Old Bailey Proceedings, 23rd October 1828.
Reference Number: 18281023
Reference Number: f18281023-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS, MAYOR.

EIGHTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 23d DAY OF OCTOBER, 1828, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY HENRY STOKES, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1828.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; John Ansley , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; and William Heygate , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Thompson , Esq.; John Crowder , Esq.; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; and Charles Farebrother , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

James Williams ,

William Griffin ,

William Light ,

George Miller ,

John Nichols ,

Benjamin Turford ,

George Barker ,

Thomas Price ,

Samuel King ,

William Cobb ,

George Philpot ,

James Jones .

Second

John Thornton ,

Thomas Gordon ,

Thomas S. Hazeland ,

John Wood ,

Richard Clay ,

James W. Warren ,

Lewis Lloyd ,

Walton Muncaster ,

Solomon Rogers ,

Thomas H. Giles ,

Edward Souton ,

John Smith .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Charles Skinner ,

Austin Stace ,

William Saunders ,

William Smith ,

William Smallridge ,

Thomas Shaw ,

Silvester Sapsford ,

John Steer ,

Robert Spain ,

Thomas Silverwood ,

James Soper ,

John Sturges .

Second

Christopher Shew ,

Samuel Stacey ,

David Steel ,

Charles Tapps .

John William Swail ,

Samuel T. Taylor ,

John Tollett ,

David Scott ,

John Simpson ,

Thomas Smith ,

Edward Staple ,

Henry Stevens .

Third

Robert Turner ,

Maxfield T. Temple ,

Thomas Thomas ,

William Spendlove ,

William Stone ,

William Squib ,

Robert Summers ,

Samuel Stroud ,

Henry Smith ,

James Snare ,

William Scothrup ,

Thomas Simcock .

Fourth

Robert Sillito ,

William Spring ,

Valentine Simmons ,

Samuel Sedgwick ,

John Handford ,

Thomas Skelton ,

William Sims ,

John Silver ,

William Shepherd ,

Thomas Stevens ,

Robert Slocomb ,

John Savage .

Fifth

James Smith ,

Allan Lang Spice ,

John Scarrott ,

Robert Syrett ,

William Shaw ,

William Skinner ,

Jonathan Sowden ,

George Simpson ,

William Sandback ,

Frederick Sparks ,

James Sutling ,

William Stapleford .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 23, 1828.

LUCAS, MAYOR - EIGHTH SESSION.

Reference Number: t18281023-1

OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Park.

1956. BENJAMIN MAWLEY and SAMUEL COTTERELL were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Patrick Holland , on the 6th of April , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s.; 1 hat, value 18s.; 14 shillings, and the sum of 5d. in copper monies, his property .

JOHN PATRICK HOLLAND. I am foreman to Mr. Fisher, stereotype printer, and live in Charles-street, Parr's-place, Goswell-road. On Sunday evening. the 6th of April, about ten o'clock, I was going to see my sister, who was dangerously ill - she lives in Green Arbour-court, between Golden-lane and Goswell-street; instead of passing through the court I went through the Queen's Head public-house , which was at that time kept by Blower, whom I had known for some years - I asked for him merely as an excuse to pass through the house; they said he was in the tap-room- I did not see him: I saw his son; I did not sit down - when I arrived at the back door, Donohough (who has been transported) took my hat off my head; I did not see him - he came behind me and took it off; he did not strike me: I turned round - there was nobody with him at that time; I seized my hat with my left hand, to get it back again - I struck him once or twice in the scuffle, to endeavour to regain my hat; I struck him in the face, when he called for assistance, and several of them rushed from the tap-room.

Q. Where was the landlord's son at this time? A. He was present, near me; and when the scuffle ensued he said,"You had better let the man alone - I know him - he is going to his sister's;" I had told him I was going there on my first entering the house - she lives within fifteen yards of where the hat was taken from me; I did not know Donohough before - there was nobody with him when he took my hat.

Q. How many men do you think rushed out of the taproom? A. I should think five or six or more; I did not know any of them, to be acquainted with them: I am positive Cotterell is one of those who rushed out of the room- when they all came round me I scuffled with them; they lifted my legs from under me, and carried me into the skittle-ground - I was laid hold of in all parts, and tumbled about, and being struck at the time; I cannot say what part of me they laid hold of in particular, except my legs: I called out - the landlord came, but they had got me on the ground then; they kept me on the ground; as soon as the landlord came I knew his voice, and said would he allow a man to be robbed and ill-treated in that manner - he asked me what my name was; I told him, and he said he did not know me - I said, "If you do not know me then, tell my brother Eatly, who is so close by (he is my sister's husband); he said I might be d - d, or something to that effect, and I must get out of it in the best manner I could; my shoes were off then: I was held by the legs, and beat on the heel of my left foot, to hinder me from hallooing, the pain was so intense, that after a short time I became quite senseless - I was kicked about the loins and the side of my head, and my lip was cut in getting me into the skittle-ground: they took from me there, a blue surtout coat and a pair of shoes - my money was in my waistcoat pocket; they tore my waistcoat off my back: while they were stripping me I was held by the handkerchief, by Cotterell, and he was threatening me during the time, that if I made resistance they would finish me; I told them to take what they liked, but not prevent my getting more (meaning not to hinder me from work) - they left me; and as soon as I recovered, which I suppose was in a few minutes, I got to the door, and got out, but when I got to the door leading from the house to the court, (having nothing on but my trousers, stockings, and shirt,) they kicked me into the gutter.

Q. Then they were all about the place, though not near you? A. They were in different places; one was about the door - I was kicked into the gutter, they saying at the time, "You b - r, we wish we had finished you;" I got up, and said, "I don't care - I have got out safe;" I went to my sister's door - I was bruised about my side, and hurt in the face, but not disabled from doing my business, it not being hard labour.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had any thing been done to you when the landlord came? A. My shoes had been taken off, and I was on the ground, on my back, when the landlord spoke to me; I am quite positive of that - he was barely a minute talking to me; this was in the skittle-ground: a glimmer of light came into the skittle-ground at the time the landlord came - a candle was brought in; I am positive of that - I think I mentioned

that at the last trial; I have not read what I stated then - I am positive I mentioned it before the Magistrate; it was quite dark of course, but the candle came in and went away - it did not remain there; I believe it was a woman who had it: I said I could not see Donohought assisting to take off my clothes - I will not be certain that I mentioned about the candle on the last trial, as I omitted many trifling things, and made it as short as I could; I do not think I was asked the question - I said I was senseless for a short time; it was a kind of fainting: when they took my property they left me - I cannot say they ran, as I was lying in a dormant state; when I came to myself they were gone from the spot - I had seen Cotterell in the passage; he was one of those who joined at the time I was struggling with Donohough for my hat: I suppose there were five, six, or seven in the passage, or more - the landlord's son was looking on; there was a light from the bar - the passage runs down by the side of the bar, which has a counter and a window, which forms a partition; I have known the landlord eighteen or twenty years. Nothing had been done to me when I struck Donohough, except my hat being taken; I was too much confused to see whether they were drunk or sober: my sister left her room a minute or two after I got there - I cannot say whether she went out.

COURT. Q. Donohough took your hat before you struck him? A. Yes; when they gave me these blows on the ground I became insensible; when I came to myself I got up to go away, but as I came out they kicked me into the gutter; I cannot speak to Mawley, but there is another not in custody, who I know.

WILLIAM BLOWER, JUN . My father kept the Queen's Head - he now keeps a potato-shop; I am a lapidary. -On Easter Sunday, the 6th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock, Holland went through the house - he did not speak to me, nor say any thing about his sister; as he came by the bar, going out into Green Arbour-court, Donohough took his hat off - I said "Give the man his hat, or else I will tell the officers of you;" there were no blows struck: I did not see Holland strike him - Holland did not call out for help.

Q. What did you see done? Who came out? A. They were all standing in the passage - I cannot say how many came out of the tap-room; there were five of them altogether: I told the officers who they were - I had seen them coming to the house several times; after Donohough took Holland's hat, he was trying to save it from going - they took hold of him and brought him towards the door.

Q. Who do you mean by "They"? A. The thieves who took hold of him and pulled him to the yard door, are not taken: I saw both the prisoners in the passage that night - they stood in the passage; they took hold of me and stopped me from going into the tap-room to tell my father that Holland was being robbed - I heard no words used.

Q. Not about "Entrails"? you have been examined before. On your oath did you hear nothing about entrails and kicking? A. There was no kicking at all - I have sworn they said "If you speak a word, I will kick your entrails out."

Q. What do you mean by saying you did not hear it? A. I thought you meant if they said it to Holland, they said it to me - I told them to let the man alone; they were then pulling his clothes off, between the passage and the yard door; they took hold of his coat, pulled him to the yard door, and pulled off his coat and waistcoat.

Q. Who was present when they pulled off his clothes? A. Banks was - he had hold of Holland: the two prisoners kept me from going into the tap-room; I said "Let him alone, because his sister lives in the neighbourhood;" he had not told me he was going to his sister's, but I often saw him going to his sister's, and I thought he was going there when he came through the house - they also took his shoes off; the tap-room is parted from the bar and the passage.

Q. Did you see them do any thing to the prosecutor while he was on the ground? A. No: after they took his clothes off, they shoved him down; he was not in the skittle-ground at all, nor within several yards of it - that is the whole truth; I had seen the five or six men in my father's house before, but not to stop, not to sit down to drink - they have drunk at the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you were quite sober? A. Yes; I was there all the time and am certain Holland was not within many yards of the skittle-ground - he was about six yards from it; my father was not present during any part of the transaction - he did not converse with Holland; he knew nothing of it - I was within three yards of Holland.

Q. Could your father be conversing with Holland for a minute and a half, while he was on the ground, without your seeing it? A. No - he never came there at all, or I must have seen it; I saw Holland at the time his hat was taken off - he did not strike any one then - he could not have struck Donohough two blows in the face without my seeing him; he could have gone to his sister's, without going through our house.

Q. Did Cotterell, during this affair, touch Holland at all, or lay violent hands on him? A. He did not, because he had hold of me at the time, to keep me from going to my father; they went away after the transaction - Mrs. Eatly let her brother in, and came into our house in about four minutes; Cotterell was not in the house then - I did not see her conversing with him; I saw her all the time she was in the house - she did not converse with Cotterell at all while she was in the house - that is the truth; she could not converse with him without my seeing her. The young men had been in the house about an hour and a half, before Holland came - they had been drinking ale.

Q. Had they not been larking about the skittle-ground, with some women of the town? A. No - there were no women at all; they had been shoving each other about the passage, and saying, "I will treat you - I will stand a pot, and you shall stand a pot:" the direct road to Green Arbour-court is through Golden-lane.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know when Mawley was apprehended? A. No; it was a long time after the robbery; I had seen him before the offence, but never afterwards till he was in custody.

COURT. Q. Do you live with your father? A. No - he lives in Whitecross-street - I saw him last night.

JAMES FORDHAM . I am an officer. I was directed to apprehend the prisoners; I gave information at Hatton-garden and they were taken.

SARAH EATLY . I am Holland's sister, and live in

Green Arbour-court. There is a small narrow alley leading to the house, which two people cannot pass through, or they may go through this house; my brother came to my house on Easter Sunday, about a quarter-past ten o'clock - I was ill at the time; I let him in - he had nothing on but his trousers, stockings, and shirt - no shoes, coat, or waistcoat; he was dirty and his trousers torn - he seemed very much beaten, and as if he had been on the ground; his face was scratched and he had a little scratch on his lip - he told me what had happened when I let him in - I ran to the public-house directly, and called the landlord out of the bar; there were several persons about him - I asked him if he knew any thing of the robbery, and my brother losing his things; he said he knew nothing of it - he was very saucy indeed, and very much in liquor; he called his son and asked if he knew any thing of it, and he said No - he then called the pot-boy, who said he knew nothing of it; I went away - Blower's father came to me next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you see Cotterell there? A. I did - he came up to me and said he knew nothing about it; he came to my house next day, and said he heard I represented him as one of the party, and had come to ask why I said so - my husband was at breakfast and could have taken him, but young Blower had not given his name then: I knew Cotterell before - he is a neighbour, and worked with my husband, (who is a bricklayer) he knew where I lived, and I suppose knew I was Holland's sister.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When the landlord called his son, he said he knew nothing about it? A. Yes; he denied all knowledge of the fact, and the person Mawley was taken about five weeks ago.

JOHN PATRICK HOLLAND. I have not recovered my coat, waistcoat or shoes.

COTTERELL'S Defence. I was drinking in the house at the time. but am innocent, and directly my name was brought in question, I went to Eatly.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-2

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1957. THOMAS LUPTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Bayley , Esq. , on the 13th of October , at St. Andrew, Holborn , and stealing therein 4 coats, value 8l.; 6 pairs of trousers, value 6l.; 7 waistcoats, value 3l.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 4 shirts, value 1l., and 1 pair of breeches, value 1l., his property .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating the house to be in Lincoln's Inn instead of St. Andrew, Holborn.

SAMUEL WALKER . I am a badge-porter of Lincoln's Inn - it is part of my duty to attend to the security of the Inn in the evening. On the evening of the 13th of October, in consequence of what Morris. Mr. Thompson's clerk, said to me, I went to No. 16, Old-square, and from there to No. 19 - I saw no person there; I went through the passage of that house, to No. 21, and saw the prisoner standing at the corner of No. 21, with a bundle under his arm, in a red handkerchief, with white spots - there was a gas-light within five or six yards of him; I took particular notice of him, and am certain he is the person; I have not the slightest doubt of him - I walked towards him, and when I got within five or six yards of him, he jumped back in the corner, threw the bundle over the rails, and then ran towards Chancery-lane; I followed him, caught him by the arm, and turned him round - he struck at me, got from me, and ran through the passage, towards No. 16 again, and then towards the New-square, but seeing Evans, a porter, coming towards him, he turned to the right, and ran up by the garden wall; I called Stop thief! he kept saying, "It is only a lark - let me go;" one of my fellowservants ran towards him, and Eldridge came up; he went to avoid him, and fell over him - I then secured him; I had not lost sight of him at all, and am positive he is the man who threw the bundle over the rails.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was there not some turning which the person had to go round? A. None but what I could see him the whole time; he ran up towards No. 9, Old-square, and there I took him - I followed him so close that I never lost sight of him; he only turned one corner, and that is a very wide place, by the Vice Chancellor's Court.

COURT. Q. Did you see the bundle picked up? A. Yes - it was picked up from the place I saw him throw it, and it appeared to be the same bundle; Mr. Bayley saw it in my presence, and claimed the contents.

WILLIAM SEELEY . I am a porter at Lincoln's Inn . On the evening of the 13th of October. in consequence of what happened, I went on the roof of No. 19; I got to it through the trap-door of Mr. Bayley's chambers, which are at No. 16; I then went towards No. 19, and there found a bundle, which I delivered to Mr. Bayley - he examined the articles in it, in my presence, and claimed them; I saw a crow-bar found on the staircase of No. 19. and was present when Harper produced two skeleton-keys, tied in a silk handkerchief.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I am a tailor. On the evening of the 13th of October I was in Lincoln's Inn, and saw the prisoner running; Walker was pursuing him, calling Stop thief! I ran after him, and as I got up to him; he made a stumble, and a young man collared him; he went on his knees, and said it was only a lark - he was secured.

MOSES MORRIS . I am clerk to Mr. Thompson, of Lincoln's Inn. On the 13th of October, at half-past six o'clock, I was in the Inn, and as I came out of our chambers, No. 19, I saw one person standing at No. 19, and two at No. 16; I went away, after securing the door, and walked round the square - the two at No. 16 walked away, and went before me, into Chancery-lane: one went up Cursitor-street, and the other remained at the picture-shop. At half-past nine o'clock I went to see if our chambers were safe, and saw a person coming down the staircase - he said to me, very faintly, "Good night;" I went and told Walker what I had seen, and he secured the prisoner - I am not able to say I had seen him before.

Cross-examined. Q. You have not seen any of the persons you saw that night since? A. Not to recollect them; there was no light at the bottom of our staircase - there was a good light in the Inn, but not at the corner by No. 19. I cannot say whether the person I saw had a bundle.

THOMAS WILKIE . I am constable of the Rolls. On the 13th of October the prisoner was given into my charge, about half-past nine o'clock; I searched him, and found on him 2l. 17s. in money (which I returned him), also a

knife and the key of a room door; the property was brought into the watch-house; Mr. Bayley saw and claimed it.

CHARLES HOLLIMAN . I am clerk to Mr. Bayley. I was at the chambers on Monday evening, the 13th, and left about half-past seven o'clock: I locked them up in the usual way, and left every thing secure - I heard nothing till next morning.

MR. FRANCIS BAYLEY. These chambers belong to me. I have examined the contents of these bundles carefully, and have no doubt they are all mine - they consist of all the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth 20l. at least.

Cross-examined. Q. Are they new? A. Some of them. I sleep in the chambers very often - when I went there I found my door double locked, but on going in I found the trap-door in the roof was open - a person could then get from the chambers on the roof, and to No. 19.

Q. Did you notice whether the trap-door was open when you were there? A. No - it might have been open.

COURT. Q. Are your chambers in Lincoln's Inn? A. They are; I do not know what parish it is in.

SAMUEL WALKER . I have been a porter of the Inn since 1826; No. 16, Old-square is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, if it is in any parish, I believe.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know any thing about it? A. It is beyond the mark which is called the Liberty of the Rolls.

CHARLES HOLLIMAN re-examined. I had seen the trap-door secure in the morning; I did not notice it afterwards, but have no reason to believe it was opened.

Cross-examined. Q. You will not swear it might not be opened? A. No.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am a constable of Hatton-garden. I applied a crow-bar to the trap-door at the top of the prosecutor's chambers, and found marks exactly corresponding with it - it had been fastened by two bolts inside, the marks were outside, as if somebody had got up some other staircase on to the roof, and then broken in at the trap-door; they had unfastened one bolt, and then the door would open - the other bolt, had no power.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing whatever respecting what I am charged with; I am not the person who had the bundle - I never saw it till I was taken to the watch-house: I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran, the same as other people.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Reference Number: t18281023-3

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1958. GEORGE THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Frederick Young , on the 29th of September , at St. Anne , and stealing therein 3 silver mugs, value 3l.; 1 silver waiter, value 5l.; 1 tea-pot, value 10l.; 8 spoons, value 2l., and 1 ladle, value 2l., his property .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE FREDERICK YOUNG. I live at Limehouse , in the parish of St. Anne. On the 29th of September I slept at home, and was awoke by a tapping at my door, a little after two o'clock in the morning - I found Johnson, my servant, at my door, and in consequence of what he said I armed myself with a brace of pistols; I went over the house, and at last came to the foot of the stairs, to an area which leads into the garden - I found one of the pannels of the area door cut out, and laid outside; the door was perforated with holes all round, and the door itself was open: on returning up stairs, and going out at the street door, I met Long - I saw the prisoner close at my street door, with Long; I went to the watch-house, and was shown a silver mug and soup-ladle: I afterwards saw eight silver tea-spoons at Lambeth-street office - the silver mug had a cypher on it, which I positively swear to; the other articles were not marked, but I have not the slightest doubt of their being mine.

Prisoner. Q. When I was apprehended, did you not say you would blow my brains out? A. I said it was fortunate for you that I did not catch you in the house, or I should have blown your brains out.

Q. You said, "Let the rascal go, and I will blow his brains out?" A. I did not.

MICHAEL LONG . I am a sailor. On the 29th of September, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, Mr. Young spoke to me in the street, and in consequence of what he said I watched at the back of his garden wall - I saw a young man drop from the wall, and about a minute afterwards I saw another man drop - that was the prisoner - I attempted to stop him; he lifted his hand up, with something in it, and said, "I will cut you down if you don't let me pass;" I could not see what it was - he passed me; I followed him, and came up to him; I was about three yards from him, and saw him heave this silver mug away - I stooped, and picked it up; I put it into my pocket, ran. and collared him, about twenty yards from where I took up the mug; I had never lost sight of him, and am quite certain he is the person who dropped from the wall - Norris came up, and I gave it to him.

RICHARD JOHNSON . I am servant to Mr. Young. On the 29th of September I was alarmed in the night, and awoke master; the area-door was shut and barred the night before and the pannel safe - I afterwards saw Long with the prisoner; I did not see any body drop from the wall.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am beadle of the night. I was at the watch-house between three and four o'clock in the morning, when the prisoner was brought in; I searched him, and found a soup-ladle, the stock of a centre-bit, two centre-bits, a gimblet and dark-lantern; I asked his name, he said I might guess it, but in the morning he gave his name George Thompson: Lee, the watchman, brought the mug to me.

JOHN LEE . I am a watchman of Limehouse. I was on duty, about two hundred yards from Mr. Young's garden, a little after two o'clock in the morning, and saw two persons making towards me; the one who has escaped threw two jugs into the river, which was afterwards dragged; I saw the prisoner running and pursued him; I saw something shining in his hand - I came up when he was taken, and asked him where the property was which I had seen in his hand, and this jug was given to me by Long; when he saw me, he turned round, and I saw something shining in his hand - I did not see him stopped, but came up soon after.

JOHN NORRIS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 30th of September I searched the prisoner at the office,

and found eight silver tea-spoons in his drawers, rolled up in his shirt, between his legs.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not told to search me by a person who gave you half a crown, to prevent his going to the House of Correction? A. Certainly not; he was under no charge whatever, nor under any suspicion; the prisoner said the grabbers on this side of the water were very good, for they did not half search, and from that I thought I would search him.

JOHN LEE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I went to Mr. Young's house on the 30th of September, and brought this pannel away, (producing it) here are twenty or thirty marks of two different centre-bits on it; I applied the two centre-bits to it - one of them fitted the marks, and the gimblet fitted the hole in the middle.

RICHARD JOHNSON. I am servant to the prosecutor. I believe these eight tea-spoons to be Mr. Young's; he had eight of that description and I missed them; there is R. T. on the back, which was on his - it is the maker's initials - he had a sonp-ladle of this description, no mark is on it, but from its appearance, I believe it to be his; the mug I know - it has the cypher on it.

MR. YOUNG. The river was dragged, and a tea-pot produced to me; the value of all the property lost could not be less than 30l.; there was a silver waiter which I have heard nothing of - I know this mug.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Reference Number: t18281023-4

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1959. GEORGE EDWARDS was indicted for that he, on the 20th of September , at St. Mary, Islington , in and upon Thomas Summerfield , feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and then and there feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did stab, cut, and wound him in and upon his body, with intent feloniously, wilfully, and of malice aforethought, to kill and murder him ; against the Statute.

2d COUNT, stating his intent to be to maim, &c.

3d COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable. &c.

4th COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm, & c.

THOMAS SUMMERFIELD. I live at the back of Paradise-row, Islington, in a little cottage, and am a horsekeeper ; I have a wife and five children. I have known the prisoner about fourteen months; I cannot say where he lived - it is somewhere about Holloway , which is a quarter of a mile from my cottage; he has a wife, but no family. On Saturday, the 20th of September, I had been to the Swan public-house - I had a pint of beer, and was going home about half-past eleven o'clock at night; I was going along the road and overtook the prisoner's wife, she was alone; I asked her for a half-quartern loaf which I had lent her the Saturday night before, (I had lent her one) she said she had not got one with her, but if I would go home with her she would pay me; I agreed to go with her - I had not then seen any other person; I walked with her about two hundred yards towards her home - I walked at her side - she did not lay hold of me, nor I of her - we walked on decently, and about two hundred yards on, somebody hallooed out "Nance," in a rough voice; she went back and said "George, is that you?" he said something to her, but what, I could not hear; I could not see who was talking to her at that time - I saw him knock her down and kick her about; (it was the prisoner) she then called Murder! I went back and asked him if he was going to murder the woman - he said "If you do not go away, I will serve you worse than I do her;" I then went to pick the woman up, as she was still on the ground; he went to push me away as I thought, but I felt something prick me, it run into my side - I dropped the woman and ran away - he ran after me; the prick was in the lower part of my body - he followed me, I dare say a hundred yards, and said, "You b - r, I will stab you;" I did not then know he had run a knife into me, but I knew something was run into me, and as he came by the gas-light I saw his hand raised up, and the blade of a knife about three inches out of his hand - that was when he said he would stab me; I said,"You have stabbed me!" he said, "You b - r, I will murder you;" I ran forward - he ran on, and I called Watch! some persons came to my assistance; he was secured in a very short time - I gave charge of him, and his wife came up to me, and gave charge of me; she told the watchman to take charge of me as well as him, charge for charge; the watchman let go of him, and took me - he sprang his rattle, and another watchman came; he was secared, and taken to Islington watch-house - I was taken to Mr. Jeaffreson's, the doctor's-shop; that was twenty minutes after it was done: I have the shirt here which I had on - it is stabbed through; the stab was below my waistcoat - I was stooping at the time.

Q. Had any thing passed between you and the woman, except your asking for a loaf, and her saying she would pay you if you went home? A. No - I had made no proposition to her, or offered to kiss her, or any thing; there was nothing improper whatever.

Prisoner. He said he would go home with my wife in my room - that he had been with her before, and he was a stouter man than me.

COURT to THOMAS SUMMERFIELD. Q. Had you, in any manner, intimated to her that you wanted her to go with you for any improper purpose? A. No, nothing of the sort - she left me when he called Nance.

Q. While he was beating her, did she suggest that you had endeavoured to take any liberties with her? A. No; I swear solemnly nothing of the sort took place.

Prisoner. He knocked her down, and said he would do as he pleased with her.

JOHN LOVEDER . I am a watchman of Holloway - About twelve o'clock on this night, as I was walking along I heard a noise, and went to the spot; I saw the prosecutor, the prisoner, and a woman - they gave charge for charge; they were standing about two or three yards apart, all on their feet - I sprang my rattle and Whiting came up immediately; the prosecutor said "I give charge of that man - he has stabbed me;" Whiting took hold of the prisoner and I of the prosecutor - I told him to open his breeches, and saw the blood on the lower part of his shirt, from the lower part of his body: we gave him to the next watchman to take to a doctor - as we took the prisoner to the watch-house, he said several times that if he had not murdered him, he would; he was searched at the watch-house, and a knife was taken from him by Warren, in my presence.

WILLIAM WHITING . I am a watchman. I heard a

loud talking, advanced towards the spot, and found three persons together - they had given charge for charge; the prosecutor said "Watchman, take that man, he has stabbed me;" I immediately took him, and when we got a few yards, the prosecutor complained of being faint - on examining him I saw a patch of blood, four or five inches long, on his shirt: I said to the prisoner, "Why, for what I know, you have murdered the man;" he said "If I have not murdered him, I will do it:" we gave the prosecutor to another watchman, to go to Mr. Jeaffreson - the prisoner said several times on the road to the watch-house, "If I have not killed him, or murdered him, I will do it;" I saw Warren take a knife out of his waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not give it up? A. It came out of your possession.

DANIEL WARREN . I am constable of the watch-house at Islington. I searched the prisoner, and took a knife from his left-hand waistcoat pocket; I heard him say "If I have not murdered the b-gg-r, I will if I can make my escape," and he said so in the morning, when he was sober.

JOHN JEAFFRESON . I am a surgeon of Islington. I was called up between twelve and one o'clock, to see the prosecutor - I found a wound in his belly, which they said had been done maliciously; it was a puncture from some sharp instrument - the knife produced is very likely to have been the instrument: he might have lost about an ounce of blood - if the wound had been a little deeper, it would have produced instant death.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home intoxicated; having been wounded in the head, and had a glass of liquor - this man was drinking in the same place with me, and attempted to strike me before I touched him; he fought me about two hours before, and nearly killed me; he came into the Bull public-house and took my beer away - he bit me and we fought; I have been in the army fourteen years - I work for Mr. Laycock.

The prisoner then handed in a paper, which was as follows; On the day in question, on my way home from employment, I met the prosecutor, in company with my wife; after remonstrating with him, as to the apparent intimacy between them, the prosecutor replied that he had a greater claim on my wife than myself; he immediately struck her down, prostrated her at my feet, and from the feelings most men possess towards their partners in life, I committed the assault complained of; I have been under Lord Wellington at Waterloo and in several engagements - I have a pension for life, in consequence of a wound in my head; I therefore might, as a military man, have been more irritated than another - the prosecutor was able to go to his work next day; my wife is in attendance, and will prove the truth of this statement. I am a poor man and beg to submit my case to the humane consideration of your Lordship.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged `.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, being of opinion that he laboured under some delusion of jealousy.

Reference Number: t18281023-5

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1960. JOHN JAMES and RICHARD RYAN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Witham , Esq , on the 16th of September , at St. Clement Danes , and stealing therein 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 7s.; 1 punch-ladle, value 10s.; 2 coats, value 14s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 2 waistcoats, value 3s.; 2 pairs of boots, value 10s.; 5 sovereigns, and 1 half-sovereign, the property of John Ross .

JOHN ROSS. I am clerk to Henry Witham, Esq., whose chambers are at No. 9, Boswell-court, Carey-street - he is a barrister ; I sleep at the chambers usually, but did not on the night of the robbery - I came home about eight o'clock in the morning of the 16th of September, and found the house had been robbed - the housekeeper and Fisher had been at home all night; Mr. Witham sleeps there sometimes.

WILLIAM FISHER . I am a tailor, and live in Well-street, Oxford-street. I slept in Mr. Witham's house on this night, by his consent - he was out of town; the housekeeper was there - Mr. Witham is a single man and has a house in Gower-street; I believe he rents the whole of the house in Boswell-court - Ross had to sleep in Gower-street and asked me to sleep in Boswell-court, as there was no male there: I went to bed at ten o'clock, and slept in the top room - the housekeeper slept on the same floor; I saw the doors and windows safe - I came down about a quarter to six o'clock in the morning; it was then light - I was the first person who came down (we had both gone to bed at the same time) - I found the back door open, and the sash of the kitchen window taken out altogether; I had left my boots down stairs, and they were gone.

JOHN ROSS re-examined. I left the house about eight o'clock in the evening of the 16th, and left five sovereigns, one half-sovereign, and some silver of mine in the house, and all my clothes; I went next morning at eight o'clock and missed two blue coats, a pair of trousers, two waistcoats, a pair of silver sugar-tougs of master's, and several other things, which I know were safe the night before; I found the window out, and some table-cloths spread on the floor- I saw a blue coat and a waistcoat, which I knew to be mine, on James' back, at Bow-street, on the Friday, two days after the robbery, and the boots which James had on I was convinced were Fisher's - the coat had not been altered.

THOMAS FORD . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 19th of September, I took a coat off James' back and gave it to Bond - I did not take the waistcoat off.

WILLIAM BOND. I belong to Bow-street. I received the coat from Ford; I have also a waistcoat, which I took off James myself two days after the robbery, and a pair of half-boots, which I took off his feet.

JOHN ROSS. This is my coat and waistcoat.

WILLIAM FISHER. These are my boots - I had left them down stairs.

RICHARD HARRIS. I am a watchman of Carey-street and Boswell-court. Ross came to me about nine or ten o'clock in the morning; I had seen the prisoner James with another, about his own size, about ten minutes before five o'clock, run down Yates'-court, not very fast - they did not look suspicious; I saw nothing with them, and let them pass: James and another came down first, and then Ryan, who was a third, came after them - it was quite day-light.

JAMES' Defence. I bought the clothes of a Jew in Petticoat-lane, the morning before I was taken: he had the coat and waistcoat on his arm and the boots in his hand - I asked the price of a black coat; he asked 10s. for it, and said "I have a coat and waistcoat here, which will just fit you;" he took me into a public-house - I tried them on, and bought them: he then produced the shoes, and they exactly fitted me - I gave 23s. for the whole; he said "As you have not bated me much, we will have a glass of gin."

JOHN ROSS. He told the Magistrate he had had them six weeks.

THOMAS FORD. I heard him tell the Magistrate he had bought the coat six weeks ago, in Petticoat-lane.

JAMES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

RYAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-6

1961. JOHN JAMES and RICHARD RYAN were again indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Raphael Clint , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 18th of September , at St. Martin-in-the-fields , and stealing therein 2 cloaks, value 2l.; 2 veils, value 2l.; 1 window-curtain, value 5s.; 3 muslin collars, value 3s., and 2 caps, value 2s., his property; 1 writing-desk, value 10s., and 1 cash-box, value 3s., the goods of Edward Henry Green .

RAPHAEL CLINT. I live in Cecil-street , in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-fields , and keep the house. On the night of the 8th of September, I went to bed at eleven o'clock, leaving my servant up - she is not here; the chain of the street-door was up, but the entry was made at the back door, which opens into a long passage, leading to a wharf belonging to Mr. Bacon; I know the back window was fastened, and I fastened the back-door myself - I have a wife but no children: Mr. Green occupies my parlours in the daytime, but goes away at five o'clock, and does not sleep there - he is an agent . I was alarmed about four o'clock in the morning - I sleep in the back-room, first-floor; I lifted up my window, looked into the yard, and saw a number of watchmen coming up the steps which lead from this passage to my back yard; I went down stairs, and found my yard-door fastened inside, as I had left it the evening before - before I left my bed-room I saw the prisoners apprehended by the watchman in the yard, in the water-closet, and when I went down, I found them in custody - I returned into the house, and went into the back kitchen, which I had left safe the night before; I missed nothing from there, but saw it in great confusion - the cupboards had been emptied, the linen taken out and put on the floor, but not carried away; it was all right the night before - I went up to the front-parlour and found the cupboards there had been opened; they were not locked - the plated spoons and cruet-stands were taken out, and thrown about the floor - Mr. Green's desk, which was found, was in the front-parlour when I went to bed; I missed nothing of my own.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you any other name? A. No: I only left the servant up to let in the lodgers, who were out - she is not here.

Q. How do you know the lodgers might not have gone to the back place? A. They could not force the locks; Mr. Palmer, a merchant, who lives in the same street, keeps the key of the gate of the back-passage, leading from the wharf; I have a back-door from the house to my yard, and another door from the yard to the passage - I found the back-door of the house locked in the morning, but I had left the key in the lock, outside the door; I had fastened the back-door of the house - the persons had got in at the staircase-window; it is the kitchen staircase-window- I had shut that window down myself; it had shutters to it, which I did not fasten - they had moved a ladder to get at it.

EDWIN POOL . I am a watchman of Salisbury coal-wharf, Strand, which is close behind this house. On the night in question I perceived the iron gate, leading to a passage behind Clint's house, and to some wine-cellars, was broken open - I opened the gate, went in, and picked up a lock, which had been forced off; I proceeded up the passage about thirty yards - the passage is under ground; I there saw a writing-desk, a cash-box, two gentlemen's cloaks, a parcel of papers strewed about, and some letters - I returned, and went into Salisbury-street, closing the gate after me; I got four watchmen - we went through the passage, till we came to No. 7, and I perceived the back-door of the yard wide open, and on the steps I picked up some caps and two veils; I looked about the yard, opened the water-closet door, and saw the two prisoners sitting there, in a sleeping posture - it was four o'clock in the morning, and dark; we had lights: I took them to the watch-house. I found in the pan of the water-closet a large chisel, a stock, two centre-bits, a skeleton-key, a phosphorus-box, matches and candle; the mark on the padlock forced off the gate exactly corresponds with the chisel.

EDWARD HENRY GREEN. I have apartments in this house, as a place of business. I left a desk and cash-box there a few minutes before five o'clock in the afternoon, in the front room, locked up, and in the morning they were gone; I saw them at Bow-street.

HENRY DULY . I am a butcher. At the time in question I was constable of St. Martin's; I have two gentlemen's cloaks, a writing-desk, and cash-box, which I got from the passage. I went with the watchman, and took the prisoners, searched them, and found a window-curtain on Ryan, in his hat, and on James a large and a small knife.

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS . I am a watchman, and assisted in taking them.

MR. GREEN. This cash-box and desk are mine - I have the keys of them.

MR. CLINT. These two cloaks were left in my care by two lodgers - I saw them when I went to bed; this curtain is mine, also the veils and caps - the cloaks hung in the passage when I went to bed.

JAMES - GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 19.

RYAN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18281023-7

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1962. CHARLES LEDGE was indicted for that he, on the 25th of September , being in the dwelling-house of John McLean , at Christchurch , did steal therein 1 sovereign, 4 crowns, 8 half-crowns, 40 shillings, and the sum of 5l. 15s. in copper monies, his property - and that, being in the said dwelling-house, as aforesaid, and having committed the felony aforesaid, afterwards, about two o'clock in the night of the same day, feloniously and burglariously did break out of the same ; against the Statute.

EDWARD TAYLOR . I am headborough of Christchurch, Middlesex, which is Spitalfields. On the 24th of September, between half-past one and two o'clock in the morning, I was out on duty, and observed the prisoner with a basket on his shoulder, coming from Red Lion-court, Wood-street, about three hundred yards from the prosecutor's house, which is in Lamb-street; I asked what he had got there, which appeared to be weighty - he said some cop

per; I said I wished to see it, and he put it down immediately - I asked where he got it from; he said from Mr. Atkins, a salesman in Spitalfields-market: I asked where he was going to take it to - he said to No. 4, Old Montague-street, Whitechapel, to his mother, and I might go with him if I pleased; he said his mother used to send Atkins silver for copper, and the reason of his being so late was, that he had been drinking with Atkins - we passed on together towards Brick-lane, where I met a watchman, and asked if he knew the prisoner; he said not - I secured him, made inquiry, and went to McLean's, with two inspectors, about two o'clock, or half-past two: I saw the prisoner searched at the watch-house, and a 5s. paper of halfpence found in each of his trousers pockets, also a phosphorus match and three farthings; the match did not appear to have been used. I produce the property I took from him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What you call a match is a bit of stick with sulphur at the end? A. Yes - I found no phosphorus-box; he went quietly with me: I have not inquired at No. 4, Old Montague-street.

ARTHUR HALEY . I am a watchman of Christchurch, Spitalfields. On the morning in question I saw the prisoner with Taylor, and the basket on his shoulder - I went to the watch-house with them.

JOHN FREDERICK CLEMENTS . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I went to make inquiry - I went to Mclean's, and found two of our watchmen there: the place had been robbed; before that I searched the prisoner, and found two 5s. papers of copper, and a phosphorus-match on him.

Cross-examined. Q. That is a common match? A. It will light with phosphorus, but not with any thing else.

JOHN BARRS . I was at the watch-house; the prisoner delivered me a 5s. paper of halfpence.

JOHN RIVERS . I am a watchman. Mr. McLean's house is on my beat - I tried his door at one o'clock; it was all safe: after the alarm at half-past one I tried it, and found it open - I alarmed McLean, and saw three locks broken, and his desk and cupboard lock.

JOHN McLEAN. I am a factor and dealer in potatoes ; I live in Lambeth-street, Spitalfields . On the evening of the 24th of September, I went to bed about ten o'clock, and left every thing secure; my elder children and servant were up after me; my bell rang about eleven o'clock - my servant called me down to speak to a person, and every thing was then safe: I was alarmed about two by the watchman ringing the bell violently - I came down and found my house open; I had left in a cupboard in my counting-house, 10l. in copper, all in 5s. papers, except a few loose coppers in a bowl - I left a sovereign and some silver in the desk, and have no doubt there were crowns and half crowns among it - after the alarm, some 5s. papers of copper were produced to me - there was 5l. 15s. in the basket, some of the papers had my own hand-writing on them, and some my son's; two of them were not marked - here are some with my writing on them; I am certain they are part of what I left safe when I went to bed.

Q. How did it appear the person had got out of your house? A. There is a door in the side of my premises which leads to a passage at the side of my house; he had opened that door and drawn out two bolts; I found the door entirely open, when I came down - it must have been opened by somebody within, certainly.

Cross-examined. Q. How many persons did you leave up when you went to bed? A. Two sons and perhaps my daughter - I have no partner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent, and throw myself on the mercy of your Lordship. I was coming through the market, and actually picked up the basket with the copper in it - when the man stopped me I put it down, and if I had known them to be stolen, I could have thrown them down and escaped - but knowing myself innocent I went to the watch-house with him.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, as he had not disturbed the family.

Reference Number: t18281023-8

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1963. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Finacune , from his person .

WILLIAM FINACUNE. I am a gentleman's servant , but am at present out of place; I live in Great Mary-le-bone-street. On the 23d of September, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I was coming from Holborn to Cheapside - I used my handkerchief on Holborn-hill; it was in my right-hand coat pocket: I was in Newgate-street when the officer gave me information - I missed it; I had not noticed any body near me, nor felt it taken; Herdsfield took me back to a shop, where I remained about ten minutes - he then fetched me to the Compter, where I saw the prisoner with it; I am quite certain it is mine; it was marked M., which was my wife's initial.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD. I am a City officer. About one o'clock I was coming along Snow-hill ; I saw the prisoner and two others following close behind the prosecutor - I watched them, and opposite Warwick-lane there was an obstruction in the street, with the carts, as they were repairing Ludgate-street; and during this time I lost sight of them; they had been close to the prosecutor all the time - I stood still; the carts went on, and I saw the three turn round, and go back in a contrary direction to that they were going before, towards Snow-hill; I stepped up, and asked the prosecutor if he had lost any thing - he felt, and missed his handkerchief; I told him to wait in a shop while I went after them: I did not know the prisoner before - he was in my sight two or three minutes; I cannot have mistaken him; I saw him going, and followed them down Snow-hill; I desired Scourfield to lay hold of him while I followed the others; I took one of them in Fleet-market, and upon my return I found the prisoner in his custody.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see me pick the handkerchief up in Warwick-lane? A. Never.

WILLIAM SCOURFIELD . I am a turnkey of Giltspur-street Compter. I was asked to walk down Snow-hill with Herdsfield; I saw the prisoner with two others in company - I crossed over, met the prisoner alone, and took him to the Compter; while I was searching him he put his hand into his breeches pocket, produced the handkerchief, and said he did not think I had seen him pick any body's pocket - the prosecutor came in with Herdsfield, and claimed it;

Herdsfield went after the others, and brought one of them to the Compter.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Cheapside, and at the corner of Newgate-street I saw the handkerchief on the ground, and took it up; when I got further the two persons came and said it was their's - I asked them to describe it; they said it was a black Belcher; I said it was not, and I should not give it to them - they turned round, said, "Here is Charley," and left me; Herdsfield took me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281023-9

1964. DANIEL SPRING and WILLIAM HEAD were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 5 loaves of bread, value 5s. 9d. , the goods of Richard Wright .

CHARLES BOLT . I am a journeyman to Richard Wright, a baker , of Brick-lane, Old-street. I left my truck in St. Paul's church-yard , with two men to take care of it, while I went to serve some customers in Shoemaker-row, and when I came back Spring had three loaves in his hand, and Head was just putting two back again - I asked Spring to give the three loaves back to me; he would not, but said he would pitch into me if I did not let him go; an officer came up, and I gave charge of them.

FRANCIS MCLANE . I saw a crowd in St. Paul's church-yard; Spring had a peck loaf under one arm, and a quartern under the other - he said they were his own; I detained him.

THOMAS COGHILL . I was in St. Paul's church-yard; Bolt asked me to look after his truck - I said I would, and in five minutes I saw the prisoners lifting up the lid of the truck; they let it down, and presently Spring opened it, took out three loaves, and gave them to the other man; I said, "Put the bread back;" he said he would not, and I gave them in charge.

WILLIAM DEAN . I saw Bolt in the street; he asked me and Coghill to mind his truck, which I have done before; I saw Spring take one loaf, and he took two himself.

SPRING'S Defence. A man, who appeared to be a baker, asked if I wanted to buy any bread, and said I should have half a peck and a quartern for 1s. 6d., which I gave him.

SPRING - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

HEAD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18281023-10

1965. JOHN MAYHEW was indicted for embezzlement .

DANIEL HERNLEY . I am apprentice to Mr. Day , an oilman , of Gracechurch-street ; the prisoner was the porter - when he served customers he ought to tell one of the gentlemen behind the counter, to take the money, and not take it himself. On the 9th of October I was at the back of the shop - Mr. Hope , one of the partners, stood behind the counter, talking to a lady; I saw the prisoner serve a little boy with some oil; I saw him take the money and put it on the counter - I was called away, but went behind the counter, and as near as I could count the money was 3s. 9d.: Mr. Hope went behind the counter, and while I was serving a customer I saw the prisoner take the money and put it into his own pocket - I told the partner of it directly, but he said nothing about it till the Saturday; this was Thursday evening - he was not at business on Friday: the prisoner was not behind the counter when he received the money: I cannot say he did not afterwards put it into the till - it remained on the counter about five minutes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-11

1966. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 glass lamp, with brass mountings, value 25s. , the goods of George Blackburne .

GEORGE BLACKBURNE. I am a wine-merchant , and live in Mark-lane . I lost a lamp on the 6th of October, from the top of the staircase - it is a large house, and let out in offices; the lamp was to light the stair-case. About a quarter before five o'clock I saw the prisoner coming down the yard, with it under his arm; I seized him before he got out of the yard, and asked what he had got - he said a lamp; I said, "Who does it belong to?" he said Mr. Parker: I took him into the passage - he dropped the lamp, and ran off: I ran and took him - I never lost sight of him.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am an officer, and secured the prisoner; Mr. Black burne was pursuing him - he said nothing to the charge: he would give me no information about his friends.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-12

1967. JOHN BOWDEN and MICHAEL SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Basil Francis , from his person .

MR. BASIL FRANCIS. I am living with a friend, in Featherstone-buildings - I am not in business. On the 16th of October, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going towards the City, and was stopped by Carlisle, at the bottom of Skinner-street; he asked me if I had lost a handkerchief - I felt and missed it - I am sure I had it safe when I left home: my wife and nephew were walking with me; Carlisle desired me to return with him, and he would recover my handkerchief - I went, and found the prisoners in custody, at Mr. Raven's, the grocer, at the bottom of Holborn-hill; my handkerchief was produced at the Compter, by the officer - it was the same I had had in my pocket before; I had perceived nobody near me.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a night-patrol of the Mansion-house. I was coming down Holborn-hill , and saw Mr. Francis with a gentleman and lady; I observed the prisoners near him, in company with another, who turned down Field-lane, - I saw Sullivan go up to the prosecutor's nephew, and feel his pocket - there was nothing taken then: he turned towards the prosecutor - I saw him take his handkerchief about six or seven inches out, then Bowden went up and took it quite out, took off his cap, and threw it into it; he turned round a corner, where a house is being pulled down; I told the prosecutor I thought his pocket was picked - I turned back, and took them both at the corner of Field-lane; I took off Bowden's cap, and found the handkerchief in it: Mr. Francis followed me to the Compter, and he said it was his.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BOWDEN'S Defence. I picked the handkerchief up on Snow-hill.

SULLIVAN'S Defence. I know as much about it as any gentleman here.

BOWDEN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281023-13

1968. THOMAS ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , 1 gown, value 8s.; 1 cap, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 1 apron, value 6d., the goods of George Bird , from the person of Sarah Bird .

SARAH BIRD. I live at No. 60, Wilson-street, Finsbury-square; my husband is a journeyman baker - his name is George. On the 13th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was going to the Blackfriars'-road - it was a wet night; I had a bundle, which contained the things stated in the indictment; about eight o'clock I was in Castle-street, Falcon-square , with my bundle on my left arm, and holding an umbrella in the other hand, and I had my pattens on - all in a minute the bundle was taken from me by being twitched over my shoulder; I turned round to see who it was, and somebody who stood at my elbow tried to knock me down, he only pushed me; the person who had my bundle was running away; I could not distinguish who it was, as his back was towards me - the man who pushed me ran down Maidenhead-court; I pursued the man with the bundle, calling Stop thief! I lost sight of him; the prisoner was stopped - I did not see him throw the bundle away - he was taken in a few minutes after I called Stop thief! the bundle was produced at the watch-house; it contained all the things.

SAMUEL HOLLOWAY . I am a watchman of Aldersgate. I was going up Maidenhead-court, calling half-past eight o'clock - I saw three or four persons together under the dark place; the prisoner made a plunge through, and almost knocked down a young man who was eating oysters, and then nearly knocked a woman down to make way for him to run away; I saw the bundle under his left arm, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I went after him and saw him throw it away at the bottom of the court in Aldersgate-street - I am quite sure he is the man; I ran, but lost sight of him for about three minutes - he was stopped in Falcon-street; I came up and took him - I saw the prosecutrix in Maidenhead-court, trying to save her bundle, as I thought - she was nearly close to the prisoner - I heard her cry out Stop thief! I can swear he is the man who was running away with the bundle - some person brought the bundle to the watch-house; the prosecutrix owned it there.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . I am a watchman of Aldersgate. I saw the prisoner coming out of Maidenhead-court, running towards Falcon-street; he had not got the bundle then - I pursued and picked up the bundle - I did not lose sight of him; he was secured in two minutes - I produced the bundle at the watch-house; the prosecutrix described the contents - I gave it to Hart.

WILLIAM HART . I am a constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; he did not say any thing to the charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from work; I turned through Falcon-street, and ran, as it rained very hard; I heard a cry of Stop thief! - two men came up and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281023-14

1969. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 7 yards of carpet, value 28s. , the goods of Henry Matthews .

HENRY MATTHEWS. I am an upholsterer , and live in Budge-row, Walbrook . On the 29th of September, between one and two o'clock I lost some carpet, which was safe a quarter of an hour before; the shop-door was open, but the carpet was seven yards from the door inside the shop - I was called down stairs by my boy; the prisoner was in custody with it - he was quite a stranger to me.

JAMES NAYLER . I am a cork-cutter, and live in John-street, Hackney. I was in a shop opposite the prosecutor's, in Budge-row, and saw the prisoner, in company with another, pass the shop - in a short time he returned, went into the shop and brought out some carpet - I pursued and brought him back to Mr. Matthews, who gave him in charge; when I took him, he threw it down and said, I might carry it myself - I gave it to the officer.

WILLIAM GOODHUGH . I am a constable. I received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I think something has been added to this carpet since.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-15

1970. WILLIAM GREENWAY and WILLIAM SAGE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 box, value 1s., the goods of John Stamp , from his person .

JOHN STAMP. I live in Church-row, Commercial-road. On the 19th of September, I was in Holborn , a little above Gray's Inn-lane - Riordan asked me if I had lost my snuff-box, and on feeling in my pocket, I missed it - it was safe a few minutes before; I never saw the prisoner near me - I described it to Riordan; he had taken the prisoners before he spoke to me - I was walking slowly with a lady; he showed it to me after I described it to him - it was my box; it could not have dropped from my pocket.

DANIEL RIORDAN . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 19th of September, I saw Mr. Stamp beyond Hatton-garden, near Furnival's Inn, in the City; I saw the prisoners for ten minutes before, in company with a third- I saw them just before they came to Brook-street, following Mr. Stamp, who was with a lady; at the end of Brook-street, they all three went close up to Mr. Stamp; Sage laid hold of the left-hand skirt of the pocket, put his hand in, and took out a box - the other two were close behind him; Sage immediately handed it to Greenway - they then rushed up into Brook-street; I rushed on them immediately and laid hold of the two prisoners, without losing sight of them, and Greenway threw the box down on the pavement - I picked it up, lodged them in a shop and handcuffed them; I then went after Mr. Stamp, and told him of it - I have not seen the third since; I should know him again. The prosecutor described the box to me before

he saw it - it had a particular kind of snuff in it; I was on the curb, the same side of the way as them.

MR. STAMP. This is my box - it contained some of the same snuff which I had put into it; it had come from the West Indies.

SAGE'S Defence. A man came up and asked me to buy a box; I said I had no use for it - he came to this young man, (who is a stranger to me) and asked him to buy it; I followed him, and the officer took us.

GREENWAY'S Defence. A man in a leather apron came and asked me to buy the box; I said I had got one - he took me to the light to look at it, and put it into my hand- the officer came and he ran away; the box dropped out of my hand.

DANIEL RIORDAN. That is impossible; I was after them before they got three feet into Brook-street - he threw the box down.

GREENWAY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SAGE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281023-16

1971. WILLIAM NORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 3 spoons, value 8s. , the goods of Ann Thompson .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Ferrier .

JOHN FERRIER. I am in the service of Ann Thompson who keeps the Dr. Butler's Head tavern, in White Rose-court, Coleman-street . On Tuesday, the 14th of October, the prisoner came there, between six and seven o'clock - he had a glass of mixed liquor in the coffee-room; he staid there about half an hour, and paid 6d. for what he had, when I brought it him; there were three gentlemen at the other end of the table, with a glass of liquor each, there was a spoon in each glass: two of them went out soon after - I went to fetch the glass, and missed a spoon: the prisoner left in a quarter of an hour - I went into the room, and missed two more: I went after him and saw him in Bellalley, about one hundred yards off - he had taken his own spoon also; I collared and told him he had stolen the spoons - as I brought him back he took two spoons out of his pocket, threw them on the pavement, and said "There is your spoons;" I brought him back, and said he had another spoon - he denied it; he came out of the room as I stood in the passage - I asked him about it again; he then said he had thrown it down: I went and found it on the seat where he had been sitting - I am quite sure it was not there when the prisoner went out; they are silver: he said he was in distress - an officer was sent for who took him; I am quite sure they are mistress' spoons.

SAMUEL TURNER . I am a constable and took the prisoner; I searched him and found 3s. 5d. on him - he said he lived at No. 6, Silver-street, Falcon-square; I could find no such person there.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-17

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24.

Second Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

1978. HENRY PANK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 30 calf-skins, value 7l., and 4 horse-hides, value 4l., the goods of Abel Foulkes , in his dwelling-house .

ABEL FOULKES. I am a currier and live in Orchard-street, Westminster . On the 10th of October I missed eighteen calf-skins and 4 horse-hides, from my passage, which leads to my shop; I have seen the prisoner once or twice at my shop within the last six weeks - he came to buy some leather; I supposed he was a shoemaker. Mr. Hall, a currier, sent for me on the 14th, and produced part of a skin which I considered to be mine - it was the butt-end of a calf-skin, the head and the King's stamp was taken off; it was not in a fit state for a shoemaker, it would be quite useless to him, as it was not finished - I found part of a skin corresponding in quality and colour with it, on my premises, but not to match it in the cut, as I had sold part of it - this was cut in the way I cut mine; I have not any part which tallies with the cut, but it tallies in quality - while I was talking to Hall, the prisoner came and asked him about the leather; I asked how he got that piece of leather, he said he bought it in Strutton-ground for 9d. - that he should know the man if he saw him again, but could not tell his name; I then went to Queen-square, met an officer, and told him - he had said he lodged in Strutton-ground; I went there and found it was false - I found him in the street afterwards, and gave him in charge; he took us to his lodgings in Old Pye-street - he said they were his lodgings, and there I found these pieces of leather; they are pieces of horse-skins - there was no mark on them, but they corresponded with others which I have in my possession; they are fit for a shoemaker to use for stiffeners - I believe them to be part of this hide; it tallies exactly with a piece which is on my premises - it dovetails on both sides; I am perfectly satisfied that they are part of the same in quality, and they tally in the cut; the prisoner said he had bought this piece at 1s. a pound, at Mr. Pounds, of Wardour-street, Soho - I know he is a currier; this piece must have been taken within nine days - no one skin is worth 5l.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you could not swear to it? A. I could not swear to satisfy any one but myself till I found this piece, which matches - there were some pieces which were not mine.

