Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd July 1828.
Reference Number: 18280703
Reference Number: f18280703-1

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS, MAYOR.

SIXTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 3d DAY OF JULY, 1828, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED BY HENRY STOKES, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1828.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Burrough , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Joseph Littledale , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart.; John Ausley , Esq.; George Scholey , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; and John Garratt , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; and John Crowder , Esq.; Alderman of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

John Biggs ,

Ruben Edwards ,

Edward Adcock ,

James Robins ,

Samuel Lynch ,

John B. Lucum ,

Tryal Hall ,

Patrick L. Good ,

John Britten ,

William Blackhall

John Wilson ,

Edwd. H. Davies .

Second

Charles Board ,

Joseph Proctor ,

Samuel Beales ,

Thomas Shaw ,

John Reynolds ,

James Elisha ,

John Goodman ,

Harry Kendal ,

Ryan Adams ,

Henry Wood ,

William Cook Gill ,

Thomas Sadler .

Third

William Cory , sen.

George Johnson ,

John Waterworth ,

George Campion ,

John Bradley ,

Peter Duncan , jun.

Joseph Lee ,

John Elliott ,

Charles Morley ,

John Thwaites ,

Thomas Jacks ,

Joseph Groves .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Thomas Brushfield ,

Thomas Oakey ,

Thomas Burton ,

Samuel Gravenor ,

George W. Oakley ,

Richard Harmer ,

John Mc. Neal ,

John Edmeads ,

Robert Bathurst ,

George Desbois ,

John Sampson ,

George Verrell .

Second

Joseph Spires ,

William Davies ,

Mark A. Lowe ,

Peter Smith ,

Butler Adams ,

John Farrow ,

Arthur Graham ,

Thomas Perry ,

Robert Huntsman ,

James Lawrence ,

John Cleaves ,

Thomas Howard .

Third

Walter Watkins ,

John Mc. Lean ,

Benj. Nicholson ,

William Marshall ,

Leonard Janson ,

Walter Levy ,

Samuel Selves ,

George Chapman ,

Robert Cooper ,

Richard Bennett ,

Edward Jones ,

Robt. A. Reynolds .

Fourth

Saml. M. Bonvier ,

John Killing worth ,

William Sabine ,

John Yorkins ,

William Smith ,

Richard Hook ,

John Lacellas ,

William Gandy ,

Daniel Shearman ,

John Colson ,

John Holmes ,

Samuel Bar. Gaze .

Fifth

James Gardiner ,

John Fitzgerald ,

James H. Grieve ,

Hugh Metcalf .

George Archer ,

James Jones ,

George Jackson ,

Thos. Patterson ,

Farring. Stevens ,

George Yapp ,

W. Bartholomew

William Davies .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JULY 3. 1828.

LUCAS, MAYOR. - SIXTH SESSION.

OLD COURT.

Reference Number: t18280703-1

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1349. GEORGE WATTS was indicted for that he, on the 26th of April , with a certain pistol loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did shoot at Thomas Bullock Watts , with intent to kill and murder him; against the Statute .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable him; or to do him some grevious bodily harm.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BULLOCK WATTS. I am the prisoner's brother. Previous to the 26th of April last we had been involved in law transactions; there had been a Chancery suit. On the 26th of April he called, under the idea that I owed him some money, and he demanded money of me - I told him I owed him none, and that he, at least, owed me 150l.; but he rather came to borrow 100l. of me; his wife was on my right-hand, and he on my left; I was making a reply to his wife, and heard the report of a pistol; I saw the flash, and heard a wizzing noise by the side of my head- he was within four feet of me at the time - I heard the report, turned round, fell on him, and clasped my arms round him; he was at that time pulling out another pistol with his left hand.

Q. Did you happen to see the first pistol at all? A. Certainly - it was in his right hand; I immediately called my servant, and I grappled with him across the room; the servant immediately came to my assistance, and so did his wife; we overpowered him: I believe I said he was a vile wretch - he muttered something, but I do not recollect the particulars; I saw him searched, and two other pistols found on him besides the one he had fired; I cannot myself say whether they were loaded - they were not tried in my presence. I believe for the last twelve or fourteen months he has been decidedly insane; he was secured, and handed over to the constable.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Where do you reside? A. In Chapel-street, Pentonville - I am an attorney.

Q. Had not this unfortunate man conveyed all his property, in trust, to you and others? A. Yes, to four trustees.

Q. On your oath can any one of those trustees act besides yourself? A. Yes; Winifred Watts was the acting trustee; I have got the instructions for the deed here - it was executed in March, 1827, and about a fortnight or three weeks after that I was sent for to his lodgings in Amwell-street, and the landlord told me he had been laying in a fit for some hours; a surgeon had been sent for, and attended him: some days after that I was sent for, and found him in bed in violent fits - Dr. Farr was called in, and I believe said he was decidedly insane.

Q. How long after the deed was executed did you place him in the hands of Wheeler, a person accustomed to keep insane persons? A. I believe a month or six weeks after.

Q. Did you not tell Wheeler to get the deeds and papers from him before he took him? A. No; I told him to get them from him, because he had hawked them all about London.

Q. You say other trustees besides yourself have acted under the deed - have you not filed a bill to compel them to act? A. To prevent his wasting his property, it certainly was done; by the advice of all his family; his family were defendants in the suit, but they were friendly defendants, and they desired us to do it.

Q. In that bill have you not charged them with a conspiracy? A. It may be - Mr. Russell filed the bill; I have never seen it. I stated to the Magistrate that he was insane.

Q. Why not then secure his person and not bring him here? A. If I had secured him, and taken out a commission of lunacy (as I have done since) I should have had greater reflections from his family.

Q. Do you mean to say the commission of lunacy was issued by your recommendation? A. I mean to say I made an affidavit for it.

Q. Did you not make this affidavit because the Chancellor required to know why you proceeded against your brother, and had him in prison at the time? A. Certainly- I was not examined under the commission of lunacy; I offered some evidence to satisfy the Chancellor why I prosecuted him. I was present when the Inquest was held; I did not insist on being examined - I said they ought to examine me; I was partly examined - I believe I was sworn.

Q. Why, you are an attorney, you must recollect whether you were sworn? A. I do not recollect it at the moment; they did not take my evidence - they refused it; I

was asked several questions, but they said my evidence was so contrary; two other gentlemen proved he was insane when they saw him in the country - they thought that was sufficient.

Q. Was not all his property conveyed to you, and you were to have 100l. a year, or something out of it? A. No- the deeds and every thing were given up to him.

Q. Are you not insisting on the validity of that deed? A. No otherwise than securing the property for his family, and prevent his hawking them about London; I have made no attempt to establish the deed, except the Chancery suit I have named. When I turned round to speak to his wife he was not quite four feet from me - I was not looking at him when the pistol went off; I was turning round - the ball went into the ceiling, not immediately over my head, but just on the right-hand side; the ceiling is about seven or eight feet high; it happened in the kitchen, on the basement story; my servant came to say they were there, and while I went into the parlour they had descended into the kitchen.

Q. As he stood so near to you, would there have been the slightest difficulty in hitting you if he had meant to shoot you? A. I believe he did not fire directly, but that the pistol went off as he was raising it up.

COURT. Q. You believe he did not fire at you? A. Yes; as he was raising the pistol it went off, I think - I saw the flash - the ball was afterwards found in the ceiling, not over my head, but just in front, to my right.

JURY. Q. Might it be done accidentally? A. That is a question I do not know how to answer.

MR. PLATT. Q. Do you mean to say you cannot say it might not have been accidental, when your own brother is in charge? A. It might have been so; I do not know that he always carried pistols about - I have heard he did so very frequently.

Q. Do not you know that he had a delusion about passing a place where they killed horses, and that he expected to be thrown into a caldron? Q. I never heard of it till now.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many pistols had he? A. Three; but I did not see the other two: I think from the noise I heard, that the ball must have passed within three inches of my head; he was suffered to go at large- my servant came in on hearing the report; she is not here.

Q. At the time the pistol went off, did he appear cool or angry? A. He appeared in a trembling condition - his wife blamed him for his conduct; he muttered something, but I did not hear what; the servant had then gone for a constable.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, in 1802 I was churchwarden of Yeovil, and received a letter from the Lord Bishop of Bath and Wells, (the late Bishop) to look into the charities of the town, the church and charity lands; and in consequence of looking into them, has caused all this trouble and difficulty; the present Bishop in 1805 took it up - I was up in Langham place before his Lordship, and then this Tom, this brother of mine undertook the case, to carry it on, saying what a good partner he had, (Mr. Russell) and they would carry it through, and get my expenses; the church books have been in my debt 613l. ever since; they came to Yeovil, he was to recover it for me, and he drove me out of my mind, and drove me about the country - I have been dreadfully ill used, he pretended to take me up, and to go and put me into a madhouse; I had no peace nor rest for my life; he drove me to Bath, and after that, he persuaded me to sign a deed - after I signed the deed, they took away my property, all my goods and furniture, and every thing; he turned out my wife and family, and distressed them; I have five children and always took care of them, and never troubled anybody - I have been an honest industrious young fellow; he has pitched on all my family, and pitched on me at last, and distressed my children and wife and me; I have been worse than death for years; I knew no more what had been done than the dead - it is a hard case, he has been a very great deceitful man; he deceived me, and made so many deceptions, and drove me out of my mind; he would come one day and say one thing, and his partner come next day and contradict it; I have been like a shuttlecock kicked about from one to the other - I do not know where his partner is, but he is a man who has treated me shamefully, it is a disgrace to the law to have such men in the profession.

DR. EDWARD THOMAS MUNROE . I have been in the habit of attending lunatics for a great many years; I have seen the prisoner four times - the first time was the 29th of April last; I remained with him about twenty minutes - quite sufficient to ascertain the state of his mind; I say he is of unsound mind - I could not form an accurate judgment whether it has been of long duration; it appeared to me a disease of some standing, certainly; I can say certainly, for a month or two; I have seen him three times since, and examined him on all those occasions, and have not the least cause to alter my opinion - I conceive him at this present moment to be insane, and should say it is not at all likely that he will ever recover; I was examined before the jury on the commission.

JOHN FENNER . I am a surgeon, and reside at Pentonville. I was called to attend the prisoner in February 1827, and found him suffering from a violent hemorrhage from the nose, in consequence of a termination of blood to the head, which was very probably caused by great excitement of the mind; I attended him again on the 12th of April 1827, in consequence of his being seized with an epileptic fit of a most violent description, and found him in one of those fits.

Q. Are persons afflicted with epileptic fits, when they come to any age likely to become deranged or idiots? A. I believe that is the usual tendency, these fits are frequently precursors of that affliction; in April 1827, he was decidedly insane, and I considered the fits to be the cause of it - I gave it as my opinion in a very strong manner to the family, that he should have a person to look after him, or something very unpleasant might be the consequence.

WILLIAM HENRY BOX , ESQ. I am surgeon of this goal. The prisoner has been under my inspection since his confinement; I have had an opportunity of forming a judgment as to his state of mind - I should say he was decidedly of unsound mind, he is so now, and has been

so from the time he came into the prison; I saw him with Dr. Munroe on the 29th of April.

WILLIAM HULL . I am a glover, and live in Wood-street, Cheapside. I have known the prisoner from a child - I always considered him a very respectable, intelligent, and prosperous man, kind to his wife and family; I have known him till about Easter 1827 - in October 1826 I visited him at Yeovil, in Somersetshire; he was living with his wife and family - his conduct then was very different to what I had observed before; I made my visit as short as possible, conceiving him to be labouring under an insane state of mind; in Easter 1827 I visited him in Amwell-street, Pentonville - he was then in the care of a keeper, and appeared to me as deranged as he possibly could be; he came to my house a week or ten days afterwards, to my great surprise and regret, for I considered he ought not to have been suffered to come; his wife, who was with him, stated that she could not keep him in, for he was desirous of dining with me - he played with the meat and vegetables; and I considered him very malicious.

EDWARD WATTS . I am the prisoner's brother. I am older than the prosecutor; I have been appointed by the Lord Chancellor to take care of my brother - I have never seen him with pistols, but it is notorious that he has carried them about for three years past - and last December I told him it was very improper to carry fire-arms; he told me that when he was in London he had occasion to go by where they boiled horses, and he carried the pistols to prevent his being thrown into a large furnace.

NOT GUILTY .

The Jury stated that their Verdict was not found on the ground of Insanity, but considering there was not sufficient evidence to prove the intent charged.

Reference Number: t18280703-2

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1350. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Richard Fox , Esq. , on the 17th of June , at St. Mary Abbott's, Kensington and stealing therein, 2 clocks, value 40l.; 2 silver candlesticks, value 25l.; 1 silver ink-stand, value 10l.; 1 ink-bottle, value 5s.; 1 scissor-case, value 20s.; 1 memorandum-book, value 10s.; 1 scent-bottle, value 5s.; 1 bead-purse, value 2s.; 1 silver box, value 10s.; 2 silver spoons, value 10s.; 2 silver forks, value 20s.; and 1 silver taper-candlestick, value 2l. , his property.

CHARLES RICHARD FOX, ESQ. I reside in Addison-row, in the parish of St. Mary Abbott's, Kensington , and rent the house. On the 17th of June, at six o'clock in the morning, I was awoke by my servants, who stated the house had been robbed - I got up immediately, and found two pannels taken out of two separate doors at the back of the house, and a great many things missing from the drawing-room and the library; some of the things lay outside, on the step of the door - one is an outer-door, there is then a small entry; the inner-door leads directly into the house - the inner-door leads to the open air as there is no roof to the entry; the pannel might be large enough to admit a small boy; but I apprehend it was done to put a hand in and undo the fastenings - the doors were not in that state the night before; I missed the greater part of a clock, two silver candlesticks, a small pocket-book and sixteen or seventeen small articles; the candlesticks were certainly worth 25l. - the servant missed some forks and spoons; every thing was my property.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You know nothing of the prisoner? A. No - he was taken at a quarter before four o'clock that morning; I have recovered every thing of consequence but the body of one clock - some small articles have not been found.

CHARLES BISSIX . I am a patrol of St. George's. On the 17th of June, a quarter before four o'clock in the morning, I was coming up St. James's-street into Piccadilly, and looking towards the Park I saw the prisoner coming towards me with a bundle under his arm; when he came up to me I said, "You appear to be a sailor" - he said he was; I said, "I suppose you are going on board." and he said he was; I felt the bundle which he had under his arm - he said it was nothing but his clothes, and that he wished to go down St. James's-street a little way, not to expose himself there; we came down to Berry-street - he put the bundle down on a step, and I immediately saw something shine, which was a small ink-stand - I then found a large candlestick; I brought him and the property to the watch-house - he made no resistance; the constable of the night examined the bundle, and all these articles were found in it and taken in charge by Turner.

Cross-examined. Q. I take it for granted you stated the conversation to the Magistrate the same as you have to his Lordship? A. I did - I have stated all he said; he did not tell me he had found the property under a hedge, nor that he saw three men digging; when he was fully examined I heard him say he got it under a hedge, where there were three men - he said so at the watch-house when he was examined by the constable; he said he was coming from Uxbridge, and had seen three men under a hedge digging - that he made the best of his way up towards them - they left this property, and he took it; he said the three persons ran away as he was coming up.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a house patrol of St. George's, Hanover-square. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house five minutes before four o'clock on the 17th of June; I saw the bundle opened, containing the articles which have been mentioned - I searched him, and found this stock of a centre-bit concealed between the lining of his jacket; he had made a hole to put it in.

Cross-examined. Q. The stock was not of any use without the bit? A. No - I found no bit; it was carefully concealed in his jacket; I did not know him before - he appeared a sailor by his dress, but his hands did not look like a seaman's - he said he had not been on shore more than six weeks; I have myself been a soldier and a sailor.

ROBERT TURNER . I went to the watch-house at five o'clock, and took charge of the prisoner and these articles - I was not there when he was brought in; Bissix delivered them to me - I have had them ever since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you examine the premises? A. Yes - I should think it would have required three persons to have done what I observed there; I found the glass of an ink-stand just by the door - I found a screw-driver in the field in front of the house, near the door by the hedge, and this scissor-case.

Q. You heard the account he gave of the persons being under the hedge? A. He told me it was by the road side - I found this box near the hedge.

Q. Was it between the hedge and the prosecutor's house that the different articles were afterwards found, except the ink-stand? A. Yes - it appeared that the persons had gone from the house to the hedge, and dropped the things which I found; there are a good many officers about at four o'clock in the morning - there was no dirt about the bundle at all; he did not describe any particular spot where he had found it, but said by the road side - I went to the hedge about nine o'clock that morning, and found some persons at work in the road there.

COURT. Q. He did not describe any part of the hedge? A. No - I looked every where to find the centre-bit, and could not; I could see that persons had been lying under the hedge on the grass; there is a field between the hedge and the road coming from the house - there appeared to have been more than one person there.

MR. FOX. These candlesticks are mine, I have no doubt - I had seen them in my room at a quarter to one o'clock that morning; this clock is my brother's, and was in my charge - these two ten-spoons and two forks I can swear to; the ink-stand is mine, it is silver, and worth 10l. and more; I cannot say whether more than one person had committed the robbery.

JURY. Q. Were the doors open, or only the pannels broken? A. They were open when I went down, but I was not present when it was first discovered.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up from my cousin's, at Uxbridge - he used to be ostler at the Bell; I wanted to see him before I went away again; as I came up the road I saw three men digging at the side of the hedge- as soon as they saw me they ran away and left these things; I brought them along till I was stopped; I had come home in the Buckingham East Indiaman.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18280703-3

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1351. JOHN MALCOLM was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , at St. John, at Hackney, 1 cow, price 15l. , the property of George Mash .

GEORGE MASH. I am a farmer , and live at Homerton, in Middlesex - I have a great many cows at different places; I was called up a little before five o'clock on Saturday, the 24th of May; I slipped on my clothes, came down stairs, and Smith, the patrol, pointed out a light red and white cow to me in a field adjoining my house - it was along with several more of my cows; I had seen it there the night before - I had had it ten or twelve months, and am certain it was mine.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a patrol of Hackney-road. On Saturday morning, the 24th of May, about a quarter or twenty minutes after four o'clock, I and Warner were standing together, about a mile or more from Mr. Mash's - Warner said, "Here comes a lad driving a cow," and as soon as I turned I saw the prisoner; he left the cow and ran- I saw him with the cow for about two minutes; he was driving it towards us; I drew my cutlass from my side and ran after him, but he got away - we came back to the cow; a man said it belonged to Mash - we took it back; I called Mash up, leaving Warner with the cow, and while Mash was getting up Warner got the cow into Mash's field - I pointed it out, and Mash claimed it; it was the cow I had seen the prisoner driving; I had seen the prisoner before in our watch-house, and knew him - I am certain he is the man who was driving the cow; he was taken on the 16th of June.

CHARLES WARNER . I am a patrol. On the morning of the 24th of May I was with Smith, and saw the prisoner driving the cow - it was about half past four o'clock, as near as I can guess; he was coming towards us; I spoke to Smith, and as we went towards him to stop him he left the cow, and ran across the fields to Bethnal-green; Smith pursued him - I remained with the cow, and took it to Mash's field; Mash came in about five minutes, and claimed the same cow as I had seen the prisoner driving; it had not been out of my sight; I am positive of the prisoner's person - I had seen him before; he was about a mile or more from Mash's house.

GEORGE MASH . The cow Smith pointed out was mine- I had seen it the night before, between nine and ten o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I solemnly declare, before God and this respectable assembly, my innocence and utter ignorance of what has been urged against me; I leave myself and my life in your hands, knowing you will not decide hastily, and every thing that can be done in my behalf will be done for me; my life hangs, as it were, on a thread - I have no friends to speak for me, and therefore leave all in your hands.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth .

Reference Number: t18280703-4

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1352. ANDREW WIGHT was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Mark Bifield , and with a certain sharp instrument striking and stabbing him, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable him, or do him some grevious bodily harm.

JOHN MARK BIFIELD. I live with Mr. Tollitt, a fishmonger, of Orchard-street - the prisoner was also in his employ. On Sunday, the 1st of June, Mr. Tollitt went out of town, leaving me in charge of the business; about eleven o'clock, shortly after he was gone, Wight made up a tray of fish to send to customers in Edgware-road, Cumberland-place, and other places; I looked at his tray, and found he was going to send some fish to Harley-street, and told him some of it was not proper to go there, and removed part of it - he got into a passion, and told me I did not know how to send out fish, and was no fishmonger; I told him it was of no use to make a piece of work on a Sunday, and what complaint he had to make he had better make to master when he came home; about half an hour afterwards he went out with a tray, and came back in about an hour with a lobster; I asked where he brought it from - he said it was no business of mine; he put his tray down, and was going out - I asked where he was going - he said on his own pleasure; I said he had better stop and do his master's business first: he then attempted to pass by me, to go out - I pushed him back; he attempted to pass again, and I struck him with my hand - he said he would get a warrant for me on the Monday, and make me pay for it; I told him I would answer any charge, but to let it rest till Monday; I then took down

some fish to put in the ice, and while I was down in the ice-house, I heard him tell the servant that if I struck him again when I came up, he wished God might strike him dead if he did not stab me to the heart with the knife, which he then had in his hand, if he was hung to-morrow at Newgate for it. I came up into the shop in about ten minutes, and saw him standing by the block where we clean the fish, with the knife in his hand; he said to me,"You are no man - you are as frightened now as you can be, and look as white as a boiled maggot - you are no father of a child;" he then threw the knife which he held in his hand at me - it passed close by me: I jumped out of the way - it struck against the wainscot, and bounded back; I then saw him take another knife off the block, and thinking he was going to throw it at me, I ran to catch hold of him; he chopped at me, and cut me on the finger of my left-hand; I was trying to take it from him - he got hold of me, made a sudden turn, got out of my grasp, and stabbed me in the back with the same knife as he chopped me on the finger with; I said, "Oh! dear me - he has stabbed me!" I ran out of the shop, and as I ran across the road to the surgeon's, I felt something strike me on the legs, which I found to be a steel which was thrown after me; I did not see him throw it, I was in such a flurry.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You resisted his progress in attempting to go out? A. Yes - I gave him the first push; I pushed him in, and then struck him. I am a weekly servant, and so is he - he is younger than I- I do not suppose he would attempt to fight me. I had heard him say he would stab me if I attempted to strike him; I saw blood on my hand, and on his nose - I cannot swear whether there was any blood on his face before my hand was cut, I was so flurried; I do not know whether I struck him or not before my finger was cut - I might have struck him in the face after he threw the first knife at me - I will not swear that I did not strike him several times before that; I did not hold him and strike him on the back of his neck.

JOHN CARTER . I am a surgeon. I first saw the prosecutor on the 2d of June, at ten o'clock at night; my assistant had been and stopped the hemorrhage; I did not open the wound till next morning - I found a wound on the right side of the spine, about an inch long, and a quarter of an inch deep - it appeared to have been done with a cutting instrument. I attended him till about the 20th of June: I considered him in great danger at first.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you have seen the instrument with which it was supposed to have been inflicted? A. Yes; it certainly appeared to have been made by a knife of that description; there must have been an artery severed by the hemorrhage; I did not see the artery, as the wound was bound up - I put an adhesive plaister to it; that is all.

Q. And do you mean to swear he was in the slightest danger? A. I certainly do; an artery having been severed; we did not sew it up, but brought it together by compression, and put a bandage on; he was in bed for a fortnight.

COURT. Q. How long did you consider him in danger? A. I could not decide that he was out of danger under a fortnight.

JOSEPH SALISBURY . I am shopman to Mr. Tollitt. On the 1st of June Wight was placing some fish on a tray to go out; Bifield came from breakfast, and asked where it was to go - he looked at the tray, and told him he should not send the Cumberland-place fish with what was going to Upper Harley-street; Wight was vexed at that, and said Bifield was no fishmonger, and did not know his business; he still kept on scolding, and saying disagreeable words to Bifield, who told him to hold his tongue, and if he had anything to say to tell Mr. Tollitt of it - he still kept wrangling; Bifield would not speak to him, and he went out with some fish; he returned in about an hour - Bifield asked if he had any orders - he made him no answer; Bifield asked where he brought the lobster from; I did not hear his answer - after that he said he was going out; Bifield stopped him, and said it was not his Sunday out; and if he went he would kick him out of the shop; Wight went to rush by - Bifield stopped him with one hand, and hit him with the other; a scuffle ensued, and Wight said he would make him pay 7s. 6d. for that to-morrow, and pushed himself in Bifield's face, for him to hit him again, but he did not; about ten minutes elapsed - Bifield went down to put some fish into the ice-hole; in the mean time Wight took up a knife which I work with, and said to the servant-maid, "I wish God may strike me dead if Bifield hits me again, if I am hung to-morrow, I will stab him;" Bifield came up - he did nothing to Wight, but went to send some more fish out; Wight walked from one side of the shop to the other, and said, "Mark, you are no man, nor the father of a child - you look as white as a boiled maggot;" he then have the knife at him, but it did not hit him - Bifield crossed the shop to him; I saw Wight take another knife off the fish-block - a scuffle ensued; I heard Wight cry Murder! I turned away for a minute, and then heard Bifield cry Oh! I turned, and saw the knife sticking in his side, about his loins; I followed him across the road, and saw the knife fall from him in the road.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner in a great passion? A. He was in a passion when they were quarrelling in the morning; he cried Murder! before the other cried Oh! I was about three yards from him when Bifield asked where the lobster came from, but heard no answer given; there was a carriage going by at the time - I believe no answer was given; I think Bifield swore he would kick him out of the shop; I saw him hit him in the face once before the prisoner went out with the fish - it was not done in play; I was close to them when they were struggling, and do not know what made the prisoner cry Murder! I only saw Bifield strike him once - I saw his nose bleeding when I came from the doctor's; it must have been from violence used before I returned - Wight came to master's service before Bifield.

ELIZABETH GOFF . I am servant to Mr. Tollitt. I heard a scuffle overhead, and went up stairs - it was then over; I told Wight not to quarrel; he said, "Betsy, God strike me dead, if he hits me again, I will stab him to the heart:" he had a knife in his hand at the time - a scuffle began again; I did not see Bifield stabbed, but saw him run out of the shop after he was stabbed - I ran over to the doctor's, and came back again; the prisoner asked me if he was much hurt - I said he was; he said he was very sorry; that it was done, and he could not help it.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had the prisoner lived there? A. About four months; Bifield has not been there so long; the prisoner's nose was bleeding; I did not see any blows given, but it was not bleeding when I first saw him; Bifield might have struck him; they had been quarrelling, and I dare say were angry at each other - both seemed in a passion.

WILLIAM FORDER . I live at Mr. Tollitt's coach-office. I was standing over at the office, and saw Bifield run from the shop to the doctor's; I saw the knife drop from his side; I went into the shop, and saw the knife laying on the block - the prisoner took it up, and wiped it with a cloth.

Cross-examined. Q. Could you see into the shop? A. Yes; I saw Bifield run out, and Salisbury after him - the prisoner did not throw anything after him, if he had I must have seen it; I saw no steel thrown; I found a bit of a steel at the doctor's, and picked it up - it belonged to Mr. Tollitt.

JOSEPH SALISBURY re-examined. I did not see the steel thrown at him; it came by me as I ran; I took it up, and carried it into the doctor's.

THOMAS PERRALL . I am servant to Mr. Tollitt. I saw Bifield go out of the shop with a knife sticking in his side; he put his hand behind, and took it out - it dropped down in the road; I saw the prisoner throw something at Bifield as he crossed the road, but cannot say what.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. In the shop; I did not see Bifield give him a bloody nose; I saw part of the scuffle; there was a sprinkle of blood on the floor; I heard nobody call Murder! I heard Bifield say Oh! I was some distance from them; if murder had been called I should have heard it.

THOMAS PERRING. I am a constable. On the 1st of June I saw a crowd round Tollitt's shop; I was informed a person had been stabbed, and the person had escaped down in the cellar - I went down into the cellar and the prisoner said he was the man who had stabbed him; I said he must go to the watch-house - he refused to go till his master came home; I said I could not wait - he asked if he might write a letter to his friends; I said he could do that at the watch-house - he then changed his coat; I asked how he came to commit such a rash act - he said he and the prosecutor had had a few words, and that he took the knife and put it into him; as we went along he expressed his sorrow, and said he did it in the heat of passion - I went back to the shop, and this knife and steel were given to me.

Cross-examined. Q. How old is he? A. He said he was nearly twenty.

Prisoner's Defence. When master went off by the coach he said, "Andrew, make haste and get the things ready" - I took my tray out, and came back with a lobster; Bifield asked where the lobster came from - I would not satisfy him; I crossed the shop for a basket to take out some fish - he said, "If you go out, strike me dead if I don't kick you out;" he instantly struck me - I had a knife in my hand, and in the heat of passion threw it at him; he struck me in the nose and made it bleed - I knew no more of the transaction till Betsey told me I had stabbed him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-5

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1353. JANE DEVEREUX was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , at St. George, Westminster, three 5l. Bank notes, the property of James Burt Pearson , her master, in his dwelling-house, against the Statute .

JAMES BURT PEARSON. I live in Brook-street, Grosvenor-square, in the parish of St. George, Westminster - I am a publican , and rent the house: the prisoner had been about three weeks in my service. On the 9th of June, in the morning, when I got up I was counting some silver and sovereigns in the bar - I had some notes lying in my lap, and among them were three 5l. notes rolled carelessly up; the prisoner came in and disturbed me, to sweep the bar, and I dropped them from my lap on the hearth as I moved for her; I sat in front of the fire place - she saw me counting the money; she began sweeping the bar, and requested me to move - I got up immediately, and must have dropped the notes in getting up; I had occasion to give change to a gentleman about two hours afterwards, and then missed the notes; I called her up into the bar, and told her I had lost three 5l. notes, and asked what she had done with the dirt she swept from the floor of the bar - she said she had burnt it, but there was no paper among it; I said I suspected she had stolen them, and sent to Marlborough-street for an officer - this was about ten o'clock in the morning - I had dropped them about seven; the officer came and looked very slightly about the place, and said he could do nothing unless I gave charge of her for felony; I said I did not like to do that, for I thought her innocent - he went away; and on the Wednesday following she seemed very anxious to go out in the evening; I told her I could not suffer her to go out by any means, but between eight and nine o'clock that evening I found she had slipped out unobserved - I then concluded she had stolen the notes; I went to Marlborough-street and fetched Avis, the officer - when I came with him she had returned; I called her into the bar and accused her of the robbery, and desired she would give up the notes - she denied all knowledge of them; I had her taken to the watch-house immediately, and as she went along she dropped a little parcel containing ribbon; we had her searched at the watch-house, and a bill of the ribbon bought at Sewell and Cross's was found on her; we returned home - some friends made a search, and the remainder of the notes were found in the cellar.

RICHARD GRIFFITHS . I am shopman to Messrs. Sewell and Cross, of Compton-street, Soho. I know the prisoner, and saw her at our shop on Wednesday, the 11th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening; she came in and asked to look at some plaid ribbons - I showed her some; she bought two yards at 1s. 7d. a yard, and paid for it with a 5l. Bank of England note - it came to 3s. 2d.; I gave her the change - she gave me the name of Miss Keene, 19, Frith-street, Soho; she said it was for Miss Keene - I gave her four sovereigns and 16s. 10d., and made a bill out; I took the note to the desk and marked it - I afterwards delivered it to Avis on the Thursday morning; when we take money we always take it to a cashier at a desk in the shop - he gives change and stamps the bill; I marked the note myself.

GEORGE AVIS . I am a constable of Marlborough-street. On Wednesday evening the 11th of June, about nine o'clock I went to the prosecutor's house; the prisoner was called into the bar - I told her, her master charged her with stealing three 5l. notes; she said she was in

nocent - he accused her of going out after he had refused her; I asked where she had been - she said to Walker's-court for some sheep's-trotters, for her mistress's supper; I asked where else she had been - she said no where else; I took her to the watch-house - Mr. Pearson went with me and gave me this ribbon; I then searched in her pocket and found a bill of the ribbon, which came to 3s. 2d. - I took it to Sewell and Cross the next morning, and received a 5l. note from Griffiths; which I now produce, with the ribbon and bill - I found but 8d. or 9d. on her.

WILLIAM SUTTON . I am servant to the prosecutor. On Wednesday evening, the 11th of June, at eleven o'clock, I found a paper parcel in the coal-cellar, containing two 5l. Bank notes, some sovereigns, and some silver; I cannot say how much there was - they were altogether, notes and all; I took it up, and gave it to master immediately - the coal-cellar is on the same floor as the kitchen; you go out of the kitchen into the cellar without going into the air - the cellar is under the street; the area is between the kitchen and the cellar; the area is not covered with a roof - there is some wood over it; I did not open the parcel - I saw master find the notes, some sovereigns, and some silver in it.

Q. What made you take the parcel to your master? A. We were all in search of the money, and I could feel there was money in the paper.

RICHARD GRIFFITHS . This is the note I received from her, I am quite certain; I have written the name and address she gave me on it - this is the ribbon I sold her.

J.B. PEARSON re-examined. There is a door from my kitchen into the cellar without going into the area; the witness is mistaken - the kitchen is on the basement story; there is no way from the area to the cellar, it goes right under the stable-yard, not under the house: here is the paper the notes were found in - here are two 5l. notes, three sovereigns and a half, and 4s. in silver; there is written on the notes the name of the person I took them from - the note paid to Griffiths is the other one; it has the name of Clement's on it, which was on it before I lost it - both of those in the paper have the name of Lord Clifton's coachman on them; he had pointed it out to me when I took them of him - I took the note with Clement's on it of a person in Bond-street; I have made no mark of my own on them - I swear these are all my notes, and what I dropped from my lap in the bar; this is the ribbon I picked up as I followed her to the watch-house - the sweepings of the house are never put into the cellar; nothing is kept there but coals and fire-wood.

Prisoner's Defence. My master sits there every morning counting his money; I went into the bar and began to sweep; he put his money up - I found the saw-dust too clean to throw away; I gathered it up, and put it on the top of the kitchen stairs - I went and scoured the bar out, and swept the parlour; leaving the saw-dust where it was - we had breakfast - the work was all done; I was going down stairs, and seeing the saw-dust on the top of the stairs, I said, "William, what is the reason you have not cleaned this away?" he said, he was not going to clean away my dirt; I went and threw it behind the fire - William saw me do it; between ten and eleven o'clock my mistress ran down stairs, and said,"What have you done with the saw-dust?" I said, I had thrown it behind the fire, she said, "Oh! your master has been so careless, he has lost some money among it;" I said, I saw nothing but some pieces of newspaper - master sent for a constable and stripped me, but nothing was found - on Tuesday, master came down, and said,"I don't care who finds the money. I will give a sovereign to find it;" I said, I should be glad to find it without the sovereign, or anything - nothing more passed till Wednesday afternoon; I went up to my mistress, she gave me 6d. to fetch some sheep's-trotters - I went to the bar to master, and said, I was going out for mistress; he said, I could not go; I went up to mistress, and she said, I was a fool for telling him I was going; so I slipped out, and master fetched an officer and took me; a gentleman said, I had thrown a bit of ribbon in the street; but I declare I never saw the ribbon - it is said the bill was found on me, it might, or might not, I cannot say; next morning the shopman came to the office, and said, he did not know me - the officer said,"Is not this the woman who bought the ribbon last night?" he said, "I believe so;" the officer said, "You believe, say you are sure" - I am innocent, I never saw him before, and he did not know me.

RICHARD GRIFFITHS re-examined. I am positive she is the woman who paid the note to me; I had not seen her before - I did not say I believed her to be the woman.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 48.

Reference Number: t18280703-6

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1354. MARY POTTER CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. the goods of Henry Hartley , from his person .

HENRY HARTLEY. I live in Denmark-street, Soho, and am a draper . On the 20th of June, at half-past twelve o'clock at night, I was returning from visiting some friends; I was quite sober - my handkerchief was safe when I was on Blackfriars'-bridge, and as I turned round into Fleet-street , I was accosted by the prisoner, as a woman of the town; I did not consent to go with her; she walked by my side till we got to Salisbury-court , where she left me; when I got about five doors from the court, I perceived I had lost my handkerchief from my inside coat pocket; she had caught hold of my left arm, and put her arm round my waist - nobody but her had been near enough to take it: I immediately turned back, up Salisbury-court, and saw her there; I accused her of taking it - she denied it and abused me; I said "If you will give it up by fair means, I will not give you in charge;" she said she had not got it - I immediately went into Fleet-street for a watchman, but not seeing one, I returned for fear she should go; I took hold of her - Bolton came up and took her in charge, and as she went down Fleet-street, I saw her give him the handkerchief, which I know to be mine: I had used no familiarity with her whatever.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not meet me in Fleet-street, and beckon me down a court? A. I did not. I told her repeatedly to go away; I did not give her the handkerchief.

Q. Did I not say I would sooner have cash than a handkerchief? A. Nothing of the sort passed; she did not desire me to give her in charge.

HENRY BOLTON . I am superintendant of the watch. I saw the prisoner standing in Salisbury-court, and knew her before; in about a minute I saw the prosecutor come up to her, ask for his handkerchief, and say, "If there was a watchman or constable I would give you in charge;" I then said I was an officer, and took her; she denied having the handkerchief; as I took her down Fleet-street I saw her put her hand into her bosom, and pull part of the handkerchief out; she then pulled it quite out and gave it to me; she then said the prosecutor had given it to her for a certain purpose, which he directly denied - she had before denied having it - she again asserted at the watch-house that he had given it her - he appeared to be quite sober.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say, "Here is the handkerchief he gave me," and I would not give it, and that I would not go down a court with any gentlemen? A. No; she said nothing of the kind.

JOHN HARVEY . I am constable of the night; the prisoner was brought in with the handkerchief; the prosecutor appeared to be perfectly sober, and claimed it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the handkerchief for indecent liberties which he took with me up the court.

HENRY HARTLEY . I swear I did not take any liberties with her.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-7

1355. THOMAS LEDGE was indicted for breaking and entering the warehouse of George Harker and others, on the 31st of May , and stealing therein, 8 1/2cwt. of ginger, value 29l.; 5 bags, value 3s.; 1 1/2 cwt. of white lead, value 25s.; 3 casks, value 3s.; 1 rug, value 3l. 12s.; 10lbs. of nutmegs, value 3l.; 2lbs. of cloves, value 8s.; 56lbs. of Italian juice, value 3l. 10s.; 1 bridle, value 10s.; 56lbs. of pimento, value 3l. 10s.; 16 blank accountbooks, value 6l. 10s., and 1 truck, value 2l., their property ; against the Statute.

MR. RYLAND conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . On the 30th of May, I was in the service of George Harker and another, of Martin's-lane ; their warehouse was secured on Friday evening, the 30th of May, at half-past seven o'clock; there were spices and ginger there; the ginger was in bags, marked H. & Co. and there were some empty bags not marked - there were two trucks on the premises, one belonging to Martin, and another to Mr. Ward, a wine-merchant: I left about half-past seven - the property was all safe then and the premises secured; I went there again at a quarter before eight in the morning, and found the outer-gate open, and both the trucks were gone - I missed five bags of ginger, about 10lbs. of nutmegs, and four or 5 lbs. of cloves were taken out of boxes, a bag of pimento, and four casks of white lead were gone: I was present when our truck was brought home that morning, about eleven o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. All the ginger was in bags, having the proprietor's name on them? A. It was; I cannot say whether the pimento bag was marked; I was the last person on the premises at night.

GEORGE HARKER. I have a partner. On the Monday week after the robbery, I got a search warrant, having advertised and received information from Thompson; I went with him and several officers to the prisoner's house, in Old Montague-street, Whitechapel; he came in while we were searching; I found some bags in the cellar, corresponding in every particular with what I had lost, the same quality and size - there was a piece cut out of them in the very identical place where my name had been marked; the hole was not filled up with another piece; in the corner of one of two I found some ginger of the same description as what I had lost, and in the house we found a small quantity of nutmegs, mace, and several other sorts of spices which I had lost; I also found a number of picklock-keys and a dark lantern; they were, I think, in the sitting-room; a small wax candle was left in our warehouse, which would just fit the nozzle of the dark lantern: I had seen the two trucks on the premises the evening before - one was brought back on the morning of the robbery; Evans brought back the other on the day of the search; but after the search; that one belonged to Mr. Ward.

Cross-examined. Q. How many bags did you find in the prisoner's house? A. Three - I lost six: the holes appeared to have been recently cut; they were fresher than the rest of the bags: I found a piece of ginger in one bag; there are several sorts of ginger; the prisoner kept no shop there; there was an appearance of his dealing in old clothes, as there were a number of old black clothes bags up stairs, and all those bags smelt strong of spice; I saw no lodgers - the prisoner came in about half-past one o'clock in the middle of the day; there was a woman in the house who appeared to be the mistress; I cannot say whether she was his wife.

COURT. Q. Where were the bags which smelt strong of spice? A. In the bed chamber; I think there were four or five large bags - they had all had ginger in them certainly, for it hung about the sides of the bag; the prisoner denied having had any ginger in his house for years before.

MICHAEL THOMAS . I am a labourer at the East India Docks. On Saturday, the 31st of May, about half-past five o'clock, I was going to work there, and saw a truck standing by the Tower gates with three bags on it; a young man was with it - the prisoner called out "Do you want a job;" he was not five yards from the truck, but he was not the young man - I am certain of his person: I said Yes - he said "Take hold of the truck and go on;" another person at the same time came and took hold of the truck with me - he was employed at the same time; we went on with the truck across Tower-hill to Old Montague-street; in our way one of the bags broke, by the wheel touching it, and something fell out; I looked round and found it was ginger - the prisoner then came up to assist in putting the bags right on the truck, and asked if either of us had a nail to secure the bag; I said I had no nail but I had a needle and if anybody had a bit of twine I would sew it up - he said never mind that would do; he took hold of the needle and stuck it into the bag - I said to the prisoner"Let me go back and pick up the ginger which has fallen

down;" he said "No, never mind, go on" and I went on till we came to Old Montague-street; at the end of that street the prisoner came up to us at the truck, and pointing to a person in a white apron and fustain jacket, said"Follow that man" - we followed that man with the truck till we came to the house where the search-warrant was afterwards executed; we unloaded the bags, put them into the passage of the house - the prisoner then came up and said "Go on with the truck, follow that man;" we went on with the truck to the end of the street, and turned up towards Whitechapel-road - as we turned round the corner of a street, I recollected I had lent my needle to fasten up the bag; I did not go back for it - before I turned the corner of the street, I turned round and saw another truck at the door of the same house where we had left the bags at; this was about one hundred yards off - when we had turned the corner of the street, the man with the white apron said "How much is your charge" I said we should be satisfied with 6d. a piece; we were paid 1s. 6d. between us, and the man took the truck away up Whitechapel-road, which was the way I was going to the Docks; he was in front of me - I saw him lodge the truck at a wheelwright's shop near the London Hospital, and come away. About a week afterwards I read something in the newspaper and went to the prosecutors and communicated it to them the next day - I afterwards showed the officer where I had seen the truck left - he found it there, and I believe it to be the same; he took it to Mr. Harker's.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you read in the newspaper anything about a reward? A. No - I read that a robbery had been committed; there was nothing about a reward - I never saw the prisoner before; he was about twenty minutes with me, sometimes in front and sometimes in the rear - he sometimes walked on the flags; he was dressed in a black coat - I made no bargain for the job; it was broad day light, five o'clock; I did not observe any names on the bags - the names might be turned inside.

JURY. Q. Did the young man go away after you took charge of the truck? A. Yes; I believe he left of his own accord - the prisoner did not stop behind and pick up the ginger; I should think about a quarter of a pound dropped out - I did not know the man who helped me.

JOSIAH EVANS . I am street-keeper in the neighbourhood of these premises; I went with Mr. Harker and two others to search the prisoner's house, on Monday the 9th of June, and have had possession of what I found there ever since - here are some picklock-keys which I found in a room on the ground floor, under a chest of drawers - I found a dark-lantern in the same place, and a cash-box; I was present when some spices were found by Forrester - the keys are not all picklocks; some are blank keys - two of them are picklocks and some skeletons.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you often find such bundles of keys at ironmongers? A. Some are door keys - there was not the least appearance of ironmongery business being carried on there.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I accompanied Evans to search this house, and took possession of the spices; here is some ginger, nutmegs, mace, pimento, and cloves, a small quantity of each; I found two phosphorus-boxes. I saw Harker's man draw the truck out of a yard belonging to a carman named Cobley, on the day of the robbery - it was near a quarter of a mile from the prisoner's house.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the robbery - I was out of town at the time; those black bags are my clothes bags: I often buy pawnbroker's clothes, and want four or five bags to carry them. As to the keys and lantern I can give no account of them, except that I had a lodger named Day, who I am afraid has made a dupe of me; he appeared a respectable man, but has not been heard of since my wife told him these things had been found; he must have deposited them under the drawers - I know no more of the lantern than a child unborn; I bought the four bags in Petticoat-lane - I had three dozens cut in a similar way, to make door mats; there was not a word passed between Mr. Harker and me about spice.

ELIZABETH GREEN . I keep the Waggon and Horses public-house, at Tottenham, and am a widow. The prisoner is my own brother; this letter (looking at it) is my writing; I had it put into the post, and sent to him.

This letter was here read; it was dated Tottenham, 28th of May, and bore the post-mark of Upper Edmonton, 28th of May, at night; it was addressed to Mr. Ledge, No. 3, Old Montague-street, Whitechapel, and signed Elizabeth Green; it stated that she would be glad if he could come down on Thursday night or Friday morning, as her son was going out for a week or ten days' and requested an answer by return of post.

Witness. I received this answer by post from my brother.

This letter being read, was dated 28th of May, acknowledging the receipt of the former, and promising to be down to-morrow forenoon (Friday) as soon as possible.

Q. On the following day did your brother come down? A. He was down with me on Friday, the 30th of May, about twelve o'clock at noon, the day he mentions in the letter, and he never left my house till Saturday, the 7th of June, except to walk out in the evening; he was never out of my sight long enough to go to town; I am certain he was never absent above an hour; he always went to bed in proper time.

MR. RYLAND. Q. How far do you live from Towerhill? A. We call it six miles from my house to Shoreditch - it is quite the lower end of Tottenham, within a very few doors of Edmonton. I remember Mr. Salt's house, which has lately been pulled down; mine is half a mile further from town; my brother slept in the room adjoining mine: he came to assist in the business during my son's absence; he went to bed first at night - I got up first in the morning; I was always the last person up. I saw him go to bed on the Friday night; I saw him go up stairs with the candle, and bade him good night; I saw him in bed that night - I always take the candles: I do not recollect whether I took his candle. I saw him in bed between eleven and twelve o'clock, and went to bed myself very soon; I was down between six and seven next morning, and saw him when he came down about eight o'clock; he could not have gone out at night, because my doors were all fast at night, and I found them closed in the morning; I unfastened the street door that morning.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You went to bed, having fastened the house up - did you take your keys up with you? A. I did, and found them in the morning where I left them; I had locked my bed-room door; I found every thing as I

had left it at night: I saw my brother come down in the morning in his shirt sleeves; he could not have gone out for want of the keys.

COURT. Q. On the top of this letter, are the words,"letter, No.1;" is that your brother's writing? A. Why I do not know - I dare say it was on the paper when I wrote it; it might be a piece of paper that had had something written on it before - I cannot say whether they were there when I wrote it; I cannot tell whether it is my brother's hand writing - it may be, but I cannot tell.

Q. There is No. 2 at the top of the other letter, do you believe that to be your brother's writing? A. I cannot tell, it does not look like his; I cannot say indeed whether he wrote it or not.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When your brother was in trouble did he send to you for the letter he sent you? A. No, I sent it to him last Sunday.

COURT. Q. Were the words, letter, No. 2 on it when you sent it to him? A. I really cannot say; I generally wrote to my brother myself.

ELLEN PARKER . I am servant to Mrs. Green. I remember the prisoner coming down there on Friday, the 30th of May, between twelve and one o'clock; he slept in the front room next to my mistress - I slept with my mistress, she goes to bed last - nobody could have gone out and returned without our knowledge in the night; the keys were on mistress's table - I saw her place them there, and they were there in the morning when she got up; she was the first who got up.

MR. RYLAND. Q. Do you mean to swear you saw her place the keys on the table? A. Yes; I went to bed with her, but was always in bed before her; we go up stairs together.

Q. Who told you it was Friday the 30th of May the prisoner came? A. I saw him, I remember the day, because my mistress' son went out on Friday morning; I heard he was in trouble on the Tuesday week following - I have not often talked this over with my mistress, and have not mentioned the day of the week or month to her; the prisoner's wife sent for me on Sunday, but I had been asked about this before that, by the people who knew him - he slept in the first floor front room; it has a casement window, which opens inside - I do not think he could casily get out of the window.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is the casement window large enough? A. Yes; there was no appearance of a person having got out there - mistress always examined the doors and fastenings, the last thing at night.

