this woman was brought to the watch-house; she acknowledged that she had had the bundle, and would take care the man should have it back again - on the Monday, the prosecutor came, and told me he was in a public-house, and that the bundle was dropped by the side of him, but he did not know by whom; the prisoner said she knew nothing of the money - she desired to have a man named Taylor fetched; I went with a summons, but his father said he was gone into the country - no doubt he was concerned.

WILLIAM PARKER . There was a man who sat by the side of the prosecutor; he and I went and awoke him up; he said, "She has not got the silver, it is here," (meaning on a bench by his side) but it was gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pay for a pint of beer at all - the man paid for it, out of the handkerchief; I paid for the quartern of gin with my own money - when I took the bundle, I put it down by his side; I met him on the Sunday morning again, and said, "Good morning, how did you get home;" I then met his wife, and she said,"Can you make up any money for my husband's loss?" I said, "What do you mean? I cannot make it up" - she said, "If you do not make me up some money, I must put you in the watch-house;" when I was in the watch-house, I heard the man had got his property, and that the landlord had made him a present of 5s. - the Magistrate said I had better come before a Jury of gentlemen, to have myself righted, for what one could not swear another could.

PROSECUTOR. The silk was dropped by my side; and the publican said, that as I was distressed, he would give me a few shillings.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-174

173. JOHN HUMPHREYS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , 1 cloak, value 10s.; 1 tippet, value 6d.; 2 caps, value 5s., and 1 collar, value 1s. , the goods of Samuel Low .

SARAH LOW . I am the wife of Samuel Low, and live in London-fields, Hackney . I lost these articles some day in October, from a back-parlour; a neighbour had got the prisoner with them, and I owned them; I had seen them about three quarters of an hour before.

JOHN CALP . I saw the prisoner, and another boy, running across the fields with a bundle, in a direction from the prosecutrix's house; I pursued, and took the prisoner, with these things - he made no reply, as to where he had got them; he was running,(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18281204-175

174. HENRY GARDINER and THOMAS FITZGERALD were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 5 shilling, and 1 sixpence , the monies of Jane Jeans .

JANE JEANS . I am single , and keep a shop at Brentford . On the 8th of November, I saw the prisoners in the house, after I heard the street-door open - it was nearly one o'clock; I was up stairs, and my brother was taking care of the shop - I heard him shut the door and go out quickly; I came down, the street-door was locked, and my brother had got the two prisoners in the room; he said they had robbed the shop - they said they had not; he sent for the constable, who found 5s. 6d., which was about the amount I had in my till - I had taken some money out, and I thought there was between 5s. and 6s. left, but when I came down stairs there was only 8d. in copper.

EDWARD JEANS . I am the prosecutrix's brother. On the 8th of November I was keeping the shop for her, and was in the back-parlour; there is a window looks into the shop - I saw the door gently open, which I knew before to be shut; I got up and saw Gardiner lying all across the counter - he had got the till out and was taking some money: I ran, shut the door, and heard him drop some silver into his pocket - the other prisoner was in the shop, outside the counter, but close to him; I locked the door and sent for the constable - when he came, I said if he would search Gardiner's right-hand breeches-pocket he would find the money, and he found 5s. 6d.

Prisoner GARDINER. I came in for a pennyworth of candy; you went round to the till, and said "I have lost half a crown and some more silver," but you did not know what. Witness. No, I locked the door, then looked into the till, and missed the money.

JOHN DICKENSON . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found the two prisoners; I searched Gardiner, and found 5s. 6d. in silver in his right-hand breeches-pocket, and 3 1/2d. in his fob, one halfpenny in another pocket, and a knife - they both stated they came in for a halfpennyworth of candy; when I brought them out to take them to the cage, I asked where they came from - one said from the Mint, in the Borough, and the other from Gravel-lane in the Borough.

GARDINER'S Defence. I left my work to go with a young man to Maidenhead, and coming back I met the other prisoner - as we were coming to London, we went to buy a halfpenny-worth of candy; the man came into the shop and said he had lost the money.

GARDINER - GUILTY . Aged 17.

FITZGERALD - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-176

175. JOHN FARRELL was indicted for stealing,

on the 15th of November , 11 yards of paper-bordering, value 13s. , the goods of John Bolton .

JOHN BOLTON. I keep a paper-hanger's shop in the City-road . On the 15th of November the constable came, and brought this paper with him, which I had seen the evening before, under the counter - I can swear to it, by particular marks on it.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am an officer. On the 15th of November, I had information, and saw the prisoner go down Golden-lane, with another lad, who is called the sailor boy - the prisoner had this paper in his hand; I said "I want you, what have you got here?" he said"They are not mine, they belong to the sailor boy;" the sailor boy then ran away - the prisoner said he did not know what he was; when I got to the watch-house I was told to open it - the prisoner said "It is paper;" I saw the name Smith on it, and took it to that place - they said they could not say any thing to it till the foreman came, but it was their paper. The sailor was a bigger lad - I have not seen him since.

SAMUEL YATES . I was coming up Golden-lane with a lad, and assisted in taking the prisoner to the watch-house- when there, the officer asked him what he had got; he said he did not know - he was then untying it, and the prisoner said "It is paper."

Prisoner's Defence. I came out to see for work for my mother - I met this boy, who said "Jack, hold this while I stop;" I carried it a little way, and the officer came.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-177

176. JOSEPH MARMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 1 pocket-book, value 6d.: 3 shillings and 1 sixpence, the property of Charles Seabeck , from his person .

CHARLES SEABECK. On the 5th of November, at a quarter before nine o'clock in the evening, I was in the Tenterground, near Prescot-street - there was a fire, and I was standing to look at it; I had not stopped above three minutes, when I took out my handkerchief; my pocketbook was then safe; I put my handkerchief into my pocket in about three minutes - my pocket-book was then gone; I went home, and the next morning my mother went to stop the things at the pawnbroker's - these duplicates were in the pocket-book at the time.

GEORGE GILES . I am a pawnbroker. On the morning of the 6th of November, the prosecutor's mother came to inform us her son had been robbed of his pocket-book, in which were some of our duplicates; and about twelve o'clock, the prisoner presented this one - I asked him where he got it; he said he bought it on the Saturday, which was the 1st of November - the date of it is the 22d of September; the date of this other duplicate is the 11th of October.

Prisoner. I said I bought them that day, about eleven o'clock, in Whitechapel. Witness. No; I pressed him three or four times about it, and he said he bought it on the Saturday; I then said "Have you any more;" he pulled out this one, and said he bought that that morning.

JAMES NORRIS . I was sent for and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove where I was on the night of the robbery.

HENRY PAYNE . I live in the Old Kent-road - I am a whip-maker: the prisoner is my apprentice - he was in my house from the Sunday evening till Thursday morning - he was not outside the door on the 5th of November - he was working with me till nine o'clock at night, in the front shop; he then had his supper, and went to bed with his fellow-apprentice, Wheeler - he is no relation of mine.

WILLIAM WHEELER . I work with the prisoner for Mr. Payne - I was at work with him on the night of the 5th of November; and on the morning of the 6th, we went out together, and parted in the Dover-road.

MARY PAYNE . I saw the prisoner all that evening - he worked till nine o'clock, in the front-shop; I was in the adjoining room - we did not know of his being taken up till eight days afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-178

177. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 2 bonnets, value 10s., and 1 bag, value 6d., the goods of William Butterfield , from the person of John Butterfield .

WILLIAM BUTTERFIELD. I am the father of John Butterfield ; he is eleven years of age next June. On the 16th of October, I gave him two bonnets in a bag to take from my house, No. 2, Chequer-alley, to Mr. Johns, in Redcross-street, Cripplegate - he came back without them, and brought a parcel; he said Mrs. Johns had sent her young man for the bonnets, and he had given him that parcel - it contained a dirty greasy frock.

JOHN BUTTERFIELD. I was going along with two bonnets, and met the prisoner; he said "Is not your name Butterfield?" I said Yes; he said "I have come from Mr. Johns for they two bonnets;" and he said "Here is a parcel for your father from Mrs. Johns" - I believed it, and gave him the bonnets: he came with me as far as Red Lion-market ; he said "I was coming to your father's" - he then went away with the bonnets, and I went home with the parcel, which contained a dirty frock, of no value.

Prisoner. Q.Where did you meet me? A. I know you by your countenance; you had on a great coat and a black waistcoat.

ROBERT LOCK . I am an officer. I have the dirty frock - the last witness stopped the prisoner near my house last Friday week; he said "I am not the man - you cannot say that I am the man;" Yes, said the lad, "You are the man that took my bonnets, and gave me the parcel."

MARGARET JOHNS . I never gave the prisoner, or any one else, this parcel; and I never received the bonnets.

WILLIAM BUTTERFIELD re-examined. Q. Did your son describe the person of the man? A. Yes - I never knew the prisoner before; I do not know how he knew about my sending a parcel to Mrs. Johns.

JOHN BUTTERFIELD re-examined. Another young man came to me first, and asked if I did not want a place; I told him where I was going, and my name - then the prisoner came up to me.

Prisoner. I can prove where I was on the day in question.

THOMAS SMITH . I am the prisoner's father. On the 16th of October, he was at work very hard with me at

shoemaking; I live at No. 6, Webb's-square, Shoreditch, and work for Mr. Fennell, in Shoreditch; the prisoner did not go out till he had done work, which was after eight o'clock - he dined with me; it was Thursday, and my youngest child's birth-day.

ANN POWELL . I was at Mr. Smith's on Thursday, the 16th of October - I was invited in consequence of the little boy's birthday, with three of my own children; the prisoner was sitting in a back-room at work with his father all day, and some part of it shoemaking; I should not have recollected the day, had it not been the birthday.

COURT to WILLIAM BUTTERFIELD . Q. Are you quite sure of its being the 16th of October? A. Yes, and it was on a Thursday; I am sure of it for several reasons - I had a letter from my mother the next Thursday, and I said"This is of a pleasing nature - there is a difference betwixt this Thursday and last Thursday."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-179

OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 8.

First London Jury - before Mr. Baron Hullock.

178. JOHN PONSONBY was indicted, for that at the General Session of the Peace holden for the county of Middlesex, at the Sessions'-house, for the said Country, on Monday, the 5th of December, in the 6th year of the present King, he was in due form of law arraigned upon, and pleaded guilty to, a certain indictment against him as a common utterer of counterfeit coin, and there-upon it was considered by the Court there, that he should be imprisoned in the House of Correction at Clerkenwell, for one year, and at the expiration of that time he should find sureties for his good behaviour for two years more; and that he, having been so convicted as a common utterer of false money, afterwards, on the 20th of October , in the 9th year of the present King, at the precinet of St. Ann, Blackfriars, one piece of false and counterfeit money counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a piece of good and current money and silver coin called a shilling, as and for a good one, unlawfully and feloniously did utter, to one Ellen, the wife of John Berry, he, at the time he so uttered the said piece of counterfeit money, well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, the same as the former Count, only omitting the words in italics; and instead thereof inserting the words "as aforesaid."

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD JOSEPH POWELL . I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of John Ponsonby at the Middlesex December Sessions, 1825 - I have examined it with the original and it is correct.

GEORGE BRAND. I am chief turnkey of the House of Correction, Coldbath-fields. I know the prisoner, and was present, in December, 1825, at Clerkenwell, when the prisoner was tried there; he is the same man as is mentioned in that record.(The record was here read as in the indictment.)

ELLEN BERRY . I am the wife of John Berry ; my husband is a carpenter, we live in Glasshouse-yard; I keep an oyster-stall . The prisoner came to my stall about half-past twelve o'clock on a Monday - I do not know the day of the month, it was the day he was taken; he asked if I had any oysters; I said Yes; he askedf or twopennyworth, and gave me a shilling - I gave him a silver sixpence and 4d; he went away after talking a little; I had kept the shilling in my hand, and when he was gone I examined it - I found it was bad; I met Sharpe's man and showed him the shilling; Sharpe is a neighbour, and keeps a coal and potato-shop; I afterwards saw Potter, and got him to go with me to look for the prisoner, but did not find him - I rolled the shilling up in paper and gave it to Potter; I afterwards had a message from Sharpe's; I went there and saw the prisoner, and went before the Alderman; I never saw the prisoner before, but am quite certain he is the man.

ANN GLOVER . I live at No. 2, Church-entry, Shoemaker-row; my mother keeps a shop there. On the 20th of October the prisoner came into the shop about a quarter to one o'clock, and asked for twopenny-worth of oysters - he gave me a shilling, and I gave him 10d. in halfpence; he went away; I bit the shilling, rubbed it on a stone, and found it was bad; I ran after him, overtook him, brought him back, and made him return the 10d. and oysters; I gave him back the shilling, but think I should know it again; Potter has since shewn me one, and I think it is the one I had bit and rubbed - I am not positive of it, but it has all the marks where I bit and rubbed it - [ Joseph Potter here produced ten shillings, the witness selected one of them] - this is it I think, here is where I rubbed it, and it is rough where I bit it; I believe this to be the shilling.

ELIZABETH SHARPE . I am the wife of Joseph Sharpe , we live in Glasshouse-yard, and deal in potatoes. The prisoner came to our shop about a quarter to twelve o'clock on the day he was taken up, and asked how I sold potatoes; I said 3lbs. for 2d. - he asked what 2lbs. would be; I told him 1 1/2d.; he said, "Weigh me 2lbs. and put them aside for me, and I will come back for them;" which I did; and in about ten minutes he came, and was taken into custody.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am a constable. In consequence of information from Mrs. Berry I went in search of the prisoner, but did not find him till about ten minutes past one o'clock, when I was sent for, and took him at Sharpe's shop - it was in October, and on the 20th I believe; I searched him and found nine bad shillings in the corner of his jacket, within the lining, not in his pocket - I cut them out with a pen-knife, and have produced them; I found a good sixpence and 7 1/2d. in copper in his waistcoat-pocket - the shilling, Glover has pointed out, is one of the nine; I have another shilling which Berry gave me.