JOSEPH HALL . I am a currier and leather-seller, and live in Broadway, Westminster. I have known the prisoner six or seven years as a shoemaker; on the 14th of October he brought this piece of calf-skin, and asked me to curry it for a pair of shoes for himself - I asked where he got it; he said he had bought it for 9d.; I asked where - he said in the street; I said I suspected it was stolen, and should neither curry it, nor give it him back till I had sent for Foulkes, who I heard had lost some - I asked his address - he said No. 15, Strutton-ground; it is worth 2s. 6d. or 3s. - curriers can speak very well to the quality of skins; here are two pieces of horse-skin, which tally - I believe them to be part of the same hide, and am satisfied of it; I have been in the trade all my life.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at the office that you doubted whether they corresponded? A. I did on the first appearance, but after minutely examining the other side I was as well satisfied as if I cut it myself.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. I went to No. 16, Strutton-ground - I could hear nothing of the pri

soner there; we met him in the street, and he took us to Palmer's-rents, Duck-lane, as his lodging, and I found this piece of leather, with several others.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to work - a person stopped me, and asked me to buy the leather - I said I did not want it; he said I should have it for a 1s. - I had but 9d.; he said I should have it - it was not worth more to me for stiffening.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-18

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1973. JOHN PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , one 5l. Bank note, the property of Charles Moor , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES MOOR, JUN . I am the son of Charles Moor who lives in St. James's-street , and is a gun-maker . On the 19th of September, I received three 5l. notes, four sovereigns and twenty shillings, on my father's account; I did not take the numbers of the notes - I put the notes into the drawer of our iron chest, which stood in the shop; I locked it, and put the key into the desk - I locked the desk, and put that key into my pocket; the prisoner was in the house when I received the money - he was our errand-boy , and slept in the shop; I saw the shop apparently safe about six o'clock in the evening, and next morning found it unlocked - the key of the chest laid in much about the same place as I had left it; I went to the chest and missed a 5l. note - I am positive I put the three notes there - nobody could have gone to the chest without my key, properly, as I had the key of the desk; I found another key of the desk inside it - I had left it there, but did not observe whether it was there when I put the key of the chest in; the prisoner was still in the house, but did not see me examine the chest - I reported my loss to my father - he made enquiry; the prisoner was taken up about twelve o'clock at night; I had received the notes from Alliband.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What character did the prisoner bear? A. Very honest; he has been about two years with us - he appeared voluntarily before the Magistrate - but at the time he was charged with it, he appeared rather embarrassed; there were nine or ten of our workmen on the premises that evening - I was in the shop when my father told him to go with him to a public-house, where it was supposed a note had been changed, and he went; he was told he was suspected about eleven o'clock - there was nothing to prevent his leaving the house before that; I was present when he was given in charge - no silver or gold was found on him; his mother took his boxes away - I do not know whether they were searched.

WILLIAM ALLIBAND . I am porter to Mr. Moor. On the morning of the 19th of September, I went to Jenkins' in Little St. James'-street; I received three 5l. notes, four sovereigns and twenty shillings in silver - I gave it to Mr. Moor, Jun., and in the evening saw him put the three notes into the chest.

THOMAS JENKINS . I gave Alliband three 5l. notes.

MARGARET HORNER . I keep the King's Head public-house, King-street, St. James's. I know the prisoner by having seen him come after Mr. Moor's men. On the 19th of September, about half-past ten o'clock at night, he came and asked me for change of a 5l. note; I asked who for - he said for Mr. Moor, St. James's-street; I gave him four sovereigns and 1l. in silver; I marked the note before I gave him the change - he saw me mark it; I put Moor's name on it; and put it into my cash-box, where I had no other notes; next day Mr. Moore came in with the porter; and about twelve o'clock he came with the prisoner, and asked if he was the young man I had changed the note for - I turned round and said Yes - he said "No, Mrs. Horner, I never was in your bar;" I said I felt quite confident that he was - he persisted in saying he was not the man, and was taken away.

Cross-examined. Q. Mr. Moor's men frequent your house? A. Not constantly; they come at times, five or six at a time.

Q. Did you ask Mr. Moor if he had any body else like the prisoner? A. The prisoner persisted in saying it was not him; I said "Then Mr. Moor must have a man exactly like you" - I only said that once; I described him to Mr. Moor before he brought him to me - he did not frequent the house, but came occasionally for the men; I never served him with a glass of liquor but once - if he had not come for change at so unseasonable an hour, I should not have noticed him; none of Mr. Moor's men had been to my house that day - I changed no other note that day; I was not out of the house.

WILLIAM ALLIBAND. The prisoner's boxes were searched on the 20th, after he had been to the office.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to the lady's house she asked Mr. Moor if he had not somebody in the shop like me - he said he did not know whether he had any body exactly like me; I went back with him - he asked what money I had - I shewed it to him; it was two penny-pieces; I told him I had changed half a crown out of my wages at the public-house the night before the note was changed, and received 2d. out; he asked me to go with him - I went to Marlborough-street; the key of my box was found on me- the officer searched it, and found nothing.

MR. MOOR. I had paid him 10s. on the Saturday night, when he was discharged on an understanding that he should come three days in the week till he could find another situation.

Q. Was he discharged for any impropriety? A. My father thought him too intimate with the female servants.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-19

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1974. WILLIAM WATTS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Vaughan , widow , on the 10th of October , at St. James, Westminster , and stealing therein 4 pairs of shoes, value 20s., her property .

JOSEPH VAUGHAN . I live with my mother Ann Vaughan, who is a widow, and carries on the business of a shoemaker - I attend to the shop; she lives at No. 114, Jermyn-street . On Friday, the 10th of October, I was down in the kitchen, at tea, and heard a slight noise in the shop; I went up and not perceiving any thing, went down again: in about two minutes I heard a greater noise than before - I went up and went to the window to see if the cat was there, (as it was in the habit of going there) the first thing I observed

was a pair of men's slippers shaking about in the window; a pair of shoes were gone, and a piece cut out of the window; I went out of the door, looked towards the left, and saw the prisoner near the public-house - I did not lose sight of him till he was secured; he walked up, and stood still, at the corner of Well-street: I walked up, walked round him, and rubbed him down by his coat - he then dropped some shoes; I caught hold of his coat, he struggled and struck me in the face - I called Stop thief! persons came and assisted me in securing him; he was taken back to the shop, and a pair of shoes produced, which were stated to have been taken from his pocket - I found the glass cut or broken out; I saw no pieces of glass, either in or outside of the window - they were gone entirely; I had seen that part of the widow in the afternoon - it was quite safe when I went down to tea, (looking at some shoes produced by G. Knox) I know this one shoe to be one which I picked up in the street, after rubbing down his coat - it is one of my mother's; here is the fellow to it - here are two more pairs: they are all my mother's, and worth 20s. - the opening in the window was large enough to get them through.

Prisoner. Q. You found me standing at the corner of the street? A. Yes, you were standing still.

GEORGE KNOX . I am a constable. The prisoner, and goods were given into my custody - I have had them ever since; I found nothing on him.

JOHN HOPGOOD . I live at No. 115, Jermyn-street. I heard a cry of Stop thief! went up, and saw the prisoner struggling with Vaughan, endeavouring to get away; I assisted in bringing him back, and observed him endeavouring to get a pair of shoes out of his pocket, which I prevented his doing, but when we got to the shop, I took them out of his pocket myself, and gave them to Vaughan; they were delivered to Knox.

Prisoner's Defence. I generally leave work about six o'clock in the evening, and take a walk for about two hours - unfortunately I went down Jermyn-street, and met two men who appeared to be intoxicated; they pushed against me, and had not got two yards, before I heard a window break- I turned round and saw the two men go from Vaughan's shop - I went up, saw the window broken, and the shoes on the area; I picked them up, and tried the door to get in, then went and stood at the corner for five minutes, thinking somebody might come out of the shop; I gave a whistle for my dog; Vaughan came up and looked at me; I looked at him, not knowing who he was - he laid hold of me, and I wrestled with him and dropped a shoe; he sang out Stop thief! I then desisted, and went into his shop. Now if I had a felonious intent, might I not have gone away with the shoes instead of stopping at the corner of the street? I am a shoemaker and have a wife and child.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, having a wife and child.

Reference Number: t18281023-20

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1975. JOSEPH MAHONEY and JOHN MORRIS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Barron , on the 15th of October , at St. Martin's-in-the-fields , and stealing therein 5 spoons, value 40s., and 2 forks, value 10s., his property .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

SARAH MANSELL . I am servant to Mr. Barron, who lives in St. Martin's-lane . On the 15th of October, I fastened up the house, and left every thing safe and secure when I went to bed; I was alarmed about two o'clock in the night by a noise, and got up - I had left five tea-spoons, two forks, and a table-spoon in the kitchen-drawer, they were all silver; I knew Mahoney before - he married a relation of mine, and had been at master's house on Twelfth Night - when I awoke, I got up and listened on the stairs; I saw a glimmering light - I threw up the window and called the watchman, and then alarmed my master; I missed all the property from the kitchen-drawer.

JOHN WARDLEY . I am a watchman of St. Martin's-parish. On the morning of the 16th of October, I was alarmed by Mr. Barron's family - his house is in St. Martin's-in-the-fields; I observed the back part of his premises, leading to Kinnerston-alley - there is a high wall there; I saw Mahoney drop from the ledge of that wall, and immediately secured him - he had no shoes on; I gave him to Mosely and Watkins: I afterwards went round to the front of the premises for a light - I went through the house; I found a silver table-spoon out of the back-kitchen window, in the yard, that morning, and have kept it ever since - I afterwards searched the dust-hole of Mr. Simpson's house, which joins the prosecutor's, and found Morris in that dust-hole - this was near five o'clock in the morning; I could not observe any tract on the wall - I found three centre-bits, three skeleton-keys, a large knife and the stock of a centre-bit on his person: I saw Boucher pick up a crow-bar in Barron's yard, about four o'clock - there was a piece cut out of Barron's back-kitchen door, and I saw Mr. Barron apply the centre-bits, found on Morris, to the door, one of them fits it; I have brought the pannel here; I saw him fit the crow-bar to the kitchen-door - it corresponded; I took Morris to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You found these things before Morris was in custody? A. They were in his pocket; I found the spoon before he was taken - I have always said I saw Mahoney drop from the wall; there is a little privy in the yard - I do not know whether it belongs to Mr. Barron's premises; it is in the alley - the wall encloses none but Mr. Barron's premises - it encloses all his own yard.

COURT. Q. When you were examined before the Magistrate and said Mahoney came over the wall, did you say you heard any thing? A. Yes - I heard a rattle like a chain.

WILLIAM BARRON. My house is in the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-fields. On the 16th of October, about ten minutes past two o'clock in the morning, my servant alarmed me; I employed the watchman to search my back premises, and I searched myself - I found the back-kitchen window wide open - and the kitchen-door wide open: a piece of the pannel which had been cut with a centre-bit and wrenched out, was lying by the side, the hole would admit a hand to withdraw the bolt - I searched the drawer in the kitchen, and missed five tea, two table-spoons, and two forks, all silver - I applied one centre-bit to the pannel and found the end had been broken off by boring against the bolt - it corresponded with the marks on the pannel, and the crow-bar fitted some marks on the door; I afterwards saw Mahoney at the watch-house, and asked him to

tell me the truth, and asked who was concerned with him; I afterwards saw Mr. Simpson's dust-hole searched, and saw Morris after he was taken out; I was looking over the wall and saw him - I did not see him in the yard before the dust-hole was searched - I saw the stock of a centre-bit, three centre-bits, three skeleton-keys, and a clasp-knife taken from his person; I saw Wells, the watch-house keeper, fit a pair of shoes on Mahoney's feet - they appeared to fit him - this is my spoon.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose they would fit any man of the same size? A. They might: I have no other Christian name, nor any partner; the house is my leasehold.

THOMAS MOSELEY . I am a patrol of St. Martin's-in-the-fields. I took Mahoney to the watch-house, and on the way he begged very hard for his liberty - I did not hold out either threat or promise to him; I only said"What have you done with your shoes?" he said he had lost them, and that his crime was very frivolous, for he had only been having a lark with a young woman; about fifty yards from the watch-house he made a sudden stop, and said "I cannot think of going to the watch-house, let me have my liberty;" I said I could not; he said he would reward us, or any thing - I put him into the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he tell you who he had the lark with? A. No.

WILLIAM BRUCKNER . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 16th of October, I searched Mr. Barron's premises, and found this pair of shoes in the back part of his yard, and a dark lantern in the yard; I fitted the shoes on Mahoney's feet, they fitted exactly, and the mark on his stocking corresponded with the top of his shoe.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear Wardley say whether Mahoney came from the wall or the privy? A. Over the wall.

WILLIAM BOUCHER . I am servant to Mr. Barron. On the 16th of October, I was called up about three o'clock in the morning; I searched the back of the premises - about five o'clock, I heard somebody coughing in Mr. Simpson's premises - I jumped on the wall, heard a noise there, and found Morris in the dust-hole; I found this crow-bar in Barron's yard, about twenty minutes before I found Morris.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say, at the office that you found the keys? A. The watchman and I drew them out of his pocket.

Prisoner MAHONEY to JOHN WARDLEY. Q. On your taking me in the alley, you opened the door which parts the privy from the court, and said that is the door you came out of? A. I did not; nor did I tell the Magistrate so - I said, "I have got one without his shoes" and heard Bruckner say,"I have got the shoes here;" I did not spring my rattle, one was sprung by my order; I had hold of you at the time Moseley, Wardley, and Briggs came to my assistance.

Prisoner MAHONEY to BRUCKNER. Q. Where is your beat? A. From St. Martin's-lane up to Long-acre; I only had to run across the road when I heard the alarm - I was let in immediately; I was in the yard about ten minutes before I found the shoes, and said I had found them when I heard the watchman say he had taken a man.

MAHONEY'S Defence. It is clear I could not be ten minutes crossing the yard from the house; if the shoes are tried, it will be plain they are two inches too big; they are new - and is it likely I should buy new shoes so much too big? - on the night of the robbery I was at home; a friend called and said "Will you go and have a share of a pint of beer;" I went and spent the evening with him, till half-past twelve o'clock; I drank freely, and went out in my slippers, and getting into company with a parcel of men and girls, I quarrelled, and in the row, lost my slippers; the watchman came up, and I followed; I was taken short coming by this court, and went to the privy - and as I came out Wardley laid hold of me: I said I had only been having a lark.

Prisoner MORRIS. I throw myself entirely upon the mercy of the Court.

Prisoner MAHONEY to SARAH MANSELL. Q. How many times have I been in your master's house? A. I cannot say; but you were there on Twelfth Night and slept there, and for two nights before - I never left you alone in the house on Sunday morning, or at all.

Prisoner MAHONEY. I leave it to you to say whether it was better to sleep there and rob the house, or to break it open.

MAHONEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

MORRIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18281023-21

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1976. ELIZABETH STRUTTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Lane , on the 13th of September , and stealing 1 bonnet, value 30s.; 2 hats, value 9s.; two gowns, value 10s.; 2 petticoats, value 4s.; 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 1 shirt, value 4s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 sheet, value 4s.; 1 shift, value 4d.; 1 other petticoat, value 1s., and 1 counterpane, value 5s., his goods; and 1 hat, value 20s., the goods of James Weaver .

MARY LANE . I am the wife of William Lane, a journeyman carpenter - at the time in question we lived in Beeves-place, Hoxton Old-town , in a small house, consisting of a parlour, a kitchen, and a room above; James Weaver lodged with us: I knew the prisoner before - she was frequently at her sister's. On the 13th of September I went out at nine o'clock, and left nobody at home but the children, who are quite infants, and were in bed; I bolted the back-door, pulled the front-door too, and tried it with my hand - it was as fast as it could be, but any body used to it could push it open by putting their knee against it; I returned at half-past ten o'clock, and found my husband had come home in my absence - I missed a bonnet out of a box, and two children's hats from another box, also the lodger's hat, one muslin and one cotton gown(which had a skirt separated from the body) two petticoats, and the counterpane off the child's bed; and on Monday I missed a shift, which I had seen on the Saturday evening, just before I went out; I took it up stairs, and shut the room-door - there was a particular patch on it, where the bone of my stays had made a hole, by which I know it, but no mark. Two months before this happened I had left a message for my lodger at the prisoner's sister's, how the door could be opened. I found my child's hat at Mrs. Mills' - the maker's name had then been taken out; I went away, and when I returned to Mills', the hat was gone - it has been produced since. The prisoner was taken into custody; I was present when a female searched her - she

took the shift off her person herself, in my presence, while Fielding was searching her; I know it to be mine by the mark I have mentioned - it was clean when I lost it; here is the patch on it - it is my own work: the prisoner said her mother gave it to her two years ago, at Brixton; she was taken on Monday, the 15th of September.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not at Worship-street, give an inventory of the things you lost? A. Yes, on Sunday - I had not then missed the shift; I told Fielding I had lost it on Monday morning, before it was found - it is much more torn than when I lost it, but the patch is not torn; I know my own work.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge; Fielding and the prosecutrix searched her, and produced the shift.

ANN FIELDING . I am a laundress. I saw the shift on the prisoner; she took it off, and I saw it delivered to Vann.

MARY MATILDA MILLS . I keep a clothes-shop in Austin-street, Shoreditch. A person resembling the prisoner came to my shop, and asked me if I bought gowns; she said they were two muslin ones - she had them wrapped in a cloth, and had a child's hat: I said I would not look at the gowns, as it was too late in the season; I bought the hat of her - I believe the prisoner to be the woman, but my sight is bad.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say at the office that you did not know her? A. I could not swear to her; I was locked up in the office about five minutes - I cannot say what for; I did not swear to her when I came out.

COURT. Q. Were you put into a place of confinement? A. I was put into a place with the prisoner, but was no sooner in than out.

ESTHER ROBINS . I am Mills' sister, and assist in her shop. The prisoner is the person who came there - I had been out, and came in just as she was leaving; she was bargaining for a pair of black stockings.

DANIEL MANSFIELD . I am journeyman to Mr. Miller, a pawnbroker. On Monday, the 15th of September, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner offered to pawn a muslin and a cotton gown; the cotton one had the body separated from the skirt - I refused to take them in; Mrs. Lane has since shewn me two patterns - (looking at them) these are exactly like them.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY. Aged 26. Of stealing the shift only . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-22

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1976. WILLIAM LEWIS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , at St. Paul, Covent-garden , 2 watches, value 25l., and 1 seal, value 20s., the goods of George Henry Robins , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the goods of Joseph Harrison .

JANE KELLY . I live at Mrs. Hales', in James-street, Covent-garden, and have been servant to Mr. George Henry Robins for eighteen years - I am there all day, but sleep at Mrs. Hales'; Mr. Robins' house is under the Piazza, in the parish of St. Paul, Covent-garden; he has a dwelling-house there - you can go from his auction-room to the dwelling-house without coming out to the Piazza, I believe. On Friday, the 10th of October, I was sitting at breakfast in the auction-room - my business is to keep and protect the goods; ten o'clock is the general hour to view goods - the doors are opened at nine: while I was at breakfast, about nine, the prisoner, who had lived with Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker , of Tottenham-court-road, came into the room, and went behind the counter to view the goods which were for that day's sale; there was plate, watches, jewellery, and wearing-apparel - Parsons, our foreman, was in the room; the prisoner stopped a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, and then went away- I saw him do nothing: after he was gone, Mr. Bentley, of Wigmore-street, came.

SAMUEL PARSONS . I am in Mr. Robins' employ - there is a private communication from his dwelling-house to the auction-room, without going into the street; he has no partner - the business is always conducted under the name of Messrs. Robins. On the 10th of October I was in the auction-room, about a quarter before nine o'clock, when the prisoner came - I knew him before; I understood he had lived with Mr. Harrison, of Tottenham-court-road; he came in, wished me good morning, and asked Mrs. Kelly for a catalogue and permission to go round the room, to look at the goods for that day's sale; he staid there about a quarter of an hour, and was within the counter, where there was plate, watches, jewellery, and apparel- any person having permission to go behind the counter, could take a watch; we had several watches for that day's sale - I did not observe him do any thing: Mr. Bentley came in about a quarter of an hour, and asked to look at a watch, with the name of Bentley on it - it was not his own; I gave him leave to go behind the counter, and told him it was on the last nail, but when he went round it was gone - I am certain it was there when the prisoner was there. I went out with the officer to give information, and when I came back I heard another watch was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you remain in the room the whole quarter of an hour the prisoner was there? A. I did - my attention was not directed to him, for I was busy sweeping the room; we seldom lose property - Bentley is not here: I had no knowledge of the loss till he informed me it was not there; any body who we know to be respectable we allow to go round and see the goods: there is a Mr. Henry Robins - he sells, but is not a partner; Mr. Edmund Robins also sells - they are cousins; I only know they are not partners from what Mr. George Henry Robins said at Bow-street.

Q. From all appearance in the business, they participate with him in the disposal of property? A. Yes; many of the catalogues are in the name of George Henry Robins, and some as Messrs. - the principal of them are in the name of George Henry Robins only, and the advertisements also - I have no means of knowing whether the cousins have an interest in the business.

COURT. Q. What age are these gentlemen? A. Mr. Henry is thirty-two; Mr. Edmond lives in the house with George Henry - I know nothing of their arrangement except what Mr. George Henry stated at Bow-street.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know who the dwelling-house belongs to? A. The whole premises belong to Mr. George Henry - I always understood so; and have seen the receipts for the rent in his name alone.

JOHN PIERSON. I live with Mr. Joseph Harrison, of Tottenham-court-road - the prisoner was in his service, and left about six months ago. I delivered two gold watches to Mr. Robins' porter on Tuesday or Wednesday, the 7th or 8th of October, with a great deal of other property, at our house - they were Mr. Harrison's property, and worth 25l. together; there was a seal to them - I should know them again.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you happen to know that Mr. George Henry Robins lives at Turnham-green? A. That is his country-house, but he lives on the premises at times- the whole of the goods in the sale that day were Mr. Harrison's; I had a catalogue - it described the property to be sold by Messrs. Robins; it was unredeemed pledges.

JOHN JUPP . I live in the Borough. I have two gold watches and a seal, which the prisoner pawned with me, on Friday, the 10th of October, a little after twelve o'clock in the name of John Jones, No. 14, Union-row, Kent-road, for 22l. - I am certain he is the man; I did not know him before.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know you ought to have two tickets when the property exceeds 10l.? A. I gave three, one for each article; he offered them at first to a young man in our shop - he brought them to me; I said I thought they would do for 20l.: I then went down the shop, and saw the prisoner - he said I had lent him once before 17l. on one of them; I said I did not recollect it, but 15l. was as much as I could lend now: the two watches were offered first, and the seal afterwards. I saw him for about ten minutes, and cannot be mistaken in him; I swear he is the person.

WILLIAM DICKER . I am a Pawnbroker, and live at Lambeth-marsh. The prisoner came to my shop about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning of the 10th of October; I was not in the shop - my partner came up to me: I went down stairs, and saw the prisoner; the two gold watches lay on the back counter - he wanted to pawn them; I agreed to lend him 20l. on them, but on questioning him I did not like his manner, and declined lending it- I am certain he is the man; (looking at the watches) these are them, I am certain.

JOHN PIERSON . These watches and seal are those I gave Robins' porter.

WILLIAM BOND, JUN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 13th of October, at No. 26, Exeter-street, Strand; he was at home when I went - after searching him I asked if he had any clothes in the room; he said he had, and showed them to me: he showed me a coat, which, from a description I had, I conceived to be the one he wore at the auction-room; I felt in the pocket, and found these two catalogues - they are the catalogues of Messrs. Robins' sale of the 10th of October.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22. On the 2d Count.

Reference Number: t18281023-23

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1977. RICHARD JEFKINS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Harry Charrington , on the 7th of October , at Hornsey , and stealing therein 1 pair of boots, value 12s.; 6 spoons, value 10s.; 1 pair of snuffers, value 4s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d., and 1 straining-cloth, value 6d., his property .

HARRY CHARRINGTON. I live at Hornsey, and am a coal-merchant ; I rent the house - it is in Hornsey parish. On Tuesday morning, the 7th of October, I went to bed about half-past two o'clock, leaving my mother and the servant up; the house was secure, to the best of my knowledge, when I went to bed - I was called up about four, by my father, who lives with me, but I am the housekeeper - I jumped out of bed, ran down stairs in my night clothes, and found a candle burning under the kitchen table, and a pair of wet shoes in the kitchen; they did not belong to any of the family - I then saw the kitchen-window open, and the shutter closed. I and my father went out, after dressing myself, towards London, in the Hornsey-road; we went about half a mile up Hornsey-lane, and then returned to Crouch-end, my father going another way - I had not proceeded far before I saw the prisoner and another man coming towards me, and towards London; when they came up to me I asked if they had met any one - they hesitated some time, and then the other man said they had met two men in Lordship-lane, Tottenham; I said I had had my house broken open, and as I was rather suspicious, I wished to know their names, and where they were going - they said they were bricklayers, and were going to work at the top of the hill; I then cast my eye down, and perceived either shoes or boots shining on the prisoner's feet - they turned out to be top boots, just fresh put on; that increased my suspicion: I lifted up his smock-frock with a poker which I had taken with me, and saw they were top-boots; I took them down to the village, and the other man ran away - the prisoner never got out of my custody; the boots were taken off his feet, and I found they were my father's.

GEORGE CHARRINGTON . I am the prosecutor's father, and live with him. In consequence of the alarm I called him up, looked down stairs, saw a light in the kitchen, and on going down saw a pair of shoes - we dressed, and went out in pursuit; we took different roads as we returned, and in half an hour my son brought the prisoner back to me, with my top-boots on - when they were taken off I knew them to be mine; these are them (looking at them) - they hung up in the kitchen: I should know them from a hundred, by the sparables at the bottom; I have not the least doubt of them.

GEORGE CHAMBERS . The prisoner was given into my charge with the boots; I found a chisel handle in his right-hand coat pocket, and a pair of wet stockings - here are the shoes I found under the kitchen table; they have not been fitted on the prisoner.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

Reference Number: t18281023-24

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1978. JAMES HURLEY and ELIZABETH RYAN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Neal , on the 19th of September , and stealing 1 ink-stand, value 7s.; 4 bottle-stands, value 6s.; 1 pair of decanters, value 1l.; 2 liquor-bottles, value 10s.; 6 wine-glasses, value 3s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 1l.; 5 spoons, value 1l. 14s.; 1 ladle, value 15s.; 1 umbrella, value 2s.; 1 candlestick, value 10s.; 1 snuffer-tray, value 3s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 2 salt-cellars, value 10s.; 1 table-cloth, value 5s.; 1 table-cover, value 2s.;

1 tea-ladle, value 1s., and 1 muffineer, value 3s., his property .

GEORGE NEAL. I live in Great Cambridge-street, Hackney-road , and am a clerk in the Post-office . On the 18th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I went to bed, and left every thing safe, I believe; I am generally the last person up, and believe I was so that night - I came down at six o'clock in the morning, and found the back-door wide open; I am certain it was fastened the night before: I found the back-kitchen door perforated by some instrument, and a piece taken out - it is an inner door; there was a similar apperture in the windowshutter, and the window thrown open - I found all the closet-doors of the parlour open, and missed a plated ink-stand, a tea-caddy, and a variety of property, worth 10l. at a moderate calculation: I went up stairs, and called my family up, then went to the post-office, and on my return gave information at Worship-street.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. I went to Neal's house with him on the morning of the 19th, and observed some footmarks in the garden - I could only discover the footmarks of one person distinctly; they extended about twenty yards from the back of the house: I laid a board over them, to prevent their being destroyed by rain. The prisoners were both brought to the office on the 30th of September; I took these shoes off the male prisoner's feet, and went with them to Neal's garden, on the 1st of October - I found the board as I had left it; the footmark was still visible, and the right shoe corresponded with the right footmark, which was more visible than the other, as it was made in the mould, but on the gravel the impression was lost.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a constable of St. Luke's. On the 30th of September, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the City-road, and saw the two prisoners crossing from Featherstone-street; the woman had a bundle in her lap - I went up and laid hold of the man; I then opened the woman's lap, and saw something which looked like silver - I said, "How did you get this?" they both said, "It was given to us;" I took them into Preston's shop, at the corner of Featherstone-street, and in the woman's lap found a pair of bottle-stands and ink-stand - I asked where she got them; she said they were given to her: the man said he knew nothing about it - that he had just met her in Featherstone-street; I took them in charge.

Prisoner HURLEY. He never asked me about the property till he got into the shop. Witness. When I first met him I asked him about it.

NATHANIEL PRESTON . The officer brought the prisoners into my shop; I heard the woman say the things were given to her(Property produced and sworn to.)

HURLEY's Defence. I met this woman in Featherstone-street - she asked how my sister was; I had not talked to her many minutes before Lock took us.

RYAN's Defence. A young man went home with me - he gave me these things till he should call for them on the Monday; he never came - he said he lived at the City of Carlisle public-house, Shoreditch; I thought I would take them there, and met Hurley just as the officer came - he did not know what I had got.

ROBERT LOCK re-examined. I am positive the shoe fitted the impression; the dirt being dry, the nail-marks were not seen; the impression was on the mould - the gravel was too hard.

GEORGE NEAL . I saw the shoe fitted - it corresponded exactly: the parties must have come over the garden-wall from a vacant piece of ground. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-25

Before Mr. Baron Gurrow.

1979. WILLIAM HILL was charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition, with killing and slaying Joseph Pearson .

ELIZA CUTBUSH . I live in New Church-street, Edgware-road - there is a canal near my house; the deceased was four years old - he was missing for some time, and at last his body was found in the canal: the prisoner is eight years and a half old - I had some conversation with him, before the body was found; I was anxious to know where it was, and told him nothing should happen to him, if he told the truth.

ANN FUZZY . I had some conversation with the prisoner, in his mother's presence - he was told he should not be hurt if he told the truth.

JAMES COGWELL . In consequence of information from the witnesses, I went to the canal with the prisoner; I could not find the body where he pointed out - I found it a considerable distance from the spot.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-26

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1980. WILLIAM WARREN DEVENISH & MARY ANN,(HIS WIFE) were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Hart , on the 8th of September , and stealing 1 basin, value 1/2d.; 1 dish, value 1d., and 3 shillings, the property of the said Michael Hart .

MICHAEL HART. I lodge in Spitalfields - the landlord lives in the house. About a month ago, I went out to work at six o'clock in the morning, taking the key of my room with me; I returned at eleven o'clock at night, and found the room broken open - I missed a dish and a basin, and three shillings out of my breeches-pocket, which hung on the bed; the prisoners lodged in the house - I got an officer, went to their room next morning, and found the basin in their cupboard, and the dish in a drawer in the back-room, covered with a carpet - the man was out at work; the woman said we were welcome to search for them; I lodge on the third-floor, and they on the first.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not she claim them as her own? A. Yes, but I told the officer what mark was on it before I saw it - they were both let out on bail; the man afterwards came and wanted me to make it up - I drank a pot of beer with him twice, when he came to ask me to make it up; he used to go to work at six o'clock, and return between six and seven - I was on good terms with him, but not in the habit of going into their room; I came home tipsy one night and he charged me with some indecency - he recommended me to avoid it in future, and so I did.

MOSES SIMONS . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's room and found the basin and dish - the dish was covered up in a drawer; the woman said they were hers - she was liberated on her husband answering for her appearance - the dish and basin are quite common ones.

MICHAEL HART. I know the dish by three cracks in it, and a small piece broken out.

MARY ANN DEVENISH 'S Defence. I bought them in Petticoat-lane eighteen months ago.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-27

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

1981. GEORGE CURTIS and THOMAS SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September 1 diamond-ring, value 10l., the goods of Esther West , in her dwelling-house .

MR. BONKIN conducted the prosecution.

HENRY SMITH . I am shopman to Mrs. Esther West, a widow - she keeps a shop in Ludgate-street ; this tray,(looking at one) I filled with rings the day before the prisoner came in - they were placed so as to occupy all the places in it, except three rings, which were out on approbation; they were all in a line, and together, so that only one space was caused by their absence; I put the tray into the iron-chest the night before - I have no doubt it was full then: I took it out the next morning, which was the 24th, and put it into the window, about half-past nine o'clock - it was then in the same state as the night before, and about twelve or half-past the two prisoners came into the shop; I had been in the shop all the day - the tray was not shown to any other customer; it was enclosed in the window with a glass sash: no person could reach it from outside the counter, as the sash behind the counter must be opened before the others can be pushed back: they came in in company together, and asked to look at some gentlemen's rings - I believe Curtis was spokesman; I asked what sort of rings they would like - they said diamond rings; I believe Smith gave that answer - the tray was so placed in the window that any person passing in the street could see it; I took the tray from the window - there were some emerald, ruby, and turquoise rings in it, but the principal part were diamonds: in taking the tray out I observed but the one vacancy I have spoken of - I know the ring that was lost on that day - it was a diamond cluster, larger than any other in the tray, but it was not the most valuable: its absence would cause a larger space than any other: I always keep my attention on the customers as much as I can - we always look more attentive to two than one; I did not miss it before the prisoners came in: both the prisoners inspected the rings - there were only two taken out of the tray; I took them to show to them - they examined two single stoned diamonds, and all this time the tray was within the reach of Curtis, who was nearest to it, Smith was nearer the door, and not within reach of the tray - they both agreed to purchase one of the single stone rings; the price was 5l. 10s., but I agreed to take 5l. 5s. for it: Curtis said neither of them had money enough to pay for it then, and took out 5s. as a deposit; Smith then said if Curtis had not silver enough he would lend him some - Curtis then gave me 5s.; the ring was to be cleaned up by four o'clock, and they would call for it that day - they both desired it might be done, and said they would call for it at four; they left no name - I did not ask for one; they then left the shop, and directly they were gone I put the tray into the window again; I brushed up their ring, and laid it by with the 5s., on a board behind the counter, by itself; in about three quarters of an hour, or an hour, after they left the shop, I went to the tray to polish the rings - some ladies had been in the shop till then, but I am quite sure that tray was not taken out to show to any other person; I had put it into the window before they came in: upon taking it out to wipe the rings, which is usual after they have been handled, I missed the diamond cluster-ring; the space where it had been was vacant - I cannot exactly say where the space was; I discovered the loss directly: it was worth 10l. - the prisoners did not return at four o'clock, or at any time. About seventeen days after this occurrence, about two o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner Smith at the window; he came straight up, and looked at that part of the window where the tray was on the day they came - it was near the door; he was in the street: Gaselee, our porter, was in the shop at the time I saw Smith looking in at the window - I said something to him, and sent him out to where Smith was standing; a lady came in at the time, which prevented my going out: I am certain Smith is the person I saw looking in at the window. On the 15th of October I saw both the prisoners in custody at Mary-le-bone office - it was about a week after Smith came to the window.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Does any body but yourself serve in the shop? A. Yes, Greenhow - he was in the shop, and saw the prisoners; Gaselee cleans the plate, but not the jewellery: there is a boy named Read, and Mrs. West herself, but nobody is allowed to go to the glass-case unless we are out; we put so many rings in a row - if one is stouter than another there might be one less: the one in question was generally in the center of the tray, but I cannot say what line it was in; I saw it safe at half-past four o'clock the day before, and we shut up shop at nine o'clock at night - I had no occasion to go to the glass-case afterwards till I locked the tray up: I did not then see any vacancy but what the three occasioned, but will not swear I saw this very ring there after half-past four o'clock. I did not know the prisoners before - they were about ten minutes in the shop; no other customer came in while they were there, but directly they went out others came in: the two rings were not taken from the same row as the three- I put back the one they did not chose. I am positive Curtis is one of the men.

Q. When the ring was missed, did you not inquire among the young men in the shop, if they had sold it? A. I inquired of Grenhow if he had sold it the moment he came in, which was about four o'clock, but not of any body else. I did not tell Cobham, the constable, when I had seen it last.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did you see Cobham? A. On Monday evening, the 15th of October; I did not tell him I had not missed it for a day or two after they came - I took the two rings out of the tray myself, to show them; the tray stood about half-way down a pane of a glass-case on the counter.

Q. Did you inquire of Mrs. West if she had done any thing with it? A. I did afterwards - I wished to make every inquiry; I saw Smith at the window for about a minute; he could not have seen me send the porter out- some things hung in the window, but I could see distiactly between the chains, and am positive it was him;

our shop is opened about seven o'clock in the morning - I sleep there, and was in the shop about seven o'clock the day they came, and was there all day; I am sure I put the tray into the window after they went out, before the other customer came in.

MR. BODKIN. Q. The three rings had been out for two days? A. Yes; I am sure I saw the cluster-ring at half-past four o'clock the day before they came: the ladies came in about two minutes after the prisoner left - Smith left the window, and passed the door before Gaselee went out.

COURT. Q. Was Mrs. West in the shop when the prisoners came in? A. No - she never serves in the shop; I am certain she did not serve that day, nor the day before.

JOSEPH GREENHOW . I am in the service of Mrs. West. I remember the day when the ring was missed - I knew the ring very well; I had seen it the afternoon previous, about half-past four o'clock, in the tray: it was a large diamond ring - as far as I can recollect it was placed in the third or fourth row in the tray, not quite in the centre; I took it out at that time to show to a gentleman - I then put the tray into the window; I am quite sure that when I put it in the ring was in it: I was in the shop when the two persons came in about twelve o'clock next day, and in the shop all the time; I was not particularly engaged - the shop is small, but of some depth inside; I was close to the two persons, behind the counter, and outside also; I cannot speak to their persons, as my attention was not particularly drawn to them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were in the shop the whole time? A. Yes - I might be doing something; we watch customers as well as we can: I paid no attention to them - I am not in the habit of looking at people; I saw the ring safe the afternoon before - I will not swear to the prisoners in the dress they are now in.

MR. BODKIN. Q. You did not assist in serving them? A. Not in the least.

COURT. Q. You saw two persons differently dressed to what the prisoners are now? A. Yes - one had a sort of olive or brown coat, with basket gilt buttons.

JOHN GASELEE . I am porter to Mrs. West. About four days before the prisoners were taken I was directed to go out and watch the prisoner Smith, and if I saw an officer to give him in charge; I went out, and saw Smith just below the next house; I was at the further end of our shop, and did not see him till I got out - I followed him as far as Wine-office-court, Fleet-street; he walked all the way, and stopped at the court; I was on the opposite side, crossing the road - he came back, and I came back also; a waggon or two were passing, and when I got over he was gone - I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You saw a person beyond the next house? A. Yes - that was the first I saw of him; his back was towards me: I walked on the same side of the way, till he crossed on Ludgate-hill - I have not seen him since till to-day.

Q. Did you tell people before you came here, that you would swear to him? A. They said Smith was the man - I said I would swear to the man when I saw him - that I should know the man if I saw him.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you asked before you came here, if you should know the man? A. Yes, by the shopman, and said it was possible I should - that is the man (pointing to Curtis;) I am sure he is the man I followed down Ludgate-hill: I only knew his name by what I heard from other people - I followed the same person as the shopman pointed out.

HENRY SMITH re-examined. The prisoner Smith is the man who came to the window, and he is the man I directed the porter to follow - (pointing to Smith.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-28

1982. GEORGE CURTIS and THOMAS SMITH were again indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 gold watch-key, value 45s., and 1 gold seal, value 50s. , the goods of William Thomas Tyas .

WILLIAM THOMAS TYAS. I am a jeweller and watchmaker , and live on Holborn-hill . On the 8th of October, about one o'clock in the day, the two prisoners came into my shop together; I am certain of their persons - Curtis requested me to show him a gold seal which was in the window, in a tray; I produced the tray, with gold seals and keys in it - he then wished me to point out those which were solid and most valuable, and said he would leave it to me to select him a good one, that the price was no object; I selected five or six of the best - he took them in his hand separately, weighed them, and showed them to Smith; they both stood at the counter: Smith said they were good seals he had no doubt, and then selected one - he asked if I could recommend it; I said it was one of the best I had: Smith then put his arm on the tray, towards the top of it, and took up several, which I told him were inferior; he took them up again and again - Curtis then decided on the one I had recommended; he then gave it to Smith, and Smith said he could not have a better: he then said had I another that would match it - Smith was by him all the time; my sister was in the kitchen; I knocked with my foot for her to come up. to get another tray out of the window, to show them - I kept my station behind the counter; there was nothing that they liked in the second tray - Curtis put his hand into his pocket, and gave me 5s. as a deposit for the one he had selected, which came to 3l. 18s., he said he would call again in two hours, and in the meantime I might possibly find another that would match it, and that he should want a key also; Smith urged him to go: he said, "No, I wish to look at a key" - Smith said he might look at the key when he returned; they then left the shop: after they were gone I took the tray off the counter, and put it on the glass-case; the seals were disturbed, and when my sister and I were putting the tray in order, I missed one of the solid seals, but cannot say there was one less in the tray than when they came in (not suspecting them); I reproved my sister, as she generally attends to that tray. I expected them to return in two hours, as they had said so two or three times, but they never came again; I waited at home all that afternoon and evening, and sent for some seals to match the one Curtis had selected - Mr. Hardman, a neighbour, came in the evening; in consequence of what he said to me, I looked at my tray about seven o'clock next morning - (it was before any customers came) and missed a

gold key, worth 2l. 5s.; I am quite sure that was in the tray when the prisoners called: the tray was kept in the window, secured by slides, and locked - no person could reach it from the other side of the counter: no other customer looked at the tray. I saw them in custody on the Monday following - I am quite sure they are the persons who came to buy the seal; they never came to my shop again - the key has never been found.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long were the persons in your shop? A. I suppose ten minutes; I never saw them before - I speak to them with the greatest certainly; my tray is a very large one, and in taking it out the key caught my eye, but I cannot positively say the seal was there then.

JANE TYAS . I live with my brother. On the 8th of October I was called up by him, and saw the prisoners in the shop; I am quite sure of them - I produced a tray from the other window; they selected nothing from that - I always arrange the tray which they first saw; it was on the counter when I came up, and the prisoners were close to it - I had seen it safe about half an hour before they came in; I saw Curtis give my brother 5s., and said he would call again in two hours: after they were gone I put the tray to rights, and then I missed a key, and my brother missed a seal; he was very angry with me about it - I cannot say whether a seal was missing myself; I am quite sure the key was safe that morning - I had seen it about two or three hours before: I have never seen the prisoners since, till last night; I am quite sure they are the persons.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw the key two or three hours before? A. Yes; I was in the shop all the morning, and that tray was not produced to any one - it was enclosed in the window, and not within reach.

CURTIS' Defence. I am innocent.

SMITH'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

CURTIS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Of stealing the key only. - Transported for even Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-29

1983. GEORGE CURTIS and THOMAS SMITH were again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 mourning-ring, value 30s. , the goods of William Marriott .

CHARLES MILNE . I live with Mr. William Marriott, who is a jeweller - his shop is No. 27, Fenchurch-street . I was serving in the shop on the 10th of October, when the two prisoners came in together - Curtis had spectacles on, and wanted a mourning-ring: Smith said Curtis wanted it for his father, who was lately dead - I took out the tray of mourning-rings to shew them; they both stood close to - gether on the other side of the counter - Smith was nearest to the door; Curtis selected two rings, one for the size of the finger, and the other for the pattern of one he wished to be made, as he did not like any that would fit him - there was to be engraved inside it, "John Sidmouth, obit 26th January, 1828, aged 82;" they staid about ten minutes, and Curtis gave me 5s. for a deposit, which he borrowed of Smith: and in less than five minutes after they were gone, on our arranging the rings in the tray, I missed one which I had in my hand shewing to them - I had put it into the tray only half an hour before; I had only a boy in the shop, and could not go after them; this was on Friday - I saw them on the following Wednesday at the office, and was certain of them; they never called for the ring or the 5s.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Marriott? A. Eighteen months; he and his brother are partners in an ironmongery business, but not in the jewellery - Curtis was to pay 38s. for the ring, and to call for it on the Monday - they were in custody then; the ring must have been taken while I was writing the inscription - they had several rings in their hands, and scattered them about; I drew them together as quick as I could - the boy was not in the shop, but in a back-room.

SAMUEL COBHAM . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners on the 13th of October going along Cumberland-street together.

Both - GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years from the expiration of their former sentence .

Reference Number: t18281023-30

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1984. JOHN JOHNSON, alias SAXTON, alias WRIGHT , was indicted for that he, at the General Session of the Peace Oyer and Terminer and Gaol Delivery, holden for the City of Bristol, on the 5th of April, in the fourth year of the reign of the present King, was in due form of law convicted of felony and burglary, by the name of John Johnson, and sentence of death was recorded against him; and he was afterwards pardoned on condition of being transported for his natural life, and was thereupon ordered to be transported accordingly; and afterwards, on the 6th of October , in the ninth year of the present King, feloniously was at large, without lawful excuse, within his Majesty's dominions, at St. James, Clerkenwell, before the expiration of the term for which he had been ordered to be transported ; against the Statute.

SECOND COUNT, that he at the same Session was ordered to be transported for the term of his natural life, pursuant to the Statute, &c., and that he afterwards, on the 6th of October aforesaid, feloniously was at large within His Majesty's dominions, at the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell , without any lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term for which he had been ordered to be transported; against the Statute, &c.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 38.

Reference Number: t18281023-31

1990. THOMAS MOORE and JOHN CRISP were indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Clarke , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 1st of October , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , with intent to steal the goods and chattels therein .

SECOND COUNT, stating the dwelling-house to be of the Guardians of the Poor of the parish of St. Luke, in the County of Middlesex .

WILLIAM CLARKE. I am master of St. Luke's work-house, which is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; I live there - it is my dwelling-house. On the 1st of October, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I saw the Board-room perfectly secure, and every thing in the room in order - I went into the room again about seven o'clock in the morning, having been given to understand it was in

confusion; I found the things, which had been secure the night before, removed from their places, no doubt with intent to carry them away - a locker had been opened by a key, which they furnished themselves with by breaking open a desk; that locker usually contained copper, but there was none there then - the bags were moved out of the locker; in a lower warehouse some panes of glass were broken out.

Q. By what means had the persons entered? A. By raising the window of the Board-room, not by breaking the glass; the Board-room is part of the building, and communicates internally with the rest of the premises - it is part of my dwelling-house; I know that window was shut down the preceding night, but whether it was fastened I cannot say: I looked about that night to see that every thing was safe - the boxes had been broken open, by a chisel, which we found; a piece of brass, belonging to a centre-bit, was found under the window in the garden - they had entered at the Board-room window, which was found open. Moore was a pauper in the house two or three years ago.

HENRY DELLOR . I am a watchman of St. Luke's. On the morning of the 2d of October, about half-past four, I was standing near the workhouse-wall; I heard the prisoner Moore jump from the wall, and saw Crisp on the wall - I took them both into custody; they at first said they were only making their escape from the workhouse, and begged of me to let them go - it was quite dark; they came from the wall which enclosed the workhouse: Moore jumped off the wall and I took him - then Crisp came down and I took him, and going down Bath-street I met another watchman, who assisted me in taking them to the watch-house; in Bath-street I heard something drop from Crisp, and as we returned from the watch-house, we found a centre-bit in the place where I heard something drop, and this small crow-bar I found in Moore's jacket pocket in Bath-street.

JAMES LEWINGTON . I was in Bath-street on the morning of the 2d of October, at half-past four o'clock, and joined Dellor - I assisted in taking the prisoners to the watch-house; I returned to the workhouse-wall, and about four yards from the City-road, in Bath-street, I picked up this centre-bit.

THOMAS TRAFFORD . I am a gardener at the work-house. On the morning of the 2d of October, about five minutes past six o'clock, when it was quite light, I found a hoe, hanging up at the Board-room window, and under the window I found this brass bit - it fits the centre-bit produced; I traced footmarks across the garden, and sent to inform the master.

MOORE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

CRISP - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18281023-32

1985. HENRY MANSFIELD was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Jones on the King's highway, on the 21st of October , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 14 shillings, his property .

EDWARD JONES. I am a labourer and get work where I can - my last place was at Mr. Kent's a hop-merchant; I live in Shepherd-court, Shoreditch. Last Tuesday night, the 21st of October, I was out of work; I was in Wentworth-street , between eleven and twelve o'clock, about half a mile from where I live - I am a married man and was going for a loaf of bread; I had sixteen shillings in my breeches pocket - I looked behind me and saw four or five men; they knocked me down - my legs were kicked from under me, and I was thrown down; my smock-frock was pulled over my head - I had just that minute turned my head behind me and was knocked down by force; I was kept down about a minute, or half a minute: they took my money out of my pocket - it was fourteen shillings; I could not hinder them - I could not see who took it, as my frock was pulled over my head; the prisoner was one of the gang, I positively swear - I cannot say whether he took the money, but am positive he is one of those who threw me down, and held me when I was was robbed: I never got my money again - they all ran away; when I called for the watchman, the prisoner ran away; I ran after the watchman - I saw the prisoner runing and the watchman pursuing him; he took him immediately he ran up a court - I said I was positive he was one of the four or five men; I saw him running - he was taken immediately - they left two shillings in my pocket.

JOHN POWELL . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Wentworth-street, between eleven and twelve o'clock last Tuesday night, and heard the prosecutor cry Watch! and Murder! I was about eighty yards off; I came down as quick as possible: Jones said he had been knocked down and robbed - the prisoner then directly ran away; I followed him into Sugar Loaf-court, Essex-street, Whitechapel, and there found him lying on a dust-bin, as if he were asleep - I took him, knowing him to be the man that Jones had pointed out; he feigned to be asleep - there was no other person up the court, it is not a thoroughfare; I never had him out of sight, till he turned into the court - he was down on the bin, pretending to be asleep, in a moment; Jones was quite sober; the prisoner seemed the worse for liquor, but could run very well - I found no money on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I came home intoxicated, heard the watchman called and ran away; the watchman laid hold of me - Jones was drunk when he came to the watch-house.

EDWARD JONES. I had only had a pint of beer.

Prisoner. Q. Had you not been drinking in the same public-house as me, all the evening? A. I never saw him in my life before.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18281023-33

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1986. EDWARD COOPER, alias HOLLINGDALE , was indicted for that he, on the 13th of December , at St. Mary-le-bone , foloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain receipt for money , which is as follows:

Lady Nepean, London, 13th December, 1827.

Bought of S. Swain, Cornfactor and Seedsman, Dealer in Malt, Hops, &c., No.9, Berwick-street, Soho, 1 Qr. of Oats,£1. 8s. 0d. Received S. SWAIN. with intent to defraud Stephen Swain ; against the Statute.

2d COUNT. that he, on the same day, at same parish, feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain false,

forged, and counterfeited receipt for money, well knowing the same to be false, forged and counterfeited, which is as follows: (Bill and Receipt set out as before); with intent to defraud the said Stephen Swain; against the Statute.

3d COUNT, that he, on the same day, at same parish, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain receipt for money, which is as follows: (Bill and Receipt set out as before); which said words and letters,"Received, S. SWAIN" imported and signified that Stephen Swain had received the sum of 1l. 8s. 0d. abovementioned, with intention to defraud the said Stephen Swain; against the Statute, &c.

4th COUNT, that he, on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain false, forged and counterfeited receipt for money, well knowing the same to be false, forged and counterfeited, which is as follows: (Bill and Receipt set out as before;) which said words and letters "Received, S. SWAIN" then and there imported and signified, that Stephen Swain had received the sum of 1l. 8s. 0d. above-mentioned; with intent to defraud the said Stephen Swain; against the Statute.

5th and 6th COUNTS, like the 3d and 4th, only stating the intent to be to defraud Dame Margaret Nepean .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

THE HONOURABLE HARRIET NEPEAN . I live with my mother, Lady Margaret Nepean, who is a widow - my father was a Baronet. The prisoner was in her Ladyship's service, as coachman - he came on the 6th of October, 1827, and left on the 6th of October, 1828; Lady Nepean keeps her own horses, and dealt with Stephen Swain for corn: the prisoner was desired to bring in the bills when due, that they might be liquidated as soon as possible - when he brought them in, the money was given to him to pay them, and he was desired to bring receipts; after the bills were presented to Lady Nepean she gave me the bill and money, which I gave to the prisoner - he was to bring me back the bill, with the receipt on it.(Looking at a bill,) I remember the prisoner bringing this to me a few days after its date, which is the 13th of December - I gave it to Lady Nepean, and gave it to the prisoner, with the money; he afterwards brought it back to me, receipted, as it now appears - her Ladyship has dealt with Swain all the time the prisoner lived there - we live at No.5, Henrietta-street, Cavendish-square; the prisoner boarded there, and slept at the stables.

STEPHEN SWAIN. I am a corn-dealer , and live in Berwick-street, Soho. When the prisoner first went into Lady Nepean's service, he came to me - I was to supply her Ladyship with oats; I had not dealt with her before - I supplied her with oats from time to time, and delivered the bills to the prisoner every three weeks; that was part of the original order: (looking at the bill) the upper part of this bill is in my hand-writing - it is one of my printed bills, and the oats charged in it is my writing, I think, but really cannot tell, but I know the receipt is not my writing - I think the upper part must be my writing,"1 qr. of oats, 1l. 8s.," but "Received, S. Swain," is not my writing. I have known the prisoner about ten years.

COURT. Q. Is the upper part of the bill your writing or not? A. Yes, the top part is my writing I must say, but not the receipt, nor is it written by any person in my employ, nor by my authority; when the prisoner came to me first, he said her Ladyship was very good pay, and that she paid every three weeks.

STEPHEN SWAIN, JUN. I am the son of the last witness. The words "Received, S. Swain," on this bill is not my father's hand-writing, nor mine - nobody but me and my father signs receipts.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone Office. I took the prisoner into custody on the 7th of October, in Williams'-mews, Devonshire-street, Portland-place; I said I had a warrant against him, and asked if he knew what it was for - he said."I suppose it is for not giving my livery in;" I said No, it was for felony - I said there was a case of felony against him: I neither threatened or promised him any thing - he said he did not know what it was; I asked if he had ever received money from Lady Nepean, to pay for corn and hay - he said Yes, he had received it from Lady Nepean; I asked if he had ever paid Mr. Swain any - he said he had not, except the first bill, that he paid the first bill, but never paid any afterwards; I asked what he had done with the money - he said he was very much involved in debt, and made use of it for himself and family; I asked him who receipted those bills - he said he receipted them himself; I had not got the bills myself at that time.

STEPHEN SWAIN, JUN. I make out my father's bills; Lady Nepean had about 30l. worth of oats in the year, and about 30l. worth of hay, 60l. in all. (Receipt read.)

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - being called on to say a something in extenuation for my guilt, at the same time well knowing the awful situation in which I am placed, allow me to remark, that had I wished to have robbed my prosecutrix, I had other opportunities besides what I am charged with, having on one occasion been sent to her Ladyship's banker's, where I received the sum of 100l., which her Ladyship, I am sure, will not attempt to deny, having had an undeniable character with me from my last place. Therefore, my Lord and Gentlemen, let me humbly intreat you to take my truly deplorable case into your most humane consideration, for the sake of my innocent family, being five children, one of which is now on the breast, who will be left to an unforgiving word, who are more ready to oppress the unfortunate than to relieve and forgive the faults of their unfortunate parent. I was induced, my Lord and Gentlemen, to pay my debts with the money I am charged with embezzling, thinking that if her Ladyship knew I was in debt she would discharge me from her service, and knowing that in time I should be able to recover from my difficulties; and having known Mr. Swain for upwards of sixteen years, I supposed he would have waited until I was able to pay him. I had been out of employ for a length of time previous to my being engaged by her Ladyship, during which time I was laid on a sick bed, and was obliged to dispose of every thing I had to maintain my starving family, who have no one in the world to look up to, either for instruction or support. Therefore, should your Lordship and the Gentlemen of the Jury, think fit to find me guilty, let me intreat your Lordship to consider the awful state of my disconsolate family, whose prayers are always ascending for the protection of their unhappy and distracted father, who is well aware that his very life is in your Lordship's hands, and who is well aware that whatever the decision of this Court may be, it will be passed with mercy, for the sake of his wretched, but perfectly innocent, family, having never appeared before at any bar.

THE HONOURABLE HARRIET NEPEAN. I was present

when Lady Nepean had the prisoner's character - he received a good character for honesty and sobriety.

THE REV. EVAN NEPEAN . I live with my mother. - The prisoner bore a very good character; I believe him sober and honest.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 44.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix, on account of his character, and being in distress.

Reference Number: t18281023-34

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1987. JOHN GODWIN , RICHARD PINDER , WILLIAM MITCHERSON, alias MITCHINSON , and JAMES NICHOLLS were indicted for feloniously assaulting David Hiatt , on the 19th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 cap, value 3d.; 1 tobacco-box, value 3d.; 1 knife, value 6d.; 1 hat, value 5s., and 2 sovereigns, his property .

DAVID HIATT. On the 19th of July, I and a friend named Goddard, went to the Lancers public-house, on Hounslow-heath , between eight and nine o'clock; we staid there till between eleven and twelve - I asked for a lodging in the house, but the beds were all full; we said we did not know where to go to lodge - a young woman said she would show us a rick where we could lie down; she took us to a rick not half a mile from the house: we went into the rick-yard, and lay down directly, about two or three yards apart - I was dozing off to sleep, and Goddard hallooed out to me, "Come and pull these men off me;" I roused up, and before I could get up three of them came and fastened me down - there were five in all - they were all on the top of Goddard when I first awoke, then three came and held me down - I threw them off once, and then they fastened me down before I could get up; Godwin then fastened me with his left hand in my throat, and said if I did not lie still be would blow my brains out; I could see a pistol in his right-hand at that time.