COURT. Q. How long did the prisoner stay at your mistress's? A. From the 30th of May to the 7th of June, which was Saturday; I always recollect the days of the month by the newspaper, which we have every day - I generally look at the date; my mistress's son had left the house on the day the prisoner came - he is at Tottenham; he came back on the Friday following, the day before the prisoner left - I was not desired to take particular notice when the prisoner came, or to notice the day of the month.

ELIZABETH GEORGE . I live at Tottenham; I am a char-woman, and work every Saturday for Mrs. Green, at the Waggon and Horses public-house. On Saturday the 31st of May, I went there at half-past six o'clock in the morning; the prisoner came down to where I was at work - he was slip-shod, and in his shirt sleeves; it was impossible for him to be on Tower-hill at half-past five o'clock, for I saw him come down stairs at half-past six; I saw him again there on Saturday the 7th of June - I did not see him leave the house; he was assisting the landlady as her son had gone to Leicestershire on the 30th.

MR. RYLAND. Q. How do you know he went away on the 30th? A. I know I did not see him on the 31st, and the girl said he was gone; I think it was hardly halfpast six o'clock when I got there - I will not swear to five or ten minutes; it might be ten minutes to seven, or seven, when I saw the prisoner - it was not so late as eight; he could not have laid a-bed till eight - I have worked there more than two years, and go there every Saturday.

Q. How can you distinguish the 31st of May from any other Saturday? A. Because it was the call-over day for the parish officers; and a woman asked me the day of the month - I saw young Green there on Saturday the 7th of June.

GEORGE GROVES . I am a painter and glazier, and live at Tottenham. I saw the prisoner at Green's house about seven o'clock in the evening of the 30th of May; I staid there all the evening, and slept there - I saw him go up stairs to bed at half-past eleven o'clock; I walked up with him - I saw him there again the next evening; I heard no noise in the night.

MR. RYLAND. Q. Do you live with your father and mother? A. Yes; I slept there because there happened to be a disturbance down the lane, about ground rent - my father was afraid of his things being seized, and removed some of the things from his house; I slept at the back of the house, and he in front - I got up at five o'clock in the morning, and went out; I let myself out.

Q. You knocked Mrs. Green up to get the keys, I suppose? A. No, it is a spring-lock; I pulled it back, and drew the bolts back - I had no occasion to ask for the keys; I have slept there before, and could easily go out without disturbing anybody - there was a key left in the lock; I twisted it round, and opened it.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Could you have let yourself in as quietly? A. No; all the other doors were fastened - I went to work at Newington all day.

COURT. Q. How often do you sleep there? A. Sometimes not for two or three months; if I have a friend come down, I go and sleep there - my father and mother slept at home that night; they had moved what they could spare to Green's for safety - there was no bed for me at home; I remember the date because Mr. Green went down to Leicester - he returned on the 7th on Saturday.

Q. Are you sure of that? A. No; he returned on the Friday; I remember that, because we did not expect him that night, and the prisoner slept with me - he is at home now minding the house; he knew I was coming here - he had told me a week before that he was going to Leicester on the 30th, and that he should return on the Friday.

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-8

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JULY 4.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1356. CHARLES THORP was indicted for stealing

on the 11th of June , in St. Martin in the Fields, 1 watch, value 100l., the goods of Abraham Harrison Dry , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES VAUGHAN . I am shopman to Abraham Harrison Dry, a pawnbroker and silversmith , of 32, St. Martin's-lane, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . On the 11th of June, a little after eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and said, he was sent by a person in the Strand, to look at a gold repeating watch, which was marked 120 guineas; he did not mention the gentleman's name - I did not know the prisoner before; he said he was sent by the gentleman to ask the lowest price of it; the watch lay on the counter with many others at the time; I gave it to him to look at, and he ran away with it - it had been marked 120 guineas, and hung in the window; but was not in the window when he came in - the ticket was not on it on the counter; it had the maker's name, "Westwood" on it - I pursued him, calling Stop thief! and saw him running in the street as hard as he could; he turned the corner as I got out of the door - he was stopped in the next street in two or three minutes after he ran out, by the beadle; I lost sight of him while he turned the corner, but caught sight of him again, and saw him taken; I came up directly - I am certain he is the man; I asked what he had done with the watch - he directly gave it to me from his pocket; here it is - I am quite certain of it by the name and number; there is no private mark on it; it is worth 100l.

RICHARD DAVIS . I am a beadle. I was at the bottom of Castle-street, near Duke's-court, and saw several persons running from the end of Hemming's-row; the prisoner was running first - I heard the cry of Stop thief! put myself in his way and stopped him; Vaughan came up and asked him where the watch was - he put his hand into his pocket, and gave it him; he offered no resistance, and declared it was real poverty caused him to do it for he had no where to go.

Prisoner's Defence. I only recollected where I was at the time I came to the watch-house; I was in that misery of mind, I did not know what occurred - it would be vain for me to attempt to address the Court as I could wish; I only wish to state, that nothing but the greatest poverty and the greatest misery of mind would ever induce me to commit so great a crime - I walked one hundred and fifty miles with only 3s. 6d. in my pocket; and within twenty miles of town I made application to the overseer of the parish - who said, it was surprising, such a creditable young man as me should ask for relief, and that I had better go on the highway; I walked all night, in order to get employ, and I thought for the first time of dishonesty - may the All-seeing Eye witness what I have related; I have friends, but they are too far off, and their knowing my being guilty of so base a transaction, would be worse than the punishment I shall receive - had I got away with the property, I do not know what I should have done with it; may the Almighty forgive what the world cannot.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, believing it to be his first offence, and on account of his poverty .

Reference Number: t18280703-9

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1357. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 4 handkerchiefs, value 5l. 8s., the goods of Catherine Matthison and Jesse Matthison , in their dwelling-house .

MARY REILLY . I am shopwoman to Catherine and Jesse Matthison, linen-drapers of Red Lion-street, Holborn , they are the sole house-keepers. On Monday last, at half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I went out for about five minutes, and as I came back I met the prisoner coming out of the shop door with these handkerchiefs open in his hand - I gave an alarm, and attempted to take them from him; he avoided me - I cried Stop thief! and ran after him for some yards; he was so closely pursued, he threw them down - a neighbour named Chapel picked them up. and gave them to me; Hall stopped the prisoner - I had seen them safe a few minutes before; there are three pieces and three loose ones, twenty-seven handkerchiefs in all.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. He brought them out exposed in his hand? A. Yes; the prosecutrixs are not here - I have lived with them twenty-five years; the premises are their joint freehold - the handkerchiefs are worth 5l. 8s.; they cost that - I know the value is deteriorated lately, but they are worth that - I cannot say what they weigh; some of them are India - they sell for 7s. each; the British are from 6s. to 7s. 6d. each - we get about 1s. on each; these were bought since the fall - tolerably good handkerchiefs are sold at 28s. a piece, but not like these.

ROBERT HALL . I live near Red Lion-passage; I was standing at the corner of Princes'-square, and saw the prisoner coming towards the corner, and about thirty yards further I collared him, and gave him in charge; I did not see him with the property.

Cross-examined. Q. How far was Mrs. Reilly from him? A. There was a crowd, and I did not recognize her.

CHRISTIAN PADZUS . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to me in Prince's-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through Red Lion-street and saw a person running along; some boys were crying Stop thief! I joined in the pursuit, and a man stopped me; the woman said she believed I was the man at first, and then said I was.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-10

Before Mr. Justice Burroughs.

1358. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Spencer , on the King's highway, on the 17th of June , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 pocket-book, value 6d., and two half-crowns , his property.

JOSEPH SPENCER . I am porter to Messrs. Bousfield and Co. On the 17th of June I was going home from the Borough; I had been at a public-house drinking two or three pots of porter and two or three glasses of gin and water; I was tipsy, but knew what I was about; I was going to Osborne-place, Brick-lane, where I live; I was in High-street, Whitechapel about half-past eleven o'clock I was going along, and was knocked down, and my pocket-book taken from me; I did not see anybody near me - they must have come behind me; while I was

on the ground I felt a man's hand go out of my pocket; I got up and saw a man going away; I hallooed out Stop thief! he was running away - I saw a crowd collected in a minute or two, and the man was in charge of Winter, the watchman; I do not know that he is the same man who knocked me down; he was carried to the watch-house, and there my pocket-book was produced by the watchman. I looked at it and knew it to be mine; it was in my pocket when I was knocked down; there were two half-crowns in it, some other silver, two 1s. 6d. stamps, and a pencil; I had had it about a month or five weeks, and knew it to be mine - it has my writing in it.

Prisoner. Q. When I was taken, was anybody with you? A. I cannot say; it was I who cried Stop thief! not a woman; I recollect saying at the watch-house, that I had lost two half-crowns; I asked the watchman next morning which was the man, as I did not know you; I said I had lost two half-crowns and some other money.

EDMUND WINTER . I am a watchman. On the 17th of June, about half-past eleven o'clock at night, I was in the street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! three times; I looked out and saw the prisoner come running up; I crossed over, and when he saw me, he stopped running, and walked; when he came up I took him - I knew him well before and had spoken to him that night; I saw the prosecutor soon after, and when the prisoner got to the watch-house door, he had both his hands in his pocket and wanted to get them out very bad; I told him not to take them out; he said, "O, that is all stuff;" I took hold of his wrist; he directly dropped the pocket-book from his pocket - Webb picked it up in my presence; I examined it in Spencer's presence and found two 1s. 6d. stamps in it, with a card of where he worked; I found no half-crown, but Spencer said he had put two in there.

Prisoner. Q. When you took me, where was the prosecutor? A. At the corner of Osborne-street; there was one gentleman with him and a young woman; I only saw one gentleman - several gentlemen came to the watch-house; Spencer said he had lost two half-crowns; I did not pick the pocket-book up, as I thought you wished to drop something else, and I had enough to do to take care of you.

Prisoner. If he saw me drop it, why not mention it to the night officer? A. He said he had got nothing; the pocket-book was produced and shown to him; he said he knew nothing about it - but I saw it drop from his pocket, and saw it picked up.

GEORGE WEBB . I am a watchman. I was close by the watch-house when the prisoner was brought there; I saw the pocket-book fall from him; I had hold of his shoulder, as he was trying to get from Winter; I picked it up- it was examined in his presence, and two stamps and a card found in it, but no money; the pocket-book was open when I picked it up; the watchman said "Webb pick up the pocket-book."

Prisoner. Q. How long was I in the watch-house before you came in? A. I shoved you in behind; but you might not know it.

JOSEPH SPENCER. This is the pocket-book which I lost that night; here is written in it, in my hand writing,"God is my help."

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Whitechapel; the prosecutor lay on the stones, and two gentlemen stood before him; a woman was standing with him - when I came up she had hold of his right arm - one of the gentlemen told me to help him up; I caught hold of his arm, helped him up, and was going away, when the woman cried Stop thief! the watchman came up and asked what the woman was crying after me for; the gentleman gave his address, and he could testify that he never moved, he was so drunk; I never saw the pocket-book till it was produced in the watch-house.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Reference Number: t18280703-11

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1359. MARY THOMPSON , ELIZABETH SMITH , and SARAH SHAW were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Thomas , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 5d.; 3 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 1 shilling, 3 penny pieces and 6 halfpence , his property.

JOHN THOMAS. I am a cabinet-maker and live in Swanyard, Shoreditch. On the 5th of June, I went to Covent-garden Theatre; I left there about twelve and went from there to Johnson's alamode beef shop, in a court in Drury-lane - I staid there about an hour and had a pint of porter; I went from there into the Strand to a watering-house, and had a glass of porter - from there I went down the Strand as far as Bride-lane; I had another glass of porter and might have stopped about a quarter of an hour at each place - from there I went to Fleet-market and rested myself on the settles of the market for near an hour, as I had been walking about all day on business; I went from there to a watering-house in Holborn, and had another glass of porter - I stopped there about ten minutes; I left there about three o'clock and then came back through Smithfield towards home - I went through Bridgewater-square; three women of the town accosted me in Whitecross-street - they asked me to treat them with some gin; Shaw and Smith are two of them - I made them no reply: Shaw then left the other two, caught hold of my arm and said I should come home with her, and see where she lived - I told her to go to h - I and he d-d, and tried to get away from her; with that the other two came and swore I should go and see where they lived, if I did not stop - I was then about passing a gateway; two of them got behind me and held my arms down, while the other got behind - they shoved me down the gateway into the first house we came to; Smith and Shaw came into the room - the other one who was behind, left after delivering me into the room, and I saw no more of her - they began to ask me for money, for gin, and so on; there were two girls in bed in the room - they jumped out of bed, caught hold of me and swore I should come in between them; perceiving their intention was nothing but robbery, I tried all possible means I could to get out of doors, but was prevented by the four women - in a very short time the two who had been in bed huddled on their clothes, and one of them swore I should stand some gin as I was preventing her from going to Billingsgate; I gave her 4d. to get some and as she was going out I tried to rush out with her, but was prevented by the three prisoners - Thompson was one of those in bed - the door was shut; I told them they were

welcome to the gin if they would let me go - they said"Stop, she will not be long, you may as well have part of it;" I said I wanted none, and tried several times to rush out at the door, but was prevented by them - they then said I should go if I paid 1s. and after struggling a long time I proposed to give them the 1s. if they would let me here my hat and let me go; they then said it was all d-d stuff, that I had got no shilling and they were used to such characters as me - I put my hand into my pocket and showed them a shilling; they then threw me back on the bed and swore they would have the shilling from my hand - I held it tight, and after a very severe struggle on the bed, either Thompson or Smith, by the advice of Shaw, bit my hand - she said "Bite the b-r's hand;" I then opened my hand and they took they shilling out, and during the struggle on the bed they took some halfpence from my trousers pocket; after they had got the shilling, I managed to get from the bed and endeavoured to get out, but was prevented by their well guarding the door - they then said they knew I had more money, they would stand none of my nonsense, and gave me a great deal of abuse; they threw me a third time on the bed, (for they had thrown me on when I first went in;) they began a severe search of my person, to see what I had - I hallooed out Murder! and Help! but no one came to my assistance; they swore if I made an alarm they would murder me, and several times put their hands before my mouth to prevent my being heard - all of them did so; Shaw was at the head of them - she sung out most to me, and used more violence and oaths than the others; after struggling for near an hour, they pinioned me back on the bed - Thompson and Smith held my arms extended back; Shaw knelt on my stomach and swore she would pull every bit of clothes off my back, but what she would get the money, and called to them to hold the - tight - my strength was exhausted; Shaw tore my clothes and took from my fob three sovereigns and a half; I saw the three sovereigns and a half in her hand, while she was on the bed - she opened her hand and exposed them; she then said "Hold the b-r tight while I go;" she jumped off the bed and was out of the room in a second - I struggled and got from the bed; I struck one of them, broke from the others and got outside the door to follow Shaw, but could see nobody but a man in a smock frock: I ran to the watch-house and gave an alarm - the constable of the night and two watchmen came to the place with me; I knocked at the door and asked for my hat which was knocked off in the scuffle: an Irishman came down from the upper part of the house and produced my hat; I asked for the girls - he said he knew nothing of them; we went to several public-houses, and in one at the corner of Old-street, I recognized the three prisoners and gave them in charge - I am quite certain of their persons; there was not above 3s. 6d. found on them all - we went and searched the room, but nothing was found; I was quite sober - I might have had a glass of spirits, or two glasses in the course of the day, before I went to the Theatre, and a pint of beer - I am certain I did not have more; a finger-stall, which had been on my finger, was found in the passage of the house - it was pulled off in the struggle; I had seen my sovereigns safe at the eating-house, and put them into my fob there - my silver was in my waistcoat pocket; I had a pocket-book, which they did not take - there was nothing in it.

Prisoner THOMPSON. Q. When you came into the public-house, did you not say, I was not one of those who stopped? A. She was attempting to escape - the watchman said "Is that one?" I was confused at seeing the three together, and said No, but with the same breath said"Stop her!" I could not recognize her at the distance - I had but a glimpse of her at that time; she went out at the door; I thought she was one but could not recognize her at the moment - I was at the time going in at one door and she was coming out at the other, and the other prisoners were trying to escape at the back part of the house; I am positive she is the person - I said at the place I was robbed at that if I did not get my money, I would hang them, as I was irritated; that was immediately after being robbed - I did not say so at the office.

Prisoner SHAW. You met me at half-past eleven o'clock the preceding evening, and went with me to the Bull's Head public-house, Smithfield, gave me three glasses of gin and peppermint and after that wanted to gamble with a gentleman at the bar, but the landlord would not let you - you took me to a house of accommodation in West-street. Witness. I did not see her at any house, or ask her to take anything, or take her to any house - I was at the Theatre at half-past eleven o'clock; I was not intoxicated.

JOHN CRAWLEY . I lodge in Scotch-yard, Whitecross-street, on the first floor; Thompson has occupied a room on the ground floor for about two months. I was ill with a bad leg on this night, and could not get rest; I went to sleep about four o'clock and was awoke by a noise and quarrelling; I heard a woman, who I thought was Thompson, call out, "Don't break all my things!" I heard, as I thought, a man's voice swearing bitterly half a dozen times,"I will do it;" when all was silent I got up and came down stairs, and opposite the street door was a butcher's chaise cart, in which I found a hat - I took it up stairs, and afterwards delivered it to Thomas.

Prisoner THOMPSON. Q. Did you hear the man cry Murder! A. No - I heard a good deal which I could not understand; when he came for his hat he said he had lost 3l. 11s., and if he did not get it he would hang them.

THOMAS WALKER . I am the watch-house-keeper. On the 6th of June, soon after five o'clock in the morning, the prosecutor came and made a complaint; I went with him and found the prisoners at the Bull and Ram public-house, Old-street-road, about six o'clock - he told me to stop Thompson; I said to him immediately after, "Are these the three?" he said, "They are the three women," and that another was not one; there were four at first - the prosecutor was quite sober.

JAMES LEWIS . I am a watchman. I went with Walker; when Thomas first saw Thompson I asked if she was one of them - he said, "No - stop, don't let her go;" I immediately gave her to Perry; Shaw said she had never seen him in her life - Thompson we brought into the tap-room, and he said positively that she was one of them.

THOMAS PERRY . I am a watchman. I saw the fingerstall found behind the street door, at the first house on the left of Scotch-yard.

- LEWIS. I picked up this finger-stall just against the room door.

JOHN THOMAS. This is mine; I had it on when I was robbed, and missed it the moment I got to the watch-house - I am certain they are the three who robbed me; I am a married man.

THOMPSON's Defence. I arose very early that morning, as I sell things in the street; this young woman lodges with me - but as to the prosecutor I never saw him till he came to the public-house and gave charge of me.

SMITH's Defence. I met Thompson and Shaw, and went to the public-house; the prosecutor came in and said we had robbed him, but I never saw him before.

SHAW's Defence. The prosecutor came into the public-house and said we had robbed him; in my flurry I did not know him till I got to the watch-house - I then recollected being in his company the night before, and be took me to a house of accommodation.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-12

Before Mr. Justice Burroughs.

1360. JOHN EDMUNDS and ANN JOHNSON were indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Dewdney , on the King's highway, on the 28th of May , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 3 rings, value 50s.; 1 brooch, value 10s.; 1 cap, value 9d; 1 frill, value 5s.; 1 scarf, value 10s., and 1 bonnet, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Dewdney .

MARY DEWDNEY. I am the wife of Thomas Dewdney. On the 28th of May I went with some friends to Old Bagnigge-wells - there was a concert there; I came away about twelve o'clock with my husband and a relation; my husband and I had a few words, and they left me in the street - I had drank a little, but was perfectly sensible; I lost my way - I was down by the Marsh-gate, New-road; I did not know my way home, and gave myself in charge to the watchman, telling him my husband and I had quarrelled and left me, and I did not know my way home - he took me to the watch-house; I do not know what watch-house it was - I asked to remain there for the night, as I did not know my way home; I sat there about half an hour - I then had the articles stated in the indictment on; the watchman thought me capable of going home; I came out and wandered about, not knowing my way - I was perfectly sober then, but was bewildered and frightened, not knowing my way; I did not ask the watchman to tell me my way, nor tell him where I lived - I live in Little Gower-place, Enston-square; I was frightened, and did not know what watch-house I was in - I wandered about for an hour, and met the prisoner Johnson about two o'clock; she put her hand on me, and asked me to treat her - I said I would provided she would see me home; I told her where I lived; I went into a public-house to treat her - she took me about for more than an hour; I said I was sure that was not the way home - she said, "Oh, Yes - I know a good shop where we can get it good;" I said, "For God's sake, see me home:" we went into a house, and had as much gin as came to 1s. 1 1/2d.; there were two or three others in the house; she said to them, "Come along," and they all partook of the gin; I drank about half a glass - we staid there about ten minutes; she came out with me: I had not been out of the house a quarter of an hour before Johnson and the male prisoner dragged me up a court; they said they were going to see me home, and fastened my scarf round me, that I should not lose it; they knocked me down, and rolled me in a gutter; the watchman found me lying there, senseless; they had struck me on the head, and tore my gown: my arm was bruised, and I was nearly stripped; I felt somebody taking my ring off; before that I said, "Where are you going to take me, for God's sake take care of me;" "Oh, you b-h, (said they) we will take care of you;" I said, "Take every thing I have, but spare my life;" my brooch was taken; I screamed Murder! in the passage, and the watchman came to me; he saw them, and took Johnson; I was quite exhausted in the struggle, and was taken to the watch-house, senseless, with struggling for my life; we had only taken three sixpenny worths of gin and water and a pint of ale; I recollect every thing that happened; I walked to the watch-house. I was stripped of my bonnet, scarf, rings, cap, comb, and all. I certainly told the Magistrate I was in liquor, and I say so now.

PATRICK MARA . I am a watchman of Hart-street, Bloomsbury. I saw the prosecutrix and two prisoners come down Hart-street together, about two o'clock in the morning; they were forcing her along, as it were against her consent - they held her arms; she stopped opposite my box; I crossed over - she was rather noisy, objecting to go with them; I thought she was intoxicated, for she was all over mud, and her clothes torn; I said if she did not go on quietly I must take her to the watch-house; Johnson said,"No, don't do that - you seem to be a married man; she has been to the watch-house, and the constable of the night has been so kind as to discharge her - we are taking her home." She had her bonnet and cap on then; they took her down Hart-street, into Castle-street ; when they had got about fifty yards both started off from her; I ran, and saw her lying down, and apparently fainting; they were running away - I followed, and caught them in Broad-street, Bloomsbury, both together; Johnson had the bonnet and comb; I brought them back to the prosecutrix, who was still fainting; the constable of the night recognized her as having been in the watch-house before, and having her ring and things on then; I considered at first that they were her friends: she had not the sense to tell me she knew nothing of them, or that she did not know her way home.

GEORGE PRATT . I am a watchman. I heard a noise in Hart-street, and found Mara talking to the prosecutrix and prisoners; he was putting her cap and bonnet straight on her head; the prisoners said they knew where she lived, and would see her home; they went on about fifty yards, and then ran from her with all speed; we ran up, and found her lying there, with her bonnet, shawl, and cap stripped off; Mara ran and overtook the prisoners - I afterwards returned to where they were stopped, and found the shawl dropped down an area, in the way they had been brought to the watch-house.

MARY DEWDNEY . This is my bonnet and shawl.

Prisoner EDMUNDS. Q. Did not you ask me the way to Euston-square? A. No. I do not remember biting the watchman's finger; I did not see Edmunds in the public-house - he laid hold of me immediately I came out - my arms have been black ever since: I did not see a creature about me but them.

PATRICK MARA re-examined. She did attempt to bite my finger.

Prisoner EDMUNDS. She tried to bite me; I let her go, and walked away; this watchman came after me. Did I not walk back with you to justify myself? A. No; I took you back: I said what a shame it was to leave her in that way; Johnson said, "D-n her, we shall leave no more trouble with her;" I said, "How came you to rob her of her bonnet and things?" she said, "D-n her bonnet - here it is, and the comb, for you;" in Plumbtree-street one of them shoved the shawl down an area; the prosecutrix was fainting, and was carried to the watch-house. I saw nobody else running away.

JOHNSON'S Defence. She came over to me in Broad-street, St. Giles', between twelve and one o'clock, quite intoxicated, and asked if I could get her anything to drink - she gave me 1s.; a watchman came over, and said,"What, mistress, have you not been home yet - you have been in the watch-house, and promised to go home;" she said she would go home when she thought proper - we went over and had some gin, which came to 1s. 1 1/2d.; she had not got the 1 1/2d. - the landlord said, "Take her out, or she is beastly drunk;" she followed me over, and asked me to get her a bed; this man was passing with an umbrella - she caught hold of his arm; two watchmen same, and said they would take her to the watch-house: at this time there were two men and two women with her; they went a little way, and then left her: we stopped, and he watchman came up; this watchman pulled her about; I said, "Don't ill-use her - let her go home; she says she lives in Tottenham-court-road:" we took her a little way- her bonnet fell off before we touched her, she was so intoxicated; this man left me; I could not get her on - she fell, being so drunk, and I left her.

EDMUNDS' Defence. I met her - the rain poured; she asked me to hold the umbrella over her, which I did; two persons were there; she said she had been robbed of two rings, and they directly ran away; she began making a noise; these watchmen came up; I was going to move her on - she bit my finger; and about twenty yards further on she tried to bite me again; I left her, but ran back for my umbrella; I came away; this young woman followed me; I stood talking to her; when the watchman came up I returned with him.

GEORGE PRATT re-examined. I did not lose sight of her till she was robbed; I saw her fall, and they both ran away; there was nobody near her but the prisoners; they were both going away together when I came up to them.

EDMUNDS - GUILTY. Aged 22.

JOHNSON - GUILTY. Aged 53.

Of stealing from the person only . - Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-13

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1361. GEORGE FORECART was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Picard , on the 21st of June , and stealing 1 shawl, value 8s. , his property.

GEORGE PICARD. I live with my son Joseph, a haberdasher, in Shoreditch - he rents the house.

JOHN ROBERTS . I live in Shoreditch, opposite Mr. Picard, and am a headborough. On the 21st of June I stood at my door, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and saw the prisoner go to Mr. Picard's window - he stopped there seven or eight minutes; he went away, and returned again in a minute; he left again in a few minutes; I crossed, looked at the window, and found it cracked in two places; he kept going to the window and returning; I saw Perry and Fryer, and pointed him out to them, as I had business to do.

DANIEL PERRY . I am a Bow-street officer. The prisoner was pointed out to me: I watched him from four o'clock till half-past nine, during which time he went up to Mr. Picard's window fourteen or fifteen times; I at last saw him go up, turn short round, take something out, and place it a few yards off, near the scraper of the next house; he then returned - I saw him take something from the window, and put it into his hat; I ran across, and took him - he immediately pulled his hat off, and threw this shawl out of it; Fryer came and took it up; I took him to the watch-house, then went to the scraper, and found a piece of glass there, which fitted one part of the window.

JOSEPH FRYER . I am an officer. I was watching the prisoner - there is a gas-lamp at the next house; I stood in a shop, and saw him go to the window several times, and press his finger, as if to force the glass in: Perry ran across; I ran out, and received the shawl from a stranger, who picked it up; I had seen him go to the scraper.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I walked down Shoreditch twice, waiting for somebody in a pawnbroker's shop; I came back, and as they were gone I ran along; this man came and took me; they went about three yards off, and picked the shawl up.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing only .

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280703-14

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1362. EDWARD JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Rutherford , and with a certain sharp instrument striking and cutting him, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable, or to do him some grievous bodily harm.

ROBERT RUTHERFORD. I live in Great Chesterfield-street, Mary-le-bone. On the 16th of June , between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the back area, and a boy threw a stick on my head out of the court; I gave him the stick back - several boys were in the court - they then threw down a saucepan handle which struck me; they kept throwing one another's hats and caps down; I got a pot of water, and threw on them; the prisoner directly said he would break all the windows in the house; a boy, named Parker, went into the bakehouse, and called the man a -; the man followed him up, and the prisoner, who was in the court, put himself in an attitude to fight the man - he made a blow at him, and the man hit him with his open hand; the prisoner kept calling him names; Miller pulled him into the shop, and let him go by my sister's persuasion; directly he got out of the shop, he took a knife out, drew it, and said he would stick the first bl-y Scotch b-g-r through the heart who touched him - I went over to his father, and as I returned, he said to me,"You - it was you who threw the water over me;" I said if

he did not go on I would make him, or I would get a constable - I held my hand up in a threatening posture; he drew his knife, and said he would stick me or any one who came near him; I laid hold of him to take the knife away, and he cut me over the thumb - it was only a slight cut; he went to stab me in the side, but the knife was broken - he kept jobbing at my side as hard as he could, but the point was broken; my thumb got cut in the scuffle between us for the knife - I did not see him when I threw the water.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-15

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1363. WILLIAM TIMSON and CATHERINE MACK were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 300 yards of calico, value 7l. the goods of William Venables and Thomas Venables , in their dwelling-house .

RICHARD NORRISH . On Sunday morning, the 8th of June, at half-past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner Mack and a man go into Mr Venables' shop; the door was a little open; I crossed Whitechapel , and watched; I saw them come out in two or three minutes, and both had some white linen on their shoulders; they went up the second yard from the house; I saw Timson go up, and take the linen from Mack, and all three ran off with it - Timson had been standing against a post, about three yards from the shop, when the other two went in; I went in, and told the shopman - they had as much linen as they could carry.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Were there not many persons passing? A. Yes; I saw them in custody on the Saturday following; I am a clerk to Mark and Co., of Mincing-lane; they were not above five minutes in my sight - I did not see Timson till they had gone into the shop.

WILLIAM VENABLES . I am a linen-draper , in partnership with my brother Thomas; we live in Whitechapel, and both occupy the house. On Sunday morning, the 8th of June, Norrish gave me information; I missed at least three hundred yards of calico, which I had seen safe the day before.

Cross-examined. Q. Cannot you say what you lost? A. Not how many pieces, as there were a great many small pieces; we guess the quantity.

WILLIAM STALL . On the 8th of June I had been to Bow-common with my father, and on returning I sat down on Venables' step to rest, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning; the two prisoners came up and told me to get up - another man was with them - I got up, and walked away; I then watched, and saw the two at the bar go into the shop; they came out in two minutes with the linen - the other man stopped outside while they went in - he went away with them; I am certain of both the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. The two who came out carried the linen away? A. Yes. I was once taken up for a row, and held to bail; I was never charged with felony.

COURT. Q. When they desired you to go away, how far did you go? A. Five or six doors off; I went and told my parents of it, and my father sent Mr. Venables a letter - nobody was with me.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you not say another boy was sitting at the door with you? A. There was another boy walking about outside, but not with me - that boy was brought before the Magistrate, and he was said to be a reputed thief; he told the Magistrate he knew the prisoners by sight - he did not say he had been taking a walk with me; they would not take his eveidence; I do not know his name - I have seen him about; I never was in his company.

JOHN VANN . I am a constable. On the 12th of June I apprehended Mack in Whitechapel; she denied the charge.

Cross-examined. Q. do you remember the last witness? A. Yes; I apprehended him, having information that he was on the spot at the time; another boy, named Hayes, was produced before the Magistrate; I have seen him and Stall together: he said Hayes and him were together at the door, and he said Johnny Hayes was outside, and had seen it as well as him.

FRANCIS KEYS . I apprehended Timson on the 12th of June; he denied having been in Whitechapel.

SAMUEL JONES . On the 8th of June I saw two men loaded with linen, and a woman walking behind; they passed my door, which is about 130 yards from Venables' - I do not know who they were.

TIMSONS' Defence. I was in bed till eight o'clock that morning, and then walked to Hackney-road.

MACK - GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

TIMSON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-16

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1364. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted for bigamy . There being no proof of the prisoner's second marriage; he was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280703-17

1365. WILLIAM STAFFORD was indicted for stealing on the 19th of June , 3 corderoy jackets, value 12s., and 2 pairs of corderoy trousers, value 8s. , the goods of James Hurren and another.

JAMES HURREN. I am a slopseller , and live in Wormwood-street ; I have a partner. On the 19th of June, about one o'clock, Selby came in and inquired if I had lost anything; I then missed these things which were tied up ready to be sent out - I had seen them safe ten minutes before, about six feet inside the shop; the prisoner was brought in with them, and said they were given to him by somebody, he was a stranger; the parcel contained three jackets and to pairs of trousers - the invoice, which had been stuck into it, was gone.

PHILIP SELBY . I am an officer. I was coming up Wormwood-street, and saw the prisoner with two more waiting about at the prosecutors' premises, and in a few minutes I saw one of the others come out of the shop with a parcel; they all three turned up a court; I went in and asked Mr. Hurren if he had lost anything. - I went out, but could not see them; I was going down Threadneedle-street in a chaise in about ten minutes and saw them all three together - the prisoner then had the parcel and when he saw me pull up the chaise, the threw it down and ran away - I jumped out and took it up; I lost sight of him for five or ten minutes, and saw him again in Bishopsgate-street; he was stopped by Thompson, who was in the chaise with me; I delivered the parcel to Mr. Hurren - I am quite certain of the prisoner.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I was in a chaise with Selby; he pointed out three persons to me; I saw the prisoner drop he parcel - Selby picked it up; I went after the prisoner

- I lost sight of him for about a minute. but am certain of him; I stopped him - he said the parcel was given to him by one of the others; I followed him into a corner of Leadenhall-market, which is no thoroughfare - the others took a different direction.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I beg to state that I have lately come from Sheffield and am a perfect stranger to the schemes and villanies of London; I met two young men, one of whom I knew at Sheffield - they took me into a house and gave me some ale; in Wormwood-street one of them came up behind and gave me the parcel to carry - when the officer came up, they told me to run away, which I did, and threw the parcel down.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-18

1366. ROBERT STANLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 2 quarters of oats, value 2l. , the goods of James Thomas , his master.

SAMUEL WILMOT . I am wharfinger to Mr. Thomas, a coal-merchant and lighterman of Queen-street, Horsleydown; the prisoner has been his carman for several years. On the 2d of July, 1827, I had an order for thirty quarters of oats, to be fetched from Thames-street, and delivered to Mr. Shefford of Camberwell; I sent the prisoner about the middle of the day with the waggon and horses to execute that order - I heard nothing more of him till ten o'clock at night, when master's son brought a message to my house; I went directly to Camberwell - I found the waggon and horses in Mr. Shefford's-yard, but the prisoner was not there; I did not see him again till the end of May, this year, when he was in custody - he never came to our premises; I found a quarter and a half of oats had been shot at Camberwell, and twenty-six quarters and a half were left in the waggon, making a deficiency of two quarters out of thirty; but instead of there being only three empty sacks I found four in the granary and three in the waggon.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was what he said before the Majistrates, taken down? A. I cannot tell - he was asked what he had to say, and said he should leave it to his solicitor.

JOHN BURGIN . I am a sworn corn-meter. On the 2d of July, 1827, I was employed to measure thirty quarters of oats, which laid in Mr. Smith's granary, Paul's-wharf, Thames-street - I do not recollect seeing the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot say whether he is the man who brought you the order? A. No; I only know the circumstance by my book.

WILLIAM CUFFLEY . I am foreman to Mr. Smith. of Anchor-wharf, Thames-street - he has a granary at Paul's-wharf. On the 2nd of July, 1827, thirty quarters of oats were delivered into Mr. Thomas's waggon, to be delivered to Mr. Shefford - here is my entry of the transaction; I have no recollection who the waggoner was.

Cross-examined. Q. By whose direction did you make this entry; A. I wrote it myself; I enter every thing that goes out; I recollect that thirty quarters of oats were delivered into the waggon - it was the only time a waggon came for any of that lot; the name was on the waggon, no doubt - I did no notice whether it was on it or not.

SAMUEL WILMOT re-examined. The waggon had Mr. Thomas' name on it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the waggon go off? A. Most assuredly, and I saw it at Camberwell; when it left our place he had twenty-five quarters of oats to deliver at another place, and then he was to call for these.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a labourer; I was in Mr. Shefford's service, as horse-keeper. I saw the prisoner drive the waggon into the yard on the 2d of July; there was another man with him - they began to unload the oats, and wanted me and the other man to help, as he was in a great hurry; we had our own work, and could not; they carried up two or three sacks; he then said he should leave the other man to finish, as he was going to join his benefit society, at the Grove House, to dine; he went away, and I never saw him again; the other man stopped in the yard some time, but did not unload, for master came and asked how much corn had been shot; the rest was not unloaded. The waggon remained there till after eleven o'clock at night, and then Wilmot fetched it home, after unloading it. I did not see the prisoner again till he was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. When did the prisoner arrive at your yard? A. About six o'clock in the evening; it was very near six; master is a stage proprietor; strangers are not allowed in our yard; the other man was not detained: the prisoner said he wanted to have his dinner, and would come again; I was absent at tea about ten minutes, and when I returned master was questioning about the corn.

COURT. Q. How many sacks go to a quarter? A. Two; there was no cart on our premises to carry the corn away.

WILLIAM SHEFFORD . I am a coachmaster. On the 2d of July the waggon came to my yard, but only twentyeight quarters of oats were in it; I did not see the prisoner - the waggon was fetched about eleven or twelve o'clock; I found two men unloading the waggon between six and seven o'clock; they were in a hurry; I found the deficiency, and would not let it be unloaded; I sent my son to Thomas, to fetch the waggon; Wilmot came - only three sacks had been shot; he measured it, and two quarters were deficient; here is the delivery ticket - I have written on it "Only twenty-eight quarters."

Cross-examined. Q. The carman gave you this note with thirty quarters written on it? A. It was given to my wife by somebody; there has been no attempt to alter the figures: I followed the waggon into the yard almost directly it came; they had shot three sacks; I found nobody in the yard but two strangers; they said they had nothing to do it with it - I did not see the prisoner.

THOMAS BREWER . I am a watchman of Horsleydown. On the 27th of May the prisoner was given into my charge by one of Mr. Thomas' clerks; he offered to give me 5s. to let him go, and within three hundred yards of the watch-house he tried to get from me, but I kept my hold; the clerk came to my assistance; he said he had done nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I hired two men at London-bridge to go with my waggon that afternoon, and gave them 3s. to do it; I saw no more of them till one of them came to me at the Grove House, and said the other man was gone

away, and there was some corn short; I found myself very much hurt, and went away.

JAMES DRY . In 1827 I belonged to a benefit club, and on the 2d of July was at the club with the prisoner, at Grove House, Camberwell; the prisoner was there at a quarter to four o'clock - he was a member; he stopped there with me till half-past nine; a short thick man in a smock-frock came running, and told him something wrong had happened about the corn - he said there was something short; I did not exactly understand it; the man ran away directly.

COURT. Q. Have you ever seen the short thick man since? A. No; I should know him among a thousand; the prisoner asked him what was the matter, and he was off directly: the prisoner ran after him, to know what was the matter, and did not come back - he stopped out on the green till I came to him, which was in four minutes; the man ran towards town; I ran after him for half a mile; he ran by the Elephant and Castle, into the Borough: the prisoner did not return to the club, nor did I; the man came about half-past seven o'clock, as near as I can guess - we paid for every thing as it was brought to us: I knew the prisoner lived at Dock head, somewhere, but did not know his master's name; I once lived with him at Russell's, in Friday-street; I never saw him after this happened; he has a wife and family - he never came to the club again, and his name was scratched out.

WILLIAM SHEFFORD re-examined. I got into my yard about five minutes after the waggon arrived; I saw there were more sacks in the granary than the corn would fill, and measured it.

WILLIAM CUFFLEY . I saw sixty sacks put into the waggon; the sacks were brought with the waggon - Paul's-wharf is not half a mile from Blackfriars-bridge.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-19

1367. JOHN CLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 turbot, value 10s. , the goods of James Horatio Fenn .

JAMES HORATIO FENN. I am a fish-salesman . On the 5th of June I lost a turbot from my place at Billingsgate ; I had put it on a flat half an hour before - I found the prisoner at Guildhall, between two and three o'clock, with it.

SAMUEL MALENOIR . I attend the market. On the 5th of June I saw the prisoner with a turbot in a basket, about ten yards from Mr. Fenn's - he frequented the market; I informed Mr. Goldham.

JOHN GOLDHAM . I attend the market. On the 5th of June, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner deliver this turbot to a basket woman, and in consequence of what Malenoir told me, I stopped him, and asked how he came by it; he said he had left it with her for a fishmonger named Marshal; I went and found Mr. Marshal; I detained him in consequence of what Marshal said; the prisoner is a jobber in the market.

CATHERINE WOOLF . I mind fish at Billingsgate for the fishmongers. The prisoner brought me this turbot, and desired me to mind it for Marshal; I should not have delivered it to anybody but Marshal or him.

DANIEL WOODHAM . On the 5th of June, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw Clay going away with a basket on his head, and a turbot in it, close to Mr. Fenn's stand; I had the care of Mr. Fenn's fish, and missed one, which was safe a minute before, on the form; I have every reason to believe the turbot found to be the same.

MR. FENN. I saw it, and know it by a particular mark on the shoulder.

Prisoner's Defence. A man put it into my basket, and gave me a 1d. to take it to the woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-20

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JULY 5.

First Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1368. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Ewen , on the 4th of June , at St. Luke, and stealing therein 1 suit of boy's clothes, value 26s.; 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 shift, value 1s., and 1 apron, value 1s. , his property.

ELIZABETH EWEN . I am the wife of William Ewen; we live in Noble-street, Goswell-street, in the parish of St. Luke's and rent the house. On the 3d of June I went to bed about ten o'clock; the house was all secure and fastened - this property all laid together, with an old gown thrown over it, in the bottom room, where we sleep. I awoke about a quarter-past seven o'clock, and missed them- the room door was open, and the street door also; I had a child ill, and had no rest for a long time, and slept very sound; my husband goes out at six o'clock in the morning, and my son after him; I did not hear them go out - I was asleep.

THOMAS HANDLEY . I am constable of St. Sepulchre's without. On the 4th of June, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went to No. 21, Peter-street, to apprehend two prisoners for another robbery; I was searching for the property in the room, and discovered this bundle of clothes - the prisoner was in the room; I asked her who rented the room; she said she did, and had done so for some time - I said, "Whose clothes are these?" she said they were her brother's, and that he was in a school; I asked what school he was in - she hesitated, and said I did not understand her - it was her brother-in-law's son; I said, "What school is he in?" she did not answer, but sat down, and began to cry; I said, "I have no doubt the things are stolen - you must go with me;" she then said, one Charley, a pot-boy, who lived in Holborn twelve months ago, left them with her the night before, and was to call for them that morning; I found the clothes belonged to St.Luke's school; her house is about a quarter of a mile from Noble-street; I went to the prosecutrix, who said she had also lost a black silk gown and apron; I went and saw Millen find the gown and apron in the same room.

Prisoner. He took a young woman named Matthews out of my room; the property was not in the room then; it was brought there between the time of his taking her and returning. I mentioned nothing about any school.

THOMAS HANDLEY . There were three persons in her room; the prisoner said she had not been in the room above ten minutes, and her gown was quite wet; I am certain she said they were her brother-in-law's, and then that Charley had left them.

RICHARD MILLEN . I was with Handley; his account is correct. The prisoner said the clothes belonged to her

brother, who was in a school, and then that they belonged to her brother-in-law's son - I am sure she is the woman who claimed them; I cannot say what occurred before I went into the room, but I told her myself that it was very curious that a pot-boy should leave the clothes - she said it was Charley, but before that I heard her say they were her brother's, and then her brother-in-law's son's.

HENRY EWENS . I live with my father and mother. - On Wednesday morning, the 4th of June, my father went out at six o'clock - I went out myself at ten minutes after six, and left my mother asleep; I shut my mother's bed-room door after me - it shuts with a latch; I heard it latch: I found the street door standing open - we always leave it open; the latch of the room door has no handle to it - it fastens inside; it cannot be opened outside without a piece of wood being put into a little hole - that lifts it up; I am certain I latched it, and tried it afterwards.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. About half-past seven o'clock in the morning I was standing at my street door; that gentleman had taken a young woman out of my room to the watch-house; a lad came up to me, who I knew as a potboy at a public-house in Holborn; he had a bundle under his arm. and said, "Will you let me leave this with you, for I am going into the City, and will return for it?" I said, "I don't know, for I am in a deal of trouble, as a young woman has been taken from my house;" he said he would come for it at half-past four o'clock, whether he came or not I do not know.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18280703-21

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1369. WILLIAM BULL and WILLIAM SMITH alias COX were indicted for that they, on the 19th of February , at Hounslow , feloniously did steal, take, and carry away, from, and out, of a certain post-office there, for the receipt and delivery of bags and mails of letters, sent and to be sent by the Post of Great Britain, 29 bags of letters .

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL, MESSRS. GURNEY, BOLLOND, and SHEPHERD conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN WATSON . I am post mistress of Southampton. On the 18th of February, I made up the bag for Hounslow; I have only entered one letter: Miss Stride sealed the bag.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you put the letter into the bag yourself? A. No; I took it in, entered it, and gave it to Miss Stride.

SOPHIA STRIDE . I assist Mrs. Watson in the Post-office business. On the night of the 18th of February, I put the letter into the bag, tied and sealed it, and delivered it to the guard; I heard of the robbery next day - the bag had"Staines and Houuslow," engraved on a brass plate on it.

JOHN HUTTON . I am clerk at the Post-office at Bristol. On the 18th of February, I tied and sealed the Hounslow bag - it laid on the board with other bags for the guard.

MARY WHITE . My father is Post-master of Reading. On the 18th of February I put the letters into the Hounslow bag, tied and sealed it, and delivered it to William Cook, who exchanges the bags.

WILLIAM COOK . On the morning of the 19th of February, I delivered the bags to the guard of the Bristol mail, at Reading, to take to Hounslow.

WILLIAM HAMMOND BAILEY . My father is Post-master of Colnbrook. On the night of the 18th of February, I made up the Hounslow bag; I tied and sealed it, and delivered it on the 19th to the guard of the Bristol mail, in the morning.

HENRY KENTFIELD . I am guard of the Exeter mail. On the morning of the 19th of February, about five o'clock, I came with the mail to Hounslow; I left the coach, and took the bags to the Post-office; I rang the bell; a person from within threw up the first floor window - I threw in the Basingstoke, Harford-bridge, and Andover bags; the window is twelve or fourteen feet from the ground; I came on towards London - I had been used to throw the bags in at the window.

WILLIAM OXLADE . I am guard of the Southampton mail. On the 19th of February I came with the mail to Hounslow, and got there about twenty minutes past five o'clock - the coach stops close to the Post-office: I found the first floor window open, and threw in the Wareham, Pool, Winslow, Ringwood, Southampton, Winchester, Alveston, Alton, Farnham, Bagshot, and Staines bags.

SAMUEL BREWER . I am guard of the Davenport mail. On the morning of the 19th. at twenty-five minutes past five o'clock, I brought up the Salisbury. Shaftesbury, Sherbon, and Yeovil bags - we change horses about twenty yards from the Post-office at Hounslow, on the same side of the way; I found the window open, and threw the bags in. As I went from the coach-office to the Post-office, I saw two men standing about twenty yards from the Post-office with a ladder - the ladder stood up against the wall of a house; I passed quite close to the men - one had a light short jacket on, and the other a long brown coat; it was a very dark morning; I did not observe their features - it was not light enough for them to see me throw the bags in.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. As it was dark I presume you guess the coat was brown? A. Exactly so - I saw one jacket was long, and the other short.

MR. GURNEY. Q. Can you form a judgment of the height of the men? A. One was about the height of Smith - the other was a tall man.

WILLIAM ORMAN . I am guard to the Bristol mail. On the 19th of February I arrived at Hounslow with the mail, at ten minutes to six o'clock, and delivered the Colnbrook, Maidenhead, Reading, Newbury, Hungerford, Marlboro', Calne, Chippenham, Bath and Bristol bags at the Post-office - I found the first floor window open, and threw them in.

GEORGE ROSS . I am guard of the Bath mail. On the 19th of February I arrived at Hounslow with the mail, at twenty minutes to six o'clock, and delivered the Melksham and Devizes bags: I threw them in at the window, which was open.

JAMES WHITE . I am guard of the Gloucester mail, which arrived at Hounslow at fifteen minutes to six o'clock, on the morning of the 19th of February. I found the first floor window open, and threw in the Henley, Nettlebed, Wallingford and Oxford bags; I then rang the bell - the servant opened the second-floor window, and threw out the Hounslow bag to me, which I brought to London.

Cross-examined by Mr. CLARKSON. Q. Was the servant dressed? A. I did not notice.

THOMAS STYLES . I am guard of the Stroud mail. On the 19th of February I arrived at Hounslow about six o'clock, and delivered the Abingdon, Farringdon, Leatherhead, Fairford, Cirencester, Stroud, Minchinhampton, Wotton-under-edge, and Chippenslade bags in at the window which was open - I did not see the servant.