Mr. JOHN FIELD . I have been many years inspector of coin alleged to be counterfeit. These nine shillings are all counterfeit, and all made of white metal, generally known by the name of Britannia metal; the one uttered to Berry is also counterfeit, and of the same description.

JASPER ATKINSON , Esq. I am a moneyer of the Mint. This coin is all bad.

Prisoner. I am guilty of passing this bad money; I beg for mercy - distress drove me to it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 59.

Reference Number: t18281204-180

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

179. JAMES COLEMAN , and RHODA COLEMAN , (the wife of the said James Coleman ,) alias RHODA HOUNSOM , were indicted for that they, not being persons, or either of them a person, employed in or for the Mint or Mints of our Lord the King, and for the use and service of the said Mints only; nor being lawfully authorised by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, or Lord High Treasurer of England, on the 14th of November , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, one mould made of plaster of Paris, in and upon which was made and impressed the figure, stamp, resemblance, and similitude of one of the sides (to wit) the obverse side of the lawful silver coin current within this kingdom called a shilling, without any lawful authority or sufficient excuse for that purpose, knowingly, feloniously, and traitorously had in their custody and possession, against their allegiance and against the Statute .

SECOND COUNT, for knowingly, feloniously, and traitorously, having in their custody and possession one mould, made of plaster of paris, in and upon which was made and impressed the figure, stamp, resemblance, and similitude of the reverse side of the lawful silver coin current within this kingdom, called a shilling, &c. &c.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN VANN . I am a Police patrol of Bow-street. On the 14th of November, in consequence of information, I went to a house in Jubilee-court, Parliament-street, Dogrow, Bethnal-green, in the County of Middlesex - the house consists of two rooms, one over the other, and a small shed; there is an internal communication between the lower-room and the shed, and there is an outer-door to the shed - I went in company with Keys, Drew, and Messrs. Powells'; I went down the court and saw the door open - I ran into the house directly, and saw the male prisoner sitting at dinner; the female prisoner was there, another female, who gave her name as Hounsom, and a child - there is no passage, the door opens into the room; the male prisoner was sitting at a table at dinner and the female prisoner also, but Hounsom was sitting away from the table - I understand she is the female prisoner's mother; the room is very small - I said to the man "Coleman, what have you got in the house?" he said Nothing; I handcuffed him, and commenced searching the place - I left him in the custody of Keys while I searched the lower part of the place - the door of the shed leading from the room was ajar, about half a yard open; I went into the shed, and directly I got there I saw a tub with some straw in it - there was a donkey and some fowls in the shed; here is the tub with the straw in it, and in this piece of paper, under the straw, I found these moulds, which I now produce - they have the impression of a shilling on them; there is a mark of the letter T on one of the impressions - I afterwards saw a shilling produced, and that shilling corresponded with the mould, and had the letter T on it; I took care of the male prisoner while Drew and Keys went up with Rhoda to search up stairs - and while they were up stairs James Coleman said," Thank God you have not caught me making any thing;" he repeated this again, and I said "No, you were sitting at your dinner" - he afterwards said,"Vann, tell me the worst they can do with me for having the things in my possession;" I said "You had better say nothing, it is a capital offence, you had better hold your tongue" - he stood still for a minute or two, and afterwards said, "Did you ever know any body hung for it?" I said,"There was a man convicted at Kingston;" he said, "Oh, you mean ireland, but he was not hanged" - he then said,"Well, I don't mind, if they send me and my old woman away;" there was a little scuffle with the prisoner - he was in a state of agitation; he pushed against the table and some things fell down, but I do not know that it was more than an accident - Drew came down and threatened him unless he was quiet, and went up again; when they all came down I commenced searching the lower room - I searched a cupboard by the side of the fire-place, and found a pipkin containing fused metal quite cold, but it had been fused, and on the floor of the cupboard I found a similar piece of metal and two tobacco-pipes, one of which had part of the same kind of metal in the bowl of it, and that pipe was black from the smoke of fire; I also found in the cupboard a pot containing some glass-paper and pieces of leather, and a piece of rag - they have been used with something of a white description; I found a tin canister in the cupboard that contained the paper and rags; I found a counterfeit half-crown and shilling in a canister on the mantel-piece over the fire-place - there was some matting before the fire-place; I examined that, and found several splashes of metal on it; they had fallen on the matting and adhered to it - I tore it off and have brought it here; I found in the room a file, which appears to have a particle of white metal in the teeth of it - the outer-door of the shed was closed; Drew examined that.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.What time of day did you go there? A.Between one and two o'clock- the door leading from the room to the shed was ajar; there is another door which opens to the street - there was a donkey and fowls there; I found nothing in the shed which appeared to have been used with the metal, except the mould - there were no tinker's tools in the shed; there were such tools in the house.

Q. Do you not know he is a man who works in metal and travels the country? A. No; I had rather say nothing about that - I do not know it; I did not search his person - I should think it was about three yards from where he sat to the tub in the shed - directly on entering the shed the tub stood close to the threshold of the door: it might be four yards - he did not say the donkey and things in the shed did not belong to him; he said he was a costermonger, and got his living by the donkey - he did not say he had lent the donkey to any body; I had found the things before I had the conversation with him.

Q. He said, "Well, you did not catch me doing anything, and so you cannot hang me?" A.Those were his words; that is part of what he said.

Q. And afterwards, with the same danger before his eyes, he asked you the worst of it? A.Just so.

FRANCIS KEYS . I am a Police constable. I accompanied Vann and Drew to this house, at Bethnal-green; I entered at the front-door as Vann did; I stood and saw him handcuff the male prisoner - they were at dinner; I stood for a minute, and then Vann commenced searching- he looked into a cupboard first; he went into a shed, and called out to Mr. Powell and Drew; while they were bringing the tub out, I said, "Is that your donkey, Jem?"

he said, "The donkey is mine, Sir:" after that I went up stairs with the female prisoner, and Drew commenced searching the bottom of a cupboard, and found this basket, containing a quantity of charcoal and a quantity of bar tin: I searched the grate - there was no fire in it; I found among the cinders some bits of metal, which appeared to have dropped - it has the appearance of having been melted; I pulled the grate out, and behind that found a paper bag containing plaster of Paris - I found a tobacco-pipe on the grate, with some metal inside it, and some sticking about it - it appears to have been used to melt metal; the hole of it is filled with metal, so that nothing would run through; I found two knives on the top of the stove, with plaster of Paris on them, and I found a pair of furnace-tongs, which are used to lay hold of things in the fire; we found in the room a piece of tin, with grease on one side of it, and plaster of Paris on the other- I found a quantity of rags with plaster on them; while I was searching, I saw the female prisoner taking something out of a flower-pot - I asked what she had got there; she said only a few shillings, which she had got there unknown to her old man; I took them from her - they were three good shillings; one of them had some plaster or something sticking on it: I said I must search her - she pulled two shillings and two sixpences out of her pocket; they were good - she pulled out a tin box, which she opened, and there was a half-crown, a sixpence, and shilling, good money, in it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You asked the man whose the donkey was? A. Yes; he said it was his own - he did not say he had lent it to any body, nor that he had lent the shed to any body, in my presence - there are a number of poor persons living about there.

THOMAS DREW . I accompanied the other officers to the house; I stood at the back part of the house till the prisoners were in custody; I then went round, and went into the shed with Vann - he went to the tub, lifted up the straw, took something out, and said, "What is this?" he gave it to Mr. Powell - I went up stairs, and found five Britannia metal table-spoons on a shelf; the shelf seemed to have white on it, as if wet had been put on it - plaster of Paris or something; I found several pieces of leather, and a knife with plaster of Paris on it, two old tooth-brushes, with the handles covered with plaster of Paris; I found a cup with some paper and powder in it, and sandpaper, which had been used, apparently, to rub white metal - I found the bottom of a plate with plaster of Paris on it; I also found a large piece of cloth, with drops of metal on each side of it - in the cupboard, I found four Britannia metal tea-spoons; I went down stairs, and saw a woman who goes by the name of Hannah Hounsom; I searched her, and found a purse, containing three sovereigns, a half-crown, a sixpence, and two shillings, all good; the prisoners were present at the time - she said it was her money, and before I asked her how she got it, she said,"The two shillings I took of my daughter, for making a shirt, which I brought home this day;" I have since looked at the shillings, and a mark, like the letter T, is on the head side of one of those shillings on the neck - I have that shilling, and produce it; while I was up stairs, I heard some words below - I went down, and asked Vann what was the matter; he said Coleman seemed very restless - I said, "Coleman, behave yourself as you ought to do, you will have nothing but civility from us; if you make any resistance, by G-d I will shoot you!" he said I might shoot and be d-d; he then addressed himself to Vann, and said, "You did not catch me doing any thing; you cannot hang me."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You found marks of white on the shelf - that might be whitening? A. It might; I found sand-paper, which had been rubbing white metal - not leather; leather is used to clean spoons, or metal goods, no doubt.

MR. LAW. Q. Did you observe the state of the outer door of the shed? A. Yes - it was fastened inside by a bolt; I put the bolt back myself.

EVAN EDWARDS . I am warehouseman to Mr. Alderman, who keeps a Birmingham warehouse, in Barbican, and sells Britannia metal spoons. The male prisoner has bought Britannia metal spoons there twice, about the beginning of November; he bought four each time; the second time was about the 11th or 12th of November.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you sell a great number of spoons? A. Yes - a great many; I have seen the prisoner twice only - he inquired the first time for metal spoons with Dixon's name on them, and asked if we had not a large size.

Q.Were you never asked for Dixon's spoons before? A. Oh, yes.

JOHN EDWARD BUZZARD . I live in Mayfield-street, Dalston. I let the house, in which the prisoners were found, to them; sometimes the husband, and sometimes the wife, paid the rent - they occupied it together; I let them two houses; they went into the first about the middle of June - the female mostly paid the rent.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What trade did he carry on? A. A costermonger; I never heard of his being a tinker, or tinman.

HANNAH HOUNSOM was called into the witness-box, but not examined on either side.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin: this mould is composed of plaster of Paris - there are the obverse and reverse sides of two shillings on it; it is made for casting two shillings at once - by the obverse side, I mean the head; I have seen the two shillings found on Hounsom - one of them has on the neck of the head a punch mark of the letter T; I have compared that shilling with one of the impressions on the mould, and there find a letter corresponding with the T on the shilling - I have no doubt the impression on the mould has been made with that shilling; the mould appears to me, from the discoloured state of it, to have been used - the discolouration would arise from pouring hot metal into it; I have seen another shilling, produced by Drew, and that appears to me to have made the other impression in the mould - there has been a crack in the die from which the good shilling was made, and there is a corresponding impression in the mould; they are both on the obverse side.

FRANCIS KEYS . I produced one of the shillings Mr. Field has spoken of; it came out of the little box in the female prisoner's pocket.

MR. FIELD. This mould is capable of making the impression on both sides of the shilling, by the process of casting, and a very perfect one; both the obverse and reverse sides; I have compared the impression in the mould

with the two shillings, and have no doubt it was made from those shillings - the mould is capable of giving a very good impression of both sides of a shilling; they are the best I ever saw - I have examined the various articles produced by the officers; the greater part of them are such as may be applied to the process of casting, or making money - I have seen sand-paper and leather, which may be used to give it a brighter appearance after it has been cast, to render it fit for circulation; I cannot say much about this file having been used with white metal; here are some small pieces of glass-paper, which have apparently been used to metal.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. All these materials are applicable to ten thousand other purposes? A. They might be used for other purposes - the impressions are quite white, but the mouth of the mould is discoloured, which I suppose to have been done by hot metal.

Q. Would not the beat of the metal produce the same degree of discoloration in the impression? A. No; you might pour metal into it several times without producing discoloration on the impression, but the metal is at an increased heat at the mouth, but is much diminished as it goes down the channel; if it had been used very much, it would be more discolored, certainly; I do not swear, from the appearance of the impressions, that any shillings have been made by it - I rather think there has, by the general appearance, from the channel.

MR. FRANCIS KIRBY . I am a lecturer on natural philosophy, and am assistant to the natural philosophy class at the London University; I am a chymist, and have analyzed the materials of which this mould is made: I find it to be what is commonly called plaster of Paris, sulphuric-acid, and lime.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Could you discover sulphuric-acid in the analyzation of it? A. Yes; there is not any chalk in it - it is called sulphurate of lime.

JASPER ATKINSON , ESQ. I am a moneyer of the Mint; I have examined the two shillings produced - they are lawful coin; the obverse side of the moulds are taken from the obverse side of the shillings, and the reverse also.

JAMES COLEMAN 's Defence. I am entirely innocent - one of the officers (Drew) never entered the shed; he took the money from our mother, and gave it back to her again, because it was good; they put us into a coach - a man called him out of the coach, and talked to him - he came in again, and said "Old woman, give us your purse, will you?" she gave it to him, and when he came to the office at night, he said he had found a shilling in the purse which corresponded with the mould - I have witnesses to prove the shed-door was open at the time, and was never fastened.

SARAH PALISER . I live in Jubilee-court, and know the male prisoner - he lives at No. 3; I do not know what trade he is, further than seeing him go out with a donkey, and with fruit; I know his house and shed, but was never in it much - his shed is open at all hours, day and night; I have seen it open at twelve o'clock at night and five in the morning; I have seen several people going in and out- he lent his donkey to Lyons, his next-door neighbour, who is a costermonger - he used to go to the shed - it was left open a good deal for the use of both parties; I never saw any thing carried into the shed.

THOMAS LYONS . I live in Jubilee-court, next door to the prisoner - he frequently lent me his donkey for about seven weeks at times when he was not using it; his shed has an outer-door leading to the court; that was left open; the bolt was broken off about eight weeks ago: since that, it has been fastened with a nail just put through into the doorpost; I have seen it open, for the ass could open it by knocking his head against it, and I have had to go to the field to find the ass, as it has got out - I have gone into the stable to feed the ass.