Q. What makes you say it was Godwin? A. Because I knew his face. It was about one o'clock in the morning; I could see five or six yards, well enough to know any one - he was a stranger before, but I am certain he is the man: I lay still after he said that, and they took two sovereigns from me, a knife, a tobacco-box, a leather cap, and a black beaver-hat, also two or three halfpence; I wore the hat, and had the cap in my pocket - I saw Richard Pinder there, he was on the top of my hip, and helped to hold me down; I did not know him before, but am positive of him - we ran to the gate, hallooed for the watchman, and cried Murder! they got away, I do not know which way they went - Goddard and I went for assistance, and met Hall, the watchman; I described to him the person who held the pistol to me; he took me to a house where I saw a man and woman, I knew the man; I said I thought I knew him, but should know him a good deal better if he had his clothes on; he was undressed - he shut the door, and we went for Stevens, a constable, who returned with us to the house; the man came down stairs half-dressed, with his coat on his arm; I said, "That is the man who had the pistol;" I am sure he is the man; Hall told him to put his coat on; I said I knew him to be the man who had the pistol - we went into the house, and saw a pistol on the mantel-shelf - it was very much like the one which was held at me. Filby shewed me my hat next morning (Monday.)

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This took place about one o'clock in the morning? A. Yes. I was dozing off to sleep; the affair lasted four or five minutes - I was much alarmed and confused; I was taken to a public-house at Hounslow on the Sunday morning, about nine o'clock, and one of the constables pointed out Pinder and Mitcherson to me; they were in the same room as me.

Q. Had you not as good an opportunity of pointing them out to him? A. Yes; I was three or four yards from them; there were five or six people there - I said I did not know Mitcherson - I said he was not one of the men, and he was let go; he knew I was making a charge of highway robbery; he was taken up on the Monday morning.

MR. RYLAND. Q. You say Pinder and Mitcherson were pointed out? A. Yes - I was taken into the room and asked if I know any of the men in the room.

Prisoner GODWIN. Q. The first time you came to my house I came down, and you said it was a younger man who robbed you? A. I said there was one in a flannel jacket, whose face I did not see, but he seemed to be a young man.

COURT. Q. Where had you been at work for some days before? A. I had been reaping rye for Mr. Layson; I finished work about twelve o'clock on Saturday, and received my money; I then went to Belfont, got a job, and went to the Lancers about nine o'clock; Goddard and I were drinking with two more who came from Belfont - we had six pots of beer between four of us, and I had a glass of gin coming out; the landlord turned us out, and we were at the door for a few minutes - there was a considerable disturbance caused by the people wanting to get in, but it was not us, and then the woman took us; to the rick - she appeared a common woman; I was sober.

Q. Some of these people were in custody in July, and examined before the Magistrate? A. Yes, and committed for trial; I had notice to attend at the September Session to prosecute them, and was bound over in a recognizance of 40l., but I did not attend; I went home to Brittle in Oxfordshire, two or three weeks after I was examined before the Magistrate - I was cutting oats during that time at Belfont; I received 3l. 5s. to pay my expences to Oxfordshire.

Q. Did you receive that to induce you to go away and not appear against them? A. Yes; I accepted that at the risk of forfeiting my recognizance - I was at home all the time; Filby, the constable, came down and fetched me here.

WILLIAM HALL . I am constable of Hounslow. I was out on duty on Saturday night, the 19th of July, three or four hundred yards from the hay-rick, and four or five hundred from Godwin's house, when I heard loud cries of Murder! I waited a few minutes, and heard it again; I ran down the town towards London, in a direction towards Godwin's house, and when about forty yards from his house, I heard a door either open or shut - the sound came from Godwin's house; I ran along the back of the town, turned round our watch-house, and met Hiatt and Goddard,

and from what Hiatt said I took him to Godwin's house, and called Godwin up; he made his appearance at the door undressed, as if he had come out of bed - Hiatt was close by - I said "These two men have been robbed, and you are suspected to be one of the men;" this was before Hiatt had said any thing - Godwin said to both of us, "If I am the man, say so;" I told Hiatt not to swear to him without he was certain; Hiatt then said, "I don't much think he is the man;" he said nothing more then - Godwin then shut the door; we went a few yards, then Hiatt said something; I then went and called Stevens - we all returned to Godwin's house, having been absent half an hour or more - we knocked at the door, Godwin looked out of window; we said we wanted to speak with him again - he came down directly, as soon as he could, and opened the door; he had got his trousers on and his jacket on his arm - Hiatt immediately said, "You are the man that lay on my breast, and put the pistol against my head;" (Godwin put his jacket on after that) he said,"If I was the man, why did not you say so before?" Hiatt said, "I can swear to you better with your clothes on than I could with them off," this was before he had his jacket on; I asked Hiatt if he was quite sure he was the man - he said he was; we had a candle; I do not think there was any candle the first time - if I recollect right, there was a light the first time.

Q. Did any thing take place about his jacket? A. No, not that I recollect; he put it on because I told him to put on the rest of his clothes, as I must take him into custody - this was after the conversation.

COURT. Q. Then that was not to enable the prosecutor to judge whether he was the man, but because he was going into custody? A. Certainly - Godwin said several times that he was not the man; I said nothing to Hiatt after his jacket was put on. On the shelf, nearest to the fire-place down stairs, there was an old pistol and a little saw; I afterwards searched the hay-rick and found an old hat, which Goddard claimed - a purse was afterwards found, which Hiatt owned.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am a constable of Hounslow. - I was called up by Hall, about two o'clock in the morning of the 19th of July, and went with him, Hiatt, and Goddard to Godwin's house; Hall knocked at the door, and said "Godwin, we want you" - he looked out of window and said he would come down directly; he did so and opened the door - he brought no light with him, and we had none; I could see him - he was in his shirt; I do not believe he had any thing else on - he was just as if he had got out of bed; he said if we would wait while he put on his clothes, he would come down; this was at the door - we waited at the door: he went up and came down again with his trousers and waistcoat on, his shoes in his hand, and his coat on his arm; I had run home and got a light by that time - we then all went in and searched the house: Hiatt said that was the man who robbed him - that he presented a pistol at him; I believe he made no answer - he was very willing to go with us; he denied the charge, and said he was not at the place - he said he was at the Cricketers, public-house, and left there at six o'clock, and had been in bed ever since; we found a few shillings on him - I saw an old pistol in the house; Hall and I searched the hay-rick, and I think it was he who found the bag or purse - he picked it up and took possession of it; I was present when it was shown to Hiatt, who owned it - there was nothing in it.

COURT, Q. Did you carefully search Godwin's clothes? A. Hall did in my presence - we searched all his pockets carefully; the pistol was an old one - an old apron or something of that kind, was over it.

Q. The first proposal about dressing came from Godwin himself? A. Yes - I was bound over to appear at the September Session, but could do nothing, without Hiatt; we afterwards found he had been bribed to go out of the way - I am certain the proposal to dress, proceeded from Godwin and not from Hiatt.

JOSEPH COX . I am a labourer. On Sunday, the 20th of July, I was at the Royal Oak, public-house, Isleworth, about six o'clock in the evening, and saw Mitcherson and Pinder there; I had known Mitcherson these twelve months, and knew them both before; a woman sat between them - Mitcherson had a black hat, and offered it to me for sale, for 5s.; I asked if it were his own to sell - he said it was; I offered him 4s. - Pinder then said "Let him have it" and he did so; before I left the house, the two constables came and took them up - I took the hat home, leaving word with the landlord where it was to be found, if it were stolen, and delivered it to Cook next morning - Hiatt claimed it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many people were in the room? A. Seven or eight - he offered it openly; he knew that I knew him - the of ficers took him away without Hiatt being there.

ROBERT FILBY . I am a constable. I apprehend Mitcherson and Pinder at the Royal Oak, about six o'clock on Sunday the 20th of July; I took them to the Red Lion public-house; I took Pinder into a room where Hiatt was, and asked if he knew any thing of that man - there were a great many people in the room; he said "I will swear to his being the person who knelt on me, and held me down;" Pinder directly said "Do you say I robbed you?" he said Yes - Pinder said "Then I will knock your d-d head off" and wanted to fight him; I then took Mitcherson in, and asked the same question, but he knew nothing of him.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not Pinder exceedingly angry, as an honest man would be? A. He was very angry; I did not hear Hiatt say Mitcherson was not one of them - I was not present all the time, as I took Pinder to the cage; Mitcherson was let go about half-past six or seven o'clock, and taken again about seven next morning.

COURT. Q. You were bound over to prosecute? A. Yes, and attended at the September Session, but Hiatt had absconded; I went down into the country and asked him to come up, and he came - I did not make him a prisoner - I prosecuted Godwin, Pinder, and Mitcherson for a riot in the Mgaistrates' room; while I was giving my evidence, Pinder came and said "You bl-y little rogue," and struck me.

FRANCIS HOLDEN . I am the landlord of the Lancers, public-house, at Hounslow. On the 19th of July, I had a good many people drinking at my house; I know Pinder and Mitcherson were there, having seen them both

before; they went out at eleven o'clock, when I turned all the people out - my house is nearly half a mile from the rick-yard; I remember Hiatt being at the house - he was sober when he went out.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am high-constable of Hounslow. I have a hat which I received from Cox; I have had it ever since - the prisoners Godwin, Pinder and Mitcherson have been in custody ever since July; they were indicted for a riot, but have not been tried, as a principal witness was not present.

DAVID HIATT. It is my hat, and the one I had on the night I was robbed - here is my neck-handkerchief; it is torn - I did not lose that.

Godwin put in a written Defence stating that on the 19th of July, he went to bed between six and seven o'clock, being unwell, and slept till he was awoke by his wife, on the prosecutor and officers calling him, and that on his going down, both Hiatt and Goddard said he was not one of the men, as they were younger.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-35

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1988. GEORGE REYNOLDS , THOMAS HARRIS , and RICHARD CROZIER , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Stephen Robinson , on the King's highway, on the 1st of October , at St. Luke. Chelsea , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 3 half-crowns, 1 sixpences; the sum of 9d. in copper monies; 1 pair of braces, value 6d., and 1 knife, value 3d., his property .

STEPHEN ROBINSON. I live at the Duke of York public-house, Chelsea, it is kept by Mr. M'Pherson. On Wednesday night, the 1st of October, about half-past ten o'clock, I found a fit of the ague coming on, I went out intending to get some medicine from the apothecary's; as I went along, four men followed me and knocked me down - I knew three of them, they were the three prisoners; I knew them before; I saw them in the street every day, several times; the fourth was a young man not so tall as Crozier, I had never seen him before; I do not know what the prisoners are - it was a fine night, there were lamps in the street; I cannot say whether they were gas or oil; it was Crozier who knocked me down, he struck me on the eye with his fist; when they got me down, they throttled me and bruised me; two of them got on the top of my breast, I screamed out, and they throttled me; Crozier took three half-crowns from my trowsers pocket, a sixpence. and 9d. in copper, from my waistcoat pocket; also a pen-knife and pair of new braces from my pocket; the half-crowns were in a little white bag in my fob; Wright came out and they ran away: after I got up, I went to Winkle the constable's door - I stopped knocking at his door for seven or eight minutes, but did not get in; I heard a noise in White Lion-street, somebody was screaming out there - I went down to the corner, and saw the three prisoners holding some other person down; I have found none of my property; they were taken up the day but one after; I am certain I had seen them before several times every day.

RICHARD WRIGHT . I live at No. 10, Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea, next door to Robinson. On the 1st of October I shut up about ten o'clock; I am a hair-dresser; after putting my family to bed, I was looking over my half-batch door, and heard a noise - I looked out, and saw these three men having a man down on the ground, (I had only my shoes on) and before I could get my pantaloons on they were gone; there was a fourth man with them, he ran away when I opened my door; I went to the man who they had been robbing - it was the prosecutor, he was rapping at the constable's door - his face was as black as it could be, and all over blood; he is a pensioner; I did not go with him to White Lion-street, and know nothing more.

Prisoner REYNOLDS. Q. Two days before I was apprehended, had not you and I a quarrel? A. Not that I know of; I have known these persons these four years, and have suffered a great deal by them; I quarrelled with Harris, for he broke my door.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer of Queen-square. I apprehended the prisoners - I found Crozier and Reynolds together, on Friday, the 3d of October; and Dawkins, my brother officer, took Harris close to me - I found nothing but an old knife on Reynolds.

REYNOLDS' Defence. Two or three days before I was apprehended, Wright told me my mother was rotten with v - l disease; I told him to look at home; then he said he would have me transported like he had the other boy - I could bring witnesses who heard him say so.

HARRIS'S Defence. I am innocent; for on the night of the robbery I was at home at eight o'clock with my mother, and never went out again, for she was taken ill.

CROZIER'S Defence. I am not guilty; I know no more of the prosecutor than a child unborn; on the Wednesday I went with my brother-in-law to take his pension, and was with him till eight o'clock - I then went home to my mother, and never went out afterwards.

REYNOLDS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

HARRIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

CROZIER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Reference Number: t18281023-36

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1989. GEORGE REYNOLDS , THOMAS HARRIS , and RICHARD CROZIER , were again indicted for feloniously assaulting James Riley , on the King's highway, on the 1st of October , at St. Luke, Chelsea , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 6 pairs of scissors, value 18d.; 1 hat, value 1s., and 1 pair of braces, value 8d., his property .

JAMES RILEY. I am a weaver , and lodge in Royal Hospital-row. On the 1st of October I was in the Nell Gwynne public-house a few minutes before eleven o'clock; I saw Reynolds, Crozier, and Harris, all sitting there drinking - I am certain of them all, I knew their persons before; Crozier's father was in my regiment, and he was born at that time: when I left the house they were within a few yards of me, and followed me - I turned into White Lion-street - Reynolds came and put his hand into my pocket and pulled out a pair of new braces; they shoved me down directly - I endeavoured to resist, and they shoved me down; two got on the top of me, and took six pairs of scissors out of my inside pocket - I had them for sale; and they took my hat off; I called for assistance; I had no money but 1s., and I kept that in my hand - they got away.

STEPHEN ROBINSON . I saw the three prisoners on a man in White Lion-street - I did not go up to identify the prosecutor, but the prisoners are the men.

REYNOLDS' Defence. He said it was committed on Wednesday night, and on Thursday morning I saw Robinson, and heard him say he had been robbed; I went to

work on Friday morning, came home to dinner, and saw this gentleman and Riley - they walked by me, and as I went to work they passed me again, then came back, and said I was the person who robbed him.

REYNOLDS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

HARRIS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

CROZIER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

Reference Number: t18281023-37

1990. MICHAEL COLLINS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Avery , on the 14th of September , and stealing 2 beds, value 1l.; 2 tables, value 7s.; 1 stove, value 6s.; 1 pillow, value 18d.; 1 bolster, value 2s., and 1 wash-hand stand, value 3s. her property .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-38

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1991. KITTY CARROLL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Smith , on the 4th of October , and stealing there in 1 tea-kettle, value 1s.; 1 saucepan, value 1s.; 4 cups and saucers, value 1s.; 3 basins, value 6d.; 3 plates, value 3d.; 2 pictures, value 4d.; 3 mugs, value 2d.; 1 collar, value 6d.; 1 gridiron, value 7d., and 1 tea-pot, value 5d., his property .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-39

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1992. JOHN VIGO was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 1 coat, value 4s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 5s. , the goods of James Henry Williamson .

SARAH GANDER . I am nephew to James Henry Williamson, a pawnbroker , of Brick-lane . On Friday, the 12th of September, the prisoner came into one of the boxes, to redeem these articles, which he had pawned; he had given the duplicate of it the night before - I brought the bundle to the counter, and took the ticket off; while I turned to my uncle, to ask what the interest was (my eye was fixed on my uncle), the prisoner took the things off the counter, and ran out of the box with them - they were pawned for 9s. 6d., on the 13th of October, 1827; my uncle went out to follow him.

ELIZA ROBERTSON . I live with the prisoner's mother. In October, 1827, I pawned a coat, waistcoat, and trousers, for the prisoner, for 9s. 6d., in my own name; I gave him the money.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in custody on another charge; he had got the trousers and waistcoat on, and in his fob I found the duplicate of a coat, pawned for 1s. 6d., which being produced belonged to the suit; I questioned him - he said he had done it from distress, as he had no clothes to wear; I told him it could not be distress, as he had the money to redeem them - he said No, he only had 1s. and a few halfpence.

The prisoner put in a written Defence pleading distress, and he received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Strongly recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-40

1993. WILLIAM WELLINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 saw, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of John Tillott .

JOHN TILLOTT. I have been a carpenter , and keep my tools in a room at Kingsbury-place, Chancery-lane . On the 29th of September I saw them safe, and left the door locked - I missed the saw on the 7th of October.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARGARET GRAHAM . I live in Kingsbury-place, and can see Tillott's room from my window. On the 6th of October I saw the prisoner open the window with a nail; I went down, and told my landlady - I had seen him before, and am certain of him.

JOHN PROSSER . I am apprentice to Mr. Creed, a pawnbroker, of Gray's Inn-lane. On the 6th of October, in the afternoon, this saw was pawned by the prisoner, I believe; I have no doubt of him.

THOMAS KEARSLEY . I am a constable. On the 7th of October I took the prisoner, in Grainger's-buildings, Chancery-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it, or pledge it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-41

First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1994. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 deal box, value 3s.; 3 gowns, value 10s.; 2 shawls, value 20s.; 7 caps, value 14s.; 1 bonnet, value 2s.; 3 petticoats, value 6s.: 2 shifts, value 10s.; 3 night-gowns, value 3s.; 9 handkerchiefs, value 5s.; 5 aprons, value 5s.; 3 frills, value 6s.; 1 pair of pockets, value 1s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 2s.; 2 towels, value 1s., and 1 printed bound book, value 2s. , the goods of Serena Copas .

FRANCIS SHERBORN . I am a farmer. On Monday last I brought my family from Margate; we landed on Tower-stairs, with six packages; I had a cart waiting for them - I saw them in the cart myself, about six o'clock in the evening; one was a trunk, belonging to Serena Copas, our nursery-maid ; I directed the carman to take them to my brother's, in Piccadilly, and next day I sent from Belfont, where I live, for them, and one package was missing: I have no recollection of seeing the prisoner near - I found him in custody at the Mansion-house, on the Wednesday, with it.

SERENA COPAS. I am servant to Mr. Sherborn, and landed with him; I saw my trunk taken out of the packet, and carried to the cart, but did not see it put in, as I was with the family - it contained the articles stated in the indictment: it was a deal trunk, covered with a wrapper; it was to be brought next day to Belfont, but was missing; the name of Sherborn was on the wrapper, but no address - I found it at the Mansion-house yesterday, and all the articles in it - they are worth 3l. or 4l.; I had not noticed the prisoner.

WILLIAM WILTSHIRE . I am one of the City patrol. -On Monday evening, the 20th of October, about ten minutes to seven o'clock, I and Lovel were in St. Maryaxe, and saw the prisoner, alone, with this trunk on his shoulder; I crossed over, and asked where he was going with it - he said to Mr. or Miss Mitchell, No. 23; he did not recollect the name of the lane, but it was close by, and he would show me where it was; I followed him into Houndsditch - he crossed over towards Catler-street; I then took hold of the box, and said he must go with me

to the Mansion-house; he said a lady had given it to him to carry at Irongate - he then ran away; I took care of the trunk while Lovel pursued, and brought him to the Mansion-house: I have no doubt of his person. - Copas described the contents of the box before she saw it - the direction was then torn off.

JAMES LOVEL . I was with Wiltshire, and saw the prisoner with the box - he said he was going to Mr. Mitchell's, at No. 23, in a lane below; I asked where the name was - he said he did not know, but would show me - that the box was given to him by a lady, in a public-house on Tower-hill, near Tower-stairs: he did not know the sign, but there was a large three before the door - there is such a house exactly opposite Tower-stairs: I asked where the lady was - he said he did not know: he went on - we both took hold of the box; he slipped it from his shoulder, and ran away - I pursued; he ran into a court, which is no thoroughfare, and I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY STOKES . I am carman to the prosecutor's brother. I received the packages into the cart at Tower-wharf - they were secured behind with a rope; I had three bags besides: I drove to Piccadilly, and when I got there I only had five packages - I was riding in the cart all the way: I drove down two or three places, into Thames-street, took up some other packages, and went towards Tower-hill again. The prisoner is a stranger to me; I gave nobody leave to come into the cart - a person might reach over the rope and get the box.

Prisoner's Defence. I was jobbing about Billingsgate, as a porter, and at a quarter to seven o'clock a lady came and said she would give me 2s. 6d. to carry this box to Mitchell's, No. 23, Petticoat-lane, and when the officers came I forgot the name of the lane for a minute; I ran away, as I did not like to he taken to a watch-house.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-42

1995. THOMAS BULGER was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS HALES . I am a wire-drawer , and live in Fenchurch-street . The prisoner was occasionally in my employ, to take out parcels ; these sums were owing to me - I desired him to call on the parties, to receive them - Jennings, of Brick-lane, owed me 2l. 9s. 2d., in March - the prisoner never accounted to me for that, but absented himself, without notice, but he was only occasionally in my employ.

THEODORE JENNINGS . I live in Pleasent-row, Brick-lane. I owed Mr. Hales 2l. 9s. 2d.; the prisoner called in February, and I paid him 10s. on account - he wrote on the back of the bill, "Received, 24th of February, 10s., T. Bulger;" I paid him 10s. more in April, and wrote a receipt for that on the bill; and in June 5s. - I saw him write a receipt for these sums; he brought me the bill himself; here it is - (read.)

MR. HALES. I never received these sums from him, nor did he ever tell me he had received them; he was my under servant for two years, and behaved well; he then had 12s. a week and his breakfast, but afterwards I only paid him for what he did.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge this day three weeks, and told him it was for embezzling his master's money - he said he hoped if he could make up the money his master would not interfere.

Prisoner. He never told me the charge till Monday: and then he said, "Your master is very partial to you - you had better make it up;" I said I had neither money nor friends: he said, "Your master is worth plenty of blant."

THOMAS VANN. I had no such conversation with him: I only said he must be a foolish fellow to use so good a master ill.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-43

1996. WILLIAM HAYDON and JANE HAYDON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , half a pig's head, value 1s., the goods of Benjamin Charles Murray , from the person of Sarah Murray .

SARAH MURRAY. I am the wife of Benjamin Charles Murray, and live in West-street. On Saturday night, about half-past twelve o'clock. I was coming by the corner of Smithfield-bars , with half a pig's head; the male prisoner came and snatched it out of my hand - he was quite a stranger to me; the woman was in company with him - I ran and caught bold of his coat: the woman ran after him, and told him to run; he threw down the head. struck me in the face, and ran away; I picked it up, followed, and secured him in five minutes; I have no doubt of the prisoners.

WILLIAM WATSON . I am a watchman. About twelve o'clock I heard an alarm, went up, and found the prosecutrix surrounded by a mob; she gave the prisoners in charge - the woman was very active, trying to rescue him, and she was put into the watch-house.

RICE PRICE . I am constable of the night. The prisoners and the pig's head were brought in - I returned it to the prosecutrix: the man had no money, and was rather intoxicated.

WILLIAM HAYDON'S Defence. I had been drinking ale, and it got into my head, not being used to it; I accidentally ran against this woman, and knocked the head out of her hand: she called Watch! and I offered to pay for it, but she would give me in charge.

SARAH MURRAY. He offered to pay for it at the watch-house.

JANE HAYDON'S Defence. I met this young chap very tipsy; he fell against the woman, and knocked the head out of her hand - she pulled him about; I asked what she did that for - I followed to the watch-house, and was called in as a witness.

WILLIAM HAYDON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

JANE HAYDON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-44

1997. WILLIAM BADLAND was indicted for embezzlement .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-45

1998. JOHN YATE S was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 1 half-crown, 5 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 2 halfpence, the monies of Charles Meller , from his person .

CHARLES MELLER. I belong to the 1st regiment of Grenadier Guards . On the 26th of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was looking at a rowing-match from the Tower-wharf - there were a good many people looking at it; I was there from five to ten minutes - my money was loose in my right-hand coat pocket; I had eight shillings, one sixpence, two half-crowns, two halfpence, and one farthing - I had been to a shop in the Minories, and had it in my hand ten minutes before; I was quite sober - I felt some one at my pocket, looked round, and perceived the prisoner take his hand from my coat pocket, and put it towards his own pocket - I laid hold of him by the collar, told him he had picked my pocket, and took him to the guard-room; after I had got him in I called the corporal of the guard, who took him in charge; he began to beg very hard, and offered me any recompense to let him go - he took out 5s., and offered it met to let him go; I then felt in my pocket, and missed one of the half-crowns, a sixpence, and one penny - I asked him if he had not got my half-crown: he said he had, he put his hand into his pocket, and gave it to me: I threw it into the window, and sent for an officer - I told him he had taken more, as I missed five shillings also.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This took place in a crowd? A. In the year of the crowd - I was not in the crowd, that was near the river; I had no pocket in my trousers, and generally carry silver loose in my coat pocket - he took nine pieces of coin out of my coat pocket - it was all loose; I did not make an alarm in the crowd; I said in the guard-room, that if he produced the whole of my money I should be inclined to let him go - not if he gave me all the money he had.

Q. Did you name any specific sum that you had lost till you found what he had about him? A. Yes - to every body there; I told them he had taken more out of my pocket, before the officer searched him - he had only offered me 7s. 6d then; whether I mentioned the exact sum I lost I cannot be positive - I mentioned the two halfpence before he was searched; when I found he had got one half-crown I put my hand into my pocket, and found I had lost one half-crown and five shillings.

Q. Did you state how much you had lost before you found he had money? A. No, I had no time - he offered me the 5s. as he was going into the guard-room; I had received my pay that morning - I cannot say how much, having money about me belonging to the Company, and I do not always receive alike, as I lay out money for the Company; my full pay was 9s. 10d - I do not suppose I receive more.

Q. How came you to recollect exactly what money you had in your pocket? A. I counted it in a grocer's shop in the Minories, where I laid some out, and took all my money out to get at some halfpence.

WILLIAM CLARK . I belong to the same regiment. and was corporal on the wharf guard that day; there was a rowing-match. About seven o'clock in the evening I was keeping back the crowd, and heard Meller call for the corporal - I immediately turned round, and saw him holding the prisoner by the collar; I went up he said he wished to give him in charge while he got an officer; I assisted in putting him into the guard-room; when he got there Meller asked if he was not ashamed of robbing him - he denied it, and said he would give any sum of money to make it up, and not be given in charge; he took some silver from his right-hand breeches pocket, and offered it to him - I cannot tell how much; Meller asked if he had not got a half-crown which he had taken from him - he immediately said he had; he took one from his breeches pocket, and put it to the other silver, which made 7s. 6d. - he put that into Meller's hand; Meller put it into the guard-room window, and said he should take no fee whatever, but go for an officer; the prisoner several times went down on his knees to beg pardon, and said he was sorry Meller had been robbed, and would give him any sum to let him go - I was not present when the constable came.

Cross-examined. Q. Then it was in the guard-room the money was produced? A. Yes - I did not hear Meller say what he had been robbed of, till the money was produced.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I heard the prisoner ask Meller to say no more about it - to let him go, and he would make it all right; I saw 5s. produced - he wanted him to take that; Meller asked if he had not a half-crown piece of his in his pocket - he said he had, took it out, and added it to the 5s., and when the constable came he found a sixpence and two halfpence on him.

Cross-examined. Q. Were your fellow-soldiers in the guard-room? A. Yes, the corporal was; the prisoner said he was sorry he had robbed him - I am sure of that; he said he had taken the money from him; I did not hear him say he had not robbed him, but would give him the money to let him go: I was anxious to see the rowing-match, and went out once or twice - Clark was present all the time I was there, and I should think must have heard him say he had taken the money - he did not deny it in my presence; when Meller said, "You have taken my half-crown" - he said, "I have," and he said he would make it all right; he said those words before he produced the money.

Q. When did he say he had taken the money from him? A. When the corporal said he had a half-crown of his, he said "I have."

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner - there were five shillings and a half-crown in the window - he had been searched by another person who gave me a sixpence and two halfpence, and said, in his presence, that he had found them on him - the prisoner did not deny it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was surrounded by seven or eight, and what I did say I cannot tell - I was so flurried I did not know what I said, being accused of such a depredation; one or two of them asked me to give them all the money I had, and he would let me go - I pulled out all I had, and said I would give it them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281023-46

1999. LEWIS JOSEPH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , 1 ball of mohair twist, value 4s. , the goods of Theophilus Smith .

JOSIAH WALKER . I am shopman to Theophilus Smith, a woollen-draper , of Pilgrim-street, Ludgate-hill . On the 3d of September I saw the prisoner and another person standing at the top of our street, conversing together, about three o'clock; the prisoner came into the shop

with a pattern of brown cloth, and wanted twist to match it; I took the twist drawer out, and put it before him, on the counter - while doing that, the other man came in, and said he wanted some black ferrit; I was the only person in the shop; my suspicions were raised; I said I had none - he went out, leaving the prisoner in the shop- the prisoner chose a ball of twist, and said he would have a yard of it; I had to go to the other end of the shop for the scissors: I kept a sharp eye on him, and just as I turned round I saw him take a ball of twist out of the drawer, and put it into his pocket; there being nobody near, and knowing he had an accomplice outside, I looked at him, but said nothing: and let him go out, as nobody was there to take care of the shop, which is open back and front; I did not tell master of it till the 17th, when the man who had asked for the ferrit came again, and asked for a yard of black twist - I did not exactly know him, but I knew the twist by the pattern he brought; I supposed another man would come, and in came the prisoner - he said, "Have you got any books and eyes?" I said, "No, but stop;" master just happened to come into the shop, and I said, "This is the man who a fortnight ago stole a ball of twist;" they were both secured, the other man was discharged at Guildhall: I am sure I saw the prisoner take a ball of twist on the 3d of September.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was your master at home? A. No - I saw him every day for a fortnight after; I do not know why I did not tell him of it - he might have been cross with me for not securing him, and I thought it best to say nothing about - it was very improper, I own; nobody was passing in the street - it is an out of the way place: I do not know whether the female servant was at home. I gave the prisoner a look to make him think I saw him; he went straight out to Ludgate-hill - if he thought I had seen him, of course, he would not come again; there were rolls of cloth on the counter, and it would not be right for me to follow him: the other man produced the same pattern as the prisoner brought before - when they were secured a ball of twist was found between two cloths, they must have been placed there while I was gone for a constable; a silk handkerchief was found on him, which he said belonged to his companion.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner; I found nothing on either of them - the prisoner had a watch and about 7s. 6d., also a handkerchief, which he said was his companion's.

Prisoner's Defence. He accused me of having been there a fortnight before, and taking the twist - his master was at the door; I was out in the street - he said, "My young man says you have robbed me," and I came back - at the second examination the young man said he found a hall of twist in the window.

JOHN WALKER . I found a ball in the window, about an hour after they were taken; it was not the stolen ball, but a different colour - it was between two cloths in the window.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not come back to the shop of his own accord, and ask you to send for a constable, if you had any charge? A. Not to my recollection - he had the handle of the door in his hand, when master told me to go for a constable; I said, "Stop," and he came back.

JOSEPH POTTER. I produced the twist which I found between the cloths, at his first examination - the first time he was at Guildhall was not an examination.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-47

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, OCTOBER 27.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2000. JOHN RUMBELOW was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 cheese, value 6s., and 2 loaves of bread, value 10d. , the goods of Ann Sturdy .

ANN STURDY. I keep a chandler's-shop in Charles-place, Hoxton . I know the prisoner, his father lodged in my house about a twelvemonth, and he occasionally came to see him; he came on the 14th of October and asked for his father - I said I did not know where he was (he lodged with me then); he went out of the shop, returned in a few minutes, and said he had seen his father, who would give him nothing, and he must have something; I said I had nothing to give him, his father's affairs were nothing to me; his father is a carpenter, and the prisoner sells fish about; he hastened round the counter, stood there a minute or two, then turned round and said, I deserved all I should meet with for marrying his old father - I said we were not married; we do not cohabit together; he then took the bread and cheese off the shelf and walked out with it - he returned in five or six minutes in his shirt sleeves, and said he was ready for any one I could find, and if he was there, he would throw him into the river: I have trusted his father with bread.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-48

1923. HENRY THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 pair of boots, value 12s. , the goods of Augustus Boulland .

AUGUSTUS BOULLAND. I am boot-maker , and live in Russell-street . On the 14th of October I was called down stairs and missed a pair of boots - being told somebody had run away with them, I went out but could find nobody, but afterwards heard the thief was taken; they hung in the door-way, and and could be taken without entering the shop.

ETOPHAN BROOK . I live near the prosecutor. About a quarter to seven o'clock I saw the prisoner take one boot from his shop - I pursued, and brought him back.

HENRY WEBB . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge - I found the boots in a door-way where he was taken, about two hundred yards from the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I think, at so late an hour, the witness might make a mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-49

2002. THOMAS PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 20 napkins, value 10s. , the goods of Charles Crokat .

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. On the 21st of September, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the morning, I was standing in Earl-street, Edgware-road, the prisoner

passed me with a bundle under his arm - he went into the Olive Branch public-house, I followed and took it from him; it contained twenty dirty napkins; I asked how he got them - he said he found them in a cart at the back of a load of hay, and could prove it; I asked if any body was with him; he said - No: the prosecutor's name was on them.

CAROLINE SHILLINGWORTH . I am nursery-maid to Mr. Crokat, of Connaught-square. On Saturday morning, the 20th of September, I pinned these napkins up, and gave them to the cook for the man who calls for the washing things; I put them into the kitchen about nine o'clock in the morning - she gave them to the man in the afternoon; I did not see them put into the cart.

WILLIAM DANIELS . I received this bundle from Mr. Crokat's, I do not know what it contained; I went round for more linen; I sent my wife and boy home with the cart - I was not near Earl-street; the bundle was in front of the cart - it could not have fallen out.

HARRIET DANIELS . I am the wife of the last witness. I did not see the prisoner - I left the cart at my own door with a boy to mind it; I cannot say the things were missing.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the linen in a cart behind a load of hay, about twelve o'clock at night, as I was going home; I went to see if I could find an owner.

JAMES DAVIS . I am a bricklayer, and have known the prisoner four or five years. On the Monday morning, when I was going to work, Mr. Daniels called to me and said,"Don't Reeves work for you?" I said Yes; he said,"Well, he has got me in a complete hobble. I took some linen home for people, and on returning I had a bundle, and put it into the cart; and when I came to where the wild beasts were, I went to see them, and left nobody with the cart" - and he did not know whether the bundle was in the cart or not.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-50

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

2003. RICHARD HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 pewter pint-measure, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Edmonson ; also 1 pewter pint-measure, value 6d. , the goods of Henry Bremer .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-51

1924. JAMES ABBOTT was indicted, for that he, on the 9th of September , at St. Dunstan's in the West , in and upon Hannah his wife, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and with a certain knife, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously, did cut and wound her in and upon her throat and neck, with intent, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her ; against the Statute, &c.

2d COUNT, stating his intent to be to main, disfigure, and disable her.

3rd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do her some grievous bodily harm.

HANNAH ABBOTT . I am the prisoner's wife; we have been married about seven years and a half. On the 9th of September, about eleven o'clock at night, this happened - we were living together; he left me for about three weeks about a year ago, but had returned; we lived in Fetter-lane , at the house in question - he prepares leather for gloves ; I came home about seven o'clock that evening - he fetched me from the Three Tuns public-house, where I was charing ; we had had some words on the Sunday - this was Tuesday; we had no words then, but he was particularly friendly, and kissed me several times; about nine o'clock I laid on the bed - I was afraid to go into the bed, for I had received some cool treatment from him the night before; he undressed and came to bed - I was inside the bed with my clothes on; I got up off the bed, and complained that I was too warm - I went towards the window to take off my gown; he got up, and held my hand, as I thought, in a friendly way - I was taking my clothes off, and putting my cap on; he said, "Oh, my dear, don't put your cap on," he pulled me towards him, and put his arm round my neck, as I thought, to kiss me again; but he put a knife to my neck, and began to cut it in an instant - I felt the knife cut across my neck the instant he said, "Oh, my dear, don't put your cap on;" I screamed Murder! and struggled with my hands, and put up my hand to protect my neck as much as I could; I got two of my fingers cut - one was cut very much; the scar remains on it still - (showing it) - I got away; then he made as if he dropped the knife - I screamed Murder! and called Mr. Fitzgerald as well as I could; I ran out of the room as fast as I could, and was going into Fitzgerald's room (he lodged on the same floor) - I was going there for shelter, but he slammed the door too to prevent my going in; he seemed frightened; I had got my hand cut - it seemed bleeding; I screamed Murder! ran down stairs, and got into the street - the blood flowed very fast indeed: I screamed Murder! all the way into the street - I supported myself by the bannisters down three pair of stairs, ran into the street, and into the Three Tuns, which is next door; the people were up - the blood was still flowing very fast from my neck; it wetted me very much.

Q. Did he follow you into the Three Tuns? A. I never looked back to see, and never saw him afterwards; I desired somebody to come back with me, to see if the children were not murdered, as I was afraid be was murdering them; I was taken to a doctor's shop in Fleet-street - I was able to walk there; I was supported by some friends; I was not married before I married the prisoner - my children are young; I was supported to the doctor's in Fleet-street - I do not know his name; he is a surgeon - he looked at my wound, but I cannot tell what was said, though I still had my senses: I was taken up into the street, put into a coach, and taken to the Hospital - my wound was dressed there; I remained in the Hospital five weeks; I was at Guildhall twice - I think it was a month before I was able to go before the Alderman, but I cannot justly say how long.

Q. From the time you came home till he cut you in the neck, there was every expression of kindness on his part? A. Yes; no anger at all - he was very kind that night; every thing appeared kind and affectionate on his part, from the time he brought me from the public-house; I did not see the knife.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your name Ann or Hannah? A. Hannah; I have had four children by the prisoner - three of them are alive; the eldest is turned seven, and the youngest is three years old - I have been married to him going on for eight years.

Q. He is rather weak in his mind I understand - not

strong understanding? A. He is not very stout; I cannot say any thing of his mind - he is in general in the same way; I do not know any difference; I thought him a sensible man myself - I never heard that he was thought weak in his understanding.

Q. Whether he had any cause for it or not I do not ask, but was he not very much given to jealousy? A. I cannot think he was given to jealousy at all - I have no reason to think it in the least; I do not think he was at all jealous - he had once left me for three weeks.

Q. Was he not jealous then? A. He pretended so; he left me, and took his clothes off with him; I cannot tell whether he was jealous or not then; he went out, and said he was going to take a walk - I asked if I could not go with him; he said I should not, and as soon as he went out, I put on my bonnet, told my little girl to mind her sister, and followed him, but lost sight of him; I returned, and found that he had got back as soon as me - I followed him in, and followed him up stairs (we then lived in Collingwood-street), and as soon as I went in he said, "Oh, you have been having it - you have been having it:" I said,"Oh, James, what have I been having?" he then began to abuse me in a most disgusting manner, which I cannot repeat; I went down stairs to the door, because I would not hear his words - he came down to the door to me, and asked what I had done with his black trousers; I said I thought he had taken them up stairs.

Q. Were not the disgusting words imputing some infidelity to you? A. Yes, but there is a clear proof that it was quite false; I do not know my landlady's name - I was not there above seven or eight weeks; we lived two years in King-street, Smithfield, at Turnbull's: I cannot say that he was jealous there, for he frequently offered me protection - Mrs. Turnbull and I were very good friends; I have no reason to think he was jealous, or he never would have a desire for me to go on the town to get money.

Q. Do you mean, on your oath, that you never heard, and did not understand that he was very weak in his understanding? A. I never observed it, nor ever heard it; I swear I never knew of any deficiency in his mind more than wickedness - he was excessively wicked.

Q. Do not you know that his life is now at stake? A. My life was at stake as well as his; I never considered my life safe with him - I do not wish him executed; it is my wish to save his life, but my own as well.

FRANCIS ASSIOTTI . I am a green-grocer, and live at the back of the premises where the prisoner lodged. On the night of the 9th of September, I was serving in my shop between ten and eleven o'clock, and heard the cries of Murder! upon which I rushed out of my back-door, and saw the prisoner's wife rushing out of the passage; I followed her into the Three Tuns - she was then bleeding very much from the neck, as I suppose; when I went in, I saw the blood come from her throat - it flowed in considerable quantities; she immediately requested somebody would secure her children from being murdered by her husband - I went up to her room with a constable, and saw the prisoner; we apprehended him - he stood by the bed side in his shirt, and on his right-hand sleeve there was blood; they asked him if he had cut his wife's throat; his answer was "She must have done it herself, for he knew nothing of it" - the knife was not found at that time; I was not present when it was found, which was two or three days after - I was at Guildhall when it was produced: he was taken to the watch-house - I was not intimate with them.

JOSEPH HEWER . I was dresser at St. Bartholomew's-hospital when this happened; I was present when the prosecutrix was brought in - she was rather taint, and had received a deep wound in the throat; I did not imagine that it would prove fatal; there was a great hemorrhage, the carroted artery was not divided, the wound was hut two lines off it - the pulsation of the carroted artery was very visible - if that had been cut, it must have proved fatal; she was able to leave the hospital much sooner than she did - she had recovered strength enough to leave in about a month - it would not have been proper for her to leave before.

GEORGE SELF . I am a leather-dresser, and live at No. 22, Crown-street, Soho. I worked for the prisoner at a shop, which he hired of Russell, in Fetter-lane, not where he lived; he borrowed a knife of me on the 9th of September, between two and four o'clock in the afternoon - he told me it was to skin a cat - I saw the knife again at Guildhall; after he had borrowed it he asked if I would turn the grindstone, and it was ground in the form of a table-knife - I turned the stone, and he ground it round, which would make it sharper than when I lent it him - I am quite sure I saw the same knife before the Alderman; he appeared at times very low in spirits.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you known him long? A. I have seen him about for three years - I only knew him while I worked for him, about seven weeks - he has worked for three hours together without saying a word.

Q. Did he not appear at times in a very low and melancholy state? A. He did - he always behaved with the greatest kindness to me, more like a brother than any thing, but latterly he got exceeding low and melancholy.

THOMAS DAVIS . I keep a shop in Fleur-de-lis-court, at the back of these premises - I heard a cry of Murder! about half-past ten o'clock; I left my house - we proceeded to where the cry came from, and saw the prosecutrix rush into the Three Tuns with her throat cut; she ran into the kitchen; there was a considerable effusion of blood - it ran all down the front of her clothes; Mr. Perry, who keeps the house, came out to me, and said,"What's the matter?" I did not go to the prisoner's room, but assisted the prosecutrix to the surgeon's, and then in a coach to the hospital - she continued bleeding all that time.

ROBERT FITZGERALD . I am a boot-maker, and live in Fetter-lane - I sleep on the same floor as the prisoner. On the night this happened, I was sitting in the room with my wife and children, between ten and eleven o'clock; I heard a shriek and a cry of Murder! I expected it proceeded from Abbott's room - I went into the passage, still hearing the cry of Murder! I knocked at the door and called Abbott; I had no answer, but still heard the cries of Murder! and forced the door open; I heard a scuffle towards the door and went back to my own door, stood with it in my hand, and saw Mrs. Abbott come running out of the room; I saw some one behind her in the door-way - she was coming towards my door, and for some reason, which I cannot account for, I shut the door

- I did not see her afterwards; I heard her running down stairs, but did not go down myself; I opened my door, went and knocked at Abbott's door two or three times - he came to the door, and said in a very slow tone of voice,"Did you call, Mr. Fitzgerald?" I said "Yes, what have you been doing?" he said, "I have been asleep;" I then saw some blood on the side of the door, and in the passage - I said "Why, your wife must be cut terribly, how has this happened?' he said he knew nothing at all of it - she must have done it herself; I saw some blood on his shirt sleeve, and asked him how that came; he said he supposed it must have come from a cut on his knuckle (he had cut his knuckle that day, and came into my shop and shewed it to me just after it happened) he then went into his room; I followed him, and he went as he was getting into bed - I said, "Abbott, it is no use you getting into bed, you will have to go into the watch-house;" he said "Do you think so?" I said "Yes, I am certain of it;" he said, "Then I had better dress myself, I suppose?" I said "Yes, by all means, get you clothes on as soon as you can;" he put his trousers on, and was putting on his waistcoat; several persons then came up stairs, and he was secured - they asked him how he came to do it - he said "She must have have done it herself," and that she had attempted to hang herself some time before; I never heard of that before - the room was searched twice in my presence, but the knife could not be found.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known him long? A. About twelve weeks; he always appeared to me depressed in spirits; he would go in and out of the house with his head hanging down, and never speak unless spoken to - he appeared to be under jealousy; I did not know that till the day this happened; about twelve o'clock that day I had seen him in and out very frequcutly - I went up into my room, and said "Abbott seemed very uncomfortable to day" - they had been quarrelling a few minutes before that; when I had said that he came to my door, knocked, and said he wanted to speak to me - I went into his room; he put the door too, and said "I want you to give me some advice about my situation;" I said if I could give him advice I would, but I did not like to interfere between man and wife - he said "I am very miserably situated; I wish my wife would stop at home, and pay attention to her home the same as your's - she can earn money at glove-making at home, but prefers going out charing, that she should have an opportunity of going with other men," and the three children he declared were not his own, neither of the three; he was always depressed, and never spoke unless spoken to - he was under a strong fit of jealousy I have no doubt.

COURT. Q. Did you know any thing of his wife except seeing her go in and out? A. No.

EDWARD GILBERT . I am pot-boy at Mr. Perry's, the Three Tuns; I frequently saw the prosecutrix charing at his house; on the night of the 9th of September, I saw her leave the house with her husband - they had a few words together in the kitchen; I walked in and walked out again, and did not hear what it was about - some words passed between them, whether they were angry or kind I cannot tell - they went away, and about three hours and a half after I saw her again, (about half-past ten o'clock) - I was in the kitchen - she came into the kitchen bleeding very much; I took hold of the jack towel, and put it round her neck - she said "Save me! save me! for he is after me; she said "Pray go out and see whether my children are alive" - a great many people went; I saw the prisoner at the watch-house, and the officer asked him how he came to do it; he said whatever was done she had done it herself.

Cross-examined. Q. Were not the words they had, high words? A. I just looked into the kitchen - mistress was talking to them - Mrs. Abbott was crying; they seemed to be quarrelling.

Q. Do not you know that they were words of anger? A. I cannot tell.

ANN WEBB . I live in Fleur-de-lis-court. On the 9th of September, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was looking from my own window, and saw something fall from the window of the room in which this deed was committed; I was not well at the time; what it was I cannot tell - I did not hear it sound as it fell; when I heard the instrument could not be found, I mentioned this, and they went in the direction I said it had fallen.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a constable. I was on duty on the night this happened; I went there, and found two watchman and several people round the prisoner - he was sitting down in his room half undressed; I looked about, but could find no knife - I went to the top of the house to look for it, but could not find it; one of the parish-beadles brought it to me two or three days afterwards; Self saw it afterwards, and claimed it - I produce it just in the state I received it; the prisoner said nothing about the knife.

GEORGE SELF. That is the knife I lent the prisoner - it was rusty when he had it; it was in the form of a shoe-maker's knife, but he ground the two corners off.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

WILLIAM TURNBULL . I live at No. 24, King-street, West Smithfield. The prisoner and his wife lodged in my house for upwards of two years; for the first eighteen months of that time, he and his wife were remarkably comfortable, sober, and quiet - after that, I observed a remarkable change take place in his mind - he was very much depressed in spirits; he certainly laboured under an infirmity of mind - under jealousy; I frequently said so; he appeared for the first eighteen months remarkably kind to his family, sober, and remarkably industrious, and his general demeanour was very affable - he seemed happy in the bosom of his family; but for the last six months he was in my house, he seemed quite a reverse man; he would pass up and down without speaking to any body - in fact, the whole house pitied him: he left my house fourteen or fifteen months ago.

ANN TURNBULL . I am the wife of the last witness: for the first eighteen months the prisoner lived with us he was very cheerful, and after that I observed a great change in him, and so did all the house - he fell into quite a melancholy state, frequently reading and praying: before that he worked night and day for his wife and family, and was a very kind loving husband - he used to carry the children out, and take delight in his family.

COURT. Q. Did he leave your lodging of his own accord? A. My husband gave them notice on account of their continually quarrelling.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The woman has said she never knew him to be jealous; was he to your knowledge, and that of the whole house, jealous for the last six months? A. Yes, he made no secret of it; his wife knew he was jealous, and owned to me that he had reason for it.

COURT. Q. She owned to you, he had reason to be jealous? A. Yes, and she told me the fact: I told my husband of it that Saturday night, when Mr. Abbott came up very much distracted in mind - Mr. Abbott told me of it first; and two or three days after Mrs. Abbott said to me "Mrs. Turnbull, I am ashamed to look you in the face, for my husband has told you the circumstance"- I told my husband of it that night; we could not sleep in consequence of it.

Q. Did you keep company with her much? A. Yes, she was frequently borrowing, and what she wanted I let her have - she told me of this five or six months before they left our house.

Q. You continued on the same terms with her? A. Yes - they were lodgers and we did not wish to expose them to the house; we gave them a week's notice before they left - we did not give them notice when this happened, for they said they would try and live comfortably, and I was to keep it to myself.

JAMES TURNBULL . I am the witness' brother, and live in the same house. I have known the prisoner three years - he was a quiet, humane, industrious man; I lived there at the same time as him, and for the last six months of that time he was quite jealous; it was known throughout the house - it was impossible his wife could be ignorant of his jealousy.

GEORGE COLE . I am a leather-dresser, and live in Wallis-place, Pimlico. I have known the prisoner upwards of two years - he was a very kind, good man: I observed a change in his mind, and latterly he got much worse.

- CHESLET . I am foreman to Messrs. Turner and Ball, glove-manufacturers, and live at Newington. - I have employed the prisoner between two and three years - he was an industrious, hard-working man; I should judge him to be humane: I perceived a great alteration in him lately - about last May he became very dejected indeed; I used to pay him when he brought work to the warehouse - he was certainly labouring under a delusion.

HENRY BARKER . I am a shoemaker, and live in King-street, West Smithfield. I know the prisoner; he conducted himself very kind to his children for the first eighteen months, but for the last six months he conducted himself very indifferently towards his wife - he was too much troubled with jealousy.

EDWARD ABBOTT . I am the prisoner's uncle, and live in St. Martin's-lane - I have known him most of his life; he was a humane man, and inoffensive; he lived with me when a boy, and was in the habit of being with my children - he was never vicious or behaved wrong; for the last six months I have observed a wonderful change in him, from the little I saw of him.

Five other Witnesses deposed to the prisoner's humanity, industry, and sobriety. GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing that be acted under an impression that his wife had been unfaithful, but at the same time there was no proof to that effect - the prosecutrix also recommended him to Mercy.

Reference Number: t18281023-52

2005. SAMUEL BERGIN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 oz 7 1/2 dwts., of silver wire, value 8s., the goods of James Reynolds , his master .

JAMES REYNOLDS. I am a gold and silver thread-maker , and live in West-street, West Smithfield - the prisoner was in my employ for about seven years. On the 17th of September, between one and two o'clock, I was standing in my factory, seeing my work-people come in, several of them were rather late; about twenty minutes past two o'clock, I saw a little lad come down the street - I took him into my work-shop, and collared the prisoner; I took him into my parlour, then went into my work-shop, called the prisoner, and brought him into the parlour; I then sent for an officer, and asked the prisoner how he could be so ungrateful as to rob me, when he had lived with me so many years - he gave no answer; I then asked where he had got the silver from - he voluntarily said he was very sorry for what he had done, and that he had been to the same shop three times before to sell silver; I went up stairs and missed 1 oz. 7 1/2 dwts. of silver wire, (from a bobbin,) which cost 7s. 6d.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. - Did he at times work after hours for you? Yes, he had 3d. an hour for that, and at times I gave him beer, once or twice a week.

LAWRENCE CHILD . I live with Mr. Sorrell, gold and silver refiner, of Barbican. On the 17th of September the prisoner came to the shop, and offered this 1 oz. 7 dwts. of silver wire for sale, and brought this note with it:" it says,"Please, Sir, I shall feel very much obliged if you will, take the silver wire of my son, - Charles Webb, No. 3, Berkley-street:" he had brought the same not once before - I enquired at No. 3, Berkley-street, and when he came again, I detained the note, and told him to fetch his father; but instead of that a little boy brought another note to me.

JAMES POULTER . I am in Mr. Reynold's service. The prisoner asked me to write a note for him - I wrote one, and took it to Sorrell's on the same day as the prisoner was taken: he went with me, and waited outside while I went in.

GEORGE THOMAS HANNINGTON . I am a constable. I have the silver wire which Mr. Reynolds gave me - I was present when the prisoner and Poulter were in the parlour: he confessed voluntarily that he had robbed his master two or three times.

Cross-examined. Q. He appeared very sorry? A. He did.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy.

Confined Two Months , and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18281023-53

2000. THOMAS TURNER, alias CHARLES WALFORD , was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Read Knott , from his person .

THOMAS READ KNOTT. I have been a waiter , but am out of place. On the 25th of September I lived at Richmond; I was in Fleet-street about seven o'clock in the evening, going towards Temple-bar; I felt something at my pocket, turned round, and saw the prisoner, and another behind him; I laid hold of him, and my handkerchief was gone - I found it in his right-hand trousers pocket; his companion ran away: he began crying, and

hoped I would let him go - I gave him to a constable - his companion was about eighteen years old - I think I should know him again.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE SHARP . I am a constable. I was fetched to the watch-house, and met the prisoner being brought there; he cried very much, and said he was very sorry - that he had been deluded by a person named Williams, who lived at No. 6, Little Saffron-street, Saffron-hill - I have been there several times, but cannot find him - his father lives there.

GEORGE - . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found three more handkerchiefs in his pocket: they have not been claimed.

Prisoner's Defence. One handkerchief he took off my neck, and gave me one instead.

GEORGE - . I lent him another.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281023-54

2007. WILLIAM FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , at St. Mary Aldermary , 2 musical-boxes, value 38l. 17s., the goods of Stephen Symonds , his master, in his dwelling-house .

2d COUNT, the same, only stating them to be the goods of John Constantius Upham .

3d COUNT, stating them to be the goods of William Thomas Dulin .

STEPHEN SYMONDS. I keep the Crown tavern, Bow-lane , in the parish of St. Mary, Aldermary. The prisoner was in my constant employ for six months, up to the time in question; and for two days after; these two musical-boxes were lost from a private room on the first floor in my house, facing Watling-street, occupied by Mr. Upham, who was stopping at my house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What is Mr. Upham's name? A. John Constantius: he is not here - he is at my house ill in bed at this time - I had seen the boxes - I am quite certain the prisoner was in my employ at the time - I do not pay him wages; my servants are paid by the persons frequenting the house: he was a porter -Mr. Upham did not give him the boxes, for I know they were in my house after Mr. Upham was gone.

Q. Do you mean to say you were never present when Mr. Upham gave the boxes to him to take to Mr. Dulin? A. I was not. I never stated so - if that is put down in my deposition, it is a mistake - I might have said Mr. Upham was in the habit of employing him as a messenger.

COURT. There is nothing of the sort in his deposition.

WILLIAM EPHRAIM DULIN. I only know that I have never received these boxes since they were delivered to Mr. Upham - I know they were delivered to him - I delivered one of them to him myself, at the Crown tavern, kept by Symonds; the value of that one was twelve guineas: it was on a Saturday in September - they are manufactured abroad, but I sell them - I saw another one in his possession at that time; they were merely sent to him on approbation - I have not seen either of them since.

SARAH LANAWAY . I am housemaid at the Crown. I was in the room where Mr. Upham used to sit, at the time the prisoner took the boxes out - they were musical-boxes, and came from Mr. Dulin; I saw the prisoner go out of the room with them about eight o'clock in the evening, or a little after - I never saw him after; I do not know the day of the month - it was in September: he was taken up three weeks or a fortnight ago last Friday; he took them some weeks before that - I never saw him again; they stood on a table - Mr. Upham had left the house when he took them, and was not expected to return; I did not see Mr. Upham again till three weeks ago, and when he inquired for the boxes I said I had seen the prisoner take them; my fellow-servant has seen them since me, but they have not been found - I have lived at Symonds' about fifteen months, and am still there.