SARAH BARNES . I am servant to Mrs. Butler the Post-mistress of Hounslow; I have lived with her four years. Seven mails call at Hounslow every morning in their way to town; when the first arrives the guard rings the bell; I sleep in the second-floor front room - on the first guard ringing the bell, I get out of bed and open the first floor window, and he throws the bags in; I then return to bed - this was the constant custom. On the morning of the 19th of February I remember the guard ringing: I opened the window - the bags were thrown in, and I returned to my room; as the different mails came in I heard the bags thrown in - I knew all the mails, and heard the horns; I did not go to sleep again - one guard rang the bell, and I delivered him the London bag from my bed room window: I went down to the first floor front room about two minutes after the guard rang for the London bag, and found only the Gloucester set of bags - I expected to find six sets - the rest were all gone; I went directly and told mistress; the Stroud mail came to the door directly after - I went down stairs, opened the front door, and found a ladder lying in the road, just against the pavement under the tree, about nine feet from the house; I afterwards took it into the house - it was a shut up ladder - this is it (looking at it); it laid close against the foot-path - the coaches could pass without going over it; it is high enough for a person to get in at the window with - the foot-path is raised and the ladder leaned against it; I found the Newbury bag lying on the footpath against the step of the door, and took it in.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The first mail passed about five o'clock? A. Yes, and the last nearly at six; the window was left open all that hour for the bags to be thrown in - I began to dress myself that morning immediately after the first mail arrived; I was in the room above, and heard all the bags thrown in - I heard nothing else; the ladder laid sideways, not across the road - the window has been left open for the hour all the time I have been there; I dare say that was well known to the people of Hounslow.

ANN BUTLER . I am Post-mistress of Hounslow, and receive letters both going into the country and coming to London. We throw the window open when the first mail arrives - the servant then goes up to dress; the other mails come in quick, and throw the bags in; this has been the case for twenty years. On the 19th of February the servant came and gave me information; I immediately went to the room, and found only the Gloucester set of bags - a ladder was brought in with the Newbury bag; twenty-nine bags were missing.

Q. What inmates were in your house? A. My sister, who was ill, Mrs. Letitia, and Ann Bickham, who lodged there, and two little children - every one in the house was in bed; I did not take the bags.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Nobody else lived in the house? A. No - I secured the house the night before; I bolted the front door, as I always do: nobody sleeps in the room the bags are thrown into - a person in the room above could hear them thrown in.

COURT. Q. Could anybody have got into your house except at the window? A. They could not - the bags must have been taken out at the window; I examined the house - every part was secure.

LETITIA BICKHAM . In February I lodged with my sister, at Mrs. Butler's - we occupied the first floor bed room, and the sitting room, which the bags are thrown into every morning; I was not disturbed in the morning, and saw nothing of the bags.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you slept there long? A. For ten years; I have occasionally been disturbed by the bell-ringing, and heard the bags thrown in - I heard one set thrown in that morning, but not more, for I was asleep.

ANN BICKHAM . I sleep with my sister; I heard nothing of the bags, and did not see them that morning.

SARAH BUTLER . I live in my sister's house. In February last I was confined to my bed - I saw nothing of the bags.

JOSEPH DYER . I keep the Pembroke Arms public-house, at the corner of Pembroke-square, Kensington. In February last Bull rented of me a four-stall stable, a coach-house, a loft and dwelling-room adjoining - they are all at the back of my house, in my yard; I have frequently seen Smith on Bull's premises - I have seen them in the yard together both before and after the 19th of February; I have seen them together almost daily for two or three months; Bull took the premises for the purpose of taking in horses to bait, and to let horses and gigs - Smith did live at Kensington, about three quarters of a mile from me.

Q. What is the mode of entering the loft? A. There is one way from the inside of the stable, and another from the outside, through a door, by means of a ladder; when I let Bull the premises I left him a ladder, expressly for the purpose of getting up to the loft - the ladder produced is the same; but when I let it to him it was one straight piece with thirteen steps: it is now cut in the middle, and folds too, with hinges - the steps were wider than they are now: I recollect seeing it on the 11th of February, but not after - I missed it on Sunday morning, the 16th of March; when I wanted it to get on the roof of my bowling-green shed, as some lead had been stolen.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did Bull live at these stables? A. He did - I cannot say whether he was there on the 19th of February; I had not seen the ladder after the 11th of February, but had every reason to suppose it was there - I did not want it till the 16th of March; Bull continued to live with me till then, and after - he took the premises in November; the yard is not open to the public - I gave him the keys of the gates; he kept them open in the day time; he appeared to live very regular, but never had any horses or chaises to let; when or how the ladder went I cannot say.

MR. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Q. You used the ladder on the 11th of February, and did not want it again till the 16th of March? A. No; I placed it in Bull's coach-

house on the 11th of February, just by the side of the loft - I know it to be the same by one step, which I broke by letting a piece of timber fall on it, and by this nail in it - this step was always cracked; the steps projected about three quarters of an inch beyond the frame-work originally, but they have been cut to make them level with the frame, for the ladder to shut closer - it would not have closed if they had not been cut; Bull and I occupied all the premises - my back door opens into the yard; he had a horse and a chaise cart there, and sometimes two chaise carts, but he let none out - he had a green body to his cart, with a patent axle; he has bought horses and sold them.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Your ladder had wider steps than the one produced? A. It had originally - one was broken on the projecting part of the frame, but the greater part of it remains; my customers generally went through the yard to the green.

COURT. Q. Was Bull generally at home at night? A. I cannot say - I never saw him with any bags, nor any about; I have no reason to believe he was absent about the time of the robbery.

ROBERT AUSTIN . I am ostler at Dyer's. I swear that this is master's ladder - it was there a week or two after Christmas, when I went there; the second step at the bottom has been broken - the steps were about two inches wider than they are now; I used the ladder on the 11th of February to assist master to throw snow off my master's building - I did not miss it before the 16th of March, when the lead was stolen; it was not wanted till then.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were there binges on the ladder when you knew it? A. No - I know nothing about its being altered; I only saw it when I wanted to use it.

JOHN SELLS . I am a carpenter. I ordered one of my men to make Dyer a ladder, with thirteen or fourteen steps - that man has left me about three years; I do not know where he is; the ladder was made just as this is - I cannot swear to it, it has been so cut about since.

JOHN BROWN . I am coachman of the Davenport mail. On the 19th of February, about six o'clock in the morning, when I changed horses at Hounslow, I observed two men standing opposite the mail, on the side of the road near the Post-office; I perceived a ladder against the wall close to the men; one man was taller than the other; and one, who wore a light jacket, was about the size of Smith.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was it dark or light? A. Dark - the ladder was standing up, and about the length it is now it is closed: the man might be taller or shorter, and thinner than Smith; but he was as near his size as possible - I am sure he had a light jacket on.

JOSEPH ROACH . On the morning of the 19th of February I recollect seeing a cart nearly opposite the Post-office, at Hounslow, on the opposite side of the way - it was a low market-cart, and two men were in it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you sure there were not three or four men in it? A. I cannot say - I only saw two; I had seen it on the Monday morning, about two hundred yards from the Post-office- it was a very dark morning.

CHARLES TUCKER . I am driver of a music van. On the 19th of February, early in the morning, I was on the road to Inglefield-green and stopped with my van at the Coach and Horses public-house, a very short way from Hounslow - it was a very dark morning; I went into the tap-room, and as I went in two men passed me; and when I got in, there was another man finishing a glass of gin; as I went I said "Good morning gentlemen, it is a very sharp morning;" one of them said it was very sharp - one of them had a light coat on, and the other, who finished the gin, had a jacket; it seemed to be a light jacket - there was a light in the tap-room; I had to move aside to let the men pass me to come out - the man finished his gin and went out; he seemed about the size of Smith - I cannot swear he is the man; before I went into the tap-room I drew up alongside a cart which stood close against the door; it was a light chaise cart, with pannels - there were no other persons coming out of the tap-room; it opens immediately into the road - I saw a ladder in the cart - about two rails hung over the tail of the cart; it was this end of the ladder, because I could see some iron work about it - I stopped in the taproom for ten or twenty minutes; I heard it drive off - after the man went out of the tap-room, I proceeded on, and when I got to Hounslow, I saw a cart opposite some trees, about the middle of the town; I cannot positively swear it was the same cart, but it looked very much like it - there was a horse in it: I saw two men standing about, but nobody in it, and did not observe the ladder then; I did not take particular notice, but passed on.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What time were you at the public-house? A. About five o'clock - I went through Smallberry-green turnpike that morning; and that cart must have gone through the same turnpike and must have known the number - I do not swear to Smith.

Q. Were you asked before the Magistrate to point out the persons you saw at the public-house, to the best of your judgment? A. Yes, and I pointed to the officer, and to an old thin man, who was taller than either of the prisoners.

THOMAS CURTIS . I am ostler of the Coach and Horses. On the 19th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, I recollect a cart coming with three men; they had some hay and water, and some gin; they left the cart two or three yards from the door for a few minutes; it was a kind of light market-cart, with a stoutish horse - the tail of the cart was let about half-way down, and something hung half out of it; I cannot say what it was, for it was covered over - I think it was covered with a mat - it lodged just inside the tail-board; the men staid in the house a few minutes, had four glasses of gin, and went on with the cart towards Hounslow; it came from towards town: after giving their horse some hay I went and hung the three keys of our stable in the passage; the three men were with me, and saw me hang them up; there was a light three or four yards from where the keys hung - the passage leads from the tap-room; I missed those three keys eight or ten minutes after they were gone - they went through that passage to come in and go out: a man came with a music-van shortly before they left. (Looking at a key produced by Ruthven) this looks very much like one of the keys;

many keys are alike; I missed the keys about three minutes after the van went. I have seen a cart this morning - I cannot swear whether it is the one the men came with - it resembles it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you hear of this robbery? A. Yes, that morning; two or three days after that two men were apprehended, and one was taken to Brentford, in custody; Bull came to our house, and demanded a horse and gig which were left there; I did not know him before.

Q. Did you think he was one of the men who had been there on the 19th? A. I thought nothing about it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When did you see Smith? A. I saw him at Bow-street; I never pretended to say he was one of the men; if this is our key it has been altered; there is a good deal cut out of the middle; another key was produced at the office, which I said was a little like one of ours - I have three fellow servants, who use the keys as well as me. I said what I saw in the cart was covered up, and looked like a coffin - I saw no part of it project over the tail; it was not my business to notice it: I did not say only three men were at the house that morning; I said the music van came just as they were going away.

COURT. Q. Two men were taken to prison? A. That was a few days after - they were taken on suspicion of robbing a waggon; their cart stopped at our house - Bull came and claimed it; I had no reason to believe he was the man who had been before.

JURY. Q. When they went out, did one go out first or two? A. One went out with me, and two were left in the tap-room.

THOMAS WOODWARD . My father keeps the Coach and Horses. On the 19th of February, in the morning, three of the stable keys were missing - the one produced is one of them; the interior of the wards have since been filed out - it is turned into a skeleton-key, but I know it by a mark on the face of the bit. I have locked up the stable twice a week for the last two years, and my attention has been called to this key - I am certain of it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What enables you to speak to it? A. That grove and the faulty part on the face of the bit; I told the Magistrate I also knew it by the brazing - I believe, after I gave my evidence, Mr. Harmer said that was common to all keys; I then mentioned the grove and other parts; the ostlers lock up the stables, but if they forget it I do it; the other two ostlers are not here; I do not know whether they have been asked about the keys.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. You locked the stable about twice a week? A. Yes; I have known the key about two years.

DANIEL HINGE . I am a blacksmith. I have a lock here whick I took off Woodward's stable door; this key fits the opening of the lock; the wards of the key have been taken out.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. If the wards were there, you cannot say whether it would open it? A. Yes; I am certain of it; it is a very particular lock - there is no collar ward to it - I call it an uncommon key.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate they might get a key at any stall in London to undo this lock? A. Not that lock; they asked the value of the key - I said they might get one at any stall for 1s.; a common key reduced to this shape would certainly open it; the key-hole is worn - most likely this is not the key which was first made for the lock, but it has been made as a make-shift. I never heard of a reward in this case.

JURY. Q. Do not you call all keys that are not straight,"fancy bits?" A. Yes - whether this has been one or not I do not know: this has no doubt been "burred" to fit the lock.

GEORGE THOMAS JOSEPH RUTHVEN . I am an officer. I searched Smith's lodging in Burford-mews, Edgware-road, and found this key, among several others, in this box, on his drawers in the sitting-room; he claimed the lodging as his. On the 14th of May, Mrs. Butler and Barnes delivered me this ladder at the Post-office at Hounslow.

WILLIAM BATTLE . I keep the turnpike-gate at Smallberry-green, which is a little on this side of Hounslow. - On the 19th of February, about five o'clock in the morning, I remember a cart passing through, towards Hounslow; I saw two men in it; it was a dark morning; there appeared something in the cart - I could not observe what; I did not particularly look at the back of the cart - there was something in it about the size of the cart: it appeared to be loaded as other carts are; I did not notice the tail-board- about six o'clock the same morning a cart returned, trotting very fast, with two men in it - they called the proper number; they drove very fast, which made me notice them; it was a dark coloured horse, and a dark cart; my lamp was nearly out - it appeared to be a light cart, for draft.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You change your number at twelve o'clock at night? A. Yes; every cart that goes through knows the number, and they often tell others the number.

ANN COLLINS . I know the prisoner Bull and his wife. About the middle of February I went to his premises at the Pembroke Arms - I went in, and saw Smith there, with Bull - I saw a ladder standing at the loft door: I saw Bull standing by the side of the ladder, with a fork, which he took out of the stable; he was holding it up close to the side of the ladder, to measure it, to cut it, to put it into the cart; I went down out of the loft - Smith was then standing at the side of the cart, with the same fork; I saw him hold the fork along the side of the cart; when he saw me he put it down, and asked what I wanted - I said I was come to see if they could pay the money for the use of a horse and cart which they had of Thompson; they had taken it away when Thompson was in trouble; I saw Bull put the fork to the side of the cart - it was a green cart; Smith said he could not do anything then, I must come again in a fortnight; I went up stairs, and staid all day with Mrs. Bull; when Bull came up he told me Smith could do nothing yet, he was short of money, but in the course of a week or fortnight, or it might be a month, he could, for he had a job in hand: I asked what - he said it was a job at the Post-office at Hounslow, and it was a "put up job" Smith was not present; I understood by that that they were going to rob the Post-office. He said they had a job in hand - Bulls' wife was present; I was not very intimate with Bull; I did not know him till Thompson was taken: I did not hear of the Post-office robbery till I mentioned that they talked of doing it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you married? A. I am - I have been married ever since 1812; I have no husband now: I do not know whether he is dead; I have not seen him for about four years; I do not always go by the name of Collins - I never lived but with one man; I went by the name of Wright - I go by that name now.

Q. Have you gone by any other name since you have married Collins? A. I do not think that question has anything to do with this; I never went by the name of Thompson - he was taken up for robbing the Tally Ho, Birmingham coach, and Smith was one of the party. -Wright's name was Wright Waller - that is not two names - it is one person and one name. I have not been living with a parcel of different men; I went by the name of Wright Waller; I know Kinsby - I never lived with him as his wife, or kept woman - I defy you or any one to say so- I have a room in his house, and pay for it, Waller was transported last January Session - I was never taken up for felony.

Q. In January, 1826, were you committed by Mr. Hardwick, to the custody of Norris, on a charge of felony? A. I never was taken up for thieving - I have been in Clerkenwell prison, but not for thieving; I do not know who took me there; I was not there a month, nor half a month - it was about some wine which was brought into a house when I was in bed and asleep.

Q. The prisoners put down the fork that you might not see what they were at? A. They did not mind me.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you say a word before the Magistrate about Smith measuring the cart with the fork? A. I said he was there, as I do now, and that he held it by the side of the cart; I mentioned it before I heard the key mentioned - I cannot say at which examination I mentioned it; I never heard of any reward - I never saw the placard.

Q. You swear you never heard of the reward? A. I do not know about swearing that; I was asked at the office by Mr. Harmer if I wanted the 100l. - I had not heard of it before; I never could find Smith afterwards - I went to Bull's after him, to ask for the clothes they took out of my box; I saw Mrs. Bull - she said if I would come down she would see and get me some things - I did not go for money.

JOHN KNIGHT . I keep the Green Man public-house, at Chelsea. I have known Bull for twelve or fourteen years; I saw him drive up to the Swan public-house, at Fulham, with a horse and green chaise, or chaise-cart; he said to me,"This is the little drag to carry the mail (or Post-office) bags."

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When was this? A. At four o'clock one afternoon, about the end of February or beginning of March, he said that and went off - there were about a dozen people there; I know the mail business is done in light carts - it would suit that business, and that is what I understood by it.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am a fishmonger, and live in Newland-terrace, Kensington. About the 3d of March I bought a cart of Smith at the Pembroke Arms - Bull was present; I was fetched by a farrier to look at it - Smith said he had it to sell for a person who had a bill to meet, and he must sell it; I bought it for 6l. - there was no name or number on it; I sold it on that day fortnight to Mr. Benham, and it was claimed: I went to Smith - he was out, but called on me next morning, and said he understood there was something unpleasant about the cart; I said it had been owned - it was not stolen, but I understood taken away for bire; he returned me the 6l. and said it would be a very hard case for him, for he had paid the 6l. to the person, and very likely he should get none of it back; I saw the same cart at Bow-street.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was anybody present besides the prisoners? A. Yes - two others; I bought an old horse-cloth of one of them.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I was at Coventgarden watch-house with the prisoner Smith all night, and in the morning he breakfasted in the parlour; after breakfast we were going down below to the lock-up place, he said to Mrs. Bartlett, who was there, "I will thank you for another cup of tea before I go down" - she said he could not have it; he saw the watch-house door open, gave her a push, and ran out - I ran after him, and he was taken in King-street.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I overtook and secured Smith at the corner of Bedford-street.

ROBERT DUKE . I apprehended Bull on Saturday, the 17th of May, at the Pembroke Arms - I had taken Smith the day before; when I went to Bull's I heard him scolding a child - I went to the foot of the stairs, and said, "Bull, I want you;" he said, "I know what you want very well, it is of no use to come here to ask me any questions, for I won't know anything about it" - he came down and said, "I know what you have done. you have pulled Bill Cox for the Hounslow business;" I then took him, and in the course of conversation I asked how he came to know of Smith being taken - he said he heard of it in the Edgeware-road two or three hours before.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you examined at the office? A. Yes - I did not mention this conversation - I only answered what questions were asked me; I was only called to identify a key.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable of Hammersmith. On the morning of this robbery I was in the Hounslow-road looking for some persons, and about a quarter to nine o'clock I saw Smith and two other young fellows come along with an iron-grey horse and cart, and turn towards Fulham; I heard of the robbery that morning at the turnpike.

BULL'S Defence. The horse that we had at Hounslow was a broken-winded one - I had bought her for 5l.; it was there about the 28th of February - I went to claim it; a person named Evans had asked if I had a low-priced horse - he took it away without paying; I heard it was at Hounslow, and went for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-22

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1370. WILLIAM THORNE was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Chalkley , on the 8th of April , and stealing 8 lbs. of veal, value 13s. , his property.

FRANCIS CHALKLEY. I am a butcher , and live in Whitecross-street - my slaughter-house joins my dwelling-house, and communicates with it by a covered pas

sage. On Saturday night, about eleven o'clock, I saw a hind quarter of veal hung in the slaughter-house; which was not sufficiently fastened - the hinges were off one door; it used to be fastened with two hooks, but was only fastened with one; I went there next morning, and the veal was gone - I sent for Harris, the officer, who shewed me some mutton fat, which we put over the veal to prevent its turning; I went to the prisoner's house with Harris - he was in bed; I saw part of a loin of veal on the table - he said it did not belong to me, that he had bought it elsewhere; either he or the officer brought the other part of the veal from the closet - the prisoner then said he hoped I would forgive him, and consider his family; I afterwards wished to forgive him, as his wife was heavy in the family-way - he said he had done it from want, and his wife expected to be confined every hour; the officer said he must not give up a prisoner like him - I knew the veal by the colour, it was much whiter than common; he lives about forty yards from me.

JAMES FULLERD . I am shop-boy to Mr. Chalkley. I was in the slaughter-house when the veal was hung up - I fastened the door with one hook instead of two; the hinges were off - a person could pull the door open; I heard a noise next morning about two o'clock, and heard the bar fall which I put across the door, which had the book in it - it opens into a court: I went into the slaughter-house, but did not miss the veal then - I fastened the house up, and master in the morning missed the veal; there is a way from the shop to the slaughter-house without going through the court.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a constable. On Sunday morning, about a month ago, I went to Mr. Chalkley's - I saw some bits of fat on the ground, and traced them about thirty yards along to where the prisoner lived, and in the passage some more pieces of fat lay; the gate opens into the court he lives in; I knocked at the door - the prisoner asked who was there; I said it was an officer - he immediately got up and opened the door; it was about ten o'clock in the morning - I found in the cupboard part of a loin of veal, with a piece of a breast of mutton; he said he had bought the mutton of Chalkley, and the veal at another place - I put it on the table, and called Chalkley in; I went towards another cupboard - the prisoner hallooed out that it was there; he brought it out, begged Chalkley to forgive him, and hung round his shoulder - I said I could not let him go, but if the Magistrate chose I did not care.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Of stealing only .

Strongly Recommended to Mercy, - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-23

First London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1371. FREDERICK CARMAN and JOSEPH CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of James Kilgour , from his person .

JAMES KILGOUR. I live at Aberdeen and am a merchant . On the 9th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Sweeting's-alley, Cornhill , and stood looking at some caricatures in a shop window; I felt my coat pocket pulled - I turned round and saw Carman making off as fast as he could; I followed and secured him a few steps off; when I took hold of him I heard some person say "You have got hold of the wrong person;" but I could not see who said so - the person did not come up to me; I let him go and turned round thinking to lay hold of some other person, but almost immediately another person called out that I was perfectly right in taking Carman, and I secured him again - I saw my handkerchief in the officer's hands in about a minute; he had then secured Clark who I had not noticed before - I had just come off' Change.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many people were about the shop? A. Probably eight or ten - Clark was close to the shop door when I saw him in custody.

CHARLES CLITHEROW . I am an officer and was in Sweeting's-alley. I met the two prisoners in company in Cornhill; I suspected them and fell back into a hatter's shop in Sweeting's-alley to watch them - Clark was on the right-hand side when he first went into the crowd at the shop; there might be a dozen persons at the window - Carman was on the left hand; I saw him try the prosecutor's left pocket - he found nothing there: I saw them speaking together; Clark then placed himself on Mr. Kilgour's left hand and Carman on the right - I saw Carman's hand in Mr. Kilgour's right-hand pocket- Clark held his coat out to conceal Carman's hand; a gentleman passed at the time and I did not see the handkerchief taken out, but I saw it drop, and saw Carman run away: I instantly followed and took him - I was only about a yard and a half from him; I brought him back and found Clark in custody of another officer, who I had not seen before - I am perfectly certain of both their persons; the handkerchief was in the hands of another officer - when I took Carman he said he had done nothing; I told him I had watched him and seen his hand in the pocket - we searched, but found nothing on him; Clark said he was of good parents and begged hard to be allowed to go to his friends, and we should be satisfied he was innocent - they were strangers to me before.

Cross-examined. Q. He meant you should be satisfied of his respectability? A. He said his father would give him a good character - I did not see the handkerchief picked up.

GEORGE MORGAN . I am a constable of Broad-street. I was in Sweeting's-alley about half-past three o'clock and saw the prisoner in company together, in the crowd by the caricature shop for a little while; they then went away together - I noticed their persons, and am sure of them; I saw them again a few minutes before four o'clock, in the same place - they turned round, saw me and went away again together; I followed them as far as the Mansion-house - they went up the Poultry; I saw them again about twenty minutes to five, at the same shop window - I did not notice Mr. Kilgour; Clark stood on the left of Carman - I saw the handkerchief in Clark's hand; he put his hand towards his pocket - I laid hold of him and it dropped; Carman was close to him - they were joined together; I caught hold of Clark- Mr. Kilgour turned round immediately and caught hold of him also; I said "Catch the other one" - Carman was then running; I did not see him taken - Mr. Kilgour described the mark on his handkerchief before he saw it; Carman was taken directly, and both conveyed to the Mansion-house.

Cross-examined. Q. When you saw the handkerchief in Clark's hand, they were standing close together? A. Yes; Carman had not then run away - it was Clark who dropped the handkerchief; Carman did not run till I told Mr. Kilgour to catch him: Clark had dropped the handkerchief before that - Mr. Kilgour put his hand on Clark's shoulder; I said "Catch the other" - he turned round and caught Carman; he did not take Clark - he only put his hand upon his shoulder.(Property produced and sworn to.)

CARMAN - GUILTY . Aged 13.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280703-24

1372. THOMAS JONES alias NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 3 wooden drawers, value 5s. , the goods of William Palmer .

WILLIAM PALMER. I am a paper-hanging manufacturer , and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 16th of June I was at a house in Prince's-street, Bank , which is in my care, and was under repair; I saw the prisoner go out of the door with a parcel - I looked out and saw Forrester holding him; he brought him into the house, and three drawers were found in his apron - they belonged to a desk on my first floor; he had no business in the house.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner go into the house, and watched him out; I stopped him with these drawers in his apron - I found a woman's cloak on him, but no money.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up accidentally on one side of the door - I am afficted with apoplexy, and hope you will be merciful.

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280703-25

1373. ANN PARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , 144 brass claw feet, value 30s.; 144 brass handles, value 30s.; 72 escutcheons, value 30s., and 43 nail brushes, value 5ls. , the goods of John Barber and another; and ELIZABETH MOON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN BARBER. I am a dressing-case maker , and live in Cateaton-street - I have two partners. The prisoner Parry's brother-in-law was my apprentice; she used to come backward and forward for work which he did at home - we never delivered any of these articles to her; we have missed an immense quantity of goods from our back warehouse. On the 31st of May I went with Martin and Forster to Moon's house, in Creed-lane, and found a small quantity of brass claw feet and escutcheons - part of them were in a little box; Moon was at home, and acknowledged that she had bought a great quantity of such things of Parry, who was shewn to her, and that she had given her 5d. a pound for the escutcheons and feet; they were all quite new, and cost me after the rate of 30s. a pound.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Which of the articles will you venture to swear to? A. I do not swear to any of them, but they are part of what Parry acknowledged to have taken - I have been told Moon said she was married, but I never saw her husband; Parry's brother never worked on brass - I have missed 50 lbs. weight of goods; I was missing things every day - nobody could buy them as old brass; they were not exposed for sale at her house - they are quite new and are made at Birmingham.

HENRY FORSTER . I am a marshalman. On the 31st of May I apprehended Parry, at Mr. Barber's, and took her to Moon's house; the name of John Moon is over the door, but I found no man there - Parry wished to say something to me; I told her to be cautious what she said, as I must state it here; she said all the property she had taken she had sold to Mrs. Moon, in Creed-lane - I met Martin on the road, and desired him to take her into Moon's house; I went in afterwards - Parry saw the things found there, and said, in Moon's presence, that she had sold them to her; Moon said she gave her, I think, 6d. a lb. for them - Parry said she had got 5 1/2d. a lb. for them; I found three claws and an escutcheon in a small box in the parlour; also three small locks and keys - Martin found more property.

Cross-examined. Q. The things found, I suppose, are worth 2d.? A. I am not a judge; Moon said she had asked Parry how she came by them, and she said her father or brother gave them to her - not that they had made them, nor that she had placed them in her window for sale - she said she had taken them to Petticoat-lane for sale.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a City patrol. I went with Foster and Parry to Moon's house - I found Moon in the parlour, which appeared to be used as a shop; I asked Moon if she knew Parry - she said she did, and that a few days before she had bought about thirteen brushes of her for 18d., and had sold them in Petticoat-lane to people who came by in the street; I asked if she had bought anything else of her - she said Yes, some old brass at different times, about 2 lbs., for which she gave her 13d. or 14d. in all; not being aware that the prosecutors had lost brass, I said I was not looking for brass, but brushes - Mr. Barber and Forster came in at that moment, and said he had lost a great deal of brass furniture; we asked if she had any of it left - she went to the trunk and pulled out three or four of the brass things; I pulled out some - she said that was all she had left; she was questioned and said she had dealt with Parry for about three months - that she asked her where she got the things, and she said they were her father's or brother's, and said Parry had stated that what she gave 1 1/2d. for, her brother could get 2 1/2d. for, over the water; Parry said in her hearing that she had sold her a vast number of things at different times - none of the brass was exposed to view; I never saw her husband - her daughter was in the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Parry deny receiving 13d. or 14d. for them? A. Parry always said she did not give more than 5d. or 5 1/2d. a pound; she did not deny telling her she had them from her brother: Moon said she was no judge of the articles, and bought them by weight; nobody could buy them as old brass.

JURY. Q. Did any business appear to be carried on there? A. She deals in old clothes, rags, and phials.

COURT. Q. Does this brass appear new or old? A. Quite new; she had but one room.

JOHN BARBER , JUN. I am in partnership with my father. We have lost a quantity of property, and Parry

confessed to taking it; these articles cost 30s. or 33s. a pound.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you in a large way of business? A. Yes. Parry's brother covered boxes with leather; he did not work on brass: we missed most of the property the beginning of April - her brother seldom came except on Saturday, to receive his money; Parry said she had been in the habit of taking articles of this description, and others which we lost, at various times, for the last nine months; she had been told if she confessed who she sold them to she would be dealt mercifully with - my father told her so, but she had before that said she had been in the habit of selling them; she had been brought back by the officer with some of our brushes, and I believe she told who she sold the property to, before my father promised to be lenient.

MR. BARBER. I looked at her, and said, "Have you been robbing me in this way?" A. She said, "If you will be merciful I will tell you all;" I said I would recommend her as well as I could - when the things were produced at Moon's she said she had sold them to her; I said nothing to induce Moon to make a statement.

Cross-examined. Q. Why did you not tell us this before? A. It did not strike you to ask me, or I should have stated it; I intended to recommend her strongly to mercy, but I could not let her go - she told me she had taken some things before; I said I would be lenient, and she acknowledged taking several things, but not that she had sold them to Moon.

MOON's Defence. I asked if they were her own - she said Yes, and that her father sent her with them.

PARRY - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Three Months .

MOON - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-26

Second Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1374. JOHN CASEY , TIMOTHY COCHRANE , JAMES BARRY , CORNELIUS BARRY , JAMES SHEA , JEREMIAH MURRAY , JAMES HAYES , DENNIS BURKE , and TIMOTHY CONNOR , were indicted for the wilful murder of John Eales, alias Long John .

HENRY RUCKLEY . I am groom to Mr. Elmore, of Duke-street, Manchester-square. On the 29th of June I was sent to Mr. Reed's, a farmer, near Harrow ; I was there about half-past ten o'clock at night, and heard a great riot - I heard the voices of several persons abusing each other: I ran to the spot, and in the way met several persons coming back; it was very dark - when I got to the spot the first thing I saw was the prisoner Casey striking Long John, with a black-thorn stick, across the shoulder; the stick was rather thicker than my thumb - the blow knocked him down on the ground; Casey instantly fell on his knees on him, and beat him about the head very much, with the stick; the blood poured out of Long John's forehead very much - he gave him about three blows on the head when he was down - he tried very hard to get up, but it was of no use, he could not: I went and pulled Casey off him - Long John then got up, and was pulling his clothes off to fight Casey; he said if assistance was given him to get his clothes off he would fight him: they had a round or two, and then the others came up.

Q. Was the fight fair? A. No - Casey struck with a stick, and John had nothing but his fist; I cried out that it was not fair, and then all these others came up - they fought for an hour or better before the others came up.

Q. What, before the others came up? A. They were so long between the rounds; the stick continued in Casey's hands all the time, but after about three blows were struck on John's head with the stick, it was lost; he cut him very much about the forehead with the stick, and after that the fight was fair: after fighting about an hour the others came up, and Long John was struck by Casey across the loins, with a hay-fork, which the others had brought up; one for him, and the others for themselves; some brought hayforks, and some sticks; they came from Mr. Reed's barn, which is about two hundred yards off; Long John was standing on his legs when Casey struck him across the loins with the fork; the blow knocked him down, and he never moved hand or foot after that blow.

Q. At that time none of the others had done anything? A. No; I did not see whether one of them gave him the fork, or whether he took it himself; we were all obliged to run away then, for they all ran after us with their forks - Casey followed with the rest: Long John remained on the ground: I, and a person who was with me, ran into my mother's house - we returned to the spot in about twenty minutes, and found only the body there; Bell and a woman stood looking at it; Long John was not quite dead - he drew his last breath after we got there, as we were carrying him to a house; he did not speak, but appeared to be alive: the blood was running down his nose; he made a noise with his nose; we found some forks about, which we have brought here. The prisoners were all hay-makers at Mr. Reed's. I took the body to the Green Man public-house, which is about ten yards from where it began - he was dead then.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. It was very dark? A. Yes, but I could distinctly see every thing that was done; I could see it was a black-thorn stick: I believe they had been fighting before I came up; the deceased was a stranger to me - I took no part in the fight; I had an elm walking-stick in my hand - my feet were blistered, as I had been driving a cart, which I am not used to - I could scarcely walk on my toes.

Q. Did you strike Casey? A. They ran at us, and as I ran I struck him on the knuckles - that was all; I did not see Casey knocked down by any one; the witnesses Nix and Arnold were knocked down while Casey and John were fighting: Barry and Hayes knocked them down- when I assisted to pull Casey off I put my stick back,

and struck him on the knuckles as I ran away, to prevent the fork from coming into me; none of us fought with them; they could get the pitch-forks from the barn in two minutes; before we could turn round they were on us again.

RICHARD ARNOLD . I am a labourer, and work for Mr. Reed. I was at the back door of the Green Man on the night in question; Long John went out at the back door: his woman was with him - a number of Irishmen came out after him; one of them spoke to him out at the door - they seemed quarrelling, but what it was about, or what he said, I cannot say; Casey lifted up his fist, and knocked Long John down, without saying any more - Long John then called out for help, to get the man off; I went to him, and saw these men beating him when he was down, and I assisted him: Casey was beating him - I cannot speak to the others; he laid on the ground - Casey and some others were beating him; I was in the scuffle about ten minutes, and then had a fork run into my cheek and under my chin - I was then struck down with a blow on my head, from a fork, and was senseless.

Q. How many persons were there? A. I cannot say - they were all fighting one among another, but after that I saw nothing more; Long John and the rest of the Englishmen were fighting with the Irishmen, for their lives - this happened near the trees, about twenty yards from the house.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You work at Reed's? A. Yes - another Mr. Reed is the prisoners' employer. When the row began there was not above five men, but more came afterwards; Casey spoke to the deceased before he struck him; whether it was in anger or not I cannot say - I cannot swear that anybody but Casey struck him - he was a tall strong man; we fought for our lives, and struggled to get away as well as we could.

ELIZABETH REEVES . I am a hay-maker, and lived with Long John for eight years. I was in the tap-room of the Green Man with him - the prisoners were up in the clubroom; they did not seem to be in liquor - he was sober; he went out about half-past ten o'clock, for a certain purpose - I went after him, and just as I got to the door I saw Casey knock him down; I heard no words between them- I got up to go out as soon as he got up, and when I got to the door I saw Casey knock him down; he got up, and immediately struck Casey again - four men then came out to assist Casey; he assisted himself as well as he could, and when they got a little distance they all came up with forks.

Q. Was there nobody to assist John? A. Only the two who got hurt; all the rest ran away; Casey's wife and Muiray were two of the four, and one is not taken; they would not let him get up any more.

Q. A witness has said they fought for an hour before the forks came? A. No - there was a great skirmish, but not for so long as that; I was close to them - they tried to beat John, but as he was very strong they could not, till they got the forks; these men then fell on him. knocked him down, with the forks, and beat him as long as they could; Casey and his wife then got on him, and stamped on him; he lived for half an hour after that; Casey and the other two men struck him with forks - the fork struck him in the eye - I saw the whole of it; there was no fighting for an hour, nor any stopping between the bouts - Casey went away for half an hour, returned with a scythe and fork, and said to me, "Is he dead?" I said he was dead, but he was not - Casey said, "If he is not dead, I am come to kill him with a scythe and fork;" nobody but me was there then - he made towards the body, but a man came from the other side of the hedge to assist me, and so he went away without touching the body.

Q. How long might it last altogether? A. I suppose an hour, the skirmish with the fork and all; before he was dead.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. You have cohabited with the deceased eight years? A. Yes - there were four of us in the public-house; we had two pots of beer - we were there about an hour and a half: I did not say at the office that I had been there five hours; the deceased was quite sober - two others shared the beer with us; there was no quarrelling in the house: the prisoners were not in the tap-roop; I went out directly after John, to get him to go home; he knocked Casey down after Casey had knocked him down - there were five of them down; the deceased was very violent on this occasion - his right name was John Eales; we had been down there about three weeks - we went to hay-making; I saw John Nix strike a man with a stick, but I kept by my own man; the witnesses helped John all they could, when they tried to get him down.

Q. There was a general row and scuffle, after the quarrel between the deceased and Casey? A. Yes - there were four on our side, and, I suppose, fourteen on the other - some others were on the other side of the hedge, but not with us; I do not exactly know how many there were on our side.

MR. BARRY to RICHARD ARNOLD. Q. You saw Casey strike the deceased near the public-house? A. Yes, and he got on him as soon as he was down; Rackley was not there till I was beat out of my senses - I did not see him: I was wounded in the chin in less than ten minutes.

JAMES BELL . I am carter to Mr. Gray. I was not at this fight, but got up just after, and was taking the deceased off the ground, when Casey came up, and asked who I was; he said he would kill me - I said, "I hope not John;" he said, "Who are you?" he came and looked at me, and said, "You are Gray's carter - is the man dead? if he is not I will kill him quite;" this was about eleven o'clock - I gave him good words, and he went away; I went with him a little way.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you alone? A. No; the woman was with me; I had seen no part of the transaction.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Was he dead when Casey said he would kill him? A. Not quite; Casey spoke in a violent manner.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS . I was in the Green Man publichouse about twenty minutes or half-past ten o'clock; I saw the deceased and Arnold go out of the house - they went across to where there were some lrishmen and women, who appeared to be quarrelling; there seemed an uproar - I could not hear what passed - I said there was a fight, and ran over - the deceased was then stripped, and fighting with Casey, with his fist; just as I got up they were both down; the men there got them up again, and almost immediately they were down again - they were still

fighting with their fists; they continued to fight fair for five or ten minutes, but when some more Irishmen came running up the road, and threw stones over the hedge, where I and several young men were standing - I said it was time to run away; I ran to the house, and asked the landlord to let me in.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. You heard an uproar before you saw them fighting? A. Yes; the deceased was stripped, and I think Casey was not stripped, but I was so confused I did not notice; I did not see the beginning, and cannot say who struck first; Casey would not let the man go when he was on the ground - they were pulled away by somebody; both seemed irritated: the deceased seemed to want to fight fair - Nix and Arnold were there; I cannot say whether they interfered; I saw nobody with sticks; but I returned a second time from the public-house, and then saw Lacey with a fork or scythe.

JOHN NIX . I am a shoemaker. I went to the Green Man; the landlord would not draw me any beer: I was returning to my lodging, and on the green, very near the Green Man I saw two men stripping, as I thought, to fight - I saw the deceased knocked down by Casey; I cannot say what he did it with - it appeared to be with something, not his fist; I had a stick in my hand, being a cripple - I immediately went up to the spot; several men were there - I cannot say who: I interfered with my stick; I had not been long among them before I got a severe cut over the eye, and two stabs underneath; I saw no more pass - I was fighting in among them with my stick, trying to rescue the deceased; I fought till I fell into a ditch, being blinded with the blood, which flowed from one eye into the other.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Were you perfectly sober? A. Perfectly; I saw Rattle with a stick; I did not see them strip - I did not get up to them when it first began; I did not see Bell till the deceased was picked up - his (the deceased's) coat and waistcoat were off.

COURT. Q. You could not see what passed after you were in the ditch? A. I got my eye bound up, then armed myself, and went to pick the deceased man up.

STEPHEN LACEY . The first I saw of this was the Irishmen throwing stones at the Englishmen, at the Green Man - we then followed them down the lane a few steps, and met the Irish with their forks and things; the deceased was stripped - I saw Casey take a fork and beat him down for dead with it; they had been fighting before that - I received a blow on my head from some of them, and went away; I afterwards saw them bring the dead body away.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q. Had you not seen them fighting before Casey knocked him down? A. No: I did not fight - I kept them off from the poor man as well as I could, with my hands; I did not knock anybody down - I tried to do it; I was there about a quarter of an hour: there was not a general battle; I saw the Irish with forks - I did not see the deceased's party strike the prisoners; I saw the prisoners strike them repeatedly - they did not return the blows; I never saw the deceased before: I had lived there about three weeks, and came from High Wycombe; I never heard the deceased called the fighting man; there were about six English and fourteen Irishmen- I did not see the whole of the fight.

JAMES BROOKS . I am a labourer. I saw Casey strike the deceased several times, and saw him strike him with his fist when he was down; I left them, and did not see him get up: I had not seen the quarrel.

JOHN ISHWIN . I was at the public-house. I went home, and after that heard a noise and went out; I saw the deceased and Casey fighting with their fists - they fought till they got through the hedge; I stopped till the Irish came up the lane, and then ran away - the deceased and Casey fought several rounds, up and down with their fists; I saw no stick in Casey's hands.

JOHN STREET . After this fight I heard a great noise in the barn; I saw Casey come down towards Mr. Reed's after the man was killed - he was stripped, and had a scythe in one hand and a stick in the other; he said there was one man dead, if not two; and if any man attempted to take his weapons away he would destroy him - I saw nothing of the fight.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Are not the scythes and things kept at his master's? A. Yes, I suppose so.

JAMES TROWER . I am a horse-patrol. I met Casey in a lane on this night - he would not surrender: I threatened him, and he threatened to knock me off my horse, and attempted to strike me - I followed him across two fields, and found him in a ditch; he was very obstreperous - he had a fustian jacket on, and a stick in his hand.

WILLIAM PUTNAM . I am a labourer. I was going by the Green Man - Casey had got the deceased down, and two more were scuffling about with him; I cannot say who they were; some others stood in the road - they ran down and said, "Let us go after a fork;" I saw them come back, and then ran home.

JOHN COLLINS . I was in Mr. Reed's field, and heard a row in the barn among the Irishmen - they were quarrelling and fighting among themselves; I stopped there about ten minutes, and then returned to the field - I came back, saw the patrol, and told him Casey was coming down.

DANIEL BOWEN . I am a surgeon. On the 30th of June, at one o'clock in the morning, I saw the deceased lying on a board in a stable quite dead; he had been very much beat about the face - the bruises were very considerable; there were two incised wounds on the upper lip and one in the under lip - that appeared a contused wound; the lower jaw was fractured - his month was full of blood, and there were punctures with a fork in his left shoulder and considerable bruises about the chest: on opening the scalp a great quantity of blood flowed out, and on opening the skull ten or twelve ounces of blood flowed; there was a considerable wound in the left eye, about two inches long, on the orbit ridge; I consider the suffusion of blood on the brain must have been the cause of his death; a blow on the loins might have brought on paralysis no doubt.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. It is your opinion that he died from the suffusion of blood on the brain? A. Yes; he appeared to have been knocked about by very heavy weapons; I think the wounds on the lip were caused by the prongs of a fork - I cannot say whether the blow in the eye was caused by a stick or a fall.

The prisoner Casey handed in the following statement: -

My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I and my fellow prisoners were employed by Mr. Reed, a farmer, of Harrow, at hay-making, for some time back. On the 14th of June last, before this business happened, the party of the deceased came up to the barn, which Mr. Reed allowed myself and my fellow prisoners to sleep in, and threw stones and brick-bats into the barn, and threatened to kill us. On the night in question, which was Sunday, I was at the Green Man; the deceased was there, and struck me first - he gave me a violent blow, and knocked me down; he also knocked Burke down, and beat him when down. After the deceased struck me I returned the blow; I then retired from the fight; the deceased renewed the fight - he ran over to where I was, and struck me a second time, upon which I instantly seized a pitch-fork, which laid in my way, and which I had used the day before, in hay-making, and I struck Long John with it: my fellow prisoners and myself were first struck by the deceased and his party, and a general scuffle then followed; I and my fellow prisoners were knocked down many times, and much cut by pitch-forks, which the deceased and his party struck us with. I declare, before God and my country, I had no intention to kill any one; I was almost cut to pieces by the deceased and his party.

ABBEY BROWN . I live at Harrow and was at the Green Man between nine and ten o'clock; when the row began; the deceased asked Dennis Burke for a drink of beer - he said he was welcome; the deceased then said "You Irish b-r, your beer I don't want, but I want to fight and have blood;" Burke said "I don't want to fight;" this was in the yard - he came out into the yard; I saw Long John knock Burke down and strike him when he was down, and saw him strike Casey; I had been in the house two hours - there were no words between them till they were coming out to go home; Casey did not strike him first - I swear John struck him first - the women and the Irish then ran down to Reed's barn, and the English came after them; the forks were kept in the barn: master used to give them forks and fire-arms. When the deceased struck Casey, his wife begged of him not to kill him (Casey.)

MARY McCARTHY . I am thirteen years old. I went to the Green Man about nine o'clock for some beer for my mother; I saw Burke and Long John there - they were all coming out; John said to Burke "Master will you give me a drink of beer?" Burke said "Yes, in welcome, or if it was better;" John said "No you b-r I shan't have your beer, I want to fight, I will have fight or blood;" he then took and hit Burke - he ran over and hit Casey; I am sure he hit Casey before Casey hit him.

JOHN REED. I am a farmer and live at Wembley, near Harrow - five or six of the prisoners have worked for me for the last seven years, and the others are occasional workmen; I gave them a barn near the Green Man to sleep in; the hay forks were kept there, but no scythes - they never disturbed anybody, but have frequently been disturbed and assaulted at night with stones and brick-bats.

CASEY - GUILTY. Aged 31.

Of manslaughter only . - Transported for Seven Years .

COCHRANE and others NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-27

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

1375. WILLIAM BRAMSTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hill , on the 3d of July , at Christchurch, and stealing therein 1 blanket, value 2s. 6d. and 1 candlestick, value 1s. , his property.

MARY HILL . I am the wife of John Hill - we live in Flower and Dean-street, Spitalfields and rent the house, I do not know the name of the parish - we let one room and keep the rest. On Thursday morning, the 3d of July, about half-past nine o'clock, I went out - I was the last person in the ground-floor room, and locked that room door myself; the street door is left open for the lodger, but is fastened at night: I returned at eleven, in company with Clark, my sister-in-law, and as I got home I saw the prisoner step off the step of the door with my blanket under his arm - I knew it directly to be ours by the border; I went up and said "Sir, you have got my blanket," and he said he had not - I returned to my room and found half the pannel of the door broken out, so that a person could get through; I returned to the prisoner, who was standing with my sister-in-law - she was then taking the blanket from under his arm, and then the brass candlestick fell out of the blanket: they were both my husband's - the blanket was on my bed and the candlestick on a box by the bed-side that morning; the prisoner was given into Clement's charge - the bed was up a small flight of stairs adjoining the room, over the wash-house, and is part of the house; you go through the ground floor room to get to it, but not out into the open air: the prisoner said voluntarily "Don't make yourself uneasy, don't fret yourself, for I have done it;' he said that directly he was stopped with the blanket - the things are worth 3s. 6d.

JOSHUA FREDERICK CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I know Hill's house; it is in the parish of Christchurch, Spitalfields. The prisoner was delivered into my charge last Thursday; he said he had broken open the door and taken the things out, and he thought it was the best day's work he had done for a long while; nothing was said to induce him to say this - the prosecutrix and a man gave him into my charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

REBECCA CLARK . I am Mrs. Hill's sister-in-law, and stopped the prisoner two doors from the house and took this blanket from under his arm; he never moved after I stopped him - I said "What business have you with this blanket?" he said it was not hers; Hill went to her door and cried out that it was broken open - I had hold of him; I then took hold of the blanket, he let go of it and the candlestick fell out; a mob collected and he was taken to the watch-house.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 46.

Reference Number: t18280703-28

Before Mr. Justice Burrough.

1376. WILLIAM DAVISON alias THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for stealing on the 26th of June , 1 watch, value 4l.; 2 seals, value 30s.; and 1 chain, value 1s., the goods of William Crichton , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Elder ; and that at the Delivery of the King's Goal of Newgate, on the 19th of June, in the 5th year of His Majesty's reign, he was convicted of felony.