Q.Have you seen other people go in and out? A. I have seen people who I have brought with me go in.

MR. ATKINSON. The prisoner was never employed by the Mint - he had no authority from the Lords of the Treasury, or any body else, to make money.

JURY to MR. FIELD. Q. Is it your opinion that the good shillings have been polished? A. The brightness on the shillings is produced by the plaster of Paris being on it; some spoons have been produced which are made of similar metal to that found melted.

JAMES COLEMAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 33.

RHODA COLEMAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-181

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

180. JAMES WHEELER , JOHN DENNIS , GEORGE DUFF , DANIEL JOHN QUAY , and THOMAS GROVES , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Brooks on the King's highway, on the 5th of November , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 purse, value 6d.; 5 sovereigns, and 1 watch, value 50l. , his property.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution

MR. THOMAS BROOKS . I am a merchant , of the City. On the 5th of November, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was near the Rosemary Branch public-house, at Hoxton , walking in the public-way, and observed a mob coming from Hoxton in a contrary direction to what I was going - there were thirty of forty of them; they had an ass, and a man in disguise sat on it - I stepped from the foot-path into the road, to make way for them; part of the mob (probably half of them) passed me, when one of the mob seized my watch-ribbon; I seized another part of it and struggled with him; I seized the upper part, nearest to the watch - I struggled with him, and others came and got the watch out of my fob; and as I still retained hold of the ring, they began to beat me with sticks- in the struggle, the ring which fastened the ribbon to the watch, broke, and then they got my watch; they struck me about the head and shoulders with sticks, and one blow came on my face, and cut me in two places, which bled; they immediately left me and went towards the Rosemary Branch; I should think the whole transaction did not last more than four or five minutes - some persons afterwards came and assisted me; I went into a house - a surgeon, who was passing, came and dressed my face - after that, I went to put my hand to my pocket to give the surgeon something, and found my pocket turned out, and my purse containing five sovereigns was gone; I saw the prisoners at the office, and cannot swear that either of them were among the men.

JOHN JOHNSON . I live with my father, at No. 25, Queen-street, Spitalfields. On the 5th of November, at

half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was coming down Brick-lane, a young man snatched my cap off and ran into George-street with it, and there was a whole mob with a man - they had a young man with a mask on his face in the mob - there was no donkey then; they took the man up in their arms and carried him down George-street - and when they came to near the end of George-street they turned round another street, and round another at the end of that, and went up Hare-street-fields; they there met three or four young men coming with a donkey, and sat the man in the mask on it - they then went down towards Bethnal-green-road into Hackney-road, crossed there, and down some more turnings into Philip-street.

Q. Well; did you see Mr. Brooks at any time? A. Yes; I was in what I think is called Hyde-place - a good many of them collected round him; some went on in front and came back again; they all turned to him, and John Quay struck him with a stick; I am certain of Quay's person; they all got round him, and I saw a young man put his hand to his watch and pull it out; I should know him again I think - it was not any of the prisoners; he took his watch, and then ran away across the bridge and down a place - I saw Wheeler there, he was round the mob and acting with them; I did not see him do any thing - he was among the men who were engaged about the prosecutor. I got my cap from the young man.

Q.After the gentleman was robbed, what became of the party? A. They all went across the brick-field - they kept together while they were in my sight; I saw an officer and told him, and came to Worship-street with him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not a great many persons there? A. Yes, it was Guy Fawkes - there were forty or fifty in the crowd, and great confusion among them; I am above thirteen years old - I was very much frightened.

Q.Were you not a good deal occupied in trying to get your cap during a good deal of the time? A. Yes: the occurrence with the prosecutor was over in about five minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. You are quite sure the man who stole the watch is not here? A. Yes; quite sure - I have seen them about the streets before; I was looking at Wheeler particularly, and saw him do nothing.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Had you got your cap before the robbery of after? A.When they all came round the robbery - I have seen Quay about the street, and am positive I saw him strike the gentleman.

THOMAS ALDER . I am a butcher. I was present at the first of the transaction about the Guy; I saw the prisoner Wheeler first running with a stick about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, when I was at home at breakfast; I looked out of the window - they brought a young man down to be a Guy, but he would not; they got another, and dressed him out with ribbons and leaves; I saw no more; Wheeler was busy about it; he had on a blue jacket and trousers, and a hairy-cap.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Where was this? A. In Cheesman's-court, George-street, Bethnal-green.

SARAH TAYLOR . I live in King's-row, close to the Rosemary Branch. I saw a Guy and the mob; I was close to Mr. Brooks with my little girl; I saw Mr. Brooks step out of the carriage-road on to the footpath out of their way - I saw the crowd rush against him, and I suppose that was about three minutes before they got his watch; they struck him three or four times on his face and head - the blood gushed out of him and came on my hand: Wheeler and Dennis were there; I saw Wheeler rush against Mr. Brooks for the space of half a minute, and then I saw his hand in his pocket; I did not see Dennis do any thing, but he had a stick in his hand, and was close with Mr. Brooks.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.How old was your child? A.Four years - she was walking; she was alarmed and cried, and I was alarmed; I am sure I was close to Mr. Brooks, and observed the crowd before they came up to him.

Q. Did you observe before they came up that they had a quarrel among themselves, and were striking each other? A. No, I did not; there might be four or six persons close to Mr. Brooks at the time I saw Wheeler's hand in his pocket - but I saw Wheeler for the space of half a moment before he went up to Mr. Brooks; I did not say the mob all rushed on him together - I do not mean to say they went up singly; the footpath is only on one side of the road and I was on that side; I know Moss, he was not there - I did not see him there.

HENRY PAGE . I am a butcher. On the 5th of November, about eleven o'clock in the day, Wheeler came to my shop; I live about fifty yards from where Mr. Brooks was robbed - I saw none of the transaction, but saw Mr. Brooks bleeding afterwards; Wheeler came in a direction from where Mr. Brooks was bleeding, about that time - Mrs. Taylor was in my shop two minutes before, and went towards where Mr. Brooks was robbed.

SAMUEL BOULTON . I am a coal-dealer. On the day Mr. Brooks was robbed, I saw Wheeler at Page's window, apparently asking for money - that was about ten minutes past eleven o'clock; he followed the mob, and joined them; I did not see Mr. Brooks, but saw a scuffle - I cannot say whether Wheeler was in the scuffle, but I saw him join that part of the mob.

Q.What was the scuffle? A. They were striking a person with sticks, and surrounding him; I cannot say it was Mr. Brooks.

JAMES LITTON . I am a butcher. I met the Guy Fawkes at Haggerstone about an hour before the robbery, about ten o'clock, but saw no more of them; I cannot recognise any of the prisoners but Groves - he was at the latter part of the mob; I met the mob; one on the opposite side called out to knock my hat off, and another immediately said, "Knock his head off;" I took out my steel, and one of them said,"No, No;" I cannot say who it was, but believe it was Groves trying to prevent their touching me.

WILLIAM BARLOW . I am a coal and corn-dealer. I saw a parcel of men and boys coming up the lane by my house, on the 5th of November, about eleven o'clock; I live at the corner of Haggerstone-lane, about a quarter of a mile from where Mr. Brooks was robbed; to the best of my recollection Duff was among them; I never saw him before - I saw nothing of the robbery.

JOSEPH DORMER . On the 5th of November, about eleven o'clock, I saw some persons on the canal-bridge; I

do not know how far it was from where Mr. Brooks was robbed - they were running; I saw Duff among them, and saw him strike a donkey with a stick: I did not see Mr. Brooks.

RICHARD SAUNDERS . I am a constable. On the 5th of November, I was at work in Bridport-place, in the parish of Shoreditch; there was a cry of Stop thief! I ran out, and followed a gang of about thirty as far as the brickfields in Ball's-pond - they stopped there, and threatened to rip me up; I cannot say whether either of the prisoners were there.

THOMAS HAYWOOD . I live in Pelham-street. On the 5th of November I saw the Guy Fawkes; I was near the place where Mr. Brooks was robbed and wounded - I was not quite so near to him as to Mr. Goodyear, who was robbed; I came up after Mr. Brooks was robbed - I saw Wheeler and Groves there - I did not see them doing any thing; it was over: they were going up further - about forty or fifty persons were with them.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I apprehended Wheeler on the 10th of November, at a public-house, and asked him where he was on the 5th - be said he was at home from nine o'clock in the morning till between one and two, making fire-works; nothing further passed then; after I brought him out of the tap-room I told him to go in and sit down again, not being satisfied sufficiently to take him, and in less than five minutes we had information that he had left the house, and was gone to the Bull's Head public-house; I went there, and took him - I told him the charge; he said he should like to see the party, to see if they should know him - he was taken to different houses, and then to the Whitmore's Head, Hoxton; I sent for Taylor, told her to go into the room, and see if she knew any body - she went in, came out, and said she knew one man there, and pointed out Wheeler as one of the men who were round Mr. Brooks at the time he was robbed; Page, the butcher, went in - he came out, and said he knew one man, and pointed out Wheeler: I then told Waters, in the prisoner's presence, to take him - he called to me, in the prisoner's presence, and said, "I want to speak to you;" I went, and Wheeler said, "I am not going to suffer for other chaps - I know the chap who robbed him, and I had a sovereign out of the money at the Halifax Arms, next day;" Groves came to me and surrendered, as he had heard I had been to his master's about him.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q.How far is the second public-house from the first? A.About two hundred yards - I had not told him the charge; when I first took him, I asked him about the 5th of November: I went to look after him again in three minutes - I found him then in custody.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer of Worship-street. I was with Armstrong when Wheeler was taken - after he had been identified, as I was taking him to the watch-house, he said it was hard to suffer for other people; I immediately called Armstrong to him - he said, "If you will do what is right, I will do what is right;" I said I always did right on duty; he then said, "It was not me that took the purse - it was another chap that took it, and gave me a sovereign out of it the next day, at the Halifax Arms;" I said he had better disclose that to the Magistrate.

WHEELER'S Defence. When Armstrong took me out of the Halifax Arms he let me go again: I went in for a few minutes, and came out and went to the Bull's Head - a man stopped me, and said I wanted to rob him of a cart; he took me into the house - the officers came and said,"We have got you now, and will keep you;" they took me to two or three houses - then took me to a house in Hoxton, among a parcel of respectable people, and fetched the woman in; I was sitting by the side of an officer, and she said, "That is one of them," and as we went along Hattfield said, "I know you know about it, why don't you tell me whether any of the people at the Halifax Arms were with you or not?" I said, "I don't know" - he said,"If you will tell me of six people, I will let you go;" I said, "Would you have me swear to six innocent people? I will do no such a thing" - I have witnesses to prove Taylor has forsworn herself.

QUAY's Defence. People outside can swear I was at home at the time.

GEORGE CECIL . I am a silk-weaver, and live at No. 37, St. John-street; Quay lives in my house, and is in my employ: on the 5th of November I saw him first - about a quarter to eight o'clock he got up; he is a weaver, and works in my house - I had occasion to go out at twenty minutes to eleven o'clock, and left him at work; my wife was then out - I returned at half-past eleven, and found him at home at work; I did not notice his shoes to see if he had been out - I know his father; he was not in my house that day.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.What first called your attention to the prisoner on the 5th of November? A.Because I was at work on the 5th, and he worked; I was at work on the 4th and 6th, and he also - I cannot say how far my place is from Hoxton.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know where Hoxton is? A. Yes - Quay has lived in my house about three years; he bears an excellent good character - I have left him in my place for days and half days together; I have a deal of silk there.

BETSY CECIL . I am the wife of the last witness. I saw Quay at work on the 5th of November, at half-past ten o'clock; I went out soon after that - he is a hard-working industrious young man.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you or your husband go out first? A. I did - at what time he went out I do not know; I did not meet him.

JAMES JOHN QUAY . I am the prisoner's father - he was at work on the 5th of November; he came up to my place where I live, which is right opposite Cecil's, and asked me to give him a bit of stuff to mend his harness - that was about ten minutes before eleven o'clock; after I gave it to him he walked towards the back-window - some boys were letting off some little cannons in the yard; he looked at them, came from the window, and said, "Father, it is just gone eleven o'clock, I shall go back and get to work till dark, and then leave off.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. About what time of day did he come to you? A. About ten minutes before eleven o'clock- I know the time by what he told me; he told me the clock had struck eleven - he goes by Spitalfield's clock, which is about a quarter of a mile from our window, and we can plainly hear it; I did not hear it - I am not so quick of hearing, but my daughter heard it.

JOSEPH FLETCHER MOSS . I live at No. 29, Pool-street, New North-road, and am a tailor. I know Sarah Taylor - she was a tenant of mine prior to Michaelmas twelve

month; I saw her on the 5th of November at the bottom of Abury-street, facing the canal, about one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards from where the robbery was committed - she had a child in her arms; she remained there in conversation with me about five minutes - there was then a party, a mob returning from towards the Rosemary Branch - she walked towards the mob, and I walked home.

Q. Could you, where you stood, see any thing done in the scuffle? A.Certainly not - she was nearer to it than me, but I did not see the scuffle - it was half an hour after.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. This was after the robbery was over? A. Yes.

Seven witnesses deposed to the good character of Quay, and the same number to that of Wheeler.

WHEELER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

QUAY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Quay recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account or his good character .

DENNIS - NOT GUILTY .

DUFF - NOT GUILTY .

GROVES - NOT GUILTY .

The said prisoners were all again indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah Warner on the King's highway, on the 5th of November , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 3 shillings; 12 halfpence, and 6 keys, her property. Also for feloniously assaulting John Goodyear , on the same day, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 seal, value 1s., and 1 key, value 6d., his property ; but no evidence was offered. ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18281204-182

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

181. THOMAS BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , at St. John, at Hampstead, 1 gelding, price 10l. , the property of William Rodwell .