Cross-examined. Q. Mr. Upham is in town? A. I do not know: I have come from Mr. Symonds' to-day - I saw Mr. Upham a few days ago: he may be ill in bed there now, but I have not seen him for some days: I believe he is in the house - he was there on Saturday, but I do not often see him; I did not see him on Saturday, but I made his bed then - I do not recollect seeing him yesterday; I do not always see him, though I make his bed - he had been in bed, and was not well on Saturday - he was not in the room when I made his bed; he never dines in the coffee-room.

Q. Were the boxes wrapped in paper when you saw them? A. Yes - he did not take them out of the paper, but I heard him say they were musical boxes; I did not look at them, I understood they were Mr. Upham's, and were going to Mr. Dulin's, to be repaired; Mr. Upham had left the house about half an hour when I saw them - I did not state to the Magistrate that he had left three days.

SARAH CHAPMAN . I am servant at the Crown, and have lived there nearly four months. I saw the prisoner bring two musical-boxes into the kitchen - they were kept in the room Mr. Upham used to be in; when he brought them into the kitchen they were in paper - I asked him what they were: he said they were musical-boxes, and that he was going to take them home presently - I did not know where he meant by home; I have not seen them since: Mr. Upham had left the house on the Monday, and I think this was Wednesday - it was on the same night as Mr. Upham went - I am positive of that; I heard the prisoner say they came from Mr. Dulin's, and he was going to take them home - I cannot say how long after this he was taken up; I was examined at Guildhall on a Monday - I do not know how long ago; I asked the prisoner to let me look at the boxes - he said he should not, for he was going to take them home presently, and went out of the kitchen; I tore the paper, thinking I should see them, and saw them, but could not see the music; I had seen Ford take one up stairs, playing, under his arm, a day or two before.

Cross-examined. Q. About how long before? A. I cannot say, to be positive; I live at Mr. Symonds' now; I cannot say where Mr. Upham is now, whether he is in Devonshire or not. I am the kitchen-maid - it is a large house; I do not know whether Mr. Upham is there or not; it is impossible for me to say - he has been sleeping there for the last few nights.

Q. He is not laid upon a sick bed? A. No - he gets up sometimes; whether he is in bed now I do not know.

Q. Did you tell the Magistrate on what day you had seen the boxes in the possession of the prisoner? A. It was all the same night.

Q. Did not one of you say it was three days after? A. My fellow-servant, whom you will hear presently, contradicts me; I did not hear Nicholls tell the Magistrate she saw them in his possession three days after Mr. Upham left; she was at Guildhall twice - I was only there once.

STEPHEN SYMONDS re-examined. Mr. Upham was in bed till twelve o'clock yesterday; he goes out in his carriage, but is very ill; I know he has a great objection to come here.

ELIZABETH NICHOLLS . I am housemaid to Mr. Symonds. I saw the prisoner bring the musical-boxes into the kitchen; I do not recollect on what day of the week it was; I heard him tell my fellow-servant they were musical-boxes; I did not hear him say what he was going to do with them; it is my business to clean Mr. Upham's room, and I had seen the boxes there; I saw the prisoner take the boxes out at the street-door to go into the street, and never saw him afterwards; I have been ten months in the prosecutor's service.

Cross-examined. Q. You clean Mr. Upham's room? A. Yes - I cleaned it this morning and saw him in bed - I clean it every morning before he gets up; he is a gentleman about twenty-five years old; I believe he went out yesterday for an hour in his own carriage - it was the same day that Mr. Upham left the house that I saw the boxes - they looked like mahogany to me; my fellow-servant was there; she did not take them out of the paper - they were covered with paper.

Q. Did you ever say it was three days after Mr. Upham left the house that you saw them? A. No, I said I saw the prisoner at the house three days after, not the boxes; Mr. Upham was not up when I came out this morning; he dined at home yesterday at six o'clock, and the day before; he dines in a private room, not in the coffee-room.

RICHARD GEORGE STATHAM . The prisoner was given into my custody on the 11th of September, by Mr. Symonds, charged with stealing two musical-boxes; he said he knew nothing of them; I searched his lodgings, but found no boxes.

MR. DULIN re-examined. The box I myself delivered to Mr. Upham was worth twelve guineas, the other twenty-five guineas - they were very large; I have seen Mr. Upham several times, but have not been able to find the boxes.

Cross-examined. Q. What cases had they? A. Mahogany; they were very large - one played eight tunes, and the other four.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. SYMONDS. Q. The prisoner was absent for two days after this affair; did he return to your premises? A. He came to speak to one of my servants, and was taken up - that was the very day the loss was discovered.

COURT. Q. Had he given you any notice of his meming to quit you? A. I discharged him two days after this happened - not for dishonesty; he was about nine months in my service.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He behaved well? A. Why, if I must answer you, I found two knives in his pocket, which shews a dishonest principle.

Prisoner. Q. They were in the clothes I had on? A. No, in the clothes which were in his bundle.

Prisoner's Defence (written). Gentlemen, I may perhaps be permitted to state, that prior to my engaging to become a servant to Mr. Symonds, I was employed by Thomas Brandram, Esq., of Sise-lane, in the City of London, merchant, as his footman, for a period of two years and a half, whom, I have no doubt, will feel much pleasure in satisfying your Lordship and Gentlemen of the Jury, that I served him during that time with diligence, honesty, and good repute, which, I trust, will not be deemed undeserving of your kind attention and serious consideration. I acted in the capacity of a porter for my last employer, Mr. Symonds, in whose service I continued about nine months, during which time I made it my study and delight to make myself subservient to his interest, which I trust he will most readily admit. Gentlemen - With regard to the two boxes, which I am accused of having stolen, I can only say that I never saw nor had them in my possession after Mr. Upham left town, on the 8th of September last; and if that gentleman left them at the house of my late employer, Mr. Symonds, after I had given them to Mr. Upham, I declare most solemnly I was not aware of it; so far from attempting flight, I even went to Mr. Symonds' house, for the purpose of speaking to a waiter, upwards of a month afterwards, and was then given in charge.

MR. SYMONDS. I never found anything amiss in his conduct before; I only discharged him for being careless.

JURY. Q. Has he ever quarrelled with the other servants? A. I believe not.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

Reference Number: t18281023-55

2005. JOHN OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 33 lbs. of minion type, value 3l. 6s. , the goods of Robert Wilks, the elder .

ROBERT WILKS. I am a printer , and live in Chancery-lane - my business is carried on in Fleet-street. I employed the prisoner to print out of doors, at his own place; in July last, I discovered my loss - I received information, and went to Mr. Christie, of Snow-hill, and found 38lbs. of minion type, which I knew to be mine; I had lost considerably more; I sent for the prisoner to my house, and told him what I had seen, and that I was convinced the type was mine, and that Christie had informed me he had bought it of him - he did not for some time deny it being mine; he seemed confused, and said it was not mine, and he could prove of whom he had bought it; he had no minion for my work - it was kept in my shop in Chancery-lane ; he was frequently there, but never worked there - he only came for orders; the type was kept under a shelf behind the counter - he used to hang about the shop a good deal, looking at books and things; he was at liberty till about a month ago, when I had him taken; the regular price of type is 4s. a lb.; he mentioned the name of a person who he said he bought it of; I forget the name, but he said the person was shipping some letter at the West-India Ducks - that a quantity of it fell overboard, and it was raked up by that person, and part of it was what he had sold to Christie - falling into water would discolour it very much; there was no appearance of this having been in the water; it never could have appeared as it did if it had been in water; I told him it was idle to tell me a story of that kind, for the type was quite new, and of a silvery appearance; he still persisted that it was so, and we parted for that time; in a little time I sent for him again, and said it was impossible I could believe what he said; he then told me he purchased it of Shrubsole, a printer, in Rathbone-place.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was any body present at this conversation? A. No; my son had let the prisoner's father some rooms for a short time in Black Horse-court, Fleet-street; they were under the same roof as my son's business, but not the same rooms; his father was formerly in business, but not the same rooms; his father was formerly in business in the Borough; he left my son's premises in July or August, as near as I can tell - they worked together I believe at the time I got this information; the type found at Christle's is a font, but a very small one - they are regularly-assorted letters - it could not have been in the water; he came when I sent for him - he told me about a fortnight after that Shruhsole had sold it to him; I did not have him taken up; I had lost a great deal more type.

Q. Before you took him up did he not demand some money as wages? A. No, the account is in my favour - he began to do business for me in January; he might have a job in hand at the time I discovered the type; he once said something was due to him - I said there was not: I took him before Mr. Rogers - he was not inclined to discharge him; I did not say I could produce a boy who had seen him steal it; my son informed me his errand-boy had seen something.

Q. From July till October you took no proceedings against him? A. I was extremely busy, and out of town- I have a house at Newington-green, and it takes a good deal of time going backwards and forwards, and Mrs. Wilks was ill; I plead guilty to delay, but I was busy - I never proposed to settle it for 15l.

WILLIAM SHRUBSOLE . I am a printer, and live in Rathbone-place. The prisoner never bought any minion type of me; I saw this type at Hatton-garden; I never sold him any of this description.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you think it easy to steal an entire font? A. I should think it very difficult, as it is an exact proportion of type; I should think it as easy to swear to sugar, tea, or sand, as to type - I should be very lothe to swear to any taken from my premises.

THOMAS CHRISTIE . I live in King-street, Snow-hill; Wilks saw some minion type at my house - he said he believed it to be his - it was a complete font; I had purchased it of the prisoner about the beginning of May last, at 2s. 6d. per 1b.; it might have been a little used but not much - being thrown into the river might discolour it a little; this appeared to have been used, and it is always washed with water after being used; I think when Wilks saw it the appearance would be the same if it had fallen into water; I met the prisoner at the corner of Fleet-market after Wilks had seen it, and told him of it; he gave me Shrubsole's card, saying it was bought of him; I think nobody can swear to type - a printer may have the same description of letter from the same font; I could not swear to my type; I appeared before the Magistrate in September.

Cross-examined. Q. When type has been used, is it put into water and washed? A. We brush it with pearlash, and then wash it with water; Thames water would make no other effect on it.

Q. As to its being bought of Shrubsole, did he not say his father was in some circumstances which made him unwilling to tell where he bought it? A. He did afterwards; he sold it to me publicly in my shop, and did not tell me to conceal it; it is as complete a font as the quantity will admit.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. I went after the prisoner twice, and left word with his father - he came next morning and gave himself up; Mr. Wilks had told me he thought he should want me to take him, two months ago.

ROBERT WILKS, Jun . I called on Mr. Christie in July, we were talking on business when a message came, in consequence of which this type was shewn to me; I immediately told him it was my father's, and was stolen; it is decidedly possible to identify type - I have examined it minutely.

Cross-examined. Q. What founder does your father buy from? A. It was part of the materials of the Evening Times newspaper, it came from Pouchee's - I know it by the nicks on it; that is common to all type; he might make type exactly like it for other people; I charged the prisoner with having some of this minion type in April last - he said he had some which he would give me; I said it was my father's - he acknowledged it, and said it was very little; he afterwards gave it to me, it was nearly half a pound; it was no part of this font, but similar to it: his father and I worked in the same place then.

Mr. WILKS. I can speak positively to this type - it is certainly mine, as far as I am able to judge - there is a peculiarity about it; there is always a nick to direct the compositors to keep it all up one way, but this letter has two nicks; and referring to my type I find it the same - this must he caused by the founder being obliged to mix two fonts to complete the order; he might possibly do so for another printer.

THOMAS CHRISTIE re-examined. It is very common for type to have two nicks, and I have seen three - part of this has three.

Prisoner's Defence. Several witnesses will prove that type cannot be sworn to; my father has had it two years.

JOHN OSBORN , I am the prisoner's father - I have been unfortunate, and in Whitecross-street Prison till within a few days; I am a printer - I have no doubt this is some of the type I employed him to sell; I put a few letters into my pocket at Christee's on Saturday, and went to the founder's and got some exactly like it - nobody can tell the difference of it.

THOMAS JACKSON . I am town-traveller to Mr. Wilks. The prisoner applied to me in May or June for some particular kind of type for a job he had in hand; Wilks told him where to find it, and to take what he wanted - he took some from several cases, several handsful; he had leave to do so. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-56

2009. ANN PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 6 lbs. of ham, value 4s. , the goods of George Foulkes .

GEORGE FOULKES. I am a cheesemonger , and live in the Minories . On Saturday, the 4th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, an alarm was given, and I missed a ham from the window, which was open - it could be reached by a person outside; the prisoner was taken that night, and the ham produced - I sold it directly after.

THOMAS BAXTER . I am a fellowship-porter. I saw the prisoner stop at Foulkes' shop, she saw me looking at her and went away, but returned back and took the ham - I went and stopped her, but could not get it from her; she dropped it on the ground.

PETER BOSTON . I am a constable. I took the pri

soner about half an hour afterwards at another shop - she had no money.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18281023-57

2010. THOMAS PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 4 napkins, value 1s.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Samuel Wells .

SAMUEL WELLS. I now live in Pitfield-street. On the 10th of June I lodged at the prisoner's father's, in Liverpool-street , on the first floor; these articles were locked up in a trunk; I went out about eleven o'clock, leaving the trunk in my bed-room - my wife was in the next room; I returned about one, and found I had been robbed - he lived with his parents.

MARY WELLS . I am the prosecutor's wife. I was at home - the key of the trunk was in the table-drawer; I did not miss the trunk till the property was brought up stairs to me in the sitting-room - they had been picked up in the street between eleven and one o'clock; I then went to the bed-room, and the trunk was gone - it was found in the back-kitchen, broken open and empty; a great many things have not been found - the value of the whole is nearly 3l.; I know these articles were in the trunk at eleven o'clock - I had not seen the prisoner in the room; he could be there without my hearing him, as it does not communicate with the front-room.

JOHN PALMER . I am the prisoner's father. On the 10th of June, a young man came and took a lodging; the lady on the second-floor was always desirous of his earning 6d. - though he has been a bad boy; she got him a job to fetch a box and pair of trousers from a linen-draper in Bishopsgate-street; he brought the box and took it up to the second-floor, by Mrs. Wells' bed-room; this was between eleven and one o'clock - after that, I saw him sitting in the back-kitchen, for I would not have him in the shop; in about ten minutes the young man came and inquired for his trousers - I called him twice - he did not answer; I went and found him in the yard - I was looking at the gentleman, and he ran by me through the shop; his jacket projected out - I ran after him - the dust blew in my face; he ran by me - I saw a handkerchief and some white linen in his bosom; I said "Where are you going?" he ran into One Swan-yard, and I after him - I fell over a child, and he dropped part of this linen; he ran on to the other end of the yard which leads to Petticoat-lane, and I lost him - I did not see him again till the 31st of August, when he was at Hatton-garden; I brought the things back to Mrs. Wells, who claimed them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-58

2010. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Philip Greenbrook , on the 22nd of September , at Christ church , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will 1 coat, value 20s., and 1 apron, value 2s., his property .

PHILIP GREENBROOK. I am a labourer , and work for Mr. Baxter, a chemist, at Bromley, Kent, and live there. I was in London on the 22nd of September, and coming from the Foundling; I had a coat belonging to Frederick Barry , tied up in an apron - I got into Newgate-street a little after nine o'clock in the evening, and in about five minutes I was going down with the prisoner on the left-hand side of me - before we got to Newgate-street, he shewed me the names of the wards of the prison, and where they hang the people in the Old Bailey; I had been in his company about three quarters of an hour - he was shewing me the way to St. Mary Axe - I did not know him before; he was walking on my left-hand side in Newgate-street - he went a little before me and looked down St. John's-court; he stepped back to the left side of me, and then pulled at my bundle - he could not get in as I held it very hard, and he struck me with his fist very hard; he knocked me down, and as I was falling he pulled it from under me, and ran down St. John's-court; I got up as quick as I could - I saw him running in the middle of the court with my bundle under his arm: I lost sight of him for about a minute in turning the corner, but did not lose sight of him again till Beach stopped him - it was only a few minutes from the time he robbed me; I am quite sure he is the man.

Prisoner. He says I struck him, that is false. Witness. I swear he struck me, and knocked me down.

GEORGE BEACH . I am porter at the Queen's Arms tavern, Newgate-street. I heard a call of Stop thief! in the yard of the tavern - I ran out, and slipped the prisoner; Greenbrook came up in less than two minutes, and charged him with this - I saw him drop the bundle before I caught him; I gave him to the watchman, and Williams picked up the bundle - I was before him.

DAVID WILLIAMS . I heard an alarm of robbery - ran out of my house and saw the prisoner running down St. John's-court with a bundle under his arm; when he got to the bottom of the court he stopped and dropped the bundle - I picked it up, and delivered it to the prosecutor, who came up in a very few minutes after, and claimed it; he charged the prisoner with being the man who robbed him - he said nothing to it in my hearing; the prosecutor gave the bundle to a watchman.

WILLIAM HART . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to me, and the prosecutor gave me this bundle; I have had it ever since - it contains an apron and coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor says false - I did not strike him; it was distress drove me to it - I was totally destitute; the officer took two duplicates from me of a pair of shoes I had pawned - my father was nine months in prison; my mother died, and we were turned out of doors.

WILLIAM HART. He had a knife and two duplicates.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Reference Number: t18281023-59

2012. ELIZABETH WOOLLER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 tin box, value 1d.; 3 half-crowns, and 1 shilling, the property of Patrick McGowan , from his person .

PATRICK MCGOWAN. I am a Chelsea pensioner . On the 13th of October, at night, I met the prisoner - I think it was between twelve and one o'clock; I was looking for a woman who had run away with my money three nights before - I do not know where I met her; I was

sober: she put her arms about me, but did not ask me to go any where; she took out of my pocket a tin box, with three half-crowns and a shilling in it; I laid hold of her, and called the watchman - he came up, and she gave him the box; I was making the best of my way home to Shadwell.

THOMAS GREGG . I am a watchman. Between one and two o'clock in the morning I saw the prosecutor and prisoner together; the prosecutor had been drinking, but knew what he was about - he had hold of the prisoner, and charged her with robbing him of three half-crowns and a shilling; she said she had taken no money, but did take the box, and he might have it if he liked: the prosecutor gave the same account he has now - she said she did not intend to steal it; I opened the box - there was nothing in it. I knew the prisoner before; a man came up to her in the street, and wanted to speak to her; I would not let him, and he knocked the prosecutor down.

- HORTON. I took the prisoner, and searched her as far as decency would allow, but I knew by her position she had something about her - I could not get a woman to search her, and from a certain part of her person I took three half-crowns and a shilling, which I gave to Noyes, who is not here.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second London Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18281023-60

2013. WILLIAM BRADFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 oz. weight of tea, value 3d., and 1 four-pound brass weight, value 3s., the goods of the United Company of Merchants of England, trading to the East Indies , to whom he was a servant .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SYRETT . I am a commodore in the East India Company's service. On the 18th of September the prisoner had the care of the room, No. 30, at Crutched-friars , so far that nobody else had any business there; we had finished work there, and I went to see if the warehouse was cleaned up - the room contained chests of tea which had been repaired - they were piled up; I observed a chest broken open, which I had secured by nailing up and nailing hoops over the head; I mentioned this to Barber and Fraser, who are elders - the prisoner had no business in that room, that I know of; he was a commodore in the establishment: about 1 lb. of tea was taken from the chest.

BENJAMIN COLE . I am a labourer in the East India Company's employ, and am also an officer. I was directed by Fraser on the 19th of September, to station myself in the warehouse, No. 19; I concealed myself there about eight o'clock in the morning - in the afternoon the prisoner came into a little room, about half-past one o'clock; I had noticed this chest of tea particularly; it was about the centre of the room - the floor near it was perfectly clean; the prisoner came to the first window, stopped there about a minute, and then walked round, feeling with his feet, as if to see if any one was secreted there; the men at times conceal themselves there to sleep - he then went to the chest, moved part of the head, and put his hand in - he took something out, which he smelt, and returned it to the chest; he took something more out, and walked away with it in his hand; he came back in five minutes, and was going to return to the chest, but a noise occurred, which prevented him - he went away; I waited two hours - nobody else came, and I then informed Barber and Fraser; after the prisoner left the chest, there was some tea sprinkled on the floor, in two places; he was sent for, and I told him I suspected he had something belonging to the Company; he said he had not - I said it was my duty to search him, and if he had, to produce it; he then pulled some tea from his trousers pocket - I said I was not satisfied, and in searching him found a small packet more of tea on him, and in his right-hand coat pocket a 4lbs. weight, such as the Company use; he said he had had one before, and was going to take that home to pound something with, and would bring it back, and that he had obtained Mr. Barber's leave to do so - Barber said he had not; we allow nothing to go off the premises: these weights are made particularly for the Company - the tea weighed about three quarters of an ounce, besides what was spilt; I kept the weight in my possession, and gave the tea to the Excise-officer.

JEREMIAH COX . I am an Excise-officer, and have the tea, which Cole delivered to me.

RICHARD VARDOME . I am a weight-maker, and work for the Company. I never make weights of this pattern for any body else - it is a 4 lbs. weight.

Prisoner. Q. Have you any private-mark on it? A. No; the Company sent me a pattern to make it by - I do not believe there was ever any made of this construction before; it has been made some time.

ALEXANDER FRASER . I am assistant elder to the Company. These are such weights as the Company use - this one belonged to No. 3 room; I believe the prisoner had access to that room; I saw the prisoner that day - he should have been in No. 9 room, where he had a gang of men under him.

Prisoner. Mr. Fraser's desk is in the room where the weight was kept, and he must have seen me go for it if I took it.

ALEXANDER FRASER . They are not kept there; he need not come through my room to come from No. 9; his wages were 22s. 6d. a week.

Prisoner's Defence. Being almost overwhelmed with my awful situation, I trust you will show me some lenity - I entered the service three years ago, and have borne an unblemished character; I have served as an extra surveyor, and had many trunks of specie to take to Gravesend; of which I kept the key; I could have robbed them, and it would not have been found out till the vessel returned; I trust you will consider my wife and family, and that I have a mother to support.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-61

2014. ELIZA BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , - of a yard of ribbon, value 1s. 3d.; 1 yard of other ribbon, value 2s.; 1 1/2 yard of other ribbon, value 2s. 6d.; 3 yards of other ribbon, value 3s.; 1 1/2 yard of other ribbon, value 1s.; 3 1/2 yards of other ribbon, value 3d.; 1 stay-lace, value 6d.; - a yard of trimming, value 6d.; 2 yards of edging, value 1s. 8d.; 2 1/2 yards of lace, value 10s.; 1 gauze handkerchief,

value 1s. 6d.; 1 other handkerchief. value 2s. 4d.: 1 1/2 yard of gros de Naples, value 5s. 3d.; 10 yards of silk, value 1l. 10s.; 1 lace veil, value 1s., and 1 bonnet, value 17s., the goods of James Jones and another her masters .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-62

2016. WILLIAM JORDAN was separately indicted for embezzling the sums of 4l.; 3l.; 4l.; 4l. 5s. 10d., and 12l. 15s., which he had received on account of Joseph Fothergill , to whom he was clerk .

To which indictments, the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-63

2017. HENRY JONES and JOHN SIMPSON were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Esther West , at St. Martin, Ludgate , on the 29th of September , and stealing therein 12 silver forks, value 17l.; 12 silver table-spoons, value 17l, and 18 silver tea-spoons, value 6l., her property .

HENRY SMITH . I am shopman to Esther West, a jeweller ; she is a jeweller, and lives in Ludgate-street , in the parish of St. Martin, Ludgate. On the 29th of September, about a quarter-past four o'clock in the afternoon, Thorowgood the officer came into the shop, and asked if I was aware of the window being cut; I said not; he took me to the end of the window, and pointed out a boy, who, he said, had cut it; I saw then that it was starred but not broken, only split to the bottom - it was entire half an hour before, when I was inspecting the outside of the window; the property was safe when the officer spoke to me - we let it remain there; the glass was split at the bottom, and a crack down, so that by pushing the glass in, a hand could he put in, but there was no hole then; the officer pointed through the window to Simpson, who was looking in at the window; he walked away, and, as I suppose, went round under the gateway of Pilgrim-street; I turned my head round again, and saw a man leaning against the window under the gateway, and saw the glass pushed suddenly through by his elbows - his hand entered, and he took at first six forks - the officer was undoing the door, and went out to secure him; he walked away; I took notice of his face, it was Jones I am certain; the officer went out and I after him - we overtook Jones, two doors from our's, at Mr. Eyles', the linen-draper - he took him back, and I saw him take the property from him in the shop; it belonged to Mrs. West.

ROBERT HOCKLEY . I knew the prisoners - I saw them come several times up Ludgate-hill together on the 29th of September - they came up the street together, and went to Mrs. West's shop: I was on the opposite side of the way when Jones was taken - it was near a quarter-past four o'clock; I had seen them together before four.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you knew Simpson before? A. No - he is a very little boy, which made me remark him; the officer pointed him out to me - I had seen them together last about ten minutes to four o'clock, I think.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD . I am an officer. On the afternoon of the 29th of September I saw the prisoners in company with another, at the end of Cornhill - I followed them, thinking they looked suspicious, and in Cheapside I saw them survey two or three silversmiths' shops; I then followed them to Ludgate-hill, and saw them cross the street to Mrs. West's shop - I saw them walk three or four times round under the archway, and return again: Simpson twice looked into the front-window on Ludgate-street - I went into Mr. Alger's shop, where the last witness lives and told him to observe the lad, pointing him out - I then went down Ludgate-hill, facing the passage opposite the Old Bailey, came round through the archway, and saw Jones talking to somebody; I passed them, and saw Simpson still standing at the corner - I crossed over to Mr. Alger's, and said to the witness."You have kept your eye on the boy, shall you know him again?" he said he should; I then crossed, and saw the boy cross his hand at the window - I went round the hill, returned, and saw the glass was cut across and down: I went in and shewed it to Smith - I turned my eye, and Jones was leaning with his arm against the corner - he forced the glass in some little distance: I asked if there was another door - Smith said there were two side doors; Simpson then put his hand up, took the gass from the frame, and put it into his pocket - Jones immediately turned round, and drew the property out of the window: I saw him draw out some articles - the porter opened the first door, and in opening the second, which leads into the street, the bolt made a noise, and they immediately made off: I kept my eye on Jones - Simpson turned round and looked me full in the face; I followed Jones up the bill, and stopped him two doors from the house; I asked him what he had been doing - he said Nothing: I took him back to the shop, and asked what he had got in his pocket - he said Nothing; I found these articles in his coat-pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Why did you not make somebody else take Simpson? A. I had not an opportunity - I was at one time on the opposite side, and at another time by the gateway: I saw him pass him hand across the window - the window was not broken, but cut and starred; I never saw one broken in that way by accident - glass so thick as this would not split by the pressure of the elbow without being first starred; we might he not above six yards from Simpson - I saw nothing in his hand to cut the glass with; he did not run - I cannot conceive that it could he done by accident in the way it was broken - Jones took the glass; he took no goods out; it rained at the time, and there were a number of people standing under the archway - none of them are here; the crowd would hide him; the glass broken was in the gateway, where the people were standing - the prisoners stood rather away from the people, and were more conspicuous to me; the persons standing up were looking on to Ludgate-hill - I knew Simpson had not got the property, and by taking him I should have made a disturbance, and the one with the property would have escaped; the property was taken about four minutes after the window was broken: I knew Simpson's person before - he had on a brown jacket, waistcoat and trowsers, and a black hat - his jacket was braided.

JAMES LEE . I took up Simpson next day on Ludgate-hill - he had a blue coat on; I had seen him in Jones' company the day before, in a brown braided jacket and black hat, which I found at his lodgings in Prince's-street; his mother went there with me.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I went with Lee to the prisoners' lodgings.

Jones pleaded distress.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SIMPSON - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 99s., but not of breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-64

2018. CELIA HENLEY and MARY CANNON were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 20 yards of printed cotton, value 20s. , the goods of William Brown .

HENRY BROWN . I am shopman to my brother William, linen-draper , of the Minories . The prisoners came to the shop between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, and looked at several pieces of print, and after shewing them several they fixed on two remnants, which came to 8s. - I folded them up, and they said they would pay 2s. deposit; Henley put her hand to her pocket, and said she had left her money on the mantel-shelf, and would leave me her shawl till she brought the 2s.: they left the shop - I suspected them, went out and brought them back, and saw this linen fall from Cannon; I charged her with taking it - she said she knew nothing about it; I stopped them five or six yards from the door - I have some recollection of them both before.

Prisoner HENLY. I never went out of the shop - we were both at the top of the shop. Witness. They were both out of the shop.

PETER BOSTON . I am an officer, and received the prisoners in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENLEY'S Defence. I was never outside the shop - as we came in we saw the print lying there; I had gone out in a hurry, and left 2s. on my shelf, and told him to put my name on the print; as I came down the shop he laid hold of me, and said the print fell from Cannon.

CANNON'S Defence. I did not leave the shop at all.

HENLY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

CANNON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-65

2019. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 wooden box, value 2d.; 1 half-crown, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the property of Susannah Ashfield , from her person .

BENJAMIN LOUTS LECAND . I am a looking-glass maker, and live in Prescott-street. On the 6th of October, I was in Lower Thames-street , about half-past eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner draw his hand out of the pocket of a person, who said her name was Susannah Ashfield; I tapped her on the shoulder and informed her- the prisoner immediately ran away; I pursued - he was stopped before I lost sight of him; I am certain of his person.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Were you acquainted with either of the parties? A. No: I was merely passing - I did not see what was in his hand - I was close alongside him.

COURT. Q. Where is the prosecutrix? A. She cannot be found - she has moved, and says she has got her money back again and will not come.

JEMIMA HOLDSWORTH . I heard a call of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running towards me; I saw him throw a box down, which I picked up and gave to the officer, who took him - I saw the prosecutrix afterwards, she said it was hers.

JOHN YEARRON . I was coming out of my door, and heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was stopped and I laid hold of him; Holdsworth handed the box to me - I took him into a shop; he fell on his knees, and said if I would let him go, he would never do so again - I opened the box - there was half a sovereign, a shilling, and sixpence in it.

BENJAMIN LOUIS LECAND re-examined. The woman and begged the Lord Mayor to let her have her money, it was given to her.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-66

2020. MARY LUDKE and JANE TWORD were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 diamond ring, value 4l., the goods of Lewis Emanuel , the master of the said Mary Ludke .

LEWIS EMANUEL. The prisoner Ludke was in my service and Tword used to come to the house to do jobs, but was not regularly employed. On the 20th of July, I received a paper, containing some diamonds, six rings, and six brooches, which were ordered to be put away into my bed-room: on the 25th, I missed a diamond ring, and told Ludke of it; the house was searched, and she looked for it - on the 4th of August she left my service, and on the 15th of September I was sent for by Mr. Williamson, a pawnbroker, who had detained Tword.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long had she been in your service? A. Four months; she behaved well - I certainly think she has fallen into bad hands, for she has been intrusted with some hundreds of my property; I should not object to take her back myself.

COURT. Q. You cannot say that Tword was in your house that day? A. No.

JAMES HENRY WILLIAMSON . I am a pawnbroker. - I have a diamond ring which Tword came on the 18th of September, to pawn for 1l.; I asked if she pawned it for herself - she said it was her own, and she considered it quite an impertient question, as she had worn many rings of that description; I detained her - she said it was her own property; I asked where she lived - she said in Castle-street, Whitechapel, and was a green-grocer; that her husband worked in Smithfield-market - she made a hasty step to go away; I went after her and brought her back.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did she take you to Emanuel's house? A. No.

PETER BOSTON . I am an officer. I took Ludke; her mother was with her, and asked what it was about; I said a diamond ring; Ludke said "That wretch of a washerwoman told me to take it;" this was said quite voluntary.

THOMAS COX . I went by Williamson's desire with Tword; she took me to Mr. Emanuel's - she pushed the door too, and said to Mr. Emanuel "Where is Mary Ann?" I said "This woman has been to pawn a diamond ring at Williamson's; he sent me to see where she lived, and she has brought me here;" he said her had lost a ring - he

went to Williamson's, and claimed it; Ludke made her escape out of the back-door, and next morning was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How did she come to take you to Emanuel's? A. I do not know, but she took me there; she asked for Mary Ann; she said she had given her the ring, or something to that effect, and that she had received it last night from Ludke.

Ludke put in a written Defence, stating that she had frequently been urged by Tword to rob her master; that she had found this ring in the bed-room, and on calling at Tword's she shewed it to her; that she took it from her, and promised to take her to the theatre.

TWORD'S Defence. I did not know the ring was stolen.

LUDKE - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

TWORD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-67

2021. THOMAS MUNNS and JOHN HOPKINS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Davis , on the 11th of October , at St. Bridget , and stealing 120 halfpence, his property .

WILLIAM KINGHAM . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 11th of October, I saw the two prisoners at the corner of the prosecutor's shop, which is at the corner of Fleet-market and Ludgate-hill - he is a poulterer ; I saw Hopkins very busy at the side-window; I saw him put his crutch on the ground; he jumped up into the window, and took out a parcel, which he gave to Munns; I went and asked the prosecutor if he missed any thing - he looked, and missed a 5s. paper of halfpence - I followed the prisoners, and took the parcel from Munns.

JAMES DAVIS . My father, William Davis, is owner of this house; Kingham came in, and asked if I missed anything; I missed a 5s. paper of halfpence. which I had put on the table in the parlour adjoining the shop five minutes before - the parlour window was opened to get it; I went out with him; I took Hopkins and saw him take the paper of halfpence from Munns,

MUNNS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

HOPKINS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Of Stealing only. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-68

2022. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Emanuel Emanuel , from his person .

EMANUEL EMANUEL. On the 1st of October, about two o'clock, I was in Cornhill ; an officer tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if I had lost any thing; I put my hand to my pocket, and the handkerchief was gone; I had it a minute or two before; the officer produced it to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES ROBERTS . I am an officer. On the 1st of October, at two o'clock, I was in Broad-street; Forrester pointed the prisoner out to me - he went from there to the corner of Sweeting's-alley; Mr. Emanuel came out of the alley with a friend; the prisoner followed him about one hundred yards, then put his hand into Mr. Emanuel's pocket, and took out the handkerchief; he walked across the road, and as soon as he saw me he ran; I took him directly with the handkerchief in his hand.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I pointed the prisoner out to Roberts, having seen him follow different gentlemen.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Mr. Simpson's, in Leadenhall-street, for work; this gentleman was before me- I took my handkerchief out to use, and as I put it back the officer came over and took me; the prosecutor said he had lost nothing, and could not swear to it.

MR. EMANUEL. I did not say so.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-69

2023. RICHARD LITTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of John Street Dickson .

JOHN JONES . I am servant to John Street Dickson. Last Thursday the prisoner came and knocked at the door, about twenty minutes to eight o'clock; I let him in; he asked the shopwoman for a pair of nine-sized shoes; she opened the drawers; he began pulling them about, but could find none to suit him; the young woman left me to mind the shop while she went up stairs - I stood between two counters, and did not see him take the shoes off the iron, but saw him sliding his hand down by his pocket; he said he would call again, and went out; I looked out, and saw him running as hard as he could - I ran after him, calling Stop thief! and in St. Ann's-lane I saw him throw the shoes out of his pocket; he was stopped without my losing sight of him; I took them up.

THOMAS RIVERS . I heard a cry of Stop thief! as I was in St. Martins-le-grand, and had seen the prisoner in the shop; he was stopped, and given into my charge.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-70

2024. EDWARD BASHFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 basket, value 5s.; 1 yard of baize, value 3d.: and 8 loaves of bread, value 5s. 10d. , the goods of Harvey Brown .

WILLIAM LANE . I was servant to Harvey Brown, a baker . On the 26th of September, I left his basket of bread in care of an old man, at the top of Houndsditch , while I went to Guildhall tap; I returned in ten minutes - the basket, eight loaves, and the green baize, were gone; the baize is here - I believe it to the same - it has marks of flour and bread about it.

ISABELLA RICHARDSON . I live in Houndsditch; I saw the basket in care of an old man, who sells cakes - the prisoner came up to me, and asked where the man was who belonged to it; I said I believed he was gone with some bread - he said it was his brother's; and while I was serving ginger-beer at my stall, he took the basket, and went down Liverpool-street with it on his back.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know him before? A. No. I noticed that he had a blue tooth in his top row, when he spoke to me; I am quite sure about him.

CHARLES WALLER . I apprehended the prisoner two days after this at the Turk's Head public-house, Aldgate; the landlord gave me a green baize, which he said, in the prisoner's presence, he had given to him - the prisoner did not deny it; there is a little dough on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner say he found it on the step of a door? A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I was not near that part of the town; I found the baize on the pavement.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-71

2025. JOHN CARDEN was indicted for embezzlement .

There being no proof of the prisoner's being possessed of the money in the City of London, he was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18281023-72

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28.

First London Jury. - Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

2026. JOHN KNOX was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-73

2027. JOHN PARSONS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

SAMUEL BURROWS . I am a milkman , and live in Tash-street, Gray's Inn-lane. I have known the prisoner two years and a half - he calls himself cellarman to a wine-merchant, but I have not seen him for a year and a half; I used to see him at the Vine public-house, in Vine-street - I met him in Fleet-street on the 19th of September ; he said, "How are you?" I did not recollect him at the moment, and was going on, but he made a full stop; I recollected him, and asked what he was doing - he said he was selling wine for a gentleman in Mark-lane, and that he had four bottles of sherry in his cart. would I buy them; I said I would - that I had to go to Serjeant's Inn, and would return to him, which I did, and went to a wine-vaults with him; I had not seen his cart - he pulled a bottle out of his pocket, and said he had sold 90l. worth of wine that week, and he must make haste to go and receive the money; he shewed me a bill which amounted to 90l. odd - he pulled four bottles out of his pocket, and assisted me in putting them into mine; I asked what they came to - he said 9s.; I had but 8s., which I gave him, and was to pay him the other another time - on my road home I accident ally broke a bottle; I could not smell the wine, and said,"D-n the fellow, he has done me;" when I got home I drew a cork - it was the colour of wine, but was not wine; here is a bottle of it; I met him on the Tuesday following in Baldwin's-gardens, and said, "You are a d-d pretty fellow to sell me such stuff as that for wine" - he said."Why, by G-d! it was wine;" I got into a passion with him - he said, "Well, shew me the wine;" I took him to a public-house, and told the landlord to mind him while I fetched a bottle - I poured out a glass, and he said so help him G-d he did not know but it was wine, it was just as it was given by his master to sell: I said, "Well, give me the money back, and take the bottles" - he said, "No, you may send to my master for the money;" I asked who his master was - he said Mr. Ramsay, of Mark-lane.

THOMAS RAMSAY . I am a wine-merchant, and live in Mark-lane. The prisoner was not in my employ, except that he had occasionally washed bottles for our cellarman, but not latterly; he never had wine to sell for me - this is water coloured, not wine.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am an officer. I found a bottle of stuff on the prisoner.

MR. RAMSAY. This stuff is used to colour rum - it is coloured sugar; I believe he was in distress.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Whipped and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18281023-74

2028. HENRY LLOYD was indicted for a misdemeanor .

GEORGE NETTLEFIELD . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Bishopsgate-street, Without . On the 2d of August the prisoner came to my shop, and asked my man for some Dutch cheese - I was present; the shop was full of customers - he was served with 7 lbs. 3 oz., which came to 4s. 1 1/2d.; he threw down a gilt sixpence, and said, "Give me change" - my man came round and said, "This is another of them that this man was here last night with;" he said it was no such thing - he was not here last night - I sent for Sapwell, who searched him, and he had not got a farthing.

WILLIAM FARR . I live with the prosecutor. The prisoner came about 11 o'clock at night, on the 1st of August - I served him with Dutch cheese, which came to 3s. 4d.; he threw down a gilt sixpence - I did not know but it was a half-sovereign, and gave him 6s. 8d. in change; he went away; while I was giving him change he said he kept a public-house close by, and was going to have a club, and should want some hams - this took my attention from the money; he came again next day, and tendered another gilt sixpence, and said, "Give me change" - I told master he was the man who had been there the night before; they are both gilt sixpences (looking at them).

Prisoner's Defence. I took them in exchange for a double sovereign; and postponed my trial last Session in order to prove it, but I cannot find the witnesses; I had got intoxicated the first night, and lost the cheese.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18281023-75

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2029. WILLIAM WILLIS was indicted for that he, on the 25th of August , at St. Ann, Blackfriars , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain order for payment of money , as follows:

Messrs. Hankey and Co. London, August 23, 1828.

Pay to Mr. Ibbottson, or bearer, the sum of sixty-four pounds, ten shillings.

£64. 10s. THOMAS TAYLOR. with intention to defrand John Joseph Lawson and others; against the Statute, &c.

2d COUNT, that he on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain false, forged, and counterfeited order for payment of money, he well knowing the same to be false, forged, and counterfeited, as follows; (Order set out as above;) with intention to defrand the said John Joseph Lawson and others; against the Statute, &c.

3d and 4th COUNTS, like the first and second, only stating the intent to be to defraud Augustus Robert Hankey and others.

5th and 6th COUNTS, the same, only stating the intent to be to defraud George Horatio Street .

7th and 8th COUNTS, the same, only stating the intent to be to defraud John Davis .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE HORATIO STREET. I am acting publisher of the Times newspaper , and manage my business at the office in Printing-house-square, in the City. I know the prisoner - he was in the employ of Mr. Davis, a newsagent , in August last - Davis purchased papers at our office; on the 25th of August, in the afternoon, the pri

soner called at the office, and presented a cheque for 64l. 10s., out of which he requested me to take ten guineas, and give him the difference, (it was the cheque in question) - he owed me a balance for extra papers which he had taken up apparently on account of his master; I did as he required; I paid him the balance, deducting the ten guineas; I gave the cheque to Cannon, our clerk in the office; my endorsement was written on the cheque; before it was sent to the bankers I wrote"W. E. Davis" on the back of it; I wrote that to indentify it as the cheque I had received from the prisoner; I always do it the moment I receive it; I will not say I did it in his presence, but it must have been before he left the office; the cheque was sent to Gosling's, the bankers of our establishment; it was returned from Gosling's on the following day dishonoured (looking at a cheque,) this is the cheque - it was my endorsement on it; John James Lawson is one of the firm of the office; there are others.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLHUS. Q. Your's is an office of great business? A. It is - my department is the publishing, which is separate from where the public came; we have one other customer named Davis; I am certain the prisoner is the person who gave me the cheque, and that he said he came from Davis - by W. E. I mean West-end Davis, to distinguish him from the other, who lives in the City.

COURT. Q. What are the Christian names of the other Mr. Davis? A. We do not know their Christian names - they go with us by the names of West-end and City Davis; I know the prisoner acted for the West-end Davis - he came regularly from him, and took a very different quantity of papers to the other.

GEORGE SKEATE . I am clerk to Messrs. Hankey, bankers : I have been there nearly thirty years; I am acquainted with the names of the different customers (looking at the cheque) - we have no customer of this name; nobody of this name has authority to draw on our Bank; we have no account in that name, if there had been I should have known it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you the books of the firm here? A. No; my knowledge is derived from those books, there is no other criterion - but I have not only to examine the various accounts, but to go through every account, and if there is any default, I report it to my employers.

COURT. Q. Does your knowledge merely arise from the inspection of the books, or from your knowledge of the business of the house? A. From the ledgers; I generally go through the accounts every evening, and my habit of checking the accounts enables me to say no such customer was authorised to draw on the house on the 26th of August.

JOHN DAVIS. I am a newspaper-agent, and live in Broad-street, St. Giles': the prisoner was in my employ. I have purchesed newspapers from the Times for these nine years, to the amount of 75l. a week; I always sent down a cheque on the Monday morning for the week's papers in advance; I send it by different boys, sometimes by the prisoner, and sometimes by others; I did not owe them a halfpenny on the 25th of August - not to my knowledge: the prisoner lived three years and three quarters with me - I am well acquainted with his hand-writing (looking at the cheque) - I will swear this is the hand-writing of the prisoner - I am confident the whole of the cheque is in his writing; but this on the back, and W. E. Davis is not his.

Q. On the 25th of August had you sent him to the Times office? A. I saw him on the Sunday, and his business was to go to fetch the papers without further orders; he comes every morning at six o'clock - I saw him on Monday, he brought the papers; I did not see him on the Tuesday, nor afterwards, till he was apprehended on my offering a reward of twenty guineas; he left me on the 25th of August, at nine o'clock in the evening - I did not see him again till the 8th of September, when he was in custody.

Q. When did you first see this cheque? A. On the Wednesday morning - Street sent me up a memorandum, and I saw the cheque - I had never seen it before.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you so well acquainted with the prisoner's hand-writing, that you can swear the cheque is his? A. I am; it is disguised from what he generally writes; but I am confident it is his writing.

COURT. Q. In paying for your papers, would you deliver to the person who went for you a cheque on your own banker's? A. Yes; Messrs. Praeds, of Temple-bar, are my bankers - I never sent the Times a cheque on any body but my own banker's, as the amount was so much; I have no customer named Taylor.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of September, at No. 14, Home-street, Paddington.(The cheque was here read, see Indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - Overwhelmed with despair at the awful situation in which I am placed, and being called upon to say something in my defence, I will not trespass long upon your time but in as brief a manner as I can, will state the facts of how I came in possession of the cheque. My Lord, I stand before you for having forged a cheque, and afterwards uttering it, knowing it to be forged; I declare most solemnly that I am entirely innocent of either the one or the other. On Saturday, previous to the presentation of the bill, I was at a gambling-house near Temple-bar; by appointment I was to meet a person there on business: a young man, of a most gentlemanly appearance, took a pocket-book from his pocket - he opened it before me, it contained various papers - I saw him drop one; he having left the room, I picked it up unperceived by any one - on opening it, I found it to be a cheque for 64l. 10s.; I rejoiced at my seeming good fortune - put it in my pocket, and left the house; being embarrassed in my affairs, and not hearing any thing respecting the loss of the cheque, on the Monday following, I presented it to one Mr. Street, offering to pay him what I was indebted to him; Mr. Street took it, deducting his account, and gave me the balance. My Lord, in regard to my absconding, I answer, that knowing I had become possessed of the cheque in a clandestine manner, having received the balance from Mr. Street, who knew me well, and being convinced that should Mr. Street call upon me for the money which he had given me, I should not be able to reimburse him, I left the service of the best of masters. My Lord and Gentlemen, - I have been in the service of my prosecutor for the last four years; I call God to witness, at whose tribunal I must one day render an account, that I have never injured him in any one instance, but have in every thing served him faithfully, which my prosecutor will not deny. My Lord and Gentlemen, I have a wife and three helpless infants, destitute of bread, in consequence of my long confinement - and aged parents forlorn and distracted for my disgraceful and awful situation, trembling for the result. My Lord and Gentlemen, I have stated the whole truth of my unfortunate case; should you after

the above facts deem me guilty of the charge, I leave my life and all my future prospects in your hands, feeling assured, that whatever may be the decision against me, it will be given with due deliberation; and should the utmost penalty of the law be awarded me, I shall still be able to say with my last breath - I am innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

Of uttering, knowing it to be forged.

Reference Number: t18281023-76

Before Mr. Recorder.

2030. WILLIAM MATTHEWS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE EDWARD FALLOWS . I am grandson of George Webb , a publican , of Lower Thames-street . On the 2d of October , between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner came and called for a pot of porter, he gave me a shilling, which I took to my grandfather; I gave the prisoner a sixpence and one penny in change: he then called for a pot of half-and-half, and gave me a shilling; I gave him sixpence in change; he afterwards called for another pot of half-and-half, and gave me another shilling, which I also gave to my grandfather; I received four shillings from him, all of which I gave to my grandfather, but the two last were not put into the till.

GEORGE WEBB. The prisoner came to my house; I received four shillings from Fallow; I put the two first into the till: I suspected the third, and laid it on the counter, and the fourth also; I sent for Hall, and gave them to him - I am certain I did not mix the two last with any others.

JAMES HALL . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner: Webb delivered me four shillings, two of which were marked; I found on the prisoner three good shillings, six sixpences, and 8 1/2d - in his waistcoat and breeches pockets I found ten counterfeit shillings, and in his jacket pocket a paper containing fifty-one counterfeit shillings, each wrapped separately in paper; I found some letters in his pocket-book, and under the seal of one of them was a bad sovereign, in whitey-brown paper.

MR. FIELD. I am an inspector of counterfeit coin. These two shillings are both counterfeit, and from the same die; the sixty-one shillings are also counterfeit, and from the same die - there is a slight silvering on them, which a little rubbing will remove.

Prisoner's Defence. I went and pawned my clothes for 6s., and as I came out two gentleman came and asked what I had been there for; I said to get something to enable me to go home: they each gave me 2s. a piece.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties .

Reference Number: t18281023-77

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2031. WILLIAM GUEST was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-78

2032. CAROLINE MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 waistcoat, value 4s. , the goods of George Clamp .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18281023-79

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2033. THOMAS CHURCH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 6 gold rings, value 4l. 12s.; 1 gold seal, value 30s.; 2 silver medals, value 10s.; 1 pair of shoe-buckles, value 3s.; 7 cornelian buttons, with silver shanks, value 14s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 15s.; 1 waist-buckle, set with amethyst, value 5s., and 1 gold ring, set with a garnet, value 8s., the goods of William Watkins , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WATKINS. I am in the employ of Mr. Charles Stock , a newsvender, of Racquet-court, Fleet-street : he does not live in the house - he keeps the house, but does not sleep there; I reside there as his servant ; the roof of the house was being repaired on the 9th of October - the prisoner was at work there; these articles were safe on Sunday, the 5th of October, in a small box, which was in a trunk in my bed-room; I missed them on the 19th - the prisoner only worked there on the 9th.

ROBERT PICKERILL . The prisoner was my apprentice. I was employed to repair this house - he worked there; I saw some of the articles in the possession of Sarah Smith's mother; the officer searched the room the prisoner slept in, and found some property in the trousers which he wore on Sundays.

SARAH SMITH . I am servant to a person at Bagnigge-wells. I have known the prisoner some time - we were not very intimate; he gave me a pair of drops and a ring last Sunday fortnight - I took them to my mother.

CHARLOTTE SMITH . My daughter brought a box to me with jewellery in it; I put it into a drawer, and afterwards delivered to Elms the same articles as my daughter gave to me.

WILLIAM ELMS . I have the articles. I apprehended the prisoner at the prosecutor's house last Monday week; I went to his master, who took me to his bed-room, and in his trousers pocket, in his box, we found seven cornelian buttons; I found concealed in the room, on a rafter near the ceiling, three seals - it was a top room; I did not either threaten or promise him any thing; I was going to the Compter with him, and said, "You showed a button to Mr. Pickerill's servant; when I have taken you to the Compter, I shall go and see whether you had it from your cousin, as you have said;" he said, "It is of no use going to my cousin, for I took it out of the box."

WILLIAM WATKINS. Here are five gold rings, a gold seal, some silver medals, a shoe-buckle, ear-ring, waist-buckle, a set of amethyst and gold rings, set with garnets; they are all articles of fashion.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the box locked? A. No; he was obliged to go through the room at different times to get on the roof.

GUILTY. Aged 16. Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-80

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2034. JOHN REES was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JOHN DUNDAS . I live in Basing-lane . On the 12th of

September , a little after six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and told me he wanted to buy some book-muslin - he stated that he was in the silk trade, but had sometimes an order for muslin, and would give me the order; I shewed him some book-muslins - he was quite satisfied with them: I told him the price, and said I could not afford to give him credit, for I paid ready money for all my goods; he said he did not want any credit, and if I would allow him to have them on approbation, he would return what he did not keep, and pay me for the rest in the course of the day; he told me his warehouse was at No. 8, Bow-lane, and his name was John Rees - he wanted me to send the muslins there next morning by half-past nine o'clock, which I promised to do, but he called in the morning before that time - I was dressing myself; my wife shewed him into the room - I went to him, and said I had not entered the goods, nor made an invoice; he said it was of no consequence - he wanted to show them to a customer, and as soon as he had done he would return with either the goods or money in the course of the day: he went away with three pieces of book-muslin, measuring thirty-six yards, which are worth 3l. 2s., and never returned, with or without the goods - this happened on a Saturday; I had occasion to go to the West-end of the town - on the Monday I went to No. 8, Bow-lane, and inquired, and found no such person lived there - he had lodged there on the very day he had my goods, but on the Sunday the landlord had turned him out, but he had no warehouse there - I found he was not in the silk trade, nor in any trade whatever: when he was apprehended, he told me what an unfortunate thing it was for him, for he was going to commence business that day, in Lawrence-lane: I told him he could not commence business without having money, and asked him to pay me for my goods - I have got neither goods no money.

Prisoner. Q. Was I not to pay you the cash at the end of the month? A. No: I told him he must bring me back money or goods.

MARY ANN LOVETT . I live at No. 8, Bow-lane - the prisoner lodged about a month with me, and left the day before the prosecutor called, which was on the Monday; he only had a sleeping-room - no warehouse; I never knew him in any business - he paid me 6s. 6d. a week for his room.

Prisoner. Q. Did I leave of my own accord, or was I turned out? A. He was turned out on the Sunday; I should not object to his taking a friend into my parlour, to speak to him, but it was our room - he did not breakfast or sup there.

COURT. Q. You did not let it to him as a warehouse? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. Dundas has known me for fourteen years, and is it to be supposed he would trust me, without knowing me - of course he had faith in me by giving me credit; I owe him for the goods and will pay him - I took it for granted he meant cash at the end of the month.

JOHN DUNDAS. I have known him fourteen years - I have been a short time in business, and he knew I had no money; I never had any transaction with him in my life before. GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-81

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2035. JOHN CORPER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 2 bottles, value 4d., and 3 pints of wine, value 3s. , the goods of William Cansdell .

HENRY WILLIAM CANSDELL . I am the son of William Cansdell, of Bishopsgate-street Within . On Saturday evening last, about seven o'clock, I observed five suspicious characters round our door; I watched, and saw the prisoner come out of the office with two bottles of wine - the door is always open; I allowed him to come out, and then seized him; Forrester came up, and took him from me - I found one bottle of wine in his pocket, and the other in his hand; I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Are you quite certain you saw him come out of your door? A. I am - I told the Magistrate so.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I was passing and secured the prisoner; I took one bottle out of his hand, and the other from his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the door - a gentleman in a leather-apron asked me to hold the bottles while he stopped for a necessary purpose; I lost sight of him, and as I stood at the door I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-82

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2036. WILLIAM THOMAS and THOMAS BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 9 pairs of stockings, value 12s. , the goods of Richard Kipling .

WILLIAM ALLISTON . I am shopman to Mr. Richard Kipling, hosier , of the Poultry . On the 24th of October, between five and six o'clock, I was in the window getting some goods out for a customer, and saw the prisoner Thomas come into the shop, and take nine pairs of stockings off a side counter - he put them under his coat; I jumped out of window, and laid hold of his arms just as he was throwing them into the passage of Mr. Cowling's house, next door but one - I secured him; Herdsfield came across the road - Baker was with him, and when I took hold of his arm, he ran away; Herdsfield took him.

Prisoner THOMAS. At the Mansion-house I asked if he could swear I stole them - he said No, and that he did not see them in my possession. Witness. It is false - I said I saw him take them off the counter, and throw them into the passage.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners standing together at Mr. Kipling's window - I saw them go from the window very close to the door; they stood and talked together, then went to the window - I did not see the stockings taken, but saw Alliston run out; he took hold of one, and I of the other - they were together then.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS' Defence. I am a tailor , and was out of employ; I was going into a tavern to ask for some water when the gentlemen laid hold of me, and said I had stolen the stockings.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-83

Second London Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

2037. THOMAS LAWRENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 1 fishing-rod, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Smith and another.

JOSEPH PAYNE . I am foreman to Messrs. Smith and Son. On the evening of the 24th of October, at eight o'clock, I saw this fishing-rod in a carriage which stood on Galley-quay to be shipped - the carriage was secured by a leather covering, and the rod was inside; I went next morning at five o'clock to put it on board, and the fishing-rod was gone - I saw the prisoner on Tower-hill, about eight o'clock in the morning, with it in his possession; he was going towards Postern-row, in a direction from the quay - I did not know I was authorized to stop him; I knew him before - I went and told Mr. Smith; I went to the prisoner's house afterwards, and saw the rod produced.

Prisoner. Q. Did not a quantity of people come on the wharf at nine o'clock in the morning? A. Six men came to ship the carriage.