WILLIAM CRICHTON. I am a journeyman baker , and live at Thomas Elder's, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields . On the 24th of June, the prisoner came to lodge there, and slept in the same bed with me; I got

up next morning about eight o'clock, and left my watch under the pillow while I was in bed - he returned and slept there next night, and about a quarter to eight in the morning I went down to wash, and went into the yard; I returned about a quarter past eight; he was then gone, and so was my watch - I found it in pledge; I gave 5l. 10s. for the watch, and 30s. for the seals - there was another person in the room.

DANIEL SMITH . I am shopman to Mr. Archbut, pawnbroker, Bridge-road, Lambeth. On the 20th of June, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned this watch and one seal at our shop; I am certain he is the man.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT DUKE . The prisoner was delivered into my charge, on last Monday, on another charge; I produce the certificate of the conviction of William Davis, in June 1824, for felony (read).

HENRY BARBER . I was not here when the prisoner was tried before, but I received him from the Penitentiary on the 2d of May, after his trial; I knew him before, and saw him in prison before the trial.

Prisoner's Defence. When the prosecutor went down I was talking to a person; I got up and washed - then went down to the bar and had two glasses of gin - he must have been absent longer than he says.

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 99s. only , but not being the person before convicted.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-29

Second London Jury - before Mr. Recorder.

1377. WILLIAM MILLINGHAM was indicted for stealing on the 17th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Cook , from his person .

THOMAS COOK. I am a clerk in the Custom house, and live at Brixton. On the 17th of June, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was crossing London bridge on the back of the stage, and a few yards from St. Magnus's church I felt a pressure at my outside coat-pocket; I turned round, and saw the prisoner hanging behind the coach with one hand - and saw him in the act of conveying my handkerchief into his bosom; he then dropped from the coach - I stopped the coach; got down, and overtook him about half way across the bridge without loosing sight of him; he ran - I asked him for my handkerchief; he took it from between his shirt and flesh, where it was concealed - and said, if I would forgive him he would never do so any more.

EDWARD THOROGOOD . I am an officer, and took the prisoner with the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280703-30

1378. HENRY BURROWS was indicted for stealing on the 1st of July , 3 1/2 yards of woollen-cloth, value 2l. , the goods of Thomas Stevens .

THOMAS STEVENS. I am a tailor , and live in Addle-street. On the 1st of July, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I called at a public-house, and put this cloth in front of the bar; I did not see the prisoner there - I missed it in two or three minutes; Mrs. Hall gave me information - I went out and met the prisoner in Golden-lane; I collared him, and said, "You are my prisoner, for stealing my cloth;" I brought him back to the public-house, and the cloth was thrown in at the door.

MARY HALL . I keep a wine-vaults in Barbican ; the prisoner occasionally came to the house - I came down about a quarter to nine o'clock, and saw a bundle of cloth on the top of the bar; I saw the prisoner take it up - I thought it was his own; in about five minutes Stevens enquired for it, and I told him what I had seen, and described the prisoner; he went out, and brought him in in about ten minutes without the bundle - he denied taking it; an officer was fetched - the bundle was afterwards put, or thrown into the house by somebody; the prisoner was very much in liquor - I had seen nobody in his company.

SUSAN FIELD . I live in Crown-court, Golden-lane; the prisoner lodged with me for about nine months, and was a market porter; Mrs. Burton called me between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and said the prisoner had brought a bundle in - which she suspected was stolen; I went into the cellar which he had the use of, and found this bundle of cloth - he was not at home then; I brought it up, and gave it to Burton, who lives next door to me - he was a very industrious man.

ELIZABETH BURTON . My husband is a silver-spoon threader. On the 1st of July the prisoner passed my house, and went into his lodgings with something under his coat; I went out, and heard a bundle was lost, and asked Field if he had brought anything in - she brought up this bundle; I took it to Mrs. Hall's, and put it in - I did not stay a moment; the prisoner was very much in liquor.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am a constable, and received him in charge about nine o'clock. This cloth was shoved into the house; he was the worse for liquor, but not senseless - he said he took it in a joke.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. We were both drinking together for an hour, and were very much intoxicated; I took it out of a joke, meaning to bring it back.

THOMAS STEVENS . I never saw him before.

GUILTY. Aged 37.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-31

1379. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing on the 11th of June , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. the goods of Edward John Scott .

EDWARD JOHN SCOTT. I am a shoe-maker , and live on Holborn-hill . On the 11th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner was brought in with these shoes, which hung at the door; she was intoxicated.

ROBERT BURGESS . I live with Mr. Scott. I received information, and took the prisoner crossing the road with the shoes; she directly dropped them into the gutter.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 36.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Ten Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-32

1380. JOHN RAYSON was indicted for stealing on

the 20th of June , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 ribbon, value 2d.; and 1 key, value 4d. , the goods of William Bamford .

DOROTHY BAMFORD . I am the wife of William Bamford, who has left me, and lives at Nottingham: I am house-keeper to Mr. Miller, shoemaker of Skinner-street - the prisoner was our errand-boy , but did not sleep in the house. On the 20th of June, at one o'clock I saw my watch hanging in the kitchen, and missed it at half-past ten, when I went to bed; the prisoner had only been employed there seven days - he occasionally came into the kitchen.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRALL . I am a beadle. I was sent for, and took the prisoner at Mr. Miller's the day after the watch was stolen; he was charged with taking the watch - but no threat or promise was held out; he said, he had taken it, and pawned it - I asked where the duplicate was; he said, he had put it down the sink-hole - that he had pawned it in Warner-street, Clerkenwell.

WILLIAM MOTE . I am a pawnbroker of Little Warner-street. On the 20th of June the prisoner pawned this watch for 20s. he asked no more; it is worth 3l.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Master and the prosecutrix promised to forgive me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-33

1381. EDWARD HOGG was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Henry Thomas Gruaz , from his person .

HENRY THOMAS GRUAZ. I belong to the Ordnance Department , and live in Portland-terrace, St. John's-wood. On the 12th of June, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Fleet-street , in my way home; I felt something at my outside coat pocket, where my handkerchief was - I turned round, and instantly saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; I laid hold of him, and took him into a shop, where an officer took him; he said it was his first offence.

Prisoner. I picked it up. Witness. I could not have dropped it; I had used it two minutes before, and put it quite close down in my pocket.

DANIEL TURNER . I am a constable. I took him in custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-34

1382. THOMAS DUNBAR was indicted for stealing, of the 9th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of James Palmer , from his person .

JAMES PALMER. I am a wine-merchant , and live in Leicester-square. On the 9th of June, at twelve o'clock at noon, I was passing in St. Paul's church-yard , and had a handkerchief in my coat pocket; I felt a jerk at my pocket - I put my hand down, and missed my handkerchief; I turned round, and the first thing I saw was the prisoner going up a court alone - I followed and collared him, without losing sight of him; I said, "I believe you have my handkerchief;" he said, he had not - I searched him, and found it in his right hand breeches pocket; he then said, he had picked it up - Fache was near, and I gave him in charge.

LEWIS FACHE . I am a constable, and saw the prisoner go down the court, but did not know what he had done; I received him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the handkerchief up, and turned up a court; the gentleman came and collared me, and asked if I had his handkerchief - he said, it was a red one; he swore at Guildhall that he took it out of my pocket immediately he turned round - he said at the watch-house, that if he was certain it was me, he would give me in charge, and if I would say whether I did it he would let me go. GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280703-35

1383. JOHN ROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 6 loaves of bread, value 2s. , the goods of John Manning , his master.

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-36

1384. RICHARD STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 6 lbs. of copper, value 4s. the goods of William John Joliffe and another.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a certain building.

JAMES CLUTTERBUCK . I work for Mr. Jolliffe at the New London-bridge . I saw the prisoner, with a chisel, cut this copper from the works of the bridge: it was nailed on - he took the nails out and then cut it; I sent a boy to tell Mr. Bean; he saw the boy go and then left it behind him, as he saw the boy looking at him.

DAVID GEARY . I work for Wm. John Joliffe, at the New London-bridge; he has a partner. On the 31st of May the prisoner was employed there, but was poorly; the copper was nailed on the centre of the bridge, and between seven and eight o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner unfix it and lay it aside; he went away leaving it behind him, as he saw us - we had gone in and seen him cutting it before he unfixed it; it is large sheets of copper; Clutterbuck sent a boy to Mr. Bean, the foreman of the works. I did not see the prisoner again till he was before the Lord Mayor.

JOHN RANDOM . I am a labourer. Mr. Bean sent me to take an account of the copper; I found two pieces cut off, measuring fifteen inches by eighteen - they are used to stop the wedges in: I was present when the prisoner was taken; he said he had been there after two pieces of copper, and that he had taken some before.

WILLIAM BEAN . I am foreman of the works. I found this copper removed - we have lost two hundred pieces; the prisoner sometimes worked there two or three days in a week.

EDWARD THOROWGOOD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner at his lodgings, in Tooley-street.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-37

1385. MARY BURFOOT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 1 knife, value 2d., and the skirt of a frock, value 3s. the goods of George Weston .

ELIZABETH WESTON . I am the wife of George Weston, who is porter to a silversmith - we lodge in Golden Lion-court, Aldersgate-street , the street door is kept

open; this knife was on the table, and the frock skirt on a chair - I saw the prisoner pass the garden railing about eight o'clock; I went out and called after her; she made no answer - I ran, and a young man stopped her - she struggled with him and dropped the knife, and afterwards the skirt.

MARY BARTLET . I live with Mrs. Weston, and was at breakfast with her up stairs; I was at the window, and said, "There is a woman gone into your room," and before she could get down - I saw the prisoner pass with the things in her lap.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up at the door.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280703-38

1386. THOMAS BARRATT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 1 bundle of double laths, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Charles Hayne .

HENRY HAYNE . I am the son of Charles Hayne a timber-merchant . On the 10th of June, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner was brought into our yard in Long-lane , charged with stealing these laths - two bundles had stood at the gate and one was missing.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a butcher and live next door to Mr. Hayne; I saw the prisoner go up the yard without anything and come out with this bundle of laths - I ran and secured him with them - Mr. Hayne claimed them.

WILLIAM MOLE . I assisted in apprehending the prisoner at the corner of Long-lane with the laths on his shoulder.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-39

1387. JAMES JAMESON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 2 sovereigns, 1 half-crown, 3 shillings and 2 sixpences, the monies of Richard Marshall Phillips and another, his masters .

RICHARD MARSHALL PHILLIPS. I am a lighterman ; the prisoner was my servant . On Saturday, the 31st of May, he was sent to the West India Docks with some goods; there were charges to the amount of 2l. 6s. 4d. to be paid - he came to me at the Custom-house and I gave him two sovereigns, a half-sovereign, and 3s. 6d. to pay them: I went next morning (Sunday) to his lodging in Rosemary-lane - the craft could not go out of the Dock, till the charges were paid; I was obliged to send the amount up on Monday.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a constable and apprehended the prisoner on Sunday morning the 1st of June - he said he had lost the money.

Prisoner's Defence. I pulled out my papers in the Commercial-road to be ready with the money, and when I got to the office, I missed it and did not like to return.

MR. PHILLIPS. This is the first time I ever heard of his losing it; he has worked for me a long time and is a sober man - I would take him back; he never came for his wages - I did not owe him above 3s.

GUILTY. Aged 30

Recommended to Mercy . - Fined 1s. and delivered to his master.

Reference Number: t18280703-40

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JULY 8.

First Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Recorder.

1388. RICHARD BREACH was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Slater , on the King's highway, on the 19th of January , at St. Anne, Westminster, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 shirt, value 2s.: 1 gown, value 3s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 3 caps, value 6d.; 2 shawls, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 2d. , his property.

JAMES SLATER. I am a labourer , and live in North-street, Limehouse. On the 19th of January I had charge of a gentleman's house in Thames-street; my wife had given me a basket of linen; I was entering the top of North-street, Limehouse , with it, at nine o'clock at night, and as I turned the corner of North-street I met two men; it was very dark - one of the two asked me who I was, and the moment he spoke the word I was knocked down; there was nobody near me but those two men - one of them must have knocked me down; it was done with no weapon - I struggled to keep my basket, and after struggling my fingers were very much cut - whether it was with the handles of the basket, or with their feet, I cannot say; they stuffed my mouth full of dirt; I had the presence of mind to turn myself on my belly, and called out Murder! somebody then came to my assistance; I was on the ground for five or ten minutes - it was very dirty: the moment I cried Murder! the people came to my assistance, and they left me; they kept me forcibly on the ground till then - they took my basket away with them; I could not distinguish which of them knocked me down, or which of them took my basket, it was so very dark; I could not swear to either of them; there was nobody near me except those two - my cry brought persons to my assistance; I went home, and was ordered to go to the watch-house - I got there in about half an hour, and found the property there - I could swear to the basket; my wife can speak to the contents. I found the prisoner in custody next morning, not before.

HARRIET SLATER . I am the prosecutor's wife. On the 19th of January, about half-past eight o'clock, I gave him a basket, containing the articles stated in the indictment -(enumerating them) I gave it to him at No. 90, Lower Thames-street, to take to our house in North-street, Limehouse; I saw them at Lambeth-street Office next morning, in the same basket, and was quite sure of them; they were dirty things to be washed. The prisoner was then in custody.

CHARLES FREEMAN . I am a labourer in the London Docks; in January last I lived in the Commercial-road. on the 19th of January, about nine o'clock at night, I was in North-street, Limehouse, waiting for a young man; the watchman was calling nine o'clock - I heard somebody cry Stop thief! and saw the prisoner at the bar run by me, with a basket under his arm; he was alone - I went after him, keeping very close to him, and about one hundred yards on, when he found I was very close behind him, he chucked the basket from under his arm; I let the basket lay on the ground, and kept in pursuit; I ran as far as Trafalgar-square, Stepney, and as he turned round I caught him, without losing sight of him - he had run

about two hundred yards altogether; I brought him back in the way he had run, and met a boy who lived at a public-house - he had picked up the basket, and was bringing it after us; it was him who had been calling Stop thief! the prisoner said nothing, but abused me very much - my friend, whom I was waiting for, heard me crying Stop thief! and followed; he assisted me in conveying him to Mile-end watch-house; he gave no account how he came by the basket: I left it at the watch-house with him. I then met Slater - he stated what he had lost; I took him to the watch-house, and he spoke to the basket; Mrs. Slater claimed the articles at the office.

Prisoner. Q. When I ran by you why did you not stop me? A. I was standing on the pavement, and he was in the road - I was not near enough to him.

Q. You said at the watch-house that you were down another street at the time? A. I was down no street - I stood at the top; there is a watch-box at the corner, and the watchman went out to cry nine o'clock: I never lost sight of the prisoner.

COURT. Q. You saw Slater about half an hour after you took the prisoner? A. Yes - he was all over mud, his face and clothes, and every thing, and his fingers cut; the basket was all over mud, and the handles broken, as if it had been pulled to pieces; the prisoner's hands were dirty, and his fingers cut.

MRS SLATER. The basket and property were delivered up to me afterwards, and are not here; I am quite sure they were the same - the basket, when I saw it, was broken all to pieces, and all muddy; the things in it were also muddy - they were worth 10s.

EBENEZER DALTON . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. The prisoner was put into our lock-up room at Lambeth-street after he was committed, and somehow or other he broke the door open and got out; I found him in custody at Lynn, in Norfolk, on another charge, and brought him to town last Friday evening.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the Ben Johnson public-house, to have a pint of beer; when I came out I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw a man come from the street opposite - I pursued him, calling Stop thief! but it being dark I could not see him; the people, seeing me running, stopped me; I said I was not the person, and before this young man could see me, he said, "Have you got him?" and before he could see me he said, "Oh! that is the young man;" plenty of people, as we went to the watch-house, said I was not the young man; Slater said at the office that he was so intoxicated he could not tell whether he fell down or not.

JAMES SLATER . I was as sober as I am now.

CHARLES FREEMAN . I saw Slater the same night - he was quite sober.

Prisoner. It is put down so in his deposition.

COURT. It is not so in the deposition.

EBENEZER DALTON . I saw Slater next morning; nobody ever stated that he was intoxicated; he did not appear to me to have been drinking overnight.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Reference Number: t18280703-41

1389. THOMAS JOSEPH HINTON was indicted for that he, being a person employed by and under the Postoffice of Great Britian , on the 14th of June , a certain letter, containing a promissory note, for payment of and value 15l. 2s. 6d., came into his hands and possession, whilst he was so employed, and that he did feloniously secrete the said letter , the property of Zachariah Finch .

SECOND COUNT, charging him with stealing the said promissory note from and out of the said letter, which came into his hands and possession whilst so employed.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, calling it a packet instead of a letter.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating the note to be the property of Harding Olney .

NINTH COUNT, for stealing a letter from and out of the said Post-office.

TENTH COUNT, calling it a packet.

MESSRS. BOLLAND GURNEY AND SHEPHERD conducted the prosecution.

ZACHARIAH FINCH. I am a fringe-maker , and live in High Holborn. On the 14th of June I wrote a letter to Mr. Olney, of Tring, Hertfordshire, and enclosed in it a promissory note for 15l. 2s. 6d. - this is the letter (looking at it) - the note is still in it; I took it myself to Mr. Wasp's receiving-house, in Holborn, at the corner of Chancery-lane, and paid 7d. with it, to Perry; I asked him what the postage was - he took the letter back to the prisoner, returned to me, and said it was 7d., which I paid him; I do not know what he did with the letter; it was afterwards brought to me by Mr. Wasp, open, and dirty; I had wafered, but not sealed it.

CHARLES PERRY . I am twelve years old, and am errand-boy to Mr. Wasp, a shoe-maker. On Saturday, the 14th of June, between four and five o'clock, Mr. Finch brought a letter and wanted to pay the postage; I took the letter to the prisoner at the bottom of the shop, and asked him the postage - he said, 7d.; I then took the letter back to Finch, who paid me 7d., and went out; I was going to mark the letter as paid - the prisoner came up, and took it out of my hand, with the postage, and told me to go to my own board; which I did, and saw no more of the money or letter - there was nobody else in the shop; (looking at the letter), this is the letter; this "Paid 7d." at the top of it, is my writing - on the Tuesday following I was sent out on an errand, and was going to take my pan-pipe with me; but my master told me to lay it down - I laid it down between my board and the prisoner's; I returned in about an hour, and could not find it; I asked the prisoner if he had seen it - he said, master had taken it from me, and would give it to me in the morning; I saw Johnson the female servant, and asked her about it - she knew nothing of it; I at times put bread and butter on my board, and always found it taken away - some was taken on the 16th of June.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner did not abscond? A. No; he was taken on the Wednesday - he seldom has his meals at the shop; he stays at home all Sunday - he does not sleep at master's; I saw my bread and butter found in the same place as the letters - it was in the shop in which the letters are received; I sometimes seal the letter bags - master always tells me when to begin to seal; I do not mean to say he is always present - the letters are put into a drawer; the key of which was lost when I first went there - it had

been found, and the drawer was locked on the Saturday in question; my mistress locked it - my master always managed the letters; we have a book to refer to, to find the rate of postage - a double letter to Tring, would be 1s. 2d.; I take in paid letters now and then - but have not done it since this has happened; I have been in master's service two months - the maid servant never marked letters, nor took them in; master's desk is sometimes left open.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. There is a box in which unpaid letters are put, is that locked? A. Yes; the key is kept in master's-desk; the paid letters are put through a slit into a drawer - the key of that is kept in the desk; the money is put into another drawer, over that - the money drawer has no lock; I saw the letters found under the further cutting-board in the shop, and my brend and butter was with them - we all work at that board.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON . I am servant to Mr. Wasp. I first heard of Perry losing his pipe on Wednesday evening, the 18th of June, about a quarter to ten o'clock; I asked master about it - he said, he knew nothing about it; I then searched for it in the shop, and under the third board I found two letters - that produced is one of them, they laid together and were both open; I unfolded Mr. Finch's letter, and looked at the bill of exchange - I showed the bill to the prisoner and said "Dear me Thomas, do you know anything about these letters?" showing them to him; he said "I don't know anything about them" - I asked him to look at Mr. Finch's letter and he was so agitated he could not hold it; Mr. Thomas Wasp, Jun. was sitting in the warehouse and called me; I gave them to him - the prisoner staid about a quarter of an hour after this, then shut up the shop and went home as usual; after he was gone I took the candle and found another letter under the same board - it had fallen down; I found some bread and butter in the same place - next day (Thursday) the prisoner came to the shop as usual; I said "Dear me, Thomas, I have found another letter;" he said "Don't say anything about it now;" I had not put the letters or bread and butter there.

Cross-examined. Q. There was nobody present when the prisoner said "Don't say anything about it"? A. No; he had heard my master call me away the night before; he said nothing of the kind then; every body in the shop had access to the board - I have lived there twelve months; I never receive letters, nor seal the bags - the boy sometimes seals them; I never have received a single letter since I have been there - I never heard of the key of the drawer being mislaid; I did hear mistress mention it once - that is all; I know where the postage money is kept, because I saw Thomas once take it down - whether it is kept locked I cannot say; I do not know where the keys are kept - I did not know of the key being mislaid till after the prisoner was taken.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. When did your mistress mention about the key? A. About a week or a fortnight ago.

THOMAS WASP , JUN. My father keeps the receiving house at the corner of Chancery-lane; unpaid letters are put into a box at an opening outside the door - it is not always locked, for the key was mislaid for some time; the paid letters are brought in, and given to a person in the shop, who would put them through a hole at the top of the drawer - the postage would be put into another drawer above that; when we make up the bag we compare the amount of the paid letters with the money in the drawer - if they tally it is right; the money drawer is left open for the purpose of giving change. On Wednesday evening, the 18th of July, Johnson was in the shop talking to the prisoner; I did not hear what she said; she came to me and complained of the prisoner having had the boy's pan-pipe - she was searching for it; the prisoner was shutting up at the time - she found these two letters, which were brought to me (looking at them); they were open, and the wafers quite dry; I immediately told the prisoner it was a very serious thing, and whoever had done it would be placed in a very serious situation, and a very strict investigation must follow - he said indistinctly that he did not care what investigation took place; he kept shutting up the shop, and paid little attention to what I said - he was going away without shutting up the inside shutters, and was called back by Johnson to do them; he appeared in a hurry to get away - a customer came in after he was gone, and Johnson brought me a third letter; the letters were found on a shelf under the cutting-board - I did not place them there; the mark of 9d. on the third letter, to the best of my belief, is in the prisoner's writing - it is not the writing of any other person.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where do you keep the keys of the letter-boxes? A. In a drawer in my desk, at the very end of the warehouse, for safety sake; the desk is not kept locked - no one has any business there: every body in the shop has access to it; the paid letter-box was locked on the 14th of June, I am certain, and it was usually kept locked, but the key was missing; it might be missing for six months; I did not get another lock, as there was nobody in the shop but my family, the prisoner, and Perry; I am seldom at home except for about two hours in the afternoon, to make up the bag. I believe inquiry was made about the house for the key, but I do not know - it might have been missing only three months; the boy may have sealed the four o'clock bag of letters, in the presence of some of the family, but not alone; I have at times been absent when it was sealed.

Q. After you told him a strict investigation should be made, did he not return on the Monday, as usual? A. I understood so - he lived in Great Queen-street; there was nothing to prevent his carrying the letters away, or destroying them.

JURY. Q. A customer was in the shop when he left, was not that the cause of his leaving the inside shutters? A. He left before the customer came; he had lived with us about three months.

MR. PHILLIPS to ELIZABETH JOHNSON . Q. You showed the prisoner the letters that night, did not you? - A. Yes, before I showed them to my master; master spoke to him about it, and he said he knew nothing about it; he was going away without shutting up the inside shutters - I have at times put them up myself, when there was nobody to do it - I forget whether I called him back.

JOHN WASP. I am the son Mr. Wasp, and reside with him. It is my duty to make up the letters - the bag is

made up at five o'clock. On the 14th of June, I made up the paid letters: this is my money bill (looking at it) it is my writing: the paid letter drawer was locked that day, I am certain - to the best of my recollection the money tallied with the letters: sometimes there is a 6d. or so taken out to give change in the business, and if so I always ascertain that it was so taken out; I do not think it happened that day - I did not put these letters under the board.

Cross-examined. Q. The money drawer is always open? A. Yes, for we have to give change for almost every paid letter; the key of the letter-box might be lost for two months, not six; the key of the paid letter-box was found six or seven weeks since - I cannot tell when it was lost; I made inquiry about it, and have no doubt but I asked the servant about it, for I made a general inquiry; I never remember the boy sealing the paid letters; I am not absent once in two months; the prisoner never absconded, but was apprehended at our house - the boy has sealed the four o'clock bag, which are unpaid letters.

MR. PHILLIPS here contended that this indictment could not be sustained by the evidence; the prisoner was not employed by the Post-office, according to the meaning of the Act, nor was the property taken out of the shop; which, in this case, must be considered the office, the letter never having been deposited in any letter-box. - The Court held these objections to be good.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-42

1390. THOMAS JOSEPH HINTON was again indicted for embezzling the sum of 9d. , the monies of our Lord the King .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-43

1391. THOMAS JOSEPH HINTON was again indicted for embezzling 9d. , the monies of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the monies of Thomas Wasp , his master.

THOMAS WASP. The prisoner was in my service, and entrusted to receive postage of letters and monies paid at my shop. On the 19th of June I showed the prisoner this letter, and asked if the words "paid 9d." on it was his writing - he said Yes, and I knew it to be his; he did not say who took the letter in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where is the postage money put? A. Into a till, but this letter never belonged to me; if we have wanted change for the shop, I have known it taken from the postage at times, for a few minutes, but not often. I have kept the office twenty years; I do not believe it has been done twenty times in those twenty years.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. At what time do you close your box? A. At five o'clock; if a letter is brought after that it is left on the desk for the bellman, who calls at six o'clock; the money is laid on the letter for the postman to take away with him.

WILLIAM CODD . I live in Warwick-court, Holborn. This letter is my writing (looking at it) - it is addressed to Mr. Talliser, Lynn, Norfolk; it is only dated Thursday afternoon; I believe it was on the 12th of June - I took it myself to Mr. Wasp's receiving-house; it might be before five o'clock, but I think it was between five and six o'clock - I took it into the shop: if it was after five o'clock I should pay 10d. for it; if before, only 9d.; I paid the postage to somebody in the shop - I cannot say to whom.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON . I am servant to Mr. Wasp. I found the letter produced under the cutting-board in the shop; it was the third that I found; there was a lot of lumber on it - I gave it to Mr. Wasp, Jun.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you mean still to swear that you never heard from your master of a key being lost? A. I never heard either of the Mr. Wasps mention it; he never told me of it.

GEORGE LEADBETTER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of June, at Mr. Wasp's, and asked him what he had done with the boy's pipe - he said, "You will find it at the back of the benches; I searched, and found it there: he acknowledged that the words "paid 9d." on the letter, was his writing.

JOHN WASP . On the 12th of June, I counted up the paid letters, and found the postage money corresponded with the letters in the box - the letters were all sent away.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you any doubt that you told the girl of the loss of the key? A. None.

ISAAC PARKES . I am a letter-carrier. On the 12th of June I collected the letters from Wasp's, as bellman, and sent them to the Post-office; I could not receive the postage without the letter.

THOMAS WASP , JUN. Johnson gave me this letter when she found it; I had never seen it before, nor the postage of it.

CHARLES PERRY . I never saw this letter till Johnson found it.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you never sealed the bags yourself? A. The four o'clock bag I have, but they were unpaid letters; some of my master's have been in the shop at the time, generally.

ELIZABETH JOHNSON . I found this third letter under the same board as the others, but lower down; I never saw it before, nor had the postage.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not the place open to every body in the shop? A. Yes. The prisoner went home to dinner every day; the board is behind the counter - customers cannot go there.

MRS. WASP. I had never seen the letter before it was found and had nothing to do with the postage.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask the servant about the key? A. No - it might be lost for three or four months; I never knew the boy seal the bags alone.

Prisoner's Defence. Letters which are brought after five o'clock are put on a cutting board close to the door with the money on them, for the postman; anybody could take the money, and if brought before five, it is put into a box which is never locked; I recollect once there was 6d. or a 1s. too much in the drawer; the son asked Mrs. Wasp if she knew of it; she told him to look behind the desk to see if any letters had fallen down.

MR. WASP. When a letter comes after five o'clock, it is put on the first counter, which is not near the door; people who bring them generally know where to lay them.

NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner was again indicted for a like offence, but no evidence was offered.

Reference Number: t18280703-44

1392. THOMAS LOOSELEY was indicted for manslaughter .

HENRY PUDDEFOOT . I am a constable, and live at Harrow. I knew Richard John Tyler - he was three years and a half old; I did not see this accident.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The prisoner has surrendered here? A. Yes - he was not under bail; he appeared in great distress about this.

BENJAMIN EVANS . I am a master of Harrow school. On the 30th of June, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was standing at the back door of my garden, and saw four children coming towards me, two in a little child's cart, and two drawing it - the deceased was in the cart; when they came up to me the other one got out of the cart, and the three then drew the cart on - they passed me, and in less than a minute I heard a cart coming towards me; I called to the children to draw close to my pailing, but in their fright they ran back screaming, and in half a minute I heard the child's cart crush, and the child was thrown out - it was done so rapidly, I could not see who it was done by; I did not see the cart strike the child's cart - it was certainly driving at a very rapid rate; I know the prisoner - I did not see him urge the horse on; he met the child's cart - the child never stirred afterwards; it had received its mortal injury; the cart went on without stopping.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe that the prisoner's seat at that moment gave way, and threw him back? A. I could not see - it might have happened; whether he saw the child's cart I cannot say.

THOMAS HEWLETT . I am a surgeon. The child was brought to my house dead - its death was no doubt occasioned by the accident.

Cross-examined. Q. Does the back of Mr. Evan's garden abut on Long-lane? A. It forms one side of the lane - the road is very narrow at one part.

CHARLES BUCKINGHAM . I live in this lane. I saw the cart going along, with the prisoner in it, before the accident; he was driving faster than he ought - he was about one hundred and fifty yards from Mr. Evans' garden; I saw him fall back off the seat of his cart - I ran, and thought he would be thrown out of his cart; but before I could get up, he was out of my sight - the lane is nine feet ten inches wide where the accident happened.

Cross-examined. Q. When he fell, did he appear to lose the command of his horse? A. I cannot say, for I lost sight of him; I saw him hit his horse just before.

SARAH BROMLEY . I am thirteen years old. I was drawing this little cart; one child got out, leaving the deceased in - two of us were drawing it, and the other pushing behind; I did not hear anything - but saw a cart and horse coming very fast towards us; the prisoner was in the cart - Mr. Evans called out to me; I then ran away, being frightened - I did not see the cart run against ours, and cannot say whether the prisoner called out to us.

MR. JAMES MARILLIER . I am a professor of languages at Harrow-school. I was walking out on the evening in question, and saw a cart passing very rapidly, and immediately afterwards, I saw the deceased child brought up in Buckingham's arms; it was done instantaneously - I did not hear anybody in the cart call out, and cannot recognize the prisoner as the driver; nor did I see the seat to ascertain whether it was broken.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see his cart come against the child's cart? A. No; it is low, and might easily escape the observation of the driver.

COURT. Q. Is the lane narrow at this spot? A. The street is narrow all the way through; I think there is scarcely room for two carriages to pass.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. As such, a person would be anxious to get out of the street as soon as he could? A. It was nearly at the end of the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I have the rope in my pocket which occasioned my falling; it threw me over - I hit my head against the tail-board; I had not power over my horse at the time the accident happened; which I am exceedingly sorry for.

WILLIAM LOOSELEY . I am the prisoner's father. On the night in question, when my son came home, the seat of his cart was broken; he did not show it to me till next day - the rope which tied the seat was broken; he lives about three miles from the spot; it was a swing seat.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-45

1393. CHARLES GODBOLD was indicted for feloniously receiving of a certain evil disposed person, 1 cart, value 10l., the goods of James Deadman , well knowing the same to have been stolen .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES DEADMAN. On the 28th of December I entrusted John Hill, my servant, with a horse, cart, and harness, and he never returned; I saw my cart last Tuesday in possession of the prisoner - I knew it to be mine, by one wheel in particular; I asked him where he got it - he said, he bought it of a person who he named, and where he lived; that man is here - he said, he gave 4l. for it; I consider it worth 8l. or 10l., it cost me 18l. six months before.

COURT. Q. Was your name on it when you lost it? A. Yes; but when I found it the prisoner's name was on it - the prisoner told me at the public-house, that he would give it up, provided I did not take him before a Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. Being a respectable tradesman he did not wish to go to the office? A. I believe his general character is good; he told me directly that he bought it of Doddridge - I took Doddridge before the Magistrate, and charged him as an accessary, or something; the Magistrate would not entertain the charge, because the thief could not be found.

ROBINSON SMITH . I made the iron-work of the cart, and know it to be Deadman's.

JOHN BOWYER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge on the 1st of July; he said at the public-house,"I don't mind losing the cart, if you don't take me before the Magistrate."

WILLIAM WATSON . I am a wheelwright. The fair value of the cart, at the time it was stolen, was 12l.

JOHN GHRIMES . I am a smith, and live in Charlotte-street, Old-street-road. About five months ago Doddridge placed this cart in my yard; it stood there five months, and

full five hundred people looked at it there - the prisoner is a bedstead-maker, and did business with me; he has several times pulled out his rule, and measured the cart - I told him he might as well buy it; I saw him pay Doddridge for it.

- DODDRIDGE. I am a painter. I bought this cart at the Bear and Ragged Staff public-house, and I think I gave 3l. for it; I bought it on the 28th of December - here is a memorandum which I made on the following Sunday morning, (reads) "Bought a cart on Friday, the 28th of December, at Smithfield; No. -, name, James Deadman, Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell, at the Bear and Ragged Staff."

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-46

NEW COURT, (1st DAY.)

Third Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1394. RICHARD JERRARD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 1 coat, value 4l. , the goods of Charles Gaines .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280703-47

1395. HENRY WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 pair of boots, value 14s. , the goods of Augustus Boulland .

AUGUSTUS BOULLAND . I am the son of Augustus Boulland, a boot and shoemaker , and live in Little Newport-street . At half-past nine o'clock in the evening of the 20th of June, I saw the prisoner come and take the boots off the hooks within the door, and run away; I ran out without my shoes - I saw a man attempt to stop him in Castle-street; he left the boots and ran away, and was taken in about half a minute, without my losing sight of him - I did not see the boots taken up; but a man gave them to me - the prisoner has been a respectable man.

JOHN HENRY BILLINGS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was coming along Cranbourn-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I followed, and saw the prisoner in custody of two persons; they gave him to me - I took him to the watch-house; I did not see the boots till I got there - I was just behind him when he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Castle-street. and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran like the rest, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-48

1396. SAMUEL PANK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 13 lbs. weight of ham, value 14s. , the goods of William Forster .

WILLIAM FORSTER. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Bedford-place, Vauxhall-road . On the 12th of June I was coming out of my sitting-room, soon after seven o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner stepping out of my shop with this ham, which had been on my machine a few minutes before; I pursued and took him, without losing sight of him - he threw the ham down, two doors off.

THOMAS JOHNSON . I was sent for to take the prisoner; he said he had taken the ham for downright want.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had not a farthing in the world, and had had but a penny loaf for two days and nights.

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined One Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-49

1397. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 2 watches, value 4l.; 13s.; 1 sixpence, and 4 halfpence , the property of Richard Pratt .

MARTHA PRATT . I am wife of Richard Pratt; he is a straw-platter for Mr. Osborne, and we live in a room over his stable, near Manchester-square . I went into the country on the 8th of June, and left two watches, 13s. 6d., and 2d. in halfpence, in a drawer in my room; the drawer was not locked - the prisoner had worked at Mr. Osborne's; I returned the Sunday following, and missed these articles - I have not seen them since.

MARGARET ANN DEIGHTON . I am grand-daughter to Mrs. Pratt. On the Tuesday morning, at nine o'clock, I felt one watch safe in the canvass-bag in the drawer; I was out all that day, and when I came home at ten in the evening, it was gone - I did not miss anything else; I did not see the prisoner there.

WILLIAM NUNN . I am servant to Mr. Osborne. On Tuesday, the 10th of June, I went into the loft, which is on the same floor with Pratt's room, and found the trap-door open, and a ladder by it; I had been there at five o'clock- the door was then bolted: I called to a fellow-servant, and said, "William, what can be the matter?" we stood there, and the prisoner came down in a great hurry, took hold of the ladder, and threw it down; I called out, "What is the matter? there is something amiss here;" he hesitated a minute, and then said, "All is right - all is right;" I said, "I will go and see;" I went up on the roof, and he went away; I did not go into Pratt's room, but there is a sky-light on the leads, which goes down into their room; I saw the prisoner in custody on the Sunday morning following - he has worked there a year and a half, and had a good character.

HENRY STOWELL . I am an officer. I heard of the robbery, and went after the prisoner; he had been working there on the Tuesday morning, but did not return; I did not find him till the Sunday morning - I said, "I came to take you for stealing a watch from Mr. Osborne's yard;" he said, "Are you going to take me to the watch-house?" I said Yes - he said if I would take him to the yard he would make all right; I took him there, and he asked Mr. Osborne to forgive him - I asked him where the watch was, and he sent me to a pawnbroker's, but they denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had but one watch - the sovereigns were laid to a washerwoman.

MRS. PRATT. There were five sovereigns lost some time before; the washerwoman was discharged for that.

GUILTY. Aged 27.

Of stealing one watch only . - Confined Four Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-50

1398. DAVID RISK was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 2 half-crowns, 14 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the monies of James Parsons .

JAMES PARSONS. I am a butcher , and live in Wilstead-street, Somer's-town. The prisoner was occasionally employed to go on errands for me. On the 30th of May I sent him to Mr. Brown, at Kentish-town, with this money; it was the change out of a sovereign - I did not see him again till the Tuesday evening following, when I took him at Battle-bridge - he said, "I know I have done wrong."

SARAH BROWN . I expected this money in change for a sovereign which I had sent to pay a bill, but I did not receive it.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I received the prisoner in charge - he said he had taken the money - that he had been overpersuaded by a boy named Robins - they had been into the country, and that morning Robins had run off with the remainder of the money; I have known him from his birth, and never knew him to do anything wrong.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280703-51

1399. JAMES PACE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 4 tea-spoons, value 20s., the goods of Robert Herbert Brightwell ; and 2 spoons, value 10s. , the goods of Catherine Longe , since deceased.

THOMAS NICHOLSON . I was servant to Catherine Longe, who was a widow , but is now dead: Robert Herbert Brightwell is landlord of the house where she lived, No. 16, Alfred-place . On the morning of the 18th of June the bell rang, and I went up to answer it; I came down in about two minutes, and saw the prisoner in the kitchen; there had been no one there when I went up; I said,"What do you want?" he said he came to know if we had any shoes or boots to clean; I said No, and asked what else he came for: he said nothing; I said I would not let him go till I called some person; I went to the back of the door to ring a bell, which leads to the top of the house; the prisoner pushed the door too, but did not quite shut it - I opened the door, and saw these six spoons in his hand; they came down with the breakfast things in the two tea-trays, which stood about two yards from the door; I told him to give me the spoons, which he did - I took hold of him - he told me to let him go; I said I would not - he dragged me to the passage, and put his hand round my face - I bit his finger; the servant came down, and pushed us into the kitchen, and the constable was fetched.

JANE PERRY . I was servant at the house; I heard the noise, and came down; I pushed the prisoner and Nicholson into the kitchen; the prisoner asked me to let him go; I said I would not.

THOMAS COLE . I am a constable. I took the prisoner - he said he did not steal the spoons, he came to inquire for work: he was very obstinate; I was forced to throw him on the floor to get the handcuffs on - I believe he got down the area; he must have got through three doorways.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS NICHOLSON re-examined. He had them in his hand; I did not see him take them from his pocket - he was near the table; I did not see him with them when I first came down, nor did I notice them in the trays.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-52

1400. ELIZABETH SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 2 candlesticks, value 5s., and 1 sheet, value 5s. , the goods of John Calow .

ELIZABETH AMY CALOW . I am the daughter of John Calow, who lives in Little James-street, Bedford-row . On the 23d of June I saw these two candlesticks safe on the mantel-piece, and this sheet on a horse; in about half an hour after I saw the prisoner, (who was a stranger,) at our door - I asked what she had got; she said nothing: I found those articles under her shawl.

ELIZABETH AMY CALOW. I am the wife of John Calow. I saw the prisoner with these articles, and my daughter took them from her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My husband has been out of employ for eight months; I have ten children - it is my first offence.

The prisoner received an excellent character, and was recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-53

1401. JAMES McFARLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 chain, value 1s.; 1 seal, value 2s., and 1 watch-key, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Hugh Brown .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of James Brown .

The property had been entrusted to the prisoner's care in the East Indies, and found in pledge at Canterbury; there being no possession in Middlesex, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280703-54

1401. WILLIAM HARRIS CAREY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 cushion, value 6s. , the goods of John Marks .

JAMES MARKS . I am the son of John Marks - he keeps a coach repository in Langham-place. The prisoner was stopped on the premises on the 28th of June, with this property.

JAMES LEWIS . I am servant to John Marks. I was going down the ride for a pitcher of water, and saw the prisoner coming towards the door with the cushion; when he saw me he put it on a chariot which was near him, and asked me the price of it; he went into the premises, and said he wanted to look at a carriage; he went out, and Henson followed him.

CHARLES HENSON . I saw the prisoner take up this cushion and put it down; he took it up again, and went out; I went after him, and asked what he wanted - he said to buy a carriage; I said it was very odd he should take up a cushion, I supposed he wanted to steal it, as he did one in the morning, which I met him with - I told him to come back, but he would not.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I say, "It is not good enough for the person I want it for," and threw it on the carriage? A. No - he took it up from a travelling carriage,

and then put it down, took it up again, and put it on a chariot.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he was intoxicated, and had gone to the premises to purchase a cushion for a coachman - that he had been deranged, and in hot weather his intellects were still affected.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-55

1403. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 1 basket, value 1s. 6d., and 8 gallons of gooseberries, value 6s. , the goods of William Davis and John Davis .

JAMES MATTHEWS . I am in the employ of William and John Davis, fruit salesman , of Spitalfields-market . On the 21st of June I saw this basket of gooseberries on their stand; my master missed it about seven o'clock - I went up several streets; and was coming home, when I saw it covered with another basket, in Paternoster-row. I watched, and saw the prisoner come with some potatoes put them down by the side of the basket, and go in the market again - he came back again; I went and asked him if they were his gooseberries; he said No; my master came up and gave charge of him; I did not see him do anything with the basket.

GEORGE NOBLE . I was close to Davis' stand and saw the prisoner look round him, and then stoop and drag this basket from the stand round the corner; a boy said "Shall I mind it?" he said "No, I am going to take it away;" I did not see him take it away, but in a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes I missed it from there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. At what time was this? A. A quarter before seven o'clock in the morning.

GEORGE ADAMS . I received the prisoner in charge - he denied all knowledge of the gooseberries; he had 15s. 6d. in his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-56

1404. CHARLES BLAZIE was indicted for bigamy .

ANN BENTLEY . I know the prisoner; I was present at his marriage with Jane Lowe (who was a widow ), on the 26th of July, 1818; she is still alive and is in Court.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know how long they lived together? A. No; I have been in the habit of going to see them, but not for the last four years - she told the prisoner she had two children living.

SARAH MILES . I married the prisoner on the 18th of June, 1824 .

Cross-examined. Q. Had you been living in the house with him and his wife? A. I lived in the house, but did not know she was his wife; he was sleeping with her - he was a very false man; I never took any money of him but once - that was 4l.; I never slept with him but one night; I did not go back to that house after my marriage - I have not prosecuted him before; because he never became troublesome to me, but through his ill-using his wife I have done it; I am now living with a man, whom I lived with before I married the prisoner.

Q. Had you slept with the prisoner before you married him? A. No - I was cohabiting with the other man; what harm is that?

COURT. Q. What name did the prisoner's wife go by? A. I used to call her Mrs. Blazie, but he was so false and deceitful; I said to him "If you mean to be honest, tell me," and he said she was not his wife.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. But did not his wife answer to the name of Mrs. Blazie? A. I do not know that I called her so above once or twice; I did not ask her if she was his wife - he told me she was married to another man, and he brought the marriage lines into the passage; the man I live with is not married to another woman - I have had two children by him; he has not had any children by any other woman - his name is Joseph Vigor - I go by that name, and should have married him but for this case; I should have married him before I had the prisoner, but he used me ill and then I would not have him; he has used me better since - I told Vigor I had married the prisoner, but not on the same day.

BENJAMIN SCOFIELD . I produce two certificates of marriages, one from St. George's, Hanover-square, and one from St. Luke's, Chelsea - the clerks copied them out and read them while I held the book.

Prisoner's Defence. I married this woman but I never slept with her; we sat drinking that night till two o'clock in the morning, and at a quarter-past two I put on my hat and came home to my wife and have remained with her ever since.

MR. PHILLIPS to SARAH MILES. Q. Can you read and write? Q. Yes. I received 4l. of the prisoner in full of all demands, at his wife's wish - because she should live comfortably with him - this is my receipt.

GUILTY . Aged 68.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-57

1400. JOHN JONES and JOSEPH EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 7 pairs of boottops. value 1l. 18s. 6d., and 6 yards of lasting, value 1l. 3s. 6d. the goods of Nicholas Brown and Algernon Wallington .

ROBERT SMITH . I am clerk to Nicholas Brown and Algernon Wallington, of the Castle and Falcon Inn. On the 6th of June, the two prisoners brought a small box; I said to Jones "I want 2d." he borrowed 6d. of Edwards - I looked for the change, but they went off without it; as soon as they were gone, I missed a parcel which had been on the counter, it had come from Mr. Woods, for Lee and Sons, Coventry; I went to Jones' employers and waited till he came home, and gave him into custody - I said he had brought a parcel to our place and had a man with him; he said he had no man with him, but as we were going along, he said if I would intercede with his master he would tell me where the property was, and he told me part of it was at a pawnbroker's - from a place near his master's be took out these seven pairs of boot-tops; we then went into his master's office - Edwards was afterwards taken.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It was through Jones you found the property? A. Yes: I knew he came from Mr. Weston's of Bond-street, at they have a mark on their boxes - he was not intoxicated.

COURT. Q. Did he appear intoxicated when he first came? A. No: but when I took them they appeared to have been drinking.

ABSOLOM GINN . I am an officer. I was called to take the prisoners - I got this lasting from the pawnbroker's,

and I saw these boot-tops taken from the place where the shutters are put.

WILLIAM PINCKNEY . I am porter to Mr. James Wood . I took a parcel to the Castle and Falcon on the 6th of June, to go to Lee and Sons of Coventry; there were lasting, Denmark, and seven pairs of boot-tops in it; I saw it packed up - these are the boot-tops and the lasting; they have the dresser's mark on them - the Denmark is missing.

Cross-examined. Q. Does not the dresser put marks on other people's work? A. Yes; there is no mark of ours on them; the dresser is one of the first in the kingdom - four pairs of them are marked D. W. with a P at the top.

THOMAS MARCHANT . I am shopman to Mr. Day, a pawnbroker of St. Martin's-lane. I have two pieces of stuff pawned by Edwards, between three and four o'clock on the 6th of June; Smith came and asked for leather and we said we had none, but he came again, asked for stuff and we gave it him.

JONES' Defence. I was intoxicated and am innocently drawn into in.

EDWARDS Defence. I was out of place and very much distressed - I did not know what I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-58

1406. JAMES MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 1 sovereign and two 5l. Bank notes, the property of John Mirk , from his person ; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN MIRK. I am a ship-carpenter . On the 5th of June, soon after six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came up to me and asked for Wapping Old Stairs - we walked on together, and when we got to the middle of the street, I was holding out my left hand to direct him, down a street opposite, when he made a catch and took my pocket-book; I saw it in his hand, and made a grasp at it; he ran off, and I lost sight of him at the different turnings; he ran about a quarter of a mile; he started from me in Green Bank-street, and ran down Meetinghouse-alley, where I lodge - a man came out of my lodgings and pursued him - he turned into King-street, where he was taken; I did not see him taken; I have never got my pocket-book again; there was 11l. in it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you tell the numbers of those notes? A. No: I had them only one day; I got them from Captain Scarlett; I was quite sober - it was in my inside jacket-pocket - it was day light; the prisoner was not taken for two days after; I never saw him before - but am certain he is the person.