WILLIAM RODWELL. I live at Hampstead , and keep a laundry . I had had this gelding five years - it was a roan colour; I put it out on the heath on the 12th of September, and saw it there about twelve o'clock that day - I went there on Saturday morning, the 13th, and it was gone; I found it at one o'clock on the 20th of September, opposite the Swan public-house, at Kennington, standing in a chaise - I saw the ostler there, and spoke about the chaise to him; I proposed to hire it, and in consequence of what I said the ostler went away, and returned in about ten minutes with the prisoner, who asked if I was the gentleman who wanted the chaise - I said I was, and asked what he charged an hour; he said 2s. 6d; I said, "Don't you think that is a great deal" - he said that was a regular fare; I said it was a good deal - he asked how far I was going; I said not much farther, and then told him the poney belonged to me, and I should have him locked up, and the poney too; I asked what he gave for it - he said he gave a fair price for it; I said if he would take me to the man he bought it of I should be satisfied, and would let him go - I told the ostler to take the poney out of the chaise, and lock it up; he unharnessed it, and I took hold of the prisoner - I caught hold of my poney, and let of the prisoner, to put my poney into the stable; the prisoner said he bought it in Smithfield on the 12th of September, at nine o'clock in the evening - I said, "That must be a great story, for you never bought it in Smithfield at all;" he then said, "No, I did not buy it in Smithfield, I bought it coming away from Smithfield-market" - I told him it was mine, and pointed out a large W on the near shoulder; he was very willing for me to have it; I left him in charge of Sturges while I put the poney into the stable, and when I got back he was gone - I got over the top of a water-butt to look for him, but could not see him; I got over several fences, but could not find him.

Prisoner. Q.Did you see me go over the wall? A. No; I could see nothing of you when I looked over the wall; I had missed you about a minute - I never lost the horse before; and did not buy it as a stolen one; I know George Wood, who, I believe, deals in horses.

COURT. Q. How do you know the horse? A.By a large W which I burnt myself in the near shoulder, and it has three white feet - two behind white, and one white about the fetlock joint; I am sure it is mine - I had had it five years - it was four years old when I bought it.

Prisoner. Q. Do you really believe that I stole it? A. If you did not, you know something about who did; I never bought a horse of Wood - it was owned from me as a stolen horse; it had been stolen at two years old from Jackman, a drover; I bought it about two years after that- I have seen Wood - he is wanted now, I believe - I have not seen him for six or seven months; I used to see him at Hampstead; he had horses, but whether they were his own I do not know; I was never intimate with him - I never drank with him to my knowledge; I bought the horse of Bolton, who kept the Hour Glass public-houses, at Walworth.

SAMUEL STURGES . I live at St. Ann's-row, Kennington, and am in the provision trade. On the 20th of September, I was near the Swan public-house, at Kennington, and saw Rodwell, and saw a chaise with a poney in it; I saw Fops, the ostler, go from Rodwell - he returned in about ten minutes with the prisoner; Rodwell asked what he charged an hour for the horse and chaise; the prisoner said it was his horse and chaise, and that he charged half a crown -Rodwell said it was a great deal - he said it was the usual price; Rodwell said it was a decent-looking horse - how long might he have had it; how much he had given for it, and where he bought it; the prisoner said he had had it about a fortnight or three weeks, that he bought it in Smithfield, and gave the full value for it - he did not say how much; Rodwell then said "It is my horse, and you are my prisoner;" and directed the ostler to unharness it, signifying his intention to send it to livery; the ostler said it would be safe in his possession, in the stable - I then told the prisoner, that to say the least of it, it was an unfortunate circumstance, and if he could take us to the person he had bought it of, and satisfy the prosecutor, that would be all that was required of him - he expressed his entire concurrence, and said he would go immediately to Smithfield to satisfy the prosecutor; I hinted to him that we were both ready and willing to go - he said he was perfectly ready and willing to go immediately, and if I would allow him to go into the back-yard, he would not detain me a moment - I rather hesitated, but allowed him to go, following a few yards behind him; he then leaped over a high fence, got across some gentlemen's gardens, and escaped; Rodwell and I pursued after him, but he got clear off - this was about one o'clock in the day.

Prisoner. Q. On your oath, did you see me in the garden? A. No; we pursued along the gardens - I did not see you get over the fence; I was not at all intoxicated -

I had drunk nothing that day; the impression on my mind is that you said you had the horse a fortnight or three weeks - I will swear you said so.

COURT. Q. You did not see him get over the fence; did you see him go away at all? A. Yes; he went into the back-yard, and did not come back.

BENJAMIN FOPS . On the 20th of September, I was at the Swan, at Kennington - I am employed there by the ostler when he goes out with his chaise; I was there on Tuesday, the 16th of September, and saw the prisoner there then - his horse stood there at livery: it was a kind of roancoloured horse: I saw him there on Friday - he said nothing about the horse that day: he came to see it fed, but said nothing to me about it - I saw him waiting there while the ostler fed it; it continued there till Saturday, the 20th; he was there every day; I did not see the horse used till the Saturday, when it stood in the chaise eating a feed of oats, which I had given him; Rodwell spoke to me about it - I went to the cookshop to the prisoner; he came up to Rodwell, who said "Do you own this?" (meaning the horse and chaise) - he said Yes, that he bought it on the Friday, at Smithfield; Rodwell asked if he let it out - he said Yes; Rodwell said "Do you charge so much an hour, or so much by the job?" Yes, said he, half a crown an hour, or so much the job; Rodwell said he was in no hurry, and then said "This is my horse, and it was stolen from me;" the prisoner answered "I am very willing to go with you to the man I bought it off:" the horse was unharnessed -Rodwell asked me to lend him a bridle to take it to livery, I said he might as well leave it there, and it should be taken care of, and it was put into the stable.

Q.Did the prisoner give you any directions about the horse, between the Tuesday and Saturday? A. He used to dress him over, and wash his bad eye; I put it into the stable, and left Rodwell and Sturges talking together, and when I returned, the prisoner was not there.

Prisoner. Q.Did I not work the horse on Wednesday and Thursday? A. I was not there all day; it was in the afternoon, if you did - he did work it in the afternoon, in the ostler's chaise - I was not there on Thursday or Friday.

JAMES GIBBS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I went near the Duke's Head public-house, Kennington-lane, on Monday, the 3d of November, and met the prisoner with a bridle on his back - he was a little intoxicated; I told him I wanted him, would he step a little way with me? he said"Let us go in here;" I said No, I wanted him on a charge of felony; he said "Then I shall not go further, unless I know what it is for;" I said "It is respecting that horse you stole from Hampstead Heath;" he then made a little resistance - I told him it was of no use, though he had escaped once, he should not escape from me, but if he would walk civilly with me, I would not behave rough to him; he said he would; he said the horse was his own - that he gave 4l. 10s. for it, at the Ram public-house, Smithfield; I took him towards Queen-square: he said "Why, I know how it will be - I know how it will go - you may as well round it at once - twenty sovereigns is no object to me to make it up" - I had not either threatened or promised him any thing; I told him I did not do my business in that way - as he had escaped once, I would take care he did not again.

Prisoner. Q.Why did you not apprehend me when you saw me at Croydon fair? A. I had not then got an exact description of you; I swear you offered me twenty sovereigns to make it up.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 12th of September, I went to Smithfield, and bought the horse, between six and seven o'clock, at the Ram-inn door, as I came out - I bid the man 6l. for it; it had a large lump on his off-haunch; he would not take the money, but said he would take it home, and cut his head off first; I at last gave him seven sovereigns - he gave me 5s. out of it - one Sanderson and Goodman were present when I offered for it - I bought it to let out, at Kennington, and was offered money for it several times, but would not sell it; I had seen the person I bought it of several times in the market, but never spoke to him before; he was a stout man - I had seen him dealing in horses, and considered I gave a fair price for it - I had no reason to believe it was stolen; I put the man's name down on a piece of paper - he gave me the name of W. Wood, and said he lived at Clerkenwell; I never missed a day in going to Smithfield to look after him, to have him apprehended, but never saw him; the witnesses against me had seen me in Smithfield, and heard me say I would have the man apprehended, if I saw him; Fops was in Smithfield the whole time I was there.

THOMAS FOPS . I was at Smithfield that day, and saw the prisoner there - I went, between two and three o'clock, and saw him there till four, when I left; I did not see this horse there - I saw Saunders and Goodwin with the prisoner - they were all three together.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18281204-183

First London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

182. JOHN BARCLAY HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November , 2lbs. of nutmegs, value 11s. , the goods of William Eastman , and others.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM EASTMAN . I am in partnership with Major Eastman and others - the prisoner was in the employ of Bailey, a town carman, but his whole time was taken up in our business - we are wholesale spice dealers . On the 11th of November I sent him to Messrs. Heron and Co., in Bishopsgate-street, with some goods - no nut-megs were among them; he was to clear some nutmegs afterwards.

JOSEPH WAITE . I am in the employ of Messrs. Heron and Co. About three weeks ago the prisoner came and delivered some goods from Eastman and Co., and after he brought them in, he was standing in the warehouse, his hat fell off, and I perceived a great many nutmegs falling about in different parts; I looked into his hat and saw some more nutmegs, and two pieces of ginger - there might be a pound or a pound and a half of nutmegs; he said it was a parcel he got had to deliver, and the paper or bag had burst - he said who he was to take it to, but I forget the name; I sent to Mr. Eastman's about it.

MR. EASTMAN. In consequence of a message from Mr. Heron's, I saw the prisoner soon after seven o'clock in the evening, and asked what he had done with the nut-megs which fell out of his hat; he said "What nutmegs?" I asked him again, and he said "I had no nutmegs;" I put the question to him a third time, mentioning Heron's,

where they had fallen from his hat - he then said if I would step aside, he would tell me all about it; I said nothing to induce him to confess - I retired behind the premises with him, he fell on his knees, begged I would not hurt him, and said he had taken them away, and that he had done it through distress; he had 18s. a week - he said, at that time, his wife and child had not bread to eat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is he a married man? A. I suppose so; I saw his wife and child that night.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you go and look into his cart that evening? A. He told me they were in his cart, and I saw the officer find above 2lbs. of nutmegs there - they are worth more than 11s.; he repeated his statement before both my partners - we had missed 2lbs. or 3lbs. of nutmegs from a cask that day; they were such as these,

Prisoner's Defence. Not any of these can be sworn to- I used to deal in pices in a small way; those in the cart were my own.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his character.

Judgment Respited . (See 5th Day, New Court.)

Reference Number: t18281204-184

183. MARY ANN WALTERS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 1 umbrella, value 10s., the goods of Sarah Eaton , her mistress .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Thomas Bamford .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

SARAH EATON . I live in Fenchurch-street . On the 19th of October Thomas Bamford left an umberella at my house - on the 30th it was called for, and could not be found; the prisoner was at that time in my service - she was out when I searched for the umbrella; I had given her leave to go out - when she came home I asked if she knew what had become of the umbrella, which was in the closet at the foot of the stairs; she said she did not know any thing of it - I directed my daughter to inquire at the different pawnbrokers.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What is Bamford? A. A cellarman . The prisoner came into my service on the 15th of August; I took in the umbrella myself.

JANE EATON . I am the proserutrix's daughter. I called at Barker's the pawnbroker's, and described this umbrella; he then produced it to me - I left it there, returned to my mother's, and saw the prisoner - I told her I had found the umbrella; she then said "I pledged it, and lost the duplicate as I came home from Fenchurch-street" - I had not said she had better tell the truth.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you appear against the prisoner on Saturday? A. My sister did - she was then acquitted.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know how any charge was made against her? A. She was charged with nothing till the umbrella was lost.

EBENEZA HODGES . I am shopman to Mr. Barker, and know the prisoner: on the 30th of October she pawned this umbrella with me for 7s. - I did not know her before, but have not the least doubt of her; a young woman was with her.

Cross-examined. Q.When were you spoken to about this? A. Next morning Miss Eaton came; the prisoner pawned it in the name of Ann Roach - it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening, and dark; we have thirty or forty customers in a day.

MARIA BOLTON . I am single. I went to Barker's with the prisoner, when she pawned this umbrella for 7s.; I saw it in her hand - it was a brown silk one.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was it? A. It was in the evening, and I should think between seven and nine o'clock; I know I was in the kitchen with my mother at seven and I returned at nine.

SARAH EATON . This is the umbrella Bamford left with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you a servant named Roach? A. I had - she left me on the 15th of August, before the umbrella was left; she left the day before the prisoner came - she has called at the house since.

JANE EATON . I am certain of this umbrella.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you receive it from Bamford? A. No, but I have very often seen it - it has been in our house about ten days; I often noticed it.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you describe it to the pawnbroker before he produced it? A.Yes; I described the head of it, and as a brown silk one, with a leather string.

THOMAS BAMFORD . This is my umbrella - I left it at Mrs. Eaton's.

Cross-examined. Q. When did you leave it there? A. On Sunday morning, the 19th of October - I gave it Mrs. Eaton herself, to take care of; I bought it new a month or two before - I have no name on it, but am quite confident of it, and could point it out among a hundred.

BRIDGET ROACH . On my oath I never pawned that umbrella, or any other.

Cross-examined. Q. How long were you in Mrs. Eaton's service? A. Three months and a fortnight - I was discharged.

EBENEZA HODGES . The last witness did not pawn the umbrella - I never saw her before.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Judge and Jury.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-185

184. JOHN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Harrison , from his person .

THOMAS HARRISON. I am now out of business. On the 1st of November, I was at the bottom of Skinner-street , and felt something at my coat pocket; I turned round, and perceived a person who had been following me a considerable distance - I felt, and missed my handkerchief; I saw the prisoner in the middle of the street, thrusting something into his bosom - I seized him, and found my handkerchief on him; two person had been following me - he was one of them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along Barbican, and met a person who I knew; he asked me where I was going - I said, "Towards Fleet-street;" he said he was going that way - I stopped on Snow-hill, to look into an eating-house window, and, on turning round, a handkerchief

was thrown on my arm; I saw nobody, and put it into my pocket - I corssed over - this gentleman came, and said I had his handkerchief; I asked if that was his.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven years .