WILLIAM CRAFTER . I am a constable of the Customs. In consequence of information I went and apprehended the prisoner, who was a watchman of the Customs - I found him at No. 36, Cannon-street, Cannon-street-road, in bed; I told him the charge - he said he found the rod on Galley-quay gateway, behind the gate; this was about ten o'clock on the morning of the 25th.

Prisoner. Q. Was the rod secreted at all? A. No - it stood in the room; his wife shewed me where it was.

JAMES JORDAN . I am an officer of the Customs. I saw the prisoner at the carriage between three and four o'clock that morning, with something in his hand like a stick - I told him to return it to the carriage, and come away to his station, which he did; he had not left the carriage when I saw him with it.

Prisoner. Q. Was it not a staff I had in my hand? A. No, it was something long - our staffs are two feet long.

MR. ROBERT SMITH. I am a wharfinger of Galley-quay. This carriage and its contents were under my care - I was answerable for it; I did not know the rod was in it - I am in partnership with my son.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it behind the door of Chester-quay, after retiring from my duty; I have been eight years in the revenue service - I took it intending to enquire who it belonged to; I did not secrete it, but carried it openly across the hill.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18281023-84

2038. WILLIAM PROBEE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 coat, value 12s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 jacket, value 4s.; 1 other waistcoat, value 2s., and one gown, value 3s. , the goods of William Henry Wright .

WILLIAM HENRY WRIGHT. I am a baker , and live in Fleet-lane . On Monday, the 15th of September, the prisoner lodged in my back-garret, where these things were in a box; I had locked them up that day, and on the Friday I found the box broken open, and missed the things - he had been absent two days; I had him apprehended.

FREDERICK LANCE . I am a pawnbroker, and have a black coat, trousers and waistcoat, and a boy's jacket and waistcoat, which were pawned, on the 16th of September, by the prisoner, between eight and nine o'clock - I am certain of his person.

MARY ANN WRIGHT . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw the prisoner by the Mansion-house on Friday, and said he was the man who robbed my husband - he immediately ran away, but was pursued and taken; he had absconded himself from the lodgings - his wife lodged there with him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

PETER BOSTON . I took him in charge. He saw the prosecutor next day, and told him where the property was.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work in the road in Newgate-street; I owed a man some money - he threatened to trouble me about it; I told my landlady - she said if she had a sovereign she would lend it to me, and on the Monday she said if I would promise to bring the things back on Saturday, I might pawn them; she lent my sister a shawl to pawn for 3s. - her husband missed it and she said "Depend on it Probee has taken it."

MARY ANN WRIGHT. I never knew of his having them - it is false; I pawned a shawl to raise money to assist the prisoner's wife on the Wednesday before he was taken up.

WILLIAM HENRY WRIGHT. She told me she had lent the prisoner's wife a shawl, as she had no money.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-85

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2039. RICHARD HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , 1 saw, value 8s.; 1 plough, value 8s., and 1 plane, value 3s. , the goods of Martin Williams .

MARTIN WILLIAMS. I am a carpenter , and live in Bide's-place, Shoreditch; on the 23d of August, between twelve and one o'clock; I left my tools locked up in a building in Thomas-street, Hackney , and missed them at one, when I returned; two boards were taken down from the back-window; I have seen the prisoner about as a neighbour.

WILLIAM MORTER . I am a carpenter, and work for Williams. The prisoner is a carpenter , but did not work there - I saw him coming out of the premises with Williams' saw under his arm, on the 23d of August, between twelve and one o'clock - I knew it to be his, having used it; he had no business there; I accused him of stealing it, and took it from under his arm; I saw nothing else, but his jacket was bulky, as if something was in it; I did not stop him, as I knew him so well; I asked him to stop - I went to the house, and missed the property; he went away, and could not be found; I am certain it was Williams saw, and I saw him come out of the premises; he said it was his own; I said if he would stop I would convince him it was not, but he went away; I knew it by five punch marks on the handle.

Prisoner's Defence. It was my own saw - I had nothing else; I was not near the premises.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-86

2040, JOHN MUMFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 2 sheets, value 12s. , the goods of Mary Garrett .

JAMES HUXLEY . I live at Newington-green , next door to Mrs. Garrett; there is a private passage between our houses. On the 25th of September, a little after two o'clock, I met the prisoner in that passage with some linen in a bundle; I asked what brought him there; he said he thought it was a thoroughfare; I said it was not, and asked what linen he had got - he said it was his own; I kept by his side till we got to Mrs. Garrett's door - I then knocked; he threw the bundle down, and ran away; I pursued, gave an alarm, and he was secured; I am certain he is the man - the property was claimed by Mrs. Garrett.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you sure it was the same bundle? A. I found it still on the spot he threw it down; he was not out of my sight in turning the corner, for there are railings there, and I do not think I lost sight of him - I am sure he is the man.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a labourer. I was near Mr. Huxley's premises, and saw the prisoner run from Mrs. Garrett's passage; Huxley was two or three yards behind him, calling Stop thief! - I ran and took him, and am positive he is the man.

SARAH HITCHCOCK . I am servant to Mrs. Mary Garrett; I hung these sheets out to dry at nine o'clock this morning; Mr. Huxley knocked at the door - I ran out - he called Stop thief! and I saw Scott collar the prisoner - he brought him back to the door where the sheets lay.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 51.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-87

2040. SARAH WEARE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 8lbs, of beef, value 5s.; 3lbs. of mutton, value 2s., and 3lbs of lamb, value 2s. , the goods of Ann Webb .

GEORGE TURPIN . I am servant to Ann Webb, butcher , of Uxbridge . On the 4th of October, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner, who lives at Stoke, come into the shop, she asked if I had any odd pieces to sell cheap; I said not: I went to my dinner, and after that missed a piece of beef; I suspected her, and went and overtook her in about an hour with a basket: I said I thought that she had a piece of beef; she said she had not; I found it in her basket, and said I could swear to it; she said she had bought it in the market; I swore it was mine - she then said she did take it, and begged so hard to be forgiven; I said if she would take it back, I would - but when we got back I found all this other meat in the basket; it belonged to mistress - she had bought none of it.

JOHN FARRANT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner with the meat.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-88

2041. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 5s. , the goods of John Aaron .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-89

2042. ALFRED JOHN PEEK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 2 shillings, the monies of Louis Adolphus Durieu , his master .

LOUIS ADOLPHUS DURIEU. I am a tallow-chandler , and live in Drury-lane ; the prisoner was about six weeks in my employ. On the 5th of October, I marked six shillings, in consequence of suspicion, and gave them to Maynard - the prisoner was afterwards searched by the officer in my presence, and two of the marked shillings found on him; I afterwards searched his box - I found a sovereign and about 11s. in silver in his trousers pocket, and 6l. in silver in two paper parcels.

Prisoner. Q. I believe you know I had received a quarter's wages from my late employer, and that he made me a present of a sovereign? A. I understood so from you; he acknowledged that the marked shillings were mine.

WILLIAM MAYNARD . I received six marked shillings from Durieu, and gave them to Aikine.

ELIZABETH AIKINE . I received six marked shillings from Maynard. - I went to the prosecutor's shop and bought soap and candles of the prisoner. and paid him the same six shillings - he put them into the till.

HENRY BROWN . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found two marked shillings in his fob; I asked for the keys of his box, which he gave me; I asked if he had any more money - he said he had not, or he should not have taken the two shillings from the till, and asked forgiveness; I found a sovereign and half a guinea in his trousers pocket in his box, and 6l. in silver besides; he voluntarily said that he took the two shillings, out of the till; I found four sovereigns in another box of his.

LOUIS ADOLPHUS DURIEU. These two shillings are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to mercy. - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18281023-90

NEW COURT, (1st DAY.)

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2043. GEORGE TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 2 coats, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, value 10s., and 2 books, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Dixon .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-91

2044. GEORGE CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , 1 saddle, value 2l. , the goods of Leonard Briggs : - also for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 set of harness, value 3l. 10s. , the goods of William Gullock .

To which indictments the prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-92

2045. HENRY REED was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 1 bag, value 6d.; 1 purse, value 6d.; 2 half-crowns, 1 shilling, 1 sixpence, and 7 1/2d. in copper monies, the property of John Bertie , from the person of Esther, his wife .

ESTHER BERTIE . I am the wife of John Bertie. On the 12th of September, about twelve o'clock at noon, I was in the Commercial-road , going home; the prisoner pushed violently against me, put his hand into my basket, and took out my black reticule, containing a purse, two half-crowns, and other money - I saw him take it; he ran, and I followed him: he threw my bag over the wall of a gentleman's yard - he then stood still, and I took hold of him; he said he had not got the bag.

CHARLES LUBBOCK . I was coming along, and saw the prisoner turn round a corner, and throw a black bag over the wall; I saw the lady come up in a minute or two after - the servant of the house got the bag.

JANE ELLIS . I am servant at the house. This bag was in the yard - I got it, and gave it to the prosecutrix.

HENRY KNIGHT . I am a headborough. I took the prisoner, and received this bag and purse from a gentleman named Warden; the money was in it, but that was given to the prosecutrix by order of the Magistrate.

ESTHER BERTIE. The witness Ellis gave me this bag- it is mine; Mr. Warden came up and took hold of the prisoner, and I believe he took hold of the bag.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Wapping, selling fruit ; I heard a cry of Stop thief! this lady came up and said I had taken her reticule, but I had not seen it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281023-93

2046. RICHARD THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 till, value 1s.; 2 shillings, and the sum of 2s. 7d., in copper monies , the property of Robert Dunipace .

MARGARET DUNIPACE . I am the wife of Robert Dunipace - we keep a shop at Stepney . About a quarter-past eleven o'clock on the night of the 9th of October, I was in my parlour, looking through the window, into the shop - I did not see any one, but my daughter said there was somebody in the shop; I heard a noise, which I thought was a dog, but I found it was a man, going on his hands and knees - I sprung into the shop, and saw the prisoner with the till in one hand, and the keys in the other; I saw him plainly before he left the shop - I followed him about a stone's cast, and cried Stop thief! the watchman stopped him; there was 5s. 7d. in the till altogether.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. What sort of a window is there between your shop and parlour? A. It is all window - there is a curtain before it, but it was drawn back; there is a gas-light in the shop - I lost sight of him, but did not say I should not know him again.

BENJAMIN LLOYD . I am a watchman. On the night of the 9th of October I stopped the prisoner - he was running about one hundred yards from the shop; I did not see any one following him, but I heard voices calling Stop thief! I did not see the prosecutrix till I returned from the watch-house.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I am a night-officer. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I asked what he had been doing - he said Nothing; I waited some time, the prosecutor and his wife came in - she identified him directly; I asked if she was sure he was the man - she said Yes; she did not hesitate: he begged I would let him go, and told me his name was Williams; I said I could not let him go - he said if I would he would tell me the whole - that he fell asleep, and some person stole his hat and shoes, and he did this to buy some more, as he did not like to go home without them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she say she knew him by his black whiskers? A. No, by his black head.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to sleep in the square, and some person took my hat and shoes; I awoke up, and some persons were crying Stop thief! I ran to see for my hat and shoes, and the watchman took hold of me.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN. He was without hat and shoes.

THOMAS DORMAN . I am a watchman, but am not always on one beat, I saw Mrs. Dunipace that night, and asked her if she could swear to the man - she was quite flurried, and said she did not know what coloured coat he had on, whether it was blue or brown.

COURT. Q. Was that before she came to the watch-house? A. Yes - she was quite flurried; I have stated all she said.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-94

2047. JOHN STOCKINGS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 18th of August , 60 lbs. weight of horse-hair, value 9l. the goods of William Purkis , of which, by the same indictment, John Hodges , Francis Todd , Thomas Lumbley , and Thomas Wheatley , were convicted of stealing, in the dwelling-house of the said William Purkis, to whom they were servants, - he, the said prisoner well knowing the same to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

The record of the conviction of Hodges, Todd, Lumbley, and Wheatley, was put in and read.

WILLIAM PURKIS . I am a horse-hair manufacturer . - The four persons just named were all in my employ; the prisoner had been in my service about seven years ago - he left me, and got his living in the trade: I lost a great deal of property from time to time.

JAMES HANLEY . I am an officer of Worship-street, On the 18th of August, 1827, I went with the prosecutor and my brother officer to No. 48, Church-street, Mile-end - it is a small shop; I searched the house, and found this hair: the prisoner's wife was there, and was taken into custody, but was discharged.

DANIEL MURPHY . I sell oysters in the street. I saw Wheatley and Todd take some horse-hair to the prisoner's premises, in Church-street, Mile-end; they took it in, and he weighed it and gave them money - when they came out they said he gave them 1s. per lb. for it: I think this was on the 23d of July last year - it was about a month before I went to the Magistrate.

PHILIP WADE . I saw Hodges turn into the prisoner's house one day, but I do not know on what day, nor what month - it was in the last year; I was on the opposite side of the way, and did not hear what passed.

JAMES HANLEY re-examined. Q. When did you find this hair? A. On the 18th of August; we had apprehended the other four men on the 17th, and a warrant was taken out for the prisoner - we went there the next day, but he was not found till the 4th of this month, when the prosecutor met him in the street.

WILLIAM PURKIS re-examined. Q. Do you know at what time you were robbed? A. I had been robbed for two months before August, 1827. I can swear to this hair, as it had been washed out on the Monday before it was found - it was not washed to my mind, and I sent it to be washed again; I can swear to it - it must have been taken in that week: all the hair I lost was worth 3s. per lb.

COURT to DANIEL MURPHY. Q. You were before the Magistrate on the 18th of August in last year; How long before that did you see the men take the hair to the prisoner's house? A. About a month; I was afraid of them, they were all big fellows - I saw them take the hair and put it round their waists, under their shirts; they took it to this man's house, and there they took it from their waists, and gave it to him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you come into my house? A. No- I stood at the door; I saw you standing at the door when they came - you went in, and they after you.

Prisoner's Defence. My friends are not here to rectify it; if you could put it off to another day I should be obliged; I can bring plenty of proof that it was not worth more than I gave for it.

JURY to MR. PURKIS. Q. Had you ever sold any horse-hair to the prisoner? A. No, never. I have some hair at 1s. per lb., but what I lost was worth 3s. per lb.

JURY to DANIEL MURPHY. Q. What part of the 1s. per lb. did you have? A. I had none; they asked me to go and have something, but I did not; I had no promise of any thing - they said I knew of it, and if I told they would give me a good hiding, and be the death of me, no doubt. I staid away from Mr. Purkis' above a month.

COURT. Q. Did the men take the hair from their persons, in the presence of the prisoner? A. Yes - I can swear he saw it there.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-95

2048. EDWARD EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 looking-glass, value 1l. 18s. , the goods of George Walker .

GEORGE WALKER. I am a cabinet-maker , and live in St. John-street-road . I had a looking-glass in my shop on the 17th of September; I saw it after two o'clock -Mr. Okey came afterwards, and asked if I had sold a glass; I said No - I went out and took the prisoner with it on his person.

JAMES OKEY . I was going along, and met the prisoner with the glass - I told the prosecutor of it, and he followed him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the house, and met a man, who asked me to be so good as to carry it to Berners-street, Oxford-street, to one Nias - being out of work I took it under my arm, and when I turned one corner Mr. Walker came and said I had got his glass; I said nothing - I was struck with horror, and looked round for the man who gave it to me, but he was gone.

MR. WALKER re-examined. Q. Did he say any one had given it to him to carry? A. No; he looked hard at me, but said nothing about any one having employed him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-96

2049. CHARLES EMMERI was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 pair of boots, value 12s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 2s., and 1 pair of braces, value 1s. , the goods of James McCombie .

JAMES McCOMBIE. I am a plasterer . I lost a pair of trousers, a pair of boots, and a pair of braces, from my lodging, on the 20th of September - I had seen them the night before, and they were gone in the morning; the prisoner lodged in the same room that night only, but he was gone that morning.

ALEXANDER ELLIS . I am a salesman. I have a pair of trousers, sold to me, on the 20th of September, by the prisoner.

JAMES NORRIS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner. I found the braces in his hat, and the boots had been on his feet - he had just pulled them off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-97

2050 ANN DORAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 2 spoons, value 12s. , the goods of Joseph Groom .

JOSEPH GROOM. I am a clerk , and live at Islington . The prisoner came on the 3d of October to be hired into my service - she gave a reference which I did not approve of; she came again, and my servant missed two spoons.

ANN WELLMAN . I was in the service of the prosecutor. On the 7th of October the prisoner came and asked if my master was at home - I said No; she then asked for some water, I went for it, and when she was gone I missed two spoons from the shelf over the dresser, they were there when I left the kitchen to let her in.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I have one spoon pawned by the prisoner on the 7th of October.

JOSEPH CADBY . I was sent for, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They kept me a week in suspense and I had no where to go, and then they disappointed me, and he came and left word that his servant would stop; I went to the kitchen, and being very destitute, I took the spoons and pawned them to release some clothes to go to get another place, and intended to release them when I got another service.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, presuming it to be her first offence.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-98

2051. FRANCES KENDRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , 1 gallon of oil, value 2s. 9d. , the goods of Edmund Box .

EDMUND BOX. I live in Wheeler-street , and am a plumber . The prisoner came to wash for my wife two or three times; on the 10th of September, my little boy told me that she came into the shop and took a gallon of oil out of a cistern; I went to an officer - we went to her lodgings, some fish oil was found, which corresponds with what I sell - I cannot swear to it, but I have no doubt it is mine.

EDMUND BOX, Jun . I am nearly nine years old. I saw this woman at my father's shop one day, I do not know when - she took a half-pint measure, dipped it in, and took out the oil from the can, a great many times till she could not get any more, and then she lifted up the can and put it into the bottle; she put the measure down with the others, and took out the oil in a large stone bottle - I told my father of it; I called my sister down before she took the oil - she told me to call her.

ANN BOX . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I was up stairs and my brother called me down - I told him to tell the woman to wait; he called me again, I went down, and met the prisoner going up stairs - she said she was going to see my mother; she went up stairs, and I did not see her when she came down again.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Box to the prisoner's lodgings, she was there - and while I was looking into a cupboard, she took up a pail and ran down stairs - I ran after her, but could not get hold of it before she had emptied it down a gully-hole; I then took hold of the pail and found it was linseed oil; I have been in the oil business twenty years; I said this was just what I wanted - she said it was no such thing: I found two bottles of fish oil in the cupboard in the room.

Prisoner's Defence. I passed by the prosecutor's door, and the little girl said, "My mother wants you:" I left my basket and went up to her; she said, "To-morrow I shall want you to come and do a little washing, but I don't want my husband to know of it - call at ten o'clock, and if he is there, don't say any thing about it;" I went to the house about eleven o'clock, and did her washing - I went again the next day, and asked the girl if her mother said any thing about my money; she said No; I said,"Then give me three quarts of lamp-oil," and she drew it out and served me; the woman owes me a spite, because one day she beat this little boy very much; she is his mother-in-law - and she said to me, "I suppose you don't approve of it;" and I told the neighbours of it.

COURT to ANN BOX. Q. Did you sell her any oil on this day; A. No; I have sold her half-pints; my mother-in-law was ill, and I went for the prisoner, and she could not come.

JOHN BARRS re-examined. Q. Did you see any stone-bottle? A. No; there was a white jug by the side of the pail, which had had some linseed-oil in it, and some was spilt.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-99

2052. JOHN LOVEDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 jacket, value 6s. , the goods of John Russell Law .

JAMES HENRY LONG . I am apprentice to John Russell Law, a pawnbroker , of the Commercial-road . On the 18th of September I was coming out of the shop, and was told the prisoner had stolen a jacket from over the window - I went after him and saw him running; he turned his head, saw me coming, and dropped the jacket; I pursued and saw him stopped, and a boy gave me the jacket; I am sure the prisoner dropped it.

JAMES KENSEY . I was passing, and saw the prisoner pull the jacket down from the door and go away with it - he carried it quite open; a young lad went and gave information, the witness pursued - I did not see it dropped, but I saw it on the ground, and a lad picked it up.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I am an officer. I saw the crowd: I took the prisoner - he was not sober.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not sober, nor did I know any thing about it till after; I hope you will take it into consideration.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18281023-100

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2053. MARIA ESTHER BACON and ANN LANHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 lb. weight of beef, value 6d.; 5 ozs. weight of butter, value 5d.; 1 lb. weight of flour, value 4d.; 1 oz. weight of cheese, value 1d.; 2 lbs. weight of bread, value 6d.; 1 lb. weight of potatoes, value 1d., and 1/2oz. weight of pepper, value 1/2d. , the goods of the Governors of the Society for Clothing, Maintaining, and Educating Poor Orphans of Clergymen of the Established Church, in that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain called England, until of Age to be put Apprentice .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of Sarah Ann Jones , widow .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

HARRIET ROBERTSON . I live at the Clergy Orphan Society's house in St. John's-wood . On Tuesday, the 30th of September, I opened the window at six o'clock in the morning, I saw Lanham standing opposite the house in a door-way - she beckoned to me, and I went and opened the iron-gate, and she came to it; I had seen her there before; she asked if Mrs. Bacon, the cook, was come down; I said Bacon was not come down, but she would not be long; I told her to go round to the kitchen-door and I would let her in; I did so, and she told me to tell Bacon she was waiting: Mrs. Jones is the housekeeper there, and I had spoken to her before; I went up stairs, and told Bacon that the woman who was there the other night was waiting for her; Bacon said she supposed she had brought a letter or some word for her, and asked if I had let her in; I said Yes; she asked why I had let her in, and told me to say she was coming down; I went down and told Lanham - she said she had brought some snuff, and would have brought the spirits but she had no bottle; Bacon came down in about five minutes, and I left them together; I went up to a window, from whence I could have a view of any one going out, and I saw Lanham go down the back way with a bundle under her arm; I told Mrs. Jones, we went out by the iron-gate and round by the wooden gate, where Lanham had just got through - we stopped her; Mrs. Jones asked her what she had got; she said,"Some broken victuals from the cook;" she was then taken into custody.

SARAH ANN JONES. I am mistress at the Clergy Orphan House . The witness was under my orders; I had received some communication from her, and on the morning of the 30th of September I was on the watch - and about six o'clock, I saw Lanham standing on the opposite side of St John's-wood-road, leaning against a door; I

saw her beckon to some one - the witness went and unlocked the gate - she went in: she had no bundle in her hand then, nor any thing else that I could discover - I went down to the Committe-room, expecting she would go out at the iron-gate, but she did not; the witness then came to me, and gave me information - we went out into the road: I saw Lanham, who had just got through a hole in a wooden gate in the pales at the bottom of the yard - I went up to her; she said she had got some broken victuals - I brought her into the house, and examined the bundle: I found the various articles which are here, with some beef and butter which could not be kept - the constable has had these things ever since; when I engaged Bacon in that establishment. I told her she was not at liberty to give any broken victuals away, nor to have any followers - the kitchen-stuff was to be her perquisite.

COURT. Q. Is there a bell at the iron-gate? A. No, nor a knocker; that is the only place to which a person should come on business, and go out; the wooden gate in the pales, out of which Lanham got, is only used for carts to come in. I am a widow - and all the provision there is under my care; I am responsible for it.

THE REVEREND THOMAS WHARTON . I am master of the boys at the Clergy Orphan House. I saw the two prisoners in custody; Bacon acknowledged that she had given these things to Lanham.

HENRY RYDER . I am a constable. I was sent for between six and seven o'clock in the morning, on the 30th of September, and took the two prisoners; Mrs. Jones delivered this bundle to me, which she said she took from Lanham - there was about 1 lb. of beef in it, and some butter, which would not keep; here is some bread, flour, potatoes and other things.

BACON'S Defence. I had a great deal to do, and had not time to wash my things - I have had them in water from Monday morning till Friday night; I had sixty-six persons to cook for - I met Lanham one night, and told her to call for my trunk; she called on me, but I told her I thought I should not stop, and it was no use to have my box, and I would eadeavour to wash my things myself; these pieces of bread and other things, Robertson brought from the young ladies table the night before, and said "It is a pity to throw them into the hog-tub;" I said "Yes;" there are many persons come and take them out of the hog-tub, and before I lived there the broken victuals were sold for 2s. a week - the same person came to me and asked for it, but I said I would not make a price of it - if there were any thing to part with I would give it away; Mrs. Jones never gave me any caution.

COURT to MRS. JONES. Q. Was it sold by your knowledge or approbation? A. No, certainly not; I gave her the caution which I have named.

COURT to HARRIET ROBERTSON . Q. Had you told her the night before it was a pity that any thing should be thrown in the hog tub? A. No.

BACON - GUILTY . Aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

LANHAM - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-101

2044. JOHN KING was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 fixture, (i.e.) 1 copper, value 1l., the goods of John Atkinson , then being fixed to a certain building , against the statute, &c.

ISAAC COX . I have care of an empty house in Well-street, Hackney , which belongs to Mr. John Atkinson; there was a copper set in it; I saw the prisoner on the 10th of October, at twenty minutes before one o'clock, carrying the copper out of the gate in front of the premises - I went and asked how he came by it; he said a gentleman gave it him to carry - but I did not see any person near there; the gate is about three yards from the house - I followed the prisoner, and took the copper from him; I have fitted it to the place, and have no doubt it came from there: I had not known the prisoner before - I do not know how he got in - but a back window-shutter had been forced open with a turn-buckle.

JOHN WOODS I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and fitted the copper to the place where it had been fixed- it fitted exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work, and went round to beg a bit of bread: a man stood at the gate, and asked me to carry this to Hackney-road, and said he would give me 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-102

2045. CHARLES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th September , 1 saw, value 5s. , the goods of Philip Hill .

PHILIP HILL. I am a millwright . I lost a saw from Mr. Moores' shop, at Rotherhithe . On the 18th of September, I left my saw in my chest that day at a quarter before seven o'clock; the prisoner is my master's son- I returned on the morning of the 19th, and my tools had been taken out of the chest, and were lying about - this saw was gone; the prisoner is married - I had other articles in my box of as much value; I should think the value of all my property was five guineas - I never worked with the prisoner; he had been discharged from his father about a week.

JAMES BENNETT . I am a smith. I went to the house where the prisoner lives; the landlady keeps a broker's shop; I found the saw in the cellar which belongs to the landlady; I did not speak to the prisoner about it myself, but I was in the room when Hill told the prisoner that if he would give him up the saw, he would be glad of it, and say no more.

JOHN GUDGE . I am a constable. Bennett came to me- I went to the house and saw the prisoner; I asked him to let me search his room, which I did, but found nothing- when I was gone, Bennett came to me again, and said he had found the saw in the cellar; I went again, and found the prosecutor in the prisoner's room; he asked the prisoner, "Did you ever see this saw before?" he said Yes; the prosecutor said, "Then you never saw it till last night, when you took it;" the prisoner and his wife begged he would not hurt them.

PHILIP HILL. This is my saw; I meant the prisoner had not seen my saw before that night, because he had been at work in the country.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-103

2046. MARY WALLACE was indicted for stealing,

on the 3d of October , 8 lbs. weight of bacon, value 3s. , the goods of John Denman .

CHARLES DENMAN . I am in the service of John Denman, a cheesemonger , of High-street, Shadwell . On the 3d of October, about eight o'clock, the prisoner came for a quartern of butter - as soon as she was gone, a bit of bacon was missed; I followed her just across the road, and asked what she had in her apron; she took the bacon out of her lap, and said she was going to ask the price, to have a rasher cut off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along - there was a great piece of work; I kicked the bacon with my foot, and then took it up; I was knocked off the pavement - this gentleman came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-104

2047. ROBERT ARCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 coat, value 30s., and 1 cloak, value 30s. , the goods of Andrew Tilt .

ANDREW TILT. I am a surgeon , and live in Chichester-place, Grays-Inn-lane . I lost a coat and a cloak from the passage of my house; about eight o'clock in the evening of the 25th of September, I was sitting in my drawing-room, and the servant brought me up this note - I sent my boy out, who brought back the prisoner.

MARGARET HAYES . I am servant to the prosecutor. The prisoner brought this note to me that evening; there was no direction on it - I asked who it was for - he said for my master; I took it up stairs, and when I returned, the prisoner was gone, and I missed these articles from the passage.

Prisoner. Q. Do you know me again? A. Yes, I do.

JOHN PERKINS . I was sent after the prisoner, and overtook him about a quarter of a mile off, with this coat and cloak - I caught hold of the things and took him into custody.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am a constable. I produce the articles; I saw the scuffle, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28. (see the 5th Day.)

Reference Number: t18281023-105

2048. MARY MORIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 1 fixture (i.e.) 1 copper, value 12s., the goods of Thomas Kingswell , and fixed to a certain building ; against the Statute, &c.

THOMAS KINGSWELL. I am a bricklayer , and live in Gun-street, Old Artillery-ground. This copper was fixed in the wash-house of a house which I let out in tenements; I had not seen it for six months before; I saw it in the prisoner's hands on the 22d of September - she was coming out of the passage with it - she was not a lodger of mine, and had no right there; I went in and missed it, and then went after her and asked her about it - she said she had sold it; this is it.

HENRY PETTY . I am a broker. The prisoner came to me in September, and asked if I would purchase a copper, as she was removing, and should have no occasion for it; I said Yes - she said it was one that would hold twelve pails; she brought it in about two hours, and asked 12s. or it - I gave her 9s. 6d.

DAVID HEALY . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I received the prisoner in custody; I went to the house and fitted this copper to the place where it had been fixed - it fitted exactly.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be her first offence.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-106

2049. ELIZABETH WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , 3 shirts, value 20s.; 1 table-cloth, value 5s.; 4 towels, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 3s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of William Waters , her master .

WILLIAM WATERS. I live at No. 288, Oxford-street , and am a butcher . The prisoner came into my service on the 1st of September, and was discharged on the 15th, for drunkenness; after she was gone, we missed the property stated - we found her again in about a fortnight.

ALEXANDER MANN . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge on the 2d of October, about nine o'clock in the evening; on searching her, I found a number of duplicates - three of which relate to this property; some of them were in her pocket, and some in her bosom.

CHRISTOPHER GREAVES . I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 8, Bulstrode-street. I have a petticoat and a tablecloth, pawned on the 6th of September, also a shirt and towel on the 8th, in the name of Elizabeth Willis; I gave the person these duplicates.

HUGH GANLEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Mary-le-bone. I produce a pocket handkerchief pawned with me, for which I gave this duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I confessed it when they took the duplicates from me.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported Fourteen Years .

There was a second indictment against the prisoner, at the suit of another prosecutor.

Reference Number: t18281023-107

2050. SARAH POTTER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 watch-chain, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 6d.; and 1 key, value 3d., the goods of John Blakes , from his person .

JOHN BLAKES. I am a labourer at the West India Docks . On the 8th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in Whitechapel with two young women; the prisoner left the other two, and asked me to go home with her - I said no; she said "Go and see where I live, that you may call another time" - I went with her to a small cottage at the end of George-street ; there was a person in the passage, but she came out, and the prisoner said, "Come in, there is no one here;" I went in with her to a room up stairs - I had not been there above a minute or two, when she cried out, "Who is there? who is there?" and she caught my watch out of my pocket - another woman came in; I caught hold of the prisoner, but she got away - there was another woman on the stairs, who pulled her down; I went out to Wentworth-street, and when I came back, the house was locked, and a padlock was on the door; I gave information at the office, and they told me to go there the next evening; I went every evening till the Sunday, and then I saw her again in Whitechapel;

she came to me with the same story - I told her I was in a hurry; I went and got her taken; my watch was returned to me by an unknown person - I knew nothing of her before.

COURT. Q. Was not this girl pointed out to you more than once at a public-house, and you said she was not the girl? A. The officer went with me to a public-house - there was a young woman there, whom he spoke to - he asked me if either of them were the girl, but I did not go up to her; I do not know whether that is the woman.

Q. Did not the officer say "There is a young woman; look at her" - and does not that turn out to be the prisoner? A. The officer says it is, but she sat side-ways to me - I went two or three different nights.

JOHN NORRIS . I went to a public-house with the prosecutor; the prisoner was there, and my brother officer pointed her out; the prosecutor said he did not know her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-108

2051. THOMAS BUNN was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a ship-chandler , and live at Ratcliff-cross . The prisoner was in my employ from 1822 until February last, when I discharged him, but not for dishonesty; it was his duty to receive money for me, and enter it in a regular book, which was settled every week - here it is; he was to enter here all the accounts he received from my customers - here is no sum of 15l. 5s. 3d. received from Mr. Douglas of Fenchurch-street; I had a customer of that name; an indictment was preferred against the prisoner in April last - I was not able to attend, and he was acquitted.

HENRY VANE . I succeeded the prisoner in the service of Mr. Scott in February last. It was my duty to collect debts; I called on Mr. Douglas.

ROBERT DOUGLAS . I am a ship insurance-broker, and live in Fenchurch-street. On the 7th of July, 1827 , I gave the prisoner this cheque, for 15l. 5s. 3d., in payment of an account for Mr. Scott; he gave me a receipt for it - Mr. Vane called on me for it, and I shewed him the receipt.

CHARLES ROGERS . I am clerk in the banking-house of Sir William Kay and Co. - this gentleman keeps cash there - I paid this cheque on the 7th of July, 1827.

JOHN SCOTT . This receipt is in the prisoner's writing - he never accounted to me for this 15l. 5s. 3d. - when he left me, we went over the whole account together.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had been tried twice in April last, on charges brought by the prosecutor, and acquitted - that if any deficiency had occurred, it must have happened in the hurry of business.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-109

1252. ONESIPHORUS FREDERICK was indicted for bigamy .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

MR. CHARLES HORTON PULLEY. I am a solicitor and vestry-clerk of Hackney. I have a certificate of a marriage between Onesiphorus Frederick, and Mary Jolly , on the 23d of April, 1823, at St. Mary, Walthamstow - I made the extract myself; I went down to Turner's-green, on the 8th of September, to see if his wife was alive - I saw her and conversed with her; the prisoner was a pauper of our parish , and his last wife too - he has been placed at Willis' farm.

Prisoner. Q. Do you recollect my making application for relief, rather more that three years and a half ago? A. I recollect your making application repeatedly - I do not remember asking you if Mary Jolly was alive; I have not the slightest recollection of saying the marriage was never consummated - I do not recollect being surprised that you should ask for relief, or your saying "What shall I do?" I very likely might recommend you to go to the hay-field.

JAMES SAYER . I live in the parish of Dalston. I was present at the marriage of the prisoner with Mary Jolly, on the 23d of April, 1823 - I went with Mr. Pulley to Turner's-green, Cheshunt, on the 8th of September last, and saw her alive there.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not ask you to go and see if you could hear any thing of Mary Jolly? A. Yes, but I did not do it - I do not recollect telling you I had made the inquiry; I know Mr. Scriven - I have seen him since your marriage, in London-field.

CHARLES SARTINE . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Cox Head-court. I was present on the 23d of July last, at the marriage of the prisoner to Alice Clark , at St. Martin's, Ludgate .

Prisoner. Q. Did not you know I was married? A. Yes, you said you were, but it was not a lawful marriage.

ALICE CLARK. I was a pauper at Willis' farm-house, in the Borough. I married the prisoner on the 23d of July last, at St. Martin's, Ludgate.

JOHN GARVA . I am beadle of Hackney. I took the prisoner at Hackney, in the county of Middlesex.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that although he had been married to Mary Jolly, she refused to go home with him, and had never once cohabited with him, although he had used every means to persuade her to do so - that after a few weeks he heard no more of her; and in a few years heard she had married a Mr. White, by whom she had two children; and being informed by Mr. Pulley that the marriage was not consummated, and he had no claim on her, he subsequently married the prosecutrix to whom he first related all the above facts.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-110

2053. WILLIAM BRACKEN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 2 asses, price 36s. , the property of Thomas Bennett Sturgeon ; and THOMAS BELNAP was indicted for feloniously receiving 1 ass, price 18s., part of the same, knowing it to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

JOHN NORRIS . I am a constable. I received information, and went on the 14th of October, and found two asses in a shed in Gibraltar-walk, Bethnal-green; I waited there till the evening, when the two prisoners, and another person came to the shed, and began to feed the asses: I went in and asked who they belonged to, and each of the prisoners owned one - I asked who the third boy was, and he said he merely came to see them; I then asked where they got them, and they said they

bought them in Smithfield on Friday last - I asked what they gave for them, and Belnap said he gave 7s. for his, and Bracken said he gave 10s. for his - I told them I suspected they were stolen, and took them to the office.

THOMAS BENNETT STURGEON. I am a farmer . I bought ten asses on the 10th of October, in Smithfield, and sent them to Mr. Gardner's, at the Globe public-house, Mile-end , who takes in cattle: I heard that two of them had been stolen, and I have seen the two which the officer shewed me - I could be positive of one of them though the mark I made on them had been erased.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had they been in your possession? A. Only while I bought them, and turned them over to a drover; I did not see them above two hours- the one I speak of had a sore place on the back, just where the saddle goes; I objected to it on that account - such a thing is very common.

SAMUEL WILLIAMS . I am in the employ of Mr. Gardner. I drove these ten asses to the gate, and told the man to put them in; I have seen these two asses, but I cannot swear to them - I had shut them into the field the morning before, and the next morning two were missing.

THOMAS GARDNER . I received the asses, and am accountable for them, but I did not see them.

WILLIAM COX . I am an officer. I took up Lees on the 16th of October.

SAMUEL LEES . I am a bricklayer. I have known the prisoner these two or three months; I was at Smithfield with Bracken on the 10th of October - I did not see the other prisoner there; I saw Mr. Sturgeon there, whom I had seen before - I saw him buy three asses that day; I do not know whether Bracken saw him buy them - a drover, who lives near Mr. Sturgeon's, took the drove of asses out of the market; Mr. Sturgeon told me to mind them - I went with them down to the Globe; Bracken was there, but the other was not - we staid there till about half-past eight o'clock, when we went to the field, and he took out one donkey, and I took another; we took them to the top of Hoxton and put them into a field - the next morning we went to Belnap's in Old-street-road, and told him we had been and taken two donkeys, which Mr. Sturgeon had been buying, and we had stolen two out of his drove: Belnap had the smallest and paid me 7s. for it - they told me they took the other round Hackney and Hotherton; Belnap offered 13s. for the other, but Bracken would not take it, and he kept it - I believe it was found in the stable; I told the same story to the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you always told the same story? A. Yes; I have been in the House of Correction - they put me there for fear I should not come here; I was never there, nor in a Court of Justice before - my mother was at the Police-office; she did not tell me what to say - she did not say "I say Sam, mind what I told you, when you went down yonder, mind you say 'Mind E. B. B.'" nor any thing to that effect, either there or at any other place.

COURT to MR. STURGEON. Q. What did you give for the asses? A. 18s. for one, and 20s. for the other.

BRACKEN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

BELNAP - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-111

2054. JOHN DALEY , JAMES HAGGERTY , JOHN BARRETT and JOHN DWYER were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 262 lbs. weight of rope, value 20s., the goods of Joseph Bennett and James Hunt , and then being in a certain barge on the navigable River Thames .

THOMAS MARTIN , I am in the employ of Joseph Bennett and James Hunt - they are building the St. Catharine Docks . On the 11th of October they had some rope, which I saw put into a barge - it is what is used for scaffold cord; the barge was lying in the Thames , under the crane, at the jetty - there were two hundred and fifty-nine bundles of rope, which I saw safe at twenty minutes or half-past five o'clock in the evening; I did not miss it till the Tuesday - I then missed six bundles: I have seen the rope found by the officer, and I believe that to be part of the rope taken from the barge - I do not know any of the prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. RYLAND. Q. How do you know it? A. It is marked with red at the end.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am a Thames Police-officer. On Saturday night, on the 11th of October, about half past ten o'clock, I saw a boat alongside of a lighter - I suppose half a mile from this barge; I was coming down the river at the time - I saw a man standing on the gunwale of the lighter in a stooping position; I put my boat alongside that boat, and saw Daley in it stooping down with his face on the rope; I said to him, "What have you got here?" he said Rope, and he got on the lighter where Haggerty was standing - I had them both into my boat; I then saw two lads, who, as far as I can understand, were Barrett and Dwyer; I asked Daley how he came by the rope - he said they picked it up in the river, and were going to sell it to get some beer; I asked Haggerty if that was the case - he laughed, and spoke in Irish; I took them to the office; I then went to the lighter and found two more bundles of rope - I went to the next lighter, No. 28, and there found Barrett and Dwyer asleep; I awoke them and took them - some more rope was found on board that lighter.

ROBERT MARTIN . I was with my brother officer - I saw Barrett and Dwyer on the lighter the first time we went alongside: I asked them if these men belonged to them - they said "No, we know nothing about them;" I went afterwards on board the other lighter, and found them asleep.

THOMAS HAYLOCK . On Saturday night, at eleven o'clock, I went round to see that all was right, and saw a barge alongside the jetty, loaded with scaffold cord; I went round, and asked the watchman if it was right - he said "No, the barge is gone adrift;" I went and found she was fastened to a buoy - I saw Daley on the gunwale of a lighter, by the side of a boat; I asked where he was going - he said on shore; I said, "That is not the way, come with me" - he came with me on shore, and I left him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DALEY'S Defence. After I got my money I was ordered to watch this lighter - I was rather tipsy, and Haggerty would not go till he saw me safe into the lighter; these boys would not go till they saw me safe, and I told them not to go till I had a nap; I then went and saw this

rope in the boat - I did not know what to do with it, and the Police-boat came down.

DALEY - GUILTY . Aged 67.

Confined Three Months .

HAGGERTY - NOT GUILTY .

BARRETT - NOT GUILTY .

DWYER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-112

2055. ANN COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 petticoat, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Catherine Block .

CATHERINE BLOCK. I live at No. 24, Porter-street, Newport-market . I had a petticoat hanging in the passage on a horse, about half-past two o'clock, on the 6th of October; Scott afterwards told me it was gone - I never saw the prisoner before.

WILLIAM HENRY SCOTT . I rent the first-floor in the same house. I saw the prisoner in the passage on the 6th of October; I asked what she wanted - she said a Mrs. Emmett; I said she lived at the top of the house, not the bottom - she then went away; it struck me all was not right - I went and brought her back, and found this petticoat on her.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am an officer. I produce the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-113

2056. ANN CARTWRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 2 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of George Fullwood Jackson ; and 2 pewter pots, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Rollinston .

GEORGE FULLWOOD JACKSON. I am a publican , and live in South-street, Berkeley-square . These two pots are mine.

JOHN LACEY . I found the prisoner, on the 16th of October, in a mews, near Hill-street, Berkeley-square; I saw her take these pots from Hill-street - I went up to her, and asked what she had got - she said Nothing; I found the pots under her arm and in her pocket, with 2s.

THOMAS ROLLINSTON. The pint-pot and quart-pot are mine. I live in Hill-street .

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-114

2057. THOMAS CHAMPION and HENRY FARNDELL were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 3 live tame fowls, price 3s. , the property of William Avery .

SAMUEL WARD . I live in Kenton-street, Brunswick-square, with Mr. Clark, a dyer; the two prisoners came to me with two fowls, on the 4th of October - Champion had them in the other's handkerchief; they wanted me to buy them, but I would not; they remained in the yard, and in the evening they were taken for stealing fowls; they asked me what they were worth - I said 2s. or 2s. 6d., and Farndell said I should have them for 2s. - I said they might leave them till the evening, and I would give them an answer; I shewed the same fowls to the prosecutor.

EDWARD PERRY . I live in Cromer-street; Mr. Avery lives in the next street but one to me. On Saturday, the 4th of October, I saw Farndell and two other boys - the fowls were running loose in the street, and one of the boys who was with Farndell cut the throat of one of the fowls, and put it into a bag.

WILLIAM AVERY. I live in Sidmouth-street, Gray's-Inn-lane . I have seen those two lads about, and know their parents - one of them is a cabinet-maker, and one an upholsterer; I missed three fowls, and when I saw these knew them to be mine - two were alive, and the other was nearly dead.

CHAMPION - GUILTY . Aged 12.

FARNDELL - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of their youth.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18281023-115

2058. THOMAS BOWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 3 loaves of bread, value 1s. 7d. , the goods of Andrew Dunn .

ANDREW DUNN. I am a journeyman baker , in the employ of Mr. Harvey. I was in the street on the 16th of October, and left my barrow while I went round the Regent's-park , about half a mile - I left it in charge of a person who is not here: when I came back, the beadle asked me to look, and I missed three loaves; the prisoner was then in custody.

JAMES McINTOSH . I am a constable. The prisoner was walking about the different streets, and I rather suspected him; he went near the Trinity church, and I saw him lift up the sack from the basket which was on the barrow, and take out three loaves and walk away; I and another man took him into custody.

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18281023-116

2059. JEREMIAH CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 1 coat, value 1l. , the goods of Joseph Orchard .

JOSEPH ORCHARD. I am a plasterer , and work at St. Katharine's Docks . On the 23d of September, I missed a jacket, which I had hung up on the window at the office; it was there when I went to breakfast, and when I came back it was gone - we searched, and found it in one of the flues; we sent for the officer; I did not know the prisoner before, and never saw him in possession of my jacket.

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am an officer, and have the care of these docks. On the 23d of September, I heard the coat was lost - I went and secreted myself in a place near the flue, and about a quarter-past six o'clock, the prisoner came and tried to get into the place where I was - the men should have left about ten minutes before that; he could not get in, he went down, and got into the flue, and came out with something; the bricks on which I stood gave way- he heard the noise, and crept into the flue again, and came out without any thing; he then caught hold of me; I called for the beadle, who came and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you say you saw him with any coat or jacket? A. It was something dark - I cannot swear what it was.

COURT. Q. Did you find any coat in the flue? A. Yes - I went into the flue, and found this jacket, but it was removed from where it had been; I have no hesitation in saying he had it; I cannot swear positively it was the coat - I suppose there are about two thousand men on the premises.

ROBERT HENRY BURGESS . I was called to assist in taking the prisoner - he had no jacket then.

JURY to THOMAS HAYLOCK. Q. Who took the jacket out at last? A. The owner of it; I believe the prosecutor was the last person on the premises except myself, and the person who assisted me.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean you saw the prisoner take it from the nail it was hung on? A. No - the men go away about five minutes past six o'clock; the bell rings just before.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-117

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2060. FREDERICK BOULDSTRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 12s. , the goods of Daniel Dobell .

DANIEL DOBELL. I am a boot-maker , and live in St. John-street, Clerkenwell . On the 7th of October, I went out, about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the evening, leaving my boy Sanders in care of my shop - I returned about five minutes before eight, and he told me that Mr. Parker had detained the prisoner offering a pair of shoes to pawn, which I knew to be mine.

JAMES SANDERS . I am in the employ of the prosecutor: he went out on the evening of the 7th of October - I went to sleep in the parlour, and in the meantime the man came and took the shoes out of the window - it awoke me, and I looked up, and missed them.

HENRY PARKER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker on Clerkenwell-green. The pair of shoes were offered at our shop by the prisoner; I detained him, and sent for the constable.

HENRY BURGESS . I went to the shop, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to pawn them for 6s., and said he would give me 1s. for myself.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-118

2061. JOHN BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Frances Donoughoe .

FRANCES DONOUGHOE. I am a widow , and keep a front-kitchen in Monmouth-street . On the evening of the 11th of October, I left the top of my kitchen-stairs (where my goods are exposed for sale,) while I went into the kitchen; I returned in three minutes. and missed a pair of high shoes; I saw the prisoner at the next house, looking down the cellar; I went and took the boots from his right hand, and he said he was not going to steal them - he was inquiring the price of a pair of trousers - he would have got from me had it not been for my next-door neighbour.

THOMAS WILSON . I took the prisoner about seven o'clock that evening - the prosecutrix gave me these shoes, and said the prisoner had been robbing her; I found 1s. 6d. on him.

ANN WELDON . I live next door to the prosecutrix. The prisoner came to me, and asked for a pair of shoes for 6d. - I said I had none at that price; in about ten minutes the prosecutrix called me to assist in taking him; he had been inquiring the price of a pair of trousers in my kitchen.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never went to any kitchen.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-119

2062. WILLIAM BORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 shift, value 1s., and 1 shawl, value 6d. , the goods of Samuel Peowrie ; and ANN PAGET was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

ELIZABETH PEOWRIE . I am the wife of Samuel Peowrie, a printer , of Turk-street, Bethnal-green ; Borne is my son by a former husband - he lodged with us. On the 16th of September, he did not come home all night; on the 24th of September, I went out between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I fastened the door inside, and got out of the window, and missed my shift and shawl, which I had laid down the night before when I went to bed; Borne came home between eight and nine that evening but I did not say anything to him then, as my husband had been such a very bad man to him; in the morning, I asked him where he had been, and whether he knew any thing of this shift and shawl - he made me no answer; I asked him again, and he told me he had been at Mrs. Paget's, and slept in a pig-sty, with four other boys, and in the morning she told him he must go and steal a quartern-loaf and a piece of meat; I went to the house he described, and Mrs. Cushion stopped till Paget came home; I then went, and saw my shawl lying across a stove; I then said "This is mine," and Mrs. Cushion said to her "What else have you got?" - she said a shift, she took it out of a drawer, and said she bought them of a little boy in a seal-skin cap, and a light dress, who said he got them out of a swagbasket, such as women carry their clothes in on their arms: Mrs. Cushion said "Mrs. Paget, you perfectly well know that these clothes were stolen, and you knew me well;" she said Yes; Mrs. Cushion then said "How came you to harbour my boy here for five nights, and send him out thieving;" she said "I did not know your boy, or I would have put him in bed with my boy" - she said to me "And your's too;" I said "What do you know of me or mine?" and she said if I would bring the little boy, she would give up the things to him.

ELIZABETH CUSHION . I went to Paget's house; she had had my boy five nights and six days from home; when I saw her I said "How came you to harbour my child;" she said "Don't make a noise - come in;" I went in, and the witness said "This shawl is mine;" I said to Paget "What did you buy with that?" she said a shift, she got it out of a drawer, and said she bought it of a little boy with a light dress and a seal-skin cap; that she took him by the hand, and took him behind the counter, and asked where he got it; he said from a feeder, which she said was a basket to carry things to Petticoat-lane; I said "You knew it was stolen;" she said "I gave a full price for it," but did not say what; the boy said she gave him 3d. for it.

JAMES HANLEY . I went to the house on the 24th, and took Paget. Mrs. Peowrie went and fetched Borne; I said I had come to search for a shift and shawl - she produced these; I asked Borne where he got them - he said

he stole them from his mother, and sold them to Paget for 3d.; Paget said she bought them of him, but he told her his mother sent him to sell them.

BORNE's Defence. I went home, and my brother was there; he went up stairs, I went out, and shut up the place as I found it.

PAGET's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I am a married woman; I keep a shop in St. John-street, Bethnal-green; my neighbours are in the habit of sending their children to borrow money on trifling articles, such as the pawnbrokers will not take in; such was the case with the prosecutor's son; he brought the few old things to my shop, and what he asked for them he had, telling him, at the same time, he might have them again when he got the money; a short time after a woman came into the shop - the things were lying on the table- she saw the things, as any one else might, but nothing was said about them; a few days after, the prosecutor came with the officer, and asked for the articles; I laid my hand on them, and gave them to him, without any thoughts of any thing wrong, only I thought she wanted the things without the money I had given for them; when before the Magistrate, I was surprised to hear the woman witness swear she heard me say I knew them to have been stolen - neither had I heard the words before; but after I understood the woman's character, I did not wonder at her false swearing; her name is Cushion, and has a son to be tried this Sessions. (See the 3rd day, page 960.)

BORNE - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Judgment Respited.

PAGET - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-120

2063. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 dumb-waiter, value 30s. , the goods of Robert Donaldson .

ROBERT DONALDSON. I am an upholsterer , and live in Rathbone-place . On the 15th of September, about two or three o'clock, I missed a mahogany dumb-waiter from my door; I had seen it about ten o'clock that day - I made inquiries, and told the porters to look about; I received information that there was such an article at the door of a shop opposite the reservoir - I went there, and got it.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I am a broker. I bought the dumb waiter of the prisoner; I cannot tell on what day, but it was four days before the prosecutor owned it; I had some slight knowledge of his person, his brother being a broker - he said it was his brother's.

JOHN AMES . I went to Mr. Marshall's on the 13th of October, and there I found the prisoner offering another article for sale; I took him to the watch-house - he said the waiter belonged to his brother.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal it from the door. I called at a public-house; a porter came in and said, "I have got an article to dispose of, which I bought where I was in possession, and it was not down in the inventory;" I said I would try to sell it for him - I went to Mr. Marshall's, and sold it him - I brought the money to the man, who gave me 1s.

ROBERT DONALDSON re-examined. Q. When did you loose it? A. On the 15th, and on the 18th I went to the shop, and saw it, I told him if he should see the man, I would prosecute him.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-121

2064. THOMAS BULLOCK and SOPHIA ATKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 32 live tame pigeons, price 30s. , the property of Joseph Parr .

JOSEPH PARR. I live in Matthew's-place, Hackney-road . On Sunday night, the 28th of September, I was robbed of eighteen pigeons. I had locked up the pigeon-house safe the night before; they had taken out the pannel of a shutter, lifted up the window, and opened the bolts; on the Monday they came again, got in at the door, and took fourteen more; they were fancy pigeons, and very valuable - here are twenty-seven of them; I know nothing of the prisoners.

WILLIAM SMITH . On Tuesday morning, the 29th of September, I saw the prisoners about half-past eight o'clock coming down Brick-lane, Spitalfields; I was looking out of my top-shop window - they came to me, and asked me to buy eight pigeons, which I did; I gave the money to Bullock, but Atkins gave me the pigeons in a bag.

LOT FLETCHER . I stopped ten of these pigeons which were brought to me for sale by the two prisoners on that Tuesday.

JOHN RAWLINS . I bought these eight pigeons of Smith.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I went to Mr. Fletcher on the Tuesday evening, and from thence to a house in Nichol-street, where I found Bullock and nine pigeons; I went to another place, and took Atkins.

MARY FLETCHER . I am the wife of Lot Fletcher. I gave the same pigeons which the prisoner brought to Mr. Armstrong.(Property produced and sworn to.)

BULLOCK's Defence. I met Atkins, who is my sister, and asked her if she would go to sell the pigeons with me; she said Yes, and we came to Smith's, and sold ten of them - I asked 1s. a piece for them, he said he would give me 8d. - I said No, but at last I let him have them; my sister knew nothing about it.

ATKINS' Defence. I was coming from the shop just as my brother said he was going to sell some pigeons - I went with him; he said he was going to buy a bushel of apples with the money - I went, as a sister would do, to see he made no bad use of it - there was not enough money in the house, and the man gave 6s. 8d. for them; my brother has never been into my house since last Christmas - I did not know where he got them, he said he bought them.

COURT to LOT FLETCHER. Q. Did you tell the prisoner to go and fetch the owner? A. Yes; and Atkins said to him, "Go fetch the man you bought them off" - they both went away, and never returned.

BULLOCK - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

ATKINS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-122

2065. SAMUEL ASHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 5 frying-pans, value 9s. the goods of Henry Frost .

HENRY FROST. I am an ironmonger , and live in Goswell-road - I lost five frying-pans from my shop-door on the 17th of September - I had seen them about a quarter of an hour before, when an unknown person came and apprized

me of their being taken - I heard no more till the next morning, when the officer brought the prisoner.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was in Goswell-street at half-past seven o'clock on the night of the 17th of September; I saw the prisoner coming with some frying-pans' under his arms, about one hundred and fifty yards from Mr. Frost's; I followed him and asked what he had got - he said some frying-pans which he had brought from the Seven Dials - I said "Where did you get them there?" he said, "You know I am a jeweller, and I changed some jewellery for them" - I took him into custody.

JOSEPH PYNE . I was with Thompson, and saw what he has stated.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I exchanged some work for them.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-123

2066. THOMAS ANSELL and GEORGE NICHOLSON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , 1 wooden till, value 2s.,: 2 shillings, and 8s. in copper monies , the property of William Harris .

SARAH HARRIS . I am daughter of William Harris, a baker , of Cleveland-street, St. Pancras . On the 16th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I left the shop for four or five minutes - when I returned a man came in and asked if I had lost a till; I looked, and the till was gone - I had seen it safe a short time before; I do not know what money was in it; I should think about 16s. - the man told me a young fellow in a sailor's jacket took it - I went out and saw the two prisoners together in Warren-street - they were walking slowly together, as if they were sharing something in their aprons - they looked behind them, saw me, and ran directly - I cried Stop thief! the people ran, and Ansell was taken in Grafton-street; the till was picked up in Southampton-street; I saw it in the street, but there was no money in it; just before I came up to the prisoner Ansell let down part of his apron; I did not hear any thing fall, but just at that spot a number of halfpence were found; I am sure of Nicholson's person, but he was not taken at that time.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you seen Nicholson since? A. Yes; on the day following he came past with some other boys; he was walking along; I was told he was the same person, by the man who saw him take the till out - I came to the door and saw him; I was within about ten yards of him - he saw us, and made off very fast down the street - I did not give him into custody, because he was out of the way; their backs were towards me when I pursued them, but they turned, and I saw their faces sufficient to be sure of them - I turned into Southampton-street, where they were walking together; Nicholson was taken up that day month.