EDMUND CHAPMAN . I am a smith: I know Mirk; I saw him at dinner-time, on the 5th of June; he went out afterwards - I did not see that he had any pocket-book or money; at six o'clock I went to our yard, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I went out and saw the prisoner turn the corner of Love-lane; I pursued him to King-street, and saw him sitting down there; I had just glimpsed him as he turned the corner; Mirk and some women and boys were crying Stop thief! when I got to him he was sitting down scratching his head; I passed him and then went back; Mirk came up and said that was the man; he jumped up and ran away; I followed, but could not catch him; on the Saturday evening following, I went with the officer to the public-houses in the neighbourhood; we found him at the door of the White Swan public-house, in Ratcliff-highway, with two or three women; I went to speak to a shop-mate, and asked him to give me something to drink - he said he had no money; the prisoner came up and said, "I will lend you as much;" I then charged him with having stolen this money.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the prisoner? A. I do not know. I knew him before, but it was rather late and dark - there were gas lights about; I told him I knew him; I dare say he had seen me at different skittle-grounds; I have not a doubt but he saw me the night he stole the money, and knew me; he had a full opportunity of running away on the Saturday night, because I had to go and call the officer, which took me five minutes; he did not attempt to go away.

THOMAS AMES . I took up the prisoner, by desire of Chapman; he denied all knowledge of the robbery, and nothing was found on him.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-59

1407. GEORGE FOWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Matthias King , from his person .

MATTHIAS KING. On Friday, as I was walking up Long Acre , I felt a jerk at my pocket, and turned round and caught the prisoner; he dropped my handkerchief from his left hand - there was another lad with him, who got away.

Prisoner. There was a young chap passed by the gentleman at the time, and I saw the handkerchief on the ground. - Witness. There was another lad - but they were together; it fell from the prisoner's left hand - the other ran away.

JOHN HICKS . I took the prisoner; I knew him before - he denied having taken it, but said, another boy who was with him drew it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been into the Borough, and was going home; I saw another boy take the handkerchief and run by.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280703-60

1408. SAMUEL DYKE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 3 silver-spoons, value 2l., and 3 silver-forks, value 2l. , the goods of Edward Farnham , his master.

THOMAS EVAN JONES . I am butler to Edward Farnham, Esq. , of Stafford-street . The prisoner was our under-butler till the 12th of June, and left about two o'clock that day; when he was gone, I examined the plate, as far as I could; it was then about in different parts of the house - I missed some; and when it was collected I missed this property.

JAMES HILL . I am a pawnbroker. On the 13th of June, the prisoner pawned these three table-spoons for 30s., and on the 19th he brought these forks to pawn; I observed that he had been filing out the crest; he said, No, it was a cypher, S. D.; I saw it had been a crest, because there was part of a scroll; I said I should detain him - he then said it was his father's crest which he had taken out, and intended to have his own put on; I asked his

name; he said, Samuel Dyke - I the usaid I would go home with him, as he said he lived close by; he took me to a house in Robert-street, and in the passage he asked if Mr. Douglass was at home, who he said was his landlord - I then said he must come to me again, and in about an hour, he and Douglass came together; I had known Douglass for ten years - he said, he did not know anything of these things; and then my employer went to a Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you tell the prisoner you would meet him at Marlborough-street? A. Yes; he was at large till then - I did not go to the office the first evening; I was sent for the next day.

COURT. Q. You saw Mr. Dauglass first? A. Yes, and said, I was not satisfied, and wished to have some other person; he then went and brought a Mr. Woodland, who said he had known him a long time, and knew the forks to belong to his father - I did not go to the Magistrate till the next day; the prisoner was there then, and Woodland with him - Woodland then said he was told to say they were his father's by the prisoner, at the public-house; he was at liberty about half an hour, to go to get the second person.

GEORGE AVIS . I took the prisoner on the 16th; I think it was - he said they were his father's, and that he erased the initials out of them; I found a duplicate in a pocket-book, and that led to the spoons - I went to the prosecutor, and they counted up the plate, and missed them.

THOMAS EVAN JONES . These are Mr. Farnham's property, which I gave the officer, and those others appear of the same sets; this spoon is one of this set with the eagle, Lady Denbigh's crest erased from it - from this one a dolphin has been erased; these forks have part of a star on them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not twice say at the office, that you would not swear to it? A. I did to these two spoons, but not to all the property; I did not at first swear to the property - the Magistrates were on the point of discharging the prisoner; no one whispered anything to me - the Magistrate said, there was the point of the wings, and the coronet to be seen, and them I saw it; I had not given the prisoner an inventory of the plate - I only know the forks by comparing them with the same set.

COURT. Q. Had you had a dinner party the day before? A. Yes; my master has some of the deceased Lady Deubigh's plate, which was left him - I have brought some with the different marks on them; here are some with a star, and some with a dolphin.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it from my father.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-61

1409. THOMAS BEE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May , 1 brass taper pillar, value 10s.; 1 brass consumer and chain, value 6s.; 1 iron brace, value 1s. 6d.; 1 iron frame-saw, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of hand-vices, value 6d.; 1 basket, value 6d.; 1 table-cloth, value 6d.; 1 knife, value 1d., and 1 fork, value 2d. the goods of James Pritchard .

JAMES PRITCHARD. I am a brass-finisher . I left these articles safe on the 27th of May, at No. 55, Long-Acre , when I left work; and when I went next day they were gone, and the shop-door was broken open - only the pillar has been found.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is this an uncommon pillar? A. I know it by some marks on it, and the top is not straight; that might happen with others - I have seen the prisoner twice before - I do not know that he is in the habit of making such things.

COURT. Q. What time did you leave them? A. At half-past five o'clock; this pillar was hanging up against the wall; the shop-door was broken, but the stairs were open.

WILLIAM PURCELL . I am a broker. I bought this pillar of the prisoner on the 12th or 13th of June, for 8s. 6d.; he told me he had made it - and said, he was a gas-fitter; I have know him about two years.

Cross-examnied. Q. Has he not sold such things to you? A. Yes, frequently; I understood he made this too short for an order, and he sold it to me.

COURT. Q. Where did he live? A. I was to find him at a wine-vaults, where he was know by the name of the Gas-fitter.

WILLIAM DODD . I am an officer. I executed the warrant; Purcell took us to the Constitution public-house, and they directed us to the Harp, in Russel-street - they gave us the prisoner's direction, but he was not there; I afterwards found him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the same line of business as the prosecutor, and made such things every week.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-62

1410. MARGARET BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 2 decanters, value 20s. , the goods of Benjamin Brooks .

JANE BROOKS . I am the wife of Benjamin Brooks, of Berwick-street ; we deal in china and glass ; I know these decanters - I did not see them taken, but a neighbour came and told me a woman had walked out with them; I pursued the prisoner, who had got into the next street, and took them from her; she made use of very ill language, and struck me two or three times - she said they were her own; I had seen them safe five minutes before.

BRIDGET POCOCK . I was sitting in my house, which is opposite the prosecutor's, and saw the prisoner in the shop- she took up one decanter, and waited some time, then took up the other, and walked away with them; I went and inquired if the prosecutor had sold them; we pursued, and took them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280703-63

1411. WILLIAM STOCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 9lbs. weight of cheese, value 6s., the goods of Thomas Brown , his master ; and ANN BLACK was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well-knowing it to have been stolen , against the Statute.

THOMAS BROWN. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Grafton-street, Soho; the prisoner was in my service. I had been away two or three days, and when I came home Mr. Bromley told me he thought something was going on

wrong; I told him to come the next morning, and he pointed out Stockley - I did not miss any cheese.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then, whether you lost any or not, you cannot tell? A. From the business we do, we could not miss it; I know it by my mark on it, and by the dairy also - the whole of the cheese from that dairy comes to me - it is near Burton-upon-Trent.

WILLIAM BROMLEY . I was in Black's yard and saw Ann Black removing some dung from a dung heap; she said to Stockley "I want some straw" he said "You must be blind or have no feeling" - he came and said "Here it is" and she took up this cheese in her lap, from the heap of dung.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Brown on the 4th of June, to Ann Black's premises, which join to the prosecutor's; I found this cheese wrapped in a cloth by the bed side - Mr. Brown said it was his; Black begged for mercy and said her husband would make all right, and Stockley gave it her.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-64

1412. DANIEL DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , 5 pairs of stockings, value 40s., and 8 handkerchiefs, value 30s., the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross , his masters .

WILLIAM EVANS . I am servant to George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross; the prisoner was their porter for about a month - we had missed a paper of men's black silk stockings about a week before the 22d of June, and on that day I saw the prisoner going out with black silk stockings on - I called him back, and asked where he got them; he said he bought them of Mr. Matthews, in Orange-street - I said they were ours; he said he took them from our shop: I said I should search his box - he said there was nothing there, and gave me the key; I there found three other pairs of stockings and a handkerchief; and another pair of stockings wrapped up in some dirty linen, an behind his bed a piece of Bandanna handkerchiefs, with our mark, but he said he did not put them there; they were all new except one pair of stockings, which he had worn - he said they were our property: we had a good character with him.

HENRY WARDELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 22d of June.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 4 Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-65

1413. WILLIAM WILLIAMS & THOMAS DOWNES were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 90 yards of printed cotton, value 30s. , the goods of James Hendrey .

JAMES HENDREY. I am a linen-draper , and live at the corner of Great Newport-street . On the 7th of June a neighbour came and asked if we had lost anything - we inquired, and missed the prints; and soon after the officer came in with them, tied up in a handkerchief; I have every reason to believe they are mine, but there are no marks on them - there are four different patterns.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it not a great thoroughfare? A. Yes, and particularly at that time; we have a passage about four feet from the window, and in that doorway they stood; the outer door was open - I missed them between eleven and twelve o'clock; we were shutting-up when the officer came.

WILLIAM WHITTINGHAM . I live opposite the prosecutor. On the night in question, at near twelve o'clock, while the boys were putting up the shutters, I saw the two prisoners together; I took Williams for a person who was arraigned here last Session, but he is not; I saw them together from five to ten minutes - I watched them, and saw Williams go and look at something in the doorway, and while his hand was extended Downes took these prints, ran down Castle-street, and Williams after him - I pursued; I met Groom, and said, "I want your assistance - take that man (meaning Williams) into custody;" I went and took Downes with these prints; he had got them down, and was tying them up in this handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see Williams do anything? A. No - he extended his arm, and Downes came and took them out; there was no third man, to my knowledge - there were plenty of people in the street; I swear that I was not reprimanded at Bow-street office for letting a third man go, nor was Groom, in my presence; we went before Sir Richard Birnie - I was on the opposite side of the street: I saw them together ten or twelve minutes - they were not in the passage two minutes: the street was not very much crowded - I did not give an alarm, or go into the shop. I believe there were three or four cases in which I was examined last Session which were acquitted- I do not know in how many cases the Jury desired I might not have my expenses; I had my expenses in two cases.

JOHN GROOM . I am an officer. Whittingham asked me to assist him; he ran down Castle-street, and took Downes, who was stooping down - he told me to lay hold of Williams, which I did; while Whittingham and Downes were struggling I saw some prints on the ground, which I took up - I did not see who they fell from; before Whittingham came to me I saw a man like Downes, about his size, carrying a bundle: but I lost sight of him: there were several persons crossing the street.

Cross-examined. Q. Is not this street very much crowded? A. Yes - I had only come up to Bear-street; the Magistrate said that the other man ought to have been taken as well, but I do not know that Whittingham heard it - he went to the gate part of the time; there was another man with Williams, and I took them both, but Whittingham said, "This is the man," and the other got off; he walked fast - he did not run.

COURT. Q. Might not the other man have been the party carrying the bundle? A. I should think he might be one of the party; Williams struggled a great deal, and Whittingham said, "Let the other man go - this is the man;" I told Sir Richard Birnie of the third man.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then Whittingham saw the third man? A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-66

1414. WALTHAM AINSWORTH were indicted for embezzlement .

ROBERT HILES . I am a grocer , and live near Oxford-street. The prisoner was in my employ, and was to receive money, which it was his duty to bring to me. On the 12th of June 1 sent him to Mr. Charles Burt's, in the Commercial-road - he never came back; he was taken on the Sunday following.

CHARLES BURT . On the 12th of June I paid the prisoner 4l., between ten and eleven o'clock; he brought a note, and I paid him the money for his master.

JOHN ATLEY . Mr. Hiles described the prisoner to me, and I took him between one and two o'clock on the Sunday.

WILLIAM SEALEY . I paid the prisoner 1l. 4s. 6d. on Wednesday, the 11th of June, for his master.

MR. HILES. He never paid the money to me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-67

1415. EDWARD WHITAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , 3 1/2 dwts. of gold, value 14s. the goods of John Grandin , his master.

JOSEPH DAY. I manage the business of Mr. John Grandin, a goldsmith ; the prisoner was in his employ - we received information, and marked some gold on Saturday. the 31st of May, and gave it to the prisoner to melt- on Monday he had some more to melt, marked in the same way, and a piece of it was missing from the crucible; an officer was sent for, who taxed him with it, and one piece of gold was found on him; I think he said it was the only piece he had taken; it was worth about twelve shillings.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had any promise been made to him? A. No.

WILLIAM RUEL . I am in the prosecutor's employ. On the morning of the 2d of June, I marked thirteen pieces of gold, weighing 20z. 6 dwts., and gave them to the prisoner to melt; I afterwards went to his crucible, and found only eleven pieces there; the officer was sent for, and one gold found; I charged him with taking it, and he said he had, and it was the first time he had done such a thing.

Cross-examined. Q. What had you said to him? Q. I said he had purloined some of the gold - Verden was there at the time.

WILLIAM VERDEN . I am in the prosecutor's employ; I heard the prisoner accused of robbing Mr. Grandin; he said, after a little hesitation, that he had done so, and produced the gold out of his pocket.

JOHN HUGHES . I am a patrol. I went to the prosecutor's; I took this largest piece of gold from the prisoner's hand, and this small piece I found in his handkerchief under his braces; they are marked.

SAMUEL CALVERT . When the prisoner was accused, he brought out one of the pieces, but it was not taken from him - he kept it in his hand.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he might have put these into the crucible afterwards? A. He was called away from it - I gave him the gold to melt.

JURY. Q. Is it usual to put the whole of the gold in at once? A. It depends on the size of the crucible - it would have held all this.

Prisoner's Defence. The crucible would not hold it.

GUILTY. Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 6 Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-68

1416. JAMES KELLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 3 drinking-glasses, value 1s., the goods of Edward Wade; and 1 drinking-glass, value 1s. , the goods of Alexander Thornton .

ALEXANDER THORNTON. I am landlord of the Two Brewers public-house, Bunhill-row . The prisoner and some other persons came to my house last Saturday evening, from a quarter to half-past eleven o'clock; they ordered half a pint of gin, some water, and a glass; they paid for what they had - and when they were gone, I missed the glass; they had been there ten minutes - I pursued and overtook the prisoner and another of the party; the prisoner had a basket, in which two glasses were found belonging to Mr. Wade; we went to his house, and I found on the mantelpiece this glass, which very much resembles mine - but I cannot swear to it.

EDWARD WADE . I am a publican, and live in Whitecross-street. These two glasses were taken from my bar last Saturday night; the gas burst, and we lost three glasses in a moment; I had not noticed the prisoner there.

THOMAS HAYLOCK . I am an officer. I was going to Mr. Thornton's, and met him with the prisoner; I found these two glasses in the basket; I then went to his lodgings and found this glass, which Mr. Thornton said he thought was his; his landlady and another lodger had been with him, and they had got home.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that his landlady and her brother had given him the basket to carry.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-69

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1417. CHARLES SEXTON , HENRY MITCHELL and JOHN MANFIELD , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 knife, value 1s.; 2 purses, value 1s.; 10 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 4 crowns, 8 half-crowns and 5s., the property of Robert Green , from his person .

ROBERT GREEN. I am a labourer and live at Edgware. Last Friday night, I was returning from London and had got about eight miles - I went in a Hackney-coach part of the way; it was between twelve and one o'clock, when I got out of the coach at the sign of the Boot public-house, which is about the centre of the town; I went in, drank some beer, and then left the house; Sexton was sitting in the tap-room and Manfield was drawing beer - he was the pot-boy; the landlady wanted me to go to bed there; I was middling, not to say drunk nor sober - we drank three or four quarts of beer; I had ten sovereigns in a purse in my hat, and 45s. in my right-hand breeches pocket - I had it safe when I left the house; I had been there three quarters of an hour - I went out and slept in the road-way, and when I awoke my money was gone, and my pocket cut; I went before a Magistrate at Stanmore: I felt my money safe enough when I went to sleep - I had pulled out my silver to pay for some beer, but not the sovereigns out of my hat; I think I slept three hours and a half - I have never seen my money again.

HENRY LYNE . I am a butcher, and live at Edgware . I was standing at my slaughter-house between one and two o'clock and saw Manfield come up to the prosecutor and put his hand into his pocket - in the meantime the other two prisoners came up; the prosecutor was awake- Manfield took nothing out then; I went up to them and Manfield put his hand into his pocket again - I did not see anything taken from him; the other two then said "We will go home, and go to bed;" Manfield said to the prosecutor "You will go home with me, won't you?" I then saw the prosecutor go and lie down under a wall - I saw

the other two prisoners kneel on him, cut his pocket, and then go away; I said to Manfield in the morning "You had some of the money" - he said he had not.

FRANCIS LEE . I am a constable. Sexton was brought to me and I found on him 1l. 3s. 6d. in silver, a half-sovereign and a clasp-knife; it was then considered that Mitchell was concerned with him - he was fetched, and one crown, 7s., and a knife were found on him; we went before Mr. Orm at Stanmore - he has not sent any depositions - it is not customary there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-70

1418. AMELIA DIAMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 10s., the monies of Michael Cannon , from his person .

MICHAEL CANNON. I am a pavior . Last Sunday, I went to see a friend, and left him about twenty minutes after two o'clock in the morning - I then met the prisoner in Oxford-street; she asked me to go home with her - I went with her down some back streets, and she went to a door-way and could not get in; I was ashamed to go home to my wife as it was so late - I should have been knocking or ringing a long while; the prisoner then took 10s. from my waistcoat pocket - I am sure I had it there; I did not take hold of her, as I was afraid she would say I was robbing her; I went and looked for a watchman - I was sober- I told the watchman of her, as I had taken particular notice of her person; he said he thought she was gone down the square - I went there, but could not find her; I afterwards met her in Oxford-street, and I said "My good woman give me my 10s. before you and I get into any bother;" she said she would see me d - d first; I gave charge of her - 9s. and some copper was found on her; I had 10s. in shillings, and a half-crown in my pocket; two half-crowns were found on her; I had not given her this money - I intended to have given her 2s., but I had not taken it out of my pocket.

NOAH CLARK . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner, and found on her two half-crowns, and 4s. in silver, and 1s. 1 1/2d. in copper - she said she had been with the man and did not deny that it was his money.

Prisoner's Defence. I had got some money from some gentlemen; I met this man after two o'clock - he said he would like to go and take a walk with me; I said he might- he did so, and then I said I would not be made a fool of, he had been with me and I would be paid for it, and I would have my money.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-71

1419. SARAH BURKE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 7 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the monies of John Milne , from his person .

JOHN MILNE. I am a mariner , belonging to the General Steam Navigation Company. I had been to see some of my acquaintances, and was in Ratcliff-highway at a quarterpast one o'clock in the morning of the 6th of June: I was bidding another man good night - the prisoner came up, turned my pocket inside out, and took my money in a moment: I did not know her before - I had 7s. 6d. in my breeches pocket, and it was safe four minutes before; she only said where was I going, and then turned out my pocket; some of my money fell down; I took hold of her hand, and asked for my money; a man, calling himself her husband, came and told me to let his wife go; I called the watchman, and gave her in charge; I had 7s. 6d. in my pocket - I got 2s. back.

JAMES CARROLL . I am a watchman. I heard the prosecutor cry Watch! I went up to the place, and found him and the prisoner in a row with some other persons; he gave charge of her for robbing him of 7s. 6d. - she denied it; she had dropped 1s. before I came up - it was given me to take to the watch-house, and in going along she dropped another shilling from her person - she stooped took it up; I took it from her hand.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that her husband had occasion to step aside for a short time, when the prosecutor, who had passed her with two girls, returned, and accosted her as a prostitute - he continued to follow her, and she could not get rid of him till near the watch-house, when he charged her with robbing him.

JOHN MILNE re-examined. Q. Upon your solemn oath had you had any conversation with her before this money was taken? A. No; her husband came to the Thames Police-office the next morning, and offered to pay me the money if I would let her go and go and get something to drink.

JAMES CARROLL re-examined. I was standing by the prosecutor at the office - the prisoner's husband came up, and said, "If you will take your oath she took the money, I will pay it you, and we will have something to drink." I have been a watchman about twelve years.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-72

1420. GEORGE COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 23lbs. weight of lead, value 4s., the goods of William Dempsey , and fixed to a building; against the Statute .

JOHN VANN . I am a Police-officer. I was in Whitechapel about eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 5th of June; I saw the prisoner with a bundle under his arm, near Petticoat-lane - I suspected he had not come by it honestly, and asked what he had got; he said Nothing, and wanted to go on; I took the bundle, and found these two sheets of lead - I detained him.

FRANCIS KEYS . I was with Vann. I took the lead to the prosecutor's building - it fitted exactly.

WILLIAM DEMPSEY. This building belonged to me - it is the carcase of a house at Stepney ; I had seen the lead safe two days before - I did not see it fitted.

JOHN DAY BARNES . I am a plumber. On the 5th of June the officer brought the lead to me; I went and compared it with the place where I had laid it down; I am quite certain it is the same lead which I had laid down- here are 24lbs.; there was about 1 cwt. and a half taken ltogether. GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-73

1421. MARTHA WALL was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , 18 yards of ribbon, value 7s. , the goods of John Hopkins .

MARY WADSWORTH . I lived with Mr. John Hopkins, a linen-draper , of Shoreditch . The prisoner came there in the evening of the 30th of May, and asked to look at some ribbons - I showed her some, and she bought one yard of gauze ribbon; I saw her take half a piece of rib

bon, and put it into her basket; I asked her to give it me, and said she had taken it off the counter - she said she had not; I looked into her basket, and saw it; she had not then paid for the ribbon she had bought; I named it to Mr. Goulburn - he came up, and she was taken; before she left the shop she said it was the first time she had ever done so.

WILLIAM GOULBURN . I occasionally serve in that shop. Miss Wadsworth called me, and related the transaction; she handed me the ribbon, which I kept till I gave the prisoner in charge; I did not see it in the basket - it is Mr. Hopkins' property.

BARNARD JEFFERY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and produce the property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280703-74

1422. JOSEPH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 2 books, value 2l. 10s. , the goods of William George Mores .

JOHN SIDNEY GOWER . I am foreman to Mr. William George Mores, an auctioneer , of Bond-street. These two books were on the table in the room; the prisoner came in on Monday, the 30th of June, and seemed very busy looking at the books - I left the room, and when I returned I saw him look more bulky than when he came in; he went out - I told the porter to go and stop him; he said it looked so to take a gentleman in Bond-street; I then went and took him with these two books.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that nothing but the most urgent distress had induced him to commit the offence.

GUILTY. Aged 68.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be his first offence, and that he was in distress .

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-75

1423. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 1 basket, value 6d., and 7 gallons of gooseberries, value 4s. , the goods of Charles May .

CHARLES MAY. I keep a chandler's shop . I had a basket of gooseberries at my door on Saturday night - I think it was the 13th or 14th of June; a man told me he saw the prisoner going up Grove-street with a basket on his head - I went after him, and found a watchman at the corner of James-street; I told him to follow me, and we went and took the prisoner into custody; I knew it was my basket - he had not bought them; there were about seven gallons.(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man came and asked if I would carry it, and he would give me 1s,; he was a tallish man, and lifted it on my head - he told me to go on slowly.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-76

1424. JANE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 1 watch, value 18s. , the goods of John Tebbutt .

JOHN TEBBUTT. I am a brick-burner . On the 15th of June, at five o'clock in the morning, I put my watch on the shelf, between two large pickling jars; I went out to work, and when I returned at night it was gone - there was not a soul in the house all day; I went to my son, and told him I had lost it - the prisoner's sister, Ann, came the next morning, and I accused her of stealing it; she put her hands together, and fell a crying, and said she was innocent; I said, "Who was here yesterday" - she said, "My sister Jane." On the 15th, (which was Sunday,) the prisoner was there and breakfasted; I got an officer, and went to the prisoner's father, and she was taken - she said, "It was my sister, Ann, stole the watch, or else how could she buy those clothes on Sunday morning;" I said, "You impudent hussey, how could she take it when I had it on Monday?" she then told me where it was.

Prisoner. He lives with my sister, and she goes out every night to help to support him; she told me to take watch to Mr. Newman's.

COURT. Q. Does her sister live in the house with you? A. No - she comes to make my bed, and to wash up; I never slept with her in my life - she is nothing but a bad girl; they are a bad breed; I have only been there about a year and a half - I might perhaps get an honest woman to make my bed, but I seldom see the girl; she goes out on the town, but the bed is generally made when I go home - if not, I make it myself. I was robbed of some fowls once, and was here once - I never was at Clerkenwell, nor any where else for thieving; I am surprised you should ask me such a thing - I am quite angry that you should think I had been there, Do you think I look like a thief? I have never seen any of my family there - none of them have ever gone abroad.

GEORGE NEWMAN . I am a watch-maker. This watch was brought to me to be repaired - the handle was broken.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-77

1425. JAMES PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 8 books, value 5l. 16s. , the goods of John Dewar .

HENRY SAUNDERS . I am in the employ of Mr. John Dewar, of No. 3, Mile-end-road . On Friday week the prisoner came to my master's shop, and asked to look at some Bibles and Prayer-books - I showed him some, and he looked out a lot, which he said were for his sister; he then cast his eye over a glass-case, and saw two volumes of Pelham's Voyages - he asked me to let him look at them for his brother; I said they were 3l. - he offered me 2l. 10s., and told me to take them over to his lodging with the Bibles and Prayer-books - which I did; the servant took them up stairs, and the prisoner came down to the door and said I must come the next morning - I said I might lose the sale of them; he then said I must leave them till five o'clock - I went there then, and he was gone; the value of the books was 5l. 16s. 6d - there were three Bibles, three Prayer-books, and two volumes of Pelham's Travels; he said he wanted them for his, brother and sister.

MARY ANN SMITH . This witness brought the books to me, and I took them to the prisoner - he had taken the

lodging about a quarter of an hour before; I know nothing of him.

HANNAH CURTIS . I keep the house. The prisoner came to hire my lodgings on the 20th of June, about twelve o'clock - I knew nothing of him; he took the books out of the house, and I saw no more of him; he was to have the lodgings by the quarter, but I sent to his reference and no such person was known - he was to come at five o'clock for an answer.

COURT to HENRY SAUNDERS. Q. Was he a perfect stranger to you? A. Yes - he said he expected his brother and sister about five o'clock, but did not say where they lived; I made no enquiry about them, but I knew the house where he lived, as I had taken goods there before - I had parted with the books, expecting he would pay me for them, or return some of them; he took them to look at - I traced two of them to a pawnbroker's - he is not here; he felt great reluctance at attending - I did subpoena him; I know these two are two which he took away.

Prisoner. I bought the books, and he was to come in the evening, or in the morning, for the money. Witness. There was no bargain - they were left on liking.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-78

1426. JAMES PICKERING was again indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 1 sextant, value 6l.; 1 quadrant, value 3l., and 2 telescopes, value 4l. 10s. , the goods of Joseph Fairey .

JOSEPH FAIREY. I am a mathematical instrument maker , and live at No. 8, Commercial-road. On Thursday, the 19th of June, the prisoner called and said he wanted a quadrant, a telescope, and a sextant, for his brother, who was going to sea; I sent my lad with them to his house - he came back without them, and said he was to go in an hour; they were not to be disposed of without the money - they were merely for his brother to look at; they were not quite finished - I have found them since at four different pawnbrokers.

JOHN HEWITSON . I live with Mr. Fairey. I took these articles to No. 6, Grenada-terrace, Commercial-road; the prisoner carried one telescope, and I carried the rest of the articles - he took them at the house, and said his brother was not at home, but I was to call in an hour and a half; I went with my master - he was then gone.

JOSEPH FORSTER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner at Tottenham, where he got two watches; in consequence of an advertisement I went down and took him.

THOMAS GARDNER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bishopsgate-street. I have a telescope pawned by the prisoner on the 19th of June.

THOMAS CASTLE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a quadrant pawned by the prisoner.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a telescope pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM SHARP . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sextant pawned by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years to commence from the expiration of his former sentence .

Reference Number: t18280703-79

1427. HARRIET MILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 30 pieces of ribbon, value 34s.; 8 pieces of lace, value 32s.; 2 caps, value 2s.; 11 yards of flannel binding, value 6d.; 4 pairs of gloves, value 4s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s., and 3 pairs of stockings, value 2s. , the goods of James West .

JAMES WEST. I am a haberdasher , and live in Shoreditch . The prisoner was my servant of all-work, but had nothing to do with the shop. On Monday, the 9th of June, I missed a piece of ribbon, which I discovered to be cut in the drawer; I told Miss Backhouse of it, and said I would search the boxes - I went to the prisoner's box, and found the ribbon I had missed, and all these other articles - they are all mine; this parcel was found under Miss Backhouse's bed.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you reason to believe that her connections are respectable? A. I do not know anything against it; I am not desirous of pressing harshly against her by any means - her friends have promised to take her, and act kindly to her; I believe it is her first offence; she pushed back the sash, and took the goods from the place they had been in in the warehouse.

MARGARET BACKHOUSE . I live in the service of the prosecutor. I was present when the goods were found - I know nothing of the bundle which was under the foot of my bed.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-80

1428. JAMES MALONEY was indicted for stealing on the 12th of June , 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. 7d. , the goods of John Smith .

DAVID HAKTON. I am in the service of Mr. John Smith - he is a baker . On the 12th of June, about twelve o'clock, I left my basket to go on a few doors; when I returned a young man told me the prisoner had been stopped with two loaves, and was at the constable's - I went there and found him.

JAMES QUICK . I was serving my master's customers, and heard a lad had taken some bread; I ran after the prisoner, and saw him throw down two quartern bricks in Great James-street - when I came up to him he fell on his knees, and said he did it for hunger.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very hungry, and had had nothing since the night before the last - I work for Mr. Boyle, the paper-stainer.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280703-81

1429. JOHN MISSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 15s. , the goods of Joseph Nias .

RICHARD THOMPSON . I work for Mr. Thomas Nias , son of Mr. Joseph Nias. On the 17th of June I was at work opposite Mr. Joseph Nias' house; between twelve and one o'clock, a woman called to me, and said, she had seen a person go in at the window; I looked and saw the prisoner coming out of the window with a bundle of shavings - I went up to him, and called to him, to stop, but he ran away towards the gate; I pursued him - he ran round the back road; I came to the bridge at the

Rosemary Branch, and cried, Stop thief! he was stopped by two officers who were going along; I did not search him - these tongs were found in the garden.

AMELIA NIAS . I am the daughter of Joseph Nias. On the 17th of June, there was a noise - I went to the door and heard some person had been there, and run away; I had seen these tongs safe in the parlour which the prisoner got out of about ten minutes before.

SARAH CLARK . I was at the adjoining house, and saw the prisoner get in at the window; I gave an alarm to Thompson, and he was pursued - he ran through the garden where these tongs were found.

SOPHIA HAZLE . I was in my own house between twelve and one o'clock; I saw a man running fast - I went out and saw some people looking about; they said, some person had been into the house and taken a pair of tongs - I found these tongs in the garden.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-82

1430. ISAAC LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 1 pair of breeches, value 10s. , the goods of Moses Davis .

THOMAS COLEMAN . I was at my door on the 10th of June, and saw the prisoner go and unhook a pair of breeches from the prosecutor's shop-window; I knew that Davis knew him, and did not think he was going to steal them, till he began to run - I then told Davis of it; he was taken in the afternoon, but the property has not been found - I have known him two or three years, and never knew anything amiss of him; I am certain of him.

MOSES DAVIS . I keep a clothes-shop . At half-past seven o'clock that morning, Coleman came and told me of the circumstance; I had put out the breeches about ten minutes before - the prisoner's brother lived servant with me, and I believe he had a good character; I was quite surprised at it - I had seen him passing, but never had any dealings with him.

ROBERT TATTEN . I am a porter of Gray's Inn. The prosecutor's wife gave me information, and I took the prisoner going through the square.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through the square; the prosecutor's wife said, I had taken a pair of breeches; I said, she was mistaken, I would go anywhere to rectify the mistake.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury . - Confined 1 Month .

Reference Number: t18280703-83

1431. GEORGE HERRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 6 pairs of plyers, value 5s. , the goods of George Allen .

JOSEPH FRYER . I am a patrol. On the 4th of June, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning I was in Norton Falgate , and saw the prisoner in Mr. Allen's shop; I saw there was no other person in the shop, and I watched him - I saw him put his hand across the counter into a recess; I waited till he came out, and asked what he had got; he said, Nothing; I took off his hat and found this property in it.

GEORGE ALLEN . I was at home in my counting-house; I was called, and saw this property; it had been in a glass-case in the shop, near the window - here is my private mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man, and had nothing to do.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor .

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280703-84

1432. EMMA GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 1 shawl, value 14s. , the goods of William Rowling .

WILLIAM ROWLING. I am a linen-draper , and live in Gray's Inn-lane-road . I missed a shawl on the 12th of June, which had been in the window about eight o'clock in the morning, and about ten I found it at a pawnbroker's; we had served nobody that morning.

WILLIAM WARD . I live with Mr. Brown, a pawnbroker. This shawl was pawned by the prisoner on the 12th of June, and on the 14th she came to redeem it - I sent for the prosecutor, and she was taken.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I came from Norwich; a girl asked me to pawn it for her.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280703-85

1433. MICHAEL FLEMING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , 1 spoon, value 10s. , the goods of Sawyer Spence .

The prosecutor not being able to identify the property, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18280703-86

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JULY 4.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1434. JAMES DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 fork, value 5s., and 1 spoon, value 2s. , the goods of William Henry Trant .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-87

1435. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , 1 fender, value 28s. , the goods of George Wood .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-88

1436. SAMUEL MORGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , 1 milk-kettle, value 6d.; 2 shillings. 2 sixpences, 3 pence, and 12 halfpence , the property of Ann Miller .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-89

1437. JAMES BULLOUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 8 half-crowns, 20 shillings, 7 sixpences, and 6 halfpence, the property of William Peppet , to whom he was servant .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-90

1438. SUSANNAH BOTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 1 silver spoon, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Chapman .

SAMUEL CHAPMAN. I am a painter , and live in Cranford-street, Mary-le-bone . I lost a spoon on the 7th of June.

CHARLOTTE MARGARUM . My mother sent the prisoner to work at Mr. Chapman's house, in her place; I heard on the Tuesday following, that the spoon was missed - I asked the prisoner if she took it; she said, certainly she did - that she was very sorry - that she had done it through distress, and had pawned it at Mr. Jenkin's, Crawford-street, and she gave me the affidavit of it.

HENRY GIBBS . I am an assistant to Mr. Jenkins, a pawnbroker. I have a spoon pawned by a woman on the 22d of June - I cannot say it was the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-91

1439. MARY BURNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 12 pairs of upper-leathers, value 5s. 6d. , the goods of Daniel England .

DANIEL ENGLAND. I am a shoe-maker , and live in Charlotte-street, Bethnal-green . I lost twelve pairs of upper-leathers on Sunday, the 8th of June out of a box - I had seen them on the Friday before; I did not miss them till the Tuesday after - the box was in the room where I sleep and work; it had no lock on it - the prisoner's son has worked for me twelve months, and I took her in out of charity; I took my bed out to oblige her and her three children - these are my upper-leathers, but since they were taken nine pairs of them have had soles put on them.

JOHN WRENCH . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Spitalfields. The prisoner came to my shop on Sunday the 8th of June, and brought a number of upper-leathers - I did not see them particularly; I looked at one or two, and refused to buy them - but I firmly believe these are a part of them; I said, I manufactured my own work in general, and what I did not, I bought of Mr. Stokes - she said, she was in great distress, and her children were starving.

MARY ISAACS . The prisoner came to my house that Sunday, and asked me to buy these upper-leathers; I said, I never bought things in that way - she said, "My husband died in great distress, and my four children have been two days without food, if you would let me have 2s. on them, I should be very much obliged to you," and out of humanity I let her have it, as I could not get rid of her; a man who works for me, came to my house - I gave them to him to put soles to them; I gave them to the officer.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-92

1440. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 16th of June , 1 gown, value 3s.; 1 frock, value 6s.; 6 aprons, value 6s.; 1 shift, value 2s., 1 nightgown, value 1s.; 1 pillow-case, value 9d.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 pinafore, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 2s.; 1 half shawl, value 2s., and one table-cloth, value 1s., the goods and chattels of Edmund Sayers , well knowing the same to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

CICELY SAYERS . I am the wife of Edmund Sayers; we live in a cottage, near North End . On the night of the 28th of April, our premises were broken open, and I lost a gown, a frock, some aprons, and a variety of other articles; among other things I lost some beads; on the 15th of June I received a communication from my daughter, and in consequence of what she said, the prisoner's premises were searched; he lives at Fulham-fields, a short distance from my house; we found one gown, one frock, six aprons, one shawl, one diaper pinafore, one pillow-case, and the beads - the beads were in the caddy, on the table - the gown and coloured things were tied up in a bundle, between the bed and the sacking, and the white things were in a chest with other things; the prisoner was not at home, but he was taken the same evening - his wife was there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your daughter here? A. No; she is ten years of age; she saw them on the prisoner's child's neck, and came and told me; I believe the prisoner has three children.

ISAAC HAWKINS . I had a search-warrant from Mr. Scott, to search the prisoner's premises; I went after him; and found him about four or five o'clock in the evening; Mr. Sayer's evidence is quite correct; I told the prisoner I had come to him about some things found at his house; he said he had found them on the roof of his house, but I do not recollect what he said when I told him they were the prosecutor's, and had been stolen; some of the articles had been marked - he lives about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Sayers; there was a great deal of talk about the robbery.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SARAH BERRY . I live at the back of the prisoner's house. On Saturday evening, the 14th of June, he came home about nine o'clock in the evening, with his wife and child in a cart; he got on the house and said he saw a bundle there; a woman named Hatton was there and saw it; Mr. Pendrell is a neighbour; I saw the prisoner throw the bundle down from the roof - it was in an old shawl or apron, and seemed to contain a bundle of something; they are low cottages, about seven feet high; he asked me if they belonged to me - I said they did not.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Does Pendrell live in the same house with you? A. Yes; there are two rooms in it; I am single; I never was in trouble for stealing a watch; I was once in trouble for being out late; I was in prison two months - I have been in prison for a day or so several times - I never knew Pendrell to be in any bother about thieving; he used to go about with a horse and cart, and now he has a donkey; he has worked for Mr. Scott.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. By being out late, do you mean being disorderly? A. Yes.

AMELIA HATTON . My husband works in the gardens. I am a neighbour of the prisoner. On Saturday, the 14th of June, I saw him come home with his family in a cart; he had thrown the bundle off the house; I did not see Berry.

Cross-examined. Q. Was that a wet day? A. No, very dry; it was between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I do not know whether it had rained in the morning - I do not know that I recollect the day; but I remember the first time I was spoken to about coming here was on the Tuesday, as the prisoner was taken on the Monday;

I went before the Magistrate, and told him the same. My husband works for Mr. Halesbury, a market-gardener - Berry lives next door to me and the back of the prisoner's house faces my door.

WILLIAM PENDRELL . I live near the prisoner; Berry lives in the house with me. On the evening of the 14th of June I saw the bundles; the prisoner said, "I have found some things - I will take them in, and I dare say we shall find an owner;" he keeps a horse and cart.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you ever in trouble? A. Never, except for being in liquor, or anything of that - I never was in prison for any sort of felony; the constable met me one night, and took a shawl from me, and because I would not be content to have my money taken out of my pocket they struck me, and said I hit them; they put me into the cage, and took me before a Magistrate; they said if I would give 15s. 6d. they would make it up, and then they got a bill against me; it cost me about 8l. in all; I keep a donkey - I go out gathering hones, iron and rags, and such things. I did not take particular notice whether there were two or three bundles - I think there was more than one. I do not recollect the 28th of April, but I remember I was at home on the 14th; I did not go before the Magistrate: I remember, when I came home, hearing that the prisoner was taken.

COURT to ISAAC HAWKINS . Q. What sort of a roof is there to the house? A. There is a gutter to it - it is seven or eight feet high; I should think a person could not discover a bundle on the roof in walking by; but on a horse or in a cart they might.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-93

Third Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1441. WILLIAM BURNHAM and CHARLES BUTLER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , at Wilsden, 3 shillings, and 1 sixpence , the monies of Joseph Smith .

JOSEPH SMITH. I am a grocer , and live at Wilsden . - On Friday, the 13th of June, I was in my kitchen, and heard a rustle in my shop; I came into the shop, and found Burnham leaning over the counter, and putting his hand to the till; I asked what he was doing - he gave me no answer, but ran out; Butler was standing in the doorway, and he walked off; there had been a younger one in the shop, but he got away; I looked into the till, and missed the bowl, with, I think, from 3s. to 5s. in it - I ran after Butler, who was then walking by the window, and asked him if he had got the money - he said No; I left him in charge of a friend, and ran after Burnham - I overtook him about three quarters of a mile off; he got into a field, and threw himself under the hedge; I took him there, and near to where he was I tore up the grass, and found 3s. 6d.: when I returned to my shop I found this bowl in the doorway - it might be there when I went out, but I did not see it; I suppose Butler had got thirty yards from the shop when I went out; I charged Burnham with taking the 3s. 6d. - he said it was what he had taken, and he hoped I would forgive him; when I brought him back he said,"That young one was with me, and ought to go as well as me."

COURT. Q. How long did you see Butler at the door? A. While I spoke to Burnham; I know the bowl was in the till; I had taken out 10s. a short time before, and it was safe.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer. The prisoners were given into my charge.

BURNHAM - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

BUTLER - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-94

1442. ABRAHAM WEST and JOHN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Atto , from his person .

THOMAS ATTO. On the 30th of June I lost a silk handkerchief; I did not feel it taken, but I received information from the officer and the persons around me, and then I missed it - I had had it about five minutes before; it has not my initials on it, but has a hole in it; I have had it two years, and know it well - I did not see the prisoner.

GEORGE WADDINGTON. I was on duty at the fire in Red Lion-street ; I saw the two prisoners close up upon the prosecutor - Smith put his hands round him, and West took the handkerchief from him: I caught hold of West, who dropped it at his feet.

DANIEL RIERDON . I was on duty; I heard Waddington's voice, turned round, and saw he had hold of West - he told me to take up this handkerchief, which I did.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WEST'S Defence (written.) I followed the engines to see the fire, and what the officer swears arises from a mistake; between me and the prosecutor there was another person, who disappeared on the officer touching me; I am quite a stranger to my fellow prisoner.

SMITH'S Defence. I was going from Hackney; I saw the people, and heard there was a fire; I went there, and had not been ten minutes when I was taken.

GEORGE WADDINGTON re-examined. Q. How long had you seen them together? A. For near three quarters of an hour, or an hour, trying different pockets - that induced me to watch them.

WEST - GUILTY . Aged 20.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-95

1443. WILLIAM MAYHO was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 7s., the goods of Robert Spencer , from the person of Robert Spencer , the younger .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the property of Robert Spencer, the younger, and stolen from his person.

ROBERT SPENCER, JUN. My father's name is Robert Spencer. On the 20th of June the prisoner took a handkerchief from me at the door of the Duke of Gloucester public-house in Whitecross-street - my mother sent my sister and me to get the handkerchief and a waistcoat out of pawn; my sister gave me the handkerchief - the prisoner came and took it out of my hand; I had not seen him before, but I noticed the spot in his eye - he ran into the Duke of Gloucester, came out again, and said some person had taken it from him, but he said if I would give him 1s. he would try and get it; I gave him 1s. - he went in, but came out again, and said he could not find it.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. What time was this? A. Half-past nine o'clock in the evening; it did not take long - he snatched it out of my hand; I had seen

him once before; the milk-woman outside saw me give him the shilling, but she is not here; my sister was gone at that time to take the waistcoat home; I had to go on to buy a mackerel - there was no boy named Harley by me; the woman saw it, and saw a person from a window, but they are not here - they called out from one of the windows, what a shame it was; the people afterwards persuaded me to follow him into the house, to see if I could get it - I went in, and there were some more people there, who said if I would give 2s. more they would give it me, but I had not any more to give; the prisoner was there, sitting smoking his pipe - I have not got the handkerchief since; I cried out very loudly, "Give me my handkerchief," but no one came to my assistance, and no one was by when he took it but the milk-woman.

ELIZABETH SPENCER . On the night of the 20th of June I went with my brother to take these things out of pawn; I went home, and he was to go - he had the handkerchief.

CHARLES RICHARDSON . I am a constable. A person came to me at a quarter before ten o'clock, and stated that a boy at the Duke of Gloucester had been robbed of a silk handkerchief; I went up to the house, but as it is a most desperate house, and I had nearly lost my life there, I did not go in alone, but waited till the watchman came up; when I went in I saw this boy up in a corner. and those characters would not let him out: I called him out, and said, "What have you lost?" he said a silk handkerchief; I said, "Go in and point out the man" - he pointed out the prisoner; he said he had given him 1s., and he was to return him the handkerchief or the 1s., but he had not; two or three of them said, "Why don't you give the handkerchief," but the prisoner took no notice.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search him? A. Yes, but found nothing; the boy did not say anything to me about a milk-woman being there - there were not many persons round the house; the boy was in the house - I was told he had been crying for a quarter of an hour in the street: as I went in the prisoner seemed to be coming from the back yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I had done work at half-past eight o'clock, and went to have a pint of beer; I came out to the door, and this lad said, "Tell John Harley I want him;" I went in, and said that person was wanted- this lad then came in, and I sat down; in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour the officer came and called this boy out, and in two or three minutes I was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-96

1444. THEODORE ALBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Vorley , the elder, from the person of John Iliff Vorley .

JOHN ILIFF VORLEY. On the 3d of June, as I was in St. John-street, Clerkenwell , a man took a handkerchief out of my pocket and gave it to the prisoner, who ran down a street; I pursued him, crying Stop thief! he was taken in Arlington-street - the other man walked away; I had seen the prisoner before - it belonged to my father whose name is William.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. The other man took the handkerchief? A. Yes - there was a great crowd there, looking at a drunken man; the prisoner was close to me when it was taken - he ran away, the other walked; the prisoner threw the handkerchief out of his pocket at the end of Arlington-street - I was about one hundred yards from him; I had seen him by the New river. near Sadler's Wells, with some persons who were fishing - I saw the constable at Hatton-garden; he called at our house on Sunday night to see my father - he spoke about this transaction a little, I believe; he did not tell me what to say when I came here - my father did not wish me to prosecute at first, so I did not go to the Magistrate's the next day; the day after that the constable came with a summons - I am in my thirteenth year - my father uses the handkerchief sometimes; I have the care of my own clothes, but I did not buy that handkerchief - there is no mark on it, but I know it by the pattern; a lady picked it up and gave it me: when the prisoner was stopped he went very quietly and said he had picked it up - when we got up higher, the constable came up; I had had the handkerchief just before it was taken - I did tell the Magistrate I saw it taken from my bosom.

CHARLES SNEYD . I saw the prisoner running on the 3d of June; there was a cry of Stop thief, raised by the prosecutor - the prisoner had nothing in his hand when I saw him; I saw the handkerchief, which he flung out of his side pocket into the middle of the road - a lady picked it up and gave it to the prosecutor; I stopped him about half a second after he threw it down - this is the handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear he was running? A. I will; there were not many people after him; only the prosecutor; the prisoner was coming towards me - the street is about two hundred yards long; they tell me the crowd was by the Woolpack public-house, but I did not see it.

DANIEL RIERDON . I am a constable. I received the prisoner and produce the handkerchief; he told the Magistrate, he picked it up, lying by the curb stone.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the back of Hornsey Wood, and fearing I should be too late for Sadler's Well, I hurried; there was a disturbance with a drunken man, but I did not stop above a moment or two - I turned from the crowd and saw the handkerchief; I took it up, and going down Arlington-street, I heard the cry Stop thief! I turned and saw the prosecutor running - I did not proceed a yard from the place, but, being flurried, I own the handkerchief did drop from my hand: I said I had picked it up and would go with him anywhere.

COURT to J. L. VORLEY. Did you see the handkerchief taken up? A. Yes, about two hundred yards from where I had been - I am sure I had not dropped it.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Five Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-97

Fifth Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1445. ELIZABETH SAINSBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 1 sheet, value 4s.; 1 tablecloth, value 10s.; 1 shift, value 6s., and 1 spoon, value 2s. , the goods of George Andrews , her master.

ELEANOR ANDREWS . I am the wife of George Andrews; the prisoner had been in my service about a week. On the

25th of June I missed a spoon, and made some inquires - I have since found some articles at the pawnbrokers.

HENRY CHURCHILL . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I took in this sheet of the prisoner on the 25th of June.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. I received a table-cloth and shift of the prisoner on the 24th of June.