Reference Number: t18281204-186

186. WILLIAM BUCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , 1 coat, value 8s. , the goods of Henry Parry .

ALEXANDER JOHNSON . I am beadle of St. Bride's. On the 2d of November, at about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was on the west side of Fleet-market, and saw the prisoner take a great coat out of a gig: he ran away with it; I stopped him, about ten yards off, with it - I took him to Mr. Saunders's shop, where the gig stood.

HENRY PARRY . My chaise stood in Fleet-market for about ten minutes, while I was in Mr. Saunders's shop; a charity-boy was minding it - the coat was in it; I know nothing of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-187

187. JOHN RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of Edmund Fleming .

MARY HARRIS . On the 25th of November, about half-past eleven o'clock, I was passing Mr. Fleming's shop, and saw the prisoner cut down a pair of trousers, which hung just outside the door - he walked away; I went and told them - he was pursued and taken; I am sure he is the man.

FRANCIS WITTY . I am servant to Edmund Fleming, a pawnbroker , of Newgate-street . Harris gave me information - I pursued, and found the prisoner in custody of some persons; the trousers were two or three yards from where he was taken, in Ivy-lane.

JAMES GIBSON . I am an officer, and have the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A friend appointed to meet me at a house in Newgate-market, kept by one Baker: I could not find the name, and was walking down a street, when I heard a cry of Stop thief! a man ordered me to stop, which I did - I had nothing on me, as he said, but the Alderman, not believing his evidence material, did not bind him over; it was five minutes before the prosecutor came up.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281204-188

188. ANN MALDON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Budd , on the 4th of December , and stealing 1 pair of sheets, value 2s. 8d; 7 neck-handkerchiefs, value 3s; 5 handkerchiefs, value 3s. 6d.; 1 table-cloth, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 shirt, value 2s. 6d; and 4 knives, value 1s. , his property.

MARY BUDD . I am the wife of William Budd - we live in Bride-lane, Fleet-street . On the 4th of December, about half-past twelve o'clock in the day, I followed my son into the kitchen; I got in, by unlocking the door with the key - there is a long passage leading to the kitchen; I had locked the kitchen-door at nine o'clock, and at eleven I went there again - every thing was safe; I locked the door, and took the key - about quarter of an hour before I went there again, I gave my son the key, he went for his hat; I went down at half-past twelve o'clock; my son had left the key outside the door - we found it still in the lock, and the door locked; I found my things tumbled about, and the door locked; I found my things tumbled about, and these articles were taken out of the drawers and laid on the dresser - I accused my son of moving them; he said he never touched them - I remained there till my husband went to the closet to draw some tablebeer, and then the prisoner walked out of the close, said she begged pardon, she wanted to speak to the good woman of the house; she was an entire stranger - we keep a school, and cannot always have the street door locked.

Cross-examined by Mr. PHILIPS. Q. Did not she say something more? A. She said a man had taken her into the yard, and used her in amost cruel manner - and said it was a stout man, and afterward she said it was my son; he had not come up stairs for the key, but took it down, as he left the school-room.

WILLIAM BUDD . I followed my wife into the kitchen, as she followed my son; we all three went in, and found the things removed - I went away, returned again in about a quarter of an hour, and found the prisoner in the cupboard in the about three minutes; I did not know of her being there till them.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you ever given your son any warning? A. I have often given him warning.

WILLIAM EDWARD BUDD . I am the prosecutor's son. I got the key from my mother, and came down with it in my hand from the school-room; I went into the kitchen about twenty minutes past twelve o'clock - every thing appeared secure; I only went to the window and took up my hat - I did not notice the things on the dresser; I went out, leaving the key in the door - I returned in five minutes, and picked up a basket of potatoes; I returned to the kitchen, and in ten minutes went out to change a 5l. note; I returned in twenty minutes, and found my father and the prisoner in the kitchen - I had not seen her there before.

Cross-examined. Q. Your father had been giving you some warning? A. Not respecting this person; he has given me lectures, as it is a father's duty to do - he has warned me about women, but I am not that way inclined -I had not been out that morning till then; I have seen the prisoner once, about ten months ago, in Bridge-street, quarrelling with another woman, and an officer of Bridewell called me to assist in parting them - I did not speak to her.

Q. You remember her well? A. I can remember any one who I have seen before; she said I had been with her, but I strongly deny it - I never saw her, but at the time I mention; I did not tell her where I lived, and have never seen her since - my father never found me at all prodigal.

Q. Did you ever say he had said he would turn you out of doors if he found anything? A. Never - the prisoner did not accuse me on the spot; she did at the watch-house, and she accused my father before me - he was not present, but three officers were; she at first took me for the officer; she said this much, that it was the gentleman belonging to the house, and that he had ill-used her; that it was au elderly gentleman - and then that it was a pock-marked gentleman, in a blue coat; I had not a blue coat on - my father is not pock-marked, nor am I; she did not mention my father's name - I swear I never had any intercourse with

her; I never told her my father had threatened to turn me out - he has cautioned me, as it is a parent's duty; if I read my Bible, I cannot help seeing a reprimand against women - my father never saw me with women, or given that way.

JOHN HUCKLE . I am an inspector of the watch. I took the prisoner in charge; when I went into the kitchen Mr. Budd said she had entered the house, got into the kitchen, and moved things from the drawers to the dresser; I took her to the watch-house - she there begged to be allowed to go to the water-closet, and directly she went in an officer said, "You are doing wrong;" he opened the door, and said she was putting something down there, and I took out of the pan these two common keys, which I tried to the kitchen-door - one of them opens it; she said some old man, pock-marked, took her into the house, and left her in the kitchen.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been intimate with this young man for ten months; he has given me a trifle of money - he gave me encouragement to be more sociable with him: he said he objected to go to a house, but when his mother was out he could go to his apartment with me; I met him on this day as the children were coming out of school - he said, "My father is just going out - come here and wait in the kitchen a few minutes till I go up and get the key to open the door, and I will speak to you;" I said I was in a hurry - he said,

"Wait, for I have not seen you this fortnight;" he went up, came down again, and opened the door: his mother called him up to get change - he said,"Wait here, and if my mother comes down go, into the cupboard, or I shall be turued out of the house;" I staid a few minutes, and hearing somebody coming I went in - his father came to the door, and he ill-used me; I said,"Wait till your son comes back, and I will give you a proper understanding how I came here;" the father dragged me about: I said, "If you will let me stay here till I can give you a proper understanding I shall be thankful;" both mother and father ill-used me - the son came in; I applied to him for assistance - he held up his hand, and said, "Don't say any thing," and so I did not, thinking he would speak the truth to his mother privately, but at the watch-house he turned round upon me, and said he did know me, and then he did not know me; I told him to speak the truth - he said, "Don't say any thing - my father won't hurt you."

JOHN HUCKLE . He did not say he knew her, and then that he did not.

WILLIAM EDWARD BUDD . There is not a word of truth in what she has said.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you go up stairs for change? A. I did not; my mother was in the kitchen when she sent me out for change.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-189

189. WILLIAM COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , I handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Augustine Frederick Goddard from his person .

AUGUSTINE FREDERICK GODDARD. On the 29th of October I was at the corner of Wood-street, Cheapside ; I put my hand behind me, and found my pocket empty - I turned round, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I took it from him, collared him, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Did he not say he found it on the ground? A.He did not - the crowd was so great that he could not have stooped to pick it up; he was close behind me - I do not recollect feeling any body at my pocket; whether I did, or whether I put my hand down by accident, I cannot say.

FRANCIS MCLEAN . I am an officer, and have the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it off the ground.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-190

190. THOMAS ROGERS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-191

NEW COURT, Fourth Day.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

198. THOMAS SPARROWHAWK and MARIA SPARROWHAWK were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , 6 hats, value 80s., the goods of John Rawlinson Harris and John Rush Warner , the masters of the said Thomas Sparrowhawk .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am a Bow-Street patrol. On the 20th of November. I saw the female prisoner in White-street, Spitalfields, with a bundle containing six hats, and a cloak over it; I asked where she got them - she said she had brought them from over the water, from Mr. Harris', to pick, the day before, had left them at a house close by, and had called for them; she said if we went with her she would shew us where they lived - I handed her to my conductor: she was going towards Bishopsgate, and might have gone to the Borough that way.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then she told you if you went she would shew you the house? A. Yes, and she staid with me while my conductor went to the place; her account was true - it was in some street in Surrey-street.

THOMAS GOODING . I am conductor of the patrol. Mitchell gave the female prisoner to me on the 20th of November; he said, "I have stopped this woman with this bag, and she says there are hats in it;" I asked her how many there were, and she said half a dozen - I found it was so: she said she did not know the street, nor number, but she would shew us the house; I asked where she lived, and she said in a street in King-street, Borough - I asked whose hats they were - she said her husband was foreman to Messrs. Harris, of Winchester-street, Borough - that she brought the hats over last night, left them at Mr. Coffee's, and when she called for them they were removed - that she had them to pick, and was returning them; I left her in custody, and went to Harris'.

SAMUEL JONES . I am in the employ of John Rawlinson Harris and John Rush Warner ; the male prisoner has been in their service eight or nine months - the woman came to fetch hats to pick, and to bring them back; her husband delivers them to her - I deliver them to him in general, but sometimes Mr. Walmesley does; we keep a book, in which we enter the work given to the prisoner - he gives

them to his wife as he pleases: he has no right to give out any which are not delivered to him; here is an account in the book of work delivered to him - the whole of them are accounted for; we at times give bats back to repair, but these were not to be repaired - the bats delivered to him have been returned; if any others were made use of by him, I did not deliver them to him: I believe these to be my employers' property.

Cross-examined. Q. The man had the liberty of giving hats to be picked as he chose? A. Yes; the wife may have received them innocently of him - she might have got them from him.

COURT. Q. Do you say these hats were never delivered to him; A. I believe not - the last entry of hats to him was on the 20th.

EDWARD WALMESLEY . I am in the employ of the prosecutors. If Jones is out of the way I deliver out hats; I am the only person who does so - I never delivered these to either of the prisoners; if hats are given out to he picked they are not in this state.

Cross-examined. Q. The husband may have delivered them to her? A. Yes - he gives hats from those delivered to him; I will swear hats have not been sold in this state.

MR. PHILLIPS to SAMUEL JONES . Q.Have hats ever been sold from your house in the state these are in? A. Yes, in the same state these are now - no one has been doing any thing to them since they were taken from the woman.

MR. ALLEY. Q.Look at the inside of these hats; are hats ever delivered out to be picked in that state? A. No- they have been picked; hats have been sold in this state.

Q. Can you say, or can you not, whether these have been sold? A. I belive not.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You say these hats are picked? - A. Yes; she may have picked these very hats, and have been bringing them back.

COURT to EDWARD WALMESLEY . Q. Are you the only person who sells hats? A. Oh, No, Sir, we keep several travellers who sell them; I have no doubt these have been picked - I do not know how long it takes to pick them; it is generally done by the men's wives: they have never been sold in this state - they could not, because there is not a hat sent out without my knowledge; we could not miss these hats from the stock - five hundred would not be missed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-192

192. DENNIS MAHONEY and JOHN DILLON were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , 10 gold watch-keys, value 10l.; 3 gold watch-chains, value 14l.; 9 coloured stone rings, value 26l.; 2 eye-glasses, value 4l.; 9 pairs of ear-rings, value 25l.; 1 pink topaz cross, value 20l.; 13 brooches, value 30l.; 7 necklaces, value 85l., and 1 pair of gold bracelets, value 10l., the goods of Edward Simpson and Henry Woolbert , in a certain ship in the port of London .

HENRY WOOLBERT . I am in partnership with Edward Simpson . About the 2d of September we shipped some jewellery in a box on board the Alfred. which was lying in the East India Docks , bound to the East Indies - it contained all the various articles stated in the indictment; I did not accompany them on board the ship; I delivered them to the shipping-agent, Robert Escombe; I have never seen them since, but saw the box, I think, about the end of September or the beginning of October, at the Thames Police-office, broken to pieces; I had not directed it, the shipping-agent directed it; I have no doubt it was the same; the ship had sailed at that time; this was not discovered till the ship got round to Portsmouth; I know nothing of the prisoners; I saw the goods all safe at the end of August.

ROBERT ESCOMBE . I am shipping-agent. The box of jewellery was delivered to me by Mr. Woolbert; I gave it into the charge of Charles Chapman , the Wharfinger at the Quay, to be conveyed on board the Alfred; I saw it again at the Thames Police-office, but the lid had been removed, and has not been found.

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am servant to Mr. Hall, of the Custom-house-quay. I received a small box from Escombe to be put in Mr. Turnley's lighter; William King is the lighterman; I delivered the same box to him or some of his men - it was put on board his craft.

WILLIAM KING . I am in the employ of Mr. Turnley, the lighterman. I took charge of the box, and kept it from the Saturday till the Tuesday; I delivered it at the East India Dock, and saw it put on board the Alfred - I cannot recollect when I heard of its being taken from the Alfred; I saw a box at the Thames Police, which was much of the same kind, but it was then empty, and there was no lid to it.

WILLIAM ASHTON . I am a ship and insurance-broker. I went round in the Alfred from London to Portsmouth; I merely saw this box brought out of the hold into the Captain's cabin at Portsmouth, in the state it is now in; there was one ear-ring in it, which I believe the officer has; I believe the prisoners were employed as lumpers to load the ship - I never saw them in the docks employed to load ships; they did not go to Portsmouth.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am clerk to Mr. Foss, of Mark-lane, he is agent to the Alfred. This box did not go originally from our house, but I received it from Portsmouth with this ear-ring, which I delivered to Beechey, the officer.