COURT. Q. When you saw Nicholson the next day, had he the same dress? A. Yes; I told his mother I was certain he was the person - he came the next day.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you say you swore to him because you saw him the next day, but if you had not you could not? A. No.

JAMES CROSBY . On the 16th of September I was near Mr. Harris' shop, and saw the two prisoners come and stand by the railing - Nicholson had a blue jacket and trousers on, and the other an apron and fustian coat - I saw them about ten minutes, and then Ansell went to the corner of Warren-mews; I saw Nicholson come out of the shop with a sort of box in his hand - he went to Ansell, and gave it into his apron; I heard some money rattle: they both went off together - I went and told what I saw; Miss Harris came out of the shop, inquiring for the till.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. I am apprentice to a stenciller. I had seen Ansell before - I was looking at Nicholson, but my observation of him was less than of Ansell; he had no hat on.

CHARLES LEWIS . I live in Rathbone-place. I was in Grafton-street, about six hundred yards from the shop, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw Ansell, and stopped him - a young man said, "He is wanted - there is a young woman coming;" this young lady came up, and said, "What have you done with our till?" he said, "I know nothing about it;" I took him back the way the people said he had come, and took up several pieces of coin - I found this till in Southampton-street.(Till produced and sworn to.)

ANSELL - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

NICHOLSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-124

2067. GEORGE ALABASTER and ANN ALABASTER were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 2 blankets, value 2s.; 1 bolster, value 4s.; 1 pair of bellows, value 1s.; 2 irons, value 6d., and 1 candlestick, value 1s. , the goods of Frederick Reeves .

FREDERICK REEVES. I live in Webb-square, Shoreditch . The prisoners came to lodge with me on the 9th of June; they staid three months, and left one Thursday, without notice, and on the Sunday they sent the key - they had left behind them the duplicates of two blankets, a bolster, a pair of bellows, some flat-irons, and a candlestick; they had all been let to the prisoners with the lodging.

JOHN BOARDS . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this bolster on the 11th of June, of a man, and gave him this duplicate - and this blanket of a woman, on the 28th of August, and gave her this duplicate; I have known both the prisoners for years, but cannot swear they are the persons who pawned them. The blanket was pawned by a man, whom I think was the prisoner, but I do not recollect the fact.

LEVI TOBIAS . I live in Wheeler-street. On the 26th of June I bought a blanket of a person, who gave the name of Mary Jones - I do not know whom.

WILLIAM COMBS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a flatiron, pawned in the name of Jones - I do not know by whom.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I am an officer. I received these duplicates from the prosecutor; when I took the man he said he pawned part himself, that part were pawned by the woman, and he did it through distress.

GEORGE ALABASTER's Defence. He said he took me for a case of felony - I said, "You may take me for what you please:" I told him I knew of part of them, and of the other I had only been told by my wife - it was through distress.

SAMUEL MAYNE POWELL . I took up the woman: she said it had been done through distress, but they had got a little work, and meant to pay a trifle a week.

GEORGE ALABASTER - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Of stealing the blanket only. - Confined One Month .

ANN ALABASTER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-125

2068. MARY HORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 tub, value 1s.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 1 frock, value 6d.; 1 skirt, value 2d., and 1 night-gown, value 3d. , the goods of Joseph Taylor .

SUSANNAH TAYLOR . I am the wife of Joseph Taylor- we live in Hare-street, Bethnal-green . On the 10th of October a neighbour's little boy came and asked if I had left a tub in my yard - I said Yes; I went out, and saw the prisoner five doors from where I live - she had the tub under her arm, and these other things in her lap - she was quite a stranger; I had seen them safe about an hour before.

HENRY CLARK . I was going on an errand for my mother, and saw this woman in the prosecutor's passage - I watched her out, with the tub under her arm, and the things in her lap; I told Mrs. Taylor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-126

2069. THOMAS HIGGINBOTTOM was indicted stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 bedstead, value 1l. 6s. , the goods of William Pearson .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Mary Pearson .

MARY PEARSON. I am the wife of William Pearson, of Old-street, St. Luke's . On the 30th of September the watch-house-keeper came and asked if I had lost a bedstead - I said No, but found I had.

THOMAS WALKER . I am the watch-house-keeper. On the 30th of September, about eleven o'clock. I saw the prisoner looking at the bedstead; he then took it up, and went away with it - I went and spoke to Mrs. Pearson, who said he had stolen it; I went and took him with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-127

207. WILLIAM HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , 2 pictures, value 14s. , the goods of Robert Tuffs .

ROBERT TUFFS. I am a publican . I lost these two pictures on the 20th of September, from my parlour; my waiter told me they were gone - I went and found them in a basket: the prisoner ran away, but we caught him - he said he knew nothing about them: I might have seen him in the house before, but I had not noticed him - we found in his pocket the duplicate of two other pictures, which I lost on the 6th.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were there any pictures on the prisoner? A. No. I did not say these pictures were worth five hundred guineas - I said I had as many pictures in my house as were worth five hundred guineas; I valued these at 10s.

THOMAS STIMPSON . I am the waiter. I saw the prisoner on the 20th of September - he came into the house with an empty basket, and called for a pint of porter at one end of the room; he drank that, and called for another pint at the other end of it, and then I saw the pictures were taken down - I stopped down to take a chair, and saw something like a picture in his basket; I told my master, who came into the room - the prisoner went out: we went and called Stop thief! and a milkman stopped him; there were five or six people in the parlour.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw the pictures in the basket in the room? A. Yes: the prisoner had not left the room then; I went to my master, and when he came in the prisoner was gone out of the room - he had not taken the pictures out of the room.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-128

SECOND DAY, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2071. JAMES NEWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 toast-rack, value 2s. , the goods of The Honourable Robert Henry Clive .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-129

2072. JOHN BARRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 tea-chest, value 10s., and 1 sugar-basin, value 4s. , the goods of Richard Gould .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-130

2073. WILLIAM HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , 2 pictures, value 14s. , the goods of Robert Tuffs .

ROBERT TUFFS. I keep the Crown public-house, at Mile-end . On Sunday, the 7th of September, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed two pictures from my parlour; I had seen them safe on the Saturday morning, but did not miss them till Sunday afternoon.

THOMAS STIMPSON . I was waiter to the prosecutor. On the 7th of September I missed two pictures; I saw the prisoner there on the 6th, but not on the 7th; I had cleaned out the room on Sunday morning, but did not miss the pictures till master told me of it.

WILLIAM BROCK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Broad-street, Ratcliff. These pictures were pawned with me, on the 6th of September, in the afternoon, by a man, in the name of William Hardy; I believe the prisoner to have been the man: I remember seeing him in the shop - I gave him a duplicate; I live about a mile and a half from the prosecutor's.

THOMAS CURRANT . I am an officer, and took the prisoner on the 20th of September; I found on his person this duplicate, which the pawnbroker says he gave him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased them of a person who hawks them about for sale on the Friday.

MR. TUFFS. I saw them safe at nine o'clock on Saturday morning.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-131

2074. GEORGE JOYCE and WILLIAM WOODROFF were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 4 ducks, price 10s., and 7 fowls, price 14s. , the property of Thomas Husband .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

ELIZABETH MILLS . I am dairy-maid to Mr. Thomas Husband - he lives near Waltham Abbey ; I have the care of his ducks and fowls - I secured them at half-past four o'clock on the 6th of October, and at half-past five next morning I missed them; I saw four ducks and seven fowls at Lambeth-street office, and knew them to be my master's- I lost nine fowls and six ducks.

JOHN ADAMAN . On the morning of the 7th of October I stopped Joyce in Pond-lane, Clapton, at half-past six o'clock - he was coming from Waltham Abbey towards London, but not in the direct road; in his jacket pockets I found three ducks, and buttoned in his waistcoat was one fowl, and in his hat another fowl - I suspected there was another person with him, and I sent two men to see if any one else appeared; Woodroff was brought in in half an hour, and I found on him a duplicate, a knife, 1s. 6d. in silver, and in his jacket pocket a few feathers and some scales, which appeared to have come from the legs of fowls.

JAMES DENBY . I am a patrol. Adaman sent me to watch; I saw Woodroff in a field - he saw me, and ran across a field; Barrett, who was with me, ran after him to Lee-bridge-road, and took him - I found four fowls and a duck ten or a dozen yards from the spot where I first saw Woodroff; they were dead, but quite warm - Mills owned them.

JONATHAN BARRETT . I am a patrol. I was with Denby - I saw Woodroff, and pursued and took him; Denby's evidence is correct.

WOODROFF's Defence. When they first took me to the watch-house, the officer said, "You have got another;" he said, "Yes, I have;" he said, "Can you swear to this man?" "Yes," said he, "I saw him throw the fowls over the hedge, and they were found in a ditch:" I was with some friends catching birds, and it is generally the custom to run across fields to turn the birds back again.

JOYCE's Defence. I bought three ducks and three fowls of a man for 6s. - they were white ducks, and speckled fowls; they have no mark on them.

JONATHAN BARRETT. I did not see any bird-catchers or any persons at all,

JOYCE - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined One Year .

WOODROFF - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-132

2075. JOHN BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Francis Sullivan .

FRANCIS SULLIVAN. I had these shoes for sale at my door, No. 37, Monmouth-street - I had seen them just after ten o'clock that morning.

GEORGE SMITH. I was at my door, and saw the prisoner go to the top of Sullivan's cellar, and take up the shoes; I told Sullivan - we went and took him with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Confined One Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-133

2076. MARY FRY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 2 sheets, value 8s. , the goods of Samuel Mogford .

WILLIAM BLAY . I am a pawnbroker. I have two sheets pawned, one on the 22d of September, in the name of Ann Fry, and another on the 23d of September, in the name of Ann Martin - I do not know by whom.

MARY ANN MOGFORD . I am the wife of Samuel Mogford. I know one of these sheets to be mine - I missed this and another, on the 24th of September, from the adjoining room to that which the prisoner occupied in the next house to mine; this one had been safe a day or two before - she gave me four duplicates.

JOHN HARRISON . I am the officer. I took the prisoner, and found these two duplicates on her.

Prisoner. I gave up the duplicates to her.

JOHN HARRISON. I believe I made a mistake, she gave up these - I found several others on her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed, and intended to redeem them.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-134

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2077. CHARLES HENDRICK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 box, value 1d.; 1 ring, value 1s., and 3 sovereigns , the property of Jane Smith .

JANE SMITH. I live in Red Lion-court , and keep a mangle . I make up one bed for a single man - the prisoner came to lodge with me in the latter part of September; I had a trunk in one of my rooms - it was locked, but the room was not; the key of the trunk was kept in the cupboard in my bed-room - the prisoner had nothing to do with my rooms; in the trunk was a little box, with a ring and three sovereigns in it; on the 3d of October I saw my key safe when I went out in the morning - when I came back it was gone; I went down to the prisoner about it - he denied it, but I felt it in his trouser's pocket; I then went out, and on my return he threw the key at me, and said he had taken it for a lark - I went up, opened the trunk, and all was right; I hung the key on a nail in the cupboard, and on the Monday I missed my money, ring and little box - I went down to the prisoner, and asked him to give me the man's money - he said, "What man?" I said,"Don't ask me what man, I mean the man that is sick in the hospital" - he said he knew nothing of it; it was in the chest - he took his hat to go out; I said he should not go out till I found the money - I sent for the officer, who found the ring and one sovereign.

JOHN ADAMS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and found the prisoner in the middle-room - I searched the room, and found a little box in a tea-pot, and behind the stove I found a sovereign and a little ring, which was just by where the prisoner had been standing when we went into room.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never had them.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-135

2078. JOHN HENDERSON was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. RYLAND conducted the prosecution.

BENJAMIN WARREN . I am in partnership with my brother Robert, in the Strand ; the prisoner came into our employ four or five years ago as clerk and traveller - he was employed to receive money; if he received money in London, he was to account for it to me or my brother every evening in the counting-house, but I generally received it; when he was on a journey he was to write to us twice a week, with an account of his orders and payments, and when he came home he was to make up his book; I have his book here - in 1827, September 21, he has written against the account of Mr. George Kidley , of Chatham, "Six months," meaning that the account had not been standing six months, the goods having been sent in May, and they would not be paid for till November; he went again in April last, and then he writes against it "Next journey:" in April or May last we desired a conference with him on the subject of his accounts; he produced a long list, in pencil, of accounts which he had received, and not paid in, as was his duty to do, but had purloined - I think it very likely he used the word embezzled; we told him if he would give up every instance of what he had embezzled, we would not prosecute him, but go on his former security, which was a bond of indemnity - he said he had never received any account of any one person who lived out of London but what he had mentioned.

Q. What sort of a statement did he give? A. A pencil memorandum, and some verbal statements; this written list (looking at it) was not made out in his presence, nor shown to him; he said there was every single instance on which he had received money from the country, and not accounted for it; no account of 1l. 12s. from Mr. Lawrence, on the 15th of September was received - here is his book of receipts of that day, and there is no such account in it- I never received it.

COURT. Q. Were you the person who spoke to him at that time? A. Yes; I can swear he never gave me an account of the 1l. 12s.

MR. RYLAND. Q. You say that not only Mr. Lawrence's money is not down here in the book, but from your own recollection that he did not account for it to you? A. Kidley's account at Chatham was 1l. 15s. 6d., but he did not receive the whole of it; I believe he received 1l. 3s. Mr. Hathersick was the gentleman who succeeded the prisoner, and he went round the journey to investigate the accounts - he is not here; this letter we received from him - it is addressed by the prisoner to him, and is in the prisoner's hand-writing; the sums mentioned in these indictments were not mentioned by the prisoner at the time of the investigation, nor at any other time.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. This man had been in your service five years, had he? A. Yes, thereabouts; I know nothing of a firm of Russell and Warren - I have heard of them about eight or nine months: at the time of this investigation we had security to the amount of 500l., in a bond of indemnity, for any deficiency of the prisoner's - the parties were solvent, and paid us on the 5th of June; if the prisoner had stated these accounts in his investigation, they would have been paid no doubt - we did not turn him away till the 31st of May; we have never had him back since that; when we spoke of his accounts he was away for a week - we wrote to his friends; he came and made up a story; we took him again, and he went this journey - I think we took him about a month ago, in September; we could not find him before - the officer said he was on the look out for him; I did not know he was on the journey for the other firm till afterwards - we had a warrant out against him.(The letter was here put in and read.)

DEAR SIR, - Agreeable to my promise, I write, but am sorry to say, not with the cash, as I cannot get it these three weeks; since I had the pleasure of seeing you, I have heard that Mr. Warren intends to prosecute me, if any more accounts are brought against me, and they are only waiting your letter to hear: now, my dear Sir, I know your kindness, and the unpleasant situation you are placed in; my liberty and prospects in this life are entirely left in your hands. If you take the accounts in against me I am done, which I am sure is not your wish; I pledge you my word all shall be paid long before the next journey is due; if you will send me the accounts, I will get a friend to pay them at different times, saying they wanted to Mr. account, or in any other way you may think proper; you have only to say on the bills - "not at home;" I am sure you would not be the means of sending me out of the country. It is not for myself I care, but my poor motherless child; for God's sake, Mr. Hathersick, let me know what you intend to do, and when and where I may take the liberty of sending you a letter; will you be pleased to send a letter for me to the barn by Sunday night's post; I leave here at ten o'clock to night by a sailing packet. I hope you will excuse this scrawl, and not say that I am in London.

I am, Sir, your humble servant, J. HENDERSON.

For God's sake do what you can for me. I have heard from London, and know they only wait for your letter.

Addressed, Mr. Hathersick, Post-office, Faversham.

To be called for. Post-mark, Dover, 3d July.

CHARLES LAWRENCE . I am an oilman, and live in Osnaburgh-street, Regent's-park. In 1827 I dealt with the prosecutors; on the 15th of September, 1827, I paid the prisoner 1l. 12s. - he gave me this receipt.

GEORGE KIDLEY. I live at Chatham, and am a shoemaker; I was a customer of the prosecutors. On the 18th of September, 1827 , I paid the prisoner 1l. 3s., which was part of a bill of 1l. 15s. 6d. - there was a deduction of 12s. 6d.

Cross-examined. Q. What was the deduction for? A. A part of the goods, a cask, and discount; the prisoner has called on me once since on behalf of Messrs. Warren; I cannot exactly say when - it was early in this year, to the best of my recollection; I was entitled to six months credit.

MR. RYLAND. Q. Did the prisoner call on you on the 3d of April last? A. I believe it was about that time - he did not ask me for this sum; I told him I would pay him next journey; I owed them nothing then - he has not called for any other trader in blacking.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-136

2079. RICHARD GUILT and JAMES BROADHURST were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 24 lbs. weight of lead, value 5s. , the goods of Joseph Bennett and James Hunt .

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am an officer employed at the St. Katharine's Docks . I had particular orders to watch the men; Guilt is a labourer , and Broadhurst is a plumber . On Friday, the 19th of September, I searched the men, and on the two prisoners I found something bulky; I searched

Guilt, and found on him 12 lbs. of lead - this piece was in his hat, and these two pieces in his trousers pocket; it is new lead - they had been employed on the roof of letter A warehouse; I watched them out of the shop, and when they got to the gate I stopped them.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. What was it their duty to do with these cuttings? A. To take them to the warehouse on which they were at work; they were not out of the dock when I stopped them - they were just going out.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I received charge of Broadhurst, and found in his left trousers pocket this piece of lead, which weighs 3 1/2 lbs., and Latham took this other piece out of his right-hand pocket - this other piece was found on him; there are 12 lbs. altogether - they were going out to go home.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search them going in? A. No.

WILLIAM LATHAM . I am foreman to Joseph Bennett and James Hunt; all the lead on these premises is their property.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you the superintendant of the lead? A. Messrs. Bennett and Hunt are to do the whole of the work; they have their own labourers and foreman over their respective tradesmen.

BROADHURST's Defence. I had only one pocket to my trousers; as we were returning to dinner, I had occasion to go into a corner, and saw some lead among some stones; I called my partner and told him - we divided it as equally as we could, and concealed it to take it away at night in our pockets.

GUILT - GUILTY . Aged 44.

BROADHURST - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury on account of their good characters.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-137

2080. WILLIAM RILEY and PHILIP MOORE were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 basin, value 2s. , the goods of Edward Howard .

WILLIAM BIDDLE . I live with my father in Bath-street; Edward Howard's shop is in Bath-street . On the 24th of September, about two o'clock, I saw Riley take a glass basin from the table in the shop - there is no window - he took it without going in; he went on and gave it to Moore, who put it under his jacket; Riley then ran on and Moore went after him, but not so fast; I told Howard of it - he went and brought back Moore with the basin; Riley was not taken till past eleven o'clock at night; I had seen him about for two or three days.

GEORGE HOWARD . I am the son of Edward Howard. Biddle gave me information, and I went and took Moore - I saw Riley running; the basin was found on Moore.

THOMAS WALKER . I took Moore, and bring the basin.

HENRY SHELDRICK . I am an officer. I took Riley in bed in a house in Brackley-street; I asked him what he had done with the glass - he said he had given it to Moore.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MOORE put in a written Defence, stating that Riley had given him the glass and told him he had found it.

Two witnesses gave Moore a good character.

RILEY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months .

MOORE - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-138

2081. GEORGE FELL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 hat, value 15s. , the goods of John Jones .

AMELIA DUBOURG . I live with Mr. J. Jones, hatter , of Tottenham-court-road . On the 17th of September I was coming home, and met a boy near my master's shop with three hats - I cannot say that it was the prisoner; I went in and told Mr. Jones, who went out and returned with one hat - I saw the prisoner the next morning, but I cannot say whether he was dressed like the boy.

JOHN JONES. I am a hatter, and live in Tottenham-court-road. This witness gave me information, I went in pursuit, and saw the prisoner about one hundred yards from my shop with this hat under his arm; I ran by him first, then turned, and followed him about four hundred yards, and just as I went to take hold of him, he dropped this hat and ran; I ran and took him; this is my hat he had it under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running by John-street, and this man came and gave charge of me for stealing a hat, but I had not seen it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-139

2082. JAMES SHEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 clock, value 10s.; 2 saws, value 3s., and 1 hammock, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Frederick Clarke .

FREDERICK CLARKE. I live in Granby-row, Bethnal-green ; I cut wood, and make it into bundles to burn . On the 15th of September I saw the prisoner - he came to me, and asked if I was by myself; I said Yes; he asked me if I would let him be a lodger of mine, and said he would pay half my rent; I agreed to it; and he came home and slept with me; I went out the next morning, and came home at half-past twelve o'clock - he had the dinner ready: he stopped that night - I went out again the next day; when I came home I found the place locked up, I looked through the window and missed my clock - when I got in I missed two saws and a hammock; I went to his mother's house and found him; he told me to make myself easy, and he would let me have my things; he said he had not taken the saws, but the clock and the hammock.

LEWIS MYERSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; as we were going to the watch-house, I asked what he had done with the property; he said he had sold it in Dogrow; I went to Clark; this is the clock; and as I was going down stairs Clark gave me the saw.

THOMAS DOLBY . I saw the saw hanging at Clarke's.

ABIGAIL CLARK . I live in Dog-row, and deal in marine-stores; I bought this clock and this saw of the prisoner - I asked him three times if they were his own property - he said they were; and did I suppose he would tell me a lie? I gave 6s. for the clock, and 6d. for the saw - he asked 8d. for it; I asked where he lived, and he told me where his mother lived; I should have charged 7s. for the clock I dare say, but I might have kept it twelve months.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress at the time; and the prosecutor said he would forgive me if I told him where the things were.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-140

2083. THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 oar, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Daniel Fidler .

HENRY WHITTAKER . I am a labourer in the West India Docks . On the 15th of September, about 10 o'clock in the morning, I found a boat-oar, a boat-hook, and two fendons, near the Dock-wall, in a part where no one had any business to go.

JOHN SUTTON . Whittaker gave me information of these things - they appeared to have been thrown over the wall of the basin; Whittaker staid on the spot.

HENRY WHITTAKER re-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner? A. Yes: about a quarter before one o'clock, he was looking about - I asked what he was looking for; he said for some things which had been thrown over the wall belonging to him; he did not say how he came possessed of them, but said that if I would go with him to Blackwall, to a shipmate of his, he would redeem the property; in going along, he said it was not his own, but belonged to the Captain of the ship Charles; I then gave him in charge.

JOHN BISHOP . I am an officer. On the 15th of September I took these articles from the information of Whittaker; I have seen the prisoner in the docks, but he never worked there.

DANIEL FIDLER. I am commander of a merchant-vessel , she was in the basin; I had seen this property on board when she was in the river, and have every reason to believe it was there when she was in the basin.

Prisoner's Defence. There were twenty-four vessels came in - there was a boat alongside of one, and the Captain, (as I took him to be), said he wished somebody would get into the boat or she would be stowed; I got in and took care of her - I then put all these things that were in her on shore at the stairs - I left them there, and the next morning came down and missed the oars, the boat-hook, and the piece of old mat; I was looking about for them, and the man came and asked what I wanted; I said, "These things which had been in the boat last night."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-141

2084. SARAH RAFFLES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 hat, value 7s. , the goods of John Vaughan .

JOHN WATSON . I am an assistant to Mr. John Vaughan, he is a hatter , of Lamb's Conduit-street . On the 20th of September I received information, and pursued the prisoner about forty yards from our shop, and took her with this hat, which she said a young man gave her; it is my master's, and had been placed in the lobby of our shop, about a yard within the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I was quite intoxicated, and knew not what I had done.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-142

2085. JAMES ROBERTSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 1 drinking-glass, value 1s., and 1 knife, value 6d. , the goods of James Grace .

CATHERINE GRACE . I am the wife of James Grace: he keeps the Colliseum Tavern . On the 22d of September I saw the prisoner go out of the parlour; I went into the room, and missed a drinking-glass and a knife, which I had seen half a minute before - he was taken in about three-quarters of an hour.

JOHN ORAM . I was returning home from dinner, and saw the prisoner in Carburton-street: this glass was falling from his jacket - I told him of it; he gave me a very saucy answer, and in stopping to take up the glass, he dropped this knife - I said "I don't think you have come by them honestly;" he gave me another very insolent answer - I gave him in charge; he was then going towards the tavern.

SAMUEL EVANS . I am an officer, and took charge of the prisoner; he said it was his property, and no mistake.

Prisoner's Defence. There is no mark on them, and are fifty public-houses have the same sort of knives and glasses; Grace said she never saw me - I had bought them of a man in the Strand.

CATHERINE GRACE. I saw his face; I cannot tell what clothes he had on - he had neither shoes nor stockings.

SAMUEL EVANS. She described him to me before she saw him at the office.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-143

2086. MILES OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 26 yards of flannel, value 28s. , the goods of David Griffiths .

DAVID GRIFFITHS. I am a linen-draper , and live at Islington . On the evening of the 19th of September, a lady was in my shop; my young man, who was serving her, received some information from her - I was called in, my young man went out, and brought in the prisoner with this flannel.

JOHN SPOONER . I am in the service of Mr. Griffiths; a lady said a man had stolen some flannel - I went and overtook the prisoner about two hundred yards from the shop, walking very fast with this roll of flannel under his arm, which had been about one yard within the door - I did not know him before; he said a man gave it to him to take to the corner of Fetter-lane.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN LANE . I am a watchman; I was coming by -Spooner called me to take the prisoner.

DANIEL WARREN . - I am a night-constable. The prisoner was brought to me.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man came to me, and asked me if I wanted a job - he said he would give me 6d. to take this to Fetter-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-144

2087. JOHN SUTTON and EMMA COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July , 2 blankets, value 7s.; 1 frying-pan, value 2s.; and 1 dish, value 1d. , the goods of Catherine Geohegan .

CATHERINE GEOHEGAN. I live in a street in Gray's Inn-road - I let the two prisoners a room in my house some time in June; they said they were married - they went away, without giving me notice, taking the key of the room - there was a fortnight's rent due; I got the door opened, and missed these things - I have never found any of them since.

MARGARET GEOHEGAN . I know the prisoners; they lodged at my mother-in-law's - I met them together, and

gave charge of them; the man turned round, and said he knew nothing of me, nor the property - they lived there as man and wife; the woman went by the name of Sutton.

SAMUEL EVANS . I am a constable - the witness called me, and gave charge of the prisoners; the woman said the goods were all safe enough, or words to that effect; there was something said by Sutton about paying by instalments - I believe it was said by the woman, and the man joined in it.

SUTTON's Defence. He called after me; I never attempted to run away; I might have got away if I had chosen.

COLLINS' Defence. I was very ill, and not able to carry any thing out; we had private reasons for not being married.

SUTTON - GUILTY . Aged 48.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-145

2088. JOHN MURPHY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 1 writing-desk, value 30s.; 1 coat, value 7s.; 1 pair of pantaloons, value 20s.; 1 purse, value 1s., and 2 sixpences, the property of John Wright ; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 8s. , the goods of John Fletcher .

JOHN WRIGHT. I am master of the Hebe, collier ; she was at Bell-wharf - on the 9th of October, I was asleep in the cabin, and about one o'clock that morning I was awoke by some person in my bed-place; I lay still, and heard the noise again - I put out my hand, and got a slight hold of a man; I said "What do you want?" he got off, and I pursued him - he went out at the starboard gangway, and was getting into a boat, but he fell overboard; I got into the boat, and picked him up out of the water; I called for my crew, and two of them came; I found it was the prisoner I had hold of - we got him on deck, and made him fast with a chain; my men called the Police-boat - we found three silk handkerchiefs on him; I went down, and found my desk removed bottom uppermost, and my pantaloons and hat were removed, they had been hanging up - my purse was in my pantaloons pocket; he was quite a stranger, and had no right to be there.

JOHN FLETCHER. I am a mariner , and was on board the Hebe. These two handkerchiefs are mine, and had been taken from the ship that night.

JAMES WHITE . I was called, and took the prisoner; he said he came off in a boat, and must get on shore as he could.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was on board that vessel.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-146

2089. JOHN MALONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 4 rings, value 11s.; 2 brooches, value 5s., and 1 pair of ear-rings, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Solomon .

SAMUEL WOOLF . I am shopman to Mr. Henry Solomon, a refiner and silversmith ; he deals in rings ; the prisoner came into his shop with a woman who has been discharged; they asked to look at some ear-rings; I shewed them the 4s. bowl, with ear-rings, seals, and rings in it - the woman was going to pay me for a pair of ear-rings, when I sent for an officer, and gave them into custody, because I had seen the prisoner take up rings between his fingers, and make an excuse to pull out his handkerchief, and leave the rings in his pocket; I sent for an officer - a ring and brooch were found on him, and three rings in my hat, which happened to be on the counter; two rings and a brooch I found on the ground; they were all my master's.

THOMAS CUSS . I am an officer. I was sent for, and searched the prisoner; I found a brooch and a ring in his right-hand waistcoat pocket; three rings in the shopman's hat, which stood close to the prisoner on the counter, and this brooch and a pair of ear-rings were behind the counter.

Prisoner's Defence. The young woman offered him some money for them, which he would not take; he got into a passion, and snatched the bowl away, and dropped some of them; the ring and brooch which were found on me I had got out of pawn that morning; he said at Bow-street he could not swear to them.

SAMUEL WOOLF. I said I could not swear to any of them, for we have a number of articles all like these.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-147

2090. EDWARD MANAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 shovel, value 2s. , the goods of Jonathan Rees .

JONATHAN REES. I am an excavator at St. Katharine's Docks ; I put down my shovel on the 20th of October, and in a few minutes it was gone.

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am an officer on duty at the docks; on the 20th of October I heard the prosecutor had lost a shovel, and I found the prisoner about three hundred yards from the place, in East Smithfield, with a shovel; I asked him how he got it - he said he bought and paid for it - this was about half-past six o'clock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was there at work; I put down my shovel where there were a lot of shovels - the foreman told me to go and get the earth down for some stones to pass; I went for my shovel but some one had taken it, as I suppose in place of his own, as we never mind to have our own - I said some one had got it, and the officer said "Come along, I will shew you the man who has got it," and he struck me a rap on the head; my foreman came up and said "Let the man go, he did not want to steal it," but they would not let me go.

DENNIS BRIAN . On Monday morning I met the prisoner, and said "Are you come to work" - he said Yes; I said "That is not your shovel" - he said "No, it is one I took up to work" - I saw him soon after at work with a shovel; he told me it was not his own, he did not know where his own was.

DAVID BARRY . I was at work - the officer came and took the shovel out of the prisoner's hand; he did not tell him he had bought and paid for it, I will swear that.

COURT to THOMAS HAYLOCK. Q. Will you swear positively that the prisoner said he had bought it and paid for it? A. Yes, he did; when he got to the prosecutor he said,"Well, then, it may be a mistake;" the prisoner is a pavior, and the prosecutor is in the employ of Messrs. Bennett and Hunt.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281023-148

2091. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 live tame fowl, price 3s. , the property of Samuel Wilkinson .

It being the property of Martin Hook Wilkinson , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18281023-149

2092. PATRICK KYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 pillow, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 half-handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Matheson ; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 1 pair of trousers, value 2s., the goods of Edmund Mason ; 1 pillow, value 1s., the goods of James Thomas ; 1 pair of braces, value 1s, the goods of William Raymond ; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Emanuel Peire .

JOSEPH HYNSON . I am an officer of the Lancaster West India Naval School Ship - the prisoner was an apprentice on board; no part of the property was mine - the persons it belongs to are all apprentice s, except Raymond; on the 9th of October I called the prisoner and ordered him to unlash his hammock; he took it to the other side of the deck, and did it in a way which excited great suspicion - I went to him, and said I did not think all was right; I overhauled it, and found all the articles stated; he said he did it out of fun and sky-larking.

THOMAS MATHESON. I am an apprentice on board this ship. This pillow, and handkerchief, and half-handkerchief, are mine; they had been in my hammock.

EDMUND MASON. I am apprentice on board the ship. This handkerchief and trousers are mine; they were taken out of the hawl-up-deck - I had tied them up in my handkerchief; I never lent them to the prisoner.

JAMES THOMAS. I am apprentice on board the ship. I lost this pillow from my hammock on the hawl-up-deck.

EMANUEL PEIRE. I am apprentice on board the ship. This handkerchief was taken from my hammock.

FRANCIS FAIRBAIRN . I am an officer. I was sent for and took the prisoner; I went on board the Sir Edward Hamilton, where the prisoner said he had a chest; I there selected a number of other things which are not here.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the things; I lost my own pillow; they got hove about by the boys in their play.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-150

2093. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , 1 waistcoat, value 6s. the goods of Samuel Pulsford .

SAMUEL PULSFORD. I live in Davies-street, Berkeley-square . I saw the prisoner, on the 22d of September, take a waistcoat from the corner of my door - I was up stairs - I came down and pursued him; he had got about one hundred yards from my house - he dropped the waistcoat and I took him.

BENJAMIN HOLLOWAY . I took the prisoner, and produce the property - I found nothing on him but a pipe.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18281023-151

2094. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , 20 lbs. weight of lead, value 3s. , the goods of Sir Henry William Martin , Bart .

JAMES GANTREY . I was at work at the house of Sir Henry William Martin, Bart., in Harley-street - the prisoner worked there as a plumber's labourer ; I saw him go out of the stable-door, on the 10th of September, with some lead on his shoulders - I followed him down Devonshire-street, and into Paddington-street - he went into the shop of a plumber; I went up to him in the passage and said, "You have taken that lead from Sir Henry Martin's and you must bring it back;" he said "Let me go, I will never take another piece of lead."

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Upon your oath, did not you take upon yourself to forgive him? A. No: Sir Henry William Martin is in Berkshire - I wrote to him by the first night's post; I did not give the prisoner into custody, because I did not know whether I had acted right; I had a communication from Sir Henry to go to Mr. Roe, the Magistrate, with a note, which I did - I knew it was my duty to apprehend the prisoner, but I did not know whether Sir Henry would have him taken up or not: I said I would not acquaint his master of it, if he told me where he had taken the lead to - it was the property of Sir Henry Martin; I had the prisoner apprehended, I think about three weeks afterwards - I had not told him he was to be taken up.

JOHN ANNIS . I am a plumber, and was employed by Sir Henry William Martin, and have been so for many years - the lead is his property.

JAMES GANTREY. I have had the lead ever since. I am not an officer; I had a note to appear against the prisoner - Charles Lewis was at work on the premises.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Gantrey did promise me it should drop if I would acknowledge where I had taken the lead; I said I had not taken any.

CHARLES LUCAS . I hard Mr. Gautrey promise the prisoner forgiveness, if he would say where he took the lead - this was on the Thursday afternoon, about four o'clock.

JAMES GANTREY re-examined. Q. What day was it that you traced the prisoner to the house? A. On Wednesday the 10th of September, about twenty minutes after five o'clock - I put it into one of the rooms, and looked it up.

Cross-examined. Q. You said you would not tell the prisoner's master, if he told you where he took the lead? A. That did not allude to this lead.

CHARLES LUCAS. On the evening when they both came back together, the prisoner had a piece of lead, and it was thrown down with some old lead in the laundry - I said "I will take care that no lead shall go away, for I will take it away;" that piece was not kept by the witness.

GUILTY . Aged 62.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-152

2095. GEORGE HARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 5 lbs. weight of bacon, value 1s. 8d. , the goods of Thomas Byers .

WILLIAM LACY . I live in Earl-street, Lisson-grove , opposite to Mr. Thomas Byers, who is a cheesemonger . On the 4th of October I saw the prisoner come and take

a piece of bacon from his shop-window - he did not go into the shop, but went on the steps of a private-door, and took it round some casks; he put it under his coat - I ran and took him; he dropped it at my feet - I chased him to No. 2, Little Exeter-street; he ran into a house, where the door was open and shut the door in my face - I then returned and went to my work.

SARAH LACY . I saw the prisoner take the bacon from Mr. Byers' board - I am sure he is the person.

JOHN BOYD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at No. 1, Little Exeter-street; he appeared to be asleep - I said "You appear very fast asleep?" he opened his eyes, and said "I did not take the bacon. it was another boy."

Prisoner's Defence. I said I knew nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-153

2096. JOHN WILSON and ROBERT BURN were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 100 cigars, value 3s. , the goods of Frank Hutchins .

WILLIAM HUTCHINS . I am brother of Frank Hutchins, a tobacconist , who lives in Greek-street . On the 17th of October I saw Wilson take a bundle of cigars from our shop-window, a little past ten o'clock in the morning - he stood on the step, put in his arm and took them out; I ran out, and saw him and Burn - he had got but a little way past the shop-window; I caught Wilson and Burn got away, but he had disposed of the cigars - I have never seen them since.

THOMAS WILSON . I am an officer. I was sent for and took Wilson; I asked where he had given the cigars - he said he knew nothing of them.

JURY to WILLIAM HUTCHINS. Q. Do you know how many bundles of cigars there were in the window? A. No: I saw him take one - there are eighty or ninety cigars in a bundle; I saw where the bundle had been, and there was a vacancy.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-154

2097. MARY WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 2 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of James Mantle ; 2 pewter pots, value 2s., the goods of John Hemery ; and 1 pewter pot, value 6d. , the goods of William Hiddon .

JAMES BARBER . I am servant to Mr. Mantle, who keeps the Berkeley Arms public-house, in John-street, Berkeley-square . I saw the prisoner on the 18th of October, with two pots close by her; I turned my head to speak to a person, and she was gone - I ran after her and found four pots in her apron, and one in her pocket; two of these are ours.

JOHN HEMERY. I keep the Masons' Arms public-house . Two of these pots are mine.

WILLIAM HIDDON. I am a publican . One of these pots is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress and have two children.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-155

2098. JANE WALLACE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 coat, value 25s. , the goods of John Allan .

JOHN ALLAN. I am assistant to Mr. Wagner, of Greek-street, Soho - he is a draper. My coat was hanging over the foot of my bed, on the second-floor; I did not see the prisoner take it, but I found it thrown over the door of my bed-room - she was quite a stranger.

FANNY STOKES . I am housekeeper at that house. -On the 24th of September, about a quarter before five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in the bed-room, with the coat in her hands; I said, "Good woman, what are you doing here?" she said, "I want a silversmith;" I said, "It is a curious place to come here for a silversmith - Did you not see any one in the shop?"

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Did not she say his name was Nash? A. She said some name; she must have gone through the passage - there were a great many people at work in the house: I never saw any coat in the passage - there were hats there; Mr. Allan and Mr. Clark sleep in that room.

THOMAS WILSON . I am an officer, and produce the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the coat, and never had it; there were plenty of things in the passage.

GUILTY . Aged 73.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-156

2099. STILMAN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 seal, value 10s.; 2 watch-keys, value 2s., and 2 other keys, value 2s. , the goods of James Dods .

JAMES DODS. I am steward of the Lord Melville - she was lying off Irongate wharf, at the Tower , on the 6th of October; my mate brought a friend on board, and the prisoner came with him; my watch was at the foot of the bed in the state-room - they went about the vessel, to see the accommodation, and went into the state-room; they then went away - the mate and his friend afterwards returned, but not the prisoner: I did not miss my watch till they had left the second time - I went after them, and saw them all; they came back to the ship - the mate and his friend stripped; the prisoner very reluctantly pulled off his jacket and waistcoat - he said it was of no use for him to strip, as he had not got it; the watch was not found at that time: they went on shore again, and in the evening I went and received the watch from the mate, at a public-house.

JAMES LANNEY . I am the mate. On the 6th of October a friend came on board the ship - the prisoner came with him, and appeared as an acquaintance; I showed them the vessel, but did not go into the state-room with them - I stood outside; the witness told me he had lost his watch, and we all stripped - the prisoner said there was no occasion for him to strip, he had not got it; we then went on shore, and had some beer at a public-house - as we were coming away the prisoner put his hand into his pocket, and drew it out again - I saw the two seals, and said they were the steward's seals; I asked him for the watch, but he would not give it to me; I said I would call the watchman - the prisoner dropped the watch in the passage, and the landlord took it up.

GEORGE BRYSON . I keep the Inverness Arms public-

house. I picked up the watch in my passage, between the parlour and the tap-room; the prisoner had been on that spot just before.

ROBERT HENRY BURGESS . I am the officer, and took the prisoner; he said he would give anything if I would let him go.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it; I had not the watch in my possession; it was taken into the public-house by some other person.

COURT to JAMES LANNEY. Q. Did you see the seals? A. Yes - he drew them just out of his pocket with his hand; I asked to look at it, and he would not let me: I went out at the door - he followed me, and dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-157

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2100. FREDERICK WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 3 brooches, value 12s. , the goods of Samuel Lyon .

SAMUEL LYON. I live in York-street, Covent-garden , and am a jeweller ; the prisoner's father worked for me. On the 25th of September the prisoner came to my house, and asked if he could assist me; I told him to ask his father for leave, and to come in an hour - he came again between two and three o'clock; when he went out, about five o'clock, I had some suspicion, and had him stopped by the officer; he was searched, and I saw these three brooches taken from him - he at first denied having them.

ROBERT COOK . I am a street-keeper. I was directed to wait at the premises of Mr. Lyon, and saw the prisoner come out between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; I took him, and said I believed he had some property of Mr. Lyon's about him - he said he had not; I took him back, searched him, and found these gold brooches in an inner-pocket of his trousers - I heard him say he took them from Mr. Lyons, and ask forgiveness.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18281023-158

2101. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 piece of handkerchiefs, containing 7 handkerchiefs, value 22s. , the goods of John Webb .

PHILIP NEWMAN . I am shopman to John Webb, who lives in the Strand . On the 13th of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the shop, and heard the bar of the door fall; I ran into the street, and up the first court where I saw the prisoner with this piece of handkerchiefs in his hand - I cried Stop thief! he ran, and threw them down; I took them up, and pursued him, till he was stopped: I never lost sight of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-159

2102. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , 1 pair of wooden steps, value 3s. , the goods of Anthony Bousfield .

ANTHONY BOUSFIELD. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Great Marlborough-street . I lost a pair of steps on the 2d of October, from outside my window, a little after five o'clock in the evening; I did not know they were gone till I saw them in possession of the officer - I had seen them safe about three quarters of an hour before.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer, and live in Tyler's-court. I was coming home about five o'clock that evening, and saw the prisoner standing with his back against these steps; I got to my own door, and saw him just behind me, with them - I stopped him, and told him he must go back with me; he said he was glad he was taken, for he had been out of a situation, walking all day, and was tired and hungry.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was actually starving.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18281023-160

2103. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 leg of mutton, value 5s., and 1 iron hook, value 2d. , the goods of William Way .

WILLIAM WAY. I am a butcher , and live in North Audley-street . On the 11th of October, about ten minutes past seven o'clock, my son told me something; I went out, and saw the prisoner about two doors from me, with the leg of mutton - I caught him by the collar, and brought him back; he threw down the mutton in the next door-way - it was mine, and I had hung it just outside my shop about a quarter of an hour before.

WILLIAM WAY, JUN . I am the prosecutor's son. I saw the prisoner take the leg of mutton and the book off the rail, wrap it in a handkerchief, and put it under his arm - I ran in and told my father, who caught him two doors off.

THOMAS LEWIS . I am the officer. When I came up the prosecutor had the prisoner by the collar, and the mutton was on the board; I asked him how he came to do it - he said he found it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in front of the shop at all till he brought me there.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-161

2104. THOMAS COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 1 coat, value 40s. , the goods of John Pashley .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-162

2105. WILLIAM CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 8s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Peter Simeon , from the person of David Simeon .

PETER SIMEON. I live in Market-street, Finsbury New-market. My wife got a woman to make a suit of clothes - my son, David, went for them with another boy; I went afterwards to the Curtain-road - I saw the prisoner there, and my son said, "That is the man who took the parcel away, and gave the other in exchange;" I laid hold of him, and sent to Worship-street - the officer came and took him; the prisoner did not say any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who was he talking to in the Curtain-road? A. To a tall man,

who turned away, said Good bye, and went to Chapel-street.

SARAH SIMEON . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 11th of October I sent my son to fetch some clothes, about twelve o'clock - he returned in three quarters of an hour with a parcel containing some old stockings and rubbish, but without the clothes; I sent my eldest son back with him, and in returning they saw the prisoner.

REBECCA PRATT . On Saturday, the 11th of October, the little boy came to my house to fetch a pair of trousers and a waistcoat - I gave them to him in a silk handkerchief; in about an hour he returned, and said I had given him a wrong bundle - I said, "No such thing;" he said,"You must come to my father" - I went, and in going back he said there stood a man just like the man who took his parcel; I said, "If you think it is him, go and fetch your father" - he fetched him, and he took him.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you from the prisoner when the boy said, "That is like the man who took my parcel?" A. Twenty or thirty yards perhaps - he stood then talking to another tall man.

ALFRED ADAMS . I am eight years old. I was coming down the Curtain-road with David Simeon; the prisoner called him, and said "What have you got there?" he said"My brother's trousers and waistcoat;" the prisoner said"Where did you come from?" he said "From Mr. Pratt, in Henrietta-street;" the prisoner said "Mrs. Pratt sent me to say she gave you the wrong parcel, and to give you this;" he took that parcel, and gave him another; he then ran away with it; this was about one o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know the time? A. I heard the beer-man going along - it was near the corner public-house that the prisoner took the bundle; I am sure he ran away; I have been talking with my father and mother about this business, and to David - I had never seen the prisoner before - it was about thirty yards from the public-house; he ran straight along, so fast that I could not see him; I saw him again about twenty-five minutes past one o'clock.

DAVID SIMEON. My mother gave me a silk-handkerchief - I went to Mrs. Pratt's for a bundle with Alfred Adams , and as we were coming back, the prisoner said"Stop! what have you got there?" I told him, and he said"Mrs. Pratt gave you the wrong parcel, and you must take this;" he took that one from my arm - I took the one he gave me home to my mother; she opened it, and sent me back with it to Mrs. Pratt; as I was coming back, I saw the prisoner with another man - I described him; in the parcel I took home there were five pieces of tiles, some handkerchiefs, and some old stockings.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say the man ran away with it? A. Yes - this was near the public-house; it was near the same place that I saw the prisoner afterwards - that was the reason why I charged him as being the man; there was a crowd round.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I was sent for and took the prisoner; he denied it, but the boys said he was the man - some woman came up, and said she had been in his company till very near the time they charged him with it; I think she said till within ten minutes, or something like that, of two o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear that the hour of two was mentioned? A. That did not take my attention at the time; I would not be bound to swear it; it is my belief that she did say so.

COURT to REBECCA PRATT. Q. How many persons were round when the boy said the prisoner was like the man who took the bundle from him? A. I cannot say - there might be a dozen.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a witness here, and am innocent.

JOHN JONES . I am independent - I have known the prisoner about fourteen months; he was speaking to me when he was taken by the prosecutor; he had been from five to eight minutes chatting with me; there was nothing to have prevented his going away.

COURT. Q. What took place? A. The prosecutor came up, collared him, and charged him with taking a bundle from his son; the prisoner said "I am not the man; I took no bundle;" I went away.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-163

2105. JOHN HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Cowling , from his person .

JOSEPH FRYER . On the 13th of October, I was passing Whitechapel , and saw the prisoner get up behind a stagecoach - the prosecutor was sitting behind, and the prisoner took his handkerchief from his pocket; he got down, and I took him into custody - Keys stopped the coach.

FRANCIS KEYS . I was with Fryer; I did not see the prisoner take the handkerchief, but I followed the coach, and took Cowling back to the watch-house.

JOHN COWLING . I was behind the coach; Keys came to me, and told me the handkerchief was taken - I went to the watch-house, and saw it - this is it.

Prisoner. Q. Had you seen me before? A. Yes - near Limehouse church.

Prisoner's Defence, I was not five minutes out of Whitechapel hospital; I had been knocked down and kicked by some young man, who broke open a house; I told them I had just got out of the hospital, and got up behind this coach; I saw another boy there - he dropped something, and the officer came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-164

2106. ELLEN MCCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-chain, value 1d., and 1 watch-key, value 1d., the goods of Adam Barclay , from his person .

ADAM BARCLAY. I am a stonemason . On the 6th of October, about eleven o'clock at night, I was in Cartwright-street ; the prisoner came running up against me, put her arm round me, took my watch, and ran away; she had no talk with me, except to ask me if I was goodnatured, and would I give her some gin; I said I thought I gave her an answer at the corner of the street, where I had seen her before talking with a man, when she took my watch; I ran after her, and saw something flash in her hand - I caught her, but a man came up to her directly; I searched her hand, but there was no watch; I received the watch from her mother last Saturday night; the watchman who took her is not here.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take the watch? A. Yes - I both saw and felt you - I was alone.

Prisoner's Defence. I said nothing to the man, but he took hold of my hand; I asked him if I had his watch - he said whether I had or not I should pay for it; he was very much intoxicated. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-165

2108. HANNAH LOWTHER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 watch, value 5l., the goods of James Pearcy , from his person .

JAMES PEARCY. On the 19th of September, I met the prisoner in Sun-court, about six o'clock in the morning - we went into a private house; we had been about the street all night, and never went into any room at all till the morning - we went to this room; she asked me to give her some gin - I gave her 1s., and she took my watch out of my jacket-pocket, which was by the side of me, and ran down stairs; I saw her take it, and I said "Don't break my watch;" she came up again, and I said "Where is my watch;" she denied that she had had it - I went for an officer, and while I was gone she brushed - I did not see her again till the next morning, when I got a man to take her.

CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am an officer. I was sent for, and went to the house with the witness - I could not find the prisoner, but he described her, and stated verbatim almost as he has now; the prosecutor met her the next morning, and took her into a house, and sent a neighbour for me - I went and found her there with him; the moment I went into the room, he said "This woman robbed me of my watch in Sun-court yesterday morning; in going to the watch-house;" she met three very low looking characters, and said to one of them, "Tom, good bye, I am going for seven years," and the tears came into her eyes.

Prisoner's Defence. It was on the 18th he met me, and said he had come from my parents, and they were all well; he said he had but 10s., and he had spent it in drink - he met a young woman, and asked her for a bed; she said she had a room in Sun-court, and we went there, to a room on the first-floor - there was a man in bed there, and we went up to the other floor; he lay down on the bed with his clothes on; he sent the woman for 1s. worth of gin - I heard a person come in in; I went and said to the young woman, "Is that you come in;" a man there said "Yes, she and I have drank it;" the prosecutor then jumped off the bed, came down, and said I had got his watch; I said I had not seen it - he then said "Where is the young woman I sent for the gin?" and said to the man "Have you got it?" he said No; he then went out - I waited an hour and a half - he did not come; he had a pot of beer at a house the night before, and a quartern and a half of rum, at the White Hart public-house; when he asked about the watch I said"I have never been out of the house;" I undressed myself, and had nothing on me; he said he was fully convinced that I had not got it; he then went and got the officer.

COURT to JAMES PEARCY. Q. Were you at any house the night before? A. I had a pot of beer at one house - I had no spirits; I was quite sober - there was no other woman in the house but the prisoner.

Prisoner. When the officer came in, the prosecutor had had three pints of beer, and given 1s. to a young man to go for an officer - I said I was quite innocent, and would not move for it; the prosecutor took out some gold, and said "If you will tell me where the watch is, I will give you money to take it out, if you have pawned it."

COURT to JAMES PEARCY. Q. Where did you find her? A. At her lodging the next morning - I had but 6s. 6d. the morning before, and had only 2s. left; I had neither gold nor silver.

GUILTY. Aged 28. Of Stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-166

2108. WILLIAM STANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Gillingwater , from his person .

JOHN GILLINGWATER. On Sunday last I was in Lower-street, Islington , about half-past twelve o'clock - I had got about one hundred yards from the chapel, when a lady tapped me on the shoulder, and asked if I had lost any thing; I said "Yes, my handkerchief;" she said "One of those have got it;" I saw the prisoner and two other young men; I took the prisoner and the others got away; he did not endeavour to escape - I left him with a person and went after the other two, but I could not get them; when I returned to the prisoner I got an officer, and sent him to the watch-house - I saw my handkerchief there.

Cross-examined by MR. RYLAND. Q. Then the first intimation you had of it was from some lady? A. Yes; I saw the prisoner cross the street before me, and two other persons - I laid hold of him; I do not know where the handkerchief came from - after it was in my pocket I did not see it again till I was at the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SARAH WESTON . I was behind the prosecutor and his wife - three young men came between us, and I rather suspected they wanted to take something from them - I was particular in looking to see if the prosecutor's handkerchief hung out of his pocket, but it did not; they then went close up to the prosecutor - the prisoner held his coat up to the prosecutor's pocket, and another put his hand very near to his pocket; they then crossed the road to Britannia-row - I went and asked the prosecutor if he had lost any thing; he said Yes; I said I thought one of those men had got it.

JOHN GLENNAN . The prosecutor gave the prisoner to me to take care of - I did not see his hand any where at that time, but I held him by the collar on the left-side; he said, "Why do you hold me so tight?" I said I would hold him tighter if he did not go to the watch-house - he sat down at a door, and I saw one hand under his coat; I pulled him up with my two hands, and this handkerchief fell from his coat behind.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean it was in his pocket? Q. No - it was behind him under his coat; I put it into my pocket, and gave it to the officer.

JOHN GILL . I am an officer. This handkerchief the last witness gave to me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-167

2109. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 tobacco-box, value 1d.; 2 sovereigns, and 20s. in silver monies numbered , the property of Thomas Dyke .

THOMAS DYKE. On the morning of the 18th of September, I was sitting between two and three o'clock, on the shambles at Whitechapel - I was sober, but very tired; I live at Sheerness; the prisoner came and asked what I did there; I said I was waiting for a coach; I had been to two houses to try to get a lodging, but they could not accommodate me; she said, "I can show you where you can get a bed;" I asked her how far it was - she said, "Not far;" I went about fifty yards, she met two more - they said,"Where are you going?" she said, "To a house, to get a lodging for this gentleman;" they said, "You know where to go;" and we all went to a house, and into a room on the first-floor - I saw the woman of the house, and gave her 6d. for my bed, but did not give the prisoner any money; she did not ask for any; I said to the others, "I am going to sleep here, and I will thank you to disperse;" they said, No, they would stop; I said, "I don't want you to stop here;" they would not disperse; I felt the prisoner's hand coming out of my pocket; I said, "You have taken my money;" she said she had not; I had not given her 2s. - she wanted 3s. of me; she began to unbutton my dress; I said, "I will thank you to disperse;" while the prisoner's hand was about me, I missed my purse with two sovereigns in it and some silver; I said, "If you don't give me the money I will call the watchman;" the other two woman were in the room at the time; I called the watchman; the person below let him in - he came up, and I told him the prisoner had robbed me of two sovereigns and 1l. worth of silver in a leather purse; the watchman found 17s. 6d. in the purse on the bed, but no sovereigns; I also lost a tobacco-box; nothing else was found but a bit of India-rubber; the watchman searched the room, and the other woman; I had seen the two sovereigns and the silver safe in the purse at five or six o'clock in the evening.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where had you seen them? A. I came to London in the morning, and saw them at a house I had been at - I do not know the name of it; I had not taken lodgings; I was there getting a pint of beer - I took out my money to see that it was correct; the house is a very little way from Irongate at the Tower; I then walked down the Minories - I only went to two houses to ask for a lodging; I did not stop there long - I kept walking about till I got to Whitechapel at near two o'clock; I did take a little beer at the houses where I asked for a lodging; I was at Irongate till near nine, standing outside the house for about half an hour; I had been about with a truck to sell ketchup - that truck was taken down by the Mint; there were two men drawing it, and I was in it riding to where it was hired; I was not in the truck above five minutes; I asked the men to have something to drink, and they went with me to a back part of Whitechapel; I then said, "I will not go any further;" I know the name of one of the men was Griffiths; I lent them 1s. a piece - I do not know where they live; I was on the shambles but not asleep; I can swear that three women did not come to me; I did not say to them that my friends had behaved very shabby to me, that I had lent them 1s. a piece, and they left me there and I fell asleep; I do not know whether it was a front room or a back - it was a room where there were old rags, rope, and iron; I was sober; I gave one of the women 1s. for showing me the room; one of them said, "I should like to have a drop of gin," and I gave 1s.; I did not offer the prisoner 2s. to sleep with her - she wanted 3s. for me to stop with her; I said "I would rather you would disperse;" I said "I would not give you 2s. let alone 3s.;" I was not at any public-house with them; I was not sitting on the bed with them - the prisoner was close to the bed; I was looking at the watchman when he searched her, and he found 8s. 4d. on her; the room was on the first-floor - I do not know whether it was a front-room.