JOHN BRANDLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found the duplicates in her pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-98

1446. JOHN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , 2 coats, value 30s.; 1 brooch, value 3s.; 4 ozs. weight of tea, value 1s. 6d.; 2 lbs. weight of sugar, value 1s. 2d., and 1 handkerchief, value 3d., the goods of Robert Lynch , from his person .

ROBERT LYNCH. I went at eleven o'clock on the night of the 7th of June to the prisoner's lodgings, in Wentworth-street , and laid down and went to sleep - I have known him seven or eight years; while I was asleep they must have cut my shirt, and taken my brooch out; I had a large blue coat on, and a black coat; I took them off when I went to bed, and these other articles were about them; I had been drinking, but I said I would rather go home; the prisoner said as I was there I had better stop - he said he was going out to do a job at four o'clock the next morning, and he went out; he returned at six, and said he wanted his breakfast - I was still in bed, and had not missed the things; he did not have any breakfast, but went away, and said he would come back again - he did not return; I then went to feel in my pockets for my money, and it was gone; I said to Hannah Shepherd, "Do you know where my great coat is?" she said, "I saw you lay it on the bottom of the bed:" she said in about half an hour afterwards, "I will go and look for John Clark," and in about three-quarters of an hour she came back crying, with a terrible black eye.

MARTHA JONES . I am the prosecutor's daughter; he did not come home; I went to look for him, and found him at the prisoner's, at near eleven o'clock on Sunday morning- his things were then gone; I found the prisoner in the passage, before Church was over, and asked him where my father's clothes were: he made no answer, or one which I did not understand; I then got an officer.

ELIZABETH MARY FENTON . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I went to the prisoner's house, and found the papers in which the tea and sugar had been.

MOSES SIMMONS . I took up the prisoner and Mrs. Shepherd; I charged the prisoner with robbing the prosecutor; he said he knew nothing about it, but on the Monday morning he told me he had left the coats in his own room; he charged Shepherd with them, and made me apprehend her.

JOHN DAWSON . This paper found in the prisoner's room is what I delivered to the prosecutor with the tea and sugar in it.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-99

1447. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June . 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 seal, value 6s.; 1 key, value 2s., and 15 shillings, the property of John Ash , from his person .

JOHN ASH. I am a sailor . I met the prisoner about six o'clock in the evening, on the 2d of June, and went with her to No. 2, Angel-gardens ; we laid down on the bed in a room up stairs; I had a silver watch, a gold seal and key, and fifteen shillings when I went into the room; I went to sleep, and when I awoke the watch and money were gone, and the prisoner also: I had been drinking, but was quite sober - I gave her 1s.

CAROLINE LANE . I was at the house when the prisoner and the prosecutor came in, between five and six o'clock; the prosecutor gave me 6d. for the room - they were up stairs ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour; she left the prosecutor in bed asleep, and went out saying she should be back in a few minutes, but she did not return: the prosecutor called out that he was robbed; I went up stairs, and he said he insisted upon having a watchman, as he was robbed of his watch and money; I saw him come in, but did not notice whether he had watch then - he had been drinking, but was not very drunk; I went to a public-house to see for the prisoner, but could not find her; I afterwards found her coming out of an eating-house, on Cock-hill; she asked what I took her for; I said, "Never mind till I come to the watch-house."

GEORGE DEVERILL . I am night-beadle of Shadwell. The prisoner was brought in on a charge of robbing a sailor; she denied it, and said she had no money but a few halfpence about her; I searched her, and found 8s. 11 1/2d. on her, and among the silver this broken seal, which the prosecutor swore to as his; she put a shilling into her mouth, and said it was a sovereign, but it was only a shilling; she said she had had the seal for two years.(Seal produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the Coach and Horses public-house, to get a pint of beer; I had not been there above ten minutes when this man came in, intoxicated; he went to sit down; he and the table almost fell on the floor - two girls came in, with whom he had been in company all day, and the night before; he then dozed, and while he was dozing she searched all his pockets, took out something, and gave to the other girl, who took them out: the prosecutor then awoke, and asked her where the other girl was - she went out, and brought in another girl; he said that was not her - she said it was, and wanted him to go home with her - he said she was too wide awake for him, and said she had made him pay heavy that day.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-100

1448. LOUISA ARMSTRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , two 5l. Bank notes , the property of Richard Smith .

RICHARD SMITH. I am a servant out of place. On the 16th of June I went to the Waterloo Arms publichouse, High-street, Mary-le-bone , with the prisoner - I went to give her a pint of beer; I had a tailor's bill in my pocket, and two 5l. notes in it, and in paying for the beer, whether I dropped it or not I cannot tell, but it lay at my feet; the prisoner took it up; I said, "Give it me" - she said, "Let me see what it is:" she opened it and read it; I said, "It is a tailor's bill, and two 5l. notes" she said, "They are not worth 2d.;" I said,

"Whether they are worth 2d., or not, give them to me"- she said she would not; I asked her eight or nine times- she then said, if Mr. Tottill would bring in pen, ink and paper, and I could give the numbers of the notes, I should have them; I said I could not - she then said she would go before my betters before she would give them up, and said, "Edward, what is your's is mine;" I said,"My name is not Edward" - she then said she was my wife; I said I never had a wife.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What had you drank before you went there? A. Nothing but two pints of ale in a public-house in High-street - no gin nor brandy and water; at this house we had some ale, and she had one glass of gin - I had been out of place for about a month; I did not know her before, but I met her in the New-road, and said it was rather wet, and I was going to take a pint of beer, and asked her to take part of it - I had only drank one glass of ale beside what I have stated - that was at a brew-house, where I had been to pay a bill; I had taken my money from home - I took out 20l., I never said I had ten 5l. notes about me - I saw the 5l. notes in the tailor's bill at my lodging; I wrapped them up there - I went to the tailor's, but he was not at home; I then went to the brew-house and paid 10l. there - I had some silver in my pocket beside; I did not, in the course of conversation with the prisoner, say, "I have a letter in my pocket about Devonshire;" I was not intoxicated - I might be a little gone; I had the two notes, and I never lost sight of her - a search was made, but the notes were not found; I paid the money at the brew-house on my own account - I had to find my own beer, and instead of having it from a public-house I had it from the brew-house; I had had 10l. worth of beer in about five months for my own use - the servants in the family had it of me; I have not exactly left the place yet - the gentleman died, but I still go backward and forward to settle accounts; I got the notes from a banking-house at Charing-cross, for a cheque which I got from the solicitor - I did not see how she got rid of the notes.

THOMAS STEEL . I am a carpenter. I was at the Waterloo Arms on the 16th of June; I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner sitting close together in deep conversation - the prosecutor got up to pull the bell, and something like a bill fell down; the prisoner took it up and said to him, "How cautions you ought to be how you drop your things about, do you know what this is?" he said, "Yes, it is a tailor's bill and two 5l. notes" - I saw they were Bank notes, but I could not see they were fives; he asked her for them, and she would not give them to him; I said to the landlord, "She has got some of his money" - the prisoner then said if the landlord would bring in pen, ink and paper, and he would write down the numbers, she would give them up; he said he could not - she then said she would go before his betters before she would give them up; she said what was his was hers, for she was his wife, and had been married to him three years - she was then taken by the officer, but the notes have not been found.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she not tipsy? A. I saw her countenance alter as soon as she got the notes in her hand; they had only one pint of ale while I was there - I saw an empty glass on the table; I was opposite to them - it is a small room; I looked about everywhere for the notes, but they could not be found.

CHARLES TOTTILL . I keep the Waterloo Arms. I saw the prosecutor and prisoner there; I went in to speak to Steel - he said the prisoner had taken two notes from the prosecutor; the prisoner came across the room, and gave me a tailor's bill to read - the notes had been wrapped up in that; she said if I would give her pen, ink and paper, for him to give her the numbers of the notes she would give them up, as they were not worth 2d. to him without - I said that was nonsense; she then said she would not give them up; I said she had better, it would be worse for her - she said she would not till she got before my betters; that she was his wife, and had been married three years; the prosecutor got an officer - he and my wife searched her, but nothing was found.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she not tipsy? A. No; I have known Steel five years.

DANIEL DUTCH . I am a constable. I took the prisoner at the Waterloo Arms - I found this tailor's bill, but nothing more; she said, "Don't you meddle with me and my husband, I am his wife" - she said she would not give the notes up; I am sure she did not say she had not got them - she said she would not give them up till she went before her betters.

Cross-examined. Q. Was she not tipsy? A. No - I took her before the Magistrate the same evening, which I dared not have done if she had been tipsy; I supposed she had the notes and made a search.

The prisoner put in a written defence, declaring she had not seen the notes.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-101

1449. MARY WITHERINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 3 spoons, value 8s.; 4 blankets, value 8s.; 2 table-cloths, value 5s.; 5 sheets, value 14s.; 1 counterpane, value 4s.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 3 pillows, value 3s., and 1 table-cover, value 1s., the goods of Ann Stanley , widow, her mistress .

ANN STANLEY. I am a widow . The prisoner was in my service for about eight months - I missed all these articles from my house, and saw them at the office.

JAMES SAYERS . I am a pawnbroker. I have three spoons pawned by the prisoner at different times in January and May.

JULIUS HOCKLEY . I am a pawnbroker. I have some blankets and other articles pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM CORDWELL . I am a pawnbroker. I have two sheets and a table-cloth pawned by the prisoner in May and June.

WILLIAM MARCHANT . I am a pawnbroker. I have some articles pawned by the prisoner between December and May.

JOHN BURCHALL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found fifteen duplicates in her housewife, and some in a tea-cup in her bed-room.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I took the prisoner, and on her person I found two duplicates, which relate to this property.

CHRISTOPHER JOHN STANLLY . I am son-in-law to the

prosecutrix. I found two duplicates in the prisoner's bed-room.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-102

1450. WILLIAM PARISH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 2 lbs. weight of rhubarb, value 12s., the goods of Thomas Churchyard and Henry Treacher , his masters .

HENRY SCUDAMORE CASTLE . I am in the employ of Thomas Churchyard and Henry Treacher - they are wholesale druggists . The prisoner was in their service; we lost some things and watched him - I saw him through a hole take this from a chest, put it into his hat, and go out of the room; I went and gave information - the officer came and found this rhubarb in his hat.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Where was his hat? A. On his head; he was in the warehouse under the floor, where he took it from - I had been in an adjoining room, and looked through a hole; he had been near six months in the service.

COURT. Q. Was the chest locked? A. No.

THOMAS VANN . I took up the prisoner, and produce the rhubarb, which I found in his hat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, having received a good character .

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-103

1451. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 2 chaise-cushions, value 5s., and 1 whip-socket, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Robert Willis Blencowe , Esq.

HENRY HART . I am coachman to Mr. Blencowe. I left the cushions and whip-socket safe on the 8th of June, at ten o'clock in the evening, in the coach-house, and at six next morning I missed them; the coach-house was not locked; I have seen the prisoner at Hayes , where Mr. Blencowe lives.

STANLEY JARVIS . I am an officer. The coachman came to me, and said he had lost these things; I went to Hillingdon, and took the prisoner with the property on him, about two miles from the prosecutor's - he said he bought them for 1s. of a well-dressed man.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am a labourer at Hayes. On Monday, the 9th of June, I saw the prisoner at five o'clock in the morning coming up a lane from Mr. Blencowe's, with these cushions under his arm.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I gave a man 1s. for them, and was going to keep them till I got an owner for them.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-104

1452. EDWARD DEE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of June , 1 jacket, value 1l.; 1 pair of pantaloons, value 8s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of John Cuss .

JOHN CUSS. I have been at sea four years. I lost these articles on the 23d of June from my mistress' room; the prisoner was apprenticed with me about four years ago; these are the articles - they are marked with my name.

WILLIAM TRODD . I am an officer. The prosecutor called at my house, and said he had been robbed; I went with him to the Castle public-house, leading to the Edgware-road, where we found the prisoner; I said he must go with me for robbing the prosecutor - he said it was no more than he expected.

JAMES HILLYER . I am a pawnbroker. All these articles were pawned with me by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-105

1453. HENRY DREDDRY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 1 coat, value 4s.; 2 pairs of spurs, value 2s.; 1 set of phelgms, value 1s.; 1 blood-stick, value 6d.; 1 pair of scissors, value 4d.; 4 straps, value 4d., and 1 file, value 1d. , the goods of William Thorp , the elder.

WILLIAM THORP, JUN. I am son of William Thorp; he is a stable-keeper . I saw the prisoner with a pair of spurs of mine on, which led me to go to his lodging, where I found these articles; he was charged with stealing them, but he said nothing - I have worn this coat from the time it was new; I know these spurs, from having worn them some months - they were found at the pawnbroker's; I was in the habit of using these articles - the prisoner had been with us about six months.

JAMES MOODY . I am a pawnbroker. I produce this coat and a pair of spurs, they were pawned by the prisoner, I believe.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I took the prisoner - I found the duplicate of this coat and spurs in his room and these other things.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I think it is a very difficult thing to swear to articles of this kind - they are my property.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-106

1454. ELIZA BATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , two pairs of trousers, value 1l. , the goods of Edward Singleton .

MARIA SINGLETON . I am the wife of Edward Singleton; we work for Mr. Lloyd in the Commercial-road. I sent my little boy out with these trousers, and he came back and said the person in my house had got them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you not known her some time? Q. Yes, these twenty years; her husband has deserted her, and she has been rather distressed in her mind - I never knew her guilty of any bad act before.

JAMES SINGLETON . My mother sent me with two pairs of trousers to Mr. Lloyd; when I got to the top of Cross-street, Mrs. Batley asked me to let her hold my bundle, while I went to a house to ask for Mr. Batley - when I came out she was gone with the bundle.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I took up the prisoner and found a duplicate of the trousers on her.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned these trousers with me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-107

1455. FRANCIS ANDREWS and JAMES DOVE were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of June , 1 ironwheel, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Ridge and John Ridge .

THOMAS MESSENGER . I am a driver to Messrs. Ridges. This wheel is their property.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am watchman to Messrs. Samuel and John Ridge. I know this wheel is their property - I saw it on Tuesday-week last.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . I was going over Bishop Bonner's field on Wednesday evening the 25th of June, and saw the two prisoners and another person; Dove had got this wheel - he threw it down and ran away; I saw Mr. Payne at Mr. Ridge's - he went to the steam-engine and missed it; I have compared it - it seems to fit exactly.

SAMUEL MAYNE POWELL . I was with West and saw Dove throw down this wheel - I took it up.

ANDREW'S Defence. I went to my father on the canal; on returning I saw Dove fishing and he said "What have I got? come and help me carry this" we went and got it out of the water - it was half in and half out.

DOVES' Defence. I was catching fish with James Rosamond - he saw this wheel and said "Come and help me get it out - another boy said he saw it there at four o'clock in the morning.

THOMAS JOSEPH WEST . There was a boy in the brick-fields who said he had seen it there three or four days; we saw no mark of a wheel near the water, but there were the marks of footsteps - it is about ten yards from the steam-engine; the wheel was wrapped up in Dove's jacket and tied with a rope.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-108

1456. ELIZABETH GILLIES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 1 gown, value 2s. , the goods of Henry Smith .

ELIZABETH SMITH . I am the wife of Henry Smith. I lost a gown on the 1st of July; I had seen it safe on the table in my parlour the night before - the parlour adjoins my shop, which is in South-street, Manchester-square .

JAMES MOODY . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this gown of the prisoner on the 1st of July.

PHILIP WEBSTER . From the description the pawnbroker gave me, I went to the first-floor back room of the house where the prisoner lived - she was a long time before she would let me in; I said I wanted her to go to the pawnbroker's - I at last got her out; she said I had no occasion to take her to the pawnbroker's, she was guilty and had taken the gown.

Prisoner. I picked it up as I was going for milk - I did not steal it; I did pawn it, but it was through distress.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-109

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1457. RICHARD HOBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , 1 diamond, value 4s. 6d. , the goods of Alexander Purvis .

ALEXANDER PURVIS. I am a clock and watch-maker ; the prisoner was my errand-boy . On the 17th of May, I sent him to Clerkenwell with a gold watch and several other things; this diamond was in the watch - he was to take it to get a spring at Mr. Clare's, and bring it back; he did not return - but on the 28th his brother brought back all the other articles to me, except the diamond and the case: he had been with me two or three years.

CHARLES PADDON . I am servant to Mr. Cotton, a pawnbroker, of No. 90, Shoreditch. A diamond was pawned with me for 1s., but I cannot say it was this; the prisoner brought it, and said, his father was a watchmaker.

THOMAS MALSON . I am an officer. The prisoner was at the watch-house on the 30th of May; he acknowledged to me that he had pawned the diamond in Shoreditch and buried the ticket in his father's garden - I went to his father's and searched the garden, but could not find it; I found this diamond had been offered at different pawnbroker's, and found it had been pawned at Mr. Cotton's for 1s.; I took it out to see if it would correspond with the watch - which it did.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. The prosecutor said he would forgive me.

PROSECUTOR. I certainly did; he had been a very good boy.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Reference Number: t18280703-110

1458. REBECCA HILL and ELIZABETH BOYCE were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 4 yards of ribbon, value 8s. , the goods of William Elliott , the elder.

REBECCA TRINGHAM . I am in the service of William Elliot, a straw-bonnet maker , who lives in Church-street, Hackney. The two prisoners came to his shop on the 17th of June, between four and five o'clock, to look at some bonnets - Miss Elliott called me down, and Mrs. Elliott told them to go out, as she had nothing to suit them; they hesitated about going - but did go, and then I missed the ribbon; Mr. Elliott went after them - Boyce had been nearest to where the ribbon was; the box was open on the counter.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. When they came in, did they not point out a bonnet? A. They did not speak to me first, but to Mrs. Elliott; she said, she had nothing to suit them - I had seen the ribbon safe about an hour before; there had been but one person in the shop, but not at that end of it.

COURT. Q. What quantity of ribbon did you lose? A. Four yards; I should think one of them could not have taken it without the others knowledge - they both stood near the counter; they spoke to Miss Elliott about a Leghorn-bonnet.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I am a shoe-maker. I saw the two prisoner's in Hackney Church-yard; Hill threw down a piece of paper belonging to the ribbon - I took it up; it has the price of the ribbon on it.

JAMES POPE . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoners from the back parlour of a shoe-maker's house; young Mr. Elliott told me his father had been robbed, and desired me to take them - this ribbon was given me, and the paper was brought to me.

GEORGE ASHFORD . I am a linen-draper, and live with Mr. Mayhers. I saw the two prisoners going towards Mr. Elliott's shop, and went and told him of it; I did not see them again till they were at Mr. Oborne's shop -

they were asked into the back room, and I suspected they had dropped something near where they had stood in the shop; I looked, and found this ribbon within two feet of where they had stood.

Cross-examined. Q. In what state was it? A. A little opened; they objected to being searched - they did not go into the shop after they had been in the room.

WILLIAM ELLIOTT , JUN. I live with my father; his name is William - this is his ribbon; I saw it under Boyce's apron when they were opposite the church.

Cross-examined. Q. By what do you know it? A. By the patterns, and this writing on the paper.

BOYCE'S Defence. I went with this young woman, a bonnet attracted my eye; we went in and asked the price of it - the young lady called an old lady down, who said, she had nothing to suit us.

HILL'S Defence. I never was in the church-yard till I was taken to the watch-house.

HILL - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BOYCE - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-111

1459. SARAH HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 2 petticoats, value 3s.; 1 shift, value 6s., and 1 1/2 yards of lace, value 6d. , the goods of Samuel Lenton .

ANN LENTON . I am the wife of Samuel Lenton; the prisoner was our servant for six or seven weeks. On the 7th of June I asked for a silk handkerchief, which she said, was in my box; I looked, but could not find it - I called her, and told her to look for it; she could not find it - my husband said, "You have pawned it;" she seemed confused - we sent for an officer; my flannel petticoat was found on her.

MICHAEL TURNER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a silk handkerchief, a gown, and a petticoat, pawned by the prisoner in the name of Mrs. Lenton, Rupert-street.

PETER TURNBULL TATE . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shift pawned by the prisoner on the 7th of June.

SAMUEL LINDLEY . I am an officer. I found this lace in the prisoner's box, and these things at the pawnbroker's.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the lace and some bits of ribbon; I am very sorry - I had a small bill to make up; I did not intend to rob, but to get them out in a day or two - she has employed me to pawn things for her.

ANN LENTON. I never did, but once, that was to pawn my husband's coat. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-112

1460. HELEN HAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 2 yards of lace, value 2s. 6d., and 1 cap-crown, value 1s. , the goods of Henry Hammer .

CHARLES DAVEY . I live with Henry Hammer, a linen-draper , of Ratcliff-highway. The prisoner came and asked me to show her some lace; I shewed her some, and saw her put a piece into her pocket; she continued looking at them, and bought three yards, which came to 2s. 6d.; she then asked for some Norwich crape, and while I was getting that down, I saw her take another piece of lace and a cap-crown; she bought a yard of crape, which came to 1s. 2d.; she paid me a shilling, and said she would call again; she went out - I followed her, and accused her of taking the lace, and she said I gave it her: I brought her back, and it was found on her.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had all the lace been pinned together? A. No, this piece was separate - I had not bargained to sell her the cap-crown; she did not say a word about that to me - my master has a partner, a brother of his, who does not serve in the shop; he lives with his father, in Mile-end-road; the money is sent there every night.

JOHN RALPH LAWSON . I am an officer, and took her in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-113

1461. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , 240 penny-pieces, and 84 halfpence , the monies of John Young Rand and another.

JOSEPH DENLEY . I am in the service of John Young Rand - he is a brewer , and has a partner. On the 2d of June I was with my dray in Whitechapel-road; I had received a great deal of money; there was 2l. odd in copper in the dray-box - I lost 1l. 3s. 6d., which I had received for my master's beer, but I am accountable for it. I left the dray for about three minutes - I had not seen the prisoner near the dray, till the officer had him; the box was locked, and I had the key in my pocket; when I came back the box was unlocked - it was about a quarter before eight o'clock in the evening; the officer had this bag, with the copper in it.

JOHN SHIELDS . I am an officer. I saw the dray in Whitechapel, and Butler had the prisoner in custody - I took charge of him, the bag, and copper; he was close to the dray; here is 5s. worth of penny-pieces, and 4s. 2d. in halfpence, but this is not all that was lost.

JAMES BUTLER . I was passing, and saw the prisoner go up to the dray, and take out this bag, with the money- he ran across the road, into a pawnbroker's passage; I pursued, and took him - the box was not locked then; the lock was hanging on the catch, but it was quite open- there was no time to unlock it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the pawnbroker's to look for my mother; a boy threw this bag in, and the man came and took hold of me.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-114

1462. HENRY JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 1 live tame drake, price 2s. , the property of John Raynor .

THOMAS GRAY . I am an officer. I met the prisoner at four o'clock in the morning of the 6th of June, in Ratcliffhighway; he had a live drake by the legs; I asked where he got it - he said he bought it of a man near Shadwell church, for 6d., and he should know the man if he saw him; this was about half a mile from Raynor's.

ANN RAYNOR . I am the wife of John Raynor - we live in Vinegar-lane. This is my drake - I know him by his marks; I have had him nine months; I put them all up the night before, in a small house which we have for them; the

ducks were not taken - they are setting; I get up to feed them at six o'clock in the morning, and the drake was gone: the person must have got over the wall - it could not have got out of itself.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man with this drake under his arm; he said he wanted 1s. for it - I said I had but 6d., and I gave it him for it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280703-115

1463. GEORGE STOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 book, value 5s. , the goods of James Shirley Hodson .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES SHIRLEY HODSON. I am a printer , and live in Cross-street, Hatton-garden. I attend the New Jerusalum chapel in Cross-street , and missed this Hymn-book from there on Good Friday - I found it at Mr. Dickey's, in the Strand.

WILLIAM WALKER . I am an agent, and live in Hart-street, Covent-garden. I received twenty-three or twenty-four duplicates of Hymn and Prayer-books, from the prisoner, to sell; I gave them all to Mr. Reeves, to borrow money on them; I cannot swear the duplicate of this book was one of them; they were not in my possession above an hour.

WILLIAM REEVES . I am a wine-merchant, and live in Savoy-street. On the 8th of April I received twenty-four duplicates from Walker; I advanced 30s. on them - one was for this Hymn-book, pawned at Bassett's; I redeemed it, and gave it to Dickey for sale - I believe the one produced to be the same.

JAMES BASSETT . I live in Queen-street. A Hymnbook was pawned with me on the 31st of March, in the name of George Stokes - this is the duplicate of it; I cannot say whether the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM REEVES . I cannot swear to this duplicate, for I thought I cut the corner of it - there is no cut on this.

JOHN BIRCHALL . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of June, at the Feathers public-house, Hart-street, Covent-garden; I showed him this book, which I got from Mr. Reeves - he said he bought it of a man named Savage, for 3s.; I asked how he became possessed of the other books, which were pawned for 4l.; he said he had them from another man, named Savage also, and that both the men were in the country; I found on him six duplicates of Bibles and Prayer-books.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-116

1464. ELIZABETH McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 1 gown, value 6s. , the goods of John Ralph Lawson .

JOHN RALPH LAWSON. I am a pawnbroker. I lost a gown on the 12th of June, and found it in pawn at another pawnbroker's, but he is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-117

1465. JAMES SHEA was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 1s. 6d.; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 6d. , the goods of William Haddon .

WILLIAM HADDON. I am a mariner , and belong to the brig Martin. The prisoner was employed by the mate to assist in clearing the vessel, on the 6th of June; these articles were in a bag in the state-room; I missed them while the prisoner was on board; I suspected him, and said,"What do you mean to do with the things of mine, which you have stolen;" he said he had not taken them - he had got my trousers on under his own, and my stockings on; I took them off, and told him to go about his business - he went away, and was taken five days after.

JAMES SULLIVAN . I belong to the same ship. The prisoner told me on the Friday that he was going to make a lift, meaning to take some things.

ROBERT MARSTON . I am a Thames Police-officer. I took the prisoner, and then went to the ship; I got these trousers and stockings from the captain; the other things have not been found.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The mate told me to wash the decks; my trousers were wet - I went and put these on, and when he told me to get dinner I put the others over them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-118

1466. JAMES SPARKS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 1 pair of clams, value 4s. , the goods of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH. I am a coach-master , and live at Mile-end. The prisoner was my ostler ; I missed these clams, and asked him about them five or six times - he denied all knowledge of them; I searched his house, and found them in a cupboard under the stairs - he then said he had brought them home to mend some harness; he does my work on my premises.

Cross-examined by MR. BARNABY. Q. Should you have objected to his using them? A. Not if he had asked me. I had an information laid against me on the 3d of June, about going too great a distance; I believe I once said I suspected the prisoner of laying that information; I do not believe he was concerned; but I had heard he was an informer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-119

1467. JOHN SWEENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 1 jacket, value 3s. , the goods of William Belcher .

JOHN HARRIS . I live in Portland-town, about two hundred yards from Mr. Belcher's. On the 31st of May I took the prisoner, with this jacket concealed under his coat and waistcoat; he was sitting on a post.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

WILLIAM BELCHER. I keep a shop in High-street, Portland-town - this jacket hung in my shop. On the 31st of May I missed it, and found it in the officer's possession; I know nothing of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-120

1468. JAMES STAPLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , 1 cheese, value 13s. , the goods of Isaiah Cox .

WILLIAM RICHARD GREVILLE . I am in the employ of Isaiah Cox, a cheesemonger , of Crown-street, Finsbury. On the 10th of June, about nine o'clock in the morning, I missed a cheese; I went out, and followed the prisoner about fifty yards - I took him with this cheese under his jacket; he dropped it, and said, "D-n you let me go - you have got the cheese;" he then knocked me down, and kicked me violently in the back; I got up - he knocked me down again, struck me, and knelt upon me; I still kept hold of him - he was taken back to the shop.

Prisoner. He knocked me down first. Witness. He tried to slip out of his jacket.

THOMAS ELLIS . I am messenger to the Mutual Benefit Institution. I saw the prisoner in Crown-street, standing against the pile of cheeses at Cox's door; I passed him eight or ten yards, then turned back, and saw him throw a black apron over a cheese, and carry it off; I gave information, and pursued him with the shopman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-121

1469. ANN TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 2 caps, value 6d., the goods of Margaret Martin; and 1 pair of half-boots, value 2s. , the goods of Daniel Sullivan .

MARGARET MARTIN . I am a widow. The prisoner and her husband lodged with me; Daniel Sullivan lodges on my second floor - the prisoner lodged on the same floor: I lost several things from my kitchen.

THOMAS FOSTER . I am an officer, and took the prisoner at Charing-cross; I found these boots on her feet, a cap on her head, and another in her pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-122

1470. HENRY TYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 2 pairs of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of John Hopkins .

CATHERINE BORCKHARDT . I live opposite Mr. Hopkins. On the 18th of June, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner looking into his shop; he then went in and took a pair of shoes off the horse - he stopped a bit, then took another pair, and went off; I ran and called to him to stop - he would not; and a butcher stopped him.

THOMAS PENNY . I am an officer, and have the shoes.

JOHN HOPKINS . These shoes are mine.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . - Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280703-123

1471. ALFRED THOMPSON , WILLIAM KENT , and THOMAS EVERARD were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 120 halfpence , the monies of Isaac Coggin .

WILLIAM COGGIN . I am nephew of Isaac Coggin, a grocer , of High-street, Ratcliff . There were six 5s. papers of halfpence on our counter, on the 9th of June, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; Thompson and Kent came in, and asked for 6d. worth of halfpence for a sixpence: I went to the till, and turned my back a little to them, while I counted the halfpence; they went out, and I missed the money from the counter; Penny came in immediately - I and our man went out about a quarter of a mile, and there took Thompson; several persons were with him, but I cannot say whether the other prisoners were among them; part of the copper was found in his pocket - I am certain Thompson and Kent are the lads who came in; the money was gone the moment they turned their backs.

THOMAS PENNY . I am a porter. I was passing the prosecutor's house, and saw the three prisoners, in company with two others, about three or four yards from the house; I saw Thompson and Kent go into the shop; they came out in a minute or two - Thompson put his hand behind, under his coat; he took a paper parcel, threw it up, and said, "This is the way to get browns," meaning halfpence; they joined the others, and went down towards Shadwell; I heard Thompson say, "It will be all right by and by;" I went and told Coggin, who went after them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Everard did not go into the shop? A. No.

JOSHUA ARTHUR . I saw the three prisoners dividing the money in Collingwood-place, which is about fifty yards from the prosecutor's; a man, who looked like a pieman, gave Thompson and Kent 1s. 1d. - Thompson grumbled, and he gave him a penny more - Kent grumbled, and he gave him a halfpenny; the money was in a paper - Everard was there, but I did not see him receive any of it.

JAMES YOUNG . I took Thompson in charge, and found 1s. 2d. in copper in his waistcoat pocket; I took Kent and Everard between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I found in Kent's pocket 18d. in copper; he said he had not been at work for a month, but he had saved up the money before - Thompson said he had worked for his money.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

KENT - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Whipped and Discharged.

EVERARD - NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-124

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JULY 5.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1472. WILLIAM HANSON and SARAH McINTOSH were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s., and 1 half-crown , the goods of Francis McCartey .

FRANCIS McCARTEY. I met the prisoner McIntosh at two o'clock in the morning, on the 15th of June; she took me home with her - I had half a crown in my trousers pocket; I took my trousers off, and put them under the bed - I then went to bed; in a short time she went down stairs, and came up again with Hanson, who told me to get out of bed - I got up and could not find my trousers; I went down, fetched the watchman up, and gave them in charge - I had taken a drop, but got sober by that time; I had not put them on the bed.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a watchman. The prosecutor called me - I went up stairs with him, turned up the bed, and found his trousers, but the half-crown was not in the pocket - the prosecutor seemed sober; Hanson came up, and he gave him in charge.

FRANCIS McCARTEY. I might have given the woman the half-crown.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-125

1475. MARY WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 pair of trousers, value 5s. , the goods of James Richman Folkard .

RICHARD HOLDING . On the 6th of June I was in my master's shop, Mr. James Richman Folkard, a pawnbroker , in St. John's-street . About nine o'clock in the morning a person said a pair of trousers were taken; I went out and followed the prisoner up Wilderness-row, and brought her back with them on her person - she pleaded distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM CLAYTON . I saw the prisoner coming out of the shop with the trousers - she put them under her apron.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280703-126

1473. WILLIAM HAWKINS was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN QUINNELL . I am a chair-maker . The prisoner had been in my service three years and a half - he received money for me; it was his duty to bring it to me directly he came in. On Friday, the 6th of June, I sent him with twelve chairs to Mr. Lingard - the price was 2l.; he returned about half-past one o'clock, and said he was to go at five for the money - I sent him at half-past four o'clock, and he did not return for a fortnight; I then asked how he came to leave me - he said he did not know; I asked him about the money - he said he did not know what he had done with it, and that he had been to Bristol; he behaved very well before - I would take him again.

JAMES LINGARD . The prisoner brought me a dozen of chairs; I paid him 15s. in part about two o'clock in the day - I should not have paid him any, as two armchairs were to come, but he pleaded poverty; he returned in the evening; but I was not at home.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-127

1474. HENRY HAYTHORN was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES HOOD . I am a baker , and live near the Regent's-park. The prisoner was in my service, and was to receive money for me, which he was to bring me every evening; he went out on the 2d of June, but did not bring me 3l. from Mrs. Thornton - I asked him repeatedly if he had it, and he always said they had not paid it.

SOPHIA THORNTON . I am servant to Mr. Jackson - I always paid the prisoner on the delivery of the bread, unless my mistress was out, and then we paid next time; we had perhaps three loaves a week,

LOUISA JACKSON . I am servant to Mr. Thompson - he keeps a wine-vaults in Holborn. The prisoner brought bread and biscuits there - sometimes two loaves a day, sometimes three, for seven or eight months, for which I paid him.

JAMES HOOD . He never accounted to me for money received of Mr. Thompson.

JURY. Q. Had you never received any money from Thompsom, from him? A. Not for four months past, nor from Jackson for ten months.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280703-128

1475. JOSEPH GARRAWAY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 20th of June , of a certain evildisposed person, 2 bushels of corn, value 4s., and 1 sack, value 6d., the goods of William Clark , well knowing the same to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

TWO OTHER COUNTS. stating it to belong to Elizabeth Perfect , widow , and John Perfect .

JOHN PERFECT. I live with my mother, Elizabeth Perfect, who keeps the Crane inn, at Edgware . The prisoner keeps a horse and cart, and lives just by the side of our gate-way, next door but one; I did not miss any of the corn, but our gate has been found open at certain times - I have a sack and some corn which was found in the stable where the prisoner's horse stood; the sack belongs to Mr. Hearn, of the King's Arms coach-office - the corn is William Clark's property; he keeps horses in our yard; I do not know that he had corn in that sack - he had some shot in a bin; the prisoner was in his stable feeding a horse when I went in - I took a sample of it, and went to the door to look at them; I then said to the prisoner, "Joe, these are Mr. Clark's oats" - they are a mixture of black and white; it is a mixture which is made by some corn-factors, but by none in our town - they appear to me to be the same as those of Mr. Clark's, and just the same age.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Is it unusual to mix white and black oats? A. No; other coach-proprietors may do it.

JOSEPH WAGER . I went to this stable between ten and eleven o'clock at night, on the 20th of June, and saw John Hill go into the stable of the Crane inn, and bring out a sack about half full; he shut the door, and unlocked the yard gate, which I had locked up - I went into the privy and saw him come to the dung-hill, and give it to the prisoner over the pales; I went and told Mr. Perfect what I had seen, and we went to the prisoner's stable, where we found the corn - Hill went away directly, there was no other corn in the stable but this, which I believe belongs to Mr. Clark - it appeared to be about the same quantity as I saw in the sack; there was not more in the prisoner's stable than one man could carry.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it dark? A. Middling; I could see the prisoner's yard from the privy - it was only a board fence which parted us.

JOHN PERFECT re-examined. I called Hill, and said to him, "This is a pretty game;" but I did not know whether I should take him - I let them both go; the prisoner slept at home I believe, but went off the next day; when I went to his stable, he did not attempt to conceal anything - I sent for a light, and the corn was standing before the horse; it corresponds with what remained of Mr. Clark's - I inquired the next day, and the people in the town all said, they had no mixed corn; I do not know whether it is usual to feed horses with mixed corn - I have known the prisoner two or three years, and never knew anything amiss of him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-129

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1476. JANE WHITE was indicted for stealing, on

the 1st of July , 1 umbrella, value 5s., the goods of James Lilley , from the person of Mary Lilley , spinster .

JOSEPH MOULTON . I was in Bethnal Green-road on Tuesday afternoon, between four and five o'clock; I saw the prisoner snatch the umbrella from the child, and run down Church-row as fast as she could - I ran and took it from her; I gave it to the child, who was screaming - the officer came and took the prisoner.

CAROLINE LILLEY . I am the wife of James Lilley, Mary Lilley is my daughter: we live in Edward-street, Bethnal-green, but a short distance from Church-row, this is our umbrella.

SAMUEL MAYNE POWELL . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the little child carrying a baby, who was crying; I said, "Little girl, you are not able to carry that child and the umbrella;" she gave me the umbrella to hold while she took up the child and carried it a little way, and then put it down; the man came up, and said, I wanted to swindle the child out of the umbrella - I am a widow and have had six children.

JOSEPH MOULTON. She said it was her own property, and was running as fast as she could; she very nearly struck me with it.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-130

1478. MARY LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 1 watch, value 2l.; 3 seals, value 2l.; 1 key, value 3s.; 1 ring, value 3s., and 1 watch-ribbon, value 1d., the goods of Charles Blizard , from his person .

CHARLES BLIZARD. I am a servant to Mr. Hall, he lives at Cottage-house, near Melksham. On the 13th of June, after twelve o'clock at night, I was in Stafford-street ; the prisoner met me, and wanted me to go with her - I said, I could not; I stood for a moment and felt my watch drawn from my pocket - I had not the least intention to go with her; I was going to the hotel - I accused her of robbing me; she said, she had not got it - I said, "You have, and I insist upon your giving it me, or you shall not go home;" I turned my head and saw the watchman, who came up and took her, and found the watch in her hand.

THOMAS PULLEN . Mr. Blizard gave charge of the prisoner for robbing him of his watch and seals; I found them in her hand - she said, when I went up, that she had not got them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280703-131

1479. HENRY SMITH and WILLIAM REASON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of a certain person unknown, from his person .

GUSTAVUS ELLIS . I live with my father who is a muffin-baker, in Hanway-street . On the 6th of June my father told me something, and I went to the door, and saw the two prisoners following a gentleman; Reason took a handkerchief out of his pocket at the corner of the street, and put it into his bosom - they were close together at the time it was taken, and went away together; I told my father, who followed them on to St. Giles'-church - but before he got to them, Reason gave it to the other; I did not know the gentleman.

JOSEPH CARTER . These lads were given into my charge, and this handkerchief was in Smith's hat.

SMITH'S Defence. I was returning home and saw the handkerchief at the corner of the stone; I took it up - I did not take it from anyone; I have no occasion to go thieving - I have a good trade.

REASON'S Defence. I did not take it.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 16.

REASON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-132

1480. PATRICK HESKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June , 9 shillings, the monies of George Johnson , from his person .

GEORGE JOHNSON. On the 9th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was at a public-house in White Lion-street ; I do not know the sign - I went with an acquaintance to treat him; we had something to drink - a young woman came in, and asked for something; which I gave her - I then bought a pipe of tobacco; a woman came out of the long room, and asked me to give her something to drink - I said, I had got no money; she then asked me to change her half a crown - I said, I had no money, but she pushed it into my hand; I took 3s. out of my pocket, and said, "I will give you change;" the young woman then said, "You shall not give her change;" "Very well," said I; a man then came out of the long room, whom I took to be lame - he snapped the pipe out of my mouth; I said, "What did you do that for?" he then struck me with a stick - my hat fell off, and the girl took it up; two other men then came out of the room - I made towards the man who had struck me; three of them then seized me, and shoved me out of the door; I then felt a man's hand in my breeches pocket, where I had 9s.; I came into the house again, and said to the landlord, "I think it very hard to come to your house to spend my money, and to be robbed of it;" the landlord came out and took me by the collar - these men came out of the long room again, and put me out at the door; I then felt a man put his hand into my pocket again - I could not see who it was; I came into the house again and the officers had seized the prisoner, and asked me what was the matter - I made them no answer as I was in a flurry; I did not know where my hat was, and the officers told me to go with them - I went to the office, where the prisoner was carried; I had lost my money, and my pocket was turned inside out - I cannot swear to the prisoner being there, because I did not take notice of any man, except the one who broke the pipe from my mouth; I lost two half-crowns, and 4s. from my pocket, and have never got a copper of it back; they were all strangers to me - I do not know that I was ever in the house before.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you say I was not the man? A. No.

COURT. Q. What time did you lose your money? A. About twenty minutes before six o'clock.

EDWARD MOORE . I am a Bow-street patrol. At twenty minutes past eleven o'clock that night I went to

Mr. Colson's, the White Lion public-house, White Lionsquare, Whitechapel; I saw the prosecutor standing in a mob, and I saw the prisoner take his hand out of his pocket - a lame man was in company with him, who got away then, but he has since been committed for three months; I called my brother officer, and we took the prisoner into custody - I am certain he is the man who had his hand in the prosecutor's pocket; I charged him with it at the moment - I think I saw something pass from the prisoner to the lame man: the prosecutor gave the same account at the office, as he has now.

Prisoner. Q. When you saw me take my hand out of the pocket, why did you not seize me? A. I did, and charged you at the moment, but did not search you.

GEORGE JOHNSON re-examined. I went to the house at five o'clock, and had my pipe knocked out of my hand, when I had been there about half an hour; it was not more than three or four minutes before the officer came in, that I had my pockets turned out.

CHARLES COOKE . I am an officer. I was with Moore - we were passing the house at twenty minutes past eleven o'clock, and heard a disturbance; we went and saw the landlord and several persons turn the prosecutor out; he said he would have satisfaction and was going to play the dence with them - I could not get out of him what it was; he said they had robbed him - I said "Look round and see if you can see the party;" he said he could not see the person - my partner came up and said "I saw this man take his hand out of his pocket," I said "If you saw him, take him into custody;" he did so; there were one or two more suspicious characters - we went after them, but they got away; I took the prosecutor to the office and found 4s. 8d. on the prisoner.

COURT to GEORGE JOHNSON . Q. Was your money all secure when you were in the public-house? A. Yes - I felt it when I put my hand into my pocket to give change.

Prisoner's Defence. At eleven o'clock at night, I went to the house to have something to drink; I saw this man quarrelling with some young women and some other persons - he was turned out and came in again, he struck the young woman and said he was robbed; then the officer came in and said I was one who had my hand in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280703-133

1481. GEORGE GARLICK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 necklace, value 5s., the goods of John Darnell , from the person of Eliza Darnell .

ROSETTA SHARP . I am eleven years old; I know the nature of an oath. I took Eliza Darnell out for a walk last Saturday - she is two years old; we were in Great Leonard-street , looking at some men tumbling, and hearing some music; I saw the prisoner come and take the necklace off Eliza's neck - I saw it in his hand and he ran away with it; I told Mr. Darnell - I am sure the prisoner is the boy.

WILLIAM TILLETT . I am an upholsterer, and live in Great Leonard-street. I was going along - the prisoner was pointed out to me; I went and took him - he said he had got nothing, but I found these beads in his right hand pocket.

MARY DARNELL . I am the wife of John Darnell. I sent out Rosetta Sharp with my daughter, who had these beads round her neck - I am quite sure these are them.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280703-134

1482. CHARLES LANGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 1 cheese, value 13s. , the goods of David Bridges .

MARY STEEL . I know Mr. Bridges - he keeps a chandler's shop at Battle-bridge . On the 21st of June, I saw the prisoner go into the shop and come out with the cheese under his arm - he rather ran than walked; he dropped the cheese - I took it up, and he was taken.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you take notice of his features or dress? A. No, but he was in my sight, from the time he went into the shop till he was taken - this is the cheese.

CHARLOTTE BRIDGES . I am the wife of David Bridges. The prisoner was taken to a public-house; I went there and saw this cheese, which I know to be ours.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my brother's and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Month .

Reference Number: t18280703-135

1483. HENRY BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 1 necklace, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Bunney , from the person of Elizabeth Bunney , spinster .

ELIZABETH HUTCHINS . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Bunney of Golden-lane. I took out his child on the 1st of July, about three o'clock; I had seen the prisoner two or three times, and once before he had tried to get the necklace off the child's neck; I was in Chiswell-street , and saw him behind me - there were some ladies and gentlemen getting into a carriage and I did not like to pass by: the prisoner came behind me and took off the necklace - I went directly to a pawnbroker's and found the prisoner there, trying to pawn it; an officer came in and I gave charge of him - this is the necklace - the child is one year and nine months old.

Prisoner's Defence. A little boy picked up the necklace at the side of a scraper - I asked him to give it me, which he did.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-136

1484. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 5 lbs. weight of bacon, value 3s. , the goods of John Sloane and others.

ROBERT WALKINGTON . I am shopman to John Sloane and others; they are cheesemongers , and live in St. Martin's-lane . On the 27th of June, I saw the prisoner come and take the bacon over the wire-work of the window; she put it under her gown between her legs; I went and took her into the warehouse - she kneeled down to beg pardon: this is the bacon.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor widow.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Two Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-137

1485. JOHN PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the

14th of June , 3 rummers, value 15s.; 1 milk-pot, value 8d., and 1 sugar-bason, value 10d. , the goods of John Pilcher .

JOHN PILCHER. I live on Back-hill . The prisoner came to lodge with me, I think on the 3d of June; I missed three rummers, a milk-pot, and sugar-bason; I accused him of taking them, and he denied it; I sent for an officer, but before he came, the prisoner confessed that he had taken them and pawned them.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he said he had made away with the tickets.

WILLIAM DEMPSTER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Drury-lane; I have three tumblers and a milk-jug, pawned on the 7th and 10th of June, in the name of John Parker. I do not know by whom.

JOHN PROSSER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a sugarbason pawned by the prisoner, on the 14th of June.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-138

1482. WILLIAM SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , 2 truck-wheels, value 5s. , the goods of Patrick Mara .

PATRICK MARA. I live in Buckeridge-street ; on the night of the 26th of June, the watchman asked me if my truck-wheels were stolen - I looked, and said Yes; my truck was in the yard, and the wheels off; I had seen them safe the day before; the watchman told me he had seen the prisoner with them; I went and found them at McCormack's, where the prisoner lodges, but I do not know whose room they were in.

JOHN MURPHY . I am a watchman. I found the wheels at McCormacks; I had seen the prisoner there at a quarterpast one o'clock in the morning of the 26th of June.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. What sort of a yard is it that they were in? A. One side is open and the other is inclosed; it was dark - I knew the prisoner these two years.

JAMES McCORMACK . The prisoner lodged with me sometimes; but a woman took the room; I have seen him there twice; I understand the wheels were found in that room.

Cross-examined. Q. How long has the woman taken the room? A. About three weeks. I am not always at home; I have seen the prisoner lay on the bed; I had also seen a lad there.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-139

1483. HENRY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; one waistcoat, value 6s.; 3 shillings, and 3 pennies , the property of James Moyes .

JAMES MOYES. I am helper at Mr. Tarling's liverystables; the prisoner was in his employ: I saw him there on the day he was taken; I do not know what day it was; he was employed that day, and he left without giving notice: he was employed by the day - when he was gone, I missed my handkerchief, my waistcoat, and 3s. 3d. which was in the pocket; it had hung on the nail, No. 2, in the stable; the head ostler gave information, and the property was found on the prisoner.

JOHN DAVIS . I am an officer. I was sent for to take the prisoner at the Red Lion public-house; he was very drunk, and had this jacket on at the time: this handkerchief was in possession of a boy at the public-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I do not recollect a word about it, till I was taken at the Red Lion public-house - I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-140

1484. WILLIAM GIBBS and WILLIAM HOLMES were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 12 lbs. weight of horse-hair, value 10s., and 1 sack, value 1s. , the goods of Thomas White .

THOMAS WHITE. I am a licensed horse-slaughterer , and live in Sharpes-alley, Cow-cross ; the prisoners have both worked for me occasionally; I have a great deal of horsehair on my premises. On the 3d of June I saw it all safe, locked up in a box, and on the 4th the box was found broken open, and the horse-hair all gone; there was about 30 lbs. of hair - I lost a sack from the same room; I went to the horse-hair manufactory, and found it in the sack, tied up in Gibbs' apron - Gibbs was at that time out of employ; I have no doubt whatever of its being my horse-hair, from its appearance - I know the sack, and I know Gibbs' apron- one person could have taken it.