JAMES BEECHEY . I am an officer of the Thames Police. I received this ear-ring and box from Mr. Griffiths; I know both the prisoners perfectly well; they were lumpers employed in stowing ships-holds - they were not employed in the East India Docks to my knowledge; they were first taken in the mouth of September, and brought to the Thames Police, where they were discharged for want of evidence; I took Dillon again on the 15th of November - I told him it was for the jewellery: he said it was a had job; I took Mahoney on the 16th of November - I told him it was for the box of jewellery; he said he saw me the night previous, when I was going to the watch-house with Dillon, and that if I had not apprehended him, he should have come forward at the examination on the Monday; from the list which I received from their employer, (Mr. Wright.) it appears the prisoners were employed as lumpers in the early part of September, but I do not know it myself.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When in September were the men taken first? A. I think about the 19th, but I did not take them - I think they were dis

charged the latter end of September or the beginning of October; they had four or five examinations - I think they were kept in prison about a fortnight, or something more.

WILLIAM WOOD OGILVIE . I am a pawnbroker, in the employ of Miss Wood, No. 207, High-street, Poplar. I know both the prisoners - I did not see either of them on this business; I stopped this pair of ear-rings, which were brought by a woman in the name of Johanna Hayes; I had never seen her in company with either of the prisoners - but Mr. Beechey told us if such things were offered, to stop them; I attended at the Police-office, but they were not at that time claimed by Mr. Woolbert.

MR. WOOLBERT. I have no doubt these are a part of the property sent out.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the jewellery your property? A. Yes; they had no mark on them; I merely identify them from recollection; there were ear-rings of this size and sort and pattern; but here is a private-mark upon the paper, in Mr. Simpson's writing, which I know; and there were other papers corresponding in the box.

DANIEL HARRINGTON . I am a labourer at the docks. The prisoners were employed in the East India Docks in the beginning of September, or thereabout, in the hold of the Alfred - there were about four lumpers in the hold, and about twelve in all, and the ship's company - I was employed as foreman to take the cargo on board the ship; I cannot say how long they were employed about the ship, because the cargo came at different times - they were employed till the ship left the docks.

ANDREW HAYES . I am a lumper. I know the two prisoners - I was in the East India Docks when the Alfred was loading; the prisoners were employed to load it, and I was employed half a day, from half-past two o'clock -I did not hear of the loss of a box from the Alfred before I was taken up myself; I was the first man that was taken up - I had two hearings; the prisoners were taken up afterwards - I was set at liberty; they found no bill against me- I got clear off, because the owner could not swear to the things; I know Johannah Mahoney - she is no relation of the prisoners, as far as I know, but we all live close together, and sometimes work together; when I went on board the Alfred I was sent on the orlop-deck - after we finished there I was ordered down into the hold; after that I was ordered by an officer, named Hill, to stand in the main-hatchway, and hand the cargo to these men; after we had the cargo down the main-batchway, the officer said there was no more to go down but that in the orlop-deck, and that he did not want that stowed, but put on one side- he called me on the orlop-deck to lend a hand to get it done; I did not see anything of a small box put into the hold, but when I was sent on the orlop-deck Mahoney called me down into the hold again, where he was taking the things down - he ordered me to stand in his place and take the things down, and said he had other work to do; the prisoners both went away - there was a heap of things in the way, and I called to them to come and take them out of my way; they did not come - I looked over the ship's still and saw the box broken open, and Mahoney and Dillon taking the things and putting them into their pockets; I did not see them break the box, but I saw the box which was broken between them - I ran towards them, and asked them what they were doing; Mahoney said he would knock me down if I did not turn back and do my work, and I did turn back to my work in taking the things off the orlopdeck - at the same time Dillon said, "There is nothing in the box but papers;" I did not tell any body that I had seen this - I did not think any thing of it, when the man said there was nothing in it but papers; there was nobody in the hold at the time, but the two prisoners and me - I did not tell the Magistrates of this the first time I was taken, because I was afraid of my life, but the second time I did; after we had taken those things off the orlop-deck, I went over the ship's side, and there was a paper, which I took up and put into my bosom; I did not open it, but I came and took my jacket off, and threw the paper down on the bed - I did not know what was in it, and never saw it open; my wife took it up and put it into her pocket - I never saw it opened, nor ever saw this pair of ear-rings till I was at the Thames Police; the next day my wife opened the paper, and found the ear-rings in it - I did not see any body open it; I cannot say that the paper I saw at the Police-office was the one my wife put into her pocket - I am no scholar, and never took notice; I never knew there was any thing in it - I saw Mahoney in prison; I was the first man that was taken - Dillon and Mahoney were taken afterwards, and a man named Driscoll; while I was in prison with Mahoney I was complaining of being in prison, which had never happened to me, nor to any body belonging to me before, and Mahoney said it was all right, since the owner did not swear to it - I said he must have a deal of money, as I heard he was in it, and I must pay for it - he said he did not make of his own share more than 9l., and Dillon had the most part of the goods; Dillon was not within hearing at this time, as far as I could see.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.You are an Irishman, I suppose? A. Yes, I am, and a Catholic; I made the sign of the cross when I was sworn; the woman I call my wife, was here just now - she has had four of five children by me; she is not my wife, but a woman I live with - I have not a wife in Ireland; I never was married in Ireland; I will not swear that - I will not swear any thing; I never was married in my life; I do swear that- I was born near Ross, I came from Kinsale - I was only living there three days, and swear I was never married there; I sometimes put papers into my pocket, when I see them lying about - not always in my bosom; it did not strike me there was any bulk in the paper, if I had known that, I would not have picked it up; I have been living with Johanab Mahoney these eight years; she picked the paper up off the bed - I did not know what was in it; she did not open it in my presence - she never told what was in it before she pawned it, and then she said there was an ear-ring in it; when she told me it was an ear-ring she pawned, I did not give information; I could not have any share of the money, for the article was stopped - I was taken up nine or ten days afterterwards; the reason I did not tell at first, was because I was afraid of my life - but I did tell at last; I had no jewellery in my possession, that I swear - I know a man named Dennis Donovan ; I know Mary Dunovan , his wife; I never had any jewellery in my possession, in their presence - I will swear, that in the presence of these three person, or any one of them, I never had any

jewellery in my possession of any kind; nothing ever happened to any one belonging to me; Mahoney was in gaol for awhile - I heard there had been a reward for the discovery of the persons who had taken these things; I did not hear that till I was in Clerkenwell - I did not say a single word till I heard of the reward, which was 20l. - I do not expect to get the 20l. if these men are convicted; I was told by the Magistrate I should not get a halfpenny - I was not offered the reward, and if I were, I would not take it: there were plenty of persons in the yard when Mahoney and I had this conversation; when I was taken up the first time, they told me they would have my life if I told any thing about it; if you were in the same way you might look about you before you told - I was in gaol seven weeks; they were continually coming to me all the time, to desire me not to say anything about it, and I was a fool among them; nobody ever saw the prisoners speak to me on the subject, they kept their talk to themselves, they were deep enough - I never took any of these things; this ear-ring is my share, which I picked up after them, and I am sorry for what I took - I cannot tell what kind of paper the ear-ring was in; I thought it was no more than an empty paper.

JOHANNAH MAHONEY. I live in the same house with Hayes - I generally go by the name of Johannah Hayes; when Andrew Hayes came home, between six and seven o'clock on that night, he took his jacket off, and threw it on the bed - I was making the bed, and picked up a bit of paper, with a pair of ear-rings in it; I did not open it till the next morning, about nine o'clock - Hayes was not present when I opened it; I was going to Mrs. Wood's, to fetch a garment; I took the ear-rings, and shewed them to Mrs. Wood - she said they were only gilt, and offered me 10s. and a new gown for them; I said I would not take it - I would go to a Justice, and accordingly I did go to a Justice - I went of my own accord; they stopped the rings, but I went and told the Justice; I took them to the pawnbroker's on the same day I opened them, as I did not understand them; I had not seen Hayes before I took them to be pawned, and he had no opportunity of knowing what they were - he was on board a Scotch steam-boat; I told the Justice I picked them up by Shadwell Church; that was not true - I picked them off the bed, but I was not sworn to it; I said this, because some of the party came and told me to say so - I was kept in prison four days, and then I was to be in prison a fortnight, or pay 1l., and Mahoney paid the 1l. to set me at liberty: I did not see him pay it; (I was locked up,) but he told me he paid it; I was taken up again in about a week, but I was at home from the Wednesday to the next Tuesday; I have not been in prison ever since - I gave this account before the Magistrate after I had been set at liberty, and examined again - the ear-rings were kept by the pawnbroker.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Hayes ever tell you whether he was married in Ireland? A.No; I never asked him - I went with him for ten months to Ireland - I was living with him there; I never was in prison in my life before, except one night in the watch-house, on account of a woman who sent a waist-buckle for me to pawn; I was taken one night, but she owned to it; I shewed these ear-rings to Mrs. Wood, the pawnbroker, and asked her what they were - I did not offer to pawn them; I swear I did not offer to pawn them; she did not say that I offered to pawn them, but her first-cousin did; the Magistrate committed me, but I never offered to pawn them - I never offered them to William Wood Ogilive to pawn, but he called me from the shop into the box - Hayes was in custody on this charge seven weeks and a day - be never brought a piece of paper home before; I slept with him that night; I swear I did not open this paper till the next morning; I put it on one side - I heaved it on a chair, and did not put it into my pocket; there was a blue paper and a white paper - I thought it was nothing but paper; Mr. Broderip was the Magistrate; I do not know Mary nor Dennis Danovan, nor Michael Crawley; I have lived with Hayes about nine years - I never saw him have any jewellery - I am quite sure I did not put this paper into my pocket; if Hayes has sworn so, that is not true; I had no pocket to put it into; I do not know what the Magistrate made me pay the 1l. for - I do not, know the law - I do not know that it was for attempting unlawfully to pawn these things.

MR. PHILLIPS to WILLIAM WOOD OGILVIE. Q. Did this woman offer to pawn these articles with you? A. yes, she did; she came into the shop first, and said"William." and then went into one of the side boxes, and asked if I would lend her 10s. upon these ear-rings -Miss Wood was in the shop, and I think she heard what she asked; I shewed them to Miss Wood - she desired me to stop her; she asked her where she got them - she said she found them by a lamp-post, near Shadwell church; there was no one with her when she came into the shop, that I know of; they are gold ear-rings; I had heard of the robbery.

COURT to JAMES BEECHEY . Q. Were you the person that took up Mahoney? A. Yes, I took him at his residence, in Robin-lane, Poplar; he was in bed; his wife followed me up stairs - it was about twelve o'clock in the day; I asked his wife if she had any duplicates - she produced some and some bills - this was when she was taken the second time; he did not say any thing - these are the ear-rings; I have had them ever since; I shewed them to Mr. Woolbert.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you take both the prisoners at their lodgings? A. Yes; I took them again about a month after they were first taken.

CATHERINE MOSES . My husband keeps a shop in High-street, Poplar, and sells shells and curiosities of different kinds. A man walked into my house, one Tuesday evening, between seven and eight o'clock - I cannot tell what time it was, nor how long before, I was examined; I should know the man again; I saw him before the Justice, but I do not see him here - he brought three, or four, or five pairs of ear-rings to sell; I did not buy them - I looked at a chain and a pair, which I said if he liked to leave he might, as my husband was not at home, but he did not leave them; he brushed them off the counter where they say into his hat, and went off in a very great hurry; no man came in with him, but when he went away I looked out, and I think I saw two or three men, but I do not know whether they were with him.

THOMAS SPAUL . I am an officer of the Thames Police. I took the two prisoners, on the 19th of September; I

asked them if they had been employed on board the Alfred- they said they had; I said "You must go along with me;" Mahoney said he was sorry for it, as he had a gentleman to meet that morning. and would I allow him till twelve o'clock; knowing him, I told him I would allow him till eleven, and he returned about that time; I said"Where is Dillon?" and he pointed him out to me - I did not know him at that time - he was somewhat disfigured in his dress and person; Mahoney said "I suppose it is about that box of jewellery stolen from the Alfred, that there is so much talk about."

Cross-examined. Q. He said he supposed it was about the box taken from the Alfred? A. Yes - the reason I let him go was, because he lived near me, and I have known him these seven years.

COURT to MR. WOOLBERT. Q. What was the amount of the loss altogether? A. About 230l.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-193

193. JOSEPH COLLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of November , 20 bridle-hits, value 3l., and 1 pair of reins, value 10s , the goods of Robert Gray .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously receiving the said goods, which had been lately before been stolen; against the Statute.

ROBERT GRAY . I keep the Bolt-in-Tun inn . I lost twenty bridle-bits and these reins, on the 7th of November, between five and six o'clock in the morning, out of my stables; the gates are closed at eleven o'clock at night, but the stables are open - no person could have access to them unless they concealed themselves in the coaches; I have seen the twenty hits, and one pair of the reins, before the Magistrate - I have every reason to believe they are mine; I know nothing of the prisoner - the latest stage comes in about ten o'clock at night, and after the horse-keepers have dressed the horses, the business is over for that night; they are opened by half-past four or five o'clock in the morning.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Is there anything particular in these bits? A. No; they are common coach-bits - the yard is not of easy access without breaking the gates, but the stables are; I can speak positively to the reins from their general appearance, and from the pattern of the buckles.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am one of the horse-keepers at the Bolt-in-Tun; I have the care of the Bath stable; I left it at a quarter-past eleven o'clock - the bits and reins were all safe; I went the next day at twenty minutes before five, and four bits were gone - these are them; I can swear to them - it was a week or eight days before I saw them again; it was before the Magistrate - I have had them under my care four years and a half, and saw them two or three times every day.