SAMUEL GREEN . I am a watchman. On the night of the 18th of September I was going along Wentworth-street , and heard a man, inside a house say, that he had lost his money, and if he did not have it he would have a Magistrate; I knocked at the door and a man opened it - I saw a little woman who keeps the house; I asked what room they were in - she said the two-pair back-room; I, went in, and saw the prisoner with her hand near the bed; she drew her hand from it and had hold of the sheet; I went and found this purse of silver; I saw her hand up to her head, I ran to her, and said, "Spit it out;" she said, What; I said, "The two sovereigns;" she said, "I have none;" I said, "You must have swallowed them;" I thought I heard something between her teeth; there was 17s. 6d. in the purse, and 8s. 4d. I found on her - and this tobacco-box, and 3d. or 4d. on the other women.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you take any means to ascertain whether she had any thing in her mouth? A. Yes; I took hold of her mouth, and said, "Spit them out;" she said, "What? I have got nothing;" she spoke in a good tone of voice - not half a second had elapsed: the prosecutor said he had given 6d. for his bed, and one of the girls something for beer; he did not say whether there had been any chaffing about 2s. or 3s.; - he never told me he had offered 2s. to the woman; I should think he had drunk more than a pint or two of beer.

COURT. Q. Did she say any thing about 2s. that night? A. No. the prosecutor looked very red; I thought he had been drinking something, but he spoke very freely - he was very much flurried.

THOMAS COX . I am a constable. I was at the watch-house when the prosecutor and prisoner came there; the prosecutor seemed as sober as the generality of men would be at that time; he might perhaps have had a pint of beer or so; I took notice of him - he was sober.

Cross-examined. Q. If the watchman has sworn that he appeared to have drunk more than a pint or two of beer, is that true? A. He appeared perfectly sober; he might have taken a pint or two; he did not tell me he had offered 2s. to this woman to sleep with her - he identified the person; that was nearly all that happened; he told me he had sent some one from the house for drink.

Prisoner's Defence. He offered 2s.; I said it was so little, I would not take it - I would rather go; I think he put the purse on the bed; when he gave the money for the room he gave me the tobacco-box.

COURT to SAMUEL GREEN. Q. Did the prisoner say the box had been given to her then? A. No - she had it in her pocket, and I was going to take it out - she said "I will take it out;" I caught it in her hand - it was not cleverly out of her pocket. GUILTY. Aged 28. Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-168

2110. MARY WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 hone, value 4s., the goods of Andrew Gilligan , her master .

ANDREW GILLIGAN. The prisoner was in my service for half a day on the 13th of October; I gave her 1s. - she was at my room from seven o'clock till half-past one; I went down stairs about eleven, and during that time she took my hone from my drawer - I had used it that morning, and did not want it again till the Friday following - I then sent for her, and she said she had sold it.

WILLIAM GREEN . I took up the prisoner, and on the road to the watch-house, she said she stole the hone, and sold it in Peter-street, for 8d.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor about half-past three o'clock in West-street; he asked me to go and light his fire, as his wife had left him; I made his bed, and cooked his fish - I went again the next morning, about nine, and he left me in the room; I do not deny taking the hone, but it was from distress; he did not give me any money; he said if I would tell him where it was he would give me a glass of gin; I took him to the place; he said "I will not hurt a hair of your head;" he has my tea-pot and cups and saucers in his room, and he had my apron on at Marlborough-street.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18281023-169

2111. EDMUND BULLOCK (THE YOUNGER) was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 gold pin, value 2s. , the goods of Edmund Bullock, the elder .

HARRIET BULLOCK . I live at No 16, Martin-street ; I am the wife of Edmund Bullock, and mother of the prisoner. On the 15th of September, I went out, and left the prisoner in care of my place, and he took away every sixpence I had in the world; and a pin and a handkerchief of his father's, which I cannot be positive I had seen that day.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in the mews; I produce the handkerchief and pin which he had on at the time - the witness swore to them at the office; he at first said he had been robbed of the other things, and then denied it altogether.

Prisoner's Defence. I put on the handkerchief and pin, as I had done before - I did not mean to steal them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-170

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2112. LOUISA PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 rug, value 1s.; 1 looking-glass, value 2s.; 1 pair of bellows, value 1s, and 1 flat-iron, value 6d. , the goods of John Clarke .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18281023-171

2113. ELIZABETH BETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , 3 coats, value 40s. , the goods of John Webber .

JANE WEBBER. I live with my parents - they work for Mr. Clark, a slop-merchant. On the 8th of September, 1827, my father and mother sent me to Mr. Clark's; I had seven coats to take home from Mr. Clark's to be done again; the prisoner came up to me at his shop, and said should she help me; she had lived in our neighbourhood, and worked for my mother; I gave her five coats to take to my mother - we went away together to Ratcliff-highway , and then she absconded from me with the coats; we were twelve months looking for her - my father and mother have had to pay for them.

JANE WEBBER . I am the witness' mother. The coats were to be brought to me to finish; we have since found two of them - the other three we have had to pay 14s. a piece for.

ALEXANDER JAMES BURGESS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a coat with me on the 8th of September 1827 - I gave it up to the prosecutor.

JANE WEBBER. That was one of these coats; I never permitted the prisoner to pawn them.

BOYD SILVESTER . I was looking out for the prisoner for twelve months, and at last I found her; I told her Mrs. Webber charged her with stealing five coats - she said she did not steal them - they were to be sent back to have some buttons altered, and Mrs. Webber sent her to pawn two of them, that she got some liquor, and then heard that Mrs. Webber was looking for her, and that made her abscond.

Prisoner's Defence. She sent me with one of them to pawn; I had a dispute with her daughter about a warrant - there are pawnbrokers who would come and say that I have often pawned them.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-172

2114. JAMES HALSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 1/2 peck of oats and beans, value 2s. , the goods of William Curtis and Richard Curtis ; and JAMES HANCOCK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same knowing it to he stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

The prisoners pleaded GUILTY .

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Twelve Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-173

2115. WILLIAM PAYNE and JOHN VICKERY were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 2 plates, value 4d.; 1 butter-ewer, value 6d., and 1 creampot, value 6d. , the goods of Phoebe Sullivan .

THOMAS SPENCER . I am a carpenter, and live at Palace Court, Kensington. I met the two prisoners about ten yards from Mrs. Sullivan's house on the 26th of September, about half-past five o'clock in the morning; I went to work in Pembroke-square , and saw Vickery get down the prosecutor's area - Payne sat on the step of the door; I was working in the opposite house, and saw Vickery come up again with something in a bag, which he went and concealed among the shrubs in the square; Vickery then went to the back of the buildings, and Payne staid in the square; I went and got the bag, and asked Payne if it belonged to him; he said it belonged to his partner: I then saw Vickery come, and asked him if it belonged to him; he denied it; my employer then came up - I told him; he sent for the watchman - I gave the bag to him.

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am constable of Pimlico. I produce the bag, the plates, the milk-pot and butter-dish.

PHOEBE SULLIVAN. This property is all mine - it was

taken from the safe in my area; I was not up at the time, but I missed it when I was told of it.

VICKERY's Defence. I was going to look for work: going along Pembroke-square, the witness stopped me, and said I had been down an area, which I had not.

PAYNE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

VICKERY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-174

2116. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Charles Steuart , from his person .

CHARLES STEUART. I am an officer in the 5th Dragoon Guards . On the 17th of October, about half-past eleven o'clock in the day, I was just by Spring-gardens ; I had a handkerchief in my pocket, but did not miss it till the officer informed me of it - the prisoner was in custody.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer of Bow-street. I saw this gentleman near Spring-gardens, and the prisoner following him for about fifty yards; I watched, and saw him go close up to the prosecutor, put his hand into his pocket, and take out the handkerchief - I took it from him, and took hold of him; I had not known him before.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-175

2117. GEORGE WARE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 7s. , the goods of John Boards .

JOHN BOARDS. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Shoreditch . On the 8th of October I had information given me; I went to my door, and a neighbour cried, "Up the court:" I went up the court, and met the prisoner, with these trousers under his arm, which had been hanging at my door-post; I collared and took him into my shop - the trousers were safe ten minutes before.

SAMUEL WHITELY . I saw the prosecutor take the trousers from the prisoner; I went and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down the court to see for my mother: I met a man running, who threw down these trousers - I took them up, and was going to take them to Mr. Boards, when he came and secured me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-176

2118. ELIZABETH BURGIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 sheet, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Frances Gilham , widow .

FRANCES GILHAM. I am a widow, and live in Elbow-lane, New Gravel-lane, Shadwell . I let a first-floor room, furnished, to the prisoner; she was with me about a fortnight - I gave her notice to quit: I went into her room and missed a sheet - she denied it at first, and then said she had pawned it, and would redeem it next morning - I had never permitted her to pawn any of my property.

JAMES NOBLE . I took the prisoner into custody.

JOHN RALPH LAWSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Ratcliff-highway. I took in this sheet of the prisoner, on the 1st of October, in the name of Mary Smith.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If I had done it with an intention of wronging her, should I not have taken something of more value? I was distressed for a trifle of money - I told her I should take it out the next morning, and she was satisfied.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-177

2119. ANN BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 bonnet, value 5s.; 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 tippet, value 9s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s.; 2 caps, value 1s. 6d., and 1 flat-iron, value 1s. , the goods of Martha Gray .

ELIZABETH CRAY. I live with my sister, Martha Gray; she goes out nursing - I am out of place, and live with her, at No. 100, Golden-lane ; I had known the prisoner from being in the poor-house some time ago, when I was ill; I met her on the 17th of September, crying, in the street; she said to me, "Betsy, how do you do?" I said,"I don't know you;" she described herself to me, and asked if I would give her a lodging: I said Yes, if my sister would let me; I took her home - she slept with me, and the next morning she said she was very poorly, and asked to have her breakfast in bed; she then asked me to go to Wilmington-buildings, to a person named Vidler, to receive a pound or two; I went, and could not find any such person - my sister was out at this time: when I came back the prisoner was gone, and I missed all the property stated, which belonged to my sister: I found she was in custody on another charge, at Worship-street - she had this gown and bonnet on, which are my sister's; the other part of the property has not been found - she at first told the Magistrate that she had lost them, and then that she had not had them; she had left her own things in our room, and I gave them to her.

JAMES GLIBBERY . The prisoner was taken up for an assault, and this property was found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery: I was walking down Long-lane, and met a man, who asked me to buy these things; I bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-178

4120. SAMUEL CUSHION and JOHN DYE were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 2 barrow-pigs, value 70s. , the property of Thomas Rook .

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer. On the 4th of Octber, about half-past eleven o'clock in the day; I met the two prisoners in Swan-street, about three-quarters of a mile from the prosecutors; they were driving two pigs - each of them had a stick; I went up to them, and Dye ran away, leaving the other with the pigs - Dye knew me; I went up to Cushion, and asked whose they were; he said they belonged to the father of the boy who had run away - he said he met Dye driving them, and he told him his father would give him 1d., if he would assist him in driving them home; I took Cushion to the watch-house, and drove the pigs to the Green-yard - I then went and took Dye at his father's house' before I spoke to either of the boys I heard a man ask if the pigs were for sale, and Cushion said Yes, for 12s. each; Dye heard that, and that was what struck my attention - when I went to Dye's father, I saw Dye looking at the side of the door, and when he

saw me, he ran up stairs - I went up after him. and before I asked him any question, he said "The pigs did not belong to me, they belonged to the boy Cushion; and he asked if I would assist him in driving them to Mrs. Paget's;" I took Dye, and found the owne.

THOMAS ROOK. I live in Pollard-row, Bethnal-green . I saw the two barrow-pigs in the Green-yard, and knew them to be mine - they had been safe in our yard, where we put our carts about ten o'clock that morning, - the yard-gate is sometimes open; I have known Paget for years, but know no good of her.

THOMAS COOPER . I am keeper of the Green-yard - I showed the same pigs to the prosecutor, and he owned them.

CUSHION put in a written defence, stating that he and three other boys had found the pigs straying on the road, and were driving them to the Green-yard.

CUSHION - GUILTY . Aged 11.

DYE - GUILTY - Aged 7.

Judgment Respited. (See 1st day, page 944.)

Reference Number: t18281023-179

2121. WILLIAM EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 24 lbs. weight of paper, value 8s.; 1 quart of ink, value 1s.; 1 bottle, value 3d.; 1 lb. weight of candles, value 6d.; 6 door mats, value 3s.; 6 other mats, value 3s., and 2 pieces of coal, value 2d. the goods of our Lord the King .

MESSRS. SHEPHERD & MAUL conducted the prosecution.

JOHN LITTLE . I am a constable of the Thames Police-office. On the 17th of October I was coming on shore from a vessel, a little before six o'clock in the morning, and met the prisoner coming out of Somerset-house - in consequence of what I perceived, I stopped him and went to his residence in Cromer-street; I found some paper, some coals, and other things about him, which he said he brought from the Navy office; when I searched his house I found 24 lbs. of writing paper in a cupboard - they are printed forms, and appear to belong to the Navy office ; I found a stone bottle which bears the mark of the Navy Board on it, and one quart of ink in it - about 1 lb. of candles in the same cupboard, and two large coals in the cellar, and in the kitchen I found six mats - I asked how he came by the paper; he said he took it from the Navy office, to light his fire - that the ink was old ink left at different times, but he did not say any thing about the bottle - he said he bought the candles at a shop; I said he must shew me the shop - he then said they were candles allowed him to burn by the Navy Board, and he had been saving, and took them home to burn - two or three of them had been lighted, but most of them were whole.

WILLIAM WHEATLY . I am librarian at the Navy office, in the secretary's department - the prisoner was employed as messenger there; these printed forms are what are made use of in the secretary's office - some of them are perfect, but the greater part are cut; they are clean and good - they are what are used in that department, and would not be applicable to any other; the prisoner had access to them, as upon the resignation of the Lord High Admiral the forms were altered, and he had to remove them - they were never allowed him to dispose of; I cannot tell whether the prisoner had any right to candles.

GEORGE LILBURN . I am head-messenger at the Navy office - the prisoner was one of the messengers there; there is an allowance of candles during the six winter months; the housekeeper supplies them to get the coals and other things to be used in the house.

COURT. Q. Is there any pretence for saying, that in any of the Government departments, any of the messengers or other persons, can use, off the premises of the King, what is allowed them to use there? A. No; I have no doubt about that - I have been there about seven months.

WILLIAM WHEATLY re-examined. Q. How long have you been in the Navy office? A. Nearly twenty-six years; I have heard that a certain quantity of candles and brown paper is allowed to messenger to light the fires, and if they can save any thing of it, they take it away - I believe it is done, but not from authority, but that does not apply to such paper as this.

Prisoner's Defence. The candles and other things are allowed from October to March, and if I can save any, I take them home; with respect to that white paper some time ago Mr. Vinal's room was altered, and a desk put away - I believe, to tell the truth, some of the paper, that was in the desk, may be there. Mr. Smith's room is very hot in the summer time, and the drawers smelt very much - I was ordered to clean them, and some of that paper was in them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-180

2122. WILLIAM EATON was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 peck of coals, value 6d.; 2 bundles of wood, value 1d., and - a pint of oil, value 6d. , the goods of our Lord, the King .

JOHN LITTLE . I am an officer of the Thames Police. On Friday week last, I saw the prisoner about six o'clock in the morning, coming from Somerset-house , carrying two bundles, one under his arm, and the other in his hand - they were in brown paper, and tied round with red tape, as they are now; I asked what he was carrying - he said a few coals and a little wood to light his fire; I found in one bundle about a peck of coals, and in the other two bundles of wood; I asked how he came by them - he said he brought them from the Navy office , and he begged hard for me to let him go; he said "If you take me it will be my ruin;" I asked where he lived - he said in Cromer-street; I went there and searched his pockets, and found a bag with a bottle in it, and about half a pint of lamp-oil; I asked where he got that - he said at a shop; I said he must show me the shop - he then said he brought it from the Navy office, and it was what he had to trim his lamps; I found in his other pocket a piece of coal in a brown paper - here is marked on the bag "The Commisioners of his Majesty's Navy."

GEORGE LILBURN . The prisoner is an under-messenger in the Navy office , and an occasional watchman: on the night of the 16th of October, he was to watch, and ought to leave at seven o'clock in the morning - he leaves at six o'clock in the summer time, but he ought not to have left at six o'clock that morning, unless the other men had come earlier than usual; I am certain the watchmen or messengers have no right to carry coals or oil away.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself entirely on the mercy of the Court.

Seven witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Eighteen Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-181

2123. JOHN CONEY was indicted for unlawfully, knowingly, and feloniously sending a certain letter, to one William Goodhall , demanding, with menaces, and without any reasonable or probable cause, certain money of him, (which letter was here set out) ; against the Statute.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM GOODHALL. I am nearly fifty years of age; I have been ten years as butler in the service of Mr. Warren, Chief Justice of Chester - he lives in Bedford-square. On the 3d or 4th of August, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was coming down Oxford-street, and saw a man with paintings on a board - I was looking at them and a person spoke to me; we walked on together, and in consequence of some representations he made to me, I gave him a little silver - I had never seen him before, to my knowledge, but I gave him the silver out of charity; he said he was in distress, and had a wife and child - I had no other conversation with him, except about the pictures, and about his wife and family: the shops were open and people were about - there was no look or act of an indecent nature passed between us; I was going to Mr. Hatchard's in a few days afterwards, when the prisoner, and the person I had met before, and another person, overtook me; they said "You know what you have been doing, and if you don't give us money, you know what we can do with you;" I said "I am a servant - I can't afford to give any money, and I have done nothing that I know of," with that, to get rid of them, I gave them a shilling; they did not name any sum of money that I was to give - this was about seven or eight o'clock; after this, the prisoner and the other two men, came to my master's house and rang the bell - I spoke to them from the area; the prisoner was with them, but not close - he was within sight; the man I had met first asked me to give him 5l., or otherwise he would expose me: I said I had no money - I was a servant and could not afford to give any money; I said "Whatever you have to do, you must do;" the next day, which was the 9th, we went upon the Circuit, and returned on the 9th of September. On the 10th Mr. Warren went down to his country seat, near Seven Oaks, and I was packing up the things, to send to him: in about a quarter of an hour after the carriage was gone, the prisoner rang at the bell - I opened the area-door and he threw down this note. (The Note was put in and read.)

September, 1828.

SIR, - I should be glad if you can oblige me with the loan of 5l., and I will let you have it next Monday week, without fail. Be so kind as to meet me in half an hour's time, at the corner of the square.

Mr. Goodall, at Mr. Warren's, No. 15, Bedford-square. I asked him who it came from, but he went away; in about a quarter of an hour a servant of Lord Chief Justice Best's called - I showed him the note, and had some conversation with him; he went and got the streetkeeper, and I went to the corner of the square, to see if I could see any thing of the prisoner, but I could not: on the following morning there came another letter, by the twopenny-post - this is it; I went out the next day, and met the prisoner and the man I met first, but the third man I never saw afterwards - the other man said to me, "Have you got the money? the 5l.?" I said, "I have not;" the prisoner then said, "You can let us have half-of it now, and half another time;" I said, "I can neither let you have half, nor the whole - I have not so much:" the prisoner said, "Come, you can surely let us have half, for I am going out of town this evening, and want to pack up my things;" I told them I would make an appointment to meet them at any house at any hour they thought proper - the prisoner and the other man whispered together, and appointed the Orange Tree public-house, in the New-road, opposite Gower-street, at half-past two o'clock; I told them I might perhaps get some money by that time. I went to Bow-street, and got two officers, and went to the Orange Tree - I waited there some time, but saw no person; I then said, "I think we shall not meet them here - we are more likely to meet them in going home;" the officers said, "You go on, and we will follow you;" I went down a street, and saw the prisoner at a distance, sitting on a step; he got up, and walked a little way, then looked behind him, and ran - I followed him, but he turned down a street, and I lost him - about eight o'clock that night the area-bell rung; I went to the door, and there was the prisoner and another man - they said, "Have you got the money?" I said, "I can do nothing to-night, but I will meet you to-morrow, at the public-house; Why did not you meet me at the public-house?" they said they must have the money, or part of it, that night: I said, "I can give you no money to-night - if you will call at eleven o'clock to-morrow, I will see what I can do for you;" had I had any one in the house I should have taken them then. I wrote a letter immediately to Mr. Wheatley, who sent me word he would pay attention to my letter, but he did not come, and the prisoner was in the square from ten o'clock in the morning till half-past two, when he was taken - we had coals coming in, and the prisoner walked by two or three times, but did not take any notice of me; the officer came about half-past two, but Mr. White took him - he said to Mr. White, "What business have you to take me? Are you an officer? I will make you pay for this;" I said, "Never you mind that - you are my prisoner;" Mr. White went for another officer, but could not get him - Mr. Wheatley and another officer came down the area, and asked if that was the man; I said Yes: they took him to Bow-street, and I appeared in the evening - the prisoner, in my hearing, said, he did not deliver the first letter, but he afterwards said that two gentlemen gave him 6d. to throw it down the area.(The second letter was here read.)

September, 1828.

SIR, - I am surprize at you not cumming to meet me; on the second thought I am not, for I perceived a friend call on you - you was so kind as to let him se my letter, and then go to the street-keeper to come to you; but you

to think to frighting us, it is all in vain, for your friend is a person that I can expose, knowing is character so well; and the first time i se him any were, i shall make a publick example on him. Sir, i sent to you for the loan of a small sum of money; and if it was not convenient for you to oblige me, you might a come and spoke to me your selfe, for i should have taken more kind of you; but as you thought proper to expose your selfe, i shall think proper to, for sending for that street-keeper yesterday, is the worst day work you ever did, My friends say that if you do not come to meet us to-night, at the Orange Tree Public House, near the turnpike gate, New-road, opposite Gore-street, at half-past six o'clock to-night, without fail; and please to bring no one with you, for if you do, you will only get yourself expose with all your fellowservants - for we shall acquaint them all, and your master will have a line dropt him; for we shall closely watch your actions to-day, so be on your guard, for my friends you will know nothing of them to look after you: if you can oblige me with the sem of money, you will never hear from us again; if you have any reguard for your selfe and character, you will not hesitate one moment; for knowing the state i found you in, whould hope sent you to prison for a yeare or more, for you know there is five or six whitness i can bring against you with are respectable character, that know you to be guilty of that annaterall crime; so if you can oblige me to-day, come, and you will once more make yourself a h man; for i shall never call on you again, if not - you may expect to se bill up at every corner of the square about you, you name, and where you live, and the situation - as my friend is a printer.

COURT. Q. Were they all total strangers to you? A. Yes, and no conversation took place but what I have stated.

GEORGE GARDNER . I am pot-boy at the Gower Arms public-house, in Store-street. The prisoner and another man came to me, and the other man asked me if Judge Warren was in town - I said, "Yes, he came to town last night;" they then asked, "Is the butler come?" I said, "Do you mean Mr. Goodhall?" they said Yes - I said, "He has come;" the prisoner did not say any thing, but he heard what the other said: I saw them again the next day, and the man in company with the prisoner asked if Mr. Goodhall was at my master's; I said I did not know: I have frequently seen the prisoner and the other walking about Bedford-square - Mr. Warren's house has the name on the door.

WILLIAM WHEATLEY. I am an officer of Bow-street. I went with the witness to the Orange Tree, and waited there four hours, but they did not come; the prisoner came near the house, but before I could get out he ran down the road, and got away - I said we had better go towards the square; I told the witness if he saw any one to take no notice, and I would come up - in going along he saw the prisoner, but he got away; we had before marked some money for him to give them. I received a note in the evening from Mr. Goodhall, but I could not go till half-past two o'clock the next day - I then found the prisoner in custody in the area, I said he was my prisoner - he said, "What about?" I said, "You know what - it is about those letters;" he said, "I did drop one down the area, but two men gave me 6d. to do it." I took him into the butler's pantry.

JOHN WHITE. I am a tailor, and live near Bedford-square. I saw the prisoner on the Friday evening, talking to Mr. Goodhall, and another taller man with him; I saw the prisoner in the square the next day - I went to him, and told him to come with me to the butler; he said he would not - he made great resistance; I seized hold of him, and he tore his shirt; I got him into the area - he told me he would bring an action against me, and offered to fight me; he said he had never been in the house, and then he turned round, and said he had, and he could bring witnesses to prove what he had done.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Bedford-square, and two respectable men stopped me, and said,"Have you any thing to do?" I said No - they said, "I will give you a shilling to take this note to No. 15;" I took it, and they gave me but sixpence, told me to meet them the next day, and they would give me a shilling; I went, but they did not come - I staid half an hour, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281023-182

2124. JOSEPH CUTHBERTSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 2 blankets, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Crosfield .

MARGARET CROSFIELD . I am the wife of Thomas Crosfield - we live in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell . On the 4th of October I let a ready-furnished lodging to the prisoner: I went into his room, and missed the blankets - he had not left me; he continued till the 13th.

WILLIAM MOATE . I am a pawnbroker. I have two blankets, pawned by the prisoner - one on the 8th and the other on the 11th of October.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Nine Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-183

2125. WILLIAM DOVE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 fowl, price 3s. , the property of Joseph Benwell .

JOSEPH BENWELL. I live in West-street, Mile-end Old-town . On the 29th of September, about a quarter-past one o'clock, I was in my garden, and heard one of my fowls make a desperate noise; I looked to a hole through which the fowls go, and saw a man's hand - I opened the back-gate, and saw the prisoner with the fowl in his hand; he put it down - I took him, and asked what he did there, it being private property; he said he was going to look at the pipe-makers - I knew his name to be Dove, but he said it was Ridley; he struggled, but the officer came and took him.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am an officer, and took him in charge - he made a great resistance.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the fowl - it made a rush out of the hole, and made a noise; the man came out, and said he saw it in my hand, and it was three yards before me.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-184

2126. JAMES DALLAWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 4 petticoats, value 8s.; 6 table-covers, value 6s.: 15 d'Oyley's, value 15s.; 2 pincushion-covers, value 6d.; 4 shifts, value 6s.; 2 gowns, value 8s.; 1 bed-gown, value 6d., and 2 aprons, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Ryan .

JANE RYAN . I am the wife of John Ryan, and live in Castle-street, City-road - I am a mangler. A boy came to me, to ask some question, on the 24th of September; I answered him as well as I could, and at the same time I saw the prisoner at the door: the boy came again in about ten minutes - I told him I could give him no further intelligence; I had a basket on my table, and I missed a bundle from it - I went after them, and caught the person who asked me the question, but he was rescued from me; the bundle was brought to me in a few minutes.

MARGARET WALKER . I was in Tabernacle-walk, and met the prisoner with a bundle; he looked at me, and nearly knocked me down - he then dropped the bundle at my feet, and ran away; Squires caught him - he was two hundred yards from the prosecutor's.

THOMAS JOHN SQUIRES . I saw the prisoner with the bundle; he ran - I pursued, and took him.

Prisoner's Defence. She told my father she did not see me till I was brought back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-185

2127. GEORGE GRAVES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 stove, value 6s. , the goods of Charles Barnes .

SAMUEL HOUGH . I am in the service of Mr. Charles Barnes, a smith , who lives at the corner of Brook-street and Kirby -street. On the 18th of October, I was at work below, and heard some footsteps; I looked up, and saw two men standing on the area-railing; one of them took a little stove, put it on his shoulder, and walked off- I ran up, and told my master; I then went out, and saw the prisoner carrying the stove, about twenty yards off; I brought him back, and he was given in charge.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer, and received him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, who asked if I would earn 6d., to carry this stove to Saffron-hill; he went to the door, and gave it to me.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18281023-186

2128. ANN HINCHLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 shawl, value 2s. , the goods of Mary Watts .

The prosecutrix being married, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18281023-187

2129. GEORGE HINE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , 1 pair of boots, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Whiteman .

CHARLES WHITEMAN. I live in Monmouth-street . On the 18th of July, about one o'clock, I missed a boot - I went over the road, and watched; about two o'clock the prisoner came and took the other - he had the first one on at that time; I had not known him before - I took him into custody with the second boot under his jacket.

CHARLES GOLD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18281023-188

2130. HENRY HASTINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October . 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of James Drywood .

JAMES DRYWOOD. I am servant to Nathaniel Randall, Esq. I lost my great coat from the box of the chariot, on the 19th of October, about half-past twelve o'clock at night; it was in Charlotte-street, Bloomsbury - I had occasion to get off the box for about three minutes; I heard an alarm, and my coat was gone - it was my own.

JOHN GROSCH . I was in Museum-street, Bloomsbury, about five minutes walk from where the carriage was; I heard the cry of Stop thief! - I saw the prisoner run and throw down this coat; I picked it up and ran after him - he is the man who dropped it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you lose sight of him? A. Yes, but not for more than a second, as he turned into Holborn; I was not above ten yards from him.

ELY WOLSTENHOLM . I met the prisoner with the coat; he was walking very deliberately - I heard the cry of Stop thief! - I pursued him, saw him drop the coat, and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was the prisoner tipsy? A. I should think not, or he could not have run so fast.

DANIEL FURZEMAN . I have had the coat ever since - the prisoner appeared as if he had had a glass or two.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, and did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-189

2131. DENNIS LAWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , 1 saw, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of George Frederick Richard Lloyd .

GEORGE FREDERICK RICHARD LLOYD. I live in Featherstone-street, City-road , and am an upholsterer . The prisoner had worked for me about ten years - in July last I missed some tools; I asked him what had become of a particular saw - he said he had broken it; I asked what had become of the pieces - he gave me no answer; I saw it afterwards at the office.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a pawnbroker, of Old-street. I have a saw pawned by the prisoner on the 23d of July.

ROBERT LOCK . I took the prisoner, and produce the duplicate which I found on him - he is a hard-working man, but sometimes drinks. (Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-190

2132. THOMAS OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , 1 watch, value 30s. , the goods of George George .

GEORGE GEORGE. I am a coachman , and live at the Red Lion public-house, in Cockspur-street . I had a watch hanging on a nail over the mantel-piece, in my room - I had known the prisoner about three weeks before the 3d of October; when I saw him in my room, and after he was gone in the evening I missed my watch - it was found at the pawnbroker's.

ELIZABETH GEORGE . I am the wife of George George; we occupy a room there. On the 3d of October my husband's watch was in the room; the prisoner was there - he had left his hat in my care and came to get it; I was in the next room and saw him pass to take his hat - I saw him stand with his hands in his pockets; he asked for his hat, which I gave him - he went away; I then missed the watch and alarmed my husband - he had been working there as a carpenter.

GEORGE LAWS . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this watch with me on the 3d of October.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When the prosecutor came to me at Bayswater, he said if I would give him his watch he did not want to have any more trouble about it.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-191

2133. WILLIAM OAKES was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of September , 2 hats, value 14s. , the goods of John Vaughan .

CHARLES PHILLIPS . I am a plasterer. Mr. Vaughan is a linen-draper and hatter , and lives in Lamb's Conduit-street . On the 23d of September, about six or seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in company with another young man, rather shorter than himself - I watched them for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I then saw the other take two hats from Mr. Vaughan's shop, and give them to the prisoner, who was close to him; they walked five or six yards - I cried Stop thief! ran, and made a catch at the other person - the prisoner dropped the two hats - I took them up, followed the prisoner, and took him; I am sure he is the man - the other got away.

MATHIAS WELDEN . I am an officer. I have had the hats ever since.

JOHN VAUGHAN. I am a hatter. These hats are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Lamb's Conduit-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! - there was a mob; this person came up and took me.

JURY to CHARLES PHILLIPS. Q. Was there any crowd at the time he was taken? A. No, not above a dozen people; I am sure he is the man - I had followed him and his companion to two or three streets.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-192

2134. MARY RUDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 cap, value 4s.; 1 gown, value 4s.; 2 shifts, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Samuel Newsum .

HARRIET NEWSUM . I am the wife of Samuel Newsum; he is at sea - I live in Denmark-street ; the prisoner was recommended to assist me as a milliner - I entrusted her with the care of my house; I went out on the 30th of September, and expected to find her at home on my return, but my little nephew came with the key; I did not see her till the next evening, when I went out and saw her coming towards my house - I found my handkerchief on her; I had missed all the articles stated but nothing more - there were articles of much greater value there - I have found her honest before.

DANIEL LEWIS . On the 2d of October the prisoner was brought to the watch-house; she had been but a short time in there, before she took this handkerchief from her neck, which she said was the prosecutrix's, and the petticoat she had on - she said she had been lodging in Catherine-street, Limehouse-fields; I went there, and found a cap and a bundle, which the prosecutrix owns.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a gown pawned by the prisoner - she has been in the habit of coming for the prosecutrix before.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix allowed me to wear her clothes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-193

2135. MARY REEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 axe, value 5s. , the goods of Frederick Scott .

FREDERICK SCOTT. I am a carpenter , and live in Church-row . On the 14th of October, I went out, and bought the blade of an axe at Mr. Bristow's; I did not get drunk, but coming home from sea I had drunk two glasses after I bought the axe; I could not tell the name of the street, and I asked a man to see me home; the prisoner fell in with the man, and they both saw me home; I got to my door, and the blade of the axe fell from my arm; the prisoner took it up, and I thought she would be honest, and bring it home; I did not know her before.

JANE SCOTT . I am the prosecutor's daughter; he was very drunk that night, and the young man assisted him up stairs; I did not know the prisoner before; I saw the head of the axe, and the prisoner took it up at the door; she saw my father drop it - she went away for a short time, and then came back to see if the young man was there; the axe has not been found.

THOMAS JONES . I am a marine-store dealer. The prisoner offered me the head of an axe for sale, on Tuesday week I think it was - I did not buy it - I knew her before.

MARY VANTEEN . On Tuesday week, the prisoner brought the head of an axe for sale between four and five o'clock - supposing it was not her's, I would not buy it; she said the man had received his pension that day, and would not give her any money, that he should not get to the windward of her, she would sell the axe.

GEORGE REYNOLDS . I am a constable, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 14th of October, I had been for a pail of water; I met the prosecutor; he was drunk, and the man who was leading him said "Will you have the goodness to hold this axe for me;" he then asked me to go with them, as he could not hold the prosecutor up with one arm; I put away my pail, and went - I stood at the foot of the stairs - I said to the young man "Are you coming?" he made no answer; I then went up, and said"Come, I wish you would come" - he came down, and we went down the street together; he said "I wish I knew where to leave this axe" - I took it to these two shops, and they would not take it in, because it was without a handle - I took it back, and gave it to the young man.

JANE SCOTT re-examined. Q. Did you see the axe fall from your father's arm? A. Yes, and the prisoner took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-194

2136. ELIZABETH SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 15 yards of printed cotton, value 15s. , the goods of John Graham .

THOMAS WHITTAKER . I am in the service of Mr. John Graham, linen-draper , of Holborn Hill . The prisoner came to his shop on the 7th of October - I did not see her come in, but I saw her go out; I had suspicion, and followed her three or four yards; she was walking, and I saw she had a piece of print rolled up in her hand - I took her back; there were from twelve to sixteen persons behind the counter in the shop - she had not bought any thing; I do not know how long she had been in the shop; I had seen her in the shop before; this is the print - it is my master's property; it was not in paper.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to buy a yard of muslin, and took up the print in my hand; he snatched it out of my hand - I had not got out of the shop.

THOMAS WHITTAKER. Yes, she had five or six yards.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-195

2137. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , 1 pair of boots, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Burt .

THOMAS BURT. I live in Oxford-street, and am a journeyman baker . I missed my boots on the 10th of September, from the Globe public-house, Hatton-garden , where I lodge; I was at my situation in Oxford-street at the time they were taken.

JAMES McLEISH . The witness lodged with me, and asked me to let him leave his clothes there; the prisoner came to me one night, and asked for a bed - I said he might sleep there one night, but in the morning he asked to stop a little longer; he stopped about a fortnight - the prosecutor then came and said he had lost a pair of boots; I met the prisoner in Holborn, and took him to my house; I was getting my hat to go to his lodging, where he said the boots were, and he ran away - I ran after him, and took him - he had them on his legs.

JAMES ISAACS . The prisoner was brought to me at the watch-house - I took these boots off him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18281023-196

2138. ROBERT SMITH and JOHN SIMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , 3 pigs, price 6l. , the property of William Francis .

JOSEPH GREENWOOD . I am a night inspector. On the 16th of September, at ten minutes past five o'clock in the morning, I saw the two prisoners in Bethnal-green, going towards Dog-row, about half a mile from the prosecutor's; they were driving a sow and two pigs - each of them driving; one had a stick, the other a piece of iron; I watched them for a quarter of a mile, and in Three Coltlane I went up and collared Smith - I said "Where are you going to take the pigs to, and where have you got them from?" he told me he was going to take them to Spitalfields, but he did not know where there, nor the man's name he got them from; the other prisoner heard all this; Smith said the man was to give him half a crown, but he had not given it to him; I took Smith to the watch-house, and in his right-hand pocket I found this piece of a poker; I left the pigs safe, and found the owner; Simpson did not say any thing.

WILLIAM LINGEY . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoners driving the pigs, and I watched them; I saw them taken, and heard the conversation which has been stated; I had seen them first, and I asked Simpson the price of them: he said they were not for sale; I followed them till I met Greenwood, and got him to assist me; I took Simpson - he said he would not be collared, and would not go with me; I said he must; he tried to resist - I saw him throw away something that looked to me like a piece of iron.

Prisoner SMITH. It was I he asked if they were for sale, and now he says it was Simpson. Witness. Yes, it was him; I mistook the name - I thought he was Simpson.

JOHN HOLLETT . I am a watchman. What they have stated is correct.

THOMAS COOPER . I keep the Green-yard. I received the sow and two pigs; I shewed the same to Mr. Francis.

WILLIAM FRANCIS. I keep pigs at Norfolk-place, Mile-end, Old-town . I saw my sow and two pigs in the Green-yard - they had been secure in the sty on the night of the 15th; I fastened them in, about seven o'clock in the evening; I got up at half-past five the next morning; the stable-door which I had locked was wide open, the sty open, and the pigs gone.

SIMPSON's Defence. I had been out of work three weeks, and was destitute of a lodging; I went to sleep in the fields, and when I came in sight of this man he was talking to a man dressed like a butcher; I asked the way to the West-end of the town, and he said he was going to Spitalfields church, and would give me sixpence and a breakfast to help him drive the pigs; it was a stick which I threw away.

SMITH's Defence. I said I did not know the man's name, but I would take him to the place where I should meet the man.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SIMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-197

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2139. JOSEPH MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 3 live pigs, price 6l. , the property of John Spicer , Esq .

JOHN KINGSFORD . I live at Esher, and am bailiff to John Spicer, Esq. - he has property at Lonesham-farm : I went there on the 17th of October, and missed three pigs; I received information that they were at Hounslow - I went there and found them in the possession of the constable, and knew them to be my master's; as the prisoner was going up to the Magistrate, I asked him why he sold the pigs - he said he had found them on the road, that they followed him, and then he thought he would drive them and sell them; Lonesham is eight or nine miles from Hounslow.

THOMAS SEXTON . I am a cattle-jobber, and live at Hounslow. Last Friday morning I was at the cross-lanes, and saw the prisoner with three pigs; I said,"Are you going to sell them" - he said Yes; I said,"What do you want for the two big pigs?" he said 3l. 10s.; I offered 3l. - he said for 5s. more I should have them; I went and told my wife I was afraid they

were stolen; I then came out and followed him to Bell lane - I called to him, and he stopped; I said, "Do you mean to let me have these two pigs" - he said Yes; I said I had a brother in the town who would have one, and I would have two - I then brought him back to Mr. Filbey's; I said to him, "These are the pigs," he wanted 3l. for the two; I then said what would he take for the whole three - he said 4l. 10s.; I said, "We will go down the yard," and we took them there - I then said,"If any man can come and say they are your's, you shall have them;" he said they were his. and he lived at Chertsey-common; I said, "There is no such place" - he than said he lived at a lone house at Haddlestone-common; I said, "There is no lone house" - he said, "There is," but he could not tell me the name of the landlord; he then said he sold the mother of them at the Chequers public-house - I said, "There is no such sign;" I then said, "My fine fellow, if you will fetch any body to tell us these are your pigs, you shall have them" - he said he would fetch Mr. Sanders, but he was not up; we then took him to the Rev. Mr. Trimby, the Magistrate of Henley; the prisoner then said he would know nothing, and he was ordered to be locked up - on the road he said he wanted to be transported for seven or fourteen years.

JOHN HUMPHRIES . I am in the employ of Mr. Spicer; I knew four pigs that he had - I saw them on the 16th of October, about six o'clock, and the next morning, a little after five, I got up, and saw one of them in the road, and three were gone; I fetched them away from Mr. Filbey's- they were Mr. Spicer's.

Prisoner. Q. If you saw them amongst one hundred more could you swear to them? A. Yes, I could - one was a sow-pig, one a barrow-pig, and one a boar-pig.

ROBERT FILBEY . I am a butcher and a constable - I live at Hounslow. Sexton came to me last Friday morning, and said he wanted me - there was a man had got three pigs near the Bell public-house; I went and found the pigs and the prisoner - Sexton then said, "Shall I have them?" the prisoner said, "No, not without 10s. more;" he asked what he would take for the three - he said 4l. 10s.; I should think the value of them was 6l. - I then took them into my care; Humphries claimed them.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I ask five guineas for them? A. No, not to my knowledge - you asked 4l. 10s.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out looking for work for two days, and had had nothing but 2d. worth of bread- these pigs ran after me, and then walked on steadily before me; when I got to Hounslow the witness came and asked if I would sell them, and being starving I did offer to sell them.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-198

2140. JOHN PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 1 saw, value 4s. , the goods of William Wingrove .

WILLIAM WINGROVE. On the 15th of October I was working at an unoccupied house in Liverpool-street, Battle-bridge . I went out for about ten minutes, about half-past eleven o'clock; I saw the prisoner going out of the house - I looked and missed my saw - I followed him; I took him coming from behind a cask; a witness went and took the saw - this is it.

THOMAS WALSWORTH . I was coming up the streeet, and saw the prisoner come out of the house; I said to the witness, "I don't like that man" - he went in, and missed his tenant's saw; I had not seen any thing in the prisoner's hand, but I ran after him, and saw him coming from behind a cask; I did not see any body else but him between the house and the cask - I charged him with taking it; he said nothing.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am street-keeper. I took the prisoner running from Wingrove's, and as he was turning into the street I saw the handle of a saw in his bosom - he turned into another street, and in a minutes or two he was brought to me; he begged very hard to be let go.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He was not there at all - it is not uncommon for me to be employed in paper-hanging, and as this house was not finished I went to see for the master, and seeing no one, I came out; I was met by the witness, who said I had stolen the saw, which I had not- as to the saw sticking out of my bosom I solemnly declare it did not.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-199

2141. CATHERINE TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 12 pairs of stockings, value 18s , the goods of John Graham ,

GEORGE EDWARD ENO . I am in the service of John Graham, linen-draper , of High Holborn . About half-past four o'clock, on the 11th of October, we were uncommonly busy; I had not seen the prisoner come in, but a woman told me a woman had taken a parcel of stockings- I went to the door; the prisoner had left the shop, and was very near Great Turnstile, about a dozen doors from our shop; I stopped her, and took from her these twelve pairs of men's stockings, which are Mr. Graham's - I had put them into the window about ten o'clock; when I brought her back she said she had done it merely on purpose - I had got my property, and she was very glad of it.

JAMES BOND . I am an officer. I took the prisoner at the shop, and heard her say she was glad of it.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-200

2142. RICHARD TRUELOVE and WILLIAM WARBOYS were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 8 boots, value 2l.; 1 pair of shoes, value 5s.; 1 pair of upper-leathers, value 2s., and 3 pieces of leather, value 6d, the goods of William Day; and 3 pairs of upper-leathers, value 2s.; 2 lasts, value 6d., and 2 pairs of inner-soles, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Pretty .

THOMAS PRETTY. I am a shoemaker , and live at No. 5, Star-court, Grub-street. I was working in Mr. Day's shop - I went there to work on the morning of the 19th of September; I could not get in; I forced down a shutter, and missed all the articles stated; the string of the outer door was cut, the pannel of the door leading into the shop was cut out, and was set against the wall; that door was locked; these things are my property; they were safe the night before.

WILLIAM DAY . I am a shoemaker. I have occupied that shop above four years; I missed eight boots,

one pair of shoes, one pair of upper-leathers, and some leather - I had seen them safe the night before when I left the shop, a few minutes after nine o'clock; I was alarmed the next morning, by a person calling and telling me the shop had been robbed - I went and missed my property; this is it - I know nothing of the prisoners.

JOSEPH BANKS . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Grub-street about half-past five o'clock that morning; I saw the two prisoners with each a bundle; I made towards them, and they ran into Crown-court, got into a house, and shut the door; I sent the other watchman to get an officer; we got the door open, and I found this property in the passage - neither of them gave any account of how they got the articles, till they got to the watch-house, and then they said they found them; they were about thirty yards from the prosecutor's when I first saw them.

Prisoner TRUELOVE. Q. Did you see me with a bundle? A. Yes; tied up in an apron.

RICHARD HILLS . I am a watchman. I assisted in taking these men.

JOHN BROWN . I am watch-house-keeper. I received the prisoners and the bundle - the whole of the property was claimed by the prosecutor; I was desirous of searching the house they went into but they said I need not - that was all.

TRUELOVE'S Defence. I merely went to get my shoes mended by a young man who lives there; I did not fasten the door, there is no fastening to it - there was no bundle on me; Pretty has been convicted here himself with two others.

THOMAS PRETTY. Yes; I was tried here fifteen months ago for stealing a box, which I was innocent of - but I was found guilty.

Prisoner TRUELOVE. And since then he has been in Bridewell.

THOMAS PRETTY. Yes I was, through standing talking to a young man, but I had not taken the property; Truelove has been here himself for stealing a pair of trousers from Golden-lane.

TRUELOVE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

WARBOYS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-201

2143. ELEANOR TRACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 7 yards of printed cotton, value 8s. , the goods of Bartholomew Howley .

BRIDGET HOWLEY . I am the wife of Bartholomew Howley; we live in Sun-court , the prisoner lives opposite to me. On the 30th of September, about twelve o'clock, I was looking out of the window of the next house, and saw the prisoner come out of my house with a parcel wrapped up in her apron; I had seen her go in, but I thought she went to the upper-part where there was a room to let; when she came out she went to her own house - I went in and missed seven yards of cotton, which I had seen five or six minutes before on the tester of my bed; I then went to the prisoner's house, but she was gone out.

MARY TREE . I live in Sun-court. After the cotton had been pawned, I said to the prisoner, "You did not behave well about the gown-piece;" she said she did not intend to keep it for good.

LEONARD CLARA MATTHEWS . On the 30th of September, about half-past twelve o'clock, I took in this gown-piece of a woman; the prosecutrix called and asked if I had taken in such a thing; I said I had, and described the person; she went and took the prisoner; when I saw her again she was in a different dress; I cannot swear to her.

JOHN BEE . I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. We had half a pint of gin together, and she wanted me to go and live in the room; if I had wanted to make a thief of myself I might have done it on Saturday night and Sunday night, when I went to get her to bed drunk and made her bed; she says she saw me take it out of her house, and why did not she ask me where I was going with it? I went for some rags down to a warehouse that I work for, I brought them home, and she says it was her gown - she knows what my friends said to her.

BRIDGET HOWLEY. They told me they would bring me a gown-piece if I would not come here; but I said it was more than I could do - we had no gin together.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-202

2144. GEORGE CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 necklace, value 1l., the goods of George Wildash , from the person of Sarah Susannah Wildash , Spinster .

GEORGE WILDASH. My daughter, Sarah Susannah Wildash, is seventeen months old: on the 12th of October, while I was at dinner, I ordered my servant to take her out; she then had a necklace round her neck - the servant returned in about eight minutes, and asked for me; I ran down stairs, and she said, "Sir, here is a boy who has stolen the necklace;" I went out, and saw a person holding the prisoner by the collar - I gave him in charge.

ELEANOR STRANGE . I am servant to the prosecutor. I took out the child on the 12th - the prisoner was standing behind us; he put his hand up to the baby's neck; she turned round, and said, Ah! I should not have noticed the prisoner, if the child had not turned round; I missed the necklace, and caught hold of the prisoner - I held him about three minutes, and he dropped the necklace from the bottom of his trousers; I knew they were the child's - I held him; he begged of me to let him go - he then threw off his shoe, and asked me to let him go, and put it on, but I kept him till the witness came and took him - there were several other persons near us, but not so near as the prisoner; he was close to us.

EBENEZER WILSON . I went up and took the prisoner from Strange - he was struggling with her, and just getting from her, when I took him.

JAMES HOWES . I was at my door, and heard a scuffle; the girl said the boy had robbed the child of the beads - I took hold of him, and she went for her master; the prisoner begged me to let him go, or he should lose his place - he said a boy gave them him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. There was a man in liquor, and I was looking at him - that young woman missed the beads; she laid hold of me - she looked round, saw them, and said I shook them down my trousers; I used to work at the Bell and Crown inn Holborn.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18281023-203

2145. WILLIAM CHALON and JOHN WILD were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of William Todd , from his person .

WILLIAM TODD. On Sunday week last I was in Broad-street, St. Giles' . At one o'clock in the morning I felt my watch drawn out of my pocket by Chalon, who made off with it - I saw both him and Wild close to me at the time - they were standing together; Wild stopped fast at the place - I do not know whether he saw what was done, or whether he knew it was going to be done; he did not resist my going after the other - he merely stood before me; I gave him a shove, and ran after the other; I have never seen my watch since.

Cross-examined by MR, CLARKSON, Q. Were any other person taken to the watchouse? A. I did not give Wild in charge; we went altogether - he could not be in custody; there was not a person named Norcutt there -Wild went to the watch-house; he did not say any thing - he attended before the Magistrate; he was called in as a witness - I was asked if he was the other; I said he was - I did not say he was one of the persons who robbed me; I said he was there, my knowing him was the cause of his being taken into custody - there were three or four men on the spot; I do not know Norcutt - I was quite sober; I am a carpenter, and was out on a little business for a sick man - Norcutt was not charged by me at the watch-house, as being one; I did not see either of them searched - I was called to sign my name in the book; I still say I was sober.

JOHN MURPHY . I am a watchman. On the morning of Sunday week I saw the prisoners, and Norcutt was not far from them - the prisoner Chalon first called me to send the prosecutor one way, and he would go the other; he did not give any reason for it, not I did not ask him, but in a moment the prosecutor told me to take charge of him, for robbing him - I took him, and he went very quietly; he wanted to go to the watch-house; I do not remember what they said at the watch-house, but Todd complained to me that Chalon had stolen his watch - the watch has not been found; it was in Church-street he showed him to me, and in George-street he said he had been robbed at the corner of Vigo-lane.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Chalon call you to take the prosecutor, who had been using abusive language to him? A. Yes, neither Wild nor Norcutt said so; we went to the watch-house, and they were searched by the beadle - I do not know whether the prosecutor said that there were several persons there.

COURT. Q. Were there many persons about, at the time you were called? A. No, only the four - I had not heard a cry of Stop thief! nor heard Todd call out that somebody had robbed him; he gave charge of Chalon the moment he saw me.

MR. CLARKSON to WILLIAM TODD . Q. How long had you been out of employ? A. I had not been out of employ; I was in the employ of Mr. Harris as a journeyman - I did not tell the Magistrate that I had been out of work three weeks, or that I had pawned my clothes; I said I had been ten months in the hospital, and had made away with the best part of my clothes.

COURT. Q. You said in your examination "Wild and the other man went to the watch-house, but were permitted to leave it; on Monday morning last, upon my coming to this office, the prisoner Wild appeared as a witness for Chalon, but upon my identifying him as one of the men who had been concerned in stealing the watch, he was ordered to be taken into custody;" Did you identify him as one? A. The question put to me was did I know that man? I said I knew him - he was with the other; Chalon was never charging me with insulting and abusing him - when I ran after Chalon, it was a very dirty place, and I did no go far up the place; I turned back, and there were three persons there, who urged me to go to the watchman - when I went to him, Chalon came up and urged him to make me go one way, and he would go another; I then gave charge of him - when I lost my watch, there were three or four women, and one of them caught hold of my arm.

COURT to JOHN MURPHY . Q. Was the prosecutor sober? A. I could not say that he was drunk - I took him to be sober; I could not call him a drunken man.

The prisoners called -

JAMES NORCUTT . I remember the time the prosecutor said he lost his watch - it was a few minutes after one o'clock; I was with Chalon and Wild - I was about thirty feet ahead, and heard Chalon sing out "James, here is a man charges me with stealing his watch;" I turned my head, and saw the prosecutor and the watchman, but Chalon had not been out of my sight - he could not have taken a watch and disposed of it, without my knowing it; I did not hear Chalon charge the prosecutor with having assaulted him.

COURT. Q. Were there any women? A. I did not see any - I saw Chalon and the prosecutor together.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you go before the Magistrate? A. Yes, and so did Wild; the prosecutor saw me at the watch-house, and he said he had never seen me, and did not know me - the night-constable searched us all, and no watch was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-204

2146. JAMES COPPING and WILLIAM JESSOP were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 3d., the goods of George Williams , from his person .

GEORGE WILLIAMS. On the 16th of September, I was in Whitecross-street , between six and seven o'clock in the evening - I put my hand to my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, which I had had about two minutes before; the officer then came up to me, and I saw it found on Jessop - I had not seen the prisoners before.

DANIEL RIORDAN . I was on duty at a fire in Whitecross-street, and saw the prisoner Copping put his hand into the prosecutor's left-hand coat-pocket, and take the handkerchief, and give it to Jessop - they rushed into the crowd; I ran and laid hold of them both - I took the handkerchief from under Jessop's arm; I am sure Copping took it - I knew his person before, and I had watched them for half an hour.(Property produced and sworn to.)

COPPING'S Defence. I was standing close by the prosecutor - the officer came and took hold of me: I had never seen the other prisoner.

JESSOP'S Defence. I was going up Whitecross-street, and saw a great number of people - there was a fire - I went to see it, and picked up this handkerchief, and put it in my bosom.

Jessop received a good character.

COPPING - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

JESSOP - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-205

2147. MICHAEL MALONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of William Isherwood , from his person .

WILLIAM ISHERWOOD. On the 18th of September, I was coming down Regent-street, and stopped to see some young men behind me; they charged the watchman with me - I was taken to the watch-house ; about eleven o'clock at night I found the prisoner there - I sat close to him; I had one sovereign, two half-crowns, two shillings, and one sixpence at that time - I went to sleep for an hour or an hour and a half; when I awoke and missed my money, I challenged them all with it - the prisoner and all denied it; I told the watch-house-keeper of it, and said I should like to have the prisoner searched - he took them up stairs, and searched them all; I was searched first, and I had no money, and then the others, and they had none, but the prisoner showed two shillings - they said that was all they could find; I had had one sovereign in my right-hand pocket, and the silver in my left-hand pocket; I had a purse, and that was taken from me, but the sovereign was not in it; we then went to the office, and had 1s. a piece to pay - I had not one, and I told the officer that I thought it very hard that I should have to pay 1s., when I had lost my money; he said "Who do you suspect?" I said the prisoner - he then went and searched the prisoner's coat, which he was mending - but he could not find any money; he then searched him, and pulled the money out of his watch-pocket - I had told the officer what money it was.

Prisoner. Q. He first said it was in a steel purse? A. No, I did not.

COURT. Q. You said, "I had a sovereign in a purse, in one of my breeches pockets?" A. No - I did not say it was in the purse; the purse was in the same pocket - I said a sovereign and a purse.

Prisoner. Let the money be brought forward, and if there is any mark on it, let it be his; I know it is mine- I got 25s. from my master, and put it into my fob pocket; I had 4s. 6d. before, and that they found on me - he said he had his money when he was standing by a lamppost in Bond-street; he charged the two watchmen first about it. Witness. No, I did not; I asked them about it - I am certain I had it when I went to the watch-house; the prisoner said he had no money but 2s., and he told the Magistrate he sold a hat the night before for the money; I had no mark on my money.