EASTER BIRD . I work at the horse-hair manufactory. Holmes brought this horse-hair a little after eight o'clock, on the 4th of June; there was no one in the way to pay for it; I told him to leave it, and call in an hour; I weighed it, and there were 17 lbs. with the bag; he left it, and in about half an hour Mr. White came, and asked if any had been brought; I said Yes; he saw it in the scale just as it had been left - it had not been opened.

WILLIAM WATSON . I was standing at the door of the Castle public-house, on the night of the 3d of June, at halfpast ten o'clock; I heard Gibbs say to Holmes, "Will you go now? he said, "Not yet," and then by-and-by I heard Holmes say, "We will go and do it now," and they walked away together - that was about one hundred yards from Mr. White's.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took Holmes on the 13th of June; he had a hearing, and said Gibbs gave it to him; he was discharged, and taken again.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I took the two prisoner together in Smithfield market, on Friday week.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I went with Mr. White to take Gibbs, but as he could not swear to him, we let him go; this is the apron, sack, and horse-hair; I know Gibbs used to wear an apron - I took him again, and he said it was not his, but I believe it is.

GIBBS - GUILTY . Aged 20.

HOLMES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-141

1485. JAMES FENN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 2 silver spoons, value 8s. , the goods of John Simpson .

ELIZABETH CURTIS . I am servant to Mr. John Simpson, at his Chambers, on a second floor, in Raymond's-buildings, Gray's Inn . On the 7th of June I saw the prisoner in the hall, coming from the cupboard, where a basket of plate was kept, which I have the care of; I went and missed the

spoons; I ran after him; he dropped them, and was taken - he said I was a pretty creature to mind chambers.

TIMOTHY RUSSELL . I was standing at my back premises, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running first, and a number of people after him; he was crying Stop thief! I let him pass, and he went down King's Mews, where there is a grating; I saw him stoop, and put something down the grating; I called to some men to stop him, which they did; I saw a man go to the grating, and take up something.

JAMES CATO . Mr. Russell pointed out the grating to me; I went there, and found these two spoons.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A young man told me a gentleman in that inn wanted a clerk; I went there, and saw a young man coming down with some papers: I went up, and knocked at a door, but could get no answer; I went on further, and saw this young woman: I said, "I have been knocking, and can't get an answer:" she then went away, and I walked down. As to my throwing down the spoons, I know nothing about them.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-142

1490. JOHN COOMBS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , 1 coat, value 8s. , the goods of John Levy .

MICHAEL HAMILTON . I am servant to John Levy, who keeps a clothes-shop , in Bloomsbury . On the 13th of June, I had just hung up this coat, when a man cried out, "There he goes - he has got something;" I pursued the prisoner, and when I got near him I saw it was the coat which I had hung outside the window; he dropped it - I took it up; I lost sight of him, but I believe the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM TUCKLEY . I saw the prisoner take the coat; he dropped it at the corner of the street.

JOHN FRANCIS . I heard the witness cry Stop thief! and saw the prisoner run; I pursued, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had not been out of my bed ten minutes; I live nearly opposite the church: I was going up Monmouth-street, and the man stopped me, and asked if I was the person; the witness said he was not certain.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-143

1491. EDWARD DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 2 candlesticks, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Jones .

THOMAS JONES. I am a publican , and keep the George, George-street, Whitechapel . The prisoner came on the 6th of June, and asked permission to go into my private parlour to take a pint of porter, as he was afraid of some Irishmen coming to abuse him; I gave him leave: I then went out on business, and on returning in threequarters of an hour, I met the prisoner going out: he said he should be in presently: my wife went into the parlour, and cried out, "Stop that man! he has got my candlesticks:" I ran and collared him, and said, "You have got the candlesticks;" he said by his God he had not got them, but an Irishman had taken them; I said, "I shall take you, and you may look for the Irishman:" I found the candlesticks, one in each of his inside pockets.

Prisoner's Defence. I go there to receive some rents. I had hired an Irishman to put on a lock; I was looking at some prints, and he took them and put them into my pockets; I did not know it till they were found in my pockets. I live with Mr. Brodie, of Lincoln's Inn-fields.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-144

1492. JOHN DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , 1 trowel, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of James Beagley .

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a bricklayer. I saw the prisoner on the 10th of June, near a scaffolding, in King-street, Camden-town ; I pursued him, and took this trowel from under his waistcoat.

JAMES BEAGLEY. I had been at work at that scaffolding, and left at eight o'clock; I left this trowel there, and when I returned the witness had got the prisoner with it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man like a bricklayer - he asked me if I was looking for work - I said Yes, and when we got to Camden-town he said he would go to borrow a trowel - he went and got one, gave it me, and told me to go on.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-145

1493. GEORGE CRACKNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 1 hat, value 8s. , the goods of Richard Bowden .

RICHARD TAYLOR . About a quarter before four o'clock on the 3d of June, I was passing Crown-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw this man running with a hat in his hand, and a ticket in it; I pursued him up Oxford-street, and took him with it.

RICHARD BOWDEN. I am a hatter , and live in High-street, St. Giles.' The prisoner was brought to me on the 3d of June, with this hat and my ticket in it. I have heard that the prisoner's friends are respectable.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280703-146

1494. JOHN CARNCROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , 11 pairs of half-stockings, value 3s. , the goods of Samuel Everingham .

JOHN EVERINGHAM . I am in the employ of Samuel Everingham, a hosier , who lives in Oxford-street . On the 7th of June the officer came and said he saw a boy taking eleven pairs of stockings from the door; I went and saw the prisoner with them - they had been inside the shop.

JOSEPH CARTER . I am an officer. I was going by, and saw the prisoner take these stockings from the door; he wrapped them up in his apron, walked away a few yards, and then ran - I took him; they were just inside the door.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280703-147

1495. THOMAS CAREY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , 2 planes, value 4s.; 1 mallet, value 6d., and 1 wooden-square, value 6d. , the goods of James Trotter .

JAMES TROTTER. I am a coffin-maker , and live on Saffron-hill . I lost these tools on Sunday, the 15th of

June; the prisoner had not worked for me, but he knew my premises, by living in the neighbourhood; these tools had been locked up in a saw-pit at the back of my house.

JOHN WATSON . I am a watchman. I was returning from the watch-house at a quarter-past three o'clock, and met the prisoner with these tools in his hand; I asked where he got them - he said from his lodging, No. 14, Peter-street; I said I would go there - I went on with him till I found he had passed the door - I then said, "You shall go before the officer of the night;" he threw them down and ran away - I retook him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I unfortunately met with a person familiar to me, who I considered to be a carpenter, he requested me to go to the watch-house with him, as he was giving another man in charge for an assault - having given the man in charge we came out of the watch-house, when he asked if I should have any objection to let him put a few things into my lodgings, as his landlord would put a padlock on his room door in the morning, which I agreed to do; he then told me to wait there while he went to No. 4, or 14, Peter-street; being inebriated I cannot possibly remember which; after waiting a few minutes he returned with the things found upon me, which he strongly desired me to put in my apron or handkerchief, but I, not being conscious of anything wrong, carried them in my open hands - he then told me to walk slowly on, and he would overtake me with some more; a watchman passing at the time inquired where I got them from; I told him from No. 4, or 14, Peter-street, which was the place I was told they came from; having just before been at the watch-house with the same man, and being fearful of being taken up, I attempted to run away; I had not been in the watch-house long before the person I had the things of came and said that there was no charge against me, as the things belonged to him: when the watch-house-keeper thought he ought to be detained likewise, but the nightconstable would not detain him.

JOHN WATSON re-examined. Q. Do you remember any person applying at the watch-house? A. Yes - there was a person called and said they were his tools; we sent him away - the Magistrate directed me to look for that man, but I could not find him: the prisoner said he brought the tools from his lodging, and was going to a job - I asked where he lodged - he said No. 14, Peter-street, and as he passed by there I detained him: he had been taken in a row before that, and after he had been in the watch-house this must have been committed.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-148

1496. JAMES TONKS was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM DAVID PAINE . I am an iron-founder . The prisoner was in my employ for two years, as my foreman . On the 5th of June I missed 3s. - I had got John Davis Paine to go and purchase something at my factory.

JOHN DAVIS PAINE . On the 5th of June I went to the shop disguised, and asked the prisoner for a pair of mangle end irons; he weighed them - they were 22 lbs., and I paid him 5s. for them; they came to 5s. 6d., but he said never mind the 6d., I could pay that when I went again: I went with the prosecutor to the factory - he asked the prisoner, in my presence, if anyone had been there, and he said No, only a person who left a letter; he did not ask if he had sold anything.

WILLIAM DAVID PAINE re-examined. I asked if anyone had been there; he said No, only the letter - I did not say "Has any customer been here?" he should have kept the money till I came, and given it to me, and have entered it in a book, which he had not done; I called him again about eleven o'clock and said "Let us have a balance;" as he had owed me 30s. some time before - he was to work it out; I took the book to see what he owed me then, and it was about 13s., which I made him give me a memorandum for in this book.

WILLIAM RAYBOULD . I went to the prosecutor and purchased a sack of coke, for which I paid 3s. to the prisoner - it was on a Saturday; I believe he put the money into his pocket.

WILLIAM DAVID PAINE re-examined. I had no conversation with him about this last transaction; I went out of town and returned on the Tuesday morning - I did not ask the prisoner if he had received any money; it was his duty to enter it in this book, which he should have given me when he saw me - here is no entry on the 5th or on the 7th; the second purchase was not with my knowledge.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had laid out some money for his master while he was from town; and that he intended to settle with him on the day he was apprehended.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-149

1497. WILLIAM DANKS was indicted for embezzlement .

WILLIAM DAVID PAYNE . The prisoner has been in my employ three years as carman ; he was to receive money in the absence of myself or the clerk - Mr. John Hill Powell, an acquaintance of mine, made a purchase at my house on the 6th of June.

JOHN HILL POWELL . I am a clerk. I went to the prosecutor's shop on the 6th of June and bought two mangle end irons of the prisoner, for which I paid 5s. 2d.; I either gave it to the prisoner, or put it on the desk - it was about half-past seven o'clock in the morning; I received a bill of them from the prisoner.

WILLIAM DAVID PAINE re-examined. He never accounted to me for this money; it was his duty to put it down in this book and give me the money: I went out of town on the Saturday - I called the prisoner and asked if any one had been there; he said No - I said "Come in, and let us settle about your tolls;" he owed me 2s. 6d., which he gave me; he said nothing about this 5s. 2d. - it was about two hours after he received it; he was taken into custody on the Tuesday following - I had left him there to give him an opportunity of settling this.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Have you any till? A. No; I did not ask if he had received any money - I asked if any one had been there.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Saturday previous to this, Mr. Paine discharged the clerk, and during that time I was bound to receive money on his account if anybody came for goods; on the Friday he called me to settle my tolls - they came to 8d.; he asked if I had had anybody there for him - I told him of course not: on the

Saturday evening I expected him to settle with me, when there would have been some more due to me for cart grease, tolls and oil, but before breakfast he went out of town.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-150

1498. JAMES WILCOX was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , certain fixtures, that is to say, 4 locks, value 1l. 15s., the goods of Thomas Nias , and fixed to a certain building; against the Statute .

GEORGE MOSTO . I am a nurseryman, and live at Islington. On the 21st of June, about four o'clock, I received information that a person had got into an empty house; I got up and went to the back part of the premises; I heard some one in the house; I tried the back door - it was fast; I went to the front of the premises, and found the prisoner in the adjoining carcase; he made a little resistance, and then begged for mercy - but finding it was no use, he began to pull these locks from his pocket and his hat; these three locks were on him, and this large lock and the screwdriver were by the area.

WILLIAM CLARK . I locked up the house, about halfpast nine o'clock the night before, and a little after four the next morning, I heard an alarm; I went down and found the prisoner with the witness, and these locks lying about; I believe these were the locks that were on that house, but I cannot swear to them.

THOMAS NIAS . I am the owner of the house. I believe these locks to have been fastened on the doors of that house.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-151

1499. JOHN DYER , JOHN LLOYD , EMANUEL HARRIS , and LEWIS HARRIS , were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 42 hats, value 12l. 9s.; 3 yards of silk hat shag, value 10s.; 3 yards of silk, value 10s.; 3 yards of shag, value 10s.; 3 brushes, value 10s., and 1 unmanufactured hat, value 4s. , the goods of John Gravenor , the master of the said John Dyer.

MR. BARRY declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-152

1500. JOHN COOPER was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN SMALL GORE . I am a salesman and live in St. James's market. The prisoner was in my employ, and was to sell hay for me, and give me the money; he accounts to me as often as he sells any - he brings me the money, and it is my duty to book it; he sold half a load on the 8th of May, but he never brought me the money; he left the team in the street; I met him about three weeks afterwards, in the Edgware-road, and gave him in charge; he had lived with me a year or two before.

THOMAS WALLIS . I bought half a load of hay in the beginning of May, of the prisoner; I paid him 2l. for it for his master.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost the money, or else I should not have run away; a boy took the horse and cart home.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-153

1501. FREDERICK FISHER was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am a linen-draper , and live in the Quadrant, Regent-street. The prisoner was my errand-boy , and received money when he took out goods; he was to give it me when he returned; he did not keep any book: on the 7th of June, I sent him to Mr. Burns, No. 14, Montague-place, to receive 1l. 8s. for goods sent the day before - he came back and said, the lady would call and discharge the bill; I then sent him to another place, and he did not return.

ANN IBELL . I paid the prisoner 1l. 8s. on the 7th of June, for Mr. Griffiths on Mr. Burn's account; he wrote this receipt.

HARRIET HARRISON . The prisoner brought me a bill for 13s. 6d. on the 7th of June, and I paid it him for his master.

MR. GRIFFITHS. I never received either of thesemonies.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-154

1502. ALFRED COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Rixon , from his person .

HENRY RIXON. I was at the end of St. Martin's-court , a little after two o'clock on the 2d of July; I missed my handkerchief, turned round, and saw the prisoner putting it into his waistcoat; I seized him, and took him into a shop, where he was taken charge of.

JOHN GROOM . I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy drop it; I took it up and put it into my jacket pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-155

1503. CHARLES JEFFKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 4 pieces of calico, value 6s., the goods of David Gibson , from the person of Alexander William Wilkie .

ALEXANDER WILLIAM WILKIE. On Tuesday afternoon last, I was going to my grandmother with these four pieces of calico; they belong to my aunt - her husband's name is David Gibson; I was in Bethnal-green-fields looking at the boys bathing in the canal - the prisoner pretended to be going into the water; he took my bundle, and asked what I had got there, and ran off with it- I called Stop thief! and he was taken soon after.

WILLIAM LASH HAYWARD . I was with Wilkie; I hear him cry Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running away with his bundle.

THOMAS BENNETT WARNER . I live in the neighbourhood, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running with the bundle; I went to take him - he dropped it; I took it up, and took him.

SARAH COLLEY . I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner run with a bundle.

JAMES ESSEX . I am an officer, and produce the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to bathe; the prosecutor was standing by the side of the canal - I took up my hat, and the bundle which was lying beside it; I looked at it, and a person called to me to take it to him - I was going to him, and he ran away; I went back to the prosecutor and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-156

1504. JOSEPH BIGLEY and WILLIAM FOR

ROW were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 1 hat, value 2s. , the goods of Benjamin Dew .

BENJAMIN DEW. I am a shoe-maker , and live at Old Brentford, in Ealing parish; I knew the prisoner by sight. On Wednesday, the 18th of June, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was speaking to a woman who was going to Bristol, in the gateway of the Bull inn; the prisoners came up - Bigley knocked me down, and my hat fell off, and one of them took it up; they both ran away - I pursued and caught them: but my hat was gone - they had turned a corner; there was no other person in the gateway, but there was one or two about there - I went next day to Bigley's father, and asked if they would send my hat back, which was all I wanted; the old gentleman said, they were bad chaps - I let it rest till the middle of the day, and then got a warrant; I have never seen my hat since - I had been drinking; but I do not think my hat could have fallen off - I do not think it was a lark.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You went to Bigley's father before you got the warrant? A. Yes; I had not heard that either of them were going to prosecute me for an assault - I walked to the gateway; the woman told me she was going to Bristol - I had part of three or four pints of beer, and had been playing at skittles.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-157

1505. CHARLES GARLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 1 loaf of bread, value 9d., and 1 frock-skirt, value 9d. , the goods of Richard Clark .

GEORGE WHITTEL . I am a watchman. On the 2d of July, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in Lower Grosvenor-place, about one hundred yards from Mr. Clark's, with a bundle, containing a loaf of bread, some broken bread and butter, part of a leg of lamb dressed, and a frock-skirt; I asked where he got them - he said, he did not know.

MARY WARNER . I am servant to Mr. Richard Clark of No. 21, Grosvenor-street, West . We missed a loaf from the safe, and this skirt was taken off a line in the yard; they were safe when I went to bed the night before - I can swear to the skirt, but not to the loaf.

GUILTY Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-158

1506. SAMUEL HARDING and WILLIAM MORRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 4 casks, value 2l. , the goods of William Kinsman Jones , the elder.

The Prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-159

1507. SARAH JENKINS was indicted was stealing, on the 6th of June , 1 hat, value 5s. , the goods of Martha Gardiner .

THOMAS DANIEL GARDINER . I live with my mother, Martha Gardiner, in Chiswell-street . I was told a person had taken a hat from a rail inside the door - I went after the prisoner: I found her opposite Bunhill-row with it under her shawl - I took her to the watch-house; she said, I could only lag her for seven years, and then she should come out sweet and fresh.

MARY HURLEY . I was opposite the next house, and saw the prisoner take the hat; I told the witness to pursue her - he took her; I did not see her face, but I believe it was her.

JOHN BEE . I took the prisoner; I found nothing on her - there were two more girls who she wanted me to take.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the hat four doors from the prosecutor's.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

The prisoner received a good character, and was strongly recommended to Mercy .

Confined Seven Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-160

1507. WILLIAM RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of Henry Haddock .

HENRY HADDOCK. I have been at sea three years; I left my vessel, and employed the prisoner to carry a box, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, on the 3d of June; I had not seen him before - he was to carry it to Mr. Pearce, No. 14, Penny-fields, Poplar; I went there the next morning, and it was not there - I saw it at the watch-house the same night; I had paid him before he set off - it would have taken him about an hour to have gone with it.

JOHN DAWSON . I am a porter. The prisoner lodged a few nights with me; I was at my dinner, and he asked me if I would go and fetch his chest - I said, "Yes, it was my business;" I do not recollect the day - I was to go for it at the Star public-house, Shadwell; we went there, and sat down, and had three pints of beer - he then told me take to this chest to No. 3, Glass-house-street, Rosemary-lane; I was going there, and was stopped - they said, the chest was stolen; I told where I got it, and they took the prisoner.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I am an officer. Dawson was brought to the watch-house on the 3d or 4th of June, with the chest; the prosecutor came and missed a coat and some other things out of it - I was taking the prisoner to the office the next day, and he said he had pawned it; I asked where the duplicate was - he said, he did not know; he told me where it was pawned.

ROBERT MILTON . I am assistant to a pawnbroker in Cable-street. I took in this coat of a man - it was very wet, and he asked me to hang it up to dry.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-161

1509. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 ham, value 6s., the goods of John Davis ; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s., the goods of Richard Amor , and 1 pair of trousers, value 3s. , the goods of William Cordley .

THOMAS RAINE . I am groom to Mr. Burford, and when I have done for him, I work for Mr. John Davis, who is a publican , and lives in Ratcliff-highway; I was sitting up at night for his coming home on the 5th of June, and a few minutes after ten o'clock I heard a noise in the back yard; I went out and saw the prisoner come out of the wash-house where the ham had hung -

he went down the yard and went into the wash-house again; I went in, collared, and brought him out - he was quite a stranger; I put my hand into his bosom, and found this pair of trousers - another pair were found on him afterwards; and the ham was taken off the hook just within the door.

GEORGE DEVERELL . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house at half-past eleven o'clock; I heard a pair of trousers had been found on him, and I asked him if he had anything else; he said he had not - I searched him and found a flash-note for 50l. in his pocket-book, and this pair of trousers in his hat; he said, he had had them washed at No. 3. Union-street - I took him there, and the woman said to him, "You need not wink at me; I neither know you nor the trousers;" he said, he had belonged to the Willing Maid - there is a collier of that name.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman of Shadwell. I was called to take the prisoner to the watch-house.

SARAH LAWRENCE . I live in Field-alley, Shadwell. I had these trousers to wash for Mr. Richard Amor, and these for Mr. William Cordley; I can swear to them - I had them safe in my yard at half-past eight o'clock that evening; and missed them at ten.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the stable to sleep; the man came and took me - I said, "I can't get on board to night;" I have lost my ship now.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-162

1510. JOHN HOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , 1 piece of wood, value 1s. , the goods of George Harrison .

GEORGE THOMAS . I know Mr. George Harrison - he is a carpenter , and lives at Pimlico. This wood was taken from the Shot and Shell wharf at Blackwall - it is shut up at night: I missed three pieces of wood, and on the 3d of June I found one of them on the Anchor wharf - I know it to be Mr. Harrison's; the prisoner was sawing it up - he said he did not know whose it was; I said "You knew it was not yours" - he was at work there, digging post-holes for anchors.

JOHN WEBB . I am an East India Dock constable. - On Tuesday morning, the 3d of June, at half-past six o'clock, Thomas came to me and said he had lost some timber - Mr. Harrison is building a shed there; soon afterwards he fetched me to take the prisoner.

DANIEL THOMAS . I was with my brother and saw him find the timber.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had used the wood in his work, and thought it belonged to the Company.

GEORGE THOMAS re-examined. The distance between the two wharfs is only the width of the gate; when I spoke to the prisoner, he said "Say nothing about it; if you do, I shall lose my birth and get out of bread."

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280703-163

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1511. JOHN TROTT was indicted for bigamy .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS OUSLEY . I am parish-clerk of Thorncomb, in Devonshire. I have the register of the marriage in that parish on the 21st of December, 1819: John Trott, batchelor and Sarah Stevens , spinster , were married; I knew her at the time - she is daughter of Sarah Prout - she and her mother are here; she had lived before that at a farm-house.

ROBERT FARRANT . I am a farmer, and live in Thorncombe parish. I subscribed this register - the prisoner is the man; I have no doubt about it - this is the woman - I am quite sure; she had been an apprentice to a relation of mine.

SARAH PROUT . I am mother of Sarah Stevens. I know the prisoner - he associated with my daughter; I was in Thorncombe and saw them go into church - I saw them afterwards, and went as far as Crockerne, where they had a supper - they conducted themselves as man and wife for a long time afterwards.

WILLIAM LOW . I am parish-clerk of Speene in Berkshire. On the 16th of February, 1824 , John Trott widower, of that parish, and Mary Whitten , widow of that parish, were married by banns; I was a witness to this register - I know that is the man; I knew him before.

Prisoner's Defence. If it meets your approbation, I will now make out my whole defence, as I have no one to plead for me - this morning when at this bar, I should have pleaded guilty, but for one thing; I wished my case might prove a caution to others, and I wished to place before the Judge and Jury the hardships I have undergone; this trial has nevertheless brought me from living in a state of adultery; in which, I am now sensible I have transgressed the laws of God and of my country; and I hope I shall bear with patience and resignation, by the will of God, the sentence you may pass upon me: I trust however, the Court will hear what I have to say, and that it will operate in my favour, when brought up to receive my sentence. In 1807, I entered His Majest'y service: I was then but sixteen years and nine months old - I served as private, corporal and serjeant at most of the battles in the Peninsula at Waterloo and other places, where I received a wound in my head, which has caused a great depression of my intellectual powers; I have not worn a hat for three years, and have undergone four painful operations - I have had two false passages made for my urine and a leader cut under my ham, which had made me a cripple: to these causes I may perhaps attribute my present degraded situation: but I did not know that I was committing this crime till last summer; when at Brighton, I heard that a gentlemen had been imprisoned for having two wives - only this led to an inquiry, which convinced me of my error; if ever pity dwell in your breast towards a poor individual, I trust it dwells there now, for I can truly say "I acknowledge my transgression, and my sin is ever before me."

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Reference Number: t18280703-164

1512. JOHN TROTT was again indicted for a like offence .

SARAH PROUT . The prisoner married my daughter, Sarah Stevens , in 1819, she is still alive; they had three children, who are all dead.

ELIZABETH SIMS . I married the prisoner at Romsey, on the 7th of February, 1826; we have had no family.

GEORGE WILLMOT . I apprehended the prisoner at Shoreditch workhouse.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-165

1513. CHRISTOPHER McKENNA was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 sieve, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Abraham Clark .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-166

1514. WILLIAM PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 live pig, price 30s., the property of Daniel Winch ; also, for stealing, on the 9th of March, 2 live pigs, price 5l. , the property of Eleanor Cock .

To which indictments the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years upon each indictment .

Reference Number: t18280703-167

1515. EDWARD COLEBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , 7 books, value 5l.; 1 flute, value 1s. 6d., and 1 lb. weight of thread, value 1s. , the goods of James Martin and David Watson Martin , his master; and HENRY RETMIRE was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the same day 3 books, value 4l., he well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

JAMES MARTIN. I am a bookbinder , in partnership with my son David Watson Martin. Colebrook lived with me for eight months as errand-boy; I went to his lodgings on the 21st of May, in Chatham-gardens, City-road - I think it is No. 32; the house was pointed out to me by my son, who was there before me; I found several books there, also a fiddle, and 1 lb. of thread, which were mine; the prisoner was gone to the City, and on his return I charged him with taking these things - he denied it stoutly; I said if he would confess, and endeavour to recover the property, I would not send for an officer, nor proceed against him; he still said he took nothing; I was so provoked that I took the property and spread before him, and said, "How can you deny taking the property, when I have found this at your lodgings?" he then said, "I took that and no more:" I said, "What is become of Clarke's Bible?" (and several others I mentioned) he said, "I don't know - I did not take them at all:" seeing him so obstinate I sent for an officer, and when he saw him he told me he had sold a great part of them to Retmire, a bookseller, living in Shire-lane; I went there, and brought him to Colebrook; who said, "That is the person I bought the books of;" he had said before that he bought books of one and another, and did not know that he should know the person again - I did not find any books at his house, but he said he had bought a great many volumes of Plays, and this Bible for half-a-crown; but he said it was imperfect, and wanted thirteen leaves; I have looked at it, though not particularly, but I believe it is all right; when the two prisoners were brought together, Colebrook said to Retmire, "You said you would give me so much a dozen for volumes of Plays," and Retmire said, "No, I said so and so;" these books were found at the pawnbroker's by the duplicates.

Prisoner RETMIRE. Q. Did you not ask me if I had any Prayer-books or Play-books, or the Londinensis? A. Yes; You said you had not, but you had duplicates of them; and knew where they were, and that they could be recovered; you said you bought books of various persons and when you saw Colebrook you said, "That is the person I bought books of," and he said, "Yes, it was me."

DAVID WATSON MARTIN . I am in partnership with my father; I found the property at Colebrook's; when he came in he at first denied taking them, but the identical things were shown him; when the constable came, he entered into a very full confession of what he had taken - this is not a tenth part of it; this History of England, from the information Retmire gave before Mr. Twyford, was traced to Mr. Dance of Holborn, and I got it from there; these other two volumes also were traced there by the same means.

JOHN ARCHAM . I am a bookseller, and live in Fetter-lane. I bought the duplicate of a Bible from Retmire, I think, four or five months ago, for 5s. - it was this Bible in two volumes; I had been acquainted with him a long time - I bought this History of England of him for 12s., and sold it to Mr. Dance for 12s. 6d.; he did not tell me where he had them from - he said he knew the owner of the Bible.

Prisoner RETMIRE. Q. When I first brought you the Bible, before I pawned it, what did I offer it for? A. I believe he asked me 15s. for it; I said I had not the money or I would have bought it - he said he would go and pawn it, as he wanted money very badly; I gave him 4s. for the duplicate, and did not take it out for a fortnight - I then sold it to Mr. Dance.

Q. Did I take novels in part of payment for the History of England? A. Yes; there were 7s. worth of novels, and 5s. in money.

THOMAS DANCE . These books were sold to me by Archam.

RICHARD CONSTANTINE . I went to Colebrook's, and found some books; he confessed to a great many.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RETMIRE's Defence. This lad was introduced by McDonald, who said he knew his master, who was a regular dealer, and attended auctions, to buy books, and having a great many volumes of plays which he could not make up into sets, he wished to know if I would take them; I looked at them, and found them decayed; I then questioned the lad, who said he wanted 2s. 6d. per dozen volumes; I said they were not worth it, but I would take two dozen - shortly afterwards he brought some more, which he agreed to leave, as I said I did not want them: in a few days he brought the Bible, and left that - in a short time he called to know if I would buy them - I said, No, I did not want such books as that, but he would leave them; I then took the Bible to Mr. Archam, and asked him one guinea for it; he said, "It may be worth 15s., but I have not money enough - if you will pawn it I will buy the duplicate;" I pawned it in the Strand, for 15s.; I went to Archam, and told him - he said I had taken in the pawnbroker, but he would give me a shilling for the duplicate; I took the shilling, and in a day or two the lad called with the History of England, and I gave him the whole of the money - I took the History of England to Archam; I gave Colebrook the money, and he told me his master had desired him to give me 3s. 6d. - those four Hebrew books I pawned, and the duplicate was found at my premises.

COURT to JAMES MARTIN . Q. Did Colebrook say, in

the presence of Retmire, what he had given for this Bible? A. Yes; he said 2s. 6d., and that it wanted thirteen or fourteen leaves; Retmire then said it was sold out and out, and he could not get it; the title page is wanting to this second volume, but it is not in general bound in two volumes - that is the reason; I found nothing at Retmire's but the duplicate of these four Hebrew books.

COLEBROOK - GUILTY . Aged 15.

RETMIRE - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined One Year .

Reference Number: t18280703-168

1516. GEORGE ASPINSHAW was indicted for that he, on the 17th of June , a certain male child of the age of six years, named Christopher Douglass, son of Christopher Douglass , the elder, feloniously and maliciously did decoy and entice away, with intent certain articles of apparel (to wit) 1 hat, value 3s., and 1 pinafore, value 1s. 6d., the goods and chattels of Christopher Douglass, the elder, upon and about the person of the said child, to steal, take, and carry away; against the Statute .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the said goods.

CHRISTOPHER DOUGLASS. I am a carpenter , and live at No. 5, Queen's-row, Hoxton. I have a little boy named Christopher: on the 17th of June, when I came home from my work, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, he was missing - we inquired for him all night, and towards the morning I found him in Clerkenwell workhouse; he was without his hat and pinafore then.

JAMES PINKS . My father is a butcher, and lives in Queen's-row. I was playing with Christopher Douglass and some other boys, on some gravel-heaps, near our house - I saw the prisoner sitting on the hill, talking to Christopher Douglass, and he said if we would come down the road he would get us a bird's nest: we went up a new street, and he told Christopher Douglass and Charles Cluse to stop, and he staid with them while I went into a house; when I came out they were gone: when I left them Christopher Douglass had a white hat on, with a crape round it, and a brown Holland pinafore.

Prisoner. Q. When did you first observe me? A. I saw you on the gravel - you took us down the New North-road, and then to Cavendish-street; I went into the house, but no one else - it was an unfinished house; I got through the pales, and over a ditch - you did not wait till I came out; you did not offer to take anything from me.

AUGUSTUS LLOYD . I met the prisoner with Christopher Douglass, at the corner of Lisle-street, on the 17th of June, they took the road towards the Crown and Sceptre public-house; Cluse and Douglass were on the prisoner's righthand - I did not hear him say anything: Douglass had a hat and pinafore on.

ELIZABETH DOUGLASS . I am the mother of Christopher Douglass - he is five years old; I sent him to school at three o'clock that day, with a white beaver hat and brown Holland pinafore on.

MARY DEWBERY . My husband is a carpenter. I saw the prisoner on the gravel, and the children were about him; he threw Douglass' hat down the gravel-heap, and sent Cluse to fetch it up; Cluse had a pinafore on at that time; he was brought home by a gentleman at ten o'clock at night, without one.

JAMES CLUSE . I am the father of Charles Cluse. When I came home from work that day my son was absent; I went in search of him till one o'clock in the morning - when I came back he had been brought back by a gentleman, but had no pinafore on; we then went in search of Douglass. I saw the prisoner on the Friday following, and as he answered the description given me, I took him into custody; I told him to come with me, and if all was right I would give him a pint of beer; I took him to a neighbour's house, and sent for my little boy - he said, "That is the man who took my pinafore away:" the prisoner said he knew nothing about it.

MARY HARDEN . I saw the prisoner in the street on the 17th of June, at near five o'clock - he came round the corner by the canal; he went and looked over a wall, and then went on towards the gravel.

JOHN RICHMOND . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner.

JAMES CLUSE . I am eleven years of age - I know the Commandments. I saw the prisoner on the 17th of June; I was with my brother Charles, Christopher Douglass, and James Pinks; the prisoner said he would get us a bird'snest; we went down the New North-road, and he told Pinks to go through the ditch and get the bird's-nest; he then went on with my brother and Christopher Douglass, and told me if I did not go back he would smash my brains out - I went away.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take them into any house? A. No: you did not ask me to do anything; you only told us to take off our coats and go over a ditch, and said you would mind them - I did not go into any house; we all got over a wall; Pinks and Halls went over the ditch - you said you would go and get the bird's-nest, and would call out; I went with you as far as the turnpike.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Ripley, or near there at the time; I have tried to bring the persons I was with, but could not. GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-169

There was another indictment against the prisoner.

1567. MARGARET BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 1 apron, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of William Love .

WILLIAM LOVE. The prisoner came to lodge at my house in Cartwright-street, Aldgate ; her husband was with her - they staid a fortnight; she left without notice: I did not see her again till last Wednesday, when she had my wife's apron on; I asked if she was not a pretty sort of woman to leave my house as she did - she said it was not her intention to rob me, but she was persuaded by her husband.

ELIZABETH LOVE . I am the wife of William Love. - The prisoner and her husband lodged with me; I went out on the 14th of June, leaving the prisoner and a girl there to take care of my child; I returned in two hours, and the prisoner was gone; her husband came home after that - he said he was going to the pay-table, and would come back and pay me, but I never saw him any more - I afterwards missed my apron and handkerchief; when the prisoner was taken she had my apron on.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not in the habit of lending it to me? A. You borrowed an apron to go out to see for a situation a fortnight before; I was not in the house at the time you took this.

CATHERINE CASEY. I was servant at the prosecutor's. I saw the prisoner go to the cradle and take out this blue apron, and put it on her milking-pail; she then went to the chair, took the handkerchief, and put that in her pail - she said she was going to borrow them.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-170

1518. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 3 saws, value 15s.; 1 plane, value 5s.; 8 chisels, value 8s.; 1 rule, value 5s.; 1 pair of pincers, value 1s.; 1 trying-square, value 2s., and 1 gimblet, value 8d. , the goods of Robert Humphrey .

ROBERT HUMPHREY. I am a carpenter . I was working in an empty house in Stanhope-street, Hampsted-road , on the 24th of June; I left my tools all safe when I went to dinner - when I returned I missed these articles.

SAMUEL DEACON . The prisoner brought these tools to my house, and wanted me to buy them; I asked if he was in work - he said No, he had been out of work three months - I at last gave 1s. 6d. for them; he said a person had given them to him; he went out and came in again.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Hampstead-road - an Irishman asked me to sell these tools for him, and said he would give me 6d.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-171

1519. MARY TURPIN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of George Foster ; and 1 coat, value 5s., the goods of Richard Bush Skillern .

The prosecutors did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-172

1520. DIANA SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 1/2lb. weight of butter, value 1s., and two loaves of bread, value 8d. , the goods of the Overseers of the Poor , for the time being, of the hamlet of Mile-end Old-town.

NICHOLAS EDGECOMBE. I am gate-keeper of the workhouse of Mile-end Old-town . On the morning of the 20th of June the prisoner, who is a pauper there, came through the hall leading to the front door: the mistress said to her,"Well, Scott, what have you in your pocket?" she said,"Nothing particular;" the mistress told me to search her- she then took two loaves of bread from one pocket, and there half-pounds of butter from the other.

JOHN PALMER . I am master of the work-house. The mistress gave me the loaves and butter, which she said she took from the prisoner; I sent for the officer - the bread and butter belonged to the Guardians of the Poor; the butter had been given out half and hour before, and the loaves in the morning; I had given the prisoner one loaf and one half-pound of butter for her share - there were no more; some of the paupers were without, and they said they had given their's to her to take out.

Prisoner's Defence. One half-pound of butter and one loaf were my own; and the others, two poor individuals pressed me to take out to get them some tea.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-173

1521. JAMES THORNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June , 3 live tame fowls, price 5s., the property of Nicholas Bell ; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Isaac Terry ; and 2 blankets, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 4d., and 1 pewter pot, value 4d. , the goods of John Boyd .

NICHOLAS BELL. I am a weaver , and live in Spitalfields . I lost three fowls from a shed in my yard on the 30th of June; I went to bed at ten o'clock at night, and was called at half-past eleven; the fowls were then in the next yard, with their heads cut off; I knew nothing of the prisoner till I saw him the next morning; he then said he knew nothing at all of them - he had gone through a passage into the yard, and could not get out, for a dog barked - the woman went and bolted the door, and he could not get back.

ISAAC TERRY. I live in the next house to Mr. Bell. I found the prisoner the next morning in my privy, with my stockings round his body; I asked him what he wanted there - he said he came up the passage; I told him to go along, and he tried to get out, but the door was bolted; I then looked further, and found two blankets down the privy.

MARY ANN BOYD . I am the wife of John Boyd. I saw my two blankets under the water-cock; they appeared to have been down the privy.

JOHN BARRS . I was sent for, and took the prisoner. I found these stockings and this handkerchief round his body.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to go to the privy - when I was coming out the door was bolted; I did not like to disturb the people, and I staid there; I picked up the handkerchief and stockings.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-174

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JULY 7.

Fifth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1522. JOHN EAMES and JOHN HUDSON were indicted for assaulting John Richardson , with intent to rob him, and his goods and monies to steal .

The prosecutor did not appear NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-175

1523 WILLIAM HEMSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , 2 quarts of Rum, value 7s., and 3 bottles, value 6d. , the goods of Samuel KcKenzie.

SAMUEL McKENZIE . I keep the Horse and Groom public-house, near Hanover-square ; the prisoner lodged in my house. On Thursday night last I fastened my barat half-past eleven o'clock, and went to bed; I was alarmed at half-past five next morning - I found my har door open, and missed some rum from a cask, as I found it run slack; I went up stairs to put on my clothes, when the prisoner passed by my door he shut it nearly to, and put a stone against it - he went down, and went out with a parcel under his arm; when he returned at night I got an officer, and we went up to his bed-room - there was a parcel on his bed; I asked him what he had in his box - he said Nothing; I told the officer to search his box - he pulled out his knapsack, and in that we found two bottles and one pint of rum; I asked where he took it from, he said from my bar, that it was my rum, and he did not know how he came to take it; three empty bottles were found in the bundle on the bed - there had been rum in them.

ROBERT DONKIN . I am an officer and took the prisoner.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-176

1524. GEORGE BAYS and WILLIAM CAVE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 1 watch, value 40s.; 1 watch-chain, value 6d.; 1 seal, value 20s. and 1 watch-key, value 4s. , the goods of John Cavener .

JOHN KENNY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a watch, which was pawned with me on the 19th of December, by a young woman named Slaughterey; the two prisoners came together the day after, and had an affidavit of it; saying the duplicate was lost.

JOHN CAVENER. On Monday, the 17th of December, Bays came to sweep the chimney of my apartment; I believe the duplicate of this watch, which is my brother's, was in my coat pocket - I had seen it on the Sunday; Bays told me on the 19th that he got the ticket at a green-grocers, in Gloucester-street, St. James's - Cave was in my employ.

BAYS' Defence. Cave came to me and said, "I picked up this duplicate at the corner of Gloucester-court, in a piece of paper - we could not read, and we asked a person to read it for us.

HENRY CAVENER . This is my watch I believe; my brother lent me some money on it, and has had it these three years.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-177

1525. JOHN FELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 cask, value 5s., and 2 cwt. of pork, value 3l. , the goods of Robert Linklater , his master; and GEORGE ROWLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT LINKLATER . I am a provision-merchant , and live at Wapping . Fell has been in my employ as warehouseman these thirteen years; Rowley is a provisiondealer , and lives three or four hundred yards from me - this cask of pork was in an under-ground warehouse; I have a crane to raise goods from there. On the 24th of March, about half-past two o'clock, I went on 'Change, as usual; I returned about half-past five, and received information - (Fell knew my hours of being on 'Change); I went to Rowley's shop directly, and saw him - I said,"Mr. Rowley, have you been receiving a cask of provision from my warehousemen?" he said he had; I said,"How came you to take in a cask from my warehouseman"- he said, "I took this cask from John Fell, your warehouseman, because he said it was made a present to him;" I said, "It is a curious way, are you in the habit of receiving casks from my warehouseman?" he said, "I don't know;" I said he should have asked me if I had made such a present - I think he added that I did not want the cask; he said, "Here is the cask, will you have it; or will you take it away?" I said, "Oh! no, Mr. Rowley; it is perfectly safe here, let it stand;" I went home, and in the course of the evening it was brought back to my warehouse - I had not ordered it to be sent; I had my stock taken, and found a very large deficiency - I immediately ordered Fell to quit my premises in five minutes; he kept out of the way for about a fortnight - I went and sent for him, but could not find him; he was advertised by the parish, and taken - I know the cask to be mine by the carrier's brand-mark on it; it was one of one hundred barrels imported from Limerick; Fell had no authority to sell my goods.

DAVIS BROWN . I am in the prosecutor's employ. On the 24th of March, a little after three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Fell rolling a barrel of pork from our cellar, towards Wapping-dock; I lost sight of him at near the gun-dock - he was going towards Rowley's; I went home and reported what I had seen - I went after him again, and saw him pitch it into Mr. Rowley's shop; there was a young man at the further end of the shop - I saw Fell talking to him; I then came away; and told master when he came home - I afterwards saw the cask, and believe it to be the same - it was full.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How near were you to the cask at any time? A. Within four or five yards; I did not particularly examine it - I did not see him take it from the cellar; I knew it by the brandmark.

COURT. Q. Did you go to the warehouse to see if any casks were missing? A. Yes, and missed it - I had stowed it away a day or two before myself, and had seen it there that very day about half-past six o'clock - this one stood in front of the others.

JOHN McNAMARA . I am cooper to the prosecutors. - On the 24th of March, about half-past three o'clock, Fell asked me to go down into the cellar, to help him roll out a barrel of pork - we do not always use the crane; master was not at home - Fell first asked me, where Storey. the clerk, was; I said at the public-house: he then said"Come down and help me with a barrel of pork out of the cellar, it is a good time;" I helped him - he then asked me to roll it for him to Rowley's shop - I would not, and then he said he was the best man himself to roll it; and accordingly he did; he said "D - n your eyes, you are as bad as I am;" I had some suspicion that all was not right - I went over to Brown and told him what had happened; I did not see where he took it to - the brandmark on it was "Reading, Limerick." I did not see him take it more than twenty or thirty yards: it came back the same evening - I am sure it was the same cask, I can swear to it: he said I was as bad as he was, and liable to be transported - it was taken from a pile of about one hundred others.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then it was not standing by itself? A. No; it was in the pile - my master allows me a piece of pork, when I want it.

Q. Were you ever fined 40s. for stealing pork? A. Yes, but Fell, the foreman, gave it to me; he and I were together - it was eighteen months ago; I did not tell master of this till I was taken to the Police-office - I was never taken up before - I had no quarrel with Fell.

COURT. Q. Was Fell fined at the time you were? A. No - he went away; we were only going through the docks to give a bit of pork to the foreman of the wine

department, for some wine: I never told master that Fell was concerned.

MR. BRODRICK to ROBERT LINKLATER. Q. Do not you know that it was Rowley who sent the cask home? A. I do not know; he came to me that evening, after it had come, and told me he had sent it home; he went over the way then - I made no charge against him at that time; he continued in his business: Fell was taken about a month ago, and the Magistrate issued a summons for Rowley, by my desire - there were three hearings; I do not think there were more - Rowley did not attend at one of them; he attended once as a witness - I went to the office one evening, in consequence of a notice, but he did not come, and nothing was done, as Mr. Humphries, my solicitor, ordered me not to do anything unless he was there; Rowley was there that night, and attended two or three times after.

Q. Did you apply to an attorney named Dodd? A. No. I know him very well; he did not act as my attorney; I was never in Mr. Harmer's office in my life - I do not know where it is; I did not send Dodd to Rowley's at any time; I know he went there - that might be a week after the discovery - it was before any examination.

Q. Is not Dodd now acting as your attorney? A. No: Mr. Humphries is my attorney - Dodd did not attend before the Magistrate, as my attorney; he may have been there; he told me afterwards that he had been to Rowley, and I approved of what he said, but I did not apply to him - when Rowley came to me, nothing passed about anything but the cask: I took hold of the chain of the crane and said,"The cask could not be taken out without this;' no other conversation passed to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you not in the first instance forget that Rowley had called on you? A. Yes; I had entirely forgotten it, but I recollected it when he mentioned it: I do not recollect any other conversation passing.

MR. CLARKSON. Are you sure no conversation passed respecting his dealing with Fell for two or three years? A. Not a sentence; I attended all the examinations.

COURT. Q. What did you understand by Rowley saying, you did not want it? A. I understood him to mean that Fell had received it as a present from some other person, and I did not want to purchase it - that was the impression on my mind; I said it was curious to take casks from my foreman without coming to me, as I did not live three hundred yards off - he did not say what he gave for it - Dodd told me he had information that Rowley had sent money to Fell, and ordered him to keep out of the way while I was looking for him.

Q. Is that what you approved of? A. Why, I thought I could not convict him without having Fell, and I thought it was necessary for me to have information, whether he was out of the way; and Dodd said he would call to know that: I approved of his calling, as it saved me trouble; he said he would call and ask Rowley that; I think he called afterwards, and told me he had been to Rowley. I did not authorize Dodd to go to Rowley and say he should be prosecuted unless he paid 1000l.; on my oath I never did; nor did Dodd tell me he had made such a communication: Rowley did not say Fell had told him he had the cask from the master of a vessel.

JAMES DODDS . I am occasionally employed as attorney for the prosecutor; but on this prosecution I never was employed profssionally by him; I am subpoenaed here for the prisoners; I called on Rowley three times; I did not communicate with the prosecutor before I called - the first time was a fortnight or three weeks after the 24th of March; I saw Rowley in his counting-house, and told him I understood he knew where Fell, Mr. Linklater's late foreman was, as it was reported he had given him money to go out of town; he denied it, and asked if Linklater intended to prosecute Fell; I said I believed he did, but he was away - he then asked if he intended to prosecute him; I said I did not know; that I had no instruction to call on him, but I had merely called to get this question answered and to see some receipts which he had; the prosecutor's son is articled to me; I am continually calling on him: Rowley asked me if Fell could turn King's evidence against him; I told him he could - he said he did not care for that, as he had plenty of receipts for some empty casks which he had received, and he pulled one from a file - it was for empty casks, and signed John Fell; he then asked me how much property was lost from Linklater's premises; I said the books were at an accountants in the City, and I believed 2,000l. worth of provisons were said to be lost from the stock; he said he had not had above 100l. worth, nor so much, and asked me what would settle the affair; I told him I had no authority to call on him, and advised him to go to his friends, consult some professional man, and get the best advice he could; I afterwards saw Linklater, and said, I do not know whether I have done right - but I have been to Rowley's to get information about Fell and look at some receips: I called on Rowley again - he appeared much dejected, said he had been speaking to his friends, and asked me if the thing could he settled; I said No, he could not buy Mr. Linklater I was sure - he said, "If I was to send a friend of mine, who is a friend of Linklater's, would it nothave great weight?" I said it might, but I had nothing to do with it, I called as a friend; I called again, and there were two persons in the shop, one was a lad and the other an elderly person, whose name I understood to be Mitchell; Rowley then said he had been into the country. but had not found any friend who he could call one, who would go to Mr. Linklater on the business, and here the conversation ended; we were shut in the counting-house; the two persons were not present; when we came out into the shop, Rowley said, "I cannot find 1,000l.;" I said, I do not know what you mean, for I supposed he was going to make some evidence of my being there; I had said nothing about 1,000l.; I said in these peoples' presence, that I had no authority from Mr. Linklater for calling, and in point of fact, I was blamed by him for going there.

MR. LAW. Q. How long have you been a professional man? A. Nine years; I was not a friend of Rowley's - I saw Linklater the evening I had the first conversation, and told him about the receipts; I did not think there was any occasion to tell him more.

Q. Why did you conceal any part of the conversation? A. Rowley being a neighbour of Linklater's, I did not wish to irritate Linklater's feelings; the second interview was four or five days afterwards - I called to do everything in my power to avoid a prosecution; as Rowley had friends in the neighbourhood, I thought the best way would be to send an intimate friend of his to Linklater, to prevent a prosecution.