Cross-examined. Q. What is there to enable you to swear to them? A. One of the mouth-pieces has been loose, and has been re-rivetted - the head of the rivet is smaller than the other; I can swear to this from fifty - it belongs to Mr. Robert Gray , the proprietor of the Bath coach.

MR. GRAY. I have no partners to whom this property belongs.

WILLIAM HOPWOOD . I have the care of the horses of the Reading coach, at the Bolt-in-Tun: I left them at half-past eight or a quarter before nine o'clock on the night before - the horse furniture was all safe then; I went in the morning, between six and seven - four bits were missing from that stable, and a pair of reins; I saw them at Hatton-garden, and swore to them - I have had the care of them nearly five years, and am confident of them; I could pick them out from five thousand.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you know them by? A. One has been rivetted afresh at the mouth-piece, and one at the bottom bar; the horse that had this is a very hard mouthed horse.

COURT. Q. Was the prisoner at all employed there? A. I never saw him in my life - I cannot speak with certainty to the reins.

THOMAS BOLTON . I have the care of the Porstsmouth horses at the Bolt-in-Tun. I left on the night of the 6th of November, at a quarter before ten o'clock; I had taken off the harness, and they were all safe; I returned at half-past four in the morning, and missed four bits, but no reins.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen the bits again? A. Yes, at Hutton-garden; I am certain of them - I had them in my hand every day: I have not the least doubt of them - I rivetted this one myself with a hammer; this I am positive of.

GEORGE HILL . I drive a hackney-coach for different masters, and live at No. 2, Compton-place, Brunswick-square. The prisoner and another man came to me while-I was at work in the stable in Doughty-mews, about eight o'clock in the morning - I am certain of the prisoner; I had known him by sight about the neighbourhood - it was on a Friday morning, about a fortnight or three weeks before I gave evidence at Hatton-garden; I cannot tell the day of the month; the prisoner said the man with him had a number of bits to sell, and the man had them on his back in a bag, I believe, but I not see it opened; the prisoner asked if I knew any body that was in want of such things, as the man had promised him if he could get a customer he would pay him for his trouble: I said very likely some of the master hackney men might be in want of such things; I recommended him to Mr. Yeomans - I did not go with him; he went to try to see him, then came to me again, and said he was not in the way: I then recommended him to Mr. Jolley - I went to the public-house, and there was Jolley; the other man had left the prisoner then, and Jolley told him to bring them down to his place the next morning, and he would look at them.

Cross-examined. Q. Then you did not see the bits in the prisoner's possession? A. No; he said he came with the other man to get him a customer.

JAMES JOLLEY . I am a plate-holder. The prisoner came to me one Friday, and said he had some bits to sell for a man, but he did not know any master saddler; I said, "If you don't know any master, I can try to sell them for you; bring them down to me:" he brought them on the Saturday morning - he said there were twenty, but I did not particularly look at them, nor count them; he left them with me; my brother-in-law (Underwood) came, about eight o'clock, and I said, "Here are twenty bits, which a man has left here to be sold:" there were no reins; I saw the prisoner on the Saturday evening, and I

told him we had been to different places, and had only 1s. 6d. per pair offered for them; I said I could not get the money that night - he said would I advance it myself; I said I was very short - he said if I could advance him a little he would give it to the man, and I advance him a little he would give it to the man, and I advanced him 8s.

JOSEPH UNDERWOOD . I am Jolley's brother-in-law. I did not see the prisoner, but Jolley gave me the twenty bits to dispose of; I offered them to different people in the trade - I had 1s. 6d. a pair offered for them; I left them in Doughty-mews - I did not see the prisoner afterwards; I was before the Magistrate, but was not questioned about it when I was first taken; I offered them to a Mr. Gullock, and a Mr. Cobb - Mr. Cobb shewed them to Mr. White; I was with him - that was on the Monday morning, and he bought them for 26s.; I did not receive any money till Wednesday, when I called, and received one sovereign from Mr. White's shopman - the rest of the purchase-money was paid on the Friday; it was on the 14th of November, I was taken up for this - the prisoner was taken up three days before I was discharged; I had no bits but those I received from Jolley.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not make any particular observation of the bits? A. No; I cannot swear to them- I was in custody thirteen days.

Q. When did you give this information about the prisoner? A. My brother-in-law gave the information; I said where I got them, but I was not allowed to say one word - the prosecutor was not there; witnesses appeared against me, and then I was remanded till the following Wednesday - then the same charge was made against me, and I was remanded till Friday, and then again; I was not committed for trial - I was discharged as soon as I was allowed to speak; I wished to speak on the first examination, but the prosecutor was not there - he was there the second time, but I did not state it then; My solicitor was in full possession of the facts - he advised me to say nothing about it then, for reasons best known to himself; I gave this account the last time I was examined at Hatton-garden - it was the fourth time I was before the Magistrate; I was not asked a question before- I do not know that I was prohibited from speaking the second time, but the first time the Magistrate said the prosecutor was not there.

JOHN CONN . I keep livery-stables, in Wilmington-yard, Bagnigge-wells-road. Underwood brought these hits to me on the Monday morning, and asked me to buy them; I told him they were of no use to me - I went with him to Mr. White's; they were left for his inspection, when he came home - 26s. was agreed to be given for them, but I was not present when the payment was made; Underwood did keep a public-house.

Cross-examined. Q. What is he now? A. He is out of business, I believe; I cannot tell how he gets his living - I have always understood him to be a very respectable man; I did not know he was living with his brother-in-law.

THOMAS BLYDE . I am an apprentice to Mr. White. The two last witnesses brought twenty bits to my master's- I believe he agreed to buy them at last, but not in my presence; I gave Underwood a sovereign on the 12th, in part of payment - the same bits were afterwards brought to Hatton-garden, and claimed by the prosecutor.

JOHN WHITE . In am a sadler and harness-maker, and live at No. 64, Goswell-road. I saw Cobb and Underwood, on the 11th, and knowing Cobb before, I was induced to buy these twenty bits for 26s.; I left a sovereign with my apprentice, on the Wednesday, to give to Cobb, or the other man, and on the Friday, Underwood came for the remainder - I heard on the Wednesday, that the bits had been stolen, and on the Thursday morning, Mr. Gray and two of his men came; they looked at them - Gray said he believed they were his, and his men swore to them; they advised me, when Underwood came for the remaining 6s., to give him in charge.

ROBERT DUKE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at an obscure public-house, in Ship-yard, Temple-bar; I said it was about the bits belonging to the Bolt-in-Tun, Fleet-street - he said nothing that night; I put him into the watch-house - I went for him the next morning, and on the road, without making him any threat or promise, he said "I wish to ask you your advice;" I said I could not give him any advice - he then said it appeared as if they meant to put him into the hold, and if so, he should say something.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any difficulty in finding him? A. No; Jolly pointed him out to me.

WILLIAM CORDWELL . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 31, Compton-street, Brunswick-square, A pair of reins were pawned with me for 2s., on the 7th of November, about noon, in the name of Jane Hill, I suppose by one of the witnesses, but I would not swear to him - they were redeemed by the prisoner the same evening, about six or seven o'clock; I am quite sure of his person, as he had been employed in the coach-rank before my door - I saw a pair at the office, and I suppose them to be the same; I can only speak from their appearance.

Cross-examined. Q. You were well acquainted with the prisoner's person? A. I had seen him frequently - I cannot say that I saw him after he redeemed the reins.

JAMES YEOMANS . I drive a hackney-coach, and live in Brunswick-mews. I know the prisoner by sight; on the evening of the 7th of November he came and asked if I wanted a pair of reins; I told him No - he said he had a pair in pawn for 2s., and asked if I would buy the duplicate, as he was very poor, and greatly distressed; I bought it of him for 1s.; I went to the pawnbroker to look at the reins, but he would not allow me - I came out and gave the prisoner 2s. 1/2d. to get them out, and I bought them of him - I gave up the same reins at Hatton-garden, I think about a fortnight afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any great bargain? A. I did not consider it so; they were worth perhaps about 4s. to me as a wearer.

MR. GRAY re-examined. Q. Are these your reins? A. Yes; I judge so by the shape and make of the buckles, which correspond with the leading reins, which were not taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any thing particular in this kind of buckle? A. Yes; some are square and some round, but these are neither one nor the other - I do not know that I ever saw such as these till within the last twelve months; I had them of Mr. Maberly, at the Horse Bazaar.

Prisoner to JAMES JOLLEY . Q. You state your brother

was in custody for it - had you not a free opportunity of seeing me every day at the Hunter's Arms public-house, and did you not drink with me there - I should not have staid if I had been guilty of stealing? A. I never saw him till the Saturday night when he was taken; I went to the Police-office the same day that Underwood was taken - I was not there when he was brought before the Magistrate, I went when he was brought up again, but I did not go in before the Magistrate - I did not know they wanted me; I told the way in which underwood got the bits to a afraid or two that came to see him, but they are not here - I mentioned it the day he was taken up or the next day; I made the statement to the solicitor, and I believe he made it to the Magistrate the second time but I was not there - I mentioned it to Mr. Sherman, the solicitor, of Broad-buildings, Holborn; I did not mention it to any constable or Bow-street officer, Mr. Sherman advised me to say nothing about it till we could see if we could get the prisoner.

Prisoner. I proffered at Hatton-garden to produces the man I had them to sell for, but I was not allowed to speak, as the officer knows, and now that man has absconded.

ROBERT DUKE . He never mentioned the name of the person, nor where he lived.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-194

194. JULIA WELSH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , 1 watch, value 2l.; 2 keys, value 4s., and two seals, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Stokey .

ESTHER STOKEY , I am the wife of Thomas Stokey: we live in Seymour-place, Bryanstone-square ; my husband is a gas-man - the prisoner was the person who charged at my house. On the 28th of November this watch was hanging up in my kitchen - I saw it safe about three o'clock in the afternoon, when I went out; the prisoner had done her work before I went out; I had not paid her - I left her and the servant in the house; I lost my little child, and asked the prisoner to go and look for it, and while she was gone I missed my watch; my street-door is not kept open - the child came back, but the prisoner did not return; I sent my servant for her the same evening and she came; I spoke to her about the watch - she took some dreadful oaths, and said she had never touched nor seen it; I saw the watch at Mr. Fleming's about the middle of the next day.

WILLIAM SMALLSHAW . I am in the employ of Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, in Newgate-street. I produce the watch - it was pawned with me by the prisoner on the 29th of November, in the name of Julia Wesh, for 1l. 12s.; Mrs. Stokey saw it in about three hours - a young man in the shop knew her; I had not been there long.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in Hollis-street, Mary-le-bone - I told her it was on suspicion of stealing Mr. Stokey's watch; she replied very impassionately, "If I took, it I took it" - I took her coming down stairs in the house where she lived; I found no duplicate, and only three halfpence on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to work at this lady's; I had done work - I went and came back again, and then she told me to go to Queen-street for her little girl; I went there and the child had been sent home - I then went home, as my child had been left all day, and my husband wanted his tea; the servant came to me afterwards to go there, and I went; I saw a man coming out of the kitchen, who put the watch down - I took it up, and did not know what to do with it, put it into my bosom: and as I am in the habit of going to Newgate-market, I left the watch there with the intention of taking it out, and returning it when I had done.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-195

195. ANN MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 bolster, value 3s.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 2 sheets, 2s.; 1 blanket, value 1s.; 1 rug, value 1s.; 1 curtain, value 6d., and 1 candlestick, value 1s. , the goods of Sarah Coulan .

SARAH COULAN. I live in Eagle-street, Clerkenwell . I let a furnished room to the prisoner and her husband in the beginning of September, at 4s. per week; they paid 3s. 6d. the first week, and on the following Saturday locked the door and went away together, without notice - in consequence of their not returning I got the constable and opened the door, and missed the articles stated - they sent me back one pillow, and I saw the other articles at Hatton-garden.

Prisoner. She promised my sister to take half the money? A. No; I never received any money - they sent a strange man to me on the 5th of November, with a pillow and 5s.

WILLIAM IVEY . I am an apprentice to Mr. Reeves, a pawnbroker, of Snow-hill. I took in a bolster, a pillow, two sheets, a blanket, and a curtain, on the 10th, 11th, and 12th of September - I do not know who pawned them, they were in the name of Ann Mills.

JOHN PROSSER . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker in Gray's Inn-lane. I took in a rug and a candlestick in the name if Ann Mills , Fox-court, of a person whom I do not know.

WILLIAM MARLBOROUGH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner's daughter first - the prisoner and her husband came to see her, I then locked them up; the Magistrate discharged the man.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-196

196. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 1 1/2 yards of cloth, value 13s., the goods of Charles Archer ; 2 1/2 yards of cotton cord, value 6s., the goods of James Holdon ; 1 coat, value 8s., the goods of Elizabeth Anstee ; and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Peter Pullen .

CHARLES ARCHER . I live at Ashford, near Staines, in Middlesex - I live with my father, and work under a groom . I let the prisoner have a yard and a half of cloth on the 18th of November, to make a coat for me; I expected to receive it in a coat - he never returned, but I saw it the day after he was taken; I had known him for about a fortnight - he professed to be a tailor, and had made several things.

JAMES HOLDON . I am a labourer , and live at Ashford. I gave the prisoner a yard and three quarters of cotton cord to make a pair of breeches for me - I expected to receive them made up; he was taken the day afterwards.

EDWARD ANSTEE . I am sixteen years of age - my mo

ther gave the prisoner a coat, which was to be altered and made up for me; it was not to be returned in the state it was given to him.

PETER PULLEN . I gave the prisoner a coat to alter for me, and he took this handkerchief out of the pocket of it - this was on the 18th; he was taken up the same evening - I am certain this is my handkerchief.