EDMUND PEPPER . I am gaoler at Marlborough-street. The witness and prisoner came to the office, and the charge was heard; the witness then had to pay 1s. for his discharge - he had not got it, and I was ordered to detain him; in going down he said, "It is very hard I should have to pay 1s. for my discharge, when I have been robbed of a sovereign, two half-crowns, two shillings and a sixpence;" I said, "Did you tell the people at the watch-house?" he said Yes, and they had searched every body, and could not find it; he then said he suspected the Irishman I had just locked up; I called the prisoner and said, "This young man says you have robbed him; Do you know any thing about it?" he said No; I said,"I will search you;" he began to pinch my toes - I said,"That won't do - I shall search you;" I took this money out of his fob-pocket - it corresponds with what the prosecutor says; the prisoner said he received it from his master a fortnight before.

Prisoner's Defence. I had but 4s. 6d. that night, and I had paid 6d. for my breakfast; I then had two shillings, two sixpences, and some halfpence in my pocket; my sister came to the place where I was, and I told her to go to my master, who would come and speak for me - he could not come, but he sent 25s., which I put into my pocket; my master has been here, but he was obliged to go - his name is Benman, and there is a young man in Court who he accused before me; the watch-house-keeper could not find any thing on me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-206

2148. THOMAS CUMMINGS and JOHN DOUGHTY were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 2 sheets, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Robert Nicholls ; and that, at the Delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on the 7th of December, in the 7th year of the reign of our Lord the King, the said Thomas Cummings was convicted of felony .

SARAH NICHOLLS . I am the wife of Robert Nicholls. On the 6th of October I lost two sheets out of my garden- I did not see them taken, but they were safe at three o'clock in the afternoon, and I missed them at five: my house is in White Conduit-fields, Islington ; these are my sheets.

GEORGE UPWARD . On the 6th of October, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the two prisoners running across the fields, from the prosecutor's, about thirty yards from his house: I thought something was not right, and stopped them - I found the sheets on Doughty; I asked them what they had got and Doughty said they had some table-cloths; I asked where they lived, and they both said at Hoxton - Cummings did not say anything about the sheets or tablecloths; Doughty then said his mother had borrowed the table-cloths when she had company - I asked where, and he said in Gray's Inn-lane; I went there, and they knew nothing about them; I took both the prisoners into custody - I do not recollect that Cummings said any thing about them: they both said they lived at Hoxton.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CUMMINGS' Defence. I was coming across the fields, and met my fellow-prisoner - he said he was going with two table-cloths to Mount Pleasant, and asked me if I would take a walk - I said Yes.

DOUGHTY'S Defence. I had been at Hoxton, looking for work; I met a man in the fields, who gave me the

sheets, and asked me to take them to Mount Pleasant; I met this prisoner, and asked him to go with me - he laughed at me, and said I had been made a fool of; I said I did not care.

DOUGHTY - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Confined Two Months .

CUMMINGS - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-207

2149. WILLIAM HEDGER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 2 pairs of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of George Briggs .

GEORGE BRIGGS. I am a boot and shoemaker , and live in Mile-end-road . On the 21st of October, I was in my back-room, and saw the prisoner take two pairs of shoes from my shop, about eleven o'clock in the morning - he took down six pairs; four pairs fell down, and he took two pairs off - I pursued him: he threw them down- I took them up, and pursued; he was taken by the officer, in my sight - they had been hanging by the side of my door-post.

ROBERT CHRISTIAN . I took the prisoner; the prosecutor was following him - I took the shoes from the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of Court. GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18281023-208

2141. MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 2 shirts, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas William Perry .

MARY PERRY . I am the wife of Thomas William Perry, who lives in Playhouse-yard . One Monday in September, about nine o'clock, the prisoner came and asked me to give her a breakfast, which I did; I was called out, and returned at eleven o'clock - she was then gone; she had been in the habit of coming to the house to assist me in washing; she came again on the Friday, and asked if she should come to wash - I said No; but she came on the Saturday, and brought a cap which I had lent her; she sat down, and I saw her move something under her clothes, and when she was gone I found this flannel petticoat - I had missed it that Saturday morning, before she came, and a shirt likewise, from a tub under the bed in my back-room; I afterwards took her in Newgate-street.

GEORGE CURTIS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt, pawned on the 17th of September, by the prisoner, about the middle of the day.

ANN DETHERIDGE . I have a baby's shirt, which the prisoner left at my lodging, where she had lived; I found it when the prosecutrix came to look after her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutrix had given her leave to pawn one shirt.

MARY PERRY re-examined. Q. Did she tell you she had taken the shirt? A. No; she had the Saturday before, asked for leave to go out, and I missed a child's seal-skin hat; I had stopped a shilling from her, because I had lent it for a time, and she said I could take the shilling; she did not tell me of this other shirt, which she had pawned - I did not say I would go as far against her as the law would allow, or say I should get well paid for my time.

COURT to JOHN THOMAS WRIGHT . Q. Did you hear the prosecutrix say anything of that kind? A. No - I do not remember hearing any thing of that sort; she said, "That is the prisoner, and I shall leave her in charge with you."

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18281023-209

2142. MARY ANN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of October , 26 yards of calico, value 5s. , the goods of John Graham .

THOMAS WHITTAKER . I am shopman to John Graham, a draper , of Holborn . On the afternoon of the 22d of October, between three or four o'clock, I was passing down the shop, and saw the prisoner with her right-hand by the side of the counter, and a piece of calico in it; I snatched it out of her hand, threw it on the counter, and gave her a push to go away; I was going in haste to speak to a person in a carriage, but I turned round, and saw the prisoner had something in her apron, and was crossing the road - I went to her, and found a piece of calico in her apron; I took her back.

MATTHIAS WELDEN . I am an officer. I have the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Recommended to mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

Reference Number: t18281023-210

2143. THOMAS BEECROFT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 watch, value 30s., and 1 watch-key, value 6d. , the goods of John White .

JOHN WHITE. I live at Hampton-wick. I lost my watch on the 8th of October; it was at Mr. Cooper's to be mended - this is it.

JAMES MEEKS . My father is a blacksmith, and lives at Hampton-wick. On the morning of the 9th of October, I picked up this watch-key near Mr. Cooper's door.

GEORGE COOPER . I am a cutler, and live at Hampton-wick . The watch was hanging up in my father's window on the Wednesday night, and I was sitting in the back-room with my mother; we have a little bitch, and she would not go into the shop; I got up, and saw the prisoner just round by the counter - I went and took hold of him; he put up his finger, and said "What is the price of that knife?" I held him tight; he wanted to get away - he got to the window, and broke it - he then stood quiet; I got him in the room - the constable came and searched him, but nothing was found; I then went to the window, and found this watch, with the case off, just inside the window - down by the window; I had seen it safe in the window nearly all the evening; I was not looking into the shop when he came in - I was sitting by the fire, and we could not see the shop - we were on the listen; my brother and father were in and out that evening; I think we were near enough to have heard if any one had come in; I think this watch had been hanging on a hook, which I saw shaking when the prisoner was there.

Prisoner. Q. Was I round the counter? A. Just at the end of it.

COURT. Q. How high was the nail it hung on? A.

About half-way up the window; he might have knocked it down in the scuffle; he broke the pane of glass where it was hanging; if a watch comes violently on the ground, the case might come off - this key, which the witness found, was to it, and is broken off; I went to the cage when the prisoner was there; I said to the constable "If I were to speak perhaps he would answer" - I went, and whistled; he said "Jem, is that you?" I said Yes; he said "Have you brought the screws?" I said Yes, and then he would not answer again.

JAMES STREET . I am a constable. I took up the prisoner, and found a sixpence, a knife, a had farthing, two needle-cases, and a tobacco-box, on him; I put him into the cage, and saw Cooper go and whistle; the prisoner said"Jem, have you got the screws," which I understood meant picklock-keys.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the shop, and saw a knife; I am a butcher; I went to ask the price - there was no one in the shop; I went up to the room-door, and said "What do you ask for that knife?" the witness came and collared me - I resisted to get out of his arms - another man and a woman came and took hold of me; I got round to the window, and either hit my head against it, or knocked something against it, and broke it.

JURY to GEORGE COOPER. Q. Did you know him before? A. No - I did not know what I had lost; when I went to the cage, there were two others outside the door, and I do not think the prisoner was the worst of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-211

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2144. HENRY MACKENZIE & JOHN HOWARD were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 6 pairs of stockings, value 6s. , the goods of Joseph Gillett .

SARAH GILLETT . I am the wife of Joseph Gillett, who is servant to the Duke of Sussex - we live in Somerset-terrace , where I keep a haberdasher's shop. On the 20th of October, about three o'clock, I received information, and missed six pairs of stockings from my window - I had seen them safe five minutes before; a pane of glass had been broken two months before, and a piece of glass placed before it with some putty - that had been broken, so that any body could have taken the stockings; the prisoners were brought to my shop in about five minutes.

JAMES BALL . I am a shoemaker, and live next door to the prosecutor. About three o'clock that afternoon I saw the two prisoners, and watched them some time; I told my wife and son, who watched them - my son said,"They are at the window now;" I heard glass break, and saw the two prisoners run towards London - I ran out, and saw one of them throw down a bundle of stockings; I am not quite sure which it was - I ran after them- two other persons stopped them, and brought them back; I had not lost sight of them at all - a woman took up the stockings; they were the same the prisoner threw down.

RICHARD MARTIN . I am a constable, and took the prisoners.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MACKENZIE'S Defence. I had been to Brentford for work, and was running to make haste - I ran by the shop, and heard Stop thief! called, and this gentleman came and took hold of me.

MACKENZIE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

HOWARD - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-212

2145. JOHN CANTLON and SAMUEL SHEAF were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 watch, value 1l. 15s.; 2 seals, value 10s., and 1 key, value 4s. , the goods of George Ince .

HARRIET INCE . I am the wife of George Ince, who is an umbrella-maker , and lives in Fashion-street, Spitalfields . On the 17th of October, the two prisoners knocked at our door; Sheaf asked for 2lbs. of brass ferrules - I went across my sitting-room to get them; Sheaf sat down while I was getting them, and while I turned to get the scales to weigh them Canthon left the room - I weighed the ferrules, and missed the watch immediately; I went down stairs, followed Sheaf about twenty doors down the street, and then sent a butcher's boy after him - I had seen them before on the Wednesday; they came to my house - I am sure he is the person - there was no one else in the room; there are families live in the house.

WILLIAM RILEY . I saw a butcher's boy in Bishopsgate-street on the Friday, and he pointed out Sheaf - I took him with these ferrules.

JOSEPH BROWN . I took up Canthon in Great Dover-road - the prosecutor and I were together; I found four sixpences on him.

HARRIET INCE re-examined. Q. What was Sheaf doing when you saw him in the street? A. Walking quietly with the ferrules in hand - he was not attempting to escape; I had seen the watch just as they knocked at the door - it has not been found; I suppose Canthon did not stay more than five minutes, and the other not more than ten - they came through the room where the watch hung, to the shop.

SHEAF'S Defence. I went for 2lbs. of brass - she said she did not know that she had quite two lbs.; I said,"Let me have what you have got" - I helped her to break the sticks, and she weighed them; while I was being served Canthon went away - I paid her, and went away; while I was going along the street the officer stopped me.

CANTLON'S Defence. I saw Sheaf, who asked me to go with him - I said Yes, if he would not he long; I went to the house, and they were a good while breaking sticks, and I could not wait, as I had to take some fan-lights to Peckham.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-213

2146. GEORGE CHAMBERLANE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 9 paving-stones, value 5s.; 100 bricks, value 3s.; 1 deal plank, value 1s.; 3 pieces of deal quartering, value 2s; 1 piece of elm quartering, value 9d., and 3 laths, value 4l , the goods of John Gosling .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN GOSLING. I reside at Highbury-house, High

bury-park - the prisoner was a tenant of mine at Hanwell ; I ejected him from my premises - there was an agreement that he was to quit at Michaelmas-day last; I had some premises adjoining, which were building for me - I had three, four, or five thousand bricks there, which I saw delivered by the carman, and some pan-tiles, laths, and fir-timber, which were sent from Highbury; there were some stones there, which had been the paving of a pantry of one of the old houses; on quitting my premises the prisoner went to a house opposite - he is a baker, and a part of the bake-house he had to build himself; I missed some property, and set Higgs to watch, I think about August - I afterwards saw Higgs, and in consequence of what he said I went down to the prisoner's place on the 2d or 3d of October; I saw some elm timber and fir too, which were nailed up, one as a place for a pig-stye, and the other as a rafter for a wash-house - I believe they both belong to me; I stood by the cart while my men loaded them from Highbury, to go to the premises adjoining the prisoner's - I speak from its form, and my having seen it so repeatedly; the timber is now here, and some pan-tile laths which I found there at the same time - they are not common, but particularly stout, cut on purpose for me by the timber-merchant; they were nailed up in the wash-house - I know them to be a part of those I sent to build my premises; I did not find any thing else.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long had the prisoner been your tenant? A. I think last November; I let him the premises rent-free - one Dale was there before; I think it was in May or June last that I brought the ejectment - I did not pay the costs, on condition of his going out; I understood from my solicitor that 20l. were paid to me in part of the costs - this was on Michaelmas-day; I never received that as rent, and never understood it as such - I do not know that there was any lean-too to the premises the prisoner occupied; he took down a door and a frame, but not a building, to my knowledge - he took some premises on the opposite side of the way: my premises have been a baker's shop for fourteen or fifteen years, and it is my wish to continue them so; I know all these timbers very well - they were worked in the building.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you ever give the prisoner any laths or timber? A. No.

JOSEPH HIGGS . I am a horse-patrol of Hanwell, and am a carpenter by trade. I had the overlooking of the prosecutor's premises - giving cheques for the bricks, and any thing wanted; the prisoner was a tenant of Mr. Gosling's in the month of July - I saw him living there in the latter end of July; I had orders from Mr. Gosling to watch his premises - I went down, when off duty; I saw a number of bricks on these premises, perhaps one thousand at a time - they were on the adjoining premises, in front of Mr. Gosling's new building; there were some laths and wood there likewise; In August last, I missed three pantile laths, and a little after that three pieces of timber and one paving-stone - I had seen the timber the night before I missed it - that was early in August; I had been working up some of these timbers myself, that enabled me to know them - it was on Sunday morning I missed the timber; I afterwards saw William Brown, and in consequence of what passed between us, I went to the premises of Mr. Gosling - I do not recollect seeing the prisoner there that day, but I did on the Sunday, in the bakehouse which he occupied of Mr. Gosling; I saw the pieces of timber and pan-tiles on the oven on the premises he occupied of Mr. Gosling, covered with some empty sacks - the prisoner was not there then; this was before I took Mr. Gosling to the premises over the way - we afterwards went over the way, and saw the laths and some elm and fir timber, which I did not know, and some bits of paving-stones, shot down loose in the wash-house - one of them I could speak to, as I had seen it in the bakehouse on Mr. Gosling's premises, covered with two sacks; some bricks were missed from the premises, but I could not identify them; I saw Filby on the premises, but not the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. If I understood you rightly, you began to miss these things in August? A. There was a good deal missed before, but what I missed was in August; the prisoner was then in possession of the bakehouse on the prosecutor's premises - I told him the prisoner was robbing him, but he continued in possession of his house; the house opposite was building for him, but that part which he had to build I do not think was built at that time; I did not take away the timbers which I saw there; I spoke to Palmer about them, he did not take them away, and I had orders not to molest him in any way; there was something about the action going on, but every man on the premises was told not to hurt a hair of his head - and it is my opinion Mr. Gosling would not, had not the stones been taken away; I took something to another house in July because some things had been missed, but we had not seen any thing on the prisoner's premises then; I know Abbot; Mr. Gosling claimed some rafters, but Abbot was not called to prove that he had supplied them, in my hearing; the prisoner has been living there ever since, and came here this morning.

WILLIAM BROWN . I was in the employ of Mr. Gosling, as a bricklayer; I took up some paving-stones, which had been the flooring of a pantry, in some old houses of Mr. Gosling's; I took them up with a pick-axe, and used some of them for back-hearths, and left the other laid in a place which was formerly a pantry, but the walls were pulled down that were adjoining the prisoner's premises; about the beginning of September I saw the prisoner take some of them and put them into a barrow, and his servant was wheeling them away; I told him they did not belong to his master but to Mr. Gosling; he said he did not know any thing about it, his master told him to wheel them away - I afterwards saw some of them on the prisoner's premises over the way; I know there were some pan-tile laths, timber, and bricks - I did not miss any of them, for I had not much to do with them; I went with Higgs to the prisoner's premises about October; I had told Higgs what I had seen - I saw the prisoner there, but did not see him do any thing; I saw three pieces of timber at the coach-house door on Saturday night, and on Sunday morning there were but two.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was this coach-house? A. On the premises, adjoining those of the prisoner's - it was six or seven o'clock in the evening when the stones were removed, in the beginning of September; it was not very dark- I saw it, and any one else might have seen it - the prisoner brought them down.

COURT. Q. Did you see him bring them down? A.

Yes - he brought them down on his shoulder, placed them in the barrow, and his servant took them.

JOSEPH PALMER . I was in the prisoner's service; in August last I wheeled away some new bricks from the stack of Mr. Gosling by the prisoner's direction; he was not on the spot at the time; I wheeled them over to the place he was building over the way - I wheeled above four barrows, but the prisoner was not there; I saw some fir timber in the bakehouse of Mr. Gosling's premises - I did not know whose it was; I did not see the prisoner do anything with that.

Cross-examined. Q. How long have you left the prisoner's service? A. About five weeks - that was before this business; I am now in the service of Mr. Strand, of Brentford, and have been so for three weeks; I think I did not take any thing away when the prisoner was present - I took them away about one o'clock, when the men were at dinner; Mr. Abbot built the premises over the way for the prisoner, but the bakehouse and wash-house the prisoner was building; I left the prisoner because he worked on Sundays, and I did not like it; when I was going away, he said I had charged loaves to his customers.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did the premises stand by themselves? A. There are some new houses about, I do not know whether any body lives there; I had given notice to the prisoner all that week, and when I went for my money he told me of having charged loaves to customers; I saw the prisoner bringing one long paving-stone to the premises. I shot down the bricks, and they were used for building the oven.

GEORGE FILBY . I am a bricklayer. The prisoner directed me to nail up some pan-tile laths on the bakehouse and wash-house of the premises he was building; I do not know whether I should know them again, these have the appearance of them, but I will not swear to them; some bricks were used to build an oven, but I do not know where they came from - they were part new and part old; these laths are thicker than are usually made.

Cross-examined. Q. You were employed by the prisoner? A. Yes - Abbot did not employ me.

JOHN LEYICK . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's premises, and received these laths, which had been taken down, and these timbers.

MR. GOSLING. These belong to me - they are what I saw nailed up against the prisoner's premises; this piece of timber was in the pig-sty, and this was a rafter in the wash-house, and these laths were there; here are some of the stones here - I did not take any proceedings against the prisoner, when I heard of none of my property being on his premises; because I had had so much trouble to get him out, I should not have taken any steps had he not continued to take things - there was no argreement with him for a lease; it was on account of the difficulty of getting him from the premises that I took no steps.

Cross-examined. Q. Where is this agreement about getting him off the premises? A. I really do not know; it was done at Westminster Hall - I cannot tell whether it was settled by my solicitor and the other, before the trial came on; he continued on the premises after that; Higgs told me of this in July or August, and I believe the agreement was made in July, but I cannot tell exactly; I had had so much trouble I did not really intend to take any steps; I think it was on the 4th of October I went before the Justice.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. When did you go on the prisoner's premises? A. On the 1st of October.

ROBERT GUNTON . I am a bricklayer. I know this paving-stone to be Mr. Gosling's property.

Cross-examined. Q. You know the prisoner? A. Yes; I believe he had some old bricks of his own on the premises he occupied of Mr. Gosling; I do not know whether they were taken to assist in his building - I believe he had a small bit of a shed and a pig-sty on the premises of Mr. Gosling - I do not know whether he took them away; he had an oak cill which he changed with me for two pieces of railing; they were Mr. Gosling's - the cill was worked up in Mr. Gosling's work; this piece of wood is a good deal like one of those pieces, but I cannot swear it is one; it has been cut since I saw it.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you exchange any of those other pieces of wood? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I can prove the contrary of what Mr. Gosling's witnesses have related.

ELIZABETH PRINGLE . I know the prisoner; his father rented a house in Hanwell many years - the prisoner afterwards took the house of Mr. Gosling; I saw some stones removed from his father's premises to the bakehouse, at Mr Gosling's - his father's premises belonged to the Rev. Dr. Bond; four or five of the stones which are here I saw at the bottom of the truck, which the prisoner took from Dr. Bond's premises to the other.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is Dr. Bond alive? A. No; it is six or seven years since I saw the stones on those premises - they then went to Mr. Gladman's, a painter, at Hanwell, and remained there till a few months ago, when the prisoner took the house of Mr. Gosling - I did not see them removed, but I saw them a few days afterwards.

COURT. Q. Did you see them removed? A. No; but I know they were at Gladman's in a box, and it was so weighty it could not be removed.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is the prisoner's father's house pulled down? A. Yes; I was called on to speak about the stones last night.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you before that any conversation with the prisoner about them? A. No; last night was the first time I heard anything about this - the prisoner's father had some stones which were removed to Gladman's, and I saw them afterwards at the premises occupied by the prisoner at Mr. Gosling's - it was the same premises and bakehouse, used by his father before him - I saw these stones in the bakehouse, and one was laid down.

THOMAS MINTON . I am a baker - I lived at Hanwell during the time I worked for the prisoner; I recollect two stones adjoining his bakehouse door, at the time I lived with him at Mr. Gosling's premises, which are now pulled down - they were about two inches and a half thick - I do not think these are quite so large; I cannot tell for an inch or two; this was during the prisoner's father's life; I left him about two months ago - I knew of his sending Palmer for some bricks which had been used for his copper to be set in - I do not know of his taking any other; I do not know of any timber - I burnt none but faggot-wood.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you build the premises over the way. A. No; I am a baker - I saw

the bricks taken by Palmer - I swear he took no new ones; I cannot tell what he took at any other time.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You know Palmer; is he a young gentleman you would believe on his oath? A. I should not like to trust to it.

COURT. Q. Do you mean to swear, that from his character, he is not fit to be believed? A. I do; he is of a very lying disposition altogether; I have heard so from Mr. Martin, his master; I never gave him the power to tell any lies about me.

HENRY MARTIN . I am a baker. I know Palmer; he was my apprentice nearly two years ago; he said he was fourteen when he was put apprentice - he has left me about six months; from what I know of him I would not believe him on his oath.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Give us some reasons? A. He was in the habit of fetching yeast for me every day - he went to another place and got it cheap, and got threepence a day by me; he has acknowledged it himself oftentimes - another reason is, he got into bad company, and ran awya twice; if I sent him anywhere he has always told me lie - I sent him once to Wimpole-street, and went there two hours afterwards; when I got there he came to the gate - he told so many lies I could not believe him; here is a person here who told me he has acknowledged that he robbed me of 4s. a day, but I do not believe it; he took a pound of butter of mine and asked a young man to take it away, but he would not - I found the butter under the trough.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is it because you found him in the daily habit of telling lies that you would not believe him? A. Yes. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-214

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2155. ANN SCOTCHBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 2 spoons, value 5s. , the goods of George Bassett .

The spoons being the property of George King , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18281023-215

2147. GEORGE EDDS and WILLIAM ROGERS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Fowler .

JAMES FOWLER . I am the son of Thomas Fowler, a tailor , who lives at Tottenham . On the evening of the 10th of October, this coat was given me to make an alteration; on the morning in question, I put it into a cupboard in the bottom shop; I went up stairs, and at twelve o'clock I was told the shop had been robbed; I went down, and saw the shop-door open, and a key in it; I went out, and saw Rogers in custody; I detained him, and Edds was brought in soon afterwards; I gave charge of them.

WILLIAM THOMAS HORNER . I know Mr. Fowler's shop- I saw the two prisoners together about twelve o'clock, and saw Edds go into the shop and stop about two minutes; he came out, and they walked away together - in about ten minutes I saw them again; Rogers went in, and came out with something under his smock-frock; I told my master I suspected that they had stolen something - my master went, and took Rogers with the coat; I went and told Mr. Fowler.

SAMUEL BAKER . I am a tailor. I took Edds about one hundred yards from Mr. Fowler's - I took Rogers first, as soon as Horner told me of it, and found the coat on him; Edds was walking, and appeared to take no notice at all when I took him; he asked what I wanted, and said he had done nothing.

JOHN FOWLER . I am a constable, and took the prisoners.(Property produced and sworn to.)

EDDS' Defence. I was standing behind a tree near the public-house.

EDDS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

ROGERS - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Judgment Respited.

Reference Number: t18281023-216

2149. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 tub, value 2s., and 36 oysters, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Wyatt .

JANE DYSON . On the 20th of October, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner near Mr. Wyatt's shop, in Little Guildford-street , with two other persons; I watched them ten minutes walking and looking into the shop, which is an oyster-shop; I saw the prisoner take the tub of oysters from the shop, and hand it to another person he did not go into the shop; he stood at the door, and took it out; I gave an alarm to Mr. Wyatt, and he took the prisoner - he was never out of my sight, except while I ran down stairs; I am sure of his person.

THOMAS WYATT. I took the prisoner - he was close to my door; I took him immediately; he had got a few oysters, but I never saw the tub, nor the greater part of the oysters.

JAMES BROWN . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-217

2150. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 cap, value 3s. , the goods of Martha Gardiner .

THOMAS DANIEL GARDINER . I live with my mother, Martha Gardiner; she is a hatter . On the 2d of October, I was writing at the desk - I lifted up my eyes, and saw the prisoner leaving the shop; I pursued, and took him with a cap, which had been lying in the shop.

JOHN BEES . I am an officer - I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18281023-218

2151. WILLIAM WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 basket, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Holbrook .

SAMUEL HOLBROOK. I live in Playhouse-yard. My basket stood at a cellar-door, in Whitecross-street , where I sell them: between seven and eight o'clock at night, on the 17th of October I saw the prisoner pass and try it with his right-hand, and then return and take it with his left; I pursued, and took him with it about ten yards off.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18281023-219

2152. WILLIAM STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 4 live tame rabbits, price 4s., the property of Eliza Ennos ; and 1 sack, value 1s.; 1 jacket, value 1s., and 1 apron, value 6d. , the goods of John Knewstubb .

JOHN AUGUST . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 21st of September, I saw the prisoner, about twenty minutes

past twelve o'clock at night, coming down Windmill-hill , about three miles on the Edgware-road, about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's house - he had this bag, and the four rabbits in it; I said, "What have you got?" he said,"Rabbits, which I have brought for twenty miles;" I said,"Let me look at them?" they were quite warm - he then said they were his own, and he had plenty more at his residence, about a mile off; I asked who he worked for; he said Mr. Ennos - I went there, and knocked; the prisoner said, "It is no use knocking, they won't hear you - get over the yard:" I said, "No, there is a great dog there;" he said, "No, the dog is poisoned, and is dead."

JOHN ANDREWS . I was with my brother officer. I had information of a jacket being stolen the same evening; I found this jacket on the prisoner's back, and this apron by the side of a hedge.

JOHN KNEWSTUBB. I am in the employ of Mr. Charles Ennos. I lost this jacket and apron from the outhouse where I had left them on the Saturday.

CHARLES ENNOS . These premises belong to my father - the rabbits were the property of my sister Eliza; these are the skins of them - I saw them just after they were killed, and knew them; the out-house on our premises was broken open - the prisoner was in our employ as a labourer ; I had paid him on the Saturday night - we had only a small dog on the premises; we had a large one which died some time ago - I do not know whether it was poisoned.

Prisoner's Defence. My master gave me liberty to lie down; I was returning after supper; as I was going in the gates, I saw three men, who ran away - I went to the place, and found these rabbits in the sack, and the jacket; I took them on my shoulder, and was looking after these men, when the officer came and took me - I took off the sack, and showed them; I said they were my master's property, and some men had been and killed them - they took me back to my master's; I never told the officer I brought them twenty miles.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-220

2153. ROBERT SEABROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 1 sheet, value 4s.; 2 shirts, value 3s.; 2 shifts, value 3s.; 1 pillow-case, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 4s.; 1 apron, value 1s.; 1 bed-gown, value 6d.; 2 frocks, value 2s.; 1 napkin, value 6d.: 1 towel, value 6d., and 1 pinafore, value 6d. , the goods of Thomas Lewis .

SARAH LEWIS . I am the wife of Thomas Lewis, and live in Grange-road, Bermondsey. I have a little daughter named Jane Amelia. On the 12th of September, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning (I had been confined for three weeks), I sent her to take these things to the mangler's, about one hundred yards from my house - there were all the articles stated in the indictment in a towel; a person came and told me my daughter was in fits in the street, and the bundle taken from her by a man; I took the officer, and found the prisoner in his own room, about four o'clock - a person went to show us the place; one of the shirts was on the prisoner's back - we found some of the articles in a corner of the room, and two duplicates were given us by a woman he cohabits with; he was quite a stranger to me.

JANE AMELIA LEWIS . I am nine years of age; my mother gave me the bundle to take to the mangler's: I met the prisoner, who asked me to get him 6d. worth of trotters, and said he would give me a halfpenny - he gave me the money to pay for them; he took the bundle, and put it into his basket - I went for the trotters, and when I came back he was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q, Did you go to a shop? A. Yes; I was not to meet him at a public-house - he said he would be standing till I came back; I was not gone above five minutes - it was only just over the way; I am sure he is the man; I did not ask him to hold it - he took it; I said I would take it home first; I inquired for him at the public-house when I came back, but he was not there; I saw him again at half-past four o'clock.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am an officer. Mrs. Lewis gave me information, and I went with her to the prisoner's lodgings, in Frying-pan-alley, a little after four o'clock - he had just come home; I asked if his name was Seabrook - he said No; I called in the child, who said he was the man - he had this shirt on his back, and his coat was on a nail; I found his basket in the room; a woman in the room gave me two duplicates, and I found a shift, a napkin, and pillow-case.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he offer to hand you over some money, which he said he got for the things? A. No; I took some money out of his pocket; he pulled this shirt off himself, and said he was sorry for what he had done, and hoped he should be forgiven - he did not say he was kept waiting almost all day.

HENRY JOHN PARKER . I live with Mr. Hooper, a pawnbroker, on Clerkenwell-green. I have a sheet, shawl, and frock, pawned by a woman; I gave these duplicates for them.

SARAH LEWIS . These are all my property except these four, which I received from a Society in my confinement - they have been picked to pieces.

Cross-examined. Q. Has not the prisoner employed people to go and get trotters? A. I have heard so, and that led to his being taken up; he said he hoped he should have mercy shown him, and he would produce the things if I gave him time.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Bermondsey-street for some trotters; I frequently used to send a little boy for them - he was not there, and I asked this little girl to go; I gave her a shilling, and said I would wait at the public-house - I waited, but she did not come; I went to my lodgings, and thought I was entitled to make use of some of the things - I went out - when I came back the woman at the house had pawned these things.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-221

2154. THOMAS WILLIAMS , MICHAEL CREEMAN , JORDAN HENRY , JOHN TAYLOR , and JAMES PAIN , were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 packing-tilt, value 6d.; 4 saws, value 25s.; 2 saw-pads, value 3s.; 8 planes, value 20s.; 1 plough, value 18s.; 6 plane-irons, value 4s.; 15 chisels, value 9s.; 1 stock, value 7s.; 10 bits, value 5s.; 1 iron bevil, value 1s. 6d.; 2 squares, value 5s.; 1 bed-wrench, value 1s. 6d.; 3 guages, value 7s.; 4 gimblets, value 6d., and 3 brad-awls, value 6d. , the goods of Daniel Lake ; and ELIZABETH

WILLIAMS and ELIZABETH CHAPMAN were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

WILLIAM BOTT . I am a carpenter, and live in Queen-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 30th of September, I left these tools in my shop, at two o'clock - the men were then at work there; I returned at eight, and found the door open, some tools gone, and the rest scattered about the place; Pye's chest was broken open; the prisoner Henry had been in my employ for seven years, but left me about two months - I know nothing of the others; more tools were taken than one person could carry.

WILLIAM PYE . I work for Mr. Bott. About a quarter before six o'clock in the afternoon, I left the premises safe; I was the last person there - I fastened the door in the usual way; my chest was locked - the other tools were in their places; next morning a quantity were missing - four of the men had left with me.

DANIEL LAKE. I am in Mr. Bott's employ. I lost all these tools on the 30th of September - most of them are here.

JOHN NEWTON RADCLYFFE . I am a coach-smith, and live nearly opposite to Bott. On the evening of the 30th of September, a few minutes before eight o'clock, I saw Thomas Williams come out of the shop, and run away from the door - there was a light in the shop, but I saw no other person; my son came down the street; I went in doors with him - I am certain of William's person; I had seen most of the prisoners about there for two or three days.

Prisoner THOMAS WILLIAMS. Q. What dress had I? A. A dark dress.

ALFRED RADCLYFFE . I live with my father. On the night of the robbery, I saw Pain go into the shop a few minutes after eight o'clock; he knocked or rang - a person came with a light, and let him in - he was dressed as a sweep; I am certain of his person.

GEORGE TURNER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, St. Giles's. I have a plane pawned on the 1st of October, in the name of William Smith - I think by Thomas Williams, but am not certain.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I am shopman to Mr. Hedges, a pawnbroker, of Drury-lane. I have two saws pawned by Creeman, on the 1st of October.

WILLIAM PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Gunton-street. I have a stock and nine bits, pawned on the 1st of October, by Creeman, I believe.

RICHARD RINGHAN . I am shopman to Mr. Page, a pawnbroker, of Long-acre. I have two saws, pawned on the 1st of October by Creaman, I think, but cannot swear to him.

CHARLES COOPER . I am an officer. On the 1st of October, I went to No. 5, Perkin's-rents, Westminster, with another officer, and found Thomas Williams, Creeman, Henry, Taylor, and Elizabeth Williams, all in the room, and a quantity of carpenters' tools about the room; Creeman sat in a chair near the window, examining this saw, I asked how these tools came there; they all said they knew nothing about them - Elizabeth Williams was sitting up in bed sewing something; Taylor was in bed with her - I asked her who the room belonged to - she said to her, that she had taken it the day before; I asked if she could not give some account of the tools, or how they came there; she said she could not, as they came in the night before, while she was out - I asked how they came there; she said they were brought there - I asked if she locked the door; she said she had - I said "Was your place broken open, then?" she said she supposed it might be so - I examined the door, it had not been broken; she then said she had left the key with an Irish girl, but did not remember her name - I looked round the room, and saw Henry on a chair, and a jacket was at the back of his chair; I found a great coat hung up at the window as a curtain - I told Elizabeth Williams to get up; she said the Irish girl was out, and had got her shawl and shoes - I went to the door, and saw Chapman at a distance, she had the shawl and shoes on - I brought her in; she said she had the care of the place last night, while Elizabeth Williams was out, and that at eleven o'clock she went to Williams again with the key of the door - I searched further, and in Thomas Williams's hat I found a flannel jacket, and on the table a crooked nail, which I tried to the door of the workshop - it opens it very well; I heard Thomas Williams say at the office, that he was not seen at eight o'clock at night at the place, for he had all the property in a coach at Westminster by eight, and that none of the other prisoners had any thing to do with it - after the examination he told me where the things were pawned, and I found them; I had applied to some of the pawnbrokers before, and am sorry to say they denied having the things.(Property produced and sworn to.)

DANIEL DAWKINS . I went with Cooper - his account is correct; I found this basket under the bed, and these tools in it.

DANIEL LAKE. These saws, bits, irons, and other tools are mine.

JAMES RILEY . This coat is mine - I had left it safe in the shop.

THOMAS WILLIAMS' Defence. I was passing the shop, and saw no one - I took out a nail, and opened the door; took as many tools as I could, and gave a boy 6d. to carry them to a coach - next morning I pawned several of them; the other prisoners knew nothing about it - I asked Creeman to breakfast with me; I know nothing of the other prisoners.

HENRY'S Defence. Taylor was taken ill, and sent for me.

TAYLOR'S Defence. I was taken ill, and went to lay down in this woman's room - I sent for Henry, to tell my parents; he had not been in the room ten minutes, when the officer came.

T. WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

CREEMAN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

PAIN - GUILTY . Aged 28.

E. WILLIAMS - GUILTY Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

There were four other indictments against the prisoners.

HENRY - NOT GUILTY .

TAYLOR - NOT GUILTY .

CHAPMAN - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-222

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2155. JOHN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 pair of springs, value 2l.; 1 pair of

wheels, value 2l., and 1 axletree, value 18s. , the goods of John Blackwell .

JOHN BLACKWELL. I am a builder , and live in the Five fields, Chelsea . I lost a pair of springs. a pair of wheels, and an axletree, on the 10th of October, or early on the 11th, from a shed, where they were fixed to a cart; and found them a week afterwards at Mr. Herring's, the original maker of them - I knew them to be mine; I know nothing of the prisoner - these are the springs and axletree - I did not bring the wheels into Court.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You went to he prisoner's house? A. Yes - he said he bought them openly in the middle of the street, opposite his own house; Herring said if he would tell who he had bought them of nothing would be said about them; I agreed to that; he said they were not mine, but his own - he did not desire to be taken before a Magistrate; he said he would meet us there; I said he could go in my cart - the Magistrate offered to bail him, which I opposed, as his bail was not worth 9d. - but he was bailed, and has surrendered.

CYRENIUS HERRING . I am a wheelwright. The prisoner came to me on the 15th of October, and said he had a pair of wheels, springs, and an axletree for sale; I was to fetch them from his place, and give him what they were worth; he asked about 4l. 10s.; I sent my brother for them, and knew them to be the prosecutor's, as I had made them.

Cross-examined. Q. When were they made? A. In 1825; they are worth 5l.

ISAAC HERRING . I went with the prisoner to fetch the wheels.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold them to a Mr. Bell, and went to ask Herring to fetch them in his cart; I refused to give them up, as I had bought them.

WILLIAM TURTLE . I am a butcher, and live in Tottenham-court-road. I have known the prisoner fourteen years - he has been in my employ; last Saturday week I went to Mornington-place, and saw the prisoner in the road; he said "I have bought these wheels, springs, and axletree for 4l. 10s., and wish you to be present at my paying for them" - he gave a man two sovereigns and some shillings in my presence; I said "Take them to my house, and I will give you the rest."

GEORGE GARD . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Harford-street, Fitzroy-market. I was in Tottenham-court-road, and overtook Turtle; the prisoner called him; we went over - he was talking to a man with a cart; he said he had bought these articles for 4l. 10s., and paid 2l. 10s. in our presence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-223

2156. MARY WILLIAMS and MARIA COZENS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 watch, value 50s.; 1 watch-chain, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 7s., and 2 watch-keys, value 2s., the goods of William Johnston , from his person ; and WILLIAM KIMBLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON. I am a mariner . On the evening of the 6th of October, a few minutes after eleven o'clock, I met Williams and another woman in Back-lane, near Ratcliff-highway, in Stepney; I did not see Cozens at that time, nor any man - they asked me to give them some gin; I told them to go about their business, and gave them sixpence to get rid of them; I said I was going on board a ship - they followed me to the canal basin , and then Williams took my watch out of my pocket; I took hold of her hand, and never let go till I got her to the watch-house, which was close by; the other woman ran off while I was feeling in Williams' hand and breast for my watch - I cannot say whether it was Cozens; I was told to appear before the Magistrate, and then I went down with the ship, and was written for to come up; the watch was not found on Williams - it was gone in a moment; I do not know what became of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She might have thrown it away? A. Yes - or given it away.

WILLIAM ASHFORD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a watch pawned with me, on the 7th of October, by Cozens and Kimbley, in the name of John Smith.

WILLIAM WEBB . I am a headborough. On the night of the 6th of October, Williams was brought to the watch-house by the prosecutor, charged with stealing his watch; I searched her, but found nothing - but recollecting I had seen her in company with Cozens, who she always walked with, I went to look for her, but could not find her till the 10th, when she was with another girl, who she called her sister; I searched her - she said she was innocent; I said it was useless to say so, as William had made a split of it- she said "If she split, I'll split too, if you will be favourable to me;" I said that was not in my power; she then said she and Williams met the prosecutor in the Back-road- Williams asked him to go home, and she, Williams, drew the watch from him, and she went and told Kimbley,(who cohabits with Williams,) of it, and I should be likely to find him at his mother's, Mrs. Smith's - he had come to the watch-house while Williams was there, and gone away again; I went to Smith's - knocked some time at the door; they did not open it - I peeped through the key-hole, and saw a man make his escape out at the back-door; I got in, and found somebody had gone out with naked feet, as there were the marks on the damp ground; I scaled the wall, and found a bit of braces; I then heard a woman in the next house scream out that a man was there; I called to a watchman, who found Kimbley there.

Cross-examined. Q. You told an untruth in saying that Williams had split? A. She had told me she had been in trouble before through Cozens - she had said nothing about this watch; I meant to say she had said enough to convince me she was in it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAMS' Defence. I was returning from Poplar, and met this man, who told me he had lost a watch - we stood talking some time, then he took me to the watch-house; I knew nothing about it.

KIMBLEY'S Defence. I own pawning the watch, but that witness did not take it in.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 26.

COZENS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

KIMBLEY - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-224

2157. JAMES HERESY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , 1 basket, value 1s. 6d.; 2 cruets,

value 2s.; 1 china goblet, value 1s., and 1 cloth, value 6d., the goods of Hopkin Egerton , from his person .

HOPKIN EGERTON. I am a carpenter . On the 11th of September I had a basket, which contained these articles; I met the prisoner in the White Horse public-house, Chiswell-street, about twelve o'clock in the day, I had been having some bread and cheese - he came in with his wife and an old man, who he called his father - he asked me to have a glass of ale, which I refused at first, but afterwards took; his wife went out and got some meat - I had some of it and gave them some cheese- we drank together; his wife went out and brought in change for a 5l. note - I played at skittles with him; then we went to another public-house in Bunhill-row, and took me down to a dark place - I saw the woman put her hand into my basket; we all went into Old-street - the prisoner and I went into a public-house there, and then to another house and had some brandy; his wife came in there crying, and said there was her money which her old aunt had left her, and asked the landlord to take care of it - he would not have it: the prisoner then took up my basket:- I went up and said "Don't run away with my basket;" he knocked me down - he held it tight and would fight; the patrol came up and took us to the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. As soon as you called him, he stopped with the basket? Q. Yes - he had got about six yards: we went to four public-houses - I drank a quartern of brandy at each house; the prisoner was not tipsy - he knew what he was about.

DANIEL PAINTER . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner and prosecutor in Goswell-street; the prosecutor's nose was bleeding - he went to Worship-street; we had been to Hatton-garden by mistake, and therefore the basket was given up to the prisoner.

JOHN WHEELER . I assisted in taking the prisoner - the prosecutor had been drinking, but appeared sensible.

Prisoner's Defence. We were both very much in liquor indeed - the landlord fetched the patrols to take us away for being intoxicated.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18281023-225

2158. SOPHIA SANDERS, alias SOPHIA STAMP SUTTON COOK, alias SOPHIA COOK and WILLIAM BARRETT, alias GODFREY , were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , 1 piano-forte, value 38l. , the goods of George Rathmacher, the elder .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE BATHMACHER, SEN. I live at No. 6, Charles-street, Soho-square , and am a piano-forte maker . The prisoner Barrett called on me two or three times in July last; he first said he wanted a harp for a lady: on the 25th he called again and said Mrs. Sutton had been out the evening before and tried a harp - that it made her fingers ache, and she wanted a piano-forte; he asked what it would be a month, I said 26s.; he said he would come the day following and give me an answer - it was to be a cottage piano-forte; he came the next day and said the lady was quite agreeable to the price, and she wished it to be sent that evening, as she had a little party, and wished it particularly; he left me this blue card, with a reference to Mrs. Paul, No. 4, Curzon-street, May-fair, where he said Mrs. Sutton had lived, but she had now taken a house in South-parade, Chelsea - being in ill health I sent my wife there - I do not know whether this was the first time he mentioned the name of Sutton; I sent the harp by my son on the evening of the 26th of July, and two or three days after Barrett called and said Mrs. Sutton was very well pleased with it - I have received no money for the hire - I have seen my piano-forte again for the first time this morning at a pawnbroker's in Houndsditch; I would not have parted with it unless I had received a reference.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. He said he was sent by her? A. Yes, and said he would bring the money for the hire himself.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. What was the price of the best cottage piano-forte you had? A. I do not make expensive ones - there are rosewood ones at seventy guineas; some harps are one hundred and fifty guineas - this piano-forte was worth thirty-six guineas; I did not tell him the price, on my oath - he did not ask me.

Q. Was it not agreed between you, that if the lady chose to buy it, it was thirty-six guineas? A. Never - no such thing was named.

MARY RATHMACHER . About the 26th of July I went to No. 4, Curzon-street, May-fair - Mrs. Paul was out; I saw a person, who called herself her daughter - I asked her respecting Mrs. Sutton - she said she was a very respectable lady, and had lodged with her mother; I returned to my husband, and told him: on the 26th of August, when the month was expired, I sent my son to receive the hire, and at that same time Barrett came and asked when the month was up; I said it was up, and I had sent my son for the money - he turned out of the shop in great confusion.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. Did he not tell you Mrs. Sutton had left the house? A. He did not - nor did he say I should receive the hire in a few days.

MARY PAUL . I live in Curzon-street, May-fair. A Mrs. Sutton and her mother lodged with me, but I know nothing of the prisoner - I never saw her till I saw her at Bow-street; my daughter had heard me talk of Mrs. Sutton, but did not know her.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. When did Mrs. Sutton live with you? A. About nineteen years ago - it is ten or eleven years since I saw her - I had a letter from her three months ago, dated from Bath; her mother has been dead about fourteen years - I cannot read or write; I received a good many letters from Mrs. Sutton - I have burnt them; I believe if there had been twenty references I should have given them.

COURT. Q. Did you ever know Barrett? A. I believe I have seen him at my house two or three months ago - he called, and asked me to come and see Mrs. Sutton at Queen-elms, and I had a two penny-post letter before that to invite me to see her; I supposed it was the Mrs. Sutton whom I knew - a person had called to say she had returned from Bath.

MR. MILLER. Q. If you had gone to Queen-elms, and seen the prisoner, you would have known she was not the person? A. Yes.

SARAH PAUL . I am Mrs. Paul's daughter. Mrs.

Rathmacher applied to me for Mrs. Sutton's character; I had not seen her, but heard my mother speak of her - I had never seen the prisoner.

ANN ARNOLD . I know a counting-house in Sherbourne lane - the name of Drummond and Burgh is on the door. I saw the prisoner Sutton there once, and she wrote a letter there - this is it; (looking at the card) - I believe this to be her hand-writing; it corresponds with the letter.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. Have you compared it with the letter? A. Yes - my opinion is formed from that comparison, and having seen her write the letter.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Looking at them separately, do you believe the card to be her writing? A. Yes - (card read) "Mrs. Sutton, 12, Queen-elms" - on the reverse side, "Mrs. Paul, Curzon-street, foom twelve o'clock to half-past three."

GEORGE RATHMACHER, JUN. I took the piano-forte to No. 12, South-parade, Queen-elms, on the 26th of July, and to the best of my belief the woman at the bar is the person who received it; I believe she ran her fingers just over the keys - I afterwards called there for my money, and found Captain Pettingall there; I returned, and told my father - I have since seen the piano-forte at a pawnbroker's in Houndsditch, and am sure it is the same.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How do you know it? A. The fall projects over, and it was never finished - there was only one beading instead of two; our name is on it.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. On your oath, did the female you see here, run her fingers over the keys? A. Yes, and I did the same - she did not play a tune; I stated this at Bow-street - I did not state that she did not touch it; I know two reporters were examined there - I got to the house about four or five o'clock in the afternoon; to the best of my belief the prisoner is the person; I did not see her again till she was at Bow-street - I do not think I had any conversation with her.

Q. Now look at that woman behind you, have you ever expressed a doubt as to which of the two women you saw on that occasion? A. I take that to be the person (the prisoner;) when I was asked about it I could not exactly say which was the woman, because I could not see her face, and when the piano-forte was taken, she kept her back as much as she could towards us; I think the prisoner is the person by her beight - she appears to be the person; I cannot swear which is the woman.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you believe the prisoner is the woman? A. Yes - I saw her at Bow-street, and expressed the same belief there.

COURT. Q. When you took the instrument, did you ask for Mrs. Sutton? A. Yes; I went to deliver it to Mrs. Sutton.

THOMAS LOVETT . I am a porter. I carried the pianoforte to Mrs. Sutton Cook; I understood the name of Cook was on the paper - a female received it, but I did not see her face; I said I had brought a piano-fore from Mr. Rathmacher for Mrs. Sutton Cook, and asked where it was to be placed - she desired it might be brought into the parlour: a table was moved from a recess for it to be placed in - she touched the instrument; I also saw a little child there - the lady gave me something to drink.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. Look at that other woman with a child? A. I can swear to the child, but not the woman; I do not believe her to be the woman - I did not see her face.

CAPTAIN PETTINGALL . I am proprietor of the house at Queen-elms - I let the house to Barrett, that was the name he gave, and referred me to Messrs. Alois and Co., No. 9, Liverpool-street, Broad-street; I went there the following day, and saw a very respectable looking man - he either answered to the name of Alois, or I understood from the representation that he was the person; I said I was referred to him by a man named Barrett, who was about taking a house of me for Mrs. Sutton; he said, "Mrs. Sutton is coming to town, I have received a letter from her from Bath; she is coming to town for her health, and to consult her physician; she stated that a reference would be necessary, and begged me to give it;" I asked if he would guarantee the payment of the rent; he said, "No; I guarantee nobody's debts; but when the quarter or half-quarter is due, if Mrs. Sutton gives you an order on me for the money, I will pay you:" he said she was a very respectable lady, and I think said she was a West Indian; I let the house to Barrett - I told him the reference was perfectly satisfactory, and I would let him have it; I desired him to call on a certain day, which he did, and we finally agreed about it: a paper was signed by my son and Barrett - the signature of Mrs. Sutton was added some days after she was in the house - she came in that evening before I left it; I had lived there before - a woman, who I understood to be her housekeeper, came an hour and a half before - that is the woman who has been pointed out in Caurt.

COURT. Q. Is the prisoner the Mrs. Sutton who took the house? A. Yes, most certainly; I was at the house several times, and once sat an hour with her - she said to me, "Captain Pettingall, I believe my rent is due on the 1st of May, but I shall not receive my money till the 10th, will it make any difference to you?" I said, "Certainly not."

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you get your money on the 10th? A. I am sorry to say not; my house was empty on the 12th of August; I went on the 14th of August, and found Alois and Co. had decamped; I saw Mrs. Sutton sign the agreement, and believe the card to be her writing; my son signed it - as I intended to go abroad I left my son to act for me; the house was let for one hundred and forty guineas per annum.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did Barrett sign it as a witness? A. I suppose so; I did not ask him to sign it.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. Was the house let furnished or not? A. Furnished respectably all over; they did not take it all away - I left a piano-forte there; Barrett said, "Mrs. Sutton will be quite delighted with this, for she is very musical;" my daughter replied, "I don't know that I shall leave it, but I will leave it for two or three months to accommodate the lady;" it is now in my possession - I had it away.

Q. Are you aware that she is the daughter of a west India planter, who left her 40,000l.? A. I knew nothing about it.

THOMAS WOLSTENHOLME . I am shopman to Mr. Bar

ker, a pawnbroker, of Houndsditch. On the 1st of August Barrett applied to know if I would take in a cottage piano-forte; I knew him before always by the name of Godfrey; and on Saturday morning, between eight and nine o'clock he brought it; I advanced 15l. on it - Rathmacher's name is on it - he has seen it and claimed it; Barrett said it was for a friend of his, and would be removed in a month - but we have it now.

ELIZABETH DOWNEY . I was servant to Mr. Parkinson, of Greek-street, Soho. I was at Brighton from November to February last - a cousin of mine used to wash for Mrs. Sutton in November; I knew them both there; I came to town in February, Sutton then lived at Chelsea; I remember Barrett being there; I heard Mrs. Sutton say the piano-forte was in pawn for eighteen guineas, but when she could raise the money it should be sent home; this was at my cousin's house in the Borough, the latter end of August; she said she did not pawn it, and did not know where it was, but if she could get eighteen guineas she would take it out and send it home - that she was involved in debt, and she thought she should be taken; I was with her at the Falcon public-house in the Borough, where she was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. MILLER. Q. She said if she could get eighteen guineas she would take it out, and send it home? A. Yes; I was in Greek-street on the 26th of July - Sutton was there several times on Saturdays, and lived there solely for a time I understand.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When did you see her at Brompton? A. I was there in June, and part of July - I left about the 17th; I was there with her at Mr. Parkinson's about a fortnight - she was at Parkinson's every Saturday - whether she was at Nine-elms, I do not know.

JURY. Q. Was it before she was in trouble, that she said she had the piano in pawn? A. Before.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am an officer of Bow-street. I had instructions to apprehend Sutton; I saw her on the 3d of September, and told her she was taken for stealing a piano-forte, the property of Mr. Rathmacher; she made no observations then, but before the Magistrate, she said the piano-forte would be forthcoming, and it might be at Mr. Rathmacher's by that time.

The prisoner SUTTON put in a written defence, protesting her innocence, and stating that circumstances had compelled her to leave the house in South-parade for five weeks, during which time the instrument was sent - that she was not at the house when it was brought, and on her return to the house, on the 3d of August, it was not there; that she was entitled to considerable property by the will of her father, some of which was now in the Accountant-General's hands.

BARRETT, in a long address, stated, that he was an agent for letting and hiring houses, and as such had taken the house for Mrs. Sutton; that he was afterwards arrested upon a forged bill, and Sutton, finding him without a home, had given him an asylum in her house; that he had hired the piano for two months, and intended to redeem and return it, but both himself and Sutton were taken into custody before that time had expired - that it was pawned to prevent its being seized for rent or taxes.

CAPTAIN PETTINGAL. There is not a word of truth in there being any fear that rent or taxes could be seized for.

MARY GRAINGER . I am a washerwoman. I was at Mrs. Sutton's when the instrument came there - I went after some money she owed me - Mrs. Sutton was not there; the woman who has been pointed out, and a tall thin woman were there, but Mrs. Sutton was not there.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What is your husband? A. A cork-cutter; I never heard the prisoner called any name but Sutton - I have known her twelve months, and I saw Barrett at Walworth about twelve months ago; I never saw him at the house at Chelsea - the child the woman has, is the prisoner's - I did not hear the instrument played.

MR. MILLER. Q. Did you go up stairs into the parlour and kitchen? A. Yes; if she had been there, I must have seen her; this woman gave me a note to take to Greek-street to Mrs. Sutton - she owed me 6s.

COURT. Q. What is that woman? A. The housekeeper - she was up stairs scouring; I went up to speak to her - I was there from three o'clock till about eight.

SAUNDERS - GUILTY . Aged 38.

BARRETT - GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18281023-226

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant,

2159. ALFRED JOHN PEEK was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 2 shillings, the monies of Louis Adolphus Durieu , his master .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.(See Page 935.)

Reference Number: t18281023-227

2160. CAROLINE THOMAS and JOHN KIRBY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 watch, value 4l.: 1 hat, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s.; 1 watch-ribbon, value 2d.; 1 watch-key, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-crown, and 1 sixpence, the property of Thomas Allan , from his person .

THOMAS ALLAN. I am a painter . About twelve o'clock at night on the 27th of September, I was going home, and met the female prisoner in Gray's Inn-lane ; I went to her lodging, and slept there all night - in the morning I missed my hat, waistcoat, watch, and money: they were safe in the room the night before, and no other person had been there - I was sober; I know nothing of the man - I do not know that I ever saw him in my life; I dressed myself, went into Gray's Inn-lane, and told the patrol; we afterwards saw the woman going into the house - she was taken and searched, but nothing was found on her.

ELIZABETH BURN . I keep the house. The prisoner Thomas lodged with me, but I never knew her to bring men there; Kirby lodged in the house that night, and as he went out in the morning I saw him stoop, as if to pick up something.

WILLIAM ALDER . I a