Q. On your oath did you not, yourself, mention the 1000l.? A. Yes: Rowley asked what would settle it; I said I could not enter into it - he asked if 100l. or 200l. would settle it; I said No, nor 1000l. either: I mentioned one or two of these circumstances to Linklater, and he blamed me for going, as I had no authority; I did not mention the 1000l. to him - my object was to settle it without a compromise.

Q. On your solemn oath, did you not say, in the presence of the two persons in the shop, that it was Mr. Linklater's wish that Rowley should deposit 1000l. till his books were examined? A. No, nor did I say Rowley was to make up what was deficient; nor anything to that effect.

Q. Did not Rowley say, "If you have any proposition to make you had better put it into writing," and then he could consult his friends? A. I do not remember it, I assure you; if it did pass it must have occurred in the hurry, when he called me, as I was going out, and said, "I cannot find 1000l." - I swear I never heard it.

Q. And did you not say, you should commit yourself as a professional man by doing it? A. No: I went to Mr. Harmer to appoint a time for Linklater to come to him; I had told Linklater I should go to Mr. Harmer's, and he assented to it: I went, and Mr. Harmer told me he was engaged in the case, and next day I went with Linklater to Mr. Humphries - I did not attend at the office; I never told Linklater what had passed between me and Rowley, respecting making up the books and the 1000l. - I do not think I did, but really I cannot charge my memory.

Q. Then when you went to Mr. Harmer, you had no desire to settle it? A. No; the truth is, Rowley's character had been pretty well blown about the neighbourhood, and it was known on 'Change, and if Linklater had not prosecuted, he would have suffered in his character himself.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You were subpoenaed on the prisoner's behalf? A. Yes; I called the second and third time at Rowley's request; he said nothing more to me about money than I have stated.

FELL's Defence. I never did anything but what the clerk directed; as to master's loss I cannot be accountable - I understand they have found 800l. worth since I have been confined; I was not out of the way at all - the clerk is the guilty man; he cannot be found: McNamara told me Dodd had him into the parlour, and gave him two glasses of wine to get all he could out of him.

ROWLEY's Defence. Dodd came three times to me to make a compromise, and if I would do that they would forbear the prosecution: I said I was innocent, and would not give 1d., he might do his worst; I asked him to put it down in writing - he said, as a professional man he should be committing himself.

MR. LINKLATER. I do not know where my clerk is now - he has been with two accountants, but has been unwell; I suppose he is at home - he left word that he was not well; I have not sent for him since I have dismissed him; there is a delinquency, but I have not proof to bring it forward; Fell was advertised for leaving his wife and child.

JOHN McNAMARA re-examined. Dodd never gave me any wine.

COURT. Q. He said you were as liable to be transported as he was? A. Yes - that was when I refused to help him to Rowley's with it.

CHARLES ADAMS. I am shopman to Mr. Rowley, and have been so this twelve months; he has been in his shop till this morning, and has surrendered. I remember Dodd coming to him three times - he said he came from Mr. Linklater - that Linklater had lost property to the amount of 1000l., and wished. Mr. Rowley to deposit 1000l. in a certain person's hands till the books were examined, and then to make up the deficiency; Rowley asked him to give him a statement in writing, and said he would consult his friends - Dodd replied, that being a professional man be should commit himself by so doing; this was at the second interview - he came again after that, and I heard him say,"Have you done anything, but I did not hear the answer, as they went into the counting-house.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How often have you seen Fell at Rowley's? A. Not more than three or four times, or it may be five or six: I never saw him bring anything but the harrel of pork in question.

Q. How did it get back? A. Mr. Linklater said he would send his man for it, but Rowley said he would send it for him, and he sent it between five and six o'clock. When the pork came Mr. Rowley looked out of the counting-house, and told Fell to leave it and call some other time, as he was busy then, he would open it, and see what he could give for it - he was not in the habit of buying such things; I have seen empty casks there - I knew Fell was in the prosecutor's service: I never knew him bring any beef; Mitchell was present at the third interview; nothing was said then but, "Have you done anything?"

MR. BRODRICK. Q. The cask came between three and five o'clock? A. Yes - it had not been examined when it was found by the prosecutor; a man named Edwards, who was in our employ, took it back.

Q. Who were the empty casks bought of? A. I went for some of them; I went to Mr. Linklater's, and asked for Fell - if he was not there I went to the public-house.

JOHN MITCHELL . I assist Rowley in his business, and know Fell; he is foreman to Mr. Linklater - I have gone there to give orders for empty casks, and Mr. Linklater's servants brought them. I saw Dodd at Rowley's once, but did not hear what passed.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. How often were you at Rowley's? A. Almost daily for nine or ten months; I sometimes saw Fell there two or three times a week, when casks have been ordered; he came to cooper sometimes.

Q. Did you ever see Mr. Linklater respecting any order? A. I have: Rowley never sent me there for brands - I have been sent for the cooper.

FELL - GUILTY . Aged 23.

ROWLEY - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-178

Second London Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1526. JOHN COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , 8lbs. weight of bristles, value 16s. the goods of Robert Smith and another.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-179

1527. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on

the 3d of July , 1 pair of woman's boots, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of William Edward Cooper .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-180

1528. JOSEPH GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , 3 metal half-moons, value 15s. , the goods of John Capel Batho .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Whipped and Discharged.

Reference Number: t18280703-181

1529. JOSEPH WEAVER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , 18ozs. of silver, value 4l. 10s. , the goods of Augustus Brown .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-182

1530. DAVID LIVERMORE and CHARLES ELVERY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the warehouse of Joseph Morris , and stealing therein 222 silk shawls, value 222l.; 45 yards of net, value 6l. 15s.; 8 lace veils, value 3l. 4s.; 80 yards of sprig muslin, value 12l.; 90 silk handkerchiefs, value 9l.; 4 cotton dresses, value 16s.; 240 yards of lawn, value 24l.; 540 yards of Gros de Naples, value 81l.; 50 yards of French cambric, value 25l.; 28 yards of Scotch cambric, value 2l. 16s.; 64 black silk handkerchiefs, value 12s. 16s.; 48 French cambric handkerchiefs, value 8l. 8s.; 214 yards of printed cotton, value 10l. 14s.; 2 reticules, value 10s.; 144 pairs of cotton stockings, value 10l. 16s.; 60 pairs of silk stocking, value 18l.; 12 cotton caps, value 6s.; 60 yards of diaper, value 4l. 10s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 3 lace collars, value 6s.; 40 muslin collars, value 4l.; 450 yards of lace, value 45l., and 540 yards of quilling-net, value 6l. 16s. , the goods of Joseph Morris; against the Statute.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN FISHBURN . I am a watchman of St. Brides - Mr. Morris directed me to watch his premises. On the morning of the 22d of June, I was there and saw his warehouse apparently safe - Mr. Richardson lives next door; I went to his door and found it opened rather stiffer than usual: I got up to the shutter-hole, looked through and saw the back of a man - I informed Huckel - we both went to Richardson's back door and found it open; we went in and found five black bags there, and saw a large hole in the wall, which goes through to Mr. Morris premises, it was large enough to admit one of the prisoners to get through - Huckel left me there, and Mr. Morris took the property when he came.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Did you measure the hole? A. No - it was not large enough for me to get through, but I think the prisoners could; I did say at first that the man I saw seemed a tall man - I had not examined the lock of Richardson's door the day before, but it used to open very easily with a push.

JOHN HUCKEL . I am inspector of the nightly watch. Fishburn came and said he saw a man in Richardson's shop; I went and looked and saw the back door open - I ran round to the door and saw five bags there; I saw the hole in the wall - it was large enough for the prisoners to get through; I went with Skilling down the market to the end of Fleet-lane, and then to the Albion coffee-shop - I had left my hat at Richardson's shop; when we came out of the coffee-shop - Livermore was there and he said to Skilling "What does he do here? what is he looking for?" I said "Go about your business;" Skilling then nodded to me and I seized Livermore - he endeavoured to get away, and used all the violence he could; I was up and down with him repeatedly - he was rescued from me; I was knocked about severely - I had a black eye and my lip was cut; some firemen came up and assisted me - I had repeatedly seen Livermore before, but not Elvery.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you spring your rattle? A. I do not carry one; it was just five o'clock - the watchmen were off duty; Livermore appeared to be standing there unconcerned - I had not been drinking anything that could affect me: I might have had a glass or two of ale, and a pint of porter, in the night - I heard Livermore say to Skilling "He is a pretty officer to go to sleep in the market, and lose his hat;" several persons tried to rescue him - no one took my part till the firemen came up; I called on the people to assist me, but they did not - I was with him alone some time, and held him by his neckcloth, till he was black in the face - he held me by the throat; I said I wanted him, but did not say what for, as there were persons round who would have rescued him.

GEORGE SKILLING . I am a watchman of St. Sepulchre's. I was standing at the end of Fleet-lane, leaning against a post, at a few minutes to five o'clock on this morning; I could see Richardson's back-door; I saw two men come out of that door; they ran as hard as they could, and in running, knocked down a large hamper; they ran towards me as far as the first opening, nearly opposite the Fleetprison gates; I noticed their dress particularly - and in about fifteen minutes they came into the market again, and were within eight yards of me; they stopped two or three minutes - one of them said, "Do they call this Fleet-market?" the other said, "Yes, I believe it is;" I have known Livermore these twelve months; I went up to the premises and found Huckel; he came down the market with me; I described their dress to him - he went down the middle of the market, and I down the side, but saw nothing of them; we went into the coffee-shop, and as we came out I saw Livermore, who said, "Skilling, what is the matter?" I said,"Nothing, but that man (Huckel) has lost his hat;" Livermore said, "There is something more than that; there is a screw loose, I am sure;" I nodded to Huckel, who came up and said, "Hold you impudence," and seized him by the handkerchief, and he seized him; they struggled together, I assisted as well as I could, but the mob intefered and secured him; I followed him to Newcastle-street, where he met Elvery, who took hold of him, and hurried him up the street; I saw Elvery take his apron off: they then came down the street again, went to the place, and stood looking at Huckel, who was then being ill-used by the mob; I ran out to the watch-house for assistance, but in that time Huckel was released; I have no doubt whatever of the prisoners being the men.

Cross-examined. Q. What distance were you from the shop when you first saw them? A. About ninety yards; I knew them by their dress chiefly - nobody was near them; they were out of my sight part of the time; Livermore came up to me voluntarily, and said there was a screw loose, and so on - there were then sixty or eighty persons about; I

knew it was no use to call for assistance, for I will be bound full forty of them were thieves - I knew them before.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Have you seen them about the market? A. Yes; particularly on Sunday mornings; Huckel was not drunk.

JURY. Q. Did you observe their dresses soiled? A. No; they both had aprons on when they came out of the house.

COURT. Q. Why did not you and Huckel take hold of Livermore together? A. I was some little distance; I did not mention Livermore's name to Huckel, as I did not know he knew him by name; he had a black coat and drab trousers; I had not seen him in that dress before, but I knew his person before.

- ELMES. I am a night watchman of St. Martin's, Ludgate. The two prisoners had been brought into the watch-house soon after twelve o'clock on this night, for an assault; I let them out shortly after - they then both had white aprons on, twisted round them; they were not searched.

JOSEPH MORRIS . I am a linen-draper , and have a shop at No. 10, Fleet-market ; nobody sleeps there. On the morning of the 22d I was alarmed, and went down to the shop - I went throught Richardson's shop, and saw five bags, containing the property stated in the indictment, all of which I had left in the shop the night before; I have valued them at 508l., but they are worth more. I saw the aperture in the wall, and think it large enough for a person to go through; I found this brick auger, a crow-bar, four centre-bits, a dark lantern, and turnscrew, all in Richardson's shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Were the bags large? A. Yes; most of the goods were laid in the wrappers, as they were in the shop; a few, which were taken from the windows, were rather tumbled - it might take about an hour to do all this.

COURT. Q. Was there any thing done to the wall which would have made dirt on the persons who did it? A. Yes, unless their coats were off; some of the shawls were soiled by being taken through that hole.

JAMES NEWTON . I am an officer. I apprehended Livermore at the corner of John-street-road; he particularly wished to go into a public-house, and there he spoke to Elvery, who came out and walked after us to the watch-house; I told Livermore I wanted him for that affair in Fleet-market - he said, was it for the rescue or the robbery; I said for both; Elvery stood by the watch-house for some time - somebody went out, recognized him, and brought him in.

LIVERMORE's Defence. On Sunday morning I was standing at the coffee-shop door; Elvery came up, and said he had been at a fire in Old-street; Huckel and Skilling went into the coffee-shop, and staid a short time; Skilling came out - I asked him what was the matter; he said, "Nothing, but this man has lost his hat" - I said he was a pretty officer to be rolling about the market without his hat; Huckel then came up, and told me to go on - I said I had done nothing, and would not go; he seized me, and when I got black in the face the mob interfered; Skilling then pushed me up Newcastle-street - I went up some distance, then returned, and stood looking at the row, and when Huckel got out, he went and washed himself at the pump; I went home, and heard no more till Wednesday evening; I told Elvery I was going to the watch-house for the row in Fleet-market - he said he would go with me - the Magistrate asked Skilling if there were any marks on our clothes - he said No.

ELVERY's Defence. Livermore asked me to go to the watch-house with him.

JOHN WOODS . I am a baker, and live on Holborn-hill. I was in Fleet-market on Sunday morning, the 22d, and saw two men fighting - I do not know who they were; neither of them appeared sober.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. What reason have you to believe them tipsy? A. The people said, "That is an officer, and he is tipsy; I then looked at him particularly, and he appeared so, for he fell down at the least touch - I was about twenty yards off.

JOHN HUCKEL . I did not see Livermore return.

FRANCIS BENNETT . I am a watchman of Gray's Innlane. On Sunday morning, the 22d of June, Livermore was in my company in Gray's Inn-lane, from a quarter to three till half-past three o'clock, looking at a quarrel between a drunken man and a young chap, who was given in charge; Livermore went with me to the watch-house and back again: he had on a white apron with a bib, and a black coat - he left me at the corner of Gray's Inn-lane, and went down Holborn with another man.

- DAWLEY. I was with Bennett - Livermore followed us to the watch-house and back; I did not know him before.

MR. BOLLLAND. Q. Had he a coat on? A. Yes - a black one and a white apron.

EDWARD FORD . I am a printer and live in Green Arbour-square, Old Bailey. I have known Livermore about two years; I saw him on the morning of the 22d of June, at the Albion coffee-house, about five minutes past four o'clock, taking some coffee, and staid with him there till ten minutes or a quarter to five o'clock; he could not have gone out during that time without my seeing him.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Had you been out all night? A. Yes - I had been at a free and easy club; I did not see this bustle.

COURT. Q. Who else was there? A. Several; Livermore was known there as a customer.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-183

1531. GEORGE GRAVES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Nathaniel Jerrom , on the 18th of May , at St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 half-crowns .

NATHANIEL JERROM. On the 18th of May, at twelve o'clock at night. I was coming from the Borough, where I had been at work; I was going by Bishopsgate-street, and saw Sarah Mitchell, whom I knew; she asked me to give her something to drink, and said she would take me to a house- I went with her to the Sun public-house, in Angel-alley - there were several persons at the door, trying to get in; the prisoner and his brother came up to me - his brother seized my right hand, and he took my left: the prisoner turned my pocket inside out, and his brother cried out,"Floor the b - r," and some of the party did floor me; I got a bad hurt on the knee; I called out for assistance, but no one came, and they got away; Mitchell

knew his brother; the watchman came up, and asked what was the matter; I told him, and he said he knew what sort of a person he was; and on the Sunday night we went into a little wine-vaults; I spied the brother out, and pointed him out: I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me there? A. Yes - I did not know your place of residence, to have you taken up.

SARAH MITCHELL . Nathaniel Jerrom was going by me at half-past twelve o'clock on Saturday night, the 18th of May; I asked him for something to drink, and took him to the Sun - we knocked at the back door in Angel-alley - the prisoner and his brother, who is gone, came up, and turned his pockets out, and said, "Floor him;" the prisoner knocked me down on the step of the Sun publichouse - with that four or five of them came up belonging to the party, and ill-used Mr. Jerrom; I was not able to give any assistance; I did not see them take any money, but Mr. Jerrom said he had lost two half-crowns.

Prisoner. She knew where I lived. Witness. No, I did not know where he lived - I knew his friends.

Q. Did you not come and live in the same court, and say to me, "Graves, you was not one of them that robbed Mr. Jerrom?" A. No, I did not - as a woman I did not; he said he was very sorry, but he hoped I would speak as much in behalf of his brother as I could; I took breakfast with his sister, and they behaved very well.

Prisoner. I met her in Shoreditch five days after: she stopped me, and said, "George, I have very bad news to tell you of your brother; there was a robbery done in Angel-alley;" I said, "Was I in it?" she said, "You was not," and she said she had mentioned every man's name that was in it. Witness. No; I do not know any man that was in it but the prisoner and his brother.

JURY. The prisoner says you went to reside in the court he did? A. No, I did not; I have seen him frequently; I did meet him, but I do not know that he resided in that court.

COURT. Q. Did you tell the prosecutor who it was? A. Yes, I did, and he said he should know the two men- they had certainly turned his pockets inside out; I said it was the two Graves. It was dark - there was a lamp; it was rather dark: I can swear the prisoner is the man who wrested me from Mr. Jerrom's left arm the moment the brother said "Floor her;" there was a gas-lamp about four yards off; five or six people came up to him after the robbery - I called out for assistance; they all made their escape after they knocked Jerrom down - there were six or seven in the court before the robbery; there were two females sitting on a step, who I believe were with the party; I do not know whether they knew of it after if had been committed. I saw the pocket turned inside out.

COURT to NATHANIEL JERROM. Q. Was there a light there? A. Yes, at the bottom of the court; it enabled me to see the persons' features distinctly; he asked me to give him a glass of gin - I said I did not mind, and then he put his hand into my pocket.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. On the 18th of May Jerrom and Mitchell came to me; they were both perfectly sober - they stated the case, how he had been robbed; I said, "It is of no use to go to look after these villins to night, as I know them well;" Mitchell said it was the two Graves; I went to the Black Raven public-house on Sunday night, a little after ten o'clock; I said to Jerrom,"You walk into this house along with me, and if the person is there. point him out" - he did so, and said, "That is the man;" I said, "Are you positive sure of it?" "Yes (said he) that is the man." I have seen the prisoner at the bar several times since, but he has another brother, and I should be sorry to take the wrong man; when I took the prisoner he said, "Brown, be so good as to let me go on my errand," and I said, "1'll be d - d if you do - I have a heavy charge against you."

Prisoner. Q. What was I doing? A. Standing at the corner, doing nothing.

Prisoner. I said, "What is the matter?" and he would not tell me; I went very quitely, and he treated me with a pint of beer.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) Your memorialist says that the witness, Sarah Mitchell, has been a drunken and bad character; in the year 1820 she was transported for seven years, and afterwards sent to the Penitentiary; she now has no real place of residence. but prostitution with the prosecutor, as your memorialist has been informed and believes. Your memorialist submits it, and it may be obvious, that on and after the 17th of May last, the witness well knew where to find your memorialist, she having been a witness against your memorialist's brother, and convicted him for the offence last Session. Your memorialist's witness (Mary Ranson) will prove that at the time alledged your memorialist was in bed, as a lodger, and of good character.

COURT to NATHANIEL JERROM. Q. What time was it? A. Past twelve o'clock.

JURY. Q. Had you taken any wine? A. No.

MARY RANSON . I was at breakfast at Mr. and Mrs. Roof's, the sister and brother of the prisoner, about a month ago, and Mitchell said she never saw this young man with her eyes; he said, "I was not in it;" "No, young man,(said she) I never saw you with my eyes."

SARAH MITCHELL re-examined. Q. Did you say you never saw him? A. No, I could not say that; I remember being at breakfast with his sister, but did not say I never saw him before, upon my word and honour; I will swear I did not.

MARY RANSON . She was quite in liquor.

SARAH MITCHELL . I was asked to go and take breakfast with his brother and sister; I thanked them, and said I would - when I went in this young woman sent for some rum - a quartern, I believe it was, and then his sister sent for another quartern; I took some, but very trifling.

COURT to JOHN BROWN . Q. When did you go with Jerrom to the public-house? A. On the 18th of May; I then took the prisoner's brother, who was tried here; the prosecutor pointed this prisoner out to me, in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street afterwards; he told me at first it was the two Graves, but as there is another brother I waited to be sure which it was.

Prisoner. They did not take me out of a public-house at all.

COURT to NATHANIEL JERROM. Q. Was he in a public-house? A. No. I know him by his features: I saw him in Angel-alley, and told Brown, who was with me,

that was the man; it was the prisoner's brother who was taken out of the public-house.

JOHN BROWN. I took Isaac Graves from the public-house, but the prisoner I took in the street.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

Reference Number: t18280703-184

1532. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , 11 pairs of cotton stockings, value 12s. 10d. , the goods of Moses Charles Bidmead .

EDWARD MAHAGAN . I am apprentice to Moses Charles Bidmead, a hosier , of Holborn-hill . On the 14th of June the prisoner ran into the shop, and took eleven pairs of stockings off a form - he ran away with them; I pursued, and took him with them, about twenty doors off.

THOMAS WILSDEN . I ran, hearing the cry of Stop thief! and found the prisoner in charge - he said he did it through distress.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Fourteen Days .

Reference Number: t18280703-185

1533. MICHAEL MACDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of James Scruton , from his person .

JAMES SCRUTON. I was going down Holborn-hill about half-past twelve or one o'clock at night, on the 16th of June; I felt some one behind me, and turned round - I saw the prisoner near me, with his hands behind him; I felt in my pocket, and missed my handkerchief, which I had used two minutes before; the watchman took him immediatley, but the handkerchief had been passed - I have not seen it.

GEORGE CRANE . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief from the prosecutor's lefthand pocket, and seized him immediately, but the handkerchief was passed.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman turned round, and accused me of taking the handkerchief; I said I had not got it - he struck me in the mouth: I called the watchman, who told the gentleman to desist, and then they took me to the watch-house, but nothing was found on me; the gentleman was quarrelling with two other gentlemen, and I thought there would be a fight; there was no person near me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-186

1534. WILLIAM TAYLOR alias WILLIAM BLIGH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , 6 printed bound books, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas North .

THOMAS NORTH. I am a bookseller , and live in Paternoster-row . I have known the prisoner several years - he was in the habit of calling on me; I missed two books last Saturday fortnight - I advertised them, and they were brought to me by a pawnbroker; I suspected the prisoner, and had him apprehended; the duplicates were found on him - these are them: I had seen them safe about a week before.

Prisoner. Q. How do you know them? A. By the binding, and one of them has a wreath, which is peculiar; it is a coloured engraving stuck in it, and this volume has my private-mark.

Q. Have not I heard you say, that people called at your shop, and read the newspapers, and you did not like it? - A. Yes. The books were all in my shop within a month.

ROBERT COX . I am a pawnbroker, and have Cowper's Poems, pawned by a person, who I believe to be the prisoner, in the name of George Edwards, on the 24th of June.

LAURENCE NOBLE . I am a pawnbroker, and have two books, which I believe were pawned by the prisoner, but I am not certain.

GEORGE HANSON . I am a pawnbroker, and have a Common Prayer-book and another book, but cannot say who pawned them; the prisoner came and paid the interest, renewed them, and had fresh duplicates.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found some duplicates on him, which he said were his own. I found others, relating to these books, at his lodging.

The prisoner, in a long address to the Court, stated that he had purchased the duplicates of a stranger, at an eating-house in the Minories; and that the prosecution was brought against him because he had declared it his intention to bring an action against Mr. North.

MR. NORTH. The prisoner has been a respectable man, but fell into misfortunes; he has been a clerk: what he means about an action is, a medical certificate was obtained some time ago, by which he was confined in Hoxton madhouse.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-187

1535. WILLIAM TAYLOR, alias WILLIAM BLIGH TAYLOR , was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 4 printed bound books, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas North .

THOMAS NORTH. I know these four books to be mine; they were in my shop this day three weeks.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not said, that if the persons who came to your shop did not come to steal books, they might come to enable others to steal them? A. Yes, I have. I know you formerly were in the habit of buying and selling books.

WILLIAM PERRY . I am a pawnbroker. These four books were pawned with me by the prisoner, on Monday afternoon, the 23d of June, in the name of John Edwards.

Prisoner. Q. Are you sure of that? A. I am; Mr. Anderton is my servant - I know you by pawning books before; you wore a black coat - your hair was longer than it is now, but I know you well; I have not claimed any reward.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD . I found the duplicate of these four books on the prisoner's person - he gave it up to me.

MR. NORTH. I offered a reward of 5l. about the books - Mr. Anderton, himself, called about it.

The prisoner stated that he had purchased this duplicate of the same person.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-188

Third London Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1536. JOHN BEAZLEY was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. CLARKSON (on behalf of the prosecution) declined proceeding with the case.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-189

1537. WILLIAM KING was indicted for stealing, on

the 30th of May , 14lbs. weight of cheese, value 5s. , the goods of Edmund Ronalds .

CHARLES MORTLEY . I am warehouseman to Mr. Ronalds, of Upper Thames-street . On the 27th or 28th of May I weighed up forty-seven cheeses for Mr. Thomas Smith, and marked them T. S.; on the 20th I was away from business - on the day following I heard that a cheese had been taken - I went and saw it, and knew it by the mark.

JEFFERY FRIEND . I am porter at the warehouse. The officer came and asked if we had lost a cheese - I counted, and there were but forty-six instead of forty-seven. I had counted them when they were weighed, a day or two before.

JAMES SMITH . I saw the prisoner and another person on the 30th of May, near Old Swan-lane - the prisoner had this cheese; I let him go some distance, and then asked what he had got - he said a cheese, which he was to carry further on, for a man who had employed him - I told him to carry it to the watch-house, and then I went and found the owner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry it as far as Blackfriars-bridge, for 1s.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-190

1538. WILLIAM LAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , 1 coat, value 4l. , the goods of Henry Woodthorpe .

WOOLFRING GOOCH . I am coachman to Henry Woodthorpe, Esq. I was standing at the City of London tavern on the 19th of June, a little before ten o'clock in the evening, waiting for my master; I was near the horses' heads, and saw the coach move - I looked on the box, and missed the coat; I ran round, and saw the prisoner six or seven yards off, with the coat on his arm - I gave him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM RILEY . I am an officer. I was called, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-191

1539. JOHN SPIRES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , 1 seal-skin cap, value 2s. , the goods of William Beeck .

WILLIAM BEECK. On the 17th of June my child was going to school, and lost his cap.

SARAH STEVENSON . I was coming down John-street, Crutched-friars, and just as I got to Gunpowder-alley I saw the prisoner take the cap off the child's head, put it under his jacket, and run across the road, up Northumberland-alley; I said it was a pity some person did not run and take it from him; a gentleman and a young man went and took him; I waited with the child till they brought him back; I am quite sure he is the boy; he took it with his right-hand.

JOSHUA PENNOCK . I was passing through Leadenhall-street - I saw the prisoner running; he dropped a cap from his coat; I ran, and stopped him in Cree-church-lane, brought him back, and took up the cap from where I saw him drop it, in the road; a gentleman said he had stolen it from Northumberland-alley; I took him there, and met the officer, who took charge of him.

THOMAS DEVEY . I am an officer, and have the cap.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

Reference Number: t18280703-192

1540. JANE HARRISON was indicted for stealing on the 20th of June , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Alexander Wilson .

GEORGE NEBBS . I am shopman to Alexander Wilson, shoe-maker , of Holborn-hill . The prisoner came there to sell a pair of child's boots on the 20th of June - Mr. Wilson was at dinner, and I sent them up to him by the boy; during that time the prisoner put her basket down in the shop, where a quantity of goods were lying - I saw her take up a pair of shoes, put them into her basket, and cover them up; the boy then came down, and said Mr. Wilson would give 6d. for her boots - she said she would not take that, and was going away; I said, "Stop, I will send for Mr. Wilson, perhaps he may give you more" - he came down, and I said, "This woman has robbed you;" I took these shoes from her basket.

SAMUEL HEINSON . I am an officer. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - she said she had made a mistake.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I made a mistake, and took them out of the basket, and put them on the counter.

GEORGE NEBBS. Nothing else was in her basket.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Six Weeks .

Reference Number: t18280703-193

1541. PETER STOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 72 iron tea-spoons, value 8s., and 6 iron rollers, value 5s. , the goods of Edward Cureton .

EDWARD CURETON. I am an ironmonger , and live in Bread-street . The prisoner came to my warehouse to buy some article on the 26th of June, and on the 27th my apprentice came to my counting-house and gave me information; I sent for an officer, and went up to the prisoner and asked what he had got - he with some reluctance pulled out this paper of spoons; the man said that was not all - he then pulled out these six iron-rollers; they are my property.

WILLIAM THOMAS EVANS . I am clerk to Mr. Cureton. While the apprentice was gone for the officer, I saw the prisoner pull this parcel from under his coat, and take this from his pocket.

ROBERT HAZEL . I am apprentice to Mr. Cureton. The prisoner came on the 27th of June, and asked for a pair of hinges - he had a white apron on, and a saw in his hand, which appeared new; I saw him take this parcel up and put it into his pocket - he then asked me how much the hinges were; I said I would go and ask Mr. Cureton - I went and told him, and he sent me for a constable.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Three Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-194

1542. HENRY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , 10 lbs. weight of beef, value 4s. 2d. the goods of Joseph Daniel .

HENRY DANIEL . I am the son of Joseph Daniel. This beef was in Mr. Cooke's premises, in Leadenhall-market ; the beef belongs to Mr. Cooke.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-195

1543. LEWIS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , 1 coat, value 5s. the goods of George Corderoy .

GEORGE CORDEROY. I am groom to Mr. William Magnay . I lost my coat out of the stable, at Collegehill, on the 28th of June, about one o'clock in the day; I had not left it above a minute before I missed it - I had shut the door, but it was not locked; as I returned I met the prisoner coming from the stable, but I did not see that he had anything with him - I went in, missed the coat, and followed; he ran about one hundred yards and was stopped; I got hold of him - I am sure he is the person who came out of the stable; he had no right in the stable.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. How did he come out? A. He walked out and shut the door - I did not see anything about him, but I think he must have had the coat.

JAMES THOMAS WHEELER . I am a boot-maker. On the 28th of June I saw the prisoner coming out of the stable with the coat on his arm - I followed him, and saw him throw it down; I never lost sight of him - I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you pick it up? A. Yes - I followed him, and a gentleman who stood at his door watched the coat, till I came back and took it.

THOMAS HERDSFIELD . I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner and coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-196

1530. HENRY PONTER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of James Hill , from his person .

JAMES HILL. I am a copper-plate printer , and live in Greek-street, Soho. On the 22d of June, about twenty minutes past ten o'clock, I was in Cow-lane , and I saw, by the reflection on a shutter, the tail of my coat in the prisoner's hand; three men had just then rubbed up against me; I turned round and saw my coat tail in the prisoner's hand, and my handkerchief round his hand; I called the watchman, who took him; he dropped the handkerchief and I took it up - when I took hold of him he said "I have not picked your pocket."

JAMES WILLIAMSON . I am a watchman. On Sunday evening, the 22d of June, Mr. Hill called me, and said this young man had picked his pocket - I took him to the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Cow-lane, when this gentleman brought the watchman, and said I had got his handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-197

1545. THOMAS SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , 1 saddle, value 30s.; 2 girths, value 10s.; 2 stirrup-straps, value 5s., and 2 stirrups, value 5s. , the goods of James Mahony .

JAMES MAHONY. I am a builder and reside in Watling-street. On the 24th of June I was going home, and met the prisoner with my saddle and girths on his shoulder; I said"That is mine;" he threw them at me and turned down Red Lion-court, and ran as far as Old Fish-street - he was quite a stranger; I had seen them safe on a pin at my stable door, about two hours before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was your yard gate locked? A. Yes: I had a good many servants at work for me - the prisoner had got about one hundred and fifty yards off perhaps; it was between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day - I am satisfied none of my men had been there while I was out.

JAMES HENWOOD . I was sitting in Gerrard's Hall tap, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran out, and took the prisoner - I did not see the saddle till I got back.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who asked me if I wanted a job; I said Yes, and then he asked me if I had a saddle - I said No; he went and got this and told me to go on to the docks - I had not gone above one hundred yards, when Mr. Mahony dragged the saddle from me - I was alarmed and ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Months .

Reference Number: t18280703-198

1546. MARGARET HELING was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , 4 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 4 halfpence, the monies of Thomas Thomas , from his person .

THOMAS THOMAS. I am a tailor , and live in New-street, Cloth-fair. On Saturday night, the 21st of June, about ten o'clock, I was in West-street, Smithfield; I had been making a garment with another man, and was going to pay him, when I had got the money, at the shop - I had been at work at my master's that day and was quite sober; I could not see the man - I was looking about in West-street for him; the prisoner came up and put her right hand round my breast; she slipped her hand into my breeches pocket and took my money out - I had nine shillings, one sixpence, and four halfpence; she left two shillings - she did it all in a moment; she was going to run away, but I told her it was of no use to run away with my money - I seized hold of her; she had not run above a yard - she turned round, said she had no money, and tried to put it into her bosom; I called the watchman - she dropped some of the money; I picked up three shillings from the ground - I had not had any conversation with her - I have a wife and family.

WILLIAM WATSON . I am a watchman. The witness gave the prisoner in charge; he said he had 9s. 8d., and she had robbed him of most of it - he did not pick up anything in my presence; she was searched at the watch-house and 3s. found on her.

RICE PRICE . I was constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house and I found 3s. in silver on her, but no copper.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this gentleman, he caught hold of me opposite the work-house; he asked me to have something to drink - I objected to it; he then asked me to come and speak to him, and I did for about half a minute

- he had his hand in his pocket; I then said I would go - he ran round the corner after me, and said he would give charge of me for robbing him; I said I did not care, for I had not robbed him; I walked on towards King-street and called the watchman myself.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-199

1547. EDWARD ALDER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of July , 1 coat, value 20s. , the goods of Thomas Scullard .

THOMAS SCULLARD. I am a Hackney-coachman - my coach is No. 882; it stood on the stand in Bishopsgate-street , on the 2d of July, about half-past eleven o'clock; I gave the horses some water, and put the bags to their noses; I then got on the box, and sat there about twenty minutes, when a friend came and asked me if I would copy a receipt for him - I said Yes, and we went to Jones' wine-vaults, but could not get a seat: we then went to the Bull's Head public-house, where they generally provide for coachmen - I was not absent more than a quarter of an hour; when I returned the coat was gone from the box, and I have never seen it since - I asked the waterman about it, and he gave me information.

MARY ROGERS . I live at Mr. Jones' No. 152, Bishopsgate-street. I was in my mistress' room, dusting it, and saw the prisoner take the coat off the coach box and walk away with it, towards Artillery-lane; I went to see for the waterman and told him - I am sure the prisoner is the man - it was a light drab coat; I believe he was taken the same afternoon - I have known him these four years; he goes from one coach-stand to another, and gets his living as he can.

Prisoner. I was at Shoreditch church at the time - I get a job of watering sometimes, and sometimes go out with a coach.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-200

1548. JOSEPH WARE alias SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , 11lbs. 4 ozs. weight of silk, value 14l. 18s. 1d., and 12 lbs. weight of other silk, value 12l. , the goods of Nathaniel Sherrey .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of George Austin .

NATHANIEL SHERREY . I am in the service of Mr. George Austin, of Devonshire-street. On the 6th of June I was sent for these two bundles of silk, and was going home with them in a black bag; I got to Newgate-street about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner in a passage - he said "My man, will you fetch me a coach, and I will give you 6d.?" he took my bundle off my shoulder, and said "I will take care of your property; I went, and I returned in a short time, and he was gone; he was dressed in drab knee-breeches and topboots - he had no hat; I thought he was a gentleman - I am quite sure he is the man; I thought he was in the house, and knocked at the door, but he was not there.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long have you been in London? A. About eight years; I am positive he is the man - my master was angry with me, but did not beat me; when the prisoner was taken, I went into a room, and picked him out among about one hundred people - he was dressed like a gentleman then; he was not pointed out to me - my master has topped 2s. a week out of my wages; I think I shall not have to pay that if he is convicted.

RICHARD POPE . I live with Mr. Strange a silkman; I delivered two bundles of silk to this lad to take to his master. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-201

1549. JOSEPH WARE alias SHEPPARD , was again indicted for stealing on the 28th of June , 1 basket, value 2s. 6d., and 36 composition dolls, value 39s. , the goods of John Barton .

JOHN BARTON. I am a doll-maker , and live in Long-lane. On the 28th of June, about seven o'clock, I sent James Price out with three dozens of composition dolls, in a basket, to Messrs. Lee and Co. in Great St. Thomas Apostle - he came back without them and told me to go to the Mansion-house, where I found the prisoner.

JAMES PRICE . I am apprentice to Mr. Barton. I went out with these dolls, and in Bow-church-yard a man tapped me on the shoulder, and pointed to the prisoner, who stood in the passage of a house, and said "That gentleman wants you," he was dressed in a black coat, waistcoat and trousers; he stood with his hat off and his hands behind him - he said "Will you fetch me a coach, and I will give you 6d.?" I was going with my basket, he called me back and said "Not a coach, a cabriolet, and you can leave your basket here;" he helped it off my shoulder, and when I came back I found him in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. On your oath, did you not tell the Magistrate the other man told you to fetch the coach? A. I did not.

JOHN ROE . I am an officer. At ten minutes past seven on the 28th of June, I was in Cheapside; I saw the prisoner and another man cross over and go down Bowchurch-yard; I went down Bow-lane, and round towards the Church-yard, and met the other man with this basket - I went to take him; he threw the basket at me and ran away; I took up the basket - the prisoner then came up; I collared him and took him into a warehouse; I did not then know who had been robbed, but this boy came up in two or three minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner with the basket? A. No.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-202

1550. MARY CALLAGHAN , spinster , and MARY CALLAGHAN , the elder, were indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

PERSIS CLARK . I am the daughter of Jeremiah Clark , who keeps the Bell Savage public-house, Ludgate-hill . On Monday, the 16th of June, I saw the two prisoners, with a man; the youngest prisoner asked for a pint of porter; she gave me a shilling, which I put into the till by itself; I gave her 9 1/2d. - she went into the tap-room, where the other two were: the elder prisoner came out some time after, and had a glass of gin, which she drank, and gave me a shilling; I took it to my father to look at, as I thought it was bad; he cut it, and said it was bad; they all three came in together, were in company, and conversed together; I told the elder prisoner the shilling

was bad; she said she did not know it; these are the shillings (looking at them) - the man and the younger prisoner had gone out, but the younger prisoner came back, and asked for half a pint of porter; she was taken into custody by Wake, and said she knew nothing of the other woman; she had left a bundle there the first time she came.

JEREMIAH CLARK . I received this shilling from my daughter; I cut it, and said it was bad: the prisoner said she did not know it was bad, and said, "Here are three farthings."

HENRY WAKE . I am a constable. I took the prisoners, and have the shillings; I searched the prisoners, but found nothing on them; the younger prisoner denied having been there before, but as we went to the Compter she said she had left a bundle, and desired me to fetch it, which I did.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant solicitor to the Mint. These shillings are both counterfeit, and merely cast.

MARY CALLAGHAN , JUN.'s Defence. I came home with my uncle - I met this woman, and asked her to have a pint of beer; I went there to see my uncle off by the coach, and went back, which I should not have done if I had known the shilling was bad.

MARY CALLAGHAN, SEN.'s Defence. I took the shilling for some fruit.

GUILTY .

Both Confined Six Months . and to find sureties for their good behaviour .

Reference Number: t18280703-203

FIFTH DAY. TUESDAY, JULY 8.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1551. WILLIAM HENRY HUNT was indicted for feloniously marrying Jane Davis , spinster , Maria Lloyd Roberts , his former wife being then alive .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MARY ANN COWDERY . I know the prisoner, and was present on the 19th of August, 1817, when he was married to Maria Lloyd Roberts, at Paddington church; they lived together as man and wife.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is she alive now? A. Yes - she is in Court; I believe she was nineteen years old - they were married by banns.

JAMES BANN . I am a dancing-master, and was present when the prisoner was married to Jane Davis, at Fulham, on the 16th of November, 1826, in the name of Henry Phillips; I am sure he is the person.

COURT. Q. Was she a spinster? A. Yes, as far as I know - I understood so.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you sign the register? A. Yes; I thought it was written down that she was a spinster, but I cannot recollect; I cannot say whether she was a spinster - she is now in Court.

MR. PHILLIPS called -

DAVID DAVIS . I am a hair-dresser, and live at Bristol. I was married to Jane Davis, who is now is Court; this is the first time I have seen her for thirteen years; I married her in 1809, I believe, about the 14th of April, at St. Nicholas, Bristol; she left me, and left the child in the cradle.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you in the Mediterranean when she went away? A. Yes - that was about sixteen years ago, but I came home about thirteen years ago, and met her in the street, but have not seen her since.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-204

1552. JOHN BATTEN FELTHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 4 pictures, value 13l. , the goods of William Henry Beardmore .

MR. CLARKSON (on behalf of the prosecution) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-205

1553. GEORGE DUNER , THOMAS KEEFE , and GEORGE ARMSTRONG were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of John Richard , from his person .

JOHN RICHARD. I am a gentleman . I was passing from the Strand to Craven-street, on the 3d of July, at a quarter-past nine o'clock at night; a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and said, "You have been robbed, and there are the thieves;" he caught hold of Duner and Keefe, put them into my hands, and ran after Armstrong, whom he secured; and as we went to the watch-house one of them dropped my handkerchief, which had been taken from my right-hand coat pocket.

SAMUEL ROBERT WELLS . I am watch-house-keeper of St. Martin's. I received the prisoners in charge with the handkerchief - I found nothing on them.

JOHN WEAL . I am a bookseller. I was in the Strand, and saw the three prisoners; they pressed very close against me: I suspected them, turned round, and let them pass; in a moment afterwards I saw one of them put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take his handkerchief; I cannot say which took it, but am certain they were all acting in concert together; I immediately went up and collared Duner and Keefe; the prosecutor held them while I followed and took Armstrong; as they were going to the watch-house a gentleman at my side showed me the handkerchief on the ground, close behind them - I took it up.

KEEFE's Defence. I was a little before the gentleman - he caught hold of me.

DUNER's Defence. He said at the watch-house that I took the handkerchief.

JOHN WEAL. No; I said I thought it was him, and think so now, but will not swear it.

ARMSTRONG's Defence. I had been to my aunt's/.

DUNER - GUILTY . Aged 18.

KEEFE - GUILTY . Aged 16.

ARMSTRONG - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-206

Third London Jury - before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1554. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , 500 engravings, value 40s.; 36 coloured engravings, value 15s.; 2 drawings, in water-colours, value 5s.; 4 printed books, value 5s.; 9 pamphlets, value 5s., and 4 memorandum-books, value 4s. , the goods of Lupton Relfe , his master.

LUPTON RELFE. I am a bookseller , and live in Corn-hill. The prisoner was my porter ; I went to his premises on the 16th of June, with the officer - I went there in consequence of finding his name in the Directory, as a shopkeeper; he was not there, but I found a person who stated herself to be his wife - I found some books, drawings, and prints of mine there; I gave him some prints some time

ago, but none of these; I do not know of my own knowledge that they were his premises.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I went with this gentleman, and searched the shop - it is in John's-row, Old-street; I did not notice any name over the door; I found a woman and child there - I do not know that they were his premises.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-207

1555. REBECCA JOHNSON, alias BARRETT , and ESTHER MATTHEWS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , 1 cap, value 6s., and 1 shawl, value 14s., the goods of Elizabeth Grainger , from her person .

ELIZABETH GRAINGER. I am single , and lived with Mr. Gibson, of 'Change-alley, but am now out of place. On the morning of the 4th of June, between five and six o'clock, I was coming down Holborn, and between Brook-street and Gray's Inn-lane , I saw the two prisoners in company. at the corner of a court - I do not know the name of the court; I asked them the way to the Strand - they directed me to go across the road; Johnson said it was going to rain, and I had better pull off my shawl and put on another; I took off a red shawl, and put on another, from a bundle which I had; Johnson then took my red shawl and my lace cap, and they both ran off together: I followed them to some street in Cow-cross, begging them to give them back to me; they went into a house, and ran into a one pair of stairs room - I just got up to the door - they pushed me out, and shut the door too; they came out again, and ran down stairs; I got over the balustrade, or they would have pushed me down; I followed them into Cow-cross again, and into a gin-shop; one of them threw a glass of gin into my eyes, which nearly blinded me; they came out again - I still kept up to them, asking them for my shawl and cap; I got the street-keeper, who directed me to an officer - they were taken in about an hour and a half; I have not got my things back; I am certain they are the girls.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. How long have you been out of place? A. Two months; I had been living with my friends, and had come from Uxbridge that morning; I lived eight months with Mr. Gibson - I do not know how I came to ask them the way to the Strand; I was quite sober - I had taken nothing to drink; I did not tell them anything about a waggoner; they ran through some streets - I kept calling after them, "Give me my shawl and cap;" I did not observe any persons about - I asked a watchman if he would take them, and he said No, but did not say why. I then followed them to the gin-shop; I showed Handley the room I had seen them go into.

THOMAS HANDLEY . I am constable of St. Sepulchre. On the 4th of June, at a quarter to eight o'clock in the morning, the prosecutrix came and told me she had been robbed in Holborn, and had followed the women to a house - I went with her to the house, and she showed me the room; I went in, and four women were there; she directly pointed to Matthews, and said, "That is one;" I took her - she afterwards pointed out Johnson, in another room, in bed with two others; I sent for Millen, who went up and took Johnson: the prosecutrix was perfectly sober, but had been crying.

RICHARD MILLEN . I am a constable. Handley called me - I went with the prosecutrix into the room, and asked the girls where the other was - they said they did not know; I went up stairs to another room, and found Johnson in bed with two other girls; they all appeared to he asleep: the prosecutrix pointed her out - I told her to get up and dress; she was a long while, and did not dress; at last I found most of her clothes down in the room I at first went into.

HENRY RANDOLPH . I keep a wine-vaults. The prisoners came into my house, and called for a quartern of gin; the prosecutrix followed them in, and kept asking for her shawl and cap; one of them threw the gin in her eyes.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you not to interfere? A. I could not, as nobody else was there: the prosecutrix was prefectly sober, and so were they.

JOHNSON's Defence. She came and asked us where she could get a lodging, and said a waggoner had taken her into a field, by force; she took her ring off, and gave it to me - I put it on my finger; she asked where she could get some gin; I said she had had enough - she was very much intoxicated; we went home - she sat down there for half an hour; I asked her for a pin - she opened her bundle for one, and said she had been robbed of her shawl and cap; she called the watchman - he said he would sooner take her to the watch-house than us.

ELIZABETH GRAINGER . I did not open my bundle; I had no ring to give her; I had no conversation about what she mentions.

THOMAS GODDARD . I am a watchman of Peter-street, Cow-cross, St. John-street, Clerkenwell; I have been so about two years. I was on duty. and the prosecutrix applied to me, saying she had been robbed, but I had seen her half an hour before, as I was calling five o'clock, coming down Peter-street, from Saffron-hill; I went to my beat, and shut up my box, and then she came and said she had been robbed of a cap and shawl by two girls who were in the passage; I went up, but could not find her things: she said she did not know whether they had taken the ring off her finger; she had one on, and tried to get it off, but could not without putting her teeth to it; she appeared to me to be tipsy: whether she had been crying or not I cannot tell.

COURT. Q. Do you know the house the prisoners ran into? A. Yes; the door is open all night: they were both at the door: I had not seen them before: they were found in bed there after.

ELIZABETH GRAINGER. I did not bite my finger to get off a ring; I do not wear one.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

MATTHEWS - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

Reference Number: t18280703-208

1556. HENRY STANTON was indicted for obtaining, on the 20th of May , by false pretences, 1 pair of trousers, value 25s., the goods of Edward Smith ; and on the 12th of June , a coat and waistcoat, value 3l. 4s. , his goods.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18280703-209

1557. JOHN SAVAGE was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18280703-210

1558. MICHAEL DAVIS , MARK NATHAN , ELEANOR NATHAN , ESTHER COHEN , and JOHN MARKS were indicted for conspiracy .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: o18280703-1

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JULY 7.

THE KING versus THOMAS RIORDAN .

Thomas Riordan, who was convicted of bigamy in February Session, but whose case was referred to the opinion of the Twelve Judges, as to the validity of his first marriage, being called to the bar, was informed by Mr. Justice Burrough that their Lordships had decided in the affirmative, and confirmed the conviction.

Transported for Seven Years .


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