JOHN ENDERSON . I am a horse patrol. I saw the prisoner on the 18th of November, a few minutes after nine o'clock in the evening, near Staines-gate - he was coming towards town; he could have gone to Ashford that way, but it was not the direct road, and his face was towards London - soon after I first met him, a person came and asked me if I had seen such a man - I said I had; I went after him and took him - he was intoxicated; I found this coat on him, which was claimed by Anstee, and this handkerchief, which is claimed by Pullen, was in the pocket of it- he said the cloth and the cord he had sold, and he had done wrong.

Prisoner. Q.You saw me a little out of Staines? A. Yes; there is a way to go to Ashford down a turning, but it was in the road to London.

THOMAS KERSALL . I am a tailor, and live at Staines. On the 18th of November, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop, and said he had got a piece of corderoy, which he had bought to make a man a pair of breeches, and he wished to sell it, if any body would buy it; he could get some trimmings to go on with his work; I gave him 4s. 6d. for it - he said he lived at Ashford; it is cotton cord, and was claimed by Holdon.

EDWARD HACK . The prisoner came to my shop on the 18th of November, and offered this piece of cloth for sale; he said he could not go on with his other business - I bought it of him for 13s.; it was afterwards claimed by Archer - the prisoner said he lived at Ashford.

WILLIAM PHILETS . I am a labourer. Pullen came to me. and asked if I would go with him to see for the prisoner; we went to Staines, and the people at the New-inn said such a person had been there for a lodging- I went out, and the patrol stopped him; he had his own coat on, over Anstee's coat.

Prisoner to JAMES HOLDON . Q. You told me you were not in a hurry for a month or two? A. No, I did not; I said if you could get any body else's clothes to make for a fortnight or three weeks, you might.

Prisoner to ELIZABETH ANSTEE . Q.Your aunt gave me the coat to alter, and said any time before Christmas day would do? A. She said she was in no hurry - she did not say a word about Christmas; my uncle said he had better not take it till he wanted it, but he said he could unpick it of a night.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been travelling through Kent, Sussex and Hampshire, and was in great distress-for days I have been without victuals; it was distress that induced me to do what I did - I perserved to try to get some little business; I never did this with a criminal intention, but meant to return them - misfortunes crowding on me have crushed me almost to my grave: life is not sweet to me, death would be more preferable, providing it were an honourable one - I went that night into a house where some persons were having a little drink, and I took some, which affected my head, as a little does; I was on my way home - there is a way across the fields, but I did not like to go that night.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-197

197. FREDERICK TOWNLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of November , 1 tea-tray, value 4s. , the goods of William Turner .

WILLIAM TURNER . I live in Vine-street, Hatton-garden . I lost a tea-tray, on the 22d of November, from inside my shop - I saw it safe about half-past four o'clock. and was called out by my servant a little after six; I saw the prisoner about one hundred yards from the shop - Mr. Gobby had hold of him; the tray had then been taken from him.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Is yours an open shop? A. Yes - the tea-tray was inside my shop a little after four o'clock; sometimes we put things outside - the lights were burning when my servant called me.

RICHARD GOBBY . I am a broker, and live next door but one to Mr. Turner. I was going by his shop, and saw the prisoner with the tea-tray in his hand - when I came up to him he put it down, and walked seven or eight yards; I suspected he did not want to purchase it, and crossed into an opposite shop - I looked through the window, and saw him come and take it again; a person came by, and he put it down again - he came again, took it up, and ran off with it; I ran after him - when I came near to him he dropped it; I jumped over it, and took hold of him - he seemed intoxicated; I took him back to the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he got is looking at, like a purchaser? A. I did not think he was a purchaser - he did not look so much at the tray; he seemed looking at the people who were passing; he put it down when any one passed - I immediately followed him; he only turned once before I came up to him; I was only three or four yards behind him when he turned the corner.

JAMES ISAACS . I received the prisoner into custody, with this tray.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, and had no knowledge of it.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281204-198

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

198. GEORGE TREEHERNE and JOHN HALL were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 5 books, value 20s. , the goods of Richard Hodgson and Mary Hodgson .

RICHARD HODGSON . I am a stationer , in partnership with my sister Mary, and live in Great Mary-le-bone-street . On the 4th of November I lost some books from my counter, which I had seen safe about half-past six o'clock - the prisoners were stopped soon afterwards; I can swear to them - I knew they were missing, because the place where they stood was vacant.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you a card of your circulating library upon your books? A. Yes, outside and inside.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. When did you see them - soon after six o'clock? A. Yes, and they were missing about half-past.

THOMAS PERRY . I am a pawnbroker. On the 4th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came in company together to pawn the five books with me - they are all odd volumes; I suspected they were stolen, and sent to Mr. Hodgson - his brother came, and identified them; Treeherne said Mr. Hodgson had given them to him to pawn - I said I thought he was a respectable man, and would not send odd volumes to pawn.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Who placed the books on your counter? A.I do not know, but Treeherne said he wanted 30s. on them - I did not see them came in together, but they were in one of the little boxes.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found the two prisoners in the box; I asked them how they came by the books - they said that a person, calling himself Hodgson, gave them to them under the Pantheon; that he came to the corner of Berwick-street, pointed out the shop, and requested them to pawn them for 30s. - they both said so alternately; I said, "You should not take books so" - Hall then said they did not know the man, but they were to have 1s.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Then one confirmed what the other said? A. Yes - I inquired about Treeherne, and have heard that he is a very respectable young man.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you made any inquiries respecting Hall? A. Yes - I find his friends are very respectable; Mr. Hodgson's brother was in the shop, and he owned the property as his brother's and sister's; I said, "Is that the Mr. Hodgson" - they said No, he was a taller man.

MR. HODGSON. I have two other brothers - they do not live at my hose; one is only there during the vacation at Cambridge, and the other at the hours of business in the City.

The prisoners received a good character.

TREEHERN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HALL - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281204-199

199. SUSAN HAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 24 yards of ribbon, value 8s. , the goods of Samuel Cater and Thomas Wood .

THOMAS WOOD . I am a linen-draper of Finsbury-place, and am in partnership with Samuel Cater. On the 24th of November my young man called my attention, and gave me information; this is our ribbon - it has my mark on it.

JOHN HOLMES . I am shopman to the prosecutors. On the 24th of November the prisoner came into the shop to purchase, two yards of ribbon - there was one she fixed upon; she said she would go and get the money, and turned to the door - I missed two lengths of ribbon from the drawer; I went round the counter - she dropped one from her hand, and the other I found under her arm; they had been in the same drawer - these are the ribbons.

DAVID MCCRAY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the ribbons.

Five witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281204-200

200. JOHN HANCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , 17 loaves of bread, value 12s. 6d.; 1 basket, value 5s., and 1 piece of green baize, value 6d. , the goods of William Souter ; and FRANCES THOMAS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am in the service of William Souter - he is a baker . I took out twelve loaves, on the 20th of November, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, in a basket, and left it at Mr. Hawkins's, in Hackney-road ; I returned in eight or ten minutes, and it was gone - I had not seen either of the prisoners that morning, but I had seen Hancock on a former day; from information I received, I went down Crabtree-row, but I did not find my basket - I met Hancock the same day, in Bishopsgate-street, and took hold of him: I said, "Are not you the young man who took away my basket and bread to-day?" he denied it, but I took him to the watch-house.

JOHN NEWMAN . I am an oil-factor, and live in Fore-street. I was waiting in the Hackney-road, and saw the baker's basket at the door - I think it was between ten and eleven o'clock; I saw Hancock come and take it, and give it to another young man - I am quite sure he took it; he had, at that time, a cap on - he gave it to a young man with black trousers and a white hat; I did not know but that it was their property - I had occasion to wait there about a quarter of an hour longer, and then I went to Bishopsgate-street, where there was a terrible piece of work at the watch-house; I looked in, and saw Hancock and the prosecutor among the people; I said, "Yes, and that young man(meaning me) saw me take it, and, if you will forgive me, I will tell you all about it" - we took him to Mr. Souter's; he made no resistance - the officers came, and we went to a house near the Three Loggerheads public-houses, in Bethnal-green, which was occupied by the female prisoner, whom we found at work in the lower room; we went up stairs, and found the basket, empty, and the loaves in a cupboard.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am a labourer. On Wednesday week I was in Hackney-road, and saw Hancock take the basket of bread from the door; I saw Brown about five minutes afterwards, and gave him a description of Hancock - I am sure Hancock is the man.

AARON CORDEROY . I was present when Hancock was taken; I went to the house where the bread was found - the woman was at work, and I asked her if she knew any thing of the bread; she said No - the bread was found up stairs.

JOHN WILLIAM WINTLE . I took up Hancock; he said he would show me where the bread was, and he took me to No.3, Woodheads-buildings, near the Three Loggerheads - we found Thomas at work, below, and the bread was found up stairs.

WILLIAM MORTON . I went back afterwards, and found this green baize in the cupboard.(Basket and baize produced and sworn to.)

HANCOCK'S Defence. A young man asked me to fetch the bread, and give it him, which I did; we went down Crabtree-walk with it - I was afterwards in Bishopsgate-street, and met with the witnesses, I told them where the basket and bread were.

JOHN WILLIAM WINTLE . He did give a description of some other person, but we have never been able to find him.

HANCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days .

THOMAS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-201

201. ELLEN HUNTER , and WILLIAM HUNTER , were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , 3 shifts, value 8s. , the goods of Richard Hines .

SOPHIA HINES . I am the wife of Richard Hines; he is a carpenter , and lives in Adam's-row, Hampstead . On the 5th of November I lost three shifts from my yard; I saw them safe hanging on the line at five o'clock, and at half-past six they were missing - these are two of them; one is missing - the prisoners lodged in a room which looks into our yard; I picked a button up in my yard, where two bricks had fallen - it was quite clean.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Was it a dark evening? A. Nearly dark; I was in the wash-house - no persons can get to my back-yard, but from the other yard; the shifts were dry.

COURT. Q.What did you do? A.I went round to the prisoner's house, and set a person to watch; I went round to the pawnbrokers - I did not find any thing at the house, nor see the prisoners.

GEORGE PIERCE . The prosecutrix came to me, and told me she had lost this property; I said I would see if any one went in or came out of the prisoners' house - no one came out, till the prisoners did, which was about ten minutes before eight o'clock; their house is in Henry-street, Hampstead-road - they went down Tottenham-court-road; I followed them to the Adam and Eve public-house - I stood at the door, and they had a glass of something; they then came out, and came down the road; I followed them down to Tottenham-court chapel - it was then about eight o'clock, and, being cold, I returned; they had a hand-basket in their hands.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was it concealed? A. It had two lids to it, but the basket itself was not concealed.

FRANCIS RAMSEY . I am a pawnbroker. I have two shifts pawned with me, on the 5th of November, a few minutes before eight o'clock, by a woman, answering the description of the female prisoner, but I could not take upon myself to say that she is the woman.

GEORGE BLACKMAN . I am an officer. I went to No. 2, Henry-street, Hampstead-road - but previous to that, I had received a button which the prosecutrix picked up in the yard; when I went into the apartment. I saw the two prisoners, and I saw a coat on the back of a chair - I asked the man if it was his coat, and he said it was; I took it, and found one button deficient, and the button I had corresponded with the buttons on the coat - I told him what Mrs. Hines had lost; he made great resistance, and said he would not be searched - this is the coat, and the button; I found nothing on him.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is not this a common quality for buttons? A. It is marked "Best quality in London."

WILLIAM BALL . I am an officer: I was with Blackman; William Hunter made great resistance - he put his hand into his pocket, and pulled it out clenched; I could not get it open.

ELLEN HUNTER'S Defence. I know nothing of this robbery: my son had been working there about a fortnight before, putting a pot on a chimney, and if the button belonged to his coat it must have lain there from that time.

WILLIAM HUNTER'S Defence. The wall is about five or six feet high, and the bricks were loose before. as there are people to prove; inside the garden there is a piece of mould - I cannot say how wide, but it is impossible for any one to get into the garden without treading on it.

MARY LAMB . I keep the house No 2, Henry-street. I remember William Hunter going to see after the roof, and to repair a chimney-pot; he laid the bricks straight which were on the wall - I cannot say that he had such a coat as this on then, but I think he had, and for a fortnight afterwards he wore black.

COURT. Q. When did he repair the house? A. I think about a month before; he had a blue coat on that day - I do not know whether he lost a button; the wall has been broken these twelve months: all the bricks were loose, and some had fallen down - some of them are often knocked off by cats; on the 6th of November some were pushed over within two yards of the chimney.

ANN LAMB . I am the last witness' daughter. I remember the prisoner William Hunter going to do the chimney- it was about a month before this charge; he wore coloured clothes, and I think a blue coat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281204-202

202. JOHN HALE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 10 lbs. weight of currants, value 10s.; 1 bag, value 3s., and 3lbs. weight of sugar, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Wood and John Betts , his masters; and RICHARD MARKS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS WOOD . I am in partnership with John Betts ; our house is in Oxford-street - we deal in sugar and currants ; the prisoner Hale was in our employ; we received information, and on the night of the 22d of October we went to our warehouse in North-row, at the back of our house - we got into a waggon, and in the front we found the tilt-cloths corded up with a strong cord, and very heavy - we went back to our house, and called up Wood, our shopman; this was about ten minutes after eleven o'clock, and in the presence of the shopman, I and my partner uncorded the tilt-cloths, and found in them a canvas bag of currants, weighing about 43lbs; the bag had my partner's writing on it - I opened it, and put in a curious shilling and a washing-bill; the next day I found the bag, and the shilling and the bill were found in it at the office; I also found at Mr. Archer's, at Hammersmith, two paper bags of currants, and one bag of most sugar - they were the same bags as we generally send sugar out in.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You went and searched the waggon? A. Yes, and put the shilling and the bill into the bag; I saw there were currants in it - the waggon was brought to our door in the morning, and I directed two officers to go to the half-way house, to watch it, and see if any thing was taken out - I went to Hammersmith afterwards, and helped to unload the waggon; when it is loaded other persons can get to it, if the waggoner lets them. Hale has been in our